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Sample records for protostellar disks predictions

  1. Planet Forming Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubow, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    The project achieved many of its objectives. The main area of investigation was the interaction of young binary stars with surrounding protostellar disks. A secondary objective was the interaction of young planets with their central stars and surrounding disks. The grant funds were used to support visits by coinvestigators and visitors: Pawel Artymowicz, James Pringle, and Gordon Ogilvie. Funds were also used to support travel to meetings by Lubow and to provide partial salary support.

  2. Theory of protostellar accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruden, S.

    1994-01-01

    I will present an overview of the current paradigm for the theory of gaseous accretion disks around young stars. Protostellar disks form from the collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores. The disks evolve via outward angular momentum transport provided by several mechanisms: gravitational instabilities, thermal convective turbulence, and magnetic stresses. I will review the conditions under which these mechanisms are efficient and consistent with the observed disk evolutionary timescales of several million years. Time permitting, I will discuss outbursts in protostellar disks (FU Orionis variables), the effect of planet formation on disk structure, and the dispersal of remnant gas.

  3. Molecular Line Emission from Massive Protostellar Disks: Predictions for ALMA and EVLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2007-08-01

    We compute the molecular line emission of massive protostellar disks by solving the equation of radiative transfer through the cores and disks produced by the recent radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of Krumholz, Klein, & McKee. We find that in several representative lines the disks show brightness temperatures of hundreds of kelvins over velocity channels ~10 km s-1 wide, extending over regions hundreds of AU in size. We process the computed intensities to model the performance of next-generation radio and submillimeter telescopes. Our calculations show that observations using facilities such as the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) and Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) should be able to detect massive protostellar disks and measure their rotation curves, at least in the nearest massive star-forming regions. They should also detect significant substructure and nonaxisymmetry in the disks, and in some cases may be able to detect star-disk velocity offsets of a few km s-1, both of which are the result of strong gravitational instability in massive disks. We use our simulations to explore the strengths and weaknesses of different observational techniques, and we also discuss how observations of massive protostellar disks may be used to distinguish between alternative models of massive star formation.

  4. Molecular Line Emission from Massive Protostellar Disks: Predictions for ALMA and the EVLA

    SciTech Connect

    Krumholz, M R; Klein, R I; McKee, C F

    2007-05-07

    We compute the molecular line emission of massive protostellar disks by solving the equation of radiative transfer through the cores and disks produced by the recent radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of Krumholz, Klein, & McKee. We find that in several representative lines the disks show brightness temperatures of hundreds of Kelvin over velocity channels {approx} 10 km s{sup -1} wide, extending over regions hundreds of AU in size. We process the computed intensities to model the performance of next-generation radio and submillimeter telescopes. Our calculations show that observations using facilities such as the EVLA and ALMA should be able to detect massive protostellar disks and measure their rotation curves, at least in the nearest massive star-forming regions. They should also detect significant sub-structure and non-axisymmetry in the disks, and in some cases may be able to detect star-disk velocity offsets of a few km s{sup -1}, both of which are the result of strong gravitational instability in massive disks. We use our simulations to explore the strengths and weaknesses of different observational techniques, and we also discuss how observations of massive protostellar disks may be used to distinguish between alternative models of massive star formation.

  5. Gravitational instabilities in protostellar disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tohline, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The nonaxisymmetric stability of self-gravitating, geometrically thick accretion disks has been studied for protostellar systems having a wide range of disk-to-central object mass ratios. Global eigenmodes with four distinctly different characters were identified using numerical, nonlinear hydrodynamic techniques. The mode that appears most likely to arise in normal star formation settings, however, resembles the 'eccentric instability' that was identified earlier in thin, nearly Keplerian disks: It presents an open, one-armed spiral pattern that sweeps continuously in a trailing direction through more than 2-pi radians, smoothly connecting the inner and outer edges of the disk, and requires cooperative motion of the point mass for effective amplification. This particular instability promotes the development of a single, self-gravitating clump of material in orbit about the point mass, so its routine appearance in our simulations supports the conjecture that the eccentric instability provides a primary route to the formation of short-period binaries in protostellar systems.

  6. Molecular chemistry in protostellar disk winds and observational predictions for Herschel and ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvart, W.; Cabrit, S.; Pineau Des Forets, G.; Garcia, P. J. V.; Ferreira, J.; Casse, F.

    2011-05-01

    The origin of protostellar jets, and their role in extracting angular momentum from the accreting system, remain as major open questions in star formation research. The presence of abundant molecules such as CO, H_2, H_2O, SO and SiO, in the youngest class 0 jets (see eg. Taffala et al. 2010) provides an important new challenge for proposed ejection models. Here we explore the possibility that the jet may trace a dusty magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) centrifugal disk wind launched beyond the dust sublimation radius of 0.1-0.2 AU. The coupled ionization, chemical, and thermal evolution along dusty flow streamlines is computed for a prescribed MHD disk wind solution (Casse & Ferreira 2000), using a method developed for magnetized shocks in the interstellar medium (Flower and Pineau des Forets 2003). We consider 134 species, including gas-phase atoms and molecules (neutral and singly ionized) as well as species on grain icy mantles and inside grain cores. The chemical network consists of 1143 reactions including neutral-neutral and ion-neutral reactions, photo-ionization and photodissociation, recombination with electrons, charge exchange, cosmic ray induced desorption from grains, and sputtering of grain mantles and cores by neutral impact. Heating by ambipolar diffusion, and irradiation by coronal X-rays and far-ultraviolet photons from accretion shocks, are included (see Panoglou et al. 2011), as well as an improved treatment of self-shielding of H_2 and CO (Yvart et al. 2011). We present predictions for the most abundant molecules in the MHD disk wind, and emission maps and line profiles in H_2, CO, and (if available) H_2O. These predictions are compared with observed characteristics from ground-based and space-borne infrared and submm telescopes (eg. Spitzer, Herschel) and with future ALMA capabilities.

  7. Protostellar Disk L1157

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    These observations of interstellar dark cloud L1157, located in the Cepheus constellation, were made using Caltech's Owens Valley Millimeter Array near Bishop, California.

    The multi-colored area shows a dust disk surrounding a newborn star. The red-orange area at the center represents the brightest region, which contains the young star. It is surrounded by the cooler, dusty disk, which appears as yellow, green and blue. The diameter of the disk is about 20 times larger than our entire solar system.

    The white lines trace the radio wave emission of methanol. Note that the methanol emission comes only from the outer parts of the disk. That is the zone where a warm shock occurs when the cloud material moves in toward the star and meets up with the outer surface of the disk.

  8. Nonaxisymmetric evolution in protostellar disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Gregory; Bodenheimer, Peter

    1994-01-01

    We present a two-dimensional, multigridded hydrodynamical simulation of the collapse of an axisymmetric, rotating, 1 solar mass protostellar cloud, which forms a resolved, hydrotastic disk. The code includes the effects of physical viscosity, radiative transfer and radiative acceleration but not magnetic fields. We examine how the disk is affected by the inclusion of turbulent viscosity by comparing a viscous simulation with an inviscid model evolved from the same initial conditions, and we derive a disk evolutionary timescale on the order of 300,000 years if alpha = 0.01. Effects arising from non-axisymmetric gravitational instabilities in the protostellar disk are followed with a three-dimensional SPH code, starting from the two-dimensional structure. We find that the disk is prone to a series of spiral instabilities with primary azimulthal mode number m = 1 and m = 2. The torques induced by these nonaxisymmetric structures elicit material transport of angular momentum and mass through the disk, readjusting the surface density profile toward more stable configurations. We present a series of analyses which characterize both the development and the likely source of the instabilities. We speculate that an evolving disk which maintains a minimum Toomre Q-value approximately 1.4 will have a total evolutionary span of several times 10(exp 5) years, comparable to, but somewhat shorter than the evolutionary timescale resulting from viscous turbulence alone. We compare the evolution resulting from nonaxisymmetric instabilities with solutions of a one-dimensional viscous diffusion equation applied to the initial surface density and temperature profile. We find that an effective alpha-value of 0.03 is a good fit to the results of the simulation. However, the effective alpha will depend on the minimum Q in the disk at the time the instability is activated. We argue that the major fraction of the transport characterized by the value of alpha is due to the action of

  9. Heating of protostellar accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Campos, R. R.; Jatenco-Pereira, V.

    2017-07-01

    The magneto-rotational instability (MRI) is believed to be the mechanism responsible for a magneto-hydrodynamic turbulence that could lead to the accretion observed in protoplanetary disks. The need of a minimum amount of ionization in protostellar accretion disks is necessary for the MRI to take place. There are in the literature several studies that include the damping of Alfvén waves as an additional heating source besides the viscous heating mechanism in a geometrically thin and optically thick disk. The damping of the waves transfers energy to the disk increasing the temperature and consequently its ionization fraction, making possible the presence of the MRI in a large part of the disk. We analyzed the contribution of non-ideal effects such as Ohmic and ambipolar diffusion for the disk heating and compare these heating rates with those obtained by damping of Alfvén waves. In order to study these non-ideal effects, we have estimated the radiation emission of each effect through the energy conservation equation, and associated each emission with a black body radiation, which enabled us to assign a temperature contribution of each effect. Using the ATHENA code we were able to simulate the disk at different radial distances, and estimate the electric current density needed to calculate the radiation emission associated with each effect. Once we have those data, we were able to compare the results with other heating sources, like viscosity and Alfvén waves damping, and we concluded that the Ohmic and ambipolar diffusions do not heat the disk in any significant way.

  10. Modeling of Radiative Transfer in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VonAllmen, Paul; Turner, Neal

    2007-01-01

    This program implements a spectral line, radiative transfer tool for interpreting Spitzer Space Telescope observations by matching them with models of protostellar disks for improved understanding of planet and star formation. The Spitzer Space Telescope detects gas phase molecules in the infrared spectra of protostellar disks, with spectral lines carrying information on the chemical composition of the material from which planets form. Input to the software includes chemical models developed at JPL. The products are synthetic images and spectra for comparison with Spitzer measurements. Radiative transfer in a protostellar disk is primarily affected by absorption and emission processes in the dust and in molecular gases such as H2, CO, and HCO. The magnitude of the optical absorption and emission is determined by the population of the electronic, vibrational, and rotational energy levels. The population of the molecular level is in turn determined by the intensity of the radiation field. Therefore, the intensity of the radiation field and the population of the molecular levels are inter-dependent quantities. To meet the computational challenges of solving for the coupled radiation field and electronic level populations in disks having wide ranges of optical depths and spatial scales, the tool runs in parallel on the JPL Dell Cluster supercomputer with C++ and Fortran compiler with a Message Passing Interface. Because this software has been developed on a distributed computing platform, the modeling of systems previously beyond the reach of available computational resources is possible.

  11. Spiral Structure and Fragmentation in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, E. I.; Basu, S.

    2005-12-01

    The susceptibility of protostellar disks to gravitational instability and subsequent formation of protoplanetary clumps is currently under debate. We perform numerical simulations of gravitational cloud core collapse until approximately 99% of the initial cloud core mass is accreted by the central protostar and protostellar disk system. We find that the protostellar disk is gravitationally unstable, even in the later phase of negligible mass infall from the surrounding envelope, and quickly develops a flocculent spiral structure. The spiral structure is sharp in the early phase of disk evolution and is diffuse in the later phase. In the early phase, when the mass infall from the envelope is sufficiently high, dense protoplanetary clumps form within the spiral arms. Some of the clumps get dispersed over the course of several orbital periods and the others are driven onto the protostar. These episodes of clump infall can increase the luminosity of the protostar by a factor of up to ˜ 1000. This work was supported by a grant from NSERC. EIV acknowledges support from a CITA National Fellowship.

  12. Theory of Protostellar Disk Fromation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun

    2015-08-01

    Disk formation, once thought to be a simple consequence of the conservation of angular momentum during the hydrodynamic core collapse, is far more subtle in magnetized gas. In this case, the rotation can be strongly magnetically braked. Indeed, both analytic arguments and numerical simulations have shown that disk formation is suppressed in strict ideal MHD for the observed level of core magnetization. I will discuss the physical reason for this so-called "magnetic braking catastrophe," and review possible resolutions to this problem that have been proposed so far, including non-ideal MHD effects, misalignment between the magnetic field and rotation axis, and especially turbulence.

  13. The early evolution of protostellar disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahler, Steven W.; Korycansky, D. G.; Brothers, Maxwell J.; Touma, Jihad

    1994-01-01

    We consider the origin and intital growth of the disks that form around protostars during the collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores. These disks are assumed to be inviscid and pressure free, and to have masses small compared to those of their central stars. We find that there exist three distinct components-an outer disk, in which shocked gas moves with comparable azimuthal and radical velocities; and inner disk, where material follows nearly circular orbits, but spirals slowly toward the star because of the drag exerted by adjacent onfalling matter, and a turbulent ring adjoining the first two regions. Early in the evolution, i.e., soon after infalling matter begins to miss the star, only the outer disk is present, and the total mass acceration rate onto the protostar is undiminished. Once the outer disk boundary grows to more than 2.9 times the stellar radius, first the ring, and then the inner disk appear. Thereafter, the radii of all three components expand as t(exp 3). The mass of the ring increase with time and is always 13% of the total mass that has fallen from the cloud. Concurrently with the buildup of the inner disk and ring, the accretion rate onto the star falls off. However, the protostellar mass continue to rise, asymptotically as t(exp 1/4). We calculated the radiated flux from the inner and outer disk components due to the release of gravitational potential energy. The flux from the inner disk is dominant and rises steeply toward the stellar surface. We also determine the surface temperature of the inner disk as a function of radius. The total disk luminosity decreases slowly with time, while the contributions from the ring and inner disk both fall as t(exp -2).

  14. Dead Zone Accretion Flows in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Neal; Sano, T.

    2008-01-01

    Planets form inside protostellar disks in a dead zone where the electrical resistivity of the gas is too high for magnetic forces to drive turbulence. We show that much of the dead zone nevertheless is active and flows toward the star while smooth, large-scale magnetic fields transfer the orbital angular momentum radially outward. Stellar X-ray and radionuclide ionization sustain a weak coupling of the dead zone gas to the magnetic fields, despite the rapid recombination of free charges on dust grains. Net radial magnetic fields are generated in the magnetorotational turbulence in the electrically conducting top and bottom surface layers of the disk, and reach the midplane by ohmic diffusion. A toroidal component to the fields is produced near the midplane by the orbital shear. The process is similar to the magnetization of the solar tachocline. The result is a laminar, magnetically driven accretion flow in the region where the planets form.

  15. Dead Zone Accretion Flows in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Neal; Sano, T.

    2008-01-01

    Planets form inside protostellar disks in a dead zone where the electrical resistivity of the gas is too high for magnetic forces to drive turbulence. We show that much of the dead zone nevertheless is active and flows toward the star while smooth, large-scale magnetic fields transfer the orbital angular momentum radially outward. Stellar X-ray and radionuclide ionization sustain a weak coupling of the dead zone gas to the magnetic fields, despite the rapid recombination of free charges on dust grains. Net radial magnetic fields are generated in the magnetorotational turbulence in the electrically conducting top and bottom surface layers of the disk, and reach the midplane by ohmic diffusion. A toroidal component to the fields is produced near the midplane by the orbital shear. The process is similar to the magnetization of the solar tachocline. The result is a laminar, magnetically driven accretion flow in the region where the planets form.

  16. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN EARLY PROTOSTELLAR DISK FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    González-Casanova, Diego F.; Lazarian, Alexander; Santos-Lima, Reinaldo

    2016-03-10

    We consider formation of accretion disks from a realistically turbulent molecular gas using 3D MHD simulations. In particular, we analyze the effect of the fast turbulent reconnection described by the Lazarian and Vishniac model for the removal of magnetic flux from a disk. With our numerical simulations we demonstrate how the fast reconnection enables protostellar disk formation resolving the so-called “magnetic braking catastrophe.” In particular, we provide a detailed study of the dynamics of a 0.5 M{sub ⊙} protostar and the formation of its disk for up to several thousands years. We measure the evolution of the mass, angular momentum, magnetic field, and turbulence around the star. We consider effects of two processes that strongly affect the magnetic transfer of angular momentum, both of which are based on turbulent reconnection: the first, “reconnection diffusion,” removes the magnetic flux from the disk; the other involves the change of the magnetic field's topology, but does not change the absolute value of the magnetic flux through the disk. We demonstrate that for the first mechanism, turbulence causes a magnetic flux transport outward from the inner disk to the ambient medium, thus decreasing the coupling of the disk to the ambient material. A similar effect is achieved through the change of the magnetic field's topology from a split monopole configuration to a dipole configuration. We explore how both mechanisms prevent the catastrophic loss of disk angular momentum and compare both above turbulent reconnection mechanisms with alternative mechanisms from the literature.

  17. Magnetic Fields in Early Protostellar Disk Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Casanova, Diego F.; Lazarian, Alexander; Santos-Lima, Reinaldo

    2016-03-01

    We consider formation of accretion disks from a realistically turbulent molecular gas using 3D MHD simulations. In particular, we analyze the effect of the fast turbulent reconnection described by the Lazarian & Vishniac model for the removal of magnetic flux from a disk. With our numerical simulations we demonstrate how the fast reconnection enables protostellar disk formation resolving the so-called “magnetic braking catastrophe.” In particular, we provide a detailed study of the dynamics of a 0.5 M⊙ protostar and the formation of its disk for up to several thousands years. We measure the evolution of the mass, angular momentum, magnetic field, and turbulence around the star. We consider effects of two processes that strongly affect the magnetic transfer of angular momentum, both of which are based on turbulent reconnection: the first, “reconnection diffusion,” removes the magnetic flux from the disk; the other involves the change of the magnetic field's topology, but does not change the absolute value of the magnetic flux through the disk. We demonstrate that for the first mechanism, turbulence causes a magnetic flux transport outward from the inner disk to the ambient medium, thus decreasing the coupling of the disk to the ambient material. A similar effect is achieved through the change of the magnetic field's topology from a split monopole configuration to a dipole configuration. We explore how both mechanisms prevent the catastrophic loss of disk angular momentum and compare both above turbulent reconnection mechanisms with alternative mechanisms from the literature.

  18. Detection of Methanol in a Class 0 Protostellar Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W.; Velusamy, T.; Goldsmith, P.

    1999-01-01

    We report the detection of emission from methanol in a compact source coincident with the position of the L1157 infrared source, which we attribute to molecules in the disk surrounding this young, class 0 protostellar object.

  19. Detection of Methanol in a Class 0 Protostellar Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W.; Velusamy, T.; Goldsmith, P.

    1999-01-01

    We report the detection of emission from methanol in a compact source coincident with the position of the L1157 infrared source, which we attribute to molecules in the disk surrounding this young, class 0 protostellar object.

  20. Global self-similar protostellar disk/wind models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teitler, Seth A.

    The magnetocentrifugal disk wind mechanism is the leading candidate for producing the large-scale, bipolar jets commonly seen in protostellar systems. I present a detailed formulation of a global, radially self-similar model for a fully general, non-ideal disk that launches a magnetocentrifugal disk wind. This formulation generalizes the conductivity tensor formalism previously used in radially localized disk models to a global disk model. The model involves matching a solution of the equations of non-ideal MHD describing matter in the disk to a solution of the equations of ideal MHD describing a "cold" wind. The disk solution is required to pass smoothly through the sonic point, the wind solution is required to pass smoothly through the Alfven point, and the two solutions must match at the disk/wind interface. This model includes for the first time a self-consistent treatment of the evolution of magnetic flux threading the disk, which can change on the disk accretion timescale. These constraints fix the distribution of the magnetic field threading the disk, the midplane accretion speed, and the midplane migration speed of flux surfaces. Specializing to the case of a disk in the ambipolar diffusivity regime, I present a representative solution using the neutral matter-field coupling constant. I conclude with a brief discussion of the importance of self-similar disk/wind models in studying global processes in protostellar systems.

  1. Influence of luminosity bursts on properties of protostellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, E. I.; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya. N.; Trinkl, P.

    2014-08-01

    A (2+ 1)-dimensional numerical model for the formation and evolution of young stellar objects with sub-solar masses is presented. The numerical hydrodynamicall code describing the formation and evolution of a protostellar disk in a two-dimensional approximation is supplemented by one-dimensional code for the evolution of the star and an algorithm for establishing the vertical structure of the disk. This code is used to investigate the influence of luminosity bursts with intensities similar to those observed in FU Orionis objects (FUors) on the properties and thermal balance of protostellar disks. A model with gravitational instability and fragmentation of the disk, with subsequent migration of the fragments onto the protostar, is used as a basic model for FUors. Typical FUor bursts ( L ˜ 100 L ⊙) can appreciably influence the thermal balance of their disks and parent envelopes, leading to an increase in the disk temperature by more than a factor of two. On the other hand, massive fragments in the disk are only weakly perturbed by such bursts, partially due to screening by the disk and partially due to their high temperature brought about by adiabatic heating. Apart from massive fragments, the characteristic thermal time scales are appreciably shorter than the dynamical time scales throughout the radial extent of the disk and envelope; this enables the use of a stationary radiative-transfer equation when determining the vertical structure of the disk.

  2. PROTOSTELLAR DISK FORMATION ENABLED BY WEAK, MISALIGNED MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Crutcher, Richard M.; Hull, Charles L. H.

    2013-04-10

    The gas from which stars form is magnetized, and strong magnetic fields can efficiently transport angular momentum. Most theoretical models of this phenomenon find that it should prevent formation of large (>100 AU), rotationally supported disks around most protostars, even when non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects that allow the field and gas to decouple are taken into account. Using recent observations of magnetic field strengths and orientations in protostellar cores, we show that this conclusion is incorrect. The distribution of magnetic field strengths is very broad, and alignments between fields and angular momentum vectors within protostellar cores are essentially random. By combining the field strength and misalignment data with MHD simulations showing that disk formation is expected for both weak and misaligned fields, we show that these observations imply that we should expect disk fractions of {approx}10%-50% even when protostars are still deeply embedded in their parent cores, and even if the gas is governed by ideal MHD.

  3. Global Self-similar Protostellar Disk/Wind Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teitler, Seth

    2011-05-01

    The magnetocentrifugal disk wind mechanism is the leading candidate for producing the large-scale, bipolar jets commonly seen in protostellar systems. I present a detailed formulation of a global, radially self-similar model for a non-ideal disk that launches a magnetocentrifugal wind. This formulation generalizes the conductivity tensor formalism previously used in radially localized disk models. The model involves matching a solution of the equations of non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) describing matter in the disk to a solution of the equations of ideal MHD describing a "cold" wind. The disk solution must pass smoothly through the sonic point, the wind solution must pass smoothly through the Alfvén point, and the two solutions must match at the disk/wind interface. This model includes for the first time a self-consistent treatment of the evolution of magnetic flux threading the disk, which can change on the disk accretion timescale. The formulation presented here also allows a realistic conductivity profile for the disk to be used in a global disk/wind model for the first time. The physical constraints on the model solutions fix the distribution of the magnetic field threading the disk, the midplane accretion speed, and the midplane migration speed of flux surfaces. I present a representative solution that corresponds to a disk in the ambipolar conductivity regime with a nominal neutral-matter-magnetic-field coupling parameter that is constant along field lines, matched to a wind solution. I conclude with a brief discussion of the importance of self-similar disk/wind models in studying global processes such as dust evolution in protostellar systems. Presented as a dissertation to the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the PhD degree.

  4. MHD Modelling of Protostellar Disk Winds and Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Christopher; Sutherland, Ralph; Salmeron, Raquel; Bicknell, Geoff

    2013-07-01

    One of the outstanding challenges in star formation is the angular momentum problem. Angular momentum transport is required to allow a cloud core to collapse to form a star. Angular momentum in the initial collapsing cloud prevents the majority of material falling directly onto the protostar, instead settling into a circumstellar disk around it. It is from this point that the angular momentum must be redistributed to allow material to accrete. Radial transport of angular momentum is accomplished via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Vertical angular momentum transport has generally been attributed to centrifugally driven winds (CDWs) from the disk surface. Both modes of transport depend on the strength of the local magnetic field, parametrised by the ratio of the vertical Alfven speed to the isothermal sound speed, a0. MRI is expected to dominate in the presence of weak fields (a0 ≪ 1), whereas CDWs require a strong field (a0 ≲ 1). Here we present calculations of the structure of minimum-mass solar nebula protostellar disks in strong fields (a0 = 1) around a solar mass star, focusing on the regions of these disks that may launch a CDW from their surface. These results have implications for disk-driven models of protostellar jet launching including the connection between disk properties and large scale features of jets.

  5. First Detection of Methanol in a Class O Protostellar Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velusamy, T.; Langer, William D.; Goldsmith, Paul F.

    2000-01-01

    We report the detection of emission from methanol in a compact source coincident with the position of the L1157 infrared source, which we attribute to molecules in the disk surrounding this young, Class O protostellar object. In addition, we identify a spectral feature in the outflow corresponding to an ethanol transition. Using the Caltech Owens Valley Millimeter Array with a synthesized beam size of 2", we detect spatially unresolved methanol in the 2(sub k) - 1(sub k) transitions at 3mm, which is coincident in position with the peak of the continuum emission. The gas phase methanol could be located in the central region (< 100 AU radius) of a flat disk, or in an extended heated surface layer (approx. 200 AU radius) of a flared disk. The fractional abundance of methanol X(CH3OH) is approx. 2 x l0(exp -8) in the flat disk model, and 3 x l0(exp -7) for the flared disk. The fractional abundance is small in the disk as a whole, but considerably larger in the warm portions. This difference indicates that substantial chemical processing probably takes place in the disk via depletion and desorption. The methanol desorbed from the grains in the warm surface layers returns to the icy grain mantles in the cooler interior of the disk, where it is available to become part of the composition of solar system-like bodies, such as comets, formed in the outer circumstellar region. This first millimeter-wavelength detection of a complex organic molecule in a young protostellar disk has implications for disk structure and chemical evolution and for potential use as a temperature probe. The research of TV and WL was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology with support from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  6. First Detection of Methanol in a Class O Protostellar Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velusamy, T.; Langer, William D.; Goldsmith, Paul F.

    2000-01-01

    We report the detection of emission from methanol in a compact source coincident with the position of the L1157 infrared source, which we attribute to molecules in the disk surrounding this young, Class O protostellar object. In addition, we identify a spectral feature in the outflow corresponding to an ethanol transition. Using the Caltech Owens Valley Millimeter Array with a synthesized beam size of 2", we detect spatially unresolved methanol in the 2k - 1k transitions at 3mm, which is coincident in position with the peak of the continuum emission. The gas phase methanol could be located in the central region (< 100 AU radius) of a flat disk, or in an extended heated surface layer (approx. 200 AU radius) of a flared disk. The fractional abundance of methanol X(CH3OH) is approx. 2 x l0-8 in the flat disk model, and 3 x l0-7 for the flared disk. The fractional abundance is small in the disk as a whole, but considerably larger in the warm portions. This difference indicates that substantial chemical processing probably takes place in the disk via depletion and desorption. The methanol desorbed from the grains in the warm surface layers returns to the icy grain mantles in the cooler interior of the disk, where it is available to become part of the composition of solar system-like bodies, such as comets, formed in the outer circumstellar region. This first millimeter-wavelength detection of a complex organic molecule in a young protostellar disk has implications for disk structure and chemical evolution and for potential use as a temperature probe. The research of TV and WL was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology with support from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  7. First Detection of Methanol in a Class O Protostellar Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velusamy, T.; Langer, William D.; Goldsmith, Paul F.

    2000-01-01

    We report the detection of emission from methanol in a compact source coincident with the position of the L1157 infrared source, which we attribute to molecules in the disk surrounding this young, Class O protostellar object. In addition, we identify a spectral feature in the outflow corresponding to an ethanol transition. Using the Caltech Owens Valley Millimeter Array with a synthesized beam size of 2", we detect spatially unresolved methanol in the 2(sub k) - 1(sub k) transitions at 3mm, which is coincident in position with the peak of the continuum emission. The gas phase methanol could be located in the central region (< 100 AU radius) of a flat disk, or in an extended heated surface layer (approx. 200 AU radius) of a flared disk. The fractional abundance of methanol X(CH3OH) is approx. 2 x l0(exp -8) in the flat disk model, and 3 x l0(exp -7) for the flared disk. The fractional abundance is small in the disk as a whole, but considerably larger in the warm portions. This difference indicates that substantial chemical processing probably takes place in the disk via depletion and desorption. The methanol desorbed from the grains in the warm surface layers returns to the icy grain mantles in the cooler interior of the disk, where it is available to become part of the composition of solar system-like bodies, such as comets, formed in the outer circumstellar region. This first millimeter-wavelength detection of a complex organic molecule in a young protostellar disk has implications for disk structure and chemical evolution and for potential use as a temperature probe. The research of TV and WL was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology with support from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  8. Further studies of gravitationally unstable protostellar disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomley, Leslie; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Cassen, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    Models of the solar nebula reveal that it might have been gravitationally unstable, both early and later in its evolution. Such instabilities produce density waves and associated gravitational torques, which are potent agents of angular momentum transport. In previous work, we conducted a series of numerical simulations designed to quantify the effects of gravitational instabilities in a generalizable way (Tomley, Cassen, & Steiman-Cameron 1991). Here we present a second series of simulations in which we examine disks of greater size, increased star/disk mass ratio, and flatter surface density distribution than those in our initial study. The purpose is to represent disks at a later stage of evolution than those already studied, to test the quantitative relations derived in our earlier work and to explore the effects of mass ratio on the results. The new results indicate that the tendencies for unstable, uncooled disks to heat to stability and for dynamical evolution rates to be proportional to cooling rates are general characteristics of the behavior of gravitationally unstable disks. Nevertheless, there are quantitative, and (for strong cooling) even qualitative differences that are revealed in the new simulations, particularly with regard to the cooling rates at which clumping tends to occur.

  9. On the tidal interaction between protostellar disks and companions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, D. N. C.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    1993-01-01

    Formation of protoplanets and binary stars in a protostellar disk modifies the structure of the disk. Through tidal interactions, energy and angular momentum are transferred between the disk and protostellar or protoplanetary companion. We summarize recent progress in theoretical investigations of the disk-companion tidal interaction. We show that low-mass protoplanets excite density waves at their Lindblad resonances and that these waves are likely to be dissipated locally. When a protoplanet acquires sufficient mass, its tidal torque induces the formation of a gap in the vicinity of its orbit. Gap formation leads to the termination of protoplanetary growth by accretion. For proto-Jupiter to attain its present mass, we require that (1) the primordial solar nebula is heated by viscous dissipation; (2) the viscous evolution time scale of the nebula is comparable to the age of typical T Tauri stars with circumstellar disks; and (3) the mass distribution in the nebula is comparable to that estimated from a minimum-mass nebula model.

  10. Signatures of Gravitational Instability in Resolved Images of Protostellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruobing; Vorobyov, Eduard; Pavlyuchenkov, Yaroslav; Chiang, Eugene; Liu, Hauyu Baobab

    2016-06-01

    Protostellar (class 0/I) disks, which have masses comparable to those of their nascent host stars and are fed continuously from their natal infalling envelopes, are prone to gravitational instability (GI). Motivated by advances in near-infrared (NIR) adaptive optics imaging and millimeter-wave interferometry, we explore the observational signatures of GI in disks using hydrodynamical and Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations to synthesize NIR scattered light images and millimeter dust continuum maps. Spiral arms induced by GI, located at disk radii of hundreds of astronomical units, are local overdensities and have their photospheres displaced to higher altitudes above the disk midplane; therefore, arms scatter more NIR light from their central stars than inter-arm regions, and are detectable at distances up to 1 kpc by Gemini/GPI, VLT/SPHERE, and Subaru/HiCIAO/SCExAO. In contrast, collapsed clumps formed by disk fragmentation have such strong local gravitational fields that their scattering photospheres are at lower altitudes; such fragments appear fainter than their surroundings in NIR scattered light. Spiral arms and streamers recently imaged in four FU Ori systems at NIR wavelengths resemble GI-induced structures and support the interpretation that FUors are gravitationally unstable protostellar disks. At millimeter wavelengths, both spirals and clumps appear brighter in thermal emission than the ambient disk and can be detected by ALMA at distances up to 0.4 kpc with one hour integration times at ˜0.″1 resolution. Collapsed fragments having masses ≳1 M J can be detected by ALMA within ˜10 minutes.

  11. Protostellar disks and the primitive solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, P. M.; Pollack, J. B.; Bunch, T.; Hubickyj, O.; Moins, P.; Yuan, C.

    1987-01-01

    The objective is to obtain quantitative information on the turbulent transport of mass, angular momentum, and energy under the conditions that characterize the solar nebula, by direct numerical calculations. These calculations were made possible by research conducted on supercomputers (Cray XMP and Cray 2) by the Ames Computational Fluid Dynamics Branch. Techniques were developed that permitted the accurate representation of turbulent flows over the full range of important eddy sizes. So far, these techniques were applied (and verified) primarily in mundane laboratory situations, but they have a strong potential for astrophysical applications. A sequence of numerical experiments were conducted to evaluate the Reynold's stress tensor, turbulent heat transfer rate, turbulent dissipation rate, and turbulent kinetic energy spectrum, as functions of position, for conditions relevant to the solar nebula. Emphasis is placed on the variation of these properties with appropriate nondimensional quantities, so that relations can be derived that will be useful for disk modeling under a variety of hypotheses and initial conditions.

  12. The formation of protostellar disks. I - 1 M(solar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.; Bodenheimer, Peter; Laughlin, Gregory

    1993-01-01

    Hydrodynamical calculations of the collapse of an axisymmetric, rotating one solar mass protostellar cloud, including the effects of radiative transfer and radiative acceleration but without magnetic fields, are presented. The results include calculations of infrared protostellar spectra as a function of time and viewing angle. A numerical algorithm involving explicit nested grids is used to resolve the region of initial disk formation and at the same time to include the outer regions in the calculation. The central part of the protostar is modeled approximately. Initial conditions are systematically varied to investigate their influence on the evolution and final configuration of central star plus circumstellar disk. The initial state for the standard case is a centrally condensed molecular cloud core of one solar mass with a mean density of 8 x 10 exp -18 g/cu cm and a specific angular momentum at the outer edge of 7 x 10 exp 20 sq cm/s. The collapse is followed for 8 x 10 exp 4 yr, at which point 0.45 solar mass is contained in a rapidly rotating central object and most of the remainder in a surrounding equilibrium disk. The stability of this final structure is qualitatively analyzed.

  13. Magnetized Accretion and Dead Zones in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyurkevich, Natalia; Turner, Neal J.; Henning, Thomas; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-03-01

    The edges of magnetically dead zones in protostellar disks have been proposed as locations where density bumps may arise, trapping planetesimals and helping form planets. Magneto-rotational turbulence in magnetically active zones provides both accretion of gas on the star and transport of mass to the dead zone. We investigate the location of the magnetically active regions in a protostellar disk around a solar-type star, varying the disk temperature, surface density profile, and dust-to-gas ratio. We also consider stellar masses between 0.4 and 2 M ⊙, with corresponding adjustments in the disk mass and temperature. The dead zone's size and shape are found using the Elsasser number criterion with conductivities including the contributions from ions, electrons, and charged fractal dust aggregates. The charged species' abundances are found using the approach proposed by Okuzumi. The dead zone is in most cases defined by the ambipolar diffusion. In our maps, the dead zone takes a variety of shapes, including a fish tail pointing away from the star and islands located on and off the midplane. The corresponding accretion rates vary with radius, indicating locations where the surface density will increase over time, and others where it will decrease. We show that density bumps do not readily grow near the dead zone's outer edge, independently of the disk parameters and the dust properties. Instead, the accretion rate peaks at the radius where the gas-phase metals freeze out. This could lead to clearing a valley in the surface density, and to a trap for pebbles located just outside the metal freezeout line.

  14. MAGNETIZED ACCRETION AND DEAD ZONES IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Dzyurkevich, Natalia; Henning, Thomas; Turner, Neal J.; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-03-10

    The edges of magnetically dead zones in protostellar disks have been proposed as locations where density bumps may arise, trapping planetesimals and helping form planets. Magneto-rotational turbulence in magnetically active zones provides both accretion of gas on the star and transport of mass to the dead zone. We investigate the location of the magnetically active regions in a protostellar disk around a solar-type star, varying the disk temperature, surface density profile, and dust-to-gas ratio. We also consider stellar masses between 0.4 and 2 M{sub Sun }, with corresponding adjustments in the disk mass and temperature. The dead zone's size and shape are found using the Elsasser number criterion with conductivities including the contributions from ions, electrons, and charged fractal dust aggregates. The charged species' abundances are found using the approach proposed by Okuzumi. The dead zone is in most cases defined by the ambipolar diffusion. In our maps, the dead zone takes a variety of shapes, including a fish tail pointing away from the star and islands located on and off the midplane. The corresponding accretion rates vary with radius, indicating locations where the surface density will increase over time, and others where it will decrease. We show that density bumps do not readily grow near the dead zone's outer edge, independently of the disk parameters and the dust properties. Instead, the accretion rate peaks at the radius where the gas-phase metals freeze out. This could lead to clearing a valley in the surface density, and to a trap for pebbles located just outside the metal freezeout line.

  15. Rotating Molecular Gas Disks around Protostellar Jet Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer J.

    1999-10-01

    Large millimeter arrays such as ALMA provide a means to map the warm dust and molecular gas in regions encircling protostellar accretion zones. Line observations, in particular, provide the means not only for excitation studies but for kinematical studies of the protostellar environment. Radio and millimeter interferometers are already being used to trace infall, rotation, and outflow of dense gas. Recently, flattened large (~10,000 AU) molecular gas disks around protostars were detected and show strong evidence for rotation (Zhang et al. 1998, Wiseman et al. 1998). We present here our most recent VLA ammonia maps showing flattened gas disks with velocity gradients indicative of rotation around the sources of the jets HH111, HH211 and HH212. We discuss interaction with the jets and outflows. We also discuss how line maps from ALMA and radio interferometers complement each other. Wiseman, J., Wootten, A., Zinnecker, H., & McCaughrean, M. 1998, in The Physics and Chemistry of the Interstellar Medium, abstract book of the 3rd Cologne-Zermatt Symposium, ed. V. Ossenkopf Wiseman, J., Fuller, G., & Wootten, A. 1999, in preparation Zhang, Q., Hunter, T., & Sridharan, T. 1998, ApJ, 505, L151

  16. The physical and chemical evolution of protostellar disks. The growth of protostellar disks: Progress to date

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahler, Steven W.

    1993-01-01

    This study constitutes one part of our multi-disciplinary approach to the evolution of planet-forming disks. The goal is to establish the disks' thermal and mechanical properties as they grow by the infall of their parent interstellar clouds. Thus far, significant advances toward establishing the evolving surface density of such disks was made.

  17. Rapid Mid-infrared Variability in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, T. T.; Huang, H.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2012-01-01

    Spectral energy distribution (SED) in protostellar disks is determined by the disks' internal dissipation and reprocessing of irradiation from their host stars. Around T Tauri stars, most mid-infrared (MIR) radiation (in a wavelength range from a few to a few tens of μm) emerges from regions around a fraction to a few AU. This region is interesting because it contains both the habitable zone and the snow line. Recent observations reveal SED variations in the MIR wavelength range. These variations are puzzling because they occur on a timescale (a few days) which is much shorter than the dynamical (months to years) timescale from 1 AU to a few AU. They are probably caused by shadows cast by inner onto outer disk regions. Interaction between disks and their misaligned magnetized host stars can lead to warped structure and periodic SED modulations. Rapid aperiodic SED variations may also be induced by observed X-ray flares from T Tauri stars. These flares can significantly modulate the ionization fraction of the gas and the net charge carried by the grains near the surface of the inner disk. The newly charged grains may be accelerated by the stellar or disk magnetic field and adjust their distances from the midplane. Shadows cast by these grains attenuate the flux of stellar photons irradiated onto regions at several AU from the central stars. We use this model to account for the observed rapid aperiodic SED variabilities. We suggest that regular monitoring of SED variations will not only provide valuable information on the distribution of the disk aspect ratio near the habitable zone but also provide a probe of the interaction between the inner regions of the disk with the magnetosphere of their host stars.

  18. EMBEDDED PROTOSTELLAR DISKS AROUND (SUB-)SOLAR PROTOSTARS. I. DISK STRUCTURE AND EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.

    2010-11-10

    We perform a comparative numerical hydrodynamics study of embedded protostellar disks formed as a result of the gravitational collapse of cloud cores of distinct mass (M{sub cl} = 0.2-1.7 M{sub sun}) and ratio of rotational to gravitational energy {beta} = 0.0028-0.023. An increase in M{sub cl} and/or {beta} leads to the formation of protostellar disks that are more susceptible to gravitational instability. Disk fragmentation occurs in most models but its effect is often limited to the very early stage, with the fragments being either dispersed or driven onto the forming star during tens of orbital periods. Only cloud cores with high enough M{sub cl} or {beta} may eventually form wide-separation binary/multiple systems with low-mass ratios and brown dwarf or sub-solar mass companions. It is feasible that such systems may eventually break up, giving birth to rogue brown dwarfs. Protostellar disks of equal age formed from cloud cores of greater mass (but equal {beta}) are generally denser, hotter, larger, and more massive. On the other hand, protostellar disks formed from cloud cores of higher {beta} (but equal M{sub cl}) are generally thinner and colder but larger and more massive. In all models, the difference between the irradiation temperature and midplane temperature utriT is small, except for the innermost regions of young disks, dense fragments, and disk's outer edge where utriT is negative and may reach a factor of 2 or even more. Gravitationally unstable, embedded disks show radial pulsations, the amplitude of which increases along the line of increasing M{sub cl} and {beta} but tends to diminish as the envelope clears. We find that single stars with a disk-to-star mass ratio of order unity can be formed only from high-{beta} cloud cores, but such massive disks are unstable and quickly fragment into binary/multiple systems. A substantial fraction of an embedded disk, especially its inner regions, spiral arms, and dense clumps, may be optically thick

  19. Wind-driven Accretion in Transitional Protostellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lile; Goodman, Jeremy J.

    2017-01-01

    Transitional protostellar disks have inner cavities that are heavily depleted in dust and gas, yet most of them show signs of ongoing accretion, often at rates comparable to full disks. We show that recent constraints on the gas surface density in a few well-studied disk cavities suggest that the accretion speed is at least transsonic. We propose that this is the natural result of accretion driven by magnetized winds. Typical physical conditions of the gas inside these cavities are estimated for plausible X-ray and FUV radiation fields. The gas near the midplane is molecular and predominantly neutral, with a dimensionless ambipolar parameter in the right general range for wind solutions of the type developed by Königl, Wardle, and others. That is to say, the density of ions and electrons is sufficient for moderately good coupling to the magnetic field, but it is not so good that the magnetic flux needs to be dragged inward by the accreting neutrals.

  20. Heat and Dust in Active Layers of Protostellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Goodman, Jeremy

    2009-08-01

    Requirements for magnetic coupling and accretion in the active layer of a protostellar disk are re-examined, and some implications for thermal emission from the layer are discussed. The ionization and electrical conductivity are calculated following the general scheme of Ilgner and Nelson but with an updated UMIST database of chemical reactions and some improvements in the grain physics, and for the minimum-mass solar nebula rather than an alpha disk. The new limits on grain abundance are slightly more severe than theirs. Even for optimally sized grains, the layer should be at least marginally optically thin to its own thermal radiation, so that narrow, highly saturated emission lines of water and other molecular species would be expected if accretion is driven by turbulence and standard rates of ionization prevail. If the grain size distribution extends broadly from well below a micron to a millimeter or more, as suggested by observations, then the layer may be so optically thin that its cooling is dominated by molecular emission. Even under such conditions, it is difficult to have active layers of more than 10 g cm-2 near 1 AU unless dust is entirely eliminated or greatly enhanced ionization rates are assumed. Equipartition-strength magnetic fields are then required in these regions of the disk if observed accretion rates are driven by magnetorotational turbulence. Wind-driven accretion might allow weaker fields and less massive active layers but would not heat the layer as much as turbulence and therefore might not produce emission lines.

  1. Dust Transport in Protostellar Disks Through Turbulence and Settling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, N. J.; Carballido, A.; Sano, T.

    2010-01-01

    We apply ionization balance and magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) calculations to investigate whether magnetic activity moderated by recombination on dust grains can account for the mass accretion rates and the mid-infrared spectra and variability of protostellar disks. The MHD calculations use the stratified shearing-box approach and include grain settling and the feedback from the changing dust abundance on the resistivity of the gas. The two-decade spread in accretion rates among solar-mass T Tauri stars is too large to result solely from variations in the grain size and stellar X-ray luminosity, but can plausibly be produced by varying these parameters together with the disk magnetic flux. The diverse shapes and strengths of the mid-infrared silicate bands can come from the coupling of grain settling to the distribution of the magnetorotational turbulence, through the following three effects. First, recombination on grains 1 μm or smaller yields a magnetically inactive dead zone extending more than two scale heights from the midplane, while turbulent motions in the magnetically active disk atmosphere overshoot the dead zone boundary by only about one scale height. Second, grains deep in the dead zone oscillate vertically in wave motions driven by the turbulent layer above, but on average settle at the rates found in laminar flow, so that the interior of the dead zone is a particle sink and the disk atmosphere will become dust-depleted unless resupplied from elsewhere. Third, with sufficient depletion, the dead zone is thinner and mixing dredges grains off the midplane. The last of these processes enables evolutionary signatures such as the degree of settling to sometimes decrease with age. The MHD results also show that the magnetic activity intermittently lifts clouds of small grains into the atmosphere. Consequently the photosphere height changes by up to one-third over timescales of a few orbits, while the extinction along lines of sight grazing the disk surface

  2. Resolved images of a protostellar outflow driven by an extended disk wind.

    PubMed

    Bjerkeli, Per; van der Wiel, Matthijs H D; Harsono, Daniel; Ramsey, Jon P; Jørgensen, Jes K

    2016-12-14

    Young stars are associated with prominent outflows of molecular gas. The ejection of gas is believed to remove angular momentum from the protostellar system, permitting young stars to grow by the accretion of material from the protostellar disk. The underlying mechanism for outflow ejection is not yet understood, but is believed to be closely linked to the protostellar disk. Various models have been proposed to explain the outflows, differing mainly in the region where acceleration of material takes place: close to the protostar itself ('X-wind', or stellar wind), in a larger region throughout the protostellar disk (disk wind), or at the interface between the two. Outflow launching regions have so far been probed only by indirect extrapolation because of observational limits. Here we report resolved images of carbon monoxide towards the outflow associated with the TMC1A protostellar system. These data show that gas is ejected from a region extending up to a radial distance of 25 astronomical units from the central protostar, and that angular momentum is removed from an extended region of the disk. This demonstrates that the outflowing gas is launched by an extended disk wind from a Keplerian disk.

  3. The evolution of protostellar disks under the influence of external UV radiation and central stellar winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H. W.; Richling, S.

    2001-01-01

    The evolution and appearance of circumstellar disks in star forming regions can be influenced strongly by the radiation from nearby hot stars. Here we describe the results of numerical simulations of the evolution of protostellar disks and their immediate surroundings under the influence of external UV radiation.

  4. Testing protostellar disk formation models with ALMA observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsono, D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Bruderer, S.; Li, Z.-Y.; Jørgensen, J. K.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Recent simulations have explored different ways to form accretion disks around low-mass stars. However, it has been difficult to differentiate between the proposed mechanisms because of a lack of observable predictions from these numerical studies. Aims: We aim to present observables that can differentiate a rotationally supported disk from an infalling rotating envelope toward deeply embedded young stellar objects (Menv>Mdisk) and infer their masses and sizes. Methods: Two 3D magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) formation simulations are studied with a rotationally supported disk (RSD) forming in one but not the other (where a pseudo-disk is formed instead), together with the 2D semi-analytical model. We determine the dust temperature structure through continuum radiative transfer RADMC3D modeling. A simple temperature-dependent CO abundance structure is adopted and synthetic spectrally resolved submm rotational molecular lines up to Ju = 10 are compared with existing data to provide predictions for future ALMA observations. Results: The 3D MHD simulations and 2D semi-analytical model predict similar compact components in continuum if observed at the spatial resolutions of 0.5-1″ (70-140 AU) typical of the observations to date. A spatial resolution of ~14 AU and high dynamic range (>1000) are required in order to differentiate between RSD and pseudo-disk formation scenarios in the continuum. The first moment maps of the molecular lines show a blue- to red-shifted velocity gradient along the major axis of the flattened structure in the case of RSD formation, as expected, whereas it is along the minor axis in the case of a pseudo-disk. The peak position-velocity diagrams indicate that the pseudo-disk shows a flatter velocity profile with radius than does an RSD. On larger scales, the CO isotopolog line profiles within large (>9″) beams are similar and are narrower than the observed line widths of low-J (2-1 and 3-2) lines, indicating significant turbulence in the

  5. THE ROLE OF TURBULENT MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN THE FORMATION OF ROTATIONALLY SUPPORTED PROTOSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Lima, R.; De Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Lazarian, A.

    2012-03-01

    The formation of protostellar disks out of molecular cloud cores is still not fully understood. Under ideal MHD conditions, the removal of angular momentum from the disk progenitor by the typically embedded magnetic field may prevent the formation of a rotationally supported disk during the main protostellar accretion phase of low-mass stars. This has been known as the magnetic braking problem and the most investigated mechanism to alleviate this problem and help remove the excess of magnetic flux during the star formation process, the so-called ambipolar diffusion (AD), has been shown to be not sufficient to weaken the magnetic braking at least at this stage of the disk formation. In this work, motivated by recent progress in the understanding of magnetic reconnection in turbulent environments, we appeal to the diffusion of magnetic field mediated by magnetic reconnection as an alternative mechanism for removing magnetic flux. We investigate numerically this mechanism during the later phases of the protostellar disk formation and show its high efficiency. By means of fully three-dimensional MHD simulations, we show that the diffusivity arising from turbulent magnetic reconnection is able to transport magnetic flux to the outskirts of the disk progenitor at timescales compatible with the collapse, allowing the formation of a rotationally supported disk around the protostar of dimensions {approx}100 AU, with a nearly Keplerian profile in the early accretion phase. Since MHD turbulence is expected to be present in protostellar disks, this is a natural mechanism for removing magnetic flux excess and allowing the formation of these disks. This mechanism dismisses the necessity of postulating a hypothetical increase of the ohmic resistivity as discussed in the literature. Together with our earlier work which showed that magnetic flux removal from molecular cloud cores is very efficient, this work calls for reconsidering the relative role of AD in the processes of star

  6. A rotating protostellar jet launched from the innermost disk of HH 212

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Ho, Paul. T. P.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Hirano, Naomi; Zhang, Qizhou; Shang, Hsien

    2017-07-01

    The central problem in forming a star is the angular momentum in the circumstellar disk, which prevents material from falling into the central stellar core. An attractive solution to the angular momentum problem appears to be the ubiquitous (low-velocity and poorly collimated) molecular outflows and (high-velocity and highly collimated) protostellar jets accompanying the earliest phase of star formation that remove angular momentum at a range of disk radii1. Previous observations have suggested that outflowing material carries away the excess angular momentum via magneto-centrifugally driven winds from the surfaces of circumstellar disks down to ˜10 au scales2,3,4,5,6, allowing the material in the outer disk to be transported to the inner disk. Here we show that highly collimated protostellar jets remove the residual angular momenta at the ˜0.05 au scale, enabling the material in the innermost region of the disk to accrete towards the central protostar. This is supported by the rotation of the jet measured down to ˜10 au from the protostar in the HH 212 protostellar system. The measurement implies a jet launching radius of ˜0.05-0.02+0.05 au on the disk, based on the magneto-centrifugal theory of jet production, which connects the properties of the jet measured at large distances with those at its base through energy and angular momentum conservation7.

  7. Searching for the Youngest Protostellar Disks and Earliest Signs of Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura-Cox, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Circumstellar disks are fundamental for accretion and angular momentum distribution during the early phases of star formation. Class 0 objects are the youngest protostars and most embedded in their natal envelopes, and circumstellar disks can form even at this earliest stage of star formation. Less-embedded Class I protostars have cleared part of their surrounding envelope, yet the envelopes enshrouding Class 0 and Class I protostars have made detection of young protostellar disks difficult. Before this work, only 4 Class 0 and 10 Class I Keplerian disks were known. Through observational work with the VLA and ALMA on disks around some of the youngest protostars, my dissertation addresses two key questions regarding circumstellar disks and initial conditions for planet formation.1) How common are large Class 0 and I protostellar disks and what are their properties?We analyze dust continuum emission data toward all (~90) Class 0 and I sources in the Perseus molecular cloud from the 8 mm VLA Nascent Disk and Multiplicity (VANDAM) survey with 12 AU resolution. Because we lack kinematic data on small scales to confirm any resolved, elongated structures as rotationally supported, we fit the deprojected, averaged, and binned data in the u,v-plane to a disk-shaped profile to determine which sources are disk candidates.2) How early can disk substructures, and hence signs of early planet formation, be found in young disks?We study the ALMA 1.3 mm continuum observations of the disk of Class I source IRS 63 with 8 AU resolution to search for gaps in a young protostellar disk. Previous studies of disk substructure have revealed gaps in the disks of more evolved Class II sources, such as the famous HL Tau. If rings and gaps are observed in IRS 63, then planet formation and the associated disk sculpting must have started early in the Class I phase or before. If gaps are absent, then planets must have begun to form during the (late) Class I phase, rather than during the deeply

  8. Interplay between chemistry and dynamics in embedded protostellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinch, C.; Jørgensen, J. K.

    2013-11-01

    Context. A fundamental part of the study of star formation is to place young stellar objects in an evolutionary sequence. Establishing a robust evolutionary classification scheme allows us not only to understand how the Sun was born but also to predict what kind of main sequence star a given protostar will become. Traditionally, low-mass young stellar objects are classified according to the shape of their spectral energy distributions. Such methods are, however, prone to misclassification due to degeneracy and do not constrain the temporal evolution. More recently, young stellar objects have been classified based on envelope, disk, and stellar masses determined from resolved images of their continuum and line emission at submillimeter wavelengths. Aims: Through detailed modeling of two Class I sources, we aim at determining accurate velocity profiles and explore the role of freeze-out chemistry in such objects. Methods: We present new Submillimeter Array observations of the continuum and HCO+ line emission at 1.1 mm toward two protostars, IRS 63 and IRS 43 in the Ophiuchus star forming region. The sources were modeled in detail using dust radiation transfer to fit the SED and continuum images and line radiation transfer to produce synthetic position-velocity diagrams. We used a χ2 search algorithm to find the best model fit to the data and to estimate the errors in the model variables. Results: Our best fit models present disk, envelope, and stellar masses, as well as the HCO+ abundance and inclination of both sources. We also identify a ring structure with a radius of about 200 AU in IRS 63. Conclusions: We find that freeze-out chemistry is important in IRS 63 but not for IRS 43. We show that the velocity field in IRS 43 is consistent with Keplerian rotation. Owing to molecular depletion, it is not possible to draw a similar conclusion for IRS 63. We identify a ring-shaped structure in IRS 63 on the same spatial scale as the disk outer radius. No such structure

  9. Nonlinear evolution of protostellar disks and light modulations in young stellar objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, D. N. C.; Bell, K. R.

    1990-01-01

    An evolutionary model of dynamical processes in protostellar disks is described and illustrated with graphs of typical results. The effective transport mechanisms are discussed, including thermal convection, nonaxisymmetric gravitational instabilities in the outer regions of disks, and wave propagation. Consideration is then given to the stages of dynamical evolution, FU Ori outburst phenomena, unsteady accretion-disk flows, and nonlinear feedback as a mechanism to modulate mass transfer. The simulations show that mass redistribution is determined by angular-momentum transfer, which in turn is regulated by the effective viscosity generated by convectively driven turbulence. Significant mass transfer occurs as a result of mixing of infalling material with disk gas and is affected by the tidal torque associated with the growth of nonaxisymmetric disturbances in the outer disk. The time scale for disk evolution is found to be about 1 Myr.

  10. RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF PROTOSTELLAR COLLAPSE: NONIDEAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC EFFECTS AND EARLY FORMATION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Machida, Masahiro N. E-mail: okuzumi@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2015-03-10

    The transport of angular momentum by magnetic fields is a crucial physical process in the formation and evolution of stars and disks. Because the ionization degree in star-forming clouds is extremely low, nonideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects such as ambipolar diffusion and ohmic dissipation work strongly during protostellar collapse. These effects have significant impacts in the early phase of star formation as they redistribute magnetic flux and suppress angular momentum transport by magnetic fields. We perform three-dimensional nested-grid radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations including ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion. Without these effects, magnetic fields transport angular momentum so efficiently that no rotationally supported disk is formed even after the second collapse. Ohmic dissipation works only in a relatively high density region within the first core and suppresses angular momentum transport, enabling formation of a very small rotationally supported disk after the second collapse. With both ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion, these effects work effectively in almost the entire region within the first core and significant magnetic flux loss occurs. As a result, a rotationally supported disk is formed even before a protostellar core forms. The size of the disk is still small, about 5 AU at the end of the first core phase, but this disk will grow later as gas accretion continues. Thus, the nonideal MHD effects can resolve the so-called magnetic braking catastrophe while keeping the disk size small in the early phase, which is implied from recent interferometric observations.

  11. Variations in the accretion rate and luminosity in gravitationally unstable protostellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbakyan, V. G.; Vorobyov, E. I.; Glebova, G. M.

    2016-10-01

    Self-consistent modeling of a protostar and protostellar disk is carried out for early stages of their evolution. The accretion rate at distances of sevral astronomical units from the protostar is appreciably variable, which is reflected in the protostar's luminosity. The amplitude of the variations in the accretion rate and luminosity grows together with the sampling period, as a consequence of the nature of gravitationally unstable protostellar disks. A comparison of model luminosity variations with those derived from observations of nearby sites of star formation shows that the model variations are appreciably lower than the observed values for sampling periods of less than 10 years, indicating the presence of additional sources of variability on small dynamical distances from the protostar.

  12. Embedded Protostellar Disks Around (Sub-)Solar Stars. II. Disk Masses, Sizes, Densities, Temperatures, and the Planet Formation Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.

    2011-03-01

    We present basic properties of protostellar disks in the embedded phase of star formation (EPSF), which is difficult to probe observationally using available observational facilities. We use numerical hydrodynamics simulations of cloud core collapse and focus on disks formed around stars in the 0.03-1.0 M sun mass range. Our obtained disk masses scale near-linearly with the stellar mass. The mean and median disk masses in the Class 0 and I phases (M mean d,C0 = 0.12 M sun, M mdn d,C0 = 0.09 M sun and M mean d,CI = 0.18 M sun, M mdn d,CI = 0.15 M sun, respectively) are greater than those inferred from observations by (at least) a factor of 2-3. We demonstrate that this disagreement may (in part) be caused by the optically thick inner regions of protostellar disks, which do not contribute to millimeter dust flux. We find that disk masses and surface densities start to systematically exceed that of the minimum mass solar nebular for objects with stellar mass as low as M * = 0.05-0.1 M sun. Concurrently, disk radii start to grow beyond 100 AU, making gravitational fragmentation in the disk outer regions possible. Large disk masses, surface densities, and sizes suggest that giant planets may start forming as early as in the EPSF, either by means of core accretion (inner disk regions) or direct gravitational instability (outer disk regions), thus breaking a longstanding stereotype that the planet formation process begins in the Class II phase.

  13. The formation and initial evolution of protostellar disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Douglas N. C.; Pringle, John E.

    1990-01-01

    The formation and evolution of an accretion disk formed during the collapse of a rotating cloud core are considered. The effect of the usual 'turbulent' alpha-viscosity as well as the effective viscosity due to self-gravitation in the disk are taken into account. For observed values of the cloud's initial rotation rates, and for reasonable estimates of the efficiency of the various processes, it is found that the disks so formed are large (radii several hundred to a few thousand AU), relatively massive (comparable in mass to the central star), and long-lived (tens of infall time scales).

  14. ENERGETIC PROTONS, RADIONUCLIDES, AND MAGNETIC ACTIVITY IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, N. J.; Drake, J. F.

    2009-10-01

    We calculate the location of the magnetically inactive dead zone in the minimum-mass protosolar disk, under ionization scenarios including stellar X-rays, long- or short-lived radionuclide decay, and energetic protons arriving from the general interstellar medium, from a nearby supernova explosion, from the disk corona, or from the corona of the young star. The disk contains a dead zone in all scenarios except those with small dust grains removed and a fraction of the short-lived radionuclides remaining in the gas. All the cases without exception have an 'undead zone' where intermediate resistivities prevent magneto-rotational turbulence while allowing shear-generated large-scale magnetic fields. The mass column in the undead zone is typically greater than the column in the turbulent surface layers. The results support the idea that the dead and undead zones are robust consequences of cold, dusty gas with mass columns exceeding 1000 g cm{sup -2}.

  15. Energetic Protons, Radionuclides, and Magnetic Activity in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, N. J.; Drake, J. F.

    2009-10-01

    We calculate the location of the magnetically inactive dead zone in the minimum-mass protosolar disk, under ionization scenarios including stellar X-rays, long- or short-lived radionuclide decay, and energetic protons arriving from the general interstellar medium, from a nearby supernova explosion, from the disk corona, or from the corona of the young star. The disk contains a dead zone in all scenarios except those with small dust grains removed and a fraction of the short-lived radionuclides remaining in the gas. All the cases without exception have an "undead zone" where intermediate resistivities prevent magneto-rotational turbulence while allowing shear-generated large-scale magnetic fields. The mass column in the undead zone is typically greater than the column in the turbulent surface layers. The results support the idea that the dead and undead zones are robust consequences of cold, dusty gas with mass columns exceeding 1000 g cm-2.

  16. First detection of equatorial dark dust lane in a protostellar disk at submillimeter wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Li, Zhi-Yun; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hirano, Naomi; Zhang, Qizhou; Shang, Hsien

    2017-01-01

    In the earliest (so-called “Class 0”) phase of Sun-like (low-mass) star formation, circumstellar disks are expected to form, feeding the protostars. However, these disks are difficult to resolve spatially because of their small sizes. Moreover, there are theoretical difficulties in producing these disks in the earliest phase because of the retarding effects of magnetic fields on the rotating, collapsing material (so-called “magnetic braking”). With the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), it becomes possible to uncover these disks and study them in detail. HH 212 is a very young protostellar system. With ALMA, we not only detect but also spatially resolve its disk in dust emission at submillimeter wavelength. The disk is nearly edge-on and has a radius of ~60 astronomical unit. It shows a prominent equatorial dark lane sandwiched between two brighter features due to relatively low temperature and high optical depth near the disk midplane. For the first time, this dark lane is seen at submillimeter wavelength, producing a “hamburger”-shaped appearance that is reminiscent of the scattered-light image of an edge-on disk in optical and near infrared light. Our observations open up an exciting possibility of directly detecting and characterizing small disks around the youngest protostars through high-resolution imaging with ALMA, which provides strong constraints on theories of disk formation. PMID:28439561

  17. First detection of equatorial dark dust lane in a protostellar disk at submillimeter wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Li, Zhi-Yun; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hirano, Naomi; Zhang, Qizhou; Shang, Hsien

    2017-04-01

    In the earliest (so-called "Class 0") phase of Sun-like (low-mass) star formation, circumstellar disks are expected to form, feeding the protostars. However, these disks are difficult to resolve spatially because of their small sizes. Moreover, there are theoretical difficulties in producing these disks in the earliest phase because of the retarding effects of magnetic fields on the rotating, collapsing material (so-called "magnetic braking"). With the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), it becomes possible to uncover these disks and study them in detail. HH 212 is a very young protostellar system. With ALMA, we not only detect but also spatially resolve its disk in dust emission at submillimeter wavelength. The disk is nearly edge-on and has a radius of 60 astronomical unit. It shows a prominent equatorial dark lane sandwiched between two brighter features due to relatively low temperature and high optical depth near the disk midplane. For the first time, this dark lane is seen at submillimeter wavelength, producing a "hamburger"-shaped appearance that is reminiscent of the scattered-light image of an edge-on disk in optical and near infrared light. Our observations open up an exciting possibility of directly detecting and characterizing small disks around the youngest protostars through high-resolution imaging with ALMA, which provides strong constraints on theories of disk formation.

  18. DOES MAGNETIC-FIELD-ROTATION MISALIGNMENT SOLVE THE MAGNETIC BRAKING CATASTROPHE IN PROTOSTELLAR DISK FORMATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhiyun; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien

    2013-09-01

    Stars form in dense cores of molecular clouds that are observed to be significantly magnetized. In the simplest case of a laminar (non-turbulent) core with the magnetic field aligned with the rotation axis, both analytic considerations and numerical simulations have shown that the formation of a large, 10{sup 2} AU scale, rotationally supported protostellar disk is suppressed by magnetic braking in the ideal MHD limit for a realistic level of core magnetization. This theoretical difficulty in forming protostellar disks is termed the ''magnetic braking catastrophe''. A possible resolution to this problem, proposed by Hennebelle and Ciardi and Joos et al., is that misalignment between the magnetic field and rotation axis may weaken the magnetic braking enough to enable disk formation. We evaluate this possibility quantitatively through numerical simulations. We confirm the basic result of Joos et al. that the misalignment is indeed conducive to disk formation. In relatively weakly magnetized cores with dimensionless mass-to-flux ratio {approx}> 4, it enabled the formation of rotationally supported disks that would otherwise be suppressed if the magnetic field and rotation axis are aligned. For more strongly magnetized cores, disk formation remains suppressed, however, even for the maximum tilt angle of 90 Degree-Sign . If dense cores are as strongly magnetized as indicated by OH Zeeman observations (with a mean dimensionless mass-to-flux ratio {approx}2), it would be difficult for the misalignment alone to enable disk formation in the majority of them. We conclude that, while beneficial to disk formation, especially for the relatively weak field case, misalignment does not completely solve the problem of catastrophic magnetic braking in general.

  19. Does Magnetic-field-Rotation Misalignment Solve the Magnetic Braking Catastrophe in Protostellar Disk Formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien

    2013-09-01

    Stars form in dense cores of molecular clouds that are observed to be significantly magnetized. In the simplest case of a laminar (non-turbulent) core with the magnetic field aligned with the rotation axis, both analytic considerations and numerical simulations have shown that the formation of a large, 102 AU scale, rotationally supported protostellar disk is suppressed by magnetic braking in the ideal MHD limit for a realistic level of core magnetization. This theoretical difficulty in forming protostellar disks is termed the "magnetic braking catastrophe." A possible resolution to this problem, proposed by Hennebelle & Ciardi and Joos et al., is that misalignment between the magnetic field and rotation axis may weaken the magnetic braking enough to enable disk formation. We evaluate this possibility quantitatively through numerical simulations. We confirm the basic result of Joos et al. that the misalignment is indeed conducive to disk formation. In relatively weakly magnetized cores with dimensionless mass-to-flux ratio >~ 4, it enabled the formation of rotationally supported disks that would otherwise be suppressed if the magnetic field and rotation axis are aligned. For more strongly magnetized cores, disk formation remains suppressed, however, even for the maximum tilt angle of 90°. If dense cores are as strongly magnetized as indicated by OH Zeeman observations (with a mean dimensionless mass-to-flux ratio ~2), it would be difficult for the misalignment alone to enable disk formation in the majority of them. We conclude that, while beneficial to disk formation, especially for the relatively weak field case, misalignment does not completely solve the problem of catastrophic magnetic braking in general.

  20. Protostellar Multiplicity in Perseus Characterized by the VLA Nascent Disk and Multiplicity (VANDAM) Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Looney, Leslie; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire J.; Dunham, Michael; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Sadavoy, Sarah; Melis, Carl; Harris, Robert J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Perez, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of multiple star systems is thought to begin early in the star formation process. However, there have not been sufficient numbers of young protostars observed with high enough resolution to determine when and where most multiple systems form. To significantly improve our knowledge of protostellar multiplicity, we have carried out the VLA Nascent Disk and Multiplicity (VANDAM) survey, a 264 hour Jansky VLA program at wavelengths of 8 mm, 1 cm, 4 cm, and 6 cm toward all known Perseus protostars (N ~ 80) down to 15 AU (0.065") resolution. The unbiased nature of the survey has enabled us to conduct the most complete characterization of protostellar multiplicity to date, finding evidence for a bi-modal distribution of multiple protostar system separations. The bi-modal distribution may be evidence for multiple processes contributing to the formation of multiple systems. The inner peak at ~75 AU could be produced from disk fragmentation, while the outer peak at ~3000 AU could be produced by turbulent and/or rotational fragmentation Moreover, three systems are found to reside within larger, disk-like structures suggesting that they may be the product of disk fragmentation via gravitational instability. The results of this survey demonstrate the power and utility of unbiased surveys toward young stars.

  1. Angular momentum exchange by gravitational torques and infall in the circumbinary disk of the protostellar system L1551 NE

    SciTech Connect

    Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Ho, Paul T. P.; Saito, Masao; Saigo, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Lim, Jeremy; Hanawa, Tomoyuki

    2014-11-20

    We report an ALMA observation of the Class I binary protostellar system L1551 NE in the 0.9 mm continuum, C{sup 18}O (3-2), and {sup 13}CO (3-2) lines at a ∼1.6 times higher resolution and a ∼6 times higher sensitivity than those of our previous SubMillimeter Array (SMA) observations, which revealed a r ∼ 300 AU scale circumbinary disk in Keplerian rotation. The 0.9 mm continuum shows two opposing U-shaped brightenings in the circumbinary disk and exhibits a depression between the circumbinary disk and the circumstellar disk of the primary protostar. The molecular lines trace non-axisymmetric deviations from Keplerian rotation in the circumbinary disk at higher velocities relative to the systemic velocity, where our previous SMA observations could not detect the lines. In addition, we detect inward motion along the minor axis of the circumbinary disk. To explain the newly observed features, we performed a numerical simulation of gas orbits in a Roche potential tailored to the inferred properties of L1551 NE. The observed U-shaped dust features coincide with locations where gravitational torques from the central binary system are predicted to impart angular momentum to the circumbinary disk, producing shocks and hence density enhancements seen as a pair of spiral arms. The observed inward gas motion coincides with locations where angular momentum is predicted to be lowered by the gravitational torques. The good agreement between our observation and model indicates that gravitational torques from the binary stars constitute the primary driver for exchanging angular momentum so as to permit infall through the circumbinary disk of L1551 NE.

  2. Gas Heating, Chemistry and Photoevaporation in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David

    2004-01-01

    We model the thermal balance, the chemistry, and the radiative transfer in dusty disks orbiting young, low mass stars. These models are motivated by observations of infrared and ultraviolet transitions of H2 from protoplanetary disks, as well as millimeter and submillimeter observations of other molecules such as CO, and infrared continuum observations of the dust. The dust grains are heated primarily by the stellar radiation and the infrared radiation field produced by the dust itself. The gas is heated by collisions with warmer dust grains, X-rays from the region close to the stellar surface, UV pumping of hydrogen molecules, and the grain photoelectric heating mechanism initiated by UV photons from the central star. We treat cases where the gas to dust ratio is high, because the dust has settled to the midplane and coagulated into relatively large objects. We discuss situations in which the infrared emission from H2 can be detected, and how the comparison of the observations with our models can deduce physical parameters such as the mass and the density and temperature distribution of the gas.

  3. Gas Heating, Chemistry and Photoevaporation in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David

    2004-01-01

    We model the thermal balance, the chemistry, and the radiative transfer in dusty disks orbiting young, low mass stars. These models are motivated by observations of infrared and ultraviolet transitions of H2 from protoplanetary disks, as well as millimeter and submillimeter observations of other molecules such as CO, and infrared continuum observations of the dust. The dust grains are heated primarily by the stellar radiation and the infrared radiation field produced by the dust itself. The gas is heated by collisions with warmer dust grains, X-rays from the region close to the stellar surface, UV pumping of hydrogen molecules, and the grain photoelectric heating mechanism initiated by UV photons from the central star. We treat cases where the gas to dust ratio is high, because the dust has settled to the midplane and coagulated into relatively large objects. We discuss situations in which the infrared emission from H2 can be detected, and how the comparison of the observations with our models can deduce physical parameters such as the mass and the density and temperature distribution of the gas.

  4. 3-D MHD disk wind simulations of protostellar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, Jan E.; Koning, Nico; Ouyed, Rachid; Tanaka, Kei; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of large scale, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations of disk winds for different initial magnetic field configurations. The jets are followed from the source to distances, which are resolvable by HST and ALMA observations. Our simulations show that jets are heated along their length by many shocks. The mass of the protostar is a free parameter that can be inserted in the post processing of the data, and we apply the simulations to both low mass and high mass protostars. For the latter we also compute the expected diagnostics when the outflow is photoionized by the protostar. We compute the emission lines that are produced, and find excellent agreement with observations. For a one solar mass protostar, we find the jet width to be between 20 and 30 au while the maximum velocities perpendicular to the jet are found to be 100 km s-1. The initially less open magnetic field configuration simulations result in a wider, two-component jet; a cylindrically shaped outer jet surrounding a narrow and much faster, inner jet. For the initially most open magnetic field configuration the kink mode creates a narrow corkscrew-like jet without a clear Keplerian rotation profile and even regions where we observe rotation opposite to the disk (counter-rotating). This is not seen in the less open field configurations.

  5. Centrifugally driven winds from protostellar disks. I - Wind model and thermal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safier, Pedro N.

    1993-01-01

    The thermal structure of a wind that is centrifugally driven from the surface of a protostellar disk is studied. A generalized version of the Blandford and Payne self-similar wind model is introduced, and the temperature and ionization distributions in the outflow are investigated. For the evolution of atomic winds, the heat equation and the rate equations that describe the ionization and excitation state of hydrogen are solved self-consistently. Ambipolar diffusion is found to be a robust mechanism for heating the gas. In the more powerful outflows, molecular hydrogen is collisionally dissociated close to the disk surface, and hydrogen is mainly atomic within a few astronomical units from the central source. It is also demonstrated that these outflows have enough momentum to lift dust grains from the disk surface.

  6. On the role of pseudodisk warping and reconnection in protostellar disk formation in turbulent magnetized cores

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhi-Yun; Zhao, Bo; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien

    2014-10-01

    The formation of rotationally supported protostellar disks is suppressed in ideal MHD in non-turbulent cores with aligned magnetic fields and rotation axes. A promising way to resolve this so-called 'magnetic braking catastrophe' is through turbulence. The reason for the turbulence-enabled disk formation is usually attributed to the turbulence-induced magnetic reconnection, which is thought to reduce the magnetic flux accumulated in the disk-forming region. We advance an alternative interpretation, based on magnetic decoupling-triggered reconnection of severely pinched field lines close to the central protostar and turbulence-induced warping of the pseudodisk of Galli and Shu. Such reconnection weakens the central split magnetic monopole that lies at the heart of the magnetic braking catastrophe under flux freezing. We show, through idealized numerical experiments, that the pseudodisk can be strongly warped, but not completely destroyed, by a subsonic or sonic turbulence. The warping decreases the rates of angular momentum removal from the pseudodisk by both magnetic torque and outflow, making it easier to form a rotationally supported disk. More importantly, the warping of the pseudodisk out of the disk-forming, equatorial plane greatly reduces the amount of magnetic flux threading the circumstellar, disk-forming region, further promoting disk formation. The beneficial effects of pseudodisk warping can also be achieved by a misalignment between the magnetic field and rotation axis. These two mechanisms of disk formation, enabled by turbulence and field-rotation misalignment respectively, are thus unified. We find that the disks formed in turbulent magnetized cores are rather thick and significantly magnetized. Implications of these findings, particularly for the thick young disk inferred in L1527, are briefly discussed.

  7. IRAS 16293-2422: Evidence for Infall onto a Counter-Rotating Protostellar Accretion Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remijan, Anthony J.; Hollis, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    We report high spatial resolution VLA observations of the low-mass star-forming region IRAS 16293-2422 using four molecular probes: ethyl cyanide (CH3CH2CN)) methyl formate (CH3OCHO), formic acid (HCOOH), and the ground vibrational state of silicon monoxide (SiO). Ethyl cyanide emission has a spatial scale of approx. 20" and encompasses binary cores A and B as determined by continuum emission peaks. Surrounded by formic acid emission, methyl formate emission has a spatial scale of approx. 6" and is confined to core B. SiO emission shows two velocity components with spatial scales less than 2" that map approx. 2" northeast of the A and B symmetry axis. The redshifted SiO is approx. 2" northwest of blueshifted SiO along a position angle of approx. 135deg which is approximately parallel to the A and B symmetry axis. We interpret the spatial position offset in red and blueshifted SiO emission as due to rotation of a protostellar accretion disk and we derive approx. 1.4 Solar Mass, interior to the SiO emission. In the same vicinity, Mundy et al. (1986) also concluded rotation of a nearly edge-on disk from OVRO observations of much stronger and ubiquitous CO-13 emission but the direction of rotation is opposite to the SiO emission findings. Taken together, SiO and CO-13 data suggest evidence for a counter-rotating disk. Moreover, archival BIMA array CO-12C data show an inverse P Cygni profile with the strongest absorption in close proximity to the SiO emission, indicating unambiguous material infall toward the counter-rotating protostellar disk at a new source location within the IRAS 16293-2422 complex. The details of these observations and our interpretations are discussed.

  8. Are Protoplanetary Disks Born with Vortices? Rossby Wave Instability Driven by Protostellar Infall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2015-05-01

    We carry out two-fluid, two-dimensional global hydrodynamic simulations to test whether protostellar infall can trigger the Rossby wave instability (RWI) in protoplanetry disks. Our results show that infall can trigger the RWI and generate vortices near the outer edge of the mass landing on the disk (i.e., centrifugal radius). We find that the RWI is triggered under a variety of conditions, although the details depend on the disk parameters and the infall pattern. The common key feature of triggering the RWI is the steep radial gradient of the azimuthal velocity induced by the local increase in density at the outer edge of the infall region. Vortices form when the instability enters the nonlinear regime. In our standard model where self-gravity is neglected, vortices merge together to a single vortex within ˜20 local orbital times, and the merged vortex survives for the remaining duration of the calculation (>170 local orbital times). The vortex takes part in outward angular momentum transport, with a Reynolds stress of ≲10-2. Our two-fluid calculations show that vortices efficiently trap dust particles with stopping times of the order of the orbital time, locally enhancing the dust to gas ratio for particles of the appropriate size by a factor of ˜40 in our standard model. When self-gravity is considered, however, vortices tend to be impeded from merging and may eventually dissipate. We conclude it may well be that protoplanetary disks have favorable conditions for vortex formation during the protostellar infall phase, which might enhance early planetary core formation.

  9. ARE PROTOPLANETARY DISKS BORN WITH VORTICES? ROSSBY WAVE INSTABILITY DRIVEN BY PROTOSTELLAR INFALL

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee; Zhu, Zhaohuan E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu

    2015-05-20

    We carry out two-fluid, two-dimensional global hydrodynamic simulations to test whether protostellar infall can trigger the Rossby wave instability (RWI) in protoplanetry disks. Our results show that infall can trigger the RWI and generate vortices near the outer edge of the mass landing on the disk (i.e., centrifugal radius). We find that the RWI is triggered under a variety of conditions, although the details depend on the disk parameters and the infall pattern. The common key feature of triggering the RWI is the steep radial gradient of the azimuthal velocity induced by the local increase in density at the outer edge of the infall region. Vortices form when the instability enters the nonlinear regime. In our standard model where self-gravity is neglected, vortices merge together to a single vortex within ∼20 local orbital times, and the merged vortex survives for the remaining duration of the calculation (>170 local orbital times). The vortex takes part in outward angular momentum transport, with a Reynolds stress of ≲10{sup −2}. Our two-fluid calculations show that vortices efficiently trap dust particles with stopping times of the order of the orbital time, locally enhancing the dust to gas ratio for particles of the appropriate size by a factor of ∼40 in our standard model. When self-gravity is considered, however, vortices tend to be impeded from merging and may eventually dissipate. We conclude it may well be that protoplanetary disks have favorable conditions for vortex formation during the protostellar infall phase, which might enhance early planetary core formation.

  10. Formation and Atmosphere of Complex Organic Molecules of the HH 212 Protostellar Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Li, Zhi-Yun; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hirano, Naomi; Zhang, Qizhou; Shang, Hsien

    2017-07-01

    HH 212 is a nearby (400 pc) Class 0 protostellar system recently found to host a “hamburger”-shaped dusty disk with a radius of ˜60 au, deeply embedded in an infalling-rotating flattened envelope. We have spatially resolved this envelope-disk system with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array at up to ˜16 au (0.″04) resolution. The envelope is detected in HCO+ J = 4-3 down to the dusty disk. Complex organic molecules (COMs) and doubly deuterated formaldehyde (D2CO) are detected above and below the dusty disk within ˜40 au of the central protostar. The COMs are methanol (CH3OH), deuterated methanol (CH2DOH), methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), and formamide (NH2CHO, a prebiotic precursor). We have modeled the gas kinematics in HCO+ and COMs and found a centrifugal barrier (CB) at a radius of ˜44 au, within which a Keplerian rotating disk is formed. This indicates that HCO+ traces the infalling-rotating envelope down to the CB and COMs trace the atmosphere of a Keplerian rotating disk within the CB. The COMs are spatially resolved for the first time, both radially and vertically, in the atmosphere of a disk in the earliest, Class 0 phase of star formation. Our spatially resolved observations of COMs favor their formation in the disk rather than a rapidly infalling (warm) inner envelope. The abundances and spatial distributions of the COMs provide strong constraints on models of their formation and transport in low-mass star formation.

  11. The instability of viscous self-gravitating protostellar disk affected by density bump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elyasi, Mahjubeh; Nejad-Asghar, Mohsen

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we study the instability of viscous self-gravitating protostellar disk affected by infalling Low-mass condensations (LMCs) from the envelope of collapsing molecular cloud cores. The infalling low-mass-condensations (LMCs) are considered as density bumps through the nearly Keplerian viscous accretion disk, and their evolutions are analyzed by using the linear perturbation approximation. We investigate occurrence of instability in the evolution of these density bumps. We find the unstable regions of the bumped accretion disk and evaluate the growth time scale (GTS) of the instability. We also study the radial accretion and azimuthal rotation in these unstable regions. The results show that the GTS will be minimum at a special radius so that the unstable regions can be divided in two parts (inner and outer regions). The perturbed radial and azimuthal velocities in the inner unstable regions are strengthened, while in the outer unstable regions are weakened. Decreasing the radial and azimuthal velocities in the outer unstable regions may lead to coagulation of matters. This effect can help the fragmentation of the disk and formation of the self-gravitating bound objects.

  12. A CHEMICAL VIEW OF PROTOSTELLAR-DISK FORMATION IN L1527

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Nami; Oya, Yoko; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Kahane, Claudine; Lopez-Sepulcre, Ana; Lefloch, Bertrand; Vastel, Charlotte; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Caux, Emmanuel; Coutens, Audrey; Aikawa, Yuri; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Ohashi, Nagayoshi

    2014-08-20

    Subarcsecond images of the rotational line emissions of CCH, CS, H{sub 2}CO, and CH{sub 3}OH have been obtained toward the low-mass protostar IRAS 04368+2557 in L1527 as one of the early science projects of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. The intensity distributions of CCH and CS show a double-peaked structure along the edge-on envelope with a dip toward the protostar position, whereas those of H{sub 2}CO and CH{sub 3}OH are centrally peaked. By analyzing the position-velocity diagrams along the envelope, CCH and CS are found to reside mainly in the envelope, where the gas is infalling with conservation of its angular momentum. They are almost absent inward of the centrifugal barrier (a half of the centrifugal radius). Although H{sub 2}CO exists in the infalling rotating envelope, it also resides in the disk component inside the centrifugal barrier to some extent. On the other hand, CH{sub 3}OH seems to exist around the centrifugal barrier and in the disk component. Hence, the drastic chemical change occurs at the centrifugal barrier. A discontinuous infalling motion as well as the gas-grain interaction would be responsible for the chemical change. This result will put an important constraint on initial chemical compositions for chemical evolution of protostellar disks.

  13. THE CIRCUMBINARY OUTFLOW: A PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOW DRIVEN BY A CIRCUMBINARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Matsumoto, Tomoaki E-mail: inutsuka@nagoya-u.j

    2009-10-10

    Protostellar outflow is a star's first cry at the moment of birth. The outflows have an indispensable role in the formation of single stars because they carry off the excess angular momentum from the center of the shrinking gas cloud, and permit further collapse to form a star. On the other hand, a significant fraction of stars is supposedly born as binaries with circumbinary disks that are frequently observed. Here, we investigate the evolution of a magnetized rotating cloud using a three-dimensional resistive MHD nested-grid code, and show that the outflow is driven by the circumbinary disk and has an important role even in the binary formation. After the adiabatic core formation in the collapsing cloud core, the magnetic flux is significantly removed from the center of the cloud by the Ohmic dissipation. Since this removal makes the magnetic braking ineffective, the adiabatic core continuously acquires the angular momentum to induce fragmentation and subsequent binary formation. The magnetic field accumulates in the circumbinary disk where the removal and accretion of magnetic field are balanced, and finally drives the circumbinary outflow. This result explains the spectacular morphology of some specific young stellar objects such as L1551 IRS5. We can infer that most of the bipolar molecular outflows observed by low density tracers (i.e., CO) would correspond to circumbinary or circum-multiple outflows found in this Letter, since most of the young stellar objects are supposed to be binaries or multiples.

  14. Revolutionizing our View of Protostellar Multiplicity and Disks: The VLA Nascent Disk and Multiplicity (VANDAM) Survey of the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, J. J.; Looney, L. W.; Li, Z.-Y.; Chandler, C. J.; Dunham, M. M.; Segura-Cox, D.; Cox, E. G.; Harris, R. J.; Melis, C.; Sadavoy, S. I.; Pérez, L.; Kratter, K.

    2016-05-01

    There is substantial evidence for disk formation taking place during the early stages of star formation and for most stars being born in multiple systems; however, protostellar multiplicity and disk searches have been hampered by low resolution, sample bias, and variable sensitivity. We have conducted an unbiased, high-sensitivity Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) survey toward all known protostars (n = 94) in the Perseus molecular cloud (d ˜ 230 pc), with a resolution of ˜ 15 AU (0.06'') at λ = 8 mm. We have detected candidate protostellar disks toward 17 sources (with 12 of those in the Class 0 stage) and we have found substructure on < 50 AU scales for three Class 0 disk candidates, possibly evidence for disk fragmentation. We have discovered 16 new multiple systems (or new components) in this survey; the new systems have separations < 500 AU and 3 by < 30 AU. We also found a bi-modal distribution of separations, with peaks at ˜ 75 AU and ˜ 3000 AU, suggestive of formation through two distinct mechanisms: disk and turbulent fragmentation. The results from this survey demonstrate the necessity and utility of uniform, unbiased surveys of protostellar systems at millimeter and centimeter wavelengths.

  15. NON-IDEAL MHD EFFECTS AND MAGNETIC BRAKING CATASTROPHE IN PROTOSTELLAR DISK FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhiyun; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang Hsien

    2011-09-10

    Dense, star-forming cores of molecular clouds are observed to be significantly magnetized. A realistic magnetic field of moderate strength has been shown to suppress, through catastrophic magnetic braking, the formation of a rotationally supported disk (RSD) during the protostellar accretion phase of low-mass star formation in the ideal MHD limit. We address, through two-dimensional (axisymmetric) simulations, the question of whether realistic levels of non-ideal effects, computed with a simplified chemical network including dust grains, can weaken the magnetic braking enough to enable an RSD to form. We find that ambipolar diffusion (AD), the dominant non-ideal MHD effect over most of the density range relevant to disk formation, does not enable disk formation, at least in two dimensions. The reason is that AD allows the magnetic flux that would be dragged into the central stellar object in the ideal MHD limit to pile up instead in a small circumstellar region, where the magnetic field strength (and thus the braking efficiency) is greatly enhanced. We also find that, on the scale of tens of AU or more, a realistic level of Ohmic dissipation does not weaken the magnetic braking enough for an RSD to form, either by itself or in combination with AD. The Hall effect, the least explored of these three non-ideal MHD effects, can spin up the material close to the central object to a significant, supersonic rotation speed, even when the core is initially non-rotating, although the spun-up material remains too sub-Keplerian to form an RSD. The problem of catastrophic magnetic braking that prevents disk formation in dense cores magnetized to realistic levels remains unresolved. Possible resolutions of this problem are discussed.

  16. PROTOSTELLAR DISK EVOLUTION OVER MILLION-YEAR TIMESCALES WITH A PRESCRIPTION FOR MAGNETIZED TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Russell; Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Turner, Neal J.

    2013-07-10

    Magnetorotational instability (MRI) is the most promising mechanism behind accretion in low-mass protostellar disks. Here we present the first analysis of the global structure and evolution of non-ideal MRI-driven T-Tauri disks on million-year timescales. We accomplish this in a 1+1D simulation by calculating magnetic diffusivities and utilizing turbulence activity criteria to determine thermal structure and accretion rate without resorting to a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulation. Our major findings are as follows. First, even for modest surface densities of just a few times the minimum-mass solar nebula, the dead zone encompasses the giant planet-forming region, preserving any compositional gradients. Second, the surface density of the active layer is nearly constant in time at roughly 10 g cm{sup -2}, which we use to derive a simple prescription for viscous heating in MRI-active disks for those who wish to avoid detailed MHD computations. Furthermore, unlike a standard disk with constant-{alpha} viscosity, the disk midplane does not cool off over time, though the surface cools as the star evolves along the Hayashi track. Instead, the MRI may pile material in the dead zone, causing it to heat up over time. The ice line is firmly in the terrestrial planet-forming region throughout disk evolution and can move either inward or outward with time, depending on whether pileups form near the star. Finally, steady-state mass transport is an extremely poor description of flow through an MRI-active disk, as we see both the turnaround in the accretion flow required by conservation of angular momentum and peaks in M-dot (R) bracketing each side of the dead zone. We caution that MRI activity is sensitive to many parameters, including stellar X-ray flux, grain size, gas/small grain mass ratio and magnetic field strength, and we have not performed an exhaustive parameter study here. Our 1+1D model also does not include azimuthal information, which prevents

  17. ENVIRONMENT AND PROTOSTELLAR EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2015-04-01

    Even today in our Galaxy, stars form from gas cores in a variety of environments, which may affect the properties of the resulting star and planetary systems. Here, we study the role of pressure, parameterized via ambient clump mass surface density, on protostellar evolution and appearance, focusing on low-mass Sun-like stars and considering a range of conditions from relatively low pressure filaments in Taurus, to intermediate pressures of cluster-forming clumps like the Orion Nebula Cluster, to very high pressures that may be found in the densest infrared dark clouds or in the Galactic center. We present unified analytic and numerical models for the collapse of prestellar cores, accretion disks, protostellar evolution, and bipolar outflows, coupled with radiative transfer calculations and a simple astrochemical model to predict CO gas-phase abundances. Prestellar cores in high-pressure environments are smaller and denser and thus collapse with higher accretion rates and efficiencies, resulting in higher luminosity protostars with more powerful outflows. The protostellar envelope is heated to warmer temperatures, affecting infrared morphologies (and thus classification) and astrochemical processes like CO depletion onto dust grain ice mantles (and thus CO morphologies). These results have general implications for star and planet formation, especially via their effect on astrochemical and dust grain evolution during infall to and through protostellar accretion disks.

  18. Environment and Protostellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2015-04-01

    Even today in our Galaxy, stars form from gas cores in a variety of environments, which may affect the properties of the resulting star and planetary systems. Here, we study the role of pressure, parameterized via ambient clump mass surface density, on protostellar evolution and appearance, focusing on low-mass Sun-like stars and considering a range of conditions from relatively low pressure filaments in Taurus, to intermediate pressures of cluster-forming clumps like the Orion Nebula Cluster, to very high pressures that may be found in the densest infrared dark clouds or in the Galactic center. We present unified analytic and numerical models for the collapse of prestellar cores, accretion disks, protostellar evolution, and bipolar outflows, coupled with radiative transfer calculations and a simple astrochemical model to predict CO gas-phase abundances. Prestellar cores in high-pressure environments are smaller and denser and thus collapse with higher accretion rates and efficiencies, resulting in higher luminosity protostars with more powerful outflows. The protostellar envelope is heated to warmer temperatures, affecting infrared morphologies (and thus classification) and astrochemical processes like CO depletion onto dust grain ice mantles (and thus CO morphologies). These results have general implications for star and planet formation, especially via their effect on astrochemical and dust grain evolution during infall to and through protostellar accretion disks.

  19. The ALMA view of the protostellar system HH212. The wind, the cavity, and the disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codella, C.; Cabrit, S.; Gueth, F.; Podio, L.; Leurini, S.; Bachiller, R.; Gusdorf, A.; Lefloch, B.; Nisini, B.; Tafalla, M.; Yvart, W.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Because it is viewed simply edge-on, the HH212 protostellar system is an ideal laboratory for studying the interplay of infall, outflow, and rotation in the earliest stages of low-mass star formation. Aims: We wish to exploit the unmatched combination of high angular resolution, high sensitivity, high-imaging fidelity, and spectral coverage provided by ALMA to shed light on the complex kinematics of the innermost central regions of HH212. Methods: We mapped the inner 10″ (4500 AU) of the HH212 system at ≃0.5″ resolution in several molecular tracers and in the 850 μm dust continuum using the ALMA interferometer in band 7 in the extended configuration of the Early Science Cycle 0 operations. Results: Within a single ALMA spectral set-up, we simultaneously identify all the crucial ingredients known to be involved in the star formation recipe: (i) the fast, collimated bipolar SiO jet driven by the protostar; (ii) the large-scale swept-up CO outflow; (iii) the flattened rotating and infalling envelope, with bipolar cavities carved by the outflow (in C17O(3-2)); and (iv) a rotating wide-angle flow that fills the cavities and surrounds the axial jet (in C34S(7-6)). In addition, the compact high-velocity C17O emission (±1.9-3.5 km s-1 from systemic) shows a velocity gradient along the equatorial plane consistent with a rotating disk of ≃0farcs2 = 90 AU around a ≃0.3 ± 0.1 M⊙ source. The rotating disk is possibly Keplerian. Conclusions: HH212 is the third Class 0 protostar with possible signatures of a Keplerian disk of radius ≥30 AU. The warped geometry in our CS data suggests that this large Keplerian disk might result from misaligned magnetic and rotation axes during the collapse phase. The wide-angle CS flow suggests that disk winds may be present in this source. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFinal reduced ALMA cubes (FITS) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp

  20. Angular Momentum Loss in the Envelope-Disk Transition Region of the HH 111 Protostellar System: Evidence for Magnetic Braking?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Hwang, Hsiang-Chih; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2016-08-01

    HH 111 is a Class I protostellar system at a distance of ˜400 pc, with the central source VLA 1 associated with a rotating disk deeply embedded in a flattened envelope. Here we present the observations of this system at ˜0.″6 (240 au) resolution in C18O (J = 2 — 1) and a 230 GHz continuum obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array, and in SO ({N}J = {5}6-{4}5) obtained with the Submillimeter Array. The observations show for the first time how a Keplerian rotating disk can be formed inside a flattened envelope. The flattened envelope is detected in C18O, extending out to ≳2400 au from the VLA 1 source. It has a differential rotation, with the outer part (≳2000 au) better described by a rotation that has constant specific angular momentum, and the innermost part (≲160 au) by a Keplerian rotation. The rotationally supported disk is therefore relatively compact in this system, which is consistent with the dust continuum observations. Most interestingly, if the flow is in steady state, there is a substantial drop in specific angular momentum in the envelope-disk transition region from 2000 to 160 au, by a factor of ˜3. Such a decrease is not expected outside a disk formed from simple hydrodynamic core collapse, but can happen naturally if the core is significantly magnetized, because magnetic fields can be trapped in the transition region outside the disk by the ram pressure of the protostellar accretion flow, which can lead to efficient magnetic braking. In addition, SO shock emission is detected around the outer radius of the disk and could trace an accretion shock around the disk.

  1. ALMA Results of the Pseudodisk, Rotating Disk, and Jet in the Continuum and HCO+ in the Protostellar System HH 212

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Hirano, Naomi; Zhang, Qizhou; Shang, Hsien; Ho, Paul T. P.; Krasnopolsky, Ruben

    2014-05-01

    HH 212 is a nearby (400 pc) Class 0 protostellar system showing several components that can be compared with theoretical models of core collapse. We have mapped it in the 350 GHz continuum and HCO+ J = 4-3 emission with ALMA at up to ~0.''4 resolution. A flattened envelope and a compact disk are seen in the continuum around the central source, as seen before. The HCO+ kinematics shows that the flattened envelope is infalling with small rotation (i.e., spiraling) into the central source, and thus can be identified as a pseudodisk in the models of magnetized core collapse. Also, the HCO+ kinematics shows that the disk is rotating and can be rotationally supported. In addition, to account for the missing HCO+ emission at low-redshifted velocity, an extended infalling envelope is required, with its material flowing roughly parallel to the jet axis toward the pseudodisk. This is expected if it is magnetized with an hourglass B-field morphology. We have modeled the continuum and HCO+ emission of the flattened envelope and disk simultaneously. We find that a jump in density is required across the interface between the pseudodisk and the disk. A jet is seen in HCO+ extending out to ~500 AU away from the central source, with the peaks upstream of those seen before in SiO. The broad velocity range and high HCO+ abundance indicate that the HCO+ emission traces internal shocks in the jet.

  2. Self-gravitating Magnetically Supported Protostellar Disks and the Formation of Substellar Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun

    2002-08-01

    Isolated low-mass stars are formed, in the standard picture, from the collapse of dense cores condensed out of strongly magnetized molecular clouds. The dynamically collapsing inflow traps nearly half of the critical magnetic flux needed for the core support and deposits it in a small region surrounding the protostar. It has been argued previously that the deposited flux can slow down the inflow, allowing matter to pile up and settle along field lines into a magnetically supported, circumstellar disk. Here we show that the disk typically contains ~10% of the stellar mass and that it could become self-gravitating under plausible conditions during the rapidly accreting, ``Class 0'' phase of star formation. Subsequent fragmentation of the self-gravitating, magnetically subcritical disk, driven by magnetic diffusion, could produce fragments of substellar masses, which collapse to form brown dwarfs and possibly massive planets. This scenario predicts substellar object formation at distances of order 100 AU from the central star, although orbital evolution is possible after formation. It may provide an explanation for the small, but growing, number of brown dwarf companions found around nearby stars by direct imaging. The relatively large formation distances make the substellar companions vulnerable to dynamic ejection, particularly in binary (multiple) systems and dense clusters. Those ejected may account for, at least in part, the isolated brown dwarfs and perhaps free-floating planetary mass objects.

  3. A CHANGE OF ROTATION PROFILE IN THE ENVELOPE IN THE HH 111 PROTOSTELLAR SYSTEM: A TRANSITION TO A DISK?

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chin-Fei

    2010-12-10

    The HH 111 protostellar system consists of two Class I sources (VLA 1 and 2) with putative disks deeply embedded in a flattened envelope at a distance of 400 pc. A follow-up study of this system in C{sup 18}O (J = 2-1), SO (N{sub J} = 5{sub 6}-4{sub 5}), and 1.33 mm continuum at {approx}1'' (400 AU) resolution is performed, and it may show for the first time how a rotationally supported disk can be formed inside an infalling envelope. The 1.33 mm continuum emission is seen arising from both sources, likely tracing the dusty putative disks around them. In particular, the emission around the VLA 1 source is elongated in the equatorial plane with a radius of {approx}300 AU. The envelope is well seen in C{sup 18}O, extending to {approx}7000 AU out from the VLA 1 source, with the innermost part overlapping with the dusty disk. It has a differential rotation, with the outer part ({approx}2000-7000 AU) better described by a rotation that has constant specific angular momentum and the inner part ({approx}60-2000 AU) by a Keplerian rotation. The envelope seems to also have some infall motion that is smaller than the rotation motion. Thus, the material in the outer part of the envelope seems to be slowly spiraling inward with its angular momentum and the rotation can indeed become Keplerian in the inner part. A compact SO emission is seen around the VLA 1 source with a radius of {approx}400 AU and it may trace a shock such as an (inner) accretion shock around the disk.

  4. The structure of protostellar accretion disks and the origin of bipolar flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardle, Mark; Koenigl, Arieh

    1993-01-01

    Equations are obtained which govern the disk-wind structure and identify the physical parameters relevant to circumstellar disks. The system of equations is analyzed in the thin-disk approximation, and it is shown that the system can be consistently reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations in z. Representative solutions are presented, and it is shown that the apparent paradox discussed by Shu (1991) is resolved when the finite thickness of the disk is taken into account. Implications of the results for the origin of bipolar flows in young stellar objects and possible application to active galactic nuclei are discussed.

  5. Protostellar disk formation and transport of angular momentum during magnetized core collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, M.; Hennebelle, P.; Ciardi, A.

    2012-07-01

    Context. Theoretical studies of collapsing clouds have found that even a relatively weak magnetic field may prevent the formation of disks and their fragmentation. However, most previous studies have been limited to cases where the magnetic field and the rotation axis of the cloud are aligned. Aims: We study the transport of angular momentum, and its effects on disk formation, for non-aligned initial configurations and a range of magnetic intensities. Methods: We perform three-dimensional, adaptive mesh, numerical simulations of magnetically supercritical collapsing dense cores using the magneto-hydrodynamic code Ramses. We compute the contributions of all the relevant processes transporting angular momentum, in both the envelope and the region of the disk. We clearly define centrifugally supported disks and thoroughly study their properties. Results: At variance with earlier analyses, we show that the transport of angular momentum acts less efficiently in collapsing cores with non-aligned rotation and magnetic field. Analytically, this result can be understood by taking into account the bending of field lines occurring during the gravitational collapse. For the transport of angular momentum, we conclude that magnetic braking in the mean direction of the magnetic field tends to dominate over both the gravitational and outflow transport of angular momentum. We find that massive disks, containing at least 10% of the initial core mass, can form during the earliest stages of star formation even for mass-to-flux ratios as small as three to five times the critical value. At higher field intensities, the early formation of massive disks is prevented. Conclusions: Given the ubiquity of Class I disks, and because the early formation of massive disks can take place at moderate magnetic intensities, we speculate that for stronger fields, disks will form later, when most of the envelope will have been accreted. In addition, we speculate that some observed early massive disks

  6. THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTELLAR DISK OF L1527

    SciTech Connect

    Segura-Cox, Dominique M.; Looney, Leslie W.; Stephens, Ian W.; Fernández-López, Manuel; Crutcher, Richard; Kwon, Woojin; Tobin, John J.; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2015-01-01

    We present subarcsecond (∼0.''35) resolved observations of the 1.3 mm dust polarization from the edge-on circumstellar disk around the Class 0 protostar L1527. The inferred magnetic field is consistent with a dominantly toroidal morphology; there is no significantly detected vertical poloidal component to which observations of an edge-on disk are most sensitive. This suggests that angular momentum transport in Class 0 protostars (when large amounts of material are fed down to the disk from the envelope and accreted onto the protostar) is driven mainly by magnetorotational instability rather than magnetocentrifugal winds at 50 AU scales. In addition, with the data to date there is an early, tentative trend that R > 30 AU disks have so far been found in Class 0 systems with average magnetic fields on the 1000 AU scale strongly misaligned with the rotation axis. The absence of such a disk in the aligned case could be due to efficient magnetic braking that disrupts disk formation. If this is the case, this implies that candidate Class 0 disk systems could be identified by the average magnetic field direction at ∼1000 AU spatial scales.

  7. Dead, Undead, and Zombie Zones in Protostellar Disks as a Function of Stellar Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Ercolano, Barbara; Turner, Neal J.

    2013-02-01

    We investigate the viability of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in X-ray ionized viscous accretion disks around both solar-type stars and very low mass stars. In particular, we determine the disk regions where the MRI can be shut off either by Ohmic resistivity (the so-called dead and undead zones) or by ambipolar diffusion (a region we term the zombie zone). We consider two stellar masses: M * = 0.7 M ⊙ and 0.1 M ⊙. In each case, we assume that: the disk surface density profile is that of a scaled Minimum Mass Solar Nebula, with M disk/M * = 0.01 as suggested by current data; disk ionization is driven primarily by stellar X-rays, complemented by cosmic rays and radionuclides; and the stellar X-ray luminosity scales with bolometric luminosity as LX /L * ≈ 10-3.5, as observed. Ionization rates are calculated with the MOCCASIN Monte Carlo X-ray transport code, and ionization balance determined using a simplified chemical network, including well-mixed 0.1 μm grains at various levels of depletion. We find that (1) ambipolar diffusion is the primary factor controlling MRI activity in disks around both solar-type and very low mass classical T Tauri stars. Assuming that the MRI yields the maximum possible field strength at each radius, we further find that: (2) the MRI-active layer constitutes only ~5%-10% of the total disk mass; (3) the accretion rate (\\dot{M}) varies radially in both magnitude and sign (inward or outward), implying time-variable accretion as well as the creation of disk gaps and overdensities, with consequences for planet formation and migration; (4) achieving the empirical accretion rates in solar-type and very low mass stars requires a depletion of well-mixed small grains (via grain growth and/or settling) by a factor of 10-1000 relative to the standard dust-to-gas mass ratio of 10-2 and (5) the current non-detection of polarized emission from field-aligned grains in the outer disk regions is consistent with active MRI at those radii.

  8. DEAD, UNDEAD, AND ZOMBIE ZONES IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS AS A FUNCTION OF STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Ercolano, Barbara; Turner, Neal J. E-mail: ercolano@usm.lmu.de

    2013-02-10

    We investigate the viability of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in X-ray ionized viscous accretion disks around both solar-type stars and very low mass stars. In particular, we determine the disk regions where the MRI can be shut off either by Ohmic resistivity (the so-called dead and undead zones) or by ambipolar diffusion (a region we term the zombie zone). We consider two stellar masses: M {sub *} = 0.7 M {sub Sun} and 0.1 M {sub Sun }. In each case, we assume that: the disk surface density profile is that of a scaled Minimum Mass Solar Nebula, with M {sub disk}/M {sub *} = 0.01 as suggested by current data; disk ionization is driven primarily by stellar X-rays, complemented by cosmic rays and radionuclides; and the stellar X-ray luminosity scales with bolometric luminosity as L{sub X} /L {sub *} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3.5}, as observed. Ionization rates are calculated with the MOCCASIN Monte Carlo X-ray transport code, and ionization balance determined using a simplified chemical network, including well-mixed 0.1 {mu}m grains at various levels of depletion. We find that (1) ambipolar diffusion is the primary factor controlling MRI activity in disks around both solar-type and very low mass classical T Tauri stars. Assuming that the MRI yields the maximum possible field strength at each radius, we further find that: (2) the MRI-active layer constitutes only {approx}5%-10% of the total disk mass; (3) the accretion rate ( M-dot ) varies radially in both magnitude and sign (inward or outward), implying time-variable accretion as well as the creation of disk gaps and overdensities, with consequences for planet formation and migration; (4) achieving the empirical accretion rates in solar-type and very low mass stars requires a depletion of well-mixed small grains (via grain growth and/or settling) by a factor of 10-1000 relative to the standard dust-to-gas mass ratio of 10{sup -2}; and (5) the current non-detection of polarized emission from field

  9. Chemistry of protostellar envelopes and disks: computational testing of 2D abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Rivera, Lizxandra; Willacy, Karen; Terebey, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Molecule formation is dynamic during the protostar collapse phase, driven by changes in temperature, density, and UV radiation as gas and dust flows from the envelope onto the forming protoplanetary disk. In this work, we use a chemistry model to generate fractional abundances of water and carbon monoxide using primarily as input parameters the temperature and density profile produced by the dust radiative transfer model HOCHUNK3D (Whitney et al. 2013). Contour maps are presented showing the meridional temperature, density, and fractional abundance at different outer radii. High concentrations of gas phase molecules are found within 5 AU of the star along with high temperatures in the same spatial region. Shielding by the disk leads to colder temperatures outside 10 AU near the disk mid-plane. In this region, CO freezes out onto grains and shows a much reduced abundance. Water remains solid almost everywhere during the infall and evaporates within ~10 AU.

  10. Coupling protoplanetary disk formation with early protostellar evolution: influence on planet traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillie, Kevin; Piau, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    Protoplanetary disk structures are known to be shaped by various thermal and compositional effects such as (though not limited to) shadowed regions, sublimation lines, density bumps... The resulting irregularities in the surface mass density and temperature profiles are key elements to determine the location where planetary embryos can be trapped. These traps provide hints of which planets are most likely to survive, at what distance from the star, and potentially with what composition (Baillié, Charnoz, Pantin, 2015, A&A 577, A65; Baillié, Charnoz, Pantin, 2016, A&A 590, A60). These structures are determined by the viscous spreading of the disk, that is initially formed by the collapse of the molecular cloud.Starting from the numerical hydrodynamical model detailed in Baillié & Charnoz., 2014, ApJ 786, 35 which couples the disk thermodynamics, its photosphere geometry, its dynamics and its dust composition in order to follow its long-term evolution, we now consider the early stages of the central star. We model the joint formation of the disk and the star: their mass are directly derived from the collapse of the molecular cloud while the star temperature, radius and brightness are interpolated over pre-calculated stellar evolutions. Therefore, our simulations no longer depend on the initial profile of the "Minimum Mass Solar Nebula", and allow us to model the influence of the forming star on the protoplanetary disk. In particular, we will present the resulting distribution of the sublimation lines of the main dust species, as well as the locations of the planet traps at various disk ages. In the longer term, we intend to investigate the influence of the star properties on the selection of the surviving planets.

  11. Spiral Arms, Infall, and Misalignment of the Circumbinary Disk from the Circumstellar Disks in the Protostellar Binary System L1551 NE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Saigo, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Saito, Masao; Lim, Jeremy; Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Ho, Paul T. P.

    2017-03-01

    We report the ALMA Cycle 2 observations of the Class I binary protostellar system L1551 NE in the 0.9 mm continuum, C18O (3–2), 13CO (3–2), SO (78–67), and CS (7–6) emission. At 0.″18 (=25 au) resolution, ∼4 times higher than that of our Cycle 0 observations, the circumbinary disk (CBD) as seen in the 0.9 mm emission is shown to be composed of a northern and a southern spiral arm, with the southern arm connecting to the circumstellar disk (CSD) around Source B. The western parts of the spiral arms are brighter than the eastern parts, suggesting the presence of an m = 1 spiral mode. In the C18O emission, the infall gas motions in the interarm regions and the outward gas motions in the arms are identified. These observed features are well reproduced with our numerical simulations, where gravitational torques from the binary system impart angular momenta to the spiral-arm regions and extract angular momenta from the interarm regions. Chemical differentiation of the CBD is seen in the four molecular species. Our Cycle 2 observations have also resolved the CSDs around the individual protostars, and the beam-deconvolved sizes are 0.″29 × 0.″19 (=40 × 26 au) (P.A. = 144°) and 0.″26 × 0.″20 (=36 × 27 au) (P.A. = 147°) for Sources A and B, respectively. The position and inclination angles of these CSDs are misaligned with those of the CBD. The C18O emission traces the Keplerian rotation of the misaligned disk around Source A.

  12. ALMA observations of the Th 28 protostellar disk. A new example of counter-rotation between disk and optical jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louvet, F.; Dougados, C.; Cabrit, S.; Hales, A.; Pinte, C.; Ménard, F.; Bacciotti, F.; Coffey, D.; Mardones, D.; Bronfman, L.; Gueth, F.

    2016-12-01

    Aims: Recently, differences in Doppler shifts across the base of four close classical T Tauri star jets have been detected with the HST in optical and near-ultraviolet (NUV) emission lines, and these Doppler shifts were interpreted as rotation signatures under the assumption of steady state flow. To support this interpretation, it is necessary that the underlying disks rotate in the same sense. Agreement between disk rotation and jet rotation determined from optical lines has been verified in two cases and rejected in one case. Meanwhile, the near-ultraviolet lines, which may trace faster and more collimated inner spines of the jet than optical lines, either agree or show no clear indication. We propose to perform this test on the fourth system, Th 28. Methods: We present ALMA high angular resolution Band 7 continuum, 12CO(3-2) and 13CO(2-1) observations of the circumstellar disk around the T Tauri star Th 28. Results: The sub-arcsecond angular resolution (0.46''× 0.37'') and high sensitivity reached enable us to detect, in CO and continuum, clear signatures of a disk in Keplerian rotation around Th 28. The 12CO emission is clearly resolved, allowing us to derive estimates of disk position angle and inclination. The large velocity separation of the peaks in 12CO, combined with the resolved extent of the emission, indicate a central stellar mass in the range 1-2 M⊙. The rotation sense of the disk is well detected in both 13CO and 12CO emission lines, and this direction is opposite to that implied by the transverse Doppler shifts measured in the optical lines of the jet. Conclusions: The Th 28 system is now the second system, among the four investigated so far, where counter-rotation between the disk and the optical jet is detected. These findings imply either that optical transverse velocity gradients detected with HST do not trace jet rotation or that modeling the flow with the steady assumption is not valid. In both cases jet rotation studies that rely solely

  13. THE SPINDLE: AN IRRADIATED DISK AND BENT PROTOSTELLAR JET IN ORION

    SciTech Connect

    Bally, John; Youngblood, Allison; Ginsburg, Adam E-mail: Allison.Youngblood@colorado.edu

    2012-09-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope observations of a bent, pulsed Herbig-Haro jet, HH 1064, emerging from the young star Parenago 2042 embedded in the H II region NGC 1977 located about 30' north of the Orion Nebula. This outflow contains eight bow shocks in the redshifted western lobe and five bow shocks in the blueshifted eastern lobe. Shocks within a few thousand AU of the source star exhibit proper motions of {approx}160 km s{sup -1} but motions decrease with increasing distance. Parenago 2042 is embedded in a proplyd-a photoevaporating protoplanetary disk. A remarkable set of H{alpha} arcs resembling a spindle surround the redshifted (western) jet. The largest arc with a radius of 500 AU may trace the ionized edge of a circumstellar disk inclined by {approx}30 Degree-Sign . The spindle may be the photoionized edge of either a {approx}3 km s{sup -1} FUV-driven wind from the outer disk or a faster MHD-powered flow from an inner disk. The HH 1064 jet appears to be deflected north by photoablation of the south-facing side of a mostly neutral jet beam. V2412 Ori, located 1' west of Parenago 2042 drives a second bent flow, HH 1065. Both HH 1064 and 1065 are surrounded by LL Ori-type bows marking the boundary between the outflow cavity and the surrounding nebula.

  14. Herbig stars' near-infrared excess: An origin in the protostellar disk's magnetically supported atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, N. J.; Benisty, M.; Dullemond, C. P.; Hirose, S.

    2014-01-01

    Young stars with masses 2-8 times solar, the Herbig Ae and Be stars, often show a near-infrared excess too large to explain with a hydrostatically supported circumstellar disk of gas and dust. At the same time, the accretion flow carrying the circumstellar gas to the star is thought to be driven by magnetorotational turbulence, which, according to numerical MHD modeling, yields an extended low-density atmosphere supported by the magnetic fields. We demonstrate that the base of the atmosphere can be optically thick to the starlight and that the parts lying near 1 AU are tall enough to double the fraction of the stellar luminosity reprocessed into the near-infrared. We generate synthetic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations with opacities for submicron silicate and carbonaceous grains. The synthetic SEDs closely follow the median Herbig SED constructed recently by Mulders and Dominik and, in particular, match the large near-infrared flux, provided the grains have a mass fraction close to interstellar near the disk's inner rim.

  15. Chemical Evolution of Protostellar Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William D.; vanDishoeck, Ewine F.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Whittet, Douglas C. B.

    2000-01-01

    We review the chemical processes that are important in the evolution from a molecular cloud core to a protostellar disk. These cover both gas phase and gas grain interactions. The current observational and theoretical state of this field are discussed.

  16. Variable Protostellar Accretion with Episodic Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Basu, Shantanu

    2015-06-01

    We present the latest development of the disk gravitational instability and fragmentation model, originally introduced by us to explain episodic accretion bursts in the early stages of star formation. Using our numerical hydrodynamics model with improved disk thermal balance and star-disk interaction, we computed the evolution of protostellar disks formed from the gravitational collapse of prestellar cores. In agreement with our previous studies, we find that cores of higher initial mass and angular momentum produce disks that are more favorable to gravitational instability and fragmentation, while a higher background irradiation and magnetic fields moderate the disk tendency to fragment. The protostellar accretion in our models is time-variable, thanks to the nonlinear interaction between different spiral modes in the gravitationally unstable disk, and can undergo episodic bursts when fragments migrate onto the star owing to the gravitational interaction with other fragments or spiral arms. Most bursts occur in the partly embedded Class I phase, with a smaller fraction taking place in the deeply embedded Class 0 phase and a few possible bursts in the optically visible Class II phase. The average burst duration and mean luminosity are found to be in good agreement with those inferred from observations of FUors. The model predicts the existence of two types of bursts: the isolated ones, showing well-defined luminosity peaks separated with prolonged periods (˜ {{10}4} yr) of quiescent accretion, and clustered ones, demonstrating several bursts occurring one after another during just a few hundred years. Finally, we estimate that 40%-70% of the star-forming cores can display bursts after forming a star-disk system.

  17. KECK ADAPTIVE OPTICS OBSERVATIONS OF THE PROTOSTELLAR DISK AROUND RADIO SOURCE I IN THE ORION KLEINMANN-LOW NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Sitarski, Breann N.; Morris, Mark R.; Becklin, E. E.; Ghez, Andrea M.; Lu, Jessica R.; Duchene, Gaspard; Stolte, Andrea; Zinnecker, Hans

    2013-06-20

    We have made the first detection of a near-infrared counterpart associated with the disk around Radio Source ''I'', a massive protostar in the Kleinmann-Low nebula in Orion, using imaging with laser guide star adaptive optics on the Keck II telescope. The infrared emission is evident in images acquired using L' (3.8 {mu}m) and Ms (4.7 {mu}m) filters and is not detectable at K' (2.1 {mu}m). The observed morphology strongly suggests that we are seeing some combination of scattered and thermal light emanating from the disk. The disk is also manifest in the L'/Ms flux ratio image. We interpret the near-infrared emission as the illuminated surface of a nearly edge-on disk, oriented so that only the northern face is visible; the opposite surface remains hidden by the disk. We do not see infrared radiation associated directly with the star proposed to be associated with Source ''I''. The data also suggest that there is a cavity above and below the disk that is oriented perpendicular to the disk and is sculpted by the known, strong outflow from the inner disk of Source I. We compare our data to models of a protostar with a surrounding disk, envelope, and wind-blown cavity in order to elucidate the nature of the disk around Radio Source I.

  18. ALMA results of the pseudodisk, rotating disk, and jet in the continuum and HCO{sup +} in the protostellar system HH 212

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Hirano, Naomi; Shang, Hsien; Ho, Paul T. P.; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Zhang, Qizhou

    2014-05-10

    HH 212 is a nearby (400 pc) Class 0 protostellar system showing several components that can be compared with theoretical models of core collapse. We have mapped it in the 350 GHz continuum and HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 emission with ALMA at up to ∼0.''4 resolution. A flattened envelope and a compact disk are seen in the continuum around the central source, as seen before. The HCO{sup +} kinematics shows that the flattened envelope is infalling with small rotation (i.e., spiraling) into the central source, and thus can be identified as a pseudodisk in the models of magnetized core collapse. Also, the HCO{sup +} kinematics shows that the disk is rotating and can be rotationally supported. In addition, to account for the missing HCO{sup +} emission at low-redshifted velocity, an extended infalling envelope is required, with its material flowing roughly parallel to the jet axis toward the pseudodisk. This is expected if it is magnetized with an hourglass B-field morphology. We have modeled the continuum and HCO{sup +} emission of the flattened envelope and disk simultaneously. We find that a jump in density is required across the interface between the pseudodisk and the disk. A jet is seen in HCO{sup +} extending out to ∼500 AU away from the central source, with the peaks upstream of those seen before in SiO. The broad velocity range and high HCO{sup +} abundance indicate that the HCO{sup +} emission traces internal shocks in the jet.

  19. Radiation Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Protostellar Core Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomida, K.

    2013-04-01

    We perform 3D nested-grid radiation magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations of protostellar collapse from molecular cloud cores to protostellar cores with and without Ohmic dissipation of magnetic fields. We describe formation of circumstellar disks and multi-component outflows with our new code involving improved treatment of radiation transfer and thermodynamics. In the ideal RMHD models, the evolution of the protostellar core is very similar to that in the spherically symmetric non-rotating model because magnetic fields transport angular momentum very efficiently. However, if the resistivity is present, angular momentum transport is considerably suppressed due to loss of magnetic flux, and a rotationally-supported circumstellar disk is rapidly built up in the vicinity of the protostellar core. Magnetic fields are amplified by rotation and a fast well-collimated bipolar outflow is launched from the protostellar core via magnetic pressure gradient force.

  20. THE PROTOSTELLAR MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, Christopher F.; Offner, Stella S. R. E-mail: soffner@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-06-10

    The protostellar mass function (PMF) is the present-day mass function of the protostars in a region of star formation. It is determined by the initial mass function weighted by the accretion time. The PMF thus depends on the accretion history of protostars and in principle provides a powerful tool for observationally distinguishing different protostellar accretion models. We consider three basic models here: the isothermal sphere model, the turbulent core model, and an approximate representation of the competitive accretion model. We also consider modified versions of these accretion models, in which the accretion rate tapers off linearly in time. Finally, we allow for an overall acceleration in the rate of star formation. At present, it is not possible to directly determine the PMF since protostellar masses are not currently measurable. We carry out an approximate comparison of predicted PMFs with observation by using the theory to infer the conditions in the ambient medium in several star-forming regions. Tapered and accelerating models generally agree better with observed star formation times than models without tapering or acceleration, but uncertainties in the accretion models and in the observations do not allow one to rule out any of the proposed models at present. The PMF is essential for the calculation of the protostellar luminosity function, however, and this enables stronger conclusions to be drawn.

  1. The Protostellar Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offner, Stella S. R.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2011-07-01

    The protostellar luminosity function (PLF) is the present-day luminosity function of the protostars in a region of star formation. It is determined using the protostellar mass function in combination with a stellar evolutionary model that provides the luminosity as a function of instantaneous and final stellar mass. In 2010, McKee & Offner considered three main accretion models: the isothermal sphere (IS) model, the turbulent core (TC) model, and an approximation of the competitive accretion (CA) model. We also consider the effect of an accretion rate that tapers off linearly in time and an accelerating star formation rate. For each model, we characterize the luminosity distribution using the mean, median, maximum, ratio of the median to the mean, standard deviation of the logarithm of the luminosity, and the fraction of very low luminosity objects. We compare the models with bolometric luminosities observed in local star-forming regions and find that models with an approximately constant accretion time, such as the TC and CA models, appear to agree better with observation than those with a constant accretion rate, such as the IS model. We show that observations of the mean protostellar luminosity in these nearby regions of low-mass star formation suggest a mean star formation time of 0.3 ± 0.1 Myr. Such a timescale, together with some accretion that occurs non-radiatively and some that occurs in high-accretion, episodic bursts, resolves the classical "luminosity problem" in low-mass star formation, in which observed protostellar luminosities are significantly less than predicted. An accelerating star formation rate is one possible way of reconciling the observed star formation time and mean luminosity. Future observations will place tighter constraints on the observed luminosities, star formation time, and episodic accretion, enabling better discrimination between star formation models and clarifying the influence of variable accretion on the PLF.

  2. THE PROTOSTELLAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Offner, Stella S. R.; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: cmckee@astro.berkeley.edu

    2011-07-20

    The protostellar luminosity function (PLF) is the present-day luminosity function of the protostars in a region of star formation. It is determined using the protostellar mass function in combination with a stellar evolutionary model that provides the luminosity as a function of instantaneous and final stellar mass. In 2010, McKee and Offner considered three main accretion models: the isothermal sphere (IS) model, the turbulent core (TC) model, and an approximation of the competitive accretion (CA) model. We also consider the effect of an accretion rate that tapers off linearly in time and an accelerating star formation rate. For each model, we characterize the luminosity distribution using the mean, median, maximum, ratio of the median to the mean, standard deviation of the logarithm of the luminosity, and the fraction of very low luminosity objects. We compare the models with bolometric luminosities observed in local star-forming regions and find that models with an approximately constant accretion time, such as the TC and CA models, appear to agree better with observation than those with a constant accretion rate, such as the IS model. We show that observations of the mean protostellar luminosity in these nearby regions of low-mass star formation suggest a mean star formation time of 0.3 {+-} 0.1 Myr. Such a timescale, together with some accretion that occurs non-radiatively and some that occurs in high-accretion, episodic bursts, resolves the classical 'luminosity problem' in low-mass star formation, in which observed protostellar luminosities are significantly less than predicted. An accelerating star formation rate is one possible way of reconciling the observed star formation time and mean luminosity. Future observations will place tighter constraints on the observed luminosities, star formation time, and episodic accretion, enabling better discrimination between star formation models and clarifying the influence of variable accretion on the PLF.

  3. Protostellar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John

    2016-09-01

    Outflows from accreting, rotating, and magnetized systems are ubiquitous. Protostellar outflows can be observed from radio to X-ray wavelengths in the continuum and a multitude of spectral lines that probe a wide range of physical conditions, chemical phases, radial velocities, and proper motions. Wide-field visual and near-IR data, mid-IR observations from space, and aperture synthesis with centimeter- and millimeterwave interferometers are revolutionizing outflow studies. Many outflows originate in multiple systems and clusters. Although most flows are bipolar and some contain highly collimated jets, others are wide-angle winds, and a few are nearly isotropic and exhibit explosive behavior. Morphologies and velocity fields indicate variations in ejection velocity, mass-loss rate, and in some cases, flow orientation and degree of collimation. These trends indicate that stellar accretion is episodic and often occurs in a complex dynamical environment. Outflow power increases with source luminosity but decreases with evolutionary stage. The youngest outflows are small and best traced by molecules such as CO, SiO, H2O, and H2. Older outflows can grow to parsec scales and are best traced by shock-excited atoms and ions such as hydrogen-recombination lines, [Sii], and [Oii]. Outflows inject momentum and energy into their surroundings and provide an important mechanism in the self-regulation of star formation. However, momentum injection rates remain uncertain with estimates providing lower bounds.

  4. Launching and propagation of protostellar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendt, Christian; Sheikhnezami, Somayeh

    2013-07-01

    We present resistive MHD simulations of jet launching and propagation using the PLUTO code. The main question we address is which kind of disks launch jets and which kind of disks do not? We investigate the jet-disk interaction applying different profiles of the disk magnetic diffusivity and derive the corresponding accretion and ejection rates for bipolar outflows. We determine the launching disk area of the fast component of protostellar jets. We further investigate numerically symmetry aspects of jet and counter jet. Finally, we present a model explaining the observationally indicated jet rotation by MHD shocks of the helical magnetic field in the propagating jet.

  5. [Predicting Spectra of Accretion Disks Around Galactic Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this grant was to construct detailed atmosphere solutions in order to predict the spectra of accretion disks around Galactic black holes. Our plan of action was to take an existing disk atmosphere code (TLUSTY, created by Ivan Hubeny) and introduce those additional physical processes necessary to make it applicable to disks of this variety. These modifications include: treating Comptonization; introducing continuous opacity due to heavy elements; incorporating line opacity due to heavy elements; adopting a disk structure that reflects readjustments due to radiation pressure effects; and injecting heat via a physically-plausible vertical distribution.

  6. TURBULENT LINEWIDTHS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: PREDICTIONS FROM NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Jacob B.; Beckwith, Kris; Armitage, Philip J.

    2011-12-10

    Submillimeter observations of protoplanetary disks now approach the acuity needed to measure the turbulent broadening of molecular lines. These measurements constrain disk angular momentum transport, and furnish evidence of the turbulent environment within which planetesimal formation takes place. We use local magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) to predict the distribution of turbulent velocities in low-mass protoplanetary disks, as a function of radius and height above the mid-plane. We model both ideal MHD disks and disks in which Ohmic dissipation results in a dead zone of suppressed turbulence near the mid-plane. Under ideal conditions, the disk mid-plane is characterized by a velocity distribution that peaks near v {approx_equal} 0.1c{sub s} (where c{sub s} is the local sound speed), while supersonic velocities are reached at z > 3H (where H is the vertical pressure scale height). Residual velocities of v Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -2} c{sub s} persist near the mid-plane in dead zones, while the surface layers remain active. Anisotropic variation of the linewidth with disk inclination is modest. We compare our MHD results to hydrodynamic simulations in which large-scale forcing is used to initiate similar turbulent velocities. We show that the qualitative trend of increasing v with height, seen in the MHD case, persists for forced turbulence and is likely a generic property of disk turbulence. Percentage level determinations of v at different heights within the disk, or spatially resolved observations that probe the inner disk containing the dead zone region, are therefore needed to test whether the MRI is responsible for protoplanetary disk turbulence.

  7. The Burst Mode of Protostellar Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, E. I.; Basu, Shantanu

    2006-10-01

    We present new numerical simulations in the thin disk approximation that characterize the burst mode of protostellar accretion. The burst mode begins upon the formation of a centrifugally balanced disk around a newly formed protostar. It comprises prolonged quiescent periods of low accretion rate (typically <~10-7 Msolar yr-1) that are punctuated by intense bursts of accretion (typically >~10-4 Msolar yr-1, with duration <~100 yr) during which most of the protostellar mass is accumulated. The accretion bursts are associated with the formation of dense protostellar/protoplanetary embryos, which are later driven onto the protostar by the gravitational torques that develop in the disk. Gravitational instability in the disk, driven by continuing infall from the envelope, is shown to be an effective means of transporting angular momentum outward and mass inward to the protostar. We show that the disk mass always remains significantly less than the central protostar's mass throughout this process. The burst phenomenon is robust enough to occur for a variety of initial values of rotation rate and frozen-in (supercritical) magnetic field and a variety of density-temperature relations. Even in cases where the bursts are nearly entirely suppressed, a moderate increase in cloud size or rotation rate can lead to vigorous burst activity. We conclude that most (if not all) protostars undergo a burst mode of evolution during their early accretion history, as inferred empirically from observations of FU Orionis variables.

  8. Disk brake squeal prediction using the ABLE algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, G.; Wu, T. W.; Bai, Z.

    2004-05-01

    Disk brake squeal noise is mainly due to unstable friction-induced vibration. A typical disk brake system includes two pads, a rotor, a caliper and a piston. In order to predict if a disk brake system will generate squeal, the finite element method (FEM) is used to simulate the system. At the contact interfaces between the pads and the rotor, the normal displacement is continuous and Coulomb's friction law is applied. Thus, the resulting FEM matrices of the dynamic system become unsymmetric, which will yield complex eigenvalues. Any complex eigenvalue with a positive real part indicates an unstable mode, which may result in squeal. In real-world applications, the FEM model of a disk brake system usually contains tens of thousands of degrees of freedom (d.o.f.s). Therefore any direct eigenvalue solver based on the dense matrix data structure cannot efficiently perform the analysis, mainly due to its huge memory requirement and long computation time. It is well known that the FEM matrices are generally sparse and hence only the non-zeros of the matrices need to be stored for eigenvalue analysis. A recently developed iterative method named ABLE is used in this paper to search for any unstable modes within a certain user-specified frequency range. The complex eigenvalue solver ABLE is based on an adaptive block Lanczos method for sparse unsymmetric matrices. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the formulation and the eigenvalues are compared to the results from the component modal synthesis (CMS).

  9. Gravitational Instabilities in Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratter, Kaitlin; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Star and planet formation are the complex outcomes of gravitational collapse and angular momentum transport mediated by protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In this review, we focus on the role of gravitational instability in this process. We begin with a brief overview of the observational evidence for massive disks that might be subject to gravitational instability and then highlight the diverse ways in which the instability manifests itself in protostellar and protoplanetary disks: the generation of spiral arms, small-scale turbulence-like density fluctuations, and fragmentation of the disk itself. We present the analytic theory that describes the linear growth phase of the instability supplemented with a survey of numerical simulations that aim to capture the nonlinear evolution. We emphasize the role of thermodynamics and large-scale infall in controlling the outcome of the instability. Despite apparent controversies in the literature, we show a remarkable level of agreement between analytic predictions and numerical results. In the next part of our review, we focus on the astrophysical consequences of the instability. We show that the disks most likely to be gravitationally unstable are young and relatively massive compared with their host star, Md/M*≥0.1. They will develop quasi-stable spiral arms that process infall from the background cloud. Although instability is less likely at later times, once infall becomes less important, the manifestations of the instability are more varied. In this regime, the disk thermodynamics, often regulated by stellar irradiation, dictates the development and evolution of the instability. In some cases the instability may lead to fragmentation into bound companions. These companions are more likely to be brown dwarfs or stars than planetary mass objects. Finally, we highlight open questions related to the development of a turbulent cascade in thin disks and the role of mode-mode coupling in setting the maximum angular

  10. Basic Characteristics and Predicted Lifetime of Stacked Volumetric Optical Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Akira; Ido, Hiroshi; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Yamanaka, Hideaki; Osawa, Seigo; Tani, Manabu; Uchida, Takeshi; Watanabe, Yutaka; Arai, Shinichi; Yoshihiro, Masafumi; Iida, Tamotsu; Awano, Hiroyuki; Ota, Norio; Yoshida, Takashi; Abe, Yukinobu; Yoshida, Kazushi

    2008-07-01

    A stacked volumetric optical disks (SVOD) system has been developed to achieve an over 1 Tbytes cartridge capacity using a commercialized drive and conventional recording layers. To confirm the reliability of thin optical disks in SVOD, several feasibility tests were conducted. The recording power margin, tilt margin and read stability of the thin optical disks were measured, and the lifetime of the thin optical disks was estimated. The results were similar to those of conventional 1.2-mm-thick optical disks regardless of the disk thickness.

  11. Protostellar angular momentum transport by spiral density waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, C.; Cassen, P.

    1985-01-01

    The application of rotational stability criteria to a specific model of star formation leads to the conclusion that the growth of stellar angular momentum is limited by its transfer to the disk. Excess accreted angular momentum can be transferred by torques connected with spiral density waves induced by even a slight protostellar triaxiality. In addition, viscous damping of the density waves is likely to cause the excess angular momentum to be deposited within a small region close to the protostar. Thus, it would be appropriate to treat that part of the growing protostellar disk beyond the outer Lindblad resonance as an accretion disk with a torque applied to its inner edge. It is noted that this situation is directly relevant to certain models of the evolution of the protosun and solar nebula.

  12. MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE IN THE FLATTENED ENVELOPE AND JET IN THE YOUNG PROTOSTELLAR SYSTEM HH 211

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Rao, Ramprasad; Hirano, Naomi; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hwang, Hsiang-Chih; Ching, Tao-Chung; Lai, Shih-Ping

    2014-12-10

    HH 211 is a young Class 0 protostellar system with a flattened envelope, a possible rotating disk, and a collimated jet. We have mapped it with the Submillimeter Array in the 341.6 GHz continuum and SiO J = 8-7 at ∼0.''6 resolution. The continuum traces the thermal dust emission in the flattened envelope and the possible disk. Linear polarization is detected in the continuum in the flattened envelope. The field lines implied from the polarization have different orientations, but they are not incompatible with current gravitational collapse models, which predict a different orientation depending on the region/distance. Also, we might have detected for the first time polarized SiO line emission in the jet due to the Goldreich-Kylafis effect. Observations at higher sensitivity are needed to determine the field morphology in the jet.

  13. Recurrent Magnetic Reconnection in Protostellar Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Mitsuru; Shibata, K.; Matsumoto, R.

    The solar X-ray satellite Yohkoh, has found extensive evidence for magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here we extend the magnetic reconnection model of solar flares to hard X-ray flares observed in star forming regions. A new ingredient is a protostellar disk which can inject helicity into the magnetosphere if the disk is threaded by the dipole magnetic field of the protostar. We carried out 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations of the disk-star interaction. The closed magnetic loops connecting the central star and the disk are twisted by the rotation of the disk. In the presence of resistivity, magnetic reconnection takes place in the current sheet formed inside the expanding loops. A hot, outgoing plasmoid and hot post flare loops are formed as a result of the reconnection. Numerical results are consistent with the observed plasma temperature (107 - 108K), the length of the flaring loop (1011 - 1012cm), and the velocity of optical jets (200 - 400km/s). We use high-resolution numerical simulations to show that multiple magnetic islands are created in the current sheet due to the growth of the tearing mode instability. The magnetic islands are ejected quasi-periodically. Intermittent flaring activity continues as long as the disk matter twists the dipole magnetic field

  14. Evaluation of actuator disk theory for predicting indirect combustion noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashish; Bodony, Daniel J.

    2013-02-01

    Indirect combustion noise is believed to be a key component of turbofan engine core noise, but existing experimental data have not been able to definitively determine its importance. Instead, actuator disk theory (ADT) as developed by Cumpsty and Marble [The interaction of entropy fluctuations with turbine blade rows; a mechanism of turbojet noise, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A 357 (1977) 323-344] is commonly used to estimate its contribution based on combustor exit conditions and changes in the mean flow across blade rows. The theory, which assumes planar propagation of acoustic, entropic, and vortical waves in the long wavelength limit, is assessed by comparing its predictions to those from two-dimensional compressible Euler calculations of idealized entropy disturbances interacting with a 1980s era NASA turbine stator. Both low-frequency planar waves of constant frequency and higher-frequency, localized entropy disturbances are considered, with the former being within ADT's range of applicability and the latter outside of it. It is found that ADT performs well for the cut-on acoustic modes generated by the entropy-blade interaction but its accuracy suffers for the cut-off acoustic modes, which could impact indirect combustion noise predictions for turbines with closely spaced blade rows.

  15. PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOWS AND RADIATIVE FEEDBACK FROM MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, Rolf; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J. E-mail: Harold.W.Yorke@jpl.nasa.gov

    2015-02-20

    We carry out radiation hydrodynamical simulations of the formation of massive stars in the super-Eddington regime including both their radiative feedback and protostellar outflows. The calculations start from a prestellar core of dusty gas and continue until the star stops growing. The accretion ends when the remnants of the core are ejected, mostly by the force of the direct stellar radiation in the polar direction and elsewhere by the reradiated thermal infrared radiation. How long the accretion persists depends on whether the protostellar outflows are present. We set the mass outflow rate to 1% of the stellar sink particle's accretion rate. The outflows open a bipolar cavity extending to the core's outer edge, through which the thermal radiation readily escapes. The radiative flux is funneled into the polar directions while the core's collapse proceeds near the equator. The outflow thus extends the ''flashlight effect'', or anisotropic radiation field, found in previous studies from the few hundred AU scale of the circumstellar disk up to the 0.1 parsec scale of the core. The core's flashlight effect allows core gas to accrete on the disk for longer, in the same way that the disk's flashlight effect allows disk gas to accrete on the star for longer. Thus although the protostellar outflows remove material near the core's poles, causing slower stellar growth over the first few free-fall times, they also enable accretion to go on longer in our calculations. The outflows ultimately lead to stars of somewhat higher mass.

  16. Prediction of a structural transition in the hard disk fluid.

    PubMed

    Piasecki, Jarosław; Szymczak, Piotr; Kozak, John J

    2010-10-28

    Starting from the second equilibrium equation in the BBGKY hierarchy under the Kirkwood superposition closure, we implement a new method for studying the asymptotic decay of correlations in the hard disk fluid in the high density regime. From our analysis and complementary numerical studies, we find that exponentially damped oscillations can occur only up to a packing fraction η(∗)∼0.718, a value that is in substantial agreement with the packing fraction, η∼0.723, believed to characterize the transition from the ordered solid phase to a dense fluid phase, as inferred from Mak's Monte Carlo simulations [Phys. Rev. E 73, 065104 (2006)]. Next, we show that the same method of analysis predicts that the exponential damping of oscillations in the hard sphere fluid becomes impossible when λ=4nπσ(3)[1+H(1)]≥34.81, where H(1) is the contact value of the correlation function, n is the number density, and σ is the sphere diameter in exact agreement with the condition, λ≥34.8, which is first reported in a numerical study of the Kirkwood equation by Kirkwood et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 18, 1040 (1950)]. Finally, we show that our method confirms the absence of any structural transition in hard rods for the entire range of densities below close packing.

  17. VARIABLE ACCRETION OUTBURSTS IN PROTOSTELLAR EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Gammie, Charles E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu E-mail: gammie@illinois.edu

    2013-02-20

    We extend the one-dimensional, two-zone models of long-term protostellar disk evolution with infall of Zhu et al. to consider the potential effects of a finite viscosity in regions where the ionization is too low for the magnetorotational instability (MRI) to operate (the {sup d}ead zone{sup )}. We find that the presence of a small but finite dead zone viscosity, as suggested by simulations of stratified disks with MRI-active outer layers, can trigger inside-out bursts of accretion, starting at or near the inner edge of the disk, instead of the previously found outside-in bursts with zero dead zone viscosity, which originate at a few AU in radius. These inside-out bursts of accretion bear a qualitative resemblance to the outburst behavior of one FU Ori object, V1515 Cyg, in contrast to the outside-in burst models, which more closely resemble the accretion events in FU Ori and V1057 Cyg. Our results suggest that the type and frequency of outbursts are potentially a probe of transport efficiency in the dead zone. Simulations must treat the inner disk regions, R {approx}< 0.5 AU, to show the detailed time evolution of accretion outbursts in general and to observe the inside-out bursts in particular.

  18. Observed & Predicted Debris Disks Structures Beyond the Reach of Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Christopher C.

    2014-06-01

    Over the last several years our theoretical understanding of debris disks has evolved significantly. A number of new computational advances, in the realms of disk modeling and data analysis, have deepened our knowledge of structures in debris disks. More than ever, we are acutely aware of the many sources of structures--be they gravitational perturbations by planets, other external perturbations, or more subtle non-perturbative sources. At the same time, new observatories, instruments, and observation strategies have provided a rich data set for debris disk theorists to test and constrain their models. I will discuss our current understanding of structures in debris disks. I will show the wide array of structures that planets can dynamically sculpt and comment on how imaging of these structures with future missions may constrain the underlying planetary system. I will also present a cautionary tale of interpreting debris disk structures as planetary perturbations, show how our appreciation of alternative sources of structures has grown, and present new methods for disentangling true density structures from projection and scattering effects.

  19. STEADY STATE DUST DISTRIBUTIONS IN DISK VORTICES: OBSERVATIONAL PREDICTIONS AND APPLICATIONS TO TRANSITIONAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lyra, Wladimir; Lin, Min-Kai E-mail: mklin924@cita.utoronto.ca

    2013-09-20

    The Atacama Large Millimeter Array has returned images of transitional disks in which large asymmetries are seen in the distribution of millimeter sized dust in the outer disk. The explanation in vogue borrows from the vortex literature and suggests that these asymmetries are the result of dust trapping in giant vortices, excited via Rossby wave instabilities at planetary gap edges. Due to the drag force, dust trapped in vortices will accumulate in the center and diffusion is needed to maintain a steady state over the lifetime of the disk. While previous work derived semi-analytical models of the process, in this paper we provide analytical steady-steady solutions. Exact solutions exist for certain vortex models. The solution is determined by the vortex rotation profile, the gas scale height, the vortex aspect ratio, and the ratio of dust diffusion to gas-dust friction. In principle, all of these quantities can be derived from observations, which would validate the model and also provide constrains on the strength of the turbulence inside the vortex core. Based on our solution, we derive quantities such as the gas-dust contrast, the trapped dust mass, and the dust contrast at the same orbital location. We apply our model to the recently imaged Oph IRS 48 system, finding values within the range of the observational uncertainties.

  20. [Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in protostellar jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, James; Hardee, Philip

    1996-01-01

    NASA grant NAG 5 2866, funded by the Astrophysics Theory Program, enabled the study the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in protostellar jets. In collaboration with co-investigator Philip Hardee, the PI derived the analytic dispersion relation for the instability in including a cooling term in the energy equation which was modeled as one of two different power laws. Numerical solutions to this dispersion relation over a wide range of perturbation frequencies, and for a variety of parameter values characterizing the jet (such as Mach number, and density ratio) were found It was found that the growth rates and wavelengths associated with unstable roots of the dispersion relation in cooling jets are significantly different than those associated with adiabatic jets, which have been studied previously. In collaboration with graduate student Jianjun Xu (funded as a research associate under this grant), hydrodynamical simulations were used to follow the growth of the instability into the nonlinear regime. It was found that asymmetric surface waves lead to large amplitude, sinusoidal distortions of the jet, and ultimately to disruption Asymmetric body waves, on the other hand, result in the formation of shocks in the jet beam in the nonlinear regime. In cooling jets, these shocks lead to the formation of dense knots and filaments of gas within the jet. For sufficiently high perturbation frequencies, however, the jet cannot respond and it remains symmetric. Applying these results to observed systems, such as the Herbig-Haro jets HH34, HH111 and HH47 which have been observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, we predicted that some of the asymmetric structures observed in these systems could be attributed to the K-H modes, but that perturbations on timescales associated with the inner disk (about 1 year) would be too rapid to cause disruption. Moreover, it was discovered that weak shock 'spurs' in the ambient gas produced by ripples in the jet surface due to nonlinear, modes of

  1. On the role of disks in the formation of stellar systems: A numerical parameter study of rapid accretion

    DOE PAGES

    Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Matzner, Christopher D.; Krumholz, Mark R.; ...

    2009-12-23

    We study rapidly accreting, gravitationally unstable disks with a series of idealized global, numerical experiments using the code ORION. Our numerical parameter study focuses on protostellar disks, showing that one can predict disk behavior and the multiplicity of the accreting star system as a function of two dimensionless parameters which compare the infall rate to the disk sound speed and orbital period. Although gravitational instabilities become strong, we find that fragmentation into binary or multiple systems occurs only when material falls in several times more rapidly than the canonical isothermal limit. The disk-to-star accretion rate is proportional to the infallmore » rate and governed by gravitational torques generated by low-m spiral modes. Furthermore, we also confirm the existence of a maximum stable disk mass: disks that exceed ~50% of the total system mass are subject to fragmentation and the subsequent formation of binary companions.« less

  2. On the role of disks in the formation of stellar systems: A numerical parameter study of rapid accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Matzner, Christopher D.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Klein, Richard I.

    2009-12-23

    We study rapidly accreting, gravitationally unstable disks with a series of idealized global, numerical experiments using the code ORION. Our numerical parameter study focuses on protostellar disks, showing that one can predict disk behavior and the multiplicity of the accreting star system as a function of two dimensionless parameters which compare the infall rate to the disk sound speed and orbital period. Although gravitational instabilities become strong, we find that fragmentation into binary or multiple systems occurs only when material falls in several times more rapidly than the canonical isothermal limit. The disk-to-star accretion rate is proportional to the infall rate and governed by gravitational torques generated by low-m spiral modes. Furthermore, we also confirm the existence of a maximum stable disk mass: disks that exceed ~50% of the total system mass are subject to fragmentation and the subsequent formation of binary companions.

  3. Predicting Susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae to Ceftriaxone and Cefotaxime by Cefuroxime and Ceftizoxime Disk Diffusion Testing

    PubMed Central

    Williams-Bouyer, Natalie; Hernandez, Antonio; Reisner, Barbara S.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, disk diffusion testing with ceftizoxime and cefuroxime was evaluated for use in predicting the susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae to ceftriaxone and cefotaxime. Of the 194 isolates included in this study, 138 were susceptible, 34 were intermediate, and 22 were resistant to cefotaxime by MIC testing; 138 isolates were susceptible, 35 were intermediate, and 21 were resistant to ceftriaxone by MIC testing. A zone of inhibition around the cefuroxime disk of ≥32 mm correctly categorized 101 of 138 isolates as susceptible to cefotaxime and ceftriaxone. A zone of inhibition around the ceftizoxime disk of ≥26 mm correctly categorized 111 of 138 isolates as susceptible to cefotaxime and 114 of 138 as susceptible to ceftriaxone. We conclude that disk diffusion can separate S. pneumoniae isolates susceptible to ceftriaxone and cefotaxime from those that are not susceptible. Isolates not falling into the susceptible category by disk diffusion require additional testing to determine the MIC. PMID:10523580

  4. revealing H{sub 2}D{sup +} depletion and compact structure in starless and protostellar cores with ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, R. K.; Di Francesco, J.; Bourke, T. L.; Caselli, P.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Pineda, J. E.; Wong, M.

    2014-12-10

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the submillimeter dust continuum and H{sub 2}D{sup +} 1{sub 10}-1{sub 11} emission toward two evolved, potentially protostellar cores within the Ophiuchus molecular cloud, Oph A SM1 and SM1N. The data reveal small-scale condensations within both cores, with mass upper limits of M ≲ 0.02 M {sub ☉} (∼20 M {sub Jup}). The SM1 condensation is consistent with a nearly symmetric Gaussian source with a width of only 37 AU. The SM1N condensation is elongated and extends 500 AU along its major axis. No evidence for substructure is seen in either source. A Jeans analysis indicates that these sources are unlikely to fragment, suggesting that both will form single stars. H{sub 2}D{sup +} is only detected toward SM1N, offset from the continuum peak by ∼150-200 AU. This offset may be due to either heating from an undetected, young, low-luminosity protostellar source or first hydrostatic core, or HD (and consequently H{sub 2}D{sup +}) depletion in the cold center of the condensation. We propose that SM1 is protostellar and that the condensation detected by ALMA is a warm (T ∼ 30-50 K) accretion disk. The less concentrated emission of the SM1N condensation suggests that it is still starless, but we cannot rule out the presence of a low-luminosity source, perhaps surrounded by a pseudodisk. These data observationally reveal the earliest stages of the formation of circumstellar accretion regions and agree with theoretical predictions that disk formation can occur very early in the star formation process, coeval with or just after the formation of a first hydrostatic core or protostar.

  5. Morphologically complex protostellar envelopes : structure and kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.

    I present an in-depth study of protostars and their surrounding envelopes of dense gas and dust, using a multitude of observational methods to reveal new details of the star formation process. I use mid-infrared imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope, combined with photometry spanning the near-infrared to millimeter wavelengths, to construct a model of the L1527 protostellar system. I modeled both the spectral energy distribution and resolved scattered light images to determine physical properties of the protostellar system. The nature of the apparent central point source in the Spitzer images was uncertain until high-resolution L-band imaging from the Gemini observatory resolved the point source into a disk in scattered light, having a radius of 200 AU. Protostellar envelopes are also often found to cast shadows against the 8 micron Galactic background in Spitzer imaging, enabling direct probes of envelope structure. The shadow images show that the dense envelopes around twenty-two Class 0 protostars are generally morphologically complex from 0.1 pc scales down to ˜1000 AU; they are often filamentary, and frequently non-axisymmetric. The observed envelope structure indicates a likely origin in turbulent cloud structure rather than a quasi-static/equilibrium formation. The complex envelope structure also may indicate an increased likelihood of fragmentation during collapse, forming close binaries. To further characterize these envelopes, I have observed them in the dense molecular gas tracers nthp and nht, both of which closely follow the 8 micron extinction morphology. The magnitude of the velocity gradients and envelope complexity on ˜10000 AU scales indicates that the velocity structure may reflect large-scale infall in addition to the often assumed rotation. Comparisons with three-dimensional filamentary and symmetric rotating collapse models reinforce the interpretation of velocities reflecting large-scale infall, showing that the structure of the envelope

  6. The flow of a thin liquid film on a stationary and rotating disk. II - Theoretical prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Faghri, A.; Hankey, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    The existing theoretical models are improved and a systematic procedure to compute the free surface flow of a thin liquid film is suggested. The solutions for axisymmetric radial flow on a stationary horizontal disk and for the disk rotating around its axis are presented. The theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental data presented in Part I of this report. The analysis shows results for both supercritical and subcritical flows and the flow structure in the vicinity of a hydraulic jump which isolates these two flow types. The detailed flow structure in a hydraulic jump was computed and shown to contain regions of separation including a 'surface roller'. The effects of surface tension are found to be important near the outer edge of the disk where the fluid experiences a free fall. At other locations, the surface tension is negligible. For a rotating disk, the frictional resistance in the angular direction is found to be as important as that in the radial direction.

  7. PROTOSTELLAR ACCRETION FLOWS DESTABILIZED BY MAGNETIC FLUX REDISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien; Li Zhiyun; Zhao Bo

    2012-09-20

    Magnetic flux redistribution lies at the heart of the problem of star formation in dense cores of molecular clouds that are magnetized to a realistic level. If all of the magnetic flux of a typical core were to be dragged into the central star, the stellar field strength would be orders of magnitude higher than the observed values. This well-known magnetic flux problem can in principle be resolved through non-ideal MHD effects. Two-dimensional (axisymmetric) calculations have shown that ambipolar diffusion, in particular, can transport magnetic flux outward relative to matter, allowing material to enter the central object without dragging the field lines along. We show through simulations that such axisymmetric protostellar accretion flows are unstable in three dimensions to magnetic interchange instability in the azimuthal direction. The instability is driven by the magnetic flux redistributed from the matter that enters the central object. It typically starts to develop during the transition from the prestellar phase of star formation to the protostellar mass accretion phase. In the latter phase, the magnetic flux is transported outward mainly through advection by strongly magnetized low-density regions that expand against the collapsing inflow. The tussle between the gravity-driven infall and magnetically driven expansion leads to a highly filamentary inner accretion flow that is more disordered than previously envisioned. The efficient outward transport of magnetic flux by advection lowers the field strength at small radii, making the magnetic braking less efficient and the formation of rotationally supported disks easier in principle. However, we find no evidence for such disks in any of our rotating collapse simulations. We conclude that the inner protostellar accretion flow is shaped to a large extent by the flux redistribution-driven magnetic interchange instability. How disks form in such an environment is unclear.

  8. Predicting Secchi disk depth from average beam attenuation in a deep, ultra-clear lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, G.L.; Hoffman, R.L.; Hargreaves, B.R.; Collier, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    We addressed potential sources of error in estimating the water clarity of mountain lakes by investigating the use of beam transmissometer measurements to estimate Secchi disk depth. The optical properties Secchi disk depth (SD) and beam transmissometer attenuation (BA) were measured in Crater Lake (Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA) at a designated sampling station near the maximum depth of the lake. A standard 20 cm black and white disk was used to measure SD. The transmissometer light source had a nearly monochromatic wavelength of 660 nm and a path length of 25 cm. We created a SD prediction model by regression of the inverse SD of 13 measurements recorded on days when environmental conditions were acceptable for disk deployment with BA averaged over the same depth range as the measured SD. The relationship between inverse SD and averaged BA was significant and the average 95% confidence interval for predicted SD relative to the measured SD was ??1.6 m (range = -4.6 to 5.5 m) or ??5.0%. Eleven additional sample dates tested the accuracy of the predictive model. The average 95% confidence interval for these sample dates was ??0.7 m (range = -3.5 to 3.8 m) or ??2.2%. The 1996-2000 time-series means for measured and predicted SD varied by 0.1 m, and the medians varied by 0.5 m. The time-series mean annual measured and predicted SD's also varied little, with intra-annual differences between measured and predicted mean annual SD ranging from -2.1 to 0.1 m. The results demonstrated that this prediction model reliably estimated Secchi disk depths and can be used to significantly expand optical observations in an environment where the conditions for standardized SD deployments are limited. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  9. Protostellar Collapse with a Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, John C.; Hsu, Juliana J.

    1995-01-01

    ' problem of protostellar cores since the predicted central accretion rates are significantly reduced relative to that of the expansion wave solution. Furthermore, our calculations indicate that star-forming cloud cores are not very tightly bound and that modest disturbances can easily result in both termination of infall and dispersal of unaccreted material.

  10. Protostellar Collapse with a Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, John C.; Hsu, Juliana J. L.

    1995-01-01

    ' problem of protostellar cores since the predicted central accretion rates are significantly reduced relative to that of the expansion wave solution. Furthermore, our calculations indicate that star-forming cloud cores are not very tightly bound and that modest disturbances can easily result in both termination of infall and dispersal of unaccreted material.

  11. Protostellar collapse in a self-gravitating sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee; Boss, Alan; Calvet, Nuria; Whitney, Barbara

    1994-01-01

    We present preliminary calculations of protostellar cloud collapse starting from an isothermal, self-gravitating gaseous layer in hydrostatic equilibrium. This gravitationally unstable layer collapses into a flattened or toroidal density distribution, even in the absence of rotation or magnetic fields. We suggest that the flat infalling envelope recently observed in HL Tau by Hayashi et al.is the result of collapse from an initially nonspherical layer. We also speculate that the later evolution of such a flattened, collapsing envelope can produce a structure similar to the 'flared disk' invoked by Kenyon and Hartmann to explain the infrared excesses of many T Tauri stars.

  12. Molecular Outflows: Explosive versus Protostellar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, Luis A.; Schmid-Burgk, Johannes; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Palau, Aina; Loinard, Laurent

    2017-02-01

    With the recent recognition of a second, distinctive class of molecular outflows, namely the explosive ones not directly connected to the accretion–ejection process in star formation, a juxtaposition of the morphological and kinematic properties of both classes is warranted. By applying the same method used in Zapata et al., and using 12CO(J = 2-1) archival data from the Submillimeter Array, we contrast two well-known explosive objects, Orion KL and DR21, to HH 211 and DG Tau B, two flows representative of classical low-mass protostellar outflows. At the moment, there are only two well-established cases of explosive outflows, but with the full availability of ALMA we expect that more examples will be found in the near future. The main results are the largely different spatial distributions of the explosive flows, consisting of numerous narrow straight filament-like ejections with different orientations and in almost an isotropic configuration, the redshifted with respect to the blueshifted components of the flows (maximally separated in protostellar, largely overlapping in explosive outflows), the very-well-defined Hubble flow-like increase of velocity with distance from the origin in the explosive filaments versus the mostly non-organized CO velocity field in protostellar objects, and huge inequalities in mass, momentum, and energy of the two classes, at least for the case of low-mass flows. Finally, all the molecular filaments in the explosive outflows point back to approximately a central position (i.e., the place where its “exciting source” was located), contrary to the bulk of the molecular material within the protostellar outflows.

  13. Gravitoturbulence in magnetized protostellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riols, A.; Latter, H.

    2016-08-01

    Gravitational instability (GI) features in several aspects of protostellar disc evolution, most notably in angular momentum transport, fragmentation, and the outbursts exemplified by FU Ori and EX Lupi systems. The outer regions of protostellar discs may also be coupled to magnetic fields, which could then modify the development of GI. To understand the basic elements of their interaction, we perform local 2D ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations with an imposed toroidal field. In the regime of moderate plasma beta, we find that the system supports a hot gravitoturbulent state, characterized by considerable magnetic energy and stress and a surprisingly large Toomre parameter Q ≳ 10. This result has potential implications for disc structure, vertical thickness, ionization, etc. Our simulations also reveal the existence of long-lived and dense `magnetic islands' or plasmoids. Lastly, we find that the presence of a magnetic field has little impact on the fragmentation criterion of the disc. Though our focus is on protostellar discs, some of our results may be relevant for the outer radii of AGN.

  14. OT1_jchiar_1: EPICS: Evolution of Protostellar Ices, Carbonates and Silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiar, J.

    2010-07-01

    Dynamical and energetic processes that occur during the evolution of a protostar have a strong influence on composition and other characteristics of the dust and these can be well probed with far-IR spectroscopy using Herschel's PACS instrument. Physical evolution of protostars, driven by gravity, is accompanied by a dramatic evolution of the dust, driven by condensation and coagulation, thermal processing by the central star, and shocks driven by protostellar jets. Mid-IR spectroscopic studies of dust in protostellar environments reveal a wide diversity of dust components ranging from volatile ices, to carbonates to refractory crystalline silicates. However, the relationship between the dust evolution and the evolution of the protostar itself has not yet been studied. The evidence suggests that ices are connected to the deepest embedded phase, while crystalline silicates may trace the presence of disks. Carbonates may be either connected to processing of ices in the envelope of YSOs or result from disk processes. In order to probe this dust evolution that accompanies protostellar evolution, we have carefully selected a sample of well-characterized protostars spanning a wide range in evolutionary age and protostellar characteristics from the deeply embedded class 0 stage through the accretion disk (class I) and protoplanetary disk (class II) phases. We will employ PACS in SED mode to study the lattice vibration phonon modes of the ices, silicates and carbonates that occur in the 51 to 220 micron region. Our proposed study will allow us to address at what stage of protostellar evolution different dust signatures become apparent. In this way, we can address the (inter)relationship of these different compounds and the processes involved in their formation. Our study directly addresses Herschel's top-level goal of studying the ingredients in the dust throughout the evolution of a protostar that will then become part of the planetesimal and planet-forming process.

  15. Signatures of MRI-driven Turbulence in Protoplanetary Disks: Predictions for ALMA Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jacob B.; Hughes, A. Meredith; Flaherty, Kevin M.; Bai, Xue-Ning; Armitage, Philip J.

    2015-08-01

    Spatially resolved observations of molecular line emission have the potential to yield unique constraints on the nature of turbulence within protoplanetary disks. Using a combination of local non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations and radiative transfer calculations, tailored to properties of the disk around HD 163296, we assess the ability of ALMA to detect turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Our local simulations show that the MRI produces small-scale turbulent velocity fluctuations that increase in strength with height above the mid-plane. For a set of simulations at different disk radii, we fit a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution to the turbulent velocity and construct a turbulent broadening parameter as a function of radius and height. We input this broadening into radiative transfer calculations to quantify observational signatures of MRI-driven disk turbulence. We find that the ratio of the peak line flux to the flux at line center is a robust diagnostic of turbulence that is only mildly degenerate with systematic uncertainties in disk temperature. For the CO(3-2) line, which we expect to probe the most magnetically active slice of the disk column, variations in the predicted peak-to-trough ratio between our most and least turbulent models span a range of approximately 15%. Additional independent constraints can be derived from the morphology of spatially resolved line profiles, and we estimate the resolution required to detect turbulence on different spatial scales. We discuss the role of lower optical depth molecular tracers, which trace regions closer to the disk mid-plane where velocities in MRI-driven models are systematically lower.

  16. SIGNATURES OF MRI-DRIVEN TURBULENCE IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: PREDICTIONS FOR ALMA OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Jacob B.; Hughes, A. Meredith; Flaherty, Kevin M.; Bai, Xue-Ning; Armitage, Philip J.

    2015-08-01

    Spatially resolved observations of molecular line emission have the potential to yield unique constraints on the nature of turbulence within protoplanetary disks. Using a combination of local non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations and radiative transfer calculations, tailored to properties of the disk around HD 163296, we assess the ability of ALMA to detect turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Our local simulations show that the MRI produces small-scale turbulent velocity fluctuations that increase in strength with height above the mid-plane. For a set of simulations at different disk radii, we fit a Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution to the turbulent velocity and construct a turbulent broadening parameter as a function of radius and height. We input this broadening into radiative transfer calculations to quantify observational signatures of MRI-driven disk turbulence. We find that the ratio of the peak line flux to the flux at line center is a robust diagnostic of turbulence that is only mildly degenerate with systematic uncertainties in disk temperature. For the CO(3–2) line, which we expect to probe the most magnetically active slice of the disk column, variations in the predicted peak-to-trough ratio between our most and least turbulent models span a range of approximately 15%. Additional independent constraints can be derived from the morphology of spatially resolved line profiles, and we estimate the resolution required to detect turbulence on different spatial scales. We discuss the role of lower optical depth molecular tracers, which trace regions closer to the disk mid-plane where velocities in MRI-driven models are systematically lower.

  17. Nucleoplasty for treating lumbar disk degenerative low back pain: an outcome prediction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liliang, Po-Chou; Lu, Kang; Liang, Cheng-Loong; Chen, Ya-Wen; Tsai, Yu-Duan; Tu, Yuan-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Nucleoplasty is a minimally invasive technique that is considered efficacious in alleviating lumbar disk degenerative low back pain (LBP). The efficacy of nucleoplasty and identified variables that can predict pain relief for nucleoplasty was reported. Patients and methods Between December 2013 and November 2015, 47 nucleoplasty procedures on 47 lumbar disks in 31 consecutive patients were performed. The outcome was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) score. Improvements of ≥50% in VAS scores were considered substantial pain relief. The variables associated with pain relief after nucleoplasty included: 1) age; 2) sex; 3) body mass index; 4) hyperintensity zone at the rear of the disk; 5) hypointensity of the disk; 6) Modic changes of the end plates; 7) spinal instability pain; and 8) discography results. Results Twenty-one patients (67.7%) experienced substantial pain relief. The most common side effects following nucleoplasty were soreness at the needle puncture site (64.5%), numbness in the lower leg (12.9%), and increased intensity of back pain (9.7%). All side effects were transient. Multivariate analysis revealed that the discography results were the most critical predictor for substantial pain relief of nucleoplasty (P=0.03). The sensitivity and specificity of discography were 92.8% and 62.5%, respectively. Conclusion Discography results could improve the success rate of nucleoplasty in the treatment of disk degenerative LBP. PMID:27826211

  18. Protostellar Luminosity Functions in 11 Diverse Star Forming Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukova, Erin; Megeath, S. T.; Gutermuth, R.; Pipher, J.; Allen, T. S.; Allen, L. E.; Myers, P. C.; Muzerolle, J.; Cygnus-X Legacy Team

    2012-01-01

    Protostars exist in a variety of environments, ranging from clouds with dispersed low-mass stars, such as Taurus, to clustered regions in clouds forming high-mass stars, like Orion. The effect these different environments have on protostar properties such as mass or luminosity is uncertain. One way to probe the effects of cloud environment on the observable property, protostar luminosity is to compare protostellar luminosity functions of clouds hosting varied populations of protostars. In this dissertation talk I will discuss the protostellar luminosity functions from 11 star forming clouds including Lupus, Chamaeleon, Ophiuchus, Perseus, Serpens, Orion, Cep OB3, Mon R2, Cygnus-X, and Maddalena's Cloud, which encompass a wide range of star forming environments. The luminosity functions are constructed from Spitzer surveys of these molecular clouds. I employ a new technique for estimating the bolometric luminosity from near and mid-IR fluxes alone and for subtracting contamination from galaxies, reddened pre-main sequence stars with disks, and edge-on disk systems. The clouds which are forming massive stars show a significant peak at low luminosity and a tail extending toward luminosities above 10 solar luminosities, while the luminosity functions of clouds which are not forming massive stars have no significant peak down to the sensitivity limit and do not exhibit the tail. I compare these luminosity functions to existing models of protostellar evolution. I also compare the luminosity functions of protostars in distributed and clustered environments, as determined using nearest-neighbor distances. In Orion and Cygnus-X, the clouds which contain the largest populations of protostars there is a clear difference in luminosity functions between protostars incrowded and distributed regions, with the luminosity function biased towards higher luminosities in more luminous regions. I will discuss the implications of these variations and the possibility that the IMF is

  19. Misalignment of Magnetic Fields and Outflows in Protostellar Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Charles L. H.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Carpenter, John M.; Crutcher, Richard M.; Fiege, Jason D.; Franzmann, Erica; Hakobian, Nicholas S.; Heiles, Carl; Houde, Martin; Hughes, A. Meredith; Jameson, Katherine; Kwon, Woojin; Lamb, James W.; Looney, Leslie W.; Matthews, Brenda C.; Mundy, Lee; Pillai, Thushara; Pound, Marc W.; Stephens, Ian W.; Tobin, John J.; Vaillancourt, John E.; Volgenau, N. H.; Wright, Melvyn C. H.

    2013-05-01

    We present results of λ1.3 mm dust-polarization observations toward 16 nearby, low-mass protostars, mapped with ~2.''5 resolution at CARMA. The results show that magnetic fields in protostellar cores on scales of ~1000 AU are not tightly aligned with outflows from the protostars. Rather, the data are consistent with scenarios where outflows and magnetic fields are preferentially misaligned (perpendicular), or where they are randomly aligned. If one assumes that outflows emerge along the rotation axes of circumstellar disks, and that the outflows have not disrupted the fields in the surrounding material, then our results imply that the disks are not aligned with the fields in the cores from which they formed.

  20. PLANET-PLANET SCATTERING IN PLANETESIMAL DISKS. II. PREDICTIONS FOR OUTER EXTRASOLAR PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Sean N.; Armitage, Philip J.; Gorelick, Noel

    2010-03-10

    We develop an idealized dynamical model to predict the typical properties of outer extrasolar planetary systems, at radii comparable to the Jupiter-to-Neptune region of the solar system. The model is based upon the hypothesis that dynamical evolution in outer planetary systems is controlled by a combination of planet-planet scattering and planetary interactions with an exterior disk of small bodies ('planetesimals'). Our results are based on 5000 long duration N-body simulations that follow the evolution of three planets from a few to 10 AU, together with a planetesimal disk containing 50 M{sub +} from 10 to 20 AU. For large planet masses (M {approx}> M{sub Sat}), the model recovers the observed eccentricity distribution of extrasolar planets. For lower-mass planets, the range of outcomes in models with disks is far greater than that which is seen in isolated planet-planet scattering. Common outcomes include strong scattering among massive planets, sudden jumps in eccentricity due to resonance crossings driven by divergent migration, and re-circularization of scattered low-mass planets in the outer disk. We present the distributions of the eccentricity and inclination that result, and discuss how they vary with planet mass and initial system architecture. In agreement with other studies, we find that the currently observed eccentricity distribution (derived primarily from planets at a {approx}< 3 AU) is consistent with isolated planet-planet scattering. We explain the observed mass dependence-which is in the opposite sense from that predicted by the simplest scattering models-as a consequence of strong correlations between planet masses in the same system. At somewhat larger radii, initial planetary mass correlations and disk effects can yield similar modest changes to the eccentricity distribution. Nonetheless, strong damping of eccentricity for low-mass planets at large radii appears to be a secure signature of the dynamical influence of disks. Radial velocity

  1. Direct detection of a magnetic field in the innermost regions of an accretion disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, Jean-François; Paletou, Fréderic; Bouvier, Jérome; Ferreira, Jonathan

    2005-11-01

    Models predict that magnetic fields play a crucial role in the physics of astrophysical accretion disks and their associated winds and jets. For example, the rotation of the disk twists around the rotation axis the initially vertical magnetic field, which responds by slowing down the plasma in the disk and by causing it to fall towards the central star. The magnetic energy flux produced in this process points away from the disk, pushing the surface plasma outwards, leading to a wind from the disk and sometimes a collimated jet. But these predictions have hitherto not been supported by observations. Here we report the direct detection of the magnetic field in the core of the protostellar accretion disk FU Orionis. The surface field reaches strengths of about 1kG close to the centre of the disk, and it includes a significant azimuthal component, in good agreement with recent models. But we find that the field is very filamentary and slows down the disk plasma much more than models predict, which may explain why FU Ori fails to collimate its wind into a jet.

  2. Direct detection of a magnetic field in the innermost regions of an accretion disk.

    PubMed

    Donati, Jean-François; Paletou, Fréderic; Bouvier, Jérome; Ferreira, Jonathan

    2005-11-24

    Models predict that magnetic fields play a crucial role in the physics of astrophysical accretion disks and their associated winds and jets. For example, the rotation of the disk twists around the rotation axis the initially vertical magnetic field, which responds by slowing down the plasma in the disk and by causing it to fall towards the central star. The magnetic energy flux produced in this process points away from the disk, pushing the surface plasma outwards, leading to a wind from the disk and sometimes a collimated jet. But these predictions have hitherto not been supported by observations. Here we report the direct detection of the magnetic field in the core of the protostellar accretion disk FU Orionis. The surface field reaches strengths of about 1 kG close to the centre of the disk, and it includes a significant azimuthal component, in good agreement with recent models. But we find that the field is very filamentary and slows down the disk plasma much more than models predict, which may explain why FU Ori fails to collimate its wind into a jet.

  3. The deterministic prediction of failure of low pressure steam turbine disks

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chun; Macdonald, D.D.

    1993-05-01

    Localized corrosion phenomena, including pitting corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and corrosion fatigue, are the principal causes of corrosion-induced damage in electric power generating facilities and typically result in more than 50% of the unscheduled outages. Prediction of damage, so that repairs and inspections can be made during scheduled outages, could have an enormous impact on the economics of electric power generation. To date, prediction of corrosion damage has been made on the basis of empirical/statistical methods that have proven to be insufficiently robust and accurate to form the basis for the desired inspection/repair protocol. In this paper, we describe a deterministic method for predicting localized corrosion damage. We have used the method to illustrate how pitting corrosion initiates stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for low pressure steam turbine disks downstream of the Wilson line, where a thin condensed liquid layer exists on the steel disk surfaces. Our calculations show that the SCC initiation and propagation are sensitive to the oxygen content of the steam, the environment in the thin liquid condensed layer, and the stresses that the disk experiences in service.

  4. Fragment Production and Survival in Irradiated Disks: A Comprehensive Cooling Criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.

    2011-10-01

    Accretion disks that become gravitationally unstable can fragment into stellar or substellar companions. The formation and survival of these fragments depends on the precarious balance between self-gravity, internal pressure, tidal shearing, and rotation. Disk fragmentation depends on two key factors: (1) whether the disk can get to the fragmentation boundary of Q = 1 and (2) whether fragments can survive for many orbital periods. Previous work suggests that to reach Q = 1, and have fragments survive, a disk must cool on an orbital timescale. Here we show that disks heated primarily by external irradiation always satisfy the standard cooling time criterion. Thus, even though irradiation heats disks and makes them more stable in general, once they reach the fragmentation boundary, they fragment more easily. We derive a new cooling criterion that determines fragment survival and calculate a pressure-modified Hill radius, which sets the maximum size of pressure-supported objects in a Keplerian disk. We conclude that fragmentation in protostellar disks might occur at slightly smaller radii than previously thought and recommend tests for future simulations that will better predict the outcome of fragmentation in real disks.

  5. EXor Outbursts from Disk Amplification of Stellar Magnetic Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, Philip J.

    2016-12-01

    EXor outbursts—moderate-amplitude disk accretion events observed in Class I and Class II protostellar sources—have timescales and amplitudes that are consistent with the viscous accumulation and release of gas in the inner disk near the dead zone boundary. We suggest that outbursts are indirectly triggered by stellar dynamo cycles, via poloidal magnetic flux that diffuses radially outward through the disk. Interior to the dead zone the strength of the net field modulates the efficiency of angular momentum transport by the magnetorotational instability. In the dead zone changes in the polarity of the net field may lead to stronger outbursts because of the dominant role of the Hall effect in this region of the disk. At the level of simple estimates we show that changes to kG-strength stellar fields could stimulate disk outbursts on 0.1 au scales, though this optimistic conclusion depends upon the uncertain efficiency of net flux transport through the inner disk. The model predicts a close association between observational tracers of stellar magnetic activity and EXor events.

  6. Large Scale Three-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamics Simulations of Protostellar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Kai; Staff, J. E.; Niebergal, B. P.; Pudritz, R. E.; Ouyed, R.

    2007-05-01

    High resolution spectra of protostellar jets obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during the past few years, especially those near the jet base, have made it possible for a direct comparison with jet simulation results. Using Zeus-MP code, we extend our three-dimensional time-dependent calculations of such jets launched from the surface of Keplerian accretion disks to physical scales that are probed by the HST observations. We produce velocity channel maps and other diagnostics of our jet simulations that can be directly compared with the observations. In particular, the observations of jet rotation and velocity structure on these larger scales (50 AU) can be used to constrain the physics of the disk wind at its source, including information about the magnetic field configuration on the disk as well as the mass loading of the jet by the underlying accretion disk. Our approach will ultimately allow the observations to put strong constraints on the nature of the central engine. This work is supported by a grant from NSERC. K.C. acknowledges support from a CITA National Fellowship.

  7. Pericenter precession induced by a circumstellar disk on the orbit of massive bodies: comparison between analytical predictions and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, A.; Marzari, F.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Planetesimals and planets embedded in a circumstellar disk are dynamically perturbed by the disk gravity. It causes an apsidal line precession at a rate that depends on the disk density profile and on the distance of the massive body from the star. Aims: Different analytical models are exploited to compute the precession rate of the perihelion ϖ˙. We compare them to verify their equivalence, in particular after analytical manipulations performed to derive handy formulas, and test their predictions against numerical models in some selected cases. Methods: The theoretical precession rates were computed with analytical algorithms found in the literature using the Mathematica symbolic code, while the numerical simulations were performed with the hydrodynamical code FARGO. Results: For low-mass bodies (planetesimals) the analytical approaches described in Binney & Tremaine (2008, Galactic Dynamics, p. 96), Ward (1981, Icarus, 47, 234), and Silsbee & Rafikov (2015a, ApJ, 798, 71) are equivalent under the same initial conditions for the disk in terms of mass, density profile, and inner and outer borders. They also match the numerical values computed with FARGO away from the outer border of the disk reasonably well. On the other hand, the predictions of the classical Mestel disk (Mestel 1963, MNRAS, 126, 553) for disks with p = 1 significantly depart from the numerical solution for radial distances beyond one-third of the disk extension because of the underlying assumption of the Mestel disk is that the outer disk border is equal to infinity. For massive bodies such as terrestrial and giant planets, the agreement of the analytical approaches is progressively poorer because of the changes in the disk structure that are induced by the planet gravity. For giant planets the precession rate changes sign and is higher than the modulus of the theoretical value by a factor ranging from 1.5 to 1.8. In this case, the correction of the formula proposed by Ward (1981) to

  8. DISK FORMATION ENABLED BY ENHANCED RESISTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang Hsien; Li Zhiyun

    2010-06-20

    Disk formation in magnetized cloud cores is hindered by magnetic braking. Previous work has shown that for realistic levels of core magnetization, the magnetic field suppresses the formation of rotationally supported disks during the protostellar mass accretion phase of low-mass star formation both in the ideal MHD limit and in the presence of ambipolar diffusion for typical rates of cosmic-ray ionization. Additional effects, such as ohmic dissipation, the Hall effect, and protostellar outflow, are needed to weaken the magnetic braking and enable the formation of persistent, rotationally supported, protostellar disks. In this paper, we first demonstrate that the classic microscopic resistivity is not large enough to enable disk formation by itself. We then experiment with a set of enhanced values for the resistivity in the range {eta} = 10{sup 17}-10{sup 22} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. We find that a value of order 10{sup 19} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} is needed to enable the formation of a 10{sup 2} AU scale Keplerian disk; the value depends somewhat on the degree of core magnetization. The required resistivity is a few orders of magnitude larger than the classic microscopic values. Whether it can be achieved naturally during protostellar collapse remains to be determined.

  9. Studies of Young, Star-forming Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Jaehan

    2017-08-01

    . When a planet forms in a disk, the gravitational interaction between the planet and disk can create structures, such as spiral arms and gaps. In Chapter 5, I compared the disk structures formed by planetary companions in numerical simulations with the observed structures in the disk surrounding an 8 Myr-old Herbig Ae star SAO 206462. Based on the experiments, I made predictions for the mass and position of a currently unrevealed planet, which can help guide future observations to search for more conclusive evidence for the existence of a planetary companion in the system. In Chapter 6, I showed for the first time in global simulation domains that spiral waves, driven for instance by planets or gravitational instability, can be unstable due to resonant interactions with inertial modes, breaking into turbulence. In Chapter 7, I showed that the spiral wave instability operates on the waves launched by planets and that the resulting turbulence can significantly stir up solid particles from the disk midplane. The stirring of solid particles can have influences on the observation appearance of the parent disk and on the subsequent assembly of planetary bodies in the disk. Finally, in Chapter 8, I investigated the dispersal of circumstellar disks via photoevaporative winds, finding that the photoevaporative loss alone, coupled with a range of initial angular momenta of protostellar clouds, can explain the observed decline of the disk frequency with increasing age. The findings and future possibilities are summarized in Chapter 9.

  10. The Infrared Reflection Nebula Around the Protostellar System in S140

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harker, D.; Bregman, J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Temi, P.; Rank, D.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the protostellar system in S140 at 2.2, 3.1 and 3.45 microns using a 128x128 InSb array at the Lick Observatory 3m telescope. Besides the protostellar sources, the data reveal a bright infrared reflection nebula. We have developed a simple model of this region and derived the physical conditions. IRSI is surrounded by a dense dusty disk viewed almost edge-on. Photons leaking out through the poles illuminate almost directly north and south the inner edge of a surrounding shell of molecular gas, Analysis of the observed colors and intensities of the NIR light, using Mie scattering theory, reveal that the dust grains in the molecular cloud are somewhat larger than in the general diffuse interstellar medium. Moreover, the incident light has a "cool" color temperature, approximately equals 800K, and likely originates from a dust photosphere close to the protostar. Finally, we find little H2O ice associated with the dusty disk around IRSI. Most of the 3.1 micron ice extinction arises instead from cool intervening molecular cloud material. We have compared our infrared dust observations with millimeter and radio observations of molecular gas associated with this region. The large scale structure observable in the molecular gas is indicative of the interaction between the protostellar wind and the surrounding molecular cloud rather than the geometry of the protostellar disk. We conclude that S140 is a young blister formed by this outflow on the side of a molecular cloud and viewed edge-on.

  11. The Infrared Reflection Nebula Around the Protostellar System in S140

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harker, D.; Bregman, J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Temi, P.; Rank, D.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the protostellar system in S140 at 2.2, 3.1 and 3.45 microns using a 128x128 InSb array at the Lick Observatory 3m telescope. Besides the protostellar sources, the data reveal a bright infrared reflection nebula. We have developed a simple model of this region and derived the physical conditions. IRSI is surrounded by a dense dusty disk viewed almost edge-on. Photons leaking out through the poles illuminate almost directly north and south the inner edge of a surrounding shell of molecular gas, Analysis of the observed colors and intensities of the NIR light, using Mie scattering theory, reveal that the dust grains in the molecular cloud are somewhat larger than in the general diffuse interstellar medium. Moreover, the incident light has a "cool" color temperature, approximately equals 800K, and likely originates from a dust photosphere close to the protostar. Finally, we find little H2O ice associated with the dusty disk around IRSI. Most of the 3.1 micron ice extinction arises instead from cool intervening molecular cloud material. We have compared our infrared dust observations with millimeter and radio observations of molecular gas associated with this region. The large scale structure observable in the molecular gas is indicative of the interaction between the protostellar wind and the surrounding molecular cloud rather than the geometry of the protostellar disk. We conclude that S140 is a young blister formed by this outflow on the side of a molecular cloud and viewed edge-on.

  12. Protosteller Disks Under the Influence of Winds and UV Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H. W.

    2003-01-01

    Star formation and the creation of protostellar disks generally occur in a crowded environment. Nearby young stars and protostars can influence the disks of their closets neighbors by a combination of outflows and hard radiation. The central stars themselves can have a stellar wind and may produce sufficient UV and X-ray to ultimately destroy their surrounding disks. Here we describe the results of numerical simulations of the influence that an external UV source and a central star's wind can have on its circumstellar disk. The numerical method (axial symmetry assumed) is described elsewhere. We find that protostellar disks will be destroyed on a relatively short time scale ( 10(sup 5)yr) unless they are well shielded from O-stars. Initially isotropic T-Tauri winds do not significantly influence their disks, but instead are focused toward the rotation axis by the disk wind from photoevaporation.

  13. Protosteller Disks Under the Influence of Winds and UV Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H. W.

    2003-01-01

    Star formation and the creation of protostellar disks generally occur in a crowded environment. Nearby young stars and protostars can influence the disks of their closets neighbors by a combination of outflows and hard radiation. The central stars themselves can have a stellar wind and may produce sufficient UV and X-ray to ultimately destroy their surrounding disks. Here we describe the results of numerical simulations of the influence that an external UV source and a central star's wind can have on its circumstellar disk. The numerical method (axial symmetry assumed) is described elsewhere. We find that protostellar disks will be destroyed on a relatively short time scale ( 10(sup 5)yr) unless they are well shielded from O-stars. Initially isotropic T-Tauri winds do not significantly influence their disks, but instead are focused toward the rotation axis by the disk wind from photoevaporation.

  14. The VLA Nascent Disk and Multiplicity Survey (VANDAM): Resolved Candidate Disks around Class 0 and I Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura-Cox, Dominique; Harris, Robert J.; Tobin, John J.; Looney, Leslie; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Dunham, Michael; Sadavoy, Sarah; Perez, Laura M.; Melis, Carl

    2016-01-01

    The properties of young protostellar disks, particularly Class 0 disks, are not well studied observationally, and their expected properties are controversial. In particular, there is debate about whether or not the earliest disks are large and massive and about when and how disks form. To characterize the properties of the youngest disks and binaries we are conducting the VLA Nascent Disk and Multiplicity survey (VANDAM) toward all known protostars in the Perseus molecular cloud (d ~ 230 pc). The survey is the largest and most complete high-resolution millimeter/centimeter wavelength survey of protostellar disks and binaries. We present the dust emission results toward a sample of ~15 protostellar disk candidates around Class 0 and I sources in the Perseus molecular cloud from the VANDAM survey with ~0.05'' or 12 AU resolution. We have begun to confirm the disk candidacy of these sources by fitting the Ka-band 8 mm dust-continuum data in the uv-plane to a simple, parametrized model based on the Shakura-Sunyaev disk model. The seven candidate disks this analysis has been performed on are well-fit by the disk shaped model, and have estimated masses from the measured flux in agreement with masses of previously known disks. The inner-disk surface densities of the VANDAM candidate disks have shallower density profiles compared to disks around more evolved Class II systems. The best-fit model radii of the seven early-result candidate disks are R > 10 AU; at 8 mm, the radii reflect lower limits on the disk size since dust continuum emission is tied to grain size and large grains radially drift inwards. These disks, if confirmed kinematically, are inconsistent with theoretical models where the disk size is limited by strong magnetic braking to < 10 AU at early times.

  15. Chemistry in low-mass protostellar and protoplanetary regions

    PubMed Central

    van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2006-01-01

    When interstellar clouds collapse to form new stars and planets, the surrounding gas and dust become part of the infalling envelopes and rotating disks, thus providing the basic material from which new solar systems are formed. Instrumentation to probe the chemistry in low-mass star-forming regions has only recently become available. The results of a systematic program to study the abundances in solar-mass protostellar and protoplanetary regions are presented. Surveys at submillimeter and infrared wavelengths reveal a rich chemistry, including simple and complex (organic) gases, ices, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and silicates. Each of these species traces different aspects of the physical and chemical state of the objects as they evolve from deeply embedded protostars to pre-main sequence stars with planet-forming disks. Quantitative information on temperatures, densities, and abundances is obtained through molecular excitation and radiative transfer models as well as from analysis of solid-state line profiles. The chemical characteristics are dominated by freeze-out in the coldest regions and ice evaporation in the warmer zones. In the surface layers of disks, UV radiation controls the chemistry. The importance of complementary laboratory experiments and calculations to obtain basic molecular data is emphasized. PMID:16894165

  16. PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, Masahiro N.

    2014-11-20

    A protostellar jet and outflow are calculated for ∼270 yr following the protostar formation using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulation, in which both the protostar and its parent cloud are spatially resolved. A high-velocity (∼100 km s{sup –1}) jet with good collimation is driven near the disk's inner edge, while a low-velocity (≲ 10 km s{sup –1}) outflow with a wide opening angle appears in the outer-disk region. The high-velocity jet propagates into the low-velocity outflow, forming a nested velocity structure in which a narrow high-velocity flow is enclosed by a wide low-velocity flow. The low-velocity outflow is in a nearly steady state, while the high-velocity jet appears intermittently. The time-variability of the jet is related to the episodic accretion from the disk onto the protostar, which is caused by gravitational instability and magnetic effects such as magnetic braking and magnetorotational instability. Although the high-velocity jet has a large kinetic energy, the mass and momentum of the jet are much smaller than those of the low-velocity outflow. A large fraction of the infalling gas is ejected by the low-velocity outflow. Thus, the low-velocity outflow actually has a more significant effect than the high-velocity jet in the very early phase of the star formation.

  17. Initiation of bipolar flows by magnetic field twisting in protostellar nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, William I.; Newman, Alice L.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    1992-01-01

    A model is developed for the time-dependent twisting of an initial poloidal magnetic field threading a conducting protostellar disk. The region outside the disk is assumed to be filled, at least initially, with a low-density, force-free 'coronal' plasma. The differential rotation of the disk acts to twist the B field in the space outside the disk thus generating a toroidal magnetic field. In turn, the toroidal field acts to pinch the plasma and the poloidal field toward the system axis producing a collimated channel. This channel could facilitate the formation of bipolar flows. The magnitude and duration of the field twisting is expected to be limited by magnetohydrodynamic instability.

  18. Infall-driven protostellar accretion and the solution to the luminosity problem

    SciTech Connect

    Padoan, Paolo; Haugbølle, Troels; Nordlund, Åke

    2014-12-10

    We investigate the role of mass infall in the formation and evolution of protostars. To avoid ad hoc initial and boundary conditions, we consider the infall resulting self-consistently from modeling the formation of stellar clusters in turbulent molecular clouds. We show that infall rates in turbulent clouds are comparable to accretion rates inferred from protostellar luminosities or measured in pre-main-sequence stars. They should not be neglected in modeling the luminosity of protostars and the evolution of disks, even after the embedded protostellar phase. We find large variations of infall rates from protostar to protostar, and large fluctuations during the evolution of individual protostars. In most cases, the infall rate is initially of order 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, and may either decay rapidly in the formation of low-mass stars, or remain relatively large when more massive stars are formed. The simulation reproduces well the observed characteristic values and scatter of protostellar luminosities and matches the observed protostellar luminosity function. The luminosity problem is therefore solved once realistic protostellar infall histories are accounted for, with no need for extreme accretion episodes. These results are based on a simulation of randomly driven magnetohydrodynamic turbulence on a scale of 4 pc, including self-gravity, adaptive-mesh refinement to a resolution of 50 AU, and accreting sink particles. The simulation yields a low star formation rate, consistent with the observations, and a mass distribution of sink particles consistent with the observed stellar initial mass function during the whole duration of the simulation, forming nearly 1300 sink particles over 3.2 Myr.

  19. Do siblings always form and evolve simultaneously? Testing the coevality of multiple protostellar systems through SEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, N. M.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Tobin, J. J.; Fedele, D.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Multiplicity is common in field stars and among protostellar systems. Models suggest two paths of formation: turbulent fragmentation and protostellar disk fragmentation. Aims: We attempt to find whether or not the coevality frequency of multiple protostellar systems can help to better understand their formation mechanism. The coevality frequency is determined by constraining the relative evolutionary stages of the components in a multiple system. Methods: Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for known multiple protostars in Perseus were constructed from literature data. Herschel PACS photometric maps were used to sample the peak of the SED for systems with separations ≥7″, a crucial aspect in determining the evolutionary stage of a protostellar system. Inclination effects and the surrounding envelope and outflows were considered to decouple source geometry from evolution. This together with the shape and derived properties from the SED was used to determine each system's coevality as accurately as possible. SED models were used to examine the frequency of non-coevality that is due to geometry. Results: We find a non-coevality frequency of 33 ± 10% from the comparison of SED shapes of resolved multiple systems. Other source parameters suggest a somewhat lower frequency of non-coevality. The frequency of apparent non-coevality that is due to random inclination angle pairings of model SEDs is 17 ± 0.5%. Observations of the outflow of resolved multiple systems do not suggest significant misalignments within multiple systems. Effects of unresolved multiples on the SED shape are also investigated. Conclusions: We find that one-third of the multiple protostellar systems sampled here are non-coeval, which is more than expected from random geometric orientations. The other two-thirds are found to be coeval. Higher order multiples show a tendency to be non-coeval. The frequency of non-coevality found here is most likely due to formation and enhanced by

  20. Complex Organics in Embedded Protostellar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdovskaya, Maria N.; Tan, J. C.; Zhang, Y.; Visser, R.

    2017-06-01

    The results from physicochemical simulations will be shown, which model the spatial distribution within protostellar envelopes of solid and gaseous complex organic molecules. For the case of high-mass protostars, the physical model of protostellar core evolution based on the Turbulent Core Model, is adopted and combined with a large gas-grain chemical network. For the case of low-mass protostars, a dynamic semi-analytic collapse model is used in conjunction with the same chemical set up. Hereby, high-mass star-forming regions are contrasted with the low-mass regime.

  1. A Model for Infall-Outflow Interactions in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velusamy, W. Langer T.

    1997-01-01

    Recently we have shown(sup 1,2) from (sup 12)CO and C(sup 18)O OVRO-MMA observations evidence of infall-outflow interactions in the Young Stellar Object IRS1 in B5. We present new data obtained with the OVRO-MMA in (sup 13)CO(2-1) and (1-0) to trace the full extent of this infall-outflow interaction region.

  2. Consistent SPH Simulations of Protostellar Collapse and Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbasov, Ruslan; Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Cruz, Fidel; Klapp, Jaime; Ramírez-Velasquez, José M.

    2017-02-01

    We study the consistency and convergence of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) as a function of the interpolation parameters, namely the number of particles N, the number of neighbors n, and the smoothing length h, using simulations of the collapse and fragmentation of protostellar rotating cores. The calculations are made using a modified version of the GADGET-2 code that employs an improved scheme for the artificial viscosity and power-law dependences of n and h on N, as was recently proposed by Zhu et al., which comply with the combined limit N\\to ∞ , h\\to 0, and n\\to ∞ with n/N\\to 0 for full SPH consistency as the domain resolution is increased. We apply this realization to the “standard isothermal test case” in the variant calculated by Burkert & Bodenheimer and the Gaussian cloud model of Boss to investigate the response of the method to adaptive smoothing lengths in the presence of large density and pressure gradients. The degree of consistency is measured by tracking how well the estimates of the consistency integral relations reproduce their continuous counterparts. In particular, C 0 and C 1 particle consistency is demonstrated, meaning that the calculations are close to second-order accuracy. As long as n is increased with N, mass resolution also improves as the minimum resolvable mass {M}\\min ∼ {n}-1. This aspect allows proper calculation of small-scale structures in the flow associated with the formation and instability of protostellar disks around the growing fragments, which are seen to develop a spiral structure and fragment into close binary/multiple systems as supported by recent observations.

  3. Reprocessing in Luminous Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, K. Robbins; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We develop and investigate a procedure that accounts for disk reprocessing of photons that originate in the disk itself. Surface temperatures and simple, black body spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of protostellar disks are calculated. In disks that flare with radius, reprocessing of stellar photons results in temperature profiles considerably shallower than r(sup -3/4). Including the disk as a radiation source (as in the case of actively secreting disks) along with the stellar source further flattens the temperature profile. Disks that flare strongly near the star and then smoothly curve over and become shadowed at some distance ("decreasing curvature" disks) exhibit nearly power-law temperature profiles which result in power-law infrared SEDs with slopes in agreement with typical observations of young stellar objects. Disk models in which the photospheric thickness is controlled by the local opacity and in which the temperature decreases with radius naturally show this shape. Uniformly flaring models do not match observations as well; progressively stronger reprocessing at larger radii leads to SEDs that flatten toward the infrared or even have a second peak at the wavelength corresponding (through the Wien law) to the temperature of the outer edge of the disk. In FU Orionis outbursting systems, the dominant source of energy is the disk itself. The details of the reprocessing depend sensitively on the assumed disk shape and emitted temperature profile. The thermal instability outburst models of Bell Lin reproduce trends in the observed SEDs of Fuors with T varies as r(sup -3/4) in the inner disk (r approx. less than 0.25au corresponding to lambda approx. less than 10 microns) and T varies as r(sup -1/2) in the outer disk. Surface irradiation during outburst and quiescence is compared in the region of planet formation (1 - 10 au). The contrast between the two phases is diminished by the importance of the reprocessing of photons from the relatively high mass

  4. Reprocessing in Luminous Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, K. Robbins; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We develop and investigate a procedure that accounts for disk reprocessing of photons that originate in the disk itself. Surface temperatures and simple, black body spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of protostellar disks are calculated. In disks that flare with radius, reprocessing of stellar photons results in temperature profiles considerably shallower than r(sup -3/4). Including the disk as a radiation source (as in the case of actively secreting disks) along with the stellar source further flattens the temperature profile. Disks that flare strongly near the star and then smoothly curve over and become shadowed at some distance ("decreasing curvature" disks) exhibit nearly power-law temperature profiles which result in power-law infrared SEDs with slopes in agreement with typical observations of young stellar objects. Disk models in which the photospheric thickness is controlled by the local opacity and in which the temperature decreases with radius naturally show this shape. Uniformly flaring models do not match observations as well; progressively stronger reprocessing at larger radii leads to SEDs that flatten toward the infrared or even have a second peak at the wavelength corresponding (through the Wien law) to the temperature of the outer edge of the disk. In FU Orionis outbursting systems, the dominant source of energy is the disk itself. The details of the reprocessing depend sensitively on the assumed disk shape and emitted temperature profile. The thermal instability outburst models of Bell Lin reproduce trends in the observed SEDs of Fuors with T varies as r(sup -3/4) in the inner disk (r approx. less than 0.25au corresponding to lambda approx. less than 10 microns) and T varies as r(sup -1/2) in the outer disk. Surface irradiation during outburst and quiescence is compared in the region of planet formation (1 - 10 au). The contrast between the two phases is diminished by the importance of the reprocessing of photons from the relatively high mass

  5. Spectroscopic diagnostics of organic chemistry in the protostellar environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, S. B.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Kuan, Y. J.

    2001-01-01

    A combination of astronomical observations, laboratory studies, and theoretical modelling is necessary to determine the organic chemistry of dense molecular clouds. We present spectroscopic evidence for the composition and evolution of organic molecules in protostellar environments. The principal reaction pathways to complex molecule formation by catalysis on dust grains and by reactions in the interstellar gas are described. Protostellar cores, where warming of dust has induced evaporation of icy grain mantles, are excellent sites in which to study the interaction between gas phase and grain-surface chemistries. We investigate the link between organics that are observed as direct products of grain surface reactions and those which are formed by secondary gas phase reactions of evaporated surface products. Theory predicts observable correlations between specific interstellar molecules, and also which new organics are viable for detection. We discuss recent infrared observations obtained with the Infrared Space Observatory, laboratory studies of organic molecules, theories of molecule formation, and summarise recent radioastronomical searches for various complex molecules such as ethers, azaheterocyclic compounds, and amino acids.

  6. Spectroscopic diagnostics of organic chemistry in the protostellar environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, S. B.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Kuan, Y. J.

    2001-01-01

    A combination of astronomical observations, laboratory studies, and theoretical modelling is necessary to determine the organic chemistry of dense molecular clouds. We present spectroscopic evidence for the composition and evolution of organic molecules in protostellar environments. The principal reaction pathways to complex molecule formation by catalysis on dust grains and by reactions in the interstellar gas are described. Protostellar cores, where warming of dust has induced evaporation of icy grain mantles, are excellent sites in which to study the interaction between gas phase and grain-surface chemistries. We investigate the link between organics that are observed as direct products of grain surface reactions and those which are formed by secondary gas phase reactions of evaporated surface products. Theory predicts observable correlations between specific interstellar molecules, and also which new organics are viable for detection. We discuss recent infrared observations obtained with the Infrared Space Observatory, laboratory studies of organic molecules, theories of molecule formation, and summarise recent radioastronomical searches for various complex molecules such as ethers, azaheterocyclic compounds, and amino acids.

  7. Dynamo magnetic field-induced angular momentum transport in protostellar nebulae - The 'minimum mass' protosolar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Levy, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic torques can produce angular momentum redistribution in protostellar nebulas. Dynamo magnetic fields can be generated in differentially rotating and turbulent nebulas and can be the source of magnetic torques that transfer angular momentum from a protostar to a disk, as well as redistribute angular momentum within a disk. A magnetic field strength of 100-1000 G is needed to transport the major part of a protostar's angular momentum into a surrounding disk in a time characteristic of star formation, thus allowing formation of a solar-system size protoplanetary nebula in the usual 'minimum-mass' model of the protosolar nebula. This paper examines the possibility that a dynamo magnetic field could have induced the needed angular momentum transport from the proto-Sun to the protoplanetary nebula.

  8. Dynamo magnetic field-induced angular momentum transport in protostellar nebulae - The 'minimum mass' protosolar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Levy, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic torques can produce angular momentum redistribution in protostellar nebulas. Dynamo magnetic fields can be generated in differentially rotating and turbulent nebulas and can be the source of magnetic torques that transfer angular momentum from a protostar to a disk, as well as redistribute angular momentum within a disk. A magnetic field strength of 100-1000 G is needed to transport the major part of a protostar's angular momentum into a surrounding disk in a time characteristic of star formation, thus allowing formation of a solar-system size protoplanetary nebula in the usual 'minimum-mass' model of the protosolar nebula. This paper examines the possibility that a dynamo magnetic field could have induced the needed angular momentum transport from the proto-Sun to the protoplanetary nebula.

  9. Towards Bayesian Machine Learning for Estimating Parameters of Accretion Disk Models for SPH Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Amit; Montgomery, Michele; Wiegand, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Accretion disks are ubiquitous in Active Galactic Nuclei, in protostellar systems forming protoplanets, and in close binary star systems such as X-ray binaries, Cataclysmic Variables, and Algols, for example. Observations such as disk tilt are found in all of these different accreting system types, suggesting a common physics must be present. To understand the common connections between these different system types, which can help us understand their unique evolutions, we need to better understand the physics of accretion. For example, viscosity is typically a constant value in the disk of a system that is in a specific state such as a quiescent state. However, viscosity can't be constant throughout the disk, especially at the boundaries. To learn more about viscosity and other common parameters in these disk, we use Bayesian Inference and Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques to make predictions of events to come in the numerical simulations of these accreting disks. In this work, we present our techniques and initial findings.

  10. An Evolutionary Algorithm for Feature Subset Selection in Hard Disk Drive Failure Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhasin, Harpreet

    2011-01-01

    Hard disk drives are used in everyday life to store critical data. Although they are reliable, failure of a hard disk drive can be catastrophic, especially in applications like medicine, banking, air traffic control systems, missile guidance systems, computer numerical controlled machines, and more. The use of Self-Monitoring, Analysis and…

  11. Predictions for shepherding planets in scattered light images of debris disks

    SciTech Connect

    Rodigas, Timothy J.; Hinz, Philip M.; Malhotra, Renu

    2014-01-01

    Planets can affect debris disk structure by creating gaps, sharp edges, warps, and other potentially observable signatures. However, there is currently no simple way for observers to deduce a disk-shepherding planet's properties from the observed features of the disk. Here we present a single equation that relates a shepherding planet's maximum mass to the debris ring's observed width in scattered light, along with a procedure to estimate the planet's eccentricity and minimum semimajor axis. We accomplish this by performing dynamical N-body simulations of model systems containing a star, a single planet, and an exterior disk of parent bodies and dust grains to determine the resulting debris disk properties over a wide range of input parameters. We find that the relationship between planet mass and debris disk width is linear, with increasing planet mass producing broader debris rings. We apply our methods to five imaged debris rings to constrain the putative planet masses and orbits in each system. Observers can use our empirically derived equation as a guide for future direct imaging searches for planets in debris disk systems. In the fortuitous case of an imaged planet orbiting interior to an imaged disk, the planet's maximum mass can be estimated independent of atmospheric models.

  12. An Evolutionary Algorithm for Feature Subset Selection in Hard Disk Drive Failure Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhasin, Harpreet

    2011-01-01

    Hard disk drives are used in everyday life to store critical data. Although they are reliable, failure of a hard disk drive can be catastrophic, especially in applications like medicine, banking, air traffic control systems, missile guidance systems, computer numerical controlled machines, and more. The use of Self-Monitoring, Analysis and…

  13. OBSERVING SIMULATED PROTOSTARS WITH OUTFLOWS: HOW ACCURATE ARE PROTOSTELLAR PROPERTIES INFERRED FROM SEDs?

    SciTech Connect

    Offner, Stella S. R.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Hansen, Charles E.; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2012-07-10

    The properties of unresolved protostars and their local environment are frequently inferred from spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using radiative transfer modeling. In this paper, we use synthetic observations of realistic star formation simulations to evaluate the accuracy of properties inferred from fitting model SEDs to observations. We use ORION, an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) three-dimensional gravito-radiation-hydrodynamics code, to simulate low-mass star formation in a turbulent molecular cloud including the effects of protostellar outflows. To obtain the dust temperature distribution and SEDs of the forming protostars, we post-process the simulations using HYPERION, a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. We find that the ORION and HYPERION dust temperatures typically agree within a factor of two. We compare synthetic SEDs of embedded protostars for a range of evolutionary times, simulation resolutions, aperture sizes, and viewing angles. We demonstrate that complex, asymmetric gas morphology leads to a variety of classifications for individual objects as a function of viewing angle. We derive best-fit source parameters for each SED through comparison with a pre-computed grid of radiative transfer models. While the SED models correctly identify the evolutionary stage of the synthetic sources as embedded protostars, we show that the disk and stellar parameters can be very discrepant from the simulated values, which is expected since the disk and central source are obscured by the protostellar envelope. Parameters such as the stellar accretion rate, stellar mass, and disk mass show better agreement, but can still deviate significantly, and the agreement may in some cases be artificially good due to the limited range of parameters in the set of model SEDs. Lack of correlation between the model and simulation properties in many individual instances cautions against overinterpreting properties inferred from SEDs for unresolved protostellar

  14. The role of angular momentum transport in establishing the accretion rate-protostellar mass correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSouza, Alexander L.; Basu, Shantanu

    2017-02-01

    We model the mass accretion rate M˙ to stellar mass M* correlation that has been inferred from observations of intermediate to upper mass T Tauri stars-that is M˙ ∝ M*1.3±0.3. We explain this correlation within the framework of quiescent disk evolution, in which accretion is driven largely by gravitational torques acting in the bulk of the mass and volume of the disk. Stresses within the disk arise from the action of gravitationally driven torques parameterized in our 1D model in terms of Toomre's Q criterion. We do not model the hot inner sub-AU scale region of the disk that is likely stable according to this criterion, and appeal to other mechanisms to remove or redistribute angular momentum and allow accretion onto the star. Our model has the advantage of agreeing with large-scale angle-averaged values from more complex nonaxisymmetric calculations. The model disk transitions from an early phase (dominated by initial conditions inherited from the burst mode of accretion) into a later self-similar mode characterized by a steeper temporal decline in M˙. The models effectively reproduce the spread in mass accretion rates that have been observed for protostellar objects of 0.2 M⊙ ≤ M* ≤ 3.0 M⊙, such as those found in the ρ Ophiuchus and Taurus star forming regions. We then compare realistically sampled populations of young stellar objects produced by our model to their observational counterparts. We find these populations to be statistically coincident, which we argue is evidence for the role of gravitational torques in the late time evolution of quiescent protostellar disks.

  15. Vibrationally Excited HCN around AFGL 2591: A Probe of Protostellar Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veach, Todd J.; Groppi, Christopher E.; Hedden, Abigail

    2013-03-01

    Vibrationally excited molecules with submillimeter rotational transitions are potentially excellent probes of physical conditions near protostars. This study uses observations of the v = 1 and v = 2 ro-vibrational modes of HCN (4-3) to probe this environment. The presence or absence and relative strengths of these ro-vibrational lines probe the gas excitation mechanism and physical conditions in warm, dense material associated with protostellar disks. We present pilot observations from the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope and follow-up observations from the Submillimeter Array. All vibrationally excited HCN (4-3) v = 0, v = 1, and v = 2 lines were observed. The existence of the three v = 2 lines at approximately equal intensity imply collisional excitation with a density of greater than (1010 cm-3) and a temperature of >1000 K for the emitting gas. This warm, high-density material should directly trace structures formed in the protostellar envelope and disk environment. Further, the line shapes of the v = 2 emission may suggest a Keplerian disk. This Letter demonstrates the utility of this technique which is of particular interest due to the recent inauguration of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array.

  16. VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED HCN AROUND AFGL 2591: A PROBE OF PROTOSTELLAR STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Veach, Todd J.; Groppi, Christopher E.; Hedden, Abigail

    2013-03-10

    Vibrationally excited molecules with submillimeter rotational transitions are potentially excellent probes of physical conditions near protostars. This study uses observations of the v = 1 and v = 2 ro-vibrational modes of HCN (4-3) to probe this environment. The presence or absence and relative strengths of these ro-vibrational lines probe the gas excitation mechanism and physical conditions in warm, dense material associated with protostellar disks. We present pilot observations from the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope and follow-up observations from the Submillimeter Array. All vibrationally excited HCN (4-3) v = 0, v = 1, and v = 2 lines were observed. The existence of the three v = 2 lines at approximately equal intensity imply collisional excitation with a density of greater than (10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}) and a temperature of >1000 K for the emitting gas. This warm, high-density material should directly trace structures formed in the protostellar envelope and disk environment. Further, the line shapes of the v = 2 emission may suggest a Keplerian disk. This Letter demonstrates the utility of this technique which is of particular interest due to the recent inauguration of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array.

  17. Herniated disk

    MedlinePlus

    ... the disk. This may place pressure on nearby nerves or the spinal cord. ... Lumbar radiculopathy; Cervical radiculopathy; Herniated ... LBP - herniated disk; Sciatica - herniated disk; Herniated disk

  18. Vibrationally excited CS: A new probe of conditions in young protostellar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Christopher K.; Maloney, Philip R.; Serabyn, E.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first detection of vibrationally excited C(32)S J = 10-9 and J = 7-6 emission toward a young stellar object (YSO). Toward IRAS 16293-2422, the vibrationally excited C(32)S emission is redshifted approximately 3.9 km/s from the systemic velocity of the core. The emission must arise in warm (T greater than or approximately equal 1000 K), dense (n greater than or approximately equal to 10(exp 11)-10(exp 12) per cc) gas. The most plausible origin for the emission appears to be self-gravitating instabilities in a protostellar accretion disk, which produce waves and shocks.

  19. Radiation-Hydrodynamic Simulations of Massive Star Formation with Protostellar Outflows

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, A J; Klein, R I; Krumholz, M R; McKee, C F

    2011-03-02

    We report the results of a series of AMR radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the collapse of massive star forming clouds using the ORION code. These simulations are the first to include the feedback effects protostellar outflows, as well as protostellar radiative heating and radiation pressure exerted on the infalling, dusty gas. We find that that outflows evacuate polar cavities of reduced optical depth through the ambient core. These enhance the radiative flux in the poleward direction so that it is 1.7 to 15 times larger than that in the midplane. As a result the radiative heating and outward radiation force exerted on the protostellar disk and infalling cloud gas in the equatorial direction are greatly diminished. The simultaneously reduces the Eddington radiation pressure barrier to high-mass star formation and increases the minimum threshold surface density for radiative heating to suppress fragmentation compared to models that do not include outflows. The strength of both these effects depends on the initial core surface density. Lower surface density cores have longer free-fall times and thus massive stars formed within them undergo more Kelvin contraction as the core collapses, leading to more powerful outflows. Furthermore, in lower surface density clouds the ratio of the time required for the outflow to break out of the core to the core free-fall time is smaller, so that these clouds are consequently influenced by outflows at earlier stages of collapse. As a result, outflow effects are strongest in low surface density cores and weakest in high surface density one. We also find that radiation focusing in the direction of outflow cavities is sufficient to prevent the formation of radiation pressure-supported circumstellar gas bubbles, in contrast to models which neglect protostellar outflow feedback.

  20. The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: Spectral Energy Distributions and Fits Using a Grid of Protostellar Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, E.; Fischer, W. J.; Ali, B.; Stutz, A. M.; Stanke, T.; Tobin, J. J.; Megeath, S. T.; Osorio, M.; Hartmann, L.; Calvet, N.; Poteet, C. A.; Booker, J.; Manoj, P.; Watson, D. M.; Allen, L.

    2016-05-01

    We present key results from the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and model fits of 330 young stellar objects, predominantly protostars, in the Orion molecular clouds. This is the largest sample of protostars studied in a single, nearby star formation complex. With near-infrared photometry from 2MASS, mid- and far-infrared data from Spitzer and Herschel, and submillimeter photometry from APEX, our SEDs cover 1.2-870 μm and sample the peak of the protostellar envelope emission at ˜100 μm. Using mid-IR spectral indices and bolometric temperatures, we classify our sample into 92 Class 0 protostars, 125 Class I protostars, 102 flat-spectrum sources, and 11 Class II pre-main-sequence stars. We implement a simple protostellar model (including a disk in an infalling envelope with outflow cavities) to generate a grid of 30,400 model SEDs and use it to determine the best-fit model parameters for each protostar. We argue that far-IR data are essential for accurate constraints on protostellar envelope properties. We find that most protostars, and in particular the flat-spectrum sources, are well fit. The median envelope density and median inclination angle decrease from Class 0 to Class I to flat-spectrum protostars, despite the broad range in best-fit parameters in each of the three categories. We also discuss degeneracies in our model parameters. Our results confirm that the different protostellar classes generally correspond to an evolutionary sequence with a decreasing envelope infall rate, but the inclination angle also plays a role in the appearance, and thus interpretation, of the SEDs.

  1. The formation of molecules in protostellar winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Mamon, G. A.; Huggins, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    The production and destruction processes for molecules in very fast protostellar winds are analyzed and modeled with a one-dimensional chemical kinetics code. Radial density and temperature distributions suggested by protostellar theory are explored as are a range of mass-loss rates. The efficiency of in situ formation of heavy molecules is found to be high if the wind temperature falls sufficiently rapidly, as indicated by theory. The degree of molecular conversion is a strong function of the mass-loss rate and of density gradients associated with the acceleration and collimation of the wind. Even in cases where essentially all of the heavy atoms are processed into molecules, a significant fraction of atomic hydrogen remains so that hghly molecular, protostellar winds are able to emit the 21-cm line. Although CO has a substantial abundance in most models relevant to very young protostars, high abundances of other molecules such as SiO and H2O signify more complete association characteristic of winds containing regions of very high density. Although the models apply only to regions close to the protostar, they are in qualitative accord with recent observations at much larger distances of both atomic and molecular emission from extremely high-velocity flow.

  2. Oxacillin disk diffusion testing for the prediction of penicillin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Horna, Gertrudis; Molero, María L; Benites, Liliana; Roman, Sigri; Carbajal, Luz; Mercado, Erik; Castillo, María E; Zerpa, Rito; Chaparro, Eduardo; Hernandez, Roger; Silva, Wilda; Campos, Francisco; Saenz, Andy; Reyes, Isabel; Villalobos, Alex; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2016-08-01

    Objective To 1) describe the correlation between the zones of inhibition in 1-µg oxacillin disk diffusion (ODD) tests and penicillin and ceftriaxone minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of meningeal and non-meningeal strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae and 2) evaluate the usefulness of the ODD test as a predictor of susceptibility to penicillin in S. pneumoniae and as a quick and cost-effective method easily implemented in a routine clinical laboratory setting. Methods S. pneumoniae isolates from healthy nasopharyngeal carriers less than 2 years old, obtained in a multicentric cross-sectional study conducted in various Peruvian hospitals and health centers from 2007 to 2009, were analyzed. Using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoints, the correlation between the zones of inhibition of the ODD test and the MICs of penicillin and ceftriaxone was determined. Results Of the 571 S. pneumoniae isolates, 314 (55%) showed resistance to penicillin (MIC ≥ 0.12 µg/mL) and 124 (21.7%) showed resistance to ceftriaxone (MIC ≥ 1 µg/mL). Comparison of the ODD test zones of inhibition and the penicillin MICs, using the CLSI meningeal breakpoints, showed good correlation (Cohen's kappa coefficient = 0.8239). Conclusions There was good correlation between ODD zones of inhibition and penicillin meningeal breakpoints but weak correlation between the ODD results and non-meningeal breakpoints for both penicillin and ceftriaxone. Therefore, the ODD test appears to be a useful tool for predicting penicillin resistance in cases of meningeal strains of S. pneumoniae, particularly in low- and middle- income countries, where MIC determination is not routinely available.

  3. Selected Papers on Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, K. R.; Cassen, P. M.; Wasson, J. T.; Woolum, D. S.; Klahr, H. H.; Henning, Th.

    2004-01-01

    Three papers present studies of thermal balances, dynamics, and electromagnetic spectra of protoplanetary disks, which comprise gas and dust orbiting young stars. One paper addresses the reprocessing, in a disk, of photons that originate in the disk itself in addition to photons that originate in the stellar object at the center. The shape of the disk is found to strongly affect the redistribution of energy. Another of the three papers reviews an increase in the optical luminosity of the young star FU Orionis. The increase began in the year 1936 and similar increases have since been observed in other stars. The paper summarizes astronomical, meteoric, and theoretical evidence that these increases are caused by increases in mass fluxes through the inner portions of the protoplanetary disks of these stars. The remaining paper presents a mathematical-modeling study of the structures of protostellar accretion disks, with emphasis on limits on disk flaring. Among the conclusions reached in the study are that (1) the radius at which a disk becomes shadowed from its central stellar object depends on radial mass flow and (2) most planet formation has occurred in environments unheated by stellar radiation.

  4. Numerical prediction of flow and heat transfer in a tube with circumferential fins and circular disks

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, K.; Seo, T.; Lee, C.; Kim, C.

    1999-07-01

    The characteristics of fluid flow and heat transfer were numerically analyzed for hydrodynamically and thermally developing laminar flow in a tube with circumferential fins and circular disks. Computations were carried out for a variety of flow conditions and geometric arrangements for the fins and disks, and the effects of these on heat transfer enhancement and pressure drop were studied. In order to quantify the heat transfer enhancement effects of the fins and disks in a tube, the Nusselt numbers for various configurations were compared to those for a corresponding smooth tube. In addition, the flow pattern and the local Nusselt number of developing flow as well as the overall Nusselt numbers for both developing and fully developed flows were presented with associated increase in pressure drop. It was found that the flow was fully developed after passing two consecutive fins from the entrance, and that not only heat transfer enhancement but also pressure drop increase were significant with the fins and disks. And, it was known that heat transfer enhancement and pressure drop increase are strongly dependent on Reynolds number and the fin height rather than the size of the disk.

  5. Efficiency of particle trapping in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Jacob B.; Armitage, Philip J.

    2014-03-20

    We investigate the strength of axisymmetric local pressure maxima (zonal flows) in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks, where ambipolar diffusion reduces turbulent stresses driven by the magnetorotational instability. Using local numerical simulations we show that in the absence of net vertical magnetic fields, the strength of turbulence in the ambipolar dominated region of the disk is low and any zonal flows that are present are weak. For net fields strong enough to yield observed protostellar accretion rates, however, zonal flows with a density amplitude of 10%-20% are formed. These strengths are comparable to those seen in simulations of ideal MHD disk turbulence. We investigate whether these zonal flows are able to reverse the inward radial drift of solids, leading to prolonged and enhanced concentration as a prelude to planetesimal formation. For commonly assumed mean surface density profiles (surface density Σ∝r {sup –1/2} or steeper) we find that the predicted perturbations to the background disk profile do not correspond to local pressure maxima. This is a consequence of radial width of the simulated zonal flows, which is larger than was assumed in prior analytic models of particle trapping. These larger scale flows would only trap particles for higher amplitude fluctuations than observed. We conclude that zonal flows are likely to be present in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks and are potentially large enough to be observable, but are unlikely to lead to strong particle trapping.

  6. Efficiency of Particle Trapping in the Outer Regions of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jacob B.; Armitage, Philip J.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the strength of axisymmetric local pressure maxima (zonal flows) in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks, where ambipolar diffusion reduces turbulent stresses driven by the magnetorotational instability. Using local numerical simulations we show that in the absence of net vertical magnetic fields, the strength of turbulence in the ambipolar dominated region of the disk is low and any zonal flows that are present are weak. For net fields strong enough to yield observed protostellar accretion rates, however, zonal flows with a density amplitude of 10%-20% are formed. These strengths are comparable to those seen in simulations of ideal MHD disk turbulence. We investigate whether these zonal flows are able to reverse the inward radial drift of solids, leading to prolonged and enhanced concentration as a prelude to planetesimal formation. For commonly assumed mean surface density profiles (surface density Σvpropr -1/2 or steeper) we find that the predicted perturbations to the background disk profile do not correspond to local pressure maxima. This is a consequence of radial width of the simulated zonal flows, which is larger than was assumed in prior analytic models of particle trapping. These larger scale flows would only trap particles for higher amplitude fluctuations than observed. We conclude that zonal flows are likely to be present in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks and are potentially large enough to be observable, but are unlikely to lead to strong particle trapping.

  7. A SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DETECTION OF CRYSTALLINE SILICATES IN A PROTOSTELLAR ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Poteet, Charles A.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Fischer, William J.; Bjorkman, Jon E.; Watson, Dan M.; Remming, Ian S.; McClure, Melissa K.; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Tobin, John J.; Sargent, Benjamin A.; Muzerolle, James; Furlan, Elise; Allen, Lori E.; Ali, Babar

    2011-06-01

    We present the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph spectrum of the Orion A protostar HOPS-68. The mid-infrared spectrum reveals crystalline substructure at 11.1, 16.1, 18.8, 23.6, 27.9, and 33.6 {mu}m superimposed on the broad 9.7 and 18 {mu}m amorphous silicate features; the substructure is well matched by the presence of the olivine end-member forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}). Crystalline silicates are often observed as infrared emission features around the circumstellar disks of Herbig Ae/Be stars and T Tauri stars. However, this is the first unambiguous detection of crystalline silicate absorption in a cold, infalling, protostellar envelope. We estimate the crystalline mass fraction along the line of sight by first assuming that the crystalline silicates are located in a cold absorbing screen and secondly by utilizing radiative transfer models. The resulting crystalline mass fractions of 0.14 and 0.17, respectively, are significantly greater than the upper limit found in the interstellar medium ({approx}<0.02-0.05). We propose that the amorphous silicates were annealed within the hot inner disk and/or envelope regions and subsequently transported outward into the envelope by entrainment in a protostellar outflow.

  8. GGD 37: AN EXTREME PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J. D.; Watson, D. M.; Forrest, W. J.; Kim, K. H.; Bergin, E.; Maret, S.; Melnick, G.; Tolls, V.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Sargent, B. A.; Raines, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first Spitzer-IRS spectral maps of the Herbig-Haro flow GGD 37 detected in lines of [Ne III], [O IV], [Ar III], and [Ne V]. The detection of extended [O IV] (55 eV) and some extended emission in [Ne V] (97 eV) indicates a shock temperature in excess of 100,000 K, in agreement with X-ray observations, and a shock speed in excess of 200 km s{sup -1}. The presence of an extended photoionization or collisional ionization region indicates that GGD 37 is a highly unusual protostellar outflow.

  9. FIRST DETECTION OF [C I] {sup 3}P{sub 1}–{sup 3}P{sub 0} EMISSION FROM A PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Momose, Munetake; Saito, Masao; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Shimajiri, Yoshito

    2015-03-20

    We performed single point [C i] {sup 3}P{sub 1}–{sup 3}P{sub 0} and CO J = 4–3 observations toward three T Tauri stars (TTSs), DM Tau, LkCa 15, and TW Hya, using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array Band 8 qualification model receiver installed on the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment. Two protostars (PSs) in the Taurus L1551 region, L1551 IRS 5 and HL Tau, were also observed. We successfully detected [C i] emission from the protoplanetary disk around DM Tau as well as the protostellar targets. The spectral profile of the [C i] emission from the protoplanetary disk is marginally single-peaked, suggesting that atomic carbon (C) extends toward the outermost disk. The detected [C i] emission is optically thin and the column densities of C are estimated to be ≲10{sup 16} and ∼10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} for the TTS targets and the PSs, respectively. We found a clear difference in the total mass ratio of C to dust, M(C)/M(dust), between the TTSs and protostellar targets; the M(C)/M(dust) ratio of the TTSs is one order of magnitude smaller than that of the PSs. The decrease of the estimated M(C)/M(dust) ratios for the disk sources is consistent with a theoretical prediction that the atomic C can survive only in the near surface layer of the disk and C{sup +}/C/CO transition occurs deeper into the disk midplane.

  10. Ertapenem disk performance to predict Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase produced by Gram-negative bacilli isolated in a São Paulo city public hospital.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Lais Pinto de; Carvalho, Fabiana Puerro de; Marques, Alexandre Gimenes; Pereira, Andrea dos Santos; Bortoleto, Renata Puzzo; Martino, Marinês Dalla Valle

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate ertapenem disk performance to predict Klebsiella pneumonie carbapenemase production by Gram-negative bacilli. All Gram-negative bacilli isolated between January 2010 and June 2011 were tested by disk diffusion (Oxoid™) for sensitivity to ertapenem, meropenem and imipenem. Resistant or intermediate sensitivity strains (diameter < 22 mm for ertapenem) were also tested for the blaKPC gene by polymerase chain reaction. Disk predictive positive value for Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase and specificity were calculated. Out of the 21839 cultures performed, 3010 (13.78%) were positive, and Gram-negative bacilli were isolated in 708 (23.52%) of them. Zone of inhibition diameter for ertapenem disk was < 22 mm for 111 isolates, representing 15.7% of all Gram-negative isolates. The PCR assay for blaKPC detected 40 Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing strains. No strains intermediate or resistant to meropenem and imipenem were sensitive to ertapenem. The ertapenem disk presented a positive predictive value of 36% to predict blaKPC and 89% specificity. The resistance of Gram-negative bacilli detected by disk diffusion against ertapenem does not predict Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase production. Other mechanisms, such as production of other betalactamases and porin loss, may be implicated. The need to confirm the presence of the blaKPC is suggested. Therefore, ertapenem was a weak predictor for discriminating strains that produce Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase.

  11. ASSEMBLY OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS AND INCLINATIONS OF CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Foucart, Francois; Lai, Dong

    2013-02-10

    The Kepler satellite has discovered a number of transiting planets around close binary stars. These circumbinary systems have highly aligned planetary and binary orbits. In this paper, we explore how the mutual inclination between the planetary and binary orbits may reflect the physical conditions of the assembly of protoplanetary disks and the interaction between protostellar binaries and circumbinary disks. Given the turbulent nature of star-forming molecular clouds, it is possible that the gas falling onto the outer region of a circumbinary disk and the central protostellar binary have different axes of rotation. Thus, the newly assembled circumbinary disk can be misaligned with respect to the binary. However, the gravitational torque from the binary produces a warp and twist in the disk, and the back-reaction torque tends to align the disk and the binary orbital plane. We present a new, analytic calculation of this alignment torque and show that the binary-disk inclination angle can be reduced appreciably after the binary accretes a few percent of its mass from the disk. Our calculation suggests that in the absence of other disturbances, circumbinary disks and planets around close (sub-AU) stellar binaries, for which mass accretion onto the proto-binary is very likely to have occurred, are expected to be highly aligned with the binary orbits, while disks and planets around wide binaries can be misaligned. Measurements of the mutual inclinations of circumbinary planetary systems can provide a clue to the birth environments of such systems.

  12. COMPLEX STRUCTURE IN CLASS 0 PROTOSTELLAR ENVELOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Looney, Leslie W.; Chiang, Hsin-Fang

    2010-04-01

    We use archived Infrared Array Camera images from the Spitzer Space Telescope to show that many Class 0 protostars exhibit complex, irregular, and non-axisymmetric structure within their dusty envelopes. Our 8 {mu}m extinction maps probe some of the densest regions in these protostellar envelopes. Many of the systems are observed to have highly irregular and non-axisymmetric morphologies on scales {approx}>1000 AU, with a quarter of the sample exhibiting filamentary or flattened dense structures. Complex envelope structure is observed in regions spatially distinct from outflow cavities, and the densest structures often show no systematic alignment perpendicular to the cavities. These results indicate that mass ejection is not responsible for much of the irregular morphologies we detect; rather, we suggest that the observed envelope complexity is mostly the result of collapse from protostellar cores with initially non-equilibrium structures. The striking non-axisymmetry in many envelopes could provide favorable conditions for the formation of binary systems. We also note that protostars in the sample appear to be formed preferentially near the edges of clouds or bends in filaments, suggesting formation by gravitational focusing.

  13. Where is the oxygen in protostellar outflows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Lars

    2014-10-01

    Oxygen (O) is the third-most abundant element in the Universe after hydrogen and helium. Despite its high elemental abundance, a good picture of where oxygen is located in low-mass protostellar outflows and jets is missing: we cannot account for > 60% of the oxygen budget in these objects. This hole in our picture means that we currently do not have a good understanding of the dominant cooling processes in outflows jets, despite the fact that [O I] emission at 63 micron is one of the dominant cooling lines, nor how cooling processes evolve with protostellar evolution. To shed light on these processes, we propose to observe the [O I] 63 micron line with SOFIA-GREAT toward five low-mass protostars. As a first step, the velocity-resolved line profile will be decomposed into its constituent components to isolate the relative contributions from the jet and the irradiated outflow. Second, the [O I] line profile will be compared to those of H2O, OH and CO to obtain the relative atomic O abundance with respect to CO, H2O, and OH. Third, the effects of evolution will be examined by observing protostars at different evolutionary stages. These three approaches will allow us to quantify: the oxygen chemistry in warm and hot gas, the relative amounts of material in the outflow and the jet, and finally to start tracing the evolutionary sequence of how feedback evolves with time.

  14. Where is the oxygen in protostellar outflows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Lars

    Oxygen (O) is the third-most abundant element in the Universe after hydrogen and helium. Despite its high elemental abundance, a good picture of where oxygen is located in low-mass protostellar outflows and jets is missing: we cannot account for > 60% of the oxygen budget in these objects. This hole in our picture means that we currently do not have a good understanding of the dominant cooling processes in outflows jets, despite the fact that [O I] emission at 63 micron is one of the dominant cooling lines, nor how cooling processes evolve with protostellar evolution. To shed light on these processes, we propose to observe the [O I] 63 micron line with SOFIA-GREAT toward seven low-mass protostars. As a first step, the velocity-resolved line profile will be decomposed into its constituent components to isolate the relative contributions from the jet and the irradiated outflow. Second, the [O I] line profile will be compared to those of H2O, OH and CO to obtain the relative atomic O abundance with respect to CO, H2O, and OH. Third, the effects of evolution will be examined by observing protostars at different evolutionary stages. These three approaches will allow us to quantify: the oxygen chemistry in warm and hot gas, the relative amounts of material in the outflow and the jet, and finally to start tracing the evolutionary sequence of how feedback evolves with time.

  15. Protostellar Outflow Evolution in Turbulent Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, A; Frank, A; Carroll, J; Blackman, E; Quillen, A

    2008-04-11

    The link between turbulence in star formatting environments and protostellar jets remains controversial. To explore issues of turbulence and fossil cavities driven by young stellar outflows we present a series of numerical simulations tracking the evolution of transient protostellar jets driven into a turbulent medium. Our simulations show both the effect of turbulence on outflow structures and, conversely, the effect of outflows on the ambient turbulence. We demonstrate how turbulence will lead to strong modifications in jet morphology. More importantly, we demonstrate that individual transient outflows have the capacity to re-energize decaying turbulence. Our simulations support a scenario in which the directed energy/momentum associated with cavities is randomized as the cavities are disrupted by dynamical instabilities seeded by the ambient turbulence. Consideration of the energy power spectra of the simulations reveals that the disruption of the cavities powers an energy cascade consistent with Burgers-type turbulence and produces a driving scale-length associated with the cavity propagation length. We conclude that fossil cavities interacting either with a turbulent medium or with other cavities have the capacity to sustain or create turbulent flows in star forming environments. In the last section we contrast our work and its conclusions with previous studies which claim that jets can not be the source of turbulence.

  16. Verification of CFD analysis methods for predicting the drag force and thrust power of an underwater disk robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, Tae-Hwan; Choi, Hyeung-Sik; Jung, Sang-Ki; Sammut, Karl; He, Fangpo

    2014-06-01

    This paper examines the suitability of using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tools, ANSYSCFX, as an initial analysis tool for predicting the drag and propulsion performance (thrust and torque) of a concept underwater vehicle design. In order to select an appropriate thruster that will achieve the required speed of the Underwater Disk Robot (UDR), the ANSYS-CFX tools were used to predict the drag force of the UDR. Vertical Planar Motion Mechanism (VPMM) test simulations (i.e. pure heaving and pure pitching motion) by CFD motion analysis were carried out with the CFD software. The CFD results reveal the distribution of hydrodynamic values (velocity, pressure, etc.) of the UDR for these motion studies. Finally, CFD bollard pull test simulations were performed and compared with the experimental bollard pull test results conducted in a model basin. The experimental results confirm the suitability of using the ANSYS-CFX tools for predicting the behavior of concept vehicles early on in their design process.

  17. Generation of a dynamo magnetic field in a protoplanetary accretion disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T.; Levy, E. H.

    1987-01-01

    A new computational technique is developed that allows realistic calculations of dynamo magnetic field generation in disk geometries corresponding to protoplanetary and protostellar accretion disks. The approach is of sufficient generality to allow, in the future, a wide class of accretion disk problems to be solved. Here, basic modes of a disk dynamo are calculated. Spatially localized oscillatory states are found to occur in Keplerain disks. A physical interpretation is given that argues that spatially localized fields of the type found in these calculations constitute the basic modes of a Keplerian disk dynamo.

  18. The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: Constraining Protostellar Models with Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, Elise; HOPS Team

    2013-01-01

    During the protostellar stage of star formation, a young star is surrounded by a large infalling envelope of dust and gas; the material falls onto a circumstellar disk and is eventually accreted by the central star. The dust in the disk and envelope emits prominently at mid- to far-infrared wavelengths; at 10 micron, absorption by small silicate grains causes a broad absorption feature. By modeling the near- to far-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of protostars, properties of their disks and envelopes can be derived; in particular, mid-IR spectroscopy reveals the detailed emission around the silicate absorption feature and thus provides additional constraints for the models. Here we present results from modeling a sample of protostars in the Orion star-forming region that were observed as part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS). These protostars represent a subsample of HOPS; they have Spitzer/IRS spectra, which cover the mid-IR SED from 5 to 35 micron, and photometry in the near-IR (2MASS), mid-IR (Spitzer/IRAC and MIPS), and far-IR (Herschel/PACS). We show the importance of adding Spitzer/IRS spectra with appropriate weights in determining the best fit to the SED from a large grid of protostellar models. The 10 micron silicate absorption feature and the mid- to far-IR SED slope provide key constraints for the inclination angle of the object and its envelope density, with a deep absorption feature and steep SED slope for the most embedded and highly inclined objects. We show a few examples that illustrate our SED fitting method and present preliminary results from our fits.

  19. The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: Constraining Protostellar Models with Near- to Far-Infrared Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, Elise; Ali, Babar; Fischer, Will; Tobin, John; Stutz, Amy; Megeath, Tom; Allen, Lori; HOPS Team

    2013-07-01

    During the protostellar stage of star formation, a young star is surrounded by a large infalling envelope of dust and gas; the material falls onto a circumstellar disk and is eventually accreted by the central star. The dust in the disk and envelope emits prominently at mid- to far-infrared wavelengths; at 10 micron, absorption by small silicate grains typically causes a broad absorption feature. By modeling the near- to far-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of protostars, properties of their disks and envelopes can be derived. As part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS; PI: S. T. Megeath), we have observed a large sample of protostars in the Orion star-forming complex at 70 and 160 micron with the PACS instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. For most objects, we also have photometry in the near-IR (2MASS), mid-IR (Spitzer/ IRAC and MIPS), at 100 micron (PACS data from the Gould Belt Survey), sub-mm (APEX/SABOCA and LABOCA), and mid-infrared spectra (Spitzer/IRS). For the interpretation of the SEDs, we have constructed a large grid of protostellar models using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. Here we present our SED fitting techniques to determine the best-fit model for each object. We show the importance of including IRS spectra with appropriate weights, in addition to the constraints provided by the PACS measurements, which probe the peak of the SED. The 10 micron silicate absorption feature and the mid- to far-IR SED slope provide key constraints for the inclination angle of the object and its envelope density, with a deep absorption feature and steep SED slope for the most embedded and highly inclined objects. We show a few examples that illustrate our SED fitting method and present some preliminary results from our fits.

  20. Protostellar chemistry dominated by external irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, Johan E.; Charnley, Steven B.; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Bisschop, Suzanne E.; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    In their youngest stages, protostars are deeply enshrouded in envelopes of gas and dust, material that later accretes onto the central object and the protoplanetary disc. The chemical composition and excitation properties measured towards these envelopes provide valuable information about the current and previous irradiation environment of the forming protostar.We demonstrate the strengths of unbiased single-dish line surveys, which we use to study the chemical and physical properties of protostellar envelopes. We have performed line surveys of more than 50 sources in the nearby Corona Australis and Ophiuchus star-forming regions using the APEX telescope. Many of the Corona Australis sources are located near the intermediate-mass Herbig Be star R CrA, and we find that despite its moderate luminosity, the irradiation from this star enhances the H2CO temperatures of the nearby protostellar envelopes from 10 K to at least 30-40 K. This drastically elevated temperature should be of crucial importance to the chemistry of these envelopes, due to thermal evaporation of many key species from the dust grain surfaces.Towards R CrA-IRS7B, the most thoroughly investigated object in our study, we find that the chemistry differs greatly from other thoroughly investigated deeply embedded protostars (hot corinos and warm carbon-chain chemistry sources, WCCC). We find low abundances of complex organic molecules such as CH3OCH3 and CH3CN, but instead elevated abundances of CN and some carbon-chain species like HC3N and C2H, although not to the same level as towards typical WCCC sources. We interpret the observed chemical properties as a result of thermal evaporation of CO from the grain mantles and photo-dissociation reactions in the IRS7B envelope, both initiated by the irradiation from R CrA.

  1. Protostellar Outflows and Radiative Feedback from Massive Stars. II. Feedback, Star-formation Efficiency, and Outflow Broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, Rolf; Turner, Neal J.; Yorke, Harold W.

    2016-11-01

    We perform two-dimensional axially symmetric radiation hydrodynamic simulations to assess the impact of outflows and radiative force feedback from massive protostars by varying when the protostellar outflow starts, and to determine the ratio of ejection to accretion rates and the strength of the wide-angle disk wind component. The star-formation efficiency, i.e., the ratio of final stellar mass to initial core mass, is dominated by radiative forces and the ratio of outflow to accretion rates. Increasing this ratio has three effects. First, the protostar grows slower with a lower luminosity at any given time, lowering radiative feedback. Second, bipolar cavities cleared by the outflow become larger, further diminishing radiative feedback on disk and core scales. Third, the higher momentum outflow sweeps up more material from the collapsing envelope, decreasing the protostar's potential mass reservoir via entrainment. The star-formation efficiency varies with the ratio of ejection to accretion rates from 50% in the case of very weak outflows to as low as 20% for very strong outflows. At latitudes between the low-density bipolar cavity and the high-density accretion disk, wide-angle disk winds remove some of the gas, which otherwise would be part of the accretion flow onto the disk; varying the strength of these wide-angle disk winds, however, alters the final star-formation efficiency by only ±6%. For all cases, the opening angle of the bipolar outflow cavity remains below 20° during early protostellar accretion phases, increasing rapidly up to 65° at the onset of radiation pressure feedback.

  2. Studies of Circumstellar Disk Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee W.

    2004-01-01

    Spitzer Space Telescope infrared data for our program on disk evolution has been taken (the main IRAC - 3-8 micron exposures; the 24 and 70 micron MIPS data are to come later). We now have deep maps in the four IRAC bands of the 3-Myr-old cluster Trumpler 37, and the 10-Myr-old cluster NGC 7160. Analysis of these data has now begun. We will be combining these data with our ground-based photometric and spectroscopic data to obtain a complete picture of disk frequency as a function of mass through this important age range, which spans the likely epoch of (giant) planet formation in most systems. Analysis of the SIRTF data, and follow-on ground-based spectroscopy on the converted MMT telescope using the wide-field, fiber-fed, multiobject spectrographs, Hectospec and Hectochelle, will be the major activity during the next year.Work was also performed on the following: protoplanetary disk mass accretion rates in very low-mass stars; the inner edge of T Tauri disks; accretion in intermediate-mass T Tauri stars (IMPS); and the near-infrared spectra of the rapidly-accreting protostellar disks FU Ori and V1057 Cyg.

  3. Herniated Disk

    MedlinePlus

    ... to pain if the back is stressed. A herniated disk is a disk that ruptures. This allows the ... or back pain. Your doctor will diagnose a herniated disk with a physical exam and, sometimes, imaging tests. ...

  4. Laying the Groundwork for Future Alma Direct Magnetic Field Detection in Protostellar Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Erin Guilfoil; Harris, Robert J.; Looney, Leslie; Segura-Cox, Dominique M.; Crutcher, Richard; Li, Zhi-Yun; Tobin, John; Stephens, Ian; Novak, Giles; Fernandez-Lopez, Manuel

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic fields are a crucial element of the star formation process on many scales, from controlling jet and outflow formation on large scales, determining the structure of any protostellar disk, to modulating the accretion rate onto the central protostar. Both the three-dimensional structure and the field strength are important in determining the outcome of star formation. Unfortunately, the method most commonly used to infer magnetic field structure - linearly polarized dust continuum emission - is limited to the plane-of-sky field structure, and gives no reliable information on field strength. Alternatively, observations of the Zeeman effect in transitions of paramagnetic molecules, especially CN, are one of the best prospects for making such measurements due to the molecules' high Zeeman coefficients. In particular, these observations have been used in determining field strengths on cloud-size scales. However, CN and other paramagnetic molecules have, to our knowledge, never been observed in the envelopes/disks of Class 0 protostars at ˜arcsecond resolution, due both to sensitivity and resolution limits of previous generations of millimeter-wave interferometers. Because field strengths near the protostar are so important to understand the star formation process, we have conducted a snapshot ALMA Band 3 (3 mm / 113 GHz) survey of the 10 brightest Class 0 protostars in the Perseus, Taurus, and ρ Ophiuchus molecular clouds in the regions surrounding five transitions of four paramagnetic species, including CN, SO, C_2S, and C_4H. We present this survey - the principle goal of which was to assess the brightness of the lines within ˜ 1000 AU of the protostar - and assess the likelihood of using ALMA observations of the Zeeman effect to determine protostellar magnetic field strength.

  5. Imaging the water snow-line during a protostellar outburst.

    PubMed

    Cieza, Lucas A; Casassus, Simon; Tobin, John; Bos, Steven P; Williams, Jonathan P; Perez, Sebastian; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Caceres, Claudio; Canovas, Hector; Dunham, Michael M; Hales, Antonio; Prieto, Jose L; Principe, David A; Schreiber, Matthias R; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Dary; Zurlo, Alice

    2016-07-14

    A snow-line is the region of a protoplanetary disk at which a major volatile, such as water or carbon monoxide, reaches its condensation temperature. Snow-lines play a crucial role in disk evolution by promoting the rapid growth of ice-covered grains. Signatures of the carbon monoxide snow-line (at temperatures of around 20 kelvin) have recently been imaged in the disks surrounding the pre-main-sequence stars TW Hydra and HD163296 (refs 3, 10), at distances of about 30 astronomical units (au) from the star. But the water snow-line of a protoplanetary disk (at temperatures of more than 100 kelvin) has not hitherto been seen, as it generally lies very close to the star (less than 5 au away for solar-type stars). Water-ice is important because it regulates the efficiency of dust and planetesimal coagulation, and the formation of comets, ice giants and the cores of gas giants. Here we report images at 0.03-arcsec resolution (12 au) of the protoplanetary disk around V883 Ori, a protostar of 1.3 solar masses that is undergoing an outburst in luminosity arising from a temporary increase in the accretion rate. We find an intensity break corresponding to an abrupt change in the optical depth at about 42 au, where the elevated disk temperature approaches the condensation point of water, from which we conclude that the outburst has moved the water snow-line. The spectral behaviour across the snow-line confirms recent model predictions: dust fragmentation and the inhibition of grain growth at higher temperatures results in soaring grain number densities and optical depths. As most planetary systems are expected to experience outbursts caused by accretion during their formation, our results imply that highly dynamical water snow-lines must be considered when developing models of disk evolution and planet formation.

  6. Imaging the water snow-line during a protostellar outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieza, Lucas A.; Casassus, Simon; Tobin, John; Bos, Steven P.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Perez, Sebastian; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Caceres, Claudio; Canovas, Hector; Dunham, Michael M.; Hales, Antonio; Prieto, Jose L.; Principe, David A.; Schreiber, Matthias R.; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Dary; Zurlo, Alice

    2016-07-01

    A snow-line is the region of a protoplanetary disk at which a major volatile, such as water or carbon monoxide, reaches its condensation temperature. Snow-lines play a crucial role in disk evolution by promoting the rapid growth of ice-covered grains. Signatures of the carbon monoxide snow-line (at temperatures of around 20 kelvin) have recently been imaged in the disks surrounding the pre-main-sequence stars TW Hydra and HD163296 (refs 3, 10), at distances of about 30 astronomical units (AU) from the star. But the water snow-line of a protoplanetary disk (at temperatures of more than 100 kelvin) has not hitherto been seen, as it generally lies very close to the star (less than 5 AU away for solar-type stars). Water-ice is important because it regulates the efficiency of dust and planetesimal coagulation, and the formation of comets, ice giants and the cores of gas giants. Here we report images at 0.03-arcsec resolution (12 AU) of the protoplanetary disk around V883 Ori, a protostar of 1.3 solar masses that is undergoing an outburst in luminosity arising from a temporary increase in the accretion rate. We find an intensity break corresponding to an abrupt change in the optical depth at about 42 AU, where the elevated disk temperature approaches the condensation point of water, from which we conclude that the outburst has moved the water snow-line. The spectral behaviour across the snow-line confirms recent model predictions: dust fragmentation and the inhibition of grain growth at higher temperatures results in soaring grain number densities and optical depths. As most planetary systems are expected to experience outbursts caused by accretion during their formation, our results imply that highly dynamical water snow-lines must be considered when developing models of disk evolution and planet formation.

  7. Mass Flow through Gaps in Circumbinary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artymowicz, Pawel; Lubow, Stephen H.

    1996-08-01

    We demonstrate through smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations that a circumbinary disk can supply mass to the central binary through gas streams that penetrate the disk gap without closing it. The conditions for an efficient flow typically require the disk thickness-to-radius ratio z/r >~ 0.05, if the turbulent viscosity parameter alpha is greater than 0.01. This mass flow may be important for both the individual systems and their statistics. It occurs preferentially onto the lower mass object and acts toward equalization of component masses. The less massive component may be more luminous and easier to detect, owing to its larger accretion luminosity. For eccentric binaries, the mass flow is strongly modulated in time, providing diagnostics for both the disk and the binary. In the protostellar disks, the flow could be detected as shock emission phased with the binary orbit, resulting from stream impact with the circumstellar disks and/or the young stars. In the (super)massive black hole binaries in nuclei of galaxies, the flow may result from the surrounding interstellar medium and produce nearly periodic emission, as observed in quasar OJ 287. For star-planet-disk systems, our results show that the opening of a gap around a planet is not always sufficient for the termination of its growth. This suggests that planets supplied by gas streams from protoplanetary disks may outgrow Jupiter to become "superplanets" with properties heretofore reserved for stars.

  8. Alignment between Protostellar Outflows and Filamentary Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Ian W.; Dunham, Michael M.; Myers, Philip C.; Pokhrel, Riwaj; Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Tobin, John J.; Pineda, Jaime E.; Offner, Stella S. R.; Lee, Katherine I.; Kristensen, Lars E.; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Arce, Héctor G.; Plunkett, Adele L.

    2017-09-01

    We present new Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of CO(2–1) outflows toward young, embedded protostars in the Perseus molecular cloud as part of the Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA (MASSES) survey. For 57 Perseus protostars, we characterize the orientation of the outflow angles and compare them with the orientation of the local filaments as derived from Herschel observations. We find that the relative angles between outflows and filaments are inconsistent with purely parallel or purely perpendicular distributions. Instead, the observed distribution of outflow-filament angles are more consistent with either randomly aligned angles or a mix of projected parallel and perpendicular angles. A mix of parallel and perpendicular angles requires perpendicular alignment to be more common by a factor of ∼3. Our results show that the observed distributions probably hold regardless of the protostar’s multiplicity, age, or the host core’s opacity. These observations indicate that the angular momentum axis of a protostar may be independent of the large-scale structure. We discuss the significance of independent protostellar rotation axes in the general picture of filament-based star formation.

  9. Role of the UV external radiation field on the presence of astrophysical ices in protostellars environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson Monteiro Rocha, Will; Pilling, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    The astrophysical ices survival is directly related with the temperature and ionizing radiation field in protostellars environments such as disks and envelopes. Computational models has shown that pure volatile molecules like CO and CH _{4} should survive only inside densest regions of molecular clouds or protoplanetary disks On the other hand, solid molecules such as H _{2}O and CH _{3}OH can be placed around 5 - 10 AU from the central protostar. Unlike of the previous models, we investigate the role of the UV external radiation field on the presence of ices in disks and envelopes. Once that a star-forming region is composed by the formation of many protostars, the external radiation field should be an important component to understand the real localization of the ices along the sight line. To address this topic it was employed the radiative transfer code RADMC-3D based on the Monte Carlo method. The code was used to model the spectrum and the near-infrared image of Elias 29. The initial parameters of the disk and envelope was taken from our previous paper (Rocha & Pilling (2015), ApJ 803:18). The opacities of the ices were calculated from the complex refractive index obtained at laboratory experiments perfomed at Grand Accélerateur National d'Íons Lourds (GANIL), by using the NKABS code from Rocha & Pilling (2014), SAA 123:436. The partial conclusions that we have obtained shows that pure CO volatile molecule cannot be placed at disk or envelope of Elias 29, unlike shown in our paper about Elias 29. Once it was observed in Elias 29 spectrum obtained with Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) between 2.5 - 190 μm, this molecule should be placed in foreground molecular clouds or trapped in the water ice matrix. The next calculations will be able to show where are placed the ices such as CH _{3}OH and CH _{3}CHO observed in Elias 29 spectrum.

  10. Multilayer Formation and Evaporation of Deuterated Ices in Prestellar and Protostellar Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taquet, Vianney; Charnley, Steven B.; Sipilä, Olli

    2014-08-01

    Extremely large deuteration of several molecules has been observed toward prestellar cores and low-mass protostars for a decade. New observations performed toward low-mass protostars suggest that water presents a lower deuteration in the warm inner gas than in the cold external envelope. We coupled a gas-grain astrochemical model with a one-dimensional model of a collapsing core to properly follow the formation and the deuteration of interstellar ices as well as their subsequent evaporation in the low-mass protostellar envelopes with the aim of interpreting the spatial and temporal evolutions of their deuteration. The astrochemical model follows the formation and the evaporation of ices with a multilayer approach and also includes a state-of-the-art deuterated chemical network by taking the spin states of H2 and light ions into account. Because of their slow formation, interstellar ices are chemically heterogeneous and show an increase of their deuterium fractionation toward the surface. The differentiation of the deuteration in ices induces an evolution of the deuteration within protostellar envelopes. The warm inner region is poorly deuterated because it includes the whole molecular content of ices, while the deuteration predicted in the cold external envelope scales with the highly deuterated surface of ices. We are able to reproduce the observed evolution of water deuteration within protostellar envelopes, but we are still unable to predict the super-high deuteration observed for formaldehyde and methanol. Finally, the extension of this study to the deuteration of complex organics, important for the prebiotic chemistry, shows good agreement with the observations, suggesting that we can use the deuteration to retrace their mechanisms and their moments of formation.

  11. Multilayer formation and evaporation of deuterated ices in prestellar and protostellar cores

    SciTech Connect

    Taquet, Vianney; Charnley, Steven B.; Sipilä, Olli

    2014-08-10

    Extremely large deuteration of several molecules has been observed toward prestellar cores and low-mass protostars for a decade. New observations performed toward low-mass protostars suggest that water presents a lower deuteration in the warm inner gas than in the cold external envelope. We coupled a gas-grain astrochemical model with a one-dimensional model of a collapsing core to properly follow the formation and the deuteration of interstellar ices as well as their subsequent evaporation in the low-mass protostellar envelopes with the aim of interpreting the spatial and temporal evolutions of their deuteration. The astrochemical model follows the formation and the evaporation of ices with a multilayer approach and also includes a state-of-the-art deuterated chemical network by taking the spin states of H{sub 2} and light ions into account. Because of their slow formation, interstellar ices are chemically heterogeneous and show an increase of their deuterium fractionation toward the surface. The differentiation of the deuteration in ices induces an evolution of the deuteration within protostellar envelopes. The warm inner region is poorly deuterated because it includes the whole molecular content of ices, while the deuteration predicted in the cold external envelope scales with the highly deuterated surface of ices. We are able to reproduce the observed evolution of water deuteration within protostellar envelopes, but we are still unable to predict the super-high deuteration observed for formaldehyde and methanol. Finally, the extension of this study to the deuteration of complex organics, important for the prebiotic chemistry, shows good agreement with the observations, suggesting that we can use the deuteration to retrace their mechanisms and their moments of formation.

  12. High Cycle Fatigue Prediction for Mistuned Bladed Disks with Fully Coupled Fluid-Structural Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    vibration and flutter boundary of 2D NACA 64A010 transonic airfoil, 3D plate wing structural response. The predicted results agree well with benchmark...CFD code coupled with a structural integrator based on the convolution integral to obtain the flutter boundary for a NACA 64A010 airfoil[10]. Alonso and...validation case of the scheme for moving grid system, the forced pitching NACA 64A010 airfoil is calculated. For this transonic airfoil, the Reynolds

  13. Dynamics of binary and planetary-system interaction with disks - Eccentricity changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atrymowicz, Pawel

    1992-01-01

    Protostellar and protoplanetary systems, as well as merging galactic nuclei, often interact tidally and resonantly with the astrophysical disks via gravity. Underlying our understanding of the formation processes of stars, planets, and some galaxies is a dynamical theory of such interactions. Its main goals are to determine the geometry of the binary-disk system and, through the torque calculations, the rate of change of orbital elements of the components. We present some recent developments in this field concentrating on eccentricity driving mechanisms in protoplanetary and protobinary systems. In those two types of systems the result of the interaction is opposite. A small body embedded in a disk suffers a decrease of orbital eccentricity, whereas newly formed binary stars surrounded by protostellar disks may undergo a significant orbital evolution increasing their eccentricities.

  14. The collapse of clouds and the formation and evolution of stars and disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Frank; Najita, Joan; Galli, Daniele; Ostriker, Eve; Lizano, Susana

    1993-01-01

    We consider the interrelationships among the structure of molecular clouds; the collapse of rotating cloud cores; the formation of stars and disks; the origin of molecular outflows, protostellar winds, and highly collimated jets; the birth of planetary and binary systems; and the dynamics of star/disk/satellite interactions. Our discussion interweaves theory with the results of observations that span from millimeter wavelengths to X-rays.

  15. The collapse of clouds and the formation and evolution of stars and disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Frank; Najita, Joan; Galli, Daniele; Ostriker, Eve; Lizano, Susana

    1993-01-01

    We consider the interrelationships among the structure of molecular clouds; the collapse of rotating cloud cores; the formation of stars and disks; the origin of molecular outflows, protostellar winds, and highly collimated jets; the birth of planetary and binary systems; and the dynamics of star/disk/satellite interactions. Our discussion interweaves theory with the results of observations that span from millimeter wavelengths to X-rays.

  16. The ALMA Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS). First results from an unbiased submillimeter wavelength line survey of the Class 0 protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422 with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, J. K.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Coutens, A.; Lykke, J. M.; Müller, H. S. P.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Calcutt, H.; Bjerkeli, P.; Bourke, T. L.; Drozdovskaya, M. N.; Favre, C.; Fayolle, E. C.; Garrod, R. T.; Jacobsen, S. K.; Öberg, K. I.; Persson, M. V.; Wampfler, S. F.

    2016-11-01

    Context. The inner regions of the envelopes surrounding young protostars are characterized by a complex chemistry, with prebiotic molecules present on the scales where protoplanetary disks eventually may form. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) provides an unprecedented view of these regions zooming in on solar system scales of nearby protostars and mapping the emission from rare species. Aims: The goal is to introduce a systematic survey, the Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS), of the chemical complexity of one of the nearby astrochemical templates, the Class 0 protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422, using ALMA in order to understand the origin of the complex molecules formed in its vicinity. In addition to presenting the overall survey, the analysis in this paper focuses on new results for the prebiotic molecule glycolaldehyde, its isomers, and rarer isotopologues and other related molecules. Methods: An unbiased spectral survey of IRAS 16293-2422 covering the full frequency range from 329 to 363 GHz (0.8 mm) has been obtained with ALMA, in addition to a few targeted observations at 3.0 and 1.3 mm. The data consist of full maps of the protostellar binary system with an angular resolution of 0.5'' (60 AU diameter), a spectral resolution of 0.2 km s-1, and a sensitivity of 4-5 mJy beam-1 km s-1, which is approximately two orders of magnitude better than any previous studies. Results: More than 10 000 features are detected toward one component in the protostellar binary, corresponding to an average line density of approximately one line per 3 km s-1. Glycolaldehyde; its isomers, methyl formate and acetic acid; and its reduced alcohol, ethylene glycol, are clearly detected and their emission well-modeled with an excitation temperature of 300 K. For ethylene glycol both lowest state conformers, aGg' and gGg', are detected, the latter for the first time in the interstellar medium (ISM). The abundance of glycolaldehyde is comparable to or

  17. Properties of Planet-Forming Prostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, David (Technical Monitor); Lubow, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    The proposal achieved many of its objectives. The main area of investigation was the interaction of young planets with surrounding protostellar disks. The grant funds were used to support visits by CoIs and visitors: Gordon Ogilvie, Gennaro D Angelo, and Matthew Bate. Funds were used for travel and partial salary support for Lubow. We made important progress in two areas described in the original proposal: secular resonances (Section 3) and nonlinear waves in three dimensions (Section 5). In addition, we investigated several new areas: planet migration, orbital distribution of planets, and noncoorbital corotation resonances.

  18. Exploring Disks Around Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    Giant planets are thought to form in circumstellar disks surrounding young stars, but material may also accrete into a smaller disk around the planet. Weve never detected one of these circumplanetary disks before but thanks to new simulations, we now have a better idea of what to look for.Image from previous work simulating a Jupiter-mass planet forming inside a circumstellar disk. The planet has its own circumplanetary disk of accreted material. [Frdric Masset]Elusive DisksIn the formation of giant planets, we think the final phase consists of accretion onto the planet from a disk that surrounds it. This circumplanetary disk is important to understand, since it both regulates the late gas accretion and forms the birthplace of future satellites of the planet.Weve yet to detect a circumplanetary disk thus far, because the resolution needed to spot one has been out of reach. Now, however, were entering an era where the disk and its kinematics may be observable with high-powered telescopes (like the Atacama Large Millimeter Array).To prepare for such observations, we need models that predict the basic characteristics of these disks like the mass, temperature, and kinematic properties. Now a researcher at the ETH Zrich Institute for Astronomy in Switzerland, Judit Szulgyi, has worked toward this goal.Simulating CoolingSzulgyi performs a series of 3D global radiative hydrodynamic simulations of 1, 3, 5, and 10 Jupiter-mass (MJ) giant planets and their surrounding circumplanetary disks, embedded within the larger circumstellar disk around the central star.Density (left column), temperature (center), and normalized angular momentum (right) for a 1 MJ planet over temperatures cooling from 10,000 K (top) to 1,000 K (bottom). At high temperatures, a spherical circumplanetary envelope surrounds the planet, but as the planet cools, the envelope transitions around 64,000 K to a flattened disk. [Szulgyi 2017]This work explores the effects of different planet temperatures and

  19. FORMATION AND RECONDENSATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES DURING PROTOSTELLAR LUMINOSITY OUTBURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Taquet, Vianney; Wirström, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-04-10

    During the formation of stars, the accretion of surrounding material toward the central object is thought to undergo strong luminosity outbursts followed by long periods of relative quiescence, even at the early stages of star formation when the protostar is still embedded in a large envelope. We investigated the gas-phase formation and recondensation of the complex organic molecules (COMs) di-methyl ether and methyl formate, induced by sudden ice evaporation processes occurring during luminosity outbursts of different amplitudes in protostellar envelopes. For this purpose, we updated a gas-phase chemical network forming COMs in which ammonia plays a key role. The model calculations presented here demonstrate that ion–molecule reactions alone could account for the observed presence of di-methyl ether and methyl formate in a large fraction of protostellar cores without recourse to grain-surface chemistry, although they depend on uncertain ice abundances and gas-phase reaction branching ratios. In spite of the short outburst timescales of about 100 years, abundance ratios of the considered species higher than 10% with respect to methanol are predicted during outbursts due to their low binding energies relative to water and methanol which delay their recondensation during cooling. Although the current luminosity of most embedded protostars would be too low to produce complex organics in the hot-core regions that are observable with current sub-millimetric interferometers, previous luminosity outburst events would induce the formation of COMs in extended regions of protostellar envelopes with sizes increasing by up to one order of magnitude.

  20. Formation and Recondensation of Complex Organic Molecules during Protostellar Luminosity Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taquet, Vianney; Wirström, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-04-01

    During the formation of stars, the accretion of surrounding material toward the central object is thought to undergo strong luminosity outbursts followed by long periods of relative quiescence, even at the early stages of star formation when the protostar is still embedded in a large envelope. We investigated the gas-phase formation and recondensation of the complex organic molecules (COMs) di-methyl ether and methyl formate, induced by sudden ice evaporation processes occurring during luminosity outbursts of different amplitudes in protostellar envelopes. For this purpose, we updated a gas-phase chemical network forming COMs in which ammonia plays a key role. The model calculations presented here demonstrate that ion-molecule reactions alone could account for the observed presence of di-methyl ether and methyl formate in a large fraction of protostellar cores without recourse to grain-surface chemistry, although they depend on uncertain ice abundances and gas-phase reaction branching ratios. In spite of the short outburst timescales of about 100 years, abundance ratios of the considered species higher than 10% with respect to methanol are predicted during outbursts due to their low binding energies relative to water and methanol which delay their recondensation during cooling. Although the current luminosity of most embedded protostars would be too low to produce complex organics in the hot-core regions that are observable with current sub-millimetric interferometers, previous luminosity outburst events would induce the formation of COMs in extended regions of protostellar envelopes with sizes increasing by up to one order of magnitude.

  1. Formation and Recondensation of Complex Organic Molecules During Protostellar Luminosity Outbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taquet, Vianney; Wirstrom, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    During the formation of stars, the accretion of surrounding material toward the central object is thought to undergo strong luminosity outbursts followed by long periods of relative quiescence, even at the early stages of star formation when the protostar is still embedded in a large envelope. We investigated the gas-phase formation and recondensation of the complex organic molecules (COMs) di-methyl ether and methyl formate, induced by sudden ice evaporation processes occurring during luminosity outbursts of different amplitudes in protostellar envelopes. For this purpose, we updated a gas-phase chemical network forming COMs in which ammonia plays a key role. The model calculations presented here demonstrate that ion-molecule reactions alone could account for the observed presence of di-methyl ether and methyl formate in a large fraction of protostellar cores without recourse to grain-surface chemistry, although they depend on uncertain ice abundances and gas-phase reaction branching ratios. In spite of the short outburst timescales of about 100 years, abundance ratios of the considered species higher than 10% with respect to methanol are predicted during outbursts due to their low binding energies relative to water and methanol which delay their recondensation during cooling. Although the current luminosity of most embedded protostars would be too low to produce complex organics in the hot-core regions that are observable with current sub-millimetric interferometers, previous luminosity outburst events would induce the formation of COMs in extended regions of protostellar envelopes with sizes increasing by up to one order of magnitude.

  2. Formation and Recondensation of Complex Organic Molecules During Protostellar Luminosity Outbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taquet, Vianney; Wirstrom, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    During the formation of stars, the accretion of surrounding material toward the central object is thought to undergo strong luminosity outbursts followed by long periods of relative quiescence, even at the early stages of star formation when the protostar is still embedded in a large envelope. We investigated the gas-phase formation and recondensation of the complex organic molecules (COMs) di-methyl ether and methyl formate, induced by sudden ice evaporation processes occurring during luminosity outbursts of different amplitudes in protostellar envelopes. For this purpose, we updated a gas-phase chemical network forming COMs in which ammonia plays a key role. The model calculations presented here demonstrate that ion-molecule reactions alone could account for the observed presence of di-methyl ether and methyl formate in a large fraction of protostellar cores without recourse to grain-surface chemistry, although they depend on uncertain ice abundances and gas-phase reaction branching ratios. In spite of the short outburst timescales of about 100 years, abundance ratios of the considered species higher than 10% with respect to methanol are predicted during outbursts due to their low binding energies relative to water and methanol which delay their recondensation during cooling. Although the current luminosity of most embedded protostars would be too low to produce complex organics in the hot-core regions that are observable with current sub-millimetric interferometers, previous luminosity outburst events would induce the formation of COMs in extended regions of protostellar envelopes with sizes increasing by up to one order of magnitude.

  3. DEUTERIUM CHEMISTRY IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. THE INNER 30 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Willacy, K.; Woods, P. M. E-mail: Paul.Woods@manchester.ac.u

    2009-09-20

    We present the results of models of the chemistry, including deuterium, in the inner regions of protostellar disks. We find good agreement with recent gas-phase observations of several (non-deuterated) species. We also compare our results with observations of comets and find that in the absence of other processing, e.g., in the accretion shock at the surface of the disk, or by mixing in the disk, the calculated D/H ratios in ices are higher than measured and reflect the D/H ratio set in the molecular cloud phase. Our models give quite different abundances and molecular distributions to other inner disk models because of the differences in physical conditions in the model disk. This emphasizes how changes in the assumptions about the density and temperature distribution can radically affect the results of chemical models.

  4. Improving the thin-disk models of circumstellar disk evolution. The 2+1-dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Pavlyuchenkov, Yaroslav N.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Circumstellar disks of gas and dust are naturally formed from contracting pre-stellar molecular cores during the star formation process. To study various dynamical and chemical processes that take place in circumstellar disks prior to their dissipation and transition to debris disks, the appropriate numerical models capable of studying the long-term disk chemodynamical evolution are required. Aims: We improve the frequently used 2D hydrodynamical model for disk evolution in the thin-disk limit by employing a better calculation of the disk thermal balance and adding a reconstruction of the disk vertical structure. Together with the hydrodynamical processes, the thermal evolution is of great importance since it influences the strength of gravitational instability and the chemical evolution of the disk. Methods: We present a new 2+1-dimensional numerical hydrodynamics model of circumstellar disk evolution, where the thin-disk model is complemented with the procedure for calculating the vertical distributions of gas volume density and temperature in the disk. The reconstruction of the disk vertical structure is performed at every time step via the solution of the time-dependent radiative transfer equations coupled to the equation of the vertical hydrostatic equilibrium. Results: We perform a detailed comparison between circumstellar disks produced with our previous 2D model and with the improved 2+1D approach. The structure and evolution of resulting disks, including the differences in temperatures, densities, disk masses, and protostellar accretion rates, are discussed in detail. Conclusions: The new 2+1D model yields systematically colder disks, while the in-falling parental clouds are warmer. Both effects act to increase the strength of disk gravitational instability and, as a result, the number of gravitationally bound fragments that form in the disk via gravitational fragmentation as compared to the purely 2D thin-disk simulations with a simplified

  5. Grain Growth in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Munoz, Laura Maria

    The majority of young, low-mass stars are surrounded by optically thick accretion disks. These circumstellar disks provide large reservoirs of gas and dust that will eventually be transformed into planetary systems. Theory and observations suggest that the earliest stage toward planet formation in a protoplanetary disk is the growth of particles, from sub-micron-sized grains to centimeter- sized pebbles. Theory indicates that small interstellar grains are well coupled into the gas and are incorporated to the disk during the proto-stellar collapse. These dust particles settle toward the disk mid-plane and simultaneously grow through collisional coagulation in a very short timescale. Observationally, grain growth can be inferred by measuring the spectral energy distribution at long wavelengths, which traces the continuum dust emission spectrum and hence the dust opacity. Several observational studies have indicated that the dust component in protoplanetary disks has evolved as compared to interstellar medium dust particles, suggesting at least 4 orders of magnitude in particle-size growth. However, the limited angular resolution and poor sensitivity of previous observations has not allowed for further exploration of this astrophysical process. As part of my thesis, I embarked in an observational program to search for evidence of radial variations in the dust properties across a protoplanetary disk, which may be indicative of grain growth. By making use of high angular resolution observations obtained with CARMA, VLA, and SMA, I searched for radial variations in the dust opacity inside protoplanetary disks. These observations span more than an order of magnitude in wavelength (from sub-millimeter to centimeter wavelengths) and attain spatial resolutions down to 20 AU. I characterized the radial distribution of the circumstellar material and constrained radial variations of the dust opacity spectral index, which may originate from particle growth in these circumstellar

  6. The Long-term Evolution of Photoevaporating Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Gammie, Charles

    2013-09-01

    We perform calculations of our one-dimensional, two-zone disk model to study the long-term evolution of the circumstellar disk. In particular, we adopt published photoevaporation prescriptions and examine whether the photoevaporative loss alone, coupled with a range of initial angular momenta of the protostellar cloud, can explain the observed decline of the frequency of optically thick dusty disks with increasing age. In the parameter space we explore, disks have accreting and/or non-accreting transitional phases lasting for <~ 20% of their lifetime, which is in reasonable agreement with observed statistics. Assuming that photoevaporation controls disk clearing, we find that the initial angular momentum distribution of clouds needs to be weighted in favor of slowly rotating protostellar cloud cores. Again, assuming inner disk dispersal by photoevaporation, we conjecture that this skewed angular momentum distribution is a result of fragmentation into binary or multiple stellar systems in rapidly rotating cores. Accreting and non-accreting transitional disks show different evolutionary paths on the \\dot{M}{--}R_wall plane, which possibly explains the different observed properties between the two populations. However, we further find that scaling the photoevaporation rates downward by a factor of 10 makes it difficult to clear the disks on the observed timescales, showing that the precise value of the photoevaporative loss is crucial to setting the clearing times. While our results apply only to pure photoevaporative loss (plus disk accretion), there may be implications for models in which planets clear disks preferentially at radii of the order of 10 AU.

  7. THE LONG-TERM EVOLUTION OF PHOTOEVAPORATING PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee; Zhu Zhaohuan; Gammie, Charles E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu E-mail: gammie@illinois.edu

    2013-09-01

    We perform calculations of our one-dimensional, two-zone disk model to study the long-term evolution of the circumstellar disk. In particular, we adopt published photoevaporation prescriptions and examine whether the photoevaporative loss alone, coupled with a range of initial angular momenta of the protostellar cloud, can explain the observed decline of the frequency of optically thick dusty disks with increasing age. In the parameter space we explore, disks have accreting and/or non-accreting transitional phases lasting for {approx}< 20% of their lifetime, which is in reasonable agreement with observed statistics. Assuming that photoevaporation controls disk clearing, we find that the initial angular momentum distribution of clouds needs to be weighted in favor of slowly rotating protostellar cloud cores. Again, assuming inner disk dispersal by photoevaporation, we conjecture that this skewed angular momentum distribution is a result of fragmentation into binary or multiple stellar systems in rapidly rotating cores. Accreting and non-accreting transitional disks show different evolutionary paths on the M-dot-R{sub wall} plane, which possibly explains the different observed properties between the two populations. However, we further find that scaling the photoevaporation rates downward by a factor of 10 makes it difficult to clear the disks on the observed timescales, showing that the precise value of the photoevaporative loss is crucial to setting the clearing times. While our results apply only to pure photoevaporative loss (plus disk accretion), there may be implications for models in which planets clear disks preferentially at radii of the order of 10 AU.

  8. Signatures of Chemical Evolution in Protostellar Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    A decade ago observers began to take serious notice of the presence of crystalline silicate grains in the dust flowing away from some comets. While crystallinity had been seen in such objects previously, starting with the recognitions by Campins and Ryan (1990) that the 10 micron feature of Comet Halley resembled that of the mineral forsterite, most such observations were either ignored or dismissed as no path to explain such crystalline grains was available in the literature. When it was first suggested that an outward flow must be present to carry annealed silicate grains from the innermost regions of the Solar Nebula out to the regions where comets could form (Nuth, 1999; 2001) this suggestion was also dismissed because no such transport mechanism was known at the time. Since then not only have new models of nebular dynamics demonstrated the reality of long distance outward transport (Ciesla, 2007; 2008; 2009) but examination of older models (Boss, 2004) showed that such transport had been present but had gone unrecognized for many years. The most unassailable evidence for outward nebular transport came with the return of the Stardust samples from Comet Wild2, a Kuiper-belt comet that contained micron-scale grains of high temperature minerals resembling the Calcium-Aluminum Inclusions found in primitive meteorites (Zolensky et aI., 2006) that formed at T > 1400K. Now that outward transport in protostellar nebulae has been firmly established, a re-examination of its consequences for nebular gas is in order that takes into account both the factors that regulate both the outward flow as well as those that likely control the chemical composition of the gas. Laboratory studies of surface catalyzed reactions suggest that a trend toward more highly reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds in the gas phase should be correlated with a general increase in the crystallinity of the dust (Nuth et aI., 2000), but is such a trend actually observable? Unlike the Fischer-Tropsch or

  9. Secondary Disks and Disk Regrowth in S0 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, Amanda; Kannappan, Sheila; Norris, Mark; Khochfar, Sadegh; Berlind, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    Early-type galaxies are predicted to regrow late-type disks in hierarchical models of galaxy formation, but the observational confirmation of this process remains largely indirect. We seek to approach this problem kinematically by searching for evidence of disk regrowth in the form of extended secondary disks in S0s (distinct from the small-scale KDCs identified in SAURON). In order to address the possible contribution of secondary disks not indicative of true disk regrowth and the expected variations of secondary disk frequency with mass, color, and environment, we propose deep spectroscopy of a broad sample of 60 S0 galaxies located in the RESOLVE Survey volume. With these data and similar data in hand for ~12 additional S0s, we aim both to resolve conflicting measurements of the frequency of secondary disks in early-type galaxies and to determine the incidence of disk regrowth.

  10. Dust Coagulation in Protoplanetary Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, W.; Henning, Th.; Mucha, R.

    1996-01-01

    The time evolution of dust particles in circumstellar disk-like structures around protostars and young stellar objects is discussed. In particular, we consider the coagulation of grains due to collisional aggregation. The coagulation of the particles is calculated by solving numerically the non-linear Smoluchowski equation. The different physical processes leading to relative velocities between the grains are investigated. The relative velocities may be induced by Brownian motion, turbulence and drift motion. Starting from different regimes which can be identified during the grain growth we also discuss the evolution of dust opacities. These opacities are important for both the derivation of the circumstellar dust mass from submillimeter/millimeter continuum observations and the dynamical behavior of the disks. We present results of our numerical studies of the coagulation of dust grains in a turbulent protoplanetary accretion disk described by a time-dependent one-dimensional (radial) alpha-model. For several periods and disk radii, mass distributions of coagulated grains have been calculated. From these mass spectra, we determined the corresponding Rosseland mean dust opacities. The influence of grain opacity changes due to dust coagulation on the dynamical evolution of a protostellar disk is considered. Significant changes in the thermal structure of the protoplanetary nebula are observed. A 'gap' in the accretion disk forms at the very frontier of the coagulation, i.e., behind the sublimation boundary in the region between 1 and 5 AU.

  11. Diffusion Disk Susceptibility Testing with Cefaclor

    PubMed Central

    Shadomy, Smith; Carver, Melinda

    1978-01-01

    The reliability of the standardized 30-μg cephalothin disk and that of an experimental 30-μg cefaclor disk in predicting probable clinical susceptibility to cefaclor were compared. Quantitative determinations of cefaclor susceptibility were measured by the World Health Organization International Collaborative Study agar dilution procedure; diffusion disk tests were performed by the standardized U.S. Food and Drug Administration disk test. The cephalothin disk erred in predicting probable susceptibility in 52% of isolates of Enterococcus spp. resistant to 16 μg or less of cefaclor per ml; the cefaclor disk did not. The cephalothin disk erred in correctly predicting susceptibility in only 20% of cefaclor-susceptible isolates of Enterobacter spp.; the cefaclor disk correctly predicted susceptibility for 70%. These results indicate the need for further evaluation of a separate cefaclor disk for use in susceptibility testing with this new cephalosporin. PMID:646345

  12. Molecular Complexity in the Cep E protostellar Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco Vazquez, S.; Lefloch, B.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2011-05-01

    Protostellar outflows play a crucial role in molecular cloud evolution and star formation, by transferring momentum and energy back to the ambient medium, thereby, allowing new chemical processes to occur. The chemical manifestations depend on the nature of the shocks, if they are J or C type (Hollenbach 1997). In turn, it depends on the shock velocity, magnetic field strength and fractional ionization in the preshock gas. These processes lead to species abundance enhancements up to several orders of magnitude, as reported in "chemically active" outflows (Bachiller 2001) with differences not only between sources but also between regions of the same flow. There is now direct evidence that outflows contribute to the chemical enrichment of the interstellar gas (Arce et al. 2008; Codella et al. 2009). However, the actual degree of chemical complexity achieved in protostellar shocks is poorly contrained. To address this issue, we have started an unbiased survey of the millimeter line emission of the Cep E outflow. Cep E is an intermediate-mass class 0 protostar candidate (Lefloch 1996), situated in the Cep OB3 association at 725 pc (Johnson 1959) with a Lbol of ~100 Lsun. We observed the central protostellar source and the apex of the terminal Southern bowshock in order to quantify the chemistry induced by the shock. The observations were carried out in winter 2009-2010 and 2010-11 at the IRAM 30m telescope in the bands at 3mm (80-115GHz), 1.3mm (208-282GHz) and 0.8mm (329-350 GHz), reaching a rms of about 5mK per interval of 2MHz. These observations provide us with one of the most comprehensive census of the chemical composition of a protostellar outflow, and allow us to establish that the outflow associated with Cep E is probably at least as rich as L1157's one. In this work, we discuss and analyse the differences of the chemical composition and the properties of the molecular gas, associated with the protostellar envelope, the entrained (low-velocity), outflowing gas

  13. Star Formation in Low Mass Magnetized Cores: The Formation of Disks and Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffin, Dennis F.

    2012-10-01

    Protostellar discs are generally thought to drive molecular outflows and jets observed in star forming regions, but there has been some debate as to how they form. The details of the driving and collimation of outflows help determine how much mass is cleared out and how much energy is fed back into the surroundings. Recently it has been argued that the magnetic brake is so strong that early protostellar disks cannot form. We have performed 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of collapsing Bonnor-Ebert spheres, employing sink particles within an AMR grid and using a cooling function to model radiative cooling of the gas. This allows us to follow the formation and early evolution of the accretion disc (2-8)×10^4 years further into the Class 0 phase of its evolution. We form a rotationally dominated disc with a radius of 100 AU embedded inside a transient, unstable, flattened, rotating structure extending out to 2000 AU. The inner disc becomes unstable to a warping instability due to the magnetic structure of the outflow, warping 30 deg with respect to the rotation-axis by the end of the simulation. The disc is unstable to a Parker instability and sheds magnetic loops, degrading the orientation of the mean threading field. This reduces and locally reverses the magnetic braking torque of the large scale field back upon the disc. The reduction of magnetic braking allows a nearly Keplerian disc to form and may be the key way in which low mass stellar systems produce rotationally dominated discs. We discuss the relevance of our disc misalignment concerning the formation of mis-aligned hot Jupiters. Protostellar outflows are implicated in clearing mass from collapsing cores, and limiting the final mass of newly formed stars. The details of the driving and collimation of outflows help determine how much mass is cleared out and how much energy is fed back into the surroundings. The simulations generate outflows which are precessing, kinked, contain internal

  14. DETECTION OF A MAGNETIZED DISK AROUND A VERY YOUNG PROTOSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Ramprasad; Girart, Josep M.; Lai, Shih-Ping; Marrone, Daniel P. E-mail: girart@ice.cat

    2014-01-01

    We present subarcsecond resolution polarimetric observations of the 878 μm thermal dust continuum emission obtained with the Submillimeter Array toward the IRAS 16293–2422 protostellar binary system. We report the detection of linearly polarized dust emission arising from the circumstellar disk associated with the IRAS 16293–2422 B protostar. The fractional polarization of ≅ 1.4% is only slightly lower than that expected from theoretical calculations in such disks. The magnetic field structure on the plane of the sky derived from the dust polarization suggests a complex magnetic field geometry in the disk, possibly associated with a rotating disk that is wrapping the field lines as expected from the simulations. The polarization around IRAS 16293–2422 A at subarcsecond angular resolution is only marginally detected.

  15. CONVERGENCE STUDIES OF MASS TRANSPORT IN DISKS WITH GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITIES. I. THE CONSTANT COOLING TIME CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Scott; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Durisen, Richard H.; Boley, Aaron C. E-mail: tomsc@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: aaron.boley@gmail.com

    2012-02-10

    We conduct a convergence study of a protostellar disk, subject to a constant global cooling time and susceptible to gravitational instabilities (GIs), at a time when heating and cooling are roughly balanced. Our goal is to determine the gravitational torques produced by GIs, the level to which transport can be represented by a simple {alpha}-disk formulation, and to examine fragmentation criteria. Four simulations are conducted, identical except for the number of azimuthal computational grid points used. A Fourier decomposition of non-axisymmetric density structures in cos (m{phi}), sin (m{phi}) is performed to evaluate the amplitudes A{sub m} of these structures. The A{sub m} , gravitational torques, and the effective Shakura and Sunyaev {alpha} arising from gravitational stresses are determined for each resolution. We find nonzero A{sub m} for all m-values and that A{sub m} summed over all m is essentially independent of resolution. Because the number of measurable m-values is limited to half the number of azimuthal grid points, higher-resolution simulations have a larger fraction of their total amplitude in higher-order structures. These structures act more locally than lower-order structures. Therefore, as the resolution increases the total gravitational stress decreases as well, leading higher-resolution simulations to experience weaker average gravitational torques than lower-resolution simulations. The effective {alpha} also depends upon the magnitude of the stresses, thus {alpha}{sub eff} also decreases with increasing resolution. Our converged {alpha}{sub eff} is consistent with predictions from an analytic local theory for thin disks by Gammie, but only over many dynamic times when averaged over a substantial volume of the disk.

  16. Protostellar formation in rotating interstellar clouds. VIII - Inner core formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    The results are presented of a variety of spherically symmetric one-dimensional (1D) calculations intended to determine the robustness of the dynamical hiccup phenomenon in protostellar cores. The 1D models show that the phenomenon is relatively insensitive to changes in the equations of state, numerical resolution, initial density and temperature, and the radiative transfer approximation. In 1D, the hiccup results in an explosive destruction of the entire inner protostellar core. Inner core formation is studied with a sequence of three-dimensional models which show that rapid inner core rotation stabilizes the hiccup instability. Instead, the inner core becomes quite flat and undergoes a cycle of binary fragmentation, binary decay into a single object surrounded by a bar, breakup of the bar into a binary, etc. When lesser amounts of rotation are involved, the inner core does hiccup somewhat, but mass is ejected in only a few directions, leading to several broad streams of ejecta.

  17. THE VLA NASCENT DISK AND MULTIPLICITY SURVEY: FIRST LOOK AT RESOLVED CANDIDATE DISKS AROUND CLASS 0 AND I PROTOSTARS IN THE PERSEUS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Segura-Cox, Dominique M.; Harris, Robert J.; Looney, Leslie W.; Tobin, John J.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire; Perez, Laura; Kratter, Kaitlin; Dunham, Michael M.; Sadavoy, Sarah; Melis, Carl

    2016-02-01

    We present the first dust emission results toward a sample of seven protostellar disk candidates around Class 0 and I sources in the Perseus molecular cloud from the VLA Nascent Disk and Multiplicity (VANDAM) survey with ∼0.″05 or 12 AU resolution. To examine the surface brightness profiles of these sources, we fit the Ka-band 8 mm dust-continuum data in the u, v-plane to a simple, parametrized model based on the Shakura–Sunyaev disk model. The candidate disks are well-fit by a model with a disk-shaped profile and have masses consistent with known Class 0 and I disks. The inner-disk surface densities of the VANDAM candidate disks have shallower density profiles compared to disks around more evolved Class II systems. The best-fit model radii of the seven early-result candidate disks are R{sub c} > 10 AU; at 8 mm, the radii reflect lower limits on the disk size since dust continuum emission is tied to grain size and large grains radially drift inwards. These relatively large disks, if confirmed kinematically, are inconsistent with theoretical models where the disk size is limited by strong magnetic braking to <10 AU at early times.

  18. The VLA Nascent Disk and Multiplicity Survey: First Look at Resolved Candidate Disks around Class 0 and I Protostars in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura-Cox, Dominique M.; Harris, Robert J.; Tobin, John J.; Looney, Leslie W.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire; Kratter, Kaitlin; Dunham, Michael M.; Sadavoy, Sarah; Perez, Laura; Melis, Carl

    2016-02-01

    We present the first dust emission results toward a sample of seven protostellar disk candidates around Class 0 and I sources in the Perseus molecular cloud from the VLA Nascent Disk and Multiplicity (VANDAM) survey with ˜0.″05 or 12 AU resolution. To examine the surface brightness profiles of these sources, we fit the Ka-band 8 mm dust-continuum data in the u, v-plane to a simple, parametrized model based on the Shakura-Sunyaev disk model. The candidate disks are well-fit by a model with a disk-shaped profile and have masses consistent with known Class 0 and I disks. The inner-disk surface densities of the VANDAM candidate disks have shallower density profiles compared to disks around more evolved Class II systems. The best-fit model radii of the seven early-result candidate disks are Rc > 10 AU; at 8 mm, the radii reflect lower limits on the disk size since dust continuum emission is tied to grain size and large grains radially drift inwards. These relatively large disks, if confirmed kinematically, are inconsistent with theoretical models where the disk size is limited by strong magnetic braking to <10 AU at early times.

  19. Anisotropic Turbulence and Protostellar Feedback in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Charles Edward

    I investigate the decay and regeneration of turbulence in molecular clouds and the resulting star formation in those clouds in the presence of protostellar feedback. Studies of turbulence generally only consider isotropic turbulence, while the turbulence in molecular clouds may be anisotropic. I perform a series of simulations of anisotropic turbulence and measure its decay rate. I find that anisotropic turbulence decays slower than isotropic turbulence. When I break the velocity dispersion into isotropic and anisotropic components, I find the decay time is the crossing time of the isotropic component, which can be much slower than the total velocity dispersion. As part of this study, I present a measure of anisotropy that can be calculated in observations of molecular clouds. I also investigate the effects of compression on turbulence. This is motivated by the need to replenish turbulent energy. Using a series of simulations of contracting turbulence, I find that turbulence behaves as a monatomic ideal gas under isotropic compression. I also find that compression in a single direction imparts energy to that direction, but does not transfer that energy to the other two directions. Finally, I perform a series of high resolution star formation simulations with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) including hydrodynamics, gravity, radiation, protostellar outflows and protostellar luminosity. The simulations provide a self-consistent story of star formation, all while matching observations. The matched observations include the masses of both stars and prestellar cores, the clustering of cores and the luminosity function of protostars. In this story of star formation, cores form on the Jeans length of the host cloud. Each core forms a central star or binary, but also fragments repeatedly down 0.05 M⊙ stars. The stellar radiation prevents fragmentation below this mass scale, but is not important on larger scales. The protostellar outflows eject 2/3 of the incoming mass

  20. Protostellar formation in rotation interstellar clouds. III. Nonaxisymmetric collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, A.P.

    1980-05-01

    A full three spatial-dimension gravitational hydrodynamics code has been used to follow the collapse of isothermal rotating clouds subjected to various nonaxialy symmetric perturbations (NAP). An initially axially symmetric cloud collapsed to form a ring which then fragmented into a binary protostellar system. A low thermal energy cloud with a large bar-shaped NAP collapsed and fragmented directly into a binary; higher thermal energy clouds damp out such NAPs while higher rotational rotational energy clouds produce binaries with wider separations. Fragmentation into single and binary systems has been seen. The tidal effects of other nearby protostellar clouds are shown to have an important effect upon the collapse and should not be neglected. The three-dimensional calculations indicate that isothermal interstellar clouds may fragment (with or without passing through a transitory ring phase) into protostellar objects while still in the isothermal regime. The fragments obtained have masses and specific spin angular momenta roughly a 10th that of the original cloud. Interstellar clouds and their fragments may pass through successive collapse phases with fragmentation and reduction of spin angular momentum (by conversion to orbital angular momentum and preferential accretion of low angular momentum matter) terminating in the formation of pre--main-sequence stars with the observed pre--main-sequence rotation rates.

  1. A STUDY OF RADIO POLARIZATION IN PROTOSTELLAR JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Cécere, Mariana; Velázquez, Pablo F.; De Colle, Fabio; Esquivel, Alejandro; Araudo, Anabella T.; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2016-01-10

    Synchrotron radiation is commonly observed in connection with shocks of different velocities, ranging from relativistic shocks associated with active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, or microquasars, to weakly or non-relativistic flows such as those observed in supernova remnants. Recent observations of synchrotron emission in protostellar jets are important not only because they extend the range over which the acceleration process works, but also because they allow us to determine the jet and/or interstellar magnetic field structure, thus giving insights into the jet ejection and collimation mechanisms. In this paper, we compute for the first time polarized (synchrotron) and non-polarized (thermal X-ray) synthetic emission maps from axisymmetrical simulations of magnetized protostellar jets. We consider models with different jet velocities and variability, as well as a toroidal or helical magnetic field. Our simulations show that variable, low-density jets with velocities of ∼1000 km s{sup −1} and ∼10 times lighter than the environment can produce internal knots with significant synchrotron emission and thermal X-rays in the shocked region of the leading bow shock moving in a dense medium. While models with a purely toroidal magnetic field show a very large degree of polarization, models with a helical magnetic field show lower values and a decrease of the degree of polarization, in agreement with observations of protostellar jets.

  2. Spatial Distribution of Small Organics in Prestellar and Protostellar Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waalkes, William; Guzman, Viviana; Oberg, Karin I.

    2016-01-01

    In the interstellar medium, formaldehyde (H2CO) has efficient formation pathways in both the gas-phase and on the surfaces of dust grains. Methanol (CH3OH), on the other hand, is believed to form exclusively on grains as there are no efficient gas-phase reactions leading to CH3OH. We present observations taken with the IRAM 30m telescope of several H2CO and CH3OH lines in a prestellar and protostellar core. We investigated the formation pathways of H2CO and CH3OH by comparing their spatial distributions. We find that in the prestellar core, the two species are anti-correlated in the densest region, while their emission is correlated in the low-density region. In contrast, for the protostellar core we find a correlation in the distribution of both species. We conclude that in the protostellar source, H2CO and CH3OH form together on grains and have been thermally desorbed due to the central newly formed star. In the prestellar core, however, CH3OH forms on the ices and remains depleted in the coldest regions, while H2CO can form efficiently in the gas-phase. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  3. Chemical Signposts in Transition Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleeves, I.; Bergin, E. A.; Fogel, J.

    2011-05-01

    In the era of the Kepler Mission, the detection of numerous multi-planet systems has demonstrated that planet-formation appears to be a rather ubiquitous phenomenon. Such systems are believed to form from nascent protoplanetary disks, whose environment sets the stage for initial planetary chemical composition and evolution. However, disk systems typically vary by orders of magnitude in radiation field, densities and temperatures, and thus complex disk models are necessary to fully understand this unique chemical environment. Further evidence for disks as progenitors to planetary systems comes from Spitzer surveys of young disk systems, which have revealed a class of objects known as ``transition disks''. These systems appear to have inner voids and gaps in the dust opacity, possibly indicative of planet evolution and disk clearing. This physical evolution in the dust disk will significantly impact its chemical nature, and therefore these potentially planet-forming systems in ``transition'' should have unique chemical signatures. We predict one such signature to be an active chemistry at the wall interface where the conditions are such that the disk is both heated and optically thick to the photo-dissociating UV. The net result is a wide variety of gas-phase molecules, appearing in line emission as bright molecular rings far from the central star. This behavior should also reveal a wealth of information about the physical conditions in this actively evolving zone between the inner ``cleared'' disk and the massive outer disk. For this presentation I will discuss the features of our disk chemical model pipeline and select model results of transition disk systems. I will also highlight the exciting future of protoplanetary disk chemistry in the era of ALMA, which will truly revolutionize our understanding of the chemical nature of disks.

  4. Astrochemistry of Dense Protostellar and Protoplanetary Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    Dense molecular clouds contain a remarkably rich chemistry, as revealed by combined submillimeter and infrared observations. Simple and complex (organic) gases, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, ices and silicates have been unambiguously detected in both low- and high-mass star forming regions. During star- and planet formation, these molecules undergo large abundance changes, with most of the heavy species frozen out as icy mantles on grains in the cold pre-stellar phase. As the protostars heat up their immediate surroundings, the warming and evaporation of the ices triggers the formation of more complex molecules, perhaps even of pre-biotic origin. Water, a key ingredient in the chemistry of life, is boosted in abundance in hot gas. Some of these molecules enter the protoplanetary disk where they are exposed to UV radiation or X-rays and modified further. The enhanced resolution and sensitivity of ALMA, Herschel, SOFIA, JWST and ELTs across the full range of wavelengths from cm to μm will be essential to trace this lifecycle of gas and dust from clouds to planets. The continued need for basic molecular data on gaseous and solid-state material coupled with powerful radiative transfer tools is emphasized to reap the full scientific benefits from these new facilities.

  5. Near-Infrared Imaging of Protostellar Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megeath, S. T.; Pipher, Judy; Myers, Phil; Peterson, Dawn

    2000-08-01

    We propose SQIID multiband IR imaging of the LBS 23 and OMC2/3 regions in the Orion Giant Molecular Clouds. Submillimeter observations of these regions show a remarkable number of protostars, indicating that these regions are forming stars at a rapid rate, but neither LBS-23 or OMC-2/3 have been surveyed extensively at infrared wavelengths. Using deep observations with SQIID on the 2.1-m telescope, we will survey the embedded stellar population of pre--main sequence stars down to the hydrogen burning limit in these highly extincted regions. These observations will give us a unique opportunity to study the earlier stages of cluster formation before the parental molecular gas has been significantly disrupted by HII regions. We will examine the spatial distribution to study the fragmentation history of the molecular gas and to use the spacing of the observed YSOs to constrain theories of cluster formation. We will also study the early evolution of the IMF and fraction of stars with disks by comparing these ``protoclusters'' to more more evolved regions such as the Trapezium cluster and NGC 2024.

  6. Optical Disks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, John C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This four-article section focuses on information storage capacity of the optical disk covering the information workstation (uses microcomputer, optical disk, compact disc to provide reference information, information content, work product support); use of laser videodisc technology for dissemination of agricultural information; encoding databases…

  7. Herniated Disk

    MedlinePlus

    ... forearm, or fingers.A slipped disk in the lumbar part of your spine can cause pain in the back and legs. It is often referred to as sciatica. This is because the disk pushes on the sciatic nerve, which runs down your leg. Symptoms include:Pain ...

  8. DISK-SATELLITE INTERACTION IN DISKS WITH DENSITY GAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovich, Cristobal; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2012-10-10

    Gravitational coupling between a gaseous disk and an orbiting perturber leads to angular momentum exchange between them that can result in gap opening by planets in protoplanetary disks and clearing of gas by binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) embedded in accretion disks. Understanding the co-evolution of the disk and the orbit of the perturber in these circumstances requires knowledge of the spatial distribution of the torque exerted by the latter on a highly non-uniform disk. Here we explore disk-satellite interaction in disks with gaps in linear approximation both in Fourier and in physical space, explicitly incorporating the disk non-uniformity in the fluid equations. Density gradients strongly displace the positions of Lindblad resonances in the disk (which often occur at multiple locations), and the waveforms of modes excited close to the gap edge get modified compared to the uniform disk case. The spatial distribution of the excitation torque density is found to be quite different from the existing prescriptions: most of the torque is exerted in a rather narrow region near the gap edge where Lindblad resonances accumulate, followed by an exponential falloff with the distance from the perturber. Despite these differences, for a given gap profile, the full integrated torque exerted on the disk agrees with the conventional uniform disk theory prediction at the level of {approx}10%. The nonlinearity of the density wave excited by the perturber is shown to decrease as the wave travels out of the gap, slowing down its nonlinear evolution and damping. Our results suggest that gap opening in protoplanetary disks and gas clearing around SMBH binaries can be more efficient than the existing theories predict. They pave the way for self-consistent calculations of the gap structure and the orbital evolution of the perturber using accurate prescription for the torque density behavior.

  9. Simulating the Formation of Massive Protostars. I. Radiative Feedback and Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Mikhail; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Kuiper, Rolf; Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi

    2016-05-01

    We present radiation hydrodynamic simulations of collapsing protostellar cores with initial masses of 30, 100, and 200 M ⊙. We follow their gravitational collapse and the formation of a massive protostar and protostellar accretion disk. We employ a new hybrid radiative feedback method blending raytracing techniques with flux-limited diffusion for a more accurate treatment of the temperature and radiative force. In each case, the disk that forms becomes Toomre-unstable and develops spiral arms. This occurs between 0.35 and 0.55 freefall times and is accompanied by an increase in the accretion rate by a factor of 2-10. Although the disk becomes unstable, no other stars are formed. In the case of our 100 and 200 M ⊙ simulations, the star becomes highly super-Eddington and begins to drive bipolar outflow cavities that expand outwards. These radiatively driven bubbles appear stable, and appear to be channeling gas back onto the protostellar accretion disk. Accretion proceeds strongly through the disk. After 81.4 kyr of evolution, our 30 M ⊙ simulation shows a star with a mass of 5.48 M ⊙ and a disk of mass 3.3 M ⊙, while our 100 M ⊙ simulation forms a 28.8 M ⊙ mass star with a 15.8 M ⊙ disk over the course of 41.6 kyr, and our 200 M ⊙ simulation forms a 43.7 M ⊙ star with an 18 M ⊙ disk in 21.9 kyr. In the absence of magnetic fields or other forms of feedback, the masses of the stars in our simulation do not appear to be limited by their own luminosities.

  10. Signs of Early-stage Disk Growth Revealed with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Hsi-Wei; Koch, Patrick M.; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Aso, Yusuke

    2017-01-01

    We present ALMA 1.3 mm continuum, 12CO, C18O, and SO data for the Class 0 protostars Lupus 3 MMS, IRAS 15398-3559, and IRAS 16253-2429 at resolutions of ˜100 au. By measuring a rotational profile in C18O, a 100 au Keplerian disk around a 0.3 M⊙ protostar is observed in Lupus 3 MMS. No 100 au Keplerian disks are observed in IRAS 15398-3559 and IRAS 16253-2429. Nevertheless, embedded compact (<30 au) continuum components are detected. The C18O emission in IRAS 15398-3559 shows signatures of infall with a constant angular momentum. IRAS 16253-2429 exhibits signatures of infall and rotation, but its rotational profile is unresolved. By fitting the C18O data with our kinematic models, the protostellar masses and the disk radii are inferred to be 0.01 M⊙ and 20 au in IRAS 15398-3559, and 0.03 M⊙ and 6 au in IRAS 16253-2429. By comparing the specific angular momentum profiles from 10,000 au to 100 au in eight Class 0 and I protostars, we find that the evolution of envelope rotation can be described with conventional inside-out collapse models. In comparison with a sample of 18 protostars with known disk radii, our results reveal signs of disk growth, with the disk radius increasing as {{M}* }0.8+/- 0.14 or {t}1.09+/- 0.37 in the Class 0 stage, where M* is the protostellar mass and t is the age. The disk growth rate slows down in the Class I stage. In addition, we find a hint that the mass accretion rate declines as {t}-0.26+/- 0.04 from the Class 0 to the Class I stages.

  11. ROTATION AND OUTFLOW MOTIONS IN THE VERY LOW-MASS CLASS 0 PROTOSTELLAR SYSTEM HH 211 AT SUBARCSECOND RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.-F.; Hirano, Naomi; Ho, Paul T. P.; Shang, Hsien; Palau, Aina; Bourke, Tyler L.; Zhang Qizhou

    2009-07-10

    HH 211 is a nearby young protostellar system with a highly collimated jet. We have mapped it in 352 GHz continuum, SiO (J = 8 - 7), and HCO{sup +} (J = 4 - 3) emission at up to {approx}0.''2 resolution with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The continuum source is now resolved into two sources, SMM1 and SMM2, with a separation of {approx} 84 AU. SMM1 is seen at the center of the jet, probably tracing a (inner) dusty disk around the protostar driving the jet. SMM2 is seen to the southwest of SMM1 and may trace an envelope-disk around a small binary companion. A flattened envelope-disk is seen in HCO{sup +} around SMM1 with a radius of {approx} 80 AU perpendicular to the jet axis. Its velocity structure is consistent with a rotation motion and can be fitted with a Keplerian law that yields a mass of {approx}50 {+-} 15 M {sub Jup} (a mass of a brown dwarf) for the protostar. Thus, the protostar could be the lowest mass source known to have a collimated jet and a rotating flattened envelope-disk. A small-scale ({approx}200 AU) low-speed ({approx}2 km s{sup -1}) outflow is seen in HCO{sup +} around the jet axis extending from the envelope-disk. It seems to rotate in the same direction as the envelope-disk and may carry away part of the angular momentum from the envelope-disk. The jet is seen in SiO close to {approx}100 AU from SMM1. It is seen with a 'C-shaped' bending. It has a transverse width of {approx}< 40 AU and a velocity of {approx} 170 {+-} 60 km s{sup -1}. A possible velocity gradient is seen consistently across its innermost pair of knots, {approx}0.5 km s{sup -1} at {approx}10 AU, consistent with the sense of rotation of the envelope-disk. If this gradient is an upper limit of the true rotational gradient of the jet, then the jet carries away a very small amount of angular momentum of {approx}< 5 AU km s{sup -1} and thus must be launched from the very inner edge of the disk near the corotation radius.

  12. Numerical Simulations of Disk-Planet Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Gennaro

    2003-06-01

    The aim of this thesis is the study the dynamical interactions occurring between a forming planet and its surrounding protostellar environment. This task is accomplished by means of both 2D and 3D numerical simulations. The first part of this work concerned global simulations in 3D. These were intended to investigate large-scale effects caused by a Jupiter-size body still in the process of accreting matter from its surroundings. Simulations show that, despite a density gap forms along the orbital path, Jupiter-mass protoplanets still accrete at a rate on the order of 0.01 Earth's masses per year when they are embedded in a minimum-mass Solar nebula. In the same conditions, the migration time scale due to gravitational torques by the disk is around 100000 years. The second part of the work was dedicated to perform 2D calculations, by employing a nested-grid technique. This method allows to carry out global simulations of planets orbiting in disks and, at the same time, to resolve in great detail the dynamics of the flow inside the Roche lobe of both massive and low-mass planets. Regardless of the planet mass, the high resolution supplied by the nested-grid technique permits an evaluation of the torques, resulting from short and very short range gravitational interactions, more reliable than the one previously estimated with the aid of numerical methods. Likewise, the mass flow onto the planet is computed in a more accurate fashion. Resulting migration time scales are in the range from 20000 years, for intermediate-mass planets, to 1000000 years, for very low-mass as well as high-mass planets. Circumplanetary disks form inside of the Roche lobe of Jupiter-size secondaries. In order to evaluate the consequences of the flat geometry on the local flow structure around planets, 3D nested-grid simulations were carried out to investigate a range of planetary masses spanning from 1.5 Earth's masses to one Jupiter's mass. Outcomes show that migration rates are relatively

  13. PROTOSTELLAR FEEDBACK AND FINAL MASS OF THE SECOND-GENERATION PRIMORDIAL STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Yoshida, Naoki; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Yorke, Harold W. E-mail: hosokwtk@gmail.com

    2012-12-01

    The first stars in the universe ionized the ambient primordial gas through various feedback processes. 'Second-generation' primordial stars potentially form from this disturbed gas after its recombination. In this Letter, we study the late formation stage of such second-generation stars, where a large amount of gas accretes onto the protostar and the final stellar mass is determined when the accretion terminates. We directly compute the complex interplay between the accretion flow and stellar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, performing radiation-hydrodynamic simulations coupled with stellar evolution calculations. Because of more efficient H{sub 2} and HD cooling in the pre-stellar stage, the accretion rates onto the star are 10 times lower than in the case of the formation of the first stars. The lower accretion rates and envelope density result in the occurrence of an expanding bipolar H II region at a lower protostellar mass M{sub *} {approx_equal} 10 M{sub Sun }, which blows out the circumstellar material, thereby quenching the mass supply from the envelope to the accretion disk. At the same time the disk loses mass due to photoevaporation by the growing star. In our fiducial case the stellar UV feedback terminates mass accretion onto the star at M{sub *} {approx_equal} 17 M{sub Sun }. Although the derived masses of the second-generation primordial stars are systematically lower than those of the first generation, the difference is within a factor of only a few. Our results suggest a new scenario, whereby the majority of the primordial stars are born as massive stars with tens of solar masses, regardless of their generations.

  14. Protostellar Feedback and Final Mass of the Second-generation Primordial Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Yoshida, Naoki; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Yorke, Harold W.

    2012-12-01

    The first stars in the universe ionized the ambient primordial gas through various feedback processes. "Second-generation" primordial stars potentially form from this disturbed gas after its recombination. In this Letter, we study the late formation stage of such second-generation stars, where a large amount of gas accretes onto the protostar and the final stellar mass is determined when the accretion terminates. We directly compute the complex interplay between the accretion flow and stellar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, performing radiation-hydrodynamic simulations coupled with stellar evolution calculations. Because of more efficient H2 and HD cooling in the pre-stellar stage, the accretion rates onto the star are 10 times lower than in the case of the formation of the first stars. The lower accretion rates and envelope density result in the occurrence of an expanding bipolar H II region at a lower protostellar mass M * ~= 10 M ⊙, which blows out the circumstellar material, thereby quenching the mass supply from the envelope to the accretion disk. At the same time the disk loses mass due to photoevaporation by the growing star. In our fiducial case the stellar UV feedback terminates mass accretion onto the star at M * ~= 17 M ⊙. Although the derived masses of the second-generation primordial stars are systematically lower than those of the first generation, the difference is within a factor of only a few. Our results suggest a new scenario, whereby the majority of the primordial stars are born as massive stars with tens of solar masses, regardless of their generations.

  15. Investigating FP Tau’s protoplanetary disk structure through modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinjikji, Marah; Espaillat, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    This project presents a study aiming to understand the structure of the protoplanetary disk around FP Tau, a very young, very low mass star in the Taurus star-forming region. We have gathered existing optical, Spitzer, Herschel and submillimeter observations to construct the spectral energy distribution (SED) of FP Tau. We have used the D’Alessio et al (2006) physically self-consistent irradiated accretion disk model including dust settling to model the disk of FP Tau. Using this method, the best fit for the SED of FP Tau is a model that includes a gap located 10-20 AU away from the star. This gap is filled with optically thin dust that separates the optically thick dust in the outer disk from the optically thick dust in the inner disk. These characteristics indicate that FP Tau’s protostellar system is best classified as a pre-transitional disk. Near-infrared interferometry in the K-Band from Willson et al 2016 indicates that FP Tau has a small gap located 10-20 AU from the star, which is consistent with the model we produced, lending further support to the pre-transitional disk interpretation. The most likely explanation for the existence of a gap in the disk is a forming planet.

  16. Disk Drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A new material known as AlBeMet, developed by Brush Wellman for research applications in the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program, is now used for high performance disk drives. AlBeMet is a compression of aluminum, beryllium metal matrix composite. It reduces system weight and its high thermal conductivity can effectively remove heat and increase an electrical system's lifetime. The lighter, stiffer AlBeMet (AlBeMet 160) used in the disk drive means heads can be moved faster, improving disk performance.

  17. Nebra Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pásztor, Emília

    An important archaeological find from the Bronze Age has come to light in Germany. It is a round bronze disk adorned with gold figures that might be interpreted as symbols for stars, the sun, and the moon, making the disk the oldest known surviving depiction of celestial objects in Europe. By comparing the iconography and ideography of the disk with archaeological finds, ethnographic material, and historical notes of different cultures and periods, the conclusion has been reached that the compositional elements might be understood as the depiction of a traditional folk worldview.

  18. Magnetic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallinson, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic disk recording was invented in 1953 and has undergone intensive development ever since. As a result of this 38 years of development, the cost per byte and the areal density have halved and doubled respectively every 2-2 1/2 years. Today, the cost per byte is lower than 10(exp -6) dollars per byte and area densities exceed 100 10(exp 6) bits per square inch. In this talk, the recent achievements in magnetic disk recording are first surveyed briefly. Then, the principal areas of current technical development are outlined. Finally, some comments are made about the future of magnetic disk recording.

  19. ACCRETION OUTBURSTS IN CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lubow, S. H.; Martin, R. G.

    2012-04-20

    We describe a model for the long-term evolution of a circumplanetary disk that is fed mass from a circumstellar disk and contains regions of low turbulence (dead zones). We show that such disks can be subject to accretion-driven outbursts, analogous to outbursts previously modeled in the context of circumstellar disks to explain FU Ori phenomena. Circumplanetary disks around a proto-Jupiter can undergo outbursts for infall accretion rates onto the disks in the range M-dot{sub infall} approx. 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -7} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, typical of accretion rates in the T Tauri phase. During outbursts, the accretion rate and disk luminosity increases by several orders of magnitude. Most of the planet mass growth during planetary gas accretion may occur via disk outbursts involving gas that is considerably hotter than predicted by steady state models. For low infall accretion rates M-dot{sub infall} {approx}< 10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} that occur in late stages of disk accretion, disk outbursts are unlikely to occur, even if dead zones are present. Such conditions are favorable for the formation of icy satellites.

  20. Rapid planetesimal formation in turbulent circumstellar disks.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Anders; Oishi, Jeffrey S; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Klahr, Hubert; Henning, Thomas; Youdin, Andrew

    2007-08-30

    During the initial stages of planet formation in circumstellar gas disks, dust grains collide and build up larger and larger bodies. How this process continues from metre-sized boulders to kilometre-scale planetesimals is a major unsolved problem: boulders are expected to stick together poorly, and to spiral into the protostar in a few hundred orbits owing to a 'headwind' from the slower rotating gas. Gravitational collapse of the solid component has been suggested to overcome this barrier. But even low levels of turbulence will inhibit sedimentation of solids to a sufficiently dense midplane layer, and turbulence must be present to explain observed gas accretion in protostellar disks. Here we report that boulders can undergo efficient gravitational collapse in locally overdense regions in the midplane of the disk. The boulders concentrate initially in transient high pressure regions in the turbulent gas, and these concentrations are augmented a further order of magnitude by a streaming instability driven by the relative flow of gas and solids. We find that gravitationally bound clusters form with masses comparable to dwarf planets and containing a distribution of boulder sizes. Gravitational collapse happens much faster than radial drift, offering a possible path to planetesimal formation in accreting circumstellar disks.

  1. A triple protostar system formed via fragmentation of a gravitationally unstable disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Persson, Magnus V.; Looney, Leslie W.; Dunham, Michael M.; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire J.; Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Harris, Robert J.; Melis, Carl; Pérez, Laura M.

    2016-10-01

    Binary and multiple star systems are a frequent outcome of the star formation process and as a result almost half of all stars with masses similar to that of the Sun have at least one companion star. Theoretical studies indicate that there are two main pathways that can operate concurrently to form binary/multiple star systems: large-scale fragmentation of turbulent gas cores and filaments or smaller-scale fragmentation of a massive protostellar disk due to gravitational instability. Observational evidence for turbulent fragmentation on scales of more than 1,000 astronomical units has recently emerged. Previous evidence for disk fragmentation was limited to inferences based on the separations of more-evolved pre-main sequence and protostellar multiple systems. The triple protostar system L1448 IRS3B is an ideal system with which to search for evidence of disk fragmentation as it is in an early phase of the star formation process, it is likely to be less than 150,000 years old and all of the protostars in the system are separated by less than 200 astronomical units. Here we report observations of dust and molecular gas emission that reveal a disk with a spiral structure surrounding the three protostars. Two protostars near the centre of the disk are separated by 61 astronomical units and a tertiary protostar is coincident with a spiral arm in the outer disk at a separation of 183 astronomical units. The inferred mass of the central pair of protostellar objects is approximately one solar mass, while the disk surrounding the three protostars has a total mass of around 0.30 solar masses. The tertiary protostar itself has a minimum mass of about 0.085 solar masses. We demonstrate that the disk around L1448 IRS3B appears susceptible to disk fragmentation at radii between 150 and 320 astronomical units, overlapping with the location of the tertiary protostar. This is consistent with models for a protostellar disk that has recently undergone gravitational instability

  2. A triple protostar system formed via fragmentation of a gravitationally unstable disk.

    PubMed

    Tobin, John J; Kratter, Kaitlin M; Persson, Magnus V; Looney, Leslie W; Dunham, Michael M; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire J; Sadavoy, Sarah I; Harris, Robert J; Melis, Carl; Pérez, Laura M

    2016-10-27

    Binary and multiple star systems are a frequent outcome of the star formation process and as a result almost half of all stars with masses similar to that of the Sun have at least one companion star. Theoretical studies indicate that there are two main pathways that can operate concurrently to form binary/multiple star systems: large-scale fragmentation of turbulent gas cores and filaments or smaller-scale fragmentation of a massive protostellar disk due to gravitational instability. Observational evidence for turbulent fragmentation on scales of more than 1,000 astronomical units has recently emerged. Previous evidence for disk fragmentation was limited to inferences based on the separations of more-evolved pre-main sequence and protostellar multiple systems. The triple protostar system L1448 IRS3B is an ideal system with which to search for evidence of disk fragmentation as it is in an early phase of the star formation process, it is likely to be less than 150,000 years old and all of the protostars in the system are separated by less than 200 astronomical units. Here we report observations of dust and molecular gas emission that reveal a disk with a spiral structure surrounding the three protostars. Two protostars near the centre of the disk are separated by 61 astronomical units and a tertiary protostar is coincident with a spiral arm in the outer disk at a separation of 183 astronomical units. The inferred mass of the central pair of protostellar objects is approximately one solar mass, while the disk surrounding the three protostars has a total mass of around 0.30 solar masses. The tertiary protostar itself has a minimum mass of about 0.085 solar masses. We demonstrate that the disk around L1448 IRS3B appears susceptible to disk fragmentation at radii between 150 and 320 astronomical units, overlapping with the location of the tertiary protostar. This is consistent with models for a protostellar disk that has recently undergone gravitational instability

  3. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF STARLESS AND PROTOSTELLAR CORES IN GOULD BELT CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Di Francesco, James; Bontemps, Sylvain; Megeath, S. Thomas; Allgaier, Erin; Rebull, Luisa M.; Carey, Sean; McCabe, Caer-Eve; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Padgett, Deborah; Gutermuth, Robert; Hora, Joe; Huard, Tracy; Muzerolle, James; Terebey, Susan

    2010-02-20

    Using data from the SCUBA Legacy Catalogue (850 {mu}m) and Spitzer Space Telescope (3.6-70 {mu}m), we explore dense cores in the Ophiuchus, Taurus, Perseus, Serpens, and Orion molecular clouds. We develop a new method to discriminate submillimeter cores found by Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) as starless or protostellar, using point source photometry from Spitzer wide field surveys. First, we identify infrared sources with red colors associated with embedded young stellar objects (YSOs). Second, we compare the positions of these YSO candidates to our submillimeter cores. With these identifications, we construct new, self-consistent starless and protostellar core mass functions (CMFs) for the five clouds. We find best-fit slopes to the high-mass end of the CMFs of -1.26 +- 0.20, -1.22 +- 0.06, -0.95 +- 0.20, and -1.67 +- 0.72 for Ophiuchus, Taurus, Perseus, and Orion, respectively. Broadly, these slopes are each consistent with the -1.35 power-law slope of the Salpeter initial mass function at higher masses, but suggest some differences. We examine a variety of trends between these CMF shapes and their parent cloud properties, potentially finding a correlation between the high-mass slope and core temperature. We also find a trend between core mass and effective size, but we are very limited by sensitivity. We make similar comparisons between core mass and size with visual extinction (for A{sub V} >= 3) and find no obvious trends. We also predict the numbers and mass distributions of cores that future surveys with SCUBA-2 may detect in each of these clouds.

  4. Accretion and magnetic field morphology around Class 0 stage protostellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifried, D.; Banerjee, R.; Pudritz, R. E.; Klessen, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    We analyse simulations of turbulent, magnetized molecular cloud cores focusing on the formation of Class 0 stage protostellar discs and the physical conditions in their surroundings. We show that for a wide range of initial conditions Keplerian discs are formed in the Class 0 stage already. In particular, we show that even subsonic turbulent motions reduce the magnetic braking efficiency sufficiently in order to allow rotationally supported discs to form. We therefore suggest that already during the Class 0 stage the fraction of Keplerian discs is significantly higher than 50 per cent, consistent with recent observational trends but significantly higher than predictions based on simulations with misaligned magnetic fields, demonstrating the importance of turbulent motions for the formation of Keplerian discs. We show that the accretion of mass and angular momentum in the surroundings of protostellar discs occurs in a highly anisotropic manner, by means of a few narrow accretion channels. The magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the discs is highly disordered, revealing field reversals up to distances of 1000 au. These findings demonstrate that as soon as even mild turbulent motions are included, the classical disc formation scenario of a coherently rotating environment and a well-ordered magnetic field breaks down. Hence, it is highly questionable to assess the magnetic braking efficiency based on non-turbulent collapse simulation. We strongly suggest that, in addition to the global magnetic field properties, the small-scale accretion flow and detailed magnetic field structure have to be considered in order to assess the likelihood of Keplerian discs to be present.

  5. THE ANATOMY OF THE YOUNG PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOW HH 211

    SciTech Connect

    Tappe, A.; Forbrich, J.; Lada, C. J.; Martin, S.; Yuan, Y.

    2012-05-20

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope 5-36 {mu}m mapping observations toward the southeastern lobe of the young protostellar outflow HH 211. The southeastern terminal shock of the outflow shows a rich mid-infrared spectrum including molecular emission lines from OH, H{sub 2}O, HCO{sup +}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and HD. The spectrum also shows a rising infrared continuum toward 5 {mu}m, which we interpret as unresolved emission lines from highly excited rotational levels of the CO v = 1-0 fundamental band. This interpretation is supported by a strong excess flux observed in the Spitzer/IRAC 4-5 {mu}m channel 2 image compared to the other IRAC channels. The extremely high critical densities of the CO v = 1-0 ro-vibrational lines and a comparison to H{sub 2} and CO excitation models suggest jet densities larger than 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} in the terminal shock. We also observed the southeastern terminal outflow shock with the Submillimeter Array and detected pure rotational emission from CO 2-1, HCO{sup +} 3-2, and HCN 3-2. The rotationally excited CO traces the collimated outflow backbone as well as the terminal shock. HCN traces individual dense knots along the outflow and in the terminal shock, whereas HCO{sup +} solely appears in the terminal shock. The unique combination of our mid-infrared and submillimeter observations with previously published near-infrared observations allow us to study the interaction of one of the youngest known protostellar outflows with its surrounding molecular cloud. Our results help us to understand the nature of some of the so-called green fuzzies (Extended Green Objects), and elucidate the physical conditions that cause high OH excitation and affect the chemical OH/H{sub 2}O balance in protostellar outflows and young stellar objects. In an appendix to this paper, we summarize our Spitzer follow-up survey of protostellar outflow shocks to find further examples of highly excited OH occurring together with H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}.

  6. The Anatomy of the Young Protostellar Outflow HH 211

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappe, A.; Forbrich, J.; Martín, S.; Yuan, Y.; Lada, C. J.

    2012-05-01

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope 5-36 μm mapping observations toward the southeastern lobe of the young protostellar outflow HH 211. The southeastern terminal shock of the outflow shows a rich mid-infrared spectrum including molecular emission lines from OH, H2O, HCO+, CO2, H2, and HD. The spectrum also shows a rising infrared continuum toward 5 μm, which we interpret as unresolved emission lines from highly excited rotational levels of the CO v = 1-0 fundamental band. This interpretation is supported by a strong excess flux observed in the Spitzer/IRAC 4-5 μm channel 2 image compared to the other IRAC channels. The extremely high critical densities of the CO v = 1-0 ro-vibrational lines and a comparison to H2 and CO excitation models suggest jet densities larger than 106 cm-3 in the terminal shock. We also observed the southeastern terminal outflow shock with the Submillimeter Array and detected pure rotational emission from CO 2-1, HCO+ 3-2, and HCN 3-2. The rotationally excited CO traces the collimated outflow backbone as well as the terminal shock. HCN traces individual dense knots along the outflow and in the terminal shock, whereas HCO+ solely appears in the terminal shock. The unique combination of our mid-infrared and submillimeter observations with previously published near-infrared observations allow us to study the interaction of one of the youngest known protostellar outflows with its surrounding molecular cloud. Our results help us to understand the nature of some of the so-called green fuzzies (Extended Green Objects), and elucidate the physical conditions that cause high OH excitation and affect the chemical OH/H2O balance in protostellar outflows and young stellar objects. In an appendix to this paper, we summarize our Spitzer follow-up survey of protostellar outflow shocks to find further examples of highly excited OH occurring together with H2O and H2.

  7. DISPERSING ENVELOPE AROUND THE KEPLERIAN CIRCUMBINARY DISK IN L1551 NE AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR BINARY GROWTH

    SciTech Connect

    Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Kiyokane, Kazuhiro; Saigo, Kazuya; Saito, Masao

    2015-12-01

    We performed mapping observations of the Class I protostellar binary system L1551 NE in the C{sup 18}O (J = 3–2), {sup 13}CO (J = 3–2), CS (J = 7–6), and SO (J{sub N} = 7{sub 8}–6{sub 7}) lines with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). The ASTE C{sup 18}O data were combined with our previous SMA C{sup 18}O data, which show a r ∼ 300 AU scale Keplerian disk around the protostellar binary system. The C{sup 18}O maps show a ∼20,000 AU scale protostellar envelope surrounding the central Keplerian circumbinary disk. The envelope exhibits a northeast (blue) to southwest (red) velocity gradient along the minor axis, which can be interpreted as a dispersing gas motion with an outward velocity of 0.3 km s{sup −1}, while no rotational motion in the envelope is seen. In addition to the envelope, two ≲4000 AU scale, high-velocity (≳1.3 km s{sup −1}) redshifted {sup 13}CO and CS emission components are found ∼40″ southwest and ∼20″ west of the protostellar binary. These redshifted components are most likely outflow components driven from the neighboring protostellar source L1551 IRS 5, and are colliding with the envelope in L1551 NE. The net momentum, kinetic, and internal energies of the L1551 IRS 5 outflow components are comparable to those of the L1551 NE envelope, and the interactions between the outflows and the envelope are likely to cause the dissipation of the envelope and thus suppression of further growth of the mass and mass ratio of the central protostellar binary in L1551 NE.

  8. Circumstellar Disks in Very Young Embedded Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariñas, Naibí; Lada, Elizabeth A.; Teixeira, Paula S.; Lada, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    We used FLAMINGOS near-IR photometry and spectroscopy and Spitzer mid-IR photometry to study disk fractions in the 1 to 2 Myr old NGC2264 clusters. We find that stars with masses < 0.3 solar masses have lower disk fractions than stars of solar mass or higher at these early ages. We also find that most disks disappear within the first 4 Myr, which is consistent with previous studies of disk lifetimes. Our study suggests that either some very low mass stars form without disks or that their disks are less massive and/or colder than predicted from models and not detected with Spitzer/Flamingos sensitivities.

  9. Magnetized Accretion and Dead Zones in Protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyurkevich, Natalia; Turner, Neal J.; Henning, Thomas; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-07-01

    The edges of magnetically-dead zones in protostellar disks have been proposed as locations where density bumps may arise, trapping planetesimals and helping form planets. Magneto-rotational turbulence in magnetically-active zones provides both accretion of gas on the star and transport of mass to the dead zone. We investigate the location of the magnetically-active regions in a protostellar disk around a solar-type star, varying the parameters like dust-to-gas ratio. The dead zone is in most cases defined by the ambipolar diffusion. In our maps, the dead zone takes a variety of shapes, including a fish-tail pointing away from the star and islands located on and off the midplane. The corresponding accretion rates vary with radius, indicating locations where the surface density will increase over time, and others where it will decrease. We show that density bumps do not readily grow near the dead zone's outer edge, independently of the disk parameters and the dust properties. Instead, the accretion rate peaks at the radius where the gas-phase metals freeze out. This could lead to clearing a valley in the surface density, and to a trap for pebbles located just outside the metal freeze-out line. Here, we provide the fitting formula for the metal line and consider the cojoint impact of metal ans snow lines on the shape of the dead zone.

  10. EARTH, MOON, SUN, AND CV ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M. M.

    2009-11-01

    Net tidal torque by the secondary on a misaligned accretion disk, like the net tidal torque by the Moon and the Sun on the equatorial bulge of the spinning and tilted Earth, is suggested by others to be a source to retrograde precession in non-magnetic, accreting cataclysmic variable (CV) dwarf novae (DN) systems that show negative superhumps in their light curves. We investigate this idea in this work. We generate a generic theoretical expression for retrograde precession in spinning disks that are misaligned with the orbital plane. Our generic theoretical expression matches that which describes the retrograde precession of Earths' equinoxes. By making appropriate assumptions, we reduce our generic theoretical expression to those generated by others, or to those used by others, to describe retrograde precession in protostellar, protoplanetary, X-ray binary, non-magnetic CV DN, quasar, and black hole systems. We find that spinning, tilted CV DN systems cannot be described by a precessing ring or by a precessing rigid disk. We find that differential rotation and effects on the disk by the accretion stream must be addressed. Our analysis indicates that the best description of a retrogradely precessing spinning, tilted, CV DN accretion disk is a differentially rotating, tilted disk with an attached rotating, tilted ring located near the innermost disk annuli. In agreement with the observations and numerical simulations by others, we find that our numerically simulated CV DN accretion disks retrogradely precess as a unit. Our final, reduced expression for retrograde precession agrees well with our numerical simulation results and with selective observational systems that seem to have main-sequence secondaries. Our results suggest that a major source to retrograde precession is tidal torques like that by the Moon and the Sun on the Earth. In addition, these tidal torques should be common to a variety of systems where one member is spinning and tilted, regardless if

  11. Molecular ions in the protostellar shock L1157-B1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podio, L.; Lefloch, B.; Ceccarelli, C.; Codella, C.; Bachiller, R.

    2014-05-01

    Aims: We perform a complete census of molecular ions with an abundance greater than ~10-10 in the protostellar shock L1157-B1. This allows us to study the ionisation structure and chemistry of the shock. Methods: An unbiased high-sensitivity survey of L1157-B1 performed with the IRAM-30 m and Herschel/HIFI as part of the CHESS and ASAI large programmes allows searching for molecular ions emission. Then, by means of a radiative transfer code in the large velocity gradient approximation, the gas physical conditions and fractional abundances of molecular ions are derived. The latter are compared with estimates of steady-state abundances in the cloud and their evolution in the shock calculated with the chemical model Astrochem. Results: We detect emission from HCO+, H13CO+, N2H+, HCS+, and for the first time in a shock, from HOCO+ and SO+. The bulk of the emission peaks at blue-shifted velocity, ~0.5-3 km s -1 with respect to systemic, has a width of ~3-7 km s-1 and is associated with the outflow cavities (Tkin ~ 20-70 K, nH2 ~ 105 cm-3). A high-velocity component up to -40 km s-1, associated with the primary jet, is detected in the HCO+ 1-0 line. Observed HCO+ and N2H+ abundances (XHCO+ ~ 0.7-3 × 10-8, XN2H+ ~ 0.4-8 × 10-9) agree with steady-state abundances in the cloud and with their evolution in the compressed and heated gas in the shock for cosmic rays ionisation rate ζ = 3 × 10-16 s-1. HOCO+, SO+, and HCS+ observed abundances (XHOCO+ ~ 10-9, XSO+ ~ 8 × 10-10, XHCS+ ~ 3-7 × 10-10), instead, are 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than predicted in the cloud; on the other hand, they are strongly enhanced on timescales shorter than the shock age (~2000 years) if CO2, S or H2S, and OCS are sputtered off the dust grains in the shock. Conclusions: The performed analysis indicates that HCO+ and N2H+ are a fossil record of pre-shock gas in the outflow cavity, whilst HOCO+, SO+, and HCS+ are effective shock tracers that can be used to infer the amount of CO2 and sulphur

  12. Modeling Planetary System Formation with N-body Simulations: Role of Gas Disk and Statistics Compared to Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huigen; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Wang, Su

    2011-05-01

    During the late stage of planet formation, when Mars-sized cores appear, interactions among planetary cores can excite their orbital eccentricities, accelerate their merging, and thus sculpt their final orbital architecture. This study contributes to the final assembling of planetary systems with N-body simulations, including the type I or II migration of planets and gas accretion of massive cores in a viscous disk. Statistics on the final distributions of planetary masses, semimajor axes, and eccentricities are derived and are comparable to those of the observed systems. Our simulations predict some new orbital signatures of planetary systems around solar mass stars: 36% of the surviving planets are giant planets (>10 M ⊕). Most of the massive giant planets (>30 M ⊕) are located at 1-10 AU. Terrestrial planets are distributed more or less evenly at <1-2 AU. Planets in inner orbits may accumulate at the inner edges of either the protostellar disk (3-5 days) or its magnetorotational instability dead zone (30-50 days). There is a planet desert in the mass-eccentricity diagram, i.e., a lack of planets with masses 0.005-0.08MJ in highly eccentric orbits (e > 0.3-0.4). The average eccentricity (~0.15) of the giant planets (>10 M ⊕) is greater than that (~0.05) of the terrestrial planets (<10 M ⊕). A planetary system with more planets tends to have smaller planet masses and orbital eccentricities on average.

  13. 3-D MHD disk wind simulations of jets and outflows from high-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, Jan E.; Tanaka, Kei; Tan, Jonathan C.; Zhang, Yichen; Liu, Mengyao

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a series of nested, large scale, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations of disk winds with a Blandford-Payne like magnetic field configuration, resolving scales from the stellar surface to beyond the core. The goal is to understand the structure of massive protostellar cores at various stages of their formation as the protostellar mass grows from a massive core. At each stage of a given protostellar mass, first, we study how jets and winds develop from the inner accretion disk to ~100 AU scales. We use the results from these simulations to dictate the inner boundary condition of a set of simulation extending to the core boundary at ~10,000 AU of an initially 60 solar mass core. We run separate simulations where the protostellar mass is 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 Msun, and we are working on making a small grid of models in the context of the Turbulent Core Model with three different core masses and three different core surface densities. The wind is blown into the simulation box with properties derived from the previous jet simulations. We examine the opening angle of the outflow cavity and thus the star formation efficiency from the core due to outflow feedback. We find that the opening angle increases as the protostellar mass grows, but it is always less than 10 degrees, which is surprisingly small compared with previous analytic models. This is caused by the core which confines the outflow. Finally, we use our simulation results as input to a radiative transfer calculation, to compare with observations made by the SOMA survey.

  14. Ice Chemistry in Interstellar Dense Molecular Clouds, Protostellar Disks, and Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the low temperatures (T less than 20K), low pressures, and low molecular densities found in much of the cosmos, considerable chemistry is expected to occur in many astronomical environments. Much of this chemistry happens in icy grain mantles on dust grains and is driven by ionizing radiation. This ionizing radiation breaks chemical bonds of molecules in the ices and creates a host of ions and radicals that can react at the ambient temperature or when the parent ice is subsequently warmed. Experiments that similar these conditions have demonstrated a rich chemistry associated with these environments that leads to a wide variety of organic products. Many of these products are of considerable interest to astrobiology. For example, the irradiation of simple ices has been shown to abiotically produce amino acids, nucleobases, quinones, and amphiphiles, all compounds that play key roles in modern biochemistry. This suggests extraterrestrial chemistry could have played a role in the origin of life on Earth and, by extension, do so on planets in other stellar systems.

  15. PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOW HEATING IN A GROWING MASSIVE PROTOCLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ke; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei; Zhang Qizhou; Li Huabai

    2012-02-15

    The dense molecular clump P1 in the infrared dark cloud complex G28.34+0.06 harbors a massive protostellar cluster at its extreme youth. Our previous Submillimeter Array observations revealed several jet-like CO outflows emanating from the protostars, indicative of intense accretion and potential interaction with ambient natal materials. Here, we present the Expanded Very Large Array spectral line observations toward P1 in the NH{sub 3} (J,K) = (1,1), (2,2), (3,3) lines, as well as H{sub 2}O and class I CH{sub 3}OH masers. Multiple NH{sub 3} transitions reveal the heated gas widely spread in the 1 pc clump. The temperature distribution is highly structured; the heated gas is offset from the protostars, and morphologically matches the outflows very well. Hot spots of spatially compact, spectrally broad NH{sub 3} (3,3) emission features are also found coincident with the outflows. A weak NH{sub 3} (3,3) maser is discovered at the interface between an outflow jet and the ambient gas. These findings suggest that protostellar heating may not be effective in suppressing fragmentation during the formation of massive cores.

  16. Radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of protostellar collapse: Low-metallicity environments

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo

    2014-05-10

    Among many physical processes involved in star formation, radiation transfer is one of the key processes because it dominantly controls the thermodynamics. Because metallicities control opacities, they are one of the important environmental parameters that affect star formation processes. In this work, I investigate protostellar collapse in solar-metallicity and low-metallicity (Z = 0.1 Z {sub ☉}) environments using three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Because radiation cooling in high-density gas is more effective in low-metallicity environments, first cores are colder and have lower entropies. As a result, first cores are smaller, less massive, and have shorter lifetimes in low-metallicity clouds. Therefore, first cores would be less likely to be found in low-metallicity star forming clouds. This also implies that first cores tend to be more gravitationally unstable and susceptible to fragmentation. The evolution and structure of protostellar cores formed after the second collapse weakly depend on metallicities in the spherical and magnetized models, despite the large difference in the metallicities. Because this is due to the change of the heat capacity by dissociation and ionization of hydrogen, it is a general consequence of the second collapse as long as the effects of radiation cooling are not very large during the second collapse. On the other hand, the effects of different metallicities are more significant in the rotating models without magnetic fields, because they evolve slower than other models and therefore are more affected by radiation cooling.

  17. The ability of a protostellar disc to fragment and the properties of molecular cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunjian; Li, Min; Yao, Zhen; Mao, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    We explore the ability of a protostellar disc to fragment using an evolutionary disc model. Our disc model includes the mass influx from a molecular cloud core, the irradiation from the central star, the magnetorotational instability (MRI), and the gravitational instability (Kratter et al. in Astrophys. J. 681:375, 2008). We use the fragmentation criterion of Gammie (Astrophys. J. 553:174, 2001) and Rafikov (Astrophys. J. 621:L69, 2005) to judge whether or not a protostellar disc can fragment. We find that there is a link between whether a protostellar disc can fragment and the properties of the molecular cloud cores (angular velocity ω, temperature T_{core}, and mass M_{core}). In the parameter space ω-M_{core}, there is a critical value ω_{crit}, which divides the parameter space into two regions: one is the fragmentation region, the other is the non-fragmentation region. The protostellar disc can only fragment when ω> ω_{crit}. The reason can be understood as follows. The protostellar disc is formed from the gravitational collapse of a molecular cloud core, the properties of the molecular cloud core determine the properties of the protostellar disc. Thus the two categories of protostellar discs correspond to two categories of molecular cloud cores. Moreover, we find that ω_{crit} is approximately a linear function of M_{core} in log-scale coordinates.

  18. The Embedded Phase of Star Formation : Outflows, Envelopes, First Conditions of Disk Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, Eduard

    2017-06-01

    The embedded phase of star formation witnesses the birth of stars, the formation of circumstellar disks, and the launch of jets and outflows. It sets the stage for the disk and star evolution in the subsequent optically visible T Tauri phase, largely determining disk and stellar masses and paving the way for planet assembly. This phase is hard to observe and theory can provide valuable insights into the processes that take place in the depth of collapsing clouds. I will overview processes that are linked with the disk early evolution, such as gravitational instability and its implications, variable protostellar accretion with episodic bursts and its effect on the disk dynamical and chemical evolution, and initial stages of dust growth. The nature of very low luminosity objects (VELLOs) will also be discussed.

  19. Near-infrared multiwavelength imaging polarimetry of the low-mass proto-stellar object HL Tauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakawa, K.; Oya, S.; Pyo, T.-S.; Ishii, M.

    2008-12-01

    We present the {JHK}-band high-resolution polarimetric images of the low-mass proto-stellar object HL Tau using the adaptive optics-equipped CIAO instrument on the Subaru telescope. Our polarization images show a butterfly-shaped polarization disk with an ˜0.9 arcsec × 3.0 arcsec extension. In the nebula, where polarization vectors are centro-symmetrically aligned, the polarization is as high as PJ ˜30%, P_H˜42%, and PK ˜55%. On the other hand, low polarizations of P<3% in the J, H, and K bands and a low color excess ratio of EJ-H/EH-K=1.1 compared to the standard cloud value of 1.75 are detected towards the central star. We estimated the upper limit of the grain sizes a_max to be 0.4 μm in the nebula and ⪆0.7 μm in the line of sight towards the central star. Our high-resolution polarimetric data, which spatially resolves the polarization disk, provides us with important information about grain growth in the region close to the central star.

  20. ACCRETION DISKS AROUND MASSIVE STARS: HYDRODYNAMIC STRUCTURE, STABILITY, AND DUST SUBLIMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Bhargav; Fendt, Christian; Beuther, Henrik E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the structure of accretion disks around massive protostar applying steady state models of thin disks. The thin disk equations are solved with proper opacities for dust and gas taking into account the huge temperature variation along the disk. We explore a wide parameter range concerning stellar mass, accretion rate, and viscosity parameter {alpha}. The most essential finding is a very high temperature of the inner disk. For e.g., a 10 M{sub sun} protostar with an accretion rate of {approx}10{sup -4} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, the disk midplane temperature may reach almost 10{sup 5} K. The disk luminosity in this case is about 10{sup 4} L{sub sun} and, thus, potentially higher than that of a massive protostar. We motivate our disk model with similar hot disks around compact stars. We calculate a dust sublimation radius by turbulent disk self-heating of more than 10 AU, a radius, which is 3 times larger than that caused by stellar irradiation. We discuss implications of this result on the flashlight effect and the consequences for the radiation pressure of the central star. In deference to disks around low-mass protostars, our models suggest rather high values for the disk turbulence parameter {alpha} {<=} 1. However, disk stability to fragmentation due to thermal effects and gravitational instability would require a lower {alpha} value. For {alpha} = 0.1, we find stable disks out to 80 AU. Essentially, our model allows us to compare the outer disk to some of the observed massive protostellar disk sources, and from that, extrapolate the disk structure close to the star which is yet impossible to observe.

  1. Accretion outbursts in self-gravitating protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Nelson, Richard P. E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu E-mail: r.p.nelson@qmul.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    We improve on our previous treatments of the long-term evolution of protostellar disks by explicitly solving disk self-gravity in two dimensions. The current model is an extension of the one-dimensional layered accretion disk model of Bae et al. We find that gravitational instability (GI)-induced spiral density waves heat disks via compressional heating (i.e., PdV work), and can trigger accretion outbursts by activating the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in the magnetically inert disk dead zone. The GI-induced spiral waves propagate well inside of the gravitationally unstable region before they trigger outbursts at R ≲ 1 AU where GI cannot be sustained. This long-range propagation of waves cannot be reproduced with the previously used local α treatments for GI. In our standard model where zero dead-zone residual viscosity (α{sub rd}) is assumed, the GI-induced stress measured at the onset of outbursts is locally as large as 0.01 in terms of the generic α parameter. However, as suggested in our previous one-dimensional calculations, we confirm that the presence of a small but finite α{sub rd} triggers thermally driven bursts of accretion instead of the GI + MRI-driven outbursts that are observed when α{sub rd} = 0. The inclusion of non-zero residual viscosity in the dead zone decreases the importance of GI soon after mass feeding from the envelope cloud ceases. During the infall phase while the central protostar is still embedded, our models stay in a 'quiescent' accretion phase with M-dot {sub acc}∼10{sup −8}--10{sup −7} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} over 60% of the time and spend less than 15% of the infall phase in accretion outbursts. While our models indicate that episodic mass accretion during protostellar evolution can qualitatively help explain the low accretion luminosities seen in most low-mass protostars, detailed tests of the mechanism will require model calculations for a range of protostellar masses with some constraint on the initial core

  2. Accretion Outbursts in Self-gravitating Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Nelson, Richard P.

    2014-11-01

    We improve on our previous treatments of the long-term evolution of protostellar disks by explicitly solving disk self-gravity in two dimensions. The current model is an extension of the one-dimensional layered accretion disk model of Bae et al. We find that gravitational instability (GI)-induced spiral density waves heat disks via compressional heating (i.e., PdV work), and can trigger accretion outbursts by activating the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in the magnetically inert disk dead zone. The GI-induced spiral waves propagate well inside of the gravitationally unstable region before they trigger outbursts at R <~ 1 AU where GI cannot be sustained. This long-range propagation of waves cannot be reproduced with the previously used local α treatments for GI. In our standard model where zero dead-zone residual viscosity (αrd) is assumed, the GI-induced stress measured at the onset of outbursts is locally as large as 0.01 in terms of the generic α parameter. However, as suggested in our previous one-dimensional calculations, we confirm that the presence of a small but finite αrd triggers thermally driven bursts of accretion instead of the GI + MRI-driven outbursts that are observed when αrd = 0. The inclusion of non-zero residual viscosity in the dead zone decreases the importance of GI soon after mass feeding from the envelope cloud ceases. During the infall phase while the central protostar is still embedded, our models stay in a "quiescent" accretion phase with \\dot{M}_acc˜ 10-8{--}10-7 M⊙ yr-1 over 60% of the time and spend less than 15% of the infall phase in accretion outbursts. While our models indicate that episodic mass accretion during protostellar evolution can qualitatively help explain the low accretion luminosities seen in most low-mass protostars, detailed tests of the mechanism will require model calculations for a range of protostellar masses with some constraint on the initial core angular momentum, which affects the length of time

  3. Principal Component Analysis of Computed Emission Lines from Protostellar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerqueira, A. H.; Reyes-Iturbide, J.; De Colle, F.; Vasconcelos, M. J.

    2015-08-01

    A very important issue concerning protostellar jets is the mechanism behind their formation. Obtaining information on the region at the base of a jet can shed light on the subject, and some years ago this was done through a search for a rotational signature in the jet line spectrum. The existence of such signatures, however, remains controversial. In order to contribute to the clarification of this issue, in this paper we show that principal component analysis (PCA) can potentially help to distinguish between rotation and precession effects in protostellar jet images. This method reduces the dimensions of the data, facilitating the efficient extraction of information from large data sets such as those arising from integral field spectroscopy. PCA transforms the system of correlated coordinates into a system of uncorrelated coordinates, the eigenvectors, ordered by principal components of decreasing variance. The projection of the data on these coordinates produces images called tomograms, while eigenvectors can be displayed as eigenspectra. The combined analysis of both can allow the identification of patterns correlated to a particular physical property that would otherwise remain hidden, and can help to separate the effects of physically uncorrelated phenomena in the data. These are, for example, rotation and precession in the kinematics of a stellar jet. In order to show the potential of PCA analysis, we apply it to synthetic spectro-imaging datacubes generated as an output of numerical simulations of protostellar jets. In this way we generate a benchmark with which a PCA diagnostics of real observations can be confronted. Using the computed emission line profiles for [O i]λ6300 and [S ii]λ6716, we recover and analyze the effects of rotation and precession in tomograms generated by PCA. We show that different combinations of the eigenvectors can be used to enhance and to identify the rotation features present in the data. Our results indicate that PCA can be

  4. Predicting lake trophic state by relating Secchi-disk transparency measurements to Landsat-satellite imagery for Michigan inland lakes, 2003-05 and 2007-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, L.M.; Jodoin, R.S.; Minnerick, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    Inland lakes are an important economic and environmental resource for Michigan. The U.S. Geological Survey and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment have been cooperatively monitoring the quality of selected lakes in Michigan through the Lake Water Quality Assessment program. Sampling for this program began in 2001; by 2010, 730 of Michigan’s 11,000 inland lakes are expected to have been sampled once. Volunteers coordinated by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment began sampling lakes in 1974 and continue to sample (in 2010) approximately 250 inland lakes each year through the Michigan Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program. Despite these sampling efforts, it still is impossible to physically collect measurements for all Michigan inland lakes; however, Landsat-satellite imagery has been used successfully in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, and elsewhere to predict the trophic state of unsampled inland lakes greater than 20 acres by producing regression equations relating in-place Secchi-disk measurements to Landsat bands. This study tested three alternatives to methods previously used in Michigan to improve results for predicted statewide Trophic State Index (TSI) computed from Secchi-disk transparency (TSI (SDT)). The alternative methods were used on 14 Landsat-satellite scenes with statewide TSI (SDT) for two time periods (2003– 05 and 2007–08). Specifically, the methods were (1) satellitedata processing techniques to remove areas affected by clouds, cloud shadows, haze, shoreline, and dense vegetation for inland lakes greater than 20 acres in Michigan; (2) comparison of the previous method for producing a single open-water predicted TSI (SDT) value (which was based on an area of interest (AOI) and lake-average approach) to an alternative Gethist method for identifying open-water areas in inland lakes (which follows the initial satellite-data processing and targets the darkest pixels, representing the deepest water

  5. Debris Disks and Hidden Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2008-01-01

    When a planet orbits inside a debris disk like the disk around Vega or Beta Pictoris, the planet may be invisible, but the patterns it creates in the disk may give it away. Observing and decoding these patterns may be the only way we can detect exo-Neptunes orbiting more than 20 AU from their stars, and the only way we can spot planets in systems undergoing the late stages of planet formation. Fortunately, every few months, a new image of a debris disk appears with curious structures begging for explanation. I'll describe some new ideas in the theory of these planet-disk interactions and provide a buyers guide to the latest models (and the planets they predict).

  6. THE IMPORTANCE OF DISK STRUCTURE IN STALLING TYPE I MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kretke, Katherine A.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2012-08-10

    As planets form they tidally interact with their natal disks. Though the tidal perturbation induced by Earth and super-Earth mass planets is generally too weak to significantly modify the structure of the disk, the interaction is potentially strong enough to cause the planets to undergo rapid type I migration. This physical process may provide a source of short-period super-Earths, though it may also pose a challenge to the emergence and retention of cores on long-period orbits with sufficient mass to evolve into gas giants. Previous numerical simulations have shown that the type I migration rate sensitively depends upon the circumstellar disk's properties, particularly the temperature and surface density gradients. Here, we derive these structure parameters for (1) a self-consistent viscous-disk model based on a constant {alpha} prescription, (2) an irradiated disk model that takes into account heating due to the absorption of stellar photons, and (3) a layered accretion disk model with variable {alpha} parameter. We show that in the inner viscously heated regions of typical protostellar disks, the horseshoe and corotation torques of super-Earths can exceed their differential Lindblad torque and cause them to undergo outward migration. However, the temperature profile due to passive stellar irradiation causes type I migration to be inward throughout much of the disk. For disks in which there is outward migration, we show that location and the mass range of the 'planet traps' depend on some uncertain assumptions adopted for these disk models. Competing physical effects may lead to dispersion in super-Earths' mass-period distribution.

  7. Predictions for the Reverberating Spectral Line from a Newly Formed Black Hole Accretion Disk: Case of Tidal Disruption Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenda; Yu, Wenfei; Karas, Vladimír; Dovčiak, Michal

    2015-07-01

    Tidal disruption events (TDEs) can be perfect probes of dormant supermassive black holes in normal galaxies. During the rising phase, the accretion luminosity can increase by orders of magnitude in several weeks, and the emergent ionizing radiation illuminates the fresh accretion flow. In this paper, we simulated the evolution of the expected spectral line profile of iron due to such a flare by using a ray-tracing code with effects of general relativity taken into account. We found that the time-dependent profile changes significantly with black hole spin, inclination angle with respect to the black hole equatorial plane, and the expansion velocity of the ionization front. At low values of spin, a “loop” feature appears in the line profile versus time plot when the inclination is no less than 30° and the expansion velocity {v}{exp} is no less than half the speed of light, owing to a shadow in the emission of the truncated disk. In the light curve two peaks occur depending on the inclination angle. At large {v}{exp}, a shallow “nose” feature may develop ahead of the loop; its duration depends on the expansion velocity and the inclination angle. We explore the entire interval of black hole spin parameter ranging from extreme prograde to extreme retrograde rotation, -1\\lt a\\lt 1. In the prograde case, a low-energy tail appears to be more pronounced in the evolving centroid energy of the line. Our results demonstrate the importance of searching for X-ray spectral lines in the early phase of TDE flares in order to constrain black hole mass and spin, as well as properties of the innermost accretion flow.

  8. Protostellar formation in rotating interstellar clouds. IV. Nonisothermal collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, A.P.

    1984-02-15

    Radiative transfer in the Eddington approximation is included in a multidimensional, self-gravitational, hydrodynamical computer code. Details of the numerical solution and thermodynamic relations are given. Comparison calculations with previous spherically symmetrical models of protostellar collapse are used to validate the basic approach and the artifices which allow the explicit hydrodynamics code to follow the accretion of gas onto a quasi-equilibrium core. A series of axisymmetric models is used to investigate the importance of rotation in collapsing clouds, as the initial amount of angular momentum is lowered, with an emphasis on the possible formation of rings. Rings readily form even in the nonisothermal regime except for very low initial angular momenta; even these clouds may experience ring formation prior to reaching stellar densities. The models imply that other effects (such as gravitational torques or turbulent viscosity) may be necessary to avoid binary formation and thus result in a presolar nebula consistent with the assumptions of either Safronov or Cameron.

  9. Variable protostellar mass accretion rates in cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Lou, Yu-Qing

    2017-03-01

    Spherical hydrodynamic models with a polytropic equation of state (EoS) for forming protostars are revisited in order to investigate the so-called luminosity conundrum highlighted by observations. For a molecular cloud (MC) core with such an EoS with polytropic index γ > 1, the central mass accretion rate (MAR) decreases with increasing time as a protostar emerges, offering a sensible solution to this luminosity problem. As the MAR decreases, the protostellar luminosity also decreases, meaning that it is invalid to infer the star formation time from the currently observed luminosity using an isothermal model. Furthermore, observations of radial density profiles and the radio continua of numerous MC cores evolving towards protostars also suggest that polytropic dynamic spheres of γ > 1 should be used in physical models.

  10. Revealing the Jets in the BHR 71 Protostellar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, Tyler L.; Tobin, John J.; Gusdorf, Antoine; Arce, Hector G.; Tafalla, Mario

    2017-01-01

    The BHR 71 low-mass protostellar binary system powers two highly collimated outflows, with the outflow from the primary (IRS1) producing shock-induced chemical activity only seen in a handful of other outflows (notably L1157, but also L1448 and IRAS04166). This may represent a very short phase in the outflow process that we don’t yet understand. The shocks are likely caused by jets with velocities > 50 km/s impacting on the ambient material, but unlike in the other outflows mentioned above, no such jet has yet been identified in BHR 71, although hints are found in low-resolution Herschel water observations. We report on ALMA observations of SiO toward both protostars within BHR 71, with surprising results.

  11. Protostellar formation in rotating interstellar clouds. IV Nonisothermal collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.

    1984-01-01

    Radiative transfer in the Eddington approximation is included in a multidimensional, self-gravitational, hydrodynamical computer code. Details of the numerical solution and thermodynamic relations are given. Comparison calculations with previous spherically symmetrical models of protostellar collapse are used to validate the basic approach and the artifices which allow the explicit hydrodynamics code to follow the accretion of gas onto a quasi-equilibrium core. A series of axisymmetric models is used to investigate the importance of rotation in collapsing clouds, as the initial amount of angular momentum is lowered, with an emphasis on the possible formation of rings. Rings readily form even in the nonisothermal regime except for very low initial angular momenta; even these clouds may experience ring formation prior to reaching stellar densities. The models imply that other effects (such as gravitational torques or turbulent viscosity) may be necesary to avoid binary formation and thus result in a presolar nebula consistent with the assumptions of either Safronov or Cameron.

  12. Colliding Winds and Infall Confinement of Protostellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkin, F. P.; Stahler, S. W.

    1996-12-01

    We consider the hydrodynamic influence of the protostellar environment on the confinement of protostellar winds by modeling the collision of a stellar wind with anisotropic infall from a rotating cloud core. The stellar wind and infall collide supersonically, yielding a thin, radiative shocked shell. We calculate the structure of the shocked layer using a quasi-steady formulation similar to that used for stellar-wind bow shocks. At any time the shell structure is determined by simple conservation laws involving the fluxes of mass, momentum, and angular momentum of the incident wind and infall material, and including the effects of rotation and the stellar gravity. The gravitational forces are critical to the shell structure because in order for the infall ram pressure to be comparable to the wind ram pressure and allow normal force balance, the shell must be deep inside the gravitational well. We find that self-consistent, bowshock-like steady-state solutions only exist when the stellar gravity is included. There are two solution families (an inner and an outer solution), which both move outward in quasi-steady fashion with time due to the evolving infall structure. These solutions will be described and compared to new analytic solutions for bow shocks[1] and colliding winds[2] from spherically-symmetric sources. Fully non-steady calculations of the evolution will be presented in the future. [1] Wilkin, F.P. 1996, ApJ, 459, L31. [2] Canto, J., Raga, A.C., & Wilkin, F.P. 1996, ApJ, 469, 729

  13. CARMA OBSERVATIONS OF PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOWS IN NGC 1333

    SciTech Connect

    Plunkett, Adele L.; Arce, Hector G.; Corder, Stuartt A.; Mardones, Diego; Sargent, Anneila I.; Schnee, Scott L.

    2013-09-01

    We present observations of outflows in the star-forming region NGC 1333 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy (CARMA). We combined the {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO (1-0) CARMA mosaics with data from the 14 m Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory to probe the central, most dense, and active region of this protostellar cluster at scales from 5'' to 7' (or 1000 AU to 0.5 pc at a distance of 235 pc). We map and identify {sup 12}CO outflows, and along with {sup 13}CO data we estimate their mass, momentum, and energy. Within the 7' Multiplication-Sign 7' map, the 5'' resolution allows for a detailed study of morphology and kinematics of outflows and outflow candidates, some of which were previously confused with other outflow emission in the region. In total, we identify 22 outflow lobes, as well as 9 dense circumstellar envelopes marked by continuum emission, of which 6 drive outflows. We calculate a total outflow mass, momentum, and energy within the mapped region of 6 M{sub Sun }, 19 M{sub Sun} km s{sup -1}, and 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg, respectively. Within this same region, we compare outflow kinematics with turbulence and gravitational energy, and we suggest that outflows are likely important agents for the maintenance of turbulence in this region. In the earliest stages of star formation, outflows do not yet contribute enough energy to totally disrupt the clustered region where most star formation is happening, but have the potential to do so as the protostellar sources evolve. Our results can be used to constrain outflow properties, such as outflow strength, in numerical simulations of outflow-driven turbulence in clusters.

  14. A New Ductility Exhaustion Model for High Temperature Low Cycle Fatigue Life Prediction of Turbine Disk Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shun-Peng; Huang, Hong-Zhong; Li, Haiqing; Sun, Rui; Zuo, Ming J.

    2011-06-01

    Based on ductility exhaustion theory and the generalized energy-based damage parameter, a new viscosity-based life prediction model is introduced to account for the mean strain/stress effects in the low cycle fatigue regime. The loading waveform parameters and cyclic hardening effects are also incorporated within this model. It is assumed that damage accrues by means of viscous flow and ductility consumption is only related to plastic strain and creep strain under high temperature low cycle fatigue conditions. In the developed model, dynamic viscosity is used to describe the flow behavior. This model provides a better prediction of Superalloy GH4133's fatigue behavior when compared to Goswami's ductility model and the generalized damage parameter. Under non-zero mean strain conditions, moreover, the proposed model provides more accurate predictions of Superalloy GH4133's fatigue behavior than that with zero mean strains.

  15. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  16. Optical disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez-Swafford, B.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of the different types of optical storage technology is presented. Research efforts to integrate this technology into the VAX/VMS environment are discussed. In addition, plans for future applications of optical disk technology are described. The applications should prove to be beneficial to the NSSDC user community as a whole. Of particular interest is the concentration on the collaboration with the Dynamics Explorer project.

  17. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  18. Predicting water quality by relating secchi-disk transparency and chlorophyll a measurements to satellite imagery for Michigan Inland Lakes, August 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, L.M.; Aichele, S.S.; Minnerick, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Inland lakes are an important economic and environmental resource for Michigan. The U.S. Geological Survey and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality have been cooperatively monitoring the quality of selected lakes in Michigan through the Lake Water Quality Assessment program. Through this program, approximately 730 of Michigan's 11,000 inland lakes will be monitored once during this 15-year study. Targeted lakes will be sampled during spring turnover and again in late summer to characterize water quality. Because more extensive and more frequent sampling is not economically feasible in the Lake Water Quality Assessment program, the U.S. Geological Survey and Michigan Department of Environmental Quality investigate the use of satellite imagery as a means of estimating water quality in unsampled lakes. Satellite imagery has been successfully used in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and elsewhere to compute the trophic state of inland lakes from predicted secchi-disk measurements. Previous attempts of this kind in Michigan resulted in a poorer fit between observed and predicted data than was found for Minnesota or Wisconsin. This study tested whether estimates could be improved by using atmospherically corrected satellite imagery, whether a more appropriate regression model could be obtained for Michigan, and whether chlorophyll a concentrations could be reliably predicted from satellite imagery in order to compute trophic state of inland lakes. Although the atmospheric-correction did not significantly improve estimates of lake-water quality, a new regression equation was identified that consistently yielded better results than an equation obtained from the literature. A stepwise regression was used to determine an equation that accurately predicts chlorophyll a concentrations in northern Lower Michigan.

  19. Evidence for disks at an early stage in class 0 protostars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerin, M.; Pety, J.; Commerçon, B.; Fuente, A.; Cernicharo, J.; Marcelino, N.; Ciardi, A.; Lis, D. C.; Roueff, E.; Wootten, H. A.; Chapillon, E.

    2017-10-01

    Aims: The formation epoch of protostellar disks is debated because of the competing roles of rotation, turbulence, and magnetic fields in the early stages of low-mass star formation. Magnetohydrodynamics simulations of collapsing cores predict that rotationally supported disks may form in strongly magnetized cores through ambipolar diffusion or misalignment between the rotation axis and the magnetic field orientation. Detailed studies of individual sources are needed to cross check the theoretical predictions. Methods: We present 0.06-0.1'' resolution images at 350 GHz toward B1b-N and B1b-S, which are young class 0 protostars, possibly first hydrostatic cores. The images have been obtained with ALMA, and we compare these data with magnetohydrodynamics simulations of a collapsing turbulent and magnetized core. Results: The submillimeter continuum emission is spatially resolved by ALMA. Compact structures with optically thick 350 GHz emission are detected toward both B1b-N and B1b-S, with 0.2 and 0.35'' radii (46 and 80 au at the Perseus distance of 230 pc), within a more extended envelope. The flux ratio between the compact structure and the envelope is lower in B1b-N than in B1b-S, in agreement with its earlier evolutionary status. The size and orientation of the compact structure are consistent with 0.2'' resolution 32 GHz observations obtained with the Very Large Array as a part of the VANDAM survey, suggesting that grains have grown through coagulation. The morphology, temperature, and densities of the compact structures are consistent with those of disks formed in numerical simulations of collapsing cores. Moreover, the properties of B1b-N are consistent with those of a very young protostar, possibly a first hydrostatic core. These observations provide support for the early formation of disks around low-mass protostars. The reduced images and datacubes are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via

  20. Chondrules and the Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewins, R. H.; Jones, Rhian; Scott, Ed

    2011-03-01

    Part I. Introduction: 1. Chondrules and the protoplanetary disk: An overview R. H. Hewins; Part. II. Chonrules, Ca-Al-Rich Inclusions and Protoplanetary Disks: 2. Astronomical observations of phenomena in protostellar disks L. Hartmann; 3. Overview of models of the solar nebula: potential chondrule-forming environments P. Cassen; 4. Large scale processes in the solar nebula A. P. Boss; 5. Turbulence, chondrules and planetisimals J. N. Cuzzi, A. R. Dobrovolskis and R. C. Hogan; 6. Chondrule formation: energetics and length scales J. T. Wasson; 7. Unresolved issues in the formation of chondrules and chondrites J. A. Wood; 8. Thermal processing in the solar nebula: constraints from refractory inclusions A. M. Davis and G. J. MacPherson; 9. Formation times of chondrules and Ca-Al-Rich inclusions: constraints from short-lived radionuclides T. D. Swindle, A. M. Davis, C. M. Hohenberg, G. J. MacPherson and L. E. Nyquist; 10. Formation of chondrules and chondrites in the protoplanetary nebula E. R. D. Scott, S. G. Love and A. N. Krot; Part III. Chondrule precursors and multiple melting: 11. Origin of refractory precursor components of chondrules K. Misawa and N. Nakamura; 12. Mass-independent isotopic effects in chondrites: the role of chemical processes M. H. Thiemens; 13. Agglomeratic chondrules: implications for the nature of chondrule precursors and formation by incomplete melting M. K. Weisberg and M. Prinz; 14. Constraints on chondrule precursors from experimental Data H. C. Connolly Jr. and R. H. Hewins; 15. Nature of matrix in unequilibrated chondrites and its possible relationship to chondrules A. J. Brearly; 16. Constraints on chondrite agglomeration from fine-grained chondrule Rims K. Metzler and A. Bischoff; 17. Relict grains in chondrules: evidence for chondrule recycling R. H. Jones; 18. Multiple heating of chondrules A. E. Rubin and A. N. Krot; 19. Microchondrule-bearing chondrule rims: constraints on chondrule formation A. N. Krot and A. E. Rubin; Part IV

  1. ACCRETION DISK TEMPERATURES OF QSOs: CONSTRAINTS FROM THE EMISSION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bonning, E. W.; Shields, G. A.; Stevens, A. C.; Salviander, S. E-mail: shields@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: triples@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2013-06-10

    We compare QSO emission-line spectra to predictions based on theoretical ionizing continua of accretion disks. The observed line intensities do not show the expected trend of higher ionization with theoretical accretion disk temperature as predicted from the black hole mass and accretion rate. Consistent with earlier studies, this suggests that the inner disk does not reach temperatures as high as expected from standard disk theory. Modified radial temperature profiles, taking account of winds or advection in the inner disk, achieve better agreement with observation. The emission lines of radio-detected and radio-undetected sources show different trends as a function of the theoretically predicted disk temperature.

  2. The Birth of Disks Around Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    The dusty disks around young stars make the news regularly due to their appeal as the birthplace of early exoplanets. But how do disks like these first form and evolve around their newly born protostars? New observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) are helping us to better understand this process.Formation from CollapseStars are born from the gravitational collapse of a dense cloud of molecular gas. Long before they start fusing hydrogen at their centers when they are still just hot overdensities in the process of contracting we call them protostars. These low-mass cores are hidden at the hearts of the clouds of molecular gas from which they are born.Aerial image of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. [EFE/Ariel Marinkovic]During this contraction phase, before a protostar transitions to a pre-main-sequence star (which it does by blowing away its outer gas envelope, halting the stars growth), much of the collapsing material will spin into a centrifugally supported Keplerian disk that surrounds the young protostar. Later, these circumstellar disks will become the birthplace for young planets something for which weve seen observational evidence in recent years.But how do these Keplerian disks which eventually have scales of hundreds of AU first form and grow around protostars? We need observations of these disks in their early stages of formation to understand their birth and evolution a challenging prospect, given the obscuring molecular gas that hides them at these stages. ALMA, however, is up to the task: it can peer through to the center of the gas clouds to see the emission from protostellar cores and their surroundings.ALMA observations of the protostar Lupus 3 MMS. The molecular outflows from the protostar are shown in panel a. Panel b shows the continuum emission, which has a compact component that likely traces a disk surrounding the protostar. [Adapted from Yen et al. 2017]New Disks Revealed?In a recent

  3. SMA OBSERVATIONS OF CLASS 0 PROTOSTARS: A HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION SURVEY OF PROTOSTELLAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xuepeng; Arce, Hector G.; Dunham, Michael M.; Zhang Qizhou; Bourke, Tyler L.; Launhardt, Ralf; Henning, Thomas; Jorgensen, Jes K.; Lee, Chin-Fei; Foster, Jonathan B.; Pineda, Jaime E. E-mail: xuepeng.chen@yale.edu

    2013-05-10

    We present high angular resolution 1.3 mm and 850 {mu}m dust continuum data obtained with the Submillimeter Array toward 33 Class 0 protostars in nearby clouds (distance < 500 pc), which represents so far the largest survey toward protostellar binary/multiple systems. The median angular resolution in the survey is 2.''5, while the median linear resolution is approximately 600 AU. Compact dust continuum emission is observed from all sources in the sample. Twenty-one sources in the sample show signatures of binarity/multiplicity, with separations ranging from 50 AU to 5000 AU. The numbers of singles, binaries, triples, and quadruples in the sample are 12, 14, 5, and 2, respectively. The derived multiplicity frequency (MF) and companion star fraction (CSF) for Class 0 protostars are 0.64 {+-} 0.08 and 0.91 {+-} 0.05, respectively, with no correction for completeness. The derived MF and CSF in this survey are approximately two times higher than the values found in the binary surveys toward Class I young stellar objects, and approximately three (for MF) and four (for CSF) times larger than the values found among main-sequence stars, with a similar range of separations. Furthermore, the observed fraction of high-order multiple systems to binary systems in Class 0 protostars (0.50 {+-} 0.09) is also larger than the fractions found in Class I young stellar objects (0.31 {+-} 0.07) and main-sequence stars ({<=}0.2). These results suggest that binary properties evolve as protostars evolve, as predicted by numerical simulations. The distribution of separations for Class 0 protostellar binary/multiple systems shows a general trend in which CSF increases with decreasing companion separation. We find that 67% {+-} 8% of the protobinary systems have circumstellar mass ratios below 0.5, implying that unequal-mass systems are preferred in the process of binary star formation. We suggest an empirical sequential fragmentation picture for binary star formation, based on this work and

  4. The circumstellar disk response to the motion of the host star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regály, Zs.; Vorobyov, E.

    2017-05-01

    Context. Grid-based hydrodynamics simulations of circumstellar disks are often performed in the curvilinear coordinate system, in which the center of the computational domain coincides with the motionless star. However, the center of mass may be shifted from the star due to the presence of any non-axisymmetric mass distribution. As a result, the system exerts a non-zero gravity force on the star, causing the star to move in response, which can in turn affect the evolution of the circumstellar disk. Aims: We aim at studying the effects of stellar motion on the evolution of protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In protostellar disks, a non-axisymmetric distribution of matter in the form of spiral arms and/or massive clumps can form due to gravitational instability. Protoplanetary disks can also feature non-axisymmetric structures caused by an embedded high-mass planet or a large-scale vortex formed at viscosity transitions. Methods: We use 2D grid-based numerical hydrodynamic simulations to explore the effect of stellar motion. We adopt a non-inertial polar coordinate system centered on the star, in which the stellar motion is taken into account by calculating the indirect potential caused by the non-axisymmetric disk, a high-mass planet, or a large-scale vortex. We compare the results of numerical simulations with and without stellar motion. Results: We found that the stellar motion has a moderate effect on the evolution history and the mass accretion rate in protostellar disks, reducing somewhat the disk size and mass, while having a profound effect on the collapsing envelope, changing its inner shape from an initially axisymmetric to a non-axisymmetric configuration. Protoplanetary disk simulations show that the stellar motion slightly reduces the width of the gap opened by a high-mass planet, decreases the planet migration rate, and strengthens the large-scale vortices formed at the viscosity transition. Conclusions: We conclude that the inclusion of the

  5. Stem thrust prediction model for Westinghouse wedge gate valves with linkage type stem-to-disk connection

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.K.; Sharma, V.; Kalsi, M.S.

    1996-12-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) conducted a comprehensive research program with the objective of providing nuclear utilities with analytical methods to predict motor operated valve (MOV) performance under design basis conditions. This paper describes the stem thrust calculation model developed for evaluating the performance of one such valve, the Westinghouse flexible wedge gate valve. These procedures account for the unique functional characteristics of this valve design. In addition, model results are compared to available flow loop and in situ test data as a basis for evaluating the performance of the valve model.

  6. Predicting water quality by relating secchi-disk transparency and chlorophyll a measurements to Landsat satellite imagery for Michigan inland lakes, 2001-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, L.M.; Minnerick, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The State of Michigan has more than 11,000 inland lakes; approximately 3,500 of these lakes are greater than 25 acres. The USGS, in cooperation with the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ), has been monitoring the quality of inland lakes in Michigan through the Lake Water Quality Assessment monitoring program. Approximately 100 inland lakes will be sampled per year from 2001 to 2015. Volunteers coordinated by MDEQ started sampling lakes in 1974, and continue to sample to date approximately 250 inland lakes each year through the Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program (CLMP), Michigan’s volunteer lakes monitoring program. Despite this sampling effort, it is still impossible to physically collect the necessary water-quality measurements for all 3,500 Michigan inland lakes. Therefore, a technique was used by USGS, modeled after Olmanson and others (2001), in cooperation with MDEQ that uses satellite remote sensing to predict water quality in unsampled inland lakes greater than 25 acres. Water-quality characteristics that are associated with water clarity can be predicted for Michigan inland lakes by relating sampled measurements of secchi-disk transparency (SDT) and chlorophyll a concentrations (Chl-a), to satellite imagery. The trophic state index (TSI) which is an indicator of the biological productivity can be calculated based on SDT measurements, Chl-a concentrations, and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations measured near the lake’s surface. Through this process, unsampled inland lakes within the fourteen Landsat satellite scenes encompassing Michigan can be translated into estimated TSI from either predicted SDT or Chl-a (fig. 1).

  7. Magnetic diffusivities in 3D radiative chemo-hydrodynamic simulations of protostellar collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyurkevich, Natalia; Commerçon, Benoît; Lesaffre, Pierre; Semenov, Dimitry

    2017-07-01

    Context. Both theory and observations of star-forming clouds require simulations that combine the co-evolving chemistry, magneto-hydrodynamics, and radiative transfer in protostellar collapse simulation. A detailed knowledge of self-consistent chemical evolution for the main charge carriers (both gas species and dust grains) allows us to correctly estimate the rate and nature of magnetic dissipation in the collapsing core. This knowledge is critical to answer one of the most significant issues of star and planet formation: what is the magnitude and spatial distribution of magnetic flux as the initial condition to protoplanetary disk evolution? Aims: We use a chemo-dynamical version of RAMSES, which is described in a companion publication, to follow the chemo-dynamical evolution of collapsing dense cores with various dust properties and interpret differences that occur in magnetic diffusivity terms. These differences are crucial to circumstellar disk formation. Methods: We performed 3D chemo-dynamical simulations of 1 M⊙ isolated dense core collapse for a range in dust size assumptions. The number density of dust and its mean size affect the efficiency of charge capturing and the formation of ices. The radiative hydrodynamics and dynamical evolution of chemical abundances were used to reconstruct the magnetic diffusivity terms for clouds with various magnetisation. Results: The simulations are performed for a mean dust size ranging from 0.017 μm to 1 μm, and we adopt both a fixed dust size and a dust size distribution. The chemical abundances for this range of dust sizes are produced by RAMSES and serve as inputs to calculations of Ohmic, ambipolar, and Hall diffusivity terms. Ohmic resistivity only plays a role at the late stage of the collapse in the innermost region of the cloud where gas density is in excess of a few times 1013 cm-3. Ambipolar diffusion is a dominant magnetic diffusivity term in cases where mean dust size is a typical ISM value or larger. We

  8. Identifying and analysing protostellar disc fragments in smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Cassandra; Forgan, Duncan; Rice, Ken

    2017-09-01

    We present a new method of identifying protostellar disc fragments in a simulation based on density derivatives, and analyse our data using this and the existing CLUMPFIND method, which is based on an ordered search over all particles in gravitational potential energy. Using smoothed particle hydrodynamics, we carry out nine simulations of a 0.25 M⊙ disc around a 1 M⊙ star, all of which fragment to form at least two bound objects. We find that when using all particles ordered in gravitational potential space, only fragments that survive the duration of the simulation are detected. When we use the density derivative method, all fragments are detected, so the two methods are complementary, as using the two methods together allows us to identify all fragments, and to then determine those that are likely to be destroyed. We find a tentative empirical relationship between the dominant azimuthal wavenumber in the disc m and the maximum semimajor axis a fragment may achieve in a simulation, such that amax∝1/m. We find the fragment destruction rate to be around half that predicted from population synthesis models. This is due to fragment-fragment interactions in the early gas phase of the disc, which can cause scattering and eccentricity pumping on short time-scales, and affects the fragment's internal structure. We therefore caution that measurements of eccentricity as a function of semimajor axis may not necessarily constrain the formation mechanism of giant planets and brown dwarfs.

  9. The Early Era: How do protostellar discs form?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Marc; Hennebelle, Patrick; Ciardi, Andrea; Fromang, Sebastien

    2013-07-01

    The understanding of disks formation and their early stages evolution is crucial to understand planets formation. Prestellar collapse leads to the formation of a protostar as well as the possible build-up of a disk. However, most previous studies, limited to cases where the magnetic field and the rotation axis of the cloud are aligned, have found that even a relatively weak magnetic field may prevent the early formation of massive disks and their fragmentation. Moreover, very few studies investigated the combined effects of magnetic field and turbulence. We perform three-dimensional, adaptive mesh, numerical simulations of magnetically supercritical collapsing dense cores in both non-turbulent and turbulent environment, using the magneto-hydrodynamic code Ramses. At variance with earlier analyses, we show that the transport of angular momentum acts less efficiently in collapsing cores with non-aligned rotation and magnetic field. We also show that the turbulence is responsible for a misalignment between the rotation axis and the magnetic field and can diffuse out the magnetic field of the inner regions efficiently. The magnetic braking is therefore reduced, and massive disks can be built. If the disks are massive enough and the magnetization not too strong, fragmentation can occur. The early formation of massive disks and their fragmentation can take place at moderate magnetic intensities if the rotation axis is tilted or in a turbulent environment, because of misalignment and turbulent diffusion.

  10. Dark-disk universe.

    PubMed

    Fan, JiJi; Katz, Andrey; Randall, Lisa; Reece, Matthew

    2013-05-24

    We point out that current constraints on dark matter imply only that the majority of dark matter is cold and collisionless. A subdominant fraction of dark matter could have much stronger interactions. In particular, it could interact in a manner that dissipates energy, thereby cooling into a rotationally supported disk, much as baryons do. We call this proposed new dark matter component double-disk dark matter (DDDM). We argue that DDDM could constitute a fraction of all matter roughly as large as the fraction in baryons, and that it could be detected through its gravitational effects on the motion of stars in galaxies, for example. Furthermore, if DDDM can annihilate to gamma rays, it would give rise to an indirect detection signal distributed across the sky that differs dramatically from that predicted for ordinary dark matter. DDDM and more general partially interacting dark matter scenarios provide a large unexplored space of testable new physics ideas.

  11. Development report for dual-burst disks

    SciTech Connect

    Fusco, A.M.

    1996-11-01

    Burst disks, commonly used in pressure relief applications, were studied as single-use valves. A dual-burst disk design was chosen for primary investigation for systems involving separation of gases of two significantly different pressures. The two disks are used to seal either end of a piston cavity that has a different cross-sectional area on each side. Different piston surface areas are used to maintain hydrostatic equilibrium, P{sub 1}A{sub 1} = P{sub 2}A{sub 2}. The single-use valve functions when the downstream pressure is reduced to approximately atmospheric pressure, creating a pressure differential that causes the burst disks to fail. Several parameters were studied to determine the optimum design of the burst disk. These parameters include thickness, diameter, area/pressure ratio, scoring, and disk geometry. The disk material was limited to 304L stainless steel. Factors that were considered essential to the optimization of the design were robustness, manufacturability, and burst pressure variability. The thicknesses of the disks that were studied range from 0.003 in. to 0.010 in. A model for predicting burst pressures of the burst disks was derived. The model combines membrane stress theory with force/displacement data to predict the burst pressure of various designs to within {+-}10%. This model results from studies that characterize the behavior of individual small and large disks. Welding techniques used to join the dual-disk assembly are discussed. Laser welds are used to join and seal the disks to the bulkhead. These welds were optimized for repeatability and robustness. Resistance upset welding is suggested for joining the dual-disk assembly to the pressure vessel body. Resistance upset weld parameters were developed for this particular design so as to minimize the side effects on the burst-disk performance and to provide high-quality welds.

  12. A Triple Protostar System in L1448 IRS3B Formed via Fragmentation of a Gravitationally Unstable Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Persson, Magnus; Looney, Leslie; Dunham, Michael; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire J.; Sadavoy, Sarah; Harris, Robert J.; Melis, Carl; Perez, Laura M.

    2017-01-01

    Binary and multiple star systems are a frequent outcome of the star formation process; most stars form as part of a binary/multiple protostar system. A possible pathway to the formation of close (< 500 AU) binary/multiple star systems is fragmentation of a massive protostellar disk due to gravitational instability. We observed the triple protostar system L1448 IRS3B with ALMA at 1.3 mm in dust continuum and molecular lines to determine if this triple protostar system, where all companions are separated by < 200 AU, is likely to have formed via disk fragmentation. From the dust continuum emission, we find a massive, 0.39 solar mass disk surrounding the three protostars with spiral structure. The disk is centered on two protostars that are separated by 61 AU and the third protostar is located in the outer disk at 183 AU. The tertiary companion is coincident with a spiral arm, and it is the brightest source of emission in the disk, surrounded by ~0.09 solar masses of disk material. Molecular line observations from 13CO and C18O confirm that the kinematic center of mass is coincident with the two central protostars and that the disk is consistent with being in Keplerian rotation; the combined mass of the two close protostars is ~1 solar mass. We demonstrate that the disk around L1448 IRS3B remains marginally unstable at radii between 150~AU and 320~AU, overlapping with the location of the tertiary protostar. This is consistent with models for a protostellar disk that has recently undergone gravitational instability, spawning the companion stars.

  13. Synthetic Observations of Magnetic Fields in Protostellar Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joyce W. Y.; Hull, Charles L. H.; Offner, Stella S. R.

    2017-01-01

    The role of magnetic fields in the early stages of star formation is not well constrained. In order to discriminate between different star formation models, we analyze 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of low-mass cores and explore the correlation between magnetic field orientation and outflow orientation over time. We produce synthetic observations of dust polarization at resolutions comparable to millimeter-wave dust polarization maps observed by the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy and compare these with 2D visualizations of projected magnetic field and column density. Cumulative distribution functions of the projected angle between the magnetic field and outflow show different degrees of alignment in simulations with differing mass-to-flux ratios. The distribution function for the less magnetized core agrees with observations finding random alignment between outflow and field orientations, while the more magnetized core exhibits stronger alignment. We find that fractional polarization increases when the system is viewed such that the magnetic field is close to the plane of the sky, and the values of fractional polarization are consistent with observational measurements. The simulation outflow, which reflects the underlying angular momentum of the accreted gas, changes direction significantly over over the first ∼0.1 Myr of evolution. This movement could lead to the observed random alignment between outflows and the magnetic fields in protostellar cores.

  14. On the dynamics of dust during protostellar collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bate, Matthew R.; Lorén-Aguilar, Pablo

    2017-02-01

    The dynamics of dust and gas can be quite different from each other when the dust is poorly coupled to the gas. In protoplanetary discs, it is well known that this decoupling of the dust and gas can lead to diverse spatial structures and dust-to-gas ratios. In this paper, we study the dynamics of dust and gas during the earlier phase of protostellar collapse, before a protoplanetary disc is formed. We find that for dust grains with sizes ≲ 10 μm, the dust is well coupled during the collapse of a rotating, pre-stellar core and there is little variation of the dust-to-gas ratio during the collapse. However, if larger grains are present, they may have trajectories that are very different from the gas during the collapse, leading to mid-plane settling and/or oscillations of the dust grains through the mid-plane. This may produce variations in the dust-to-gas ratio and very different distributions of large and small dust grains at the very earliest stages of star formation, if large grains are present in pre-stellar cores.

  15. Transverse Velocity Shifts in Protostellar Jets: Rotation or Velocity Asymmetries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Colle, Fabio; Cerqueira, Adriano H.; Riera, Angels

    2016-12-01

    Observations of several protostellar jets show systematic differences in radial velocity transverse to the jet propagation direction that have been interpreted as evidence of rotation in the jets. In this paper we discuss the origin of these velocity shifts, and show that they could originate from rotation in the flow, or from side-to-side asymmetries in the shock velocity, which could be due to asymmetries in the jet ejection velocity/density or in the ambient medium. For typical poloidal jet velocities (˜100-200 km s-1), an asymmetry ≳10% can produce velocity shifts comparable to those observed. We also present three-dimensional numerical simulations of rotating, precessing, and asymmetric jets, and show that, even though for a given jet there is a clear degeneracy between these effects, a statistical analysis of jets with different inclination angles can help to distinguish between the alternative origins of transverse velocity shifts (TVSs). Our analysis indicates that side-to-side velocitiy asymmetries could represent an important contribution to TVSs, being the most important contributor for large jet inclination angles (with respect the the plane of the sky), and cannot be neglected when interpreting the observations.

  16. Young stars and protostellar cores near NGC 2023

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookerjea, B.; Sandell, G.; Jarrett, T. H.; McMullin, J.

    We present the results of our investigation of the young (proto)stellar population in NGC~2023 and the L~1630 molecular cloud bordering the H II region IC 434, using Spitzer IRAC and MIPS archive data and JCMT SCUBA imaging. We have performed photometry of all IRAC and MIPS images, and used colour-colour diagrams to identify and classify all young stars seen within a 22 arcmin × 26 arcmin field along the boundary between IC 434 and L 1630. We identify a total of 95 mid-infrared sources and 5 sub-millimeter cores in our 850 and 450 μm SCUBA images, two (MM 1 and MM 3) of which have embedded class 0 or I protostars. We find that HD 37903 is the most massive member of a cluster with 20 -- 30 PMS stars. We also find smaller groups of PMS stars formed in the Horsehead nebula and another elephant trunk structure to the north of the Horsehead. Our study shows that the expansion of the IC 434 H II region has triggered star formation in some of the dense elephant trunk structures and compressed gas inside the L 1630 molecular cloud.

  17. Characterizing the Cep E protostellar outflow: the oxygen chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusdorf, Antoine

    2015-10-01

    With this proposal we aim at observing two positions in the Cep E protostellar outflow in OI and OH emission lines with the GREAT receiver. It is associated with another proposal by the same team to map the CII emission in this outflow associated to an intermediate mass protostar. These observations will be combined with Herschel observations of water line emission, and with previous CO data from various telescopes (IRAM 30m, PdBI, JCMT, Herschel, and most importantly, SOFIA). Their analysis will benefit from the important work initiated since the Cycle 0 of SOFIA, which has enabled our team to accurately link spatial structures (the jet, the outflow cavity, the terminal bowshock in the southern outflow lobe) to spectral components seen in the CO line profiles, and to precisely constrain the associated physical conditions by means of LVG methods or shock models. The goal is to precisely understand the water chemistry and to characterize the energetic impacts of the outflow based on a self-consistent and unique dataset that will allow us to fully characterize the associated shocks. Such a work is necessary also to understand the processes of formation of stars of intermediate mass with respect to their low-mass counterparts.

  18. Protostellar Cosmic Rays and Extinct Radioactivities in Meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.; Shu, F.H.; Shang, H.; Glassgold, A.E.; Rehm, K.E.

    1998-10-01

    Calcium-aluminum{endash}rich inclusions (CAIs) and chondrules of chondritic meteorites may originate with the melting of dustballs launched by a magnetically driven bipolar outflow from the inner edge of the primitive solar nebula. Bombardment by protostellar cosmic rays may make the rock precursors of CAIs and chondrules radioactive, producing radionuclides found in meteorites that are difficult to obtain with other mechanisms. Reasonable scalings from the observed hard X-rays for the cosmic-ray protons released by flares in young stellar objects yield the correct amounts of {sup 41}Ca, {sup 53}Mn, and {sup 138}La inferred for meteorites, but proton- and {alpha}-induced transformations underproduce {sup 26}Al by a factor of about 20. The missing {sup 26}Al may be synthesized by {sup 3}He nuclei accelerated in impulsive flares reacting primarily with {sup 24}Mg, an abundant isotope in the target precursor rocks. The mechanism allows a simple explanation for the very different ratios of {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al inferred for normal CAIs, CAIs with fractionated and unidentified nuclear (FUN) anomalies, and chondrules. The overproduction of {sup 41}Ca by analogous {sup 3}He reactions and the case of {sup 60}Fe inferred for eucritic meteorites require special interpretations in this picture. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  19. HERSCHEL FINDS EVIDENCE FOR STELLAR WIND PARTICLES IN A PROTOSTELLAR ENVELOPE: IS THIS WHAT HAPPENED TO THE YOUNG SUN?

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccarelli, C.; López-Sepulcre, A.; Dominik, C.; Kama, M.; Padovani, M.; Caux, E.; Caselli, P.

    2014-07-20

    There is evidence that the young Sun emitted a high flux of energetic (≥10 MeV) particles. The collisions of these particles with the material at the inner edge of the Protosolar Nebula disk induced spallation reactions that formed short-lived radionuclei, like {sup 10}Be, whose trace is now visible in some meteorites. However, it is poorly known exactly when this happened, and whether and how it affected the solar system. Here, we present indirect evidence for an ejection of energetic particles in the young protostar, OMC-2 FIR 4, similar to that experienced by the young solar system. In this case, the energetic particles collide with the material in the protostellar envelope, enhancing the abundance of two molecular ions, HCO{sup +} and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, whose presence is detected via Herschel observations. The flux of energetic particles at a distance of 1 AU from the emitting source, estimated from the measured abundance ratio of HCO{sup +} and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, can easily account for the irradiation required by meteoritic observations. These new observations demonstrate that the ejection of ≥10 MeV particles is a phenomenon occurring very early in the life of a protostar, before the disappearance of the envelope from which the future star accretes. The whole envelope is affected by the event, which sets constraints on the magnetic field geometry in the source and opens up the possibility that the spallation reactions are not limited to the inner edge of the Protosolar Nebula disk.

  20. Protostellar accretion traced with chemistry. High-resolution C18O and continuum observations towards deeply embedded protostars in Perseus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimann, Søren; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Dunham, Michael M.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Kristensen, Lars E.; Offner, Stella S. R.; Stephens, Ian W.; Tobin, John J.; Vorobyov, Eduard I.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Understanding how accretion proceeds is a key question of star formation, with important implications for both the physical and chemical evolution of young stellar objects. In particular, very little is known about the accretion variability in the earliest stages of star formation. Aims: Our aim is to characterise protostellar accretion histories towards individual sources by utilising sublimation and freeze-out chemistry of CO. Methods: A sample of 24 embedded protostars are observed with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) in context of the large program "Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA" (MASSES). The size of the C18O-emitting region, where CO has sublimated into the gas-phase, is measured towards each source and compared to the expected size of the region given the current luminosity. The SMA observations also include 1.3 mm continuum data, which are used to investigate whether or not a link can be established between accretion bursts and massive circumstellar disks. Results: Depending on the adopted sublimation temperature of the CO ice, between 20% and 50% of the sources in the sample show extended C18O emission indicating that the gas was warm enough in the past that CO sublimated and is currently in the process of refreezing; something which we attribute to a recent accretion burst. Given the fraction of sources with extended C18O emission, we estimate an average interval between bursts of 20 000-50 000 yr, which is consistent with previous estimates. No clear link can be established between the presence of circumstellar disks and accretion bursts, however the three closest known binaries in the sample (projected separations <20 AU) all show evidence of a past accretion burst, indicating that close binary interactions may also play a role in inducing accretion variability.

  1. Flow between rotating disks. Part 1: Basic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, S. J.; Labbe, F.; Kaufman, H. N.; Szeri, A. Z.

    Multiplicity of basic flows, when the fluid is bounded by two infinite disks, reported by several investigators is examined with emphasis on whether, and under what conditions infinite disk flows approximate to laboratory flows between two finite disks. Laser Doppler velocity measurements were obtained in water between finite rotating disks, with and without through flow. Angular velocity ratios were studied for: (1) one disk rotating and the other stationary; (2) co-rotating disks of equal angular velocity; and (3) counter rotating disks of equal but opposite angular velocity. It is concluded that limiting flows are unique and are independent of flow history. With one disk rotating and the other stationary, the mid-radius limiting flow is recognized as the Batchelor profile of infinite disk theory. Other profiles, predicted by this theory to coexist with the Batchelor profile were neither observed experimentally nor were they calculated numerically by the finite disk solution obtained with a Galerkin, b-spline formulation.

  2. Usefulness of cefovecin disk-diffusion test for predicting mecA gene-containing strains of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and clinical efficacy of cefovecin in dogs with superficial pyoderma.

    PubMed

    Iyori, Keita; Toyoda, Yoichi; Ide, Kaori; Iwasaki, Toshiroh; Nishifuji, Koji

    2013-02-01

    Cefovecin has been widely used to treat skin infections in dogs. The relationship of the cefovecin disk-diffusion test results to the presence of the mecA gene and the clinical efficacy of cefovecin have not been fully evaluated. To determine the usefulness of an in vitro cefovecin disk-diffusion test in predicting the presence of the mecA gene in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, as well as the in vivo efficacy of cefovecin therapy in dogs with superficial pyoderma. Twenty-six S. pseudintermedius strains isolated from 22 dogs with pyoderma were used. In vitro disk-diffusion test results of cefovecin were compared with agar-dilution test results, the presence of the mecA gene, and the improvement in clinical scores of dogs with superficial pyoderma at 14 days post treatment. There was a significant linear correlation (r = -0.83) between the diameter of the obvious zone of inhibition by disk diffusion and the minimal inhibitory concentration for cefovecin (P < 0.0001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that zone diameters between 25 and 27 mm exhibited better sensitivity (92.9%) and specificity (100.0%) for detection of strains carrying the mecA gene. The mean improvement in clinical scores in dogs carrying cefovecin-resistant strains was significantly lower than in dogs carrying cefovecin-susceptible strains (P < 0.01). The cefovecin disk-diffusion test with a cut-off value estimated in this study was valuable for predicting mecA gene carriage in S. pseudintermedius, as well as the in vivo efficacy of cefovecin therapy in dogs with superficial pyoderma caused by S. pseudintermedius. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology © 2013 ESVD and ACVD.

  3. EVIDENCE FOR INFALLING GAS OF LOW ANGULAR MOMENTUM TOWARD THE L1551 NE KEPLERIAN CIRCUMBINARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Saito, Masao; Lim, Jeremy; Saigo, Kazuya

    2013-10-10

    We report follow-up C{sup 18}O(3-2) line observations of the Class I binary protostellar system L1551 NE with the Submillimeter Array in its compact and subcompact configurations. Our previous observations at a higher angular resolution in the extended configuration revealed a circumbinary disk exhibiting Keplerian motion. The combined data, with more extensive spatial coverage (∼140-2000 AU), verify the presence of a Keplerian circumbinary disk and reveal for the first time a distinct low-velocity (∼< ± 0.5 km s{sup –1} from the systemic velocity) component that displays a velocity gradient along the minor axis of the circumbinary disk. Our simple model that reproduces the main features seen in the position-velocity diagrams comprises a circumbinary disk exhibiting Keplerian motion out to a radius of ∼300 AU, beyond which the gas exhibits pure infall at a constant velocity of ∼0.6 km s{sup –1}. This velocity is significantly smaller than the expected free-fall velocity of ∼2.2 km s{sup –1} onto the L1551 NE protostellar mass of ∼0.8 M{sub ☉} at ∼300 AU, suggesting that the infalling gas is decelerated as it moves into regions of high gas pressure in the circumbinary disk. The discontinuity in angular momenta between the outer infalling gas and the inner Keplerian circumbinary disk implies an abrupt transition in the effectiveness at which magnetic braking is able to transfer angular momentum outward, a result perhaps of the different plasma β values and the ionization fractions between the outer and inner regions of the circumbinary disk.

  4. The chemical structure of the Class 0 protostellar envelope NGC 1333 IRAS 4A⋆⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumpia, E.; Semenov, D. A.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Caux, E.

    2017-07-01

    Context. It is not well known what drives the chemistry of a protostellar envelope, in particular the role of the stellar mass and the protostellar outflows on the chemical enrichment of such environments. Aims: We study the chemical structure of the Class 0 protostellar envelope NGC 1333 IRAS 4A in order to (i) investigate the influence of the outflows on the chemistry; (ii) constrain the age of our studied object; (iii) compare it with a typical high-mass protostellar envelope. Methods: In our analysis we use JCMT line mapping (360-373 GHz) and HIFI pointed spectra (626.01-721.48 GHz). To study the influence of the outflow on the degree of deuteration, we compare JCMT maps of HCO+ and DCO+ with non-LTE (RADEX) models in a region that spatially covers the outflow activity of IRAS 4A. To study the envelope chemistry, we derive empirical molecular abundance profiles for the observed species using the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code (RATRAN) and adopting a 1D dust density/temperature profile from the literature. We use a combination of constant abundance profiles and abundance profiles that include jumps at two radii (T 100 K or T 30 K) to fit our observations. We compare our best-fit observed abundance profiles with the predictions from the time dependent gas grain chemical code (ALCHEMIC). Results: We detect CO, 13CO, C18O, CS, HCN, HCO+, N2H+, H2CO, CH3OH, H2O, H2S, DCO+, HDCO, D2CO, SO, SO2, SiO, HNC, CN, C2H and OCS. We divide the detected lines in three groups based on their line profiles: a) broad emission (FWHM = 4-11 km s-1), b) narrow emission (FWHM< 4 km s-1), and c) showing absorption features. The broad component is indicative of outflow activity, the narrow component arises from dynamically quiescent gas (i.e. envelope) and the absorption is a result of infall motions or the presence of foreground material. Our maps provide information about the spatial and velocity structure of many of the molecules mentioned above, including the deuterated species

  5. ALMA observations of a misaligned binary protoplanetary disk system in Orion

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jonathan P.; Mann, Rita K.; Francesco, James Di; Johnstone, Doug; Matthews, Brenda; Andrews, Sean M.; Ricci, Luca; Hughes, A. Meredith; Bally, John

    2014-12-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of a wide binary system in Orion, with projected separation 440 AU, in which we detect submillimeter emission from the protoplanetary disks around each star. Both disks appear moderately massive and have strong line emission in CO 3-2, HCO{sup +} 4-3, and HCN 3-2. In addition, CS 7-6 is detected in one disk. The line-to-continuum ratios are similar for the two disks in each of the lines. From the resolved velocity gradients across each disk, we constrain the masses of the central stars, and show consistency with optical-infrared spectroscopy, both indicative of a high mass ratio ∼9. The small difference between the systemic velocities indicates that the binary orbital plane is close to face-on. The angle between the projected disk rotation axes is very high, ∼72°, showing that the system did not form from a single massive disk or a rigidly rotating cloud core. This finding, which adds to related evidence from disk geometries in other systems, protostellar outflows, stellar rotation, and similar recent ALMA results, demonstrates that turbulence or dynamical interactions act on small scales well below that of molecular cores during the early stages of star formation.

  6. Workshop on Physics of Accretion Disks Around Compact and Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, E (Editor); Stepinski, T. F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the two-day Workshop on Physics of Accretion Disks Around Compact and Young Stars was to bring together workers on accretion disks in the western Gulf region (Texas and Louisiana). Part 2 presents the workshop program, a list of poster presentations, and a list of workshop participants. Accretion disks are believed to surround many stars. Some of these disks form around compact stars, such as white dwarfs, neutron stars, or black holes that are members of binary systems and reveal themselves as a power source, especially in the x-ray and gamma regions of the spectrum. On the other hand, protostellar disks are believed to be accretion disks associated with young, pre-main-sequence stars and manifest themselves mostly in infrared and radio observations. These disks are considered to be a natural outcome of the star formation process. The focus of this workshop included theory and observations relevant to accretion disks around compact objects and newly forming stars, with the primary purpose of bringing the two communities together for intellectual cross-fertilization. The nature of the workshop was exploratory, to see how much interaction is possible between distinct communities and to better realize the local potential in this subject. A critical workshop activity was identification and documentation of key issues that are of mutual interest to both communities.

  7. Accretion Disks around Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessio, Paola

    1996-04-01

    A method to calculate the structure and brightness distribution of accretion disks surrounding low and intermediate mass young stars is introduced and discussed. The method includes a realistic treatment of the energy transport mechanisms and disk heating by radiation from external sources. The disk is assumed steady, geometrically thin and in vertical hydrostatic equilibrium. The turbulent viscosity coefficient is expressed using the α prescription and the α parameter and the mass accretion rate are assumed to be constant through the disk. Energy is transported in the vertical direction by: (a) a turbulent flux, computed self-consistently with the viscosity coefficient used to describe the viscous energy dissipation, (b) radiation, using the first moments of the transfer equation, the Eddington approximation, and the Rosseland and Planck Mean Opacities, and (c) convection, taking into account that the convective elements, not necessarily optically thick, lose energy by radiation and turbulent flux. This treatment of the energy transport mechanisms differs from previous work in this field, allowing one to extend, with confidence, the calculation of the disk structure to optically thin regimes. The heating mechanisms considered, which affect the disk's structure and emission, are stellar radiation and a circumstellar envelope which reprocesses and scatters radiation from the star and from the disk itself. In addition to a detailed numerical calculation, an analytical self-consistent formulation of the irradiation of the disk is given. This analytical formulation allows one to understand and extend the numerical results. To evaluate the potential of the method presented in this thesis, a set of models of viscous non-irradiated and irradiated disks are computed. Their predictions are compared with observations of young stellar sources likely to have disks. Given the disk structure and specifying its orientation with respect to the line of sight, the specific

  8. A survey of [ D2CO] /[ H2CO] and [ N2D^+] /[ N2H^+] ratios towards protostellar cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, H.; Millar, T. J.

    2007-09-01

    Aims:We use observations and models of molecular D/H ratios to probe the physical conditions and chemical history of the gas and to differentiate between gas-phase and grain-surface chemical processing in star forming regions. Methods: As a follow up to previous observations of HDCO/H2CO and DCN/HCN ratios in a selection of low-mass protostellar cores, we have measured D2CO/H2CO and N2D^+/N2H+ ratios in these same sources. For comparison, we have also measured N2D^+/N2H+ ratios towards several starless cores and have searched for N2D+ and deuterated formaldehyde towards hot molecular cores (HMCs) associated with high mass star formation. We compare our results with predictions from detailed chemical models, and to other observations made in these sources. Results: Towards the starless cores and low-mass protostellar sources we have found very high N2D+ fractionation, which suggests that the bulk of the gas in these regions is cold and heavily depleted. The non-detections of N2D+ in the HMCs indicate higher temperatures. We did detect HDCO towards two of the HMCs, with abundances 1-3% of H2CO. These are the first detections of deuterated formaldehyde in high mass sources since Turner (1990) measured HDCO/H2CO and D2CO/H2CO towards the Orion Compact Ridge. Figures 1-5 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Protostellar formation in rotating interstellar clouds. V - Nonisothermal collapse and fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan R.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical calculations are presented for rigorous models spanning a four-dimensional parameter space of initial conditions of the three-dimensional collapse of rotating protostellar clouds, encompassing radiative transfer in the Eddington approximation and detailed thermodynamical relations. It is found that protostellar formation may involve a few stages of hierarchical fragmentation terminated by increased thermal pressure in the nonisothermal regime, that high thermal energy clouds remain nearly axisymmetric during the first dynamic collapse phase, and that very slowly rotating clouds can fragment. The presolar nebula was probably formed from a cloud with very little initial rotation.

  10. Can Deuteration be Used as A Chemical Clock in Protostellar Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleicher, Dominik; Banerjee, R.; Boekholt, T.; Bovino, S.; Fellhauer, M.; Galli, D.; Grassi, T.; Grete, P.; Haugboelle, T.; Koertgen, B.; Latif, M.; Riaz, R.; Stutz, A.

    2017-06-01

    Measuring deuteration fraction in protostellar cores is considered as an important method for age determinations of protostellar cores, and the high deuteration fraction of up to 10% has been considered as evidence for high ages and strong support via magnetic field. In this talk, I will present 3D magneto-hydrodynamical simulations including the deuteration chemistry to explore how the deuteration fraction depends on the dynamical and chemical conditions. I will show that high deuteration fractions can be obtained under a large set of different conditions.

  11. Diagnostics for the elemental composition of protostellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochina, O. V.; Wiebe, D. S.

    2017-02-01

    The sensitivity of a number of aspects of the chemical evolution of a molecular cloud to its elemental composition is investigated. Four models are considered: one with high metallicity, for which the evolution proceeds exclusively in the gas phase, two with low metallicity, for which processes proceed both in the gas phase and on grain surfaces, and a model with low metallicity and an artificially reduced oxygen content. One of the low-metallicity models initially contains only neutral components, while some initial ionization of atoms of heavy elements is included in the other models. A network of chemical reactions, including a detailed description of the chemistry of deuterium compounds, is used to analyze this sensitivity. It is shown that the initial composition affects the chemical evolution of most components in some way, but this influence is sometimes negligible. The inclusion of certain chemical factors can be important, such as surface reactions and the loss of a substantial fraction of atoms of heavy elements that are in grains. However, some components are influenced by even small variations in the initial and elemental compositions. One such component is the DCO+ ion, whose evolution is sensitive to the initial degree of ionization of atoms of heavy elements, even if the set of reactions included and the elemental composition are the same in different cases. The possible use of HD and HF as indicators of the presence of molecular hydrogen is also considered. HF reliably traces H2 at times exceeding 105 years under the physical conditions considered. However,HD is not a reliable indicator of H2 at the densities characteristic for protostellar clouds.

  12. Proper motions of embedded protostellar jets in Serpens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djupvik, A. A.; Liimets, T.; Zinnecker, H.; Barzdis, A.; Rastorgueva-Foi, E. A.; Petersen, L. R.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We determine the proper motion of protostellar jets around Class 0 and Class I sources in an active star forming region in Serpens. Methods: Multi-epoch deep images in the 2.122 μm line of molecular hydrogen, v = 1-0 S(1), obtained with the near-infrared instrument NOTCam on a timescale of 10 years, are used to determine the proper motion of knots and jets. K-band spectroscopy of the brighter knots is used to supply radial velocities, estimate extinction, excitation temperature, and H2 column densities towards these knots. Results: We measure the proper motion of 31 knots on different timescales (2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 years). The typical tangential velocity is around 50 km s-1 for the 10-year baseline, but for shorter timescales, a maximum tangential velocity up to 300 km s-1 is found for a few knots. Based on morphology, velocity information, and the locations of known protostars, we argue for the existence of at least three partly overlapping and deeply embedded flows, one Class 0 flow and two Class I flows. The multi-epoch proper motion results indicate time-variable velocities of the knots, for the first time directly measured for a Class 0 jet. We find in general higher velocities for the Class 0 jet than for the two Class I jets. While the bolometric luminosites of the three driving sources are about equal, the derived mass flow rate Ṁout is two orders of magnitude higher in the Class 0 flow than in the two Class I flows. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias.

  13. CCS Observations of the Protostellar Envelope of B335

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velusamy, T.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Langer, W. D.

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the density, velocity and chemical profiles around protostars is of fundamental importance for testing dynamical models of protostar evolution and understanding the nature of the material falling onto circumstellar disks. Presented are single dish and interferometric spectral line observations of CCS towards the core of B335, a classic example of a young, low mass stellar object.

  14. Water vapor in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banzatti, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    This thesis is devoted to a study of the conditions and evolution of the planet formation region in young circumstellar disks, by means of spectroscopic observations of molecular gas emission. The main focus of this work is the infrared spectrum of water (H2O), which provides thousands of emission lines tracing the warm and dense gas inward of the water snow line in disks. The analysis includes also emission from some organic molecules that trace the carbon chemistry, C2H2, HCN, and CO2, as well as emission from OH that is connected to the formation and destruction of the water molecule. Two are the main directions explored in this work, for which we used spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope (IRS) and the Very Large Telescope (VISIR and X-shooter). The first is to investigate how variable accretion phenomena occurring during the T Tauri phase affect the molecular environments in the planet formation region of disks. By monitoring T Tauri stars in different phases of accretion, we found that outbursts can remarkably affect their mid-infrared molecular emission. We propose a scenario where accretion flares trigger a recession of the water snow line, increasing water emission from the disk, when the accretion luminosity keeps higher over long enough timescales for the thermal structure of the disk to change (at least a few weeks, as observed in the strongly variable EX Lupi). In addition, enhanced UV radiation is found to produce OH from photodissociation of water in the disk. Organic molecules instead disappear during a strong outburst, and we are currently investigating the long-term evolution of these effects. A second direction was taken to tackle another fundamental problem: the origin of water vapor in inner disks. Some models predict that water is produced by evaporation of icy solids migrating inward of the snow line. One way to probe this scenario is by measuring the abundance of water vapor in the inner disk, and compare it to the oxygen abundance

  15. Molecular Gas in Young Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, Attila; Kóspál, Ágnes; Ábrahám, Péter; Juhász, Attila; Apai, Dániel; Csengeri, Timea; Grady, Carol; Henning, Thomas; Kiss, Csaba; Pascucci, Ilaria

    2013-07-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. So far only a very few debris disks with measurable gas component have been known. We carried out a survey with the APEX radio telescope to detect molecular gas at millimeter wavelengths in 28 infrared-luminous young debris disks, and discovered two new systems with substantial amount of CO. Motivated to understand the origin, physics, and evolutionary status of the gas in these systems we observed one of them, HD 21997, with ALMA and Herschel. Our results suggest that HD 21997 may be a hybrid system where secondary debris dust and residual primordial gas coexist. This poses a serious question to the current paradigm, since the age of the system (30 Myr) significantly exceeds model predictions for disk clearing and the ages of the oldest transitional disks.

  16. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John

    2013-10-01

    Self-gravitating systems evolve toward the most tightly bound configuration that is reachable via the evolution processes that are available to them. They do this by spreading -- the inner parts shrink while the outer parts expand -- provided that some physical process efficiently transports energy or angular momentum outward. The reason is that self-gravitating systems have negative specific heats. As a result, the evolution of stars, star clusters, protostellar and protoplanetary disks, black hole accretion disks and galaxy disks are fundamentally similar. How evolution proceeds then depends on the evolution processes that are available to each kind of self-gravitating system. These processes and their consequences for galaxy disks are the subjects of my lectures and of this Canary Islands Winter School. I begin with a review of the formation, growth and death of bars. Then I review the slow (`secular') rearrangement of energy, angular momentum, and mass that results from interactions between stars or gas clouds and collective phenomena such as bars, oval disks, spiral structure and triaxial dark haloes. The `existence-proof' phase of this work is largely over: we have a good heuristic understanding of how nonaxisymmetric structures rearrange disk gas into outer rings, inner rings and stuff dumped onto the centre. The results of simulations correspond closely to the morphology of barred and oval galaxies. Gas that is transported to small radii reaches high densities. Observations confirm that many barred and oval galaxies have dense central concentrations of gas and star formation. The result is to grow, on timescales of a few Gyr, dense central components that are frequently mistaken for classical (elliptical-galaxy-like) bulges but that were grown slowly out of the disk (not made rapidly by major mergers). The resulting picture of secular galaxy evolution accounts for the richness observed in galaxy structure. We can distinguish between classical and pseudo

  17. Geometrical Structures of Chemically Decomposed Thick and Thin Disk Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, D.; Brook, C. B.; Rahimi, A.; Gibson, B. K.

    2016-10-01

    We summarize the thick and thin disk formation commonly seen in cosmological N-body simulations. As suggested in Brook et al. (2004), a hierarchical clustering scenario causes multiple minor gas-rich mergers, and leads to the formation of a kinematically hot disk, thick disk population, at a high redshift. Once the mergers become less significant at a later epoch, the thin disk population starts building up. Because in this scenario the thick disk population forms intensively at high redshift through multiple gas-rich mergers, the thick disk population is compact and has systematically higher [α/Fe] abundance than the thin disk population. We discuss that the thick disk population would be affected by the formation of the thin disk and suffer from the radial migration, which helps the thick disk population to be observed in the solar neighborhood. In addition, we show that the current cosmological simulations also naturally predict that the thin disk population is flaring at the outer region. As shown in Rahimi et al. (2014), at high vertical height from the disk plane, the compact thick disk population (low metallicity and high [α/Fe]) is dominant in the inner region and the flaring thin disk population (high metallicity and low [α/Fe]) contributes more in the outer region. This helps to explain the positive radial metallicity gradient and negative radial [α/Fe] gradient observed at high vertical height in the Milky Way stellar disk.

  18. Evaluation of Oxacillin and Cefoxitin Disk and MIC Breakpoints for Prediction of Methicillin Resistance in Human and Veterinary Isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius Group

    PubMed Central

    Wu, M. T.; Westblade, L. F.; Dien Bard, J.; Wallace, M. A.; Stanley, T.; Burd, E.; Hindler, J.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a coagulase-positive species that colonizes the nares and anal mucosa of healthy dogs and cats. Human infections with S. pseudintermedius range in severity from bite wounds and rhinosinusitis to endocarditis; historically, these infections were thought to be uncommon, but new laboratory methods suggest that their true incidence is underreported. Oxacillin and cefoxitin disk and MIC tests were evaluated for the detection of mecA- or mecC-mediated methicillin resistance in 115 human and animal isolates of the Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG), including 111 Staphylococcus pseudintermediusand 4 Staphylococcus delphini isolates, 37 of which were mecA positive. The disk and MIC breakpoints evaluated included the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M100-S25 Staphylococcus aureus/Staphylococcus lugdunensis oxacillin MIC breakpoints and cefoxitin disk and MIC breakpoints, the CLSI M100-S25 coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) oxacillin MIC breakpoint and cefoxitin disk breakpoint, the CLSI VET01-S2 S. pseudintermedius oxacillin MIC and disk breakpoints, and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) S. pseudintermedius cefoxitin disk breakpoint. The oxacillin results interpreted by the VET01-S2 (disk and MIC) and M100-S25 CoNS (MIC) breakpoints agreed with the results of mecA/mecC PCR for all isolates, with the exception of one false-resistant result (1.3% of mecA/mecC PCR-negative isolates). In contrast, cefoxitin tests performed poorly, ranging from 3 to 89% false susceptibility (very major errors) and 0 to 48% false resistance (major errors). BD Phoenix, bioMérieux Vitek 2, and Beckman Coulter MicroScan commercial automated susceptibility test panel oxacillin MIC results were also evaluated and demonstrated >95% categorical agreement with mecA/mecC PCR results if interpreted by using the M100-S25 CoNS breakpoint. The Alere penicillin-binding protein 2a test accurately detected all

  19. Evaluation of Oxacillin and Cefoxitin Disk and MIC Breakpoints for Prediction of Methicillin Resistance in Human and Veterinary Isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius Group.

    PubMed

    Wu, M T; Burnham, C-A D; Westblade, L F; Dien Bard, J; Lawhon, S D; Wallace, M A; Stanley, T; Burd, E; Hindler, J; Humphries, R M

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a coagulase-positive species that colonizes the nares and anal mucosa of healthy dogs and cats. Human infections with S. pseudintermedius range in severity from bite wounds and rhinosinusitis to endocarditis; historically, these infections were thought to be uncommon, but new laboratory methods suggest that their true incidence is underreported. Oxacillin and cefoxitin disk and MIC tests were evaluated for the detection of mecA- or mecC-mediated methicillin resistance in 115 human and animal isolates of the Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG), including 111 Staphylococcus pseudintermediusand 4 Staphylococcus delphini isolates, 37 of which were mecA positive. The disk and MIC breakpoints evaluated included the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M100-S25 Staphylococcus aureus/Staphylococcus lugdunensis oxacillin MIC breakpoints and cefoxitin disk and MIC breakpoints, the CLSI M100-S25 coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) oxacillin MIC breakpoint and cefoxitin disk breakpoint, the CLSI VET01-S2 S. pseudintermedius oxacillin MIC and disk breakpoints, and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) S. pseudintermedius cefoxitin disk breakpoint. The oxacillin results interpreted by the VET01-S2 (disk and MIC) and M100-S25 CoNS (MIC) breakpoints agreed with the results of mecA/mecC PCR for all isolates, with the exception of one false-resistant result (1.3% of mecA/mecC PCR-negative isolates). In contrast, cefoxitin tests performed poorly, ranging from 3 to 89% false susceptibility (very major errors) and 0 to 48% false resistance (major errors). BD Phoenix, bioMérieux Vitek 2, and Beckman Coulter MicroScan commercial automated susceptibility test panel oxacillin MIC results were also evaluated and demonstrated >95% categorical agreement with mecA/mecC PCR results if interpreted by using the M100-S25 CoNS breakpoint. The Alere penicillin-binding protein 2a test accurately detected all

  20. MODELING PLANETARY SYSTEM FORMATION WITH N-BODY SIMULATIONS: ROLE OF GAS DISK AND STATISTICS COMPARED TO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Huigen; Zhou Jilin; Wang Su

    2011-05-10

    During the late stage of planet formation, when Mars-sized cores appear, interactions among planetary cores can excite their orbital eccentricities, accelerate their merging, and thus sculpt their final orbital architecture. This study contributes to the final assembling of planetary systems with N-body simulations, including the type I or II migration of planets and gas accretion of massive cores in a viscous disk. Statistics on the final distributions of planetary masses, semimajor axes, and eccentricities are derived and are comparable to those of the observed systems. Our simulations predict some new orbital signatures of planetary systems around solar mass stars: 36% of the surviving planets are giant planets (>10 M{sub +}). Most of the massive giant planets (>30 M{sub +}) are located at 1-10 AU. Terrestrial planets are distributed more or less evenly at <1-2 AU. Planets in inner orbits may accumulate at the inner edges of either the protostellar disk (3-5 days) or its magnetorotational instability dead zone (30-50 days). There is a planet desert in the mass-eccentricity diagram, i.e., a lack of planets with masses 0.005-0.08M{sub J} in highly eccentric orbits (e > 0.3-0.4). The average eccentricity ({approx}0.15) of the giant planets (>10 M{sub +}) is greater than that ({approx}0.05) of the terrestrial planets (<10 M{sub +}). A planetary system with more planets tends to have smaller planet masses and orbital eccentricities on average.

  1. Circum-Protostellar Environments II. Envelopes, Activity, and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriarty-Schieven, G. H.; Wannier, P. G.; Keene, J.; Tamura, M.

    1995-01-01

    We have obtained 800 and 1100 micrometer photometric observations of a complete, flux-limited, IRAS-selected sample of cold sources in Taurus, whose infrared and molecular properties indicate them to be low-mass protostars younger than T Tauri stars. The data were used to improve understanding of the role of the circumstellar envelope and disk during low-mass star formation and to search for signs of evolution.

  2. Protostellar feedback in turbulent fragmentation: consequences for stellar clustering and multiplicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guszejnov, Dávid; Hopkins, Philip F.; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2017-07-01

    Stars are strongly clustered on both large (˜pc) and small (˜binary) scales, but there are few analytic or even semi-analytic theories for the correlation function and multiplicity of stars. In this paper, we present such a theory, based on our recently developed semi-analytic framework called MISFIT (Minimalistic Star Formation Including Turbulence), which models gravito-turbulent fragmentation, including the suppression of fragmentation by protostellar radiation feedback. We compare the results including feedback to a control model in which it is omitted. We show that both classes of models robustly reproduce the stellar correlation function at >0.01 pc scales, which is well approximated by a power law that follows generally from scale-free physics (turbulence plus gravity) on large scales. On smaller scales, protostellar disc fragmentation becomes dominant over common core fragmentation, leading to a steepening of the correlation function. Multiplicity is more sensitive to feedback: we found that a model with the protostellar heating reproduces the observed multiplicity fractions and mass ratio distributions for both Solar and sub-Solar mass stars (in particular, the brown dwarf desert), while a model without feedback fails to do so. The model with feedback also produces an at-formation period distribution consistent with the one inferred from observations. However, it is unable to produce short-range binaries below the length-scale of protostellar discs. We suggest that such close binaries are produced primarily by disc fragmentation and further decrease their separation through orbital decay.

  3. Impact of Protostellar Outflows on Turbulence and Star Formation Efficiency in Magnetized Dense Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offner, Stella S. R.; Chaban, Jonah

    2017-10-01

    The star-forming efficiency of dense gas is thought to be set within cores by outflow and radiative feedback. We use magnetohydrodynamic simulations to investigate the relation between protostellar outflow evolution, turbulence, and star formation efficiency. We model the collapse and evolution of isolated dense cores for ≳0.5 Myr including the effects of turbulence, radiation transfer, and both radiation and outflow feedback from forming protostars. We show that outflows drive and maintain turbulence in the core environment even with strong initial fields. The star formation efficiency decreases with increasing field strength, and the final efficiencies are 15%–40%. The Stage 0 lifetime, during which the protostellar mass is lower than that of the dense envelope, increases proportionally with the initial magnetic field strength and ranges from ∼ 0.1 {to} 0.4 {Myr}. The average accretion rate is well represented by a tapered turbulent core model, which is a function of the final protostellar mass and is independent of the magnetic field strength. By tagging material launched in the outflow, we demonstrate that the outflow entrains about three times the actual launched gas mass, a ratio that remains roughly constant in time regardless of the initial magnetic field strength. However, turbulent driving increases for stronger fields since momentum is more efficiently imparted to non-outflow material. The protostellar outflow momentum is highest during the first 0.1 Myr and declines thereafter by a factor of ≳ 10 as the accretion rate diminishes.

  4. Evolutionary status of the pre-protostellar core L1498

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B.; Langer, W. D.; Velusamy, T.; Levin, S. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    L1498 is a classic example of a dense cold pre-protostellar core. To study the evolutionary status, the structure, dynamics, and chemical properties of this core we have obtained high spatial and high spectral resolution observations of molecules tracing densities of 10(3)-10(5) cm-3. We observed CCS, NH3, C3H2, and HC7N with NASA's DSN 70 m antennas. We also present large-scale maps of C18O and 13CO observed with the AT&T 7 m antenna. For the high spatial resolution maps of selected regions within the core we used the VLA for CCS at 22 GHz, and the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) MMA for CCS at 94 GHz and CS (2-1). The 22 GHz CCS emission marks a high-density [n(H2) > 10(4) cm -3] core, which is elongated with a major axis along the SE-NW direction. NH3 and C3H2 emissions are located inside the boundary of the CCS emission. C18O emission traces a lower density gas extending beyond the CCS boundary. Along the major axis of the dense core, CCS, NH3 and C3H2 emission show evidence of limb brightening. The observations are consistent with a chemically differentiated onion-shell structure for the L1498 core, with NH3 in the inner and CCS in the outer parts of the core. The high angular resolution (9"-12") spectral line maps obtained by combining NASA Goldstone 70 m and VLA data resolve the CCS 22 GHz emission in the southeast and northwest boundaries into arclike enhancements, supporting the picture that CCS emission originates in a shell outside the NH3 emitting region. Interferometric maps of CCS at 94 GHz and CS at 98 GHz show that their emitting regions contain several small-scale dense condensations. We suggest that the differences between the CCS, CS, C3H2, and NH3 emission are caused by a time-dependent effect as the core evolves slowly. We interpret the chemical and physical properties of L1498 in terms of a quasi-static (or slowly contracting) dense core in which the outer envelope is still growing. The growth rate of the core is determined by the

  5. Identification of Gas Phase PAHs in Absorption Towards Protostellar Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse D.; Temi, Pasquale; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The infrared emission bands (also known as the UIR bands.) have recently been observed in absorption at 3.25 micrometers in the ices surrounding a few proto-stellar objects at 11.2 micrometers in MonR2, and at 6.2 micrometers towards two sources near the galactic center. The UIR bands have been observed in emission for many years, but identifying these bands has proven to be both difficult and contentious as no one has yet found a single material that provides a good match to the features. However, most investigators agree that some form of carbon-based material with aromatic bonds is the most likely candidate, and many arguments favor free molecules (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) as the carriers of at least the narrow emission bands. Since the emission arises not from a single molecule but from a family of molecules, identifying which PAHs are contributing to the infrared emission bands is difficult. The identification is further complicated by the fact that the emission at short wavelengths is dominated by small molecules while at long wavelengths it is dominated by large molecules. Thus, for example, the emission at 3.3 micrometers is from a different mix of molecules than those which produce the 11.2 micrometer band. To complicate matters further, the molecular mix includes both neutral and ionic species. In absorption, the same mixture of molecules contributes at all wavelengths and the molecules should be neutral, potentially simplifying comparisons with lab data. Also, absorption strengths measured in the lab are directly applicable to interstellar absorption bands without the need to model an emission spectrum of an unknown mixture of ionized and neutral PAHs. In this paper we show that a mixture of argon matrix isolated PAH molecules can reproduce the 3.25 micrometers absorption band seen in the ISO SWS spectra of four embedded Infrared sources, S140 IRS1, AFGL 2591, Elias 29, and AFGL 989. In section 2 we describe the ISO SWS data analysis and

  6. Evolutionary status of the pre-protostellar core L1498.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, T B; Langer, W D; Velusamy, T

    1996-09-10

    L1498 is a classic example of a dense cold pre-protostellar core. To study the evolutionary status, the structure, dynamics, and chemical properties of this core we have obtained high spatial and high spectral resolution observations of molecules tracing densities of 10(3)-10(5) cm-3. We observed CCS, NH3, C3H2, and HC7N with NASA's DSN 70 m antennas. We also present large-scale maps of C18O and 13CO observed with the AT&T 7 m antenna. For the high spatial resolution maps of selected regions within the core we used the VLA for CCS at 22 GHz, and the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) MMA for CCS at 94 GHz and CS (2-1). The 22 GHz CCS emission marks a high-density [n(H2) > 10(4) cm -3] core, which is elongated with a major axis along the SE-NW direction. NH3 and C3H2 emissions are located inside the boundary of the CCS emission. C18O emission traces a lower density gas extending beyond the CCS boundary. Along the major axis of the dense core, CCS, NH3 and C3H2 emission show evidence of limb brightening. The observations are consistent with a chemically differentiated onion-shell structure for the L1498 core, with NH3 in the inner and CCS in the outer parts of the core. The high angular resolution (9"-12") spectral line maps obtained by combining NASA Goldstone 70 m and VLA data resolve the CCS 22 GHz emission in the southeast and northwest boundaries into arclike enhancements, supporting the picture that CCS emission originates in a shell outside the NH3 emitting region. Interferometric maps of CCS at 94 GHz and CS at 98 GHz show that their emitting regions contain several small-scale dense condensations. We suggest that the differences between the CCS, CS, C3H2, and NH3 emission are caused by a time-dependent effect as the core evolves slowly. We interpret the chemical and physical properties of L1498 in terms of a quasi-static (or slowly contracting) dense core in which the outer envelope is still growing. The growth rate of the core is determined by the

  7. Young stars and protostellar cores near NGC 2023

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookerjea, B.; Sandell, G.; Jarrett, T. H.; McMullin, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    Context: We investigate the young (proto)stellar population in NGC 2023 and the L 1630 molecular cloud bordering the h ii region IC 434, using Spitzer IRAC and MIPS archive data, JCMT SCUBA imaging and spectroscopy as well as targeted BIMA observations of one of the Class 0 protostars, NGC 2023 MM 1. Aims: We study the distribution of gas, dust and young stars in this region to see where stars are forming, whether the expansion of the h ii region has triggered star formation, and whether dense cold cores have already formed stars. Methods: We have performed photometry of all IRAC and MIPS images, and used color-color diagrams to identify and classify all young stars seen within a 22'×26' field along the boundary between IC 434 and L 1630. For some stars, which have sufficient optical, IR, and/or sub-millimeter data we have also used the online SED fitting tool for a large 2D archive of axisymmetric radiative transfer models to perform more detailed modeling of the observed SEDs. We identify 5 sub-millimeter cores in our 850 and 450 μm SCUBA images, two of which have embedded class 0 or I protostars. Observations with BIMA are used to refine the position and characteristics of the Class 0 source NGC 2023 MM 1. These observations show that it is embedded in a very cold cloud core, which is strongly enhanced in NH2D. Results: We find that HD 37903 is the most massive member of a cluster with 20-30 PMS stars. We also find smaller groups of PMS stars formed from the Horsehead nebula and another elephant trunk structure to the north of the Horsehead. Star formation is also occurring in the dark lane seen in IRAC images and in the sub-millimeter continuum. We refine the spectral classification of HD 37903 to B2 Ve. We find that the star has a clear IR excess, and therefore it is a young Herbig Be star. Conclusions: Our study shows that the expansion of the IC 434 h ii region has triggered star formation in some of the dense elephant trunk structures and compressed gas

  8. HiRes deconvolved Spitzer images of 89 protostellar jets and outflows: New data on the evolution of the outflow morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Velusamy, T.; Langer, W. D.; Thompson, T. E-mail: William.D.Langer@jpl.nasa.gov

    2014-03-01

    To study the role of protosellar jets and outflows in the time evolution of the parent cores and the protostars, the astronomical community needs a large enough database of infrared images of protostars at the highest spatial resolution possible to reveal the details of their morphology. Spitzer provides unprecedented sensitivity in the infrared to study both the jet and outflow features, however, its spatial resolution is limited by its 0.85 m mirror. Here, we use a high-resolution deconvolution algorithm, 'HiRes,' to improve the visualization of spatial morphology by enhancing resolution (to subarcsecond levels in the IRAC bands) and removing the contaminating side lobes from bright sources in a sample of 89 protostellar objects. These reprocessed images are useful for detecting (1) wide-angle outflows seen in scattered light, (2) morphological details of H{sub 2} emission in jets and bow shocks, and (3) compact features in MIPS 24 μm images as protostar/disk and atomic/ionic line emission associated with the jets. The HiRes FITS image data of such a large homogeneous sample presented here will be useful to the community in studying these protostellar objects. To illustrate the utility of this HiRes sample, we show how the opening angle of the wide-angle outflows in 31 sources, all observed in the HiRes-processed Spitzer images, correlates with age. Our data suggest a power-law fit to opening angle versus age with an exponent of ∼0.32 and 0.02, respectively, for ages ≤8000 yr and ≥8000 yr.

  9. Disk Alloy Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Tim; Gayda, John; Telesman, Jack

    2001-01-01

    The advanced powder metallurgy disk alloy ME3 was designed using statistical screening and optimization of composition and processing variables in the NASA HSR/EPM disk program to have extended durability at 1150 to 1250 "Fin large disks. Scaled-up disks of this alloy were produced at the conclusion of this program to demonstrate these properties in realistic disk shapes. The objective of the UEET disk program was to assess the mechanical properties of these ME3 disks as functions of temperature, in order to estimate the maximum temperature capabilities of this advanced alloy. Scaled-up disks processed in the HSR/EPM Compressor / Turbine Disk program were sectioned, machined into specimens, and tested in tensile, creep, fatigue, and fatigue crack growth tests by NASA Glenn Research Center, in cooperation with General Electric Engine Company and Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Engines. Additional sub-scale disks and blanks were processed and tested to explore the effects of several processing variations on mechanical properties. Scaled-up disks of an advanced regional disk alloy, Alloy 10, were used to evaluate dual microstructure heat treatments. This allowed demonstration of an improved balance of properties in disks with higher strength and fatigue resistance in the bores and higher creep and dwell fatigue crack growth resistance in the rims. Results indicate the baseline ME3 alloy and process has 1300 to 1350 O F temperature capabilities, dependent on detailed disk and engine design property requirements. Chemistry and process enhancements show promise for further increasing temperature capabilities.

  10. ON THE FORMATION OF GALACTIC THICK DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Minchev, I.; Streich, D.; Scannapieco, C.; De Jong, R. S.; Steinmetz, M.; Martig, M.

    2015-05-01

    Recent spectroscopic observations in the Milky Way suggest that the chemically defined thick disk (stars that have high [α/Fe] ratios and are thus old) has a significantly smaller scale-length than the thin disk. This is in apparent contradiction with observations of external edge-on galaxies, where the thin and thick components have comparable scale-lengths. Moreover, while observed disks do not flare (scale-height does not increase with radius), numerical simulations suggest that disk flaring is unavoidable, resulting from both environmental effects and secular evolution. Here we address these problems by studying two different suites of simulated galactic disks formed in the cosmological context. We show that the scale-heights of coeval populations always increase with radius. However, the total population can be decomposed morphologically into thin and thick disks, which do not flare. We relate this to the disk inside-out formation, where younger populations have increasingly larger scale-lengths and flare at progressively larger radii. In this new picture, thick disks are composed of the imbedded flares of mono-age stellar populations. Assuming that disks form inside out, we predict that morphologically defined thick disks must show a decrease in age (or [α/Fe] ratios) with radius and that coeval populations should always flare. This also explains the observed inversion in the metallicity and [α/Fe] gradients for stars away from the disk midplane in the Milky Way. The results of this work are directly linked to, and can be seen as evidence of, inside-out disk growth.

  11. Supersized Disk Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-02-08

    This illustration compares the size of a gargantuan star and its surrounding dusty disk top to that of our solar system. Monstrous disks like this one were discovered around two hypergiant stars by NASA Spitzer Space Telescope.

  12. Magnetic fields in primordial accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are considered a vital ingredient of contemporary star formation and may have been important during the formation of the first stars in the presence of an efficient amplification mechanism. Initial seed fields are provided via plasma fluctuations and are subsequently amplified by the small-scale dynamo, leading to a strong, tangled magnetic field. We explore how the magnetic field provided by the small-scale dynamo is further amplified via the α-Ω dynamo in a protostellar disk and assess its implications. For this purpose, we consider two characteristic cases, a typical Pop. III star with 10M⊙ and an accretion rate of 10-3M⊙ yr-1, and a supermassive star with 105M⊙ and an accretion rate of 10-1M⊙ yr-1. For the 10M⊙ Pop. III star, we find that coherent magnetic fields can be produced on scales of at least 100 AU, which are sufficient to drive a jet with a luminosity of 100L⊙ and a mass outflow rate of 10-3.7M⊙ yr-1. For the supermassive star, the dynamical timescales in its environment are even shorter, implying smaller orbital timescales and an efficient magnetization out to at least 1000 AU. The jet luminosity corresponds to ~106.0L⊙ and a mass outflow rate of 10-2.1M⊙ yr-1. We expect that the feedback from the supermassive star can have a relevant impact on its host galaxy.

  13. Complex Structure in Class 0 Protostellar Envelopes. II. Kinematic Structure from Single-dish and Interferometric Molecular Line Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Looney, Leslie W.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Chandler, Claire J.; Masqué, Josep M.; Maret, Sébastien; Heitsch, Fabian

    2011-10-01

    We present a study of dense molecular gas kinematics in 17 nearby protostellar systems using single-dish and interferometric molecular line observations. The non-axisymmetric envelopes around a sample of Class 0/I protostars were mapped in the N2H+ (J = 1 → 0) tracer with the IRAM 30 m, CARMA, and Plateau de Bure Interferometer, as well as NH3 (1,1) with the Very Large Array. The molecular line emission is used to construct line-center velocity and linewidth maps for all sources to examine the kinematic structure in the envelopes on spatial scales from 0.1 pc to ~1000 AU. The direction of the large-scale velocity gradients from single-dish mapping is within 45° of normal to the outflow axis in more than half the sample. Furthermore, the velocity gradients are often quite substantial, the average being ~2.3 km s-1 pc-1. The interferometric data often reveal small-scale velocity structure, departing from the more gradual large-scale velocity gradients. In some cases, this likely indicates accelerating infall and/or rotational spin-up in the inner envelope; the median velocity gradient from the interferometric data is ~10.7 km s-1 pc-1. In two systems, we detect high-velocity HCO+ (J = 1 → 0) emission inside the highest-velocity N2H+ emission. This enables us to study the infall and rotation close to the disk and estimate the central object masses. The velocity fields observed on large and small scales are more complex than would be expected from rotation alone, suggesting that complex envelope structure enables other dynamical processes (i.e., infall) to affect the velocity field. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope and IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  14. Accretion disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1985-01-01

    Accretion disk electrodynamic phenomena are separable into two classes: (1) disks and coronas with turbulent magnetic fields; (2) disks and black holes which are connected to a large-scale external magnetic field. Turbulent fields may originate in an alpha-omega dynamo, provide anomalous viscous transport, and sustain an active corona by magnetic buoyancy. The large-scale field can extract energy and angular momentum from the disk and black hole, and be dynamically configured into a collimated relativistic jet.

  15. DISK PUMP FEASIBILITY INVESTIGATION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The disk pump was investigated at the Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory (AFRPL) to determine the feasibility of using a novel viscous pumping... pump primarily for application as an inducer. The disk pump differs drastically from conventional pumps because of the following major factors: (1) The...The pump inlet relative velocity is equal only to the through flow velocity between the disks. Therefore, there is good indication that the disk pump will

  16. GIANT PLANET MIGRATION, DISK EVOLUTION, AND THE ORIGIN OF TRANSITIONAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Richard D.; Armitage, Philip J.

    2009-10-20

    We present models of giant planet migration in evolving protoplanetary disks. Our disks evolve subject to viscous transport of angular momentum and photoevaporation, while planets undergo Type II migration. We use a Monte Carlo approach, running large numbers of models with a range in initial conditions. We find that relatively simple models can reproduce both the observed radial distribution of extrasolar giant planets, and the lifetimes and accretion histories of protoplanetary disks. The use of state-of-the-art photoevaporation models results in a degree of coupling between planet formation and disk clearing, which has not been found previously. Some accretion across planetary orbits is necessary if planets are to survive at radii approx<1.5 AU, and if planets of Jupiter mass or greater are to survive in our models they must be able to form at late times, when the disk surface density in the formation region is low. Our model forms two different types of 'transitional' disks, embedded planets and clearing disks, which show markedly different properties. We find that the observable properties of these systems are broadly consistent with current observations, and highlight useful observational diagnostics. We predict that young transition disks are more likely to contain embedded giant planets, while older transition disks are more likely to be undergoing disk clearing.

  17. Understanding Floppy Disks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Pamela

    1980-01-01

    The author describes the floppy disk with an analogy to the phonograph record, and discusses the advantages, disadvantages, and capabilities of hard-sectored and soft-sectored floppy disks. She concludes that, at present, the floppy disk will continue to be the primary choice of personal computer manufacturers and their customers. (KC)

  18. Herniated lumbar disk (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Herniated lumbar disk is a condition in which part or all of the soft, gelatinous central portion of an intervertebral disk (the nucleus pulposus) is forced through a weakened part of the disk, resulting in back pain and nerve root irritation.

  19. Optical Disk Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, George L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This special feature focuses on recent developments in optical disk technology. Nine articles discuss current trends, large scale image processing, data structures for optical disks, the use of computer simulators to create optical disks, videodisk use in training, interactive audio video systems, impacts on federal information policy, and…

  20. Understanding Floppy Disks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Pamela

    1980-01-01

    The author describes the floppy disk with an analogy to the phonograph record, and discusses the advantages, disadvantages, and capabilities of hard-sectored and soft-sectored floppy disks. She concludes that, at present, the floppy disk will continue to be the primary choice of personal computer manufacturers and their customers. (KC)

  1. Reverberation Mapping of AGN Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fausnaugh, Michael; AGN STORM Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    I will discuss new reverberation mapping results that allow us to investigate the temperature structure of AGN accretion disks. By measuring time-delays between broad-band continuum light curves, we can determine the size of the disk as a function of wavelength. I will discuss the detection of continuum lags in NGC 5548 reported by the AGN STORM project and implications for the accretion disk. I will also present evidence for continuum lags in two other AGN for which we recently measured black hole masses from continuum-Hbeta reverberations. The mass measurements allow us to compare the continuum lags to predictions from standard thin disk theory, and our results indicate that the accretion disks are larger than the simplest expectations.

  2. Disk-loss and disk-renewal phases in classical Be stars. II. Contrasting with stable and variable disks

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, Zachary H.; Wisniewski, John P.; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Bjorkman, Jon E.; Meade, Marilyn R.; Haubois, Xavier; Mota, Bruno C.; Carciofi, Alex C. E-mail: karen.bjorkman@utoledo.edu E-mail: meade@astro.wisc.edu E-mail: carciofi@usp.br

    2014-05-10

    Recent observational and theoretical studies of classical Be stars have established the utility of polarization color diagrams (PCDs) in helping to constrain the time-dependent mass decretion rates of these systems. We expand on our pilot observational study of this phenomenon, and report the detailed analysis of a long-term (1989-2004) spectropolarimetric survey of nine additional classical Be stars, including systems exhibiting evidence of partial disk-loss/disk-growth episodes as well as systems exhibiting long-term stable disks. After carefully characterizing and removing the interstellar polarization along the line of sight to each of these targets, we analyze their intrinsic polarization behavior. We find that many steady-state Be disks pause at the top of the PCD, as predicted by theory. We also observe sharp declines in the Balmer jump polarization for later spectral type, near edge-on steady-state disks, again as recently predicted by theory, likely caused when the base density of the disk is very high, and the outer region of the edge-on disk starts to self absorb a significant number of Balmer jump photons. The intrinsic V-band polarization and polarization position angle of γ Cas exhibits variations that seem to phase with the orbital period of a known one-armed density structure in this disk, similar to the theoretical predictions of Halonen and Jones. We also observe stochastic jumps in the intrinsic polarization across the Balmer jump of several known Be+sdO systems, and speculate that the thermal inflation of part of the outer region of these disks could be responsible for producing this observational phenomenon. Finally, we estimate the base densities of this sample of stars to be between ≈8 × 10{sup –11} and ≈4 × 10{sup –12} g cm{sup –3} during quasi steady state periods given there maximum observed polarization.

  3. Disk-loss and Disk-renewal Phases in Classical Be Stars. II. Contrasting with Stable and Variable Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Zachary H.; Wisniewski, John P.; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Meade, Marilyn R.; Haubois, Xavier; Mota, Bruno C.; Carciofi, Alex C.; Bjorkman, Jon E.

    2014-05-01

    Recent observational and theoretical studies of classical Be stars have established the utility of polarization color diagrams (PCDs) in helping to constrain the time-dependent mass decretion rates of these systems. We expand on our pilot observational study of this phenomenon, and report the detailed analysis of a long-term (1989-2004) spectropolarimetric survey of nine additional classical Be stars, including systems exhibiting evidence of partial disk-loss/disk-growth episodes as well as systems exhibiting long-term stable disks. After carefully characterizing and removing the interstellar polarization along the line of sight to each of these targets, we analyze their intrinsic polarization behavior. We find that many steady-state Be disks pause at the top of the PCD, as predicted by theory. We also observe sharp declines in the Balmer jump polarization for later spectral type, near edge-on steady-state disks, again as recently predicted by theory, likely caused when the base density of the disk is very high, and the outer region of the edge-on disk starts to self absorb a significant number of Balmer jump photons. The intrinsic V-band polarization and polarization position angle of γ Cas exhibits variations that seem to phase with the orbital period of a known one-armed density structure in this disk, similar to the theoretical predictions of Halonen & Jones. We also observe stochastic jumps in the intrinsic polarization across the Balmer jump of several known Be+sdO systems, and speculate that the thermal inflation of part of the outer region of these disks could be responsible for producing this observational phenomenon. Finally, we estimate the base densities of this sample of stars to be between ≈8 × 10-11 and ≈4 × 10-12 g cm-3 during quasi steady state periods given there maximum observed polarization.

  4. Floppy disk utility user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akers, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    A floppy disk utility program is described which transfers programs between files on a hard disk and floppy disk. It also copies the data on one floppy disk onto another floppy disk and compares the data. The program operates on the Data General NOVA-4X under the Real Time Disk Operating System. Sample operations are given.

  5. Floppy disk utility user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akers, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The Floppy Disk Utility Program transfers programs between files on the hard disk and floppy disk. It also copies the data on one floppy disk onto another floppy disk and compares the data. The program operates on the Data General NOVA-4X under the Real Time Disk Operating System (RDOS).

  6. A SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH STUDY OF DEBRIS DISKS AROUND PLANET-HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Beichman, C. A.; Carpenter, John M.; Bryden, Geoffrey

    2011-01-15

    Since giant planets scatter planetesimals within a few tidal radii of their orbits, the locations of existing planetesimal belts indicate regions where giant planet formation failed in bygone protostellar disks. Infrared observations of circumstellar dust produced by colliding planetesimals are therefore powerful probes of the formation histories of known planets. Here we present new Spitzer infrared spectrograph (IRS) spectrophotometry of 111 solar-type stars, including 105 planet hosts. Our observations reveal 11 debris disks, including two previously undetected debris disks orbiting HD 108874 and HD 130322. Combining the 32 {mu}m spectrophotometry with previously published MIPS photometry, we find that the majority of debris disks around solar-type stars have temperatures in the range 60 {approx}< T{sub dust} {approx}< 100 K. Assuming a dust temperature T{sub dust} = 70 K, which is representative of the nine debris disks detected by both IRS and MIPS, debris rings surrounding Sun-like stars orbit between 15 and 240 AU depending on the mean particle size. Our observations imply that the planets detected by radial-velocity searches formed within 240 AU of their parent stars. If any of the debris disks studied here have mostly large, blackbody emitting grains, their companion giant planets must have formed in a narrow region between the ice line and 15 AU.

  7. Debris Disks: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, D.

    2004-12-01

    An overview regarding planetary debris disks: First, more history to complement Low and Aumann's summary appearing elsewhere in this volume. Then, commentary on the nature of debris disks and what we've learned from them: properties of the original ``Fabulous Four" archetypes, results from surveys showing that a large fraction of ordinary stars may be hosts for debris disks, and relatively detailed discussion of β Pictoris, the most prominent disk. Finally, discussion of the connection between debris disks, our solar system's Kuiper Belt, and the zodiacal dust cloud. Open questions about these objects will be highlighted which can lead on to the remainder of the proceedings.

  8. Circumstellar disks around binary stars in Taurus

    SciTech Connect

    Akeson, R. L.

    2014-03-20

    We have conducted a survey of 17 wide (>100 AU) young binary systems in Taurus with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) at two wavelengths. The observations were designed to measure the masses of circumstellar disks in these systems as an aid to understanding the role of multiplicity in star and planet formation. The ALMA observations had sufficient resolution to localize emission within the binary system. Disk emission was detected around all primaries and 10 secondaries, with disk masses as low as 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉}. We compare the properties of our sample to the population of known disks in Taurus and find that the disks from this binary sample match the scaling between stellar mass and millimeter flux of F{sub mm}∝M{sub ∗}{sup 1.5--2.0} to within the scatter found in previous studies. We also compare the properties of the primaries to those of the secondaries and find that the secondary/primary stellar and disk mass ratios are not correlated; in three systems, the circumsecondary disk is more massive than the circumprimary disk, counter to some theoretical predictions.

  9. The Mystery of Herschel's ``Cold Debris Disks''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivov, A. V.; Löhne, T.; Eiroa, C.; Marshall, J. P.

    2012-03-01

    An important result of the Herschel Open Times Key Program DUNES is a discovery of a new class of ``cold debris disks''. These are tenuous disks that show little or no infrared excess at 100μm, but a significant one at 160μm and possibly longer wavelengths. A comparison of the dust temperatures inferred from the SEDs to the disk radii estimated from resolved images suggests that the dust is colder than a black body at the dust location. This requires the grains to be large (compared to far-infrared wavelengths) and to have low absorption in the visible. While the latter can be achieved, for instance if the dust is rich in ices, the absence of small grains is puzzling, since collisional models of debris disks predict the grains of all sizes down to several times the radiation pressure blowout limit to be present. We will discuss several scenarios proposed to explain depletion of small grains: transport-dominated disks, disks with dynamically cold dust-producing planetesimals, and the disks of unstirred primordial millimeter-sized grains. While the first two scenarios encounter problems, the last one looks more promising. Our collisional simulations show that, at least for some collision outcome prescriptions, such disks can indeed survive for gigayears, largely preserving the primordial size distribution. The modeled thermal emission appears to be roughly consistent with the observed one.

  10. HNC IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Graninger, Dawn; Öberg, Karin I.; Qi, Chunhua; Kastner, Joel

    2015-07-01

    The distributions and abundances of small organics in protoplanetary disks are potentially powerful probes of disk physics and chemistry. HNC is a common probe of dense interstellar regions and the target of this study. We use the Submillimeter Array (SMA) to observe HNC 3–2 toward the protoplanetary disks around the T Tauri star TW Hya and the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. HNC is detected toward both disks, constituting the first spatially resolved observations of HNC in disks. We also present SMA observations of HCN 3–2 and IRAM 30 m observations of HCN and HNC 1–0 toward HD 163296. The disk-averaged HNC/HCN emission ratio is 0.1–0.2 toward both disks. Toward TW Hya, the HNC emission is confined to a ring. The varying HNC abundance in the TW Hya disk demonstrates that HNC chemistry is strongly linked to the disk physical structure. In particular, the inner rim of the HNC ring can be explained by efficient destruction of HNC at elevated temperatures, similar to what is observed in the ISM. However, to realize the full potential of HNC as a disk tracer requires a combination of high SNR spatially resolved observations of HNC and HCN and disk-specific HNC chemical modeling.

  11. Change in the chemical composition of infalling gas forming a disk around a protostar.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Nami; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Kahane, Claudine; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Caux, Emmanuel; Demyk, Karine; Vastel, Charlotte; Coutens, Audrey; Taquet, Vianney; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Aikawa, Yuri; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2014-03-06

    IRAS 04368+2557 is a solar-type (low-mass) protostar embedded in a protostellar core (L1527) in the Taurus molecular cloud, which is only 140 parsecs away from Earth, making it the closest large star-forming region. The protostellar envelope has a flattened shape with a diameter of a thousand astronomical units (1 AU is the distance from Earth to the Sun), and is infalling and rotating. It also has a protostellar disk with a radius of 90 AU (ref. 6), from which a planetary system is expected to form. The interstellar gas, mainly consisting of hydrogen molecules, undergoes a change in density of about three orders of magnitude as it collapses from the envelope into the disk, while being heated from 10 kelvin to over 100 kelvin in the mid-plane, but it has hitherto not been possible to explore changes in chemical composition associated with this collapse. Here we report that the unsaturated hydrocarbon molecule cyclic-C3H2 resides in the infalling rotating envelope, whereas sulphur monoxide (SO) is enhanced in the transition zone at the radius of the centrifugal barrier (100 ± 20 AU), which is the radius at which the kinetic energy of the infalling gas is converted to rotational energy. Such a drastic change in chemistry at the centrifugal barrier was not anticipated, but is probably caused by the discontinuous infalling motion at the centrifugal barrier and local heating processes there.

  12. Generation of Vortices in Superconducting Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. M.; Sobnack, M. B.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    We study the nucleation of vortices in a thin mesoscopic superconducting disk and stable configurations of vortices as a function of the disk size, the applied magnetic field H and finite temperature T. We also investigate the stability of different vortex states inside the disk. Further, we compare the predictions from Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory and London theory - the GL equations take the superconducting density into account, but the London equations do not. Our simulations from both theories show similar vortex states. As more vortices are generated, more superconducting regions will be destoryed. The GL Equations consider this effect and provide a more accurate estimate.

  13. Generation of Vortices in Superconducting Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. M.; Sobnack, M. B.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2010-12-01

    We study the nucleation of vortices in a thin mesoscopic superconducting disk and stable configurations of vortices as a function of the disk size, the applied magnetic field H and finite temperature T. We also investigate the stability of different vortex states inside the disk. Further, we compare the predictions from Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory and London theory - the GL equations take the superconducting density into account, but the London equations do not. Our simulations from both theories show similar vortex states. As more vortices are generated, more superconducting regions will be destoryed. The GL Equations consider this effect and provide a more accurate estimate.

  14. Evidence for dust grain growth in young circumstellar disks.

    PubMed

    Throop, H B; Bally, J; Esposito, L W; McCaughrean, M J

    2001-06-01

    Hundreds of circumstellar disks in the Orion nebula are being rapidly destroyed by the intense ultraviolet radiation produced by nearby bright stars. These young, million-year-old disks may not survive long enough to form planetary systems. Nevertheless, the first stage of planet formation-the growth of dust grains into larger particles-may have begun in these systems. Observational evidence for these large particles in Orion's disks is presented. A model of grain evolution in externally irradiated protoplanetary disks is developed and predicts rapid particle size evolution and sharp outer disk boundaries. We discuss implications for the formation rates of planetary systems.

  15. EVAPORATION OF GRAIN-SURFACE SPECIES BY SHOCK WAVES IN A PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Aota, Takuhiro; Aikawa, Yuri; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2015-02-01

    Recent Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array observations of young protostellar objects detected warm SO emission, which could be associated with a forming protostellar disk. In order to investigate if such warm gas can be produced by accretion shock onto the forming disk, we calculate the sputtering and thermal desorption of various grain-surface species in one-dimensional shock waves. We find that thermal desorption is much more efficient than the sputtering in the post-shock region. While H{sub 2}O can be thermally desorbed, if the accretion velocity is larger than 8 km s{sup –1} with the pre-shock gas number density of 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}, SO is desorbed if the accretion velocity ≳2 km s{sup –1} and ≳4 km s{sup –1}, with the pre-shock density of 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3} and 10{sup 8} cm{sup –3}, respectively. We also find that the column density of hydrogen nuclei in warm post-shock gas is N {sub warm} ∼ 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2}.

  16. Evaporation of Grain-surface Species by Shock Waves onto a Forming Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Yuri

    2015-08-01

    Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array observations of young protostellar objects, L1527 and L1489, detected warm SO emission, which could be associated with a forming protostellar disk. We investigate if such warm gas can be produced by accretion shock onto the forming disk, by calculating the sputtering and thermal desorption of various grain-surface species in one-dimensional shock waves. Thermal desorption is found to be much more efficient than the sputtering in the dense gas. While H2O can be thermally desorbed, if the accretion velocity is larger than 8 km s^{-1} with the pre-shock gas number density of 10^9 cm^{-3}, SO is desorbed if the accretion velocity \\gtrsim 2 km s^{-1} and \\gtrism 4 km s^{-1}, with the pre-shock density of 10^9 cm^{-3} and 10^8 cm^{-3}, respectively. We also find that the column density of hydrogen nuclei in warm post-shock gas is N_{warm} \\sim 10^{21} cm^{-2}. The derived parameters, i.e. the threshold velocity for SO desorption and the column density of warm post-shock gas, are consistent with the scenario that the observed SO emission originates in the accretion shock.

  17. Episodic molecular outflow in the very young protostellar cluster Serpens South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunkett, Adele L.; Arce, Héctor G.; Mardones, Diego; van Dokkum, Pieter; Dunham, Michael M.; Fernández-López, Manuel; Gallardo, José; Corder, Stuartt A.

    2015-11-01

    The loss of mass from protostars, in the form of a jet or outflow, is a necessary counterpart to protostellar mass accretion. Outflow ejection events probably vary in their velocity and/or in the rate of mass loss. Such `episodic' ejection events have been observed during the Class 0 protostellar phase (the early accretion stage), and continue during the subsequent class I phase that marks the first one million years of star formation. Previously observed episodic-ejection sources were relatively isolated; however, the most common sites of star formation are clusters. Outflows link protostars with their environment and provide a viable source of turbulence that is necessary for regulating star formation in clusters, but it is not known how an accretion-driven jet or outflow in a clustered environment manifests itself in its earliest stage. This early stage is important in establishing the initial conditions for momentum and energy transfer to the environment as the protostar and cluster evolve. Here we report that an outflow from a very young class 0 protostar, at the hub of the very active and filamentary Serpens South protostellar cluster, shows unambiguous episodic events. The 12CO (J=2-1) emission from the protostar reveals 22 distinct features of outflow ejecta, the most recent having the highest velocity. The outflow forms bipolar lobes --- one of the first detectable signs of star formation --- which originate from the peak of 1-mm continuum emission. Emission from the surrounding C18O envelope shows kinematics consistent with rotation and an infall of material onto the protostar. The data suggest that episodic accretion-driven outflow begins in the earliest phase of protostellar evolution, and that the outflow remains intact in a very clustered environment, probably providing efficient momentum transfer for driving turbulence.

  18. Episodic molecular outflow in the very young protostellar cluster Serpens South.

    PubMed

    Plunkett, Adele L; Arce, Héctor G; Mardones, Diego; van Dokkum, Pieter; Dunham, Michael M; Fernández-López, Manuel; Gallardo, José; Corder, Stuartt A

    2015-11-05

    The loss of mass from protostars, in the form of a jet or outflow, is a necessary counterpart to protostellar mass accretion. Outflow ejection events probably vary in their velocity and/or in the rate of mass loss. Such 'episodic' ejection events have been observed during the class 0 protostellar phase (the early accretion stage), and continue during the subsequent class I phase that marks the first one million years of star formation. Previously observed episodic-ejection sources were relatively isolated; however, the most common sites of star formation are clusters. Outflows link protostars with their environment and provide a viable source of the turbulence that is necessary for regulating star formation in clusters, but it is not known how an accretion-driven jet or outflow in a clustered environment manifests itself in its earliest stage. This early stage is important in establishing the initial conditions for momentum and energy transfer to the environment as the protostar and cluster evolve. Here we report that an outflow from a young, class 0 protostar, at the hub of the very active and filamentary Serpens South protostellar cluster, shows unambiguous episodic events. The (12)C(16)O (J = 2-1) emission from the protostar reveals 22 distinct features of outflow ejecta, the most recent having the highest velocity. The outflow forms bipolar lobes--one of the first detectable signs of star formation--which originate from the peak of 1-mm continuum emission. Emission from the surrounding C(18)O envelope shows kinematics consistent with rotation and an infall of material onto the protostar. The data suggest that episodic, accretion-driven outflow begins in the earliest phase of protostellar evolution, and that the outflow remains intact in a very clustered environment, probably providing efficient momentum transfer for driving turbulence.

  19. Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS): Constraining the formation of complex organic molecules with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Jes K.; Coutens, Audrey; Bourke, Tyler L.; Favre, Cecile; Garrod, Robin; Lykke, Julie; Mueller, Holger; Oberg, Karin I.; Schmalzl, Markus; van der Wiel, Matthijs; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Wampfler, Susanne F.

    2015-08-01

    Understanding how, when and where complex organic and potentially prebiotic molecules are formed is a fundamental goal of astrochemistry and an integral part of origins of life studies. Already now ALMA is showing its capabilities for studies of the chemistry of solar-type stars with its high sensitivity for faint lines, high spectral resolution which limits line confusion, and high angular resolution making it possible to study the structure of young protostars on solar-system scales. We here present the first results from a large unbiased survey “Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS)” targeting one of the astrochemical template sources, the low-mass protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422. The survey is more than an order of magnitude more sensitive than previous surveys of the source and provide imaging down to 25 AU scales (radius) around each of the two components of the binary. An example of one of the early highlights from the survey is unambiguous detections of the (related) prebiotic species glycolaldehyde, ethylene glycol (two lowest energy conformers), methyl formate and acetic acid. The glycolaldehyde-ethylene glycol abundance ratio is high in comparison to comets and other protostars - but agrees with previous measurements, e.g., in the Galactic Centre clouds possibly reflecting different environments and/or evolutionary histories. Complete mapping of this and other chemical networks in comparison with detailed chemical models and laboratory experiments will reveal the origin of complex organic molecules in a young protostellar system and investigate the link between these protostellar stages and the early Solar System.

  20. A survey of 44-GHz Class I methanol masers toward High Mass Protostellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenice Rodríguez Garza, Carolina; Kurtz, Stan

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results of 44-GHz Class I methanol maser observations made with the Very Large Array toward a sample of 55 High Mass Protostellar Objects. We found a 44% detection rate of methanol maser emission. We present a statistical description of our results, along with a comparison of the location of the 44-GHz masers with respect to shocked gas, traced by Extended Green Objects seen in the Spitzer/IRAC bands.

  1. Three-dimensional simulations of multiple protoplanets embedded in a protostellar disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresswell, P.; Nelson, R. P.

    2008-05-01

    Context: Theory predicts that low-mass protoplanets in a protostellar disc migrate into the central star on a time scale that is short compared with the disc lifetime or the giant planet formation time scale. Protoplanet eccentricities of e⪆ H/r can slow or reverse migration, but previous 2D studies of multiple protoplanets embedded in a protoplanetary disc have shown that gravitational scattering cannot maintain significant planet eccentricities against disc-induced damping. The eventual fate of these systems was migration into the central star. Aims: Here we simulate the evolution of low-mass protoplanetary swarms in three dimensions. The aim is to examine both protoplanet survival rates and the dynamical structure of the resulting planetary systems, and to compare them with 2D simulations. Methods: We present results from a 3D hydrodynamic simulation of eight protoplanets embedded in a protoplanetary disc. We also present a suite of simulations performed using an N-body code, modified to include prescriptions for planetary migration and for eccentricity and inclination damping. These prescriptions were obtained by fitting analytic formulae to hydrodynamic simulations of planets embedded in discs with initially eccentric and/or inclined orbits. Results: As was found in two dimensions, differential migration produces groups of protoplanets in stable, multiple mean-motion resonances that migrate in lockstep, preventing prolonged periods of gravitational scattering. In almost all simulations, this leads to large-scale migration of the protoplanet swarm into the central star in the absence of a viable stopping mechanism. The evolution involves mutual collisions, occasional instances of large-scale scattering, and the frequent formation of the long-lived, co-orbital planet systems that arise in >30% of all runs. Conclusions: Disc-induced damping overwhelms eccentricity and inclination growth due to planet-planet interactions, leading to large-scale migration of

  2. Deuterium Fractionation and Ionization Degree in Massive Protostellar/cluster Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huei-Ru; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Su, Yu-Nung

    2013-03-01

    We have conducted a survey of deuterium fractionation of N2H+, RD (N2H+) ≡ N(N2D+)/N(N2H+), with the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) to assess the use of RD (N2H+) as an evolutionary tracer among massive protostellar/cluster cores in early stages. Our sample includes 32 dense cores in various evolutionary stages, from high-mass starless cores (HMSCs), high-mass protostellar objects (HMPOs), to ultra-compact (UC) HII regions, in infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) and high infrared extinction clouds. The results show a decreasing trend in deuterium fractionation with evolutionary stage traced by gas temperature and line width (Fig. 1). A moderate increasing trend of deuterium fractionation with the CO depletion factor is also found among cores in IRDCs and HMSCs. These suggest a general chemical behavior of deuterated species in low- and high-mass protostellar candidates. Upper limits to the ionization degree are also estimated to be in the range of 4 × 10-8 - 5 × 10-6.

  3. A Hot and Massive Accretion Disk around the High-mass Protostar IRAS 20126+4104

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huei-Ru Vivien; Keto, Eric; Zhang, Qizhou; Sridharan, T. K.; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Su, Yu-Nung

    2016-06-01

    We present new spectral line observations of the CH3CN molecule in the accretion disk around the massive protostar IRAS 20126+4104 with the Submillimeter Array, which, for the first time, measure the disk density, temperature, and rotational velocity with sufficient resolution (0.″37, equivalent to ˜600 au) to assess the gravitational stability of the disk through the Toomre-Q parameter. Our observations resolve the central 2000 au region that shows steeper velocity gradients with increasing upper state energy, indicating an increase in the rotational velocity of the hotter gas nearer the star. Such spin-up motions are characteristics of an accretion flow in a rotationally supported disk. We compare the observed data with synthetic image cubes produced by three-dimensional radiative transfer models describing a thin flared disk in Keplerian motion enveloped within the centrifugal radius of an angular-momentum-conserving accretion flow. Given a luminosity of 1.3 × 104 L ⊙, the optimized model gives a disk mass of 1.5 M ⊙ and a radius of 858 au rotating about a 12.0 M ⊙ protostar with a disk mass accretion rate of 3.9 × 10-5 M ⊙ yr-1. Our study finds that, in contrast to some theoretical expectations, the disk is hot and stable to fragmentation with Q > 2.8 at all radii which permits a smooth accretion flow. These results put forward the first constraints on gravitational instabilities in massive protostellar disks, which are closely connected to the formation of companion stars and planetary systems by fragmentation.

  4. MODELING THE RESOLVED DISK AROUND THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR L1527

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Calvet, Nuria; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Looney, Leslie W.; Wilner, David J.; Loinard, Laurent; D'Alessio, Paola

    2013-07-01

    We present high-resolution sub/millimeter interferometric imaging of the Class 0 protostar L1527 IRS (IRAS 04368+2557) at {lambda} = 870 {mu}m and 3.4 mm from the Submillimeter Array and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy. We detect the signature of an edge-on disk surrounding the protostar with an observed diameter of 180 AU in the sub/millimeter images. The mass of the disk is estimated to be 0.007 M{sub Sun }, assuming optically thin, isothermal dust emission. The millimeter spectral index is observed to be quite shallow at all the spatial scales probed: {alpha} {approx} 2, implying a dust opacity spectral index {beta} {approx} 0. We model the emission from the disk and surrounding envelope using Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes, simultaneously fitting the sub/millimeter visibility amplitudes, sub/millimeter images, resolved L' image, spectral energy distribution, and mid-infrared spectrum. The best-fitting model has a disk radius of R = 125 AU, is highly flared (H{proportional_to}R {sup 1.3}), has a radial density profile {rho}{proportional_to}R {sup -2.5}, and has a mass of 0.0075 M{sub Sun }. The scale height at 100 AU is 48 AU, about a factor of two greater than vertical hydrostatic equilibrium. The resolved millimeter observations indicate that disks may grow rapidly throughout the Class 0 phase. The mass and radius of the young disk around L1527 are comparable to disks around pre-main-sequence stars; however, the disk is considerably more vertically extended, possibly due to a combination of lower protostellar mass, infall onto the disk upper layers, and little settling of {approx}1 {mu}m-sized dust grains.

  5. Modeling the Resolved Disk around the Class 0 Protostar L1527

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Wilner, David J.; Looney, Leslie W.; Loinard, Laurent; Calvet, Nuria; D'Alessio, Paola

    2013-07-01

    We present high-resolution sub/millimeter interferometric imaging of the Class 0 protostar L1527 IRS (IRAS 04368+2557) at λ = 870 μm and 3.4 mm from the Submillimeter Array and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy. We detect the signature of an edge-on disk surrounding the protostar with an observed diameter of 180 AU in the sub/millimeter images. The mass of the disk is estimated to be 0.007 M ⊙, assuming optically thin, isothermal dust emission. The millimeter spectral index is observed to be quite shallow at all the spatial scales probed: α ~ 2, implying a dust opacity spectral index β ~ 0. We model the emission from the disk and surrounding envelope using Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes, simultaneously fitting the sub/millimeter visibility amplitudes, sub/millimeter images, resolved L' image, spectral energy distribution, and mid-infrared spectrum. The best-fitting model has a disk radius of R = 125 AU, is highly flared (HvpropR 1.3), has a radial density profile ρvpropR -2.5, and has a mass of 0.0075 M ⊙. The scale height at 100 AU is 48 AU, about a factor of two greater than vertical hydrostatic equilibrium. The resolved millimeter observations indicate that disks may grow rapidly throughout the Class 0 phase. The mass and radius of the young disk around L1527 are comparable to disks around pre-main-sequence stars; however, the disk is considerably more vertically extended, possibly due to a combination of lower protostellar mass, infall onto the disk upper layers, and little settling of ~1 μm-sized dust grains.

  6. The Thermal Regulation of Gravitational Instabilities in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickett, Brian K.; Mejía, Annie C.; Durisen, Richard H.; Cassen, Patrick M.; Berry, Donald K.; Link, Robert P.

    2003-06-01

    cooling. The additional heating and cooling are applied to each model over the outer half of the disk or the entire disk. The models are subject to the rapid growth of a four-armed spiral instability; the subsequent evolution of the models depends on the thermal behavior of the disk. The cooling function tends to overwhelm the heating included in our artificial viscosity prescription, and as a result the spiral structure strengthens. The spiral disturbances transport mass at prodigious rates during the early nonlinear stages of development and significantly alter the disk's vertical surface. Although dense condensations of material can appear, their character depends on the extent of the volumetric cooling in the disk. In the simulation of the high-Q model with heating and cooling applied throughout the disk, thin, dense rings form at radii ranging from 1 to 3 AU and steadily increase in mass; later companion formation may occur in these rings as cooling drives them toward instability. When heating and cooling are applied only over the outer radial half of the disk, however, a succession of single condensations appears near 5 AU. Each clump has roughly the mass of Saturn, and some survive a complete orbit. Since the clumps form near the artificial boundary in the treatment of the disk gas physics, the production of a clump in this case is a numerical artifact. Nevertheless, radially abrupt transitions in disk gas characteristics, for example, in opacity, might mimic the artificial boundary effects in our simulations and favor the production of stable companions in actual protostellar and protoplanetary disks. The ultimate survival of condensations as eventual stellar or substellar companions to the central star is still largely an open question.

  7. Why Do T Tauri Disks Accrete?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee; D'Alessio, Paola; Calvet, Nuria; Muzerolle, James

    2006-01-01

    Observations of T Tauri stars and young brown dwarfs suggest that the accretion rates of their disks scales roughly with the square of the central stellar mass. No dependence of accretion rate on stellar mass is predicted by the simplest version of the Gammie layered disk model, in which nonthermal ionization of upper disk layers allows accretion to occur via the magnetorotational instability. We show that a minor modification of Gaminie's model to include heating by irradiation from the central star yields a modest dependence of accretion on the mass of the central star. A purely viscous disk model could provide a strong dependence of accretion rate on stellar mass if the initial disk radius (before much viscous evolution has occurred) has a strong dependence on stellar mass. However, it is far from clear that at least the most massive pre-main-sequence disks can be totally magnetically activated by X-rays or cosmic rays. We suggest that a combination of effects are responsible for the observed dependence, with the lowest mass stars having the lowest mass disks, which can be thoroughly magnetically active, while the higher mass stars have higher mass disks that have layered accret,ion and relatively inactive or "dead" central zones at some radii. In such dead zones, we suggest that gravitational instabilities may play a role in allowing accretion to proceed. In this connection, we emphasize the uncertainty in disk masses derived from dust emission and argue that T Tauri disk masses have been systematically underestimated by conventional analyses. Furtlier study of accretion rates, especially in the lowest mass stars, would help to clarify the mechanisms of accretion in T Tauri stars.

  8. Measuring magnetic fields from water masers in the synchrotron protostellar jet in W3(H2O)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddi, C.; Surcis, G.; Moscadelli, L.; Imai, H.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Sanna, A.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Magnetic fields are invoked to launch, drive, and shape jets in both low- and high-mass protostars, but observational data on the spatial scales required to assess their role in the protostellar mass-loss process is still scarce. Aims: The Turner-Welch (TW) object in the W3(OH) high-mass star-forming complex drives a synchrotron jet, which is quite exceptional for a high-mass protostar, and is associated with a strongly polarized H2O maser source, W3(H2O), making it an optimal target to investigate the role of magnetic fields on the innermost scales of protostellar disk-jet systems. Methods: We report full polarimetric VLBA observations of H2O masers towards W3(H2O). Their linearly polarized emission provides clues on the orientation of the local magnetic field (on the plane of the sky), while the measurement of the Zeeman splitting provides its strength (along the line-of-sight). The linear scales probed by H2O masers are tens to hundreds of AU (at the W3(H2O) distance, 2 kpc), inaccessible to other star-formation tracers. Results: We identified a total of 148 individual maser features and we measured their physical properties. Out of 148, we measured linear polarization in 34 features, with a fractional percentage varying in the range 0.9-42%, making W3(H2O) the highest-polarized H2O maser source observed with VLBI known in the Galaxy. The H2O masers trace a bipolar, biconical outflow at the center of the synchrotron jet. Although on scales of a few thousand AU the magnetic field inferred from the masers is on average orientated along the flow axis, on smaller scales (10s to 100s of AU), we have revealed a misalignment between the magnetic field and the velocity vectors, which arises from the compression of the field component along the shock front. We also detected circularly polarized emission toward ten maser features, with a fractional percentage varying in the range 0.2-1.6%. In the gas shocked by the synchrotron jet, we estimate a total field

  9. Structure and Stability of Steady Protostellar Accretion Flows - Part Two - Linear Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balluch, M.

    1991-03-01

    Recent developments concerning spherically symmetric (1D-) numerical models of protostellar evolution show that steady protostellar accretion flows (resp. their shockfronts) may be unstable at least in the very early (Tscharnuter 1987a) and late stages (Balluch 1988) of accretion. A global, linear stability analysis of the structure of steady protostellar accretion flows with a shock discontinuity (Balluch 1990) is therefore presented to investigate such flows by different methods. Thereby three characteristic wave types, the radiation-, radiation diffusion- and acoustic modes were found. In the `ideal case' of a perfect gas law and constant opacity, the shockfront appears to be oscillatory unstable due to critical cooling as long as the mass flux rate is larger than a critical one of Mṡcrit = 10-6 Msun yr-1. In the `real case' with more realistic constitutive relations, an additional vibrational instability occurs due to the κ-mechanism in the outer layers of the core. This is shown to be the case in the whole range of core masses between 0.01 and 1 Msun, mass flow rates between 10-3 and 10-7 Msun yr-1 and different outer boundary conditions (corresponding to different states of the surrounding interstellar cloud). Analysing the first, outer protostellar cores before they get dynamically unstable due to H2-dissociation in their interiors, similar instabilities as mentioned above were found. Now the unstable κ-behaviour is due to dust instead of the deep ionisation zone as in the case of second, inner cores. According to the linear analysis, the instabilities should first appear in the velocity and the radiation flux in the settling zone. In the case of first, outer cores, these variations should be accompanied by an oscillation of the radiation flux in the region upstream from the shock up to r = 1014 cm. Sooner or later, the shockfront should oscillate in both cases too. These results are finally compared with the characteristics of the accretion shock

  10. Astounding Jumping Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzdziol, Edward S.

    1991-01-01

    Activities involving concave rubber disks are utilized to illustrate the scientific principles of kinetic and potential energy. Provides teacher instructions and questions related to the activity. (MDH)

  11. Astounding Jumping Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzdziol, Edward S.

    1991-01-01

    Activities involving concave rubber disks are utilized to illustrate the scientific principles of kinetic and potential energy. Provides teacher instructions and questions related to the activity. (MDH)

  12. Disks in elliptical galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Rix, H.; White, S.D.M. )

    1990-10-01

    The abundance and strength of disk components in elliptical galaxies are investigated by studying the photometric properties of models containing a spheroidal r exp 1/4-law bulge and a weak exponential disk. Pointed isophotes are observed in a substantial fraction of elliptical galaxies. If these isophote distortions are interpreted in the framework of the present models, then the statistics of observed samples suggest that almost all radio-weak ellipticals could have disks containing roughly 20 percent of the light. It is shown that the E5 galaxy NGC 4660 has the photometric signatures of a disk containing a third of the light. 30 refs.

  13. Glass rupture disk

    DOEpatents

    Glass, S. Jill; Nicolaysen, Scott D.; Beauchamp, Edwin K.

    2002-01-01

    A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

  14. Turbine disks for improved reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1977-01-01

    Advanced disk structural concepts were employed to improve the cyclic lives and reliability of turbine disks. Analytical studies were conducted to evaluate bore-entry disks as potential replacements for the existing first-stage turbine disks in the CF6-50 and JT8D-17 engines. Results of low cycle fatigue, burst, fracture mechanics, and fragment energy analyses are summarized for the advanced disk designs and the existing disk designs, with both conventional and advanced disk materials. Other disk concepts such as composite, laminated, link, multibore, multidisk, and spline disks were also evaluated for the CF6-50 engine.

  15. Numerical simulations of dissipationless disk accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Tronin, I. V.

    2017-09-01

    Our goal is to study the regime of disk accretion in which almost all of the angular momentum and energy is carried away by the wind outflowing from the disk in numerical experiments. For this type of accretion the kinetic energy flux in the outflowing wind can exceed considerably the bolometric luminosity of the accretion disk, what is observed in the plasma flow from galactic nuclei in a number of cases. In this paper we consider the nonrelativistic case of an outflow from a cold Keplerian disk. All of the conclusions derived previously for such a system in the self-similar approximation are shown to be correct. The numerical results agree well with the analytical predictions. The inclination angle of the magnetic field lines in the disk is less than 60°, which ensures a free wind outflow from the disk, while the energy flux per wind particle is greater than the particle rotation energy in its Keplerian orbit by several orders of magnitude, provided that the ratio r A/ r ≫ 1, where r A is the Alfvénic radius and r is the radius of the Keplerian orbit. In this case, the particle kinetic energy reaches half the maximum possible energy in the simulation region. The magnetic field collimates the outflowing wind near the rotation axis and decollimates appreciably the wind outflowing from the outer disk periphery.

  16. Dynamics of acoustically levitated disk samples.

    PubMed

    Xie, W J; Wei, B

    2004-10-01

    The acoustic levitation force on disk samples and the dynamics of large water drops in a planar standing wave are studied by solving the acoustic scattering problem through incorporating the boundary element method. The dependence of levitation force amplitude on the equivalent radius R of disks deviates seriously from the R3 law predicted by King's theory, and a larger force can be obtained for thin disks. When the disk aspect ratio gamma is larger than a critical value gamma(*) ( approximately 1.9 ) and the disk radius a is smaller than the critical value a(*) (gamma) , the levitation force per unit volume of the sample will increase with the enlargement of the disk. The acoustic levitation force on thin-disk samples ( gamma

  17. Fast radial flows in transition disk holes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Andrews, Sean M.; Chiang, Eugene

    2014-02-20

    Protoplanetary 'transition' disks have large, mass-depleted central cavities, yet also deliver gas onto their host stars at rates comparable to disks without holes. The paradox of simultaneous transparency and accretion can be explained if gas flows inward at much higher radial speeds inside the cavity than outside the cavity, since surface density (and by extension optical depth) varies inversely with inflow velocity at fixed accretion rate. Radial speeds within the cavity might even have to approach free-fall values to explain the huge surface density contrasts inferred for transition disks. We identify observational diagnostics of fast radial inflow in channel maps made in optically thick spectral lines. Signatures include (1) twisted isophotes in maps made at low systemic velocities and (2) rotation of structures observed between maps made in high-velocity line wings. As a test case, we apply our new diagnostic tools to archival Atacama Large Millimeter Array data on the transition disk HD 142527 and uncover evidence for free-fall radial velocities inside its cavity. Although the observed kinematics are also consistent with a disk warp, the radial inflow scenario is preferred because it predicts low surface densities that appear consistent with recent observations of optically thin CO isotopologues in this disk. How material in the disk cavity sheds its angular momentum wholesale to fall freely onto the star is an unsolved problem; gravitational torques exerted by giant planets or brown dwarfs are briefly discussed as a candidate mechanism.

  18. Multicenter Evaluation of a Modified Cefoxitin Disk Diffusion Method and PBP2a Testing To Predict mecA-Mediated Oxacillin Resistance in Atypical Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Shelley A; Karichu, James; Kohner, Peggy; Cole, Nicolynn; Hindler, Janet A; Patel, Robin; Richter, Sandra; Humphries, Romney M

    2017-02-01

    Phenotypic variants of Staphylococcus aureus that display small colonies, reduced pigmentation, and decreased hemolysis and/or coagulase activity are periodically isolated by the clinical laboratory. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of these isolates is complicated, because many do not grow on routine AST media, including Mueller-Hinton agar (MHA) and cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth. This multicenter study evaluated cefoxitin disk diffusion for 37 atypical S. aureus isolates (156 readings) with MHA supplemented with 5% sheep's blood (BMHA), using mecA PCR as the reference standard. The correlation of two commercial PBP2a assays with mecA PCR was also assessed. Ten isolates were negative and 27 positive for mecA No major errors for cefoxitin were observed, but 19.5% very major errors (VMEs) were observed at 24 h of incubation, and 17.2% VMEs were observed at 48 h. The proportions of VMEs ranged from 14.7 to 23.0% at 24 h, and from 13.3 to 17.6% at 48 h, across three testing laboratories. PBP2a tests were performed from growth on BMHA and blood agar plates (BAP), with and without cefoxitin disk induction. The Alere PBP2a SA culture colony test sensitivities for mecA were 90.0% with uninduced growth and 97.4% with induced growth from BMHA. On BAP, sensitivity was 96.0% with induced growth. The sensitivities of the Oxoid PBP2' latex agglutination test were 85.7% with uninduced growth and 93.9% with induced growth from BMHA and 95.9% with induced growth on BAP. On the basis of these data, we recommend that laboratories perform only mecA PCR and/or PBP2a tests when requested to perform AST on atypical isolates of S. aureus. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Migration and growth of protoplanetary embryos. I. Convergence of embryos in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojia; Lin, Douglas N. C.; Liu, Beibei; Li, Hui

    2014-12-10

    According to the core accretion scenario, planets form in protostellar disks through the condensation of dust, coagulation of planetesimals, and emergence of protoplanetary embryos. At a few AU in a minimum mass nebula, embryos' growth is quenched by dynamical isolation due to the depletion of planetesimals in their feeding zone. However, embryos with masses (M{sub p} ) in the range of a few Earth masses (M {sub ⊕}) migrate toward a transition radius between the inner viscously heated and outer irradiated regions of their natal disk. Their limiting isolation mass increases with the planetesimals surface density. When M{sub p} > 10 M {sub ⊕}, embryos efficiently accrete gas and evolve into cores of gas giants. We use a numerical simulation to show that despite stream line interference, convergent embryos essentially retain the strength of non-interacting embryos' Lindblad and corotation torques by their natal disks. In disks with modest surface density (or equivalently accretion rates), embryos capture each other in their mutual mean motion resonances and form a convoy of super-Earths. In more massive disks, they could overcome these resonant barriers to undergo repeated close encounters, including cohesive collisions that enable the formation of massive cores.

  20. Low-Mass Star Formation: From Molecular Cloud Cores to Protostars and Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inutsuka, S.-I.; Machida, M.; Matsumoto, T.; Tsukamoto, Y.; Iwasaki, K.

    2015-05-01

    This review describes realistic evolution of magnetic field and rotation of the protostars, dynamics of outflows and jets, and the formation and evolution of protoplanetary disks. Recent advances in the protostellar collapse simulations cover a huge dynamic range from molecular cloud core density to stellar density in a self-consistent manner and account for all the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamical effects, such as Ohmic resistivity, ambipolar diffusion, and Hall current. We explain the emergence of the first core, i.e., the quasi-hydrostatic object that consists of molecular gas, and the second core, i.e., the protostar. Ohmic dissipation largely removes the magnetic flux from the center of a collapsing cloud core. A fast well-collimated bipolar jet along the rotation axis of the protostar is driven after the magnetic field is re-coupled with warm gas (˜103 K) around the protostar. The circumstellar disk is born in the "dead zone", a region that is de-coupled from the magnetic field, and the outer radius of the disk increases with that of the dead zone during the early accretion phase. The rapid increase of the disk size occurs after the depletion of the envelope of molecular cloud core. The effect of Hall current may create two distinct populations of protoplanetary disks.

  1. Low-Mass Star Formation: From Molecular Cloud Cores to Protostars and Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inutsuka, S.-I.; Machida, M.; Matsumoto, T.; Tsukamoto, Y.; Iwasaki, K.

    2016-05-01

    This review describes realistic evolution of magnetic field and rotation of the protostars, dynamics of outflows and jets, and the formation and evolution of protoplanetary disks. Recent advances in the protostellar collapse simulations cover a huge dynamic range from molecular cloud core density to stellar density in a self-consistent manner and account for all the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamical effects, such as Ohmic resistivity, ambipolar diffusion, and Hall current. We explain the emergence of the first core, i.e., the quasi-hydrostatic object that consists of molecular gas, and the second core, i.e., the protostar. Ohmic dissipation largely removes the magnetic flux from the center of a collapsing cloud core. A fast well-collimated bipolar jet along the rotation axis of the protostar is driven after the magnetic field is re-coupled with warm gas (˜103 K) around the protostar. The circumstellar disk is born in the "dead zone", a region that is de-coupled from the magnetic field, and the outer radius of the disk increases with that of the dead zone during the early accretion phase. The rapid increase of the disk size occurs after the depletion of the envelope of molecular cloud core. The effect of Hall current may create two distinct populations of protoplanetary disks.

  2. Superalloy Disk With Dual-Grain Structure Spin Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John; Kantzos, Pete T.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced nickel-base disk alloys for future gas turbine engines will require greater temperature capability than current alloys, but they must also continue to deliver safe, reliable operation. An advanced, nickel-base disk alloy, designated Alloy 10, was selected for evaluation in NASA s Ultra Safe Propulsion Project. Early studies on small test specimens showed that heat treatments that produced a fine grain microstructure promoted high strength and long fatigue life in the bore of a disk, whereas heat treatments that produced a coarse grain microstructure promoted optimal creep and crack growth resistance in the rim of a disk. On the basis of these results, the optimal combination of performance and safety might be achieved by utilizing a heat-treatment technology that could produce a fine grain bore and coarse grain rim in a nickel-base disk. Alloy 10 disks that were given a dual microstructure heat treatment (DMHT) were obtained from NASA s Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program for preliminary evaluation. Data on small test specimens machined from a DMHT disk were encouraging. However, the benefit of the dual grain structure on the performance and reliability of the entire disk still needed to be demonstrated. For this reason, a high temperature spin test of a DMHT disk was run at 20 000 rpm and 1500 F at the Balancing Company of Dayton, Ohio, under the direction of NASA Glenn Research Center personnel. The results of that test showed that the DMHT disk exhibited significantly lower crack growth than a disk with a fine grain microstructure. In addition, the results of these tests could be accurately predicted using a two-dimensional, axisymmetric finite element analysis of the DMHT disk. Although the first spin test demonstrated a significant performance advantage associated with the DMHT technology, a second spin test on the DMHT disk was run to determine burst margin. The disk burst in the web at a very high speed, over 39 000 rpm, in line with

  3. Protoplanetary Disks as (Possibly) Viscous Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2017-03-01

    Protoplanetary disks are believed to evolve on megayear timescales in a diffusive (viscous) manner as a result of angular momentum transport driven by internal stresses. Here we use a sample of 26 protoplanetary disks resolved by ALMA with measured (dust-based) masses and stellar accretion rates to derive the dimensionless α-viscosity values for individual objects, with the goal of constraining the angular momentum transport mechanism. We find that the inferred values of α do not cluster around a single value, but instead have a broad distribution extending from 10‑4 to 0.04. Moreover, they correlate with neither the global disk parameters (mass, size, surface density) nor the stellar characteristics (mass, luminosity, radius). However, we do find a strong linear correlation between α and the central mass accretion rate \\dot{M}. This correlation is unlikely to result from the direct physical effect of \\dot{M} on internal stress on global scales. Instead, we suggest that it is caused by the decoupling of stellar \\dot{M} from the global disk characteristics in one of the following ways: (1) The behavior (and range) of α is controlled by a yet-unidentified parameter (e.g., ionization fraction, magnetic field strength, or geometry), ultimately driving the variation of \\dot{M}. (2) The central \\dot{M} is decoupled from the global accretion rate as a result of an instability, or mass accumulation (or loss in a wind or planetary accretion) in the inner disk. (3) Perhaps the most intriguing possibility is that angular momentum in protoplanetary disks is transported nonviscously, e.g., via magnetohydrodynamic winds or spiral density waves.

  4. From Cores to Envelopes to Disks: A Multi-scale View of Magnetized Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Charles L. H.

    2014-12-01

    protostellar envelope may be a turning point: at larger scales B-fields may still retain the memory of the global B-field drawn in from the ambient medium; but at smaller scales the B-fields may be affected by the dynamics of both envelope and disk rotation. This sets the stage for ALMA (the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array), which will soon reveal the morphology of B-fields in circumstellar disks themselves.

  5. Observational evidence for thin AGN disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Netzer, Hagai

    1992-01-01

    AGN spectrum and spectral features, polarization, inclination, and X-ray line and continuum reflection features are discussed in a critical way in order to determine the ones that are the least model-dependent. The sign and strength of absorption and emission edges are found to be model-dependent, and relativistic broadening and shifting makes them hard to detect. The presence or absence of the predicted Lyman edge polarization feature may be used as a decisive test for thin, bare AGN disks. Other good model-independent tests are several inclination-related line and continuum correlations in big AGN samples. It is shown that electron temperature near the surface of the disk can greatly exceed the disk equilibrium temperature, which causes deviations from LTE. This effect must be incorporated into realistic disk models.

  6. Observational evidence for thin AGN disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Netzer, Hagai

    1992-01-01

    AGN spectrum and spectral features, polarization, inclination, and X-ray line and continuum reflection features are discussed in a critical way in order to determine the ones that are the least model-dependent. The sign and strength of absorption and emission edges are found to be model-dependent, and relativistic broadening and shifting makes them hard to detect. The presence or absence of the predicted Lyman edge polarization feature may be used as a decisive test for thin, bare AGN disks. Other good model-independent tests are several inclination-related line and continuum correlations in big AGN samples. It is shown that electron temperature near the surface of the disk can greatly exceed the disk equilibrium temperature, which causes deviations from LTE. This effect must be incorporated into realistic disk models.

  7. Disk Masses around Solar-mass Stars are Underestimated by CO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Mo; Evans, Neal J., II; Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Willacy, Karen; Turner, Neal J.

    2017-05-01

    Gas in protostellar disks provides the raw material for giant planet formation and controls the dynamics of the planetesimal-building dust grains. Accurate gas mass measurements help map the observed properties of planet-forming disks onto the formation environments of known exoplanets. Rare isotopologues of carbon monoxide (CO) have been used as gas mass tracers for disks in the Lupus star-forming region, with an assumed interstellar CO/H2 abundance ratio. Unfortunately, observations of T-Tauri disks show that CO abundance is not interstellar, a finding reproduced by models that show CO abundance decreasing both with distance from the star and as a function of time. Here, we present radiative transfer simulations that assess the accuracy of CO-based disk mass measurements. We find that the combination of CO chemical depletion in the outer disk and optically thick emission from the inner disk leads observers to underestimate gas mass by more than an order of magnitude if they use the standard assumptions of interstellar CO/H2 ratio and optically thin emission. Furthermore, CO abundance changes on million-year timescales, introducing an age/mass degeneracy into observations. To reach a factor of a few accuracy for CO-based disk mass measurements, we suggest that observers and modelers adopt the following strategies: (1) select low-J transitions; (2) observe multiple CO isotopologues and use either intensity ratios or normalized line profiles to diagnose CO chemical depletion; and (3) use spatially resolved observations to measure the CO-abundance distribution.

  8. THE NATURE OF TRANSITION CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS. II. SOUTHERN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Gisela A.; Schreiber, Matthias R.; Rebassa-Mansergas, Alberto; Cieza, Lucas A.; Merin, Bruno; Smith Castelli, Analia V.; Allen, Lori E.; Morrell, Nidia

    2012-04-10

    Transition disk objects are pre-main-sequence stars with little or no near-IR excess and significant far-IR excess, implying inner opacity holes in their disks. Here we present a multifrequency study of transition disk candidates located in Lupus I, III, IV, V, VI, Corona Australis, and Scorpius. Complementing the information provided by Spitzer with adaptive optics (AO) imaging (NaCo, VLT), submillimeter photometry (APEX), and echelle spectroscopy (Magellan, Du Pont Telescopes), we estimate the multiplicity, disk mass, and accretion rate for each object in our sample in order to identify the mechanism potentially responsible for its inner hole. We find that our transition disks show a rich diversity in their spectral energy distribution morphology, have disk masses ranging from {approx}<1 to 10 M{sub JUP}, and accretion rates ranging from {approx}<10{sup -11} to 10{sup -7.7} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Of the 17 bona fide transition disks in our sample, three, nine, three, and two objects are consistent with giant planet formation, grain growth, photoevaporation, and debris disks, respectively. Two disks could be circumbinary, which offers tidal truncation as an alternative origin of the inner hole. We find the same heterogeneity of the transition disk population in Lupus III, IV, and Corona Australis as in our previous analysis of transition disks in Ophiuchus while all transition disk candidates selected in Lupus V, VI turned out to be contaminating background asymptotic giant branch stars. All transition disks classified as photoevaporating disks have small disk masses, which indicates that photoevaporation must be less efficient than predicted by most recent models. The three systems that are excellent candidates for harboring giant planets potentially represent invaluable laboratories to study planet formation with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array.

  9. A Realistic Accretion Disk Model for AGNs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suleimanov, V.; Ghosh, K. K.; Austin, R. A.; Ramsey, B. D.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a new relativistic accretion disk model of AGNs, based on alpha modified accretion disk theory, where alpha is a parameter that characterizes the efficiency of the mechanism of angular momentum transport. In this model we have considered a geometrically-thin, high-luminosity (alpha-accretion disk, around a supermassive black hole. The geometrically thin limit assumes a local energy balance within the accretion disk, which has been used to derive the plasma temperature of the disk. The energy balance equation has three solutions: low, medium and high temperature, depending on the heating rate of the accretion disk. We predict that the inner part of a high luminosity accretion disk is in the high- temperature (10(exp 7) to 10(exp 9) K) state and for this we obtain the high temperature solution of the energy balance equation using a Comptonization process. We find the local spectrum of each ring of the disk (we have divided the high temperature region of the disk into 50 rings) to be a diluted Wien spectrum. However, the emergent integral spectrum of the high temperature region is a power-law with a high-energy cutoff that depends on the basic parameters of AGNs (the accretion rate, the incidence angle, and the mass and the angular momentum of the central black hole). We have fitted the observed spectra of 28 AGNs using the present model and have derived the values of the basic parameters of these AGNs. Results of these spectral fittings have been discussed in the framework of the unification model of AGNs.

  10. The Milky Way disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, G.

    2015-08-01

    This review summarises the invited presentation I gave on the Milky Way disc. The idea underneath was to touch those topics that can be considered hot nowadays in the Galactic disk research: the reality of the thick disk, the spiral structure of the Milky Way, and the properties of the outer Galactic disk. A lot of work has been done in recent years on these topics, but a coherent and clear picture is still missing. Detailed studies with high quality spectroscopic data seem to support a dual Galactic disk, with a clear separation into a thin and a thick component. Much confusion and very discrepant ideas still exist concerning the spiral structure of the Milky Way. Our location in the disk makes it impossible to observe it, and we can only infer it. This process of inference is still far from being mature, and depends a lot on the selected tracers, the adopted models and their limitations, which in many cases are neither properly accounted for, nor pondered enough. Finally, there are very different opinions on the size (scale length, truncation radius) of the Galactic disk, and on the interpretation of the observed outer disk stellar populations in terms either of external entities (Monoceros, Triangulus-Andromeda, Canis Major), or as manifestations of genuine disk properties (e.g., warp and flare).

  11. CIRCUMPLANETARY DISK FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, William R.; Canup, Robin M.

    2010-11-15

    The development and evolution of a circumplanetary disk during the accretion of a giant planet is examined. The planet gains mass and angular momentum from infalling solar nebula material while simultaneously contracting due to luminosity losses. When the planet becomes rotationally unstable it begins to shed material into a circumplanetary disk. Viscosity causes the disk to spread to a moderate fraction of the Hill radius where it is assumed that a small fraction of the material escapes back into heliocentric orbit, carrying away most of the excess angular momentum. As the planet's contraction continues, its radius can become smaller than the spatial range of the inflow and material begins to fall directly onto the disk, which switches from a spin-out disk to an accretion disk as the planet completes its growth. We here develop a description of the circumplanetary disk, which is combined with models of the planet's contraction and the inflow rate including its angular momentum content to yield a solution for the time evolution of a planet-disk system.

  12. Radio pulsar disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Macroscopic physics are discussed for the case of a disk close to an isolated, magnetized, rotating neutron star that acts as a Faraday disk dynamo, while the disk acts as both a load and a neutral sheet. This sheet allows the polar cap current to return to the neutron star, splitting a dipolar field into two monopolar halves. The dominant energy loss is from the stellar wind torque, and the next contribution is dissipation in the auroral zones, where the current returns to the star in a 5 cm-thick sheet. The disk itself may be a source of visible radiation comparable to that in pulsed radio frequency emission. As the pulsar ages, the disk expands and narrows into a ring which, it is suggested, may lead to a cessation of pulsed emission at periods of a few sec.

  13. Radio pulsar disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Macroscopic physics are discussed for the case of a disk close to an isolated, magnetized, rotating neutron star that acts as a Faraday disk dynamo, while the disk acts as both a load and a neutral sheet. This sheet allows the polar cap current to return to the neutron star, splitting a dipolar field into two monopolar halves. The dominant energy loss is from the stellar wind torque, and the next contribution is dissipation in the auroral zones, where the current returns to the star in a 5 cm-thick sheet. The disk itself may be a source of visible radiation comparable to that in pulsed radio frequency emission. As the pulsar ages, the disk expands and narrows into a ring which, it is suggested, may lead to a cessation of pulsed emission at periods of a few sec.

  14. The SEEDS of Planet Formation: Observations of Transitional Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol

    2011-01-01

    As part of its 5-year study, the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disk Systems (SEEDS) has already observed a number of YSOs with circumstellar disks, including 13 0.5- 8 Myr old A-M stars with indications that they host wide gaps or central cavities in their circumstellar disks in millimeter or far-IR observations, or from deficits in warm dust thermal emission. For 8 of the disks, the 0.15" inner working angle of HiCIAO+A0188 samples material in the millimeter or mid-IR identified cavity. In one case we reprt detection of a previously unrecognized wide gap. For the remaining 4 stars, the SEEDS data sample the outer disk: in 3 cases, we present the first NIR imagery of the disks. The data for the youngest sample members (less than 1-2 Myr) closely resemble coeval primordial disks. After approximately 3 Myr, the transitional disks show a wealth of structure including spiral features, rings, divots, and in some cases, largely cleared gaps in the disks which are not seen in coeval primordial disks. Some of these structural features are predicted consequences of lovianmass planets having formed in the disk, while others are novel features. We discuss the implications for massive planet formation timescales and mechanisms.

  15. The SEEDS of Planet Formation: Observations of Transitional Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    As part of its 5-year study, the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disk Systems (SEEDS) has already observed a number of YSOs with circumstellar disks, including 13 0.5-8 Myr old A-M stars with indications that they host wide gaps or central cavities in their circumstellar disks in millimeter or far-IR observations, or from deficits in warm dust thermal emission. For 8 of the disks, the 0.15" inner working angle of HiCIAO+A0188 samples material in the millimeter or mid-IR identified cavity. In one case we report detection of a previously unrecognized wide gap. For the remaining 4 stars, the SEEDS data sample the outer disk: in 3 cases, we present the first NIR imagery of the disks. The data for the youngest sample members 1-2 Myr) closely resemble coeval primordial disks. After approximately 3 Myr, the transitional disks show a wealth of structure including spiral features, rings, divots, and in some cases, largely cleared gaps in the disks which are not seen in coeval primordial disks. Some of these structural features are predicted consequences of Jovian-mass planets having formed in the disk, while others are novel features. We discuss the implications for massive planet formation timescales and mechanisms.

  16. The Warped Nuclear Disk of Radio Galaxy 3C 449

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, G. R.; Quillen, A. C.; Floyd, D. J. E.; Noel-Storr, J.; Baum, S. A.; Axon, D. J.; O'Dea, C. P.; Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, F. D.; Sparks, W. B.; Miley, G. K.; Capetti, A.; Madrid, J. P.; Perlman, E.

    2005-12-01

    Among radio galaxies containing nuclear dust disks, the bipolar jet axis is generally expected to be perpendicular to the disk major axis. However, the FR I radio source 3C 449, possessing a nearly parallel jet/disk orientation on the sky, is an extreme example of a system that does not conform to this expectation. We examine the 600 pc dusty disk in this galaxy with images from the Hubble Space Telescope. We find that a colormap of the disk exhibits a twist in its isocolor contours (isochromes). We model the colormap by integrating galactic starlight through an absorptive disk, and find that the anomalous twist in the isochromes can be reproduced in the model with a vertically thin, warped disk. The model predicts that the disk is nearly perpendicular to the jet axis within 100 pc of the nucleus. We discuss physical mechanisms capable of causing such a warp. We show that a torque on the disk arising from a possible binary black hole in the AGN or radiation pressure from the AGN causes precession on a timescale that is too long to generate such a warp. However, we estimate that the pressure in the X-ray emitting interstellar medium is large enough to perturb the disk. The warped disk in 3C 449 may be a new manifestation of feedback from an active galactic nucleus.

  17. Probabilistic Analysis of Aircraft Gas Turbine Disk Life and Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; August, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Two series of low cycle fatigue (LCF) test data for two groups of different aircraft gas turbine engine compressor disk geometries were reanalyzed and compared using Weibull statistics. Both groups of disks were manufactured from titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy. A NASA Glenn Research Center developed probabilistic computer code Probable Cause was used to predict disk life and reliability. A material-life factor A was determined for titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy based upon fatigue disk data and successfully applied to predict the life of the disks as a function of speed. A comparison was made with the currently used life prediction method based upon crack growth rate. Applying an endurance limit to the computer code did not significantly affect the predicted lives under engine operating conditions. Failure location prediction correlates with those experimentally observed in the LCF tests. A reasonable correlation was obtained between the predicted disk lives using the Probable Cause code and a modified crack growth method for life prediction. Both methods slightly overpredict life for one disk group and significantly under predict it for the other.

  18. Investigation of selected disk systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The large disk systems offered by IBM, UNIVAC, Digital Equipment Corporation, and Data General were examined. In particular, these disk systems were analyzed in terms of how well available operating systems take advantage of the respective disk controller's transfer rates, and to what degree all available data for optimizing disk usage is effectively employed. In the course of this analysis, generic functions and components of disk systems were defined and the capabilities of the surveyed disk system were investigated.

  19. Coupling the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and Large Eddy Simulations with Actuator Disk Model: predictions of wind farm power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Cartagena, Edgardo Javier; Santoni, Christian; Ciri, Umberto; Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Leonardi, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    A large-scale wind farm operating under realistic atmospheric conditions is studied by coupling a meso-scale and micro-scale models. For this purpose, the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is coupled with an in-house LES solver for wind farms. The code is based on a finite difference scheme, with a Runge-Kutta, fractional step and the Actuator Disk Model. The WRF model has been configured using seven one-way nested domains where the child domain has a mesh size one third of its parent domain. A horizontal resolution of 70 m is used in the innermost domain. A section from the smallest and finest nested domain, 7.5 diameters upwind of the wind farm is used as inlet boundary condition for the LES code. The wind farm consists in six-turbines aligned with the mean wind direction and streamwise spacing of 10 rotor diameters, (D), and 2.75D in the spanwise direction. Three simulations were performed by varying the velocity fluctuations at the inlet: random perturbations, precursor simulation, and recycling perturbation method. Results are compared with a simulation on the same wind farm with an ideal uniform wind speed to assess the importance of the time varying incoming wind velocity. Numerical simulations were performed at TACC (Grant CTS070066). This work was supported by NSF, (Grant IIA-1243482 WINDINSPIRE).

  20. Modeling collisions in circumstellar debris disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvold, Erika

    2015-10-01

    Observations of resolved debris disks show a spectacular variety of features and asymmetries, including inner cavities and gaps, inclined secondary disks or warps, and eccentric, sharp-edged rings. Embedded exoplanets could create many of these features via gravitational perturbations, which sculpt the disk directly and by generating planetesimal collisions. In this thesis, I present the Superparticle Model/Algorithm for Collisions in Kuiper belts and debris disks (SMACK), a new method for simultaneously modeling, in 3-D, the collisional and dynamical evolution of planetesimals in a debris disk with planets. SMACK can simulate azimuthal asymmetries and how these asymmetries evolve over time. I show that SMACK is stable to numerical viscosity and numerical heating over 107 yr, and that it can reproduce analytic models of disk evolution. As an example of the algorithm's capabilities, I use SMACK to model the evolution of a debris ring containing a planet on an eccentric orbit and demonstrate that differential precession creates a spiral structure as the ring evolves, but collisions subsequently break up the spiral, leaving a narrower eccentric ring. To demonstrate SMACK's utility in studying debris disk physics, I apply SMACK to simulate a planet on a circular orbit near a ring of planetesimals that are experiencing destructive collisions. Previous simulations of a planet opening a gap in a collisionless debris disk have found that the width of the gap scales as the planet mass to the 2/7th power (alpha = 2/7). I find that gap sizes in a collisional disk still obey a power law scaling with planet mass, but that the index alpha of the power law depends on the age of the system t relative to the collisional timescale t coll of the disk by alpha = 0.32(t/ tcoll)-0.04, with inferred planet masses up to five times smaller than those predicted by the classical gap law. The increased gap sizes likely stem from the interaction between collisions and the mean motion

  1. Where a Neutron Star's Accretion Disk Ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    In X-ray binaries that consist of a neutron star and a companion star, gas funnels from the companion into an accretion disk surrounding the neutron star, spiraling around until it is eventually accreted. How do the powerful magnetic fields threading through the neutron star affect this accretion disk? Recent observations provide evidence that they may push the accretion disk away from the neutron stars surface.Truncated DisksTheoretical models have indicated that neutron star accretion disks may not extend all the way in to the surface of a neutron star, but may instead be truncated at a distance. This prediction has been difficult to test observationally, however, due to the challenge of measuring the location of the inner disk edge in neutron-star X-ray binaries.In a new study, however, a team of scientists led by Ashley King (Einstein Fellow at Stanford University) has managed to measure the location of the inner edge of the disk in Aquila X-1, a neutron-star X-ray binary located 17,000 light-years away.Iron line feature detected by Swift (red) and NuSTAR (black). The symmetry of the line is one of the indicators that the disk is located far from the neutron star; if the inner regions of the disk were close to the neutron star, severe relativistic effects would skew the line to be asymmetric. [King et al. 2016]Measurements from ReflectionsKing and collaborators used observations made by NuSTAR and Swift/XRT both X-ray space observatories of Aquila X-1 during the peak of an X-ray outburst. By observing the reflection of Aquila X-1s emission off of the inner regions of the accretion disk, the authors were able to estimate the location of the inner edge of the disk.The authors find that this inner edge sits at ~15 gravitational radii. Since the neutron stars surface is at ~5 gravitational radii, this means that the accretion disk is truncated far from the stars surface. In spite of this truncation, material still manages to cross the gap and accrete onto the

  2. Burst Testing of a Superalloy Disk with a Dual Grain Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John; Kantzos, Pete

    2002-01-01

    Room temperature burst testing of an advanced nickel-base superalloy disk with a dual grain structure was conducted. The disk had a fine grain bore and a coarse grain rim. The results of this test showed that the disk burst at 39,100 rpm in line with predictions based on a 2-D finite element analysis. Further, significant growth of the disk was observed before failure which was also in line with predictions.

  3. Warm Disks from Giant Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    mass ejected from colliding protoplanets is typically around 0.4 Earth masses. This mass is ejected in the form of fragments that then spread into the terrestrial planet region around the star. The fragments undergo cascading collisions as they orbit, forming an infrared-emitting debris disk at ~1 AU from the star.The authors then calculate the infrared flux profile expected from these simulated disks. They show that the warm disks can exist and radiate for up to ~100 Myr before the fragments are smashed into micrometer-sized pieces small enough to be blown out of the solar system by radiation pressure.The Spitzer Space Telescope has, thus far, observed tens of warm-debris-disk signatures roughly consistent with the authors predictions, primarily located at roughly 1 AU around stars with ages of 10100 Myr. This region is near the habitable zone of these stars, which makes it especially interesting that these systems may currently be undergoing a giant impact stage perhaps on the way to forming terrestrial planets.CitationH. Genda et al 2015 ApJ 810 136. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/810/2/136

  4. Organic Molecules in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, Erika; Horne, David; Shenoy, Sachindev; Blake, Daniel; van Brunt, Kari; Brittain, Sean; Rettig, Terrence

    2008-08-01

    We propose to use NIRSPEC to search for organic molecules in circumstellar disks toward nearly edge-on T Tauri stars. The feasibility of this study has been recently illustrated by the NIRSPEC detection of HCN toward two edge-on T Tauri stars, GV Tau (Gibb et al. 2007) and IRS 46 (Lahuis et al. 2006), and Spitzer detections of C_2H_2, HCN, and CO_2 toward IRS 46 (Lahuis et al. 2006) and AA Tau (Carr & Najita 2008). We have selected 10 molecules that are predicted to be abundant based on chemical models, observations of high and low mass star forming regions, and comet comae. We will investigate compositional variations among the T Tauri population and compare that to comets and chemical models of disk chemistry. Through this, we can explore the chemistry occurring in the planet-forming regions of protoplanetary disks and investigate the evolution of organic volatiles, which can help establish the mechanism and timescale for planet formation.

  5. Deuterium Fractionation as an Evolutionary Probe in Massive Protostellar/Cluster Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huei-Ru; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Su, Yu-Nung; Wang, Mei-Yan

    2011-12-01

    Clouds of high infrared extinction are promising sites of massive star/cluster formation. A large number of cloud cores discovered in recent years allow for the investigation of a possible evolutionary sequence among cores in early phases. We have conducted a survey of deuterium fractionation toward 15 dense cores in various evolutionary stages, from high-mass starless cores to ultracompact H II regions, in the massive star-forming clouds of high extinction, G34.43+0.24, IRAS 18151-1208, and IRAS 18223-1243, with the Submillimeter Telescope. Spectra of N2H+ (3-2), N2D+ (3-2), and C18O (2-1) were observed to derive the deuterium fractionation of N2H+, D frac ≡ N(N2D+)/N(N2H+), as well as the CO depletion factor for every selected core. Our results show a decreasing trend in D frac with both gas temperature and line width. Since colder and quiescent gas is likely to be associated with less evolved cores, larger D frac appears to correlate with early phases of core evolution. Such decreasing trend resembles the behavior of D frac in the low-mass protostellar cores and is consistent with several earlier studies in high-mass protostellar cores. We also find a moderate increasing trend of D frac with the CO depletion factor, suggesting that sublimation of ice mantles alters the competition in the chemical reactions and reduces D frac. Our findings suggest a general chemical behavior of deuterated species in both low- and high-mass protostellar candidates at early stages. In addition, upper limits to the ionization degree are estimated to be within 2 × 10-7 and 5 × 10-6. The four quiescent cores have marginal field-neutral coupling and perhaps favor turbulent cooling flows.

  6. ANOMALOUS CO{sub 2} ICE TOWARD HOPS-68: A TRACER OF PROTOSTELLAR FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    Poteet, Charles A.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Bjorkman, Jon E.; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Watson, Dan M.; Sheehan, Patrick D.; Isokoski, Karoliina; Linnartz, Harold

    2013-04-01

    We report the detection of a unique CO{sub 2} ice band toward the deeply embedded, low-mass protostar HOPS-68. Our spectrum, obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, reveals a 15.2 {mu}m CO{sub 2} ice bending mode profile that cannot be modeled with the same ice structure typically found toward other protostars. We develop a modified CO{sub 2} ice profile decomposition, including the addition of new high-quality laboratory spectra of pure, crystalline CO{sub 2} ice. Using this model, we find that 87%-92% of the CO{sub 2} is sequestered as spherical, CO{sub 2}-rich mantles, while typical interstellar ices show evidence of irregularly shaped, hydrogen-rich mantles. We propose that (1) the nearly complete absence of unprocessed ices along the line of sight is due to the flattened envelope structure of HOPS-68, which lacks cold absorbing material in its outer envelope, and possesses an extreme concentration of material within its inner (10 AU) envelope region and (2) an energetic event led to the evaporation of inner envelope ices, followed by cooling and re-condensation, explaining the sequestration of spherical, CO{sub 2} ice mantles in a hydrogen-poor mixture. The mechanism responsible for the sublimation could be either a transient accretion event or shocks in the interaction region between the protostellar outflow and envelope. The proposed scenario is consistent with the rarity of the observed CO{sub 2} ice profile, the formation of nearly pure CO{sub 2} ice, and the production of spherical ice mantles. HOPS-68 may therefore provide a unique window into the protostellar feedback process, as outflows and heating shape the physical and chemical structure of protostellar envelopes and molecular clouds.

  7. Generation of radiative knots in a randomly pulsed protostellar jet. I. Dynamics and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonito, R.; Orlando, S.; Peres, G.; Eislöffel, J.; Miceli, M.; Favata, F.

    2010-02-01

    Context. Herbig-Haro objects are characterized by a complex knotty morphology detected mainly along the axis of protostellar jets in a wide range of bands: from radio to IR to optical bands, with X-rays knots also detected in the past few years. Evidence of interactions between knots formed in different epochs have been found, suggesting that jets may result from the ejection of plasma blobs from the stellar source. Aims: We aim at investigating the physical mechanism leading to the irregular knotty structure observed in protostellar jets in different wavelength bands and the complex interactions occurring among blobs of plasma ejected from the stellar source. Methods: We performed 2D axisymmetric hydrodynamic numerical simulations of a randomly ejected pulsed jet. The jet consists of a train of blobs that ram with supersonic speed into the ambient medium. The initial random velocity of each blob follows an exponential distribution. We explored the ejection rate parameter to derive constraints on the physical properties of protostellar jets by comparing model results with observations. Our model takes the effects of radiative losses and thermal conduction into account. Results: We find that the mutual interactions of blobs ejected at different epochs and with different speeds lead to a variety of plasma components not described by current models of jets. The main features characterizing the randomly pulsed jet scenario are: single high-speed knots, showing a measurable proper motion in nice agreement with optical and X-rays observations; irregular chains of knots aligned along the jet axis and possibly interacting with each other; reverse shocks interacting with outgoing knots; oblique shock patterns produced by the reflection of shocks at the cocoon surrounding the jet. All these structures work together to help determining the morphology of the jet in different wavelength bands. We also find that the thermal conduction plays a crucial role in damping out

  8. High-J CO emission in the Cepheus E protostellar outflow observed with SOFIA/GREAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Gusdorf, A.; Leurini, S.; Codella, C.; Güsten, R.; Wyrowski, F.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Risacher, C.; Wampfler, S. F.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Owing to the high energy required for their excitation, high-J CO transitions are a valuable tool for the study of protostellar jets and outflows. However, high spectral resolution observations of high-J CO lines, which are essential to distinguish the different components in the line profiles, were impossible until the start of operations of the Herschel Space Observatory and the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Aims: We present and analyze two spectrally resolved high-J CO lines toward a protostellar outflow. We study the physical conditions, as a function of velocity, traced by such high-energy transitions in bipolar outflows. Methods: We selected the molecular outflow Cep E, driven by an intermediate-mass class 0 protostar. Using the German REceiver for Astronomy at Terahertz frequencies (GREAT) onboard SOFIA, we observed the CO (12-11) and (13-12) transitions (Eu ~ 430 and 500 K, respectively) toward one position in the blue lobe of this outflow, that had been known to display high-velocity molecular emission. Results: We detect the outflow emission in both transitions, up to extremely high velocities (~100 km s-1 with respect to the systemic velocity). We divide the line profiles into three velocity ranges that each have interesting spectral features: standard, intermediate, and extremely high-velocity. One distinct bullet is detected in each of the last two. A large velocity gradient analysis for these three velocity ranges provides constraints on the kinetic temperature and volume density of the emitting gas, ≳ 100 K and ≳ 104 cm-3, respectively. These results are in agreement with previous ISO observations and are comparable with results obtained by Herschel for similar objects. Conclusions: High-J CO lines are a good tracer of molecular bullets in protostellar outflows. Our analysis suggests that different physical conditions are at work in the intermediate velocity range compared with the standard and extremely high

  9. Formation of X-ray emitting stationary shocks in magnetized protostellar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustamujic, S.; Orlando, S.; Bonito, R.; Miceli, M.; Gómez de Castro, A. I.; López-Santiago, J.

    2016-12-01

    Context. X-ray observations of protostellar jets show evidence of strong shocks heating the plasma up to temperatures of a few million degrees. In some cases, the shocked features appear to be stationary. They are interpreted as shock diamonds. Aims: We investigate the physics that guides the formation of X-ray emitting stationary shocks in protostellar jets; the role of the magnetic field in determining the location, stability, and detectability in X-rays of these shocks; and the physical properties of the shocked plasma. Methods: We performed a set of 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations that modelled supersonic jets ramming into a magnetized medium and explored different configurations of the magnetic field. The model takes into account the most relevant physical effects, namely thermal conduction and radiative losses. We compared the model results with observations, via the emission measure and the X-ray luminosity synthesized from the simulations. Results: Our model explains the formation of X-ray emitting stationary shocks in a natural way. The magnetic field collimates the plasma at the base of the jet and forms a magnetic nozzle there. After an initial transient, the nozzle leads to the formation of a shock diamond at its exit which is stationary over the time covered by the simulations ( 40-60 yr; comparable with timescales of the observations). The shock generates a point-like X-ray source located close to the base of the jet with luminosity comparable with that inferred from X-ray observations of protostellar jets. For the range of parameters explored, the evolution of the post-shock plasma is dominated by the radiative cooling, whereas the thermal conduction slightly affects the structure of the shock. A movie is available at http://www.aanda.org

  10. cluster-in-a-box: Statistical model of sub-millimeter emission from embedded protostellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Lars E.; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2016-10-01

    Cluster-in-a-box provides a statistical model of sub-millimeter emission from embedded protostellar clusters and consists of three modules grouped in two scripts. The first (cluster_distribution) generates the cluster based on the number of stars, input initial mass function, spatial distribution and age distribution. The second (cluster_emission) takes an input file of observations, determines the mass-intensity correlation and generates outflow emission for all low-mass Class 0 and I sources. The output is stored as a FITS image where the flux density is determined by the desired resolution, pixel scale and cluster distance.

  11. A protostellar jet model for the water masers in W49N

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Elitzur, Moshe; Stone, James M.; Konigl, Arieh

    1994-01-01

    Observations by Gwinn, Moran, & Reid of the proper motions of water masers in W49N show that they have elongated distribution expanding from a common center. Features with high space velocity only occur far from the center, while low-velocity features occur at all distances. We propose that these observations can be interpreted in terms of a shell of shocked molecular gas that is driven by the expanding cocoon of a high-velocity protostellar jet. We present three-dimensional numerical simulations in support of this interpretation and argue that this source provides a unique oppurtunity for a detailed study of jet-driven cocoons.

  12. The segregation of starless and protostellar clumps in the Hi-GAL ℓ = 224° region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, L.; Cunningham, M.; Elia, D.; Jones, P.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Stars form in dense, dusty structures, which are embedded in larger clumps of molecular clouds often showing a clear filamentary structure on large scales (≳1 pc). The origin (e.g., turbulence or gravitational instabilities) and evolution of these filaments, as well as their relation to clump and core formation, are not yet fully understood. A large sample of both starless and protostellar clumps can now be found in the Herschel Infrared GALactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) key project, which also provides striking images of the filamentary structure of the parent molecular clouds. Recent results indicate that populations of clumps on and off filaments may differ. Aims: One of the best-studied regions in the Hi-GAL survey can be observed toward the ℓ = 224° field. Here, a filamentary region has been studied and it has been found that protostellar clumps are mostly located along the main filament, whereas starless clumps are detected off this filament and are instead found on secondary, less prominent filaments. We want to investigate this segregation effect and how it may affect the clumps properties. Methods: We mapped the 12CO (1-0) line and its main three isotopologues toward the two most prominent filaments observed toward the ℓ = 224° field using the Mopra radio telescope, in order to set observational constraints on the dynamics of these structures and the associated starless and protostellar clumps. Results: Compared to the starless clumps, the protostellar clumps are more luminous, more turbulent and lie in regions where the filamentary ambient gas shows larger linewidths. We see evidence of gas flowing along the main filament, but we do not find any signs of accretion flow from the filament onto the Hi-GAL clumps. We analyze the radial column density profile of the filaments and their gravitational stability. Conclusions: The more massive and highly fragmented main filament appears to be thermally supercritical and gravitationally bound

  13. Search for massive protostellar candidates in the southern hemisphere. I. Association with dense gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontani, F.; Beltrán, M. T.; Brand, J.; Cesaroni, R.; Testi, L.; Molinari, S.; Walmsley, C. M.

    2005-03-01

    We have observed two rotational transitions of both CS and C17O, and the 1.2 mm continuum emission towards a sample of 130 high-mass protostellar candidates with δ < -30°. This work represents the first step of the extension to the southern hemisphere of a project started more than a decade ago aimed at the identification of massive protostellar candidates. Following the same approach adopted for sources with δ ≥ -30°, we have selected from the IRAS Point Source Catalogue 429 sources which potentially are compact molecular clouds on the basis of their IR colours. The sample has then been divided into two groups according to the colour indices [25 12] and [60 12]: the 298 sources with [25 12] ≥ 0.57 and [60 12] ≥ 1.30 have been called High sources, the remaining 131 have been called Low sources. In this paper, we check the association with dense gas and dust in 130 Low sources. We have obtained a detection rate of ~85% in CS, demonstrating a tight association of the sources with dense molecular clumps. Among the sources detected in CS, ~76% have also been detected in C17O and ~93% in the 1.2 mm continuum. Millimeter-continuum maps show the presence of clumps with diameters in the range 0.2-2 pc and masses from a few M⊙ to 105 M⊙; H2 volume densities computed from CS line ratios lie between ~104.5 and 105.5 cm-3. The bolometric luminosities of the sources, derived from IRAS data, are in the range 103-106 L⊙, consistent with embedded high-mass objects. Based on our results and those found in the literature for other samples of high-mass young stellar objects, we conclude that our sources are massive objects in a very early evolutionary stage, probably prior to the formation of an Hii region. We propose a scenario in which High and Low sources are both made of a massive clump hosting a high-mass protostellar candidate and a nearby stellar cluster. The difference might be due to the fact that the 12 μm IRAS flux, the best discriminant between the two

  14. Erratum: The Protostellar Origin of a CS Outflow in S68N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf-Chase, G. A.; Barsony, M.; Wootten, H. A.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Lowrance, P. J.; Kastner, J. H.; McMullin, J. P.

    1998-12-01

    In the article ``The Protostellar Origin of a CS Outflow in S68N'' by G. A. Wolf-Chase, M. Barsony, H. A. Wootten, D. Ward-Thompson, P. J. Lowrance, J. H. Kastner, and J. P. McMullin (ApJ, 501, L193 [1998]), the units for the last eight entries of Table 1 were inadvertently omitted during the editing process and the coordinate value for the second entry under ``The Outflow'' was incorrect. Below is the table as it should have appeared.

  15. A protostellar jet model for the water masers in W49N

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Elitzur, Moshe; Stone, James M.; Konigl, Arieh

    1994-01-01

    Observations by Gwinn, Moran, & Reid of the proper motions of water masers in W49N show that they have elongated distribution expanding from a common center. Features with high space velocity only occur far from the center, while low-velocity features occur at all distances. We propose that these observations can be interpreted in terms of a shell of shocked molecular gas that is driven by the expanding cocoon of a high-velocity protostellar jet. We present three-dimensional numerical simulations in support of this interpretation and argue that this source provides a unique oppurtunity for a detailed study of jet-driven cocoons.

  16. Hydrodynamic Stability and Magnetic Reconnection in Disks and Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jeremy; Kulsrud, Russell

    1999-01-01

    edges of disks in close binaries [2], and it may be important in disks of very low ionization such as protostellar disks, or even cataclysmic-variable disks in quiescence where the MHD mechanism may be ineffective [5]. All analyses up to 1996 were done in a local approximation where the orbital frequency, shear rate, and tidal field were treated as constants. The locally computed growth rate turns out to depend strongly on radius, and it was unclear how to average these local rates to obtain the correct global rate. This is a critical issue for accretion disks in close binaries, because the local growth rate is comparable to the orbital frequency towards the outer edge of the disk but decreases rapidly inwards. Paper #1 examined this issue in a simplified global model where the destabilizing terms vary with position. We found that the global growth rate is essentially equal to the maximum local rate, provided that the latter is smoothed over a radial range equal to the distance that the destabilized wave propagates at its group speed in one growth time. Thus, in an accretion disk, waves would grow rapidly in the outer parts but would propagate both inwards and outwards at a maximum group speed of order the disk thickness divided by the orbital period.

  17. UNVEILING THE EVOLUTIONARY SEQUENCE FROM INFALLING ENVELOPES TO KEPLERIAN DISKS AROUND LOW-MASS PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Hsi-Wei; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Ho, Paul T. P.

    2013-07-20

    We performed Submillimeter Array observations in the C{sup 18}O (2-1) emission line toward six Class 0 and I protostars to study rotational motions of their surrounding envelopes and circumstellar material on 100-1000 AU scales. C{sup 18}O (2-1) emission with intensity peaks located at the protostellar positions is detected toward all six sources. The rotational velocities of the protostellar envelopes as a function of radius were measured from the position-velocity diagrams perpendicular to the outflow directions passing through the protostellar positions. Two Class 0 sources, B335 and NGC 1333 IRAS 4B, show no detectable rotational motion, while L1527 IRS (Class 0/I) and L1448-mm (Class 0) exhibit rotational motions with radial profiles of V{sub rot}{proportional_to}r {sup -1.0{+-}0.2} and {proportional_to}r {sup -1.0{+-}0.1}, respectively. The other Class I sources, TMC-1A and L1489 IRS, exhibit the fastest rotational motions among the sample, and their rotational motions have flatter radial profiles of V{sub rot}{proportional_to}r {sup -0.6{+-}0.1} and {proportional_to}r {sup -0.5{+-}0.1}, respectively. The rotational motions with the radial dependence of {approx}r {sup -1} can be interpreted as rotation with a conserved angular momentum in a dynamically infalling envelope, while those with the radial dependence of {approx}r {sup -0.5} can be interpreted as Keplerian rotation. These observational results demonstrate categorization of rotational motions from infalling envelopes to Keplerian-disk formation. Models of the inside-out collapse where the angular momentum is conserved are discussed and compared with our observational results.

  18. Stratified Simulations of Collisionless Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Kota; Hoshino, Masahiro

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a series of stratified-shearing-box simulations of collisionless accretion disks in the recently developed framework of kinetic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), which can handle finite non-gyrotropy of a pressure tensor. Although a fully kinetic simulation predicted a more efficient angular-momentum transport in collisionless disks than in the standard MHD regime, the enhanced transport has not been observed in past kinetic-MHD approaches to gyrotropic pressure anisotropy. For the purpose of investigating this missing link between the fully kinetic and MHD treatments, this paper explores the role of non-gyrotropic pressure and makes the first attempt to incorporate certain collisionless effects into disk-scale, stratified disk simulations. When the timescale of gyrotropization was longer than, or comparable to, the disk-rotation frequency of the orbit, we found that the finite non-gyrotropy selectively remaining in the vicinity of current sheets contributes to suppressing magnetic reconnection in the shearing-box system. This leads to increases both in the saturated amplitude of the MHD turbulence driven by magnetorotational instabilities and in the resultant efficiency of angular-momentum transport. Our results seem to favor the fast advection of magnetic fields toward the rotation axis of a central object, which is required to launch an ultra-relativistic jet from a black hole accretion system in, for example, a magnetically arrested disk state.

  19. Fomalhaut's Debris Disk and Planet: Constraining the Mass of Fomalhaut b from disk Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, E.; Kite, E.; Kalas, P.; Graham, J. R.; Clampin, M.

    2009-03-01

    Following the optical imaging of exoplanet candidate Fomalhaut b (Fom b), we present a numerical model of how Fomalhaut's debris disk is gravitationally shaped by a single interior planet. The model is simple, adaptable to other debris disks, and can be extended to accommodate multiple planets. If Fom b is the dominant perturber of the belt, then to produce the observed disk morphology it must have a mass M pl < 3M J, an orbital semimajor axis a pl > 101.5 AU, and an orbital eccentricity e pl = 0.11-0.13. These conclusions are independent of Fom b's photometry. To not disrupt the disk, a greater mass for Fom b demands a smaller orbit farther removed from the disk; thus, future astrometric measurement of Fom b's orbit, combined with our model of planet-disk interaction, can be used to determine the mass more precisely. The inner edge of the debris disk at a ≈ 133 AU lies at the periphery of Fom b's chaotic zone, and the mean disk eccentricity of e ≈ 0.11 is secularly forced by the planet, supporting predictions made prior to the discovery of Fom b. However, previous mass constraints based on disk morphology rely on several oversimplifications. We explain why our constraint is more reliable. It is based on a global model of the disk that is not restricted to the planet's chaotic zone boundary. Moreover, we screen disk parent bodies for dynamical stability over the system age of ~ 100 Myr, and model them separately from their dust grain progeny; the latter's orbits are strongly affected by radiation pressure and their lifetimes are limited to ~ 0.1 Myr by destructive grain-grain collisions. The single planet model predicts that planet and disk orbits be apsidally aligned. Fomalhaut b's nominal space velocity does not bear this out, but the astrometric uncertainties may be large. If the apsidal misalignment proves real, our calculated upper mass limit of 3M J still holds. If the orbits are aligned, our model predicts M pl = 0.5M J, a pl = 115 AU, and e pl = 0

  20. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  1. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  2. DIAGNOSING CIRCUMSTELLAR DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Joseph M.

    2010-08-20

    A numerical model of a circumstellar debris disk is developed and applied to observations of the circumstellar dust orbiting {beta} Pictoris. The model accounts for the rates at which dust is produced by collisions among unseen planetesimals, and the rate at which dust grains are destroyed due to collisions. The model also accounts for the effects of radiation pressure, which is the dominant perturbation on the disk's smaller but abundant dust grains. Solving the resulting system of rate equations then provides the dust abundances versus grain size and dust abundances over time. Those solutions also provide the dust grains' collisional lifetime versus grain size, and the debris disk's optical depth and surface brightness versus distance from the star. Comparison to observations then yields estimates of the unseen planetesimal disk's radius, and the rate at which the disk sheds mass due to planetesimal grinding. The model can also be used to measure or else constrain the dust grain's physical and optical properties, such as the dust grains' strength, their light-scattering asymmetry parameter, and the grains' efficiency of light scattering Q{sub s}. The model is then applied to optical observations of the edge-on dust disk orbiting {beta} Pictoris, and good agreement is achieved when the unseen planetesimal disk is broad, with 75 {approx}< r {approx}< 150 AU. If it is assumed that the dust grains are bright like Saturn's icy rings (Q{sub s} = 0.7), then the cross section of dust in the disk is A{sub d} {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup 20} km{sup 2} and its mass is M{sub d} {approx_equal} 11 lunar masses. In this case, the planetesimal disk's dust-production rate is quite heavy, M-dot {sub d{approx}}9 M {sub +} Myr{sup -1}, implying that there is or was a substantial amount of planetesimal mass there, at least 110 Earth masses. If the dust grains are darker than assumed, then the planetesimal disk's mass-loss rate and its total mass are heavier. In fact, the apparent dearth

  3. Protostars and Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The research concentrated on high angular resolution (arc-second scale) studies of molecular cloud cores associated with very young star formation. New ways to study disks and protoplanetary systems were explored. Findings from the areas studied are briefly summarized: (1) molecular clouds; (2) gravitational contraction; (3) jets, winds, and outflows; (4) Circumstellar Disks (5) Extrasolar Planetary Systems. A bibliography of publications and submitted papers produced during the grant period is included.

  4. TF41 Engine Fan Disk Seeded Fault Crack Propagation Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Uncontained engine failures, although rare in occurrence, can have a catastrophic effect on aircraft performance and safety. Engine disk cracks can eventually lead to these type of failures. A number of techniques to detect engine disk cracks have been developed in recent years. However, these technologies have only been validated by disk spin pit tests, not actual engine tests. Due to this, a project was established to perform seeded fault engine tests on a TF41 engine disk fan. A defect was machined in the first stage fan disk of a TF41 engine. The disk was run in a spin pit to initiate a crack. Once initiated, the disk was run in an actual engine test facility. The engine was cycled by a number of start and stops with the goal of propagating the crack to disk burst through low cycle fatigue. Various crack detection techniques were installed on the engine and run real-time during the test to validate their abilities to detect disk cracks. These techniques were based on methods such as change in mass imbalance using vibration or shaft displacement, change in blade position, acoustic emission, and torsional resonance. At the completion of 4474 test cycles, the crack in the TF41 disk was determined to have grown approximately 0.025 inches. This was far less the predicted crack growth based on a fracture mechanics analysis and finite element stress analysis.

  5. STIS Observations of the Disk and Outflow of the Herbig Ae Star HD163296

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Coronagraphic imaging with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope reveals a approx. 450 AU radius circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae star HDI63296. The disk includes an annulus of reduced scattering at 325 AU and exhibits a flat trend of surface brightness in to 180-222 AU, consistent with a cleared central zone. The disk is accompanied by a chain of nebulosities ("knots") oriented roughly perpendicular to the disk. Followup spectroscopy in the visible and the far ultraviolet confirms the Herbig-Haro nature of the observed knots. The FUV data in particular reveal the presence of a collimated, bipolar outflow, with a blue-shifted Lyman alpha jet that can be traced to within 0.06 arcseconds (7.3 AU) of HD163296 and a red-shifted Lyman alpha component that may be due to infall or to a poorly collimated wind. If the estimated age of this system is correct, these data indicate that protostellar outflows may last up to 10 times longer than previously believed.

  6. Optic disk drusen.

    PubMed

    Auw-Haedrich, Claudia; Staubach, Flemming; Witschel, Heinrich

    2002-01-01

    Optic disk drusen occur in 3.4 to 24 per 1,000 population and are bilateral in approximately 75%. Disturbance in the axonal metabolism in the presence of a small scleral canal--regardless of eyelength--is considered responsible for the development. The drusen increase in size, becoming more visible with age due to continuing calcium apposition, and they are associated with visual field defects in a considerable number of patients. Patients do not usually notice these defects, despite their progressive nature over the years, and this indicates an insidious course. A correct diagnosis of optic disk drusen is mandatory, although effective treatment is not yet available. It is most important to differentiate optic disk drusen from papilledema in order to avoid unnecessary neurological examinations, but also to avoid overlooking genuine neurologic disorders. Because optic disk drusen can cause severe visual field defects, patients require individual consultation regarding work issues and whether or not to drive. Optic disk drusen can be accompanied by vascular complications as well. In some cases these vascular changes--for example, choroidal neovascularization--are treatable. Patients with optic disk drusen should undergo regular visual field, IOP, and nerve fiber layer examinations. In patients with deteriorating visual field and borderline IOP, we recommend antiglaucomatous therapy.

  7. Disk Precession in Pleione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, R.

    2007-03-01

    From the polarimetric observation of Pleione, we found that the intrinsic polarization angle varied from 60° to 130° in 1974-2003. The Hα profile also changed dramatically from the edge-on type (shell-line profile) to the surface-on type (wine-bottle profile). These facts clearly indicate the spatial motion of the disk axis. We interpret these variations in terms of the disk precession, caused by the secondary of this spectroscopic binary with a period of 218d. We performed the χ^2 minimization for the polarization angle, assuming uniform precession with an imposed condition that the shell maximum occurred at edge-on view. The resulting precession angle is 59° with a period of 81 years. Then, we can describe chronologically the spatial motion of disk axis. We also derived the Hα disk radius from the peak separation, assuming the Keplerian disk. The precession of the disk gives natural explanation of the mysterious long-term spectroscopic behaviors of this star.

  8. Limits on the location of planetesimal formation in self-gravitating protostellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, C. J.; Lodato, G.

    2009-09-01

    In this Letter, we show that if planetesimals form in spiral features in self-gravitating discs, as previously suggested by the idealized simulations of Rice et al., then in realistic protostellar discs, this process will be restricted to the outer regions of the disc (i.e. at radii in excess of several tens of au). This restriction relates to the requirement that dust has to be concentrated in spiral features on a time-scale that is less than the (roughly dynamical) lifetime of such features, and that such rapid accumulation requires spiral features whose fractional amplitude is not much less than unity. This in turn requires that the cooling time-scale of the gas is relatively short, which restricts the process to the outer disc. We point out that the efficient conversion of a large fraction of the primordial dust in the disc into planetesimals could rescue this material from the well-known problem of rapid inward migration at an approximate metre-size scale and that in principle the collisional evolution of these objects could help to resupply small dust to the protostellar disc. We also point out the possible implications of this scenario for the location of planetesimal belts inferred in debris discs around main sequence stars, but stress that further dynamical studies are required in order to establish whether the disc retains a memory of the initial site of planetesimal creation.

  9. INVESTIGATING PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN PROTOSTELLAR JETS: THE TRIPLE RADIO CONTINUUM SOURCE IN SERPENS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez-Kamenetzky, Adriana; Valotto, Carlos; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Araudo, Anabella; Torrelles, José M.; Anglada, Guillem; Martí, Josep

    2016-02-10

    While most protostellar jets present free–free emission at radio wavelengths, synchrotron emission has also been proposed to be present in a handful of these objects. The presence of nonthermal emission has been inferred by negative spectral indices at centimeter wavelengths. In one case (the HH 80-81 jet arising from a massive protostar), its synchrotron nature was confirmed by the detection of linearly polarized radio emission. One of the main consequences of these results is that synchrotron emission implies the presence of relativistic particles among the nonrelativistic material of these jets. Therefore, an acceleration mechanism should be taking place. The most probable scenario is that particles are accelerated when the jets strongly impact against the dense envelope surrounding the protostar. Here we present an analysis of radio observations obtained with the Very Large Array of the triple radio source in the Serpens star-forming region. This object is known to be a radio jet arising from an intermediate-mass protostar. It is also one of the first protostellar jets where the presence of nonthermal emission was proposed. We analyze the dynamics of the jet and the nature of the emission and discuss these issues in the context of the physical parameters of the jet and the particle acceleration phenomenon.

  10. Investigating Particle Acceleration in Protostellar Jets: The Triple Radio Continuum Source in Serpens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Kamenetzky, Adriana; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Araudo, Anabella; Torrelles, José M.; Anglada, Guillem; Martí, Josep; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Valotto, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    While most protostellar jets present free-free emission at radio wavelengths, synchrotron emission has also been proposed to be present in a handful of these objects. The presence of nonthermal emission has been inferred by negative spectral indices at centimeter wavelengths. In one case (the HH 80-81 jet arising from a massive protostar), its synchrotron nature was confirmed by the detection of linearly polarized radio emission. One of the main consequences of these results is that synchrotron emission implies the presence of relativistic particles among the nonrelativistic material of these jets. Therefore, an acceleration mechanism should be taking place. The most probable scenario is that particles are accelerated when the jets strongly impact against the dense envelope surrounding the protostar. Here we present an analysis of radio observations obtained with the Very Large Array of the triple radio source in the Serpens star-forming region. This object is known to be a radio jet arising from an intermediate-mass protostar. It is also one of the first protostellar jets where the presence of nonthermal emission was proposed. We analyze the dynamics of the jet and the nature of the emission and discuss these issues in the context of the physical parameters of the jet and the particle acceleration phenomenon.

  11. NEAR-INFRARED AND MILLIMETER-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF Mol 160: A MASSIVE YOUNG PROTOSTELLAR CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf-Chase, Grace; Smutko, Michael; Sherman, Reid; Harper, Doyal A.; Medford, Michael

    2012-02-01

    We have discovered two compact sources of shocked H{sub 2} 2.12 {mu}m emission coincident with Mol 160 (IRAS 23385+6053), a massive star-forming core thought to be a precursor to an ultracompact H II region. The 2.12 {mu}m sources lie within 2'' (0.05 pc) of a millimeter-wavelength continuum peak where the column density is {>=}10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}. We estimate that the ratio of molecular hydrogen luminosity to bolometric luminosity is >0.2%, indicating a high ratio of mechanical to radiant luminosity. CS J = 2{yields}1 and HCO{sup +} J = 1{yields}0 observations with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) indicate that the protostellar molecular core has a peculiar velocity of {approx}2 km s{sup -1} with respect to its parent molecular cloud. We also observed 95 GHz CH{sub 3}OH J = 8{yields}7 Class I maser emission from several locations within the core. Comparison with previous observations of 44 GHz CH{sub 3}OH maser emission shows that the maser sources have a high mean ratio of 95 GHz to 44 GHz intensity. Our observations strengthen the case that Mol 160 (IRAS 23385+6053) is a rapidly accreting massive protostellar system in a very early phase of its evolution.

  12. Millimeter-sized grains in the protostellar envelopes: Where do they come from?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Yi Hang Valerie; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2016-08-01

    Grain growth during star formation affects the physical and chemical processes in the evolution of star-forming clouds. We investigate the origin of the millimeter (mm)-sized grains recently observed in Class I protostellar envelopes. We use the coagulation model developed in our previous paper and find that a hydrogen number density of as high as 1010 cm-3, instead of the typical density 105 cm-3, is necessary for the formation of mm-sized grains. Thus, we test a hypothesis that such large grains are transported to the envelope from the inner, denser parts, finding that gas drag by outflow efficiently "launches" the large grains as long as the central object has not grown to ≳0.1 M⊙. By investigating the shattering effect on the mm-sized grains, we ensure that the large grains are not significantly fragmented after being injected in the envelope. We conclude that the mm-sized grains observed in the protostellar envelopes are not formed in the envelopes but formed in the inner parts of the star-forming regions and transported to the envelopes before a significant mass growth of the central object, and that they survive in the envelopes.

  13. Instability and transition in rotating disk flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    The stability of three dimensional rotating disk flow and the effects of Coriolis forces and streamline curvature were investigated. It was shown that this analysis gives better growth rates than Orr-Sommerfeld equation. Results support the numerical prediction that the number of stationary vortices varies directly with the Reynolds number.

  14. The Stellar Kinematics of Galactic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottema, R.

    1993-08-01

    Stellar velocity dispersion measurements of a sample of 12 galactic disks are summarized. The observed radial functionality is parameterized such that one dispersion value is assigned to each galaxy. Comparison of the galaxy dispersion with absolute magnitude and maximum rotation reveals that the dispersion is larger for the more massive systems; the relation between dispersion and intrinsic brightness of the old disk population appears to be linear. Combination of the data for face-on and inclined systems makes the conclusion plausible that the ratio between vertical and radial dispersion in external systems equals 0.6, as for the solar neighbourhood. From the vertical disk dispersion the maximum rotation of a disk can be calculated once the ratio of scalelength to scaleheight (h/z_0_) is known. This ratio is derived as a function of disk brightness from the observed dispersion, for a simple one colour, one mass-to-light ratio disk model. It appears to be rather constant, possibly increasing towards the fainter systems. Then, for realistic h/z_0_ values, the stellar velocity dispersions only allow the disk to have maximum rotation of on average 63% of the observed maximum rotation. The disk is then still dominant in the central parts of the galaxy but generally the maximum disk hypothesis predicting a maximum disk rotation of 85-90% of the observed, does not apply. Exploring the consequences for the Tully-Fisher relation, it is found that the relation for disks only must be positioned at lower rotational velocities than what is observed. A dark halo and bulge must supply the additional rotation. A relation is calculated between Toomre's Q parameter and the mass-to- light ratio for a disk. When this relation is projected onto the observed velocity dispersion - maximum rotational velocity data it is found that the same M/L ratio for galactic disks implies that the Q value is also equal for all disks, and vice versa. A universal Q value can indeed be expected when a

  15. Fomalhaut's Debris Disk and Planet: Constraining the Mass of Formalhaut B from Disk Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, E.; Kite, E.; Kalas, P.; Graham, J. R.; Clampin, M.

    2008-01-01

    Following the optical imaging of exoplanet candidate Fomalhaut b (Fom b), we present a numerical model of how Fomalhaut's debris disk is gravitationally shaped by a single interior planet. The model is simple, adaptable to other debris disks, and can be extended to accommodate multiple planets. If Fom b is the dominant perturber of the belt, then to produce the observed disk morphology it must have a mass M(sub pl) < 3M(sub J), an orbital semimajor axis a(sub pl) > 101.5AU, and an orbital eccentricity e(sub pl) = 0.11 - 0.13. These conclusions are independent of Fom b's photometry. To not disrupt the disk, a greater mass for Fom b demands a smaller orbit farther removed from the disk; thus, future astrometric measurement of Fom b's orbit, combined with our model of planet-disk interaction, can be used to determine the mass more precisely. The inner edge of the debris disk at a approximately equals 133AU lies at the periphery of Fom b's chaotic zone, and the mean disk eccentricity of e approximately equals 0.11 is secularly forced by the planet, supporting predictions made prior to the discovery of Fom b. However, previous mass constraints based on disk morphology rely on several oversimplifications. We explain why our constraint is more reliable. It is based on a global model of the disk that is not restricted to the planet's chaotic zone boundary. Moreover, we screen disk parent bodies for dynamical stability over the system age of approximately 100 Myr, and model them separately from their dust grain progeny; the latter's orbits are strongly affected by radiation pressure and their lifetimes are limited to approximately 0.1 Myr by destructive grain-grain collisions. The single planet model predicts that planet and disk orbits be apsidally aligned. Fomalhaut b's nominal space velocity does not bear this out, but the astrometric uncertainties are difficult to quantify. Even if the apsidal misalignment proves real, our calculated upper mass limit of 3 M(sub J) still

  16. Fast, Capacious Disk Memory Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Ronald M.

    1990-01-01

    Device for recording digital data on, and playing back data from, memory disks has high recording or playback rate and utilizes available recording area more fully. Two disks, each with own reading/writing head, used to record data at same time. Head on disk A operates on one of tracks numbered from outside in; head on disk B operates on track of same number in sequence from inside out. Underlying concept of device applicable to magnetic or optical disks.

  17. Chemistry in disks. X. The molecular content of protoplanetary disks in Taurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilloteau, S.; Reboussin, L.; Dutrey, A.; Chapillon, E.; Wakelam, V.; Piétu, V.; Di Folco, E.; Semenov, D.; Henning, Th.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We attempt to determine the molecular composition of disks around young low-mass stars. Methods: We used the IRAM 30 m radio telescope to perform a sensitive wideband survey of 30 stars in the Taurus Auriga region known to be surrounded by gaseous circumstellar disks. We simultaneously observed HCO+(3-2), HCN(3-2), C2H(3-2), CS(5-4), and two transitions of SO. We combined the results with a previous survey that observed 13CO (2-1), CN(2-1), two o-H2CO lines, and another transition of SO. We used available interferometric data to derive excitation temperatures of CN and C2H in several sources. We determined characteristic sizes of the gas disks and column densities of all molecules using a parametric power-law disk model. Our study is mostly sensitive to molecules at 200-400 au from the stars. We compared the derived column densities to the predictions of an extensive gas-grain chemical disk model under conditions representative of T Tauri disks. Results: This survey provides 20 new detections of HCO+ in disks, 18 in HCN, 11 in C2H, 8 in CS, and 4 in SO. HCO+ is detected in almost all sources and its J = 3-2 line is essentially optically thick, providing good estimates of the disk radii. The other transitions are (at least partially) optically thin. Large variations of the column density ratios are observed, but do not correlate with any specific property of the star or disk. Disks around Herbig Ae stars appear less rich in molecules than those around T Tauri stars, although the sample remains small. SO is only found in the (presumably younger) embedded objects, perhaps reflecting an evolution of the S chemistry due to increasing depletion with time. Overall, the molecular column densities, and in particular the CN/HCN and CN/C2H ratios, are well reproduced by gas-grain chemistry in cold disks. Conclusions: This study provides a comprehensive census of simple molecules in disks of radii >200-300 au. Extending that to smaller disks, or searching for less

  18. An Extremely High Velocity Molecular Jet Surrounded by an Ionized Cavity in the Protostellar Source Serpens SMM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Charles L. H.; Girart, Josep M.; Kristensen, Lars E.; Dunham, Michael M.; Rodríguez-Kamenetzky, Adriana; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Cortés, Paulo C.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Plambeck, Richard L.

    2016-06-01

    We report Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of a one-sided, high-velocity (˜80 km s-1) CO(J = 2\\to 1) jet powered by the intermediate-mass protostellar source Serpens SMM1-a. The highly collimated molecular jet is flanked at the base by a wide-angle cavity; the walls of the cavity can be seen in both 4 cm free-free emission detected by the Very Large Array and 1.3 mm thermal dust emission detected by ALMA. This is the first time that ionization of an outflow cavity has been directly detected via free-free emission in a very young, embedded Class 0 protostellar source that is still powering a molecular jet. The cavity walls are ionized either by UV photons escaping from the accreting protostellar source or by the precessing molecular jet impacting the walls. These observations suggest that ionized outflow cavities may be common in Class 0 protostellar sources, shedding further light on the radiation, outflow, and jet environments in the youngest, most embedded forming stars.

  19. Diversity of Debris Disks - Constraining the Disk Outer Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George; Smith, Paul; Su, Kate

    2008-03-01

    Existing Spitzer observations of debris disks show a wide range of diversity in disk morphologies and spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The majority of debris disks observed with Spitzer are not resolved, resulting in very few direct constraints on disk extent. In general, SEDs alone have little diagnostic power beyond some basic statistics. However, as demonstrated by some Spitzer observations of nearby systems (beta Leo and gamma Oph), the spectra of the excess emission in the IRS and MIPS-SED wavelength range can help to put tighter constraints on disk properties such as minimum/maximum grain sizes and inner/outer disk radii. The dust continuum slopes are very useful to differentiate between various disk structures and constrain the dust mass. We need to study sufficient numbers of disks to explore their characteristics systematically. Therefore, we propose to obtain MIPS-SED observations of 27 debris disks that already have IRS-LL spectra and MIPS 24 and 70 micron photometry.

  20. SHADOWS CAST BY A WARP IN THE HD 142527 PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, S.; Perez, S.; Casassus, S.

    2015-01-10

    Detailed observations of gaps in protoplanetary disks have revealed structures that drive current research on circumstellar disks. One such feature is the two intensity nulls seen along the outer disk of the HD 142527 system, which are particularly well traced in polarized differential imaging. Here we propose that these are shadows cast by the inner disk. The inner and outer disk are thick, in terms of the unit-opacity surface in the H band, so that the shape and orientation of the shadows inform on the three-dimensional structure of the system. Radiative transfer predictions on a parametric disk model allow us to conclude that the relative inclination between the inner and outer disks is 70° ± 5°. This finding taps the potential of high-contrast imaging of circumstellar disks, and bears consequences on the gas dynamics of gapped disks, as well as on the physical conditions in the shadowed regions.

  1. High Temperature Spin Testing of a Superalloy Disk With a Dual Grain Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John; Kantzos, Pete

    2002-01-01

    Comparative spin tests were run on superalloy disks at an elevated temperature to determine the benefits of a DMHT disk, with a fine grain bore and coarse grain rim, versus a traditional subsolvus disk with a fine grain structure in the bore and rim. The results of these tests showed that the DMHT disk exhibited significantly lower growth at 1500 F. Further, the results of these tests could be accurately predicted using a 2D viscoelastic finite element analysis. These results indicate DMHT technology can be used to extend disk operating temperatures when compared to traditional subsolvus heat treatment options for superalloy disks. However, additional research is required to ensure the safe operation of a DMHT disk under more realistic engine operating conditions. This includes testing to determine the burst margin