Science.gov

Sample records for provide 3d information

  1. System to provide 3D information on geological anomaly zone in deep subsea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Kwon, O.; Kim, D.

    2017-12-01

    The study on building the ultra long and deep subsea tunnel of which length is 50km and depth is 200m at least, respectively, is underway in Korea. To analyze the geotechnical information required for designing and building subsea tunnel, topographic/geologiccal information analysis using 2D seabed geophysical prospecting and topographic, geologic, exploration and boring data were analyzed comprehensively and as a result, automation method to identify the geological structure zone under seabed which is needed to design the deep and long seabed tunnel was developed using geostatistical analysis. In addition, software using 3D visualized ground information to provide the information includes Gocad, MVS, Vulcan and DIMINE. This study is intended to analyze the geological anomaly zone for ultra deep seabed l and visualize the geological investigation result so as to develop the exclusive system for processing the ground investigation information which is convenient for the users. Particularly it's compatible depending on file of geophysical prospecting result and is realizable in Layer form and for 3D view as well. The data to be processed by 3D seabed information system includes (1) deep seabed topographic information, (2) geological anomaly zone, (3) geophysical prospecting, (4) boring investigation result and (5) 3D visualization of the section on seabed tunnel route. Each data has own characteristics depending on data and interface to allow interlocking with other data is granted. In each detail function, input data is displayed in a single space and each element is selectable to identify the further information as a project. Program creates the project when initially implemented and all output from detail information is stored by project unit. Each element representing detail information is stored in image file and is supported to store in text file as well. It also has the function to transfer, expand/reduce and rotate the model. To represent the all elements in

  2. Extending 3D city models with legal information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, A. U.; Fuhrmann, T.; Navratil, G.

    2012-10-01

    3D city models represent existing physical objects and their topological and functional relations. In everyday life the rights and responsibilities connected to these objects, primarily legally defined rights and obligations but also other socially and culturally established rights, are of importance. The rights and obligations are defined in various laws and it is often difficult to identify the rules applicable for a certain case. The existing 2D cadastres show civil law rights and obligations and plans to extend them to provide information about public law restrictions for land use are in several countries under way. It is tempting to design extensions to the 3D city models to provide information about legal rights in 3D. The paper analyses the different types of information that are needed to reduce conflicts and to facilitate decisions about land use. We identify the role 3D city models augmented with planning information in 3D can play, but do not advocate a general conversion from 2D to 3D for the legal cadastre. Space is not anisotropic and the up/down dimension is practically very different from the two dimensional plane - this difference must be respected when designing spatial information systems. The conclusions are: (1) continue the current regime for ownership of apartments, which is not ownership of a 3D volume, but co-ownership of a building with exclusive use of some rooms; such exclusive use rights could be shown in a 3D city model; (2) ownership of 3D volumes for complex and unusual building situations can be reported in a 3D city model, but are not required everywhere; (3) indicate restrictions for land use and building in 3D city models, with links to the legal sources.

  3. Remote Sensing Information Gateway (RSIG3D) Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Remote Sensing Information Gateway-3D (RSIG3D) is a free and downloadable application that provides easy and secure access to petabytes (millions of gigabytes) of atmospheric data that can be used to study complex air quality issues.

  4. A defocus-information-free autostereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) digital reconstruction method using direct extraction of disparity information (DEDI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Cheung, Chifai; Zhao, Xing; Ren, Mingjun; Zhang, Juan; Zhou, Liqiu

    2016-10-01

    Autostereoscopy based three-dimensional (3D) digital reconstruction has been widely applied in the field of medical science, entertainment, design, industrial manufacture, precision measurement and many other areas. The 3D digital model of the target can be reconstructed based on the series of two-dimensional (2D) information acquired by the autostereoscopic system, which consists multiple lens and can provide information of the target from multiple angles. This paper presents a generalized and precise autostereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) digital reconstruction method based on Direct Extraction of Disparity Information (DEDI) which can be used to any transform autostereoscopic systems and provides accurate 3D reconstruction results through error elimination process based on statistical analysis. The feasibility of DEDI method has been successfully verified through a series of optical 3D digital reconstruction experiments on different autostereoscopic systems which is highly efficient to perform the direct full 3D digital model construction based on tomography-like operation upon every depth plane with the exclusion of the defocused information. With the absolute focused information processed by DEDI method, the 3D digital model of the target can be directly and precisely formed along the axial direction with the depth information.

  5. The National 3-D Geospatial Information Web-Based Service of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. T.; Kim, C. W.; Kang, I. G.

    2013-09-01

    3D geospatial information systems should provide efficient spatial analysis tools and able to use all capabilities of the third dimension, and a visualization. Currently, many human activities make steps toward the third dimension like land use, urban and landscape planning, cadastre, environmental monitoring, transportation monitoring, real estate market, military applications, etc. To reflect this trend, the Korean government has been started to construct the 3D geospatial data and service platform. Since the geospatial information was introduced in Korea, the construction of geospatial information (3D geospatial information, digital maps, aerial photographs, ortho photographs, etc.) has been led by the central government. The purpose of this study is to introduce the Korean government-lead 3D geospatial information web-based service for the people who interested in this industry and we would like to introduce not only the present conditions of constructed 3D geospatial data but methodologies and applications of 3D geospatial information. About 15% (about 3,278.74 km2) of the total urban area's 3D geospatial data have been constructed by the national geographic information institute (NGII) of Korea from 2005 to 2012. Especially in six metropolitan cities and Dokdo (island belongs to Korea) on level of detail (LOD) 4 which is photo-realistic textured 3D models including corresponding ortho photographs were constructed in 2012. In this paper, we represented web-based 3D map service system composition and infrastructure and comparison of V-world with Google Earth service will be presented. We also represented Open API based service cases and discussed about the protection of location privacy when we construct 3D indoor building models. In order to prevent an invasion of privacy, we processed image blurring, elimination and camouflage. The importance of public-private cooperation and advanced geospatial information policy is emphasized in Korea. Thus, the progress of

  6. Classification of Informal Settlements Through the Integration of 2d and 3d Features Extracted from Uav Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevaert, C. M.; Persello, C.; Sliuzas, R.; Vosselman, G.

    2016-06-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are capable of providing very high resolution and up-to-date information to support informal settlement upgrading projects. In order to provide accurate basemaps, urban scene understanding through the identification and classification of buildings and terrain is imperative. However, common characteristics of informal settlements such as small, irregular buildings with heterogeneous roof material and large presence of clutter challenge state-of-the-art algorithms. Especially the dense buildings and steeply sloped terrain cause difficulties in identifying elevated objects. This work investigates how 2D radiometric and textural features, 2.5D topographic features, and 3D geometric features obtained from UAV imagery can be integrated to obtain a high classification accuracy in challenging classification problems for the analysis of informal settlements. It compares the utility of pixel-based and segment-based features obtained from an orthomosaic and DSM with point-based and segment-based features extracted from the point cloud to classify an unplanned settlement in Kigali, Rwanda. Findings show that the integration of 2D and 3D features leads to higher classification accuracies.

  7. 3D foot shape generation from 2D information.

    PubMed

    Luximon, Ameersing; Goonetilleke, Ravindra S; Zhang, Ming

    2005-05-15

    Two methods to generate an individual 3D foot shape from 2D information are proposed. A standard foot shape was first generated and then scaled based on known 2D information. In the first method, the foot outline and the foot height were used, and in the second, the foot outline and the foot profile were used. The models were developed using 40 participants and then validated using a different set of 40 participants. Results show that each individual foot shape can be predicted within a mean absolute error of 1.36 mm for the left foot and 1.37 mm for the right foot using the first method, and within a mean absolute error of 1.02 mm for the left foot and 1.02 mm for the right foot using the second method. The second method shows somewhat improved accuracy even though it requires two images. Both the methods are relatively cheaper than using a scanner to determine the 3D foot shape for custom footwear design.

  8. A web-based 3D geological information visualization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Renbo; Jiang, Nan

    2013-03-01

    Construction of 3D geological visualization system has attracted much more concern in GIS, computer modeling, simulation and visualization fields. It not only can effectively help geological interpretation and analysis work, but also can it can help leveling up geosciences professional education. In this paper, an applet-based method was introduced for developing a web-based 3D geological information visualization system. The main aims of this paper are to explore a rapid and low-cost development method for constructing a web-based 3D geological system. First, the borehole data stored in Excel spreadsheets was extracted and then stored in SQLSERVER database of a web server. Second, the JDBC data access component was utilized for providing the capability of access the database. Third, the user interface was implemented with applet component embedded in JSP page and the 3D viewing and querying functions were implemented with PickCanvas of Java3D. Last, the borehole data acquired from geological survey were used for test the system, and the test results has shown that related methods of this paper have a certain application values.

  9. Multivoxel Pattern Analysis Reveals 3D Place Information in the Human Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Misun; Jeffery, Kate J; Maguire, Eleanor A

    2017-04-19

    environment and found that the anterior hippocampus (HC) expressed location information that was sensitive to the vertical and horizontal axes. In contrast, information about heading direction, found in retrosplenial cortex and posterior HC, favored the vertical axis, perhaps due to gravity effects. These findings provide new insights into how we represent our spatial 3D world and navigate within it. Copyright © 2017 Kim et al.

  10. Quon 3D language for quantum information

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhengwei; Wozniakowski, Alex; Jaffe, Arthur M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a 3D topological picture-language for quantum information. Our approach combines charged excitations carried by strings, with topological properties that arise from embedding the strings in the interior of a 3D manifold with boundary. A quon is a composite that acts as a particle. Specifically, a quon is a hemisphere containing a neutral pair of open strings with opposite charge. We interpret multiquons and their transformations in a natural way. We obtain a type of relation, a string–genus “joint relation,” involving both a string and the 3D manifold. We use the joint relation to obtain a topological interpretation of the C∗-Hopf algebra relations, which are widely used in tensor networks. We obtain a 3D representation of the controlled NOT (CNOT) gate that is considerably simpler than earlier work, and a 3D topological protocol for teleportation. PMID:28167790

  11. Extracting 3D Information from 1D and 2D Diagnostic Systems on the DIII-D Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookman, Michael

    2017-10-01

    The interpretation of tokamak data often hinges on assumptions of axisymetry and flux surface equilibria, neglecting 3D effects. This work discusses examples on the DIII-D tokamak where this assumption is an insufficient approximation, and explores the diagnostic information available to resolve 3D effects while preserving 1D profiles. Methods for extracting 3D data from the electron cyclotron emission radiometers, density profile reflectometer, and Thomson scattering system are discussed. Coordinating diagnostics around the tokamak shows the significance of 3D features, such as sawteeth[1] and resonant magnetic perturbations. A consequence of imposed 3D perturbations is a shift in major radius of measured profiles between diagnostics at different toroidal locations. Integrating different diagnostics requires a database containing information about their toroidal, poloidal, and radial locations. Through the data analysis framework OMFIT, it is possible to measure the magnitude of the apparent shifts from 3D effects and enforce consistency between diagnostics. Using the existing 1D and 2D diagnostic systems on DIII-D, this process allows the effects of the 3D perturbations on 1D profiles to be addressed. Supported by US DOE contracts DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG03-97ER54415.

  12. Forecasting and visualization of wildfires in a 3D geographical information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrillón, M.; Jorge, P. A.; López, I. J.; Macías, A.; Martín, D.; Nebot, R. J.; Sabbagh, I.; Quintana, F. M.; Sánchez, J.; Sánchez, A. J.; Suárez, J. P.; Trujillo, A.

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes a wildfire forecasting application based on a 3D virtual environment and a fire simulation engine. A novel open-source framework is presented for the development of 3D graphics applications over large geographic areas, offering high performance 3D visualization and powerful interaction tools for the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) community. The application includes a remote module that allows simultaneous connections of several users for monitoring a real wildfire event. The system is able to make a realistic composition of what is really happening in the area of the wildfire with dynamic 3D objects and location of human and material resources in real time, providing a new perspective to analyze the wildfire information. The user is enabled to simulate and visualize the propagation of a fire on the terrain integrating at the same time spatial information on topography and vegetation types with weather and wind data. The application communicates with a remote web service that is in charge of the simulation task. The user may specify several parameters through a friendly interface before the application sends the information to the remote server responsible of carrying out the wildfire forecasting using the FARSITE simulation model. During the process, the server connects to different external resources to obtain up-to-date meteorological data. The client application implements a realistic 3D visualization of the fire evolution on the landscape. A Level Of Detail (LOD) strategy contributes to improve the performance of the visualization system.

  13. Technology and application of 3D tunnel information monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changqing; Deng, Hongliang; Chen, Ge; Wang, Simiao; Guo, Yang; Wu, Shenglin

    2015-12-01

    It is very necessary that Implement information monitoring and dynamic construction because of Complex geological environment and lack of basic information in the process of tunnel construction. The monitoring results show that 3 d laser scanning technology and information management system has important theoretical significance and application value to ensure the safety of tunnel construction, rich construction theory and technology. It can be known in real time the deformation information and the construction information in near tunnel workplace and the whole tunnel section in real time. In the meantime, it can be known the deformation regularity in the tunnel excavation process and the early warning and forecasting in the form of graphic and data. In order to determine the reasonable time and provide basis for supporting parameters and lining.

  14. Recognizing an individual face: 3D shape contributes earlier than 2D surface reflectance information.

    PubMed

    Caharel, Stéphanie; Jiang, Fang; Blanz, Volker; Rossion, Bruno

    2009-10-01

    The human brain recognizes faces by means of two main diagnostic sources of information: three-dimensional (3D) shape and two-dimensional (2D) surface reflectance. Here we used event-related potentials (ERPs) in a face adaptation paradigm to examine the time-course of processing for these two types of information. With a 3D morphable model, we generated pairs of faces that were either identical, varied in 3D shape only, in 2D surface reflectance only, or in both. Sixteen human observers discriminated individual faces in these 4 types of pairs, in which a first (adapting) face was followed shortly by a second (test) face. Behaviorally, observers were as accurate and as fast for discriminating individual faces based on either 3D shape or 2D surface reflectance alone, but were faster when both sources of information were present. As early as the face-sensitive N170 component (approximately 160 ms following the test face), there was larger amplitude for changes in 3D shape relative to the repetition of the same face, especially over the right occipito-temporal electrodes. However, changes in 2D reflectance between the adapter and target face did not increase the N170 amplitude. At about 250 ms, both 3D shape and 2D reflectance contributed equally, and the largest difference in amplitude compared to the repetition of the same face was found when both 3D shape and 2D reflectance were combined, in line with observers' behavior. These observations indicate that evidence to recognize individual faces accumulate faster in the right hemisphere human visual cortex from diagnostic 3D shape information than from 2D surface reflectance information.

  15. 2D/3D facial feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çinar Akakin, Hatice; Ali Salah, Albert; Akarun, Lale; Sankur, Bülent

    2006-02-01

    We propose and compare three different automatic landmarking methods for near-frontal faces. The face information is provided as 480x640 gray-level images in addition to the corresponding 3D scene depth information. All three methods follow a coarse-to-fine suite and use the 3D information in an assist role. The first method employs a combination of principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA) features to analyze the Gabor feature set. The second method uses a subset of DCT coefficients for template-based matching. These two methods employ SVM classifiers with polynomial kernel functions. The third method uses a mixture of factor analyzers to learn Gabor filter outputs. We contrast the localization performance separately with 2D texture and 3D depth information. Although the 3D depth information per se does not perform as well as texture images in landmark localization, the 3D information has still a beneficial role in eliminating the background and the false alarms.

  16. Evaluation of the 3d Urban Modelling Capabilities in Geographical Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogru, A. O.; Seker, D. Z.

    2010-12-01

    Geographical Information System (GIS) Technology, which provides successful solutions to basic spatial problems, is currently widely used in 3 dimensional (3D) modeling of physical reality with its developing visualization tools. The modeling of large and complicated phenomenon is a challenging problem in terms of computer graphics currently in use. However, it is possible to visualize that phenomenon in 3D by using computer systems. 3D models are used in developing computer games, military training, urban planning, tourism and etc. The use of 3D models for planning and management of urban areas is very popular issue of city administrations. In this context, 3D City models are produced and used for various purposes. However the requirements of the models vary depending on the type and scope of the application. While a high level visualization, where photorealistic visualization techniques are widely used, is required for touristy and recreational purposes, an abstract visualization of the physical reality is generally sufficient for the communication of the thematic information. The visual variables, which are the principle components of cartographic visualization, such as: color, shape, pattern, orientation, size, position, and saturation are used for communicating the thematic information. These kinds of 3D city models are called as abstract models. Standardization of technologies used for 3D modeling is now available by the use of CityGML. CityGML implements several novel concepts to support interoperability, consistency and functionality. For example it supports different Levels-of-Detail (LoD), which may arise from independent data collection processes and are used for efficient visualization and efficient data analysis. In one CityGML data set, the same object may be represented in different LoD simultaneously, enabling the analysis and visualization of the same object with regard to different degrees of resolution. Furthermore, two CityGML data sets

  17. Designing stereoscopic information visualization for 3D-TV: What can we can learn from S3D gaming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    This paper explores graphical design and spatial alignment of visual information and graphical elements into stereoscopically filmed content, e.g. captions, subtitles, and especially more complex elements in 3D-TV productions. The method used is a descriptive analysis of existing computer- and video games that have been adapted for stereoscopic display using semi-automatic rendering techniques (e.g. Nvidia 3D Vision) or games which have been specifically designed for stereoscopic vision. Digital games often feature compelling visual interfaces that combine high usability with creative visual design. We explore selected examples of game interfaces in stereoscopic vision regarding their stereoscopic characteristics, how they draw attention, how we judge effect and comfort and where the interfaces fail. As a result, we propose a list of five aspects which should be considered when designing stereoscopic visual information: explicit information, implicit information, spatial reference, drawing attention, and vertical alignment. We discuss possible consequences, opportunities and challenges for integrating visual information elements into 3D-TV content. This work shall further help to improve current editing systems and identifies a need for future editing systems for 3DTV, e.g., live editing and real-time alignment of visual information into 3D footage.

  18. RGB-D SLAM Based on Extended Bundle Adjustment with 2D and 3D Information

    PubMed Central

    Di, Kaichang; Zhao, Qiang; Wan, Wenhui; Wang, Yexin; Gao, Yunjun

    2016-01-01

    In the study of SLAM problem using an RGB-D camera, depth information and visual information as two types of primary measurement data are rarely tightly coupled during refinement of camera pose estimation. In this paper, a new method of RGB-D camera SLAM is proposed based on extended bundle adjustment with integrated 2D and 3D information on the basis of a new projection model. First, the geometric relationship between the image plane coordinates and the depth values is constructed through RGB-D camera calibration. Then, 2D and 3D feature points are automatically extracted and matched between consecutive frames to build a continuous image network. Finally, extended bundle adjustment based on the new projection model, which takes both image and depth measurements into consideration, is applied to the image network for high-precision pose estimation. Field experiments show that the proposed method has a notably better performance than the traditional method, and the experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in improving localization accuracy. PMID:27529256

  19. G.O.THERM.3D - Providing a 3D Atlas of Temperature in Ireland's Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Thomas; Fullea, Javier

    2017-04-01

    Ireland, LitMod3D models the crust as two fixed homogenous layers with laterally constant physical properties (upper-middle crust and lower crust). G.O.THERM.3D proposes to adapt the LitMod3D tool to model the heterogeneous nature of the crust, e.g. the variable distribution of heat production and the variation of thermal conductivity with lithology and temperature, with an appropriate lateral and vertical resolution. The thermal modelling process will also employ palaeoclimate-corrected heat-flow and other available complementary data sets (e.g. seismic, magnetic, radiometric and electromagnetic). Existing and emerging lithospheric-regional temperature models will be used to apply thermal boundary conditions to the crustal model of G.O.THERM.3D. The resulting crustal temperature model of G.O.THERM.3D may in turn be used to provide boundary conditions on more focussed modelling on a shallower scale (e.g. within a sedimentary basin to depths of 5 km). In this way, a nested approach can be adopted to model compositional and thermal structures on various scales and resolutions within the crust (subject to the availability of appropriate data), while maintaining consistency with the wider setting. G.O.THERM.3D will also make additional thermal conductivity measurements, the primary motivation for which being the critical importance of thermal conductivity data in constraining temperature modelling.

  20. 3D Image Display Courses for Information Media Students.

    PubMed

    Yanaka, Kazuhisa; Yamanouchi, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional displays are used extensively in movies and games. These displays are also essential in mixed reality, where virtual and real spaces overlap. Therefore, engineers and creators should be trained to master 3D display technologies. For this reason, the Department of Information Media at the Kanagawa Institute of Technology has launched two 3D image display courses specifically designed for students who aim to become information media engineers and creators.

  1. D Web Visualization of Environmental Information - Integration of Heterogeneous Data Sources when Providing Navigation and Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, L.; Řezník, T.

    2015-08-01

    3D information is essential for a number of applications used daily in various domains such as crisis management, energy management, urban planning, and cultural heritage, as well as pollution and noise mapping, etc. This paper is devoted to the issue of 3D modelling from the levels of buildings to cities. The theoretical sections comprise an analysis of cartographic principles for the 3D visualization of spatial data as well as a review of technologies and data formats used in the visualization of 3D models. Emphasis was placed on the verification of available web technologies; for example, X3DOM library was chosen for the implementation of a proof-of-concept web application. The created web application displays a 3D model of the city district of Nový Lískovec in Brno, the Czech Republic. The developed 3D visualization shows a terrain model, 3D buildings, noise pollution, and other related information. Attention was paid to the areas important for handling heterogeneous input data, the design of interactive functionality, and navigation assistants. The advantages, limitations, and future development of the proposed concept are discussed in the conclusions.

  2. Mapping detailed 3D information onto high resolution SAR signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglberger, H.; Speck, R.

    2017-05-01

    Due to challenges in the visual interpretation of radar signatures or in the subsequent information extraction, a fusion with other data sources can be beneficial. The most accurate basis for a fusion of any kind of remote sensing data is the mapping of the acquired 2D image space onto the true 3D geometry of the scenery. In the case of radar images this is a challenging task because the coordinate system is based on the measured range which causes ambiguous regions due to layover effects. This paper describes a method that accurately maps the detailed 3D information of a scene to the slantrange-based coordinate system of imaging radars. Due to this mapping all the contributing geometrical parts of one resolution cell can be determined in 3D space. The proposed method is highly efficient, because computationally expensive operations can be directly performed on graphics card hardware. The described approach builds a perfect basis for sophisticated methods to extract data from multiple complimentary sensors like from radar and optical images, especially because true 3D information from whole cities will be available in the near future. The performance of the developed methods will be demonstrated with high resolution radar data acquired by the space-borne SAR-sensor TerraSAR-X.

  3. 3D microwave tomography of the breast using prior anatomical information

    SciTech Connect

    Golnabi, Amir H., E-mail: golnabia@montclair.edu; Meaney, Paul M.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: The authors have developed a new 3D breast image reconstruction technique that utilizes the soft tissue spatial resolution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and integrates the dielectric property differentiation from microwave imaging to produce a dual modality approach with the goal of augmenting the specificity of MR imaging, possibly without the need for nonspecific contrast agents. The integration is performed through the application of a soft prior regularization which imports segmented geometric meshes generated from MR exams and uses it to constrain the microwave tomography algorithm to recover nearly uniform property distributions within segmented regions with sharp delineation betweenmore » these internal subzones. Methods: Previous investigations have demonstrated that this approach is effective in 2D simulation and phantom experiments and also in clinical exams. The current study extends the algorithm to 3D and provides a thorough analysis of the sensitivity and robustness to misalignment errors in size and location between the spatial prior information and the actual data. Results: Image results in 3D were not strongly dependent on reconstruction mesh density, and the changes of less than 30% in recovered property values arose from variations of more than 125% in target region size—an outcome which was more robust than in 2D. Similarly, changes of less than 13% occurred in the 3D image results from variations in target location of nearly 90% of the inclusion size. Permittivity and conductivity errors were about 5 times and 2 times smaller, respectively, with the 3D spatial prior algorithm in actual phantom experiments than those which occurred without priors. Conclusions: The presented study confirms that the incorporation of structural information in the form of a soft constraint can considerably improve the accuracy of the property estimates in predefined regions of interest. These findings are encouraging and establish a strong

  4. Effective 3-D surface modeling for geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüksek, K.; Alparslan, M.; Mendi, E.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we propose a dynamic, flexible and interactive urban digital terrain platform (DTP) with spatial data and query processing capabilities of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), multimedia database functionality and graphical modeling infrastructure. A new data element, called Geo-Node, which stores image, spatial data and 3-D CAD objects is developed using an efficient data structure. The system effectively handles data transfer of Geo-Nodes between main memory and secondary storage with an optimized Directional Replacement Policy (DRP) based buffer management scheme. Polyhedron structures are used in Digital Surface Modeling (DSM) and smoothing process is performed by interpolation. The experimental results show that our framework achieves high performance and works effectively with urban scenes independent from the amount of spatial data and image size. The proposed platform may contribute to the development of various applications such as Web GIS systems based on 3-D graphics standards (e.g. X3-D and VRML) and services which integrate multi-dimensional spatial information and satellite/aerial imagery.

  5. Effective 3-D surface modeling for geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüksek, K.; Alparslan, M.; Mendi, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we propose a dynamic, flexible and interactive urban digital terrain platform with spatial data and query processing capabilities of geographic information systems, multimedia database functionality and graphical modeling infrastructure. A new data element, called Geo-Node, which stores image, spatial data and 3-D CAD objects is developed using an efficient data structure. The system effectively handles data transfer of Geo-Nodes between main memory and secondary storage with an optimized directional replacement policy (DRP) based buffer management scheme. Polyhedron structures are used in digital surface modeling and smoothing process is performed by interpolation. The experimental results show that our framework achieves high performance and works effectively with urban scenes independent from the amount of spatial data and image size. The proposed platform may contribute to the development of various applications such as Web GIS systems based on 3-D graphics standards (e.g., X3-D and VRML) and services which integrate multi-dimensional spatial information and satellite/aerial imagery.

  6. Photometry unlocks 3D information from 2D localization microscopy data.

    PubMed

    Franke, Christian; Sauer, Markus; van de Linde, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    We developed a straightforward photometric method, temporal, radial-aperture-based intensity estimation (TRABI), that allows users to extract 3D information from existing 2D localization microscopy data. TRABI uses the accurate determination of photon numbers in different regions of the emission pattern of single emitters to generate a z-dependent photometric parameter. This method can determine fluorophore positions up to 600 nm from the focal plane and can be combined with biplane detection to further improve axial localization.

  7. The NIH 3D Print Exchange: A Public Resource for Bioscientific and Biomedical 3D Prints.

    PubMed

    Coakley, Meghan F; Hurt, Darrell E; Weber, Nick; Mtingwa, Makazi; Fincher, Erin C; Alekseyev, Vsevelod; Chen, David T; Yun, Alvin; Gizaw, Metasebia; Swan, Jeremy; Yoo, Terry S; Huyen, Yentram

    2014-09-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has launched the NIH 3D Print Exchange, an online portal for discovering and creating bioscientifically relevant 3D models suitable for 3D printing, to provide both researchers and educators with a trusted source to discover accurate and informative models. There are a number of online resources for 3D prints, but there is a paucity of scientific models, and the expertise required to generate and validate such models remains a barrier. The NIH 3D Print Exchange fills this gap by providing novel, web-based tools that empower users with the ability to create ready-to-print 3D files from molecular structure data, microscopy image stacks, and computed tomography scan data. The NIH 3D Print Exchange facilitates open data sharing in a community-driven environment, and also includes various interactive features, as well as information and tutorials on 3D modeling software. As the first government-sponsored website dedicated to 3D printing, the NIH 3D Print Exchange is an important step forward to bringing 3D printing to the mainstream for scientific research and education.

  8. Acquisition of 3d Information for Vanished Structure by Using Only AN Ancient Picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunii, Y.; Sakamoto, R.

    2016-06-01

    In order to acquire 3D information for reconstruction of vanished historical structure, grasp of 3D shape of such structure was attempted by using an ancient picture. Generally, 3D information of a structure is acquired by photogrammetric theory which requires two or more pictures. This paper clarifies that the geometrical information of the structure was obtained only from an ancient picture, and 3D information was acquired. This kind of method was applied for an ancient picture of the Old Imperial Theatre. The Old Imperial Theatre in the picture is constituted by two-point perspective. Therefore, estimated value of focal length of camera, length of camera to the Old Imperial Theatre and some parameters were calculated by estimation of field angle, using body height as an index of length and some geometrical information. Consequently, 3D coordinate of 120 measurement points on the surface of the Old Imperial Theatre were calculated respectively, and 3DCG modeling of the Old Imperial Theatre was realized.

  9. 3D-printed upper limb prostheses: a review.

    PubMed

    Ten Kate, Jelle; Smit, Gerwin; Breedveld, Paul

    2017-04-01

    This paper aims to provide an overview with quantitative information of existing 3D-printed upper limb prostheses. We will identify the benefits and drawbacks of 3D-printed devices to enable improvement of current devices based on the demands of prostheses users. A review was performed using Scopus, Web of Science and websites related to 3D-printing. Quantitative information on the mechanical and kinematic specifications and 3D-printing technology used was extracted from the papers and websites. The overview (58 devices) provides the general specifications, the mechanical and kinematic specifications of the devices and information regarding the 3D-printing technology used for hands. The overview shows prostheses for all different upper limb amputation levels with different types of control and a maximum material cost of $500. A large range of various prostheses have been 3D-printed, of which the majority are used by children. Evidence with respect to the user acceptance, functionality and durability of the 3D-printed hands is lacking. Contrary to what is often claimed, 3D-printing is not necessarily cheap, e.g., injection moulding can be cheaper. Conversely, 3D-printing provides a promising possibility for individualization, e.g., personalized socket, colour, shape and size, without the need for adjusting the production machine. Implications for rehabilitation Upper limb deficiency is a condition in which a part of the upper limb is missing as a result of a congenital limb deficiency of as a result of an amputation. A prosthetic hand can restore some of the functions of a missing limb and help the user in performing activities of daily living. Using 3D-printing technology is one of the solutions to manufacture hand prostheses. This overview provides information about the general, mechanical and kinematic specifications of all the devices and it provides the information about the 3D-printing technology used to print the hands.

  10. 3D interactive surgical visualization system using mobile spatial information acquisition and autostereoscopic display.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhencheng; Weng, Yitong; Chen, Guowen; Liao, Hongen

    2017-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) visualization of preoperative and intraoperative medical information becomes more and more important in minimally invasive surgery. We develop a 3D interactive surgical visualization system using mobile spatial information acquisition and autostereoscopic display for surgeons to observe surgical target intuitively. The spatial information of regions of interest (ROIs) is captured by the mobile device and transferred to a server for further image processing. Triangular patches of intraoperative data with texture are calculated with a dimension-reduced triangulation algorithm and a projection-weighted mapping algorithm. A point cloud selection-based warm-start iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm is also developed for fusion of the reconstructed 3D intraoperative image and the preoperative image. The fusion images are rendered for 3D autostereoscopic display using integral videography (IV) technology. Moreover, 3D visualization of medical image corresponding to observer's viewing direction is updated automatically using mutual information registration method. Experimental results show that the spatial position error between the IV-based 3D autostereoscopic fusion image and the actual object was 0.38±0.92mm (n=5). The system can be utilized in telemedicine, operating education, surgical planning, navigation, etc. to acquire spatial information conveniently and display surgical information intuitively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Using flow information to support 3D vessel reconstruction from rotational angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Waechter, Irina; Bredno, Joerg; Weese, Juergen

    2008-07-15

    For the assessment of cerebrovascular diseases, it is beneficial to obtain three-dimensional (3D) morphologic and hemodynamic information about the vessel system. Rotational angiography is routinely used to image the 3D vascular geometry and we have shown previously that rotational subtraction angiography has the potential to also give quantitative information about blood flow. Flow information can be determined when the angiographic sequence shows inflow and possibly outflow of contrast agent. However, a standard volume reconstruction assumes that the vessel tree is uniformly filled with contrast agent during the whole acquisition. If this is not the case, the reconstruction exhibits artifacts. Here,more » we show how flow information can be used to support the reconstruction of the 3D vessel centerline and radii in this case. Our method uses the fast marching algorithm to determine the order in which voxels are analyzed. For every voxel, the rotational time intensity curve (R-TIC) is determined from the image intensities at the projection points of the current voxel. Next, the bolus arrival time of the contrast agent at the voxel is estimated from the R-TIC. Then, a measure of the intensity and duration of the enhancement is determined, from which a speed value is calculated that steers the propagation of the fast marching algorithm. The results of the fast marching algorithm are used to determine the 3D centerline by backtracking. The 3D radius is reconstructed from 2D radius estimates on the projection images. The proposed method was tested on computer simulated rotational angiography sequences with systematically varied x-ray acquisition, blood flow, and contrast agent injection parameters and on datasets from an experimental setup using an anthropomorphic cerebrovascular phantom. For the computer simulation, the mean absolute error of the 3D centerline and 3D radius estimation was 0.42 and 0.25 mm, respectively. For the experimental datasets, the mean

  12. Modeling ECM fiber formation: structure information extracted by analysis of 2D and 3D image sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L.; Filmer, David L.; Hoffman, Christoph M.; Yuan, Bo; Chiang, Ching-Shoei; Sturgis, Jennis; Robinson, Joseph P.

    2002-05-01

    Recent evidence supports the notion that biological functions of extracellular matrix (ECM) are highly correlated to its structure. Understanding this fibrous structure is very crucial in tissue engineering to develop the next generation of biomaterials for restoration of tissues and organs. In this paper, we integrate confocal microscopy imaging and image-processing techniques to analyze the structural properties of ECM. We describe a 2D fiber middle-line tracing algorithm and apply it via Euclidean distance maps (EDM) to extract accurate fibrous structure information, such as fiber diameter, length, orientation, and density, from single slices. Based on a 2D tracing algorithm, we extend our analysis to 3D tracing via Euclidean distance maps to extract 3D fibrous structure information. We use computer simulation to construct the 3D fibrous structure which is subsequently used to test our tracing algorithms. After further image processing, these models are then applied to a variety of ECM constructions from which results of 2D and 3D traces are statistically analyzed.

  13. Face recognition using 3D facial shape and color map information: comparison and combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godil, Afzal; Ressler, Sandy; Grother, Patrick

    2004-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of 3D surface geometry for face recognition and compare it to one based on color map information. The 3D surface and color map data are from the CAESAR anthropometric database. We find that the recognition performance is not very different between 3D surface and color map information using a principal component analysis algorithm. We also discuss the different techniques for the combination of the 3D surface and color map information for multi-modal recognition by using different fusion approaches and show that there is significant improvement in results. The effectiveness of various techniques is compared and evaluated on a dataset with 200 subjects in two different positions.

  14. bioWeb3D: an online webGL 3D data visualisation tool

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Data visualization is critical for interpreting biological data. However, in practice it can prove to be a bottleneck for non trained researchers; this is especially true for three dimensional (3D) data representation. Whilst existing software can provide all necessary functionalities to represent and manipulate biological 3D datasets, very few are easily accessible (browser based), cross platform and accessible to non-expert users. Results An online HTML5/WebGL based 3D visualisation tool has been developed to allow biologists to quickly and easily view interactive and customizable three dimensional representations of their data along with multiple layers of information. Using the WebGL library Three.js written in Javascript, bioWeb3D allows the simultaneous visualisation of multiple large datasets inputted via a simple JSON, XML or CSV file, which can be read and analysed locally thanks to HTML5 capabilities. Conclusions Using basic 3D representation techniques in a technologically innovative context, we provide a program that is not intended to compete with professional 3D representation software, but that instead enables a quick and intuitive representation of reasonably large 3D datasets. PMID:23758781

  15. bioWeb3D: an online webGL 3D data visualisation tool.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Jean-Baptiste; Marioni, John C

    2013-06-07

    Data visualization is critical for interpreting biological data. However, in practice it can prove to be a bottleneck for non trained researchers; this is especially true for three dimensional (3D) data representation. Whilst existing software can provide all necessary functionalities to represent and manipulate biological 3D datasets, very few are easily accessible (browser based), cross platform and accessible to non-expert users. An online HTML5/WebGL based 3D visualisation tool has been developed to allow biologists to quickly and easily view interactive and customizable three dimensional representations of their data along with multiple layers of information. Using the WebGL library Three.js written in Javascript, bioWeb3D allows the simultaneous visualisation of multiple large datasets inputted via a simple JSON, XML or CSV file, which can be read and analysed locally thanks to HTML5 capabilities. Using basic 3D representation techniques in a technologically innovative context, we provide a program that is not intended to compete with professional 3D representation software, but that instead enables a quick and intuitive representation of reasonably large 3D datasets.

  16. Extra dimensions: 3D in PDF documentation

    DOE PAGES

    Graf, Norman A.

    2011-01-11

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universalmore » 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. Furthermore, we demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.« less

  17. Methodological development of topographic correction in 2D/3D ToF-SIMS images using AFM images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seokwon; Lee, Nodo; Choi, Myungshin; Lee, Jungmin; Cho, Eunkyunng; Joo, Minho

    2018-02-01

    Time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is an emerging technique that provides chemical information directly from the surface of electronic materials, e.g. OLED and solar cell. It is very versatile and highly sensitive mass spectrometric technique that provides surface molecular information with their lateral distribution as a two-dimensional (2D) molecular image. Extending the usefulness of ToF-SIMS, a 3D molecular image can be generated by acquiring multiple 2D images in a stack. These imaging techniques by ToF-SIMS provide an insight into understanding the complex structures of unknown composition in electronic material. However, one drawback in ToF-SIMS is not able to represent topographical information in 2D and 3D mapping images. To overcome this technical limitation, topographic information by ex-situ technique such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been combined with chemical information from SIMS that provides both chemical and physical information in one image. The key to combine two different images obtained from ToF-SIMS and AFM techniques is to develop the image processing algorithm, which performs resize and alignment by comparing the specific pixel information of each image. In this work, we present methodological development of the semiautomatic alignment and the 3D structure interpolation system for the combination of 2D/3D images obtained by ToF-SIMS and AFM measurements, which allows providing useful analytical information in a single representation.

  18. Ground and Aerial Digital Documentation of Cultural Heritage: Providing Tools for 3d Exploitation of Archaeological Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantoro, G.

    2017-02-01

    Archaeology is by its nature strictly connected with the physical landscape and as such it explores the inter-relations of individuals with places in which they leave and the nature that surrounds them. Since its earliest stages, archaeology demonstrated its permeability to scientific methods and innovative techniques or technologies. Archaeologists were indeed between the first to adopt GIS platforms (since already almost three decades) on large scale and are now between the most demanding customers for emerging technologies such as digital photogrammetry and drone-aided aerial photography. This paper aims at presenting case studies where the "3D approach" can be critically analysed and compared with more traditional means of documentation. Spot-light is directed towards the benefits of a specifically designed platform for user to access the 3D point-clouds and explore their characteristics. Beside simple measuring and editing tools, models are presented in their actual context and location, with historical and archaeological information provided on the side. As final step of a parallel project on geo-referencing and making available a large archive of aerial photographs, 3D models derived from photogrammetric processing of images have been uploaded and linked to photo-footprints polygons. Of great importance in such context is the possibility to interchange the point-cloud colours with satellite imagery from OpenLayers. This approach makes it possible to explore different landscape configurations due to time-changes with simple clicks. In these cases, photogrammetry or 3D laser scanning replaced, sided or integrated legacy documentation, creating at once a new set of information for forthcoming research and ideally new discoveries.

  19. Provider Recommendations in the Face of Scientific Uncertainty: An Analysis of Audio-Recorded Discussions about Vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Tarn, Derjung M; Paterniti, Debora A; Wenger, Neil S

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about how providers communicate recommendations when scientific uncertainty exists. To compare provider recommendations to those in the scientific literature, with a focus on whether uncertainty was communicated. Qualitative (inductive systematic content analysis) and quantitative analysis of previously collected audio-recorded provider-patient office visits. Sixty-one providers and a socio-economically diverse convenience sample of 603 of their patients from outpatient community- and academic-based primary care, integrative medicine, and complementary and alternative medicine provider offices in Southern California. Comparison of provider information-giving about vitamin D to professional guidelines and scientific information for which conflicting recommendations or insufficient scientific evidence exists; certainty with which information was conveyed. Ninety-two (15.3 %) of 603 visit discussions touched upon issues related to vitamin D testing, management and benefits. Vitamin D deficiency screening was discussed with 23 (25 %) patients, the definition of vitamin D deficiency with 21 (22.8 %), the optimal range for vitamin D levels with 26 (28.3 %), vitamin D supplementation dosing with 50 (54.3 %), and benefits of supplementation with 46 (50 %). For each of the professional guidelines/scientific information examined, providers conveyed information that deviated from professional guidelines and the existing scientific evidence. Of 166 statements made about vitamin D in this study, providers conveyed 160 (96.4 %) with certainty, without mention of any equivocal or contradictory evidence in the scientific literature. No uncertainty was mentioned when vitamin D dosing was discussed, even when recommended dosing was higher than guideline recommendations. Providers convey the vast majority of information and recommendations about vitamin D with certainty, even though the scientific literature contains inconsistent recommendations and

  20. Case study of 3D fingerprints applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Liang, Jinrong; Shen, Linlin; Yang, Meng; Zhang, David; Lai, Zhihui

    2017-01-01

    Human fingers are 3D objects. More information will be provided if three dimensional (3D) fingerprints are available compared with two dimensional (2D) fingerprints. Thus, this paper firstly collected 3D finger point cloud data by Structured-light Illumination method. Additional features from 3D fingerprint images are then studied and extracted. The applications of these features are finally discussed. A series of experiments are conducted to demonstrate the helpfulness of 3D information to fingerprint recognition. Results show that a quick alignment can be easily implemented under the guidance of 3D finger shape feature even though this feature does not work for fingerprint recognition directly. The newly defined distinctive 3D shape ridge feature can be used for personal authentication with Equal Error Rate (EER) of ~8.3%. Also, it is helpful to remove false core point. Furthermore, a promising of EER ~1.3% is realized by combining this feature with 2D features for fingerprint recognition which indicates the prospect of 3D fingerprint recognition. PMID:28399141

  1. Case study of 3D fingerprints applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Liang, Jinrong; Shen, Linlin; Yang, Meng; Zhang, David; Lai, Zhihui

    2017-01-01

    Human fingers are 3D objects. More information will be provided if three dimensional (3D) fingerprints are available compared with two dimensional (2D) fingerprints. Thus, this paper firstly collected 3D finger point cloud data by Structured-light Illumination method. Additional features from 3D fingerprint images are then studied and extracted. The applications of these features are finally discussed. A series of experiments are conducted to demonstrate the helpfulness of 3D information to fingerprint recognition. Results show that a quick alignment can be easily implemented under the guidance of 3D finger shape feature even though this feature does not work for fingerprint recognition directly. The newly defined distinctive 3D shape ridge feature can be used for personal authentication with Equal Error Rate (EER) of ~8.3%. Also, it is helpful to remove false core point. Furthermore, a promising of EER ~1.3% is realized by combining this feature with 2D features for fingerprint recognition which indicates the prospect of 3D fingerprint recognition.

  2. 3DVEM Software Modules for Efficient Management of Point Clouds and Photorealistic 3d Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabado, S.; Seguí, A. E.; Cabrelles, M.; Navarro, S.; García-De-San-Miguel, D.; Lerma, J. L.

    2013-07-01

    Cultural heritage managers in general and information users in particular are not usually used to deal with high-technological hardware and software. On the contrary, information providers of metric surveys are most of the times applying latest developments for real-life conservation and restoration projects. This paper addresses the software issue of handling and managing either 3D point clouds or (photorealistic) 3D models to bridge the gap between information users and information providers as regards the management of information which users and providers share as a tool for decision-making, analysis, visualization and management. There are not many viewers specifically designed to handle, manage and create easily animations of architectural and/or archaeological 3D objects, monuments and sites, among others. 3DVEM - 3D Viewer, Editor & Meter software will be introduced to the scientific community, as well as 3DVEM - Live and 3DVEM - Register. The advantages of managing projects with both sets of data, 3D point cloud and photorealistic 3D models, will be introduced. Different visualizations of true documentation projects in the fields of architecture, archaeology and industry will be presented. Emphasis will be driven to highlight the features of new userfriendly software to manage virtual projects. Furthermore, the easiness of creating controlled interactive animations (both walkthrough and fly-through) by the user either on-the-fly or as a traditional movie file will be demonstrated through 3DVEM - Live.

  3. 2D/3D Synthetic Vision Navigation Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Kramer, Lynda J.; Arthur, J. J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Sweeters, jason L.

    2008-01-01

    Flight-deck display software was designed and developed at NASA Langley Research Center to provide two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) terrain, obstacle, and flight-path perspectives on a single navigation display. The objective was to optimize the presentation of synthetic vision (SV) system technology that permits pilots to view multiple perspectives of flight-deck display symbology and 3D terrain information. Research was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the concept. The concept has numerous unique implementation features that would permit enhanced operational concepts and efficiencies in both current and future aircraft.

  4. Multi-view and 3D deformable part models.

    PubMed

    Pepik, Bojan; Stark, Michael; Gehler, Peter; Schiele, Bernt

    2015-11-01

    As objects are inherently 3D, they have been modeled in 3D in the early days of computer vision. Due to the ambiguities arising from mapping 2D features to 3D models, 3D object representations have been neglected and 2D feature-based models are the predominant paradigm in object detection nowadays. While such models have achieved outstanding bounding box detection performance, they come with limited expressiveness, as they are clearly limited in their capability of reasoning about 3D shape or viewpoints. In this work, we bring the worlds of 3D and 2D object representations closer, by building an object detector which leverages the expressive power of 3D object representations while at the same time can be robustly matched to image evidence. To that end, we gradually extend the successful deformable part model [1] to include viewpoint information and part-level 3D geometry information, resulting in several different models with different level of expressiveness. We end up with a 3D object model, consisting of multiple object parts represented in 3D and a continuous appearance model. We experimentally verify that our models, while providing richer object hypotheses than the 2D object models, provide consistently better joint object localization and viewpoint estimation than the state-of-the-art multi-view and 3D object detectors on various benchmarks (KITTI [2] , 3D object classes [3] , Pascal3D+ [4] , Pascal VOC 2007 [5] , EPFL multi-view cars[6] ).

  5. Full-parallax 3D display from stereo-hybrid 3D camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokmin; Ansari, Amir; Saavedra, Genaro; Martinez-Corral, Manuel

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we propose an innovative approach for the production of the microimages ready to display onto an integral-imaging monitor. Our main contribution is using a stereo-hybrid 3D camera system, which is used for picking up a 3D data pair and composing a denser point cloud. However, there is an intrinsic difficulty in the fact that hybrid sensors have dissimilarities and therefore should be equalized. Handled data facilitate to generating an integral image after projecting computationally the information through a virtual pinhole array. We illustrate this procedure with some imaging experiments that provide microimages with enhanced quality. After projection of such microimages onto the integral-imaging monitor, 3D images are produced with great parallax and viewing angle.

  6. 3D FaceCam: a fast and accurate 3D facial imaging device for biometrics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jason; Zhuang, Ping; May, Patrick; Yi, Steven; Tunnell, David

    2004-08-01

    Human faces are fundamentally three-dimensional (3D) objects, and each face has its unique 3D geometric profile. The 3D geometric features of a human face can be used, together with its 2D texture, for rapid and accurate face recognition purposes. Due to the lack of low-cost and robust 3D sensors and effective 3D facial recognition (FR) algorithms, almost all existing FR systems use 2D face images. Genex has developed 3D solutions that overcome the inherent problems in 2D while also addressing limitations in other 3D alternatives. One important aspect of our solution is a unique 3D camera (the 3D FaceCam) that combines multiple imaging sensors within a single compact device to provide instantaneous, ear-to-ear coverage of a human face. This 3D camera uses three high-resolution CCD sensors and a color encoded pattern projection system. The RGB color information from each pixel is used to compute the range data and generate an accurate 3D surface map. The imaging system uses no moving parts and combines multiple 3D views to provide detailed and complete 3D coverage of the entire face. Images are captured within a fraction of a second and full-frame 3D data is produced within a few seconds. This described method provides much better data coverage and accuracy in feature areas with sharp features or details (such as the nose and eyes). Using this 3D data, we have been able to demonstrate that a 3D approach can significantly improve the performance of facial recognition. We have conducted tests in which we have varied the lighting conditions and angle of image acquisition in the "field." These tests have shown that the matching results are significantly improved when enrolling a 3D image rather than a single 2D image. With its 3D solutions, Genex is working toward unlocking the promise of powerful 3D FR and transferring FR from a lab technology into a real-world biometric solution.

  7. Integrating Instrumental Data Provides the Full Science in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, M.; Boghosian, A.; Bell, R. E.; Frearson, N.

    2017-12-01

    Looking at data sparks questions, discussion and insights. By integrating multiple data sets we deepen our understanding of how cryosphere processes operate. Field collected data provide measurements from multiple instruments supporting rapid insights. Icepod provides a platform focused on the integration of multiple instruments. Over the last three seasons, the ROSETTA-Ice project has deployed Icepod to comprehensively map the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica. This integrative data collection along with new methods of data visualization allows us to answer questions about ice shelf structure and evolution that arise during data processing and review. While data are vetted and archived in the field to confirm instruments are operating, upon return to the lab data are again reviewed for accuracy before full analysis. Recent review of shallow ice radar data from the Beardmore Glacier, an outlet glacier into the Ross Ice Shelf, presented an abrupt discontinuity in the ice surface. This sharp 8m surface elevation drop was originally interpreted as a processing error. Data were reexamined, integrating the simultaneously collected shallow and deep ice radar with lidar data. All the data sources showed the surface discontinuity, confirming the abrupt 8m drop in surface elevation. Examining high resolution WorldView satellite imagery revealed a persistent source for these elevation drops. The satellite imagery showed that this tear in the ice surface was only one piece of a larger pattern of "chatter marks" in ice that flows at a rate of 300 m/yr. The markings are buried over a distance of 30 km or after 100 years of travel down Beardmore Glacier towards the front of the Ross Ice Shelf. Using Icepod's lidar and cameras we map this chatter mark feature in 3D to reveal its full structure. We use digital elevation models from WorldView to map the other along flow chatter marks. In order to investigate the relationship between these surface features and basal crevasses, the deep ice

  8. 3D-information fusion from very high resolution satellite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, T.; d'Angelo, P.; Kuschk, G.; Tian, J.; Partovi, T.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we show the pre-processing and potential for environmental applications of very high resolution (VHR) satellite stereo imagery like these from WorldView-2 or Pl'eiades with ground sampling distances (GSD) of half a metre to a metre. To process such data first a dense digital surface model (DSM) has to be generated. Afterwards from this a digital terrain model (DTM) representing the ground and a so called normalized digital elevation model (nDEM) representing off-ground objects are derived. Combining these elevation based data with a spectral classification allows detection and extraction of objects from the satellite scenes. Beside the object extraction also the DSM and DTM can directly be used for simulation and monitoring of environmental issues. Examples are the simulation of floodings, building-volume and people estimation, simulation of noise from roads, wave-propagation for cellphones, wind and light for estimating renewable energy sources, 3D change detection, earthquake preparedness and crisis relief, urban development and sprawl of informal settlements and much more. Also outside of urban areas volume information brings literally a new dimension to earth oberservation tasks like the volume estimations of forests and illegal logging, volume of (illegal) open pit mining activities, estimation of flooding or tsunami risks, dike planning, etc. In this paper we present the preprocessing from the original level-1 satellite data to digital surface models (DSMs), corresponding VHR ortho images and derived digital terrain models (DTMs). From these components we present how a monitoring and decision fusion based 3D change detection can be realized by using different acquisitions. The results are analyzed and assessed to derive quality parameters for the presented method. Finally the usability of 3D information fusion from VHR satellite imagery is discussed and evaluated.

  9. Reducing Costs and Increasing Productivity in Ship Maintenance Using Product Lifecycle Management, 3D Laser Scanning and 3D Printing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    information modeling guide series: 03—GSA BIM guide for 3D imaging (Ver. 1). Retrieved from http://www.gsa.gov/graphics/pbs/GSA_BIM_Guide_Series_03... model during a KVA knowledge audit at FRC San Diego. The information used in the creation of his KVA models was generated from the SME-provided...Kenney then used the information gathered during SME interviews to reengineer the process to include 3D printing to form his “to-be” model . The

  10. An exo-β-(1→3)-D-galactanase from Streptomyces sp. provides insights into type II arabinogalactan structure

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Naomi X.-Y.; Lee, Joanne; Ellis, Miriam; Liao, Ming-Long; Mau, Shaio-Lim; Guest, David; Janssen, Peter H.; Kováč, Pavol; Bacic, Antony; Pettolino, Filomena A.

    2012-01-01

    An exo-β-(1→3)-D-galactanase (SGalase1) that specifically cleaves the β-(1→3)-D-galactan backbone of arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) was isolated from culture filtrates of a soil Streptomyces sp. Internal peptide sequence information was used to clone and recombinantly express the gene in E. coli. The molecular mass of the isolated enzyme was ~45 kDa, similar to the 48.2 kDa mass predicted from the amino acid sequence. The pI, pH and temperature optima for the enzyme were ~7.45, 3.8 and 48 °C, respectively. The native and recombinant enzymes specifically hydrolysed β-(1→3)-D-galacto-oligo- or poly-saccharides from the upstream (non-reducing) end, typical of an exo-acting enzyme. A second homologous Streptomyces gene (SGalase2) was also cloned and expressed. SGalase2 was similar in size (47.9 kDa) and enzyme activity to SGalase1 but differed in its pH optimum (pH 5). Both SGalase1 and SGalase2 are predicted to belong to the CAZy glycosyl hydrolase family GH 43 based on activity, sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis. The Km and Vmax of the native exo-β-(1→3)-D-galactanase for de-arabinosylated gum arabic (dGA) were 19 mg/ml and 9.7 μmol D-Gal/min/mg protein, respectively. The activity of these enzymes is well suited for the study of type II galactan structures and provides an important tool for the investigation of the biological role of AGPs in plants. De-arabinosylated gum arabic (dGA) was used as a model to investigate the use of these enzymes in defining type II galactan structure. Exhaustive hydrolysis of dGA resulted in a limited number of oligosaccharide products with a trisaccharide of Gal2GlcA1 predominating. PMID:22464224

  11. 3-D Imaging Systems for Agricultural Applications—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Arellano, Manuel; Griepentrog, Hans W.; Reiser, David; Paraforos, Dimitris S.

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency increase of resources through automation of agriculture requires more information about the production process, as well as process and machinery status. Sensors are necessary for monitoring the status and condition of production by recognizing the surrounding structures such as objects, field structures, natural or artificial markers, and obstacles. Currently, three dimensional (3-D) sensors are economically affordable and technologically advanced to a great extent, so a breakthrough is already possible if enough research projects are commercialized. The aim of this review paper is to investigate the state-of-the-art of 3-D vision systems in agriculture, and the role and value that only 3-D data can have to provide information about environmental structures based on the recent progress in optical 3-D sensors. The structure of this research consists of an overview of the different optical 3-D vision techniques, based on the basic principles. Afterwards, their application in agriculture are reviewed. The main focus lays on vehicle navigation, and crop and animal husbandry. The depth dimension brought by 3-D sensors provides key information that greatly facilitates the implementation of automation and robotics in agriculture. PMID:27136560

  12. 3D Surveying, Modeling and Geo-Information System of the New Campus of ITB-Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwardhi, D.; Trisyanti, S. W.; Ainiyah, N.; Fajri, M. N.; Hanan, H.; Virtriana, R.; Edmarani, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    The new campus of ITB-Indonesia, which is located at Jatinangor, requires good facilities and infrastructures to supporting all of campus activities. Those can not be separated from procurement and maintenance activities. Technology for procurement and maintenance of facilities and infrastructures -based computer (information system)- has been known as Building Information Modeling (BIM). Nowadays, that technology is more affordable with some of free software that easy to use and tailored to user needs. BIM has some disadvantages and it requires other technologies to complete it, namely Geographic Information System (GIS). BIM and GIS require surveying data to visualized landscape and buildings on Jatinangor ITB campus. This paper presents the on-going of an internal service program conducted by the researcher, academic staff and students for the university. The program including 3D surveying to support the data requirements for 3D modeling of buildings in CityGML and Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) data model. The entire 3D surveying will produce point clouds that can be used to make 3D model. The 3D modeling is divided into low and high levels of detail modeling. The low levels model is stored in 3D CityGML database, and the high levels model including interiors is stored in BIM Server. 3D model can be used to visualized the building and site of Jatinangor ITB campus. For facility management of campus, an geo-information system is developed that can be used for planning, constructing, and maintaining Jatinangor ITB's facilities and infrastructures. The system uses openMAINT, an open source solution for the Property & Facility Management.

  13. Extra dimensions: 3D and time in PDF documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, N. A.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.

  14. Extra Dimensions: 3D and Time in PDF Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, N.A.; /SLAC

    2012-04-11

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universalmore » 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.« less

  15. Illustrative visualization of 3D city models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doellner, Juergen; Buchholz, Henrik; Nienhaus, Marc; Kirsch, Florian

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents an illustrative visualization technique that provides expressive representations of large-scale 3D city models, inspired by the tradition of artistic and cartographic visualizations typically found in bird"s-eye view and panoramic maps. We define a collection of city model components and a real-time multi-pass rendering algorithm that achieves comprehensible, abstract 3D city model depictions based on edge enhancement, color-based and shadow-based depth cues, and procedural facade texturing. Illustrative visualization provides an effective visual interface to urban spatial information and associated thematic information complementing visual interfaces based on the Virtual Reality paradigm, offering a huge potential for graphics design. Primary application areas include city and landscape planning, cartoon worlds in computer games, and tourist information systems.

  16. Automatic needle segmentation in 3D ultrasound images using 3D Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua; Qiu, Wu; Ding, Mingyue; Zhang, Songgeng

    2007-12-01

    3D ultrasound (US) is a new technology that can be used for a variety of diagnostic applications, such as obstetrical, vascular, and urological imaging, and has been explored greatly potential in the applications of image-guided surgery and therapy. Uterine adenoma and uterine bleeding are the two most prevalent diseases in Chinese woman, and a minimally invasive ablation system using an RF button electrode which is needle-like is being used to destroy tumor cells or stop bleeding currently. Now a 3D US guidance system has been developed to avoid accidents or death of the patient by inaccurate localizations of the electrode and the tumor position during treatment. In this paper, we described two automated techniques, the 3D Hough Transform (3DHT) and the 3D Randomized Hough Transform (3DRHT), which is potentially fast, accurate, and robust to provide needle segmentation in 3D US image for use of 3D US imaging guidance. Based on the representation (Φ , θ , ρ , α ) of straight lines in 3D space, we used the 3DHT algorithm to segment needles successfully assumed that the approximate needle position and orientation are known in priori. The 3DRHT algorithm was developed to detect needles quickly without any information of the 3D US images. The needle segmentation techniques were evaluated using the 3D US images acquired by scanning water phantoms. The experiments demonstrated the feasibility of two 3D needle segmentation algorithms described in this paper.

  17. 16 CFR 3.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 3.39 Section 3.39 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE... granting immunity. (a) Where Commission complaint counsel desire the issuance of an order requiring a witness or deponent to testify or provide other information and granting immunity under 18 U.S.C. 6002...

  18. 16 CFR 3.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 3.39 Section 3.39 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE... granting immunity. (a) Where Commission complaint counsel desire the issuance of an order requiring a witness or deponent to testify or provide other information and granting immunity under 18 U.S.C. 6002...

  19. 16 CFR 3.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 3.39 Section 3.39 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE... granting immunity. (a) Where Commission complaint counsel desire the issuance of an order requiring a witness or deponent to testify or provide other information and granting immunity under 18 U.S.C. 6002...

  20. 16 CFR 3.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 3.39 Section 3.39 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE... granting immunity. (a) Where Commission complaint counsel desire the issuance of an order requiring a witness or deponent to testify or provide other information and granting immunity under 18 U.S.C. 6002...

  1. 16 CFR 3.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 3.39 Section 3.39 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE... granting immunity. (a) Where Commission complaint counsel desire the issuance of an order requiring a witness or deponent to testify or provide other information and granting immunity under 18 U.S.C. 6002...

  2. D and D Knowledge Management Information Tool - 2012 - 12106

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, H.; Lagos, L.; Quintero, W.

    2012-07-01

    Deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) work is a high priority activity across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Subject matter specialists (SMS) associated with the different ALARA (As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable) Centers, DOE sites, Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG) and the D and D community have gained extensive knowledge and experience over the years in the cleanup of the legacy waste from the Manhattan Project. To prevent the D and D knowledge and expertise from being lost over time from the evolving and aging workforce, DOE and the Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University (FIU) proposed to capture and maintainmore » this valuable information in a universally available and easily usable system. D and D KM-IT provides single point access to all D and D related activities through its knowledge base. It is a community driven system. D and D KM-IT makes D and D knowledge available to the people who need it at the time they need it and in a readily usable format. It uses the World Wide Web as the primary source for content in addition to information collected from subject matter specialists and the D and D community. It brings information in real time through web based custom search processes and its dynamic knowledge repository. Future developments include developing a document library, providing D and D information access on mobile devices for the Technology module and Hotline, and coordinating multiple subject matter specialists to support the Hotline. The goal is to deploy a high-end sophisticated and secured system to serve as a single large knowledge base for all the D and D activities. The system consolidates a large amount of information available on the web and presents it to users in the simplest way possible. (authors)« less

  3. a 3d Information System for the Documentation of Archaeologica L Excavations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardissone, P.; Bornaz, L.; Degattis, G.; Domaine, R.

    2013-07-01

    Documentation of archaeological and cultural heritage sites is at the heart of the archaeological process and an important component in cultural heritage research, presentation and restorations. In 2012 the Superintendence of Cultural Heritage of Aosta Valley - IT (Soprintendenza per i Beni e le Attività Culturali della Region e Autonoma Valle d'Aosta) carried out a complex archaeological excavation in a composite archaeological context, situated an urban background: the Aosta city centre. This archaeological excavation has been characterized by the classical urban archaeological issues: little space, short time, complex stratigraphy. Moreover the investigations have come out several structures and walls that required safety and conservation measures. Ad hoc 3D solutions carried out a complete 3D survey of the area in 10 different time/situations of the Archaeological digs, chosen in collaborations with the archaeological staff. In this way a multi temporal 3D description of the site has been provided for the archaeological analysis and for the project of the restorations activities. The 3D surveys has been carried out integrating GPS, laser scanner technology and photogrammetry. In order to meet the needs of the site, and its complex logistics and to obtain products that guarantee the high quality and detail required for archaeological analysis, we have developed different procedures and methodologies: hdr imaging for 3D model with correct, consistent and uniform colours, noise filtering and people filtering, for the removal of interference between laser instrument and object of the survey, Advanced laser scanner triangulation, in order to consider both artificial and natural tie points, for a correct registration of a huge amount of scans. Single image orientation on 3D data, in order to integrate the laser data with data coming from digital photogrammetry (faster on the field than the laser scanner survey, than used in certain situations). The results of all

  4. 3D change detection - Approaches and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Rongjun; Tian, Jiaojiao; Reinartz, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Due to the unprecedented technology development of sensors, platforms and algorithms for 3D data acquisition and generation, 3D spaceborne, airborne and close-range data, in the form of image based, Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) based point clouds, Digital Elevation Models (DEM) and 3D city models, become more accessible than ever before. Change detection (CD) or time-series data analysis in 3D has gained great attention due to its capability of providing volumetric dynamics to facilitate more applications and provide more accurate results. The state-of-the-art CD reviews aim to provide a comprehensive synthesis and to simplify the taxonomy of the traditional remote sensing CD techniques, which mainly sit within the boundary of 2D image/spectrum analysis, largely ignoring the particularities of 3D aspects of the data. The inclusion of 3D data for change detection (termed 3D CD), not only provides a source with different modality for analysis, but also transcends the border of traditional top-view 2D pixel/object-based analysis to highly detailed, oblique view or voxel-based geometric analysis. This paper reviews the recent developments and applications of 3D CD using remote sensing and close-range data, in support of both academia and industry researchers who seek for solutions in detecting and analyzing 3D dynamics of various objects of interest. We first describe the general considerations of 3D CD problems in different processing stages and identify CD types based on the information used, being the geometric comparison and geometric-spectral analysis. We then summarize relevant works and practices in urban, environment, ecology and civil applications, etc. Given the broad spectrum of applications and different types of 3D data, we discuss important issues in 3D CD methods. Finally, we present concluding remarks in algorithmic aspects of 3D CD.

  5. R3D-2-MSA: the RNA 3D structure-to-multiple sequence alignment server

    PubMed Central

    Cannone, Jamie J.; Sweeney, Blake A.; Petrov, Anton I.; Gutell, Robin R.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles

    2015-01-01

    The RNA 3D Structure-to-Multiple Sequence Alignment Server (R3D-2-MSA) is a new web service that seamlessly links RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures to high-quality RNA multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) from diverse biological sources. In this first release, R3D-2-MSA provides manual and programmatic access to curated, representative ribosomal RNA sequence alignments from bacterial, archaeal, eukaryal and organellar ribosomes, using nucleotide numbers from representative atomic-resolution 3D structures. A web-based front end is available for manual entry and an Application Program Interface for programmatic access. Users can specify up to five ranges of nucleotides and 50 nucleotide positions per range. The R3D-2-MSA server maps these ranges to the appropriate columns of the corresponding MSA and returns the contents of the columns, either for display in a web browser or in JSON format for subsequent programmatic use. The browser output page provides a 3D interactive display of the query, a full list of sequence variants with taxonomic information and a statistical summary of distinct sequence variants found. The output can be filtered and sorted in the browser. Previous user queries can be viewed at any time by resubmitting the output URL, which encodes the search and re-generates the results. The service is freely available with no login requirement at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3d-2-msa. PMID:26048960

  6. 3-D printing provides a novel approach for standardization and reproducibility of freezing devices

    PubMed Central

    Hu, E; Childress, William; Tiersch, Terrence R.

    2017-01-01

    Cryopreservation has become an important and accepted tool for long-term germplasm conservation of animals and plants. To protect genetic resources, repositories have been developed with national and international cooperation. For a repository to be effective, the genetic material submitted must be of good quality and comparable to other submissions. However, due to a variety of reasons, including constraints in knowledge and available resources, cryopreservation methods for aquatic species vary widely across user groups which reduces reproducibility and weakens quality control. Herein we describe a standardizable freezing device produced using 3-dimensional (3-D) printing and introduce the concept of network sharing to achieve aggregate high-throughput cryopreservation for aquatic species. The objectives were to: 1) adapt widely available polystyrene foam products that would be inexpensive, portable, and provide adequate work space; 2) develop a design suitable for 3-D printing that could provide multiple configurations, be inexpensive, and easy to use, and 3) evaluate various configurations to attain freezing rates suitable for various common cryopreservation containers. Through this approach, identical components can be accessed globally, and we demonstrated that 3-D printers can be used to fabricate parts for standardizable freezing devices yielding relevant and reproducible cooling rates across users. With standardized devices for freezing, methods and samples can harmonize into an aggregated high-throughput pathway not currently available for aquatic species repository development. PMID:28465185

  7. 3D-Lab: a collaborative web-based platform for molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Grebner, Christoph; Norrby, Magnus; Enström, Jonatan; Nilsson, Ingemar; Hogner, Anders; Henriksson, Jonas; Westin, Johan; Faramarzi, Farzad; Werner, Philip; Boström, Jonas

    2016-09-01

    The use of 3D information has shown impact in numerous applications in drug design. However, it is often under-utilized and traditionally limited to specialists. We want to change that, and present an approach making 3D information and molecular modeling accessible and easy-to-use 'for the people'. A user-friendly and collaborative web-based platform (3D-Lab) for 3D modeling, including a blazingly fast virtual screening capability, was developed. 3D-Lab provides an interface to automatic molecular modeling, like conformer generation, ligand alignments, molecular dockings and simple quantum chemistry protocols. 3D-Lab is designed to be modular, and to facilitate sharing of 3D-information to promote interactions between drug designers. Recent enhancements to our open-source virtual reality tool Molecular Rift are described. The integrated drug-design platform allows drug designers to instantaneously access 3D information and readily apply advanced and automated 3D molecular modeling tasks, with the aim to improve decision-making in drug design projects.

  8. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  9. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  10. User Requirements Gathering for 3d Geographic Information in the United Kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K.; Ellul, C.

    2017-10-01

    Despite significant developments, 3D technologies are still not fully exploited in practice due to the lack of awareness as well as the lack of understanding of who the users of 3D will be and what the user requirements are. From a National Mapping & Cadastral Agency and data acquisition perspective, each new 3D feature type and element within a feature added (such as doors, windows, chimneys, street lights) requires additional processing and cost to create. There is therefore a need to understand the importance of different 3D features and components for different applications. This will allow the direction of capture effort towards items that will be relevant to a wide range of users, as well as to understand the current status of, and interest in, 3D at a national level. This paper reports the results of an initial requirements gathering exercise for 3D geographic information in the United Kingdom (UK). It describes a user-centred design approach where usability and user needs are given extensive attention at each stage of the design process. Web-based questionnaires and semi-structured face-to-face interviews were used as complementary data collection methods to understand the user needs. The results from this initial study showed that while some applications lead the field with a high adoption of 3D, others are laggards, predominantly from organisational inertia. While individuals may be positive about the use of 3D, many struggle to justify the value and business case for 3D GI. Further work is required to identify the specific geometric and semantic requirements for different applications and to repeat the study with a larger sample.

  11. R3D-2-MSA: the RNA 3D structure-to-multiple sequence alignment server.

    PubMed

    Cannone, Jamie J; Sweeney, Blake A; Petrov, Anton I; Gutell, Robin R; Zirbel, Craig L; Leontis, Neocles

    2015-07-01

    The RNA 3D Structure-to-Multiple Sequence Alignment Server (R3D-2-MSA) is a new web service that seamlessly links RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures to high-quality RNA multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) from diverse biological sources. In this first release, R3D-2-MSA provides manual and programmatic access to curated, representative ribosomal RNA sequence alignments from bacterial, archaeal, eukaryal and organellar ribosomes, using nucleotide numbers from representative atomic-resolution 3D structures. A web-based front end is available for manual entry and an Application Program Interface for programmatic access. Users can specify up to five ranges of nucleotides and 50 nucleotide positions per range. The R3D-2-MSA server maps these ranges to the appropriate columns of the corresponding MSA and returns the contents of the columns, either for display in a web browser or in JSON format for subsequent programmatic use. The browser output page provides a 3D interactive display of the query, a full list of sequence variants with taxonomic information and a statistical summary of distinct sequence variants found. The output can be filtered and sorted in the browser. Previous user queries can be viewed at any time by resubmitting the output URL, which encodes the search and re-generates the results. The service is freely available with no login requirement at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3d-2-msa. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Real-time 3D visualization of volumetric video motion sensor data

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.; Stansfield, S.; Shawver, D.

    1996-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of improving detection, assessment, and response capabilities of security systems. Our approach combines two state-of-the-art technologies: volumetric video motion detection (VVMD) and virtual reality (VR). This work capitalizes on the ability of VVMD technology to provide three-dimensional (3D) information about the position, shape, and size of intruders within a protected volume. The 3D information is obtained by fusing motion detection data from multiple video sensors. The second component involves the application of VR technology to display information relating to the sensors and the sensor environment. VR technology enables an operator, or security guard, to bemore » immersed in a 3D graphical representation of the remote site. VVMD data is transmitted from the remote site via ordinary telephone lines. There are several benefits to displaying VVMD information in this way. Because the VVMD system provides 3D information and because the sensor environment is a physical 3D space, it seems natural to display this information in 3D. Also, the 3D graphical representation depicts essential details within and around the protected volume in a natural way for human perception. Sensor information can also be more easily interpreted when the operator can `move` through the virtual environment and explore the relationships between the sensor data, objects and other visual cues present in the virtual environment. By exploiting the powerful ability of humans to understand and interpret 3D information, we expect to improve the means for visualizing and interpreting sensor information, allow a human operator to assess a potential threat more quickly and accurately, and enable a more effective response. This paper will detail both the VVMD and VR technologies and will discuss a prototype system based upon their integration.« less

  13. 3D-Printable Photochromic Molecular Materials for Reversible Information Storage.

    PubMed

    Wales, Dominic J; Cao, Qun; Kastner, Katharina; Karjalainen, Erno; Newton, Graham N; Sans, Victor

    2018-06-01

    The formulation of advanced molecular materials with bespoke polymeric ionic-liquid matrices that stabilize and solubilize hybrid organic-inorganic polyoxometalates and allow their processing by additive manufacturing, is effectively demonstrated. The unique photo and redox properties of nanostructured polyoxometalates are translated across the scales (from molecular design to functional materials) to yield macroscopic functional devices with reversible photochromism. These properties open a range of potential applications including reversible information storage based on controlled topological and temporal reduction/oxidation of pre-formed printed devices. This approach pushes the boundaries of 3D printing to the molecular limits, allowing the freedom of design enabled by 3D printing to be coupled with the molecular tuneability of polymerizable ionic liquids and the photoactivity and orbital engineering possible with hybrid polyoxometalates. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. 3D analysis of semiconductor devices: A combination of 3D imaging and 3D elemental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bianzhu; Gribelyuk, Michael A.

    2018-04-01

    3D analysis of semiconductor devices using a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) Z-contrast tomography and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) elemental tomography is presented. 3D STEM Z-contrast tomography is useful in revealing the depth information of the sample. However, it suffers from contrast problems between materials with similar atomic numbers. Examples of EDS elemental tomography are presented using an automated EDS tomography system with batch data processing, which greatly reduces the data collection and processing time. 3D EDS elemental tomography reveals more in-depth information about the defect origin in semiconductor failure analysis. The influence of detector shadowing and X-rays absorption on the EDS tomography's result is also discussed.

  15. fVisiOn: glasses-free tabletop 3D display to provide virtual 3D media naturally alongside real media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shunsuke

    2012-06-01

    A novel glasses-free tabletop 3D display, named fVisiOn, floats virtual 3D objects on an empty, flat, tabletop surface and enables multiple viewers to observe raised 3D images from any angle at 360° Our glasses-free 3D image reproduction method employs a combination of an optical device and an array of projectors and produces continuous horizontal parallax in the direction of a circular path located above the table. The optical device shapes a hollow cone and works as an anisotropic diffuser. The circularly arranged projectors cast numerous rays into the optical device. Each ray represents a particular ray that passes a corresponding point on a virtual object's surface and orients toward a viewing area around the table. At any viewpoint on the ring-shaped viewing area, both eyes collect fractional images from different projectors, and all the viewers around the table can perceive the scene as 3D from their perspectives because the images include binocular disparity. The entire principle is installed beneath the table, so the tabletop area remains clear. No ordinary tabletop activities are disturbed. Many people can naturally share the 3D images displayed together with real objects on the table. In our latest prototype, we employed a handmade optical device and an array of over 100 tiny projectors. This configuration reproduces static and animated 3D scenes for a 130° viewing area and allows 5-cm-tall virtual characters to play soccer and dance on the table.

  16. Comparative Study on Cushion Performance Between 3D Printed Kelvin Structure and 3D Printed Lattice Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshini, Lakshmi

    Frequently transported packaging goods are more prone to damage due to impact, jolting or vibration in transit. Fragile goods, for example, glass, ceramics, porcelain are susceptible to mechanical stresses. Hence ancillary materials like cushions play an important role when utilized within package. In this work, an analytical model of a 3D cellular structure is established based on Kelvin model and lattice structure. The research will provide a comparative study between the 3D printed Kelvin unit structure and 3D printed lattice structure. The comparative investigation is based on parameters defining cushion performance such as cushion creep, indentation, and cushion curve analysis. The applications of 3D printing is in rapid prototyping where the study will provide information of which model delivers better form of energy absorption. 3D printed foam will be shown as a cost-effective approach as prototype. The research also investigates about the selection of material for 3D printing process. As cushion development demands flexible material, three-dimensional printing with material having elastomeric properties is required. Further, the concept of cushion design is based on Kelvin model structure and lattice structure. The analytical solution provides the cushion curve analysis with respect to the results observed when load is applied over the cushion. The results are reported on basis of attenuation and amplification curves.

  17. H-Ransac a Hybrid Point Cloud Segmentation Combining 2d and 3d Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, A.; Chatzilari, E.; Nikolopoulos, S.; Kompatsiaris, I.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel 3D segmentation approach operating on point clouds generated from overlapping images. The aim of the proposed hybrid approach is to effectively segment co-planar objects, by leveraging the structural information originating from the 3D point cloud and the visual information from the 2D images, without resorting to learning based procedures. More specifically, the proposed hybrid approach, H-RANSAC, is an extension of the well-known RANSAC plane-fitting algorithm, incorporating an additional consistency criterion based on the results of 2D segmentation. Our expectation that the integration of 2D data into 3D segmentation will achieve more accurate results, is validated experimentally in the domain of 3D city models. Results show that HRANSAC can successfully delineate building components like main facades and windows, and provide more accurate segmentation results compared to the typical RANSAC plane-fitting algorithm.

  18. Optoelectronic interconnects for 3D wafer stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, David E.; Carson, John C.; Lome, Louis S.

    1996-01-01

    Wafer and chip stacking are envisioned as a means of providing increased processing power within the small confines of a three-dimensional structure. Optoelectronic devices can play an important role in these dense 3-D processing electronic packages in two ways. In pure electronic processing, optoelectronics can provide a method for increasing the number of input/output communication channels within the layers of the 3-D chip stack. Non-free space communication links allow the density of highly parallel input/output ports to increase dramatically over typical edge bus connections. In hybrid processors, where electronics and optics play a role in defining the computational algorithm, free space communication links are typically utilized for, among other reasons, the increased network link complexity which can be achieved. Free space optical interconnections provide bandwidths and interconnection complexity unobtainable in pure electrical interconnections. Stacked 3-D architectures can provide the electronics real estate and structure to deal with the increased bandwidth and global information provided by free space optical communications. This paper provides definitions and examples of 3-D stacked architectures in optoelectronics processors. The benefits and issues of these technologies are discussed.

  19. Optoelectronic interconnects for 3D wafer stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, David; Carson, John C.; Lome, Louis S.

    1996-01-01

    Wafer and chip stacking are envisioned as means of providing increased processing power within the small confines of a three-dimensional structure. Optoelectronic devices can play an important role in these dense 3-D processing electronic packages in two ways. In pure electronic processing, optoelectronics can provide a method for increasing the number of input/output communication channels within the layers of the 3-D chip stack. Non-free space communication links allow the density of highly parallel input/output ports to increase dramatically over typical edge bus connections. In hybrid processors, where electronics and optics play a role in defining the computational algorithm, free space communication links are typically utilized for, among other reasons, the increased network link complexity which can be achieved. Free space optical interconnections provide bandwidths and interconnection complexity unobtainable in pure electrical interconnections. Stacked 3-D architectures can provide the electronics real estate and structure to deal with the increased bandwidth and global information provided by free space optical communications. This paper will provide definitions and examples of 3-D stacked architectures in optoelectronics processors. The benefits and issues of these technologies will be discussed.

  20. FROMS3D: New Software for 3-D Visualization of Fracture Network System in Fractured Rock Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Y. H.; Um, J. G.; Choi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A new software (FROMS3D) is presented to visualize fracture network system in 3-D. The software consists of several modules that play roles in management of borehole and field fracture data, fracture network modelling, visualization of fracture geometry in 3-D and calculation and visualization of intersections and equivalent pipes between fractures. Intel Parallel Studio XE 2013, Visual Studio.NET 2010 and the open source VTK library were utilized as development tools to efficiently implement the modules and the graphical user interface of the software. The results have suggested that the developed software is effective in visualizing 3-D fracture network system, and can provide useful information to tackle the engineering geological problems related to strength, deformability and hydraulic behaviors of the fractured rock masses.

  1. Investigating the Use of 3d Geovisualizations for Urban Design in Informal Settlement Upgrading in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenbach, V.; Coetzee, S.; Çöltekin, A.

    2016-06-01

    Informal settlements are a common occurrence in South Africa, and to improve in-situ circumstances of communities living in informal settlements, upgrades and urban design processes are necessary. Spatial data and maps are essential throughout these processes to understand the current environment, plan new developments, and communicate the planned developments. All stakeholders need to understand maps to actively participate in the process. However, previous research demonstrated that map literacy was relatively low for many planning professionals in South Africa, which might hinder effective planning. Because 3D visualizations resemble the real environment more than traditional maps, many researchers posited that they would be easier to interpret. Thus, our goal is to investigate the effectiveness of 3D geovisualizations for urban design in informal settlement upgrading in South Africa. We consider all involved processes: 3D modelling, visualization design, and cognitive processes during map reading. We found that procedural modelling is a feasible alternative to time-consuming manual modelling, and can produce high quality models. When investigating the visualization design, the visual characteristics of 3D models and relevance of a subset of visual variables for urban design activities of informal settlement upgrades were qualitatively assessed. The results of three qualitative user experiments contributed to understanding the impact of various levels of complexity in 3D city models and map literacy of future geoinformatics and planning professionals when using 2D maps and 3D models. The research results can assist planners in designing suitable 3D models that can be used throughout all phases of the process.

  2. 3D Encoding of Musical Score Information and the Playback Method Used by the Cellular Phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Hitoshi; Sugiura, Akihiko

    Recently, 3G cellular phone that can take a movie has spread by improving the digital camera function. And, 2Dcode has accurate readout and high operability. And it has spread as an information transmission means. However, the symbol is expanded and complicated when information of 2D codes increases. To solve these, 3D code was proposed. But it need the special equipment for readout, and specializes in the enhancing reality feeling technology. Therefore, it is difficult to apply it to the cellular phone. And so, we propose 3D code that can be recognized by the movie shooting function of the cellular phone. And, score information was encoded. We apply Gray Code to the property of music, and encode it. And the effectiveness was verified.

  3. The D3 Middleware Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Joan; Filman, Robert E.; Korsmeyer, David J.; Lee, Diana D.; Mak, Ron; Patel, Tarang

    2002-01-01

    DARWIN is a NASA developed, Internet-based system for enabling aerospace researchers to securely and remotely access and collaborate on the analysis of aerospace vehicle design data, primarily the results of wind-tunnel testing and numeric (e.g., computational fluid-dynamics) model executions. DARWIN captures, stores and indexes data; manages derived knowledge (such as visualizations across multiple datasets); and provides an environment for designers to collaborate in the analysis of test results. DARWIN is an interesting application because it supports high-volumes of data. integrates multiple modalities of data display (e.g., images and data visualizations), and provides non-trivial access control mechanisms. DARWIN enables collaboration by allowing not only sharing visualizations of data, but also commentary about and views of data. Here we provide an overview of the architecture of D3, the third generation of DARWIN. Earlier versions of DARWIN were characterized by browser-based interfaces and a hodge-podge of server technologies: CGI scripts, applets, PERL, and so forth. But browsers proved difficult to control, and a proliferation of computational mechanisms proved inefficient and difficult to maintain. D3 substitutes a pure-Java approach for that medley: A Java client communicates (though RMI over HTTPS) with a Java-based application server. Code on the server accesses information from JDBC databases, distributed LDAP security services, and a collaborative information system. D3 is a three tier-architecture, but unlike 'E-commerce' applications, the data usage pattern suggests different strategies than traditional Enterprise Java Beans - we need to move volumes of related data together, considerable processing happens on the client, and the 'business logic' on the server-side is primarily data integration and collaboration. With D3, we are extending DARWIN to handle other data domains and to be a distributed system, where a single login allows a user

  4. Measurable realistic image-based 3D mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. J.; Ding, W.; Almagbile, A.

    2011-12-01

    Maps with 3D visual models are becoming a remarkable feature of 3D map services. High-resolution image data is obtained for the construction of 3D visualized models.The3D map not only provides the capabilities of 3D measurements and knowledge mining, but also provides the virtual experienceof places of interest, such as demonstrated in the Google Earth. Applications of 3D maps are expanding into the areas of architecture, property management, and urban environment monitoring. However, the reconstruction of high quality 3D models is time consuming, and requires robust hardware and powerful software to handle the enormous amount of data. This is especially for automatic implementation of 3D models and the representation of complicated surfacesthat still need improvements with in the visualisation techniques. The shortcoming of 3D model-based maps is the limitation of detailed coverage since a user can only view and measure objects that are already modelled in the virtual environment. This paper proposes and demonstrates a 3D map concept that is realistic and image-based, that enables geometric measurements and geo-location services. Additionally, image-based 3D maps provide more detailed information of the real world than 3D model-based maps. The image-based 3D maps use geo-referenced stereo images or panoramic images. The geometric relationships between objects in the images can be resolved from the geometric model of stereo images. The panoramic function makes 3D maps more interactive with users but also creates an interesting immersive circumstance. Actually, unmeasurable image-based 3D maps already exist, such as Google street view, but only provide virtual experiences in terms of photos. The topographic and terrain attributes, such as shapes and heights though are omitted. This paper also discusses the potential for using a low cost land Mobile Mapping System (MMS) to implement realistic image 3D mapping, and evaluates the positioning accuracy that a measureable

  5. Structure-From-Motion in 3D Space Using 2D Lidars

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong-Geol; Bok, Yunsu; Kim, Jun-Sik; Shim, Inwook; Kweon, In So

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel structure-from-motion methodology using 2D lidars (Light Detection And Ranging). In 3D space, 2D lidars do not provide sufficient information for pose estimation. For this reason, additional sensors have been used along with the lidar measurement. In this paper, we use a sensor system that consists of only 2D lidars, without any additional sensors. We propose a new method of estimating both the 6D pose of the system and the surrounding 3D structures. We compute the pose of the system using line segments of scan data and their corresponding planes. After discarding the outliers, both the pose and the 3D structures are refined via nonlinear optimization. Experiments with both synthetic and real data show the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. PMID:28165372

  6. Creating Physical 3D Stereolithograph Models of Brain and Skull

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Daniel J.; Farhoud, Mohammed; Meyerand, M. Elizabeth; Nelson, David L.; Ramirez, Lincoln F.; Dempsey, Robert J.; Wolf, Alan J.; Alexander, Andrew L.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    The human brain and skull are three dimensional (3D) anatomical structures with complex surfaces. However, medical images are often two dimensional (2D) and provide incomplete visualization of structural morphology. To overcome this loss in dimension, we developed and validated a freely available, semi-automated pathway to build 3D virtual reality (VR) and hand-held, stereolithograph models. To evaluate whether surface visualization in 3D was more informative than in 2D, undergraduate students (n = 50) used the Gillespie scale to rate 3D VR and physical models of both a living patient-volunteer's brain and the skull of Phineas Gage, a historically famous railroad worker whose misfortune with a projectile tamping iron provided the first evidence of a structure-function relationship in brain. Using our processing pathway, we successfully fabricated human brain and skull replicas and validated that the stereolithograph model preserved the scale of the VR model. Based on the Gillespie ratings, students indicated that the biological utility and quality of visual information at the surface of VR and stereolithograph models were greater than the 2D images from which they were derived. The method we developed is useful to create VR and stereolithograph 3D models from medical images and can be used to model hard or soft tissue in living or preserved specimens. Compared to 2D images, VR and stereolithograph models provide an extra dimension that enhances both the quality of visual information and utility of surface visualization in neuroscience and medicine. PMID:17971879

  7. 3D Gravity Inversion using Tikhonov Regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toushmalani, Reza; Saibi, Hakim

    2015-08-01

    Subsalt exploration for oil and gas is attractive in regions where 3D seismic depth-migration to recover the geometry of a salt base is difficult. Additional information to reduce the ambiguity in seismic images would be beneficial. Gravity data often serve these purposes in the petroleum industry. In this paper, the authors present an algorithm for a gravity inversion based on Tikhonov regularization and an automatically regularized solution process. They examined the 3D Euler deconvolution to extract the best anomaly source depth as a priori information to invert the gravity data and provided a synthetic example. Finally, they applied the gravity inversion to recently obtained gravity data from the Bandar Charak (Hormozgan, Iran) to identify its subsurface density structure. Their model showed the 3D shape of salt dome in this region.

  8. Improving Semantic Updating Method on 3d City Models Using Hybrid Semantic-Geometric 3d Segmentation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkawi, K.-H.; Abdul-Rahman, A.

    2013-09-01

    to LoD4. The accuracy and structural complexity of the 3D objects increases with the LoD level where LoD0 is the simplest LoD (2.5D; Digital Terrain Model (DTM) + building or roof print) while LoD4 is the most complex LoD (architectural details with interior structures). Semantic information is one of the main components in CityGML and 3D City Models, and provides important information for any analyses. However, more often than not, the semantic information is not available for the 3D city model due to the unstandardized modelling process. One of the examples is where a building is normally generated as one object (without specific feature layers such as Roof, Ground floor, Level 1, Level 2, Block A, Block B, etc). This research attempts to develop a method to improve the semantic data updating process by segmenting the 3D building into simpler parts which will make it easier for the users to select and update the semantic information. The methodology is implemented for 3D buildings in LoD2 where the buildings are generated without architectural details but with distinct roof structures. This paper also introduces hybrid semantic-geometric 3D segmentation method that deals with hierarchical segmentation of a 3D building based on its semantic value and surface characteristics, fitted by one of the predefined primitives. For future work, the segmentation method will be implemented as part of the change detection module that can detect any changes on the 3D buildings, store and retrieve semantic information of the changed structure, automatically updates the 3D models and visualize the results in a userfriendly graphical user interface (GUI).

  9. A 3D photographic capsule endoscope system with full field of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou-Yang, Mang; Jeng, Wei-De; Lai, Chien-Cheng; Kung, Yi-Chinn; Tao, Kuan-Heng

    2013-09-01

    Current capsule endoscope uses one camera to capture the surface image in the intestine. It can only observe the abnormal point, but cannot know the exact information of this abnormal point. Using two cameras can generate 3D images, but the visual plane changes while capsule endoscope rotates. It causes that two cameras can't capture the images information completely. To solve this question, this research provides a new kind of capsule endoscope to capture 3D images, which is 'A 3D photographic capsule endoscope system'. The system uses three cameras to capture images in real time. The advantage is increasing the viewing range up to 2.99 times respect to the two camera system. The system can accompany 3D monitor provides the exact information of symptom points, helping doctors diagnose the disease.

  10. Extra dimensions: 3d and time in pdf documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, N. A.

    2008-07-01

    High energy physics is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide audience. In this talk, we present examples of HEP applications which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input. Using this technique, higher dimensional data, such as LEGO plots or time-dependent information can be included in PDF files. In principle, a complete event display, with full interactivity, can be incorporated into a PDF file. This would allow the end user not only to customize the view and representation of the data, but to access the underlying data itself.

  11. Applications of 2D to 3D conversion for educational purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koido, Yoshihisa; Morikawa, Hiroyuki; Shiraishi, Saki; Takeuchi, Soya; Maruyama, Wataru; Nakagori, Toshio; Hirakata, Masataka; Shinkai, Hirohisa; Kawai, Takashi

    2013-03-01

    There are three main approaches creating stereoscopic S3D content: stereo filming using two cameras, stereo rendering of 3D computer graphics, and 2D to S3D conversion by adding binocular information to 2D material images. Although manual "off-line" conversion can control the amount of parallax flexibly, 2D material images are converted according to monocular information in most cases, and the flexibility of 2D to S3D conversion has not been exploited. If the depth is expressed flexibly, comprehensions and interests from converted S3D contents are anticipated to be differed from those from 2D. Therefore, in this study we created new S3D content for education by applying 2D to S3D conversion. For surgical education, we created S3D surgical operation content under a surgeon using a partial 2D to S3D conversion technique which was expected to concentrate viewers' attention on significant areas. And for art education, we converted Ukiyoe prints; traditional Japanese artworks made from a woodcut. The conversion of this content, which has little depth information, into S3D, is expected to produce different cognitive processes from those evoked by 2D content, e.g., the excitation of interest, and the understanding of spatial information. In addition, the effects of the representation of these contents were investigated.

  12. Services Oriented Smart City Platform Based On 3d City Model Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prandi, F.; Soave, M.; Devigili, F.; Andreolli, M.; De Amicis, R.

    2014-04-01

    The rapid technological evolution, which is characterizing all the disciplines involved within the wide concept of smart cities, is becoming a key factor to trigger true user-driven innovation. However to fully develop the Smart City concept to a wide geographical target, it is required an infrastructure that allows the integration of heterogeneous geographical information and sensor networks into a common technological ground. In this context 3D city models will play an increasingly important role in our daily lives and become an essential part of the modern city information infrastructure (Spatial Data Infrastructure). The work presented in this paper describes an innovative Services Oriented Architecture software platform aimed at providing smartcities services on top of 3D urban models. 3D city models are the basis of many applications and can became the platform for integrating city information within the Smart-Cites context. In particular the paper will investigate how the efficient visualisation of 3D city models using different levels of detail (LODs) is one of the pivotal technological challenge to support Smart-Cities applications. The goal is to provide to the final user realistic and abstract 3D representations of the urban environment and the possibility to interact with a massive amounts of semantic information contained into the geospatial 3D city model. The proposed solution, using OCG standards and a custom service to provide 3D city models, lets the users to consume the services and interact with the 3D model via Web in a more effective way.

  13. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  14. Acquiring 3-D information about thick objects from differential interference contrast images using texture extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, Heidy; Brooks, Dana; Dimarzio, Charles

    2010-07-01

    The extraction of 3-D morphological information about thick objects is explored in this work. We extract this information from 3-D differential interference contrast (DIC) images by applying a texture detection method. Texture extraction methods have been successfully used in different applications to study biological samples. A 3-D texture image is obtained by applying a local entropy-based texture extraction method. The use of this method to detect regions of blastocyst mouse embryos that are used in assisted reproduction techniques such as in vitro fertilization is presented as an example. Results demonstrate the potential of using texture detection methods to improve morphological analysis of thick samples, which is relevant to many biomedical and biological studies. Fluorescence and optical quadrature microscope phase images are used for validation.

  15. A Workstation for Interactive Display and Quantitative Analysis of 3-D and 4-D Biomedical Images

    PubMed Central

    Robb, R.A.; Heffeman, P.B.; Camp, J.J.; Hanson, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    The capability to extract objective and quantitatively accurate information from 3-D radiographic biomedical images has not kept pace with the capabilities to produce the images themselves. This is rather an ironic paradox, since on the one hand the new 3-D and 4-D imaging capabilities promise significant potential for providing greater specificity and sensitivity (i.e., precise objective discrimination and accurate quantitative measurement of body tissue characteristics and function) in clinical diagnostic and basic investigative imaging procedures than ever possible before, but on the other hand, the momentous advances in computer and associated electronic imaging technology which have made these 3-D imaging capabilities possible have not been concomitantly developed for full exploitation of these capabilities. Therefore, we have developed a powerful new microcomputer-based system which permits detailed investigations and evaluation of 3-D and 4-D (dynamic 3-D) biomedical images. The system comprises a special workstation to which all the information in a large 3-D image data base is accessible for rapid display, manipulation, and measurement. The system provides important capabilities for simultaneously representing and analyzing both structural and functional data and their relationships in various organs of the body. This paper provides a detailed description of this system, as well as some of the rationale, background, theoretical concepts, and practical considerations related to system implementation. ImagesFigure 5Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16

  16. Egg accumulation with 3D embryos provides insight into the life history of a pterosaur.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Kellner, Alexander W A; Jiang, Shunxing; Cheng, Xin; Wang, Qiang; Ma, Yingxia; Paidoula, Yahefujiang; Rodrigues, Taissa; Chen, He; Sayão, Juliana M; Li, Ning; Zhang, Jialiang; Bantim, Renan A M; Meng, Xi; Zhang, Xinjun; Qiu, Rui; Zhou, Zhonghe

    2017-12-01

    Fossil eggs and embryos that provide unique information about the reproduction and early growth of vertebrates are exceedingly rare, particularly for pterosaurs. Here we report on hundreds of three-dimensional (3D) eggs of the species Hamipterus tianshanensis from a Lower Cretaceous site in China, 16 of which contain embryonic remains. Computed tomography scanning, osteohistology, and micropreparation reveal that some bones lack extensive ossification in potentially late-term embryos, suggesting that hatchlings might have been flightless and less precocious than previously assumed. The geological context, including at least four levels with embryos and eggs, indicates that this deposit was formed by a rare combination of events, with storms acting on a nesting ground. This discovery supports colonial nesting behavior and potential nesting site fidelity in the Pterosauria. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  17. MMDB: Entrez’s 3D-structure database

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanli; Anderson, John B.; Chen, Jie; Geer, Lewis Y.; He, Siqian; Hurwitz, David I.; Liebert, Cynthia A.; Madej, Thomas; Marchler, Gabriele H.; Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Panchenko, Anna R.; Shoemaker, Benjamin A.; Song, James S.; Thiessen, Paul A.; Yamashita, Roxanne A.; Bryant, Stephen H.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional structures are now known within many protein families and it is quite likely, in searching a sequence database, that one will encounter a homolog with known structure. The goal of Entrez’s 3D-structure database is to make this information, and the functional annotation it can provide, easily accessible to molecular biologists. To this end Entrez’s search engine provides three powerful features. (i) Sequence and structure neighbors; one may select all sequences similar to one of interest, for example, and link to any known 3D structures. (ii) Links between databases; one may search by term matching in MEDLINE, for example, and link to 3D structures reported in these articles. (iii) Sequence and structure visualization; identifying a homolog with known structure, one may view molecular-graphic and alignment displays, to infer approximate 3D structure. In this article we focus on two features of Entrez’s Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB) not described previously: links from individual biopolymer chains within 3D structures to a systematic taxonomy of organisms represented in molecular databases, and links from individual chains (and compact 3D domains within them) to structure neighbors, other chains (and 3D domains) with similar 3D structure. MMDB may be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=Structure. PMID:11752307

  18. Evaluating the utility of 3D TRUS image information in guiding intra-procedure registration for motion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Silva, Tharindu; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    In targeted 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy, patient and prostate movement during the procedure can cause target misalignments that hinder accurate sampling of pre-planned suspicious tissue locations. Multiple solutions have been proposed for motion compensation via registration of intra-procedural TRUS images to a baseline 3D TRUS image acquired at the beginning of the biopsy procedure. While 2D TRUS images are widely used for intra-procedural guidance, some solutions utilize richer intra-procedural images such as bi- or multi-planar TRUS or 3D TRUS, acquired by specialized probes. In this work, we measured the impact of such richer intra-procedural imaging on motion compensation accuracy, to evaluate the tradeoff between cost and complexity of intra-procedural imaging versus improved motion compensation. We acquired baseline and intra-procedural 3D TRUS images from 29 patients at standard sextant-template biopsy locations. We used the planes extracted from the 3D intra-procedural scans to simulate 2D and 3D information available in different clinically relevant scenarios for registration. The registration accuracy was evaluated by calculating the target registration error (TRE) using manually identified homologous fiducial markers (micro-calcifications). Our results indicate that TRE improves gradually when the number of intra-procedural imaging planes used in registration is increased. Full 3D TRUS information helps the registration algorithm to robustly converge to more accurate solutions. These results can also inform the design of a fail-safe workflow during motion compensation in a system using a tracked 2D TRUS probe, by prescribing rotational acquisitions that can be performed quickly and easily by the physician immediately prior to needle targeting.

  19. Case study: Beauty and the Beast 3D: benefits of 3D viewing for 2D to 3D conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy Turner, Tara

    2010-02-01

    From the earliest stages of the Beauty and the Beast 3D conversion project, the advantages of accurate desk-side 3D viewing was evident. While designing and testing the 2D to 3D conversion process, the engineering team at Walt Disney Animation Studios proposed a 3D viewing configuration that not only allowed artists to "compose" stereoscopic 3D but also improved efficiency by allowing artists to instantly detect which image features were essential to the stereoscopic appeal of a shot and which features had minimal or even negative impact. At a time when few commercial 3D monitors were available and few software packages provided 3D desk-side output, the team designed their own prototype devices and collaborated with vendors to create a "3D composing" workstation. This paper outlines the display technologies explored, final choices made for Beauty and the Beast 3D, wish-lists for future development and a few rules of thumb for composing compelling 2D to 3D conversions.

  20. One-shot 3D scanning by combining sparse landmarks with dense gradient information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Martino, Matías; Flores, Jorge; Ferrari, José A.

    2018-06-01

    Scene understanding is one of the most challenging and popular problems in the field of robotics and computer vision and the estimation of 3D information is at the core of most of these applications. In order to retrieve the 3D structure of a test surface we propose a single shot approach that combines dense gradient information with sparse absolute measurements. To that end, we designed a colored pattern that codes fine horizontal and vertical fringes, with sparse corners landmarks. By measuring the deformation (bending) of horizontal and vertical fringes, we are able to estimate surface local variations (i.e. its gradient field). Then corner sparse landmarks are detected and matched to infer spare absolute information about the test surface height. Local gradient information is combined with the sparse absolute values which work as anchors to guide the integration process. We show that this can be mathematically done in a very compact and intuitive way by properly defining a Poisson-like partial differential equation. Then we address in detail how the problem can be formulated in a discrete domain and how it can be practically solved by straight forward linear numerical solvers. Finally, validation experiment are presented.

  1. 3D Imaging with Structured Illumination for Advanced Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle; Dagel, Amber Lynn; Kast, Brian A.

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) information in a physical security system is a highly useful dis- criminator. The two-dimensional data from an imaging systems fails to provide target dis- tance and three-dimensional motion vector, which can be used to reduce nuisance alarm rates and increase system effectiveness. However, 3D imaging devices designed primarily for use in physical security systems are uncommon. This report discusses an architecture favorable to physical security systems; an inexpensive snapshot 3D imaging system utilizing a simple illumination system. The method of acquiring 3D data, tests to understand illumination de- sign, and software modifications possible to maximize information gathering capabilitymore » are discussed.« less

  2. Extra Dimensions: 3D and Time in PDF Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Norman A.; /SLAC

    2011-11-10

    High energy physics is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standardmore » Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide audience. In this talk, we present examples of HEP applications which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input. Using this technique, higher dimensional data, such as LEGO plots or time-dependent information can be included in PDF files. In principle, a complete event display, with full interactivity, can be incorporated into a PDF file. This would allow the end user not only to customize the view and representation of the data, but to access the underlying data itself.« less

  3. Estimation of 3D shape from image orientations.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Roland W; Holtmann-Rice, Daniel; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2011-12-20

    One of the main functions of vision is to estimate the 3D shape of objects in our environment. Many different visual cues, such as stereopsis, motion parallax, and shading, are thought to be involved. One important cue that remains poorly understood comes from surface texture markings. When a textured surface is slanted in 3D relative to the observer, the surface patterns appear compressed in the retinal image, providing potentially important information about 3D shape. What is not known, however, is how the brain actually measures this information from the retinal image. Here, we explain how the key information could be extracted by populations of cells tuned to different orientations and spatial frequencies, like those found in the primary visual cortex. To test this theory, we created stimuli that selectively stimulate such cell populations, by "smearing" (filtering) images of 2D random noise into specific oriented patterns. We find that the resulting patterns appear vividly 3D, and that increasing the strength of the orientation signals progressively increases the sense of 3D shape, even though the filtering we apply is physically inconsistent with what would occur with a real object. This finding suggests we have isolated key mechanisms used by the brain to estimate shape from texture. Crucially, we also find that adapting the visual system's orientation detectors to orthogonal patterns causes unoriented random noise to look like a specific 3D shape. Together these findings demonstrate a crucial role of orientation detectors in the perception of 3D shape.

  4. 30 CFR 778.12 - Providing permit history information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Providing permit history information. 778.12 Section 778.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... INFORMATION § 778.12 Providing permit history information. (a) You, the applicant, must provide a list of all...

  5. 30 CFR 778.12 - Providing permit history information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Providing permit history information. 778.12 Section 778.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... INFORMATION § 778.12 Providing permit history information. (a) You, the applicant, must provide a list of all...

  6. 30 CFR 778.12 - Providing permit history information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Providing permit history information. 778.12 Section 778.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... INFORMATION § 778.12 Providing permit history information. (a) You, the applicant, must provide a list of all...

  7. 30 CFR 778.12 - Providing permit history information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Providing permit history information. 778.12 Section 778.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... INFORMATION § 778.12 Providing permit history information. (a) You, the applicant, must provide a list of all...

  8. Distributed 3D Information Visualization - Towards Integration of the Dynamic 3D Graphics and Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vucinic, Dean; Deen, Danny; Oanta, Emil; Batarilo, Zvonimir; Lacor, Chris

    This paper focuses on visualization and manipulation of graphical content in distributed network environments. The developed graphical middleware and 3D desktop prototypes were specialized for situational awareness. This research was done in the LArge Scale COllaborative decision support Technology (LASCOT) project, which explored and combined software technologies to support human-centred decision support system for crisis management (earthquake, tsunami, flooding, airplane or oil-tanker incidents, chemical, radio-active or other pollutants spreading, etc.). The performed state-of-the-art review did not identify any publicly available large scale distributed application of this kind. Existing proprietary solutions rely on the conventional technologies and 2D representations. Our challenge was to apply the "latest" available technologies, such Java3D, X3D and SOAP, compatible with average computer graphics hardware. The selected technologies are integrated and we demonstrate: the flow of data, which originates from heterogeneous data sources; interoperability across different operating systems and 3D visual representations to enhance the end-users interactions.

  9. 30 CFR 252.3 - Oil and gas data and information to be provided for use in the OCS Oil and Gas Information Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oil and gas data and information to be provided for use in the OCS Oil and Gas Information Program. 252.3 Section 252.3 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) OIL AND GAS INFORMATION PROGRAM § 252.3 Oil and gas data and...

  10. Acute D2/D3 dopaminergic agonism but chronic D2/D3 antagonism prevents NMDA antagonist neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Farber, Nuri B; Nemmers, Brian; Noguchi, Kevin K

    2006-09-15

    Antagonists of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor, most likely by producing disinhibtion in complex circuits, acutely produce psychosis and cognitive disturbances in humans, and neurotoxicity in rodents. Studies examining NMDA Receptor Hypofunction (NRHypo) neurotoxicity in animals, therefore, may provide insights into the pathophysiology of psychotic disorders. Dopaminergic D2 and/or D3 agents can modify psychosis over days to weeks, suggesting involvement of these transmitter system(s). We studied the ability of D2/D3 agonists and antagonists to modify NRHypo neurotoxicity both after a one-time acute exposure and after chronic daily exposure. Here we report that D2/D3 dopamine agonists, probably via D3 receptors, prevent NRHypo neurotoxicity when given acutely. The protective effect with D2/D3 agonists is not seen after chronic daily dosing. In contrast, the antipsychotic haloperidol does not affect NRHypo neurotoxicity when given acutely at D2/D3 doses. However, after chronic daily dosing of 1, 3, or 5 weeks, haloperidol does prevent NRHypo neurotoxicity with longer durations producing greater protection. Understanding the changes that occur in the NRHypo circuit after chronic exposure to dopaminergic agents could provide important clues into the pathophysiology of psychotic disorders.

  11. FastScript3D - A Companion to Java 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Patti

    2005-01-01

    FastScript3D is a computer program, written in the Java 3D(TM) programming language, that establishes an alternative language that helps users who lack expertise in Java 3D to use Java 3D for constructing three-dimensional (3D)-appearing graphics. The FastScript3D language provides a set of simple, intuitive, one-line text-string commands for creating, controlling, and animating 3D models. The first word in a string is the name of a command; the rest of the string contains the data arguments for the command. The commands can also be used as an aid to learning Java 3D. Developers can extend the language by adding custom text-string commands. The commands can define new 3D objects or load representations of 3D objects from files in formats compatible with such other software systems as X3D. The text strings can be easily integrated into other languages. FastScript3D facilitates communication between scripting languages [which enable programming of hyper-text markup language (HTML) documents to interact with users] and Java 3D. The FastScript3D language can be extended and customized on both the scripting side and the Java 3D side.

  12. ROOFN3D: Deep Learning Training Data for 3d Building Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichmann, A.; Agoub, A.; Kada, M.

    2018-05-01

    Machine learning methods have gained in importance through the latest development of artificial intelligence and computer hardware. Particularly approaches based on deep learning have shown that they are able to provide state-of-the-art results for various tasks. However, the direct application of deep learning methods to improve the results of 3D building reconstruction is often not possible due, for example, to the lack of suitable training data. To address this issue, we present RoofN3D which provides a new 3D point cloud training dataset that can be used to train machine learning models for different tasks in the context of 3D building reconstruction. It can be used, among others, to train semantic segmentation networks or to learn the structure of buildings and the geometric model construction. Further details about RoofN3D and the developed data preparation framework, which enables the automatic derivation of training data, are described in this paper. Furthermore, we provide an overview of other available 3D point cloud training data and approaches from current literature in which solutions for the application of deep learning to unstructured and not gridded 3D point cloud data are presented.

  13. A geographic information system-based 3D city estate modeling and simulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Xiaoli; Li, Sha

    2015-12-01

    This paper introduces a 3D city simulation system which is based on geographic information system (GIS), covering all commercial housings of the city. A regional- scale, GIS-based approach is used to capture, describe, and track the geographical attributes of each house in the city. A sorting algorithm of "Benchmark + Parity Rate" is developed to cluster houses with similar spatial and construction attributes. This system is applicable for digital city modeling, city planning, housing evaluation, housing monitoring, and visualizing housing transaction. Finally, taking Jingtian area of Shenzhen as an example, the each unit of 35,997 houses in the area could be displayed, tagged, and easily tracked by the GIS-based city modeling and simulation system. The match market real conditions well and can be provided to house buyers as reference.

  14. Registering 2D and 3D imaging data of bone during healing.

    PubMed

    Hoerth, Rebecca M; Baum, Daniel; Knötel, David; Prohaska, Steffen; Willie, Bettina M; Duda, Georg N; Hege, Hans-Christian; Fratzl, Peter; Wagermaier, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    PURPOSE/AIMS OF THE STUDY: Bone's hierarchical structure can be visualized using a variety of methods. Many techniques, such as light and electron microscopy generate two-dimensional (2D) images, while micro-computed tomography (µCT) allows a direct representation of the three-dimensional (3D) structure. In addition, different methods provide complementary structural information, such as the arrangement of organic or inorganic compounds. The overall aim of the present study is to answer bone research questions by linking information of different 2D and 3D imaging techniques. A great challenge in combining different methods arises from the fact that they usually reflect different characteristics of the real structure. We investigated bone during healing by means of µCT and a couple of 2D methods. Backscattered electron images were used to qualitatively evaluate the tissue's calcium content and served as a position map for other experimental data. Nanoindentation and X-ray scattering experiments were performed to visualize mechanical and structural properties. We present an approach for the registration of 2D data in a 3D µCT reference frame, where scanning electron microscopies serve as a methodic link. Backscattered electron images are perfectly suited for registration into µCT reference frames, since both show structures based on the same physical principles. We introduce specific registration tools that have been developed to perform the registration process in a semi-automatic way. By applying this routine, we were able to exactly locate structural information (e.g. mineral particle properties) in the 3D bone volume. In bone healing studies this will help to better understand basic formation, remodeling and mineralization processes.

  15. Extracting 3d Semantic Information from Video Surveillance System Using Deep Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. S.; Cao, J.; Mao, B.; Shen, D. Q.

    2018-04-01

    At present, intelligent video analysis technology has been widely used in various fields. Object tracking is one of the important part of intelligent video surveillance, but the traditional target tracking technology based on the pixel coordinate system in images still exists some unavoidable problems. Target tracking based on pixel can't reflect the real position information of targets, and it is difficult to track objects across scenes. Based on the analysis of Zhengyou Zhang's camera calibration method, this paper presents a method of target tracking based on the target's space coordinate system after converting the 2-D coordinate of the target into 3-D coordinate. It can be seen from the experimental results: Our method can restore the real position change information of targets well, and can also accurately get the trajectory of the target in space.

  16. Clinical 3D printing: A protected health information (PHI) and compliance perspective.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Henry; Kamali, Parisa; Lin, Samuel J; Halamka, John D

    2018-07-01

    Advanced manufacturing techniques such as 3-dimensional (3D) printing, while mature in other industries, are starting to become more commonplace in clinical care. Clinicians are producing physical objects based on patient clinical data for use in planning care and educating patients, all of which should be managed like any other healthcare system data, except it exists in the "real" world. There are currently no provisions in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) either in its original 1996 form or in more recent updates that address the nature of physical representations of clinical data. We submit that if we define the source data as protected health information (PHI), then the objects 3D printed from that data need to be treated as both (PHI), and if used clinically, part of the clinical record, and propose some basic guidelines for quality and privacy like all documentation until regulatory frameworks can catch up to this technology. Many of the mechanisms designed in the paper and film chart era will work well with 3D printed patient data. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The interactive presentation of 3D information obtained from reconstructed datasets and 3D placement of single histological sections with the 3D portable document format.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Bouke A; Soufan, Alexandre T; Hagoort, Jaco; Mohun, Timothy J; van den Hoff, Maurice J B; Hasman, Arie; Voorbraak, Frans P J M; Moorman, Antoon F M; Ruijter, Jan M

    2011-01-01

    Interpretation of the results of anatomical and embryological studies relies heavily on proper visualization of complex morphogenetic processes and patterns of gene expression in a three-dimensional (3D) context. However, reconstruction of complete 3D datasets is time consuming and often researchers study only a few sections. To help in understanding the resulting 2D data we developed a program (TRACTS) that places such arbitrary histological sections into a high-resolution 3D model of the developing heart. The program places sections correctly, robustly and as precisely as the best of the fits achieved by five morphology experts. Dissemination of 3D data is severely hampered by the 2D medium of print publication. Many insights gained from studying the 3D object are very hard to convey using 2D images and are consequently lost or cannot be verified independently. It is possible to embed 3D objects into a pdf document, which is a format widely used for the distribution of scientific papers. Using the freeware program Adobe Reader to interact with these 3D objects is reasonably straightforward; creating such objects is not. We have developed a protocol that describes, step by step, how 3D objects can be embedded into a pdf document. Both the use of TRACTS and the inclusion of 3D objects in pdf documents can help in the interpretation of 2D and 3D data, and will thus optimize communication on morphological issues in developmental biology.

  18. The impact of computer display height and desk design on 3D posture during information technology work by young adults.

    PubMed

    Straker, L; Burgess-Limerick, R; Pollock, C; Murray, K; Netto, K; Coleman, J; Skoss, R

    2008-04-01

    Computer display height and desk design to allow forearm support are two critical design features of workstations for information technology tasks. However there is currently no 3D description of head and neck posture with different computer display heights and no direct comparison to paper based information technology tasks. There is also inconsistent evidence on the effect of forearm support on posture and no evidence on whether these features interact. This study compared the 3D head, neck and upper limb postures of 18 male and 18 female young adults whilst working with different display and desk design conditions. There was no substantial interaction between display height and desk design. Lower display heights increased head and neck flexion with more spinal asymmetry when working with paper. The curved desk, designed to provide forearm support, increased scapula elevation/protraction and shoulder flexion/abduction.

  19. A computational approach for coupled 1D and 2D/3D CFD modelling of pulse Tube cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, T.; Spoor, P. S.; Ghiaasiaan, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    The physics behind Stirling-type cryocoolers are complicated. One dimensional (1D) simulation tools offer limited details and accuracy, in particular for cryocoolers that have non-linear configurations. Multi-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) methods are useful but are computationally expensive in simulating cyrocooler systems in their entirety. In view of the fact that some components of a cryocooler, e.g., inertance tubes and compliance tanks, can be modelled as 1D components with little loss of critical information, a 1D-2D/3D coupled model was developed. Accordingly, one-dimensional - like components are represented by specifically developed routines. These routines can be coupled to CFD codes and provide boundary conditions for 2D/3D CFD simulations. The developed coupled model, while preserving sufficient flow field details, is two orders of magnitude faster than equivalent 2D/3D CFD models. The predictions show good agreement with experimental data and 2D/3D CFD model.

  20. 5 CFR 1640.6 - Methods of providing information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Methods of providing information. 1640.6 Section 1640.6 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD PERIODIC PARTICIPANT STATEMENTS § 1640.6 Methods of providing information. The TSP will furnish the information described in this...

  1. 5 CFR 1640.6 - Methods of providing information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Methods of providing information. 1640.6 Section 1640.6 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD PERIODIC PARTICIPANT STATEMENTS § 1640.6 Methods of providing information. The TSP will furnish the information described in this...

  2. 3D Laser Scanner for Underwater Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Palomer, Albert; Ridao, Pere; Youakim, Dina; Ribas, David; Forest, Josep; Petillot, Yvan

    2018-04-04

    Nowadays, research in autonomous underwater manipulation has demonstrated simple applications like picking an object from the sea floor, turning a valve or plugging and unplugging a connector. These are fairly simple tasks compared with those already demonstrated by the mobile robotics community, which include, among others, safe arm motion within areas populated with a priori unknown obstacles or the recognition and location of objects based on their 3D model to grasp them. Kinect-like 3D sensors have contributed significantly to the advance of mobile manipulation providing 3D sensing capabilities in real-time at low cost. Unfortunately, the underwater robotics community is lacking a 3D sensor with similar capabilities to provide rich 3D information of the work space. In this paper, we present a new underwater 3D laser scanner and demonstrate its capabilities for underwater manipulation. In order to use this sensor in conjunction with manipulators, a calibration method to find the relative position between the manipulator and the 3D laser scanner is presented. Then, two different advanced underwater manipulation tasks beyond the state of the art are demonstrated using two different manipulation systems. First, an eight Degrees of Freedom (DoF) fixed-base manipulator system is used to demonstrate arm motion within a work space populated with a priori unknown fixed obstacles. Next, an eight DoF free floating Underwater Vehicle-Manipulator System (UVMS) is used to autonomously grasp an object from the bottom of a water tank.

  3. Volumetric 3D display using a DLP projection engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jason

    2012-03-01

    In this article, we describe a volumetric 3D display system based on the high speed DLPTM (Digital Light Processing) projection engine. Existing two-dimensional (2D) flat screen displays often lead to ambiguity and confusion in high-dimensional data/graphics presentation due to lack of true depth cues. Even with the help of powerful 3D rendering software, three-dimensional (3D) objects displayed on a 2D flat screen may still fail to provide spatial relationship or depth information correctly and effectively. Essentially, 2D displays have to rely upon capability of human brain to piece together a 3D representation from 2D images. Despite the impressive mental capability of human visual system, its visual perception is not reliable if certain depth cues are missing. In contrast, volumetric 3D display technologies to be discussed in this article are capable of displaying 3D volumetric images in true 3D space. Each "voxel" on a 3D image (analogous to a pixel in 2D image) locates physically at the spatial position where it is supposed to be, and emits light from that position toward omni-directions to form a real 3D image in 3D space. Such a volumetric 3D display provides both physiological depth cues and psychological depth cues to human visual system to truthfully perceive 3D objects. It yields a realistic spatial representation of 3D objects and simplifies our understanding to the complexity of 3D objects and spatial relationship among them.

  4. Application of 6D Building Information Model (6D BIM) for Business-storage Building in Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pučko, Zoran; Vincek, Dražen; Štrukelj, Andrej; Šuman, Nataša

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an application of 6D building information modelling (6D BIM) on a real business-storage building in Slovenia. First, features of building maintenance in general are described according to the current Slovenian legislation, and also a general principle of BIM is given. After that, step-by-step activities for modelling 6D BIM are exposed, namely from Element list for maintenance, determination of their lifetime and service measures, cost analysing and time analysing to 6D BIM modelling. The presented 6D BIM model is designed in a unique way in which cost analysis is performed as 5D BIM model with linked data to use BIM Construction Project Management Software (Vico Office), integrated with 3D BIM model, whereas time analysis as 4D BIM model is carried out as non-linked data with the help of Excel (without connection to 3D BIM model). The paper is intended to serve as a guide to the building owners to prepare 6D BIM and to provide an insight into the relevant dynamic information about intervals and costs for execution of maintenance works in the whole building lifecycle.

  5. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  6. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  7. 3D measurements in conventional X-ray imaging with RGB-D sensors.

    PubMed

    Albiol, Francisco; Corbi, Alberto; Albiol, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    A method for deriving 3D internal information in conventional X-ray settings is presented. It is based on the combination of a pair of radiographs from a patient and it avoids the use of X-ray-opaque fiducials and external reference structures. To achieve this goal, we augment an ordinary X-ray device with a consumer RGB-D camera. The patient' s rotation around the craniocaudal axis is tracked relative to this camera thanks to the depth information provided and the application of a modern surface-mapping algorithm. The measured spatial information is then translated to the reference frame of the X-ray imaging system. By using the intrinsic parameters of the diagnostic equipment, epipolar geometry, and X-ray images of the patient at different angles, 3D internal positions can be obtained. Both the RGB-D and X-ray instruments are first geometrically calibrated to find their joint spatial transformation. The proposed method is applied to three rotating phantoms. The first two consist of an anthropomorphic head and a torso, which are filled with spherical lead bearings at precise locations. The third one is made of simple foam and has metal needles of several known lengths embedded in it. The results show that it is possible to resolve anatomical positions and lengths with a millimetric level of precision. With the proposed approach, internal 3D reconstructed coordinates and distances can be provided to the physician. It also contributes to reducing the invasiveness of ordinary X-ray environments and can replace other types of clinical explorations that are mainly aimed at measuring or geometrically relating elements that are present inside the patient's body. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 3D light scanning macrography.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Keller, M; Robert, D

    2001-08-01

    The technique of 3D light scanning macrography permits the non-invasive surface scanning of small specimens at magnifications up to 200x. Obviating both the problem of limited depth of field inherent to conventional close-up macrophotography and the metallic coating required by scanning electron microscopy, 3D light scanning macrography provides three-dimensional digital images of intact specimens without the loss of colour, texture and transparency information. This newly developed technique offers a versatile, portable and cost-efficient method for the non-invasive digital and photographic documentation of small objects. Computer controlled device operation and digital image acquisition facilitate fast and accurate quantitative morphometric investigations, and the technique offers a broad field of research and educational applications in biological, medical and materials sciences.

  9. 12 CFR 989.3 - Requirement to provide financial and other information to the Finance Board and the Office of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirement to provide financial and other information to the Finance Board and the Office of Finance. 989.3 Section 989.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD OFFICE OF FINANCE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF THE BANKS § 989.3 Requirement to provide financial and other information to the...

  10. 3D documenatation of the petalaindera: digital heritage preservation methods using 3D laser scanner and photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, Harlina Md; Hazumi, Hazman; Hafizuddin Meli, Rafiq

    2018-01-01

    3D imaging technologies have undergone massive revolution in recent years. Despite this rapid development, documentation of 3D cultural assets in Malaysia is still very much reliant upon conventional techniques such as measured drawings and manual photogrammetry. There is very little progress towards exploring new methods or advanced technologies to convert 3D cultural assets into 3D visual representation and visualization models that are easily accessible for information sharing. In recent years, however, the advent of computer vision (CV) algorithms make it possible to reconstruct 3D geometry of objects by using image sequences from digital cameras, which are then processed by web services and freeware applications. This paper presents a completed stage of an exploratory study that investigates the potentials of using CV automated image-based open-source software and web services to reconstruct and replicate cultural assets. By selecting an intricate wooden boat, Petalaindera, this study attempts to evaluate the efficiency of CV systems and compare it with the application of 3D laser scanning, which is known for its accuracy, efficiency and high cost. The final aim of this study is to compare the visual accuracy of 3D models generated by CV system, and 3D models produced by 3D scanning and manual photogrammetry for an intricate subject such as the Petalaindera. The final objective is to explore cost-effective methods that could provide fundamental guidelines on the best practice approach for digital heritage in Malaysia.

  11. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A.; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K.; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J.; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B.; Grant, Gerald T.

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26562233

  12. Digital relief generation from 3D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meili; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Hongming; Qian, Kun; Chang, Jian; He, Dongjian

    2016-09-01

    It is difficult to extend image-based relief generation to high-relief generation, as the images contain insufficient height information. To generate reliefs from three-dimensional (3D) models, it is necessary to extract the height fields from the model, but this can only generate bas-reliefs. To overcome this problem, an efficient method is proposed to generate bas-reliefs and high-reliefs directly from 3D meshes. To produce relief features that are visually appropriate, the 3D meshes are first scaled. 3D unsharp masking is used to enhance the visual features in the 3D mesh, and average smoothing and Laplacian smoothing are implemented to achieve better smoothing results. A nonlinear variable scaling scheme is then employed to generate the final bas-reliefs and high-reliefs. Using the proposed method, relief models can be generated from arbitrary viewing positions with different gestures and combinations of multiple 3D models. The generated relief models can be printed by 3D printers. The proposed method provides a means of generating both high-reliefs and bas-reliefs in an efficient and effective way under the appropriate scaling factors.

  13. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist.

    PubMed

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B; Grant, Gerald T; Rybicki, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  14. Human microbiome visualization using 3D technology.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jason H; Lari, Richard Cowper Sal; Hill, Douglas; Hibberd, Patricia L; Madan, Juliette C

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technology has opened the door to the study of the human microbiome and its relationship with health and disease. This is both an opportunity and a significant biocomputing challenge. We present here a 3D visualization methodology and freely-available software package for facilitating the exploration and analysis of high-dimensional human microbiome data. Our visualization approach harnesses the power of commercial video game development engines to provide an interactive medium in the form of a 3D heat map for exploration of microbial species and their relative abundance in different patients. The advantage of this approach is that the third dimension provides additional layers of information that cannot be visualized using a traditional 2D heat map. We demonstrate the usefulness of this visualization approach using microbiome data collected from a sample of premature babies with and without sepsis.

  15. Learning to Provide 3D Virtual Reference: A Library Science Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Megan; Purpur, Geraldine; Abbott, Lisa T.

    2009-01-01

    In spring semester 2009, two of the authors taught LIB 5020--Information Sources & Services to graduate library science students at Appalachian State University. The course covers information seeking patterns and provides an overview of reference services. The course is also designed to examine and evaluate library reference materials and…

  16. Providing information regarding exposures in pregnancy: a survey of North American Teratology Information Services.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Rebecca L; Ungar, Wendy J; Einarson, Adrienne; Goodstadt, Michael; Koren, Gideon

    2008-04-01

    Teratology Information Services (TIS) provide information on exposures during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Maintaining ongoing funding is a challenge. The purpose was to gather descriptive information on current TIS operations. All North American TIS (16 American, 2 Canadian) completed a detailed survey. Service goal ranked as most important was correction of risk misperceptions. Inquiries were primarily for medications (mean 43.5%, S.D. 14.1), lactation exposures, and workplace exposures. Median employees per TIS: three (range 1-12.5). Two TIS only counsel health care professionals (HCPs). Main callers to remaining TIS were pregnant women (mean 46.8%, S.D. 22.8), physicians, and nurses. Calls per week varied (median 20, range 4-600). Median annual budget: US dollars 69,000 (range dollars 3000-335,000). Seventeen TIS collect patient data for research. This survey was the first to document TIS operations in North America and demonstrates a spectrum of clinical and research activities, and provides data for a future cost-benefit analysis of TIS.

  17. Creating 3D visualizations of MRI data: A brief guide.

    PubMed

    Madan, Christopher R

    2015-01-01

    While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data is itself 3D, it is often difficult to adequately present the results papers and slides in 3D. As a result, findings of MRI studies are often presented in 2D instead. A solution is to create figures that include perspective and can convey 3D information; such figures can sometimes be produced by standard functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis packages and related specialty programs. However, many options cannot provide functionality such as visualizing activation clusters that are both cortical and subcortical (i.e., a 3D glass brain), the production of several statistical maps with an identical perspective in the 3D rendering, or animated renderings. Here I detail an approach for creating 3D visualizations of MRI data that satisfies all of these criteria. Though a 3D 'glass brain' rendering can sometimes be difficult to interpret, they are useful in showing a more overall representation of the results, whereas the traditional slices show a more local view. Combined, presenting both 2D and 3D representations of MR images can provide a more comprehensive view of the study's findings.

  18. Creating 3D visualizations of MRI data: A brief guide

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data is itself 3D, it is often difficult to adequately present the results papers and slides in 3D. As a result, findings of MRI studies are often presented in 2D instead. A solution is to create figures that include perspective and can convey 3D information; such figures can sometimes be produced by standard functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis packages and related specialty programs. However, many options cannot provide functionality such as visualizing activation clusters that are both cortical and subcortical (i.e., a 3D glass brain), the production of several statistical maps with an identical perspective in the 3D rendering, or animated renderings. Here I detail an approach for creating 3D visualizations of MRI data that satisfies all of these criteria. Though a 3D ‘glass brain’ rendering can sometimes be difficult to interpret, they are useful in showing a more overall representation of the results, whereas the traditional slices show a more local view. Combined, presenting both 2D and 3D representations of MR images can provide a more comprehensive view of the study’s findings. PMID:26594340

  19. Two-dimensional confinement of 3d{1} electrons in LaTiO_{3}/LaAlO{3} multilayers.

    PubMed

    Seo, S S A; Han, M J; Hassink, G W J; Choi, W S; Moon, S J; Kim, J S; Susaki, T; Lee, Y S; Yu, J; Bernhard, C; Hwang, H Y; Rijnders, G; Blank, D H A; Keimer, B; Noh, T W

    2010-01-22

    We report spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements of the anisotropy of the interband transitions parallel and perpendicular to the planes of (LaTiO3)n(LaAlO3)5 multilayers with n=1-3. These provide direct information about the electronic structure of the two-dimensional (2D) 3d{1} state of the Ti ions. In combination with local density approximation, including a Hubbard U calculation, we suggest that 2D confinement in the TiO2 slabs lifts the degeneracy of the t{2g} states leaving only the planar d{xy} orbitals occupied. We outline that these multilayers can serve as a model system for the study of the t{2g} 2D Hubbard model.

  20. Vision-based building energy diagnostics and retrofit analysis using 3D thermography and building information modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, Youngjib

    localization issues of 2D thermal image-based inspection, a new computer vision-based method is presented for automated 3D spatio-thermal modeling of building environments from images and localizing the thermal images into the 3D reconstructed scenes, which helps better characterize the as-is condition of existing buildings in 3D. By using these models, auditors can conduct virtual walk-through in buildings and explore the as-is condition of building geometry and the associated thermal conditions in 3D. Second, to address the challenges in qualitative and subjective interpretation of visual data, a new model-based method is presented to convert the 3D thermal profiles of building environments into their associated energy performance metrics. More specifically, the Energy Performance Augmented Reality (EPAR) models are formed which integrate the actual 3D spatio-thermal models ('as-is') with energy performance benchmarks ('as-designed') in 3D. In the EPAR models, the presence and location of potential energy problems in building environments are inferred based on performance deviations. The as-is thermal resistances of the building assemblies are also calculated at the level of mesh vertex in 3D. Then, based on the historical weather data reflecting energy load for space conditioning, the amount of heat transfer that can be saved by improving the as-is thermal resistances of the defective areas to the recommended level is calculated, and the equivalent energy cost for this saving is estimated. The outcome provides building practitioners with unique information that can facilitate energy efficient retrofit decision-makings. This is a major departure from offhand calculations that are based on historical cost data of industry best practices. Finally, to improve the reliability of BIM-based energy performance modeling and analysis for existing buildings, a new model-based automated method is presented to map actual thermal resistance measurements at the level of 3D vertexes to the

  1. Evaluation of poison information services provided by a new poison information center.

    PubMed

    Churi, Shobha; Abraham, Lovin; Ramesh, M; Narahari, M G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the nature and quality of services provided by poison information center established at a tertiary-care teaching hospital, Mysore. This was a prospective observational study. The poison information center was officially established in September 2010 and began its functioning thereafter. The center is equipped with required resources and facility (e.g., text books, Poisindex, Drugdex, toll free telephone service, internet and online services) to provide poison information services. The poison information services provided by the center were recorded in documentation forms. The documentation form consists of numerous sections to collect information on: (a) Type of population (children, adult, elderly or pregnant) (b) poisoning agents (c) route of exposure (d) type of poisoning (intentional, accidental or environmental) (e) demographic details of patient (age, gender and bodyweight) (f) enquirer details (background, place of call and mode of request) (g) category and purpose of query and (h) details of provided service (information provided, mode of provision, time taken to provide information and references consulted). The nature and quality of poison information services provided was assessed using a quality assessment checklist developed in accordance with DSE/World Health Organization guidelines. Chi-Square test (χ(2)). A total of 419 queries were received by the center. A majority (n = 333; 79.5%) of the queries were asked by the doctors to provide optimal care (n = 400; 95.5%). Most of the queries were received during ward rounds (n = 201; 48.0%), followed by direct access (n = 147; 35.1%). The poison information services were predominantly provided through verbal communication (n = 352; 84.0%). Upon receipt of queries, the required service was provided immediately (n = 103; 24.6%) or within 10-20 min (n = 296; 70.6%). The queries were mainly related to intentional poisoning (n = 258; 64.5%), followed by accidental poisoning

  2. Scop3D: three-dimensional visualization of sequence conservation.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Tessa; Vermaere, Stijn; Schepens, Bert; Saelens, Xavier; Van Gucht, Steven; Martens, Lennart; Vandermarliere, Elien

    2015-04-01

    The integration of a protein's structure with its known sequence variation provides insight on how that protein evolves, for instance in terms of (changing) function or immunogenicity. Yet, collating the corresponding sequence variants into a multiple sequence alignment, calculating each position's conservation, and mapping this information back onto a relevant structure is not straightforward. We therefore built the Sequence Conservation on Protein 3D structure (scop3D) tool to perform these tasks automatically. The output consists of two modified PDB files in which the B-values for each position are replaced by the percentage sequence conservation, or the information entropy for each position, respectively. Furthermore, text files with absolute and relative amino acid occurrences for each position are also provided, along with snapshots of the protein from six distinct directions in space. The visualization provided by scop3D can for instance be used as an aid in vaccine development or to identify antigenic hotspots, which we here demonstrate based on an analysis of the fusion proteins of human respiratory syncytial virus and mumps virus. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. An annotation system for 3D fluid flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughlin, Maria M.; Hughes, John F.

    1995-01-01

    Annotation is a key activity of data analysis. However, current systems for data analysis focus almost exclusively on visualization. We propose a system which integrates annotations into a visualization system. Annotations are embedded in 3D data space, using the Post-it metaphor. This embedding allows contextual-based information storage and retrieval, and facilitates information sharing in collaborative environments. We provide a traditional database filter and a Magic Lens filter to create specialized views of the data. The system has been customized for fluid flow applications, with features which allow users to store parameters of visualization tools and sketch 3D volumes.

  4. 2D-3D registration using gradient-based MI for image guided surgery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Yeny; Chen, Xuanyi; Wakid, Mike; Bielamowicz, Steve; Hahn, James

    2011-03-01

    Registration of preoperative CT data to intra-operative video images is necessary not only to compare the outcome of the vocal fold after surgery with the preplanned shape but also to provide the image guidance for fusion of all imaging modalities. We propose a 2D-3D registration method using gradient-based mutual information. The 3D CT scan is aligned to 2D endoscopic images by finding the corresponding viewpoint between the real camera for endoscopic images and the virtual camera for CT scans. Even though mutual information has been successfully used to register different imaging modalities, it is difficult to robustly register the CT rendered image to the endoscopic image due to varying light patterns and shape of the vocal fold. The proposed method calculates the mutual information in the gradient images as well as original images, assigning more weight to the high gradient regions. The proposed method can emphasize the effect of vocal fold and allow a robust matching regardless of the surface illumination. To find the viewpoint with maximum mutual information, a downhill simplex method is applied in a conditional multi-resolution scheme which leads to a less-sensitive result to local maxima. To validate the registration accuracy, we evaluated the sensitivity to initial viewpoint of preoperative CT. Experimental results showed that gradient-based mutual information provided robust matching not only for two identical images with different viewpoints but also for different images acquired before and after surgery. The results also showed that conditional multi-resolution scheme led to a more accurate registration than single-resolution.

  5. Human factors guidelines for applications of 3D perspectives: a literature review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Sharon; Fitzhugh, Elisabeth; Aleva, Denise

    2009-05-01

    Once considered too processing-intense for general utility, application of the third dimension to convey complex information is facilitated by the recent proliferation of technological advancements in computer processing, 3D displays, and 3D perspective (2.5D) renderings within a 2D medium. The profusion of complex and rapidly-changing dynamic information being conveyed in operational environments has elevated interest in possible military applications of 3D technologies. 3D can be a powerful mechanism for clearer information portrayal, facilitating rapid and accurate identification of key elements essential to mission performance and operator safety. However, implementation of 3D within legacy systems can be costly, making integration prohibitive. Therefore, identifying which tasks may benefit from 3D or 2.5D versus simple 2D visualizations is critical. Unfortunately, there is no "bible" of human factors guidelines for usability optimization of 2D, 2.5D, or 3D visualizations nor for determining which display best serves a particular application. Establishing such guidelines would provide an invaluable tool for designers and operators. Defining issues common to each will enhance design effectiveness. This paper presents the results of an extensive review of open source literature addressing 3D information displays, with particular emphasis on comparison of true 3D with 2D and 2.5D representations and their utility for military tasks. Seventy-five papers are summarized, highlighting militarily relevant applications of 3D visualizations and 2.5D perspective renderings. Based on these findings, human factors guidelines for when and how to use these visualizations, along with recommendations for further research are discussed.

  6. Projection-slice theorem based 2D-3D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bom, M. J.; Pluim, J. P. W.; Homan, R.; Timmer, J.; Bartels, L. W.

    2007-03-01

    In X-ray guided procedures, the surgeon or interventionalist is dependent on his or her knowledge of the patient's specific anatomy and the projection images acquired during the procedure by a rotational X-ray source. Unfortunately, these X-ray projections fail to give information on the patient's anatomy in the dimension along the projection axis. It would be very profitable to provide the surgeon or interventionalist with a 3D insight of the patient's anatomy that is directly linked to the X-ray images acquired during the procedure. In this paper we present a new robust 2D-3D registration method based on the Projection-Slice Theorem. This theorem gives us a relation between the pre-operative 3D data set and the interventional projection images. Registration is performed by minimizing a translation invariant similarity measure that is applied to the Fourier transforms of the images. The method was tested by performing multiple exhaustive searches on phantom data of the Circle of Willis and on a post-mortem human skull. Validation was performed visually by comparing the test projections to the ones that corresponded to the minimal value of the similarity measure. The Projection-Slice Theorem Based method was shown to be very effective and robust, and provides capture ranges up to 62 degrees. Experiments have shown that the method is capable of retrieving similar results when translations are applied to the projection images.

  7. R3D Align web server for global nucleotide to nucleotide alignments of RNA 3D structures.

    PubMed

    Rahrig, Ryan R; Petrov, Anton I; Leontis, Neocles B; Zirbel, Craig L

    2013-07-01

    The R3D Align web server provides online access to 'RNA 3D Align' (R3D Align), a method for producing accurate nucleotide-level structural alignments of RNA 3D structures. The web server provides a streamlined and intuitive interface, input data validation and output that is more extensive and easier to read and interpret than related servers. The R3D Align web server offers a unique Gallery of Featured Alignments, providing immediate access to pre-computed alignments of large RNA 3D structures, including all ribosomal RNAs, as well as guidance on effective use of the server and interpretation of the output. By accessing the non-redundant lists of RNA 3D structures provided by the Bowling Green State University RNA group, R3D Align connects users to structure files in the same equivalence class and the best-modeled representative structure from each group. The R3D Align web server is freely accessible at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3dalign/.

  8. 3D local feature BKD to extract road information from mobile laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Liu, Yuan; Dong, Zhen; Liang, Fuxun; Li, Bijun; Peng, Xiangyang

    2017-08-01

    Extracting road information from point clouds obtained through mobile laser scanning (MLS) is essential for autonomous vehicle navigation, and has hence garnered a growing amount of research interest in recent years. However, the performance of such systems is seriously affected due to varying point density and noise. This paper proposes a novel three-dimensional (3D) local feature called the binary kernel descriptor (BKD) to extract road information from MLS point clouds. The BKD consists of Gaussian kernel density estimation and binarization components to encode the shape and intensity information of the 3D point clouds that are fed to a random forest classifier to extract curbs and markings on the road. These are then used to derive road information, such as the number of lanes, the lane width, and intersections. In experiments, the precision and recall of the proposed feature for the detection of curbs and road markings on an urban dataset and a highway dataset were as high as 90%, thus showing that the BKD is accurate and robust against varying point density and noise.

  9. The dimension added by 3D scanning and 3D printing of meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vet, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    An overview for the 3D photodocumentation of meteorites is presented, focussing on two 3D scanning methods in relation to 3D printing. The 3D photodocumention of meteorites provides new ways for the digital preservation of culturally, historically or scientifically unique meteorites. It has the potential for becoming a new documentation standard of meteorites that can exist complementary to traditional photographic documentation. Notable applications include (i.) use of physical properties in dark flight-, strewn field-, or aerodynamic modelling; (ii.) collection research of meteorites curated by different museum collections, and (iii.) public dissemination of meteorite models as a resource for educational users. The possible applications provided by the additional dimension of 3D illustrate the benefits for the meteoritics community.

  10. Cross-correlating 2D and 3D galaxy surveys

    DOE PAGES

    Passaglia, Samuel; Manzotti, Alessandro; Dodelson, Scott

    2017-06-08

    Galaxy surveys probe both structure formation and the expansion rate, making them promising avenues for understanding the dark universe. Photometric surveys accurately map the 2D distribution of galaxy positions and shapes in a given redshift range, while spectroscopic surveys provide sparser 3D maps of the galaxy distribution. We present a way to analyse overlapping 2D and 3D maps jointly and without loss of information. We represent 3D maps using spherical Fourier-Bessel (sFB) modes, which preserve radial coverage while accounting for the spherical sky geometry, and we decompose 2D maps in a spherical harmonic basis. In these bases, a simple expression exists for the cross-correlation of the two fields. One very powerful application is the ability to simultaneously constrain the redshift distribution of the photometric sample, the sample biases, and cosmological parameters. We use our framework to show that combined analysis of DESI and LSST can improve cosmological constraints by factors ofmore » $${\\sim}1.2$$ to $${\\sim}1.8$$ on the region where they overlap relative to identically sized disjoint regions. We also show that in the overlap of DES and SDSS-III in Stripe 82, cross-correlating improves photo-$z$ parameter constraints by factors of $${\\sim}2$$ to $${\\sim}12$$ over internal photo-$z$ reconstructions.« less

  11. Cross-correlating 2D and 3D galaxy surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Passaglia, Samuel; Manzotti, Alessandro; Dodelson, Scott

    Galaxy surveys probe both structure formation and the expansion rate, making them promising avenues for understanding the dark universe. Photometric surveys accurately map the 2D distribution of galaxy positions and shapes in a given redshift range, while spectroscopic surveys provide sparser 3D maps of the galaxy distribution. We present a way to analyse overlapping 2D and 3D maps jointly and without loss of information. We represent 3D maps using spherical Fourier-Bessel (sFB) modes, which preserve radial coverage while accounting for the spherical sky geometry, and we decompose 2D maps in a spherical harmonic basis. In these bases, a simple expression exists for the cross-correlation of the two fields. One very powerful application is the ability to simultaneously constrain the redshift distribution of the photometric sample, the sample biases, and cosmological parameters. We use our framework to show that combined analysis of DESI and LSST can improve cosmological constraints by factors ofmore » $${\\sim}1.2$$ to $${\\sim}1.8$$ on the region where they overlap relative to identically sized disjoint regions. We also show that in the overlap of DES and SDSS-III in Stripe 82, cross-correlating improves photo-$z$ parameter constraints by factors of $${\\sim}2$$ to $${\\sim}12$$ over internal photo-$z$ reconstructions.« less

  12. MRS3D: 3D Spherical Wavelet Transform on the Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2011-12-01

    Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D Spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. We present a new fast Discrete Spherical Fourier-Bessel Transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel Transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We tested the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, applied a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and found we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. The new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, called MRS3D, is ideally suited to analysing and denoising future 3D spherical cosmological surveys; it uses a novel discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel Transform. MRS3D is based on two packages, IDL and Healpix and can be used only if these two packages have been installed.

  13. The simulation of 3D structure of groundwater system based on Java/Java3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Cui, Weihong; Wang, Peifa; Huang, Yongqi

    2007-06-01

    With the singular development of Internet technique and 3DGIS as well as VR and the imminence demand of 3D visualization from Groundwater information management field, how to display, roam, anatomize and analyze of 3D structure of Groundwater system on Internet have become a research hotspot in hydrogeology field. We simulated the 3D Groundwater resource structure of Taiyuan basin and implemented displaying, roaming, anatomizing and analyzing functions on Internet by Java 3D.

  14. Brandenburg 3D - a comprehensive 3D Subsurface Model, Conception of an Infrastructure Node and a Web Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschke, Dorit; Schilling, Maik; Simon, Andreas; Wächter, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    application enables an intuitive navigation through all available information and allows the visualization of geological maps (2D), seismic transects (2D/3D), wells (2D/3D), and the 3D-model. These achievements will alleviate spatial and geological data management within the German State Geological Offices and foster the interoperability of heterogeneous systems. It will provide guidance to a systematic subsurface management across system, domain and administrative boundaries on the basis of a federated spatial data infrastructure, and include the public in the decision processes (e-Governance). Yet, the interoperability of the systems has to be strongly propelled forward through agreements on standards that need to be decided upon in responsible committees. The project B3D is funded with resources from the European Fund for Regional Development (EFRE).

  15. 48 CFR 552.215-72 - Price Adjustment-Failure To Provide Accurate Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Price Adjustment-Failure... Provisions and Clauses 552.215-72 Price Adjustment—Failure To Provide Accurate Information. As prescribed in 515.408(d), insert the following clause: Price Adjustment—Failure To Provide Accurate Information (AUG...

  16. Neurally and ocularly informed graph-based models for searching 3D environments.

    PubMed

    Jangraw, David C; Wang, Jun; Lance, Brent J; Chang, Shih-Fu; Sajda, Paul

    2014-08-01

    As we move through an environment, we are constantly making assessments, judgments and decisions about the things we encounter. Some are acted upon immediately, but many more become mental notes or fleeting impressions-our implicit 'labeling' of the world. In this paper, we use physiological correlates of this labeling to construct a hybrid brain-computer interface (hBCI) system for efficient navigation of a 3D environment. First, we record electroencephalographic (EEG), saccadic and pupillary data from subjects as they move through a small part of a 3D virtual city under free-viewing conditions. Using machine learning, we integrate the neural and ocular signals evoked by the objects they encounter to infer which ones are of subjective interest to them. These inferred labels are propagated through a large computer vision graph of objects in the city, using semi-supervised learning to identify other, unseen objects that are visually similar to the labeled ones. Finally, the system plots an efficient route to help the subjects visit the 'similar' objects it identifies. We show that by exploiting the subjects' implicit labeling to find objects of interest instead of exploring naively, the median search precision is increased from 25% to 97%, and the median subject need only travel 40% of the distance to see 84% of the objects of interest. We also find that the neural and ocular signals contribute in a complementary fashion to the classifiers' inference of subjects' implicit labeling. In summary, we show that neural and ocular signals reflecting subjective assessment of objects in a 3D environment can be used to inform a graph-based learning model of that environment, resulting in an hBCI system that improves navigation and information delivery specific to the user's interests.

  17. Neurally and ocularly informed graph-based models for searching 3D environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jangraw, David C.; Wang, Jun; Lance, Brent J.; Chang, Shih-Fu; Sajda, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Objective. As we move through an environment, we are constantly making assessments, judgments and decisions about the things we encounter. Some are acted upon immediately, but many more become mental notes or fleeting impressions—our implicit ‘labeling’ of the world. In this paper, we use physiological correlates of this labeling to construct a hybrid brain-computer interface (hBCI) system for efficient navigation of a 3D environment. Approach. First, we record electroencephalographic (EEG), saccadic and pupillary data from subjects as they move through a small part of a 3D virtual city under free-viewing conditions. Using machine learning, we integrate the neural and ocular signals evoked by the objects they encounter to infer which ones are of subjective interest to them. These inferred labels are propagated through a large computer vision graph of objects in the city, using semi-supervised learning to identify other, unseen objects that are visually similar to the labeled ones. Finally, the system plots an efficient route to help the subjects visit the ‘similar’ objects it identifies. Main results. We show that by exploiting the subjects’ implicit labeling to find objects of interest instead of exploring naively, the median search precision is increased from 25% to 97%, and the median subject need only travel 40% of the distance to see 84% of the objects of interest. We also find that the neural and ocular signals contribute in a complementary fashion to the classifiers’ inference of subjects’ implicit labeling. Significance. In summary, we show that neural and ocular signals reflecting subjective assessment of objects in a 3D environment can be used to inform a graph-based learning model of that environment, resulting in an hBCI system that improves navigation and information delivery specific to the user’s interests.

  18. Pathways for Learning from 3D Technology

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, L. Mark; Rab, Saira S.; Rosen, Larry D.; Vasquez, Ludivina; Cheever, Nancy A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out if 3D stereoscopic presentation of information in a movie format changes a viewer's experience of the movie content. Four possible pathways from 3D presentation to memory and learning were considered: a direct connection based on cognitive neuroscience research; a connection through "immersion" in that 3D presentations could provide additional sensorial cues (e.g., depth cues) that lead to a higher sense of being surrounded by the stimulus; a connection through general interest such that 3D presentation increases a viewer’s interest that leads to greater attention paid to the stimulus (e.g., "involvement"); and a connection through discomfort, with the 3D goggles causing discomfort that interferes with involvement and thus with memory. The memories of 396 participants who viewed two-dimensional (2D) or 3D movies at movie theaters in Southern California were tested. Within three days of viewing a movie, participants filled out an online anonymous questionnaire that queried them about their movie content memories, subjective movie-going experiences (including emotional reactions and "presence") and demographic backgrounds. The responses to the questionnaire were subjected to path analyses in which several different links between 3D presentation to memory (and other variables) were explored. The results showed there were no effects of 3D presentation, either directly or indirectly, upon memory. However, the largest effects of 3D presentation were on emotions and immersion, with 3D presentation leading to reduced positive emotions, increased negative emotions and lowered immersion, compared to 2D presentations. PMID:28078331

  19. 3D Visualization Development of SIUE Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellutla, Shravya

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has progressed from the traditional map-making to the modern technology where the information can be created, edited, managed and analyzed. Like any other models, maps are simplified representations of real world. Hence visualization plays an essential role in the applications of GIS. The use of sophisticated visualization tools and methods, especially three dimensional (3D) modeling, has been rising considerably due to the advancement of technology. There are currently many off-the-shelf technologies available in the market to build 3D GIS models. One of the objectives of this research was to examine the available ArcGIS and its extensions for 3D modeling and visualization and use them to depict a real world scenario. Furthermore, with the advent of the web, a platform for accessing and sharing spatial information on the Internet, it is possible to generate interactive online maps. Integrating Internet capacity with GIS functionality redefines the process of sharing and processing the spatial information. Enabling a 3D map online requires off-the-shelf GIS software, 3D model builders, web server, web applications and client server technologies. Such environments are either complicated or expensive because of the amount of hardware and software involved. Therefore, the second objective of this research was to investigate and develop simpler yet cost-effective 3D modeling approach that uses available ArcGIS suite products and the free 3D computer graphics software for designing 3D world scenes. Both ArcGIS Explorer and ArcGIS Online will be used to demonstrate the way of sharing and distributing 3D geographic information on the Internet. A case study of the development of 3D campus for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is demonstrated.

  20. 2D and 3D optical diagnostic techniques applied to Madonna dei Fusi by Leonardo da Vinci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, R.; Gambino, M. C.; Greco, M.; Marras, L.; Materazzi, M.; Pampaloni, E.; Pelagotti, A.; Pezzati, L.; Poggi, P.; Sanapo, C.

    2005-06-01

    3D measurement and modelling have been traditionally applied to statues, buildings, archeological sites or similar large structures, but rarely to paintings. Recently, however, 3D measurements have been performed successfully also on easel paintings, allowing to detect and document the painting's surface. We used 3D models to integrate the results of various 2D imaging techniques on a common reference frame. These applications show how the 3D shape information, complemented with 2D colour maps as well as with other types of sensory data, provide the most interesting information. The 3D data acquisition was carried out by means of two devices: a high-resolution laser micro-profilometer, composed of a commercial distance meter mounted on a scanning device, and a laser-line scanner. The 2D data acquisitions were carried out using a scanning device for simultaneous RGB colour imaging and IR reflectography, and a UV fluorescence multispectral image acquisition system. We present here the results of the techniques described, applied to the analysis of an important painting of the Italian Reinassance: `Madonna dei Fusi', attributed to Leonardo da Vinci.

  1. CFL3D Version 6.4-General Usage and Aeroelastic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2006-01-01

    This document contains the course notes on the computational fluid dynamics code CFL3D version 6.4. It is intended to provide from basic to advanced users the information necessary to successfully use the code for a broad range of cases. Much of the course covers capability that has been a part of previous versions of the code, with material compiled from a CFL3D v5.0 manual and from the CFL3D v6 web site prior to the current release. This part of the material is presented to users of the code not familiar with computational fluid dynamics. There is new capability in CFL3D version 6.4 presented here that has not previously been published. There are also outdated features no longer used or recommended in recent releases of the code. The information offered here supersedes earlier manuals and updates outdated usage. Where current usage supersedes older versions, notation of that is made. These course notes also provides hints for usage, code installation and examples not found elsewhere.

  2. Internet health information in the patient-provider dialogue.

    PubMed

    Hong, Traci

    2008-10-01

    A patient discussing Internet health information with a health care provider (referred to as "patient-provider communication about Internet health information") can contribute positively to health outcomes. Although research has found that once Internet access is achieved, there are no ethnic differences in Internet health information seeking, it is unclear if there are ethnic differences in patient-provider communication about Internet health information. To help fill this gap in the literature, the National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey 2005 was analyzed with Stata 9. Two sets of logistic regression analyses were conducted, one for a subsample of Internet users (n = 3,244) and one for a subsample of Internet users who are first-generation immigrants (n = 563). The dependent variable was patient-provider communication about Internet health information, which assessed whether survey participants had discussed online health information with a health care provider. The predictor variables included trust of health care provider, trust of online health information, Internet use, health care coverage, frequency of visits to health care provider, health status, and demographics. Among all Internet users, Whites had higher levels of patient-provider communication about Internet health information than Blacks and Asians. Similarly, among Internet users who are immigrants, Whites had higher levels of patient-provider communication about Internet health information than Blacks and Asians. While the digital divide is narrowing in terms of Internet access, racial differences in patient-provider communication about Internet health information may undermine the potential benefits of the information age.

  3. Improving 3d Spatial Queries Search: Newfangled Technique of Space Filling Curves in 3d City Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uznir, U.; Anton, F.; Suhaibah, A.; Rahman, A. A.; Mioc, D.

    2013-09-01

    The advantages of three dimensional (3D) city models can be seen in various applications including photogrammetry, urban and regional planning, computer games, etc.. They expand the visualization and analysis capabilities of Geographic Information Systems on cities, and they can be developed using web standards. However, these 3D city models consume much more storage compared to two dimensional (2D) spatial data. They involve extra geometrical and topological information together with semantic data. Without a proper spatial data clustering method and its corresponding spatial data access method, retrieving portions of and especially searching these 3D city models, will not be done optimally. Even though current developments are based on an open data model allotted by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) called CityGML, its XML-based structure makes it challenging to cluster the 3D urban objects. In this research, we propose an opponent data constellation technique of space-filling curves (3D Hilbert curves) for 3D city model data representation. Unlike previous methods, that try to project 3D or n-dimensional data down to 2D or 3D using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) or Hilbert mappings, in this research, we extend the Hilbert space-filling curve to one higher dimension for 3D city model data implementations. The query performance was tested using a CityGML dataset of 1,000 building blocks and the results are presented in this paper. The advantages of implementing space-filling curves in 3D city modeling will improve data retrieval time by means of optimized 3D adjacency, nearest neighbor information and 3D indexing. The Hilbert mapping, which maps a subinterval of the [0, 1] interval to the corresponding portion of the d-dimensional Hilbert's curve, preserves the Lebesgue measure and is Lipschitz continuous. Depending on the applications, several alternatives are possible in order to cluster spatial data together in the third dimension compared to its

  4. The 3D Elevation Program—Landslide recognition, hazard assessment, and mitigation support

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Carswell, Jr., William J.

    2017-01-27

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Landslide Hazards Program conducts landslide hazard assessments, pursues landslide investigations and forecasts, provides technical assistance to respond to landslide emergencies, and engages in outreach. All of these activities benefit from the availability of high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) elevation information in the form of light detection and ranging (lidar) data and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IfSAR) data. Research on landslide processes addresses critical questions of where and when landslides are likely to occur as well as their size, speed, and effects. This understanding informs the development of methods and tools for hazard assessment and situational awareness used to guide efforts to avoid or mitigate landslide impacts. Such research is essential for the USGS to provide improved information on landslide potential associated with severe storms, earthquakes, volcanic activity, coastal wave erosion, and wildfire burn areas.Decisionmakers in government and the private sector increasingly depend on information the USGS provides before, during, and following disasters so that communities can live, work, travel, and build safely. The USGS 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) provides the programmatic infrastructure to generate and supply lidar-derived superior terrain data to address landslide applications and a wide range of other urgent needs nationwide. By providing data to users, 3DEP reduces users’ costs and risks and allows them to concentrate on their mission objectives. 3DEP includes (1) data acquisition partnerships that leverage funding, (2) contracts with experienced private mapping firms, (3) technical expertise, lidar data standards, and specifications, and (4) most important, public access to high-quality 3D elevation data.

  5. Scoops3D: software to analyze 3D slope stability throughout a digital landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, Mark E.; Christian, Sarah B.; Brien, Dianne L.; Henderson, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    The computer program, Scoops3D, evaluates slope stability throughout a digital landscape represented by a digital elevation model (DEM). The program uses a three-dimensional (3D) method of columns approach to assess the stability of many (typically millions) potential landslides within a user-defined size range. For each potential landslide (or failure), Scoops3D assesses the stability of a rotational, spherical slip surface encompassing many DEM cells using a 3D version of either Bishop’s simplified method or the Ordinary (Fellenius) method of limit-equilibrium analysis. Scoops3D has several options for the user to systematically and efficiently search throughout an entire DEM, thereby incorporating the effects of complex surface topography. In a thorough search, each DEM cell is included in multiple potential failures, and Scoops3D records the lowest stability (factor of safety) for each DEM cell, as well as the size (volume or area) associated with each of these potential landslides. It also determines the least-stable potential failure for the entire DEM. The user has a variety of options for building a 3D domain, including layers or full 3D distributions of strength and pore-water pressures, simplistic earthquake loading, and unsaturated suction conditions. Results from Scoops3D can be readily incorporated into a geographic information system (GIS) or other visualization software. This manual includes information on the theoretical basis for the slope-stability analysis, requirements for constructing and searching a 3D domain, a detailed operational guide (including step-by-step instructions for using the graphical user interface [GUI] software, Scoops3D-i) and input/output file specifications, practical considerations for conducting an analysis, results of verification tests, and multiple examples illustrating the capabilities of Scoops3D. Easy-to-use software installation packages are available for the Windows or Macintosh operating systems; these packages

  6. Development of a stereo 3-D pictorial primary flight display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nataupsky, Mark; Turner, Timothy L.; Lane, Harold; Crittenden, Lucille

    1989-01-01

    Computer-generated displays are becoming increasingly popular in aerospace applications. The use of stereo 3-D technology provides an opportunity to present depth perceptions which otherwise might be lacking. In addition, the third dimension could also be used as an additional dimension along which information can be encoded. Historically, the stereo 3-D displays have been used in entertainment, in experimental facilities, and in the handling of hazardous waste. In the last example, the source of the stereo images generally has been remotely controlled television camera pairs. The development of a stereo 3-D pictorial primary flight display used in a flight simulation environment is described. The applicability of stereo 3-D displays for aerospace crew stations to meet the anticipated needs for 2000 to 2020 time frame is investigated. Although, the actual equipment that could be used in an aerospace vehicle is not currently available, the lab research is necessary to determine where stereo 3-D enhances the display of information and how the displays should be formatted.

  7. The Evolution of 3D Microimaging Techniques in Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahagian, D.; Proussevitch, A.

    2009-05-01

    In the analysis of geomaterials, it is essential to be able to analyze internal structures on a quantitative basis. Techniques have evolved from rough qualitative methods to highly accurate quantitative methods coupled with 3-D numerical analysis. The earliest primitive method for "seeing'" what was inside a rock was multiple sectioning to produce a series of image slices. This technique typically completely destroyed the sample being analyzed. Another destructive method was developed to give more detailed quantitative information by forming plastic casts of internal voids in sedimentary and volcanic rocks. For this, void were filled with plastic and the rock dissolved away with HF to reveal plastic casts of internal vesicles. Later, new approaches to stereology were developed to extract 3D information from 2D cross-sectional images. This has long been possible for spheres because the probability distribution for cutting a sphere along any small circle is known analytically (greatest probability is near the equator). However, large numbers of objects are required for statistical validity, and geomaterials are seldom spherical, so crystals, vesicles, and other inclusions would need a more sophisticated approach. Consequently, probability distributions were developed using numerical techniques for rectangular solids and various ellipsoids so that stereological techniques could be applied to these. The "holy grail" has always been to obtain 3D quantitative images non-destructively. A key method is Computed X-ray Tomography (CXT), in which attenuation of X-rays is recorded as a function of angular position in a cylindrical sample, providing a 2D "slice" of the interior. When a series of these "slices" is stacked (in increments equivalent with the resolution of the X-ray to make cubic voxels), a 3D image results with quantitative information regarding internal structure, particle/void volumes, nearest neighbors, coordination numbers, preferred orientations, etc. CXT can

  8. 2D and 3D MALDI-imaging: conceptual strategies for visualization and data mining.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Herbert; Heldmann, Stefan; Trede, Dennis; Strehlow, Jan; Wirtz, Stefan; Dreher, Wolfgang; Berger, Judith; Oetjen, Janina; Kobarg, Jan Hendrik; Fischer, Bernd; Maass, Peter

    2014-01-01

    3D imaging has a significant impact on many challenges in life sciences, because biology is a 3-dimensional phenomenon. Current 3D imaging-technologies (various types MRI, PET, SPECT) are labeled, i.e. they trace the localization of a specific compound in the body. In contrast, 3D MALDI mass spectrometry-imaging (MALDI-MSI) is a label-free method imaging the spatial distribution of molecular compounds. It complements 3D imaging labeled methods, immunohistochemistry, and genetics-based methods. However, 3D MALDI-MSI cannot tap its full potential due to the lack of statistical methods for analysis and interpretation of large and complex 3D datasets. To overcome this, we established a complete and robust 3D MALDI-MSI pipeline combined with efficient computational data analysis methods for 3D edge preserving image denoising, 3D spatial segmentation as well as finding colocalized m/z values, which will be reviewed here in detail. Furthermore, we explain, why the integration and correlation of the MALDI imaging data with other imaging modalities allows to enhance the interpretation of the molecular data and provides visualization of molecular patterns that may otherwise not be apparent. Therefore, a 3D data acquisition workflow is described generating a set of 3 different dimensional images representing the same anatomies. First, an in-vitro MRI measurement is performed which results in a three-dimensional image modality representing the 3D structure of the measured object. After sectioning the 3D object into N consecutive slices, all N slices are scanned using an optical digital scanner, enabling for performing the MS measurements. Scanning the individual sections results into low-resolution images, which define the base coordinate system for the whole pipeline. The scanned images conclude the information from the spatial (MRI) and the mass spectrometric (MALDI-MSI) dimension and are used for the spatial three-dimensional reconstruction of the object performed by image

  9. Multiple-3D-object secure information system based on phase shifting method and single interference.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Na; Shi, Chen-Xiao; Piao, Mei-Lan; Kim, Nam

    2016-05-20

    We propose a multiple-3D-object secure information system for encrypting multiple three-dimensional (3D) objects based on the three-step phase shifting method. During the decryption procedure, five phase functions (PFs) are decreased to three PFs, in comparison with our previous method, which implies that one cross beam splitter is utilized to implement the single decryption interference. Moreover, the advantages of the proposed scheme also include: each 3D object can be decrypted discretionarily without decrypting a series of other objects earlier; the quality of the decrypted slice image of each object is high according to the correlation coefficient values, none of which is lower than 0.95; no iterative algorithm is involved. The feasibility of the proposed scheme is demonstrated by computer simulation results.

  10. 3D-2D registration for surgical guidance: effect of projection view angles on registration accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uneri, A.; Otake, Y.; Wang, A. S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    An algorithm for intensity-based 3D-2D registration of CT and x-ray projections is evaluated, specifically using single- or dual-projection views to provide 3D localization. The registration framework employs the gradient information similarity metric and covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy to solve for the patient pose in six degrees of freedom. Registration performance was evaluated in an anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver, using C-arm projection views acquired at angular separation, Δθ, ranging from ˜0°-180° at variable C-arm magnification. Registration accuracy was assessed in terms of 2D projection distance error and 3D target registration error (TRE) and compared to that of an electromagnetic (EM) tracker. The results indicate that angular separation as small as Δθ ˜10°-20° achieved TRE <2 mm with 95% confidence, comparable or superior to that of the EM tracker. The method allows direct registration of preoperative CT and planning data to intraoperative fluoroscopy, providing 3D localization free from conventional limitations associated with external fiducial markers, stereotactic frames, trackers and manual registration.

  11. Information Technology Management: DoD Organization Information Assurance Management of Information Technology Goods and Services Acquired Through Interagency Agreements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-23

    Information Technology Management Department of Defense Office of Inspector General February 23, 2006 AccountabilityIntegrityQuality DoD...Organization Information Assurance Management of Information Technology Goods and Services Acquired Through Interagency Agreements (D-2006-052) Report...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2006 to 00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Information Technology Management: DoD Organization Information

  12. The Future Is 3D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Luke

    2015-01-01

    3D printers are a way of producing a 3D model of an item from a digital file. The model builds up in successive layers of material placed by the printer controlled by the information in the computer file. In this article the author argues that 3D printers are one of the greatest technological advances of recent times. He discusses practical uses…

  13. Understanding Crystal Populations; Looking Towards 3D Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerram, D. A.; Morgan, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    In order to understand volcanic systems, the potential record held within crystal populations needs to be revealed. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that the crystal populations that arrive at the surface in volcanic eruptions are commonly mixtures of crystals, which may be representative of simple crystallization, recycling of crystals and incorporation of alien crystals. If we can quantify the true 3D population within a sample then we will be able to separate crystals with different histories and begin to interrogate the true and complex plumbing within the volcanic system. Modeling crystal populations is one area where we can investigate the best methodologies to use when dealing with sections through 3D populations. By producing known 3D shapes and sizes with virtual textures and looking at the statistics of shape and size when such populations are sectioned, we are able to gain confidence about what our 2D information is telling us about the population. We can also use this approach to test the size of population we need to analyze. 3D imaging through serial sectioning or x-ray CT, provides a complete 3D quantification of a rocks texture. Individual phases can be identified and in principle the true 3D statistics of the population can be interrogated. In practice we need to develop strategies (as with 2D-3D transformations), that enable a true characterization of the 3D data, and an understanding of the errors and pitfalls that exist. Ultimately, the reproduction of true 3D textures and the wealth of information they hold, is now within our reach.

  14. iCAVE: an open source tool for visualizing biomolecular networks in 3D, stereoscopic 3D and immersive 3D

    PubMed Central

    Liluashvili, Vaja; Kalayci, Selim; Fluder, Eugene; Wilson, Manda; Gabow, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Visualizations of biomolecular networks assist in systems-level data exploration in many cellular processes. Data generated from high-throughput experiments increasingly inform these networks, yet current tools do not adequately scale with concomitant increase in their size and complexity. We present an open source software platform, interactome-CAVE (iCAVE), for visualizing large and complex biomolecular interaction networks in 3D. Users can explore networks (i) in 3D using a desktop, (ii) in stereoscopic 3D using 3D-vision glasses and a desktop, or (iii) in immersive 3D within a CAVE environment. iCAVE introduces 3D extensions of known 2D network layout, clustering, and edge-bundling algorithms, as well as new 3D network layout algorithms. Furthermore, users can simultaneously query several built-in databases within iCAVE for network generation or visualize their own networks (e.g., disease, drug, protein, metabolite). iCAVE has modular structure that allows rapid development by addition of algorithms, datasets, or features without affecting other parts of the code. Overall, iCAVE is the first freely available open source tool that enables 3D (optionally stereoscopic or immersive) visualizations of complex, dense, or multi-layered biomolecular networks. While primarily designed for researchers utilizing biomolecular networks, iCAVE can assist researchers in any field. PMID:28814063

  15. iCAVE: an open source tool for visualizing biomolecular networks in 3D, stereoscopic 3D and immersive 3D.

    PubMed

    Liluashvili, Vaja; Kalayci, Selim; Fluder, Eugene; Wilson, Manda; Gabow, Aaron; Gümüs, Zeynep H

    2017-08-01

    Visualizations of biomolecular networks assist in systems-level data exploration in many cellular processes. Data generated from high-throughput experiments increasingly inform these networks, yet current tools do not adequately scale with concomitant increase in their size and complexity. We present an open source software platform, interactome-CAVE (iCAVE), for visualizing large and complex biomolecular interaction networks in 3D. Users can explore networks (i) in 3D using a desktop, (ii) in stereoscopic 3D using 3D-vision glasses and a desktop, or (iii) in immersive 3D within a CAVE environment. iCAVE introduces 3D extensions of known 2D network layout, clustering, and edge-bundling algorithms, as well as new 3D network layout algorithms. Furthermore, users can simultaneously query several built-in databases within iCAVE for network generation or visualize their own networks (e.g., disease, drug, protein, metabolite). iCAVE has modular structure that allows rapid development by addition of algorithms, datasets, or features without affecting other parts of the code. Overall, iCAVE is the first freely available open source tool that enables 3D (optionally stereoscopic or immersive) visualizations of complex, dense, or multi-layered biomolecular networks. While primarily designed for researchers utilizing biomolecular networks, iCAVE can assist researchers in any field. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Recording stereoscopic 3D neurosurgery with a head-mounted 3D camera system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian; Chen, Brian R; Chen, Beverly B; Lu, James Y; Giannotta, Steven L

    2015-06-01

    Stereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) imaging can present more information to the viewer and further enhance the learning experience over traditional two-dimensional (2D) video. Most 3D surgical videos are recorded from the operating microscope and only feature the crux, or the most important part of the surgery, leaving out other crucial parts of surgery including the opening, approach, and closing of the surgical site. In addition, many other surgeries including complex spine, trauma, and intensive care unit procedures are also rarely recorded. We describe and share our experience with a commercially available head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system to obtain stereoscopic 3D recordings of these seldom recorded aspects of neurosurgery. The strengths and limitations of using the GoPro(®) 3D system as a head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system in the operating room are reviewed in detail. Over the past several years, we have recorded in stereoscopic 3D over 50 cranial and spinal surgeries and created a library for education purposes. We have found the head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system to be a valuable asset to supplement 3D footage from a 3D microscope. We expect that these comprehensive 3D surgical videos will become an important facet of resident education and ultimately lead to improved patient care.

  17. Probabilistic Neighborhood-Based Data Collection Algorithms for 3D Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Han, Guangjie; Li, Shanshan; Zhu, Chunsheng; Jiang, Jinfang; Zhang, Wenbo

    2017-01-01

    Marine environmental monitoring provides crucial information and support for the exploitation, utilization, and protection of marine resources. With the rapid development of information technology, the development of three-dimensional underwater acoustic sensor networks (3D UASNs) provides a novel strategy to acquire marine environment information conveniently, efficiently and accurately. However, the specific propagation effects of acoustic communication channel lead to decreased successful information delivery probability with increased distance. Therefore, we investigate two probabilistic neighborhood-based data collection algorithms for 3D UASNs which are based on a probabilistic acoustic communication model instead of the traditional deterministic acoustic communication model. An autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is employed to traverse along the designed path to collect data from neighborhoods. For 3D UASNs without prior deployment knowledge, partitioning the network into grids can allow the AUV to visit the central location of each grid for data collection. For 3D UASNs in which the deployment knowledge is known in advance, the AUV only needs to visit several selected locations by constructing a minimum probabilistic neighborhood covering set to reduce data latency. Otherwise, by increasing the transmission rounds, our proposed algorithms can provide a tradeoff between data collection latency and information gain. These algorithms are compared with basic Nearest-neighbor Heuristic algorithm via simulations. Simulation analyses show that our proposed algorithms can efficiently reduce the average data collection completion time, corresponding to a decrease of data latency. PMID:28208735

  18. Probabilistic Neighborhood-Based Data Collection Algorithms for 3D Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Han, Guangjie; Li, Shanshan; Zhu, Chunsheng; Jiang, Jinfang; Zhang, Wenbo

    2017-02-08

    Marine environmental monitoring provides crucial information and support for the exploitation, utilization, and protection of marine resources. With the rapid development of information technology, the development of three-dimensional underwater acoustic sensor networks (3D UASNs) provides a novel strategy to acquire marine environment information conveniently, efficiently and accurately. However, the specific propagation effects of acoustic communication channel lead to decreased successful information delivery probability with increased distance. Therefore, we investigate two probabilistic neighborhood-based data collection algorithms for 3D UASNs which are based on a probabilistic acoustic communication model instead of the traditional deterministic acoustic communication model. An autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is employed to traverse along the designed path to collect data from neighborhoods. For 3D UASNs without prior deployment knowledge, partitioning the network into grids can allow the AUV to visit the central location of each grid for data collection. For 3D UASNs in which the deployment knowledge is known in advance, the AUV only needs to visit several selected locations by constructing a minimum probabilistic neighborhood covering set to reduce data latency. Otherwise, by increasing the transmission rounds, our proposed algorithms can provide a tradeoff between data collection latency and information gain. These algorithms are compared with basic Nearest-neighbor Heuristic algorithm via simulations. Simulation analyses show that our proposed algorithms can efficiently reduce the average data collection completion time, corresponding to a decrease of data latency.

  19. Voxel-Based 3-D Tree Modeling from Lidar Images for Extracting Tree Structual Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoi, F.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, lidar (light detection and ranging) has been used to extracting tree structural information. Portable scanning lidar systems can capture the complex shape of individual trees as a 3-D point-cloud image. 3-D tree models reproduced from the lidar-derived 3-D image can be used to estimate tree structural parameters. We have proposed the voxel-based 3-D modeling for extracting tree structural parameters. One of the tree parameters derived from the voxel modeling is leaf area density (LAD). We refer to the method as the voxel-based canopy profiling (VCP) method. In this method, several measurement points surrounding the canopy and optimally inclined laser beams are adopted for full laser beam illumination of whole canopy up to the internal. From obtained lidar image, the 3-D information is reproduced as the voxel attributes in the 3-D voxel array. Based on the voxel attributes, contact frequency of laser beams on leaves is computed and LAD in each horizontal layer is obtained. This method offered accurate LAD estimation for individual trees and woody canopy trees. For more accurate LAD estimation, the voxel model was constructed by combining airborne and portable ground-based lidar data. The profiles obtained by the two types of lidar complemented each other, thus eliminating blind regions and yielding more accurate LAD profiles than could be obtained by using each type of lidar alone. Based on the estimation results, we proposed an index named laser beam coverage index, Ω, which relates to the lidar's laser beam settings and a laser beam attenuation factor. It was shown that this index can be used for adjusting measurement set-up of lidar systems and also used for explaining the LAD estimation error using different types of lidar systems. Moreover, we proposed a method to estimate woody material volume as another application of the voxel tree modeling. In this method, voxel solid model of a target tree was produced from the lidar image, which is composed of

  20. 3D Geo-Structures Visualization Education Project (3dgeostructuresvis.ucdavis.edu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billen, M. I.

    2014-12-01

    Students of field-based geology must master a suite of challenging skills from recognizing rocks, to measuring orientations of features in the field, to finding oneself (and the outcrop) on a map and placing structural information on maps. Students must then synthesize this information to derive meaning from the observations and ultimately to determine the three-dimensional (3D) shape of the deformed structures and their kinematic history. Synthesizing this kind of information requires sophisticated visualizations skills in order to extrapolate observations into the subsurface or missing (eroded) material. The good news is that students can learn 3D visualization skills through practice, and virtual tools can help provide some of that practice. Here I present a suite of learning modules focused at developing students' ability to imagine (visualize) complex 3D structures and their exposure through digital topographic surfaces. Using the software 3DVisualizer, developed by KeckCAVES (keckcaves.org) we have developed visualizations of common geologic structures (e.g., syncline, dipping fold) in which the rock is represented by originally flat-lying layers of sediment, each with a different color, which have been subsequently deformed. The exercises build up in complexity, first focusing on understanding the structure in 3D (penetrative understanding), and then moving to the exposure of the structure at a topographic surface. Individual layers can be rendered as a transparent feature to explore how the layer extends above and below the topographic surface (e.g., to follow an eroded fold limb across a valley). The exercises are provided using either movies of the visualization (which can also be used for examples during lectures), or the data and software can be downloaded to allow for more self-driven exploration and learning. These virtual field models and exercises can be used as "practice runs" before going into the field, as make-up assignments, as a field

  1. 2D imaging and 3D sensing data acquisition and mutual registration for painting conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Raffaella; Gambino, Maria Chiara; Greco, Marinella; Marras, Luciano; Pampaloni, Enrico M.; Pelagotti, Anna; Pezzati, Luca; Poggi, Pasquale

    2004-12-01

    We describe the application of 2D and 3D data acquisition and mutual registration to the conservation of paintings. RGB color image acquisition, IR and UV fluorescence imaging, together with the more recent hyperspectral imaging (32 bands) are among the most useful techniques in this field. They generally are meant to provide information on the painting materials, on the employed techniques and on the object state of conservation. However, only when the various images are perfectly registered on each other and on the 3D model, no ambiguity is possible and safe conclusions may be drawn. We present the integration of 2D and 3D measurements carried out on two different paintings: "Madonna of the Yarnwinder" by Leonardo da Vinci, and "Portrait of Lionello d'Este", by Pisanello, both painted in the XV century.

  2. 2D imaging and 3D sensing data acquisition and mutual registration for painting conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Raffaella; Gambino, Maria Chiara; Greco, Marinella; Marras, Luciano; Pampaloni, Enrico M.; Pelagotti, Anna; Pezzati, Luca; Poggi, Pasquale

    2005-01-01

    We describe the application of 2D and 3D data acquisition and mutual registration to the conservation of paintings. RGB color image acquisition, IR and UV fluorescence imaging, together with the more recent hyperspectral imaging (32 bands) are among the most useful techniques in this field. They generally are meant to provide information on the painting materials, on the employed techniques and on the object state of conservation. However, only when the various images are perfectly registered on each other and on the 3D model, no ambiguity is possible and safe conclusions may be drawn. We present the integration of 2D and 3D measurements carried out on two different paintings: "Madonna of the Yarnwinder" by Leonardo da Vinci, and "Portrait of Lionello d'Este", by Pisanello, both painted in the XV century.

  3. Hippocampus, Retrosplenial and Parahippocampal Cortices Encode Multicompartment 3D Space in a Hierarchical Manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Misun; Maguire, Eleanor A

    2018-05-01

    Humans commonly operate within 3D environments such as multifloor buildings and yet there is a surprising dearth of studies that have examined how these spaces are represented in the brain. Here, we had participants learn the locations of paintings within a virtual multilevel gallery building and then used behavioral tests and fMRI repetition suppression analyses to investigate how this 3D multicompartment space was represented, and whether there was a bias in encoding vertical and horizontal information. We found faster response times for within-room egocentric spatial judgments and behavioral priming effects of visiting the same room, providing evidence for a compartmentalized representation of space. At the neural level, we observed a hierarchical encoding of 3D spatial information, with left anterior hippocampus representing local information within a room, while retrosplenial cortex, parahippocampal cortex, and posterior hippocampus represented room information within the wider building. Of note, both our behavioral and neural findings showed that vertical and horizontal location information was similarly encoded, suggesting an isotropic representation of 3D space even in the context of a multicompartment environment. These findings provide much-needed information about how the human brain supports spatial memory and navigation in buildings with numerous levels and rooms.

  4. The 3D Elevation Program—Flood risk management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carswell, William J.; Lukas, Vicki

    2018-01-25

    Flood-damage reduction in the United States has been a longstanding but elusive societal goal. The national strategy for reducing flood damage has shifted over recent decades from a focus on construction of flood-control dams and levee systems to a three-pronged strategy to (1) improve the design and operation of such structures, (2) provide more accurate and accessible flood forecasting, and (3) shift the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) National Flood Insurance Program to a more balanced, less costly flood-insurance paradigm. Expanding the availability and use of high-quality, three-dimensional (3D) elevation information derived from modern light detection and ranging (lidar) technologies to provide essential terrain data poses a singular opportunity to dramatically enhance the effectiveness of all three components of this strategy. Additionally, FEMA, the National Weather Service, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have developed tools and joint program activities to support the national strategy.The USGS 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) has the programmatic infrastructure to produce and provide essential terrain data. This infrastructure includes (1) data acquisition partnerships that leverage funding and reduce duplicative efforts, (2) contracts with experienced private mapping firms that ensure acquisition of consistent, low-cost 3D elevation data, and (3) the technical expertise, standards, and specifications required for consistent, edge-to-edge utility across multiple collection platforms and public access unfettered by individual database designs and limitations.High-quality elevation data, like that collected through 3DEP, are invaluable for assessing and documenting flood risk and communicating detailed information to both responders and planners alike. Multiple flood-mapping programs make use of USGS streamflow and 3DEP data. Flood insurance rate maps, flood documentation studies, and flood-inundation map libraries are products of these

  5. NASA VERVE: Interactive 3D Visualization Within Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Tamar; Allan, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    At NASA, we develop myriad Eclipse RCP applications to provide situational awareness for remote systems. The Intelligent Robotics Group at NASA Ames Research Center has developed VERVE - a high-performance, robot user interface that provides scientists, robot operators, and mission planners with powerful, interactive 3D displays of remote environments.VERVE includes a 3D Eclipse view with an embedded Java Ardor3D scenario, including SWT and mouse controls which interact with the Ardor3D camera and objects in the scene. VERVE also includes Eclipse views for exploring and editing objects in the Ardor3D scene graph, and a HUD (Heads Up Display) framework allows Growl-style notifications and other textual information to be overlayed onto the 3D scene. We use VERVE to listen to telemetry from robots and display the robots and associated scientific data along the terrain they are exploring; VERVE can be used for any interactive 3D display of data.VERVE is now open source. VERVE derives from the prior Viz system, which was developed for Mars Polar Lander (2001) and used for the Mars Exploration Rover (2003) and the Phoenix Lander (2008). It has been used for ongoing research with IRG's K10 and KRex rovers in various locations. VERVE was used on the International Space Station during two experiments in 2013 - Surface Telerobotics, in which astronauts controlled robots on Earth from the ISS, and SPHERES, where astronauts control a free flying robot on board the ISS.We will show in detail how to code with VERVE, how to interact between SWT controls to the Ardor3D scenario, and share example code.

  6. Towards Precise Metadata-set for Discovering 3D Geospatial Models in Geo-portals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamyadi, A.; Pouliot, J.; Bédard, Y.

    2013-09-01

    Accessing 3D geospatial models, eventually at no cost and for unrestricted use, is certainly an important issue as they become popular among participatory communities, consultants, and officials. Various geo-portals, mainly established for 2D resources, have tried to provide access to existing 3D resources such as digital elevation model, LIDAR or classic topographic data. Describing the content of data, metadata is a key component of data discovery in geo-portals. An inventory of seven online geo-portals and commercial catalogues shows that the metadata referring to 3D information is very different from one geo-portal to another as well as for similar 3D resources in the same geo-portal. The inventory considered 971 data resources affiliated with elevation. 51% of them were from three geo-portals running at Canadian federal and municipal levels whose metadata resources did not consider 3D model by any definition. Regarding the remaining 49% which refer to 3D models, different definition of terms and metadata were found, resulting in confusion and misinterpretation. The overall assessment of these geo-portals clearly shows that the provided metadata do not integrate specific and common information about 3D geospatial models. Accordingly, the main objective of this research is to improve 3D geospatial model discovery in geo-portals by adding a specific metadata-set. Based on the knowledge and current practices on 3D modeling, and 3D data acquisition and management, a set of metadata is proposed to increase its suitability for 3D geospatial models. This metadata-set enables the definition of genuine classes, fields, and code-lists for a 3D metadata profile. The main structure of the proposal contains 21 metadata classes. These classes are classified in three packages as General and Complementary on contextual and structural information, and Availability on the transition from storage to delivery format. The proposed metadata set is compared with Canadian Geospatial

  7. 3D digital headform models of Australian cyclists.

    PubMed

    Ellena, Thierry; Skals, Sebastian; Subic, Aleksandar; Mustafa, Helmy; Pang, Toh Yen

    2017-03-01

    Traditional 1D anthropometric data have been the primary source of information used by ergonomists for the dimensioning of head and facial gear. Although these data are simple to use and understand, they only provide univariate measures of key dimensions. 3D anthropometric data, however, describe the complete shape characteristics of the head surface, but are complicated to interpret due to the abundance of information they contain. Consequently, current headform standards based on 1D measurements may not adequately represent the actual head shape variations of the intended user groups. The purpose of this study was to introduce a set of new digital headform models representative of the adult cyclists' community in Australia. Four models were generated based on an Australian 3D anthropometric database of head shapes and a modified hierarchical clustering algorithm. Considerable shape differences were identified between our models and the current headforms from the Australian standard. We conclude that the design of head and facial gear based on current standards might not be favorable for optimal fitting results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Perception of 3D spatial relations for 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Paul; Pizlo, Zygmunt; Hoffmann, Christoph; Popescu, Voicu S.

    2004-05-01

    We test perception of 3D spatial relations in 3D images rendered by a 3D display (Perspecta from Actuality Systems) and compare it to that of a high-resolution flat panel display. 3D images provide the observer with such depth cues as motion parallax and binocular disparity. Our 3D display is a device that renders a 3D image by displaying, in rapid succession, radial slices through the scene on a rotating screen. The image is contained in a glass globe and can be viewed from virtually any direction. In the psychophysical experiment several families of 3D objects are used as stimuli: primitive shapes (cylinders and cuboids), and complex objects (multi-story buildings, cars, and pieces of furniture). Each object has at least one plane of symmetry. On each trial an object or its "distorted" version is shown at an arbitrary orientation. The distortion is produced by stretching an object in a random direction by 40%. This distortion must eliminate the symmetry of an object. The subject's task is to decide whether or not the presented object is distorted under several viewing conditions (monocular/binocular, with/without motion parallax, and near/far). The subject's performance is measured by the discriminability d', which is a conventional dependent variable in signal detection experiments.

  9. An algorithm to correct 2D near-infrared fluorescence signals using 3D intravascular ultrasound architectural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallas, Georgios; Brooks, Dana H.; Rosenthal, Amir; Vinegoni, Claudio; Calfon, Marcella A.; Razansky, R. Nika; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2011-03-01

    Intravascular Near-Infrared Fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is a promising imaging modality to image vessel biology and high-risk plaques in vivo. We have developed a NIRF fiber optic catheter and have presented the ability to image atherosclerotic plaques in vivo, using appropriate NIR fluorescent probes. Our catheter consists of a 100/140 μm core/clad diameter housed in polyethylene tubing, emitting NIR laser light at a 90 degree angle compared to the fiber's axis. The system utilizes a rotational and a translational motor for true 2D imaging and operates in conjunction with a coaxial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) device. IVUS datasets provide 3D images of the internal structure of arteries and are used in our system for anatomical mapping. Using the IVUS images, we are building an accurate hybrid fluorescence-IVUS data inversion scheme that takes into account photon propagation through the blood filled lumen. This hybrid imaging approach can then correct for the non-linear dependence of light intensity on the distance of the fluorescence region from the fiber tip, leading to quantitative imaging. The experimental and algorithmic developments will be presented and the effectiveness of the algorithm showcased with experimental results in both saline and blood-like preparations. The combined structural and molecular information obtained from these two imaging modalities are positioned to enable the accurate diagnosis of biologically high-risk atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary arteries that are responsible for heart attacks.

  10. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2018-01-16

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  11. Volumetric 3D Display System with Static Screen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current display technology has relied on flat, 2D screens that cannot truly convey the third dimension of visual information: depth. In contrast to conventional visualization that is primarily based on 2D flat screens, the volumetric 3D display possesses a true 3D display volume, and places physically each 3D voxel in displayed 3D images at the true 3D (x,y,z) spatial position. Each voxel, analogous to a pixel in a 2D image, emits light from that position to form a real 3D image in the eyes of the viewers. Such true volumetric 3D display technology provides both physiological (accommodation, convergence, binocular disparity, and motion parallax) and psychological (image size, linear perspective, shading, brightness, etc.) depth cues to human visual systems to help in the perception of 3D objects. In a volumetric 3D display, viewers can watch the displayed 3D images from a completely 360 view without using any special eyewear. The volumetric 3D display techniques may lead to a quantum leap in information display technology and can dramatically change the ways humans interact with computers, which can lead to significant improvements in the efficiency of learning and knowledge management processes. Within a block of glass, a large amount of tiny dots of voxels are created by using a recently available machining technique called laser subsurface engraving (LSE). The LSE is able to produce tiny physical crack points (as small as 0.05 mm in diameter) at any (x,y,z) location within the cube of transparent material. The crack dots, when illuminated by a light source, scatter the light around and form visible voxels within the 3D volume. The locations of these tiny voxels are strategically determined such that each can be illuminated by a light ray from a high-resolution digital mirror device (DMD) light engine. The distribution of these voxels occupies the full display volume within the static 3D glass screen. This design eliminates any moving screen seen in previous

  12. Semiautomatic approaches to account for 3-D distortion of the electric field from local, near-surface structures in 3-D resistivity inversions of 3-D regional magnetotelluric data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2017-03-31

    This report summarizes the results of three-dimensional (3-D) resistivity inversion simulations that were performed to account for local 3-D distortion of the electric field in the presence of 3-D regional structure, without any a priori information on the actual 3-D distribution of the known subsurface geology. The methodology used a 3-D geologic model to create a 3-D resistivity forward (“known”) model that depicted the subsurface resistivity structure expected for the input geologic configuration. The calculated magnetotelluric response of the modeled resistivity structure was assumed to represent observed magnetotelluric data and was subsequently used as input into a 3-D resistivity inverse model that used an iterative 3-D algorithm to estimate 3-D distortions without any a priori geologic information. A publicly available inversion code, WSINV3DMT, was used for all of the simulated inversions, initially using the default parameters, and subsequently using adjusted inversion parameters. A semiautomatic approach of accounting for the static shift using various selections of the highest frequencies and initial models was also tested. The resulting 3-D resistivity inversion simulation was compared to the “known” model and the results evaluated. The inversion approach that produced the lowest misfit to the various local 3-D distortions was an inversion that employed an initial model volume resistivity that was nearest to the maximum resistivities in the near-surface layer.

  13. Developing 3D microscopy with CLARITY on human brain tissue: Towards a tool for informing and validating MRI-based histology.

    PubMed

    Morawski, Markus; Kirilina, Evgeniya; Scherf, Nico; Jäger, Carsten; Reimann, Katja; Trampel, Robert; Gavriilidis, Filippos; Geyer, Stefan; Biedermann, Bernd; Arendt, Thomas; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2017-11-28

    Recent breakthroughs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enabled quantitative relaxometry and diffusion-weighted imaging with sub-millimeter resolution. Combined with biophysical models of MR contrast the emerging methods promise in vivo mapping of cyto- and myelo-architectonics, i.e., in vivo histology using MRI (hMRI) in humans. The hMRI methods require histological reference data for model building and validation. This is currently provided by MRI on post mortem human brain tissue in combination with classical histology on sections. However, this well established approach is limited to qualitative 2D information, while a systematic validation of hMRI requires quantitative 3D information on macroscopic voxels. We present a promising histological method based on optical 3D imaging combined with a tissue clearing method, Clear Lipid-exchanged Acrylamide-hybridized Rigid Imaging compatible Tissue hYdrogel (CLARITY), adapted for hMRI validation. Adapting CLARITY to the needs of hMRI is challenging due to poor antibody penetration into large sample volumes and high opacity of aged post mortem human brain tissue. In a pilot experiment we achieved transparency of up to 8 mm-thick and immunohistochemical staining of up to 5 mm-thick post mortem brain tissue by a combination of active and passive clearing, prolonged clearing and staining times. We combined 3D optical imaging of the cleared samples with tailored image processing methods. We demonstrated the feasibility for quantification of neuron density, fiber orientation distribution and cell type classification within a volume with size similar to a typical MRI voxel. The presented combination of MRI, 3D optical microscopy and image processing is a promising tool for validation of MRI-based microstructure estimates. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nuclear 3D organization and radiosensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidelman, Y. A.; Slanina, S. V.; Aleshchenko, A. V.; Sen'ko, O. V.; Kononkova, A. D.; Andreev, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Current mechanisms of radiation-induced chromosomal aberration (CA) formation suggest misrepair of chromosomal lesions being in spatial proximity. In this case CAs have to depend on pattern of chromosomal contacts and on chromosome spatial organization in a cell nucleus. We were interested in whether variation of nucleus 3D organization results in difference of radiation induced CA formation frequency. Experimental data available do not provide information sufficient for definite conclusions. To have more deep insight in this issue we developed the biophysical modeling technique taking into account different levels of chromosome/nuclear organization and radiation damage of DNA and chromosomes. Computer experiments on gamma irradiation were carried out for two types of cells with different 3D organization of nuclei, preferentially peripheral and internal. CA frequencies were found to depend on spatial positioning of chromosomes within a nucleus which determines a pattern of interchromosomal contacts. For individual chromosomes this effect can be more pronounced than for genome averaged. Since significant part of aberrations, for example dicentrics, results in cell death, the proposed technique is capable of evaluating radiosensitivity of cells, both normal and cancer, with the incorporation of 3D genome information. This predictive technology allows to reduce uncertainties of prognosis of biological effects of radiation compared to phenomenological methods and may have variety of biomedical applications, in particular, in cancer radiation therapy.

  15. Depth and thermal sensor fusion to enhance 3D thermographic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanpeng; Xu, Baobei; Ye, Zhangyu; Yang, Jiangxin; Cao, Yanlong; Tisse, Christel-Loic; Li, Xin

    2018-04-02

    Three-dimensional geometrical models with incorporated surface temperature data provide important information for various applications such as medical imaging, energy auditing, and intelligent robots. In this paper we present a robust method for mobile and real-time 3D thermographic reconstruction through depth and thermal sensor fusion. A multimodal imaging device consisting of a thermal camera and a RGB-D sensor is calibrated geometrically and used for data capturing. Based on the underlying principle that temperature information remains robust against illumination and viewpoint changes, we present a Thermal-guided Iterative Closest Point (T-ICP) methodology to facilitate reliable 3D thermal scanning applications. The pose of sensing device is initially estimated using correspondences found through maximizing the thermal consistency between consecutive infrared images. The coarse pose estimate is further refined by finding the motion parameters that minimize a combined geometric and thermographic loss function. Experimental results demonstrate that complimentary information captured by multimodal sensors can be utilized to improve performance of 3D thermographic reconstruction. Through effective fusion of thermal and depth data, the proposed approach generates more accurate 3D thermal models using significantly less scanning data.

  16. 3D visualization techniques for the STEREO-mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegelmann, T.; Podlipnik, B.; Inhester, B.; Feng, L.; Ruan, P.

    The forthcoming STEREO-mission will observe the Sun from two different viewpoints We expect about 2GB data per day which ask for suitable data presentation techniques A key feature of STEREO is that it will provide for the first time a 3D-view of the Sun and the solar corona In our normal environment we see objects three dimensional because the light from real 3D objects needs different travel times to our left and right eye As a consequence we see slightly different images with our eyes which gives us information about the depth of objects and a corresponding 3D impression Techniques for the 3D-visualization of scientific and other data on paper TV computer screen cinema etc are well known e g two colour anaglyph technique shutter glasses polarization filters and head-mounted displays We discuss advantages and disadvantages of these techniques and how they can be applied to STEREO-data The 3D-visualization techniques are not limited to visual images but can be also used to show the reconstructed coronal magnetic field and energy and helicity distribution In the advent of STEREO we test the method with data from SOHO which provides us different viewpoints by the solar rotation This restricts the analysis to structures which remain stationary for several days Real STEREO-data will not be affected by these limitations however

  17. CH5M3D: an HTML5 program for creating 3D molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Earley, Clarke W

    2013-11-18

    While a number of programs and web-based applications are available for the interactive display of 3-dimensional molecular structures, few of these provide the ability to edit these structures. For this reason, we have developed a library written in JavaScript to allow for the simple creation of web-based applications that should run on any browser capable of rendering HTML5 web pages. While our primary interest in developing this application was for educational use, it may also prove useful to researchers who want a light-weight application for viewing and editing small molecular structures. Molecular compounds are drawn on the HTML5 Canvas element, with the JavaScript code making use of standard techniques to allow display of three-dimensional structures on a two-dimensional canvas. Information about the structure (bond lengths, bond angles, and dihedral angles) can be obtained using a mouse or other pointing device. Both atoms and bonds can be added or deleted, and rotation about bonds is allowed. Routines are provided to read structures either from the web server or from the user's computer, and creation of galleries of structures can be accomplished with only a few lines of code. Documentation and examples are provided to demonstrate how users can access all of the molecular information for creation of web pages with more advanced features. A light-weight (≈ 75 kb) JavaScript library has been made available that allows for the simple creation of web pages containing interactive 3-dimensional molecular structures. Although this library is designed to create web pages, a web server is not required. Installation on a web server is straightforward and does not require any server-side modules or special permissions. The ch5m3d.js library has been released under the GNU GPL version 3 open-source license and is available from http://sourceforge.net/projects/ch5m3d/.

  18. CH5M3D: an HTML5 program for creating 3D molecular structures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While a number of programs and web-based applications are available for the interactive display of 3-dimensional molecular structures, few of these provide the ability to edit these structures. For this reason, we have developed a library written in JavaScript to allow for the simple creation of web-based applications that should run on any browser capable of rendering HTML5 web pages. While our primary interest in developing this application was for educational use, it may also prove useful to researchers who want a light-weight application for viewing and editing small molecular structures. Results Molecular compounds are drawn on the HTML5 Canvas element, with the JavaScript code making use of standard techniques to allow display of three-dimensional structures on a two-dimensional canvas. Information about the structure (bond lengths, bond angles, and dihedral angles) can be obtained using a mouse or other pointing device. Both atoms and bonds can be added or deleted, and rotation about bonds is allowed. Routines are provided to read structures either from the web server or from the user’s computer, and creation of galleries of structures can be accomplished with only a few lines of code. Documentation and examples are provided to demonstrate how users can access all of the molecular information for creation of web pages with more advanced features. Conclusions A light-weight (≈ 75 kb) JavaScript library has been made available that allows for the simple creation of web pages containing interactive 3-dimensional molecular structures. Although this library is designed to create web pages, a web server is not required. Installation on a web server is straightforward and does not require any server-side modules or special permissions. The ch5m3d.js library has been released under the GNU GPL version 3 open-source license and is available from http://sourceforge.net/projects/ch5m3d/. PMID:24246004

  19. 3D Printing of Biomolecular Models for Research and Pedagogy

    PubMed Central

    Da Veiga Beltrame, Eduardo; Tyrwhitt-Drake, James; Roy, Ian; Shalaby, Raed; Suckale, Jakob; Pomeranz Krummel, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The construction of physical three-dimensional (3D) models of biomolecules can uniquely contribute to the study of the structure-function relationship. 3D structures are most often perceived using the two-dimensional and exclusively visual medium of the computer screen. Converting digital 3D molecular data into real objects enables information to be perceived through an expanded range of human senses, including direct stereoscopic vision, touch, and interaction. Such tangible models facilitate new insights, enable hypothesis testing, and serve as psychological or sensory anchors for conceptual information about the functions of biomolecules. Recent advances in consumer 3D printing technology enable, for the first time, the cost-effective fabrication of high-quality and scientifically accurate models of biomolecules in a variety of molecular representations. However, the optimization of the virtual model and its printing parameters is difficult and time consuming without detailed guidance. Here, we provide a guide on the digital design and physical fabrication of biomolecule models for research and pedagogy using open source or low-cost software and low-cost 3D printers that use fused filament fabrication technology. PMID:28362403

  20. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE PAGES

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemore » the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.« less

  1. Graph-based segmentation for RGB-D data using 3-D geometry enhanced superpixels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingyu; Gan, Ziqiao; Li, Kun; Hou, Chunping

    2015-05-01

    With the advances of depth sensing technologies, color image plus depth information (referred to as RGB-D data hereafter) is more and more popular for comprehensive description of 3-D scenes. This paper proposes a two-stage segmentation method for RGB-D data: 1) oversegmentation by 3-D geometry enhanced superpixels and 2) graph-based merging with label cost from superpixels. In the oversegmentation stage, 3-D geometrical information is reconstructed from the depth map. Then, a K-means-like clustering method is applied to the RGB-D data for oversegmentation using an 8-D distance metric constructed from both color and 3-D geometrical information. In the merging stage, treating each superpixel as a node, a graph-based model is set up to relabel the superpixels into semantically-coherent segments. In the graph-based model, RGB-D proximity, texture similarity, and boundary continuity are incorporated into the smoothness term to exploit the correlations of neighboring superpixels. To obtain a compact labeling, the label term is designed to penalize labels linking to similar superpixels that likely belong to the same object. Both the proposed 3-D geometry enhanced superpixel clustering method and the graph-based merging method from superpixels are evaluated by qualitative and quantitative results. By the fusion of color and depth information, the proposed method achieves superior segmentation performance over several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  2. An Interdisciplinary Conservation Module for Condition Survey on Cultural Heritages with a 3d Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedelì, C.

    2013-07-01

    In order to make the most of the digital outsourced documents, based on new technologies (e.g.: 3D LASER scanners, photogrammetry, etc.), a new approach was followed and a new ad hoc information system was implemented. The obtained product allow to the final user to reuse and manage the digital documents providing graphic tools and an integrated specific database to manage the entire documentation and conservation process, starting from the condition assessment until the conservation / restoration work. The system is organised on two main modules: Archaeology and Conservation. This paper focus on the features and the advantages of the second one. In particular it is emphasized its logical organisation, the possibility to easily mapping by using a very precise 3D metric platform, to benefit of the integrated relational database which allows to well organise, compare, keep and manage different kind of information at different level. Conservation module can manage along the time the conservation process of a site, monuments, object or excavation and conservation work in progress. An alternative approach called OVO by the author of this paper, force the surveyor to observe and describe the entity decomposing it on functional components, materials and construction techniques. Some integrated tools as the "ICOMOS-ISCS Illustrated glossary … " help the user to describe pathologies with a unified approach and terminology. Also the conservation project phase is strongly supported to envision future intervention and cost. A final section is devoted to record the conservation/restoration work already done or in progress. All information areas of the conservation module are interconnected to each other to allows to the system a complete interchange of graphic and alphanumeric data. The conservation module it self is connected to the archaeological one to create an interdisciplinary daily tool.

  3. Imaging chemical reactions - 3D velocity mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichinin, A. I.; Gericke, K.-H.; Kauczok, S.; Maul, C.

    Visualising a collision between an atom or a molecule or a photodissociation (half-collision) of a molecule on a single particle and single quantum level is like watching the collision of billiard balls on a pool table: Molecular beams or monoenergetic photodissociation products provide the colliding reactants at controlled velocity before the reaction products velocity is imaged directly with an elaborate camera system, where one should keep in mind that velocity is, in general, a three-dimensional (3D) vectorial property which combines scattering angles and speed. If the processes under study have no cylindrical symmetry, then only this 3D product velocity vector contains the full information of the elementary process under study.

  4. Intensity-based segmentation and visualization of cells in 3D microscopic images using the GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Lee, Jeong-Eom; Jeon, Woong-ki; Choi, Heung-Kook; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2013-02-01

    3D microscopy images contain abundant astronomical data, rendering 3D microscopy image processing time-consuming and laborious on a central processing unit (CPU). To solve these problems, many people crop a region of interest (ROI) of the input image to a small size. Although this reduces cost and time, there are drawbacks at the image processing level, e.g., the selected ROI strongly depends on the user and there is a loss in original image information. To mitigate these problems, we developed a 3D microscopy image processing tool on a graphics processing unit (GPU). Our tool provides efficient and various automatic thresholding methods to achieve intensity-based segmentation of 3D microscopy images. Users can select the algorithm to be applied. Further, the image processing tool provides visualization of segmented volume data and can set the scale, transportation, etc. using a keyboard and mouse. However, the 3D objects visualized fast still need to be analyzed to obtain information for biologists. To analyze 3D microscopic images, we need quantitative data of the images. Therefore, we label the segmented 3D objects within all 3D microscopic images and obtain quantitative information on each labeled object. This information can use the classification feature. A user can select the object to be analyzed. Our tool allows the selected object to be displayed on a new window, and hence, more details of the object can be observed. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of our tool by comparing the CPU and GPU processing times by matching the specification and configuration.

  5. Development of a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cool, Derek; Sherebrin, Shi; Izawa, Jonathan; Fenster, Aaron

    2007-03-01

    Biopsy of the prostate using ultrasound guidance is the clinical gold standard for diagnosis of prostate adenocarinoma. However, because early stage tumors are rarely visible under US, the procedure carries high false-negative rates and often patients require multiple biopsies before cancer is detected. To improve cancer detection, it is imperative that throughout the biopsy procedure, physicians know where they are within the prostate and where they have sampled during prior biopsies. The current biopsy procedure is limited to using only 2D ultrasound images to find and record target biopsy core sample sites. This information leaves ambiguity as the physician tries to interpret the 2D information and apply it to their 3D workspace. We have developed a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system that provides 3D intra-biopsy information to physicians for needle guidance and biopsy location recording. The system is designed to conform to the workflow of the current prostate biopsy procedure, making it easier for clinical integration. In this paper, we describe the system design and validate its accuracy by performing an in vitro biopsy procedure on US/CT multi-modal patient-specific prostate phantoms. A clinical sextant biopsy was performed by a urologist on the phantoms and the 3D models of the prostates were generated with volume errors less than 4% and mean boundary errors of less than 1 mm. Using the 3D biopsy system, needles were guided to within 1.36 +/- 0.83 mm of 3D targets and the position of the biopsy sites were accurately localized to 1.06 +/- 0.89 mm for the two prostates.

  6. 3dRPC: a web server for 3D RNA-protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yangyu; Li, Haotian; Xiao, Yi

    2018-04-01

    RNA-protein interactions occur in many biological processes. To understand the mechanism of these interactions one needs to know three-dimensional (3D) structures of RNA-protein complexes. 3dRPC is an algorithm for prediction of 3D RNA-protein complex structures and consists of a docking algorithm RPDOCK and a scoring function 3dRPC-Score. RPDOCK is used to sample possible complex conformations of an RNA and a protein by calculating the geometric and electrostatic complementarities and stacking interactions at the RNA-protein interface according to the features of atom packing of the interface. 3dRPC-Score is a knowledge-based potential that uses the conformations of nucleotide-amino-acid pairs as statistical variables and that is used to choose the near-native complex-conformations obtained from the docking method above. Recently, we built a web server for 3dRPC. The users can easily use 3dRPC without installing it locally. RNA and protein structures in PDB (Protein Data Bank) format are the only needed input files. It can also incorporate the information of interface residues or residue-pairs obtained from experiments or theoretical predictions to improve the prediction. The address of 3dRPC web server is http://biophy.hust.edu.cn/3dRPC. yxiao@hust.edu.cn.

  7. Using Geometry-Based Metrics as Part of Fitness-for-Purpose Evaluations of 3D City Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K.; Ellul, C.

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional geospatial information is being increasingly used in a range of tasks beyond visualisation. 3D datasets, however, are often being produced without exact specifications and at mixed levels of geometric complexity. This leads to variations within the models' geometric and semantic complexity as well as the degree of deviation from the corresponding real world objects. Existing descriptors and measures of 3D data such as CityGML's level of detail are perhaps only partially sufficient in communicating data quality and fitness-for-purpose. This study investigates whether alternative, automated, geometry-based metrics describing the variation of complexity within 3D datasets could provide additional relevant information as part of a process of fitness-for-purpose evaluation. The metrics include: mean vertex/edge/face counts per building; vertex/face ratio; minimum 2D footprint area and; minimum feature length. Each metric was tested on six 3D city models from international locations. The results show that geometry-based metrics can provide additional information on 3D city models as part of fitness-for-purpose evaluations. The metrics, while they cannot be used in isolation, may provide a complement to enhance existing data descriptors if backed up with local knowledge, where possible.

  8. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  9. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  10. Environmental Education Information Providers Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This report directory provides environmental education training resources and related support to education professionals. Surveys were sent to over 60 organizations asking them to self-identify as Environmental Information Providers or Environmental Education Information Providers. This report includes the list of organizations that responded and…

  11. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  12. D and D knowledge management information tool - a web based system developed to share D and D knowledge worldwide

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, L.; Upadhyay, H.; Shoffner, P.

    2013-07-01

    Deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) work is a high risk and technically challenging enterprise within the U.S. Department of Energy complex. During the past three decades, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management has been in charge of carrying out one of the largest environmental restoration efforts in the world: the cleanup of the Manhattan Project legacy. In today's corporate world, worker experiences and knowledge that have developed over time represent a valuable corporate asset. The ever-dynamic workplace, coupled with an aging workforce, presents corporations with the ongoing challenge of preserving work-related experiences and knowledge for cross-generational knowledge transfer tomore » the future workforce [5]. To prevent the D and D knowledge base and expertise from being lost over time, the DOE and the Applied Research Center at Florida International University (FIU) have developed the web-based Knowledge Management Information Tool (KM-IT) to capture and maintain this valuable information in a universally available and easily accessible and usable system. The D and D KM-IT was developed in collaboration with DOE Headquarters (HQ), the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG), and the ALARA [as low as reasonably achievable] Centers at Savannah River Sites to preserve the D and D information generated and collected by the D and D community. This is an open secured system that can be accessed from https://www.dndkm.org over the web and through mobile devices at https://m.dndkm.org. This knowledge system serves as a centralized repository and provides a common interface for D and D-related activities. It also improves efficiency by reducing the need to rediscover knowledge and promotes the reuse of existing knowledge. It is a community-driven system that facilitates the gathering, analyzing, storing, and sharing of knowledge and information within the D and D community. It assists the DOE D and D community in identifying potential solutions to

  13. CFL3D, FUN3d, and NSU3D Contributions to the Fifth Drag Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Laflin, Kelly R.; Chaffin, Mark S.; Powell, Nicholas; Levy, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Results presented at the Fifth Drag Prediction Workshop using CFL3D, FUN3D, and NSU3D are described. These are calculations on the workshop provided grids and drag adapted grids. The NSU3D results have been updated to reflect an improvement to skin friction calculation on skewed grids. FUN3D results generated after the workshop are included for custom participant generated grids and a grid from a previous workshop. Uniform grid refinement at the design condition shows a tight grouping in calculated drag, where the variation in the pressure component of drag is larger than the skin friction component. At this design condition, A fine-grid drag value was predicted with a smaller drag adjoint adapted grid via tetrahedral adaption to a metric and mixed-element subdivision. The buffet study produced larger variation than the design case, which is attributed to large differences in the predicted side-of-body separation extent. Various modeling and discretization approaches had a strong impact on predicted side-of-body separation. This large wing root separation bubble was not observed in wind tunnel tests indicating that more work is necessary in modeling wing root juncture flows to predict experiments.

  14. 3D thermography imaging standardization technique for inflammation diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Xiangyang; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Siebert, J. Paul

    2005-01-01

    We develop a 3D thermography imaging standardization technique to allow quantitative data analysis. Medical Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging is very sensitive and reliable mean of graphically mapping and display skin surface temperature. It allows doctors to visualise in colour and quantify temperature changes in skin surface. The spectrum of colours indicates both hot and cold responses which may co-exist if the pain associate with an inflammatory focus excites an increase in sympathetic activity. However, due to thermograph provides only qualitative diagnosis information, it has not gained acceptance in the medical and veterinary communities as a necessary or effective tool in inflammation and tumor detection. Here, our technique is based on the combination of visual 3D imaging technique and thermal imaging technique, which maps the 2D thermography images on to 3D anatomical model. Then we rectify the 3D thermogram into a view independent thermogram and conform it a standard shape template. The combination of these imaging facilities allows the generation of combined 3D and thermal data from which thermal signatures can be quantified.

  15. Canada in 3D - Toward a Sustainable 3D Model for Canadian Geology from Diverse Data Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodaric, B.; Pilkington, M.; Snyder, D. B.; St-Onge, M. R.; Russell, H.

    2015-12-01

    Many big science issues span large areas and require data from multiple heterogeneous sources, for example climate change, resource management, and hazard mitigation. Solutions to these issues can significantly benefit from access to a consistent and integrated geological model that would serve as a framework. However, such a model is absent for most large countries including Canada, due to the size of the landmass and the fragmentation of the source data into institutional and disciplinary silos. To overcome these barriers, the "Canada in 3D" (C3D) pilot project was recently launched by the Geological Survey of Canada. C3D is designed to be evergreen, multi-resolution, and inter-disciplinary: (a) it is to be updated regularly upon acquisition of new data; (b) portions vary in resolution and will initially consist of four layers (surficial, sedimentary, crystalline, and mantle) with intermediary patches of higher-resolution fill; and (c) a variety of independently managed data sources are providing inputs, such as geophysical, 3D and 2D geological models, drill logs, and others. Notably, scalability concerns dictate a decentralized and interoperable approach, such that only key control objects, denoting anchors for the modeling process, are imported into the C3D database while retaining provenance links to original sources. The resultant model is managed in the database, contains full modeling provenance as well as links to detailed information on rock units, and is to be visualized in desktop and online environments. It is anticipated that C3D will become the authoritative state of knowledge for the geology of Canada at a national scale.

  16. Detection of flood effects in montane streams based on fusion of 2D and 3D information from UAV imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhammer, Jakub; Vacková, Tereza

    2017-04-01

    In the contribution, we are presenting a novel method, enabling objective detection and classification of the alluvial features resulting from flooding, based on the imagery, acquired by the unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, drones). We have proposed and tested a workflow, using two key data products of the UAV photogrammetry - the 2D orthoimage and 3D digital elevation model, together with derived information on surface texture for the consequent classification of erosional and depositional features resulting from the flood. The workflow combines the photogrammetric analysis of the UAV imagery, texture analysis of the DEM, and the supervised image classification. Application of the texture analysis and use of DEM data is aimed to enhance 2D information, resulting from the high-resolution orthoimage by adding the newly derived bands, which enhance potential for detection and classification of key types of fluvial features in the stream and the floodplain. The method was tested on the example of a snowmelt-driven flood in a montane stream in Sumava Mts., Czech Republic, Central Europe, that occurred in December 2015. Using the UAV platform DJI Inspire 1 equipped with the RGB camera there was acquired imagery covering a 1 km long stretch of a meandering creek with elevated fluvial dynamics. Agisoft Photoscan Pro was used to derive a point cloud and further the high-resolution seamless orthoimage and DEM, Orfeo toolkit and SAGA GIS tools were used for DEM analysis. From the UAV-based data inputs, a multi-band dataset was derived as a source for the consequent classification of fluvial landforms. The RGB channels of the derived orthoimage were completed by the selected texture feature layers and the information on 3D properties of the riverscape - the normalized DEM and terrain ruggedness. Haralick features, derived from the RGB channels, are used for extracting information on the surface texture, the terrain ruggedness index is used as a measure of local topographical

  17. 41 CFR 304-3.15 - Must I provide my agency with information about any payment I receive on its behalf?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with information about any payment I receive on its behalf? 304-3.15 Section 304-3.15 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System PAYMENT OF TRAVEL EXPENSES FROM A NON-FEDERAL... RESPONSIBILITY General § 304-3.15 Must I provide my agency with information about any payment I receive on its...

  18. 41 CFR 304-3.15 - Must I provide my agency with information about any payment I receive on its behalf?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with information about any payment I receive on its behalf? 304-3.15 Section 304-3.15 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System PAYMENT OF TRAVEL EXPENSES FROM A NON-FEDERAL... RESPONSIBILITY General § 304-3.15 Must I provide my agency with information about any payment I receive on its...

  19. A CNN Regression Approach for Real-Time 2D/3D Registration.

    PubMed

    Shun Miao; Wang, Z Jane; Rui Liao

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) regression approach to address the two major limitations of existing intensity-based 2-D/3-D registration technology: 1) slow computation and 2) small capture range. Different from optimization-based methods, which iteratively optimize the transformation parameters over a scalar-valued metric function representing the quality of the registration, the proposed method exploits the information embedded in the appearances of the digitally reconstructed radiograph and X-ray images, and employs CNN regressors to directly estimate the transformation parameters. An automatic feature extraction step is introduced to calculate 3-D pose-indexed features that are sensitive to the variables to be regressed while robust to other factors. The CNN regressors are then trained for local zones and applied in a hierarchical manner to break down the complex regression task into multiple simpler sub-tasks that can be learned separately. Weight sharing is furthermore employed in the CNN regression model to reduce the memory footprint. The proposed approach has been quantitatively evaluated on 3 potential clinical applications, demonstrating its significant advantage in providing highly accurate real-time 2-D/3-D registration with a significantly enlarged capture range when compared to intensity-based methods.

  20. A high resolution and high speed 3D imaging system and its application on ATR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Thomas T.; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2006-04-01

    The paper presents an advanced 3D imaging system based on a combination of stereo vision and light projection methods. A single digital camera is used to take only one shot of the object and reconstruct the 3D model of an object. The stereo vision is achieved by employing a prism and mirror setup to split the views and combine them side by side in the camera. The advantage of this setup is its simple system architecture, easy synchronization, fast 3D imaging speed and high accuracy. The 3D imaging algorithms and potential applications are discussed. For ATR applications, it is critically important to extract maximum information for the potential targets and to separate the targets from the background and clutter noise. The added dimension of a 3D model provides additional features of surface profile, range information of the target. It is capable of removing the false shadow from camouflage and reveal the 3D profile of the object. It also provides arbitrary viewing angles and distances for training the filter bank for invariant ATR. The system architecture can be scaled to take large objects and to perform area 3D modeling onboard a UAV.

  1. Informed consent and ECT: how much information should be provided?

    PubMed

    Torrance, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Obtaining informed consent before providing treatment is a routine part of modern clinical practice. For some treatments, however, there may be disagreement over the requirements for 'informed' consent. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one such example. Blease argues that patients 'should surely be privy to the matters of fact that: (1) there is continued controversy over the effectiveness of ECT; (2) there is orthodox scientific consensus that there is currently no acknowledged explanation for ECT and (3) there is a serious (mainstream) debate over whether the response to ECT may be a placebo response.' Before embracing these suggestions, two key questions must be asked. Are these claims a reasonable representation of current ECT research? And if so, will this information be of benefit to patients? The evidence-based support for ECT from both National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the Royal College of Psychiatrists appears to undermine the validity of claims (1) and (3), and therefore the rationale for providing this information. Concerning assertion (2), it is true that the mechanism by which ECT has its therapeutic effect is not yet established, although the importance of conveying this fact to the patient is questionable. Of greater certainty is that the same irresolution surrounds the mechanism of action of pharmaceutical antidepressants, and so a double standard in patient care should be mindfully avoided if provision of this information is deemed a prerequisite for proper 'informed' consent. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. VR versus LF: towards the limitation-free 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, Tibor; Kara, Peter A.

    2017-06-01

    The evolution of 3D technologies shows a cyclical learning curve with a series of hypes and dead ends, with mistakes and consequences. 3D images contain significantly more information than the corresponding 2D ones. 3D display systems should be built on more pixels, or higher speed components. For true 3D, this factor is in the order of 100x, which is a real technological challenge. If not fulfilled, the capabilities of 3D systems will be compromised: headgears will be needed, or the viewers should be positioned or tracked, single-user devices, lack of parallax, missing cues, etc. The temptation is always there: why to provide all the information, just what the person absorbs that moment (subjective or objective visualization). Virtual Reality (VR) glasses have been around for more than two decades. With the latest technical improvements, VR became the next hype. 3D immersion was added as a new phenomenon; however, VR represents an isolated experience, and still requires headgears and a controlled environment. Augmented Reality (AR) in this sense is different. Will the VR/AR hype with the headgears be a dead end? While VR headsets may sell better than smart glasses or 3D TV glasses, also consider that using the technology may require a set of behavioral changes that the majority of people do not want to make. Displays and technologies that restrict viewers, or cause any discomfort will not be accepted on the long term. The newer wave of 3D is forecasted to 2018-2020, answering the need for unaided, limitation-free 3D experience. Light Field (LF) systems represent the next-generation in 3D. The HoloVizio system, having a capacity in the order of 100x, offers natural, restrictions-free 3D experience on a full field of view, enabling collaborative use for an unlimited number of viewers, even in a wider, immersive space. As a scalable technology, the display range goes from monitor-style units, through automotive 3D HUDs, screen-less solutions, up to cinema systems

  3. Automatic 2D-to-3D image conversion using 3D examples from the internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, J.; Brown, G.; Wang, M.; Ishwar, P.; Wu, C.; Mukherjee, D.

    2012-03-01

    The availability of 3D hardware has so far outpaced the production of 3D content. Although to date many methods have been proposed to convert 2D images to 3D stereopairs, the most successful ones involve human operators and, therefore, are time-consuming and costly, while the fully-automatic ones have not yet achieved the same level of quality. This subpar performance is due to the fact that automatic methods usually rely on assumptions about the captured 3D scene that are often violated in practice. In this paper, we explore a radically different approach inspired by our work on saliency detection in images. Instead of relying on a deterministic scene model for the input 2D image, we propose to "learn" the model from a large dictionary of stereopairs, such as YouTube 3D. Our new approach is built upon a key observation and an assumption. The key observation is that among millions of stereopairs available on-line, there likely exist many stereopairs whose 3D content matches that of the 2D input (query). We assume that two stereopairs whose left images are photometrically similar are likely to have similar disparity fields. Our approach first finds a number of on-line stereopairs whose left image is a close photometric match to the 2D query and then extracts depth information from these stereopairs. Since disparities for the selected stereopairs differ due to differences in underlying image content, level of noise, distortions, etc., we combine them by using the median. We apply the resulting median disparity field to the 2D query to obtain the corresponding right image, while handling occlusions and newly-exposed areas in the usual way. We have applied our method in two scenarios. First, we used YouTube 3D videos in search of the most similar frames. Then, we repeated the experiments on a small, but carefully-selected, dictionary of stereopairs closely matching the query. This, to a degree, emulates the results one would expect from the use of an extremely large 3D

  4. Ultra-low-cost 3D gaze estimation: an intuitive high information throughput compliment to direct brain-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, W. W.; Faisal, A. A.

    2012-08-01

    Eye movements are highly correlated with motor intentions and are often retained by patients with serious motor deficiencies. Despite this, eye tracking is not widely used as control interface for movement in impaired patients due to poor signal interpretation and lack of control flexibility. We propose that tracking the gaze position in 3D rather than 2D provides a considerably richer signal for human machine interfaces by allowing direct interaction with the environment rather than via computer displays. We demonstrate here that by using mass-produced video-game hardware, it is possible to produce an ultra-low-cost binocular eye-tracker with comparable performance to commercial systems, yet 800 times cheaper. Our head-mounted system has 30 USD material costs and operates at over 120 Hz sampling rate with a 0.5-1 degree of visual angle resolution. We perform 2D and 3D gaze estimation, controlling a real-time volumetric cursor essential for driving complex user interfaces. Our approach yields an information throughput of 43 bits s-1, more than ten times that of invasive and semi-invasive brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that are vastly more expensive. Unlike many BMIs our system yields effective real-time closed loop control of devices (10 ms latency), after just ten minutes of training, which we demonstrate through a novel BMI benchmark—the control of the video arcade game ‘Pong’.

  5. Automatic updating and 3D modeling of airport information from high resolution images using GIS and LIDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zheng; Sui, Haigang; Zhang, Xilin; Huang, Xianfeng

    2007-11-01

    As one of the most important geo-spatial objects and military establishment, airport is always a key target in fields of transportation and military affairs. Therefore, automatic recognition and extraction of airport from remote sensing images is very important and urgent for updating of civil aviation and military application. In this paper, a new multi-source data fusion approach on automatic airport information extraction, updating and 3D modeling is addressed. Corresponding key technologies including feature extraction of airport information based on a modified Ostu algorithm, automatic change detection based on new parallel lines-based buffer detection algorithm, 3D modeling based on gradual elimination of non-building points algorithm, 3D change detecting between old airport model and LIDAR data, typical CAD models imported and so on are discussed in detail. At last, based on these technologies, we develop a prototype system and the results show our method can achieve good effects.

  6. A GIS-based 3D online information system for underground energy storage in northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolde, Michael; Malte, Schwanebeck; Ehsan, Biniyaz; Rainer, Duttmann

    2015-04-01

    We would like to present the concept and current state of development of a GIS-based 3D online information system for underground energy storage. Its aim is to support the local authorities through pre-selection of possible sites for thermal, electrical and substantial underground energy storages. Since the extension of renewable energies has become legal requirement in Germany, the underground storing of superfluously produced green energy (such as during a heavy wind event) in the form of compressed air, gas or heated water has become increasingly important. However, the selection of suitable sites is a complex task. The presented information system uses data of geological features such as rock layers, salt domes and faults enriched with attribute data such as rock porosity and permeability. This information is combined with surface data of the existing energy infrastructure, such as locations of wind and biogas stations, powerline arrangement and cable capacity, and energy distribution stations. Furthermore, legal obligations such as protected areas on the surface and current underground mining permissions are used for the process of pre-selecting sites suitable for energy storage. Not only the current situation but also prospective scenarios, such as expected growth in produced amount of energy are incorporated in the system. While the process of pre-selection itself is completely automated, the user has full control of the weighting of the different factors via the web interface. The system is implemented as an online 3D server GIS environment, so that it can easily be utilized in any web browser. The results are visualized online as interactive 3d graphics. The information system is implemented in the Python programming language in combination with current Web standards, and is build using only free and open source software. It is being developed at Kiel University as part of the ANGUS+ project (lead by Prof. Sebastian Bauer) for the federal state of

  7. MOD3D: a model for incorporating MODTRAN radiative transfer into 3D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Alexander; Anderson, Gail P.; Gossage, Brett N.

    2001-08-01

    MOD3D, a rapid and accurate radiative transport algorithm, is being developed for application to 3D simulations. MOD3D couples to optical property databases generated by the MODTRAN4 Correlated-k (CK) band model algorithm. The Beer's Law dependence of the CK algorithm provides for proper coupling of illumination and line-of-sight paths. Full 3D spatial effects are modeled by scaling and interpolating optical data to local conditions. A C++ version of MOD3D has been integrated into JMASS for calculation of path transmittances, thermal emission and single scatter solar radiation. Results from initial validation efforts are presented.

  8. 3D Geological modelling - towards a European level infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kathryn A.; van der Krogt, Rob; Busschers, Freek S.

    2013-04-01

    The joint European Geological Surveys are preparing the ground for a "European Geological Data Infrastructure" (EGDI), under the framework of the FP7-project EGDI-Scope. This scoping study, started in June 2012, for a pan-European e-Infrastructure is based on the successes of earlier joint projects including 'OneGeology-Europe' and aims to provide the backbone for serving interoperable, geological data currently held by European Geological Surveys. Also data from past, ongoing and future European projects will be incorporated. The scope will include an investigation of the functional and technical requirements for serving 3D geological models and will look to research the potential for providing a framework to integrate models at different scales, and form a structure for enabling the development of new and innovative model delivery mechanisms. The EGDI-scope project encourages pan-European inter-disciplinary collaboration between all European Geological Surveys. It aims to enhance emerging web based technologies that will facilitate the delivery of geological data to user communities involved in European policy making and international industry, but also to geoscientific research communities and the general public. Therefore, stakeholder input and communication is imperative to the success, as is the collaboration with all the Geological Surveys of Europe. The most important functional and technical requirements for delivery of such information at pan-European level will be derived from exchanges with relevant European stakeholder representatives and providers of geological data. For handling and delivering 3D geological model data the project will need to address a number of strategic issues: • Which are the most important issues and queries for the relevant stakeholders, requiring 3D geological models? How can this be translated to functional requirements for development and design of an integrated European application? • How to handle the very large

  9. 5 CFR 890.910 - Provider information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Provider information. 890.910 Section 890.910 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS..., and FEHB Benefit Payments § 890.910 Provider information. The hospital provider information used to...

  10. [Reconstruction assisted by 3D printing in maxillofacial surgery].

    PubMed

    Ernoult, C; Bouletreau, P; Meyer, C; Aubry, S; Breton, P; Bachelet, J-T

    2015-04-01

    3-dimensional models (3D) appeared in the medical field 20 years ago. The recent development of consumer 3D printers explains the renewed interest in this technology. We describe the technical and practical modalities of this surgical tool, illustrated by concrete examples. The OsiriX(®) software (version 5.8.5, Geneva, Switzerland) was used for 3D surface reconstruction of the area of interest, the generation and export of ".stl" file. The NetFabb(®) software (Basic version 5.1.1, Lupburg, Germany) provided the preparation of ".stl" file. The 3D-printer was an Up plus 2 Easy 120(®) (PP3DP, Beijing Technology Co. TierTime Ltd., Chine). The printer used fused deposition modeling. The softwar Up!(®) allowed the 3d impression as required. The first case illustrated the value of 3D printing in the upper (frontal sinus and orbital roof). The second case concerned the preconfiguration of the osteosynthesis material for a complex fracture of the midface through the "mirroring" system. The third case showed the conformation of a prereconstruction for segmental mandibulectomy. Current 3D-printers are easy to use and represent a promising solution for medical prototyping. The 3D printing will quickly become undeniable because of its advantages: information sharing, simulation, surgical guides, pedagogy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Register cardiac fiber orientations from 3D DTI volume to 2D ultrasound image of rat hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound or echocardiography is one of the most widely used examinations for the diagnosis of cardiac diseases. However, it only supplies the geometric and structural information of the myocardium. In order to supply more detailed microstructure information of the myocardium, this paper proposes a registration method to map cardiac fiber orientations from three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) volume to the 2D ultrasound image. It utilizes a 2D/3D intensity based registration procedure including rigid, log-demons, and affine transformations to search the best similar slice from the template volume. After registration, the cardiac fiber orientations are mapped to the 2D ultrasound image via fiber relocations and reorientations. This method was validated by six images of rat hearts ex vivo. The evaluation results indicated that the final Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) achieved more than 90% after geometric registrations; and the inclination angle errors (IAE) between the mapped fiber orientations and the gold standards were less than 15 degree. This method may provide a practical tool for cardiologists to examine cardiac fiber orientations on ultrasound images and have the potential to supply additional information for diagnosis of cardiac diseases.

  12. PSS-3D1D: an improved 3D1D profile method of protein fold recognition for the annotation of twilight zone sequences.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, K; Parthasarathy, S

    2011-12-01

    Annotation of any newly determined protein sequence depends on the pairwise sequence identity with known sequences. However, for the twilight zone sequences which have only 15-25% identity, the pair-wise comparison methods are inadequate and the annotation becomes a challenging task. Such sequences can be annotated by using methods that recognize their fold. Bowie et al. described a 3D1D profile method in which the amino acid sequences that fold into a known 3D structure are identified by their compatibility to that known 3D structure. We have improved the above method by using the predicted secondary structure information and employ it for fold recognition from the twilight zone sequences. In our Protein Secondary Structure 3D1D (PSS-3D1D) method, a score (w) for the predicted secondary structure of the query sequence is included in finding the compatibility of the query sequence to the known fold 3D structures. In the benchmarks, the PSS-3D1D method shows a maximum of 21% improvement in predicting correctly the α + β class of folds from the sequences with twilight zone level of identity, when compared with the 3D1D profile method. Hence, the PSS-3D1D method could offer more clues than the 3D1D method for the annotation of twilight zone sequences. The web based PSS-3D1D method is freely available in the PredictFold server at http://bioinfo.bdu.ac.in/servers/ .

  13. Source Methodology for Turbofan Noise Prediction (SOURCE3D Technical Documentation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides the analytical documentation for the SOURCE3D Rotor Wake/Stator Interaction Code. It derives the equations for the rotor scattering coefficients and stator source vector and scattering coefficients that are needed for use in the TFANS (Theoretical Fan Noise Design/Prediction System). SOURCE3D treats the rotor and stator as isolated source elements. TFANS uses this information, along with scattering coefficients for inlet and exit elements, and provides complete noise solutions for turbofan engines. SOURCE3D is composed of a collection of FORTRAN programs that have been obtained by extending the approach of the earlier V072 Rotor Wake/Stator Interaction Code. Similar to V072, it treats the rotor and stator as a collection of blades and vanes having zero thickness and camber contained in an infinite, hardwall annular duct. SOURCE3D adds important features to the V072 capability-a rotor element, swirl flow and vorticity waves, actuator disks for flow turning, and combined rotor/actuator disk and stator/actuator disk elements. These items allow reflections from the rotor, frequency scattering, and mode trapping, thus providing more complete noise predictions than previously. The code has been thoroughly verified through comparison with D.B. Hanson's CUP2D two- dimensional code using a narrow annulus test case.

  14. 3D Printing Provides a Precise Approach in the Treatment of Tetralogy of Fallot, Pulmonary Atresia with Major Aortopulmonary Collateral Arteries.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Shafkat; Rockefeller, Toby; Raptis, Demetrios A; Woodard, Pamela K; Eghtesady, Pirooz

    2018-02-03

    Patients with tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia, and multiple aortopulmonary collateral arteries (Tet PA MAPCAs) have a wide spectrum of anatomy and disease severity. Management of these patients can be challenging and often require multiple high-risk surgical and interventional catheterization procedures. These interventions are made challenging by complex anatomy that require the proceduralist to mentally reconstruct three-dimensional anatomic relationships from two-dimensional images. Three-dimensional (3D) printing is an emerging medical technology that provides added benefits in the management of patients with Tet PA MAPCAs. When used in combination with current diagnostic modalities and procedures, 3D printing provides a precise approach to the management of these challenging, high-risk patients. Specifically, 3D printing enables detailed surgical and interventional planning prior to the procedure, which may improve procedural outcomes, decrease complications, and reduce procedure-related radiation dose and contrast load.

  15. Flexible Piezoresistive Sensors Embedded in 3D Printed Tires

    PubMed Central

    Emon, Md Omar Faruk; Choi, Jae-Won

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we report the development of a flexible, 3D printable piezoresistive pressure sensor capable of measuring force and detecting the location of the force. The multilayer sensor comprises of an ionic liquid-based piezoresistive intermediate layer in between carbon nanotube (CNT)-based stretchable electrodes. A sensor containing an array of different sensing units was embedded on the inner liner surface of a 3D printed tire to provide with force information at different points of contact between the tire and road. Four scaled tires, as well as wheels, were 3D printed using a flexible and a rigid material, respectively, which were later assembled with a 3D-printed chassis. Only one tire was equipped with a sensor and the chassis was driven through a motorized linear stage at different speeds and load conditions to evaluate the sensor performance. The sensor was fabricated via molding and screen printing processes using a commercially available 3D-printable photopolymer as 3D printing is our target manufacturing technique to fabricate the entire tire assembly with the sensor. Results show that the proposed sensors, inserted in the 3D printed tire assembly, could detect forces, as well as their locations, properly. PMID:28327533

  16. Flexible Piezoresistive Sensors Embedded in 3D Printed Tires.

    PubMed

    Emon, Md Omar Faruk; Choi, Jae-Won

    2017-03-22

    In this article, we report the development of a flexible, 3D printable piezoresistive pressure sensor capable of measuring force and detecting the location of the force. The multilayer sensor comprises of an ionic liquid-based piezoresistive intermediate layer in between carbon nanotube (CNT)-based stretchable electrodes. A sensor containing an array of different sensing units was embedded on the inner liner surface of a 3D printed tire to provide with force information at different points of contact between the tire and road. Four scaled tires, as well as wheels, were 3D printed using a flexible and a rigid material, respectively, which were later assembled with a 3D-printed chassis. Only one tire was equipped with a sensor and the chassis was driven through a motorized linear stage at different speeds and load conditions to evaluate the sensor performance. The sensor was fabricated via molding and screen printing processes using a commercially available 3D-printable photopolymer as 3D printing is our target manufacturing technique to fabricate the entire tire assembly with the sensor. Results show that the proposed sensors, inserted in the 3D printed tire assembly, could detect forces, as well as their locations, properly.

  17. An ROI multi-resolution compression method for 3D-HEVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ti, Chunli; Guan, Yudong; Xu, Guodong; Teng, Yidan; Miao, Xinyuan

    2017-09-01

    3D High Efficiency Video Coding (3D-HEVC) provides a significant potential on increasing the compression ratio of multi-view RGB-D videos. However, the bit rate still rises dramatically with the improvement of the video resolution, which will bring challenges to the transmission network, especially the mobile network. This paper propose an ROI multi-resolution compression method for 3D-HEVC to better preserve the information in ROI on condition of limited bandwidth. This is realized primarily through ROI extraction and compression multi-resolution preprocessed video as alternative data according to the network conditions. At first, the semantic contours are detected by the modified structured forests to restrain the color textures inside objects. The ROI is then determined utilizing the contour neighborhood along with the face region and foreground area of the scene. Secondly, the RGB-D videos are divided into slices and compressed via 3D-HEVC under different resolutions for selection by the audiences and applications. Afterwards, the reconstructed low-resolution videos from 3D-HEVC encoder are directly up-sampled via Laplace transformation and used to replace the non-ROI areas of the high-resolution videos. Finally, the ROI multi-resolution compressed slices are obtained by compressing the ROI preprocessed videos with 3D-HEVC. The temporal and special details of non-ROI are reduced in the low-resolution videos, so the ROI will be better preserved by the encoder automatically. Experiments indicate that the proposed method can keep the key high-frequency information with subjective significance while the bit rate is reduced.

  18. The 3D LAOKOON--Visual and Verbal in 3D Online Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liestol, Gunnar

    This paper reports on a project where three-dimensional (3D) online gaming environments were exploited for the purpose of academic communication and learning. 3D gaming environments are media and meaning rich and can provide inexpensive solutions for educational purposes. The experiment with teaching and discussions in this setting, however,…

  19. Chemistry of wood in 3D: new infrared imaging

    Treesearch

    Barbara L. Illman; Julia Sedlmair; Miriam Unger; Casey Crooks; Marli Oliveira; Carol Hirschmugl

    2015-01-01

    Chemical detection, mapping and imaging in three dimensions will help refine our understanding of wood properties and durability. We describe here a pioneering infrared method to create visual 3D images of the chemicals in wood, providing for the first time, spatial and architectural information at the cellular level without liquid extraction or prior fixation....

  20. Integration of 3d Models and Diagnostic Analyses Through a Conservation-Oriented Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelli, A.; Achille, C.; Tommasi, C.; Fassi, F.

    2017-08-01

    In the recent years, mature technologies for producing high quality virtual 3D replicas of Cultural Heritage (CH) artefacts has grown thanks to the progress of Information Technologies (IT) tools. These methods are an efficient way to present digital models that can be used with several scopes: heritage managing, support to conservation, virtual restoration, reconstruction and colouring, art cataloguing and visual communication. The work presented is an emblematic case of study oriented to the preventive conservation through monitoring activities, using different acquisition methods and instruments. It was developed inside a project founded by Lombardy Region, Italy, called "Smart Culture", which was aimed to realise a platform that gave the users the possibility to easily access to the CH artefacts, using as an example a very famous statue. The final product is a 3D reality-based model that contains a lot of information inside it, and that can be consulted through a common web browser. In the end, it was possible to define the general strategies oriented to the maintenance and the valorisation of CH artefacts, which, in this specific case, must consider the integration of different techniques and competencies, to obtain a complete, accurate and continuative monitoring of the statue.

  1. Stereotactic mammography imaging combined with 3D US imaging for image guided breast biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Surry, K. J. M.; Mills, G. R.; Bevan, K.

    2007-11-15

    Stereotactic X-ray mammography (SM) and ultrasound (US) guidance are both commonly used for breast biopsy. While SM provides three-dimensional (3D) targeting information and US provides real-time guidance, both have limitations. SM is a long and uncomfortable procedure and the US guided procedure is inherently two dimensional (2D), requiring a skilled physician for both safety and accuracy. The authors developed a 3D US-guided biopsy system to be integrated with, and to supplement SM imaging. Their goal is to be able to biopsy a larger percentage of suspicious masses using US, by clarifying ambiguous structures with SM imaging. Features from SM andmore » US guided biopsy were combined, including breast stabilization, a confined needle trajectory, and dual modality imaging. The 3D US guided biopsy system uses a 7.5 MHz breast probe and is mounted on an upright SM machine for preprocedural imaging. Intraprocedural targeting and guidance was achieved with real-time 2D and near real-time 3D US imaging. Postbiopsy 3D US imaging allowed for confirmation that the needle was penetrating the target. The authors evaluated 3D US-guided biopsy accuracy of their system using test phantoms. To use mammographic imaging information, they registered the SM and 3D US coordinate systems. The 3D positions of targets identified in the SM images were determined with a target localization error (TLE) of 0.49 mm. The z component (x-ray tube to image) of the TLE dominated with a TLE{sub z} of 0.47 mm. The SM system was then registered to 3D US, with a fiducial registration error (FRE) and target registration error (TRE) of 0.82 and 0.92 mm, respectively. Analysis of the FRE and TRE components showed that these errors were dominated by inaccuracies in the z component with a FRE{sub z} of 0.76 mm and a TRE{sub z} of 0.85 mm. A stereotactic mammography and 3D US guided breast biopsy system should include breast compression for stability and safety and dual modality imaging for target

  2. Enhanced LOD Concepts for Virtual 3d City Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, J.; Geiger, A.; Gröger, G.; Häfele, K.-H.; Löwner, M.-O.

    2013-09-01

    Virtual 3D city models contain digital three dimensional representations of city objects like buildings, streets or technical infrastructure. Because size and complexity of these models continuously grow, a Level of Detail (LoD) concept effectively supporting the partitioning of a complete model into alternative models of different complexity and providing metadata, addressing informational content, complexity and quality of each alternative model is indispensable. After a short overview on various LoD concepts, this paper discusses the existing LoD concept of the CityGML standard for 3D city models and identifies a number of deficits. Based on this analysis, an alternative concept is developed and illustrated with several examples. It differentiates between first, a Geometric Level of Detail (GLoD) and a Semantic Level of Detail (SLoD), and second between the interior building and its exterior shell. Finally, a possible implementation of the new concept is demonstrated by means of an UML model.

  3. Development of a new software for analyzing 3-D fracture network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Jeong-Gi; Noh, Young-Hwan; Choi, Yosoon

    2014-05-01

    A new software is presented to analyze fracture network in 3-D. Recently, we completed the software package based on information given in EGU2013. The software consists of several modules that play roles in management of borehole data, stochastic modelling of fracture network, construction of analysis domain, visualization of fracture geometry in 3-D, calculation of equivalent pipes and production of cross-section diagrams. Intel Parallel Studio XE 2013, Visual Studio.NET 2010 and the open source VTK library were utilized as development tools to efficiently implement the modules and the graphical user interface of the software. A case study was performed to analyze 3-D fracture network system at the Upper Devonian Grosmont Formation in Alberta, Canada. The results have suggested that the developed software is effective in modelling and visualizing 3-D fracture network system, and can provide useful information to tackle the geomechanical problems related to strength, deformability and hydraulic behaviours of the fractured rock masses. This presentation describes the concept and details of the development and implementation of the software.

  4. Mutual information as a measure of image quality for 3D dynamic lung imaging with EIT

    PubMed Central

    Crabb, M G; Davidson, J L; Little, R; Wright, P; Morgan, A R; Miller, C A; Naish, J H; Parker, G J M; Kikinis, R; McCann, H; Lionheart, W R B

    2014-01-01

    We report on a pilot study of dynamic lung electrical impedance tomography (EIT) at the University of Manchester. Low-noise EIT data at 100 frames per second (fps) were obtained from healthy male subjects during controlled breathing, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) subsequently used for spatial validation of the EIT reconstruction. The torso surface in the MR image and electrode positions obtained using MRI fiducial markers informed the construction of a 3D finite element model extruded along the caudal-distal axis of the subject. Small changes in the boundary that occur during respiration were accounted for by incorporating the sensitivity with respect to boundary shape into a robust temporal difference reconstruction algorithm. EIT and MRI images were co-registered using the open source medical imaging software, 3D Slicer. A quantitative comparison of quality of different EIT reconstructions was achieved through calculation of the mutual information with a lung-segmented MR image. EIT reconstructions using a linear shape correction algorithm reduced boundary image artefacts, yielding better contrast of the lungs, and had 10% greater mutual information compared with a standard linear EIT reconstruction. PMID:24710978

  5. Mutual information as a measure of image quality for 3D dynamic lung imaging with EIT.

    PubMed

    Crabb, M G; Davidson, J L; Little, R; Wright, P; Morgan, A R; Miller, C A; Naish, J H; Parker, G J M; Kikinis, R; McCann, H; Lionheart, W R B

    2014-05-01

    We report on a pilot study of dynamic lung electrical impedance tomography (EIT) at the University of Manchester. Low-noise EIT data at 100 frames per second were obtained from healthy male subjects during controlled breathing, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) subsequently used for spatial validation of the EIT reconstruction. The torso surface in the MR image and electrode positions obtained using MRI fiducial markers informed the construction of a 3D finite element model extruded along the caudal-distal axis of the subject. Small changes in the boundary that occur during respiration were accounted for by incorporating the sensitivity with respect to boundary shape into a robust temporal difference reconstruction algorithm. EIT and MRI images were co-registered using the open source medical imaging software, 3D Slicer. A quantitative comparison of quality of different EIT reconstructions was achieved through calculation of the mutual information with a lung-segmented MR image. EIT reconstructions using a linear shape correction algorithm reduced boundary image artefacts, yielding better contrast of the lungs, and had 10% greater mutual information compared with a standard linear EIT reconstruction.

  6. Extension of RCC Topological Relations for 3d Complex Objects Components Extracted from 3d LIDAR Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xu-Feng; Abolfazl Mostafavia, Mir; Wang, Chen

    2016-06-01

    Topological relations are fundamental for qualitative description, querying and analysis of a 3D scene. Although topological relations for 2D objects have been extensively studied and implemented in GIS applications, their direct extension to 3D is very challenging and they cannot be directly applied to represent relations between components of complex 3D objects represented by 3D B-Rep models in R3. Herein we present an extended Region Connection Calculus (RCC) model to express and formalize topological relations between planar regions for creating 3D model represented by Boundary Representation model in R3. We proposed a new dimension extended 9-Intersection model to represent the basic relations among components of a complex object, including disjoint, meet and intersect. The last element in 3*3 matrix records the details of connection through the common parts of two regions and the intersecting line of two planes. Additionally, this model can deal with the case of planar regions with holes. Finally, the geometric information is transformed into a list of strings consisting of topological relations between two planar regions and detailed connection information. The experiments show that the proposed approach helps to identify topological relations of planar segments of point cloud automatically.

  7. A Hybrid 3D Indoor Space Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Ali; Rahman, Alias Abdul; Boguslawski, Pawel

    2016-10-01

    GIS integrates spatial information and spatial analysis. An important example of such integration is for emergency response which requires route planning inside and outside of a building. Route planning requires detailed information related to indoor and outdoor environment. Indoor navigation network models including Geometric Network Model (GNM), Navigable Space Model, sub-division model and regular-grid model lack indoor data sources and abstraction methods. In this paper, a hybrid indoor space model is proposed. In the proposed method, 3D modeling of indoor navigation network is based on surveying control points and it is less dependent on the 3D geometrical building model. This research proposes a method of indoor space modeling for the buildings which do not have proper 2D/3D geometrical models or they lack semantic or topological information. The proposed hybrid model consists of topological, geometrical and semantical space.

  8. Development of a 3D ultrasound-guided system for thermal ablation of liver tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshat, Hamid R. S.; Cool, Derek W.; Barker, Kevin; Gardi, Lori; Kakani, Nirmal; Fenster, Aaron

    2013-03-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasound (2D US) imaging is commonly used for diagnostic and intraoperative guidance of interventional abdominal procedures including percutaneous thermal ablation of focal liver tumors with radiofrequency (RF) or microwave (MW) induced energy. However, in many situations 2D US may not provide enough anatomical detail and guidance information. Therefore, intra-procedural CT or MR imaging are used in many centers for guidance purposes. These modalities are costly and are mainly utilized to confirm tool placement rather than guiding the insertion. Three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) has been introduced to address these issues. In this paper, we present our integrated solution to provide 3D US images using a newly developed mechanical transducer with a large field-ofview and without the need for external tracking devices to combine diagnostic and planning information of different modalities for intraoperative guidance. The system provides tools to segment the target(s), plan the treatment, and detect the ablation applicators during the procedure for guiding purposes. We present experimental results used to ensure that our system generates accurate measurements and our early clinical evaluation results. The results suggest that 3D US used for focal liver ablation can provide a more reliable planning and guidance tool compared to 2D US only, and in many cases offers comparable measurements to other alternatives at significantly lower cost, faster time and with no harmful radiation.

  9. 3D-QSAR studies on 1,2,4-triazolyl 5-azaspiro [2.4]-heptanes as D3R antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Hui

    2018-07-01

    Dopamine D3 receptor has become an attractive target in the treatment of abused drugs. 3D-QSAR studies were performed on a novel series of D3 receptor antagonists, 1,2,4-triazolyl 5-azaspiro [2.4]-heptanes, using CoMFA and CoMSIA methods. Two predictive 3D-QSAR models have been generated for the modified design of D3R antagonists. Based on the steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic and hydrogen-bond acceptor information of contour maps, key structural factors affecting the bioactivity were explored. This work gives helpful suggestions on the design of novel D3R antagonists with increased activities.

  10. Complex adaptation-based LDR image rendering for 3D image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Hak; Kwon, Hyuk-Ju; Sohng, Kyu-Ik

    2014-07-01

    A low-dynamic tone-compression technique is developed for realistic image rendering that can make three-dimensional (3D) images similar to realistic scenes by overcoming brightness dimming in the 3D display mode. The 3D surround provides varying conditions for image quality, illuminant adaptation, contrast, gamma, color, sharpness, and so on. In general, gain/offset adjustment, gamma compensation, and histogram equalization have performed well in contrast compression; however, as a result of signal saturation and clipping effects, image details are removed and information is lost on bright and dark areas. Thus, an enhanced image mapping technique is proposed based on space-varying image compression. The performance of contrast compression is enhanced with complex adaptation in a 3D viewing surround combining global and local adaptation. Evaluating local image rendering in view of tone and color expression, noise reduction, and edge compensation confirms that the proposed 3D image-mapping model can compensate for the loss of image quality in the 3D mode.

  11. Recognition of 3-D Scene with Partially Occluded Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Siwei; Wong, Andrew K. C...

    1987-03-01

    This paper presents a robot vision system which is capable of recognizing objects in a 3-D scene and interpreting their spatial relation even though some objects in the scene may be partially occluded by other objects. An algorithm is developed to transform the geometric information from the range data into an attributed hypergraph representation (AHR). A hypergraph monomorphism algorithm is then used to compare the AHR of objects in the scene with a set of complete AHR's of prototypes. The capability of identifying connected components and interpreting various types of edges in the 3-D scene enables us to distinguish objects which are partially blocking each other in the scene. Using structural information stored in the primitive area graph, a heuristic hypergraph monomorphism algorithm provides an effective way for recognizing, locating, and interpreting partially occluded objects in the range image.

  12. Surface smoothing, decimation, and their effects on 3D biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Veneziano, Alessio; Landi, Federica; Profico, Antonio

    2018-06-01

    Smoothing and decimation filters are commonly used to restore the realistic appearance of virtual biological specimens, but they can cause a loss of topological information of unknown extent. In this study, we analyzed the effect of smoothing and decimation on a 3D mesh to highlight the consequences of an inappropriate use of these filters. Topological noise was simulated on four anatomical regions of the virtual reconstruction of an orangutan cranium. Sequential levels of smoothing and decimation were applied, and their effects were analyzed on the overall topology of the 3D mesh and on linear and volumetric measurements. Different smoothing algorithms affected mesh topology and measurements differently, although the influence on the latter was generally low. Decimation always produced detrimental effects on both topology and measurements. The application of smoothing and decimation, both separate and combined, is capable of recovering topological information. Based on the results, objective guidelines are provided to minimize information loss when using smoothing and decimation on 3D meshes. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. 3D-LZ helicopter ladar imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, James; Harrington, Walter; McKinley, R. Andrew; Burns, H. N.; Braddom, Steven; Szoboszlay, Zoltan

    2010-04-01

    A joint-service team led by the Air Force Research Laboratory's Munitions and Sensors Directorates completed a successful flight test demonstration of the 3D-LZ Helicopter LADAR Imaging System. This was a milestone demonstration in the development of technology solutions for a problem known as "helicopter brownout", the loss of situational awareness caused by swirling sand during approach and landing. The 3D-LZ LADAR was developed by H.N. Burns Engineering and integrated with the US Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate's Brown-Out Symbology System aircraft state symbology aboard a US Army EH-60 Black Hawk helicopter. The combination of these systems provided an integrated degraded visual environment landing solution with landing zone situational awareness as well as aircraft guidance and obstacle avoidance information. Pilots from the U.S. Army, Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps achieved a 77% landing rate in full brownout conditions at a test range at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona. This paper will focus on the LADAR technology used in 3D-LZ and the results of this milestone demonstration.

  14. Incidental Learning in 3D Virtual Environments: Relationships to Learning Style, Digital Literacy and Information Display

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Wayne W.; Boechler, Patricia M.

    2014-01-01

    With teachers taking more interest in utilizing 3D virtual environments for educational purposes, research is needed to understand how learners perceive and process information within virtual environments (Eschenbrenner, Nah, & Siau, 2008). In this study, the authors sought to determine if learning style or digital literacy predict incidental…

  15. An ergonomic handheld ultrasound probe providing contact forces and pose information.

    PubMed

    Yohan Noh; Housden, R James; Gomez, Alberto; Knight, Caroline; Garcia, Francesca; Hongbin Liu; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal; Althoefer, Kaspar

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a handheld ultrasound probe which is integrated with sensors to measure force and pose (position/orientation) information. Using an integrated probe like this, one can relate ultrasound images to spatial location and create 3D ultrasound maps. The handheld device can be used by sonographers and also easily be integrated with robot arms for automated sonography. The handheld device is ergonomically designed; rapid attachment and removal of the ultrasound transducer itself is possible using easy-to-operate clip mechanisms. A cable locking mechanism reduces the impact that gravitational and other external forces have (originating from data and power supply cables connected to the probe) on our measurements. Gravitational errors introduced by the housing of the probe are compensated for using knowledge of the housing geometry and the integrated pose sensor that provides us with accurate orientation information. In this paper, we describe the handheld probe with its integrated force/pose sensors and our approach to gravity compensation. We carried out a set of experiments to verify the feasibility of our approach to obtain accurate spatial information of the handheld probe.

  16. Serum levels of 3-epi-25-OH-D3 during hypervitaminosis D in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Granado-Lorencio, F; Blanco-Navarro, I; Pérez-Sacristán, B; Donoso-Navarro, E; Silvestre-Mardomingo, R

    2012-12-01

    Intoxication from vitamin D supplements has been rarely reported, but nowadays, it occurs more frequently. The presence of the C-3 epimer of 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) (3-epi-25-OH-D(3)) is highly prevalent in adults, although there is little information regarding its in vivo relevance, if any, especially under pathological conditions. Our aim was to assess the presence of the 3-epi-25-OH-D(3) in serum samples displaying 25-OH-D(3) concentrations indicative of hypervitaminosis D. A total of 58 samples displaying a wide range of concentrations of 25-OH-D(3) (>64-439 ng/ml) by ultrafast liquid chromatography were consecutively recruited and reassessed for the presence of 3-epi-25-OH-D(3) using a second chromatographic system. Data from additional biochemical tests performed as part of the patient evaluation were also recorded. Mean relative contribution of 3-epi-25-OH-D(3) was less than 4%, and concentrations ranged from 2-28.6 ng/ml. Serum levels of the C3 epimer, but not the relative contribution, correlate with serum 25-OH-D(3). Overall, in subjects with 25-OH-D(3) concentrations indicative of hypervitaminosis D, the presence of the C-3 epimer and its levels were apparently unrelated to age, serum markers of renal and liver function, acute-phase reactants, and the presence of hypercalcemia. 3-Epi-25-OH-D(3) did not correlate with PTH, but subjects displaying PTH suppression (<14 pg/ml) showed higher concentrations of 3-epi-25-OH-D(3). The relative contribution of 3-epi-25-D(3) was not significantly altered during hypervitaminosis D, although the absolute levels reached in serum may be biologically relevant. From a clinical viewpoint, although the small size of the group may affect the lack of relationships, the presence of 3-epi-25-OH-D(3) was apparently unrelated to serum markers of renal and liver function, acute-phase reactants, PTH, and the presence of hypercalcemia.

  17. Handheld real-time volumetric 3-D gamma-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefner, Andrew; Barnowski, Ross; Luke, Paul; Amman, Mark; Vetter, Kai

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents the concept of real-time fusion of gamma-ray imaging and visual scene data for a hand-held mobile Compton imaging system in 3-D. The ability to obtain and integrate both gamma-ray and scene data from a mobile platform enables improved capabilities in the localization and mapping of radioactive materials. This not only enhances the ability to localize these materials, but it also provides important contextual information of the scene which once acquired can be reviewed and further analyzed subsequently. To demonstrate these concepts, the high-efficiency multimode imager (HEMI) is used in a hand-portable implementation in combination with a Microsoft Kinect sensor. This sensor, in conjunction with open-source software, provides the ability to create a 3-D model of the scene and to track the position and orientation of HEMI in real-time. By combining the gamma-ray data and visual data, accurate 3-D maps of gamma-ray sources are produced in real-time. This approach is extended to map the location of radioactive materials within objects with unknown geometry.

  18. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In addition to providing the advantages of performing complex

  19. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In addition to providing the advantages of performing complex

  20. Sodium 3D COncentration MApping (COMA 3D) using 23Na and proton MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Milton L.; Harrington, Michael G.; Schepkin, Victor D.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2014-10-01

    Functional changes of sodium 3D MRI signals were converted into millimolar concentration changes using an open-source fully automated MATLAB toolbox. These concentration changes are visualized via 3D sodium concentration maps, and they are overlaid over conventional 3D proton images to provide high-resolution co-registration for easy correlation of functional changes to anatomical regions. Nearly 5000/h concentration maps were generated on a personal computer (ca. 2012) using 21.1 T 3D sodium MRI brain images of live rats with spatial resolution of 0.8 × 0.8 × 0.8 mm3 and imaging matrices of 60 × 60 × 60. The produced concentration maps allowed for non-invasive quantitative measurement of in vivo sodium concentration in the normal rat brain as a functional response to migraine-like conditions. The presented work can also be applied to sodium-associated changes in migraine, cancer, and other metabolic abnormalities that can be sensed by molecular imaging. The MATLAB toolbox allows for automated image analysis of the 3D images acquired on the Bruker platform and can be extended to other imaging platforms. The resulting images are presented in a form of series of 2D slices in all three dimensions in native MATLAB and PDF formats. The following is provided: (a) MATLAB source code for image processing, (b) the detailed processing procedures, (c) description of the code and all sub-routines, (d) example data sets of initial and processed data. The toolbox can be downloaded at: http://www.vuiis.vanderbilt.edu/ truongm/COMA3D/.

  1. Sockeye: A 3D Environment for Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Stephen B.; Astakhova, Tamara; Bilenky, Mikhail; Birney, Ewan; Fu, Tony; Hassel, Maik; Melsopp, Craig; Rak, Marcin; Robertson, A. Gordon; Sleumer, Monica; Siddiqui, Asim S.; Jones, Steven J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Comparative genomics techniques are used in bioinformatics analyses to identify the structural and functional properties of DNA sequences. As the amount of available sequence data steadily increases, the ability to perform large-scale comparative analyses has become increasingly relevant. In addition, the growing complexity of genomic feature annotation means that new approaches to genomic visualization need to be explored. We have developed a Java-based application called Sockeye that uses three-dimensional (3D) graphics technology to facilitate the visualization of annotation and conservation across multiple sequences. This software uses the Ensembl database project to import sequence and annotation information from several eukaryotic species. A user can additionally import their own custom sequence and annotation data. Individual annotation objects are displayed in Sockeye by using custom 3D models. Ensembl-derived and imported sequences can be analyzed by using a suite of multiple and pair-wise alignment algorithms. The results of these comparative analyses are also displayed in the 3D environment of Sockeye. By using the Java3D API to visualize genomic data in a 3D environment, we are able to compactly display cross-sequence comparisons. This provides the user with a novel platform for visualizing and comparing genomic feature organization. PMID:15123592

  2. Real-time 3D video compression for tele-immersive environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenyu; Cui, Yi; Anwar, Zahid; Bocchino, Robert; Kiyanclar, Nadir; Nahrstedt, Klara; Campbell, Roy H.; Yurcik, William

    2006-01-01

    Tele-immersive systems can improve productivity and aid communication by allowing distributed parties to exchange information via a shared immersive experience. The TEEVE research project at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of California at Berkeley seeks to foster the development and use of tele-immersive environments by a holistic integration of existing components that capture, transmit, and render three-dimensional (3D) scenes in real time to convey a sense of immersive space. However, the transmission of 3D video poses significant challenges. First, it is bandwidth-intensive, as it requires the transmission of multiple large-volume 3D video streams. Second, existing schemes for 2D color video compression such as MPEG, JPEG, and H.263 cannot be applied directly because the 3D video data contains depth as well as color information. Our goal is to explore from a different angle of the 3D compression space with factors including complexity, compression ratio, quality, and real-time performance. To investigate these trade-offs, we present and evaluate two simple 3D compression schemes. For the first scheme, we use color reduction to compress the color information, which we then compress along with the depth information using zlib. For the second scheme, we use motion JPEG to compress the color information and run-length encoding followed by Huffman coding to compress the depth information. We apply both schemes to 3D videos captured from a real tele-immersive environment. Our experimental results show that: (1) the compressed data preserves enough information to communicate the 3D images effectively (min. PSNR > 40) and (2) even without inter-frame motion estimation, very high compression ratios (avg. > 15) are achievable at speeds sufficient to allow real-time communication (avg. ~ 13 ms per 3D video frame).

  3. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  4. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  5. TeCo3D: a 3D telecooperation application based on VRML and Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauve, Martin

    1998-12-01

    In this paper we present a method for sharing collaboration- unaware VRML content, e.g. 3D models which were not specifically developed for use in a distributed environment. This functionality is an essential requirement for the inclusion of arbitrary VRML content, as generated by standard CAD or animation software, into teleconferencing sessions. We have developed a 3D TeleCooperation (TeCo3D) prototype to demonstrate the feasibility of our approach. The basic services provided by the prototype are the distribution of cooperation unaware VRML content, the sharing of user interactions, and the joint viewing of the content. In order to achieve maximum portability, the prototype was developed completely in Java. This paper presents general aspects of sharing VRML content as well as the concepts, the architecture and the services of the TeCo3D prototype. Our approach relies on existing VRML browsers as the VRML presentation and execution engines while reliable multicast is used as the means of communication to provide for scalability.

  6. 30 CFR 1206.62 - Does ONRR protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Does ONRR protect information I provide? 1206.62 Section 1206.62 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Oil § 1206.62 Does ONRR protect information I provide...

  7. 30 CFR 1206.62 - Does ONRR protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Does ONRR protect information I provide? 1206.62 Section 1206.62 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Oil § 1206.62 Does ONRR protect information I provide...

  8. 30 CFR 1206.108 - Does ONRR protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Does ONRR protect information I provide? 1206.108 Section 1206.108 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Oil § 1206.108 Does ONRR protect information I provide...

  9. 30 CFR 1206.108 - Does ONRR protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Does ONRR protect information I provide? 1206.108 Section 1206.108 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Oil § 1206.108 Does ONRR protect information I provide...

  10. 30 CFR 1206.108 - Does ONRR protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Does ONRR protect information I provide? 1206.108 Section 1206.108 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Oil § 1206.108 Does ONRR protect information I provide...

  11. 30 CFR 1206.62 - Does ONRR protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Does ONRR protect information I provide? 1206.62 Section 1206.62 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Oil § 1206.62 Does ONRR protect information I provide...

  12. The RCSB protein data bank: integrative view of protein, gene and 3D structural information

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Peter W.; Prlić, Andreas; Altunkaya, Ali; Bi, Chunxiao; Bradley, Anthony R.; Christie, Cole H.; Costanzo, Luigi Di; Duarte, Jose M.; Dutta, Shuchismita; Feng, Zukang; Green, Rachel Kramer; Goodsell, David S.; Hudson, Brian; Kalro, Tara; Lowe, Robert; Peisach, Ezra; Randle, Christopher; Rose, Alexander S.; Shao, Chenghua; Tao, Yi-Ping; Valasatava, Yana; Voigt, Maria; Westbrook, John D.; Woo, Jesse; Yang, Huangwang; Young, Jasmine Y.; Zardecki, Christine; Berman, Helen M.; Burley, Stephen K.

    2017-01-01

    The Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB, http://rcsb.org), the US data center for the global PDB archive, makes PDB data freely available to all users, from structural biologists to computational biologists and beyond. New tools and resources have been added to the RCSB PDB web portal in support of a ‘Structural View of Biology.’ Recent developments have improved the User experience, including the high-speed NGL Viewer that provides 3D molecular visualization in any web browser, improved support for data file download and enhanced organization of website pages for query, reporting and individual structure exploration. Structure validation information is now visible for all archival entries. PDB data have been integrated with external biological resources, including chromosomal position within the human genome; protein modifications; and metabolic pathways. PDB-101 educational materials have been reorganized into a searchable website and expanded to include new features such as the Geis Digital Archive. PMID:27794042

  13. 3D printing of intracranial artery stenosis based on the source images of magnetic resonance angiograph.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-Hai; Liu, Jia; Li, Ming-Li; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Chen, Jie; Wu, Jian-Huang

    2014-08-01

    Three dimensional (3D) printing techniques for brain diseases have not been widely studied. We attempted to 'print' the segments of intracranial arteries based on magnetic resonance imaging. Three dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was performed on two patients with middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis. Using scale-adaptive vascular modeling, 3D vascular models were constructed from the MRA source images. The magnified (ten times) regions of interest (ROI) of the stenotic segments were selected and fabricated by a 3D printer with a resolution of 30 µm. A survey to 8 clinicians was performed to evaluate the accuracy of 3D printing results as compared with MRA findings (4 grades, grade 1: consistent with MRA and provide additional visual information; grade 2: consistent with MRA; grade 3: not consistent with MRA; grade 4: not consistent with MRA and provide probable misleading information). If a 3D printing vessel segment was ideally matched to the MRA findings (grade 2 or 1), a successful 3D printing was defined. Seven responders marked "grade 1" to 3D printing results, while one marked "grade 4". Therefore, 87.5% of the clinicians considered the 3D printing were successful. Our pilot study confirms the feasibility of using 3D printing technique in the research field of intracranial artery diseases. Further investigations are warranted to optimize this technique and translate it into clinical practice.

  14. 3D FISH to analyse gene domain-specific chromatin re-modeling in human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kocanova, Silvia; Goiffon, Isabelle; Bystricky, Kerstin

    2018-06-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a common technique used to label DNA and/or RNA for detection of a genomic region of interest. However, the technique can be challenging, in particular when applied to single genes in human cancer cells. Here, we provide a step-by-step protocol for analysis of short (35 kb-300 kb) genomic regions in three dimensions (3D). We discuss the experimental design and provide practical considerations for 3D imaging and data analysis to determine chromatin folding. We demonstrate that 3D FISH using BACs (Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes) or fosmids can provide detailed information of the architecture of gene domains. More specifically, we show that mapping of specific chromatin landscapes informs on changes associated with estrogen stimulated gene activity in human breast cancer cell lines. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Understanding 3D human torso shape via manifold clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng; Li, Peng; Fu, Yun

    2013-05-01

    Discovering the variations in human torso shape plays a key role in many design-oriented applications, such as suit designing. With recent advances in 3D surface imaging technologies, people can obtain 3D human torso data that provide more information than traditional measurements. However, how to find different human shapes from 3D torso data is still an open problem. In this paper, we propose to use spectral clustering approach on torso manifold to address this problem. We first represent high-dimensional torso data in a low-dimensional space using manifold learning algorithm. Then the spectral clustering method is performed to get several disjoint clusters. Experimental results show that the clusters discovered by our approach can describe the discrepancies in both genders and human shapes, and our approach achieves better performance than the compared clustering method.

  16. 3D imaging with a single-aperture 3-mm objective lens: concept, fabrication, and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korniski, Ronald; Bae, Sam Y.; Shearn, Michael; Manohara, Harish; Shahinian, Hrayr

    2011-10-01

    There are many advantages to minimally invasive surgery (MIS). An endoscope is the optical system of choice by the surgeon for MIS. The smaller the incision or opening made to perform the surgery, the smaller the optical system needed. For minimally invasive neurological and skull base surgeries the openings are typically 10-mm in diameter (dime sized) or less. The largest outside diameter (OD) endoscope used is 4mm. A significant drawback to endoscopic MIS is that it only provides a monocular view of the surgical site thereby lacking depth information for the surgeon. A stereo view would provide the surgeon instantaneous depth information of the surroundings within the field of view, a significant advantage especially during brain surgery. Providing 3D imaging in an endoscopic objective lens system presents significant challenges because of the tight packaging constraints. This paper presents a promising new technique for endoscopic 3D imaging that uses a single lens system with complementary multi-bandpass filters (CMBFs), and describes the proof-of-concept demonstrations performed to date validating the technique. These demonstrations of the technique have utilized many commercial off-the- shelf (COTS) components including the ones used in the endoscope objective.

  17. 3D Imaging with a Single-Aperture 3-mm Objective Lens: Concept, Fabrication and Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korniski, Ron; Bae, Sam Y.; Shearn, Mike; Manohara, Harish; Shahinian, Hrayr

    2011-01-01

    There are many advantages to minimally invasive surgery (MIS). An endoscope is the optical system of choice by the surgeon for MIS. The smaller the incision or opening made to perform the surgery, the smaller the optical system needed. For minimally invasive neurological and skull base surgeries the openings are typically 10-mm in diameter (dime sized) or less. The largest outside diameter (OD) endoscope used is 4mm. A significant drawback to endoscopic MIS is that it only provides a monocular view of the surgical site thereby lacking depth information for the surgeon. A stereo view would provide the surgeon instantaneous depth information of the surroundings within the field of view, a significant advantage especially during brain surgery. Providing 3D imaging in an endoscopic objective lens system presents significant challenges because of the tight packaging constraints. This paper presents a promising new technique for endoscopic 3D imaging that uses a single lens system with complementary multi-bandpass filters (CMBFs), and describes the proof-of-concept demonstrations performed to date validating the technique. These demonstrations of the technique have utilized many commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components including the ones used in the endoscope objective.

  18. A full 3D-navigation system in a suitcase.

    PubMed

    Freysinger, W; Truppe, M J; Gunkel, A R; Thumfart, W F

    2001-01-01

    To reduce the impact of contemporary 3D-navigation systems on the environment of typical otorhinolaryngologic operating rooms, we demonstrate that a transfer of navigation software to modern high-power notebook computers is feasible and results in a practicable way to provide positional information to a surgeon intraoperatively. The ARTMA Virtual Patient System has been implemented on a Macintosh PowerBook G3 and, in connection with the Polhemus FASTRAK digitizer, provides intraoperative positional information during endoscopic endonasal surgery. Satisfactory intraoperative navigation has been realized in two- and three-dimensional medical image data sets (i.e., X-ray, ultrasound images, CT, and MR) and live video. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that acceptable ergonomics and excellent performance of the system can be achieved with contemporary high-end notebook computers. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. 3D segmentations of neuronal nuclei from confocal microscope image stacks

    PubMed Central

    LaTorre, Antonio; Alonso-Nanclares, Lidia; Muelas, Santiago; Peña, José-María; DeFelipe, Javier

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present an algorithm to create 3D segmentations of neuronal cells from stacks of previously segmented 2D images. The idea behind this proposal is to provide a general method to reconstruct 3D structures from 2D stacks, regardless of how these 2D stacks have been obtained. The algorithm not only reuses the information obtained in the 2D segmentation, but also attempts to correct some typical mistakes made by the 2D segmentation algorithms (for example, under segmentation of tightly-coupled clusters of cells). We have tested our algorithm in a real scenario—the segmentation of the neuronal nuclei in different layers of the rat cerebral cortex. Several representative images from different layers of the cerebral cortex have been considered and several 2D segmentation algorithms have been compared. Furthermore, the algorithm has also been compared with the traditional 3D Watershed algorithm and the results obtained here show better performance in terms of correctly identified neuronal nuclei. PMID:24409123

  20. 3D segmentations of neuronal nuclei from confocal microscope image stacks.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Antonio; Alonso-Nanclares, Lidia; Muelas, Santiago; Peña, José-María; Defelipe, Javier

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present an algorithm to create 3D segmentations of neuronal cells from stacks of previously segmented 2D images. The idea behind this proposal is to provide a general method to reconstruct 3D structures from 2D stacks, regardless of how these 2D stacks have been obtained. The algorithm not only reuses the information obtained in the 2D segmentation, but also attempts to correct some typical mistakes made by the 2D segmentation algorithms (for example, under segmentation of tightly-coupled clusters of cells). We have tested our algorithm in a real scenario-the segmentation of the neuronal nuclei in different layers of the rat cerebral cortex. Several representative images from different layers of the cerebral cortex have been considered and several 2D segmentation algorithms have been compared. Furthermore, the algorithm has also been compared with the traditional 3D Watershed algorithm and the results obtained here show better performance in terms of correctly identified neuronal nuclei.

  1. 3D annotation and manipulation of medical anatomical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanovski, Dime; Schaller, Christian; Hahn, Dieter; Daum, Volker; Hornegger, Joachim

    2009-02-01

    Although the medical scanners are rapidly moving towards a three-dimensional paradigm, the manipulation and annotation/labeling of the acquired data is still performed in a standard 2D environment. Editing and annotation of three-dimensional medical structures is currently a complex task and rather time-consuming, as it is carried out in 2D projections of the original object. A major problem in 2D annotation is the depth ambiguity, which requires 3D landmarks to be identified and localized in at least two of the cutting planes. Operating directly in a three-dimensional space enables the implicit consideration of the full 3D local context, which significantly increases accuracy and speed. A three-dimensional environment is as well more natural optimizing the user's comfort and acceptance. The 3D annotation environment requires the three-dimensional manipulation device and display. By means of two novel and advanced technologies, Wii Nintendo Controller and Philips 3D WoWvx display, we define an appropriate 3D annotation tool and a suitable 3D visualization monitor. We define non-coplanar setting of four Infrared LEDs with a known and exact position, which are tracked by the Wii and from which we compute the pose of the device by applying a standard pose estimation algorithm. The novel 3D renderer developed by Philips uses either the Z-value of a 3D volume, or it computes the depth information out of a 2D image, to provide a real 3D experience without having some special glasses. Within this paper we present a new framework for manipulation and annotation of medical landmarks directly in three-dimensional volume.

  2. MolPrint3D: Enhanced 3D Printing of Ball-and-Stick Molecular Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paukstelis, Paul J.

    2018-01-01

    The increased availability of noncommercial 3D printers has provided instructors and students improved access to printing technology. However, printing complex ball-and-stick molecular structures faces distinct challenges, including the need for support structures that increase with molecular complexity. MolPrint3D is a software add-on for the…

  3. Towards true 3D textural analysis; using your crystal mush wisely.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerram, D. A.; Morgan, D. J.; Pankhurst, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The crystal cargo that is found in volcanic and plutonic rocks contains a wealth of information about magmatic mush processes, crystallisation history, crystal entrainment and recycling. Phenocryst populations predominantly record episodes of growth/nucleation and bulk geochemical changes within an evolving crystal-melt body. Ante- and xeno-crysts provide useful clues to the nature of mush interaction with wall rock and with principal magma(s). Furthermore, crystal evolutions (core to rim) record pathways through pressure, temperature and compositional space. These can often illustrate complex recycling within systems, describing the plumbing architecture. Understanding this architecture underpins our knowledge of how igneous systems can interact with the crust, grow, freeze, re-mobilise and prime for eruption. Initially, 2D studies produced corrected 3D crystal size distributions to help provide information about nucleation and residence times. It immediately became clear that crystal shape is an important factor in determining the confidence placed upon 3D reconstructions of 2D data. Additionally studies utilised serial sections of medium- to coarse-grain-size populations which allowed 3D reconstruction using modelling software to be improved, since size and shape etc. can be directly constrained. Finally the advent of textural studies using X-ray tomography has revolutionised the way in which we can inspect the crystal cargo in mushy systems, allowing us to image in great detail crystal packing arrangements, 3D CSDs, shapes and orientations etc. The latest most innovative studies use X-ray micro-computed tomography to rapidly characterise chemical populations within the crystal cargo, adding a further dimension to this approach, and implies the ability to untangle magmatic chemical components to better understand their individual and combined evolution. In this contribution key examples of the different types of textural analysis techniques in 2D and 3D

  4. SU-E-T-801: Verification of Dose Information Passed Through 3D-Printed Products

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S; Yoon, M; Kim, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: When quality assurance (QA) of patient treatment beam is performed, homogeneous water equivalent phantom which has different structure from patient’s internal structure is normally used. In these days, it is possible to make structures which have same shapes of human organs with commercialization of 3D-printer. As a Result, structures with same shape of human organs made by 3D-printer could be used to test qualification of treatment beam with greater accuracy than homogeneous water phantom. In this study, we estimated the dose response of 3D-printer materials to test the probability as a humanoid phantom or new generation of compensator tool.more » Methods: The rectangular products with variety densities (50%, 75% and 100%) were made to verify their characteristics. The products for experiment group and solid water phantom and air for control group with 125 cubic centimeters were put on solid water phantom with enough thickness. CT image of two products were acquired to know their HU values and to know about their radiologic characteristics. 6MV beams with 500MU were exposed for each experiment. Doses were measured behind the 3D-printed products. These measured doses were compared to the results taken by TPS. Results: Absorbed dose penetrated from empty air is normalized to 100%. Doses measured from 6MV photon beams penetrated from 50%, 75% and 100% products were 99%, 96% and 84%, respectively. HU values of 50%, 75% and 100% products are about −910, −860 and −10. Conclusion: 3D-printer can produce structures which have similar characteristics with human organ. These results would be used to make similar phantoms with patient information. This work was supported by the Nuclear Safety Research Program (Grant No. 1305033 and 1403019) of the Korea Radiation Safety Foundation and the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission and Radiation Technology Development Program (2013M2A2A4027117) of the Republic of Korea.« less

  5. Integrating 3D geological information with a national physically-based hydrological modelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Elizabeth; Parkin, Geoff; Kessler, Holger; Whiteman, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Robust numerical models are an essential tool for informing flood and water management and policy around the world. Physically-based hydrological models have traditionally not been used for such applications due to prohibitively large data, time and computational resource requirements. Given recent advances in computing power and data availability, a robust, physically-based hydrological modelling system for Great Britain using the SHETRAN model and national datasets has been created. Such a model has several advantages over less complex systems. Firstly, compared with conceptual models, a national physically-based model is more readily applicable to ungauged catchments, in which hydrological predictions are also required. Secondly, the results of a physically-based system may be more robust under changing conditions such as climate and land cover, as physical processes and relationships are explicitly accounted for. Finally, a fully integrated surface and subsurface model such as SHETRAN offers a wider range of applications compared with simpler schemes, such as assessments of groundwater resources, sediment and nutrient transport and flooding from multiple sources. As such, SHETRAN provides a robust means of simulating numerous terrestrial system processes which will add physical realism when coupled to the JULES land surface model. 306 catchments spanning Great Britain have been modelled using this system. The standard configuration of this system performs satisfactorily (NSE > 0.5) for 72% of catchments and well (NSE > 0.7) for 48%. Many of the remaining 28% of catchments that performed relatively poorly (NSE < 0.5) are located in the chalk in the south east of England. As such, the British Geological Survey 3D geology model for Great Britain (GB3D) has been incorporated, for the first time in any hydrological model, to pave the way for improvements to be made to simulations of catchments with important groundwater regimes. This coupling has involved

  6. Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D Motif Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Anton I.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of atomic-resolution RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures reveals that many internal and hairpin loops are modular, recurrent, and structured by conserved non-Watson–Crick base pairs. Structurally similar loops define RNA 3D motifs that are conserved in homologous RNA molecules, but can also occur at nonhomologous sites in diverse RNAs, and which often vary in sequence. To further our understanding of RNA motif structure and sequence variability and to provide a useful resource for structure modeling and prediction, we present a new method for automated classification of internal and hairpin loop RNA 3D motifs and a new online database called the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. To classify the motif instances, a representative set of internal and hairpin loops is automatically extracted from a nonredundant list of RNA-containing PDB files. Their structures are compared geometrically, all-against-all, using the FR3D program suite. The loops are clustered into motif groups, taking into account geometric similarity and structural annotations and making allowance for a variable number of bulged bases. The automated procedure that we have implemented identifies all hairpin and internal loop motifs previously described in the literature. All motif instances and motif groups are assigned unique and stable identifiers and are made available in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas (http://rna.bgsu.edu/motifs), which is automatically updated every four weeks. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas provides an interactive user interface for exploring motif diversity and tools for programmatic data access. PMID:23970545

  7. Elderly Healthcare Monitoring Using an Avatar-Based 3D Virtual Environment

    PubMed Central

    Pouke, Matti; Häkkilä, Jonna

    2013-01-01

    Homecare systems for elderly people are becoming increasingly important due to both economic reasons as well as patients’ preferences. Sensor-based surveillance technologies are an expected future trend, but research so far has devoted little attention to the User Interface (UI) design of such systems and the user-centric design approach. In this paper, we explore the possibilities of an avatar-based 3D visualization system, which exploits wearable sensors and human activity simulations. We present a technical prototype and the evaluation of alternative concept designs for UIs based on a 3D virtual world. The evaluation was conducted with homecare providers through focus groups and an online survey. Our results show firstly that systems taking advantage of 3D virtual world visualization techniques have potential especially due to the privacy preserving and simplified information presentation style, and secondly that simple representations and glancability should be emphasized in the design. The identified key use cases highlight that avatar-based 3D presentations can be helpful if they provide an overview as well as details on demand. PMID:24351747

  8. Gamma/x-ray linear pushbroom stereo for 3D cargo inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhigang; Hu, Yu-Chi

    2006-05-01

    For evaluating the contents of trucks, containers, cargo, and passenger vehicles by a non-intrusive gamma-ray or X-ray imaging system to determine the possible presence of contraband, three-dimensional (3D) measurements could provide more information than 2D measurements. In this paper, a linear pushbroom scanning model is built for such a commonly used gamma-ray or x-ray cargo inspection system. Accurate 3D measurements of the objects inside a cargo can be obtained by using two such scanning systems with different scanning angles to construct a pushbroom stereo system. A simple but robust calibration method is proposed to find the important parameters of the linear pushbroom sensors. Then, a fast and automated stereo matching algorithm based on free-form deformable registration is developed to obtain 3D measurements of the objects under inspection. A user interface is designed for 3D visualization of the objects in interests. Experimental results of sensor calibration, stereo matching, 3D measurements and visualization of a 3D cargo container and the objects inside, are presented.

  9. Development of a 3D GIS and its application to karst areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Xu, Hua; Zhou, Wanfang

    2008-05-01

    There is a growing interest in modeling and analyzing karst phenomena in three dimensions. This paper integrates geology, groundwater hydrology, geographic information system (GIS), database management system (DBMS), visualization and data mining to study karst features in Huaibei, China. The 3D geo-objects retrieved from the karst area are analyzed and mapped into different abstract levels. The spatial relationships among the objects are constructed by a dual-linker. The shapes of the 3D objects and the topological models with attributes are stored and maintained in the DBMS. Spatial analysis was then used to integrate the data in the DBMS and the 3D model to form a virtual reality (VR) to provide analytical functions such as distribution analysis, correlation query, and probability assessment. The research successfully implements 3D modeling and analyses in the karst area, and meanwhile provides an efficient tool for government policy-makers to set out restrictions on water resource development in the area.

  10. A hybrid approach for fusing 4D-MRI temporal information with 3D-CT for the study of lung and lung tumor motion

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y. X.; Van Reeth, E.; Poh, C. L., E-mail: clpoh@ntu.edu.sg

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Accurate visualization of lung motion is important in many clinical applications, such as radiotherapy of lung cancer. Advancement in imaging modalities [e.g., computed tomography (CT) and MRI] has allowed dynamic imaging of lung and lung tumor motion. However, each imaging modality has its advantages and disadvantages. The study presented in this paper aims at generating synthetic 4D-CT dataset for lung cancer patients by combining both continuous three-dimensional (3D) motion captured by 4D-MRI and the high spatial resolution captured by CT using the authors’ proposed approach. Methods: A novel hybrid approach based on deformable image registration (DIR) and finite elementmore » method simulation was developed to fuse a static 3D-CT volume (acquired under breath-hold) and the 3D motion information extracted from 4D-MRI dataset, creating a synthetic 4D-CT dataset. Results: The study focuses on imaging of lung and lung tumor. Comparing the synthetic 4D-CT dataset with the acquired 4D-CT dataset of six lung cancer patients based on 420 landmarks, accurate results (average error <2 mm) were achieved using the authors’ proposed approach. Their hybrid approach achieved a 40% error reduction (based on landmarks assessment) over using only DIR techniques. Conclusions: The synthetic 4D-CT dataset generated has high spatial resolution, has excellent lung details, and is able to show movement of lung and lung tumor over multiple breathing cycles.« less

  11. A hybrid approach for fusing 4D-MRI temporal information with 3D-CT for the study of lung and lung tumor motion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y X; Teo, S-K; Van Reeth, E; Tan, C H; Tham, I W K; Poh, C L

    2015-08-01

    Accurate visualization of lung motion is important in many clinical applications, such as radiotherapy of lung cancer. Advancement in imaging modalities [e.g., computed tomography (CT) and MRI] has allowed dynamic imaging of lung and lung tumor motion. However, each imaging modality has its advantages and disadvantages. The study presented in this paper aims at generating synthetic 4D-CT dataset for lung cancer patients by combining both continuous three-dimensional (3D) motion captured by 4D-MRI and the high spatial resolution captured by CT using the authors' proposed approach. A novel hybrid approach based on deformable image registration (DIR) and finite element method simulation was developed to fuse a static 3D-CT volume (acquired under breath-hold) and the 3D motion information extracted from 4D-MRI dataset, creating a synthetic 4D-CT dataset. The study focuses on imaging of lung and lung tumor. Comparing the synthetic 4D-CT dataset with the acquired 4D-CT dataset of six lung cancer patients based on 420 landmarks, accurate results (average error <2 mm) were achieved using the authors' proposed approach. Their hybrid approach achieved a 40% error reduction (based on landmarks assessment) over using only DIR techniques. The synthetic 4D-CT dataset generated has high spatial resolution, has excellent lung details, and is able to show movement of lung and lung tumor over multiple breathing cycles.

  12. A Handy Preterm Infant Incubator for Providing Intensive Care: Simulation, 3D Printed Prototype, and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zaylaa, Amira J; Rashid, Mohamad; Shaib, Mounir; El Majzoub, Imad

    2018-01-01

    Preterm infants encounter an abrupt delivery before their complete maturity during the third trimester of pregnancy. Polls anticipate an increase in the rates of preterm infants for 2025, especially in middle- and low-income countries. Despite the abundance of intensive care methods for preterm infants, such as, but not limited to, commercial, transport, embrace warmer, radiant warmer, and Kangaroo Mother Care methods, they are either expensive, lack the most essential requirements or specifications, or lack the maternal-preterm bond. This drove us to carry this original research and innovative idea of developing a new 3D printed prototype of a Handy preterm infant incubator. We aim to provide the most indispensable intensive care with the lowest cost, to bestow low-income countries with the Handy incubator's care, preserve the maternal -preterm's bond, and diminish the rate of mortality. Biomedical features, electronics, and biocompatible materials were utilized. The design was simulated, the prototype was 3D printed, and the outcomes were tested and evaluated. Simulation results showed the best fit for the Handy incubator's components. Experimental results showed the 3D-printed prototype and the time elapsed to obtain it. Evaluation results revealed that the overall performance of Kangaroo Mother Care and the embrace warmer was 75 ± 1.4% and 66.7 ± 1.5%, respectively, while the overall performance of our Handy incubator was 91.7 ± 1.6%, thereby our cost-effective Handy incubator surpassed existing intensive care methods. The future step is associating the Handy incubator with more specifications and advancements.

  13. True 3D digital holographic tomography for virtual reality applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downham, A.; Abeywickrema, U.; Banerjee, P. P.

    2017-09-01

    Previously, a single CCD camera has been used to record holograms of an object while the object is rotated about a single axis to reconstruct a pseudo-3D image, which does not show detailed depth information from all perspectives. To generate a true 3D image, the object has to be rotated through multiple angles and along multiple axes. In this work, to reconstruct a true 3D image including depth information, a die is rotated along two orthogonal axes, and holograms are recorded using a Mach-Zehnder setup, which are subsequently numerically reconstructed. This allows for the generation of multiple images containing phase (i.e., depth) information. These images, when combined, create a true 3D image with depth information which can be exported to a Microsoft® HoloLens for true 3D virtual reality.

  14. 3D space positioning and image feature extraction for workpiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Bing; Hu, Yi

    2008-03-01

    An optical system of 3D parameters measurement for specific area of a workpiece has been presented and discussed in this paper. A number of the CCD image sensors are employed to construct the 3D coordinate system for the measured area. The CCD image sensor of the monitoring target is used to lock the measured workpiece when it enters the field of view. The other sensors, which are placed symmetrically beam scanners, measure the appearance of the workpiece and the characteristic parameters. The paper established target image segmentation and the image feature extraction algorithm to lock the target, based on the geometric similarity of objective characteristics, rapid locking the goal can be realized. When line laser beam scan the tested workpiece, a number of images are extracted equal time interval and the overlapping images are processed to complete image reconstruction, and achieve the 3D image information. From the 3D coordinate reconstruction model, the 3D characteristic parameters of the tested workpiece are gained. The experimental results are provided in the paper.

  15. 2D approaches to 3D watermarking: state-of-the-art and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrea, M.; Duţă, S.; Prêteux, F.

    2006-02-01

    With the advent of the Information Society, video, audio, speech, and 3D media represent the source of huge economic benefits. Consequently, there is a continuously increasing demand for protecting their related intellectual property rights. The solution can be provided by robust watermarking, a research field which exploded in the last 7 years. However, the largest part of the scientific effort was devoted to video and audio protection, the 3D objects being quite neglected. In the absence of any standardisation attempt, the paper starts by summarising the approaches developed in this respect and by further identifying the main challenges to be addressed in the next years. Then, it describes an original oblivious watermarking method devoted to the protection of the 3D objects represented by NURBS (Non uniform Rational B Spline) surfaces. Applied to both free form objects and CAD models, the method exhibited very good transparency (no visible differences between the marked and the unmarked model) and robustness (with respect to both traditional attacks and to NURBS processing).

  16. Learning the 3-D structure of objects from 2-D views depends on shape, not format

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Moqian; Yamins, Daniel; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2016-01-01

    Humans can learn to recognize new objects just from observing example views. However, it is unknown what structural information enables this learning. To address this question, we manipulated the amount of structural information given to subjects during unsupervised learning by varying the format of the trained views. We then tested how format affected participants' ability to discriminate similar objects across views that were rotated 90° apart. We found that, after training, participants' performance increased and generalized to new views in the same format. Surprisingly, the improvement was similar across line drawings, shape from shading, and shape from shading + stereo even though the latter two formats provide richer depth information compared to line drawings. In contrast, participants' improvement was significantly lower when training used silhouettes, suggesting that silhouettes do not have enough information to generate a robust 3-D structure. To test whether the learned object representations were format-specific or format-invariant, we examined if learning novel objects from example views transfers across formats. We found that learning objects from example line drawings transferred to shape from shading and vice versa. These results have important implications for theories of object recognition because they suggest that (a) learning the 3-D structure of objects does not require rich structural cues during training as long as shape information of internal and external features is provided and (b) learning generates shape-based object representations independent of the training format. PMID:27153196

  17. Denoising imaging polarimetry by adapted BM3D method.

    PubMed

    Tibbs, Alexander B; Daly, Ilse M; Roberts, Nicholas W; Bull, David R

    2018-04-01

    In addition to the visual information contained in intensity and color, imaging polarimetry allows visual information to be extracted from the polarization of light. However, a major challenge of imaging polarimetry is image degradation due to noise. This paper investigates the mitigation of noise through denoising algorithms and compares existing denoising algorithms with a new method, based on BM3D (Block Matching 3D). This algorithm, Polarization-BM3D (PBM3D), gives visual quality superior to the state of the art across all images and noise standard deviations tested. We show that denoising polarization images using PBM3D allows the degree of polarization to be more accurately calculated by comparing it with spectral polarimetry measurements.

  18. 3-D lithium ion microbattery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Yuting

    The lithium-ion battery has emerged as a common power source for portable consumer electronics since its debut two decades ago. Due to the low atomic weight and high electrochemical activity of lithium chemistry, lithium-ion battery has a higher energy density as compared to other battery systems, such as Ni-Cd, Ni-MH, and lead-acid batteries. As a result, use of lithium-ion batteries enables the size of batteries to be effectively reduced without compromising capacity. More importantly, as battery size is reduced, it enhances the applications of portable electronics, increasing the convenience of use. The 3-D battery architecture described in the dissertation is believed to be a new paradigm for future batteries. The architecture features coupled 3-D electrodes to provide better charge/discharge kinetics and a higher charge capacity per footprint area. The overarching objective of this dissertation is to implement the 3-D architecture using the lithium-ion chemistry. The 3-D lithium-ion batteries are designed to provide high areal energy density without compromising power density. The dissertation is comprised of four interrelated sections. First, a simulation was conducted to identify key battery parameters and to define an ideal three-dimensional cell structure. The second part of the research involved identifying fabrication routes to build the 3-D electrode, which was the key design element in the 3-D paradigm. The third part of the dissertation was to correlate the electrode performance with its geometric features. In particular, the influence of aspect ratio was investigated. Lastly, an electrolyte/separator was designed and fabricated based on the existing 3-D electrode configuration. This enabled 3-D battery to be assembled.

  19. Measurements agreement between low-cost and high-level handheld 3D scanners to scan the knee for designing a 3D printed knee brace

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Use of additive manufacturing is growing rapidly in the orthotics field. This technology allows orthotics to be designed directly on digital scans of limbs. However, little information is available about scanners and 3D scans. The aim of this study is to look at the agreement between manual measurements, high-level and low-cost handheld 3D scanners. We took two manual measurements and three 3D scans with each scanner from 14 lower limbs. The lower limbs were divided into 17 sections of 30mm each from 180mm above the mid-patella to 300mm below. Time to record and to process the three 3D scans for scanners methods were compared with Student t-test while Bland-Altman plots were used to study agreement between circumferences of each section from the three methods. The record time was 97s shorter with high-level scanner than with the low-cost (p = .02) while the process time was nine times quicker with the low-cost scanner (p < .01). An overestimation of 2.5mm was found in high-level scanner compared to manual measurement, but with a better repeatability between measurements. The low-cost scanner tended to overestimate the circumferences from 0.1% to 1.5%, overestimation being greater for smaller circumferences. In conclusion, 3D scanners provide more information about the shape of the lower limb, but the reliability depends on the 3D scanner and the size of the scanned segment. Low-cost scanners could be useful for clinicians because of the simple and fast process, but attention should be focused on accuracy, which depends on the scanned body segment. PMID:29320560

  20. Measurements agreement between low-cost and high-level handheld 3D scanners to scan the knee for designing a 3D printed knee brace.

    PubMed

    Dessery, Yoann; Pallari, Jari

    2018-01-01

    Use of additive manufacturing is growing rapidly in the orthotics field. This technology allows orthotics to be designed directly on digital scans of limbs. However, little information is available about scanners and 3D scans. The aim of this study is to look at the agreement between manual measurements, high-level and low-cost handheld 3D scanners. We took two manual measurements and three 3D scans with each scanner from 14 lower limbs. The lower limbs were divided into 17 sections of 30mm each from 180mm above the mid-patella to 300mm below. Time to record and to process the three 3D scans for scanners methods were compared with Student t-test while Bland-Altman plots were used to study agreement between circumferences of each section from the three methods. The record time was 97s shorter with high-level scanner than with the low-cost (p = .02) while the process time was nine times quicker with the low-cost scanner (p < .01). An overestimation of 2.5mm was found in high-level scanner compared to manual measurement, but with a better repeatability between measurements. The low-cost scanner tended to overestimate the circumferences from 0.1% to 1.5%, overestimation being greater for smaller circumferences. In conclusion, 3D scanners provide more information about the shape of the lower limb, but the reliability depends on the 3D scanner and the size of the scanned segment. Low-cost scanners could be useful for clinicians because of the simple and fast process, but attention should be focused on accuracy, which depends on the scanned body segment.

  1. Information theory-based analysis of CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A5 splicing mutations.

    PubMed

    Rogan, Peter K; Svojanovsky, Stan; Leeder, J Steven

    2003-04-01

    Several mutations are known or suspected to affect mRNA splicing of CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A5 genes; however, little experimental evidence exists to support these conclusions. The present study applies mathematical models that measure changes in information content of splice sites in these genes to demonstrate the relationship between the predicted phenotypes of these variants to the corresponding genotypes. Based on information analysis, the CYP2C19*2 variant activates a new cryptic site 40 nucleotides downstream of the natural splice site. CYP2C19*7 abolishes splicing at the exon 5 donor site. The CYP2D6*4 allele similarly inactivates splicing at the acceptor site of exon 4 and activates a new cryptic site one nucleotide downstream of the natural acceptor. CYP2D6*11 inactivates the acceptor site of exon 2. The CYP3A5*3 allele activates a new cryptic site 236 nucleotides upstream of the exon 4 natural acceptor site. CYP3A5*5 inactivates the exon 5 donor site and CYP3A5*6 strengthens a site upstream of the natural donor site, resulting in skipping of exon 7. Other previously described missense and nonsense mutations at terminal codons of exons in these genes affected splicing. CYP2D6*8 and CYP2D6*14 both decrease the strength of the exon 3 donor site, producing transcripts lacking this exon. The results of information analysis are consistent with the poor metabolizer phenotypes observed in patients with these mutations, and illustrate the potential value of these mathematical models to quantitatively evaluate the functional consequences of new mutations suspected of altering mRNA splicing.

  2. Mackay campus of environmental education and digital cultural construction: the application of 3D virtual reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Shao-Chi; Chung, Yu-Wei; Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Huang, Jun-Yi; Chang, Jhih-Ting; He, Cai-Ying; Cheng, Yi-Wen

    2012-04-01

    This study uses 3D virtual reality technology to create the "Mackay campus of the environmental education and digital cultural 3D navigation system" for local historical sites in the Tamsui (Hoba) area, in hopes of providing tourism information and navigation through historical sites using a 3D navigation system. We used Auto CAD, Sketch Up, and SpaceEyes 3D software to construct the virtual reality scenes and create the school's historical sites, such as the House of Reverends, the House of Maidens, the Residence of Mackay, and the Education Hall. We used this technology to complete the environmental education and digital cultural Mackay campus . The platform we established can indeed achieve the desired function of providing tourism information and historical site navigation. The interactive multimedia style and the presentation of the information will allow users to obtain a direct information response. In addition to showing the external appearances of buildings, the navigation platform can also allow users to enter the buildings to view lifelike scenes and textual information related to the historical sites. The historical sites are designed according to their actual size, which gives users a more realistic feel. In terms of the navigation route, the navigation system does not force users along a fixed route, but instead allows users to freely control the route they would like to take to view the historical sites on the platform.

  3. 3D/3D registration of coronary CTA and biplane XA reconstructions for improved image guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Dibildox, Gerardo, E-mail: g.dibildox@erasmusmc.nl; Baka, Nora; Walsum, Theo van

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The authors aim to improve image guidance during percutaneous coronary interventions of chronic total occlusions (CTO) by providing information obtained from computed tomography angiography (CTA) to the cardiac interventionist. To this end, the authors investigate a method to register a 3D CTA model to biplane reconstructions. Methods: The authors developed a method for registering preoperative coronary CTA with intraoperative biplane x-ray angiography (XA) images via 3D models of the coronary arteries. The models are extracted from the CTA and biplane XA images, and are temporally aligned based on CTA reconstruction phase and XA ECG signals. Rigid spatial alignment ismore » achieved with a robust probabilistic point set registration approach using Gaussian mixture models (GMMs). This approach is extended by including orientation in the Gaussian mixtures and by weighting bifurcation points. The method is evaluated on retrospectively acquired coronary CTA datasets of 23 CTO patients for which biplane XA images are available. Results: The Gaussian mixture model approach achieved a median registration accuracy of 1.7 mm. The extended GMM approach including orientation was not significantly different (P > 0.1) but did improve robustness with regards to the initialization of the 3D models. Conclusions: The authors demonstrated that the GMM approach can effectively be applied to register CTA to biplane XA images for the purpose of improving image guidance in percutaneous coronary interventions.« less

  4. Coronary arteries segmentation based on the 3D discrete wavelet transform and 3D neutrosophic transform.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuo-Tsung; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lee, Wen-Jeng; Huang, Tsai-Wei; Hung, Pei-Kai; Wei, Cheng-Yu; Chen, Chung-Ming; Kung, Woon-Man

    2015-01-01

    Most applications in the field of medical image processing require precise estimation. To improve the accuracy of segmentation, this study aimed to propose a novel segmentation method for coronary arteries to allow for the automatic and accurate detection of coronary pathologies. The proposed segmentation method included 2 parts. First, 3D region growing was applied to give the initial segmentation of coronary arteries. Next, the location of vessel information, HHH subband coefficients of the 3D DWT, was detected by the proposed vessel-texture discrimination algorithm. Based on the initial segmentation, 3D DWT integrated with the 3D neutrosophic transformation could accurately detect the coronary arteries. Each subbranch of the segmented coronary arteries was segmented correctly by the proposed method. The obtained results are compared with those ground truth values obtained from the commercial software from GE Healthcare and the level-set method proposed by Yang et al., 2007. Results indicate that the proposed method is better in terms of efficiency analyzed. Based on the initial segmentation of coronary arteries obtained from 3D region growing, one-level 3D DWT and 3D neutrosophic transformation can be applied to detect coronary pathologies accurately.

  5. Local-global alignment for finding 3D similarities in protein structures

    DOEpatents

    Zemla, Adam T [Brentwood, CA

    2011-09-20

    A method of finding 3D similarities in protein structures of a first molecule and a second molecule. The method comprises providing preselected information regarding the first molecule and the second molecule. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Longest Continuous Segments (LCS) analysis. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Global Distance Test (GDT) analysis. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Local Global Alignment Scoring function (LGA_S) analysis. Verifying constructed alignment and repeating the steps to find the regions of 3D similarities in protein structures.

  6. Recovering 3D Particle Size Distributions from 2D Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Olson, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss different ways to convert observed, apparent particle size distributions from 2D sections (thin sections, SEM maps on planar surfaces, etc.) into true 3D particle size distributions. We give a simple, flexible and practical method to do this, show which of these techniques gives the most faithful conversions, and provide (online) short computer codes to calculate both 2D- 3D recoveries and simulations of 2D observations by random sectioning. The most important systematic bias of 2D sectioning, from the standpoint of most chondrite studies, is an overestimate of the abundance of the larger particles. We show that fairly good recoveries can be achieved from observed size distributions containing 100-300 individual measurements of apparent particle diameter. Proper determination of particle size distributions in chondrites - for chondrules, CAIs, and metalgrains - is of basic importance for assessing the processes of formation and/or of accretion of theseparticles into their parent bodies. To date, most information of this sort is gathered from 2D samplescut from a rock such as in microscopic analysis of thin sections, or SEM maps of planar surfaces(Dodd 1976, Hughes 1978a,b; Rubin and Keil 1984, Rubin and Grossman 1987, Grossman et al1988, Rubin 1989, Metzler et al 1992, Kuebler et al 1999, Nelson and Rubin 2002, Schneider et al 2003, Hezel et al 2008; Fisher et al 2014; for an exhaustive review with numerous references seeFriedrich et al 2014). While qualitative discrimination between chondrite types can readily be doneusing data of this sort, any deeper exploration of the processes by which chondrite constituents werecreated or emplaced into their parent requires a more quantitative approach.

  7. Wearable 3D measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, Yoshitsugu; Imura, Masataka; Tsuchiya, Masanobu; Yasumuro, Yoshihiro; Chihara, Kunihiro

    2003-01-01

    Wearable 3D measurement realizes to acquire 3D information of an objects or an environment using a wearable computer. Recently, we can send voice and sound as well as pictures by mobile phone in Japan. Moreover it will become easy to capture and send data of short movie by it. On the other hand, the computers become compact and high performance. And it can easy connect to Internet by wireless LAN. Near future, we can use the wearable computer always and everywhere. So we will be able to send the three-dimensional data that is measured by wearable computer as a next new data. This paper proposes the measurement method and system of three-dimensional data of an object with the using of wearable computer. This method uses slit light projection for 3D measurement and user"s motion instead of scanning system.

  8. Treatment of Die-Punch Fractures with 3D Printing Technology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhui; Cai, Leyi; Zhang, Chuanxu; Wang, Jianshun; Guo, Xiaoshan; Zhou, Yifei

    2017-07-19

    We evaluated the feasibility, accuracy and effectiveness of applying three-dimensional (3D) printing technology for preoperative planning for die-punch fractures. A total of 107 patients who underwent die-punch fracture surgery were enrolled in the study. They were randomly divided into two groups: 52 cases in the 3D model group and 55 cases in the routine group. A 3D digital model of each die-punch fracture was reconstructed in the 3D group. The 3D digital model was imported to a 3D printer to build the full solid model. The operation time, blood loss volume, and the number of intraoperative fluoroscopy were recorded. Follow-up was performed to evaluate the patients' surgical outcomes. Treatment of die-punch fractures using the 3D printing approach reduced the number of intraoperative fluoroscopy, blood loss volume, and operation time, but did not improve wrist function compared to those in the routine group. The patients wanted the doctor to use the 3D model to introduce the condition and operative plan because it was easier for them to understand. The orthopedic surgeons thought that the 3D model was useful for communicating with their patients, but their satisfaction with the preoperative plan was much lower than the benefit of using the 3D model to communicate with their patients. 3D printing technology produced more accurate morphometric information for orthopedists to provide personalized surgical planning and communicate better with their patients. However, it is difficult to use widely in the department of orthopedics.

  9. RGB-D SLAM Combining Visual Odometry and Extended Information Filter

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heng; Liu, Yanli; Tan, Jindong; Xiong, Naixue

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel RGB-D SLAM system based on visual odometry and an extended information filter, which does not require any other sensors or odometry. In contrast to the graph optimization approaches, this is more suitable for online applications. A visual dead reckoning algorithm based on visual residuals is devised, which is used to estimate motion control input. In addition, we use a novel descriptor called binary robust appearance and normals descriptor (BRAND) to extract features from the RGB-D frame and use them as landmarks. Furthermore, considering both the 3D positions and the BRAND descriptors of the landmarks, our observation model avoids explicit data association between the observations and the map by marginalizing the observation likelihood over all possible associations. Experimental validation is provided, which compares the proposed RGB-D SLAM algorithm with just RGB-D visual odometry and a graph-based RGB-D SLAM algorithm using the publicly-available RGB-D dataset. The results of the experiments demonstrate that our system is quicker than the graph-based RGB-D SLAM algorithm. PMID:26263990

  10. Is 3D true non linear traveltime tomography reasonable ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, A.; Virieux, J.

    2003-04-01

    The data sets requiring 3D analysis tools in the context of seismic exploration (both onshore and offshore experiments) or natural seismicity (micro seismicity surveys or post event measurements) are more and more numerous. Classical linearized tomographies and also earthquake localisation codes need an accurate 3D background velocity model. However, if the medium is complex and a priori information not available, a 1D analysis is not able to provide an adequate background velocity image. Moreover, the design of the acquisition layouts is often intrinsically 3D and renders difficult even 2D approaches, especially in natural seismicity cases. Thus, the solution relies on the use of a 3D true non linear approach, which allows to explore the model space and to identify an optimal velocity image. The problem becomes then practical and its feasibility depends on the available computing resources (memory and time). In this presentation, we show that facing a 3D traveltime tomography problem with an extensive non-linear approach combining fast travel time estimators based on level set methods and optimisation techniques such as multiscale strategy is feasible. Moreover, because management of inhomogeneous inversion parameters is more friendly in a non linear approach, we describe how to perform a jointly non-linear inversion for the seismic velocities and the sources locations.

  11. Affective SSVEP BCI to effectively control 3D objects by using a prism array-based display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Sungchul; Park, Min-Chul

    2014-06-01

    3D objects with depth information can provide many benefits to users in education, surgery, and interactions. In particular, many studies have been done to enhance sense of reality in 3D interaction. Viewing and controlling stereoscopic 3D objects with crossed or uncrossed disparities, however, can cause visual fatigue due to the vergenceaccommodation conflict generally accepted in 3D research fields. In order to avoid the vergence-accommodation mismatch and provide a strong sense of presence to users, we apply a prism array-based display to presenting 3D objects. Emotional pictures were used as visual stimuli in control panels to increase information transfer rate and reduce false positives in controlling 3D objects. Involuntarily motivated selective attention by affective mechanism can enhance steady-state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) amplitude and lead to increased interaction efficiency. More attentional resources are allocated to affective pictures with high valence and arousal levels than to normal visual stimuli such as white-and-black oscillating squares and checkerboards. Among representative BCI control components (i.e., eventrelated potentials (ERP), event-related (de)synchronization (ERD/ERS), and SSVEP), SSVEP-based BCI was chosen in the following reasons. It shows high information transfer rates and takes a few minutes for users to control BCI system while few electrodes are required for obtaining reliable brainwave signals enough to capture users' intention. The proposed BCI methods are expected to enhance sense of reality in 3D space without causing critical visual fatigue to occur. In addition, people who are very susceptible to (auto) stereoscopic 3D may be able to use the affective BCI.

  12. Cybersecurity Activities Support to DoD Information Network Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-07

    8530.01, March 7, 2016 ENCLOSURE 2 24 c. Provide cybersecurity services to Combatant Commands and other organizations in accordance with support...Department of Defense INSTRUCTION NUMBER 8530.01 March 7, 2016 DoD CIO SUBJECT: Cybersecurity Activities Support to DoD Information...organizational entities within the DoD (referred to collectively in this instruction as the “DoD Components”). DoDI 8530.01, March 7, 2016 2 b

  13. Combining controlled-source seismology and receiver function information to derive 3-D Moho topography for Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spada, M.; Bianchi, I.; Kissling, E.; Agostinetti, N. Piana; Wiemer, S.

    2013-08-01

    The accurate definition of 3-D crustal structures and, in primis, the Moho depth, are the most important requirement for seismological, geophysical and geodynamic modelling in complex tectonic regions. In such areas, like the Mediterranean region, various active and passive seismic experiments are performed, locally reveal information on Moho depth, average and gradient crustal Vp velocity and average Vp/Vs velocity ratios. Until now, the most reliable information on crustal structures stems from controlled-source seismology experiments. In most parts of the Alpine region, a relatively large number of controlled-source seismology information are available though the overall coverage in the central Mediterranean area is still sparse due to high costs of such experiments. Thus, results from other seismic methodologies, such as local earthquake tomography, receiver functions and ambient noise tomography can be used to complement the controlled-source seismology information to increase coverage and thus the quality of 3-D crustal models. In this paper, we introduce a methodology to directly combine controlled-source seismology and receiver functions information relying on the strengths of each method and in relation to quantitative uncertainty estimates for all data to derive a well resolved Moho map for Italy. To obtain a homogeneous elaboration of controlled-source seismology and receiver functions results, we introduce a new classification/weighting scheme based on uncertainty assessment for receiver functions data. In order to tune the receiver functions information quality, we compare local receiver functions Moho depths and uncertainties with a recently derived well-resolved local earthquake tomography-derived Moho map and with controlled-source seismology information. We find an excellent correlation in the Moho information obtained by these three methodologies in Italy. In the final step, we interpolate the controlled-source seismology and receiver functions

  14. HNCA-TOCSY-CANH experiments with alternate 13C-12C labeling: a set of 3D experiment with unique supra-sequential information for mainchain resonance assignment

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Koh; Gal, Maayan; Takahashi, Hideo; Shimada, Ichio

    2011-01-01

    Described here is a set of three-dimensional (3D) NMR experiments that rely on CACA-TOCSY magnetization transfer via the weak 3JCαCα coupling. These pulse sequences, which resemble recently described 13C detected CACA-TOCSY (Takeuchi et al. 2010) experiments, are recorded in 1H2O, and use 1H excitation and detection. These experiments require alternate 13C-12C labeling together with perdeuteration, which allows utilizing the small 3JCαCα scalar coupling that is otherwise masked by the stronger 1JCC couplings in uniformly 13C labeled samples. These new experiments provide a unique assignment ladder-mark that yields bidirectional supra-sequential information and can readily straddle proline residues. Unlike the conventional HNCA experiment, which contains only sequential information to the 13Cα of the preceding residue, the 3D hnCA-TOCSY-caNH experiment can yield sequential correlations to alpha carbons in positions i−1, i + 1 and i−2. Furthermore, the 3D hNca-TOCSY-caNH and Hnca-TOC-SY-caNH experiments, which share the same magnetization pathway but use a different chemical shift encoding, directly couple the 15N-1H spin pair of residue i to adjacent amide protons and nitrogens at positions i−2, i−1, i + 1 and i + 2, respectively. These new experimental features make protein backbone assignments more robust by reducing the degeneracy problem associated with the conventional 3D NMR experiments. PMID:21110064

  15. [Detection of tibial condylar fractures using 3D imaging with a mobile image amplifier (Siemens ISO-C-3D): Comparison with plain films and spiral CT].

    PubMed

    Kotsianos, D; Rock, C; Wirth, S; Linsenmaier, U; Brandl, R; Fischer, T; Euler, E; Mutschler, W; Pfeifer, K J; Reiser, M

    2002-01-01

    To analyze a prototype mobile C-arm 3D image amplifier in the detection and classification of experimental tibial condylar fractures with multiplanar reconstructions (MPR). Human knee specimens (n = 22) with tibial condylar fractures were examined with a prototype C-arm (ISO-C-3D, Siemens AG), plain films (CR) and spiral CT (CT). The motorized C-arm provides fluoroscopic images during a 190 degrees orbital rotation computing a 119 mm data cube. From these 3D data sets MP reconstructions were obtained. All images were evaluated by four independent readers for the detection and assessment of fracture lines. All fractures were classified according to the Müller AO classification. To confirm the results, the specimens were finally surgically dissected. 97 % of the tibial condylar fractures were easily seen and correctly classified according to the Müller AO classification on MP reconstruction of the ISO-C-3D. There is no significant difference between ISO-C and CT in detection and correct classification of fractures, but ISO-CD-3D is significant by better than CR. The evaluation of fractures with the ISO-C is better than with plain films alone and comparable to CT scans. The three-dimensional reconstruction of the ISO-C can provide important information which cannot be obtained from plain films. The ISO-C-3D may be useful in planning operative reconstructions and evaluating surgical results in orthopaedic surgery of the limbs.

  16. 3D automatic anatomy recognition based on iterative graph-cut-ASM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinjian; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Bagci, Ulas; Alavi, Abass; Torigian, Drew A.

    2010-02-01

    We call the computerized assistive process of recognizing, delineating, and quantifying organs and tissue regions in medical imaging, occurring automatically during clinical image interpretation, automatic anatomy recognition (AAR). The AAR system we are developing includes five main parts: model building, object recognition, object delineation, pathology detection, and organ system quantification. In this paper, we focus on the delineation part. For the modeling part, we employ the active shape model (ASM) strategy. For recognition and delineation, we integrate several hybrid strategies of combining purely image based methods with ASM. In this paper, an iterative Graph-Cut ASM (IGCASM) method is proposed for object delineation. An algorithm called GC-ASM was presented at this symposium last year for object delineation in 2D images which attempted to combine synergistically ASM and GC. Here, we extend this method to 3D medical image delineation. The IGCASM method effectively combines the rich statistical shape information embodied in ASM with the globally optimal delineation capability of the GC method. We propose a new GC cost function, which effectively integrates the specific image information with the ASM shape model information. The proposed methods are tested on a clinical abdominal CT data set. The preliminary results show that: (a) it is feasible to explicitly bring prior 3D statistical shape information into the GC framework; (b) the 3D IGCASM delineation method improves on ASM and GC and can provide practical operational time on clinical images.

  17. Mean deformation metrics for quantifying 3D cell–matrix interactions without requiring information about matrix material properties

    PubMed Central

    Stout, David A.; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Estrada, Jonathan B.; Toyjanova, Jennet; Kesari, Haneesh; Reichner, Jonathan S.; Franck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Mechanobiology relates cellular processes to mechanical signals, such as determining the effect of variations in matrix stiffness with cell tractions. Cell traction recorded via traction force microscopy (TFM) commonly takes place on materials such as polyacrylamide- and polyethylene glycol-based gels. Such experiments remain limited in physiological relevance because cells natively migrate within complex tissue microenvironments that are spatially heterogeneous and hierarchical. Yet, TFM requires determination of the matrix constitutive law (stress–strain relationship), which is not always readily available. In addition, the currently achievable displacement resolution limits the accuracy of TFM for relatively small cells. To overcome these limitations, and increase the physiological relevance of in vitro experimental design, we present a new approach and a set of associated biomechanical signatures that are based purely on measurements of the matrix's displacements without requiring any knowledge of its constitutive laws. We show that our mean deformation metrics (MDM) approach can provide significant biophysical information without the need to explicitly determine cell tractions. In the process of demonstrating the use of our MDM approach, we succeeded in expanding the capability of our displacement measurement technique such that it can now measure the 3D deformations around relatively small cells (∼10 micrometers), such as neutrophils. Furthermore, we also report previously unseen deformation patterns generated by motile neutrophils in 3D collagen gels. PMID:26929377

  18. 3D laptop for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Richard; Chenault, David

    2012-06-01

    Polaris Sensor Technologies has developed numerous 3D display systems using a US Army patented approach. These displays have been developed as prototypes for handheld controllers for robotic systems and closed hatch driving, and as part of a TALON robot upgrade for 3D vision, providing depth perception for the operator for improved manipulation and hazard avoidance. In this paper we discuss the prototype rugged 3D laptop computer and its applications to defense missions. The prototype 3D laptop combines full temporal and spatial resolution display with the rugged Amrel laptop computer. The display is viewed through protective passive polarized eyewear, and allows combined 2D and 3D content. Uses include robot tele-operation with live 3D video or synthetically rendered scenery, mission planning and rehearsal, enhanced 3D data interpretation, and simulation.

  19. Do we need 3D tube current modulation information for accurate organ dosimetry in chest CT? Protocols dose comparisons.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rendon, Xochitl; Zhang, Guozhi; Coudyzer, Walter; Develter, Wim; Bosmans, Hilde; Zanca, Federica

    2017-11-01

    To compare the lung and breast dose associated with three chest protocols: standard, organ-based tube current modulation (OBTCM) and fast-speed scanning; and to estimate the error associated with organ dose when modelling the longitudinal (z-) TCM versus the 3D-TCM in Monte Carlo simulations (MC) for these three protocols. Five adult and three paediatric cadavers with different BMI were scanned. The CTDI vol of the OBTCM and the fast-speed protocols were matched to the patient-specific CTDI vol of the standard protocol. Lung and breast doses were estimated using MC with both z- and 3D-TCM simulated and compared between protocols. The fast-speed scanning protocol delivered the highest doses. A slight reduction for breast dose (up to 5.1%) was observed for two of the three female cadavers with the OBTCM in comparison to the standard. For both adult and paediatric, the implementation of the z-TCM data only for organ dose estimation resulted in 10.0% accuracy for the standard and fast-speed protocols, while relative dose differences were up to 15.3% for the OBTCM protocol. At identical CTDI vol values, the standard protocol delivered the lowest overall doses. Only for the OBTCM protocol is the 3D-TCM needed if an accurate (<10.0%) organ dosimetry is desired. • The z-TCM information is sufficient for accurate dosimetry for standard protocols. • The z-TCM information is sufficient for accurate dosimetry for fast-speed scanning protocols. • For organ-based TCM schemes, the 3D-TCM information is necessary for accurate dosimetry. • At identical CTDI vol , the fast-speed scanning protocol delivered the highest doses. • Lung dose was higher in XCare than standard protocol at identical CTDI vol .

  20. Quantification of cerebral ventricle volume change of preterm neonates using 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yimin; Kishimoto, Jessica; Qiu, Wu; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Fenster, Aaron; Chiu, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a major cause of brain injury in preterm neonates. Quantitative measurement of ventricular dilation or shrinkage is important for monitoring patients and in evaluation of treatment options. 3D ultrasound (US) has been used to monitor the ventricle volume as a biomarker for ventricular dilation. However, volumetric quantification does not provide information as to where dilation occurs. The location where dilation occurs may be related to specific neurological problems later in life. For example, posterior horn enlargement, with thinning of the corpus callosum and parietal white matter fibres, could be linked to poor visuo-spatial abilities seen in hydrocephalic children. In this work, we report on the development and application of a method used to analyze local surface change of the ventricles of preterm neonates with IVH from 3D US images. The technique is evaluated using manual segmentations from 3D US images acquired in two imaging sessions. The surfaces from baseline and follow-up were registered and then matched on a point-by-point basis. The distance between each pair of corresponding points served as an estimate of local surface change of the brain ventricle at each vertex. The measurements of local surface change were then superimposed on the ventricle surface to produce the 3D local surface change map that provide information on the spatio-temporal dilation pattern of brain ventricles following IVH. This tool can be used to monitor responses to different treatment options, and may provide important information for elucidating the deficiencies a patient will have later in life.

  1. Recent Advances in Visualizing 3D Flow with LIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria; Grosch, Chester

    1998-01-01

    Line Integral Convolution (LIC), introduced by Cabral and Leedom in 1993, is an elegant and versatile technique for representing directional information via patterns of correlation in a texture. Although most commonly used to depict 2D flow, or flow over a surface in 3D, LIC methods can equivalently be used to portray 3D flow through a volume. However, the popularity of LIC as a device for illustrating 3D flow has historically been limited both by the computational expense of generating and rendering such a 3D texture and by the difficulties inherent in clearly and effectively conveying the directional information embodied in the volumetric output textures that are produced. In an earlier paper, we briefly discussed some of the factors that may underlie the perceptual difficulties that we can encounter with dense 3D displays and outlined several strategies for more effectively visualizing 3D flow with volume LIC. In this article, we review in more detail techniques for selectively emphasizing critical regions of interest in a flow and for facilitating the accurate perception of the 3D depth and orientation of overlapping streamlines, and we demonstrate new methods for efficiently incorporating an indication of orientation into a flow representation and for conveying additional information about related scalar quantities such as temperature or vorticity over a flow via subtle, continuous line width and color variations.

  2. Synthesizing 3D Surfaces from Parameterized Strip Charts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Peter I.; Gomez, Julian; Morehouse, Michael; Gawdiak, Yuri

    2004-01-01

    We believe 3D information visualization has the power to unlock new levels of productivity in the monitoring and control of complex processes. Our goal is to provide visual methods to allow for rapid human insight into systems consisting of thousands to millions of parameters. We explore this hypothesis in two complex domains: NASA program management and NASA International Space Station (ISS) spacecraft computer operations. We seek to extend a common form of visualization called the strip chart from 2D to 3D. A strip chart can display the time series progression of a parameter and allows for trends and events to be identified. Strip charts can be overlayed when multiple parameters need to visualized in order to correlate their events. When many parameters are involved, the direct overlaying of strip charts can become confusing and may not fully utilize the graphing area to convey the relationships between the parameters. We provide a solution to this problem by generating 3D surfaces from parameterized strip charts. The 3D surface utilizes significantly more screen area to illustrate the differences in the parameters and the overlayed strip charts, and it can rapidly be scanned by humans to gain insight. The selection of the third dimension must be a parallel or parameterized homogenous resource in the target domain, defined using a finite, ordered, enumerated type, and not a heterogeneous type. We demonstrate our concepts with examples from the NASA program management domain (assessing the state of many plans) and the computers of the ISS (assessing the state of many computers). We identify 2D strip charts in each domain and show how to construct the corresponding 3D surfaces. The user can navigate the surface, zooming in on regions of interest, setting a mark and drilling down to source documents from which the data points have been derived. We close by discussing design issues, related work, and implementation challenges.

  3. Porosity, permeability and 3D fracture network characterisation of dolomite reservoir rock samples.

    PubMed

    Voorn, Maarten; Exner, Ulrike; Barnhoorn, Auke; Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry

    2015-03-01

    With fractured rocks making up an important part of hydrocarbon reservoirs worldwide, detailed analysis of fractures and fracture networks is essential. However, common analyses on drill core and plug samples taken from such reservoirs (including hand specimen analysis, thin section analysis and laboratory porosity and permeability determination) however suffer from various problems, such as having a limited resolution, providing only 2D and no internal structure information, being destructive on the samples and/or not being representative for full fracture networks. In this paper, we therefore explore the use of an additional method - non-destructive 3D X-ray micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) - to obtain more information on such fractured samples. Seven plug-sized samples were selected from narrowly fractured rocks of the Hauptdolomit formation, taken from wellbores in the Vienna basin, Austria. These samples span a range of different fault rocks in a fault zone interpretation, from damage zone to fault core. We process the 3D μCT data in this study by a Hessian-based fracture filtering routine and can successfully extract porosity, fracture aperture, fracture density and fracture orientations - in bulk as well as locally. Additionally, thin sections made from selected plug samples provide 2D information with a much higher detail than the μCT data. Finally, gas- and water permeability measurements under confining pressure provide an important link (at least in order of magnitude) towards more realistic reservoir conditions. This study shows that 3D μCT can be applied efficiently on plug-sized samples of naturally fractured rocks, and that although there are limitations, several important parameters can be extracted. μCT can therefore be a useful addition to studies on such reservoir rocks, and provide valuable input for modelling and simulations. Also permeability experiments under confining pressure provide important additional insights. Combining these and

  4. 3D multimodal cardiac data reconstruction using angiography and computerized tomographic angiography registration.

    PubMed

    Moosavi Tayebi, Rohollah; Wirza, Rahmita; Sulaiman, Puteri S B; Dimon, Mohd Zamrin; Khalid, Fatimah; Al-Surmi, Aqeel; Mazaheri, Samaneh

    2015-04-22

    Computerized tomographic angiography (3D data representing the coronary arteries) and X-ray angiography (2D X-ray image sequences providing information about coronary arteries and their stenosis) are standard and popular assessment tools utilized for medical diagnosis of coronary artery diseases. At present, the results of both modalities are individually analyzed by specialists and it is difficult for them to mentally connect the details of these two techniques. The aim of this work is to assist medical diagnosis by providing specialists with the relationship between computerized tomographic angiography and X-ray angiography. In this study, coronary arteries from two modalities are registered in order to create a 3D reconstruction of the stenosis position. The proposed method starts with coronary artery segmentation and labeling for both modalities. Then, stenosis and relevant labeled artery in X-ray angiography image are marked by a specialist. Proper control points for the marked artery in both modalities are automatically detected and normalized. Then, a geometrical transformation function is computed using these control points. Finally, this function is utilized to register the marked artery from the X-ray angiography image on the computerized tomographic angiography and get the 3D position of the stenosis lesion. The result is a 3D informative model consisting of stenosis and coronary arteries' information from the X-ray angiography and computerized tomographic angiography modalities. The results of the proposed method for coronary artery segmentation, labeling and 3D reconstruction are evaluated and validated on the dataset containing both modalities. The advantage of this method is to aid specialists to determine a visual relationship between the correspondent coronary arteries from two modalities and also set up a connection between stenosis points from an X-ray angiography along with their 3D positions on the coronary arteries from computerized

  5. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  6. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  7. PubChem3D: Conformer generation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background PubChem, an open archive for the biological activities of small molecules, provides search and analysis tools to assist users in locating desired information. Many of these tools focus on the notion of chemical structure similarity at some level. PubChem3D enables similarity of chemical structure 3-D conformers to augment the existing similarity of 2-D chemical structure graphs. It is also desirable to relate theoretical 3-D descriptions of chemical structures to experimental biological activity. As such, it is important to be assured that the theoretical conformer models can reproduce experimentally determined bioactive conformations. In the present study, we investigate the effects of three primary conformer generation parameters (the fragment sampling rate, the energy window size, and force field variant) upon the accuracy of theoretical conformer models, and determined optimal settings for PubChem3D conformer model generation and conformer sampling. Results Using the software package OMEGA from OpenEye Scientific Software, Inc., theoretical 3-D conformer models were generated for 25,972 small-molecule ligands, whose 3-D structures were experimentally determined. Different values for primary conformer generation parameters were systematically tested to find optimal settings. Employing a greater fragment sampling rate than the default did not improve the accuracy of the theoretical conformer model ensembles. An ever increasing energy window did increase the overall average accuracy, with rapid convergence observed at 10 kcal/mol and 15 kcal/mol for model building and torsion search, respectively; however, subsequent study showed that an energy threshold of 25 kcal/mol for torsion search resulted in slightly improved results for larger and more flexible structures. Exclusion of coulomb terms from the 94s variant of the Merck molecular force field (MMFF94s) in the torsion search stage gave more accurate conformer models at lower energy windows. Overall

  8. 3-D reconstruction of neurons from multichannel confocal laser scanning image series.

    PubMed

    Wouterlood, Floris G

    2014-04-10

    A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) collects information from a thin, focal plane and ignores out-of-focus information. Scanning of a specimen, with stepwise axial (Z-) movement of the stage in between each scan, produces Z-series of confocal images of a tissue volume, which then can be used to 3-D reconstruct structures of interest. The operator first configures separate channels (e.g., laser, filters, and detector settings) for each applied fluorochrome and then acquires Z-series of confocal images: one series per channel. Channel signal separation is extremely important. Measures to avoid bleaching are vital. Post-acquisition deconvolution of the image series is often performed to increase resolution before 3-D reconstruction takes place. In the 3-D reconstruction programs described in this unit, reconstructions can be inspected in real time from any viewing angle. By altering viewing angles and by switching channels off and on, the spatial relationships of 3-D-reconstructed structures with respect to structures visualized in other channels can be studied. Since each brand of CLSM, computer program, and 3-D reconstruction package has its own proprietary set of procedures, a general approach is provided in this protocol wherever possible. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. 3-D discrete analytical ridgelet transform.

    PubMed

    Helbert, David; Carré, Philippe; Andres, Eric

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, we propose an implementation of the 3-D Ridgelet transform: the 3-D discrete analytical Ridgelet transform (3-D DART). This transform uses the Fourier strategy for the computation of the associated 3-D discrete Radon transform. The innovative step is the definition of a discrete 3-D transform with the discrete analytical geometry theory by the construction of 3-D discrete analytical lines in the Fourier domain. We propose two types of 3-D discrete lines: 3-D discrete radial lines going through the origin defined from their orthogonal projections and 3-D planes covered with 2-D discrete line segments. These discrete analytical lines have a parameter called arithmetical thickness, allowing us to define a 3-D DART adapted to a specific application. Indeed, the 3-D DART representation is not orthogonal, It is associated with a flexible redundancy factor. The 3-D DART has a very simple forward/inverse algorithm that provides an exact reconstruction without any iterative method. In order to illustrate the potentiality of this new discrete transform, we apply the 3-D DART and its extension to the Local-DART (with smooth windowing) to the denoising of 3-D image and color video. These experimental results show that the simple thresholding of the 3-D DART coefficients is efficient.

  10. Evaluation of low-dose limits in 3D-2D rigid registration for surgical guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uneri, A.; Wang, A. S.; Otake, Y.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Khanna, A. J.; Gallia, G. L.; Gokaslan, Z. L.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-09-01

    An algorithm for intensity-based 3D-2D registration of CT and C-arm fluoroscopy is evaluated for use in surgical guidance, specifically considering the low-dose limits of the fluoroscopic x-ray projections. The registration method is based on a framework using the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES) to identify the 3D patient pose that maximizes the gradient information similarity metric. Registration performance was evaluated in an anthropomorphic head phantom emulating intracranial neurosurgery, using target registration error (TRE) to characterize accuracy and robustness in terms of 95% confidence upper bound in comparison to that of an infrared surgical tracking system. Three clinical scenarios were considered: (1) single-view image + guidance, wherein a single x-ray projection is used for visualization and 3D-2D guidance; (2) dual-view image + guidance, wherein one projection is acquired for visualization, combined with a second (lower-dose) projection acquired at a different C-arm angle for 3D-2D guidance; and (3) dual-view guidance, wherein both projections are acquired at low dose for the purpose of 3D-2D guidance alone (not visualization). In each case, registration accuracy was evaluated as a function of the entrance surface dose associated with the projection view(s). Results indicate that images acquired at a dose as low as 4 μGy (approximately one-tenth the dose of a typical fluoroscopic frame) were sufficient to provide TRE comparable or superior to that of conventional surgical tracking, allowing 3D-2D guidance at a level of dose that is at most 10% greater than conventional fluoroscopy (scenario #2) and potentially reducing the dose to approximately 20% of the level in a conventional fluoroscopically guided procedure (scenario #3).

  11. Prototyping a Sensor Enabled 3d Citymodel on Geospatial Managed Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjems, E.; Kolář, J.

    2013-09-01

    One of the major development efforts within the GI Science domain are pointing at sensor based information and the usage of real time information coming from geographic referenced features in general. At the same time 3D City models are mostly justified as being objects for visualization purposes rather than constituting the foundation of a geographic data representation of the world. The combination of 3D city models and real time information based systems though can provide a whole new setup for data fusion within an urban environment and provide time critical information preserving our limited resources in the most sustainable way. Using 3D models with consistent object definitions give us the possibility to avoid troublesome abstractions of reality, and design even complex urban systems fusing information from various sources of data. These systems are difficult to design with the traditional software development approach based on major software packages and traditional data exchange. The data stream is varying from urban domain to urban domain and from system to system why it is almost impossible to design a complete system taking care of all thinkable instances now and in the future within one constraint software design complex. On several occasions we have been advocating for a new end advanced formulation of real world features using the concept of Geospatial Managed Objects (GMO). This paper presents the outcome of the InfraWorld project, a 4 million Euro project financed primarily by the Norwegian Research Council where the concept of GMO's have been applied in various situations on various running platforms of an urban system. The paper will be focusing on user experiences and interfaces rather then core technical and developmental issues. The project was primarily focusing on prototyping rather than realistic implementations although the results concerning applicability are quite clear.

  12. 36 CFR 1202.20 - What advisory information does NARA provide before collecting information from me?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What advisory information does NARA provide before collecting information from me? 1202.20 Section 1202.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION GENERAL RULES REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 Collecting Information §...

  13. 3D Graphics Through the Internet: A "Shoot-Out"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Val; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    3D graphics through the Internet needs to move beyond the current lowest common denominator of pre-computed movies, which consume bandwidth and are non-interactive. Panelists will demonstrate and compare 3D graphical tools for accessing, analyzing, and collaborating on information through the Internet and World-wide web. The "shoot-out" will illustrate which tools are likely to be the best for the various types of information, including dynamic scientific data, 3-D objects, and virtual environments. The goal of the panel is to encourage more effective use of the Internet by encouraging suppliers and users of information to adopt the next generation of graphical tools.

  14. Towards a Normalised 3D Geovisualisation: The Viewpoint Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuville, R.; Poux, F.; Hallot, P.; Billen, R.

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the viewpoint management in 3D environments considering an allocentric environment. The recent advances in computer sciences and the growing number of affordable remote sensors lead to impressive improvements in the 3D visualisation. Despite some research relating to the analysis of visual variables used in 3D environments, we notice that it lacks a real standardisation of 3D representation rules. In this paper we study the "viewpoint" as being the first considered parameter for a normalised visualisation of 3D data. Unlike in a 2D environment, the viewing direction is not only fixed in a top down direction in 3D. A non-optimal camera location means a poor 3D representation in terms of relayed information. Based on this statement we propose a model based on the analysis of the computational display pixels that determines a viewpoint maximising the relayed information according to one kind of query. We developed an OpenGL prototype working on screen pixels that allows to determine the optimal camera location based on a screen pixels colour algorithm. The viewpoint management constitutes a first step towards a normalised 3D geovisualisation.

  15. HS3 Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskey, M.; Conover, H.; Ramachandran, R.; Kulkarni, A.; Mceniry, M.; Stone, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) is developing an enterprise information system to manage and better serve data for Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3), a NASA airborne field campaign. HS3 is a multiyear campaign aimed at helping scientists understand the physical processes that contribute to hurricane intensification. For in-depth analysis, HS3 encompasses not only airborne data but also variety of in-situ, satellite, simulation, and flight report data. Thus, HS3 provides a unique challenge in information system design. The GHRC team is experienced with previous airborne campaigns to handle such challenge. Many supplementary information and reports collected during the mission include information rich contents that provide mission snapshots. In particular, flight information, instrument status, weather reports, and summary statistics offer vital knowledge about the corresponding science data. Furthermore, such information help narrow the science data of interest. Therefore, the GHRC team is building HS3 information system that augments the current GHRC data management framework to support search and discover of airborne science data with interactive visual exploration. Specifically, the HS3 information system is developing a tool to visually playback mission flights along with other traditional search and discover interfaces. This playback capability allows the users to follow the flight in time and visualize collected data. The flight summary and analyzed information are also presented during the playback. If the observed data is of interest, then they can order the data from GHRC using the interface. The users will be able to order just the data for the part of the flight that they are interested in. This presentation will demonstrate use of visual exploration to data download along with other components that comprise the HS3 information system.

  16. Creating Learning Environment Connecting Engineering Design and 3D Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikkarainen, Ari; Salminen, Antti; Piili, Heidi

    Engineering education in modern days require continuous development in didactics, pedagogics and used practical methods. 3D printing provides excellent opportunity to connect different engineering areas into practice and produce learning by doing applications. The 3D-printing technology used in this study is FDM (Fused deposition modeling). FDM is the most used 3D-printing technology by commercial numbers at the moment and the qualities of the technology makes it popular especially in academic environments. For achieving the best result possible, students will incorporate the principles of DFAM (Design for additive manufacturing) into their engineering design studies together with 3D printing. This paper presents a plan for creating learning environment for mechanical engineering students combining the aspects of engineering design, 3D-CAD learning and AM (additive manufacturing). As a result, process charts for carrying out the 3D printing process from technological point of view and design process for AM from engineering design point of view were created. These charts are used in engineering design education. The learning environment is developed to work also as a platform for Bachelor theses, work-training environment for students, prototyping service centre for cooperation partners and source of information for mechanical engineering education in Lapland University of Applied Sciences.

  17. A Review on Real-Time 3D Ultrasound Imaging Technology

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhaozheng

    2017-01-01

    Real-time three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) has attracted much more attention in medical researches because it provides interactive feedback to help clinicians acquire high-quality images as well as timely spatial information of the scanned area and hence is necessary in intraoperative ultrasound examinations. Plenty of publications have been declared to complete the real-time or near real-time visualization of 3D ultrasound using volumetric probes or the routinely used two-dimensional (2D) probes. So far, a review on how to design an interactive system with appropriate processing algorithms remains missing, resulting in the lack of systematic understanding of the relevant technology. In this article, previous and the latest work on designing a real-time or near real-time 3D ultrasound imaging system are reviewed. Specifically, the data acquisition techniques, reconstruction algorithms, volume rendering methods, and clinical applications are presented. Moreover, the advantages and disadvantages of state-of-the-art approaches are discussed in detail. PMID:28459067

  18. A Review on Real-Time 3D Ultrasound Imaging Technology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinghua; Zeng, Zhaozheng

    2017-01-01

    Real-time three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) has attracted much more attention in medical researches because it provides interactive feedback to help clinicians acquire high-quality images as well as timely spatial information of the scanned area and hence is necessary in intraoperative ultrasound examinations. Plenty of publications have been declared to complete the real-time or near real-time visualization of 3D ultrasound using volumetric probes or the routinely used two-dimensional (2D) probes. So far, a review on how to design an interactive system with appropriate processing algorithms remains missing, resulting in the lack of systematic understanding of the relevant technology. In this article, previous and the latest work on designing a real-time or near real-time 3D ultrasound imaging system are reviewed. Specifically, the data acquisition techniques, reconstruction algorithms, volume rendering methods, and clinical applications are presented. Moreover, the advantages and disadvantages of state-of-the-art approaches are discussed in detail.

  19. AxiSEM3D: broadband seismic wavefields in 3-D aspherical Earth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, K.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Zad, K. H.; van Driel, M.; Al-Attar, D.

    2017-12-01

    Seismology is the primary tool for data-informed inference of Earth structure and dynamics. Simulating seismic wave propagation at a global scale is fundamental to seismology, but remains as one of most challenging problems in scientific computing, because of both the multiscale nature of Earth's interior and the observable frequency band of seismic data. We present a novel numerical method to simulate global seismic wave propagation in realistic 3-D Earth models. Our method, named AxiSEM3D, is a hybrid of spectral element method and pseudospectral method. It reduces the azimuthal dimension of wavefields by means of a global Fourier series parameterization, of which the number of terms can be locally adapted to the inherent azimuthal smoothness of the wavefields. AxiSEM3D allows not only for material heterogeneities, such as velocity, density, anisotropy and attenuation, but also for finite undulations on radial discontinuities, both solid-solid and solid-fluid, and thereby a variety of aspherical Earth features such as ellipticity, topography, variable crustal thickness, and core-mantle boundary topography. Such interface undulations are equivalently interpreted as material perturbations of the contiguous media, based on the "particle relabelling transformation". Efficiency comparisons show that AxiSEM3D can be 1 to 3 orders of magnitude faster than conventional 3-D methods, with the speedup increasing with simulation frequency and decreasing with model complexity, but for all realistic structures the speedup remains at least one order of magnitude. The observable frequency range of global seismic data (up to 1 Hz) has been covered for wavefield modelling upon a 3-D Earth model with reasonable computing resources. We show an application of surface wave modelling within a state-of-the-art global crustal model (Crust1.0), with the synthetics compared to real data. The high-performance C++ code is released at github.com/AxiSEM3D/AxiSEM3D.

  20. 3D Printers Can Provide an Added Dimension for Teaching Structure-Energy Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blauch, David N.; Carroll, Felix A.

    2014-01-01

    A 3D printer is used to prepare a variety of models representing potential energy as a function of two geometric coordinates. These models facilitate the teaching of structure-energy relationships in molecular conformations and in chemical reactions.

  1. Optimized respiratory-resolved motion-compensated 3D Cartesian coronary MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Correia, Teresa; Ginami, Giulia; Cruz, Gastão; Neji, Radhouene; Rashid, Imran; Botnar, René M; Prieto, Claudia

    2018-04-22

    To develop a robust and efficient reconstruction framework that provides high-quality motion-compensated respiratory-resolved images from free-breathing 3D whole-heart Cartesian coronary magnetic resonance angiography (CMRA) acquisitions. Recently, XD-GRASP (eXtra-Dimensional Golden-angle RAdial Sparse Parallel MRI) was proposed to achieve 100% scan efficiency and provide respiratory-resolved 3D radial CMRA images by exploiting sparsity in the respiratory dimension. Here, a reconstruction framework for Cartesian CMRA imaging is proposed, which provides respiratory-resolved motion-compensated images by incorporating 2D beat-to-beat translational motion information to increase sparsity in the respiratory dimension. The motion information is extracted from interleaved image navigators and is also used to compensate for 2D translational motion within each respiratory phase. The proposed Optimized Respiratory-resolved Cartesian Coronary MR Angiography (XD-ORCCA) method was tested on 10 healthy subjects and 2 patients with cardiovascular disease, and compared against XD-GRASP. The proposed XD-ORCCA provides high-quality respiratory-resolved images, allowing clear visualization of the right and left coronary arteries, even for irregular breathing patterns. Compared with XD-GRASP, the proposed method improves the visibility and sharpness of both coronaries. Significant differences (p < .05) in visible vessel length and proximal vessel sharpness were found between the 2 methods. The XD-GRASP method provides good-quality images in the absence of intraphase motion. However, motion blurring is observed in XD-GRASP images for respiratory phases with larger motion amplitudes and subjects with irregular breathing patterns. A robust respiratory-resolved motion-compensated framework for Cartesian CMRA has been proposed and tested in healthy subjects and patients. The proposed XD-ORCCA provides high-quality images for all respiratory phases, independently of the regularity of

  2. 3D cinema to 3DTV content adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasakethu, L.; Blondé, L.; Doyen, D.; Huynh-Thu, Q.

    2012-03-01

    3D cinema and 3DTV have grown in popularity in recent years. Filmmakers have a significant opportunity in front of them given the recent success of 3D films. In this paper we investigate whether this opportunity could be extended to the home in a meaningful way. "3D" perceived from viewing stereoscopic content depends on the viewing geometry. This implies that the stereoscopic-3D content should be captured for a specific viewing geometry in order to provide a satisfactory 3D experience. However, although it would be possible, it is clearly not viable, to produce and transmit multiple streams of the same content for different screen sizes. In this study to solve the above problem, we analyze the performance of six different disparity-based transformation techniques, which could be used for cinema-to-3DTV content conversion. Subjective tests are performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the algorithms in terms of depth effect, visual comfort and overall 3D quality. The resultant 3DTV experience is also compared to that of cinema. We show that by applying the proper transformation technique on the content originally captured for cinema, it is possible to enhance the 3DTV experience. The selection of the appropriate transformation is highly dependent on the content characteristics.

  3. Development of 3D in Vitro Technology for Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Keng-Liang; Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, biomaterials technologies together with significant efforts on developing biology have revolutionized the process of engineered materials. Three dimensional (3D) in vitro technology aims to develop set of tools that are simple, inexpensive, portable and robust that could be commercialized and used in various fields of biomedical sciences such as drug discovery, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic approaches in regenerative medicine. The proliferation of cells in the 3D scaffold needs an oxygen and nutrition supply. 3D scaffold materials should provide such an environment for cells living in close proximity. 3D scaffolds that are able to regenerate or restore tissue and/or organs have begun to revolutionize medicine and biomedical science. Scaffolds have been used to support and promote the regeneration of tissues. Different processing techniques have been developed to design and fabricate three dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering implants. Throughout the chapters we discuss in this review, we inform the reader about the potential applications of different 3D in vitro systems that can be applied for fabricating a wider range of novel biomaterials for use in tissue engineering. PMID:25299693

  4. 3D Visualization of Cultural Heritage Artefacts with Virtual Reality devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonizzi Barsanti, S.; Caruso, G.; Micoli, L. L.; Covarrubias Rodriguez, M.; Guidi, G.

    2015-08-01

    Although 3D models are useful to preserve the information about historical artefacts, the potential of these digital contents are not fully accomplished until they are not used to interactively communicate their significance to non-specialists. Starting from this consideration, a new way to provide museum visitors with more information was investigated. The research is aimed at valorising and making more accessible the Egyptian funeral objects exhibited in the Sforza Castle in Milan. The results of the research will be used for the renewal of the current exhibition, at the Archaeological Museum in Milan, by making it more attractive. A 3D virtual interactive scenario regarding the "path of the dead", an important ritual in ancient Egypt, was realized to augment the experience and the comprehension of the public through interactivity. Four important artefacts were considered for this scope: two ushabty, a wooden sarcophagus and a heart scarab. The scenario was realized by integrating low-cost Virtual Reality technologies, as the Oculus Rift DK2 and the Leap Motion controller, and implementing a specific software by using Unity. The 3D models were implemented by adding responsive points of interest in relation to important symbols or features of the artefact. This allows highlighting single parts of the artefact in order to better identify the hieroglyphs and provide their translation. The paper describes the process for optimizing the 3D models, the implementation of the interactive scenario and the results of some test that have been carried out in the lab.

  5. A constraint logic programming approach to associate 1D and 3D structural components for large protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Dal Palù, Alessandro; Pontelli, Enrico; He, Jing; Lu, Yonggang

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes a novel framework, constructed using Constraint Logic Programming (CLP) and parallelism, to determine the association between parts of the primary sequence of a protein and alpha-helices extracted from 3D low-resolution descriptions of large protein complexes. The association is determined by extracting constraints from the 3D information, regarding length, relative position and connectivity of helices, and solving these constraints with the guidance of a secondary structure prediction algorithm. Parallelism is employed to enhance performance on large proteins. The framework provides a fast, inexpensive alternative to determine the exact tertiary structure of unknown proteins.

  6. Dental measurements and Bolton index reliability and accuracy obtained from 2D digital, 3D segmented CBCT, and 3d intraoral laser scanner

    PubMed Central

    San José, Verónica; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos; Tarazona, Beatriz; Zamora, Natalia; O Lagravère, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Background To compare the reliability and accuracy of direct and indirect dental measurements derived from two types of 3D virtual models: generated by intraoral laser scanning (ILS) and segmented cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), comparing these with a 2D digital model. Material and Methods One hundred patients were selected. All patients’ records included initial plaster models, an intraoral scan and a CBCT. Patients´ dental arches were scanned with the iTero® intraoral scanner while the CBCTs were segmented to create three-dimensional models. To obtain 2D digital models, plaster models were scanned using a conventional 2D scanner. When digital models had been obtained using these three methods, direct dental measurements were measured and indirect measurements were calculated. Differences between methods were assessed by means of paired t-tests and regression models. Intra and inter-observer error were analyzed using Dahlberg´s d and coefficients of variation. Results Intraobserver and interobserver error for the ILS model was less than 0.44 mm while for segmented CBCT models, the error was less than 0.97 mm. ILS models provided statistically and clinically acceptable accuracy for all dental measurements, while CBCT models showed a tendency to underestimate measurements in the lower arch, although within the limits of clinical acceptability. Conclusions ILS and CBCT segmented models are both reliable and accurate for dental measurements. Integration of ILS with CBCT scans would get dental and skeletal information altogether. Key words:CBCT, intraoral laser scanner, 2D digital models, 3D models, dental measurements, reliability. PMID:29410764

  7. Geo3DML: A standard-based exchange format for 3D geological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhangang; Qu, Honggang; Wu, Zixing; Wang, Xianghong

    2018-01-01

    A geological model (geomodel) in three-dimensional (3D) space is a digital representation of the Earth's subsurface, recognized by geologists and stored in resultant geological data (geodata). The increasing demand for data management and interoperable applications of geomodelscan be addressed by developing standard-based exchange formats for the representation of not only a single geological object, but also holistic geomodels. However, current standards such as GeoSciML cannot incorporate all the geomodel-related information. This paper presents Geo3DML for the exchange of 3D geomodels based on the existing Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards. Geo3DML is based on a unified and formal representation of structural models, attribute models and hierarchical structures of interpreted resultant geodata in different dimensional views, including drills, cross-sections/geomaps and 3D models, which is compatible with the conceptual model of GeoSciML. Geo3DML aims to encode all geomodel-related information integrally in one framework, including the semantic and geometric information of geoobjects and their relationships, as well as visual information. At present, Geo3DML and some supporting tools have been released as a data-exchange standard by the China Geological Survey (CGS).

  8. 3D bioprinting for vascularized tissue fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Dylan; Jia, Jia; Yost, Michael; Markwald, Roger; Mei, Ying

    2016-01-01

    3D bioprinting holds remarkable promise for rapid fabrication of 3D tissue engineering constructs. Given its scalability, reproducibility, and precise multi-dimensional control that traditional fabrication methods do not provide, 3D bioprinting provides a powerful means to address one of the major challenges in tissue engineering: vascularization. Moderate success of current tissue engineering strategies have been attributed to the current inability to fabricate thick tissue engineering constructs that contain endogenous, engineered vasculature or nutrient channels that can integrate with the host tissue. Successful fabrication of a vascularized tissue construct requires synergy between high throughput, high-resolution bioprinting of larger perfusable channels and instructive bioink that promotes angiogenic sprouting and neovascularization. This review aims to cover the recent progress in the field of 3D bioprinting of vascularized tissues. It will cover the methods of bioprinting vascularized constructs, bioink for vascularization, and perspectives on recent innovations in 3D printing and biomaterials for the next generation of 3D bioprinting for vascularized tissue fabrication. PMID:27230253

  9. Spherical 3D isotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis in spherical coordinates is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. Aims: The aim of this paper is to present a new formalism for a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet, i.e. one based on the SFB decomposition of a 3D field and accompany the formalism with a public code to perform wavelet transforms. Methods: We describe a new 3D isotropic spherical wavelet decomposition based on the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) described in Starck et al. (2006). We also present a new fast discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We test the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, apply a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and find we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. Results: We have described a new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, ideally suited to analyse and denoise future 3D spherical cosmological surveys, which uses a novel DSFBT. We illustrate its potential use for denoising using a toy model. All the algorithms presented in this paper are available for download as a public code called MRS3D at http://jstarck.free.fr/mrs3d.html

  10. Motion robust high resolution 3D free-breathing pulmonary MRI using dynamic 3D image self-navigator.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenwen; Ong, Frank; Johnson, Kevin M; Nagle, Scott K; Hope, Thomas A; Lustig, Michael; Larson, Peder E Z

    2018-06-01

    To achieve motion robust high resolution 3D free-breathing pulmonary MRI utilizing a novel dynamic 3D image navigator derived directly from imaging data. Five-minute free-breathing scans were acquired with a 3D ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence with 1.25 mm isotropic resolution. From this data, dynamic 3D self-navigating images were reconstructed under locally low rank (LLR) constraints and used for motion compensation with one of two methods: a soft-gating technique to penalize the respiratory motion induced data inconsistency, and a respiratory motion-resolved technique to provide images of all respiratory motion states. Respiratory motion estimation derived from the proposed dynamic 3D self-navigator of 7.5 mm isotropic reconstruction resolution and a temporal resolution of 300 ms was successful for estimating complex respiratory motion patterns. This estimation improved image quality compared to respiratory belt and DC-based navigators. Respiratory motion compensation with soft-gating and respiratory motion-resolved techniques provided good image quality from highly undersampled data in volunteers and clinical patients. An optimized 3D UTE sequence combined with the proposed reconstruction methods can provide high-resolution motion robust pulmonary MRI. Feasibility was shown in patients who had irregular breathing patterns in which our approach could depict clinically relevant pulmonary pathologies. Magn Reson Med 79:2954-2967, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. MSX-3D: a tool to validate 3D protein models using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Heymann, Michaël; Paramelle, David; Subra, Gilles; Forest, Eric; Martinez, Jean; Geourjon, Christophe; Deléage, Gilbert

    2008-12-01

    The technique of chemical cross-linking followed by mass spectrometry has proven to bring valuable information about the protein structure and interactions between proteic subunits. It is an effective and efficient way to experimentally investigate some aspects of a protein structure when NMR and X-ray crystallography data are lacking. We introduce MSX-3D, a tool specifically geared to validate protein models using mass spectrometry. In addition to classical peptides identifications, it allows an interactive 3D visualization of the distance constraints derived from a cross-linking experiment. Freely available at http://proteomics-pbil.ibcp.fr

  12. Transfer of learning between 2D and 3D sources during infancy: Informing theory and practice

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The ability to transfer learning across contexts is an adaptive skill that develops rapidly during early childhood. Learning from television is a specific instance of transfer of learning between a 2-Dimensional (2D) representation and a 3-Dimensional (3D) object. Understanding the conditions under which young children might accomplish this particular kind of transfer is important because by 2 years of age 90% of US children are viewing television on a daily basis. Recent research shows that children can imitate actions presented on television using the corresponding real-world objects, but this same research also shows that children learn less from television than they do from live demonstrations until they are at least 3 years old; termed the video deficit effect. At present, there is no coherent theory to account for the video deficit effect; how learning is disrupted by this change in context is poorly understood. The aims of the present review are (1) to review the conditions under which children transfer learning between 2D images and 3D objects during early childhood, and (2) to integrate developmental theories of memory processing into the transfer of learning from media literature using Hayne’s (2004) developmental representational flexibility account. The review will conclude that studies on the transfer of learning between 2D and 3D sources have important theoretical implications for general developmental theories of cognitive development, and in particular the development of a flexible representational system, as well as policy implications for early education regarding the potential use and limitations of media as effective teaching tools during early childhood. PMID:20563302

  13. Improving the visualization of 3D ultrasound data with 3D filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamdasani, Vijay; Bae, Unmin; Managuli, Ravi; Kim, Yongmin

    2005-04-01

    3D ultrasound imaging is quickly gaining widespread clinical acceptance as a visualization tool that allows clinicians to obtain unique views not available with traditional 2D ultrasound imaging and an accurate understanding of patient anatomy. The ability to acquire, manipulate and interact with the 3D data in real time is an important feature of 3D ultrasound imaging. Volume rendering is often used to transform the 3D volume into 2D images for visualization. Unlike computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), volume rendering of 3D ultrasound data creates noisy images in which surfaces cannot be readily discerned due to speckles and low signal-to-noise ratio. The degrading effect of speckles is especially severe when gradient shading is performed to add depth cues to the image. Several researchers have reported that smoothing the pre-rendered volume with a 3D convolution kernel, such as 5x5x5, can significantly improve the image quality, but at the cost of decreased resolution. In this paper, we have analyzed the reasons for the improvement in image quality with 3D filtering and determined that the improvement is due to two effects. The filtering reduces speckles in the volume data, which leads to (1) more accurate gradient computation and better shading and (2) decreased noise during compositing. We have found that applying a moderate-size smoothing kernel (e.g., 7x7x7) to the volume data before gradient computation combined with some smoothing of the volume data (e.g., with a 3x3x3 lowpass filter) before compositing yielded images with good depth perception and no appreciable loss in resolution. Providing the clinician with the flexibility to control both of these effects (i.e., shading and compositing) independently could improve the visualization of the 3D ultrasound data. Introducing this flexibility into the ultrasound machine requires 3D filtering to be performed twice on the volume data, once before gradient computation and again before

  14. Using Openstreetmap Data to Generate Building Models with Their Inner Structures for 3d Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Zipf, A.

    2017-09-01

    With the development of Web 2.0, more and more data related to indoor environments has been collected within the volunteered geographic information (VGI) framework, which creates a need for construction of indoor environments from VGI. In this study, we focus on generating 3D building models from OpenStreetMap (OSM) data, and provide an approach to support construction and visualization of indoor environments on 3D maps. In this paper, we present an algorithm which can extract building information from OSM data, and can construct building structures as well as inner building components (e.g., doors, rooms, and windows). A web application is built to support the processing and visualization of the building models on a 3D map. We test our approach with an indoor dataset collected from the field. The results show the feasibility of our approach and its potentials to provide support for a wide range of applications, such as indoor and outdoor navigation, urban planning, and incident management.

  15. The 3D laser radar vision processor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebok, T. M.

    1990-10-01

    Loral Defense Systems (LDS) developed a 3D Laser Radar Vision Processor system capable of detecting, classifying, and identifying small mobile targets as well as larger fixed targets using three dimensional laser radar imagery for use with a robotic type system. This processor system is designed to interface with the NASA Johnson Space Center in-house Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Retriever robot program and provide to it needed information so it can fetch and grasp targets in a space-type scenario.

  16. The 3D laser radar vision processor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebok, T. M.

    1990-01-01

    Loral Defense Systems (LDS) developed a 3D Laser Radar Vision Processor system capable of detecting, classifying, and identifying small mobile targets as well as larger fixed targets using three dimensional laser radar imagery for use with a robotic type system. This processor system is designed to interface with the NASA Johnson Space Center in-house Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Retriever robot program and provide to it needed information so it can fetch and grasp targets in a space-type scenario.

  17. 3D palmprint data fast acquisition and recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Huang, Shujun; Gao, Nan; Zhang, Zonghua

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a fast 3D (Three-Dimension) palmprint capturing system and develops an efficient 3D palmprint feature extraction and recognition method. In order to fast acquire accurate 3D shape and texture of palmprint, a DLP projector triggers a CCD camera to realize synchronization. By generating and projecting green fringe pattern images onto the measured palm surface, 3D palmprint data are calculated from the fringe pattern images. The periodic feature vector can be derived from the calculated 3D palmprint data, so undistorted 3D biometrics is obtained. Using the obtained 3D palmprint data, feature matching test have been carried out by Gabor filter, competition rules and the mean curvature. Experimental results on capturing 3D palmprint show that the proposed acquisition method can fast get 3D shape information of palmprint. Some initial experiments on recognition show the proposed method is efficient by using 3D palmprint data.

  18. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  19. The DoD Gateway Information System (DGIS): The DoD Microcomputer User's Gateway to the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Allan D.; Cotter, Gladys A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) Gateway Information System, which provides communications capabilities and access to online databases for DoD microcomputer end-users. Functions, structure, development, and artificial intelligence applications of the system are discussed. (11 references) (MES)

  20. Realistic terrain visualization based on 3D virtual world technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fengru; Lin, Hui; Chen, Bin; Xiao, Cai

    2009-09-01

    The rapid advances in information technologies, e.g., network, graphics processing, and virtual world, have provided challenges and opportunities for new capabilities in information systems, Internet applications, and virtual geographic environments, especially geographic visualization and collaboration. In order to achieve meaningful geographic capabilities, we need to explore and understand how these technologies can be used to construct virtual geographic environments to help to engage geographic research. The generation of three-dimensional (3D) terrain plays an important part in geographical visualization, computer simulation, and virtual geographic environment applications. The paper introduces concepts and technologies of virtual worlds and virtual geographic environments, explores integration of realistic terrain and other geographic objects and phenomena of natural geographic environment based on SL/OpenSim virtual world technologies. Realistic 3D terrain visualization is a foundation of construction of a mirror world or a sand box model of the earth landscape and geographic environment. The capabilities of interaction and collaboration on geographic information are discussed as well. Further virtual geographic applications can be developed based on the foundation work of realistic terrain visualization in virtual environments.

  1. Realistic terrain visualization based on 3D virtual world technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fengru; Lin, Hui; Chen, Bin; Xiao, Cai

    2010-11-01

    The rapid advances in information technologies, e.g., network, graphics processing, and virtual world, have provided challenges and opportunities for new capabilities in information systems, Internet applications, and virtual geographic environments, especially geographic visualization and collaboration. In order to achieve meaningful geographic capabilities, we need to explore and understand how these technologies can be used to construct virtual geographic environments to help to engage geographic research. The generation of three-dimensional (3D) terrain plays an important part in geographical visualization, computer simulation, and virtual geographic environment applications. The paper introduces concepts and technologies of virtual worlds and virtual geographic environments, explores integration of realistic terrain and other geographic objects and phenomena of natural geographic environment based on SL/OpenSim virtual world technologies. Realistic 3D terrain visualization is a foundation of construction of a mirror world or a sand box model of the earth landscape and geographic environment. The capabilities of interaction and collaboration on geographic information are discussed as well. Further virtual geographic applications can be developed based on the foundation work of realistic terrain visualization in virtual environments.

  2. Effect of viewing distance on 3D fatigue caused by viewing mobile 3D content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Sungchul; Lee, Dong-Su; Park, Min-Chul; Yano, Sumio

    2013-05-01

    With an advent of autostereoscopic display technique and increased needs for smart phones, there has been a significant growth in mobile TV markets. The rapid growth in technical, economical, and social aspects has encouraged 3D TV manufacturers to apply 3D rendering technology to mobile devices so that people have more opportunities to come into contact with many 3D content anytime and anywhere. Even if the mobile 3D technology leads to the current market growth, there is an important thing to consider for consistent development and growth in the display market. To put it briefly, human factors linked to mobile 3D viewing should be taken into consideration before developing mobile 3D technology. Many studies have investigated whether mobile 3D viewing causes undesirable biomedical effects such as motion sickness and visual fatigue, but few have examined main factors adversely affecting human health. Viewing distance is considered one of the main factors to establish optimized viewing environments from a viewer's point of view. Thus, in an effort to determine human-friendly viewing environments, this study aims to investigate the effect of viewing distance on human visual system when exposing to mobile 3D environments. Recording and analyzing brainwaves before and after watching mobile 3D content, we explore how viewing distance affects viewing experience from physiological and psychological perspectives. Results obtained in this study are expected to provide viewing guidelines for viewers, help ensure viewers against undesirable 3D effects, and lead to make gradual progress towards a human-friendly mobile 3D viewing.

  3. 25 CFR 122.3 - Information collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Information collection. 122.3 Section 122.3 Indians... FUNDS FOR EDUCATION § 122.3 Information collection. (a) The information collection requirements... assistance grants. The information collected in § 122.9 provides summary review for program evaluation and...

  4. Programming 2D/3D shape-shifting with hobbyist 3D printers† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c7mh00269f

    PubMed Central

    van Manen, Teunis; Janbaz, Shahram

    2017-01-01

    Materials and devices with advanced functionalities often need to combine complex 3D shapes with functionality-inducing surface features. Precisely controlled bio-nanopatterns, printed electronic components, and sensors/actuators are all examples of such surface features. However, the vast majority of the refined technologies that are currently available for creating functional surface features work only on flat surfaces. Here we present initially flat constructs that upon triggering by high temperatures change their shape to a pre-programmed 3D shape, thereby enabling the combination of surface-related functionalities with complex 3D shapes. A number of shape-shifting materials have been proposed during the last few years based on various types of advanced technologies. The proposed techniques often require multiple fabrication steps and special materials, while being limited in terms of the 3D shapes they could achieve. The approach presented here is a single-step printing process that requires only a hobbyist 3D printer and inexpensive off-the-shelf materials. It also lends itself to a host of design strategies based on self-folding origami, instability-driven pop-up, and ‘sequential’ shape-shifting to unprecedentedly expand the space of achievable 3D shapes. This combination of simplicity and versatility is a key to widespread applications. PMID:29308207

  5. Pathways for Learning from 3D Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrier, L. Mark; Rab, Saira S.; Rosen, Larry D.; Vasquez, Ludivina; Cheever, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out if 3D stereoscopic presentation of information in a movie format changes a viewer's experience of the movie content. Four possible pathways from 3D presentation to memory and learning were considered: a direct connection based on cognitive neuroscience research; a connection through "immersion"…

  6. A 3D-Printed Sensor for Monitoring Biosignals in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Donghak; Choi, Seok-Yong; Lee, Byung-Geun; Kim, Myeong-Kyu

    2017-01-01

    Although additive manufacturing technologies, also known as 3D printing, were first introduced in the 1980s, they have recently gained remarkable popularity owing to decreased costs. 3D printing has already emerged as a viable technology in many industries; in particular, it is a good replacement for microfabrication technology. Microfabrication technology usually requires expensive clean room equipment and skilled engineers; however, 3D printing can reduce both cost and time dramatically. Although 3D printing technology has started to emerge into microfabrication manufacturing and medical applications, it is typically limited to creating mechanical structures such as hip prosthesis or dental implants. There have been increased interests in wearable devices and the critical part of such wearable devices is the sensing part to detect biosignals noninvasively. In this paper, we have built a 3D-printed sensor that can measure electroencephalogram and electrocardiogram from zebrafish. Despite measuring biosignals noninvasively from zebrafish has been known to be difficult due to that it is an underwater creature, we were able to successfully obtain electrophysiological information using the 3D-printed sensor. This 3D printing technique can accelerate the development of simple noninvasive sensors using affordable equipment and provide an economical solution to physiologists who are unfamiliar with complicated microfabrication techniques. PMID:29209491

  7. Total body irradiation with a compensator fabricated using a 3D optical scanner and a 3D printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Jung-in; Joo, Yoon Ha; Lee, Jung Chan; Park, Jong Min

    2017-05-01

    We propose bilateral total body irradiation (TBI) utilizing a 3D printer and a 3D optical scanner. We acquired surface information of an anthropomorphic phantom with the 3D scanner and fabricated the 3D compensator with the 3D printer, which could continuously compensate for the lateral missing tissue of an entire body from the beam’s eye view. To test the system’s performance, we measured doses with optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) as well as EBT3 films with the anthropomorphic phantom during TBI without a compensator, conventional bilateral TBI, and TBI with the 3D compensator (3D TBI). The 3D TBI showed the most uniform dose delivery to the phantom. From the OSLD measurements of the 3D TBI, the deviations between the measured doses and the prescription dose ranged from  -6.7% to 2.4% inside the phantom and from  -2.3% to 0.6% on the phantom’s surface. From the EBT3 film measurements, the prescription dose could be delivered to the entire body of the phantom within  ±10% accuracy, except for the chest region, where tissue heterogeneity is extreme. The 3D TBI doses were much more uniform than those of the other irradiation techniques, especially in the anterior-to-posterior direction. The 3D TBI was advantageous, owing to its uniform dose delivery as well as its efficient treatment procedure.

  8. Refined 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alday, Luis F.; Genolini, Pietro Benetti; Bullimore, Mathew; van Loon, Mark

    2017-04-01

    We explore aspects of the correspondence between Seifert 3-manifolds and 3d N = 2 supersymmetric theories with a distinguished abelian flavour symmetry. We give a prescription for computing the squashed three-sphere partition functions of such 3d N = 2 theories constructed from boundary conditions and interfaces in a 4d N = 2∗ theory, mirroring the construction of Seifert manifold invariants via Dehn surgery. This is extended to include links in the Seifert manifold by the insertion of supersymmetric Wilson-'t Hooft loops in the 4d N = 2∗ theory. In the presence of a mass parameter cfor the distinguished flavour symmetry, we recover aspects of refined Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group, and in particular construct an analytic continuation of the S-matrix of refined Chern-Simons theory.

  9. Model-based recognition of 3D articulated target using ladar range data.

    PubMed

    Lv, Dan; Sun, Jian-Feng; Li, Qi; Wang, Qi

    2015-06-10

    Ladar is suitable for 3D target recognition because ladar range images can provide rich 3D geometric surface information of targets. In this paper, we propose a part-based 3D model matching technique to recognize articulated ground military vehicles in ladar range images. The key of this approach is to solve the decomposition and pose estimation of articulated parts of targets. The articulated components were decomposed into isolate parts based on 3D geometric properties of targets, such as surface point normals, data histogram distribution, and data distance relationships. The corresponding poses of these separate parts were estimated through the linear characteristics of barrels. According to these pose parameters, all parts of the target were roughly aligned to 3D point cloud models in a library and fine matching was finally performed to accomplish 3D articulated target recognition. The recognition performance was evaluated with 1728 ladar range images of eight different articulated military vehicles with various part types and orientations. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed approach achieved a high recognition rate.

  10. Combination of Virtual Tours, 3d Model and Digital Data in a 3d Archaeological Knowledge and Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, M.; Brigand, N.

    2012-08-01

    The site of the Engelbourg ruined castle in Thann, Alsace, France, has been for some years the object of all the attention of the city, which is the owner, and also of partners like historians and archaeologists who are in charge of its study. The valuation of the site is one of the main objective, as well as its conservation and its knowledge. The aim of this project is to use the environment of the virtual tour viewer as new base for an Archaeological Knowledge and Information System (AKIS). With available development tools we add functionalities in particular through diverse scripts that convert the viewer into a real 3D interface. By beginning with a first virtual tour that contains about fifteen panoramic images, the site of about 150 times 150 meters can be completely documented by offering the user a real interactivity and that makes visualization very concrete, almost lively. After the choice of pertinent points of view, panoramic images were realized. For the documentation, other sets of images were acquired at various seasons and climate conditions, which allow documenting the site in different environments and states of vegetation. The final virtual tour was deducted from them. The initial 3D model of the castle, which is virtual too, was also joined in the form of panoramic images for completing the understanding of the site. A variety of types of hotspots were used to connect the whole digital documentation to the site, including videos (as reports during the acquisition phases, during the restoration works, during the excavations, etc.), digital georeferenced documents (archaeological reports on the various constituent elements of the castle, interpretation of the excavations and the searches, description of the sets of collected objects, etc.). The completely personalized interface of the system allows either to switch from a panoramic image to another one, which is the classic case of the virtual tours, or to go from a panoramic photographic image

  11. 3D Simulation of External Flooding Events for the RISMC Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, Steven; Mandelli, Diego; Sampath, Ramprasad

    2015-09-01

    Incorporating 3D simulations as part of the Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMIC) Toolkit allows analysts to obtain a more complete picture of complex system behavior for events including external plant hazards. External events such as flooding have become more important recently – however these can be analyzed with existing and validated simulated physics toolkits. In this report, we describe these approaches specific to flooding-based analysis using an approach called Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics. The theory, validation, and example applications of the 3D flooding simulation are described. Integrating these 3D simulation methods into computational risk analysis provides a spatial/visual aspect to themore » design, improves the realism of results, and can prove visual understanding to validate the analysis of flooding.« less

  12. FROM2D to 3d Supervised Segmentation and Classification for Cultural Heritage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilli, E.; Dininno, D.; Petrucci, G.; Remondino, F.

    2018-05-01

    The digital management of architectural heritage information is still a complex problem, as a heritage object requires an integrated representation of various types of information in order to develop appropriate restoration or conservation strategies. Currently, there is extensive research focused on automatic procedures of segmentation and classification of 3D point clouds or meshes, which can accelerate the study of a monument and integrate it with heterogeneous information and attributes, useful to characterize and describe the surveyed object. The aim of this study is to propose an optimal, repeatable and reliable procedure to manage various types of 3D surveying data and associate them with heterogeneous information and attributes to characterize and describe the surveyed object. In particular, this paper presents an approach for classifying 3D heritage models, starting from the segmentation of their textures based on supervised machine learning methods. Experimental results run on three different case studies demonstrate that the proposed approach is effective and with many further potentials.

  13. [3-D echocardiography: new developments and future prospects].

    PubMed

    Müller, Silvana; Bartel, Thomas; Pachinger, Otmar; Erbel, Raimund

    2002-05-01

    respect, especially the "real-time rendering mode" allowing the reconstructed 3-D image to be animated and moved in space and to look at it from different perspectives has gained increasing acceptance. In valvular heart disease, reconstructive surgical treatment is aspired. 3-D echocardiographic imaging is the only technique providing "surgical views" prior to opening the heart. It is capable of distinguishing particular destructive substructures of the valves and the valvular apparatus. Especially in mitral valvular reconstruction, it is of clinical importance to achieve optimal surgical results. With respect to volumetric and mass analysis, 3-D echocardiography is more accurate and reproducible in comparison with conventional 2-D analysis. It provides data independent of geometric assumptions, what may considerably influence the results in the presence of wall motion abnormalities, especially in aneurysmatic ventricles. Volumetric analysis of the aneurysmal portion may also be helpful prior to surgical resection. 3-D echocardiography can also be recommended as a valuable additional approach to atrial septal defect (ASD), corrected transposition of the great arteries, cor triatriatum, and, within limits, to ventricular septal defect (VSD) as well. Especially with respect to ASD and VSD, the potential significance of 3-D echocardiography prior to device closure is emphasized. At present, its additional information in decision-making and the increasing number of clinical cases that can be addressed and answered already justify the clinical use of this technique.

  14. Novel Analogues of (R)-5-(Methylamino)-5,6-dihydro-4H-imidazo[4,5,1-ij]quinolin-2(1H)-one (Sumanirole) Provide Clues to Dopamine D2/D3 Receptor Agonist Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Novel 1-, 5-, and 8-substituted analogues of sumanirole (1), a dopamine D2/D3 receptor (D2R/D3R) agonist, were synthesized. Binding affinities at both D2R and D3R were higher when determined in competition with the agonist radioligand [3H]7-hydroxy-N,N-dipropyl-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT) than with the antagonist radioligand [3H]N-methylspiperone. Although 1 was confirmed as a D2R-preferential agonist, its selectivity in binding and functional studies was lower than previously reported. All analogues were determined to be D2R/D3R agonists in both GoBRET and mitogenesis functional assays. Loss of efficacy was detected for the N-1-substituted analogues at D3R. In contrast, the N-5-alkyl-substituted analogues, and notably the n-butyl-arylamides (22b and 22c), all showed improved affinity at D2R over 1 with neither a loss of efficacy nor an increase in selectivity. Computational modeling provided a structural basis for the D2R selectivity of 1, illustrating how subtle differences in the highly homologous orthosteric binding site (OBS) differentially affect D2R/D3R affinity and functional efficacy. PMID:27035329

  15. Scalable Multi-Platform Distribution of Spatial 3d Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimke, J.; Hagedorn, B.; Döllner, J.

    2013-09-01

    Virtual 3D city models provide powerful user interfaces for communication of 2D and 3D geoinformation. Providing high quality visualization of massive 3D geoinformation in a scalable, fast, and cost efficient manner is still a challenging task. Especially for mobile and web-based system environments, software and hardware configurations of target systems differ significantly. This makes it hard to provide fast, visually appealing renderings of 3D data throughout a variety of platforms and devices. Current mobile or web-based solutions for 3D visualization usually require raw 3D scene data such as triangle meshes together with textures delivered from server to client, what makes them strongly limited in terms of size and complexity of the models they can handle. In this paper, we introduce a new approach for provisioning of massive, virtual 3D city models on different platforms namely web browsers, smartphones or tablets, by means of an interactive map assembled from artificial oblique image tiles. The key concept is to synthesize such images of a virtual 3D city model by a 3D rendering service in a preprocessing step. This service encapsulates model handling and 3D rendering techniques for high quality visualization of massive 3D models. By generating image tiles using this service, the 3D rendering process is shifted from the client side, which provides major advantages: (a) The complexity of the 3D city model data is decoupled from data transfer complexity (b) the implementation of client applications is simplified significantly as 3D rendering is encapsulated on server side (c) 3D city models can be easily deployed for and used by a large number of concurrent users, leading to a high degree of scalability of the overall approach. All core 3D rendering techniques are performed on a dedicated 3D rendering server, and thin-client applications can be compactly implemented for various devices and platforms.

  16. Meta!Blast computer game: a pipeline from science to 3D art to education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneller, William; Campbell, P. J.; Bassham, Diane; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    2012-03-01

    Meta!Blast (http://www.metablast.org) is designed to address the challenges students often encounter in understanding cell and metabolic biology. Developed by faculty and students in biology, biochemistry, computer science, game design, pedagogy, art and story, Meta!Blast is being created using Maya (http://usa.autodesk.com/maya/) and the Unity 3D (http://unity3d.com/) game engine, for Macs and PCs in classrooms; it has also been exhibited in an immersive environment. Here, we describe the pipeline from protein structural data and holographic information to art to the threedimensional (3D) environment to the game engine, by which we provide a publicly-available interactive 3D cellular world that mimics a photosynthetic plant cell.

  17. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  18. G23D: Online tool for mapping and visualization of genomic variants on 3D protein structures.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Oz; Kunik, Vered; Simon, Amos; Kol, Nitzan; Barel, Ortal; Lev, Atar; Amariglio, Ninette; Somech, Raz; Rechavi, Gidi; Eyal, Eran

    2016-08-26

    Evaluation of the possible implications of genomic variants is an increasingly important task in the current high throughput sequencing era. Structural information however is still not routinely exploited during this evaluation process. The main reasons can be attributed to the partial structural coverage of the human proteome and the lack of tools which conveniently convert genomic positions, which are the frequent output of genomic pipelines, to proteins and structure coordinates. We present G23D, a tool for conversion of human genomic coordinates to protein coordinates and protein structures. G23D allows mapping of genomic positions/variants on evolutionary related (and not only identical) protein three dimensional (3D) structures as well as on theoretical models. By doing so it significantly extends the space of variants for which structural insight is feasible. To facilitate interpretation of the variant consequence, pathogenic variants, functional sites and polymorphism sites are displayed on protein sequence and structure diagrams alongside the input variants. G23D also provides modeling of the mutant structure, analysis of intra-protein contacts and instant access to functional predictions and predictions of thermo-stability changes. G23D is available at http://www.sheba-cancer.org.il/G23D . G23D extends the fraction of variants for which structural analysis is applicable and provides better and faster accessibility for structural data to biologists and geneticists who routinely work with genomic information.

  19. Taiwanese adult foot shape classification using 3D scanning data.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Chi; Wang, Mao-Jiun

    2015-01-01

    This study classifies the foot shapes of Taiwanese using 3D foot scanning data from 2000 males and 1000 females. Nine foot dimensions relative to foot length and absolute measures in the common foot length categories were applied to compare the gender differences. Using foot breadth in % foot length (% FL), ball of foot length in % FL and arch height in % FL as feature parameters, three foot shape types for males and females can be classified. Significant gender differences were found in seven of the nine foot dimensions. Females had greater ball of foot length than males (0.2% FL). When comparing feet of the same foot length, males had greater breadth, girth and height dimensions than females, except for toe height. In addition, ethnic differences in foot shape were also observed. The findings can provide very useful information for building gender-specific shoe lasts and designing footwear insoles. 3D foot scanning data of 2000 males and 1000 females were classified into three different footshapes for males and females, respectively. Gender and ethnic differences on foot shape were also compared. The finding scan provide very useful information for gender-specific shoe last design and footwear production.

  20. 30 CFR 1206.365 - Does ONRR protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Does ONRR protect information I provide? 1206.365 Section 1206.365 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Geothermal Resources § 1206.365 Does ONRR protect information...

  1. 30 CFR 1206.365 - Does ONRR protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Does ONRR protect information I provide? 1206.365 Section 1206.365 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Geothermal Resources § 1206.365 Does ONRR protect information...

  2. 30 CFR 1206.365 - Does ONRR protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Does ONRR protect information I provide? 1206.365 Section 1206.365 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Geothermal Resources § 1206.365 Does ONRR protect information...

  3. Postmarket Drug Safety Information for Patients and Providers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information for Patients and Providers Postmarket Drug Safety Information for Patients and Providers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... communication to patients and healthcare providers. Latest Safety Information Index to Drug-Specific Information For patients, consumers, ...

  4. Comparison of post-contrast 3D-T1-MPRAGE, 3D-T1-SPACE and 3D-T2-FLAIR MR images in evaluation of meningeal abnormalities at 3-T MRI.

    PubMed

    Jeevanandham, Balaji; Kalyanpur, Tejas; Gupta, Prashant; Cherian, Mathew

    2017-06-01

    This study was to assess the usefulness of newer three-dimensional (3D)-T 1 sampling perfection with application optimized contrast using different flip-angle evolutions (SPACE) and 3D-T 2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences in evaluation of meningeal abnormalities. 78 patients who presented with high suspicion of meningeal abnormalities were evaluated using post-contrast 3D-T 2 -FLAIR, 3D-T 1 magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo (MPRAGE) and 3D-T 1 -SPACE sequences. The images were evaluated independently by two radiologists for cortical gyral, sulcal space, basal cisterns and dural enhancement. The diagnoses were confirmed by further investigations including histopathology. Post-contrast 3D-T 1 -SPACE and 3D-T 2 -FLAIR images yielded significantly more information than MPRAGE images (p < 0.05 for both SPACE and FLAIR images) in detection of meningeal abnormalities. SPACE images best demonstrated abnormalities in dural and sulcal spaces, whereas FLAIR was useful for basal cisterns enhancement. Both SPACE and FLAIR performed equally well in detection of gyral enhancement. In all 10 patients, where both SPACE and T 2 -FLAIR images failed to demonstrate any abnormality, further analysis was also negative. The 3D-T 1 -SPACE sequence best demonstrated abnormalities in dural and sulcal spaces, whereas FLAIR was useful for abnormalities in basal cisterns. Both SPACE and FLAIR performed holds good for detection of gyral enhancement. Post-contrast SPACE and FLAIR sequences are superior to the MPRAGE sequence for evaluation of meningeal abnormalities and when used in combination have the maximum sensitivity for leptomeningeal abnormalities. The negative-predictive value is nearly 100%, where no leptomeningeal abnormality was detected on these sequences. Advances in knowledge: Post-contrast 3D-T 1 -SPACE and 3D-T 2 -FLAIR images are more useful than 3D-T 1 -MPRAGE images in evaluation of meningeal abnormalities.

  5. Automatic needle segmentation in 3D ultrasound images using 3D improved Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua; Qiu, Wu; Ding, Mingyue; Zhang, Songgen

    2008-03-01

    3D ultrasound (US) is a new technology that can be used for a variety of diagnostic applications, such as obstetrical, vascular, and urological imaging, and has been explored greatly potential in the applications of image-guided surgery and therapy. Uterine adenoma and uterine bleeding are the two most prevalent diseases in Chinese woman, and a minimally invasive ablation system using a needle-like RF button electrode is widely used to destroy tumor cells or stop bleeding. To avoid accidents or death of the patient by inaccurate localizations of the electrode and the tumor position during treatment, 3D US guidance system was developed. In this paper, a new automated technique, the 3D Improved Hough Transform (3DIHT) algorithm, which is potentially fast, accurate, and robust to provide needle segmentation in 3D US image for use of 3D US imaging guidance, was presented. Based on the coarse-fine search strategy and a four parameter representation of lines in 3D space, 3DIHT algorithm can segment needles quickly, accurately and robustly. The technique was evaluated using the 3D US images acquired by scanning a water phantom. The segmentation position deviation of the line was less than 2mm and angular deviation was much less than 2°. The average computational time measured on a Pentium IV 2.80GHz PC computer with a 381×381×250 image was less than 2s.

  6. Strategy for D/He-3 fusion development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santarius, John F.

    1988-01-01

    It is concluded that Deuterium/Helium-3 fusion faces a more difficult physics development path but an easier technology development path than does Deuterium/Tritium. Early D/He-3 tests in next generation D/T fusion experiments might provide a valuable D/He-3 proof-of-principle at modest cost. At least one high leverage alternate concept should be vigorously pursued. Space applications of D/He-3 fusion are critically important to large scale development.

  7. Electrical Characterization of 3D Au Microelectrodes for Use in Retinal Prostheses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmin; Ahn, Jae Hyun; Seo, Jong-Mo; Chung, Hum; Cho, Dong-Il Dan

    2015-06-17

    In order to provide high-quality visual information to patients who have implanted retinal prosthetic devices, the number of microelectrodes should be large. As the number of microelectrodes is increased, the dimensions of each microelectrode must be decreased, which in turn results in an increased microelectrode interface impedance and decreased injection current dynamic range. In order to improve the trade-off envelope between the number of microelectrodes and the current injection characteristics, a 3D microelectrode structure can be used as an alternative. In this paper, the electrical characteristics of 2D and 3D Au microelectrodes were investigated. In order to examine the effects of the structural difference, 2D and 3D Au microelectrodes with different base areas but similar effective surface areas were fabricated and evaluated. Interface impedances were measured and similar dynamic ranges were obtained for both 2D and 3D Au microelectrodes. These results indicate that more electrodes can be implemented in the same area if 3D designs are used. Furthermore, the 3D Au microelectrodes showed substantially enhanced electrical durability characteristics against over-injected stimulation currents, withstanding electrical currents that are much larger than the limit measured for 2D microelectrodes of similar area. This enhanced electrical durability property of 3D Au microelectrodes is a new finding in microelectrode research, and makes 3D microelectrodes very desirable devices.

  8. 3D+time acquisitions of 3D cell culture by means of lens-free tomographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdeu, Anthony; Laperrousaz, Bastien; Bordy, Thomas; Morales, S.; Gidrol, Xavier; Picollet-D'hahan, Nathalie; Allier, Cédric

    2018-02-01

    We propose a three-dimensional (3D) imaging platform based on lens-free microscopy to perform multi-angle acquisitions on 3D cell cultures embedded in extracellular matrix (ECM). We developed algorithms based on the Fourier diffraction theorem to perform fully 3D reconstructions of biological samples and we adapted the lens-free microscope to incubator conditions. Here we demonstrate for the first time, 3D+time lens-free acquisitions of 3D cell culture over 8 days directly into the incubator. The 3D reconstructed volume is as large as 5 mm3 and provides a unique way to observe in the same 3D cell culture experiment multiple cell migration strategies. Namely, in a 3D cell culture of prostate epithelial cells embedded within a Matrigel® matrix, we are able to distinguish single cell 'leaders', migration of cell clusters, migration of large aggregates of cells, and also close-gap and large-scale branching. In addition, we observe long-scale 3D deformations of the ECM that modify the geometry of the 3D cell culture. Interestingly, we also observed the opposite, i.e. we found that large aggregates of cells may deform the ECM by generating traction forces over very long distances. In sum we put forward a novel 3D lens-free microscopy tomographic technique to study the single and collective cell migrations, the cell-to-cell interactions and the cell-to-matrix interactions.

  9. Developing 3D SEM in a broad biological context

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, A; Lippens, S; Bartunkova, S; Asselbergh, B; Blanpain, C; Fendrych, M; Goossens, A; Holt, M; Janssens, S; Krols, M; Larsimont, J-C; Mc Guire, C; Nowack, MK; Saelens, X; Schertel, A; Schepens, B; Slezak, M; Timmerman, V; Theunis, C; Van Brempt, R; Visser, Y; GuÉRin, CJ

    2015-01-01

    When electron microscopy (EM) was introduced in the 1930s it gave scientists their first look into the nanoworld of cells. Over the last 80 years EM has vastly increased our understanding of the complex cellular structures that underlie the diverse functions that cells need to maintain life. One drawback that has been difficult to overcome was the inherent lack of volume information, mainly due to the limit on the thickness of sections that could be viewed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). For many years scientists struggled to achieve three-dimensional (3D) EM using serial section reconstructions, TEM tomography, and scanning EM (SEM) techniques such as freeze-fracture. Although each technique yielded some special information, they required a significant amount of time and specialist expertise to obtain even a very small 3D EM dataset. Almost 20 years ago scientists began to exploit SEMs to image blocks of embedded tissues and perform serial sectioning of these tissues inside the SEM chamber. Using first focused ion beams (FIB) and subsequently robotic ultramicrotomes (serial block-face, SBF-SEM) microscopists were able to collect large volumes of 3D EM information at resolutions that could address many important biological questions, and do so in an efficient manner. We present here some examples of 3D EM taken from the many diverse specimens that have been imaged in our core facility. We propose that the next major step forward will be to efficiently correlate functional information obtained using light microscopy (LM) with 3D EM datasets to more completely investigate the important links between cell structures and their functions. Lay Description Life happens in three dimensions. For many years, first light, and then EM struggled to image the smallest parts of cells in 3D. With recent advances in technology and corresponding improvements in computing, scientists can now see the 3D world of the cell at the nanoscale. In this paper we present the

  10. Basics of Compounding: 3D Printing--Pharmacy Applications: Geometric Shape Effects on 3D Printing.

    PubMed

    Allen, Loyd V

    2017-01-01

    As patient therapy becomes more specialized and individualized, one applicable method of drug delivery is through 3D printing. With 3D printing, pharmacists can provide either immediate or modified drug release of either an individual drug or multiple drugs in a singledosage unit. The release rates can be varied, not only by excipients in the formulation, but also to some extent by the shapes of the finished-drug preparation. Some studies demonstrating these concepts are included in this article, along with their method of compounding using 3D printing. Copyright© by International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding, Inc.

  11. A Case Study in Astronomical 3D Printing: The Mysterious η Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas I.

    2017-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing moves beyond interactive 3D graphics and provides an excellent tool for both visual and tactile learners, since 3D printing can now easily communicate complex geometries and full color information. Some limitations of interactive 3D graphics are also alleviated by 3D printable models, including issues of limited software support, portability, accessibility, and sustainability. We describe the motivations, methods, and results of our work on using 3D printing (1) to visualize and understand the η Car Homunculus nebula and central binary system and (2) for astronomy outreach and education, specifically, with visually impaired students. One new result we present is the ability to 3D print full-color models of η Car’s colliding stellar winds. We also demonstrate how 3D printing has helped us communicate our improved understanding of the detailed structure of η Car’s Homunculus nebula and central binary colliding stellar winds, and their links to each other. Attached to this article are full-color 3D printable files of both a red-blue Homunculus model and the η Car colliding stellar winds at orbital phase 1.045. 3D printing could prove to be vital to how astronomer’s reach out and share their work with each other, the public, and new audiences.

  12. The closo-Dodecaborate Dianion Fused with Oxazoles Provides 3D Diboraheterocycles with Selective Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuji; Zhang, Jianglin; Zhang, Yuanbin; Liu, Jiyong; van der Veen, Stijn; Duttwyler, Simon

    2018-05-08

    The synthesis and application of icosahedral boron cluster compounds has been studied extensively since their discovery several decades ago; however, two aspects of their chemistry have received little attention: The possibility to form inorganic/organic fused boraheterocycles and their potential to act as antimicrobial agents. This work comprises the preparation of a class of three-dimensional diborabenzoxazole analogues with the closo-dodecaborate in place of the benzene moiety. The presented synthetic procedures provide access to a wide range of diboraheterocycles under mild conditions. These 3D heterocycles exhibit strong and selective antimicrobial activity against Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a widespread bacterial pathogen that has shown increasing incidences of multi-drug resistance and for which the development of new antimicrobial compounds is urgently needed. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Cognitive Aspects of Collaboration in 3d Virtual Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juřík, V.; Herman, L.; Kubíček, P.; Stachoň, Z.; Šašinka, Č.

    2016-06-01

    Human-computer interaction has entered the 3D era. The most important models representing spatial information — maps — are transferred into 3D versions regarding the specific content to be displayed. Virtual worlds (VW) become promising area of interest because of possibility to dynamically modify content and multi-user cooperation when solving tasks regardless to physical presence. They can be used for sharing and elaborating information via virtual images or avatars. Attractiveness of VWs is emphasized also by possibility to measure operators' actions and complex strategies. Collaboration in 3D environments is the crucial issue in many areas where the visualizations are important for the group cooperation. Within the specific 3D user interface the operators' ability to manipulate the displayed content is explored regarding such phenomena as situation awareness, cognitive workload and human error. For such purpose, the VWs offer a great number of tools for measuring the operators' responses as recording virtual movement or spots of interest in the visual field. Study focuses on the methodological issues of measuring the usability of 3D VWs and comparing them with the existing principles of 2D maps. We explore operators' strategies to reach and interpret information regarding the specific type of visualization and different level of immersion.

  14. e-Drug3D: 3D structure collections dedicated to drug repurposing and fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Pihan, Emilie; Colliandre, Lionel; Guichou, Jean-François; Douguet, Dominique

    2012-06-01

    In the drug discovery field, new uses for old drugs, selective optimization of side activities and fragment-based drug design (FBDD) have proved to be successful alternatives to high-throughput screening. e-Drug3D is a database of 3D chemical structures of drugs that provides several collections of ready-to-screen SD files of drugs and commercial drug fragments. They are natural inputs in studies dedicated to drug repurposing and FBDD. e-Drug3D collections are freely available at http://chemoinfo.ipmc.cnrs.fr/e-drug3d.html either for download or for direct in silico web-based screenings.

  15. Studies of New Fused Benzazepine as Selective Dopamine D3 Receptor Antagonists Using 3D-QSAR, Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Li, Yan; Zhang, Shuwei; Xiao, Zhengtao; Ai, Chunzhi

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, great interest has been paid to the development of compounds with high selectivity for central dopamine (DA) D3 receptors, an interesting therapeutic target in the treatment of different neurological disorders. In the present work, based on a dataset of 110 collected benzazepine (BAZ) DA D3 antagonists with diverse kinds of structures, a variety of in silico modeling approaches, including comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), comparative similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA), homology modeling, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) were carried out to reveal the requisite 3D structural features for activity. Our results show that both the receptor-based (Q2 = 0.603, R2ncv = 0.829, R2pre = 0.690, SEE = 0.316, SEP = 0.406) and ligand-based 3D-QSAR models (Q2 = 0.506, R2ncv =0.838, R2pre = 0.794, SEE = 0.316, SEP = 0.296) are reliable with proper predictive capacity. In addition, a combined analysis between the CoMFA, CoMSIA contour maps and MD results with a homology DA receptor model shows that: (1) ring-A, position-2 and R3 substituent in ring-D are crucial in the design of antagonists with higher activity; (2) more bulky R1 substituents (at position-2 of ring-A) of antagonists may well fit in the binding pocket; (3) hydrophobicity represented by MlogP is important for building satisfactory QSAR models; (4) key amino acids of the binding pocket are CYS101, ILE105, LEU106, VAL151, PHE175, PHE184, PRO254 and ALA251. To our best knowledge, this work is the first report on 3D-QSAR modeling of the new fused BAZs as DA D3 antagonists. These results might provide information for a better understanding of the mechanism of antagonism and thus be helpful in designing new potent DA D3 antagonists. PMID:21541053

  16. Studies of new fused benzazepine as selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonists using 3D-QSAR, molecular docking and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Li, Yan; Zhang, Shuwei; Xiao, Zhengtao; Ai, Chunzhi

    2011-02-18

    In recent years, great interest has been paid to the development of compounds with high selectivity for central dopamine (DA) D3 receptors, an interesting therapeutic target in the treatment of different neurological disorders. In the present work, based on a dataset of 110 collected benzazepine (BAZ) DA D3 antagonists with diverse kinds of structures, a variety of in silico modeling approaches, including comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), comparative similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA), homology modeling, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) were carried out to reveal the requisite 3D structural features for activity. Our results show that both the receptor-based (Q(2) = 0.603, R(2) (ncv) = 0.829, R(2) (pre) = 0.690, SEE = 0.316, SEP = 0.406) and ligand-based 3D-QSAR models (Q(2) = 0.506, R(2) (ncv) =0.838, R(2) (pre) = 0.794, SEE = 0.316, SEP = 0.296) are reliable with proper predictive capacity. In addition, a combined analysis between the CoMFA, CoMSIA contour maps and MD results with a homology DA receptor model shows that: (1) ring-A, position-2 and R(3) substituent in ring-D are crucial in the design of antagonists with higher activity; (2) more bulky R(1) substituents (at position-2 of ring-A) of antagonists may well fit in the binding pocket; (3) hydrophobicity represented by MlogP is important for building satisfactory QSAR models; (4) key amino acids of the binding pocket are CYS101, ILE105, LEU106, VAL151, PHE175, PHE184, PRO254 and ALA251. To our best knowledge, this work is the first report on 3D-QSAR modeling of the new fused BAZs as DA D3 antagonists. These results might provide information for a better understanding of the mechanism of antagonism and thus be helpful in designing new potent DA D3 antagonists.

  17. See-through 3D technology for augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoungho; Lee, Seungjae; Li, Gang; Jang, Changwon; Hong, Jong-Young

    2017-06-01

    Augmented reality is recently attracting a lot of attention as one of the most spotlighted next-generation technologies. In order to get toward realization of ideal augmented reality, we need to integrate 3D virtual information into real world. This integration should not be noticed by users blurring the boundary between the virtual and real worlds. Thus, ultimate device for augmented reality can reconstruct and superimpose 3D virtual information on the real world so that they are not distinguishable, which is referred to as see-through 3D technology. Here, we introduce our previous researches to combine see-through displays and 3D technologies using emerging optical combiners: holographic optical elements and index matched optical elements. Holographic optical elements are volume gratings that have angular and wavelength selectivity. Index matched optical elements are partially reflective elements using a compensation element for index matching. Using these optical combiners, we could implement see-through 3D displays based on typical methodologies including integral imaging, digital holographic displays, multi-layer displays, and retinal projection. Some of these methods are expected to be optimized and customized for head-mounted or wearable displays. We conclude with demonstration and analysis of fundamental researches for head-mounted see-through 3D displays.

  18. 3D X-Ray Luggage-Screening System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) x-ray luggage- screening system has been proposed to reduce the fatigue experienced by human inspectors and increase their ability to detect weapons and other contraband. The system and variants thereof could supplant thousands of xray scanners now in use at hundreds of airports in the United States and other countries. The device would be applicable to any security checkpoint application where current two-dimensional scanners are in use. A conventional x-ray luggage scanner generates a single two-dimensional (2D) image that conveys no depth information. Therefore, a human inspector must scrutinize the image in an effort to understand ambiguous-appearing objects as they pass by at high speed on a conveyor belt. Such a high level of concentration can induce fatigue, causing the inspector to reduce concentration and vigilance. In addition, because of the lack of depth information, contraband objects could be made more difficult to detect by positioning them near other objects so as to create x-ray images that confuse inspectors. The proposed system would make it unnecessary for a human inspector to interpret 2D images, which show objects at different depths as superimposed. Instead, the system would take advantage of the natural human ability to infer 3D information from stereographic or stereoscopic images. The inspector would be able to perceive two objects at different depths, in a more nearly natural manner, as distinct 3D objects lying at different depths. Hence, the inspector could recognize objects with greater accuracy and less effort. The major components of the proposed system would be similar to those of x-ray luggage scanners now in use. As in a conventional x-ray scanner, there would be an x-ray source. Unlike in a conventional scanner, there would be two x-ray image sensors, denoted the left and right sensors, located at positions along the conveyor that are upstream and downstream, respectively (see figure). X-ray illumination

  19. Effects of 2D and 3D Error Fields on the SAS Divertor Magnetic Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisan, G. L.; Lao, L. L.; Strait, E. J.; Guo, H. Y.; Wu, W.; Evans, T. E.

    2016-10-01

    The successful design of plasma-facing components in fusion experiments is of paramount importance in both the operation of future reactors and in the modification of operating machines. Indeed, the Small Angle Slot (SAS) divertor concept, proposed for application on the DIII-D experiment, combines a small incident angle at the plasma strike point with a progressively opening slot, so as to better control heat flux and erosion in high-performance tokamak plasmas. Uncertainty quantification of the error fields expected around the striking point provides additional useful information in both the design and the modeling phases of the new divertor, in part due to the particular geometric requirement of the striking flux surfaces. The presented work involves both 2D and 3D magnetic error field analysis on the SAS strike point carried out using the EFIT code for 2D equilibrium reconstruction, V3POST for vacuum 3D computations and the OMFIT integrated modeling framework for data analysis. An uncertainty in the magnetic probes' signals is found to propagate non-linearly as an uncertainty in the striking point and angle, which can be quantified through statistical analysis to yield robust estimates. Work supported by contracts DE-FG02-95ER54309 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  20. The GB/3D Type Fossils Online Web Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, T.; Howe, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    Fossils are the remains of once-living organisms that existed and played out their lives in 3-dimensional environments. The information content provided by a 3d representation of a fossil is much greater than that provided by a traditional photograph, and can grab the attention and imagination of the younger and older general public alike. The British Geological Survey has been leading a consortium of UK natural history museums including the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, the Sedgwick Museum Cambridge, the National Museum of Wales Cardiff, and a number of smaller regional British museums to construct a web portal giving access to metadata, high resolution images and interactive 3d models of type fossils from the UK. The web portal at www.3d-fossils.ac.uk was officially launched in August 2013. It can be used to discover metadata describing the provenance, taxonomy, and stratigraphy of the specimens. Zoom-able high resolution digital photographs are available, including for many specimens ';anaglyph' stereo images that can be viewed in 3d using red-cyan stereo spectacles. For many of the specimens interactive 3d models were generated by scanning with portable ';NextEngine 3D HD' 3d scanners. These models can be downloaded in zipped .OBJ and .PLY format from the web portal, or may be viewed and manipulated directly in certain web browsers. The images and scans may be freely downloaded subject to a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike Non-Commercial license. There is a simple application programming interface (API) allowing metadata to be downloaded, with links to the images and models, in a standardised format for use in data mash-ups and third party applications. The web portal also hosts ';open educational resources' explaining the process of fossilization and the importance of type specimens in taxonomy, as well as providing introductions to the most important fossil groups. We have experimented with using a 3d printer to create replicas of the

  1. Software architecture as a freedom for 3D content providers and users along with independency on purposes and used devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Razia; Christ, Andreas; Meyrueis, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The improvements in the hardware and software of communication devices have allowed running Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) applications on those. Nowadays, it is possible to overlay synthetic information on real images, or even to play 3D on-line games on smart phones or some other mobile devices. Hence the use of 3D data for business and specially for education purposes is ubiquitous. Due to always available at hand and always ready to use properties of mobile phones, those are considered as most potential communication devices. The total numbers of mobile phone users are increasing all over the world every day and that makes mobile phones the most suitable device to reach a huge number of end clients either for education or for business purposes. There are different standards, protocols and specifications to establish the communication among different communication devices but there is no initiative taken so far to make it sure that the send data through this communication process will be understood and used by the destination device. Since all the devices are not able to deal with all kind of 3D data formats and it is also not realistic to have different version of the same data to make it compatible with the destination device, it is necessary to have a prevalent solution. The proposed architecture in this paper describes a device and purpose independent 3D data visibility any time anywhere to the right person in suitable format. There is no solution without limitation. The architecture is implemented in a prototype to make an experimental validation of the architecture which also shows the difference between theory and practice.

  2. 3D fingerprint imaging system based on full-field fringe projection profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shujun; Zhang, Zonghua; Zhao, Yan; Dai, Jie; Chen, Chao; Xu, Yongjia; Zhang, E.; Xie, Lili

    2014-01-01

    As an unique, unchangeable and easily acquired biometrics, fingerprint has been widely studied in academics and applied in many fields over the years. The traditional fingerprint recognition methods are based on the obtained 2D feature of fingerprint. However, fingerprint is a 3D biological characteristic. The mapping from 3D to 2D loses 1D information and causes nonlinear distortion of the captured fingerprint. Therefore, it is becoming more and more important to obtain 3D fingerprint information for recognition. In this paper, a novel 3D fingerprint imaging system is presented based on fringe projection technique to obtain 3D features and the corresponding color texture information. A series of color sinusoidal fringe patterns with optimum three-fringe numbers are projected onto a finger surface. From another viewpoint, the fringe patterns are deformed by the finger surface and captured by a CCD camera. 3D shape data of the finger can be obtained from the captured fringe pattern images. This paper studies the prototype of the 3D fingerprint imaging system, including principle of 3D fingerprint acquisition, hardware design of the 3D imaging system, 3D calibration of the system, and software development. Some experiments are carried out by acquiring several 3D fingerprint data. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed 3D fingerprint imaging system.

  3. Smooth 2D manifold extraction from 3D image stack

    PubMed Central

    Shihavuddin, Asm; Basu, Sreetama; Rexhepaj, Elton; Delestro, Felipe; Menezes, Nikita; Sigoillot, Séverine M; Del Nery, Elaine; Selimi, Fekrije; Spassky, Nathalie; Genovesio, Auguste

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional fluorescence microscopy followed by image processing is routinely used to study biological objects at various scales such as cells and tissue. However, maximum intensity projection, the most broadly used rendering tool, extracts a discontinuous layer of voxels, obliviously creating important artifacts and possibly misleading interpretation. Here we propose smooth manifold extraction, an algorithm that produces a continuous focused 2D extraction from a 3D volume, hence preserving local spatial relationships. We demonstrate the usefulness of our approach by applying it to various biological applications using confocal and wide-field microscopy 3D image stacks. We provide a parameter-free ImageJ/Fiji plugin that allows 2D visualization and interpretation of 3D image stacks with maximum accuracy. PMID:28561033

  4. Direct 3D Printing of Catalytically Active Structures

    DOE PAGES

    Manzano, J. Sebastian; Weinstein, Zachary B.; Sadow, Aaron D.; ...

    2017-09-22

    3D printing of materials with active functional groups can provide custom-designed structures that promote chemical conversions. Catalytically active architectures were produced by photopolymerizing bifunctional molecules using a commercial stereolithographic 3D printer. Functionalities in the monomers included a polymerizable vinyl group to assemble the 3D structures and a secondary group to provide them with active sites. The 3D-printed architectures containing accessible carboxylic acid, amine, and copper carboxylate functionalities were catalytically active for the Mannich, aldol, and Huisgen cycloaddition reactions, respectively. The functional groups in the 3D-printed structures were also amenable to post-printing chemical modification. And as proof of principle, chemically activemore » cuvette adaptors were 3D printed and used to measure in situ the kinetics of a heterogeneously catalyzed Mannich reaction in a conventional solution spectrophotometer. In addition, 3D-printed millifluidic devices with catalytically active copper carboxylate complexes were used to promote azide-alkyne cycloaddition under flow conditions. The importance of controlling the 3D architecture of the millifluidic devices was evidenced by enhancing reaction conversion upon increasing the complexity of the 3D prints.« less

  5. Direct 3D Printing of Catalytically Active Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Manzano, J. Sebastian; Weinstein, Zachary B.; Sadow, Aaron D.

    3D printing of materials with active functional groups can provide custom-designed structures that promote chemical conversions. Catalytically active architectures were produced by photopolymerizing bifunctional molecules using a commercial stereolithographic 3D printer. Functionalities in the monomers included a polymerizable vinyl group to assemble the 3D structures and a secondary group to provide them with active sites. The 3D-printed architectures containing accessible carboxylic acid, amine, and copper carboxylate functionalities were catalytically active for the Mannich, aldol, and Huisgen cycloaddition reactions, respectively. The functional groups in the 3D-printed structures were also amenable to post-printing chemical modification. And as proof of principle, chemically activemore » cuvette adaptors were 3D printed and used to measure in situ the kinetics of a heterogeneously catalyzed Mannich reaction in a conventional solution spectrophotometer. In addition, 3D-printed millifluidic devices with catalytically active copper carboxylate complexes were used to promote azide-alkyne cycloaddition under flow conditions. The importance of controlling the 3D architecture of the millifluidic devices was evidenced by enhancing reaction conversion upon increasing the complexity of the 3D prints.« less

  6. JAtlasView: a Java atlas-viewer for browsing biomedical 3D images and atlases.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guangjie; Burton, Nick; Hill, Bill; Davidson, Duncan; Kerwin, Janet; Scott, Mark; Lindsay, Susan; Baldock, Richard

    2005-03-09

    Many three-dimensional (3D) images are routinely collected in biomedical research and a number of digital atlases with associated anatomical and other information have been published. A number of tools are available for viewing this data ranging from commercial visualization packages to freely available, typically system architecture dependent, solutions. Here we discuss an atlas viewer implemented to run on any workstation using the architecture neutral Java programming language. We report the development of a freely available Java based viewer for 3D image data, descibe the structure and functionality of the viewer and how automated tools can be developed to manage the Java Native Interface code. The viewer allows arbitrary re-sectioning of the data and interactive browsing through the volume. With appropriately formatted data, for example as provided for the Electronic Atlas of the Developing Human Brain, a 3D surface view and anatomical browsing is available. The interface is developed in Java with Java3D providing the 3D rendering. For efficiency the image data is manipulated using the Woolz image-processing library provided as a dynamically linked module for each machine architecture. We conclude that Java provides an appropriate environment for efficient development of these tools and techniques exist to allow computationally efficient image-processing libraries to be integrated relatively easily.

  7. Fast multi-core based multimodal registration of 2D cross-sections and 3D datasets.

    PubMed

    Scharfe, Michael; Pielot, Rainer; Schreiber, Falk

    2010-01-11

    Solving bioinformatics tasks often requires extensive computational power. Recent trends in processor architecture combine multiple cores into a single chip to improve overall performance. The Cell Broadband Engine (CBE), a heterogeneous multi-core processor, provides power-efficient and cost-effective high-performance computing. One application area is image analysis and visualisation, in particular registration of 2D cross-sections into 3D image datasets. Such techniques can be used to put different image modalities into spatial correspondence, for example, 2D images of histological cuts into morphological 3D frameworks. We evaluate the CBE-driven PlayStation 3 as a high performance, cost-effective computing platform by adapting a multimodal alignment procedure to several characteristic hardware properties. The optimisations are based on partitioning, vectorisation, branch reducing and loop unrolling techniques with special attention to 32-bit multiplies and limited local storage on the computing units. We show how a typical image analysis and visualisation problem, the multimodal registration of 2D cross-sections and 3D datasets, benefits from the multi-core based implementation of the alignment algorithm. We discuss several CBE-based optimisation methods and compare our results to standard solutions. More information and the source code are available from http://cbe.ipk-gatersleben.de. The results demonstrate that the CBE processor in a PlayStation 3 accelerates computational intensive multimodal registration, which is of great importance in biological/medical image processing. The PlayStation 3 as a low cost CBE-based platform offers an efficient option to conventional hardware to solve computational problems in image processing and bioinformatics.

  8. Development of 3D Atlas of Metalworking Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevgenyevna Maslennikova, Olga; Borisovna Nazarova, Olga; Aleksandrovna Chudinova, Yulia

    2018-05-01

    The paper is dedicated to solving the problem of developing innovative educational systems able to train personnel of complex and dangerous manufacturing industries (such as in metallurgy) to control the process not only under regular conditions, but in emergency and pre-emergency situations as well. At that, such educational systems shall transform training of future and current engineers into a professional activity, model both subject matter and social content of their professional labor. Key characteristics of a 3D atlas of equipment as an educational system are given, as it provides immersion of trainees into professional environment. Requirements for such systems are defined (functional, information, software and technical). Stages of development of a 3D atlas of equipment as an automated system are given, allowing one to get closer to yet another problem that of IT specialist training so that they are able to design, implement and deploy such systems.

  9. A 3D Scan Model and Thermal Image Data Fusion Algorithms for 3D Thermography in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Klima, Ondrej

    2017-01-01

    Objectives At present, medical thermal imaging is still considered a mere qualitative tool enabling us to distinguish between but lacking the ability to quantify the physiological and nonphysiological states of the body. Such a capability would, however, facilitate solving the problem of medical quantification, whose presence currently manifests itself within the entire healthcare system. Methods A generally applicable method to enhance captured 3D spatial data carrying temperature-related information is presented; in this context, all equations required for other data fusions are derived. The method can be utilized for high-density point clouds or detailed meshes at a high resolution but is conveniently usable in large objects with sparse points. Results The benefits of the approach are experimentally demonstrated on 3D thermal scans of injured subjects. We obtained diagnostic information inaccessible via traditional methods. Conclusion Using a 3D model and thermal image data fusion allows the quantification of inflammation, facilitating more precise injury and illness diagnostics or monitoring. The technique offers a wide application potential in medicine and multiple technological domains, including electrical and mechanical engineering. PMID:29250306

  10. SU-D-201-05: On the Automatic Recognition of Patient Safety Hazards in a Radiotherapy Setup Using a Novel 3D Camera System and a Deep Learning Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Santhanam, A; Min, Y; Beron, P

    Purpose: Patient safety hazards such as a wrong patient/site getting treated can lead to catastrophic results. The purpose of this project is to automatically detect potential patient safety hazards during the radiotherapy setup and alert the therapist before the treatment is initiated. Methods: We employed a set of co-located and co-registered 3D cameras placed inside the treatment room. Each camera provided a point-cloud of fraxels (fragment pixels with 3D depth information). Each of the cameras were calibrated using a custom-built calibration target to provide 3D information with less than 2 mm error in the 500 mm neighborhood around the isocenter.more » To identify potential patient safety hazards, the treatment room components and the patient’s body needed to be identified and tracked in real-time. For feature recognition purposes, we used a graph-cut based feature recognition with principal component analysis (PCA) based feature-to-object correlation to segment the objects in real-time. Changes in the object’s position were tracked using the CamShift algorithm. The 3D object information was then stored for each classified object (e.g. gantry, couch). A deep learning framework was then used to analyze all the classified objects in both 2D and 3D and was then used to fine-tune a convolutional network for object recognition. The number of network layers were optimized to identify the tracked objects with >95% accuracy. Results: Our systematic analyses showed that, the system was effectively able to recognize wrong patient setups and wrong patient accessories. The combined usage of 2D camera information (color + depth) enabled a topology-preserving approach to verify patient safety hazards in an automatic manner and even in scenarios where the depth information is partially available. Conclusion: By utilizing the 3D cameras inside the treatment room and a deep learning based image classification, potential patient safety hazards can be effectively avoided.« less

  11. 3D imaging, 3D printing and 3D virtual planning in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pratik; Chong, B S

    2018-03-01

    The adoption and adaptation of recent advances in digital technology, such as three-dimensional (3D) printed objects and haptic simulators, in dentistry have influenced teaching and/or management of cases involving implant, craniofacial, maxillofacial, orthognathic and periodontal treatments. 3D printed models and guides may help operators plan and tackle complicated non-surgical and surgical endodontic treatment and may aid skill acquisition. Haptic simulators may assist in the development of competency in endodontic procedures through the acquisition of psycho-motor skills. This review explores and discusses the potential applications of 3D printed models and guides, and haptic simulators in the teaching and management of endodontic procedures. An understanding of the pertinent technology related to the production of 3D printed objects and the operation of haptic simulators are also presented.

  12. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  13. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; ...

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  14. Feasibility study on 3D image reconstruction from 2D orthogonal cine-MRI for MRI-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, Chiara; Lee, Danny; Kipritidis, John; Whelan, Brendan; Greer, Peter B; Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco; Keall, Paul

    2018-02-11

    In-room MRI is a promising image guidance strategy in external beam radiotherapy to acquire volumetric information for moving targets. However, limitations in spatio-temporal resolution led several authors to use 2D orthogonal images for guidance. The aim of this work is to present a method to concurrently compensate for non-rigid tumour motion and provide an approach for 3D reconstruction from 2D orthogonal cine-MRI slices for MRI-guided treatments. Free-breathing sagittal/coronal interleaved 2D cine-MRI were acquired in addition to a pre-treatment 3D volume in two patients. We performed deformable image registration (DIR) between cine-MRI slices and corresponding slices in the pre-treatment 3D volume. Based on an extrapolation of the interleaved 2D motion fields, the 3D motion field was estimated and used to warp the pre-treatment volume. Due to the lack of a ground truth for patients, the method was validated on a digital 4D lung phantom. On the phantom, the 3D reconstruction method was able to compensate for tumour motion and compared favourably to the results of previously adopted strategies. The difference in the 3D motion fields between the phantom and the extrapolated motion was 0.4 ± 0.3 mm for tumour and 0.8 ± 1.5 mm for whole anatomy, demonstrating feasibility of performing a 3D volumetric reconstruction directly from 2D orthogonal cine-MRI slices. Application of the method to patient data confirmed the feasibility of utilizing this method in real world scenarios. Preliminary results on phantom and patient cases confirm the feasibility of the proposed approach in an MRI-guided scenario, especially for non-rigid tumour motion compensation. © 2018 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  15. Porosity, permeability and 3D fracture network characterisation of dolomite reservoir rock samples

    PubMed Central

    Voorn, Maarten; Exner, Ulrike; Barnhoorn, Auke; Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    With fractured rocks making up an important part of hydrocarbon reservoirs worldwide, detailed analysis of fractures and fracture networks is essential. However, common analyses on drill core and plug samples taken from such reservoirs (including hand specimen analysis, thin section analysis and laboratory porosity and permeability determination) however suffer from various problems, such as having a limited resolution, providing only 2D and no internal structure information, being destructive on the samples and/or not being representative for full fracture networks. In this paper, we therefore explore the use of an additional method – non-destructive 3D X-ray micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) – to obtain more information on such fractured samples. Seven plug-sized samples were selected from narrowly fractured rocks of the Hauptdolomit formation, taken from wellbores in the Vienna basin, Austria. These samples span a range of different fault rocks in a fault zone interpretation, from damage zone to fault core. We process the 3D μCT data in this study by a Hessian-based fracture filtering routine and can successfully extract porosity, fracture aperture, fracture density and fracture orientations – in bulk as well as locally. Additionally, thin sections made from selected plug samples provide 2D information with a much higher detail than the μCT data. Finally, gas- and water permeability measurements under confining pressure provide an important link (at least in order of magnitude) towards more realistic reservoir conditions. This study shows that 3D μCT can be applied efficiently on plug-sized samples of naturally fractured rocks, and that although there are limitations, several important parameters can be extracted. μCT can therefore be a useful addition to studies on such reservoir rocks, and provide valuable input for modelling and simulations. Also permeability experiments under confining pressure provide important additional insights. Combining these

  16. 3D Printing the Complete CubeSat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kief, Craig

    2015-01-01

    The 3D Printing the Complete CubeSat project is designed to advance the state-of-the-art in 3D printing for CubeSat applications. Printing in 3D has the potential to increase reliability, reduce design iteration time and provide greater design flexibility in the areas of radiation mitigation, communications, propulsion, and wiring, among others. This project is investigating the possibility of including propulsion systems into the design of printed CubeSat components. One such concept, an embedded micro pulsed plasma thruster (mPPT), could provide auxiliary reaction control propulsion for a spacecraft as a means to desaturate momentum wheels.

  17. Web based 3-D medical image visualization on the PC.

    PubMed

    Kim, N; Lee, D H; Kim, J H; Kim, Y; Cho, H J

    1998-01-01

    With the recent advance of Web and its associated technologies, information sharing on distribute computing environments has gained a great amount of attention from many researchers in many application areas, such as medicine, engineering, and business. One basic requirement of distributed medical consultation systems is that geographically dispersed, disparate participants are allowed to exchange information readily with each other. Such software also needs to be supported on a broad range of computer platforms to increase the softwares accessibility. In this paper, the development of world-wide-web based medical consultation system for radiology imaging is addressed to provide platform independence and greater accessibility. The system supports sharing of 3-dimensional objects. We use VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language), which is the defacto standard in 3-D modeling on the Web. 3-D objects are reconstructed from CT or MRI volume data using a VRML format, which can be viewed and manipulated easily in Web-browsers with a VRML plug-in. A Marching cubes method is used in the transformation of scanned volume data sets to polygonal surfaces of VRML. A decimation algorithm is adopted to reduce the number of meshes in the resulting VRML file. 3-D volume data are often very large in size, hence loading the data on PC level computers requires a significant reduction of the size of the data, while minimizing the loss of the original shape information. This is also important to decrease network delays. A prototype system has been implemented (http://cybernet5.snu.ac.kr/-cyber/mrivrml .html), and several sessions of experiments are carried out.

  18. Radiometric and geometric evaluation of GeoEye-1, WorldView-2 and Pléiades-1A stereo images for 3D information extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, D.; Remondino, F.; Angiuli, E.; Agugiaro, G.

    2015-02-01

    Today the use of spaceborne Very High Resolution (VHR) optical sensors for automatic 3D information extraction is increasing in the scientific and civil communities. The 3D Optical Metrology (3DOM) unit of the Bruno Kessler Foundation (FBK) in Trento (Italy) has collected VHR satellite imagery, as well as aerial and terrestrial data over Trento for creating a complete testfield for investigations on image radiometry, geometric accuracy, automatic digital surface model (DSM) generation, 2D/3D feature extraction, city modelling and data fusion. This paper addresses the radiometric and the geometric aspects of the VHR spaceborne imagery included in the Trento testfield and their potential for 3D information extraction. The dataset consist of two stereo-pairs acquired by WorldView-2 and by GeoEye-1 in panchromatic and multispectral mode, and a triplet from Pléiades-1A. For reference and validation, a DSM from airborne LiDAR acquisition is used. The paper gives details on the project, dataset characteristics and achieved results.

  19. A 3d-3d appetizer

    DOE PAGES

    Pei, Du; Ye, Ke

    2016-11-02

    Here, we test the 3d-3d correspondence for theories that are labeled by Lens spaces. We find a full agreement between the index of the 3d N=2 “Lens space theory” T [L(p, 1)] and the partition function of complex Chern-Simons theory on L(p, 1). In particular, for p = 1, we show how the familiar S 3 partition function of Chern-Simons theory arises from the index of a free theory. For large p, we find that the index of T[L(p, 1)] becomes a constant independent of p. In addition, we study T[L(p, 1)] on the squashed three-sphere S b 3. Thismore » enables us to see clearly, at the level of partition function, to what extent G C complex Chern-Simons theory can be thought of as two copies of Chern-Simons theory with compact gauge group G.« less

  20. 48 CFR 3.908-8 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Classified information. 3... Employees 3.908-8 Classified information. 41 U.S.C. 4712 does not provide any right to disclose classified information not otherwise provided by law. [78 FR 60171, Sept. 30, 2013] ...

  1. Development of Mobile Mapping System for 3D Road Asset Inventory.

    PubMed

    Sairam, Nivedita; Nagarajan, Sudhagar; Ornitz, Scott

    2016-03-12

    Asset Management is an important component of an infrastructure project. A significant cost is involved in maintaining and updating the asset information. Data collection is the most time-consuming task in the development of an asset management system. In order to reduce the time and cost involved in data collection, this paper proposes a low cost Mobile Mapping System using an equipped laser scanner and cameras. First, the feasibility of low cost sensors for 3D asset inventory is discussed by deriving appropriate sensor models. Then, through calibration procedures, respective alignments of the laser scanner, cameras, Inertial Measurement Unit and GPS (Global Positioning System) antenna are determined. The efficiency of this Mobile Mapping System is experimented by mounting it on a truck and golf cart. By using derived sensor models, geo-referenced images and 3D point clouds are derived. After validating the quality of the derived data, the paper provides a framework to extract road assets both automatically and manually using techniques implementing RANSAC plane fitting and edge extraction algorithms. Then the scope of such extraction techniques along with a sample GIS (Geographic Information System) database structure for unified 3D asset inventory are discussed.

  2. Development of Mobile Mapping System for 3D Road Asset Inventory

    PubMed Central

    Sairam, Nivedita; Nagarajan, Sudhagar; Ornitz, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Asset Management is an important component of an infrastructure project. A significant cost is involved in maintaining and updating the asset information. Data collection is the most time-consuming task in the development of an asset management system. In order to reduce the time and cost involved in data collection, this paper proposes a low cost Mobile Mapping System using an equipped laser scanner and cameras. First, the feasibility of low cost sensors for 3D asset inventory is discussed by deriving appropriate sensor models. Then, through calibration procedures, respective alignments of the laser scanner, cameras, Inertial Measurement Unit and GPS (Global Positioning System) antenna are determined. The efficiency of this Mobile Mapping System is experimented by mounting it on a truck and golf cart. By using derived sensor models, geo-referenced images and 3D point clouds are derived. After validating the quality of the derived data, the paper provides a framework to extract road assets both automatically and manually using techniques implementing RANSAC plane fitting and edge extraction algorithms. Then the scope of such extraction techniques along with a sample GIS (Geographic Information System) database structure for unified 3D asset inventory are discussed. PMID:26985897

  3. Using a 3D CAD plant model to simplify process hazard reviews

    SciTech Connect

    Tolpa, G.

    A Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) review is a formal predictive procedure used to identify potential hazard and operability problems associated with certain processes and facilities. The HAZOP procedure takes place several times during the life cycle of the facility. Replacing plastic models, layout and detail drawings with a 3D CAD electronic model, provides access to process safety information and a detailed level of plant topology that approaches the visualization capability of the imagination. This paper describes the process that is used for adding the use of a 3D CAD model to flowsheets and proven computer programs for the conduct ofmore » hazard and operability reviews. Using flowsheets and study nodes as a road map for the review the need for layout and other detail drawings is all but eliminated. Using the 3D CAD model again for a post-P and ID HAZOP supports conformance to layout and safety requirements, provides superior visualization of the plant configuration and preserves the owners equity in the design. The response from the review teams are overwhelmingly in favor of this type of review over a review that uses only drawings. Over the long term the plant model serves more than just process hazards analysis. Ongoing use of the model can satisfy the required access to process safety information, OHSA documentation and other legal requirements. In this paper extensive instructions address the logic for the process hazards analysis and the preparation required to assist anyone who wishes to add the use of a 3D model to their review.« less

  4. Integration of Jeddah Historical BIM and 3D GIS for Documentation and Restoration of Historical Monument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, A.; Yaagoubi, R.; Boehm, J.

    2015-08-01

    This work outlines a new approach for the integration of 3D Building Information Modelling and the 3D Geographic Information System (GIS) to provide semantically rich models, and to get the benefits from both systems to help document and analyse cultural heritage sites. Our proposed framework is based on the Jeddah Historical Building Information Modelling process (JHBIM). This JHBIM consists of a Hijazi Architectural Objects Library (HAOL) that supports higher level of details (LoD) while decreasing the time of modelling. The Hijazi Architectural Objects Library has been modelled based on the Islamic historical manuscripts and Hijazi architectural pattern books. Moreover, the HAOL is implemented using BIM software called Autodesk Revit. However, it is known that this BIM environment still has some limitations with the non-standard architectural objects. Hence, we propose to integrate the developed 3D JHBIM with 3D GIS for more advanced analysis. To do so, the JHBIM database is exported and semantically enriched with non-architectural information that is necessary for restoration and preservation of historical monuments. After that, this database is integrated with the 3D Model in the 3D GIS solution. At the end of this paper, we'll illustrate our proposed framework by applying it to a Historical Building called Nasif Historical House in Jeddah. First of all, this building is scanned by the use of a Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) and Close Range Photogrammetry. Then, the 3D JHBIM based on the HOAL is designed on Revit Platform. Finally, this model is integrated to a 3D GIS solution through Autodesk InfraWorks. The shown analysis presented in this research highlights the importance of such integration especially for operational decisions and sharing the historical knowledge about Jeddah Historical City. Furthermore, one of the historical buildings in Old Jeddah, Nasif Historical House, was chosen as a test case for the project.

  5. 47 CFR 64.707 - Public dissemination of information by providers of operator services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public dissemination of information by providers of operator services. 64.707 Section 64.707 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION... § 64.707 Public dissemination of information by providers of op