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Sample records for provisional restoration materials

  1. Role of provisional restorations in endodontic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Jambai Sampathkumar; Suresh Kumar, Beri Narasimiah; Shyamala, Palaniyandi Vadivel

    2013-01-01

    Root-canal treatment can be carried out in single visit in vital, non-infected teeth, eliminating the need for dressing and provisionalization. Many clinical cases with infected canals require dressing with antibacterial medicaments in a multivisit treatment in which effective provisionalization for different periods of time becomes mandatory. Successful root-canal treatment requires effective mechanical and chemical debridement, elimination of bacteria and pulp tissue remnants and proper canal shaping to facilitate effective obturation. Lack of satisfactory temporary restorations during endodontic therapy ranked second amongst the contributing factors in continuing pain after the commencement of treatment. This review aims to provide an overview of the materials used for provisionalization during and immediately after endodontic treatment. PMID:23946564

  2. An in-vitro study to compare the temperature rise in the pulp chamber by direct method using three different provisional restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Piplani, Ankita; Suresh Sajjan, M. C.; Ramaraju, A. V.; Tanwani, Tushar; Sushma, G.; Ganathipathi, G.; Jagdish, K.; Agrawal, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Statement of Problem: The provisional restorative materials in fixed prosthodontics are basically bis-GMA resins which releases exothermic temperature while polymerization which can damage the pulp. Intrapulpal temperature exceeding 42.5°C found to result in irreversible damage to the pulp. The remaining thickness of dentine after tooth preparation control the conduction of heat released by the resins. Purpose: (1) To quantify the temperature changes in the pulp chamber using different provisional restorative materials. (2) To evaluate the peak temperature time of different materials used. (3) To compare the intrapulpal temperature changes with a variation in the width of the finish line. Methodology: Two intact mandibular molars were selected and designated as Specimen A and B. Tooth preparation was done to prepare a finish line of 1.2 mm and 1 mm width, respectively. Three provisional restorative materials were considered and they were grouped as Group I-Cool temp, Group II-Protemp-4, Group III-Integrity. A J thermocouple probe was placed into the pulp chamber to determine the rise in temperature. The temperature was recorded during polymerization at 30-s intervals until the peak temperature was reached. The same procedure was repeated for fabricating remaining provisional crowns. A total of 45 provisional crowns were fabricated for each specimen. Results: Kruskal–Wallis test revealed that there was a significant difference in the temperature changes associated with the provisional restorative materials used. All the three provisional restorative materials were compared for 1.2 mm and 1 mm wide finish line. Integrity produced the highest temperature rise and the maximum temperature recorded was 40.2°C in 1.2 mm wide finish line. However, for a 1 mm wide finish line, Protemp-4 produced the highest temperature rise and the maximum temperature recorded was 40.3°C. It was observed that peak temperatures with Specimen B were more when compared with Specimen A

  3. Evaluation of surface finish and polish of eight provisional restorative materials using acrylic bur and abrasive disk with and without pumice.

    PubMed

    Maalhagh-Fard, Ahmad; Wagner, Warren C; Pink, Frank E; Neme, Ann Marie

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of two finishing techniques and pumice polishing on the surface roughness of eight different provisional materials. Provisional materials included polymethylmethacrylate-based Alike, Snap, Trim and Jetand composite-based provisional materials Temphase, Protemp 3 Garant, Luxatemp and Integrity. Baseline surface roughness was measured by a profilometer, then the provisional materials were finished using extra fine acrylic burs or medium abrasive disks. The surface roughness of each sample was measured following finishing using a profilometer as previously stated. Each surface was then polished with pumice and the surface roughness was measured again. The data were analyzed using repeated measures of ANOVA and Bonferroni pairwise comparisons (alpha = 0.05). The results indicated that with composite provisional materials, the unfinished surfaces are smoother than with bur or abrasive-disk finished surfaces. Pumice application did not smooth the surface finish for all materials. The different types of provisional materials required different finishing techniques to produce the smoothest finishes.

  4. Surface integrity of provisional resin materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouelatta, O. B.; El-Bediwi, A.; Sakrana, A.; Jiang, X. Q.; Blunt, L.

    2006-03-01

    Provisional resin materials are widely used in prosthetic dentistry and play an important role in the success of restorative treatment. Therefore, these materials must meet the requirements of preserving surface integrity during the treatment process. This study was done to evaluate surface roughness and microhardness of two provisional resin materials after 37 °C water storage. Two rectangular samples 21 mm × 11 mm × 3 mm, one bis-acrylic (bis-acrylic-Protemp II) and one polyethyl methacrylate (Trim®-PEMA) were fabricated as examples of provisional materials (n = 5 per material). The specimens were stored in 37 °C deionized distilled water for 24 h, 1, 2 and 3 weeks. The control specimens were not stored in water. The surface roughness of the tested materials (n = 10) was measured using a profilometer. Microhardness tests were conducted using a Vickers microscope mounted indenter system (n = 10). At 24 h, the surface roughness was recorded with bis-acrylic-Protemp II as higher than methacrylate materials. No significant differences of microhardness between Trim®-PEMA and bis-acrylic-Protemp II were recognized at 1, 2 and 3 weeks. The microhardness values increased with the increase of surface roughness and vice versa in both Trim®-PEMA and bis-acrylic-Protemp II. Both surface roughness and microhardness are affected by water storage. Bis-acrylic-Protemp II revealed better results in hardness than methacrylate resins, whereas Trim®-PEMA has a better surface roughness.

  5. A comparison of wire- and Kevlar-reinforced provisional restorations.

    PubMed

    Powell, D B; Nicholls, J I; Yuodelis, R A; Strygler, H

    1994-01-01

    Stainless steel wire 0.036 inch in diameter was compared with Kevlar 49 polyaramid fiber as a means of reinforcing a four-unit posterior provisional fixed restoration with 2 pontics. Three reinforcement patterns for wire and two for Kevlar 49 were evaluated and compared with the control, which was an unreinforced provisional restoration. A central tensile load was placed on the cemented provisional restoration and the variables were measured: (1) the initial stiffness; (2) the load at initial fracture; and (3) the unit toughness, or the energy stored in the beam at a point where the load had undergone a 1.0-mm deflection. Statistical analysis showed (1) the bent wire configuration had a significantly higher initial stiffness (P < or = .05), (2) there was no difference between designs for load at initial fracture, and (3) the bent wire had a significantly higher unit toughness value (P < or = .05).

  6. A direct technique for fabricating esthetic anterior fixed provisional restorations using polycarbonate veneers.

    PubMed

    Bidra, Avinash S; Manzotti, Anna

    2012-06-01

    Fabrication of esthetic interim restorations by a chairside technique often challenges the clinician with regard to the required time and skills, as well as meeting the expectations of the patient. Autopolymerizing polymethyl methacrylate resin has been reported to be the most popular material for fabricating provisional restorations. However, this material does not routinely yield esthetic provisional restorations via a chairside technique. This article describes a simple technique to overcome some of the disadvantages of this material by using prefabricated polycarbonate facings backed with autopolymerizing acrylic resin. This technique can be used chairside for fabricating esthetic anterior interim restorations, utilizing the beneficial properties of both materials. It exploits the manufactured smooth-surface finish, superior esthetics, color stability, and durability of polycarbonate facings, as well as the marginal adaptation, strength, and low cost of autopolymerizing acrylic resin.

  7. Plastic temporary abutments with provisional restorations in immediate loading procedures: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Mijiritsky, Eitan

    2006-09-01

    A provisional restoration in combination with an implant-retained restoration provides many of the same benefits as nonimplant-retained fixed restorations. Provisional restorations serve as a diagnostic tool to confirm esthetics, contours, accessibility for oral hygiene, and can be used to duplicate the definitive restoration. A provisional restoration allows for communication between the patient, dentist, and technician. The soft tissue around the implants can heal according to the contours of the provisional restoration. However, implant-retained treatment can require an extended period of osseointegration, and provisional treatment can be a challenge if a removable prosthesis is provided because adjustments of the denture may become necessary during healing. This article presents a case report that describes the simultaneous placement of implants with the connection of fixed provisional restorations to prefabricated plastic provisional abutments.

  8. Effect of five staining solutions on the colour stability of two acrylics and three composite resins based provisional restorations.

    PubMed

    Begüm Türker, Sebnem; Koçak, Ayse; Esra, Aktepe

    2006-03-01

    The effect of coffee, tea, coca-cola, orange-juice and red wine on the colour stability of acrylic and composite based provisional materials were evaluated. Two acrylic resins and three composite resins were studied. 48 standardized specimens for each provisional material were prepared. Each group was divided into 6 subgroups. Specimens from each group were immersed in staining solutions at room temperature for 30 days. Red wine and tea caused the most significant colour changes and orange juice showed the least significant colour changes. deltaE of all of the provisional restorations materials was changed after the immersion in all of the staining solutions during the experimental process.

  9. Effect of five staining solutions on the colour stability of two acrylics and three composite resins based provisional restorations.

    PubMed

    Türker, Sebnem Begüm; Koçak, Ayşe; Aktepe, Esra

    2006-09-01

    The effect of coffee, tea, coca-cola, orange-juice and red wine on the colour stability of acrylic and composite based provisional materials were evaluated. Two acrylic resins and three composite resins were studied. 48 standardized specimens for each provisional material were prepared. Each group was divided into 6 subgroups. Specimens from each group were immersed in staining solutions at room temperature for 30 days. Red wine and tea caused the most significant colour changes and orange juice showed the least significant colour changes. deltaE of all of the provisional restorations materials was changed after the immersion in all of the staining solutions during the experimental process.

  10. An indirect technique for assuring simplicity and marginal integrity of provisional restorations during full mouth rehabilitation☆

    PubMed Central

    Al Jabbari, Youssef S.; Al-Rasheed, Abdulaziz; Smith, Jesse W.; Iacopino, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    Full mouth rehabilitation with fixed prosthodontics can be a time- and labor-intensive process. The use of provisional restorations allows the treating clinician to determine the functional and esthetic requirements of the definitive prostheses. However, in the case of full mouth rehabilitation, the individual preparation of provisional restorations for multiple teeth may complicate the provisional phase and increase the treatment time. This article describes a method to simplify the indirect fabrication of provisional restorations for full mouth reconstruction. Provisional restorations may be easily achieved by splinting the provisional restorations in sextants, trimming them according to red pencil marks around the prepared margins as guidelines, and fitting them in the laboratory, utilizing a second set of solid casts for the prepared teeth. PMID:23960554

  11. Production of a Fixed Provisional Restoration Using an Acrylic Denture: Technique and Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The damage or loss of anterior teeth causes a negative impact on the patient in many ways. In adolescents and young patients, the provisional replacement with artificial teeth may minimize this impact. Many approaches have been described for provisional restorations. This article discusses about a chairside fixed provisional restoration technique that was adjusted into the edentulous area of a 15-year-old girl. PMID:26393221

  12. Mechanical Properties and Simulated Wear of Provisional Resin Materials.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, T; Barkmeier, W W; Tsujimoto, A; Scheidel, D; Erickson, R L; Latta, M A; Miyazaki, M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine flexural properties and erosive wear behavior of provisional resin materials. Three bis-acryl base provisional resins-1) Protemp Plus (PP), 2) Integrity (IG), 3) Luxatemp Automix Plus (LX)-and a conventional poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) resin, UniFast III (UF), were evaluated. A resin composite, Z100 Restorative (Z1), was included as a benchmark material. Six specimens for each of the four materials were used to determine flexural strength and elastic modulus according to ISO Standard 4049. Twelve specimens for each material were used to examine wear using a generalized wear simulation model. The test materials were each subjected to wear challenges of 25,000, 50,000, 100,000, and 200,000 cycles in a Leinfelder-Suzuki (Alabama) wear simulator. The materials were placed in custom cylinder-shaped stainless-steel fixtures, and wear was generated using a cylindrical-shaped flat-ended stainless-steel antagonist in a slurry of nonplasticized PMMA beads. Wear (mean facet depth [μm] and volume loss [mm(3)]) was determined using a noncontact profilometer (Proscan 2100) with Proscan and AnSur 3D software. The laboratory data were evaluated using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA; factors: 1) material and 2) cycles) followed by Tukey HSD post hoc test (α=0.05). The flexural strength ranged from 68.2 to 150.6 MPa, and the elastic modulus ranged from 2.0 to 15.9 GPa. All of the bis-acryl provisional resins (PP, IG, and LX) demonstrated significantly higher values than the PMMA resin (UF) in flexural strength and elastic modulus (p<0.05). However, there was no significant difference (p>0.05) in flexural properties among three bis-acryl base provisional resins (PP, IG, and LX). Z1 demonstrated significantly (p<0.05) higher flexural strength and elastic modulus than the other materials tested. The results for mean facet wear depth (μm) and standard deviations (SD) for 200,000 cycles were as follows: PP, 22.4 (5.0); IG, 51.0 (6

  13. Effect of provisional restorations on the final bond strengths of porcelain laminate veneers.

    PubMed

    Aykent, F; Usumez, A; Ozturk, A N; Yucel, M T

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of the different provisional restorations cementation techniques on the final bond strengths of porcelain laminate veneers (PLVs). Thirty-six extracted human central incisors were sectioned 2 mm below the cemento-enamel junction, and crown parts were embedded into self-cure acrylic resin. Standardized PLV preparations were carried out on labial surfaces of the teeth. Then the teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 12 each. In group 1, provisional restorations were cemented with eugenol-free cement. In group 2, prepared teeth surfaces were first coated with a desensitizing agent then provisional restorations were cemented with resin cement. In group 3, provisional restorations were not fabricated to serve as control. After specimens were stored in distilled water for 2 weeks, provisional restorations were removed and final IPS Empress 2 ceramic veneers were bonded with a dual-curing resin. Two microtensile samples from each tooth measuring 1.2 x 1.2 x 5 mm were prepared. These sections were subjected to microtensile testing and failure values were recorded. The data were analysed by one-way anova and Tukey HSD tests. The PLVs, placed on the tooth surface that had received a dentine desensitizer and provisional restorations luted with resin cement (group 2), showed the lowest bond strength in all test groups. But no statistically significant differences were found between the bond strength of PLVs in control group (no provisional restorations) and group 1 (provisional restorations cemented with eugenol-free cement before final cementations). Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) examination of this study also showed that the bonding to enamel surface was better in control group and group 1 than group 2.

  14. Transferring emergence profile created from the provisional to the definitive restoration.

    PubMed

    Buskin, R; Salinas, T J

    1998-01-01

    One primary objective for implant therapy is the achievement of an aesthetic result, and this is significantly dependent upon the condition of the peri-implant soft tissue and the implant emergence profile. The requisite for the configuration of the definitive crown is formulated by the provisional restoration, which transfers the position of the implant and the peri-implant soft tissue to the model utilized in the fabrication process. This article demonstrates the use of a provisionalization stage to precisely replicate the peri-implant tissue in the definitive restoration.

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Flexural Strength of Provisional Crown and Bridge Materials-An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Provisional restorations serve a key role as a functional and esthetic try-in for the design of the final prosthesis. During selection of materials for this restoration, clinicians must consider physical properties, ease of handling, cost and patient satisfaction and approval. Aim To evaluate and compare the flexural strength of provisional crown and bridge materials available commercially. Materials and Methods This in-vitro study was done to compare the flexural strength of six temporary crown and bridge materials available commercially at 24 hours, 8 days and after repair. Three poly methyl methacrylate based materials (DPI, SC10 and Trulon) and three bis-acrylic based composite resins (Protemp, Cooltemp and Luxatemp) were selected. A total of 72 specimens of dimensions 64mm×10mm×2.5mm were prepared from these materials (12 from each material) and divided into two groups (n=36). Specimens were stored in artificial saliva and were fractured after 24 hours and 8 days using Universal Testing Machine. The fractured samples from the 8 days study were then subjected to repair. A uniform space of 2mm and a 450 bevel was maintained for all the repaired samples for better distribution of forces. Flexural strength of these repaired samples was recorded using the same machine. Results were recorded and statistically analysed by one-way Anova and Post hoc tests. Result: Results revealed that there was decrease in flexural strength for all the materials tested from 24 hours to 8 days, though flexural strength between poly methyl methacrylate and bis-acrylic resins was similar at 24 hours and 8 days time interval. A substantial decrease was noticed in the strength of bis-acrylic composite resins after repair. Conclusion From the current study it can be suggested that though there is decrease in flexural strength for all the materials from 24 hours to 8 days, both can be used to fabricate the provisional restorations. However, in the event of a fracture of a bis

  16. A technique to facilitate the fabrication of provisional restorations for ITI solid abutments.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Murat; Güler, Ahmet Umut; Erkoçak, Ayça; Sanal, Fatma Ayşe

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this technique report was to present a procedure for the fabrication of provisional restorations for ITI solid abutments using impression caps in the laboratory with a number of advantages over intraoral techniques. There may be no need for cementation, and elimination of cementation may assist tissue healing.

  17. In vitro study of fracture strength of provisional crown materials

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Gulsum; Kara, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this report was to evaluate the effect of the fabrication method and material type on the fracture strength of provisional crowns. MATERIALS AND METHODS A master model with one crown (maxillary left second premolar) was manufactured from Cr-Co alloy. The master model was scanned, and the data set was transferred to a CAD/CAM unit (Yenamak D50, Yenadent Ltd, Istanbul, Turkey) for the Cercon Base group. For the other groups, temporary crowns were produced by direct fabrication methods (Imident, Temdent, Structur Premium, Takilon, Systemp c&b II, and Acrytemp). The specimens were subjected to water storage at 37℃ for 24 hours, and then they were thermocycled (TC, 5000×, 5-55℃) (n=10). The maximum force at fracture (Fmax) was measured in a universal test machine at 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed by non-parametric statistics (α=.05). RESULTS Fmax values varied between 711.09-1392.1 N. In the PMMA groups, Takilon showed the lowest values (711.09 N), and Cercon Base showed the highest values (959.59 N). In the composite groups, Structur Premium showed the highest values (1392.1 N), and Acrytemp showed the lowest values (910.05 N). The composite groups showed significantly higher values than the PMMA groups (P=.01). CONCLUSION Composite-based materials showed significantly higher fracture strengths than PMMA-based materials. The CAD-CAM technique offers more advantages than the direct technique. PMID:25722834

  18. Immediate provisional restoration of implant placed using flapless surgery and ridge mapping. Case report.

    PubMed

    Turkyilmaz, Ilser

    2011-04-01

    Loss of an anterior tooth as the result of trauma is relatively common, especially in the young. Orthodontic treatment is not always the definitive therapy of choice; instead, an implant can be placed to replace the missing tooth. This article describes the case of a 19-year-old woman whose maxillary left central incisor was replaced by an immediately restored dental implant, placed using flapless surgery. The implant achieved excellent primary stability, as determined by resonance frequency analysis, so it was immediately restored with a provisional acrylic resin crown in no centric occlusion. This case report supports the use of single implants for replacing a missing anterior tooth where esthetics are a priority.

  19. The effect of different fiber reinforcements on flexural strength of provisional restorative resins: an in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Parkhedkar, Rambhau D.; Mowade, Tushar Krishnarao

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the flexural strength of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and bis-acryl composite resin reinforced with polyethylene and glass fibers. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three groups of rectangular test specimens (n = 15) of each of the two resin/fiber reinforcement were prepared for flexural strength test and unreinforced group served as the control. Specimens were loaded in a universal testing machine until fracture. The mean flexural strengths (MPa) was compared by one way ANOVA test, followed by Scheffe analysis, using a significance level of 0.05. Flexural strength between fiber-reinforced resin groups were compared by independent samples t-test. RESULTS For control groups, the flexural strength for PMMA (215.53 MPa) was significantly lower than for bis-acryl composite resin (240.09 MPa). Glass fiber reinforcement produced significantly higher flexural strength for both PMMA (267.01 MPa) and bis-acryl composite resin (305.65 MPa), but the polyethylene fibers showed no significant difference (PMMA resin-218.55 MPa and bis-acryl composite resin-241.66 MPa). Among the reinforced groups, silane impregnated glass fibers showed highest flexural strength for bis-acryl composite resin (305.65 MPa). CONCLUSION Of two fiber reinforcement methods evaluated, glass fiber reinforcement for the PMMA resin and bis-acryl composite resin materials produced highest flexural strength. Clinical implications On the basis of this in-vitro study, the use of glass and polyethylene fibers may be an effective way to reinforce provisional restorative resins. When esthetics and space are of concern, glass fiber seems to be the most appropriate method for reinforcing provisional restorative resins. PMID:22439093

  20. Analysis of colour stability of selected provisional prosthetic materials: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Koczorowski, Ryszard; Linkowska-Swidzińska, Kamila; Gedrange, Tomasz; Swidziński, Teodor

    2009-08-01

    Prosthetic restorative materials (that are) used for temporary fixed dentures tend to exhibit variable discolouration over several weeks of use. The aim of this study was to perform a spectrophotometric analysis of the influence of selected discolouring factors on the colour stability of provisional prosthetic materials in vitro. In the study, the following prosthetic materials for short-term use in the oral cavity were evaluated: Luxatemp, Structur 2S.C., Protemp II, Zhermacryl STC and Dentalon Plus. Samples of these materials were immersed in coffee, tea and dark fruit juice for 60 h at different pH values. Colour was evaluated by determining the monochromatic coefficients of light reflected by the samples, using a spectrophotometric method. Results received in artificial light (illuminant A) were compared with those obtained in daylight (illuminant D65). Changes in colour and its parameters according to the CIE L*a*b* system were analysed. The analysis (of the colour and colour parameters) of the tested materials in two types of light showed that Structur displayed the greatest tendency to discolouration and that the least tendency to discolouration was exhibited by Dentalon Plus. The fact that colour parameters obtained in two types of light were not identical suggests that changes in the colour of the same material may be perceived differently, depending on the illuminant. Provisional prosthetic materials show variable colour stability under different conditions in the oral cavity. The colour of prosthetic materials may be perceived differently, depending on the illuminant and the effect of the environment in which they are used.

  1. In vitro comparison of flexural strength and elastic modulus of three provisional crown materials used in fixed prosthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Poonacha, Seema; Salagundi, Basavaraj; Rupesh, P L.; Raghavan, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate and compare the flexural strength and the elastic moduli of three provisional crown materials (methyl methacrylate based autopolymerized resin, bis acryl composite based autopolymerized resin and urethane dimethacrylate based light polymerized resin) after storing in artificial saliva and testing at intervals of 24 hours and 7 days. Study design: A metal master mould with four slots of dimensions 25x2x2 mm was fabricated to obtain samples of standard dimensions. A total of 135 specimens were thus obtained with 45 each of three provisional materials. Further 15 samples of each group were tested after storing for one hour at room temperature and again at intervals of 24 hours and 7 days after storing in artificial saliva. Three point flexural tests were carried out in the universal testing machine to calculate the flexural strength and the elastic modulus. The changes were calculated and data was analyzed with Fisher’s test and ANOVA. Results: The flexural strength of the methyl methacrylate resin reduced significantly while bis-acrylic composite resin showed a significant increase in its flexural strength after storing in artificial saliva for 24 hours and the values of both remained constant thereafter. Contrary to these findings, light polymerized resin showed a significant decrease in flexural strength after storing in artificial saliva for 24 hours and then significantly increased in flexural strength after 7 days. However the changes in the values for elastic modulus of respective materials were statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Methacrylate based autopolymerizing resin showed the highest flexural strength and elastic moduli after fabrication and after storing in artificial saliva and for 24 hours and 7 days. Bis-acrylic composite resin showed the least flexural strength and elastic moduli. Key words:Provisional restorations, interim restorations, Methyl Methacrylate, composite restoration, flexural strength, elastic moduli

  2. Effects of different food colorants and polishing techniques on color stability of provisional prosthetic materials.

    PubMed

    Rutkunas, Vygandas; Sabaliauskas, Vaidotas; Mizutani, Hiroshi

    2010-03-01

    The main objective was to investigate the effects of different polishing techniques on the color stability of provisional prosthetic materials upon exposure to different staining agents by mimicking the oral environment in vitro. Fifty-six cylindrical specimens were prepared for each type of material: bis-acryl and light-polymerized composite resins, and methyl methacrylate- and ethyl methacrylatebased resins. The specimens were polished using seven different polishing techniques and then immersed in four different staining agents. Color was measured with a spectrophotometer before and after immersion, and color changes (DeltaE) were calculated. The effects of the type of provisional material, polishing procedure, staining agent, and their interactions on color stability were significant (p<0.05). Amongst these factors, the staining agent exerted the strongest effect on color stability. Amongst the provisional materials tested, methacrylate-based resins exhibited the highest color stability irrespective of polishing technique and staining agent.

  3. In vitro comparative evaluation of mechanical properties of temporary restorative materials used in fixed partial denture

    PubMed Central

    Saisadan, D.; Manimaran, P.; Meenapriya, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Materials used to fabricate provisional restorations can be classified as acrylics or resin composites. Provisional crows can be either prefabricated or custom made. Acrylics: These materials have been used to fabricate provisional restorations since the 1930s and usually available as powder and liquid. They are the most commonly used materials today for both single-unit and multiple-unit restorations. In general, their popularity is due to their low cost, acceptable esthetics, and versatility. Composites: Composite provisional materials use bis-acryl resin, a hydrophobic material that is similar to bis-GMA. Composites are available as auto-polymerized, dualpolymerized and visible light polymerized. Preformed Crowns: Preformed provisional crowns or matrices usually consist of tooth-shaped shells of plastic, cellulose acetate or metal. They are commercially available in various tooth sizes and are usually selected for a particular tooth anatomy. They are commonly relined with acrylic resin to provide a more custom fit before cementation, but the plastic and metal crown shells can also be cemented directly onto prepared teeth. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to choose a material to serve as a better interim prosthesis and to compare three different properties – flexural strength, compressive strength, and color stability. Materials and Methods: The samples were made with three different provisional materials (Revotek LC, Protemp 4, TemSpan). Result: It was inferred from the study that no one material was superior in all three tested parameters. PMID:27829758

  4. Population and Family Education Teaching Materials: A Bibliography (Provisional).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    This annotated bibliography of population education teaching materials was prepared from documents available in the Population Education Clearninghouse collection of the UNESCO Regional Office for Education in Asia. Most of the materials were published in the 1970's, with the exception of a few which date from the 1960's. In addition to full…

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Marginal Discrepancy in Tooth Colored Self Cure Acrylic Provisional Restorations With and Without Reinforcement of Glass Beads: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Yasangi, Manoj Kumar; Mannem, Dhanalakshmi; Neturi, Sirisha; Ravoori, Srinivas; Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Context This invitro study was conducted to compare and evaluate marginal discrepancy in two types of tooth colored self cure provisional restorative materials {DPI&UNIFAST TRAD} before and after reinforcement of glass beads. Aim The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare marginal discrepancy in two types of provisional restorative materials (DPI and UNI FAST TRAD) before and after reinforcement with Glass beads. Materials and Methods Tooth shaped resin copings were fabricated on custom made brass metal die. A total of 60 resin copings were fabricated in which 30 samples were prepared with DPI and 30 samples with UNIFAST material. Each group of 30 samples were divided in to two sub groups in which 15 samples were prepared with glass bead reinforcement and 15 samples without reinforcement. The marginal discrepancy was evaluated with photomicroscope {Reichet Polyvar 2 met} by placing the resin copings on custom made brass resin coping holder. Results Measurements obtained were statistically analysed by unpaired t-test to know any significance between two variables. Unreinforced DPI specimens had shown lower marginal discrepancy (442.82) than reinforced specimens (585.77). Unreinforced UNIFAST specimens have shown high values of marginal discrepancy (592.83) than reinforced specimens (436.35). p-value between reinforced and unreinforced specimens of DPI (p=0.0013) and UNIFAST (p= 0.0038) has shown statistical significance. Conclusion This in-vitro study revealed that unreinforced DPI specimens have shown lower marginal discrepancy than reinforced specimens and unreinforced UNIFAST specimens have shown higher values of marginal discrepancy than reinforced specimens. PMID:26155574

  6. Evaluation of the effect of various beverages and food material on the color stability of provisional materials – An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Gaurav; Gupta, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated the color stability of four provisional materials: 1) Poly-methyl methacrylates (DPI); 2) Bis-acryl composite (ProtempTM II – 3M ESPE); 3) Bis-acryl composite (Systemp® c and b – Ivoclar Vivadent) and 4) Light polymerized composite resin (Revotek LC- GC). Materials and Methods: The color and color difference of each specimen after immersion in different staining solutions i.e. 1) tea and artificial saliva, 2) coffee and artificial saliva, 3) Pepsi and artificial saliva, 4) turmeric solution and artificial saliva was measured using reflectance spectrophotometer with CIELAB system before immersion and after immersion at 2, 5 ,7 , 10 and 15 days. Results: Revotek LC- GC (light polymerized composite resin) was found to be the most color stable provisional restorative material followed by Protemp II (Bis-acryl composite), Systemp (Bis-acryl composite) and DPI (Methylmethacrylate resin). Turmeric solution had the maximum staining potential followed by coffee, tea and Pepsi. PMID:22025835

  7. Evaluation of Light-Activated Provisional Resin Materials for Periodontal Soft Tissue Management

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine mechanical properties using a compressive test with cylinder specimen (h = 6 mm and ϕ = 4 mm) as well as cytotoxicity using elutes from disk specimen (ϕ = 10 mm and h = 2 mm) against human gingival fibroblasts and oral keratinocytes with light-activated provisional resin materials (Revotek LC and Luxatemp Solar) compared to chemically activated counterpart (Snap, Trim II, and Jet). Significantly increased compressive strength (210~280 MPa) was detected in light-activated products compared to chemically activated ones (20~65 MPa, P < 0.05) and similar compressive modulus was detected in both types (0.8~1.5 and 0.5~1.3 GPa). Simultaneously, the light-activated products showed less adverse effects on the periodontal soft tissue cells in any polymerization stage compared to the chemically activated products. Particularly, chemically activated products had significantly greater adverse effects during the “polymerizing” phase compared to those that were “already set” (P < 0.05), as shown in confocal microscopic images of live and dead cells. In conclusion, light-activated provisional resin materials have better mechanical properties as well as biocompatibility against two tested types of oral cells compared to the chemically activated counterpart, which are considered as more beneficial choice for periodontal soft tissue management. PMID:27672651

  8. Shear Bond Strength of Four Different Repair Materials Applied to Bis-acryl Resin Provisional Materials Measured 10 Minutes, One Hour, and Two Days After Bonding.

    PubMed

    Shim, Js; Park, Yj; Manaloto, Acf; Shin, Sw; Lee, Jy; Choi, Yj; Ryu, Jj

    2013-12-19

    SUMMARY This study investigated the shear bond strength of repaired provisional restoration materials 1) to compare the bond strengths between bis-acryl resin and four different materials and 2) to investigate the effect of the amount of time elapsed after bonding on the bond strength. The self-cured bis-acryl resin (Luxatemp) was used as the base material, and four different types of resins (Luxatemp, Protemp, Z350 flowable, and Z350) were used as the repair materials. Specimens were divided into three groups depending on the point of time of shear bond strength measurement: 10 minutes, one hour, and 48 hours. Shear bond strengths were measured with a universal testing machine, and the fracture surface was examined with a video measuring system. Two-way analysis of variance revealed that the repair materials (p<0.001) and the amount of time elapsed after bonding (p<0.001) significantly affected the repair strength. All of the repaired materials showed increasing bond strength with longer storage time. The highest bond strength and cohesive failure were observed for bonding between Luxatemp base and Luxatemp at 48 hours after bonding.

  9. Shear bond strength of four different repair materials applied to bis-acryl resin provisional materials measured 10 minutes, one hour, and two days after bonding.

    PubMed

    Shim, Js; Park, Yj; Manaloto, Acf; Shin, Sw; Lee, Jy; Choi, Yj; Ryu, Jj

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the shear bond strength of repaired provisional restoration materials 1) to compare the bond strengths between bis-acryl resin and four different materials and 2) to investigate the effect of the amount of time elapsed after bonding on the bond strength. The self-cured bis-acryl resin (Luxatemp) was used as the base material, and four different types of resins (Luxatemp, Protemp, Z350 flowable, and Z350) were used as the repair materials. Specimens were divided into three groups depending on the point of time of shear bond strength measurement: 10 minutes, one hour, and 48 hours. Shear bond strengths were measured with a universal testing machine, and the fracture surface was examined with a video measuring system. Two-way analysis of variance revealed that the repair materials (p<0.001) and the amount of time elapsed after bonding (p<0.001) significantly affected the repair strength. All of the repaired materials showed increasing bond strength with longer storage time. The highest bond strength and cohesive failure were observed for bonding between Luxatemp base and Luxatemp at 48 hours after bonding.

  10. Microleakage of intermediate restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Lim, K C

    1990-03-01

    This study compares the microleakage of a glass ionomer cement, Ketac Fil, used without cavity conditioning, with the established intermediate restorative materials, Cavit-W, and a reinforced zinc oxide-eugenol cement, Kalzinol. Microleakage was assessed using an electrochemical technique. At the end of 30 days, the materials tested, listed in decreasing order of microleakage, were Cavit-W, Ketac Fil inserted without cavity conditioning, Kalzinol, and the control group of Ketac Fil inserted into conditioned cavities. There was no significant difference in the microleakage observed in Ketac Fil restorations inserted without cavity conditioning and Kalzinol (p = 0.450), while the differences between the other groups were highly significant (p less than 0.001).

  11. Materials for chairside CAD/CAM restorations.

    PubMed

    Fasbinder, Dennis J

    2010-01-01

    Chairside computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems have become considerably more accurate, efficient, and prevalent as the technology has evolved in the past 25 years. The initial restorative material option for chairside CAD/CAM restorations was limited to ceramic blocks. Restorative material options have multiplied and now include esthetic ceramics, high-strength ceramics, and composite materials for both definitive and temporary restoration applications. This article will review current materials available for chairside CAD/CAM restorations.

  12. An Investigation Into the Integrity of Fit of Provisional Crowns Using Current Proprietary Temporary Crown Materials.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Philip D; Georgakis, Georgios; Niggli, Jason

    2016-06-01

    Three methods of direct provisional crown construction were investigated for accuracy of marginal fit. A modified proprietary crown coping was compared to Bis GMA and isobutyl methacrylate resin provisional crowns with margins modified by using a flowable composite and 'bead on' isobutyl methacrylate respectively. Measurement was at 50x magnification at seven sites over the fit surface. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 13.0.1 and measurement compared using the Mann Whitney test set at a significance level of 0.05. Reliability was checked using the Bland Altman test. Statistical significant differences were found between the three groups. The order of best fit was Bis-GMA and flowable composite > isobutyl methacrylate with 'bead on' margins > Bis-GMA modified implant temporary coping. The clinical significance is that the Bis GMA and flowable composite combination can be used with equal confidence to traditional methods of temporarisation.

  13. A comparative evaluation of the marginal accuracy of crowns fabricated from four commercially available provisional materials: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Bhavya Mohandas; Aras, Meena Ajay; Chitre, Vidya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the primary marginal accuracy of four commercially available provisional materials (Protemp 4, Luxatemp Star, Visalys Temp and DPI tooth moulding powder and liquid) at 2 time intervals (10 and 30 min). Materials and Methods: A customized stainless steel master model containing two interchangeable dies was used for fabrication of provisional crowns. Forty crowns (n = 10) were fabricated, and each crown was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Vertical marginal discrepancies were noted and compared at 10 min since the start of mixing and then at 30 min. Observations and Results: Protemp 4 showed the least vertical marginal discrepancy (71.59 μ), followed by Luxatemp Star (91.93 μ) at 10 min. DPI showed a marginal discrepancy of 95.94 μ while Visalys Temp crowns had vertical marginal discrepancy of 106.81 μ. There was a significant difference in the marginal discrepancy values of Protemp 4 and Visalys Temp. At 30 min, there was a significant difference between the marginal discrepancy of Protemp 4 crowns (83.11 μ) and Visalys Temp crowns (128.97 μ) and between Protemp 4 and DPI (118.88 μ). No significant differences were observed between Protemp 4 and Luxatemp Star. Conclusion: The vertical marginal discrepancy of temporary crowns fabricated from the four commercially available provisional materials ranged from 71 to 106 μ immediately after fabrication (at 10 min from the start of mix) to 83–128 μ (30 min from the start of mix). The time elapsed after mixing had a significant influence on the marginal accuracy of the crowns. PMID:26097348

  14. Fluoride release from restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Basso, Gabriela Romanini; Della Bona, Alvaro; Gobbi, Delton Luiz; Cecchetti, Dileta

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro fluoride (F) release from 4 restorative materials (3M ESPE): Ketak Molar Easymix [KME - conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC)]; Rely-X luting 2 [RL2 - resin-modified GIC (RMGIC)]; Vitremer (VIT- RMGIC); and Filtek Z250 [Z250 - negative control]. Disc-shaped specimens were fabricated according to the manufacturer's instructions and placed into 10 mL of reverse osmosis water at 37°C until the analyses were done using a liquid membrane for selective F ion electrode (Orion 710). F release was evaluated every 6 h in the first day and thereafter daily during 28 days (d). The results were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Mean F release and standard deviation values (in ppm) were: KME: 6 h- 0.34 ± 0.04; 24 h- 1.22 ± 0.30; 7 d- 0.29 ± 0.09; 14 d- 0.20 ± 0.04; 28 d- 0.16 ± 0.01; RL2: 6 h- 2.46 ± 0.48; 24 h-12.33 ± 2.93; 7 d- 1.37 ± 0.38; 14 d- 0.80 ± 0.13; 28 d- 0.80 ± 0.21; VIT: 6 h- 0.98 ± 0.35; 24 h- 4.35 ± 1.22; 7 d- 0.66 ± 0.23; 14 d- 0.40 ± 0.07; 28 d- 0.39 ± 0.08; Z250: 6 h- 0.029 ± 0.001; 24 h- 0.024 ± 0.009; 7 d- 0.023 ± 0.004; 14 d- 0.025 ± 0.001; 28 d- 0.028 ± 0.001. RL2 RMGIC released more F than the other materials in all periods. The greatest release of F occurred in the first 24 h.

  15. RADIOPACITY OF RESTORATIVE MATERIALS USING DIGITAL IMAGES

    PubMed Central

    Salzedas, Leda Maria Pescinini; Louzada, Mário Jefferson Quirino; de Oliveira, Antonio Braz

    2006-01-01

    The radiopacity of esthetic restorative materials has been established as an important requirement, improving the radiographic diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of six restorative materials using a direct digital image system, comparing them to the dental tissues (enamel-dentin), expressed as equivalent thickness of aluminum (millimeters of aluminum). Five specimens of each material were made. Three 2-mm thick longitudinal sections were cut from an intact extracted permanent molar tooth (including enamel and dentin). An aluminum step wedge with 9 steps was used. The samples of different materials were placed on a phosphor plate together with a tooth section, aluminum step wedge and metal code letter, and were exposed using a dental x-ray unit. Five measurements of radiographic density were obtained from each image of each item assessed (restorative material, enamel, dentin, each step of the aluminum step wedge) and the mean of these values was calculated. Radiopacity values were subsequently calculated as equivalents of aluminum thickness. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated significant differences in radiopacity values among the materials (P<0.0001). The radiopacity values of the restorative materials evaluated were, in decreasing order: TPH, F2000, Synergy, Prisma Flow, Degufill, Luxat. Only Luxat had significantly lower radiopacity values than dentin. One material (Degufill) had similar radiopacity values to enamel and four (TPH, F2000, Synergy and Prisma Flow) had significantly higher radiopacity values than enamel. In conclusion, to assess the adequacy of posterior composite restorations it is important that the restorative material to be used has enough radiopacity, in order to be easily distinguished from the tooth structure in the radiographic image. Knowledge on the radiopacity of different materials helps professionals to select the most suitable material, along with other properties such as biocompatibility, adhesion and

  16. A study on provisional cements, cementation techniques, and their effects on bonding of porcelain laminate veneers.

    PubMed

    Vinod Kumar, G; Soorya Poduval, T; Bipin Reddy; Shesha Reddy, P

    2014-03-01

    Minimal tooth preparation is required for porcelain laminate veneers, but interim restorations are a must to protect their teeth against thermal insult, chemical irritation, and to provide aesthetics. Cement remaining after the removal of the provisional restoration can impair the etching quality of the tooth surface and fit and final bonding of the porcelain laminate veneer. This in vitro study examined the tooth surface for remaining debris of cement after removal of a provisional restoration. Determine the presence of cement debris on prepared tooth surface subsequent to the removal of provisional restoration. Determine the cement with the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Determine the effect of smear layer on the amount of residual luting cement. Eighty-four extracted natural anterior teeth were prepared for porcelain laminate veneers. For half of the teeth, the smear layer was removed before luting provisional restorations. Veneer provisional restorations were fabricated and luted to teeth with six bonding methods: varnish combined with glass ionomer cement (GIC), varnish combined with resin modified GIC, varnish, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement, adhesive combined with GIC, adhesive combined with resin modified GIC, and adhesive, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement. After removal of provisional restorations 1 week later, the tooth surface was examined for residual luting material with SEM. Traces of cement debris were found on all the prepared teeth surfaces for all six groups which were cemented with different methods. Cement debris was seen on teeth subsequent to the removal of provisional's. Dual-cure cement had the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Presence of smear layer had no statistical significance in comparison with cement residue. With the use of adhesive the cement debris was always found to be more than with the use of varnish. GIC showed maximum residual cement followed by dual-cure.

  17. In situ surface biodegradation of restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Padovani, Gc; Fúcio, Sbp; Ambrosano, Gmb; Sinhoreti, Mac; Puppin-Rontani, Rm

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY This study aimed to evaluate the surface characteristics of restorative materials (roughness, hardness, chemical changes by energy-dispersive spectroscopy [EDX], and scanning electron microscopy [SEM]) submitted to in situ biodegradation. Fifteen discs of each material (IPS e.max [EM], Filtek Supreme [FS], Vitremer [VI], Ketac Molar Easymix [KM], and Amalgam GS-80 [AM]) were fabricated in a metallic mold (4.0 mm × 1.5 mm). Roughness, hardness, SEM, and EDX were then evaluated. Fifteen healthy volunteers used a palatal device containing one disc of each restorative material for seven days. After the biodegradation, the roughness, hardness, SEM, and EDX were once again evaluated. Data obtained from the roughness and hardness evaluations were submitted to Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Tukey-Kramer tests (p<0.05). All esthetic restorative materials showed a significant increase in the roughness after biodegradation. Before biodegradation, significant differences in the hardness among the materials were seen: EM>AM>FS>KM>VI. After biodegradation, the hardness was significantly altered among the materials studied: EM>AM>FS=KM>VI, along with a significant increase in the hardness for AM, KM, and VI. SEM images indicated degradation on the surface of all materials, showing porosities, cracks, and roughness. Furthermore, after biodegradation, FS showed the presence of Cl, K, and Ca on the surface, while F was not present on the VI and KM surfaces. EM and AM did not have alterations in their chemical composition after biodegradation. It was concluded that the dental biofilm accumulation in situ on different restorative materials is a material-dependent parameter. Overall, all materials changed after biodegradation: esthetic restorative materials showed increased roughness, confirmed by SEM, and the ionomer materials and silver amalgam showed a significantly higher hardness. Finally, the initial chemical composition of the composite resin and ionomer materials evaluated was

  18. What constitutes an ideal dental restorative material?

    PubMed

    Rekow, E D; Bayne, S C; Carvalho, R M; Steele, J G

    2013-11-01

    Intense environmental concerns recently have prompted dentistry to evaluate the performance and environmental impact of existing restoration materials. Doing so entices us to explore the 'what if?' innovation in materials science to create more ideal restorative materials. Articulating a specification for our design and evaluation methods is proving to be more complicated than originally anticipated. Challenges exist not only in specifying how the material should be manipulated and perform clinically but also in understanding and incorporating implications of the skill of the operator placing the restoration, economic considerations, expectations patients have for their investment, cost-effectiveness, influences of the health care system on how and for whom restorations are to be placed, and global challenges that limit the types of materials available in different areas of the world. The quandary is to find ways to actively engage multiple stakeholders to agree on priorities and future actions to focus future directions on the creation of more ideal restorative materials that can be available throughout the world.

  19. Fracture toughness of dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Ilie, Nicoleta; Hickel, Reinhard; Valceanu, Anca Silvia; Huth, Karin Christine

    2012-04-01

    The ability of a restorative material to withstand fracture is of crucial importance especially in stress-bearing area. Therefore, the study aims to analyse the fracture toughness of a large number of dental restorative materials categories. The fracture toughness (K(IC)) of 69 restorative materials belonging to ten materials categories-micro-hybrid, nanofilled, microfilled, packable, ormocer-based, and flowable resin-based composites (RBC), compomers and flowable compomers, as well as glass ionomer cements (GIC) and resin-modified GIC was measured by means of the single-edge notched-beam method after storing the samples (n = 8) for 24 h in distilled water. Data were analyzed with the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Tukey's test and partial eta-squared statistics (p < 0.05). Large variations between the tested materials within a material category were found. The lowest fracture toughness was reached in the GIC group, followed by the microfilled RBCs, resin-modified GIC, and flowable compomers, which do not differ significantly among each other as a material group. The ormocer-based, packable, and micro-hybrid RBCs performed statistically similar, reaching the highest fracture toughness values. Between the two categories of flowables-composites and compomers-no differences were measured. The correlation between K(IC) and filler volume (0.34) and respective filler weight (0.40) was low. K(IC) increased with the volume fraction of fillers until a critical value of 57%, following with a plateau, with constant values until ca. 65% volume fraction. Above this value, K(IC) decreased slightly. Due to the very large variability of the fracture toughness within a material type, the selection of a suitable restorative material should have not been done with respect to a specific material category, especially in stress-bearing areas, but by considering the individual measured material properties.

  20. Reinforcement of acrylic resins for provisional fixed restorations. Part III: effects of addition of titania and zirconia mixtures on some mechanical and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Panyayong, W; Oshida, Y; Andres, C J; Barco, T M; Brown, D T; Hovijitra, S

    2002-01-01

    Acrylic resins have been used in many different applications in dentistry, especially in the fabrication of provisional fixed partial dentures. Ideally, a provisional crown and bridge material should be easy to handle and should protect teeth against physical, chemical, and thermal injuries. Some of the problems associated with this use are related to the material's poor mechanical properties. It has been demonstrated that acrylic resin can be strengthened through the addition of structural component of different size distributed in the acrylic matrix, thus forming a composite structure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the addition effects of mixtures of titania (titanium dioxide, TiO(2)) powder and zirconia (zirconium dioxide, ZrO(2)) powder being incorporated with pre-polymerized beads mixed in monomer liquid, on some mechanical and physical properties of PMMA resin. The pre-polymerized powder poly(methyl methacrylate) resin was admixed with titania and zirconia powder. A mixing ratio was controlled by volume % of 0, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 (samples with 0 v/o served as control groups). For using mixture of titania and zirconia, total amount of the mixture was controlled by volume % of 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0, in which titania and zirconia were mixed at the ratio 1 :1, 1 :2 and 2 :1. Prior to mechanical tests, all rectangular-shaped samples (25 mm x 2 mm x 5 mm) were stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 7 days after polishing all six sides of samples. Samples were then subjected to the three-point bending flexion test to evaluate the bending strength as well as the modulus of elasticity. Weight gain and exothermic reaction survey were investigated as well. All data were collected and analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Sidak method (p=0.05). It was found that the addition of particles generally decreased the water absorbed by the composite system. Only 1 percent by volume concentration of 1 :1 ratio and 2 percent by volume concentration

  1. [Comparative study of the seal and porosity of provisional coronal filling materials in endodontics].

    PubMed

    Scherman, L; Nebot, D

    1989-06-01

    The porosity and the leakage properties of 13 temporary fillings used between each appointment during endodontic treatment were investigated by means of thermocycling and dye staining of the interface between the teeth and the filling material. A scanning electron microscope was also used for these observations. The 8 commercially produced temporary fillings seal adequately the cavity whereas the 5 materials prepared and mixed by the practitioner allowed wide staining diffusion and therefore were leaky.

  2. Plaque formation and marginal gingivitis associated with restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Litonjua, Luis A; Cabanilla, Leyvee L; Abbott, Lawrence J

    2011-05-01

    The presence of restorative materials on tooth surfaces is perceived to be a contributing factor to periodontal disease. This observation is a result of the increased accumulation of plaque on restorations adjacent to the gingiva, which may lead to gingivitis. Plaque is believed to adhere better to restorations than to enamel. This may be due to the surface characteristics of restorative materials such as surface roughness and surface-free energy inherent in the materials. This article reviews the experimental studies of plaque formation on different restorative materials. In addition, clinical studies analyzing and comparing restorative materials and the consequent formation of gingivitis are reviewed. While in vitro and in vivo studies show variations in plaque formation among restorative materials and enamel, clinical studies demonstrate that the progression of gingivitis can be prevented if patients maintain adequate oral hygiene and home care. Therefore, instructing the patient to maintain proper oral hygiene and home care is more important than the choice of restorative material.

  3. Plaque formation and marginal gingivitis associated with restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Litonjua, Luis A; Cabanilla, Leyvee L; Abbott, Lawrence J

    2012-01-01

    The presence of restorative materials on tooth surfaces is perceived to be a contributing factor to periodontal disease. This observation is a result of the increased accumulation of plaque on restorations adjacent to the gingiva, which may lead to gingivitis. Plaque is believed to adhere better to restorations than to enamel. This may be due to the surface characteristics of restorative materials such as surface roughness and surface-free energy inherent in the materials. This article reviews the experimental studies of plaque formation on different restorative materials. In addition, clinical studies analyzing and comparing restorative materials and the consequent formation of gingivitis are reviewed. While in vitro and in vivo studies show variations in plaque formation among restorative materials and enamel, clinical studies demonstrate that the progression of gingivitis can be prevented if patients maintain adequate oral hygiene and home care. Therefore, instructing the patient to maintain proper oral hygiene and home care is more important than the choice of restorative material.

  4. Microleakage between endodontic temporary restorative materials placed at different times.

    PubMed

    Pai, S F; Yang, S F; Sue, W L; Chueh, L H; Rivera, E M

    1999-06-01

    Occlusal endodontic access preparations are occasionally made in teeth without removing the original restoration. However, microleakage between restorative materials that are placed at different times has not been extensively studied. Therefore, our objective was to compare microleakage at three areas: between an access opening restorative material and the cavity wall; between an additional material placed later to patch a secondary opening in the first restorative material and the original restorative material itself; and between the secondarily placed material and the cavity wall. Standard endodontic access preparations were made in 120 noncarious, nonrestored crowns of extracted human molars. These teeth were divided into six experimental groups. Another four molars were controls. The endodontic access cavities were restored with either IRM or amalgam as the primary restorative material. After 14 days, half of the primary restorations was removed, and this defect was filled with a secondary restorative material: IRM, Caviton, or a double seal of Caviton and IRM. Microleakage was measured linearly as the extent of basic fuchsin dye penetration under a stereomicroscope after thermal cycling (5 degrees and 55 degrees C for 100 cycles) and tooth sectioning. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for statistical analysis. Results indicated significantly less microleakage between primary and secondary restorative materials placed at different times than microleakage between primary temporary restorative materials and the access cavity wall, regardless of the type of primary restorative material used (IRM or amalgam).

  5. Esthetic restorative materials and opposing enamel wear.

    PubMed

    Olivera, Anna Belsuzarri; Marques, Márcia Martins

    2008-01-01

    This in vitro study compared the effects of a gold alloy (Degulor M), four dental ceramics (IPS Empress, IPS Empress 2, Duceram Plus, Duceram LFC) and a laboratory-processed composite (Targis) on the wear of human enamel. The amount of wear of the enamel (dental cusps) and restorative materials (disks) were tested in water at 37 degrees C under standard load (20 N), with a chewing rate of 1.3 Hz and was determined after 150,000 and 300,000 cycles. Before the test, the average surface roughness of the restorative materials was analyzed using the Ra parameter. The results of this study indicate that Targis caused enamel wear similar to Degulor M and resulted in significantly less wear than all the ceramics tested. IPS Empress provoked the greatest amount of enamel wear and Degulor M caused less vertical dimension loss. Targis could be an appropriate alternative material to ceramic, because it is esthetic and produces opposing enamel wear comparable to gold alloy.

  6. Interactions of liposomes with dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Sanko; Adamczak, Malgorzata; Hiorth, Marianne; Smistad, Gro; Kopperud, Hilde Molvig

    2015-12-01

    The in vitro adsorption and retention of liposomes onto four common types of dental restorative materials (conventional and silorane-based resin composites as well as conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GIC)) have been investigated due to their potential use in the oral cavity. Uncoated liposomes (positively and negatively charged) and pectin (low- and high-methoxylated) coated liposomes were prepared and characterized in terms of particle size and zeta potential. The adsorption of liposomes was performed by immersion, quantified by fluorescence detection, and visualized by fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy. Positive liposomes demonstrated the highest adsorption on all four types of materials likely due to their attractive surface charge. They also retained well (minimum 40% after 60 min) on both conventional resin composite and GIC even when exposed to simulated salivary flow. Although an intermediate initial level of adsorption was found for the pectin coated liposomes, at least 70% high methoxylated-pectin coated liposomes still remained on the conventional resin composite after 60 min flow exposure. This indicates significant contribution of hydrophobic interactions in the prolonged binding of liposomes to resin composites. Based on these results, the present paper suggests two new possible applications of liposomes in the preservation of dental restorations.

  7. Material and clinical considerations for full-coverage indirect restorations.

    PubMed

    Martin, Margaret P

    2012-11-01

    Because dental ceramics have been used for decades and continuously improved over the years, there is a plethora of information regarding their material characteristics, applications, and contraindications. Each restorative ceramic material demonstrates benefits and disadvantages, making it difficult for dentists to research, retain, and apply the ideal material for individual restorations and/or combination cases. This article outlines the applications and benefits of dental ceramics in general and examines and reviews the current ceramic alternatives available for restorative dentistry today. It also discusses the material composition and properties of a recently introduced new classification of indirect material: resin nano-ceramic.

  8. Various Effects of Sandblasting of Dental Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nishigawa, Goro; Maruo, Yukinori; Irie, Masao; Maeda, Naoto; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Minagi, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Background Sandblasting particles which remain on the surfaces of dental restorations are removed prior to cementation. It is probable that adhesive strength between luting material and sandblasting particle remnants might exceed that with restorative material. If that being the case, blasting particles adhere to sandblasted material surface could be instrumental to increasing adhesive strength like underlying bonding mechanism between luting material and silanized particles of tribochemical silica coating-treated surface. We hypothesize that ultrasonic cleaning of bonding surfaces, which were pretreated with sandblasting, may affect adhesive strength of a resin luting material to dental restorative materials. Methods We therefore observed adhesive strength of resin luting material to aluminum oxide was greater than those to zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy beforehand. To measure the shear bond strengths of resin luting material to zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy, forty specimens of each restorative material were prepared. Bonding surfaces were polished with silicon abrasive paper and then treated with sandblasting. For each restorative material, 40 sandblasted specimens were equally divided into two groups: ultrasonic cleaning (USC) group and non-ultrasonic cleaning (NUSC) group. After resin luting material was polymerized on bonding surface, shear test was performed to evaluate effect of ultrasonic cleaning of bonding surfaces pretreated with sandblasting on bond strength. Results For both zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy, NUSC group showed significantly higher shear bond strength than USC group. Conclusions Ultrasonic cleaning of dental restorations after sandblasting should be avoided to retain improved bonding between these materials. PMID:26764913

  9. Recent advances and developments in composite dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Cramer, N B; Stansbury, J W; Bowman, C N

    2011-04-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with the goal of improving restoration performance by changing the initiation system, monomers, and fillers and their coupling agents, and by developing novel polymerization strategies. Here, we review the general characteristics of the polymerization reaction and recent approaches that have been taken to improve composite restorative performance.

  10. Material choice for restorative dentistry: inlays, onlays, crowns, and bridges.

    PubMed

    Small, Bruce W

    2006-01-01

    New materials--specifically the new CAD/CAM zirconia-based systems--are available now for restorative dentistry. When esthetics are not a factor, gold remains the standard, particularly for intracoronal restorations and full posterior coverage. Tooth-colored crowns made with zirconia are new and offer great promise for the future, although more long-term in vivo studies are necessary.

  11. [Currently Recommended Restorative Materials in Modern Conservative Dentistry].

    PubMed

    Kobierska-Brzoza, Joanna Monika; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Fita, Katarzyna Agnieszka; Bader-Orłowska, Dorota; Szymonowicz, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Conservative treatment which restores the function, aesthetics and protects remaining tooth structure, and what is the most important, the viability of the tooth pulp, is still needed. Dental fillings replace specialized tissues of the tooth that have been lost due to caries or injury. Any decision concerning the use of a particular restorative material should be individualized and based on the competence regarding the composition, properties and characteristics of the specific restorative material. This requires continuous updating of knowledge about available dental materials as well as education of patients who, according to actual models of dental care, should be active partners in the therapeutic process. The selection of restorative materials is often related to financial abilities of the patients, and more generally to the economic model of organized health care in a particular country. Nowadays, amalgam is increasingly dislodged by adhesive materials which permit to save more tooth structure and allow to preserve natural teeth for a longer time. In the nearest future we can expect further development of minimally invasive techniques and improvements of restorative materials, especially their mechanical properties like strength and wear resistance as well as biocompatibility. The article presents restorative materials used in modern dentistry.

  12. Lithium disilicate: the restorative material of multiple options.

    PubMed

    Culp, Lee; McLaren, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    As dentistry continues to evolve, new technologies and materials are continually being offered to the dental profession. Throughout the years restorative trends and techniques have come and gone. Some material developments have transformed the face of esthetic dentistry, while other initial concepts have already phased out and disappeared. Today, all-ceramic restorations continue to grow in the area of restorative dentistry, from pressed-ceramic techniques and materials to the growing use of zirconia, and new materials that can be created from CAD/CAM technology. This article will explore new uses for the all-ceramic material known as lithium disilicate, and the use of a digital format to design and process this material in new and exciting ways. An overview of the material as well as unique clinical procedures will be presented.

  13. Effect of Provisional Cements on Shear Bond Strength of Porcelain Laminate Veneers

    PubMed Central

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Tak, Onjen; Secilmis, Asli; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three provisional cements and two cleaning techniques on the final bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers. Methods: The occlusal third of the crowns of forty molar teeth were sectioned and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Dentin surfaces were polished and specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Provisional restorations were fabricated and two provisional restorations were cemented onto each tooth. Restorations were fixed with one of three different provisional cements: eugenol-free provisional cement (Cavex), calcium hydroxide (Dycal), and light-cured provisional cement (Tempond Clear). Provisional restorations were removed with either a dental explorer and air-water spray, or a cleaning bur (Opticlean). In the control group, provisional restorations were not used on the surfaces of specimens. IPS Empress 2 ceramic discs were luted with a dual-cured resin cement (Panavia F). Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey’s HSD and Dunnett tests. Surfaces were examined by scanning electronic microscopy. Results: Significant differences were found between the control group and both the light-cured provisional cement groups and the eugenol-free provisional cement-cleaning bur group (P<.05). Groups that had received light-cured provisional cement showed the lowest bond strength values. Conclusions: Selection of the provisional cement is an important factor in the ultimate bond strength of the final restoration. Calcium hydroxide provisional cement and cleaning with a dental explorer are advisable. PMID:21912495

  14. Nanotechnology-based restorative materials for dental caries management

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Mary A.S.; Guedes, Sarah F.F.; Xu, Hockin H.K.; Rodrigues, Lidiany K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been applied to dental materials as an innovative concept for the development of materials with better properties and anticaries potential. In this review we discuss the current progress and future applications of functional nanoparticles incorporated in dental restorative materials as useful strategies to dental caries management. We also overview proposed antimicrobial and remineralizing mechanisms. Nanomaterials have great potential to decrease biofilm accumulation, inhibit the demineralization process, to be used for remineralizing tooth structure, and to combat caries-related bacteria. These results are encouraging and open the doors to future clinical studies that will allow the therapeutic value of nanotechnology-based restorative materials to be established. PMID:23810638

  15. Interpreting finite element results for brittle materials in endodontic restorations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Finite element simulation has been used in last years for analysing the biomechanical performance of post-core restorations in endodontics, but results of these simulations have been interpreted in most of the works using von Mises stress criterion. However, the validity of this failure criterion for brittle materials, which are present in these restorations, is questionable. The objective of the paper is to analyse how finite element results for brittle materials of endodontic restorations should be interpreted to obtain correct conclusions about the possible failure in the restoration. Methods Different failure criteria (Von Mises, Rankine, Coulomb-Mohr, Modified Mohr and Christensen) and material strength data (diametral tensile strength and flexural strength) were considered in the study. Three finite element models (FEM) were developed to simulate an endodontic restoration and two typical material tests: diametral tensile test and flexural test. Results Results showed that the Christensen criterion predicts similar results as the Von Mises criterion for ductile components, while it predicts similar results to all other criteria for brittle components. The different criteria predict different failure points for the diametral tensile test, all of them under multi-axial stress states. All criteria except Von Mises predict failure for flexural test at the same point of the specimen, with this point under uniaxial tensile stress. Conclusions From the results it is concluded that the Christensen criterion is recommended for FEM result interpretation in endodontic restorations and that the flexural test is recommended to estimate tensile strength instead of the diametral tensile test. PMID:21635759

  16. Comparative evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sheen Juneja; Arora, Aman; Upadhyaya, Viram; Jain, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    Background or Statement of Problem: As, the longevity of provisional restorations is related to, a perfect adaptation and a strong, long-term union between restoration and teeth structures, therefore, evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional restorative materials luted with cements using the standardized procedures is essential. Aims and Objectives: To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from Autopolymerizing acrylic resin crowns and bisphenol A-glycidyl dimethacrylate (BIS-GMA) resin crowns. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from autopolymerizing acrylic resin crowns and BIS-GMA resin crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from autopolymerizing acrylic resin (SC-10) crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from BIS-GMA resin crowns (Protemp 4) cemented with different temporary luting cements. Methodology: Freshly extracted 60 maxillary premolars of approximately similar dimensions were mounted in dental plaster. Tooth reduction with shoulder margin was planned to use a customized handpiece-holding jig. Provisional crowns were prepared using the wax pattern fabricated from computer aided designing/computer aided manufacturing milling machine following the tooth preparation. Sixty provisional crowns were made, thirty each of SC-10 and Protemp 4 and were then cemented with three different luting cements. Specimens were thermocycled, submerged in a 2% methylene blue solution, then sectioned and observed under a stereomicroscope for the evaluation of marginal microleakage. A five-level scale was used to score dye penetration in the tooth/cement interface and the results of this study was analyzed using the Chi-square test, Mann–Whitney U-test, Kruskal–Wallis H-test and the results were statistically significant P < 0.05 the

  17. Bio-active restorative materials with antibacterial effects: new dimension of innovation in restorative dentistry.

    PubMed

    Imazato, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Restorative materials in the new era should be "bio-active", and antibacterial effects are highlighted as one of the important properties. In order to achieve resin-based restoratives with antibacterial effects, an antibacterial monomer MDPB has been developed. The primer incorporating MDPB demonstrated cavity-disinfecting effects, and the world's first antibacterial adhesive system employing the MDPB-containing primer was successfully commercialized. MDPB is potentially applicable to various restoratives since immobilization of the antibacterial component by polymerization of MDPB enables no deterioration in mechanical properties of cured resins and exhibition of inhibitory effects against bacterial growth on their surfaces. For glass-ionomer cements used for atraumatic restorative treatment, the approach to provide antibacterial activity has been attempted by addition of chlorhexidine. Incorporation of 1% chlorhexidine diacetate was found to be optimal to give appropriate antibacterial and physical properties, being effective to reduce the bacteria in affected and infected dentin in vivo.

  18. A CLINICAL COMPARISON OF FOUR POSTERIOR INTERMEDIATE RESTORATIVE MATERIALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The ability of four zinc oxide - eugenol formulations to serve as long-term intermediate restorative materials was investigated. The materials were...1) zinc oxide - eugenol , (2) zinc oxide - eugenol + EBA, (3) a reinforced zinc oxide - eugenol , and (4) a reinforced zinc oxide - eugenol prepared

  19. Finite element calculation of residual stress in dental restorative material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    A finite element methodology for residual stresses calculation in dental restorative materials is proposed. The material under concern is a multifunctional methacrylate-based composite for dental restorations, activated by visible light. Reaction kinetics, curing shrinkage, and viscoelastic relaxation functions were required as input data on a structural finite element solver. Post cure effects were considered in order to quantify the residual stresses coming out from natural contraction with respect to those debited to the chemical shrinkage. The analysis showed for a given test case that residual stresses frozen in the dental restoration at uniform temperature of 37°C are of the same order of magnitude of the strength of the dental composite material per se.

  20. Recent Advances and Developments in Composite Dental Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, N.B.; Stansbury, J.W.; Bowman, C.N.

    2011-01-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with the goal of improving restoration performance by changing the initiation system, monomers, and fillers and their coupling agents, and by developing novel polymerization strategies. Here, we review the general characteristics of the polymerization reaction and recent approaches that have been taken to improve composite restorative performance. PMID:20924063

  1. Bonding of restorative materials to dentin with various luting agents.

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, A; Sahafi, A; Flury, S

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to compare eight types of luting agents when used to bond six indirect, laboratory restorative materials to dentin. Cylinders of the six restorative materials (Esteticor Avenir [gold alloy], Tritan [titanium], NobelRondo [feldspathic porcelain], Finesse All-Ceramic [leucite-glass ceramic], Lava [zirconia], and Sinfony [resin composite]) were ground and air-abraded. Cylinders of feldspathic porcelain and glass ceramic were additionally etched with hydrofluoric acid and were silane-treated. The cylinders were luted to ground human dentin with eight luting agents (DeTrey Zinc [zinc phosphate cement], Fuji I [conventional glass ionomer cement], Fuji Plus [resin-modified glass ionomer cement], Variolink II [conventional etch-and-rinse resin cement], Panavia F2.0 and Multilink [self-etch resin cements], and RelyX Unicem Aplicap and Maxcem [self-adhesive resin cements]). After water storage at 37°C for one week, the shear bond strength of the specimens (n=8/group) was measured, and the fracture mode was stereomicroscopically examined. Bond strength data were analyzed with two-factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Newman-Keuls' Multiple Range Test (α=0.05). Both the restorative material and the luting agent had a significant effect on bond strength, and significant interaction was noted between the two variables. Zinc phosphate cement and glass ionomer cements produced the lowest bond strengths, whereas the highest bond strengths were found with the two self-etch and one of the self-adhesive resin cements. Generally, the fracture mode varied markedly with the restorative material. The luting agents had a bigger influence on bond strength between restorative materials and dentin than was seen with the restorative material.

  2. Directly Placed Restorative Materials: Review and Network Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, F; Göstemeyer, G; Blunck, U; Paris, S; Hsu, L-Y; Tu, Y-K

    2016-06-01

    For restoring cavitated dental lesions, whether carious or not, a large number of material combinations are available. We aimed to systematically review and synthesize data of comparative dental restorative trials. A systematic review was performed. Randomized controlled trials published between 2005 and 2015 were included that compared the survival of ≥2 restorative and/or adhesive materials (i.e., no need for restorative reintervention). Pairwise and Bayesian network meta-analyses were performed, with separate evaluations for cervical cavitated lesions and load-bearing posterior cavitated lesions in permanent and primary teeth. A total of 11,070 restorations (5,330 cervical, 5,740 load bearing) had been placed in 3,633 patients in the included trials. Thirty-six trials investigated restoration of cervical lesions (all in permanent teeth) and 36 of load-bearing lesions (8 in primary and 28 in permanent teeth). Resin-modified glass ionomer cements had the highest chance of survival in cervical cavitated lesions; composites or compomers placed via 2-step self-etch and 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesives were ranked next. Restorations placed with 2-step etch-and-rinse or 1-step self-etch adhesives performed worst. For load-bearing restorations, conventional composites had the highest probability of survival, while siloranes were found least suitable. Ambiguity remains regarding which adhesive strategy to use in load-bearing cavitated lesions. Most studies showed high risk of bias, and several comparisons were prone for publication bias. If prioritized for survival, resin-modified glass ionomer cements might be recommended to restore cervical lesions. For load-bearing ones, conventional or bulk fill composites seem most suitable. The available evidence is quantitatively and qualitatively insufficient for further recommendations, especially with regard to adhesive strategies in posterior load-bearing situations. Moreover, different material classifications might yield

  3. Slow crack propagation in composite restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Montes-G, G M; Draughn, R A

    1987-05-01

    The double-torsion test technique was used to study slow crack propagation in a set of dental composite resins including two glass-filled and two microfilled materials. The microstructure within each pair was the same but one of the resins was selfcured and the other photocured. The fracture behavior was dependent on the filler concentration and the presence of absorbed water. Wet materials fractured by slow crack growth in the range of crack velocity studied (10(-7) to 10(-3) m/s), and the microfilled composites, which contain a lower concentration of inorganic filler, had lower stress intensity factors (K1c) than the glass-filled composites tested. Dry specimens of the microfilled materials and the selfcured, glass-filled composite also showed unstable, stick-slip fracture behavior indicative of a crack blunting mechanism which leads to an elevation of the stress intensity factor for crack initiation over K1c for stable crack growth. The plasticizing effect of water increased the viscoelastic response of the materials measured by the slope of curves of slow crack growth. Analysis of fracture surfaces showed that cracks propagated at low velocities (10(-7) to 10(-5) m/s) by the apparent failure of the filler/matrix interfacial bond, and absorbed water affected the strength or fracture resistance of the interface. At high crack velocities the properties of the composite depend on the properties of the polymeric matrix, the filler, and the filler volume fraction, but at low velocities the interface is the controlling factor in the durability of these composites exposed to an aqueous environment.

  4. Annotated Bibliography of Textbooks and Reference Materials in Marine Sciences. Provisional Edition. Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, Technical Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission.

    Presented is an annotated bibliography based on selected materials from a preliminary survey of existing bibliographies, publishers' listings, and other sources. It is intended to serve educators and researchers, especially those in countries where marine sciences are just developing. One hundred annotated and 450 non-annotated entries are…

  5. Materials and methods for autonomous restoration of electrical conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Blaiszik, Benjamin J; Odom, Susan A; Caruso, Mary M; Jackson, Aaron C; Baginska, Marta B; Ritchey, Joshua A; Finke, Aaron D; White, Scott R; Moore, Jeffrey S; Sottos, Nancy R; Braun, Paul V; Amine, Khalil

    2014-03-25

    An autonomic conductivity restoration system includes a solid conductor and a plurality of particles. The particles include a conductive fluid, a plurality of conductive microparticles, and/or a conductive material forming agent. The solid conductor has a first end, a second end, and a first conductivity between the first and second ends. When a crack forms between the first and second ends of the conductor, the contents of at least a portion of the particles are released into the crack. The cracked conductor and the released contents of the particles form a restored conductor having a second conductivity, which may be at least 90% of the first conductivity.

  6. Gradual surface degradation of restorative materials by acidic agents.

    PubMed

    Hengtrakool, Chanothai; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acidic agents on surface roughness and characteristics of four restorative materials. Fifty-two discs were created from each restorative material: metal-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Ketac-S), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC), resin composite (Filtek Z250), and amalgam (Valiant-PhD); each disc was 12 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm thick. The specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=13) and immersed for 168 hours in four storage media: deionized water (control); citrate buffer solution; green mango juice; and pineapple juice. Surface roughness measurements were performed with a profilometer, both before and after storage media immersion. Surface characteristics were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistical significance among each group was analyzed using two-way repeated ANOVA and Tukey's tests. Ketac-S demonstrated the highest roughness changes after immersion in acidic agents (p<0.05), followed by Fuji II LC. Valiant-PhD and Filtek Z250 illustrated some minor changes over 168 hours. The mango juice produced the greatest degradation effect of all materials tested (p<0.05). SEM photographs demonstrated gradual surface changes of all materials tested after immersions. Of the materials evaluated, amalgam and resin composite may be the most suitable for restorations for patients with tooth surface loss.

  7. Recent Advances in Materials for All-Ceramic Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Jason A.

    2010-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The past three years of research on materials for all-ceramic veneers, inlays, onlays, single-unit crowns, and multi-unit restorations are reviewed. The primary changes in the field were the proliferation of zirconia-based frameworks and computer-aided fabrication of prostheses, as well as, a trend toward more clinically relevant in vitro test methods. This report includes an overview of ceramic fabrication methods, suggestions for critical assessment of material property data, and a summary of clinical longevity for prostheses constructed of various materials. PMID:17586152

  8. Recent advances in materials for all-ceramic restorations.

    PubMed

    Griggs, Jason A

    2007-07-01

    The past 3 years of research on materials for all-ceramic veneers, inlays, onlays, single-unit crowns, and multi-unit restorations are reviewed in this article. The primary changes in the field were the proliferation of zirconia-based frameworks and computer-aided fabrication of prostheses, and a trend toward more clinically relevant in vitro test methods. This article includes an overview of ceramic fabrication methods, suggestions for critical assessment of material property data, and a summary of clinical longevity for prostheses constructed of various materials.

  9. Overview: Damage resistance of graded ceramic restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Improving mechanical response of materials is of great interest in a wide range of disciplines, including biomechanics, tribology, geology, optoelectronics, and nanotechnology. It has been long recognized that spatial gradients in surface composition and structure can improve the mechanical integrity of a material. This review surveys recent results of sliding-contact, flexural, and fatigue tests on graded ceramic materials from our laboratories and elsewhere. Although our findings are examined in the context of possible applications for next-generation, graded all-ceramic dental restorations, implications of our studies have broad impact on biomedical, civil, structural, and an array of other engineering applications. PMID:22778494

  10. Enamel wear caused by three different restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J D; Goldstein, G R; Georgescu, M

    1995-12-01

    The ideal restorative material should cause minimal wear of opposing enamel. This study compared the effects of gold alloy, glazed porcelain, and a laboratory-processed composite on opposing enamel. Ten samples of a type III gold alloy, a porcelain, and a visible-light, heat, and vacuum-processed composite were abraded against cusps of extracted molars for 10,000 cycles on an abrading machine. Pretest and posttest profilometric measurements of the restorative materials demonstrated no statistical difference. Pretest and posttest tracings of the cusps were made on an optical comparator to determine loss of vertical height and surface area. The porcelain caused significantly more loss of vertical height and surface area than the gold alloy or the composite, which were similar.

  11. Finite element analysis of stress concentration in Class V restorations of four groups of restorative materials in mandibular premolar

    PubMed Central

    N, Shubhashini; N, Meena; Shetty, Ashish; Kumari, Anitha; DN, Naveen

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To study the concentration of stress in class V restoration of four different restorative materials subjected to occlusal load of 100N, 150N, 200N, 250N and to analyse the obtained data with the listed properties of the restorative material. Materials and Methods: Using FEM analysis the stresses generated in a class V lesion in a mandibular premolar was studied. Results: Within the framework of the aforementioned views, and from the results of the study it can be concluded that microfilled composite is the most suitable restorative material followed by flowable composite, glass ionomer cement and resin modified glass ionomer cement. Conclusion: Restoration of Class V lesions with materials of higher modulus of elasticity will enable better stress distribution. PMID:20142899

  12. Glass-ionomer cement restorative materials: a sticky subject?

    PubMed

    Sidhu, S K

    2011-06-01

    Glass-ionomer cement (GIC) materials have been in clinical use since their inception 40 years ago. They have undergone several permutations to yield different categories of these materials. Although all GICs share the same generic properties, subtle differences between commercial products may occur. They have a wide range of uses such as lining, bonding, sealing, luting or restoring a tooth. In general, GICs are useful for reasons of adhesion to tooth structure, fluoride release and being tooth-coloured although their sensitivity to moisture, inherent opacity, long-term wear and strength are not as adequate as desired. They are useful in situations where they are not disadvantaged by their comparatively lower physical properties, such as where there is adequate remaining tooth structure to support the material and where they are not subject to heavy occlusal loading. The last decade has seen the use of these materials being extended. However, they are likely to retain their specific niches of clinical application.

  13. Penetration of the pulp chamber by bleaching agents in teeth restored with various restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Gökay, O; Yilmaz, F; Akin, S; Tunçbìlek, M; Ertan, R

    2000-02-01

    It is thought that externally applied bleaching agents may penetrate into the pulp chamber. This study was conducted to evaluate the diffusion of peroxide bleaching agents into the pulp chamber of teeth restored with various restorative materials. Sixty-five human extracted anterior maxillary teeth were separated into the 13 groups containing 5 teeth. Five teeth (control group) were not subjected to any cavity preparation and restoration. Standardized class V cavities were prepared in the other 60 teeth and restored using composite resin (Charisma), polyacid modified composite resin (Dyract), or resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer). All teeth were sectioned 3 mm apical to the cementoenamel junction to remove the intracoronal pulp tissue, and the pulp chamber was filled with acetate buffer to absorb and stabilize any peroxide that might penetrate. Vestibular crown surfaces of teeth in the experimental groups were subjected to four different bleaching agents for 30 min at 37 degrees C, whereas the teeth in the control groups were exposed only to distilled water. Then the acetate buffer solution in the pulp chamber of each tooth was removed, and the pulp chamber of each tooth was rinsed with 100 ml of distilled water twice. Leukocrystal violet and enzyme horseradish peroxidase were added to the mixture of the acetate buffer and rinse water. The optical density of the resulting blue solution was determined spectrophotometrically and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Higher hydrogen peroxide concentrations resulted in a higher pulpal peroxide penetration. The highest pulpal peroxide penetration was found in resin-modified glass ionomer cement groups, whereas composite resin groups showed the lowest pulpal peroxide penetration.

  14. Backscattering from dental restorations and splint materials during therapeutic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, A.G.; Sharma, S.; George, D.I.; Wilson, D.; Dodd, D.; Figa, R.; Haskell, B.

    1985-08-01

    Models were constructed to simulate as closely as possible the human oral cavity. Radiation absorbed doses were determined for controls and various test situations involving the presence of dental restorative and splint materials during cobalt-60 irradiation of the models. Adjacent gold full crowns and adjacent solid dental silver amalgam cores both increased the dose to the interproximal gingivae by 20%. Use of orthodontic full bands for splinting the jaws increased the dose to the buccal tissues by an average of 10%. Augmentation of dose through backscatter radiation was determined to be only slight for intracoronal amalgam fillings and stainless steel or plastic bracket splints.

  15. Embryotoxicity assays for leached components from dental restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Currently, there are no suitable assays available to evaluate the embryotoxicity of leached components from restorative dental materials. Methods The effect of the medium conditioned by composites and amalgam on mouse blastocysts in vitro was tested. The materials were also subcutaneously implanted, and the effect of the medium supplemented with serum from the host blood was evaluated in the embryotoxicity assay. The embryo implantation rate in the material-transplanted mothers was also evaluated. Results The results show that while the culture in media conditioned by amalgams did not affect blastocyst development, the medium conditioned by composites caused blastocyst degeneration and apoptosis. The development of blastocysts in a medium containing serum obtained from animals after transplantation was, however, without effect. Finally, inconsistent reduction in the implantation rate in transplanted mothers was observed. Conclusions In this study, we provide examples of in vitro and in vivo tests that may be used to evaluate embryotoxicity for dental materials. Our results show that leached components from our composite-material induced embryotoxicity in vitro, however, no toxicity was observed when subcutaneously implanted in vivo. This highlights the necessity of integrated in vitro and in vivo tests for valuable predictive estimation of embryotoxicity for complex materials. PMID:21978455

  16. Colour measurements of surfaces to evaluate the restoration materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Monaco, Angela; Marabelli, Maurizio; Pelosi, Claudia; Picchio, Rodolfo

    2011-06-01

    In this paper two case studies on the application of colour measurements for the evaluation of some restoration materials are discussed. The materials related to the research are: watercolours employed in restoration of wall paintings and preservative/consolidants for wood artifacts. Commercial watercolours, supplied by Maimeri, Windsor&Newton and Talens factories have been tested. Colour measurements have been performed by means of a reflectance spectrophotometer (RS) before and after accelerated ageing of watercolours at 92% relative humidity (RH) and in a Solar Box chamber. The experimental results show that watercolours based on natural earths and artificial ultramarine undergo the main colour changes, expressed as L*, a* and b* variations and total colour difference (▵E*). In the other cases colour differences depend on both watercolour typology and suppliers. The other example concerns the evaluation of colour change due to surface treatment of Poplar (Populus sp.) and chestnut (Castanea sativa L.) wood samples. The wooden samples have been treated with a novel organic preservative/consolidant product that has been tested also in a real case as comparison. The treated samples have been artificially aged in Solar Box chamber equipped with a 280 nm UV filter. Colour has been measured before and after the artificial ageing by means of a RS. Colour changes have been determined also for the main door of an historical mansion in Viterbo, made of chestnut wood, and exposed outdoors.

  17. Criteria for clinical translucency evaluation of direct esthetic restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to suggest practical criteria for the clinical translucency evaluation of direct esthetic restorative materials, and to review the translucency with these criteria. For the evaluation of reported translucency values, measuring instrument and method, specimen thickness, background color, and illumination should be scrutinized. Translucency parameter (TP) of 15 to 19 could be regarded as the translucency of 1 mm thick human enamel. Visual perceptibility threshold for translucency difference in contrast ratio (ΔCR) of 0.07 could be transformed into ΔTP value of 2. Translucency differences between direct and indirect resin composites were perceivable (ΔTP > 2). Universal and corresponding flowable resin composites did not show perceivable translucency differences in most products. Translucency differed significantly by the product within each shade group, and by the shade group within each product. Translucency of human enamel and perceptibility threshold for translucency difference may be used as criteria for the clinical evaluation of translucency of esthetic restorative materials. PMID:27508156

  18. The challenge for innovation in direct restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Bayne, S; Petersen, P E; Piper, D; Schmalz, G; Meyer, D

    2013-11-01

    During the past 50 years, a series of key UN conferences have established a framework to minimize human health risks from environmental exposures to key chemicals. In January 2013, more than 140 countries agreed to the text of new treaty to minimize Hg effects on the environment (the Minamata Convention). Dental caries is omnipresent around the globe, affecting 60% to 90% of school children and most adults, and producing discomfort that affects quality of life. Dental amalgam is frequently used to treat carious lesions and its use releases mercury into the environment. The best way to avoid the use of dental amalgam is to emphasize caries prevention. Alternatives to amalgam are suitable in some applications, but no replacement for amalgam has been found for large posterior restorations. For any restorative material, safety and environmental impacts are part of clinical risk assessment. Safety is freedom from unacceptable risks. Risk is a combination of probability of exposure and severity of harm. Best management practices are crucial to manage dental amalgam, but these impose additional that are disproportionately more for developing countries. The Minamata Convention seeks a phase-out of all mercury-based products except dental amalgam, where a phase-down is the present goal. For dentistry, the most important focus is the promotion of caries prevention and research on new materials.

  19. Criteria for clinical translucency evaluation of direct esthetic restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this review was to suggest practical criteria for the clinical translucency evaluation of direct esthetic restorative materials, and to review the translucency with these criteria. For the evaluation of reported translucency values, measuring instrument and method, specimen thickness, background color, and illumination should be scrutinized. Translucency parameter (TP) of 15 to 19 could be regarded as the translucency of 1 mm thick human enamel. Visual perceptibility threshold for translucency difference in contrast ratio (ΔCR) of 0.07 could be transformed into ΔTP value of 2. Translucency differences between direct and indirect resin composites were perceivable (ΔTP > 2). Universal and corresponding flowable resin composites did not show perceivable translucency differences in most products. Translucency differed significantly by the product within each shade group, and by the shade group within each product. Translucency of human enamel and perceptibility threshold for translucency difference may be used as criteria for the clinical evaluation of translucency of esthetic restorative materials.

  20. Surface roughness of aesthetic restorative materials: an in vitro comparison.

    PubMed

    Rosen, M; Grossman, E S; Cleaton-Jones, P E; Volchansky, A

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the surface roughness of three types of aesthetic restorative material. Six standard samples of two brands of each type of material were prepared namely: hybrid composites (Prodigy, Z100), compomers (Compoglass F, Hytac Aplitip) and glass ionomer cements (Photac-Fil, Vitremer) in a perspex mould (N = 36). Upper and lower surfaces were covered with Mylar strips which, in turn, were covered with glass slides and compressed to express excess material. After light curing, specimens were stored in distilled water for 14 days. Thereafter, one side of each specimen was polished sequentially with medium, fine and super fine Soflex discs (treatment). Untreated surfaces served as controls. All surfaces were examined with Talysurf and the surface roughness (Ra) of each specimen was recorded. Three measurements were made of each specimen. A 4-way ANOVA and Tukey's Studentised range test were used to analyse the data. Statistically significant effects were found for both type of material (P = 0.0001) and for treatment process (P = 0.0065). Among unpolished specimens: Compoglass F is significantly rougher than Vitremer, Z100, Prodigy and Hytac Aplitip, and compomers are significantly rougher than hybrids. Among polished specimens: Photac-Fil is significantly rougher than Z100 but does not differ from Compoglass F, Vitremer, Prodigy and Hytac Aplitip, and glass ionomers are also significantly rougher than hybrids. The smoothest surface is obtained when curing materials against a Mylar strip.

  1. In situ reaction kinetic analysis of dental restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younas, Basma; Samad Khan, Abdul; Muzaffar, Danish; Hussain, Ijaz; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate in situ structural and thermal changes of dental restorative materials at periodical time intervals. The commercial materials included zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE), zinc phosphate type I (ZnPO4), glass ionomer cement type II (GIC) and resin-based nano-omposite (Filtek Z350 XT). These materials were processed according to manufacturer's instructions. For the structural analysis Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used at high resolution. TGA was used to evaluate thermal weight-loss. The FTIR spectra were collected at periodic time intervals. FTIR spectra showed that with time passing all materials exhibited an increase in peak intensities and a new appearance of shoulders and shifting of peaks for example, ZnPO4 (P-O), ZOE (C═O, C═N, C-O-C), GIC (COO-, C-H, Si-OH), composites (C═O, C═C, C═N, C-N-H). The peaks were replaced by bands and these bands became broader with time interval. Composites showed a degree of conversion and new peaks corresponded to the cross-linking of polymer composites. TGA analysis showed that significant changes in weight loss of set materials were observed after 24 h, where ZOE showed continuous changes in thermal degradation. The spectral changes and thermal degradation with time interval elucidated in situ setting behaviour and understanding of their bonding compatibility with tooth structure and change in relation to time.

  2. 14 CFR 21.225 - Provisional airworthiness certificates corresponding with provisional amendments to type...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... provisional aircraft flight manual or other document and appropriate placards containing the limitations... FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR... Class II provisional airworthiness certificate, for an aircraft, for which a provisional amendment...

  3. Opalescence of human teeth and dental esthetic restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2016-12-01

    Human tooth enamel is opalescent, which renders teeth bluish in reflected and orange in transmitted color. The aim was to review opalescent property of teeth and application and mimetic reproduction in esthetic restorations. A PubMed search for articles published in English till 2015 on the opalescence of teeth and esthetic materials revealed 29 relevant papers. Opalescence was measured with OP-RT index, which was calculated as the difference in the yellow-blue and red-green color coordinates between the reflected and transmitted colors. Mean OP-RT value of human enamel was 22.9. OP-RT values of direct resin composites changed after polymerization, and the range in these materials was 5.7-23.7. OP-RT value ranges were 1.6-6.1 and 2.0-7.1 for the core and veneer ceramics, respectively. Since the OP-RT values of esthetic materials were lower than that of enamel, it is recommended that materials that can reproduce the opalescence of enamel be further designed.

  4. The use of definitive implant abutments for the fabrication of provisional crowns: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Bilhan, Hakan; Mumcu, Emre

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The anterior region is a challenge for most clinicians to achieve optimal esthetics with dental implants. The provisional crown is a key factor in the success of obtaining pink esthetics around restorations with single implants, by soft tissue and inter-proximal papilla shaping. Provisional abutments bring additional costs and make the treatment more expensive. Since one of the aims of the clinician is to reduce costs and find more economic ways to raise patient satisfaction, this paper describes a practical method for chair-side fabrication of non-occlusal loaded provisional crowns used by the authors for several years successfully. Methods Twenty two patients (9 males, 13 females; mean age, 36,72 years) with one missing anterior tooth were treated by using the presented method. Metal definitive abutments instead of provisional abutments were used and provisional crowns were fabricated on the definitive abutments for all of the patients. The marginal fit was finished on a laboratory analogue and temporarily cemented to the abutments. The marginal adaptation of the crowns was evaluated radiographically. Results The patients were all satisfied with the final appearance and no complications occurred until the implants were loaded with permanent restorations. Conclusions The use of the definitive abutments for provisional crowns instead of provisional abutments reduces the costs and the same results can be obtained. PMID:22087416

  5. Machinable glass-ceramics forming as a restorative dental material.

    PubMed

    Chaysuwan, Duangrudee; Sirinukunwattana, Krongkarn; Kanchanatawewat, Kanchana; Heness, Greg; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2011-01-01

    MgO, SiO(2), Al(2)O(3), MgF(2), CaF(2), CaCO(3), SrCO(3), and P(2)O(5) were used to prepare glass-ceramics for restorative dental materials. Thermal properties, phases, microstructures and hardness were characterized by DTA, XRD, SEM and Vickers microhardness. Three-point bending strength and fracture toughness were applied by UTM according to ISO 6872: 1997(E). XRD showed that the glass crystallized at 892°C (second crystallization temperature+20°C) for 3 hrs consisted mainly of calcium-mica and fluorapatite crystalline phases. Average hardness (3.70 GPa) closely matched human enamel (3.20 GPa). The higher fracture toughness (2.04 MPa√m) combined with the hardness to give a lower brittleness index (1.81 µm(-1/2)) which indicates that they have exceptional machinability. Bending strength results (176.61 MPa) were analyzed by Weibull analysis to determine modulus value (m=17.80). Machinability of the calcium mica-fluorapatite glass-ceramic was demonstrated by fabricating with CAD/CAM.

  6. Compressive fatigue limit of four types of dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Öhman, Caroline; Jefferies, Steven R; Gray, Holly; Xia, Wei; Engqvist, Håkan

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quasi-static compressive strength and the compressive fatigue limit of four different dental restorative materials, before and after aging in distilled water for 30 days. A conventional glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP; IG), a zinc-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Chemfil rock; CF), a light curable resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC; LC) and a resin-based composite (Quixfil; QF) were investigated. Cylindrical specimens (4mm in diameter and 6mm in height) were prepared according to the manufacturer׳s instructions. The compressive fatigue limit was obtained using the staircase method. Samples were tested in distilled water at 37°C, at a frequency of 10Hz with 10(5) cycles set as run-out. 17 fatigue samples were tested for each group. Two-way ANOVA and one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey׳s post-hoc test were used to analyze the results. Among the four types of materials, the resin-based composite exhibited the highest compressive strength (244±13.0MPa) and compressive fatigue limit (134±7.8MPa), followed by the light-cured resin reinforced glass ionomer cement (168±8.5MPa and 92±6.6MPa, respectively) after one day of storage in distilled water. After being stored for 30 days, all specimens showed an increase in compressive strength. Aging showed no effect on the compressive fatigue limit of the resin-based composite and the light-cured resin reinforced glass ionomer cement, however, the conventional glass ionomer cements showed a drastic decrease (37% for IG, 31% for CF) in compressive fatigue limit. In conclusion, in the present study, resin modified GIC and resin-based composite were found to have superior mechanical properties to conventional GIC.

  7. Use of temporary filling material for index fabrication in Class IV resin composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun-Young; Kim, Sun-Young; Kim, Duck-Su; Choi, Kyoung-Kyu

    2013-05-01

    When a patient with a fractured anterior tooth visits the clinic, clinician has to restore the tooth esthetically and quickly. For esthetic resin restoration, clinician can use 'Natural Layering technique' and an index for palatal wall may be needed. In this case report, we introduce pre-restoration index technique on a Class IV defect, in which a temporary filling material is used for easy restoration. Chair-side index fabrication for Class IV restoration is convenient and makes a single-visit treatment possible.

  8. Repeated exposure of acidic beverages on esthetic restorative materials: An in-vitro surface microhardness study

    PubMed Central

    Sunny, Steffy M.; Rai, Kavita; Hegde, Amitha M.

    2016-01-01

    Background A manifold increase in the consumption of aerated beverages has witnessed a twin increase in tooth wear and raised demand for esthetic restorative materials. This study aimed to evaluate the surface microhardness changes of esthetic restorative materials following treatment with aerated beverages in an in-vitro situation. Material and Methods The initial surface microhardness of the restorative materials GC Fuji II LC, GC Fuji IX, Nano Glass ionomer, Resin and Nano composite was recorded. These materials were studied under 3 groups that included those exposed to the acidic beverages daily, weekly once in a month and those that had no exposures at all. The final surface microhardness of the materials was recorded following experimentation and was subjected to statistical comparisons. Results The restorative materials were compared for their surface microhardness changes following respective treatments using the T-test and One-way ANOVA analysis. Inter-comparisons between the groups showed statistical significance (p<.05), when treated with both the beverages. The five restorative materials revealed surface microhardness loss; the maximum reduction noticed with the Nano glass ionomer cement tested (p<.0005). Conclusions The surface microhardness of restorative materials markedly reduced upon repeated exposures with acidic beverages; the product with phosphoric acid producing the maximum surface microhardness loss. Key words:Restorative materials, acidic beverages, surface microhardness, resin composites, glass ionomers. PMID:27398183

  9. Effects of elevated temperatures on different restorative materials: An aid to forensic identification processes

    PubMed Central

    Pol, Chetan A.; Ghige, Suvarna K.; Gosavi, Suchitra R.; Hazarey, Vinay K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heat-induced alterations to dental and restorative materials can be of great interest to forensic dentistry. Knowing the specific optical behavior of dental materials can be of high importance as recognition of changes induced by high temperatures can lead to the determination of material which was used in a dental restoration, facilitating identification of burned human remains. Aim: To observe the effects of predetermined temperatures (200°C–400°C–600°C–800°C–1000°C) on unrestored teeth and different restorative materials macroscopically and then examine them under a stereomicroscope for the purpose of identification. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 375 extracted teeth which were divided into five groups of 75 teeth each as follows: group 1- unrestored teeth, group 2- teeth restored with all-ceramic crowns, Group 3- with class I silver amalgam filling, group 4- with class I composite restoration, and group 5- with class I glass ionomer cement restoration. Results: Unrestored and restored teeth display a series of specific macroscopic & stereomicroscopic structural changes for each range of temperature. Conclusion: Dental tissues and restorative materials undergo a series of changes which correlate well with the various temperatures to which they were exposed. These changes are a consequence of the nature of the materials and their physicochemical characteristics. PMID:26005305

  10. [Adhesion as criterion of choice of materials for dental restorations of defects in cervical area].

    PubMed

    Rusanov, F S; Poiurovskaia, I Ia; Krechina, E K; Sogachev, G V

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of comparative in vitro evaluation of classical and flow consistency restorative polymeric materials (Japan and Russia) adhesion to dentin in cervical area. The adhesive properties of these materials were compared with the experimental systems of "sandwich" type, combining layers of classic and flow consistency, glass-ionomer cement Fuji 8 (Japan) and material SMARTCEM 2 (Switzerland). The highest dentin adhesion strength showed Fuji 8, restoration materials of classical consistency proved to have advantage in adhesion properties.

  11. ClinicAl Evaluation of Dental Restorative Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    and strength of the restoration to resist flexural occlusal stresses and acts as a secondary cause for fracture. Wear together with fracture...caries, accounting for 39.9 percent of failures. Wear further decreases the bulk and strength of the restoration to resist flexural occlusal stresses ...Machining of the surface during the finishing and polishing procedure may produce microdefects and/or residual stress in the surface which would

  12. Comparative evaluation of strength of various core restorative materials for endodontically treated anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Dabas, V K

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, four restorative materials were used for the restoration of endodontically treated anterior teeth and their strength were compared with that of natural teeth. 100 freshly extracted Maxillary Central Incisors were used. The teeth were restored with Pin-retained amalgam-core buildups, Dowel-post with Glass ionomer-Amalgam alloy combination Cast Core build up. The natural tooth showed the maximum strength. Though some of the restorative materials showed promising results, none of them is able to show strength anywhere near to that of natural tooth.

  13. A comparative analysis of restorative materials used in abfraction lesions in tooth with and without occlusal restoration: Three-dimensional finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Srirekha, A; Bashetty, Kusum

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The present comparative analysis aimed at evaluating the mechanical behavior of various restorative materials in abfraction lesion in the presence and absence of occlusal restoration. Materials and Methods: A three-dimensional finite-element analysis was performed. Six experimental models of mandibular first premolar were generated and divided into two groups (groups A and B) of three each. All the groups had cervical abfraction lesion restored with materials and in addition group A had class I occlusal restoration. A load of 90 N, 200 N, and 400 N were applied at 45° loading angle on the buccal inclines of buccal cusp and Von Mises stresses was chosen for analysis. Results: In all the models, the values of stress recorded at the cervical margin of the restorations were at their maxima. Irrespective of the occlusal restoration, all the materials performed well at 90 N and 200 N. At 400 N, only low-shrink composite showed stresses lesser than its tensile strength indicating its success even at higher load. Conclusion: Irrespective of occlusal restoration, restorative materials with low modulus of elasticity are successful in abfraction lesions at moderate tensile stresses; whereas materials with higher modulus of elasticity and mechanical properties can support higher loads and resist wear. Significance: The model allows comparison of different restorative materials for restoration of abfraction lesions in the presence and absence of occlusal restoration. The model can be used to validate more sophisticated computational models as well as to conduct various optimization studies. PMID:23716970

  14. Two-year clinical performance of a resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative material.

    PubMed

    Brackett, W W; Gilpatrick, R O; Browning, W D; Gregory, P N

    1999-01-01

    This study was a 2-year clinical evaluation of a conventional and a resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative material. Thirty-four restorations each of Ketac-Fil and Photac-Fil were placed without tooth preparation in cervical abrasion/abfraction lesions, primarily in premolar teeth. Patients ranged in age from 30 to 73 years, with a median age of 45 years. Isolation for the restorations was accomplished with cotton rolls. Restorations of both materials were retained at the rate of 93%, and both were comparable in appearance, receiving Alfa ratings for more than 85% of the restorations. One occurrence of secondary caries was observed for each material. No significant difference between the materials was observed for any evaluation category (exact binomial test, P > 0.05).

  15. Inhibition of artificial secondary caries in root by fluoride-releasing restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Torii, Y; Itota, T; Okamoto, M; Nakabo, S; Nagamine, M; Inoue, K

    2001-01-01

    This investigation evaluated the fluoride-releasing properties of various fluoride-releasing restorative materials, including resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (Fuji ionomer TypeII LC, Photac-Fil Aplicap, Vitremer), compomers (Ionosit FIL, Compoglass, Dyract) and fluoride-releasing resin composites (Heliomolar radiopaque, Degufill mineral). The study also estimated the effects of those materials on the inhibition of artificial secondary caries around restorations using a bacterial caries-inducing system. The amount of fluoride released from the materials in deionized water was measured every one week for 10 weeks. Class V cavities with the gingival margin located in the root were prepared in extracted human premolars and restored with each of the materials. The restored teeth were incubated in the bacterial artificial caries chamber, and the artificial lesion created around the restoration was observed microradiographically. The resin-modified glass-ionomer cements released the largest amount of fluoride and created a thick radio-opaque zone in the artificial lesion along the restoration-dentin interface. These results indicated that the fluoride-releasing restorative materials have the potential to inhibit secondary caries formation around restorations. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cements presented a particularly strong effect, compared with compomers and fluoride-releasing resin composites.

  16. Discrimination of tooth layers and dental restorative materials using cutting sounds.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Vahid; Arzanpour, Siamak; Chehroudi, Babak

    2015-03-01

    Dental restoration begins with removing carries and affected tissues with air-turbine rotary cutting handpieces, and later restoring the lost tissues with appropriate restorative materials to retain the functionality. Most restoration materials eventually fail as they age and need to be replaced. One of the difficulties in replacing failing restorations is discerning the boundary of restorative materials, which causes inadvertent removal of healthy tooth layers. Developing an objective and sensor-based method is a promising approach to monitor dental restorative operations and to prevent excessive tooth losses. This paper has analyzed cutting sounds of an air-turbine handpiece to discriminate between tooth layers and two commonly used restorative materials, amalgam and composite. Support vector machines were employed for classification, and the averaged short-time Fourier transform coefficients were selected as the features. The classifier performance was evaluated from different aspects such as the number of features, feature scaling methods, classification schemes, and utilized kernels. The total classification accuracies were 89% and 92% for cases included composite and amalgam materials, respectively. The obtained results indicated the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Key Parameters of Hybrid Materials for CAD/CAM-Based Restorative Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Sebastian D

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid materials are a recent addition to the dental armamentarium for computer-assisted design/ computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-based restorative dentistry. They are intended to provide dentists with the capability of restoring single teeth in one appointment with a material that emulates the structure and physical properties of natural teeth. This article aims to provide an overview of currently available hybrid materials and offer the reader further understanding of their key clinical parameters and possible limitations.

  18. Microleakage of Er:YAG laser and dental bur prepared cavities in primary teeth restored with different adhesive restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Baghalian, Ali; Nakhjavani, Yahya B; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Motahhary, Pouria; Bahramian, Hoda

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser irradiation and conventional dental bur cavity preparation on in vitro microleakage of class V cavities restored with different adhesive restorative materials and two types of self-etching adhesives in primary teeth. Standard class V cavities were prepared on 80 extracted primary, and the teeth were randomly divided into eight subgroups prepared either by dental bur or Er:YAG laser irradiation and then restored with self-cured glass ionomer (GI), resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), resin composite and Clearfil SE Bond (two-step self-etching adhesive), and resin composite and Clearfil S3 Bond (one-step self-etching adhesive). Restorations were finished and stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h and then subjected to thermocycling. All the teeth were sealed with nail varnish, placed in a silver nitrate solution, and then vertically cut in a buccolingually direction. Subsequently, the specimens were evaluated for gingival and occlusal microleakage using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Mann-Whitney test. Wilcoxon test was used for comparing occlusal microleakage with gingival microleakage at p < 0.05. A higher degree of occlusal and gingival microleakage values for the teeth restored with GI or RMGI was obtained by both preparation methods compared with that of resin composites and the two self-etching primers. Er:YAG laser irradiation resulted in a significantly higher degree of microleakage only at the gingival margins for teeth restored with GI or RMGI, or composite and Clearfil S3 Bond compared with the bur preparation. The Er:YAG laser-prepared teeth restored with composite and Clearfil SE Bond demonstrated a better marginal seal on occlusal and gingival margins compared with that of bur-prepared cavities. The degree of microleakage in class V cavities was affected by the type of adhesive

  19. Surface hardness of different restorative materials after long-term immersion in sports and energy drinks.

    PubMed

    Erdemir, Ugur; Yildiz, Esra; Eren, Meltem Mert; Ozel, Sevda

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of sports and energy drinks on the surface hardness of different restorative materials over a 6-month period. Forty-two disk-shaped specimens were prepared for each of the four restorative materials tested: Compoglass F, Filtek Z250, Filtek Supreme, and Premise. Specimens were immersed for 2 min daily, up to 6 months, in six storage solutions (n=7 per material for each solution): distilled water, Powerade, Gatorade, X-IR, Burn, and Red Bull. Surface hardness was measured at baseline, after 1 week, 1 month, and 6 months. Data were analyzed statistically using repeated measures ANOVA followed by the Bonferroni test for multiple comparisons (α=0.05). Surface hardness of the restorative materials was significantly affected by both immersion solution and immersion period (p<0.001). All tested solutions induced significant reduction in surface hardness of the restorative materials over a 6-month immersion period.

  20. 14 CFR 21.225 - Provisional airworthiness certificates corresponding with provisional amendments to type...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... aircraft flight manual or other document and appropriate placards containing the limitations required by... FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR... Class II provisional airworthiness certificate, for an aircraft, for which a provisional amendment...

  1. 14 CFR 21.225 - Provisional airworthiness certificates corresponding with provisional amendments to type...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... aircraft flight manual or other document and appropriate placards containing the limitations required by... FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR... Class II provisional airworthiness certificate, for an aircraft, for which a provisional amendment...

  2. 14 CFR 21.225 - Provisional airworthiness certificates corresponding with provisional amendments to type...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... aircraft flight manual or other document and appropriate placards containing the limitations required by... FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR... Class II provisional airworthiness certificate, for an aircraft, for which a provisional amendment...

  3. [Direct restoration of the tooth crown using various core build-up materials].

    PubMed

    Maksimovskaya, L N; Krutov, V A; Kuprin, P V; Kuprina, M A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess direct restorations mechanical properties (both in vitro and in vivo) to improve dental restorations quality after root canal treatment. Laboratory tests showed that using nanocomposite materials of dual curing with the fiberglass reinforced posts improves restoration strength in endodontically treated teeth: by 3.9±5.8% in class II Peroz restorations, 12.6±5.9 and 24.2±4.2% in class III and IV, correspondently. Using fiberglass reinforced posts (LuxaPost) for the restoration of the tooth crown after endodontic treatment significantly decreases the number of complications associated with marginal leakage of the restoration during first 2 years after treatment (p<005).

  4. [Changes in gingival blood circulation in patients with provisional fixed acrylic dentures].

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, A S; Rudakova, Iu A; Ivanova, S B; Nekrasov, A N

    2015-01-01

    The adhesion of oral microorganisms to the surface of teeth and dental restorative materials is often the starting point in the developments of caries and periodontal disease. Formation of biofilm on the surface provisional acrylic bridge is especially quickly and can potentially generate decay or periodontal disease on the teeth. Occlusion trauma and occlusion disorders effects on increasing of injure regional periodontal tissues. Using ultrasonic doppler diagnostics oral mucosal blood flow was measured in 79 patients with periodontitis of medium severity with different hygiene conditions before and during orthopedic treatment by provisional fixed dentures was model by different methods. According to the results of this study was stated optimization of oral mucosal blood flow after pre-prosthetic treatments and the supportive hygiene periodontal care during the treatment. Results was used for reduce of functional stress in the in periodontal tissues during the orthopedic alignment by the use of fixed dentures. Specific prosthodontic hygiene protocol and model by individual articulator must be used to treat patients with widespread chronic periodontitis by interim prostheses.

  5. 42 CFR 431.710 - Provisional licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION State Programs for Licensing Nursing Home Administrators § 431.710 Provisional licenses. To fill a position of nursing...

  6. Measurement of the fluorescence of restorative dental materials using a 655-nm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Souza-Campos, Dilma H.; Zanin, Sissi; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Pecora, Jesus D.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Harari, Sonia

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the level of fluorescence of seven restorative materials using 655 nm diode laser. The laser fluorescence system has ben used as an auxiliary method for the detection of carious lesions. This new diagnostic method increases information which are important for the choice of treatment by the Dentist. The characteristic of restorative materials and sealers interferes in the values obtained by the apparatus during the detection of secondary carious lesions. The optical properties of each biological tissue or material are related to the interaction with the laser beam. Aware of that, the fluorescence of healthy dentin and enamel is 0-15, the authors determined the fluorescence of seven restorative materials with 10 teeth in each group. The laser reading scale differed according to the materia, ranging from 1 to 22 with several materials, for example the sealer without inorganic filler and the glass ionomer, showing fluorescence values similar to carious enamel which interferes with the readings around the restorations resulting in a false positive. Knowledge of restoration material fluorescence can aid in the detection of secondary carious lesions around the restorations.

  7. Effect of the lasers used in periodontal therapy on the surfaces of restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Hatipoğlu, Mükerrem; Barutcigil, Çağatay; Harorlı, Osman Tolga; Ulug, Bülent

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to reveal potential damage of the lasers, which are used as an alternative to manual instruments in periodontal therapy, might cause to the surface of restorative materials. Four different restorative materials were used: a glass-ionomer cement (GIC), a flowable composite (FC), a universal composite (UC) and an amalgam. Ten cylindrical samples (8 mm × 2 mm) were prepared for each restorative material. Two laser systems were used in subgingival curettage mode; an 940 nm diode laser (Epic Biolase, Irvine, CA) and an Er,Cr:YSGG laser (Waterlase iPlus, Biolase, Irvine, CA). After laser irradiation, roughness of the sample surfaces was measured using a profilometer. Additionally, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses were performed to evaluate the morphology and surface deformations of the restorative materials and surfaces. The laser irradiation did not affect the surface roughness of any restorative materials relative to that of the control group (p > 0.05) except for the Er,Cr:YSGG treatment on GIC (p < 0.05). SEM and AFM images verified the results of the surface roughness tests. Within the limitations of the present study, it was demonstrated that Er,Cr:YSGG and diode lasers, aside from the Er;Cr:YSGG treatment on GIC, caused no harmful surface effects on adjacent restorative materials. SCANNING 38:227-233, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. [Effect of water storage and intrapulpal pressure on microleakage of three restorative materials].

    PubMed

    Balogh, A E; Bouter, D; Fazekas, A; Degrange, M

    2000-09-01

    Three different restorative materials, Z100 composite, F2000 compomer and Vitremer glass ionomer cement are currently proposed for Class V restorations. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of water storage and the simulated intrapulpal pressure (sIP) on the quality of the margins of class V restorations located both in enamel and dentin. The water resorption of restorative materials containing hydrophilic groups (compomers and glass ionomer cements) can favourably modify the marginal sealing ability by hydroscopic expansion. The influence of the sIP was specific to the material. While F2000 compomer and Vitremer glass ionomer cement were un-influenced by sIP, with Z100 composite a significant difference could be observed. It was concluded that F2000 compomer and Vitremer glass ionomer cement showed significantly less microleakage, which means a better marginal sealing ability than Z100 composite.

  9. The effect of temporary restorative materials on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth.

    PubMed

    Milani, Amin Salem; Froughreyhani, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Hosein; Tabegh, Fatemeh Ghasemi; Pournaghiazar, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the fracture strength of endodontically treated teeth temporarily restored with some commonly used interim materials. Of 90 extracted maxillary premolars used in this study, 15 were left intact as the positive control. Endodontic treatment was performed on the remaining 75 teeth. The endodontically treated teeth were then randomly assigned to 5 groups (n = 15). One group was not restored and served as the negative control. In the remaining 4 experimental groups, the teeth were restored with a temporary cement: Zonalin, IRM, Coltosol, or Fuji II LC resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI). The fracture strengths of all teeth were measured with a universal testing machine. The fracture strength of teeth restored with RMGI was significantly greater than that of other groups (P < 0.001), including intact teeth (P = 0.025). The fracture strength of teeth restored with other temporary materials was significantly lower than that of intact teeth (P < 0.05) but not significantly different from that of the negative control. From a structural resistance standpoint, RMGI may be the best choice for short-term temporary restoration of endodontically treated teeth. Other types of temporary restorative material had no reinforcing effect on tooth structure.

  10. Bulk-fill resin-based composite restorative materials: a review.

    PubMed

    Chesterman, J; Jowett, A; Gallacher, A; Nixon, P

    2017-03-10

    Resin-based composite (RBC) materials are increasingly being used for the restoration of posterior teeth. The increasing demand for aesthetic, tooth-coloured restorations coupled with the patient's concerns regarding the use of mercury containing restorations, has driven a surge in the use of RBC materials. With the Minamata Convention in 2013 calling for the phase-out of dental amalgam and dental schools increasingly teaching techniques for RBC restorations in posterior teeth, it is likely that the dental profession's reliance upon RBC for the restoration of posterior teeth will only increase. In order to simplify and speed-up the placement of large posterior RBCs, manufacturers have produced a range of materials which can be placed in single or deeper increments, known as bulk-fill RBCs. Over a relatively short period of time many bulk-fill RBCs have been marketed quoting increment depths between 4-10 mm. The placement of these larger increments of RBC may reduce the time needed when placing posterior restorations and thereby reduce technique sensitivity. This article aims to review the properties and handling characteristics of the bulk-fill RBC materials currently available, while advising the optimal techniques of placement.

  11. A useful and non-invasive microanalysis method for dental restoration materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoki, M.; Satsuma, T.; Nishigawa, K.; Takeuchi, H.; Asaoka, K.

    2012-12-01

    The elemental analysis of intraoral dental restorations provides considerable information for the treatment of dental metal allergy. Elemental analyses require specific instruments and complicated procedures, so this examination is not commonly carried out in private dental clinics. We describe a novel, simple and useful micro-analytical method for dental metal restorations. Micro metal dust was obtained by polishing the surface of restorative metal material with an unused silicone point (SUPER-SNAP). The metal dust on the silicone point was then rubbed onto adhesive tape, and this tape was covered with polyethylene film. The amount of metal dust material was <20 μg. An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer was used to carry out the elementary analysis of the metal dust on the polyethylene film. Three types of dental metal alloy materials of known components were examined. The results of elementary analyses were compared with the specifications provided by the manufacturer. The same procedure was carried out for three dental metal restorations of an adult female volunteer in vivo. The results of elemental analyses for five alloy materials exactly matched the product specification. Three metal samples obtained from intraoral restoration were also available for elemental analyses. The distinct advantage of this method is that it enables sample extraction without an invasive effect for the restoration. The metal sample is in a polyethylene film, so it is easy to mail it for inspection at specialist institutes yet it can be also be used in general dental clinics.

  12. Use of a synthetic low-fusing quartz glass-ceramic material for the fabrication of metal-ceramic restorations.

    PubMed

    Chu, S J

    2001-01-01

    The development of natural aesthetics has been facilitated by various innovative ceramic materials and techniques. Although metal-ceramic restorations have traditionally been the standard for durable and predictable restorations, the use of metal core materials may result in dense, opaque restorations. The incorporation of low-fusing porcelain materials has enabled the provision of translucent restorations that enable sufficient light transmission and strength. This article presents two comparative case reports that demonstrate the clinical application of a synthetic low-fusing quartz glass-ceramic material for the fabrication of aesthetic and functional metal-ceramic restorations.

  13. Forensic applications: Fluorescence properties of tooth-coloured restorative materials using a fluorescence DSLR camera.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Ramya; Walsh, Laurence J; Forrest, Alexander; Tennant, Marc; Chapman, James

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the fluorescence properties of dry and wet samples of contemporary tooth-coloured restorative materials using a fluorescence based DSLR camera and a variety of LEDs emitting different wavelengths of visible light as excitation sources. The materials examined included resin composites; ceramics and hybrid restorative materials such as ormocers, Vita Enamic™ and resin reinforced glass-ionomer cements. The levels of fluorescence for each sample under different combinations of incident light wavelengths and filters was analysed by using histogram data for colour channels from Adobe Photoshop software. Fluorescence patterns were influenced by water sorption of the materials. UV-A/Violet light (405±nm) produced the greatest range of luminosity values (10-204) amongst the tooth-coloured restorative materials, and showed the greatest differences between restorations and tooth structure. The best filter combinations with violet light were orange or yellow filters. Under ultraviolet excitation, Fuji VIII A2 exhibited a unique bright pink fluorescence emission, while VitaEnamic™, ormocer and glass-ionomer cements emitted bluish-pink fluorescence emissions. In conclusion, restorative materials exhibited varied emission pattern under UV-A (405nm) light, which enables their detection and differentiation from natural tooth structure.

  14. Antibacterial Effect and Physical-Mechanical Properties of Temporary Restorative Material Containing Antibacterial Agents.

    PubMed

    Mushashe, Amanda Mahammad; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Tomazinho, Paulo Henrique; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; Pissaia, Janes Francio; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. For the maintenance of the aseptic chain created during the treatment the coronal sealing becomes paramount. Aim. Evaluating the antibacterial effect and the physical-mechanical properties of a temporary restorative material containing different antibacterial agents. Material and Methods. Two antibacterial agents (triclosan and chloramine T) were manually added to a temporary restorative material used as base (Coltosol). The antibacterial action of the material was analyzed using the agar diffusion method, in pure cultures of Escherichia coli (ATCC BAA-2336) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 11632) and mixed culture of saliva collection. The microleakage rate was analyzed using bovine teeth, previously restored with the materials, and submitted to thermocycling, in a solution of 0.5% methylene blue, for a period of 24 hours. The physical and mechanical properties of the materials analyzed were setting time, water sorption, solubility, and compression strength. Results. No marginal leakage was observed for all groups. There was no statistical significant difference in antimicrobial activity, setting time, water sorption, solubility, and compression strength among the materials. Conclusion. The addition of antibacterial agents on a temporary restorative material did not optimize the antibacterial ability of the material and also did not change its physical-mechanical properties.

  15. Antibacterial Effect and Physical-Mechanical Properties of Temporary Restorative Material Containing Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mushashe, Amanda Mahammad; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Tomazinho, Paulo Henrique; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; Pissaia, Janes Francio; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. For the maintenance of the aseptic chain created during the treatment the coronal sealing becomes paramount. Aim. Evaluating the antibacterial effect and the physical-mechanical properties of a temporary restorative material containing different antibacterial agents. Material and Methods. Two antibacterial agents (triclosan and chloramine T) were manually added to a temporary restorative material used as base (Coltosol). The antibacterial action of the material was analyzed using the agar diffusion method, in pure cultures of Escherichia coli (ATCC BAA-2336) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 11632) and mixed culture of saliva collection. The microleakage rate was analyzed using bovine teeth, previously restored with the materials, and submitted to thermocycling, in a solution of 0.5% methylene blue, for a period of 24 hours. The physical and mechanical properties of the materials analyzed were setting time, water sorption, solubility, and compression strength. Results. No marginal leakage was observed for all groups. There was no statistical significant difference in antimicrobial activity, setting time, water sorption, solubility, and compression strength among the materials. Conclusion. The addition of antibacterial agents on a temporary restorative material did not optimize the antibacterial ability of the material and also did not change its physical-mechanical properties. PMID:27347539

  16. [The study of precedent subgingival flora colonization on four kinds of crown and bridge restorative materials].

    PubMed

    Gao, N; Zhao, Y; Xiao, X

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effects of microbial colonization on different crown or fixed bridge-used restorative materials and discuss the standards for evaluating those materials microscopically. Four kinds of restorative materials such as SDA-II type medium alloy, ceramic-fused-to-metal material, heat cure composite resin for crown restoration, Plat castable ceramics and four species of precedent subgingival flora (A. viscosus, F. nucleterm, C. ochracea, S. sanguis) were used. The material specimen had been continuously anaerobic cultured with the experimental bacterial fluid for 3, 7 and 14 days respectively, then the OD values of the specimenwashing fluid which could stand for the biomass of colonized bacteria on the surfaces of materials were measured. The results indicated that the quantity of precedent subgingival flora colonization on the surfaces of different restorative materials varied among different species of bacteria, which might concern with the surface structure, composition, property of anticorrosion and antisoluability of those materials.

  17. The comparative radiopacity of Fuji IX-GP, an intermediate restorative material.

    PubMed

    DuBois, D J; Reichl, R B; Hondrum, S O

    2000-04-01

    The radiopacity of intermediate restorative materials should be sufficient to enable the clinician to distinguish the material from normal and decalcified tooth structure. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative radiopacities of intermediate restorative materials, including a newly introduced high-viscosity, self-cured, condensable glass ionomer material. Radiographs were made of six intermediate restorative materials: two reinforced zinc oxide-eugenol materials (IRM and Zinroc), a conventional glass ionomer material (Ketac-fil), a synthetic resin material (Cavit), a eugenol-free zinc oxide material (Tempit), and a new, general-purpose, condensable glass ionomer material (Fuji IX-GP). Optical density was measured using a densitometer. The optical density of dentin and enamel were used for radiographic comparison. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences among materials: Cavit = IRM = Tempit > Zinroc = Fuji IX-GP > Ketac-fil = enamel > dentin (where > indicates a statistical difference at p < or = 0.05). Although not as radiopaque as some other intermediate materials tested, the radiopacity of Fuji IX-GP appears sufficient to aid diagnosis.

  18. Biofilm formation on dental restorative and implant materials.

    PubMed

    Busscher, H J; Rinastiti, M; Siswomihardjo, W; van der Mei, H C

    2010-07-01

    Biomaterials for the restoration of oral function are prone to biofilm formation, affecting oral health. Oral bacteria adhere to hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, but due to fluctuating shear, little biofilm accumulates on hydrophobic surfaces in vivo. More biofilm accumulates on rough than on smooth surfaces. Oral biofilms mostly consist of multiple bacterial strains, but Candida species are found on acrylic dentures. Biofilms on gold and amalgam in vivo are thick and fully covering, but barely viable. Biofilms on ceramics are thin and highly viable. Biofilms on composites and glass-ionomer cements cause surface deterioration, which enhances biofilm formation again. Residual monomer release from composites influences biofilm growth in vitro, but effects in vivo are less pronounced, probably due to the large volume of saliva into which compounds are released and its continuous refreshment. Similarly, conflicting results have been reported on effects of fluoride release from glass-ionomer cements. Finally, biomaterial-associated infection of implants and devices elsewhere in the body is compared with oral biofilm formation. Biomaterial modifications to discourage biofilm formation on implants and devices are critically discussed for possible applications in dentistry. It is concluded that, for dental applications, antimicrobial coatings killing bacteria upon contact are more promising than antimicrobial-releasing coatings.

  19. Class V lesions restored with four different tooth-colored materials--3-year results.

    PubMed

    Folwaczny, M; Loher, C; Mehl, A; Kunzelmann, K H; Hickel, R

    2001-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the treatment results using four different types of tooth colored materials for restoring class V lesions. A total of 197 class V restorations (n = 197) were placed by one dentist in 37 patients on incisors, canines and premolars. The fillings were placed due to different indications: erosion/non-carious cervical defects (n = 69), primary carious lesions (n = 57), and for replacing defective existing fillings (n = 71). The teeth were assigned on a random basis to four groups for restoration with either a composite (group 1: n = 36; Tetric, Vivadent), or a polyacid-modified resin composite (group 2: n = 79; Dyract, Dentsply), or one of two different resin-modified glass ionomer cements (group 3: n = 51, Fuji II LC,GC; group 4: n = 31, Photac-Fil, Espe). The restorations were evaluated by a single-blind design, according to a modified USPHS system 36 months following placement. Statistical analysis was completed with the Pearson Chi-square test for comparing the results of the four groups (P < 0.05). Additionally, the survival rates were analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier estimator and the Log-rank test (P < 0.05). The Alpha ratings were as follows (Tetric/Dyract/Fuji II LC/Photac Fil): shade match (86%/77%/58%/40%), surface texture (81%/83%/16%/9%), marginal integrity (enamel) (73%/67%/61%/61%), marginal integrity (dentin) (86%/70%/55%/61%), marginal discoloration (enamel) (59%/44%/58%/52%), marginal discoloration (dentin) (82%/84%/71%/48%), anatomic contours (91%/83%/39%/35%). One Tetric restoration, five Dyract restorations, two Fuji II LC restorations and three Photac restorations were dislodged within the study period. The retention of the restorations showed no significant difference among the four materials. However, the clinical performance of the restorations retained over the 3-year period showed distinct differences for the four materials. The best clinical performance was observed for the resin composite, whereas the

  20. Color stability of fluoride-containing restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Iazzetti, G; Burgess, J O; Gardiner, D; Ripps, A

    2000-01-01

    Six fluoride-releasing materials of shade A3 were tested: one glass ionomer (Fuji IX), one resin-modified glass ionomer (Photac-Fil), two compomers (F 2000 and Dyract AP) and two composites (Tetric Ceram and Solitaire). Disk-shaped specimens of each material were prepared according to manufacturer's instructions, polished and L*a*b* baseline measurements taken. Specimens were randomly divided into two groups and given four different treatments of UV light exposure and immersion in a staining solution. Chromo Meter color measurements were taken following each treatment. Two-way ANOVA and Duncan Multiple Range post-hoc tests were used to compare color changes as a function of the four treatment conditions and one-way ANOVA was used to compare materials for each treatment separately. The results showed significant difference in shade A3 between products. In general, the hydrophobic materials showed greater color stability and stain resistance than the hydrophilic materials. Tetric ceram had the best color stability and stain resistance, while Fuji IX had the least.

  1. Selected mechanical properties of fluoride-releasing restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Iazzetti, G; Burgess, J O; Gardiner, D

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical properties, diametral tensile strength (DTS) and flexural strength (FS) of six fluoride releasing materials were measured and compared. The samples were prepared and tested according to ISO specifications. The materials included a glass ionomer (Fuji IX), a resin-modified glass ionomer (Photac-Fil), two compomers (F 2000; Dyract AP) and two composites (Solitaire; Tetric Ceram). The tests were performed after the materials were stored in distilled water (DTS) and phosphate buffered saline solution (FS) at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and one week. Fluoride-releasing composite resin had the highest flexural and diametral tensile strengths and were statistically stronger than compomers, followed by resin-modified glass ionomer and conventional glass ionomer. However, a notable exception to this general trend was Solitaire, a fluoride-releasing composite resin.

  2. Hygroscopic Expansion of Aesthetic Restorative Materials: One-Year Report

    PubMed Central

    Emamieh, S.; Ghasemi, A.; Torabzadeh, H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To measure the long-term linear hygroscopic expansion (LHE) of several materials using bulked and layered techniques. Materials and Methods: Seven materials were used; Fuji Cap II, Fuji II LC, Photac-Fil Aplicap, Vitremer, Dyract, Tetric and Z100. Ten specimens (6×4 mm) were made for each material using layered and bulked techniques (each group comprises five specimens). The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C. The length of each specimen was measured immediately after preparation, 24 hours, one week, one month, three months, six months, nine months and one year. This was used to calculate the percentage change in the length of materials. The mean LHE and standard deviation were calculated. Repeated measure analysis and paired sample t-test were used. Results: The type of material and time had a significant effect on LHE. Fuji Cap II and Fuji II LC exhibited no significant changes after one-year and one month, respectively. However, layered specimens of Photac-Fil Aplicap and Tetric showed constant expansion until six month, whereas bulked specimens reached the constant length at three months. Constant expansion was obtained for layered and bulked specimens of Dyract and Z100 at six month. Layered specimens of Vitremer showed no significant differences except between 24 hours and one year measurements. But in bulked specimens, the results at nine months and one year were significantly different from those obtained at three months and before. Conclusion: Fuji II showed no significant LHE and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs) exhibited the highest LHE. Dyract maintained an intermediate LHE in comparison with RMGIC and composite resin. PMID:21998804

  3. Shear bond strengths of self-adhesive luting resins fixing dentine to different restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Congxiao; Degrange, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the bond strengths of three self-adhesive resin cements (Rely X Unicem, Maxcem and Multilink Sprint) fixing dentine to four different restorative substrates (Ni-Cr alloy, E-Max glass-ceramic, Y-TZP Zirconia and Adoro micro-filled composite) and to compare their performances with those of two conventional dual-cured luting cements (Variolink II + Total-etch Excite DSC and Multilink Automix + Self-etching Primer A + B). Cylindric specimens (5 x 5 mm) were prepared with the four restorative materials for bonding to human dentine. Three surface treatments were performed depending on the restorative material: (i) Al2O3 50 microm sandblasting (Ni-Cr, Adoro), (ii) #800 SiC polishing (Zirconia, E-Max), (iii) hydrofluoric acid (HF)-etching (E-Max). Twenty-five groups (n = 10) were designed according to luting cements, restorative materials and surface pre-treatments. In some experimental groups, Variolink II and Multilink Automix were coupled with, respectively, a silane primer (Monobond S) and an alloy/zirconia primer (Multilink A/Z primer). Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h and then loaded in shear until failure. Variolink II and Multilink Automix showed the highest bond strengths, regardless of the restorative substrate, when used with dentine bonding systems and primers, while the weakest bonds were with Maxcem. The bond strength recorded with the two other self-adhesive cements depended on the nature of the restorative substrate. Increasing retention at the interfaces (i.e., HF ceramic etching) and using specific primers significantly improves the bond strength of luted restorative materials to dentine.

  4. Effect of prophylactic polishing protocols on the surface roughness of esthetic restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Neme, A L; Frazier, K B; Roeder, L B; Debner, T L

    2002-01-01

    Many polishing protocols have been evaluated in vitro for their effect on the surface roughness of restorative materials. These results have been useful in establishing protocols for in vivo application. However, limited research has focused on the subsequent care and maintenance of esthetic restorations following their placement. This investigation evaluated the effect of five polishing protocols that could be implemented at recall on the surface roughness of five direct esthetic restorative materials. Specimens (n=25) measuring 8 mm diameter x 3 mm thick were fabricated in an acrylic mold using five light-cured resin-based materials (hybrid composite, microfilled composite, packable composite, compomer and resin-modified glass ionomer). After photopolymerization, all specimens were polished with Sof-Lex Disks to produce an initial (baseline) surface finish. All specimens were then polished with one of five prophylactic protocols (Butler medium paste, Butler coarse paste, OneGloss, SuperBuff or OneGloss & SuperBuff). The average surface roughness of each treated specimen was determined from three measurements with a profilometer (Surface 1). Next, all specimens were brushed 60,000 times at 1.5 Hz using a brush-head force of 2 N on a Manly V-8 cross-brushing machine in a 50:50 (w/w) slurry of toothpaste and water. The surface roughness of each specimen was measured after brushing (Surface 2) followed by re-polishing with one of five protocols, then final surface roughness values were determined (Surface 3). The data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Significant differences (p=0.05) in surface roughness were observed among restorative materials and polishing protocols. The microfilled and hybrid resin composite yielded significantly rougher surfaces than the other three materials following tooth brushing. Prophylactic polishing protocols can be used to restore a smooth surface on resin-based esthetic restorative materials following simulated tooth

  5. Effects of elevated temperatures on various restorative materials: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Bose, Raison S; Mohan, B; Lakshminarayanan, L

    2005-01-01

    In cases of mass disasters associated with fire, identification of the burnt victims can be a real challenge to the forensic team. Teeth and their restorations play a significant role to aid in the identification process, as various restorative materials have varying resistance to high temperatures. A study was undertaken to evaluate the changes taking place on teeth restored with amalgam, composites, glass ionomers, heat cure acrylic, and ceramics. The specimens were placed in a furnace and heated to predetermined temperatures of 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000 degrees C and the changes were examined using a digital camera and stereomicroscope. Our observations show that while some restorations were able to withstand elevated temperatures, others were reduced to an unrecognizable mass at relatively low temperatures.

  6. Surface roughness analysis of four restorative materials exposed to 10% and 15% carbamide peroxide.

    PubMed

    Zavanelli, Adriana Cristina; Mazaro, Vitor Quinelli; Silva, Cristina Ramos; Zavanelli, Ricardo Alexandre; Mancuso, Daniela Nardi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of carbamide peroxide (CP) on surfaces of different restorative materials. Porcelain, composite resin, glass ionomer, and amalgam were analyzed in this study. Surface roughness (Ra) was measured before and after treatment with 10% and 15% CP. Fifteen percent CP increased Ra values in both the glass ionomer and amalgam subgroups, while 10% CP increased Ra values in the glass ionomer subgroup only. Changes in restorative material surfaces can be more severe when bleaching is completed without a clinician's supervision. Hence, thorough patient examinations must be done before, during, and after bleaching treatment.

  7. Measurement of Poisson's ratio of dental composite restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sew Meng; Yap, Adrian U Jin; Koh, Wee Kiat; Tsai, Kuo Tsing; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the Poisson ratio of resin-based dental composites using a static tensile test method. Materials used in this investigation were from the same manufacturer (3M ESPE) and included microfill (A110), minifill (Z100 and Filtek Z250), polyacid-modified (F2000), and flowable (Filtek Flowable [FF]) composites. The Poisson ratio of the materials were determined after 1 week conditioning in water at 37 degrees C. The tensile test was performed with using a uniaxial testing system at crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data was analysed using one-way ANOVA/post-hoc Scheffe's test and Pearson's correlation test at significance level of 0.05. Mean Poisson's ratio (n=8) ranged from 0.302 to 0.393. The Poisson ratio of FF was significantly higher than all other composites evaluated, and the Poisson ratio of A110 was higher than Z100, Z250 and F2000. The Poisson ratio is higher for materials with lower filler volume fraction.

  8. The Provisional International Standard Antityphoid Serum

    PubMed Central

    Felix, A.

    1954-01-01

    The Provisional International Standard Antityphoid Serum, prepared in 1935, provided standards of the O and the Vi antibodies, both contained in a single serum preparation, and was used for standardizing the potency of therapeutic antityphoid serum. The “Provisional Standard Serum for Vi Agglutination”, which is one of the series of proposed Standard Agglutinating Sera for Typhoid and Paratyphoid A and B Fevers, is based on the Provisional International Standard Antityphoid Serum. It is recommended that the Provisional International Standard Antityphoid Serum, in conjunction with a standard typhoid vaccine, be used in the test for the determination of the “functional efficacy” of the Vi antibody. This is one of the several tests recommended for the official control of the immunizing potency of typhoid vaccines. PMID:13199654

  9. Trends in material choice for posterior restorations in an Israeli dental school: composite resin versus amalgam.

    PubMed

    Ben-Gal, Gilad; Weiss, Ervin I

    2011-12-01

    According to a recent American Dental Association survey, posterior composite resin restorations now outnumber amalgam restorations in the United States. Dental schools around the world vary considerably in the extent to which they teach the use of composite resins. We aimed to determine if there has been an increase in the placement of posterior composite restorations in an Israeli dental school and if faculty experience affects the type of posterior restoration placed. In this retrospective study, we recorded and analyzed all the restorations performed by undergraduate students in the last five academic years at the Hebrew University Hadassah School of Dental Medicine in Jerusalem. All clinical records of student treatments between 2004 and 2009 were screened, and direct restorations were registered. Out of 6,094 posterior restorations performed during the study period, 42.3 percent were made of composite resin, increasing from 36.8 percent in 2004-05 to 48.5 percent in 2008-09, an increase of 11.7 percent. When clinical instructors were asked to state their preference if they themselves were to undergo posterior restoration, similar results were obtained. Instructors with less than ten years' experience preferred posterior composite resin restorations in 54.8 percent of the hypothetical situations, compared with 37.2 percent preferred by instructors with ten years of experience or more. It appears that the use of composite resin was influenced mainly by the prevailing trend and was not based on scientific evidence. Dental faculties should define criteria, based on up-to-date clinical studies, for using new materials, taking into consideration differences among instructors regarding treatment concept.

  10. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulkfill flowable material and a resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Isufi, Almira; Plotino, Gianluca; Grande, Nicola Maria; Ioppolo, Pietro; Testarelli, Luca; Bedini, Rossella; Al-Sudani, Dina; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aim To determine and compare the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulk fill flowable material (SDR) and a traditional resin composite. Methods Thirty maxillary and 30 mandibular first molars were selected based on similar dimensions. After cleaning, shaping and filling of the root canals and adhesive procedures, specimens were assigned to 3 subgroups for each tooth type (n=10): Group A: control group, including intact teeth; Group B: access cavities were restored with a traditional resin composite (EsthetX; Dentsply-Italy, Rome, Italy); Group C: access cavities were restored with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR; Dentsply-Italy), except 1.5 mm layer of the occlusal surface that was restored with the same resin composite as Group B. The specimens were subjected to compressive force in a material static-testing machine until fracture occurred, the maximum fracture load of the specimens was measured (N) and the type of fracture was recorded as favorable or unfavorable. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni tests (P<0.05). Results No statistically significant differences were found among groups (P<0.05). Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a traditional resin composite and with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR) was similar in both maxillary and mandibular molars and showed no significant decrease in fracture resistance compared to intact specimens. Conclusions No significant difference was observed in the mechanical fracture resistance of endodontically treated molars restored with traditional resin composite restorations compared to bulk fill flowable composite restorations. PMID:27486505

  11. Adhesion of oral streptococci to all-ceramics dental restorative materials in vitro.

    PubMed

    Meier, R; Hauser-Gerspach, I; Lüthy, H; Meyer, J

    2008-10-01

    In recent years, patients have benefited from the development of better and more esthetic materials, including all-ceramics dental restorative materials. Dental plaque formation on teeth and restorative materials plays an important role in the pathogenesis of oral diseases. This study investigates initial adhesion of stationary phase streptococcal species to different all-ceramics dental restorative materials. The saliva-coated materials were incubated with the bacteria for 1 h in an in vitro flow chamber which mimics environmental conditions in the oral cavity. Number and vitality of adhering bacteria were determined microscopically after staining. Surface roughness and the composition of the materials had no distinctive influence on bacterial adhesion. However, S. mutans and S. sobrinus adhered about tenfold less numerous to all materials than the other streptococcal species. Further, there was a correlation between bacterial vitality and materials' glass content. The results showed that early plaque formation was influenced predominantly by the presence of the salivary pellicle rather than by material dependent parameters whereas the composition of the all-ceramics appeared to have influenced the percentage of viable cells during the adhesion process. This presented in vitro technique may provide a useful model to study the influence of different parameters on adherence of oral streptococcal species.

  12. Restoration of endodontically treated anterior teeth: an evaluation of coronal microleakage of glass ionomer and composite resin materials.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Arnold, A M; Wilcox, L R

    1990-12-01

    A glass ionomer material was evaluated for coronal microleakage in permanent lingual access restorations of endodontically treated anterior teeth. The material was tested as a restoration, placed over a zinc oxide-eugenol base, and as a base with an acid-etched composite resin veneer and a dentinal bonding agent. Restored teeth were thermocycled, immersed in silver nitrate, developed, and sectioned to assess microleakage. Significant coronal leakage was observed with all materials used.

  13. 49 CFR 385.115 - Reapplying for provisional registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reapplying for provisional registration. 385.115... provisional registration. (a) A Mexico-domiciled motor carrier whose provisional operating authority or provisional Certificate of Registration has been revoked may reapply under part 365 or 368 of this...

  14. Influence of Full Veneer Restoration on Fracture Resistance of Three Different Core Materials: An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Manoharan, P.S; Shekhawat, Kuldeep Singh; Deb, Saikat; Chidambaram, S.; Konchada, Jagadish; Venugopal, Nirupa; Vadivel, Harish

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives One of the factor which affects the strength of the tooth restored with core material is the property of the material. In clinical situation all such restored teeth are protected by crowns. This study evaluated the strength of different core materials on a compromised tooth structure after restoration with a crown. Materials and Methods Seventy extracted intact human premolars were collected and mounted within a mould using auto-polymerizing resin. The teeth were divided in-to four groups - A, B, C and D. Each group contained 20 teeth except group A with 10 teeth. All the teeth were prepared for full veneer cast crown. Except for the teeth in group: A) extensive class-I cavities were prepared in the teeth of all the groups and restored with; B) composite resin, 3M EPSE Filtek P60; C) Silver reinforced glass ionomer, SHOFU Hi Dense XP and; (D) Resin reinforced glass ionomer, GC Gold Label light cure GIC. All the teeth were restored with cast-metal alloy and exposed to 1.2 million cycles of cyclic loading in a chewing simulator. Subsequently, the teeth that survived were loaded till fracture in the universal testing machine. Fracture loads and type of fractures were recorded. Results All the specimens survived cyclic loading. The mean fracture strength of the silver reinforced glass ionomer was greater with and without crown (p<0.001). Statistical analysis for the mean fracture load of each specimen showed significant difference between the groups. Conclusion Under the condition of this study, core materials when restored with artificial crown had a significant increase in fracture resistance. PMID:26501004

  15. Effects of pulp capping materials on fracture resistance of Class II composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Kucukyilmaz, Ebru; Yasa, Bilal; Akcay, Merve; Savas, Selcuk; Kavrik, Fevzi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cavity design and the type of pulp capping materials on the fracture resistance of Class II composite restorations. Materials and Methods: Sixty freshly extracted, sound molar teeth were selected for the study. A dovetail cavity on the mesio-occlusal and a slot cavity on disto-occlusal surfaces of each tooth were prepared, and the teeth were divided 4 groups which one of them as a control group. The pulp capping materials (TheraCal LC, Calcimol LC, Dycal) applied on pulpo-axial wall of each cavity, and the restoration was completed with composite resin. The teeth were subjected to a compressive load in a universal mechanical testing machine. The surfaces of the tooth and restoration were examined under a stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed using factorial analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Results: For pulp capping materials, the highest fracture load (931.15 ± 203.81 N) and the lowest fracture load (832.28 ± 245.75 N) were calculated for Control and Dycal group, respectively. However, there were no statistically significant differences among all groups (P > 0.05). The fracture load of the dovetail groups was significantly higher than those of the slot cavity groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Dovetail cavity design shows better fracture resistance in Class II composite restorations, independent of used or not used pulp capping materials. PMID:26038653

  16. Effect of Soft Drinks and Fresh Fruit Juice on Surface Roughness of Commonly used Restorative Materials.

    PubMed

    Maganur, Prabhadevi; Satish, V; Prabhakar, A R; Namineni, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    In this in vitro study, the effects of a Cola drink, and fresh fruit juice (citrus) on the surface roughness on flowable composite and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) each was evaluated and compared. Using a brass mold 70 pellets each of flowable composite (Filtek™ Flow) and RMGIC tricure restorative material were prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions. Two groups (groups I and II) were formed containing 30 pellets of each material. Remaining 10 pellets of each restorative material did form the control group [water (group III)]. Experimental group pellets were again divided into three subgroups (mild, moderate and severe) containing 10 pellets each and were kept in plastic containers with 30 ml Cola drink (group I) and fresh fruit juice (group II) respectively. Immersion regime was followed according to M aupome G et al. Baseline and final surface roughness (Ra) value for each pellet was evaluated using a profilometer. Statistical analysis was done with Wilcoxon's signed rank test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Mann-Whitney test. Results showed that the erosive effect of both Cola drink and fresh fruit juice caused significant surface roughness on both flowable composite and RMGIC restorative materials in the mild, moderate and severe immersion regimes. How to cite this article: Maganur P, Satish V, Prabhakar AR, Namineni S. Effect of Soft Drinks and Fresh Fruit Juice on Surface Roughness of Commonly used Restorative Materials. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(1):1-5.

  17. Effect of Soft Drinks and Fresh Fruit Juice on Surface Roughness of Commonly used Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Satish, V; Prabhakar, AR; Namineni, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this in vitro study, the effects of a Cola drink, and fresh fruit juice (citrus) on the surface roughness on flowable composite and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) each was evaluated and compared. Using a brass mold 70 pellets each of flowable composite (Filtek™ Flow) and RMGIC tricure restorative material were prepared according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Two groups (groups I and II) were formed containing 30 pellets of each material. Remaining 10 pellets of each restorative material did form the control group [water (group III)]. Experimental group pellets were again divided into three subgroups (mild, moderate and severe) containing 10 pellets each and were kept in plastic containers with 30 ml Cola drink (group I) and fresh fruit juice (group II) respectively. Immersion regime was followed according to M aupome G et al. Baseline and final surface roughness (Ra) value for each pellet was evaluated using a profilometer. Statistical analysis was done with Wilcoxon’s signed rank test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Mann-Whitney test. Results showed that the erosive effect of both Cola drink and fresh fruit juice caused significant surface roughness on both flowable composite and RMGIC restorative materials in the mild, moderate and severe immersion regimes. How to cite this article: Maganur P, Satish V, Prabhakar AR, Namineni S. Effect of Soft Drinks and Fresh Fruit Juice on Surface Roughness of Commonly used Restorative Materials. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(1):1-5. PMID:26124573

  18. Fluoride release and recharge abilities of contemporary fluoride-containing restorative materials and dental adhesives.

    PubMed

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Helvatzoglou-Antoniades, Maria; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of five fluoride-releasing restorative materials and three dental adhesives, before and after NaF solution treatment. Five restorative materials (Fuji IX GP, GC Corp.; Ketac N100, 3M ESPE; Dyract Extra, Dentsply; Beautifil II, Shofu Inc.; Wave, SDI) and three dental adhesives (Stae, SDI; Fluorobond II - Shofu Inc.; Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply) were investigated before and after NaF solution treatment. A fluoride ion-selective electrode was to measure fluoride concentrations. During the 86-day period before NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP released the highest amount of fluoride among the restorative materials while Prime & Bond NT was the highest among the dental adhesives. After NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP again ranked the highest in fluoride release among the restorative materials while Fluorobond II ranked the highest among dental adhesives. It was concluded that the compositions and setting mechanisms of fluoride-containing dental materials influenced their fluoride release and recharge abilities.

  19. Coronal microleakage of three temporary restorative materials: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Zmener, Osvaldo; Banegas, Gladys; Pameijer, Cornelis H

    2004-08-01

    The sealing properties of three temporary restorative materials, Cavit, IRM, and a polycarboxylate-based cement, Ultratemp Firm, were investigated in vitro. Standardized access cavities were prepared in 45, intact, extracted, human molars. The teeth were randomly assigned to three groups and the access openings filled with one of three temporary filling materials. In five teeth (negative control), no restorative material was placed but the preparations were coated entirely with sticky wax. The five teeth of the positive control group had no restorative material and no sticky wax applied. After thermocycling for 500 cycles (5-55 degrees C), the experimental teeth were dipped in molten sticky wax to the CEJ. The coronal enamel was subsequently coated with two layers of nail varnish, leaving an area of 1 mm around the filling material uncovered. The samples were then immersed in 2% methylene blue dye solution for leakage assessment. The teeth were sectioned and the greatest depth of dye penetration was recorded. Positive control sections exhibited complete dye penetration, whereas negative controls had none. There was no statistically significant difference in marginal leakage between Cavit, IRM, and Ultratemp Firm (p > 0.05). All materials leaked at the interface material-dentin, whereas some IRM specimens absorbed the dye into the bulk of the material.

  20. Cerec anterior crowns: restorative options with monolithic ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Reich, Sven; Fiedlar, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the different types of monolithic ceramic crowns that can be placed on anterior teeth with existing shoulder preparations. Anterior crowns were indicated for the teeth 12 to 22 in the present case. The patient, a 65-year-old male, had received all-ceramic crowns 20 years earlier, which had started to develop cracks and palatal fractures over the last few years. The patient's teeth were prepared and four sets of crowns were fabricated using different monolithic ceramic materials: IPS e.max CAD, Cerec Blocs C In, VITABLOCS Real Life, and ENAMIC. Both shade characterization and crystallization firing were performed on the monolithic lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns. The silicate ceramic crowns received glaze firing alone. The crowns made of hybrid ceramic (ENAMIC) were treated with a polymer sealant.

  1. Radiopacity of different shades of resin-based restorative materials compared to human and bovine teeth.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, Gurel; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the radiopacity of different shades of resin-based restorative materials and compared the results to human and bovine dental hard tissues. Disk specimens 6 mm in diameter and 1 mm thick (N = 220, n = 10) were prepared from the following restorative materials: · eight shades of nanofilled composite (Aelite Aesthetic Enamel), · seven shades of nanohybrid composite (Grandio Universal), · six shades of photopolymerized polyacid modified compomer (Glasiosite), and · one shade of hybrid composite (X-tra fil U). Human canine dentin (n = 10), bovine enamel (n = 10), and an aluminum (Al) step wedge were used as references. The optical density values of each material were measured from radiographic images using a transmission densitometer. Al step wedge thickness and optical density values were plotted, and equivalent Al thickness (eq Al) values were determined for radiopacity measurements of each material. The data were analyzed using a non-parametric one-way ANOVA (Kruskal-Wallis), and multiple comparisons were made with a Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc test (a = 0.05). Different shades of resin-based restorative materials tested did not reveal statistically significant differences within each material group (p > 0.05). Radiopacity values of the resin-based restorative materials investigated varied depending on their types; however, within different shades of one material type, radiopacity values were comparable. Every shade of nanocomposite material other than Aelite Aesthetic Enamel Incisal LT Gray showed comparable radiopacity to human dentin. Other materials tested demonstrated higher radiopacity compared to human dentin and bovine enamel.

  2. Assessment of marginal stability and permeability of an interim restorative endodontic material.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, R B; Safavi, K E; Spångberg, L S

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the marginal stability and permeability of a new interim restorative endodontic material, Tempit (Centrix Inc., Milford, Conn.), and to compare the findings with the results of two commonly used restorative endodontic materials, Cavit (Premier Dental Products Co., Philadelphia, Pa.) and IRM (Intermediate Restorative Material Capsules, The Caulk Co., Division of Dentsply International Inc., Milford, Del.) This study was performed in several steps. First, the endodontic access cavities were prepared and restored on 80 extracted mandibular molars. The samples were exposed to methylene blue dye solution for 6 days, thermocycled, and sectioned; the dye penetration and diffusion were measured along the margins and into the body of the materials. The second experiment was a special study performed in standardized glass tubes to better evaluate the marginal and body dye penetration into the materials by increasing the length of the fillings. To eliminate the possibility of hygroscopic setting mechanisms of materials, samples were first allowed to set under water before dye was introduced. Cavit and Tempit showed a substantial amount of dye diffusion into the body of the materials. Cavit exhibited the best sealing ability at all times. The marginal and body dye penetration were significantly different for the Tempit material in all experiments than Cavit (p < 0.001). IRM demonstrated the least body penetration of all three materials (p < 0.001) but had a substantial marginal leakage not significantly different from the results of the Tempit material (p = 0.6 and p = 0.1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. A new classification system for all-ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Gracis, Stefano; Thompson, Van P; Ferencz, Jonathan L; Silva, Nelson R F A; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2015-01-01

    Classification systems for all-ceramic materials are useful for communication and educational purposes and warrant continuous revisions and updates to incorporate new materials. This article proposes a classification system for ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials in an attempt to systematize and include a new class of materials. This new classification system categorizes ceramic restorative materials into three families: (1) glass-matrix ceramics, (2) polycrystalline ceramics, and (3) resin-matrix ceramics. Subfamilies are described in each group along with their composition, allowing for newly developed materials to be placed into the already existing main families. The criteria used to differentiate ceramic materials are based on the phase or phases present in their chemical composition. Thus, an all-ceramic material is classified according to whether a glass-matrix phase is present (glass-matrix ceramics) or absent (polycrystalline ceramics) or whether the material contains an organic matrix highly filled with ceramic particles (resin-matrix ceramics). Also presented are the manufacturers' clinical indications for the different materials and an overview of the different fabrication methods and whether they are used as framework materials or monolithic solutions. Current developments in ceramic materials not yet available to the dental market are discussed.

  4. A LABORATORY COMPARISON OF FOUR ZINC OXIDE-EUGENOL FORMULATIONS AS RESTORATIVE MATERIALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The ability of four zinc oxide - eugenol formulations to serve as long-term intermediate restorative materials was investigated. They were: (a...zinc oxide - eugenol , (b) zinc oxide - eugenol + EBA (ethoxybenzoic acid), (c) reinforced zinc oxide - eugenol , and (d) a reinforced zinc oxide - eugenol

  5. Development of North American forb plant materials for rangeland revegetation and restoration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant materials development for Intermountain rangelands is a primary mission of the USDA-ARS Forage and Range Research Laboratory. Currently there is a significant demand for North American forbs (including legumes) for rangeland revegetation and restoration in the Great Basin, but commercial quan...

  6. Protection offered by root-surface restorative materials against biofilm challenge.

    PubMed

    Yip, H K; Guo, J; Wong, W H S

    2007-05-01

    The prevalence of root-surface caries is increasing. We hypothesized that some restorative materials are protective against cariogenic challenge on root surfaces. Our goal was to study the effects of different restorative materials on root surfaces incubated with an oral biofilm generated in an artificial mouth. A biofilm of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Actinomyces naeslundii was co-cultured for 21 days on 24 glass-ionomer cement, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, or resin-composite-restored root surfaces. These surfaces were then examined with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Only glass-ionomer restorations showed a significant increase in log calcium-to-phosphorus ratio (P < 0.01), and a significantly lower log amide I-to-hydrogen phosphate ratio on the root surface after incubation in the artificial mouth. Glass-ionomer restoratives conferred a preventive effect on the root surfaces against initial cariogenic challenge with a mixed-species oral biofilm without therapeutic intervention.

  7. Retention of long-term interim restorations with sodium fluoride enriched interim cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strash, Carolyn

    Purpose: Interim fixed dental prostheses, or "provisional restorations", are fabricated to restore teeth when definitive prostheses are made indirectly. Patients undergoing extensive prosthodontic treatment frequently require provisionalization for several months or years. The ideal interim cement would retain the restoration for as long as needed and still allow for ease of removal. It would also avoid recurrent caries by preventing demineralization of tooth structure. This study aims to determine if adding sodium fluoride varnish to interim cement may assist in the retention of interim restorations. Materials and methods: stainless steel dies representing a crown preparation were fabricated. Provisional crowns were milled for the dies using CAD/CAM technology. Crowns were provisionally cemented onto the dies using TempBond NE and NexTemp provisional cements as well as a mixture of TempBond NE and Duraphat fluoride varnish. Samples were stored for 24h then tested or thermocycled for 2500 or 5000 cycles before being tested. Retentive strength of each cement was recorded using a universal testing machine. Results: TempBond NE and NexTemp cements performed similarly when tested after 24h. The addition of Duraphat significantly decreased the retention when added to TempBond NE. NexTemp cement had high variability in retention over all tested time periods. Thermocycling for 2500 and 5000 cycles significantly decreased the retention of all cements. Conclusions: The addition of Duraphat fluoride varnish significantly decreased the retention of TempBond NE and is therefore not recommended for clinical use. Thermocycling significantly reduced the retention of TempBond NE and NexTemp. This may suggest that use of these cements for three months, as simulated in this study, is not recommended.

  8. RESTORING A DAMAGED 16-YEAR -OLD INSULATING POLYMER CONCRETE DIKE OVERLAY: REPAIR MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this program was to design and formulate organic polymer-based material systems suitable for repairing and restoring the overlay panels of insulating lightweight polymer concrete (ILPC) from the concrete floor and slope wall of a dike at KeySpan liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, NY, just over sixteen years ago. It also included undertaking a small-scale field demonstration to ensure that the commercial repairing technologies were applicable to the designed and formulated materials.

  9. Effect of desiccation on microleakage of five Class 5 restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Bouschlicher, M R; Vargas, M A; Denehy, G E

    1996-01-01

    Resin-modified glass ionomers, combinations of resin and glass-ionomer chemistry, have resulted in materials with longer working times and command set by visible light activation. These materials are easier to use and more resistant to early moisture contamination and fracture. A glass-ionomer or resin-modified glass-ionomer restoration may be inadvertently desiccated by isolation of the same quadrant for subsequent restorative procedures. The present study is an assessment of the effects of desiccation on microleakage of three resin-modified glass-ionomers: Vitremer, Photac-Fil, Fuji II LC; a glass-ionomer, Ketac-Fil; and a microfill resin, Silux Plus. Fifty extracted molars were prepared with class 5 preparations buccal and lingual and randomly assigned to 10 groups (n = 10). Restorations were placed according to the manufacturers' specifications and finished wet after the manufacturers' specified setting interval. All samples were thermocycled 300 cycles between 50 and 500 degrees C. Samples were stored in water at all times until the five groups to be desiccated were air dried and stored dry for 45 minutes. Desiccated groups were then rehydrated for 24 hours prior to AgNO3 staining. Teeth were sectioned mesiodistally and four buccolingual sections (0.6 mm thick) through each class 5 restoration were obtained with a Silverstone-Taylor hard tissue microtome. Each section was scored on a scale of 0-4 for microleakage, and the highest score for dye penetration was used as the score for that restoration. An increase in microleakage was observed in all desiccated groups. Three materials showed a statistically significant increase in microleakage (P < 0.05) following desiccation. Microleakage increases following a brief period of desiccation corresponding to typical treatment times indicate that clinicians need to protect previously placed restorations from undue drying during subsequent dental treatment.

  10. Marginal leakage and microhardness evaluation of low-shrinkage resin-based restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Hooshmand, Tabassom; Tabari, Negin; Keshvad, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to compare the marginal leakage and microhardness of low-shrinkage resin-based dental restorative materials containing ormocer- and silorane-based composites to that of conventional methacrylate-based systems. A total of 50 noncarious extracted human teeth were collected after debridement and standard Class V cavities were prepared. Teeth were randomly assigned to five groups (n = 10) and restored with 5 types of resin-based restorative material composites: hybrid, microhybrid, nanohybrid, ormocer-based, and silorane-based. After thermocycling, all teeth were placed in a silver nitrate solution, sectioned longitudinally in a buccolingual direction, and observed under a stereomicroscope to determine the degree of dye penetration. Data were analyzed using a non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test (P < 0.05). For the microhardness test, five specimens were made for each restorative material, using Teflon molds with disk-shaped specimen wells. Specimens were photocured and placed in distilled water (at 37°C) for 24 hours. Vickers Hardness Number (VHN) measurements were performed using a microhardness tester. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc tests. In terms of microhardness, there was no statistically significant difference among the resin-based restorative materials (P > 0.05). The degree of microleakage at the gingival margins was lowest for the silorane composite, followed by microhybrid and nanohybrid. The silorane composite was significantly lower than that of the ormocer and hybrid composites (P < 0.05). Based on the results of this study, it was concluded that the silorane-based composite material could provide a marginal seal comparable to that provided by microhybrid or nanohybrid resin composites.

  11. Restoration Materials and Secondary Caries Using an In Vitro Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    van de Sande, F.H.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; de Soet, J.J.; Cenci, M.S.; Huysmans, M.C.D.J.N.M.

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated whether restoration materials and adhesives influence secondary caries formation in gaps using a short-term in vitro biofilm model. Sixty enamel–dentin blocks were restored with 6 different restoration materials with or without adhesives (n = 10 per group) with a gap: 1) Clearfil AP-X composite, 2) Clearfil AP-X composite + SE Bond, 3) Clearfil AP-X composite + ProtectBond, 4) Filtek Silorane composite, 5) Filtek Silorane composite + Silorane System adhesive, or 6) Tytin amalgam. Specimens were subjected to an intermittent 1% sucrose biofilm model for 20 days to create artificial caries lesions. Lesion progression in the enamel–dentin next to the different materials was measured in lesion depth (LD) and mineral loss (ML) using transversal wavelength independent microradiography (T-WIM). A regression analysis was used to compare the LD and ML of the different restoration materials at 4 measurement locations: 1 location at the surface of the enamel, 1 location at the wall of the enamel, and 2 locations at the wall of the dentin. A statistically significant effect of AP-X composite with Protect Bond was found for LD and ML at the WallDentin1 location, leading to less advanced wall lesions. An additional finding was that gap size was also statistically significant at the 2 wall locations in dentin, leading to increasing lesion progression with wider gaps. In conclusion, adhesives can influence wall lesion development in gaps. Protect Bond showed significantly less caries progression compared to bare restoration materials or other adhesives in this short-term in vitro biofilm model. PMID:25297114

  12. Impact of intracoronal dentin treatment prior to bleaching on bond strength of restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Zanconato-Carvalho, Erica Moreno; Bruniera, João Felipe; Faria, Natália Spadini de; Colucci, Vivian; Messias, Danielle Cristine

    2014-01-01

    Surface treatment of dentin before the bleaching procedure may affect its permeability and influence the bond strength of restorative materials. This study evaluated the influence of surface treatment before the bleaching on shear bond strength (SBT) of restorative materials to intracoronal dentin. Dentin slabs were subjected to surface treatment: no bleaching (control - CON), no surface treatment + bleaching (HP), 37% phosphoric acid + bleaching (PA) and Er:YAG laser + bleaching (L). After the bleaching procedure, specimens (n=10) were restored with: microhybrid composite resin (MH), flowable composite resin (F), and resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC). The shear test was carried out. ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05) showed significant difference for surface treatment and restorative materials (p<0.05). CON presented higher STB and was statistically different from HP (p<0.05). PA and L showed intermediate values and were statistically similar to CON and HP (p>0.05). STB for MH and F were higher than RMGIC (p<0.05), and did not differ from each other (p>0.05). The surface treatments with phosphoric acid and Er:YAG laser before the bleaching procedure provided shear bond strength at the same level of unbleached dentin and the composite resins presented superior bond strength to the intracoronal dentin.

  13. Evaluation of the Flexural Strength of Interim Restorative Materials in Fixed Prosthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Mehrpour, Hanieh; Farjood, Ehsan; Giti, Rashin; Barfi Ghasrdashti, Alireza; Heidari, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Mechanical properties of interim restorations are considered as important factors specially when selecting materials for long-term application or for patients with para-functional habits. Flexural strength is one of the most important components of these restorations. Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the flexural strength of five interim restorative materials. Materials and Method Fifty identical samples sized 25×2×2-mm were made from five interim materials (TempSpan; Protemp 4, Unifast III, Trim, and Revotek LC) according to ADA specification #27. The specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 2 weeks and then thermocycled for 2500 cycles (5-55˚C). A standard three-point bending test was conducted on the specimens with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.75mm/min. Data were analyzed by using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane’s post-hoc tests to measure the flexural strength of temporary materials. Results One of the bis-acryl resins (TempSpan) showed the highest, and the light polymerized resin (Revotek LC) showed the lowest flexural strength. The mean values of flexural strength (MPa) for the examined materials were as follow: TempSpan=120.00, Protemp 4=113.00, Unifast III=64.20, Trim= 63.73 and Revotek LC=47.16. There were significant differences between all materials except Trim and Unifast III which did not show any statistical significant difference. Conclusion Bis-acryl resins were statistically superior to traditional methacrylate and light-cured resins. Therefore, application of bis-acryl resins should be deliberated in patients with heavy occlusion and in cases that need long-term use of interim restorations. PMID:27602395

  14. The Influence of Different Restorative Materials on Secondary Caries Development in situ

    PubMed Central

    van de Sande, Françoise H.; Opdam, Niek J.M.; Truin, Gert Jan; Bronkhorst, Ewald M.; de Soet, Johannes J.; Cenci, Maximiliano S.; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The effect of direct restorative materials on caries lesion formation was investigated with an 8-week in situ study with split-mouth design, testing the hypothesis that no difference in mineral loss next to a restoration would be found between different composite-based-materials and amalgam. Methods: Six groups (n=18) of restored dentin samples were prepared using amalgam, a microhybrid, a nanohybrid and a silorane composite. The composites were adhesively bonded with systems with or without an antibacterial monomer (Clearfil-SE-Protect, Clearfil-SE-bond, respectively), except for the silorane group (Silorane- System-Adhesive). Non-restored dentin samples were used as control (primary caries). Samples were inserted into slots, in lower prosthesis especially made for the experiment. Subjects were instructed to dip the lower prosthesis in a sucrose solution 4 times per day. At baseline and 8 weeks, samples were radiographed extra-orally and the integrated mineral loss was calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using multiple linear regression with a multilevel model (p=0.05). Results: Nine subjects were selected, and only outer lesions were observed. The hypothesis was partially rejected, as the microhybrid composite bonded with the antibacterial system and the nanohybrid composite presented statistically significant lower mineral loss compared to amalgam. Also, no significant differences were seen for these groups compared to control. Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, the restorative material may influence outer lesion progression. Amalgam was not found to be related to lower secondary caries progression in dentin compared to composite-based materials after 8 weeks in situ. PMID:25010541

  15. In vitro sealing ability of temporary restorative materials used in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Tanomaru-Filho, Mario; Spinola, Sandra Gouveia; Reis, Jose Mauricio Santos Nunes; Chavez-Andrade, Gisselle M; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the marginal sealing ability of six temporary restorative materials. Seventy-six human premolars were extracted and divided into six groups (n = 12); the remaining four teeth were used as a control group. Coronal access and biomechanical preparation were performed and the root canals were sealed. The external dental surfaces were covered and the coronal access cavities were filled with one of the six materials. At that point, the teeth were immersed in 0.2% Rhodamine B solution for 72 hours and subjected to thermal cycling. Samples were rinsed in running water and sectioned longitudinally; at that point, the images of each tooth were digitized and marginal leakage was measured using the Image Tool program. Data were subjected to statistical analysis by ANOVA and Tukey's test for comparison between experimental groups. All of the glass ionomer cements tested, particularly Maxxion R, offered satisfactory sealing ability as temporary restorative materials.

  16. Color Stability of Dental Restorative Materials Submitted to Heat Sources, for Forensic Purposes.

    PubMed

    Biancalana, Roberto Cesar; Vicente, Sergio Augusto de Freitas; Alves da Silva, Ricardo Henrique; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri

    2017-03-01

    During postmortem examination of the dental arches of carbonized victims, dental restorative materials may be found. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat source action on the color stability of composite resin (CR) and glass ionomer cement (GIC) restorations, to discriminate between them and compare with antemortem dental data. Sixty bovine teeth (30 CR and 30 GIC) were prepared (6 × 6 × 2 mm) and separated into groups (n = 10). The color readouts were taken by spectrophotometer, before and after heat action (100°C, 200°C, 300°C), in an oven for 15 min. There were color alterations for all coordinates (ΔE, ΔL*, Δa* eΔb*) for both materials. GIC presented greater change. The authors concluded that it is possible to distinguish between the materials by the color changes analyzed by instrumental method, helping victim identification.

  17. Priorities for future innovation, research, and advocacy in dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Watson, T; Fox, C H; Rekow, E D

    2013-11-01

    Innovations in materials science, both within and outside of dentistry, open opportunities for the development of exciting direct restorative materials. From rich dialog among experts from dental and non-dental academic institutions and industry, as well as those from policy, research funding, and professional organizations, we learned that capitalizing on these opportunities is multifactorial and far from straightforward. Beginning from the point when a restoration is needed, what materials, delivery systems, and skills are needed to best serve the most people throughout the world's widely varied economic and infrastructure systems? New research is a critical element in progress. Effective advocacy can influence funding and drives change in practice and policy. Here we articulate both research and advocacy priorities, with the intention of focusing the energy and expertise of our best scientists on making a difference, bringing new innovations to improve oral health.

  18. Effect of dental restorative materials on total antioxidant capacity and calcium concentration of unstimulated saliva

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Mona-Momeni; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Asatourian, Armen; Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Scarbecz, Mark; Sheibani, Nader

    2017-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of dental amalgam and composite restorations on total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and calcium (Ca) ion concentration of unstimulated saliva. Material and Methods Forty-eight children aged 6-10 years selected and divided into three groups of sixteen (8 males, 8 females). In group A and B, samples consisted of two class II dental composite or amalgam restorations, while in group C samples were caries-free (control group). Unstimulated saliva from all samples was collected and TAC was measured by spectrophotometry using an adaptation of 2, 2’-azino-di-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonate) (ABTS) assay. The Ca ion level was estimated by an auto- analyzer. Data were analyzed with one- and two-way ANOVA test, at a p<.05 level of significance. Results Composite samples showed significantly higher TAC and lower Ca ion levels compared to amalgam and caries-free samples (p<.05). The TAC values showed only significant difference between groups (p<.05), while the Ca ion results showed significant differences within and between groups (p<.05). Conclusions Dental composite restorations increased TAC and decreased Ca ion levels more than amalgam restorations in saliva. Gender is an effective factor in changes induced in oral cavity as females showed more emphatic reaction to dental filling materials than males. Statement of Clinical Relevance Patients who have dental restorations, especially dental composites, should pay more attention to their dental hygiene, because dental restorations can increase oxidative stress and decrease Ca ion level in saliva, which might jeopardize remineralization process of tooth structures after demineralization. Key words:Amalgam, caries, composite, saliva, total antioxidant capacity. PMID:28149467

  19. Translucency of human teeth and dental restorative materials and its clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2015-04-01

    The purpose was to review the translucency of human teeth and related dental materials that should be considered for the development of esthetic restorative materials. Translucency is the relative amount of light transmission or diffuse reflection from a substrate surface through a turbid medium. Translucency influences the masking ability, color blending effect, and the degree of light curing through these materials. Regarding the translucency indices, transmission coefficient, translucency parameter, and contrast ratio have been used, and correlations among these indices were confirmed. Translucency of human enamel and dentine increases in direct proportion to the wavelength of incident light in the visible light range. As for the translucency changes by aging, limited differences were reported in human dentine, while those for enamel proved to increase. There have been studies for the adjustment of translucency in dental esthetic restorative materials; the size and amount of filler and the kind of resin matrix were modified in resin composites, and the kind of ingredient and the degree of crystallization were modified in ceramics. Based on the translucency properties of human enamel and dentine, those of replacing restorative materials should be optimized for successful esthetic rehabilitation. Biomimetic simulation of the natural tooth microstructure might be a promising method.

  20. Coronal microleakage with five different temporary restorative materials following walking bleach technique: An ex-vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Srikumar, G. P. V.; Varma, K. Ravi; Shetty, K. Harish; Kumar, Pramod

    2012-01-01

    Context: Walking bleach technique uses 30% hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate, and this paste mixture causes loosening of the coronal temporary restorative materials and thus decreasing its clinical effectiveness and causing irritation to the patients oral tissues. In the present study, sealing ability of hygroscopic coronal temporary restorative materials were compared with the other commonly used temporary restorative materials. Aim: To evaluate the effects of walking bleach material on the marginal sealing ability and coronal microleakage of the hydrophilic temporary restorative materials with that of the other commonly used temporary restorative materials in endodontic practice. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five extracted human maxillary central incisor teeth were prepared chemo-mechanically and obturated with gutta-percha in lateral condensation technique. Surface of each tooth was double coated with cyanoacrylate glue. All the teeth were randomly divided in to five groups. Out of 15 teeth in each group, 10 teeth served as experimental specimens, in which bleaching agent was placed in the pulp chamber and 5 teeth served as control, in which no bleaching agent was placed. The access cavities were restored with temporary restorative materials being tested per each group respectively. The specimens were then immersed in 1% India ink dye and subjected to thermo cycling for 7 days. All the teeth were longitudinally sectioned and observed with stereomicroscope and were graded according to the depth of linear dye penetration. Statistical Analysis Used: Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Hydrophilic temporary restorative materials Cavit G and Coltosol F have shown minimal coronal dye leakage with better sealing ability when exposed to walking bleach paste mixture in the dye penetration tests compared to other commonly used temporary restorative materials. Conclusion: Marginal sealing ability of Cavit G and Coltosol F were not influenced by the

  1. The effect of different organic solvents on the degradation of restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Martos, Josué; Silveira, Luiz Fernando Machado; Silveira, Carina Folgearini; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita; Ferrer-Luque, Carmen María

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the solubility of three restorative materials exposed to the different endodontic solvents. Materials and Methods: The organic solvents eucalyptus oil, xylol, chloroform, and orange oil, with distilled water as the control group was utilized. The restorative materials light-cured resin (Filtek Z250/3M ESPE), light-cured-resin-reinforced glass ionomer (Riva Light Cure LC/Southern Dental Industries SDI]) and resin-modified glass ionomer (Vitremer/3M ESPE) were analyzed. A total of 50 disks containing specimens (2 mm × 8 mm Ø) were prepared for each of the three classes of restorative materials, which were divided into 10 groups (n = 5) for immersion in eucalyptus oil, xylol, chloroform, orange oil or distilled water for periods of either 2 min or 10 min. The means of restorative material disintegration in solvents were obtained by the difference between the original preimmersion weight and the postimmersion weight in a digital analytical scale. Data were statistically analyzed by two-way analysis of variance while the difference between the materials was analyzed by Student-Newman-Keuls test. The significance level set at 0.05. Results: Vitremer showed the highest solubility, followed by Riva LC, and these were statistically different from eucalyptus oil, xylol, chloroform, and distilled water (P < 0.05). Regarding the immersion time in solvents, there were no significant differences between the two tested periods (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The solvents minimally degraded the composite resin, although they did influence the degradation of both resin-modified glass ionomer resin and resin reinforced with glass ionomer. PMID:24926215

  2. An Evaluation of Various Permanent Restorative Materials’ Effect on the Shade of Bleached Teeth.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-28

    O AD-Alt 9 628 ARMY INST OF DENTAL RESEARCH WASHINGTON DC F/G 6/5 AN EVALUATION OF VARIOUS PERMANENT RESTORATIVE MATER! S’ EFFFC--ETC (U) DEC A1 W F... Materials ’ Effect on the Shade of Bleached Teeth William F. Freccia, BS, DDS, MS Donald D. Peters, BA, DDS, MS Lewis Lorton, BA, DDS, MSD Commercial materials ...or that the materials and equip- ment are necessarily the best available for the purpose. The opinions contained herein are the private views of the

  3. Cytogenetic genotoxic investigation in peripheral blood lymphocytes of subjects with dental composite restorative filling materials.

    PubMed

    Pettini, F; Savino, M; Corsalini, M; Cantore, S; Ballini, A

    2015-01-01

    Dental composite resins are biomaterials commonly used to aesthetically restore the structure and function of teeth impaired by caries, erosion, or fracture. Residual monomers released from resin restorations as a result of incomplete polymerization processes interact with living oral tissues. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of a common dental composite material (Enamel Plus-HFO), in subjects with average 13 filled teeth with the same material, compared to a control group (subjects having neither amalgam nor composite resin fillings). Genotoxicity assessment of composite materials was carried out in vitro in human peripheral blood leukocytes using sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) cytogenetic tests. The results of correlation and multiple regression analyses confirmed the absence of a relationship between SCE/cell, high frequency of SCE(HFC) or CA frequencies and exposure to dental composite materials. These results indicate that composite resins used for dental restorations differ extensively in vivo in their cytotoxic and genotoxic potential and in their ability to affect chromosomal integrity, cell-cycle progression, DNA replication and repair.

  4. Influence of Intermediary Filling Material on Microleakage of Intracoronally Bleached and Restored Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Feiz, Atieh; Ebadi, Maysam

    2009-01-01

    Background: Failure of composite restorations in terms of microleakage after intracoronal bleaching has been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess in vitro effect of sodium ascorbate and calcium hydroxide as intermediary filling materials to repair the microleakage associated with adhe-sive restoration following intracoronal bleaching. Methods: Sixty endodontically-treated incisors with access cavities extended to the cementoenamel junction in gingival margin were randomly divided into five equal groups. In group 1, cavities were restored by applying Single Bond and Z100 composite resin. In groups 2-5, 35% hydrogen peroxide gel was placed into the pulp chamber and sealed for 5 days. In group 2, teeth were then restored as in group 1. In groups 3 and 4, 10% sodium ascorbate gel and calcium hydroxide paste were applied in the pulp chamber for 40 hours, removed, rinsed and then, restored. In group 5, the cavities were incu-bated for 7 days and then, restored. Samples were thermocycled, immersed in basic fuschin, and sec-tioned. Dye penetration was scored using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal- Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α = 0.05). Results: There was no significant difference in enamel margins (P = 0.163). In dentinal margins (P = 0.003), groups 1, 3 and 5 exhibited similar leakage patterns, each one of groups 1, 3 and 5 had sig-nificant differences with each one of groups 2 and 4. Conclusion: Intracoronal bleaching using 35% H2O2 gel increases the microleakage in dentinal margins. Application of the antioxidant agent or a seven-day delay following bleaching may improve the marginal integrity. Applying calcium hydroxide might jeopardize dentinal sealing. PMID:21528025

  5. MARGINAL ADAPTATION AND PERFORMANCE OF BIOACTIVE DENTAL RESTORATIVE MATERIALS IN DECIDUOUS AND YOUNG PERMANENT TEETH

    PubMed Central

    Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Nicholson, John W.; Iljovska, Snezana; Slipper, Ian J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the adaptation of different types of restorations towards deciduous and young permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared in deciduous and young permanent teeth and filled with different materials (a conventional glass-ionomer, a resin-modified glass-ionomer, a poly-acid-modified composite resin and a conventional composite resin). Specimens were aged in artificial saliva for 1, 6, 12 and 18 months, then examined by SEM. Results: The composite resin and the polyacid-modified composite had better marginal adaptation than the glass-ionomers, though microcracks developed in the enamel of the tooth. The glass-ionomers showed inferior marginal quality and durability, but no microcracking of the enamel. The margins of the resin-modified glass-ionomer were slightly superior to the conventional glass-ionomer. Conditioning improved the adaptation of the composite resin, but the type of tooth made little or no difference to the performance of the restorative material. All materials were associated with the formation of crystals in the gaps between the filling and the tooth; the quantity and shape of these crystals varied with the material. Conclusions: Resin-based materials are generally better at forming sound, durable margins in deciduous and young permanent teeth than cements, but are associated with microcracks in the enamel. All fluoride-releasing materials give rise to crystalline deposits. PMID:19089281

  6. The effect of different drinks on the color stability of different restorative materials after one month

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Safa; Demirci, Mustafa; Serim, Merve Efe; Baydemir, Canan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of three different drinks on the color parameters of four different restorative materials. Materials and Methods Three different composites (Filtek Ultimate Universal Restorative, Filtek Ultimate Flowable, and Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE) and a polyacid-modified composite resin material (Dyract XP, Dentsply DeTrey GmbH) were evaluated. Eighty-four disc-shaped specimens of 8 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness were prepared (n = 21 each). Color coordinates (L*a*b*, ΔL*, Δa*, Δb*, and ΔE*) were measured using a VİTA Easyshade Compact (VİTA Zahnfabrik) after 24 hr of storage (baseline) and after 30 day of storage in three different beverages of black tea, Coca cola, or water (control) (n = 7). In each beverage, the specimens were stored three times a day, one hr each, for 30 day. The color changes (ΔE) were calculated and were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn multiple comparison test. Results The color difference (ΔE*) of the resin materials ranged between 1.31 and 15.28 after 30 day of immersion in the staining solutions. Dyract XP in Coca cola (15.28 ± 2.61) and black tea (12.22 ± 2.73) showed the highest mean ΔE* value after 30 day, followed by Filtek Ultimate Universal Restorative (5.99 ± 1.25) and Filtek Ultimate Flowable (4.71 ± 1.40) in black tea (p < 0.05). Conclusions The compomers displayed unacceptable color changes at the end of 30 day in all beverages. Among resin composites, the silorane based composite exhibited relatively good color stability than the others. Filtek Ultimate Universal Restorative and Filtek Flowable showed similar color changes in all beverages. PMID:26587410

  7. 14 CFR 121.207 - Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Provisionally certificated airplanes... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.207 Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations....

  8. 14 CFR 121.207 - Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Provisionally certificated airplanes... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.207 Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations....

  9. Increasing Immunization Compliance by Reducing Provisional Admittance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Wendy S.; Varni, Susan E.; Barry, Sara E.; Frankowski, Barbara L.; Harder, Valerie S.

    2016-01-01

    Students in Vermont with incomplete or undocumented immunization status are provisionally admitted to schools and historically had a calendar year to resolve their immunization status. The process of resolving these students' immunization status was challenging for school nurses. We conducted a school-based quality improvement effort to increase…

  10. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Kammoun, Dorra; Hentati, Hajer; Janel, Sébastien; Popoff, Michka; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-08-01

    In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  11. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lassila, Lippo V.J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. Materials and Methods. Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37°C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results. Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (p<0.05). Surface roughness had no effect on bacterial adhesion. Saliva coating significantly decreased the adhesion for all materials (p<0.05). Composite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (p<0.05). Conclusions. Short fiber-reinforced composite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion than

  12. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Lippo V J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-12-04

    OBJECTIVES.: The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS.: Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37 degrees C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). RESULTS.: Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (p<0.05). Surface roughness had no effect on bacterial adhesion. Saliva coating significantly decreased the adhesion for all materials (p<0.05). Composite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS.: Short fiber-reinforced composite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion

  13. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Janaina Barros; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Tedesco, Tamara Kerber; Guglielmi, Camila de Almeida Brandão; Raggio, Daniela Prócida

    2012-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva) and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days). Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM) or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250). Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×). Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001). For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  14. 21 CFR 81.1 - Provisional lists of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Provisional lists of color additives. 81.1 Section... GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS AND GENERAL RESTRICTIONS FOR PROVISIONAL COLOR ADDITIVES FOR USE IN FOODS, DRUGS, AND COSMETICS § 81.1 Provisional lists of color additives. The Commissioner of Food and Drugs...

  15. 21 CFR 81.1 - Provisional lists of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Provisional lists of color additives. 81.1 Section... GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS AND GENERAL RESTRICTIONS FOR PROVISIONAL COLOR ADDITIVES FOR USE IN FOODS, DRUGS, AND COSMETICS § 81.1 Provisional lists of color additives. The Commissioner of Food and Drugs...

  16. 21 CFR 81.1 - Provisional lists of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Provisional lists of color additives. 81.1 Section... GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS AND GENERAL RESTRICTIONS FOR PROVISIONAL COLOR ADDITIVES FOR USE IN FOODS, DRUGS, AND COSMETICS § 81.1 Provisional lists of color additives. The Commissioner of Food and Drugs...

  17. 21 CFR 81.1 - Provisional lists of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Provisional lists of color additives. 81.1 Section... GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS AND GENERAL RESTRICTIONS FOR PROVISIONAL COLOR ADDITIVES FOR USE IN FOODS, DRUGS, AND COSMETICS § 81.1 Provisional lists of color additives. The Commissioner of Food and Drugs...

  18. 21 CFR 81.1 - Provisional lists of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Provisional lists of color additives. 81.1 Section... GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS AND GENERAL RESTRICTIONS FOR PROVISIONAL COLOR ADDITIVES FOR USE IN FOODS, DRUGS, AND COSMETICS § 81.1 Provisional lists of color additives. The Commissioner of Food and Drugs...

  19. 14 CFR 21.223 - Class II provisional airworthiness certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... provisional aircraft flight manual containing the limitations established by §§ 21.83(h), 91.317, and 121.207... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Provisional Airworthiness Certificates... applicant is entitled to a Class II provisional airworthiness certificate for an aircraft for which a...

  20. 14 CFR 21.221 - Class I provisional airworthiness certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the manufacturer. (e) The aircraft must be supplied with a provisional aircraft flight manual or other... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Provisional Airworthiness Certificates... applicant is entitled to a Class I provisional airworthiness certificate for an aircraft for which a Class...

  1. 14 CFR 21.223 - Class II provisional airworthiness certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... provisional aircraft flight manual containing the limitations established by §§ 21.83(h), 91.317, and 121.207... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Provisional Airworthiness Certificates... applicant is entitled to a Class II provisional airworthiness certificate for an aircraft for which a...

  2. 14 CFR 21.223 - Class II provisional airworthiness certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... provisional aircraft flight manual containing the limitations established by §§ 21.83(h), 91.317, and 121.207... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Provisional Airworthiness Certificates... applicant is entitled to a Class II provisional airworthiness certificate for an aircraft for which a...

  3. 14 CFR 21.221 - Class I provisional airworthiness certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the manufacturer. (e) The aircraft must be supplied with a provisional aircraft flight manual or other... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Provisional Airworthiness Certificates... applicant is entitled to a Class I provisional airworthiness certificate for an aircraft for which a Class...

  4. 14 CFR 21.223 - Class II provisional airworthiness certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... (f) The aircraft must be supplied with a provisional aircraft flight manual containing the... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Provisional Airworthiness Certificates... airworthiness certificate for an aircraft for which a Class II provisional type certificate has been issued...

  5. 14 CFR 21.223 - Class II provisional airworthiness certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... provisional aircraft flight manual containing the limitations established by §§ 21.83(h), 91.317, and 121.207... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Provisional Airworthiness Certificates... applicant is entitled to a Class II provisional airworthiness certificate for an aircraft for which a...

  6. 14 CFR 21.221 - Class I provisional airworthiness certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the manufacturer. (e) The aircraft must be supplied with a provisional aircraft flight manual or other... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Provisional Airworthiness Certificates... applicant is entitled to a Class I provisional airworthiness certificate for an aircraft for which a Class...

  7. 48 CFR 232.102-70 - Provisional delivery payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Provisional delivery... Item Purchase Financing 232.102-70 Provisional delivery payments. (a) The contracting officer may establish provisional delivery payments to pay contractors for the costs of supplies and services...

  8. 48 CFR 232.102-70 - Provisional delivery payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Provisional delivery... Item Purchase Financing 232.102-70 Provisional delivery payments. (a) The contracting officer may establish provisional delivery payments to pay contractors for the costs of supplies and services...

  9. Erosive Potential of Cola and Orange Fruit Juice on Tooth Colored Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Rajavardhan, K; Sankar, AJS; Kumar, MGM; Kumar, KR; Pranitha, K; Kishore, KK

    2014-01-01

    Background: Erosion is a common condition which manifests due to consumption of high caloric and low pH acidic food stuffs such as carbonated drinks and fruit juices which cause irreversible damage to dental hard tissues and early deterioration of the dental restorations. Aim: The main aim of this study is to evaluate and to compare the erosive potential of carbonated drink (cola) and fruit juice (orange fruit juice) by measuring the surface roughness (Ra) values on two commonly used dental restorative materials. Materials and Methods: A total of 36 specimens each were prepared using both testing materials, compomer (Group I) and giomer (Group II). Six specimens in each group were discarded due to wide variation in pre exposed Ra values and the remaining 30 specimens in each group were further sub divided into 10 samples each according to the testing media used. Immersion regime was followed according to Von Fraunhofer and Rogers. The pre and post immersion surface roughness values were recorded using a profilometer. Results: Both tested materials showed statistically-significant surface erosion (P < 0.01) when exposed to cola and orange fruit juice than the control group (water). Discussion: Compomer showed more surface roughness when compared to giomer when exposed to the three tested media which can be attributed to the variation in filler content, decomposition of resin matrix and fallout of the fillers in composites when exposed to acidic drinks. Other factors responsible for this significant erosion were also discussed. Conclusions: Significant surface changes of the dental restorative materials can take place when exposed to low pH drinks for a prolonged period. PMID:25364590

  10. Thermal stability of direct dental esthetic restorative materials at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Robinson, F G; Rueggeberg, F A; Lockwood, P E

    1998-11-01

    With increasing use of direct esthetic restorative materials, the identity of a body may rely upon knowledge of temperature effects on this class of dental restorations. This research examined the effect of atmospheric gas on thermal decomposition and color change of a wide variety of direct esthetic restorative materials. Cured discs (4 x 1 and 8 x 1 mm) were made using manufacturer's directions: traditional glass ionomer (Fuji II), light-curable resonomer (Fuji II LC), compomer (Geristore), and three types of resin composites--highly filled, urethane-based (Occlusin), and two Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resins: hybrid (Herculite XRV) and microfill (Silux Plus). Three replications of each material were heated at 5 degrees C/min in a thermogravimetric analysis unit using either room air or nitrogen purge to simulate different thermal environments. First derivative values of percent weight loss with respect to temperature were obtained to determine temperatures associated with increased decomposition rates. Room-air heating showed greater numbers of decomposition events than did nitrogen-heated discs. The only material decomposing less than 200 degrees C in either atmosphere was traditional glass ionomer. The majority of decomposition occurred between 200 degrees and 500 degrees C for all materials. Only products containing glass ionomer components decomposed between 600 degrees and 800 degrees C. Room-air heating resulted in ash white discs at 800 degrees C and higher. Specimens heated in nitrogen were gray to black at 600 degrees C and higher. Heating atmosphere greatly affected color, and some products demonstrated distinguishing color changes: glass ionomers, in particular, showed characteristic color features. An atlas was constructed from color change of specimens recovered after 200 degrees, 400 degrees, 600 degrees, 800 degrees, and 1000 degrees C compared with non-heated controls.

  11. Reinforcement of conventional glass-ionomer restorative material with short glass fibers.

    PubMed

    Hammouda, Ibrahim M

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the strengthening effect of glass fibers when added to conventional glass-ionomer restorative material. Glass fibers were incorporated into glass-ionomer powder in 3 wt% and 5 wt%. The fibers used had 1 mm length and 10 microm thickness. These criteria of fiber length, diameter, and concentration represent a new approach for reinforcing conventional glass-ionomer [Medifill, conventional restorative glass-ionomer]. The mechanical properties tested were diametral tensile strength, hardness, flexural strength, flexural modulus and fracture toughness after 24-h and 7-days of storage in deionized water. Glass short fibers were mixed thoroughly into the glass-ionomer powder before mixing with the cement liquid. Samples of specific dimensions were prepared for each time interval and fiber loading according to the manufacturer's instructions and international standards. Hardness was measured using a micro-hardness tester at 100 gram applied load for 15 s. The other mechanical properties were measured using a Lloyd universal testing machine. The results showed increased diametral tensile strength, flexural strength, flexural modulus, and fracture toughness by the addition of glass fibers. There was an appreciable increase of the tested mechanical properties of glass-ionomer restorative material as a result of increasing fiber loading and water storage for 1 week. It was concluded that conventional glass-ionomer can be reinforced by the addition of short glass fibers.

  12. Surface roughness and weight loss of esthetic restorative materials related to fluoride release and uptake.

    PubMed

    Yip, H K; Lam, W T; Smales, R J

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the surface roughness of eight esthetic restorative materials and the relationship with weight changes during fluoride release and uptake. Five specimens each of ChemFil Superior, Fuji IX Dyract, Fuji II LC, Vitremer, Photac-Fil, Ketac-Silver, and Z100 (control) were prepared and immersed in 2 ml of artificial saliva at 37 degrees C. The changes in specimen weight and fluoride release were monitored for 12 weeks. This protocol was repeated after recharging the specimens with 1.23% APF gel for 12 more weeks. The immersed and fresh specimens for each material were then examined with SEM and surface profilometry. There was a significant weight loss for all glass ionomer cements following APF gel application (P < 0.01), which correlated with fluoride release (r = 0.89-0.98). Mean roughness (Ra) measurements and SEM showed that roughness increased from the resin composite to the conventional glass ionomer cements. The marked erosive effect of APF gel on glass ionomer restorations could increase surface colonization by plaque micro-organisms, and reduce the longevity of the restorations.

  13. Comparison of microleakage from stainless steel crowns margins used with different restorative materials: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Memarpour, Mahtab; Derafshi, Reza; Razavi, Mahshid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obtaining optimal marginal adaption with prefabricated stainless steel crowns (SSCs) is difficult, especially after removing dental caries or defects in cervical areas. This situation requires the use of an SSC after tooth reconstruction. This study evaluated microleakage and material loss with five restorative materials at SSC margins. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty primary molar teeth were randomly divided into six groups (n = 20). Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of the teeth in groups 1-5. Cavities were restored with amalgam, resin-based composite, glass ionomer (GI), zinc phosphate, or reinforced zinc oxide eugenol (Zonalin). Group 6 without cavity preparation was used as a control. Restorations with SSCs were prepared according to standard methods. Then, SSCs were fitted so that the crown margins overlaid the restorative materials and cemented with GI. After thermocycling, the specimens were placed in 0.5% fuchsin and sectioned. The proportions of mircoleakage and material loss were evaluated with a digital microscope. Statistical analysis was performed with Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: The groups differed significantly (P < 0.001). Amalgam and GI showed the least microleakage. Amalgam restorations had significantly less microleakage than the other materials (P < 0.05). Microleakage was greatest with resin-based composite, followed by Zonalin. Material loss was greater in samples restored with Zonalin and zinc phosphate. Conclusion: When SSC margins overlaid the restoration materials, cavity restoration with amalgam or GI before SSC placement led to less microleakage and material loss. Regarding microleakage and material loss, resin-based composite, zinc phosphate, and Zonalin were not suitable options. PMID:26962309

  14. Effect of Whitening Dentifrice on Micro Hardness, Colour Stability and Surface Roughness of Aesthetic Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Basappa, N.; Prabhakar, AR; Raju, OS; Lamba, Gagandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Whitening agents present in the novel whitening dentifrices may have deleterious effects over the aesthetic restorations. Aim The present study evaluated the invitro effect of whitening dentifrice on micro hardness, colour stability and surface roughness on aesthetic restorative materials. Materials and Methods Forty specimens each of compomer and of composite were prepared using brass mould. Specimens were equally divided into 4 groups. Group I (20 disks of compomer are subjected to brushing with conventional tooth paste) Group II (20 disks of composite subjected to brushing with conventional tooth paste), Group III (20 disks of compomer subjected to brushing with whitening tooth paste). Group IV (20 disks of composite subjected to brushing with whitening toothpaste). Each group was further divided into two subgroups, where 10 sample were subjected for two weeks of brushing with respective tooth paste and other 10 were subjected for four weeks of brushing. For the evaluation of micro hardness, colour stability and surface roughness, micro hardness testing machine, spectrophotometer and surface testing machine were used respectively. Initial and final readings were taken for each specimen and difference obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. One-way ANOVA was used for multiple group comparison followed by post-hoc Tukey’s-test. The paried t-test was used for intra group comparison and unpaired t-test for comparing independent sample groups. Results The compomer and composite showed no significant difference in micro hardness either with conventional or whitening tooth paste both at two and four weeks. Although there was a highly significant colour change observed after using whitening tooth paste for both compomer and composite. Regarding surface roughness, there was a significant change in roughness in both conventional and whitening tooth paste with compomer and composite. However, whitening tooth paste had a significant change in surface

  15. Fracture Toughness of Veneering Ceramics for Fused to Metal (PFM) and Zirconia Dental Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Janet B.; Quinn, George D.; Sundar, Veeraraghaven

    2010-01-01

    Veneering ceramics designed to be used with modern zirconia framework restorations have been reported to fracture occasionally in vivo. The fracture toughness of such veneering ceramics was measured and compared to that of conventional feldspathic porcelain veneering ceramics for metal framework restorations. The fracture toughness of the leucite free veneer was measured to be 0.73 MPa m ± 0.02 MPa m, which is less than that for the porcelain fused to metal (PFM) veneering ceramic: 1.10 MPa ± 0.2 MPa. (Uncertainties are one standard deviation unless otherwise noted.) The surface crack in flexure (SCF) method was suitable for both materials, but precrack identification was difficult for the leucite containing feldspathic porcelain PFM veneer. PMID:21833158

  16. Matching the optical properties of direct esthetic dental restorative materials to those of human enamel and dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragain, James Carlton, Jr.

    One of the goals of the restorative dentist is to restore the appearance of the natural dentition. Clinical matching of teeth and restorative materials are seldom accurate and shade selection techniques are subjective. The first specific aim of this research was to characterize the optical absorption and scattering that occurs within enamel, dentin, and composite resin and compomer restorative materials and to relate those phenomena to translucency and color. The second aim was to evaluate small color differences among composite restorative materials which would be detectable by humans. The last aim was to lay the foundation for developing an improved model of specifying layers of dental restorative materials in order to match the translucency and color to those of human enamel. The Kubelka-Munk theory was validated for enamel, dentin, and the restorative materials. These tissues and materials were then characterized in terms of their color parameters. Tooth cores were also characterized in terms of color space parameters. Human subjects were evaluated for their abilities to discriminate small color differences in the dental composite resin materials. The following conclusions were derived from this study: (1) Kubelka-Munk theory accurately predicts the diffuse reflectance spectra of enamel, dentin, and the direct esthetic dental restorative materials studied. (2) Scattering and absorption coefficients of the dental tissues and esthetic restorative materials can be directly calculated from diffuse reflectance measurements of a uniformly thick slab of tissue/material using black and white backings and the appropriate refractive index. (3) For tooth cores, there is a positive correlation between L* and b* and a negative correlation between L* and a*. (4) The range of translucency parameters for the restorative materials studied does not match those of enamel and dentin. (5) None of the shades of the dental composite resin restorative materials studied fit into the

  17. Comparative in vitro assessment of color stability of hybrid esthetic restorative materials against various children's beverages

    PubMed Central

    Hotwani, Kavita; Thosar, Nilima; Baliga, Sudhindra

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was aimed to evaluate and compare the color stability of two hybrid tooth-colored restorative materials, namely, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (GC Fuji II LC Capsules - GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and giomer (Beautifil II - Shofu Inc, Kyoto, Japan) when subjected to immersion in various children's beverages. Materials and Methods: Standardized disc specimens were prepared using the test restorative materials. After preparation and rehydration of the specimens, baseline color evaluations were performed using spectrophotometer. The readings were recorded according to CIELAB color space. The experimental groups were further subdivided for immersion in orange juice, bournvita milk, and coke. Subsequent to immersion and pH cycling, new color evaluations were carried out after 1 week and 4 weeks for all the experimental groups. The mean color change values were calculated. Results: The obtained data was subjected to statistical analysis. The results indicated that giomer specimens exhibited less color change as compared to RMGIC specimens indicating better color stability. The maximum color changes were found with the use of coke for a period of 4 weeks. Conclusion: Amongst the two materials, giomer showed less color changes as compared to RMGIC indicating a better color stability. PMID:24554866

  18. Effects of carbamide peroxide on the staining susceptibility of tooth-colored restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Pan, Xinhua; Lin, Yao; Li, Qing; Hussain, Manal; Wang, Yining

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of an at-home bleaching gel containing 15% carbamide peroxide on the susceptibility of tooth-colored restorative materials to different staining solutions. The tooth-colored restoratives used in this study were a nano resin composite (Filtek Z350), a packable resin composite (Filtek P60), a polyacid-modified composite (Dyract AP) and a glass-ionomer cement (Ketac Molar Easymix). Each material was equally divided into two groups (n = 34): the bleaching group and the control group. This study included two treatment segments. In the first part (days 1-14), the specimens of the bleaching group were bleached with 15% carbamide peroxide gels for eight hours daily, while the specimens in the control group were stored in deionized water. Subsequently, four specimens from each group were randomly selected for observation under an environmental scanning electron microscope. In the second part (days 15-42), the samples were not bleached. Instead, they were stored in five different kinds of solutions. Color measurements for each sample were taken at six different time periods using a spectrophotometer. The data was then analyzed using SPSS statistical software. After two-weeks of bleaching, all the specimens showed statistically significant color changes compared with the control specimens. Furthermore, the bleaching agents seriously affected the surface morphology of Dyract AP and Ketac Molar Easymix. Following exposure to the staining solutions, it was found that the bleached restorative materials exhibited greater staining susceptibility than the control materials. Filtek Z350 and P60 exhibited the best color stability, while Dyract AP exhibited the least color stability.

  19. Influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage restorations.

    PubMed

    Bakeman, E M; Rego, N; Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage ceramic restorations. Forty extracted molars were allocated into four groups (n=10) to test for two variables: 1) the thickness of ceramic (1 mm or 2 mm) and 2) the ceramic materials (a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max] or leucite-reinforced glass ceramic [IPS Empress]). All ceramic restorations were luted with resin cement (Variolink II) on the prepared teeth. These luted specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine, in the compression mode, with a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey Honestly Significantly Different multiple comparison test (α =0.05). The fracture resistance revealed a significant effect for materials (p<0.001); however, the thickness of ceramic was not significant (p=0.074), and the interaction between the thickness of ceramic and the materials was not significant (p=0.406). Mean (standard deviation) fracture resistance values were as follows: a 2-mm thickness of a lithium disilicate bonded to tooth structure (2505 [401] N) revealed a significantly higher fracture resistance than did a 1-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced (1569 [452] N) and a 2-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced ceramic bonded to tooth structure (1716 [436] N) (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in fracture resistance values between a lithium disilicate ceramic at 1-mm thickness (2105 [567] N) and at 2-mm thickness. Using a lithium disilicate glass ceramic for partial coverage restoration significantly improved fracture resistance compared to using a leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The thickness of ceramic had no significant effect on fracture resistance when the ceramics were bonded to the underlying tooth structure.

  20. A new technique for screening chemical toxicity to the pulp from dental restorative materials and procedures.

    PubMed

    Hume, W R

    1985-11-01

    An in vitro test system is described which allows for quick and relatively inexpensive examination of the potential for chemical toxicity to the pulp of materials and procedures used in the restoration of single teeth. The test system consisted of two sequential steps. First, a restorative procedure was carried out on a freshly-extracted human tooth crown, to the pulpal surface of which had been attached a chamber filled with sterile tissue-culture medium. The preparation was kept at 37 degrees C. The culture medium was removed at day one and replaced with fresh medium, which was removed at day 3. In the second step, we used a standard tissue-culture toxicity assessment technique to examine both culture medium samples for the presence of chemical toxins. In use, this system gave results which correlated well with the known clinical potential for pulpal toxicity of various dental materials and techniques. For example, zinc oxide-eugenol used as temporary filling or base had no apparent potential for toxicity. Sealing a cotton pellet containing phenol into a cavity was of high apparent potential toxicity. Acrylic resin as intracoronal or extracoronal fillings showed potential for toxicity; this potential was decreased by lining with calcium hydroxide cement. Composite resin placed onto etched dentin had apparent toxic potential, but had less such potential when placed onto unetched dentin. The technique had some advantages over previously described in vitro toxicity test for restorative materials, because it included a step requiring diffusion of potential toxins into and through human dentin, and because it allowed for examination of variations in technique which mimic clinical behavior, and of materials used in sequence or in combination.

  1. Long-term cytotoxicity of resin-based dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Bouillaguet, S; Shaw, L; Gonzalez, L; Wataha, J C; Krejci, I

    2002-01-01

    Highly filled composites, Ormocers (organically modified ceramics) and 'smart' materials have been developed to overcome the polymerization shrinkage problems of conventional composite materials. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of longer-term (up to 8 weeks) ageing of these resin-based dental restorative materials and determine the effect of post-curing on cytotoxicity. Twelve discs of each material (Colombus/IDR, Definite/Degussa, Ariston pHc/Vivadent) were either light-cured (Lc) or light-cured and post-cured (Pc). For cytotoxicity testing, the discs were placed in contact with cell culture medium (DMEM) and incubated at 37 degrees C. Extracts from composite materials were collected after 24 h and weekly over a time period of 8 weeks. Cytotoxicity of the eluates to cultured fibroblasts (Balb/c3T3) were measured by the succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) activity (MTT assay) and the results expressed in percentage of negative controls (Teflon discs). The results showed that ageing significantly influenced the cytotoxicity of the materials. Except for Ariston pHc, materials were less cytotoxic after 8 weeks of ageing than they were in early intervals and post-curing was not generally useful in reducing cytotoxicity. The Ariston pHc was initially moderately toxic, but then become highly cytotoxic for 5 weeks before returning to initial levels. The current study demonstrated the importance of assessing the cytotoxicity of resin composite materials at multiple times.

  2. Water absorption, dimensional change and radial pressure in resin matrix dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    McCabe, John F; Rusby, Sandra

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the relationship between water absorption, dimensional change (swelling) under cavity constraint and radial stress generation in resin matrix dental restorative materials. Water absorption was determined on disc specimens whilst swelling was determined on samples of materials restrained within cavities cut in cast polymethylmethacrylate and pressure generated was determined using a 'push-out' test. Four commercially available resin matrix materials were used. A giomer material gave significantly greater water absorption than two compomers and a fluoride releasing composite (p<0.05). The giomer material was the only material which produced a significant degree of swelling (p<0.05) when restrained within a cavity. The giomer product produced the greatest radial pressure (over 20 MPa in 1 month) following water storage, however a significant pressure generation was also observed for other materials despite their much lower water absorption values. The mechanism of water absorption and the amount of water absorbed determine the dimensional changes and radial pressure generated by resin matrix materials in a moist environment.

  3. Fabrication of a provisional nasal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Evan B; Golden, Marjorie; Huryn, Joseph M

    2014-11-01

    A technique for making a provisional nasal prosthesis for interim use after the ablation of a midface tumor is described. The technique is especially useful for the re-creation of a nasal form in an expedient and cost-effective manner. A preoperative definitive cast, or moulage, of the patient that includes a nasal form is used to fabricate a vacuum form of the midface. The vacuum form is evaluated on the patient, the extension is adjusted, and an external adhesive knit liner is applied to give the appearance of a contoured nasal bandage. The provisional nasal prosthesis is attached with medical adhesive tape and removed daily by the patient. The prosthesis is easily replaced during the course of treatment and has been found to be functional and esthetically acceptable to those patients receiving care from the Dental Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

  4. Influence of composite restorative materials and light-curing units on diametrical tensile strength.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Maria Cecília Caldas Giorgi; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Giannini, Marcelo; Santos, Alex José Souza dos; Dias, Carlos Tadeu dos Santos

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diametrical tensile strength (DTS) of three light-curing photo-activated composites with two different light curing units (LCU). Three types of dental restorative composites were used in this study: micro filled A110 (3M Espe); P60 (3M Espe) for posterior restorations, and micro-hybrid Charisma (Heraeus-Kulzer). The two LCUs were: halogen light (HAL) (Degulux, Degussa) and blue light emitting diode (LED) (Ultrablue, DMC). Resin composite specimens were inserted incrementally into a Teflon split mold measuring 3 mm in depth and 6 mm in internal diameter, and cured using either LCU (n = 10). Specimens were placed into a dark bottle containing distilled water at 37 degrees C for 7 days. DTS tests were performed in a Universal Testing Machine (0.5 mm/min). Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results were (MPa): A110/HAL: 276.50 +/- 62.94a; A110/LED: 306.01 +/- 65.16a; P60/HAL: 568.29 +/- 60.77b and P60/LED: 543.01 +/- 83.65b; Charisma/HAL: 430.94 +/- 67.28c; Charisma/LED: 435.52 +/- 105.12c. Results suggested that no significant difference in DTS was obtained with LCUs for the same composite. However, resin composite restorative materials presented different DTS.

  5. Translucency changes of direct esthetic restorative materials after curing, aging and treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the changes in translucency of direct esthetic restorative materials after curing, aging and treatment. As a criterion for the evaluation of clinical translucency changes, visual perceptibility threshold in translucency parameter difference (ΔTP) of 2 was used. Translucency changes after curing were perceivable depending on experimental methods and products (largest ΔTP in resin composites = 15.9). Translucency changes after aging were reported as either relatively stable or showed perceivable changes by aging protocols (largest ΔTP in resin composites = -3.8). Translucency changes after curing, aging and treatment were perceivable in several products and experimental methods. Therefore, shade matching of direct esthetic materials should be performed considering these instabilities of translucency in direct esthetic materials. PMID:27847744

  6. Translucency changes of direct esthetic restorative materials after curing, aging and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the changes in translucency of direct esthetic restorative materials after curing, aging and treatment. As a criterion for the evaluation of clinical translucency changes, visual perceptibility threshold in translucency parameter difference (ΔTP) of 2 was used. Translucency changes after curing were perceivable depending on experimental methods and products (largest ΔTP in resin composites = 15.9). Translucency changes after aging were reported as either relatively stable or showed perceivable changes by aging protocols (largest ΔTP in resin composites = -3.8). Translucency changes after curing, aging and treatment were perceivable in several products and experimental methods. Therefore, shade matching of direct esthetic materials should be performed considering these instabilities of translucency in direct esthetic materials.

  7. Shear bond strengths of resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Swift, E J; Pawlus, M A; Vargas, M A

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative materials to dentin. The materials tested were Fuji II LC, Geristore, Photac-Fil, VariGlass VLC, and Vitremer. Ketac-Fil, a conventional glass ionomer, was used as the control. The occlusal surfaces of 60 extracted molars were ground flat in dentin using 600-grit silicon carbide abrasive paper. Dentin surfaces were treated according to manufacturers' instructions, and restorative materials were applied using gelatin capsule matrices. Shear bond strengths were determined after the specimens were thermocycled 500 times. Mean bond strengths of the resin-modified glass ionomers ranged from 1.4 MPa (Photac-Fil) to 12.3 MPa (Fuji II LC). Except for Photac-Fil, all values were significantly higher than the control. Pairwise comparisons between the means for Fuji II LC and Vitremer, Vitremer and Geristore, and Geristore and VariGlass were not significantly different.

  8. The assessment of surface roughness and microleakage of eroded tooth-colored dental restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Thulfiqar Ali; Bakar, Wan Zaripah Wan; Ghani, Zuryati Ab; Mohamad, Dasmawati

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of acidic solution on surface roughness and microleakage of tooth-colored restorative materials. Materials and Methods: A 160 box-shaped cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 160 human molars, and assigned to four groups: Group A restored with Ketac™ Molar Easymix, Group B with Fuji II™ LC, Group C with Ketac™ N100, and Group D with Filtek™ Z250, and subdivided into study and control groups (n = 20). Study groups were immersed in lemon juice (pH = 2.79) for 24 h, whilst controlgroups in deionized distilled water. All samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue dye, sectioned into two equal halves for surface roughness, and microleakage tests. Data were analyzed using Mann–Whitney and Kruskal–Wallis tests at P < 0.05. Results: There was a significant difference in surface roughness of Ketac™ Molar, Fuji II™ LC, and Ketac™ N100. No significant difference was found in microleakage of Ketac™ Molar and Fuji II™ LC; however, there were significant differences in the gingival margin of Ketac™ N100, and the occlusal margin of Filtek™ Z250. Conclusions: All glass ionomer cements were eroded after exposure to the acidic drink. Filtek™ Z250 and Ketac™ Molar Easymix showed more microleakage. All materials showed more microleakage at the gingival margins. PMID:25506139

  9. Thermal cycling for restorative materials: does a standardized protocol exist in laboratory testing? A literature review.

    PubMed

    Morresi, Anna Lucia; D'Amario, Maurizio; Capogreco, Mario; Gatto, Roberto; Marzo, Giuseppe; D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Monaco, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    In vitro tests continue to be an indispensable method for the initial screening of dental materials. Thermal cycling is one of the most widely used procedures to simulate the physiological aging experienced by biomaterials in clinical practice. Consequently it is routinely employed in experimental studies to evaluate materials' performance. A literature review aimed to elucidate test parameters for in vitro aging of adhesive restorations was performed. This study aims to assess whether or not a standardized protocol of thermal cycling has been acknowledged from a review of the literature. An exhaustive literature search, examining the effect of thermal cycling on restorative dental materials, was performed with electronic database and by hand. The search was restricted to studies published from 1998 to August 2013. No language restrictions were applied. The search identified 193 relevant experimental studies. Only twenty-three studies had faithfully applied ISO standard. The majority of studies used their own procedures, showing only a certain consistency within the temperature parameter (5-55°C) and a great variability in the number of cycles and dwell time chosen. A wide variation in thermal cycling parameters applied in experimental studies has been identified. The parameters selected amongst these studies seem to be done on the basis of convenience for the authors in most cases. A comparison of results between studies would appear to be impossible. The available data suggest that further investigations will be required to ultimately develop a standardized thermal cycling protocol.

  10. In vitro evaluation of surface roughness and microhardness of restorative materials submitted to erosive challenges.

    PubMed

    Briso, A L F; Caruzo, L P; Guedes, A P A; Catelan, A; dos Santos, P H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different acidic solutions on the microhardness and surface roughness of restorative materials. The 120 specimens of restorative materials (Fuji II LC, Vitremer, Supreme XT, and Supreme XT + Biscover LV) were randomly divided into three groups according to the immersion media: hydrochloric acid, soft drink, or distilled water. Over a period of five weeks, the groups were immersed in the solutions, which were changed weekly. Data were tested using analysis of variance and the Fisher protected least significant difference test (p<0.05). The results showed that the glass ionomer materials showed the highest surface roughness values (Fuji II LC: 0.111 ± 0.014 μm before and 0.139 ± 0.016 μm after immersion; Vitremer: 0.177 ± 0.012 μm before and 0.084 ± 0.012 μm after immersion), whereas the lowest values were found for the resin sealed with Biscover LV before (0.047 ± 0.011 μm) and after exposure in distilled water (0.043 ± 0.007 μm), soft drink (0.040 ± 0.005 μm), and hydrochloric acid (0.045 ± 0.005 μm). The Supreme XT showed the highest microhardness values before (44.96 ± 2.51 KHN) and after the aging process (41.26 ± 1.22 KHN in water, 35.96 ± 0.81 KHN in soft drink, and 34.74 ± 0.97 KHN in HCl), with significant differences from the other materials (p<0.0001). The lowest microhardness values were found for glass ionomer materials. The solutions used in this study decreased the microhardness of all studied materials, whereas the sealed surface suffered minor changes in microhardness and surface roughness after exposure to acidic solutions.

  11. Measuring polymerization shrinkage of photo-activated restorative materials by a water-filled dilatometer.

    PubMed

    Lai, J H; Johnson, A E

    1993-03-01

    A water-filled dilatometer specifically designed for determining the polymerization shrinkage of photo-activated composite restorative materials was used to measure the polymerization shrinkage of three visible light-activated composites. Polymerization shrinkage values ranged from 1.82% for P-50 to 2.15% and 2.19% for Herculite XRV and Prisma APH, respectively. Shrinkage data obtained in this investigation were compared with the published data, and the factors which affect shrinkage measurements were reviewed. It was concluded that maintaining a constant temperature environment (+ or - 0.02 degrees C) for the dilatometer during the shrinkage test was the most critical factor for successful application of the dilatometer.

  12. Investigation into the Depth of Cure of Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Restorative Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    cure of RMGI materials has not received the attention that has been directed to the resin composite restorations. The main cause for this lack of...temperature span of the specific heat determination (20 9 - 60 Q C) would not be sufficient to cause reasonable loss of any HEMA methacrylate components (BP...UD I C? c::i cr) All c:j c:i c::i CKD C--) A" ai 40’. C::3 c=j c=D. cri n 5 43 Table 41. Scheffe Multi Two-way ANOVA analysis of the Vitremer

  13. The effect of three finishing systems on four esthetic restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Hoelscher, D C; Neme, A M; Pink, F E; Hughes, P J

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated the finishing and smoothness of composite and traditional glass-ionomer restorations, but few have included resin-modified glass-ionomer cements or more recent finishing systems. The results of using three different finishing systems (Sof-Lex, Enhance, finishing burs) on two composites (Silux, Prisma TPH), a traditional glass ionomer (Ketac-Fil), and a resin-modified glass ionomer (Fuji II LC) were studied. Sixty samples were condensed into sectioned acrylic tubes, covered with a Mylar matrix plus a glass slide at each surface, then cured as per the manufacturers' instructions. Samples were randomized to three groups of five for each material and testing with a Surfanalyzer 4000 of unfinished samples (cured with Mylar matrix) was done to obtain baseline average surface roughness (Ra). Samples were then finished as per the manufacturers' instructions using polishing disks, abrasive impregnated disks, and finishing burs before further surface testing. Samples finished with burs and with abrasive impregnated disks were further polished using polishing paste (Prisma Gloss) and again tested. Data were analyzed with ANOVA testing and Tukey's HSD pairwise comparison. Initial testing after randomization to groups showed no significant difference in surface roughness (P = 0.24). Two-factor analysis revealed no significant difference between materials (P = 0.34), a significant difference in method of finish (P < or = 0.00), with no significant interaction between type of material and method of finish (P = 0.11). Aluminum oxide disk and impregnated disk systems provided the best finish for microfilled composite and both glass-ionomer materials (P < or = 0.00). No significant difference in method of finish existed with the hybrid composite (P = 0.07). Overall, esthetic restorative material finishing is best accomplished using abrasive impregnated disks or aluminum oxide disks. Finishing burs gave a significantly rougher surface than the

  14. Cytotoxicity of calcium enriched mixture cement compared with mineral trioxide aggregate and intermediate restorative material.

    PubMed

    Mozayeni, Mohammad A; Milani, Amin S; Marvasti, Laleh A; Asgary, Saeed

    2012-08-01

    Calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement has been recently invented by the last author. It is composed of calcium oxide, calcium phosphate, calcium silicate and calcium sulphate; however, it has a different chemical composition to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). The purpose of this ex vivo study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of CEM cement, and compare it with intermediate restorative material (IRM) and MTA. The materials were tested in fresh and set states on L929 fibroblasts to assess their cytotoxicity. The cell viability responses were evaluated with methyl-tetrazolium bromide assay and Elisa reader at 1, 24 and 168 h (7 days). The tested materials were eluted with L929 culture medium according to international standard organisation 109935 standard. Distilled water and culture medium served as positive and negative controls, respectively. Differences in cytotoxicity were evaluated by one-way anova and t-tests. The cytotoxicity of the materials was statistically different at the three time intervals (P < 0.01). The lowest cytotoxic values recorded were expressed by MTA subgroups followed by CEM cement; IRM subgroups were the most cytotoxic root-end/dental material (P < 0.001). CEM cement and MTA are reasonable alternatives to IRM because of lower cytotoxicity. CEM cement also has good biocompatibility as well as lower estimated cost to MTA and seems to be a promising dental material.

  15. Shear Bond Strength of Three Orthodontic Bonding Systems on Enamel and Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Ebeling, Jennifer; Schauseil, Michael; Stein, Steffen; Roggendorf, Matthias; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (iBond™ and Scotchbond™) on different prosthetic surfaces and enamel, in comparison with the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT™. Materials and Methods. A total of 270 surfaces (1 enamel and 8 restorative surfaces, n = 30) were randomly divided into three adhesive groups. In group 1 (control) brackets were bonded with Transbond XT primer. In the experimental groups iBond adhesive (group 2) and Scotchbond Universal adhesive (group 3) were used. The SBS was measured using a Zwicki 1120™ testing machine. The ARI and SBS were compared statistically using the Kruskal–Wallis test (P ≤ 0.05). Results. Significant differences in SBS and ARI were found between the control group and experimental groups. Conclusions. Transbond XT showed the highest SBS on human enamel. Scotchbond Universal on average provides the best bonding on all other types of surface (metal, composite, and porcelain), with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures on restorative materials in patients. If metal brackets have to be bonded to a metal surface, the use of a dual-curing resin is recommended. PMID:27738633

  16. Topical fluoride application is able to reduce acid susceptibility of restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Cheng, Hui; Wiegand, Annette; Attin, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of topical fluoride application on the acid susceptibility of restorative materials. Four restorative materials were investigated in this study: 2 composite resins (Tetric EvoCeram and Filtek Silorane), a polyacid-modified resin composite (Dyract Extra), and a conventional glass-ionomer cement (Ketac Fil Plus). The samples were treated once with 1 of 8 different fluoride solutions (TiF4, NaF, AmF, and SnF2, each at native pH or pH 4) for 3 min or remained untreated (control). The samples were then eroded by citric acid (pH 2.6) for 5 days (6×1 min daily). Erosive substance loss, surface topographic and compositional changes were investigated using surface profilometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), respectively, after fluoride pretreatment and after erosion. The results indicate high-concentrated AmF solution at native pH was effective in inhibiting erosion in the conventional glass-ionomer cement and polyacid-modified resin composite.

  17. Fishery resource utilization of a restored estuarine borrow pit: a beneficial use of dredged material case study.

    PubMed

    Reine, Kevin; Clarke, Douglas; Ray, Gary; Dickerson, Charles

    2013-08-15

    Numerous pits in coastal waters are subject to degraded water quality and benthic habitat conditions, resulting in degraded fish habitat. A pit in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey (USA) was partially filled with dredged sediment to increase flushing, alleviate hypoxia, and enhance benthic assemblages. Restoration objectives were assessed in terms of benthic community parameters and fishery resource occupation. Restoration resulted in increased benthic diversity (bottom samples) and the absence of water column stratification. Fisheries resources occupied the entire water column, unlike pre-restoration conditions where finfish tended to avoid the lower water column. The partial restoration option effectively reproduced an existing borrow pit configuration (Hole #5, control), by decreasing total depth from -11 m to -5.5 m, thereby creating a habitat less susceptible to hypoxic/anoxic conditions, while retaining sufficient vertical relief to maintain associations with juvenile weakfish and other forage fishes. Partially filling pits using dredged material represents a viable restoration alternative.

  18. Effect of oral prophylactic instrumentation on the surface texture of all metal restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Rajeswari, C. L; Kumar, M. V Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the inaccessible areas on the crown the removal of calculus and stains by hand and ultrasonic instrumentation is the method for cleaning to preserve and increase the longevity of the restoration. However, when oral prophylaxis is performed on restorative crowns, it may produce some surface alterations and may favour plaque accumulation. Statement of Problem: Many patients may have restored their teeth with artificial crowns and would come to the dental office for oral prophylaxis. If a routine oral prophylaxis is followed, its effect on the restorative materials and the plaque accumulation can be studied. Materials and Methods: A total of 15 disc shaped wax patterns were invested and casted for cast titanium (Group A) and the remaining 15 disk shaped for nickel-chromium (Group B). The obtained castings were finished and polished. All the specimens were subjected to hand and ultrasonic scaling for 15 s. Profilometer and scanning electron microscopic was used to analyze and evaluate the surface roughness. Specimens of each group were embedded on the anterior lingual aspects of the removable lower retention plates. 5 volunteers were asked to wear it in the mouth for 24 h for 7 days. After 7 days, the specimens were stained with plaque disclosing solutions and the photomicrographs were taken by the optical stereomicroscope and the plaque accumulations were assessed in percentage. Results: The difference in average surface roughness (μm) of the polished test specimens was maximum for ultrasonic scaling than hand scaling and maximum for Group A than Group B. Plaque accumulation in percentage on the treated specimens was found to be nonsignificant but, mean plaque accumulation was maximum on ultrasonic scaling surface than hand scaling and maximum for Group A than Group B. Surface roughness was found to be statistically significant after hand scaling (F = 9.377, P = 0.000) and ultrasonic scaling (F = 5.373, P = 0.0000) by Student t-test. Conclusion: The

  19. Enzymatic responses of human deciduous pulpal fibroblasts to dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chern-Chin; Chen, Robert Cheng-Shen; Huang, Shun-Te

    2002-06-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the responses of succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities of human deciduous teeth pulpal fibroblasts (HDPF) to dental restorative materials. Tested materials included Z100 (3M), Dyract (Dentsply), FujiII (GC), and FujiIILC (GC). IRM (Dentsply) and culture medium (MD) alone were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Specimens 6 mm (diameter) x 3 mm were prepared in accordance with manufacturers' instructions. For light-cured materials, specimens were light cured for 40 s on both sides under a celluloid strip. For chemical-cured materials, specimens were allowed to set at room temperature for 15 min. The specimens were immersed in 1 mL of culture medium without serum for 24 h at room temperature. The extracts were filtered through 0.22-mm filters. HDPF (10,000 cells/well) was incubated with 100 microL of extract and 20 % FBS in a 96-well plate for 24 h in a 37 degrees, 5 % CO(2) incubator. Six wells per material were prepared. Optical density (OD) of SDH and ALP of HDPF were measured by a spectrophotometer. The means were analyzed by ANOVA and then a Duncan Test. The ranking of OD of SDH was IRM < FujiIILC < FujiII = Z100 < Dyract < MD (p < 0.05). The ranking of OD of ALP was IRM < Z100 = Dyract < FujiII < FujiIILC < MD (p < 0.05). The result showed that all of the tested restorative materials were cytotoxic to human deciduous pulpal fibroblasts. The cytotoxicity of resin-modified glass ionomer cements (FujiIILC) was stronger than that of traditional glass ionomer cements (FujiII) and composite resin (Z100), and that of compomer (Dyract) was the weakest. On the contrary, ALP activities of resin-modified glass ionomer cements (FujiIILC) and composite resin (Z100) were higher than those of traditional glass ionomer cements (FujiII), while those of compomer (Dyract) were the lowest. It is concluded that, in this study, FujiIILC was the most cytotoxic material and the least

  20. Adhesion of Streptococcus sanguinis to dental implant and restorative materials in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hauser-Gerspach, Irmgard; Kulik, Eva M; Weiger, Roland; Decker, Eva-Maria; Von Ohle, Christiane; Meyer, Jürg

    2007-05-01

    Bacterial adhesion to tooth surfaces or dental materials starts immediately upon exposure to the oral environment. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the adhesion of Streptococcus sanguinis to saliva-coated human enamel and dental materials - during a one-hour period - using an in vitro flow chamber system which mimicked the oral cavity. After fluorescent staining, the number of adhered cells and their vitality were recorded. The dental materials used were: titanium (Rematitan M), gold (Neocast 3), ceramic (Vita Omega 900), and composite (Tetric Ceram). The number of adherent bacterial cells was higher on titanium, gold, and ceramic surfaces and lower on composite as compared to enamel. As for the percentage of adherent vital cells, it was higher on enamel than on the restorative materials tested. These results suggested that variations in the number and vitality of the adherent pioneer oral bacteria, S. sanguinis, in the in vitro system depended on the surface characteristics of the substratum and the acquired salivary pellicle. The in vitro adhesion model used herein provided a simple and reproducible approach to investigate the impact of surface-modified dental materials on bacterial adhesion and vitality.

  1. A Comparative Evaluation of Marginal Leakage of Different Restorative Materials in Deciduous Molars: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Rehani, Usha; Rana, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Context: Microleakage around dental restorative materials is a major problem in clinical dentistry. Inspite of many new restorative materials available in the market very few actually bond to the tooth surface. Aims: The aims of this study were: (1) To evaluate and compare the marginal leakage of newer restorative materials viz colored compomer, ormocer, giomer and RMGIC in class I restoration of deciduous molars. (2) To compare the microleakage scores between the groups of: Colored compomer and ormocer, giomer and RMGIC, ormocer with giomer and RMGIC, giomer with RMGIC. Materials and methods: A total of 40 primary molars were randomly divided into four groups of 10 each. Class I cavities were prepared and the cavities were restored with colored compomer (Group A), Ormocer (Group B), Giomer (Group C) and RMGIC (Group D). The teeth were thermocycled and subjected to 0.5% basic fuchsin dye penetration followed by sectioning. The cut sections were evaluated under a stereomicroscope and the data was subjected to statistical analysis. Statistical analysis used: Mann-Whitney U test and Student t-test. Results: No significant difference was observed when colored compomer was compared to ormocer, giomer and RMGIC. Ormocer showed significantly lower microleakage when compared to giomer. However, no significant difference was observed when ormocer was compared to RMGIC. No significant difference between giomer and RMGIC was found. Conclusion: Ormocer has proven to be an excellent restorative material as it showed least microleakage followed by colored compomer, giomer and RMGIC in increasing order. How to cite this article: Yadav G, Rehani U, Rana V. A Comparative Evaluation of Marginal Leakage of Different Restorative Materials in Deciduous Molars: An in vitro Study . Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(2):101-107. PMID:25206147

  2. Shear bond strength of bulk-fill and nano-restorative materials to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Hakan; Ercan, Ertugrul; Hamidi, Mehmet Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Bulk-fill composite materials are being developed for preparation depths of up to 4 mm in an effort to simplify and improve the placement of direct composite posterior restorations. The aim of our study was to compare shear-bond strength of bulk-fill and conventional posterior composite resins. Materials and Methods: In this study, 60 caries free extracted human molars were used and sectioned parallel to occlusal surface to expose midcoronal dentin. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups. Total-etch dentine bonding system (Adper Scotchbond 1XT, 3M ESPE) was applied to dentin surface in all the groups to reduce variability in results. Then, dentine surfaces covered by following materials. Group I: SonicFill Bulk-Fill, Group II: Tetric EvoCeram (TBF), Group III: Herculite XRV Ultra, and Group IV: TBF Bulk-Fill, 2 mm × 3 mm cylindrical restorations were prepared by using application apparatus. Shear bond testing was measured by using a universal testing machine. Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests were performed to evaluate the data. Results: The highest value was observed in Group III (14.42 ± 4.34) and the lowest value was observed in Group IV (11.16 ± 2.76) and there is a statistically significant difference between these groups (P = 0.046). However, there is no statistically significant difference between the values of other groups. In this study, Group III was showed higher strength values. Conclusion: There is a need for future studies about long-term bond strength and clinical success of these adhesive and bulk-fill systems. PMID:27011738

  3. Comparative study of mechanical properties of dental restorative materials and dental hard tissues in compressive loads

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Yeop

    2014-01-01

    There are two objectives. One is to show the differences in the mechanical properties of various dental restorative materials compared to those of enamel and dentin. The other is to ascertain which dental restorative materials are more suitable for clinical treatments. Amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy were processed as dental restorative material specimens. The specimens (width, height, and length of 1.2, 1.2, and 3.0 mm, respectively) were compressed at a constant loading speed of 0.1 mm/min. The maximum stress (115.0 ± 40.6, 55.0 ± 24.8, 291.2 ± 45.3, 274.6 ± 52.2, 2206.0 ± 522.9, and 953.4 ± 132.1 MPa), maximum strain (7.8% ± 0.5%, 4.0% ± 0.1%, 12.7% ± 0.8%, 32.8% ± 0.5%, 63.5% ± 14.0%, and 45.3% ± 7.4%), and elastic modulus (1437.5 ± 507.2, 1548.4 ± 583.5, 2323.4 ± 322.4, 833.1 ± 92.4, 3895.2 ± 202.9, and 2222.7 ± 277.6 MPa) were evident for amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy, respectively. The reference hardness value of amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy was 90, 420, 130–135, 86.6–124.2, 1250, and 349, respectively. Since enamel grinds food, its abrasion resistance is important. Therefore, hardness value should be prioritized for enamel. Since dentin absorbs bite forces, mechanical properties should be prioritized for dentin. The results suggest that gold alloy simultaneously has a hardness value lower than enamel (74.8 ± 18.1), which is important in the wear of the opposing natural teeth, and higher maximum stress, maximum strain, and elastic modulus than dentin (193.7 ± 30.6 MPa, 11.9% ± 0.1%, 1653.7 ± 277.9 MPa, respectively), which are important considering the rigidity to absorb bite forces. PMID:25352921

  4. Evaluation of Microleakage and Marginal Ridge Fracture Resistance of Primary Molars Restored with Three Restorative Materials: A Comparative in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeolekar, Tapan Satish; Mukunda, KS; Kiran, NK

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Composite restorations are popular because of their superior esthetics and acceptable clinical performance. But shrinkage is still a drawback. Polymerization shrinkage results in volumetric contraction, leading to deformation of the cusps, microleakage, decrease of marginal adaptation, enamel micro-cracks and postoperative sensitivity. A new class of ring opening resin composite based on silorane chemistry has been introduced with claims of less than 1% shrinkage during polymerization. The present study was conducted to evaluate and compare the ability of low shrink silorane based material, a packable composite and a compomer to resist microleakage in class II restorations on primary molars and evaluate marginal ridge fracture resistance of these materials. Sixty human primary molars were selected. Class II cavities were prepared and the teeth were divided into three groups of twenty each. Groups were as follows group I: low shrink composite resin (Filtek P90). Group II: packable composite (Filtek P60) and Group III: compomer (Compoglass F). Half of the teeth were used for microleakage and the rest for marginal ridge fracture resistance. For microleakage testing, dye penetration method was used with 1% methylene blue dye. Followed by evaluation and grading under stereomicroscope at 10* magnification. Fracture resistance was tested with universal testing machine. It was concluded that low shrink silorane based composite resin showed the least amount of microleakage, whereas compomer showed the highest microleakage. Packable composite resisted fracture of marginal ridge better than other composite resins. Marginal ridge fracture resistance of packable composite was comparable to the intact side. How to cite this article: Yeolekar TS, Chowdhary NR, Mukunda KS, Kiran NK. Evaluation of Microleakage and Marginal Ridge Fracture Resistance of Primary Molars Restored with Three Restorative Materials: A Comparative in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015

  5. [Is it necessary to assess experimentally and clinically restorative materials already on the market?].

    PubMed

    Merte, Ilka; Schneider, Hartmut; Merte, Knut

    2004-01-01

    The precondition for introducing medical products, e.g. new filling materials, in the European Union is their safety, not their clinical reliability. The latter arises from longitudinal studies and is assessed on the basis of available standards or, if not existant, on formulated quality guidelines. In the case of the specific products Ariston Liner and Ariston pHc (Vivadent, Schaan, FL), designed as an amalgam substitute, the material combination did not correspond to the Swiss standard 2 of restorative dentistry. Although after a short-term application testing on caries free premolars the pulp and dentin were free from inflammation and bacteria, the material combination clinically failed within the 18 months control period with a cumulative failure rate of 16.1% due to marginal caries. After six months of function the subjectively assessed sensitivity tended to increase. Gap formations and porous zones were detected in the composite-tooth-interface in vitro as well as in vivo. Neither the lining, designed to ensure the passage of cations and anions out of the filling material, nor the concept of an adequate caries protective effect proved successful. Marginal caries and hypersensitivity of teeth were the main reasons for the replacement of this amalgam substitute. The specific material combination was withdrawn from the market. As long as laboratory methods cannot substitute clinical evaluations, the introduction of new materials or systems into the market should be supported by short-term clinical studies and the further quality assessment should result from intermediate to long-term longitudinal studies. In this respect guidelines are valuable, such as the Swiss guidelines concerning materials as amalgam substitute.

  6. Immediate Provisionalization and Nonfunctional Loading of a Single Implant in the Maxillary Esthetic Zone: A Clinical Presentation and Parameters for Consideration

    PubMed Central

    Michalakis, Konstantinos X.; Kalpidis, Christos D. R.; Kirmanidou, Yvone; Hirayama, Hiroshi; Calvani, Pasquale Lino; Pissiotis, Argiris L.

    2013-01-01

    Restoration of single tooth loss with implant supported prosthesis is now considered a highly predictable treatment. However, the maxillary anterior region still presents a challenge for both the prosthodontist and the periodontist because of the inherent difficulties encountered in the provisionalization and harmonic incorporation of the definitive prosthesis into patient's dentogingival complex. This paper presents a clinical case of a single implant placed immediately after the extraction of a maxillary central incisor, followed by immediate provisionalization and nonfunctional loading. The surgical and the restorative techniques are described, and the parameters of consideration for this approach are presented. PMID:24383012

  7. Effect of artificial saliva contamination on adhesion of dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Kisaki; Karibe, Hiroyuki; Ogata, Kiyokazu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of artificial saliva contamination on three restorative materials, namely, a glass ionomer cement (GIC), a resin-modified GIC (RMGIC), and a composite resin (CR), for which two different etching adhesive systems were used. Thus, three surface conditions were created on bovine teeth using artificial saliva: control, mild saliva contamination, and severe saliva contamination. The dentin bond strength for CR was significantly lower after artificial saliva contamination. There were, however, no significant differences among the three surface conditions in terms of the dentin and enamel bond strengths of GIC and RMGIC. Moreover, CR exhibited significantly greater microleakage after artificial saliva contamination, whereas no significant differences were found in GIC and RMGIC. The results showed that artificial saliva contamination did not affect the shear bond strengths of GIC and RMGIC or their degrees of microleakage.

  8. CHIPPING FRACTURE RESISTANCE OF DENTAL CAD/CAM RESTORATIVE MATERIALS: PART I, PROCEDURES AND RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, G. D.; Giuseppetti, A. A.; Hoffman, K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The edge chipping test was used to measure the fracture resistance of CAD/CAM dental restoration ceramics and resin composites. Methods An edge chipping machine was used to evaluate six materials including one feldspathic porcelain, two glass ceramics, a filled resin-composite, a yttria-stabilized zirconia, and a new ceramic-resin composite material. Force versus edge distance data were collected over a broad range of forces and distances. Data were analyzed by several approaches and several chipping resistance parameters were evaluated. The effects of using different indenter types were explored. Results The force versus distance trends were usually nonlinear with good fits to a power law equation with exponents usually ranging from 1.2 to 1.9. The order of chipping resistance (from least to greatest) was: feldspathic porcelain and a leucite glass ceramic (which were similar), followed by the lithium disilicate glass ceramic and the two resin composites (which were similar), and finally the zirconia which had the greatest resistance to chipping. Chipping with a Vickers indenter required 28% to 45% more force than with the sharp conical 120° indenter. The two indenters rank materials approximately the same way. The power law exponents were very similar for the two indenters for a particular material, but the exponents varied with material. The Rockwell C indenter gives different power law trends and rankings. Significance Despite the variations in the trends and indenters, simple comparisons between materials can be made by chipping with sharp conical 120° or Vickers indenters at 0.50 mm. Broad distance ranges are recommended for trend evaluation. PMID:24685178

  9. Properties of methacrylate-thiol-ene formulations as dental restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Neil B.; Couch, Charles L.; Schreck, Kathleen M.; Boulden, Jordan E.; Wydra, Robert; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate ternary methacrylate-thiol-ene systems, with varying thiol-ene content and thiol:ene stoichiometry, as dental restorative resin materials. It was hypothesized that an off-stoichiometric thiol-ene component would enhance interactions between the methacrylate and thiol-ene processes to reduce shrinkage stress while maintaining equivalent mechanical properties. Methods Polymerization kinetics and functional group conversions were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Cured resin mechanical properties were evaluated using a three-point flexural test, carried out with a hydraulic universal test system. Polymerization shrinkage stress was measured with a tensometer coupled with simultaneous real-time conversion monitoring. Results The incorporation of thiol-ene mixtures as reactive diluents into conventional dimethacrylate resins previously was shown to combine synergistically advantageous methacrylate mechanical properties with the improved polymerization kinetics and reduced shrinkage stress of thiol-ene systems. In these systems, due to thiol consumption resultant from both the thiol-ene reaction and chain transfer involving the methacrylate polymerization, the optimum thiol:ene stoichiometry deviates from the traditional 1:1 ratio. Increasing the thiol:ene stoichiometry up to 3:1 results in systems with equivalent flexural modulus, 6 – 20 % reduced flexural strength, and 5 – 33 % reduced shrinkage stress relative to 1:1 stoichiometric thiol:ene systems. Significance Due to their improved overall functional group conversion, and shrinkage stress reduction while maintaining equivalent flexural modulus, methacrylate-thiol-ene resins, particularly those with excess thiol, beyond the conventional 1:1 thiol:ene molar ratio, yield superior dental restorative materials compared with purely dimethacrylate resins. PMID:20553973

  10. In vitro color changes of soft tissues caused by restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ronald E; Sailer, Irena; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Attin, Thomas; Schmidlin, Patrick

    2007-06-01

    A crucial factor influencing implant esthetics is the color of the peri-implant mucosa. This in vitro study analyzed the effect of titanium and zirconia with and without veneering ceramic on the color of mucosa of three different thicknesses. Ten pig maxillae were used, and the palatal area was chosen as the test region. To simulate different mucosa thicknesses, connective tissue grafts, 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm thick, were harvested from three additional jaws. Defined mucosa thicknesses were created by placing the grafts under a palatal mucosa flap. Four different test specimens (titanium, titanium veneered with feldspathic ceramic, zirconia, and zirconia veneered with feldspathic ceramic) were placed under the mucosa, and the color of the tissue was evaluated with a spectrophotometer for three different soft tissue thicknesses (1.5, 2.0, and 3.0 mm). The color was compared to mucosa without test specimens, and the color difference (DeltaE) was calculated. All restorative materials induced overall color changes (DeltaE), which diminished with increases in soft tissue thickness. Titanium induced the most prominent color change. Zirconia did not induce visible color changes in 2.0-mm-thick and 3.0-mm-thick mucosa, regardless of whether it was veneered. However, with a mucosa thickness of 3.0 mm, no change in color could be distinguished by the human eye on any specimen. Mucosa thickness is a crucial factor in terms of discoloration caused by different restorative materials. In patients with thinner mucosa, zirconia will show the least color change.

  11. Characteristics of pristine volcanic materials: Beneficial and harmful effects and their management for restoration of agroecosystem.

    PubMed

    Anda, Markus; Suparto; Sukarman

    2016-02-01

    Eruption of Sinabung volcano in Indonesia began again in 2010 after resting for 1200 years. The volcano is daily emitting ash and pyroclastic materials since September 2013 to the present, damaging agroecosystems and costing for management restoration. The objective of the study was to assess properties and impacts of pristine volcanic material depositions on soil properties and to provide management options for restoring the affected agroecosytem. Land satellite imagery was used for field studies to observe the distribution, thickness and properties of ashfall deposition. The pristine ashfall deposits and the underlying soils were sampled for mineralogical, soluble salt, chemical, physical and toxic compound analyses. Results showed that uneven distribution of rainfall at the time of violent eruption caused the areas receiving mud ashfall developed surface encrustation, which was not occur in areas receiving dry ashfall. Ashfall damaged the agroecosytem by burning vegetation, forming surface crusts, and creating soil acidity and toxicity. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of encrustated layer indicated the presence of gypsum and jarosite minerals. Gypsum likely acted as a cementing agent in the formation of the encrustation layer with extremely low pH (2.9) and extremely high concentrations of Al, Ca and S. Encrustation is responsible for limited water infiltration and root penetration, while the extremely high concentration of Al is responsible for crop toxicity. Mud ashfall and dry ashfall deposits also greatly changed the underlying soil properties by decreasing soil pH and cation exchange capacity and by increasing exchangeable Ca, Al, and S availability. Despite damaging vegetation in the short-term, the volcanic ashfall enriched the soil in the longer term by adding nutrients like Ca, Mg, K, Na, P, Si and S. Suggested management practices to help restore the agroecosystem after volcanic eruptions include: (i) the

  12. Evaluation of marginal leakage of different temporary restorative materials in Endodontics

    PubMed Central

    De Castro, Pedro Henrique Duarte FranÇa; Pereira, Juliana Vianna; Sponchiado, Emilio Carlos; Marques, André Augusto Franco; Garcia, Lucas Da Fonseca Roberti

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the coronal marginal leakage of three temporary restorative materials used for root canal sealing after endodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: A total of 88 single-rooted teeth were submitted to biomechanical preparation and filled by lateral condensation technique. After obturation process, the teeth were randomly separated into four groups, being two teeth of each group used as positive and negative control. Temporary sealing was performed as follows: GI - Clip F (VOCO); GII - Bioplic (Biodinβmica); GIII - Vitremer (3M ESPE) and GIV - Ketak N100 (3M ESPE). Next, the specimens were immersed into Indian ink for 30 and 60- days, being 10 specimens for each time interval and then submitted to diaphanization to verify the amount of coronal leakage using a measuring microscope. Results: Leakage mean values within the 30-day period were as follows: Vitremer (0.3 mm), Ketak N100 and Clip F (0.6 mm) and Bioplic (1.7 mm). Within the 60-day period, leakage means were 1.1 mm, 1.5 mm, 2.2 mm and 2.6 mm, respectively. Conclusions: None of the materials was capable of preventing marginal leakage within the 30- and 60-day period. In both time intervals, Bioplic presented the highest mean of leakage and Vitremer the lowest. PMID:24403791

  13. Rehabilitation of a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta using porcelain veneers and CAD/CAM polymer restorations: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Saeidi Pour, Reza; Edelhoff, Daniel; Prandtner, Otto; Liebermann, Anja

    2015-01-01

    The complete dental rehabilitation of patients with a vertical dimension loss (VDL) caused by structural enamel deficits associated with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) represents a difficult challenge for restorative teams. Accurate analysis and treatment planning that includes esthetic and functional evaluations and adequate material selection are important prerequisites for successful results. Long-term provisional restorations play an important role in exploring and elucidating the patients' esthetic demands and functional needs. Restorative treatment options can vary from requiring only oral hygiene instructions to extensive dental restorations that include composite fillings, ceramic veneers, metal-ceramic, or all-ceramic crowns. This case report describes a full-mouth rehabilitation of a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta including the case planning, bite replacement, preparation, and restoration setting steps with an experimental CAD/CAM polymer and porcelain veneers.

  14. The effectiveness of four methods for stain removal from direct resin-based composite restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nahedh, Hend Nahedh; Awliya, Wedad Yassin

    2013-01-01

    Background/purpose Few studies investigated the best method for removing stains from different types of resin-based composite restorations and compared them to the more recently introduced nanocomposites. This study compared the effect of four methods for stain removal from composite resins; finishing with Sof-lex disks, using pumice and brush, bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide and 38% hydrogen peroxide. Materials and methods Twenty disk specimens were prepared. Specimens were immersed in a staining solution for 3 weeks. The stained surfaces of five specimens from each RBC material were treated with one of the treatment procedures. Colorimetric measurements were taken using spectrophotometer prior to and after staining, and then repeated after surface treatments. Color difference values were calculated. Results One-way ANOVA indicated significant differences in color change of the three composite resin materials following staining. Filtek Z250 showed the least susceptibility to discoloration followed by Renamel, Filtek Supreme was the material most prone to discoloration. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s Post Hoc showed that all stain removing procedures except polishing with pumice, were able to return Filtek Z250 to clinically acceptable color difference. While bleaching with 38% carbamide peroxide was not effective with Renamel. Only pumice and 10% carbamide peroxide were able to return Renamel to clinically acceptable color difference. Conclusion Compositions of resin-based composite resins play an important role in their susceptibility to stain and their amenability to stain removal procedures. Home bleaching showed good results for the three materials, while office bleach was the least effective. PMID:24748758

  15. An evaluation of microleakage of various glass ionomer based restorative materials in deciduous and permanent teeth: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Teena; Pandit, I.K.; Srivastava, Nikhil; Gugnani, Neeraj; Gupta, Monika

    2011-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the microleakage of recently available glass ionomer based restorative materials (GC Fuji IX GP, GC Fuji VII, and Dyract) and compare their microleakage with the previously existing glass ionomer restorative materials (GC Fuji II LC) in primary and permanent teeth. Method One hundred and fifty (75 + 75) non-carious deciduous and permanent teeth were restored with glass ionomer based restorative materials after making class I cavities. Samples were subjected to thermocycling after storing in distilled water for 24 h. Two coats of nail polish were applied 1 mm short of restorative margins and samples sectioned buccolingually after storing in methylene blue dye for 24 h. Microleakage was assessed using stereomicroscope. Result Significant differences (P < 0.05) were found when inter group comparisons were done. Except when GC Fuji VII (Group III) was compared with GC Fuji II LC (Group II) and Dyract (Group IV), non-significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed. It was found that there was no statistically significant difference when the means of microleakage of primary teeth were compared with those of permanent teeth. Conclusions GC Fuji IX GP showed maximum microleakage and GC Fuji VII showed least microleakage. PMID:23960526

  16. Influence of Cavity Preparation with Er,Cr:YSGG Laser and Restorative Materials on In Situ Secondary Caries Development

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Ana Carolina Tedesco; Cassoni, Alessandra; de Freitas, Patrícia Moreira; Reis, André Figueiredo; Junior, Aldo Brugnera

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of cavity preparation and restorative materials containing fluorides in the prevention of secondary caries lesion development in situ. Methods: A total of 120 blocks obtained from human teeth were divided into two groups and standardized cavities were prepared using diamond burs (DB) or Er,Cr:YSGG-laser [20 Hz, 4.0W, 55% water, 65% air (LA)]. They were divided into three subgroups according to the restorative material (n=20): glass-ionomer cement (GI), resin modified glass-ionomer (RM) or composite resin (CR). Blocks were fixed in palatal intra-oral appliances worn in situ by 20 human volunteers, who dropped 20% sucrose solution eight times daily. After 21 days, blocks were removed and restorations were cross-sectioned to evaluate microhardness [Knoop hardness number (KHN)] underneath enamel surface from 30 to 200 μm. Factors “cavity preparation,” “restorative materials,” and “depth” were evaluated by three way ANOVA, followed by Tukey test (p<0.05). Results: The results showed lower microhardness in cavities prepared with DB than in cavities prepared with LA. At 30 μm, there were no statistical significant differences with regard to “cavity preparation” or “restorative materials” factors. In depth evaluation, the enamel microhardness progressively increased as a function of depth for the GI groups. In the groups prepared with LA at 60 μm/90 μm, there were no significant differences between GI and RM materials, whose microhardnesses were significantly higher than that of CR. Conclusions: Cavity preparation using Er,Cr:YSGG laser increases caries resistance of enamel walls, and reduce caries lesion depth development regardless of fluoride presence in the restorative material. CR showed higher caries lesion development than GI, and RM showed intermediate results. PMID:25654424

  17. 14 CFR 21.221 - Class I provisional airworthiness certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Provisional Airworthiness Certificates... applicant is entitled to a Class I provisional airworthiness certificate for an aircraft for which a Class I... condition of the aircraft that would make the aircraft unsafe when operated in accordance with...

  18. 14 CFR 21.221 - Class I provisional airworthiness certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Provisional Airworthiness Certificates... applicant is entitled to a Class I provisional airworthiness certificate for an aircraft for which a Class I... condition of the aircraft that would make the aircraft unsafe when operated in accordance with...

  19. Dentin bonding performance and interface observation of an MMA-based restorative material.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Junichi; Inoue, Go; Nikaido, Toru; Ikeda, Masaomi; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2016-07-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bonding performance and dentin interface acid resistance using a 4-META/MMA-TBB based restorative material (BF) compared to a conventional 4-META/MMA-TBB resin cement (SB), and the effect of sodium fluoride (NaF) addition to the materials. Dentin surfaces were treated with 10% citric acid-3% ferric chloride (10-3) or 4-META containing self-etching primer (TP), followed by application of BF or SB polymer powders with or without NaF, to evaluate microtensile bond strength (µTBS) in six experimental groups; 10-3/SB, 10-3/BF, TP/SB, TP/BF, TP/SB/NaF and TP/BF/NaF. SEM observation of the resin-dentin interface was performed after acid-base challenge to evaluate interfacial dentin resistance to acid attack. TP/BF showed highest µTBS, while NaF polymers decreased µTBS. TP/BF showed funnel-shaped erosion at the interface, however, NaF polymers improved acid resistance of interface. In conclusion, BF demonstrated high µTBSs and low acid-resistance at the interface. NaF addition enhanced acid resistance but decreased µTBS.

  20. Non-destructive and micro-invasive testing techniques for characterizing materials, structures and restoration problems in mural paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, Mariagrazia; Sfarra, Stefano; Chiarini, Marco; Daniele, Valeria; Taglieri, Giuliana; Cerichelli, Giorgio

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, chemical and structural studies of medieval wall paintings in Ocre (L'Aquila, Italy) are presented. During the latest restoration campaign, non-destructive (Near-Infrared Reflectography and Infrared Thermography) and micro-invasive (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, μ-Raman, Scanning Electron Microscopy with X-ray Microanalysis, X-Ray Diffraction, X-Ray Fluorescence, Optical Microscopy, Mass Spectrometry, Thermogravimetry) analyses were performed in order to determine the detachments of wall surfaces and the characterization of original and restoration materials. Data integration allowed to reconstruct the conservative history, the execution techniques and the conservation problems of the artefact, as well as to assess the effectiveness of restoration activities adopted. The combined use of physical and micro-chemical techniques proved to be effective for an in-depth study of materials stratification of paintings.

  1. Tooth-colored filling materials for the restoration of cervical lesions: a 24-month follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Folwaczny, M; Loher, C; Mehl, A; Kunzelmann, K H; Hinkel, R

    2000-01-01

    The recently developed resin-modified glass ionomer cements and the polyacid-modified composites are promising alternatives to conventional materials for restoring cervical defects. This clinical study evaluated the clinical condition of cervical fillings 24 months following placement. The study subjects were 197 cervical restorations placed on incisors, canines and premolars in 37 patients for restoration of erosion/non-carious lesions (69 cases), primary carious lesions (57 cases) and the replacement of deficient restorations (71 cases). The teeth were randomly divided into four groups for restoration with either Tetric (composite, Group A: n = 36), Dyract (compomer, Group B: n = 79), Fuji II LC (resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Group C: n = 51) or Photac-Fil (resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Group D: n = 31). The evaluation was done single-blind at baseline, 8 and 24 months after the placement of the fillings, according to a modified USPHS rating scale. The assessment criteria were color stability, anatomical form, surface texture, marginal integrity, marginal discoloration and loss of filling. Statistical analysis was completed using Pearson chi-square and Fisher's exact test at a significance level of 5% (p < 0.05). After the 24-month period, the composite restorations showed superior results. The compomer fillings demonstrated conditions that were only slightly worse. A substantial number of the resin-modified glass-ionomer fillings were evaluated with bravo or even charlie scores in respect to at least one of the criteria assessed.

  2. [Dentin bonding of cements. The bonding of cements with dentin in combination with various indirect restorative materials].

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, Anne; Sahafi, Alireza; Flury, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The number of both luting agents and restorative materials available on the market has rapidly increased. This study compared various types of luting agents when used to bond different indirect, laboratory restorative materials to dentin. Cylinders were produced of six restorative materials (gold alloy, titanium, feldspathic porcelain, leucite-glass ceramic, zirconia, and an indirect resin composite). Following relevant pretreatment, the end surface of the cylinders were luted to ground, human dentin with eight different luting agents (DeTrey Zinc [zinc phosphate cement], Fuji I [conventional glass ionomer cement], Fuji Plus [resin-modified glass ionomer cement], Variolink II [conventional etch-and-rinse resin cement], Panavia F2.0 and Multilink [self-etch resin cements], RelyX Unicem Aplicap and Maxcem [self-adhesive resin cements]). After water storage at 37 °C for one week, the shear bond strength of the specimens was measured and the fracture mode was examined stereo-microscopically. Restorative material and luting agent both had a significant effect on bond strength and there was a significant interaction between the two variables. The zinc phosphate cement and the glass ionomer cements resulted in the lowest bond strengths, whereas the highest bond strengths were found with the two self-etch and one of the self-adhesive resin cements.

  3. Ultrashort pulse laser processing of hard tissue, dental restoration materials, and biocompatibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, A.; Strassl, M.; Beer, F.; Verhagen, L.; Wittschier, M.; Wintner, E.

    2007-07-01

    During the last few years, ultra-short laser pulses have proven their potential for application in medical tissue treatment in many ways. In hard tissue ablation, their aptitude for material ablation with negligible collateral damage provides many advantages. Especially teeth representing an anatomically and physiologically very special region with less blood circulation and lower healing rates than other tissues require most careful treatment. Hence, overheating of the pulp and induction of microcracks are some of the most problematic issues in dental preparation. Up till now it was shown by many authors that the application of picosecond or femtosecond pulses allows to perform ablation with very low damaging potential also fitting to the physiological requirements indicated. Beside the short interaction time with the irradiated matter, scanning of the ultra-short pulse trains turned out to be crucial for ablating cavities of the required quality. One main reason for this can be seen in the fact that during scanning the time period between two subsequent pulses incident on the same spot is so much extended that no heat accumulation effects occur and each pulse can be treated as a first one with respect to its local impact. Extension of this advantageous technique to biocompatible materials, i.e. in this case dental restoration materials and titanium plasma-sprayed implants, is just a matter of consequence. Recently published results on composites fit well with earlier data on dental hard tissue. In case of plaque which has to be removed from implants, it turns out that removal of at least the calcified version is harder than tissue removal. Therefore, besides ultra-short lasers, also Diode and Neodymium lasers, in cw and pulsed modes, have been studied with respect to plaque removal and sterilization. The temperature increase during laser exposure has been experimentally evaluated in parallel.

  4. Repairability of three resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, R A; Charlton, D G; Hermesch, C B

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the repair shear bond strengths of three resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative materials repaired at two different times. Thirty specimens of Fuji II LC, Vitremer, and Photac-Fil were prepared in cavities (2 mm x 7 mm) cut into acrylic resin cylinders. After the initial fill, half of the specimens were repaired 5 minutes later and half 1 week later. The specimens were stored in 37 degrees C distilled water when not being repaired or tested. Repairs were made without any surface preparation of the initial fill. Each specimen was mixed according to the manufacturer's directions, placed in the preparation in 1-mm increments and photocured for 40 seconds. The last increment was covered with a plastic strip and a glass slide before curing to create a smooth surface. Repairs were accomplished by drying the specimen for 10 seconds, then adding the new material to the unprepared surface using a 3-mm-thick polytetrafluoroethylene mold. The specimens were thermocycled 500 times, stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 1 week, then loaded to failure in shear at a rate of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using a one-way ANOVA and Z-value multiple comparison test to determine significant differences at the 0.05 significance level. Vitremer showed no significant difference in shear bond strength for 5-minute and 1-week repair periods, while Fuji II LC and Photac-Fil did. Repair bond strength of Vitremer was significantly greater than Fuji II LC and Photac-Fil at both repair times. This study showed that time of repair significantly affected the bond strength of two of the materials tested.

  5. In vitro evaluation of fracture strength of zirconia restoration veneered with various ceramic materials

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yu-Sung; Lee, Jai-Bong; Han, Jung-Suk; Yeo, In-Sung

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Fracture of the veneering material of zirconia restorations frequently occurs in clinical situations. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the fracture strengths of zirconia crowns veneered with various ceramic materials by various techniques. MATERIALS AND METHODS A 1.2 mm, 360° chamfer preparation and occlusal reduction of 2 mm were performed on a first mandibular molar, and 45 model dies were fabricated in a titanium alloy by CAD/CAM system. Forty-five zirconia copings were fabricated and divided into three groups. In the first group (LT) zirconia copings were veneered with feldspathic porcelain by the layering technique. In the second group (HT) the glass ceramic was heat-pressed on the zirconia coping, and for the third group (ST) a CAD/CAM-fabricated high-strength anatomically shaped veneering cap was sintered onto the zirconia coping. All crowns were cemented onto their titanium dies with Rely X™ Unicem (3M ESPE) and loaded with a universal testing machine (Instron 5583) until failure. The mean fracture values were compared by an one-way ANOVA and a multiple comparison post-hoc test (α=0.05). Scanning electron microscope was used to investigate the fractured interface. RESULTS Mean fracture load and standard deviation was 4263.8±1110.8 N for Group LT, 5070.8±1016.4 for Group HT and 6242.0±1759.5 N for Group ST. The values of Group ST were significantly higher than those of the other groups. CONCLUSION Zirconia crowns veneered with CAD/CAM generated glass ceramics by the sintering technique are superior to those veneered with feldspathic porcelain by the layering technique or veneered with glass ceramics by the heat-pressing technique in terms of fracture strength. PMID:22977725

  6. [A comparative study of mechanical properties of materials for custom-made impression trays used by implant-fixed restorations].

    PubMed

    Gvetadze, R Sh; Abramian, S V; Rusanov, F S; Nubarian, A P; Ivanov, A A

    2012-01-01

    Materials for custom-made impression trays used for impression by implant fixed restorations were compared in the study. The analysis included such values as flexural strength and elasticity modulus, impression material adhesion strength with the use of adhesive and without it. Light-cured plastic Elite LC Tray had the best rates of bending strength and elasticity modulus and the Protakril M had the highest adhesion strength both with and without adhesive.

  7. The potential of novel native plant materials for the restoration of novel ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aldo Leopold is considered by many to be the father of restoration ecology in North America. While a professor of wildlife management at the University of Wisconsin, he labored 13 years to restore a functioning ecosystem to badly damaged Sauk County farmland that he purchased at the height of the G...

  8. Effect of one-step polishing systems on surface roughness of different flowable restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Emre; Korkmaz, Yonca; Attar, Nuray; Karabulut, Erdem

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of one-step polishing systems on the surface roughness of different flowable composites and a microhybrid composite. A total of 120 disks were fabricated and divided into six groups according to the different composite restorative materials tested (n = 20). Each group was further divided into four subgroups according to the polishing system (n = 5). For the control group, samples were left undisturbed after removal of Mylar strip. For the other three subgroups, samples were polished with PoGo, OptraPol, or Sof-Lex disks. Surface roughness was determined using a profilometer and observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range test. For Tetric Flow, Grandio Flow, Filtek Supreme XT Flow, and Admira Flow, their lowest surface roughness values were obtained in Mylar Strip and PoGo groups. For Compoglass Flow, there were no significant differences between Mylar Strip, PoGo, and OptraPol. For Filtek Z250, the lowest surface roughness value was obtained with Mylar Strip. In light of the surface roughness results obtained, one-step polishing systems seemed to be a good choice for polishing flowable composites.

  9. Caries prevention and adhesiveness of restorative materials submitted to cariogenic mixed biofilm.

    PubMed

    Miana, Thalita A; Fidalgo, Tatiana Kelly da Silva; Portela, Maristela Barbosa; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2014-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the mechanical properties of different restorative materials submitted to cariogenic conditions with induced mixed biofilm. Extracted bovine incisors (n = 108) were divided into 3 groups (n = 36) [Group 1, resin; Group 2, glass ionomer cement (GIC); and Group 3, resin-modified GIC] and were bonded on a previously prepared enamel surface with a 25 mm² area delimited with nail varnish. Each group was then further subdivided into 3 groups and tested for shear bond strength and effectiveness in caries protection. Groups 1A-3A were tested immediately after bonding, Groups 1B-3B were tested after 5 days in brain heart infusion media, and Groups 1C-3C were tested after 5 days under cariogenic conditions with mixed biofilm. The mixed biofilm system was composed of Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans in order to artificially create white spot lesions (WSLs). Group 1 presented the most samples with WSLs, whereas Groups 2 and Group 3 presented the highest preventive effect (P < 0.05) across all subgroups. The mean bond strengths were highest in Group 1 across all subgroups (P < 0.05). The majority of the specimens in the Group 1 subgroups presented mixed and cohesive fractures, whereas Groups 2 and 3 subgroups presented the largest amount of adhesive fractures.

  10. Reliability, failure probability, and strength of resin-based materials for CAD/CAM restorations

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kiatlin; Yap, Adrian U-Jin; Agarwalla, Shruti Vidhawan; Tan, Keson Beng-Choon; Rosa, Vinicius

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: This study investigated the Weibull parameters and 5% fracture probability of direct, indirect composites, and CAD/CAM composites. Material and Methods: Discshaped (12 mm diameter x 1 mm thick) specimens were prepared for a direct composite [Z100 (ZO), 3M-ESPE], an indirect laboratory composite [Ceramage (CM), Shofu], and two CAD/CAM composites [Lava Ultimate (LU), 3M ESPE; Vita Enamic (VE), Vita Zahnfabrik] restorations (n=30 for each group). The specimens were polished, stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C. Weibull parameters (m= modulus of Weibull, σ0= characteristic strength) and flexural strength for 5% fracture probability (σ5%) were determined using a piston-on-three-balls device at 1 MPa/s in distilled water. Statistical analysis for biaxial flexural strength analysis were performed either by both one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc (α=0.05) or by Pearson's correlation test. Results: Ranking of m was: VE (19.5), LU (14.5), CM (11.7), and ZO (9.6). Ranking of σ0 (MPa) was: LU (218.1), ZO (210.4), CM (209.0), and VE (126.5). σ5% (MPa) was 177.9 for LU, 163.2 for CM, 154.7 for Z0, and 108.7 for VE. There was no significant difference in the m for ZO, CM, and LU. VE presented the highest m value and significantly higher than ZO. For σ0 and σ5%, ZO, CM, and LU were similar but higher than VE. Conclusion: The strength characteristics of CAD/ CAM composites vary according to their composition and microstructure. VE presented the lowest strength and highest Weibull modulus among the materials. PMID:27812614

  11. Effect of Staining Solutions on Color Stability of Silorane & Methacrylate Restorative Material

    PubMed Central

    S. Madhyastha, Prashanthi; G. Naik, Dilip; Kotian, Ravindra; Srikant, N.; M. R. Bhat, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Color stability throughout the functional lifetime of restorations is important for the durability of treatment and of cosmetic importance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the discoloration properties of a silorane-based (Filtek P90) and methacrylate-based (Z100) composites upon exposure to different staining solutions that are used on day to day basis (turmeric, tea, coffee, cocoa, lime, yoghurt and distilled water) for different immersion periods (1, 7, 14 and 28 days). The colors of all specimens before and after storage in the solutions were measured by a reflectance spectrophotometer based on CIE Lab system and the color differences were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed by repeated measures of ANOVA and sidak post hoc test (for immersion period);‘t’ test (for each material) and one way ANOVA (for staining agents). All the staining agents showed significant difference in staining over time in both the materials. However, Z100 showed higher quantum of discoloration at all time periods at each staining agents (p<0.005). In conclusion, the silorane-based resin (Filtek P90) composites exhibited better color stability (less change in ΔE) after exposure to the staining solutions. Among the staining agents cocoa was found to be least staining followed by lime, yoghurt, coffee, tea whereas turmeric discolored the composites to the maximum. Highest discoloration was seen at day 28 in all staining agents. Cocoa and lime discolored to maximum at early stages but remained stable thereafter whereas tea, coffee and turmeric progressively discolored the composite over time.

  12. Influence of dentin conditioning on bond strength of light-cured ionomer restorative materials and polyacid-modified composite resins.

    PubMed

    Buchalla, W; Attin, T; Hellwig, E

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the dentin bond strength of restorative materials containing both glass ionomer and composite resin components. Three resin-modified glass ionomer restorative materials (Fuji II LC, Photac-Fil, Vitremer), three polyacid-modified composite resins (Dyract, Ionosit Fil, VariGlass VLC), a hybrid composite (blend-a-lux) and a chemical-cured glass ionomer cement (ChemFil Superior) were investigated for dentin tensile bond strength with and without conditioning of the tooth surfaces. For each material, tensile bond strength was determined using five conditioned and five unconditioned bovine tooth specimens. Conditioning of the specimens was performed according to the manufacturers' instructions. The tensile bond strength was tested with a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis was performed with analysis of variance, the Scheffe's-test and the Student's t-test. All materials showed higher adhesion to conditioned dentin than to unconditioned specimens. Except for Photac-Fil, the bond strength to conditioned dentin of all resin-modified glass ionomer restorative materials and polyacid-modified composite resins was higher as compared to the chemical-cured glass ionomer and the hybrid composite. However, these differences were not statistically significant. All polyacid-modified composite resins resulted in higher bond strengths to conditioned dentin as compared to the resin-modified glass ionomer restorative materials. These differences were statistically significant only for VariGlass VLC as compared to Photac-Fil. In order to improve adhesion of the tested materials to dentin it is highly recommended to follow the manufacturers' instructions concerning dentin conditioning.

  13. PROVISIONAL ADVISORY LEVELS (PALs) FOR PHOSGENE (CG)

    SciTech Connect

    Glass-Mattie, Dana F; McClanahan, Mark; Koller, Loren; Adeshina, Femi; Ross, Robert Hord

    2009-01-01

    The PAL protocol was applied to estimate inhalation exposure limits for phosgene (CG). Data on humans are limited to occupational exposures or accounts from the use of phosgene as a chemical warfare agent in WWI. Animal studies with phosgene show a steep dose-response curve for pulmonary edema and mortality with little species variability in effects. Although immediately upon exposure lacrimation and upper respiratory irritation can occur, the main effect in the target organ, a progressive pulmonary edema, occurs after a latency period of 1-24 hours. PAL estimates were approved by the Expert Consultation Panel for Provisional Advisory Levels in May 2007. Exposure limits for oral exposure to CG are not developed due to insufficient data. PAL estimates for inhalation exposure to CG are presented: The 24-hour PAL values for severity levels 1, 2, and 3 are 0.0017, 0.0033 and 0.022 ppm, respectively. The 30-day PAL values are 0.0006 and 0.0012 ppm for the PAL 1 and 2 values, respectively. These 30-day inhalation values were also accepted as the 90-day and 2-year PAL 1 and 2 values. Data were not available for deriving 30-day, 90-day and 2-year PAL 3 values.

  14. Change in Surface Roughness of Esthetic Restorative Materials after Exposure to Different Immersion Regimes in a Cola Drink

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Navroop Kaur; Pathak, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Context. An in vitro study carried out to evaluate and compare the effect of Cola drink on surface roughness of esthetic restorative materials. Purpose. To compare the effect of different immersion regimes in a Cola drink on surface roughness of esthetic restorative materials. Method. Two hundred samples were grouped into 4 equal groups of 50 samples each: Group I: conventional glass ionomer, Group II: resin modified glass ionomer, Group III: polyacid-modified resin composite, Group IV: Composite resin. Each group was further subdivided into 5 subgroups of 10 samples each. Subgroup A (Control Subgroup). Samples were kept immersed in artificial saliva. Subgroup B. Samples were immersed in Cola drink once a day. Subgroup C. Samples were immersed in Cola drink, 3 times a day. Subgroup D. Samples were immersed in Cola drink 5 times a day. Subgroup E. Samples were immersed in Cola drink 10 times a day. Each immersion lasted 5 minutes. The immersion protocol was repeated for 7 days. Results. Maximum surface roughness was seen in Group I conventional glass ionomer cement, followed by Group II resin modified glass ionomer, Group III polyacid modified resin composite, and Group IV composite resin samples. Conclusion. Resistance to change in surface roughness is more in resin based restorative materials as compared to glass ionomer based materials. PMID:25006464

  15. Provisional Regulations on Schooling for Migrant Children and Juveniles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinese Education and Society, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses 19 articles under the Provisional Regulations on Schooling for Migrant Children and Juveniles which were issued by the State Education Commission and the Ministry of Public Security of the People's Republic of China on March 2, 1988.

  16. New protocol for construction of eyeglasses-supported provisional nasal prosthesis using CAD/CAM techniques.

    PubMed

    Ciocca, Leonardo; Fantini, Massimiliano; De Crescenzio, Francesca; Persiani, Franco; Scotti, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    A new protocol for making an immediate provisional eyeglasses-supported nasal prosthesis is presented that uses laser scanning, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing procedures, and rapid prototyping techniques, reducing time and costs while increasing the quality of the final product. With this protocol, the eyeglasses were digitized, and the relative position of the nasal prosthesis was planned and evaluated in a virtual environment without any try-in appointment. This innovative method saves time, reduces costs, and restores the patient's aesthetic appearance after a disfiguration caused by ablation of the nasal pyramid better than conventional restoration methods. Moreover, the digital model of the designed nasal epithesis can be used to develop a definitive prosthesis anchored to osseointegrated craniofacial implants.

  17. Optical properties of dental restorative materials in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm for the simulation of color perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friebel, Moritz; Povel, Kirsten; Cappius, Hans-Joachim; Helfmann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina

    2009-09-01

    Aesthetic restorations require dental restorative materials to have optical properties very similar to those of the teeth. A method is developed to this end to determine the optical parameters absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs, anisotropy factor g, and effective scattering coefficient μs' of dental restorative materials. The method includes sample preparation and measurements of transmittance and reflectance in an integrating sphere spectrometer followed by inverse Monte Carlo simulations. Using this method the intrinsic optical parameters are determined for shade B2 of the light-activated composites TPH® Spectrum®, Esthet-X®, and the Ormocer® Definite® in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm. By using the determined parameters μa, μs, and g together with an appropriate phase function, the reflectance of samples with 1-mm layer thickness and shade B2 could be predicted with a very high degree of accuracy using a forward Monte Carlo simulation. The color perception was calculated from the simulated reflectance according to the CIELAB system. We initiate the compilation of a data pool of optical parameters that in the future will enable calculation models to be used as a basis for optimization of the optical approximation of the natural tooth, and the composition of new materials and their production process.

  18. Optical properties of dental restorative materials in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm for the simulation of color perception.

    PubMed

    Friebel, Moritz; Povel, Kirsten; Cappius, Hans-Joachim; Helfmann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Aesthetic restorations require dental restorative materials to have optical properties very similar to those of the teeth. A method is developed to this end to determine the optical parameters absorption coefficient mu(a), scattering coefficient mu(s), anisotropy factor g, and effective scattering coefficient mu(s) (') of dental restorative materials. The method includes sample preparation and measurements of transmittance and reflectance in an integrating sphere spectrometer followed by inverse Monte Carlo simulations. Using this method the intrinsic optical parameters are determined for shade B2 of the light-activated composites TPH((R)) Spectrum, Esthet-X, and the Ormocer Definite in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm. By using the determined parameters mu(a), mu(s), and g together with an appropriate phase function, the reflectance of samples with 1-mm layer thickness and shade B2 could be predicted with a very high degree of accuracy using a forward Monte Carlo simulation. The color perception was calculated from the simulated reflectance according to the CIELAB system. We initiate the compilation of a data pool of optical parameters that in the future will enable calculation models to be used as a basis for optimization of the optical approximation of the natural tooth, and the composition of new materials and their production process.

  19. Beneficial use of dredged material for habitat creation, enhancement, and restoration in New York-New Jersey Harbor.

    PubMed

    Yozzo, David J; Wilber, Pace; Will, Robert J

    2004-10-01

    A comprehensive Dredged Material Management Plan (DMMP) has been developed by the US Army Corps of Engineers, New York District (USACE-NYD) and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANY/NJ). The primary objective of the DMMP is to identify cost-effective and environmentally acceptable alternatives for the placement of dredged material derived from ongoing and proposed navigation improvements within the PANY/NJ. A significant portion of this dredged material is classified as unsuitable for open-ocean disposal. One suite of alternatives presented within the DMMP is the beneficial use of dredged material for habitat creation, enhancement, and restoration within the NY/NJ Harbor Estuary. Proposed beneficial use/habitat development projects include the use of dredged material for construction of artificial reefs, oyster reef restoration, intertidal wetland and mudflat creation, bathymetric recontouring, filling dead-end canals/basins, creation of bird/wildlife islands, and landfill/brownfields reclamation. Preliminary screening of the proposed beneficial use alternatives identified advantages, disadvantages, potential volumes, and estimated costs associated with each project type. Continued study of the proposed beneficial use alternatives has identified areas of environmental research or technology development where further investigation is warranted.

  20. The effects of ambient temperature and mixing time of glass ionomer cement material on the survival rate of proximal ART restorations in primary molars

    PubMed Central

    Kemoli, Arthur M

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Temperature fluctuations and material mixing times are likely to affect the consistency and integrity of the material mixture, and hence the restoration made out of it. The purpose of the present study was to determine the influence of the ambient temperature and the mixing time of glass ionomer cement (GIC) restorative material on the survival rate of proximal atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restorations placed in primary molars. Materials and Methods: A total of 804 restorations were placed in the primary molars of 6-8-year-olds using the ART approach. The restorations were then followed for a period of 2 years and evaluated at given intervals. The data collected were analyzed using SPSS computer statistical program, and the results tested and compared using the Chi-square, Kaplan Meier survival analysis and Cox Proportional hazard statistical tests. Results: The cumulative survival rate of the restorations dropped from the initial 94.4% to 30.8% at the end of 2 years. The higher survival rate of the restorations was associated with the experienced operators and assistants when using the rubber dam isolation method. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the survival rate of the restorations when related to the room temperature and the mixing time of the GIC materials used in spite of the variations in the temperature recoded and the methods used in mixing the materials. Conclusion: The ambient temperature and mixing time of GIC did not have a significant effect on the survival of the proximal ART restorations. PMID:24808692

  1. The Market Gate of Miletus: damages, material characteristics and the development of a compatible mortar for restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegesmund, Siegfried; Middendorf, Bernhard

    2008-12-01

    The indoor exhibit of the Market Gate of Miletus is unique for an archaeological monument. The reconstruction of the gate was done in such a way that most marble fragments were removed leaving cored marble columns 3-4 cm in thickness. These cored columns were mounted on a steel construction and filled with different mortars or filled with specially shaped blocks of brick combined with mortar. All the missing marble elements were replaced by copies made of a Portland cement based concrete, which is compositionally similar to the original building materials. During the Second World War the monument was heavily damaged by aerial bombardment. For 2 years the Market Gate of Miletus was exposed to weathering, because a brick wall protecting the gate was also destroyed. The deterioration phenomena observed are microcracks, macroscopic fractures, flaking, sugaring, greying, salt efflorescence, calcitic-sinter layers and iron oxide formation etc. The rapid deterioration seems to be due to indoor atmospheric effects, and also by a combination of incompatible materials (e.g. marble, steel, mortar, concrete, bricks etc.). Compatible building materials like mortars or stone replacing materials have to be developed for the planned restoration. The requirements for restoration mortars are chemical-mineralogical and physical-mechanical compatibilities with the existing building materials. In detail this means that the mortar should ensure good bonding properties, adapted strength development and not stain the marble when in direct contact. The favoured mortar was developed with a hydraulic binder based on iron-free white cement and pozzolana based on activated clay. A special limestone and quartz sand mixture was used as an aggregate. The cement was adjusted using chemical additives. Specially designed tests were applied extensively to prove whether the developed mortar is suitable for the restoration of this precious monument.

  2. Amino acid derivative-mediated detoxification and functionalization of dual cure dental restorative material for dental pulp cell mineralization.

    PubMed

    Minamikawa, Hajime; Yamada, Masahiro; Iwasa, Fuminori; Ueno, Takeshi; Deyama, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Kuniaki; Yawaka, Yasutaka; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2010-10-01

    Current dental restorative materials are only used to fill the defect of hard tissues, such as dentin and enamel, because of their cytotoxicity. Therefore, exposed dental pulp tissues in deep cavities must be first covered by a pulp capping material like calcium hydroxide to form a layer of mineralized tissue. However, this tissue mineralization is based on pathological reaction and triggers long-lasting inflammation, often causing clinical problems. This study tested the ability of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), amino acid derivative, to reduce cytotoxicity and induce mineralized tissue conductivity in resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), a widely used dental restorative material having dual cure mechanism. Rat dental pulp cells were cultured on untreated or NAC-supplemented RMGI. NAC supplementation substantially increased the percentage of viable cells from 46.7 to 73.3% after 24-h incubation. Cell attachment, spreading, proliferative activity, and odontoblast-related gene and protein expressions increased significantly on NAC-supplemented RMGI. The mineralization capability of cells, which was nearly suppressed on untreated RMGI, was induced on NAC-supplemented RMGI. These improved behaviors and functions of dental pulp cells on NAC-supplemented RMGI were associated with a considerable reduction in the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and with the increased level of intracellular glutathione reserves. These results demonstrated that NAC could detoxify and functionalize RMGIs via two different mechanisms involving in situ material detoxification and antioxidant cell protection. We believe that this study provides a new approach for developing dental restorative materials that enables mineralized tissue regeneration.

  3. Environmental Impact Research Program. Restoration of Problem Soil Materials at Corps of Engineers Construction Sites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    Bell, University of Queensland , Brisbane, Australia, for technical review of this report. The valuable contributions made by the following Federal and...11-2 Geology and soil characteristics. ................ 11-5 Hydrology ........................... 11-13 Topography...the interaction of soils, geology , and climate in potentially difficult restoration situations. Information and techniques are presented relating to

  4. A comparison of retentive strength of implant cement depending on various methods of removing provisional cement from implant abutment

    PubMed Central

    Keum, Eun-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the effectiveness of various methods for removing provisional cement from implant abutments, and what effect these methods have on the retention of prosthesis during the definitive cementation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty implant fixture analogues and abutments were embedded in resin blocks. Forty cast crowns were fabricated and divided into 4 groups each containing 10 implants. Group A was cemented directly with the definitive cement (Cem-Implant). The remainder were cemented with provisional cement (Temp-Bond NE), and classified according to the method for cleaning the abutments. Group B used a plastic curette and wet gauze, Group C used a rubber cup and pumice, and Group D used an airborne particle abrasion technique. The abutments were observed using a stereomicroscope after removing the provisional cement. The tensile bond strength was measured after the definitive cementation. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance test (α=.05). RESULTS Group B clearly showed provisional cement remaining, whereas the other groups showed almost no cement. Groups A and B showed a relatively smooth surface. More roughness was observed in Group C, and apparent roughness was noted in Group D. The tensile bond strength tests revealed Group D to have significantly the highest tensile bond strength followed in order by Groups C, A and B. CONCLUSION A plastic curette and wet gauze alone cannot effectively remove the residual provisional cement on the abutment. The definitive retention increased when the abutments were treated with rubber cup/pumice or airborne particle abraded to remove the provisional cement. PMID:24049563

  5. A study on the radiopacity of different shades of resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Marouf, N; Sidhu, S K

    1998-01-01

    There are several resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative materials available to the dental profession today. The commercially available brands are presented in a range of shades. There is little information on their radiopacity and whether this varies with differences in shade. While the general radiopacity of various products may have been studied, only assumptions are available regarding their consistency between shades. The purpose of this study was to investigate if there were any significant differences in the radiopacity of the shades available within each commercial product. The products evaluated were Fuji II LC, Vitremer, and Photac-Fil. The optical densities of standardized radiographs of samples of these materials were determined and radiopacity values of materials expressed in millimeter equivalents of aluminum. Of the three resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative materials tested, Fuji II LC was the most radiopaque and Photac-Fil the least. Fuji II LC and Vitremer showed radiopacity values equivalent to > 2.5 mm and > 1.5 mm aluminum respectively; Photac-Fil demonstrated very low radiopacity values (equivalent to < 0.6 mm aluminum). Statistical analysis revealed that there was no significant difference in radiopacity among the shades within each of these brands.

  6. Effects of Different Pediatric Drugs on the Color Stability of Various Restorative Materials Applicable in Pediatric Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Tüzüner, Tamer; Turgut, Sedanur; Baygin, Ozgul; Yilmaz, Nagehan; Tuna, Elif Bahar; Ozen, Bugra

    2017-01-01

    Background. The chronic recommendation of pediatric drugs could exhibit erosive and cariogenic problems. Objective. To evaluate the effects of different pediatric drugs on the color stability of various restorative materials. Methods. Five specimens (1 mm × 3 mm) were prepared and immersed in ten different pediatric drugs and agitated every 8 hours daily for 2 min up to 1 week. Between immersion periods, the samples were stored in artificial saliva. After 1-week period, ΔE(⁎) values were calculated. Two-way ANOVA and Fisher's LSD test were used for statistical analysis at a level of p < 0.05. Results. ΔE(⁎) values were only significantly influenced by restorative material factor (p < 0.001) and varied in the range of 2.08 and 6.55 units for all drugs/restorative materials. The highest ΔE(⁎) was found in Ferrosanol B-composite (6.55 ± 1.38) and the lowest one was found in Dolven-glass ionomer (2.08 ± 0.40) pairwise. The most prominent ΔE(⁎) value elevations were obtained in composite material compared to the compomer and/or glass ionomers in Macrol, Ferrosanol B, and Ventolin (p < 0.001; for all) and also for other drugs (p < 0.05). Dolven exhibited significantly higher values compared to Augmentin (p = 0.021), Macrol (p = 0.018), and Ventolin (p = 0.013) in compomer group. Conclusion. The clinically perceptible color changes for tested composite/pediatric drug pairwise can be more problematic than compomer and glass ionomers in pediatric dentistry.

  7. Effects of Different Pediatric Drugs on the Color Stability of Various Restorative Materials Applicable in Pediatric Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Turgut, Sedanur; Baygin, Ozgul; Ozen, Bugra

    2017-01-01

    Background. The chronic recommendation of pediatric drugs could exhibit erosive and cariogenic problems. Objective. To evaluate the effects of different pediatric drugs on the color stability of various restorative materials. Methods. Five specimens (1 mm × 3 mm) were prepared and immersed in ten different pediatric drugs and agitated every 8 hours daily for 2 min up to 1 week. Between immersion periods, the samples were stored in artificial saliva. After 1-week period, ΔE⁎ values were calculated. Two-way ANOVA and Fisher's LSD test were used for statistical analysis at a level of p < 0.05. Results. ΔE⁎ values were only significantly influenced by restorative material factor (p < 0.001) and varied in the range of 2.08 and 6.55 units for all drugs/restorative materials. The highest ΔE⁎ was found in Ferrosanol B-composite (6.55 ± 1.38) and the lowest one was found in Dolven-glass ionomer (2.08 ± 0.40) pairwise. The most prominent ΔE⁎ value elevations were obtained in composite material compared to the compomer and/or glass ionomers in Macrol, Ferrosanol B, and Ventolin (p < 0.001; for all) and also for other drugs (p < 0.05). Dolven exhibited significantly higher values compared to Augmentin (p = 0.021), Macrol (p = 0.018), and Ventolin (p = 0.013) in compomer group. Conclusion. The clinically perceptible color changes for tested composite/pediatric drug pairwise can be more problematic than compomer and glass ionomers in pediatric dentistry. PMID:28164130

  8. Abrasive Wear of Four Direct Restorative Materials by Standard and Whitening Dentifrices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    creating cervical lesions and altering tooth surface is an area of interest in the dental community . This has led to the development of a number of...study of root caries : baseline and incidenc data. Journal of Dental Restorations, 64(9), 1141-1144. Barnes, D., Blank, L., Gingell, J., & Gilner, P... Community Dental Oral Epidemiology, 7(1), 57-64. Bull, W. H., Callender, R. M., Pugh, B. R., & Wood, G. D. (1968). The abrasion and cleaning

  9. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Maxillary Premolars Restored by Various Direct Filling Materials: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Mincik, Jozef; Timkova, Silvia; Urban, Renata

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the effect of various restorative materials on fracture resistance in maxillary premolars. Premolars (n = 64) with no restorations or cracks were selected. MOD cavities were prepared considering the buccolingual width to be equal to half of the intercuspal distance. The specimens were randomly divided into 8 groups, 8 specimens each: group A intact teeth, group B unfilled cavity, group C composite made by oblique layering technique, group D composite with 2 mm cusp coverage, group E bulk-filled posterior composite, group F glass-ionomer, group G amalgam, and group H composite with proximal boxes. The specimens were subjected to an axial compression load with the mean values of fracture resistance in group A: 1289 N, group B: 181.75 N, group C: 445.38 N, group D: 645.88 N, group E: 355.13 N, group F: 352.00 N, group G: 191.38 N, and group H: 572.00 N. There was no significant difference between groups B and G, between C and D, E, and F, and between group D and H. All other measurements were statistically significant. We conclude that composite restoration with cusp coverage is the most ideal nonprosthetic solution for endodontically treated teeth. Cusp coverage increases the fracture resistance compared to the conventional cavity design. PMID:27656212

  10. Finite element analysis of provisional structures of implant-supported complete prostheses.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Bruno Albuquerque; de Brito, Rui Barbosa; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2014-04-01

    The use of provisional resin implant-supported complete dentures is a fast and safe procedure to restore mastication and esthetics of patients soon after surgery and during the adaptation phase to the new denture. This study assessed stress distribution of provisional implant-supported fixed dentures and the all-on-4 concept using self-curing acrylic resin (Tempron) and bis-acrylic resin (Luxatemp) to simulate functional loads through the three-dimensional finite element method. Solidworks software was used to build three-dimensional models using acrylic resin (Tempron, model A) and bis-acrylic resin (Luxatemp, model B) for denture captions. Two loading patterns were applied on each model: (1) right unilateral axial loading of 150 N on the occlusal surfaces of posterior teeth and (2) oblique loading vector of 150 N at 45°. The results showed that higher stress was found on the bone crest below oblique load application with a maximum value of 187.57 MPa on model A and 167.45 MPa on model B. It was concluded that model B improved stress distribution on the denture compared with model A.

  11. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF PROVISIONAL STRUCTURES OF IMPLANT-SUPPORTED COMPLETE PROSTHESES.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Bruno Albuquerque; Brito Jr, Rui Barbosa; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2012-03-01

    Abstract The use of provisional resin implant-supported complete dentures is a fast and safe procedure to restore mastication and aesthetics of patients soon after surgery and during the adaptation phase to the new denture. This study assessed stress distribution of provisional implant-supported fixed dentures and the all-on-four concept using self-curing acrylic resin (Tempron) and bis-acrylic resin (Luxatemp) to simulate functional loads through the 3D finite element method. The Solidworks software was used to build 3D models, using acrylic resin (Tempron - A) and bis-acrylic resin (Luxatemp - B) for denture captions. Two loading patterns were applied on each model: 1) right unilateral axial loading of 150 N on the occlusal surfaces of posterior teeth; 2) oblique loading vector of 150 N at 45 degrees. The results showed that higher stress was found on the bone crest below oblique load application with maximum value of 187.57 MPa on model A and 167.45 MPa on model B. It was concluded that model B improved stress distribution on the denture compared to model A.

  12. Temperature changes under demineralized dentin during polymerization of three resin-based restorative materials using QTH and LED units

    PubMed Central

    Mousavinasab, Sayed-Mostafa; Moharreri, Mohammadreza; Atai, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Light-curing of resin-based materials (RBMs) increases the pulp chamber temperature, with detrimental effects on the vital pulp. This in vitro study compared the temperature rise under demineralized human tooth dentin during light-curing and the degrees of conversion (DCs) of three different RBMs using quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) and light-emitting diode (LED) units (LCUs). Materials and Methods Demineralized and non-demineralized dentin disks were prepared from 120 extracted human mandibular molars. The temperature rise under the dentin disks (n = 12) during the light-curing of three RBMs, i.e. an Ormocer-based composite resin (Ceram. X, Dentsply DeTrey), a low-shrinkage silorane-based composite (Filtek P90, 3M ESPE), and a giomer (Beautifil II, Shofu GmbH), was measured with a K-type thermocouple wire. The DCs of the materials were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results The temperature rise under the demineralized dentin disks was higher than that under the non-demineralized dentin disks during the polymerization of all restorative materials (p < 0.05). Filtek P90 induced higher temperature rise during polymerization than Ceram.X and Beautifil II under demineralized dentin (p < 0.05). The temperature rise under demineralized dentin during Filtek P90 polymerization exceeded the threshold value (5.5℃), with no significant differences between the DCs of the test materials (p > 0.05). Conclusions Although there were no significant differences in the DCs, the temperature rise under demineralized dentin disks for the silorane-based composite was higher than that for dimethacrylate-based restorative materials, particularly with QTH LCU. PMID:25110638

  13. Evaluation of nystatin containing chitosan hydrogels as potential dual action bio-active restorative materials: in vitro approach.

    PubMed

    Perchyonok, V Tamara; Reher, Vanessa; Zhang, Shengmiao; Basson, Nicki; Grobler, Sias

    2014-11-28

    Healing is a specific biological process related to the general phenomenon of growth and tissue regeneration and is a process generally affected by several systemic conditions or as detrimental side-effects of chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced inflammation of the oral mucosa. The objectives of this study is to evaluate the novel chitosan based functional drug delivery systems, which can be successfully incorporated into "dual action bioactive restorative materials", capable of inducing in vitro improved wound healing prototype and containing an antibiotic, such as nystatin, krill oil as an antioxidant and hydroxyapatite as a molecular bone scaffold, which is naturally present in bone and is reported to be successfully used in promoting bone integration when implanted as well as promoting healing. The hydrogels were prepared using a protocol as previously reported by us. The physico-chemical features, including surface morphology (SEM), release behaviors, stability of the therapeutic agent-antioxidant-chitosan, were measured and compared to the earlier reported chitosan-antioxidant containing hydrogels. Structural investigations of the reactive surface of the hydrogel are reported. Release of nystatin was investigated for all newly prepared hydrogels. Bio-adhesive studies were performed in order to assess the suitability of these designer materials. Free radical defense capacity of the biomaterials was evaluated using established in vitro model. The bio-adhesive capacity of the materials in the in vitro system was tested and quantified. It was found that the favorable synergistic effect of free radical built-in defense mechanism of the new functional materials increased sustainable bio-adhesion and therefore acted as a functional multi-dimensional restorative material with potential application in wound healing in vitro.

  14. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with Zirconia filler containing composite core material and fiber posts

    PubMed Central

    Jeaidi, Zaid Al

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth with a novel Zirconia (Zr) nano-particle filler containing bulk fill resin composite. Methods: Forty-five freshly extracted maxillary central incisors were endodontically treated using conventional step back preparation and warm lateral condensation filling. Post space preparation was performed using drills compatible for fiber posts (Rely X Fiber Post) on all teeth (n=45), and posts were cemented using self etch resin cement (Rely X Unicem). Samples were equally divided into three groups (n=15) based on the type of core materials, ZirconCore (ZC) MulticCore Flow (MC) and Luxacore Dual (LC). All specimens were mounted in acrylic resin and loads were applied (Universal testing machine) at 130° to the long axis of teeth, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. The loads and the site at which the failures occurred were recorded. Data obtained was tabulated and analyzed using a statistical program. The means and standard deviations were compared using ANOVA and Multiple comparisons test. Results: The lowest and highest failure loads were shown by groups LC (18.741±3.02) and MC (25.16±3.30) respectively. Group LC (18.741±3.02) showed significantly lower failure loads compared to groups ZC (23.02±4.21) and MC (25.16±3.30) (p<0.01). However groups ZC (23.02±4.21) and MC (25.16±3.30) showed comparable failure loads (p=0.23). Conclusions: Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with Zr filler containing bulk fill composite cores was comparable to teeth restored with conventional Zr free bulk fill composites. Zr filled bulk fill composites are recommended for restoration of endodontically treated teeth as they show comparable fracture resistance to conventional composite materials with less catastrophic failures. PMID:28083048

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Sealing Ability of Four Different Restorative Materials Used as Coronal Sealants: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Divya, K T; Satish, G; Srinivasa, T S; Reddy, Veera; Umashankar, K; Rao, B Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate and compare the sealing ability of glass ionomer cement (GIC), composite resin, gray mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA) and white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) when placed coronally as double - sealing material over gutta-percha in root canal treated teeth. Materials and Methods: A sample of 70 freshly extracted human single rooted teeth were cleaned, shaped and obturated with gutta-percha and AH Plus. The gutta-percha was reduced to a depth of 4 mm from the cemento enamel junction using hot plugger and standardized access cavities with 4 mm depth were prepared at the coronal ends of the roots. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups containing 15 teeth each depending on the restorations they received in the coronal cavity. A positive control group of five teeth received no restorative barrier over gutta-percha. All root surfaces were covered with two coats of nail varnish, leaving only the access openings uncovered except teeth in the negative control group, which were completely covered with nail varnish. All teeth were immersed in India ink, cleared and observed under stereomicroscope for the depth of dye penetration. Results: The results were tabulated and analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis test and multiple comparison between each group was carried out using Mann-Whitney test. The groups sealed with GMTA and WMTA showed least dye penetration than other groups and the difference was statistically significant. Highest dye penetration was seen with groups sealed with GIC and was statistically significant compared with other three groups. Conclusion: The results showed that the GMTA and WMTA provided significantly better coronal seal when compared to other two restorations. The composite resin also showed significantly better seal than the unsealed group and the group sealed GIC, which showed highest leakage that was equivalent to that of unsealed group. PMID:25214726

  16. A comparative study of sliding wear of nonmetallic dental restorative materials with emphasis on micromechanical wear mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dupriez, Nataliya Deyneka; von Koeckritz, Ann-Kristin; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the in vitro tribological behavior of modern nonmetallic restorative materials. Specimen prepared of IPS e.max Press lithium disilicate glass ceramic, IPS Empress Esthetic leucite-reinforced glass ceramic, Everest ZS Blanks yttria-stabilized zirconia and Lava Ultimate composite were subjected to wear using a wear machine designed to simulate occlusal loads. The wear of the investigated materials and antagonists were evaluated by a three-dimensional surface scanner. The quantitative wear test results were used to compare and rank the materials. Specimens were divided into two groups with steatite and alumina antagonists. For each antagonist material an analysis of variance was applied. As a post hoc test of the significant differences, Tukey's honest significant difference test was used. With steatite antagonist: wear of zirconia < wear of leucite-reinforced ceramic < wear of lithium disilicate ceramic < wear of Lava Ultimate composite. No significant wear difference was found for steatite antagonist. The wear of IPS e.max Press and Lava Ultimate against hard alumina was found to be twice lower as compared to their wear when opposing to steatite. The differences were associated with materials mechanical properties (hardness and fracture toughness) and with materials microstructure. Wear mechanisms are discussed.

  17. Matching seed to site by climate similarity: Techniques to prioritize plant materials development and use in restoration.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Kyle D; Butterfield, Bradley J; Wood, Troy E

    2017-04-01

    Land management agencies are increasing the use of native plant materials for vegetation treatments to restore ecosystem function and maintain natural ecological integrity. This shift toward the use of natives has highlighted a need to increase the diversity of materials available. A key problem is agreeing on how many, and which, new accessions should be developed. Here we describe new methods that address this problem. Our methods use climate data to calculate a climate similarity index between two points in a defined extent. This index can be used to predict relative performance of available accessions at a target site. In addition, the index can be used in combination with standard cluster analysis algorithms to quantify and maximize climate coverage (mean climate similarity), given a modeled range extent and a specified number of accessions. We demonstrate the utility of this latter feature by applying it to the extents of 11 western North American species with proven or potential use in restoration. First, a species-specific seed transfer map can be readily generated for a species by predicting performance for accessions currently available; this map can be readily updated to accommodate new accessions. Next, the increase in climate coverage achieved by adding successive accessions can be explored, yielding information that managers can use to balance ecological and economic considerations in determining how many accessions to develop. This approach identifies sampling sites, referred to as climate centers, which contribute unique, complementary, climate coverage to accessions on hand, thus providing explicit sampling guidance for both germplasm preservation and research. We examine how these and other features of our approach add to existing methods used to guide plant materials development and use. Finally, we discuss how these new methods provide a framework that could be used to coordinate native plant materials development, evaluation, and use across

  18. Tennessine Announced As Provisional Name For Superheavy Element 117

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, Jim

    2016-06-08

    The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) Inorganic Chemistry Division has published a Provisional Recommendation for the names and symbols of the recently discovered superheavy elements 113, 115, 117, and 118. Tennessine (Ts) is proposed for element 117, recognizing the contribution of Tennessee research centers ORNL, Vanderbilt and the University of Tennessee to superheavy element research.

  19. Tennessine Announced As Provisional Name For Superheavy Element 117

    ScienceCinema

    Roberto, Jim

    2016-07-12

    The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) Inorganic Chemistry Division has published a Provisional Recommendation for the names and symbols of the recently discovered superheavy elements 113, 115, 117, and 118. Tennessine (Ts) is proposed for element 117, recognizing the contribution of Tennessee research centers ORNL, Vanderbilt and the University of Tennessee to superheavy element research.

  20. 5 CFR 316.403 - Designation of provisional appointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... 316.403 Section 316.403 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS TEMPORARY AND TERM EMPLOYMENT Temporary Limited Employment § 316.403 Designation of provisional... and completion of necessary clearances. (4) Senior Executive Service limited term and...

  1. The wear of enamel opposing shaded ceramic restorative materials: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Delong, R; Pintado, M R; Douglas, W H

    1992-07-01

    The wear rate of intact human enamel opposed by Olympia porcelain gold, Dicor, Ceramco porcelain, and externally shaded Dicor and Ceramco was investigated with an artificial oral environment. The enamel-material couples were subjected to 300,000 masticatory cycles at a maximal occlusal force of 13.4 N while they were continuously bathed with 37 degrees C deionized water. Both the enamel and material surfaces were analyzed by use of a three-dimensional surface monitoring computer program, AnSur, to record the removal of the material and the maximal loss of vertical height. The enamel opposing the externally shaded materials abraded two to five times more than that opposing the unshaded materials and 10 to 15 times more than enamel opposing gold. The wear rates for enamel opposing the gold and unshaded Dicor were similar both in the removal of material and in the loss in vertical height.

  2. Fluoride release of glass ionomer restorations after bleaching with two different bleaching materials

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Mahmoud, Rasha Said; Tarakji, Bassel

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the effect of two bleaching agents on the fluoride release of three types of glass ionomer materials. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 specimens of the tested materials (Ketac Fil, Photac Fil and F2000) were prepared by a split Teflon ring with an internal diameter of 5 mm and thickness of 2 mm. The tested materials were applied and bleached according to manufacturer instructions. Fluoride release measurements were made by using specific ion electrode. Results: Results revealed that bleaching with opalescence Xtra caused little increase in fluoride release from Ketac Fil and Photac Fil but has no effect on F2000. However, Opalescence Quick had no significant effect on the three tested materials. Conclusions: Bleaching effect on fluoride release is material dependent and time has a significant role on fluoride release. PMID:24883026

  3. Color change of newly developed esthetic restorative material immersed in food-simulating solutions.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Megumi; Kawakami, Susumu; Noda, Mamoru; Sano, Hidehiko

    2006-06-01

    Recently, an esthetic tooth coating material has been developed. The material consisted of a primer solution, a base coat, and a top coat. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to evaluate the color change of this tooth coating material and two resin composites after immersion in food-simulating, staining solutions. To this end, the newly developed coating material with and without its top coat, a flowable resin composite, and a hybrid resin composite were employed for the evaluation. The specimens were subjected to an experimental 24-hour staining cycle: 7-hour immersion in coffee, green tea or red wine, then 17-hour immersion in artificial saliva solution containing 0.3% mucin. After 24 hours, 3 days, 1, 2, and 4 weeks of immersion, the color changes of all specimen surfaces were measured. Compared with the other materials, the deltaE* value of coating material without its top coat tended to increase as the immersion period increased until 4 weeks. On the other hand, the deltaE* value of coating material with its top coat measured the lowest among the materials tested. Based on the results obtained, it was concluded that when using this recently developed tooth coating material in dental clinics, its top coat should be properly applied.

  4. A comparison of the sealing ability of various temporary restorative materials to seal the access cavity: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Markose, Aji; Krishnan, Ramesh; Ramesh, Maya; Singh, Shishir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In multiple-appointment root canal treatment, a temporary filling material is used to seal the access cavity between visits. The primary function of this material is to prevent the contamination of the root canal system by fluids, organic debris, and bacteria from the oral cavity. Material and Methods: A total of fifty extracted noncarious unrestored human maxillaryanterior teeth with intact crowns and roots were selected The canals were instrumented using stepback technique and sodium hypochlorite (3%) and hydrogen peroxide (3%) were used as irrigants for each specimen alternatively. The coronal two-thirds of each canal were flared using Gates-Glidden drills up to no. 3 size and obturated with Gutta-percha using zinc oxide-eugenol (ZnOE) as sealer. The teeth were then randomly selected and divided into six groups out of which four were experimental groups and two control groups. The teeth were then immersed in 2% methylene blue dye solution for 3 days. All sealing materials and Gutta-percha were gently removed from the walls of the canal, and the entire circumference of the canal wall examined for dye penetration. Results: The lowest mean leakage was in the Fermit-N group followed by Cavit-W, ZnOE, intermediate restorative materials (IRM), and positive control. Conclusion: Fermit-N showed better sealing ability compared to cavit, ZnOE and IRM. PMID:27829745

  5. Optimizing the design of bio-inspired functionally graded material (FGM) layer in all-ceramic dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chang; Sun, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Due to elastic modulus mismatch between the different layers in all-ceramic dental restorations, high tensile stress concentrates at the interface between the ceramic core and cement. In natural tooth structure, stress concentration is reduced by the functionally graded structure of dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) which interconnects enamel and dentin. Inspired by DEJ, the aim of this study was to explore the optimum design of a bio-inspired functionally graded material (FGM) layer in all-ceramic dental restorations to achieve excellent stress reduction and distribution. Three-dimensional finite element model of a multi-layer structure was developed, which comprised bilayered ceramic, bio-inspired FGM layer, cement, and dentin. Finite element method and first-order optimization technique were used to realize the optimal bio-inspired FGM layer design. The bio-inspired FGM layer significantly reduced stress concentration at the interface between the crown and cement, and stresses were evenly distributed in FGM layer. With the optimal design, an elastic modulus distribution similar to that in DEJ occurred in the FGM layer.

  6. Chipping fracture resistance of dental CAD/CAM restorative materials: Part 2. Phenomenological model and the effect of indenter type

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, G.D.; Giuseppetti, A.A.; Hoffman, K.H.

    2014-01-01

    The edge chipping resistances of six CAD/CAM dental restoration materials are analyzed and correlated to other mechanical properties. A new quadratic relationship that is based on a phenomenological model is presented. Objective The purpose of this study was to further analyze the edge chipping resistance of the brittle materials evaluated in Part 1. One objective was to determine why some force-distance trends were linear and others were nonlinear. A second objective was to account for differences in chipping resistance with indenter type. Methods Edge chipping experiments were conducted with different indenters, including some custom-made sharp conical indenters. A new force – distance quadratic expression was correlated to the data and compared to the linear and power law trends. Results The new quadratic function was an excellent fit in every instance. It can account for why some materials can be fit by a linear trend, while others can be fit by the power law trend. The effects of indenter type are accounted for variations in crack initiation and by the wedging stresses once an indentation hole is created. Significance The new quadratic force – edge distance function can be used with edge chipping data for all brittle materials, not just those evaluated in this study. The data trends vary from linear to nonlinear depending upon the material’s hardness, fracture toughness, and elastic modulus. PMID:24685179

  7. The role of the ionomer glass component in polyacid-modified composite resin dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Adusei, Gabriel O; Deb, Sanjukta; Nicholson, John W

    2004-07-01

    In order to model the processes that occur within polyacid-modified composite resin ("compomer") dental restoratives, a series of experiments has been carried out with silanated and silane-free ionomer glass G338, and silanated and silane-free unreactive glass (Raysorb T-4000). In an acid-base reaction with dental grade aqueous maleic acid-acrylic acid copolymer solution, the setting time of the silanted G338 was found to be 9 min, compared with 5 min for the silane-free glass. Inclusion of each glass in an experimental composite resin system showed that the formulations which contained G338 absorbed more water than the formulations which contained Raysorb T-4000, regardless of whether or not the glass was silanted. Biaxial flexure strength was superior for experimental composites containing Raysorb T-4000, with highest results being obtained with the silanated glass. Overall these results demonstrate that silanation of the filler is essential for optimal physical properties but that, for the ionomer glass, it inhibits the acid-base reaction. The presence of ionomer glass led to an increase in water uptake compared with the unreactive glass, regardless of the presence of silane.

  8. Restorative dentistry for children.

    PubMed

    Donly, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses contemporary pediatric restorative dentistry. Indications and contraindications for the choice of different restorative materials in different clinical situations, including the risk assessment of the patient, are presented. The specific use of glass ionomer cement or resin-modified glass ionomer cement, resin-based composite, and stainless steel crowns is discussed so that preparation design and restoration placement is understood.

  9. Recommendations for conducting controlled clinical studies of dental restorative materials. Science Committee Project 2/98--FDI World Dental Federation study design (Part I) and criteria for evaluation (Part II) of direct and indirect restorations including onlays and partial crowns.

    PubMed

    Hickel, Reinhard; Roulet, Jean-François; Bayne, Stephen; Heintze, Siegward D; Mjör, Ivar A; Peters, Mathilde; Rousson, Valentin; Randall, Ros; Schmalz, Gottfried; Tyas, Martin; Vanherle, Guido

    2007-01-01

    About 35 years ago, Ryge provided a practical approach to the evaluation of the clinical performance of restorative materials. This systematic approach was soon universally accepted. While that methodology has served us well, a large number of scientific methodologies and more detailed questions have arisen that require more rigor. Current restorative materials have vastly improved clinical performance, and any changes over time are not easily detected by the limited sensitivity of the Ryge criteria in short-term clinical investigations. However, the clinical evaluation of restorations not only involves the restorative material per se but also different operative techniques. For instance, a composite resin may show good longevity data when applied in conventional cavities but not in modified operative approaches. Insensitivity, combined with the continually evolving and nonstandard investigator modifications of the categories, scales, and reporting methods, has created a body of literature that is extremely difficult to interpret meaningfully. In many cases, the insensitivity of the original Ryge methods leads to misinterpretation as good clinical performance. While there are many good features of the original system, it is now time to move on to a more contemporary one. The current review approaches this challenge in two ways: (1) a proposal for a modern clinical testing protocol for controlled clinical trials, and (2) an in-depth discussion of relevant clinical evaluation parameters, providing 84 references that are primarily related to issues or problems for clinical research trials. Together, these two parts offer a standard for the clinical testing of restorative materials/procedures and provide significant guidance for research teams in the design and conduct of contemporary clinical trials. Part 1 of the review considers the recruitment of subjects, restorations per subject, clinical events, validity versus bias, legal and regulatory aspects, rationales for

  10. Comparative in vitro evaluation of CAD/CAM vs conventional provisional crowns

    PubMed Central

    ABDULLAH, Adil Othman; TSITROU, Effrosyni A; POLLINGTON, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This study compared the marginal gap, internal fit, fracture strength, and mode of fracture of CAD/CAM provisional crowns with that of direct provisional crowns. Material and Methods An upper right first premolar phantom tooth was prepared for full ceramic crown following tooth preparation guidelines. The materials tested were: VITA CAD-Temp®, Polyetheretherketone “PEEK”, Telio CAD-Temp, and Protemp™4 (control group). The crowns were divided into four groups (n=10), Group1: VITA CAD-Temp®, Group 2: PEEK, Group 3: Telio CAD-Temp, and Group 4: Protemp™4. Each crown was investigated for marginal and internal fit, fracture strength, and mode of fracture. Statistical analysis was performed using GraphPad Prism software version 6.0. Results The average marginal gap was: VITA CAD-Temp® 60.61 (±9.99) µm, PEEK 46.75 (±8.26) µm, Telio CAD-Temp 56.10 (±5.65) µm, and Protemp™4 193.07(±35.96) µm (P<0.001). The average internal fit was: VITA CAD-Temp® 124.94 (±22.96) µm, PEEK 113.14 (±23.55) µm, Telio CAD-Temp 110.95 (±11.64) µm, and Protemp™4 143.48(±26.74) µm. The average fracture strength was: VITA CAD-Temp® 361.01 (±21.61) N, PEEK 802.23 (±111.29) N, Telio CAD-Temp 719.24 (±95.17) N, and Protemp™4 416.40 (±69.14) N. One-way ANOVA test showed a statistically significant difference for marginal gap, internal gap, and fracture strength between all groups (p<0.001). However, the mode of fracture showed no differences between the groups (p>0.05). Conclusions CAD/CAM fabricated provisional crowns demonstrated superior fit and better strength than direct provisional crowns. PMID:27383707

  11. Investigation of distortions around the cervical area of teeth restored with two kinds of crown materials.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Chikako; Miura, Hiroyuki; Okada, Daizo; Komada, Wataru; Miyasaka, Munenaga; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Masuoka, David

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify crown materials to decrease the stress concentrated at the cervical area of endodontically treated teeth. To this end, 14 extracted human mandibular premolars were divided into two groups for this study: complete cast crowns versus polymer-based crown and bridge material crowns. Both complete cast crowns (MC) and polymer-based crown and bridge material crowns (HC) were cemented with a glycidyl methacrylate-based resin cement (RC) to composite resin cores with glass fiber posts. Static loading was applied and distortion was measured with four pieces of strain gages attached to the marginal area. Findings showed that there was a large difference in distortion between crown and root in MC. On the other hand, distortions at the cervical area of crown and root were similar in HC.

  12. Novel nano-particles as fillers for an experimental resin-based restorative material.

    PubMed

    Rüttermann, S; Wandrey, C; Raab, W H-M; Janda, R

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the properties of two experimental materials, nano-material (Nano) and Microhybrid, and two trade products, Clearfil AP-X and Filtek Supreme XT. The flexural strength and modulus after 24h water storage and 5000 thermocycles, water sorption, solubility and X-ray opacity were determined according to ISO 4049. The volumetric behavior (DeltaV) after curing and after water storage was investigated with the Archimedes principle. ANOVA was calculated with p<0.05. Clearfil AP-X showed the highest flexural strength (154+/-14 MPa) and flexural modulus (11,600+/-550 MPa) prior to and after thermocycling (117+/-14 MPa and 13,000+/-300 MPa). The flexural strength of all materials decreased after thermocycling, but the flexural modulus decreased only for Filtek Supreme XT. After thermocycling, there were no significant differences in flexural strength and modulus between Filtek Supreme XT, Microhybrid and Nano. Clearfil AP-X had the lowest water sorption (22+/-1.1 microg mm(-3)) and Nano had the highest water sorption (82+/-2.6 microg mm(-3)) and solubility (27+/-2.9 microg mm(-3)) of all the materials. No significant differences occurred between the solubility of Clearfil AP-X, Filtek Supreme XT and Microhybrid. Microhybrid and Nano provided the highest X-ray opacity. Owing to the lower filler content, Nano showed higher shrinkage than the commercial materials. Nano had the highest expansion after water storage. After thermocycling, Nano performed as well as Filtek Supreme XT for flexural strength, even better for X-ray opacity but significantly worse for flexural modulus, water sorption and solubility. The performances of microhybrids were superior to those of the nano-materials.

  13. Synthesis and characterizations of a fluoride-releasing dental restorative material.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Samad; Aamer, Sidra; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar; Wong, Ferranti S L; Ur Rehman, Ihtesham

    2013-08-01

    The aim was to develop an obturating material which has the tendency to release fluoride and minimize interfaces with tooth. Nano-fluorapatite (nFA) powder was synthesized by sol-gel. The composite based on polyurethane (PU) was obtained by chemically binding the nFA (10, 15, 20%wt/wt) to the diisocyanate component by utilizing in-situ polymerization. The procedure involved stepwise addition of monomeric units of PU, and optimizing the reagent concentrations to synthesize composite. The structural, phase and morphological analysis of nFA was evaluated. The structural, fluoride release and in-vitro adhesion analysis with tooth structure of PU/nFA was conducted. For fluoride release analysis the samples were stored in artificial saliva and deionized water for periodical time intervals. Bond strength of composites was analyzed by push-out test. Chemical linkage was achieved between PU and nFA without intermediate coupling agent. The insignificant difference of fluoride release pattern was observed in artificial saliva and (p≥0.05) deionized water. The PU/nFA composite provided sustained release of fluoride over a long period of time. The composite showed more adhesion toward tooth structure with the increase in concentration of nFA. Bond strength of composite was in accordance with root canal filling material, hence, the material with anti-cariogenic properties can be used as an obturating material.

  14. Provisional Machine-Gun Firing Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1917-06-21

    value in conventional angular measure is 3’ 26.2". Mirage: A word used to designate the heat waves observed on’ the target range on warm days. The...of earth or other material thrown up in front of the targets to protect the markers. Prone: Lying flat on the belly. The only position with the body...standard should be painted a neutral color, have earth rubbed on it, or have bundles of vegetation tied to it. The ropes should also be of a neutral

  15. Apical Sealing Ability of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Intermediate Restorative Material and Calcium Enriched Mixture Cement: A Bacterial Leakage Study

    PubMed Central

    Shahriari, Shahriar; Faramarzi, Farhad; Alikhani, Mohammad-Yousef; Farhadian, Maryam; Hendi, Seyedeh Sareh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This in vitro study compared the apical sealing ability of three common root end filling materials namely mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), intermediate restorative material (IRM) and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement using a bacterial leakage model. Methods and Materials: The study was conducted on 83 single-rooted human teeth. Tooth crowns were cut and root canals were prepared using the step-back technique. Apical 3 mm of the roots were cut and a three-mm-deep cavity was prepared using an ultrasonic instrument. The samples were divided into three groups (n=25) according to the root-end filling material including MTA, IRM and CEM cement. The roots were inserted into cut-end microtubes. After sterilization with ethylene oxide, microtubes were placed in sterile vials containing 10 mL of Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) broth and incubated at 37°C and 0.1 mL of Enterococcus faecalis suspension compatible with 0.5 McFarland standard (1.5×108 cell/ ml), which was refreshed daily. This procedure was continued for 70 days. The data were analyzed using the chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis and log rank tests. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: No significant difference was found in bacterial microleakage among three groups; MTA showed slightly (but not significantly) less microleakage than IRM and CEM. However, the difference in the mean time of microleakage was significant among the groups (P<0.04) and in MTA samples leakage occurred in a longer time than CEM (P<0.012). Conclusion: The three tested root end filling materials had equal sealing efficacy for preventing bacterial leakage. PMID:27790267

  16. Physical Properties of a New Sonically Placed Composite Resin Restorative Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-06

    Material 7. Intended publication/meeting : General Dentistry (the journal of the Academy of General Dentistry) 8. "Required by" date: 15 July 2013...mechanical behaviour of dental composites. Clin Oral Invest 2009;13:427-438. 17. Ferracane JL, Moser JB, Greener EH. Rheology of composite...pressure bar. Dent Mat Journal 2006;25(2):234-240. 20. Opdam N, Roeters J, Peters T, Burgersdijk R, Kuijs R. Consistency of resin composites for

  17. Restoring marsh elevation in a rapidly subsiding salt marsh by thin-layer deposition of dredged material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ford, M.A.; Cahoon, D.R.; Lynch, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Thin-layer deposition of dredged material on coastal marsh by means of high-pressure spray dredging (Jet-Spray??2) technology has been proposed as a mechanism to minimize wetland impacts associated with traditional bucket dredging technologies and to restore soil elevations in deteriorated marshes of the Mississippi River delta. The impact of spray dredging on vegetated marsh and adjacent shallow-water habitat (formerly vegetated marsh that deteriorated to open water) was evaluated in a 0.5-ha Spartina alterniflora-dominated salt marsh in coastal Louisiana. The thickness of dredged sediment deposits was determined from artificial soil marker horizons and soil elevation change was determined from sedimentation-erosion tables (SET) established prior to spraying in both sprayed and reference marshes. The vertical accretion and elevation change measurements were made simultaneously to allow for calculation of shallow (~5 m depth) subsidence (accretion minus elevation change). Measurements made immediately following spraying in July 1996 revealed that stems of S. alterniflora were knocked down by the force of the spray and covered with 23 mm of dredged material. Stems of S. alterniflora soon recovered, and by July 1997 the percent cover of S. alterniflora had increased three-fold over pre-project conditions. Thus, the layer of dredged material was thin enough to allow for survival of the S. alterniflora plants, with no subsequent colonization by plant species typical of higher marsh zones. By February 1998, 62 mm of vertical accretion accumulated at this site, and little indication of disturbance was noted. Although not statistically significant, soil elevation change was greater than accretion on average at both the spray and reference marshes, suggesting that subsurface expansion caused by increased root biomass production and/or pore water storage influence elevation in this marsh region. In the adjacent shallow water pond, 129 mm of sediment was deposited in July

  18. RECYCLED WASTE-BASED CEMENT COMPOSITE PATCH MATERIALS FOR RAPID/PERMANENT ROAD RESTORATION.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.

    2001-07-31

    Over the past year, KeySpan Energy sponsored a research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) aimed at recycling boiler ash (BA) and waste water treatment sludge (WWTS) byproducts generated from Keyspan's power stations into potentially useful materials, and at reducing concurrent costs for their disposal. Also, KeySpan has an interest in developing strategies to explicitly integrate industrial ecology and green chemistry. From our collaborative efforts with Keyspan (Diane Blankenhom Project Manager, and Kenneth Yager), we succeeded in recycling them into two viable products; Pb-exchange adsorbents (PEAs), and high-performance cements (HpCs). These products were made from chemically bonded cement and ceramic (CBC) materials that were synthesized through two-step chemical reaction pathways, acid-base and hydration. Using this synthesis technology, both the WWTS and BA served in acting as solid base reactants, and sodium polyphosphate, [-(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}], known as an intermediator of fertilizer, was employed as the acid solution reactant. In addition, two commercial cement additives, Secar No. 51 calcium aluminate cement (CAC) and Type I calcium silicate cement (CSC), were used to improve mechanical behavior and to promote the rate of acid-base reaction of the CBC materials.

  19. Ensuring the global availability of high-quality dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Ferracane, J; Fisher, J; Eiselé, J L; Fox, C H

    2013-11-01

    The Minamata Convention, a global legally binding instrument (treaty) on mercury, has been the catalyst for the emerging agenda on global dental materials research. If the current and future challenges of oral health maintenance and healing on a global scale are to be met, a logical and effective research agenda for the discovery and introduction of new, environmentally sustainable, dental materials must be developed through a coordinated effort involving materials scientists, dental clinicians, representatives of industry, members of regional and national regulatory bodies, and advocacy from research organizations. For universal impact, this agenda should be created with awareness of several important ongoing initiatives, such as the WHO non-communicable diseases action plan, the UN sustainable development agenda, and the IADR Global Oral Health In Inequalities Research Agenda (GOHIRA). A significant contributor to this cause is the FDI and its membership, who, through their Vision 2020 initiative, acknowledge their role and responsibility in globally preventing and managing dental disease and providing leadership to the profession in terms of information dissemination and affecting change. Dental researchers also have an obligation to advocate for appropriate funding to match the identified research needs, thus enhancing the possibility that key decision-makers will provide the needed support to achieve the research agenda agreed upon by this diverse group of stakeholders.

  20. Identification through X-ray fluorescence analysis of dental restorative resin materials: a comprehensive study of noncremated, cremated, and processed-cremated individuals.

    PubMed

    Bush, Mary A; Miller, Raymond G; Prutsman-Pfeiffer, Jennifer; Bush, Peter J

    2007-01-01

    Tooth-colored restorative materials are increasingly being placed in the practice of modern dentistry, replacing traditional materials such as amalgam. Many restorative resins have distinct elemental compositions that allow identification of brand. Not only are resins classifiable by elemental content, but they also survive extreme conditions such as cremation. This is of significance to the forensic odontologist because resin uniqueness adds another level of certainty in victim identification, especially when traditional means are exhausted. In this three-part study, unique combinations of resins were placed in six human cadavers (total 70 restorations). Simulated ante-mortem dental records were created. In a blind experiment, a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) unit was used to locate and identify the resin brands placed in the dentition. The technique was successful in location and brand identification of 53 of the restorations, which was sufficient to enable positive victim identification among the study group. This part of the experiment demonstrated the utility of portable XRF in detection and analysis of restorative materials for victim identification in field or morgue settings. Identification of individuals after cremation is a more difficult task, as the dentition is altered by shrinkage and fragmentation, and may not be comparable with a dental chart. Identification of processed cremains is a much greater challenge, as comminution obliterates all structural relationships. Under both circumstances, it is the nonbiological artifacts that aid in identification. Restorative resin fillings can survive these conditions, and can still be named by brand utilizing elemental analysis. In a continuation of the study, the cadavers were cremated in a cremation retort under standard mortuary conditions. XRF was again used to analyze retrieved resins and to identify the individuals based on restorative materials known to exist from dental records. The cremains were

  1. A new approach to influence contact angle and surface free energy of resin-based dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Rüttermann, Stefan; Trellenkamp, Taina; Bergmann, Nora; Raab, Wolfgang H-M; Ritter, Helmut; Janda, Ralf

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify novel delivery systems and active agents which increase the water contact angle and reduce the surface free energy when added to resin-based dental restorative materials. Two delivery systems based on zeolite or novel polymeric hollow beads (Poly-Pore), loaded with two low surface tension active agents (hydroxy functional polydimethylsiloxane and polydimethylsiloxane) or a polymerizable active agent (silicone polyether acrylate) were used to modify commonly formulated experimental dental resin composites. The non-modified resin was used as a standard (ST). Flexural strength, flexural modulus, water sorption, solubility, polymerization shrinkage, surface roughness Ra, contact angle θ, total surface free energy γS, and the apolar γSLW, polar γSAB, Lewis acid γS+ and base γS- components, and the active agents surface tensions γL were determined (P<0.05). The active agents did not differ in γL. The modified materials had significantly higher θ but significantly lower γS, γSAB and γS- than the ST. A Poly-Pore/polydimethyl siloxane delivery system yielded the highest θ (110.9±3.5°) acceptable physical properties and the lowest values for γSLW and γS-. Among the modified materials the polymerizable materials containing active agents had the lowest γAB and the highest γS+ and γS-. Although not significant, both of the zeolite delivery systems yielded higher γSLW, γS+ and γS- but lower γSAB than the Poly-Pore delivery systems. Poly-Pore based delivery systems highly loaded with low surface tension active agents were found not to influence the physical properties but to significantly increase the water contact angle and thus reduce surface free energy of dental resin composites.

  2. Reactions of connective tissue to amalgam, intermediate restorative material, mineral trioxide aggregate, and mineral trioxide aggregate mixed with chlorhexidine.

    PubMed

    Sumer, Mahmut; Muglali, Mehtap; Bodrumlu, Emre; Guvenc, Tolga

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to histopathologically examine the biocompatibility of the high-copper amalgam, intermediate restorative material (IRM), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and MTA mixed with chlorhexidine (CHX). This study was conducted to observe the rat subcutaneous connective tissue reaction to the implanted tubes filled with amalgam, IRM, MTA, and MTA mixed with CHX. The animals were sacrificed 15, 30, and 60 days after the implantation procedure. The implant sites were excised and prepared for histological evaluation. Sections of 5 to 6 microm thickness were cut by a microtome and stained with hemotoxylin eosin and examined under a light microscope. The inflammatory reactions were categorized as weak (none or few inflammatory cells < or =25 cells), moderate (>25 cells), and severe (a lot of inflammatory cells not to be counted, giant cells, and granulation tissue). Thickness of fibrous capsules measured five different areas by the digital imaging and the mean values were scored. Amalgam, IRM, and MTA mixed with CHX caused a weak inflammatory response on days 15, 30, and 60. MTA provoked an initial severe inflammatory response that subsided at the 30 and 60 day study period. A clear fibrous capsule was observed beginning from the 15 days in all of the groups. Within the limits of this study, amalgam, IRM, MTA, and MTA mixed with CHX materials were surrounded by fibrous connective tissue indicated that they were well tolerated by the tissues, therefore, MTA/CHX seemed to be biocompatible.

  3. Effects of Protective Resin Coating on the Surface Roughness and Color Stability of Resin-Based Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Tüzüner, Tamer; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Baygın, Özgül; Bağış, Yıldırım Hakan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of nanofilled protective resin coating (RC) on the surface roughness (Ra) and color stability (ΔE) of resin-based restorative materials (RM) (compomer (C), nanofilled composite (NF), and microhybrid composite (MH)) after being submitted to the ultraviolet aging (UV) method. Thirty-six specimens were prepared (n = 6 for each group). The Ra and (ΔE) values and SEM images were obtained before and after UV. Significant interactions were found among the RM-RC-UV procedures for Ra (P < 0.001). After the specimens were submitted to UV, the Ra values were significantly increased, regardless of the RC procedure (with RC; P < 0.01 for all, without RC; C (P < 0.01), NF (P < 0.001), and MH (P < 0.001)) for each RM. Significant interactions were found between the RM-RC (P < 0.001) procedures for the ΔE values. The ΔE values were increased in each group after applying the RC procedures (P < 0.001). Protective RC usage for RM could result in material-related differences in Ra and ΔE as with used UV method. PMID:25162066

  4. The chewing robot: a new biologically-inspired way to evaluate dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Raabe, D; Alemzadeh, K; Harrison, A L; Ireland, A J

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel in vitro dental wear simulator based on 6-6 parallel kinematics to replicate mechanical wear formation on dental materials and components, such as individual teeth, crowns or bridges. The human mandible, guided by a range of passive structures moves with up to six degrees of freedom (DOF). Currently available wear simulators lack the ability to perform these complex chewing movements. In addition simulators are unable to replicate the normal range of chewing forces as they have no control system able to mimic the natural muscle function controlled by the human central nervous system. Such discrepancies between true in vivo and simulated in vitro movements will influence the outcome and reliability of wear studies using such approaches. This paper summarizes the development of a new dynamic jaw simulator based on the kinematics of the human jaw.

  5. Changes in a light-cured composite resin material used to restore primary anterior teeth: an eighteen month in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Rosen, M; Melman, G E; Cohen, J

    1990-06-01

    A simple method for treating grossly decayed primary anterior teeth (GDPAT) is of clinical importance since the age of the patient precludes lengthy and difficult procedures. This study assessed the suitability of a light-cured microfilled composite resin material for the repair of GDPAT. The material Durafill was used to restore 81 primary teeth in 24 children (mean age 3.5 y). The restorations were assessed according to predetermined criteria at 6, 12, and 18 months. Results showed a significant deterioration in cavomarginal discoloration and anatomic form (p less than 0.05). Changes in anatomic form were significantly related to marginal adaptation, secondary caries, gingivitis and pain (p less than 0.05). Despite the observed changes, Durafill performed adequately and offers the dentist a simple method for restoring GDPAT.

  6. A new polymer nanocomposite repair material for restoring wellbore seal integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Genedy, Moneeb; Kandil, Usama F.; Matteo, Edward N.; Stormont, John; Reda Taha, Mahmoud M.

    2016-10-21

    Seal integrity of functional oil wells and abandoned wellbores used for CO2 subsequent storage has become of significant interest with the oil and gas leaks worldwide. This is attributed to the fact that wellbores intersecting geographical formations contain potential leakage pathways. One of the critical leakage pathways is the cement-shale interface. In this study, we examine the efficiency of a new polymer nanocomposite repair material that can be injected for sealing micro annulus in wellbores. The bond strength and microstructure of the interface of Type G oil well cement (reference), microfine cement, Novolac epoxy incorporating Neat, 0.25%, 0.5%, and 1.0% Aluminum Nanoparticles (ANPs) with shale is investigated. Interfacial bond strength testing shows that injected microfine cement repair has considerably low bond strength, while ANPs-epoxy nanocomposites have a bond strength that is an order of magnitude higher than cement. Microscopic investigations of the interface show that micro annulus interfacial cracks with widths up to 40 μm were observed at the cement-shale interface while these cracks were absent at the cement-epoxy-shale interface. Finally, Fourier Transform Infrared and Dynamic mechanical analysis measurements showed that ANPs improve interfacial bond by limiting epoxy crosslinking, and therefore allowing epoxy to form robust bonds with cement and shale.

  7. Wear properties of a novel resin composite compared to human enamel and other restorative materials.

    PubMed

    D'Arcangelo, C; Vanini, L; Rondoni, G D; Pirani, M; Vadini, M; Gattone, M; De Angelis, F

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the two-body wear resistance of human enamel, a pressable glass-ceramic (Imagine PressX), a type 3 gold alloy (Aurocast8), three resins composites currently available on the market (Enamel plus HRi, Filtek Supreme XTE, Ceram.X duo), and one recently introduced resin composite (Enamel plus HRi-Function). Resin composites were tested after simple light curing and after a further heat polymerization cycle. Ten cylindrical specimens (7 mm in diameter) were manufactured with each dental material according to standard laboratory procedures. Ten flat enamel specimens were obtained from freshly extracted human molars and included in the control group. All samples were subjected to a two-body wear test in a dual-axis chewing simulator over up to 120,000 loading cycles, against yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal cusps. Wear resistance was analyzed by measuring the vertical substance loss (mm) and the volume loss (mm(3)). Antagonist wear (mm) was also recorded. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (wear depth and volume loss) and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA on ranks (antagonist wear). Heat-cured HRi function and Aurocast8 showed similar mean values for wear depth and volumetric loss, and their results did not statistically differ in comparison with the human enamel.

  8. A new polymer nanocomposite repair material for restoring wellbore seal integrity

    DOE PAGES

    Genedy, Moneeb; Kandil, Usama F.; Matteo, Edward N.; ...

    2017-03-01

    Seal integrity of functional oil wells and abandoned wellbores used for CO2 subsequent storage has become of significant interest with the oil and gas leaks worldwide. This is attributed to the fact that wellbores intersecting geographical formations contain potential leakage pathways. One of the critical leakage pathways is the cement-shale interface. In this study, we examine the efficiency of a new polymer nanocomposite repair material that can be injected for sealing micro annulus in wellbores. The bond strength and microstructure of the interface of Type G oil well cement (reference), microfine cement, Novolac epoxy incorporating Neat, 0.25%, 0.5%, and 1.0%more » Aluminum Nanoparticles (ANPs) with shale is investigated. Interfacial bond strength testing shows that injected microfine cement repair has considerably low bond strength, while ANPs-epoxy nanocomposites have a bond strength that is an order of magnitude higher than cement. Microscopic investigations of the interface show that micro annulus interfacial cracks with widths up to 40 μm were observed at the cement-shale interface while these cracks were absent at the cement-epoxy-shale interface. Finally, Fourier Transform Infrared and Dynamic mechanical analysis measurements showed that ANPs improve interfacial bond by limiting epoxy crosslinking, and therefore allowing epoxy to form robust bonds with cement and shale.« less

  9. Proposed framework for cleanup and site restoration following a terrorist incident involving radioactive material.

    PubMed

    Conklin, W Craig

    2005-11-01

    Cleanup following a terrorism incident involving a radiological dispersal device (RDD) or improvised nuclear device (IND) is likely to be technically challenging, costly, and politically charged. Lessons learned from the Top Officials 2 exercise and the increased threat of terrorist use of an RDD or IND have driven federal officials to push for an agreed-upon process for determining appropriate cleanup levels. State and local authorities generally have the ultimate responsibility for final public health decisions in their jurisdictions. In response to terrorist attacks, local authorities are likely to request federal assistance in assessing the risk and establishing appropriate cleanup levels. It is realistic to expect local and state requests for significant federal assistance in planning and implementing recovery operations. State and local authorities may desire "shared accountability" with the federal government in setting the appropriate cleanup levels. Government officials at all levels will face pressure to say how clean is clean enough and how quickly people can re-enter affected areas. Issues arising include (1) the nature of the relationship between the federal, state, and local leadership involved in the recovery efforts and (2) where the funding for recovery comes from. Many agencies, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have long been involved in cleanup activities involving radioactive materials. These agencies have recognized the need for a participatory process and realize the need to remain flexible when faced with possible unprecedented environmental challenges following a terrorist attack. Currently, the Department of Homeland Security has a committee process underway, with participation of the EPA, NRC, DOE, and other federal agencies, to try to resolve these issues and to begin engaging state, local, and tribal governments, and others as

  10. Development of a novel oxirane-acrylate composite restorative resin material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sripathi Panditaradhyula, Anuhya

    of these specimens were done by placing the respective specimens in distilled water, ascorbic acid (pH=1.5) and NaOH (pH=13). These resins were not fully cured with filler apart from filled 25:75 oxirane: acrylate cured best. Replacing 4-(Octyloxy) phenyl] phenyl iodonium SbF6 (OPPI) with 4-Isopropyl-4'- methyldiphenyl iodonium Tetrakis (pentafluorophenyl borate (Borate) initiator enhanced 24hr oxirane cure. Formulations had greater hardness compared with the controls. The increase in hardness was due to Increase in oxirane functionality, Increase in filler loading and use of acrylate-salinated filler. Modulus and ultimate transverse strength are greater than controls, but did not have statistically significance energy to break. Thus, these composites are as tough as controls and less brittle. They have the higher hydrophobicity than BisGMA: TEGDMA controls. Furthermore, other means of increasing hydrophobicity was explored, because higher the hydrophobicity, higher the resistance to hydrolytic degradation. Further research observations, such as dynamic mechanical analysis, should be carried out in order to determine the molecular interactions and usage of multi-walled, white carbon nanotubes as filler material.

  11. Bacterial leakage of mineral trioxide aggregate as compared with zinc-free amalgam, intermediate restorative material, and Super-EBA as a root-end filling material.

    PubMed

    Fischer, E J; Arens, D E; Miller, C H

    1998-03-01

    Several dye leakage studies have demonstrated the fact that mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) leaks significantly less than other root-end filling materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the time needed for Serratia marcescens to penetrate a 3 mm thickness of zinc-free amalgam, Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), Super-EBA, and MTA when these materials were used as root-end filling materials. Fifty-six, single-rooted extracted human teeth were cleaned and shaped with a series of .04 Taper rotary instruments (Pro-series 29 files). Once the canals were prepared in a crown down approach, the ends were resected and 48 root-end cavities were ultrasonically prepared to a 3 mm depth. The teeth were then steam sterilized. Using an aseptic technique, under a laminar air flow hood, the root-end cavities were filled with amalgam, IRM, Super-EBA, and MTA. Four root-end cavities were filled with thermoplasticized gutta-percha without a root canal sealer and served as positive controls. Another four root-end cavities were filled with sticky wax covered with two layers of nail polish and served as negative controls. The teeth were attached to presterilized (ethylene oxide gas) plastic caps, and the root ends were placed into 12-ml vials of phenol red broth. Using a micropipette, a tenth of a milliliter of S. marcescens was placed into the root canal of each tooth. To test the sterility of the apparatus set-up, the root canals of two teeth with test root-end filling materials and one tooth from the positive and negative control groups were filled with sterile saline. The number of days required for S. marcescens to penetrate the four root-end filling materials and grow in the phenol red broth was recorded and analyzed. Most of the samples filled with zinc-free amalgam leaked bacteria in 10 to 63 days. IRM began leaking 28 to 91 days. Super-EBA began leaking 42 to 101 days. MTA did not begin leaking until day 49. At the end of the study, four of the MTA samples

  12. "Struggle to obtain redress": Women's experiences of living with symptoms attributed to dental restorative materials and/or electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Mårell, Lena; Lindgren, Monica; Nyhlin, Kerstin Ternulf; Ahlgren, Christina; Berglund, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of illness and the encounters with health care professionals among women who attributed their symptoms and illness to either dental restorative materials and/or electromagnetic fields, despite the fact that research on health effects from dental fillings or electricity has failed to substantiate the reported symptoms. Thirteen women (aged 37-63 years) were invited to the study and a qualitative approach was chosen as the study design, and data were collected using semi-structured interviews. The analysis was conducted with a constant comparative method, according to Grounded Theory. The analysis of the results can be described with the core category, "Struggle to obtain redress," the two categories, "Stricken with illness" and "A blot in the protocol," and five subcategories. The core category represents the women's fight for approval and arose in the conflict between their experience of developing a severe illness and the doctors' or dentists' rejection of the symptoms as a disease, which made the women feel like malingerers. The informants experienced better support and confirmation from alternative medicine practitioners. However, sick-leave certificates from alternative medicine practitioners were not approved and this led to a continuous cycle of visits in the health care system. To avoid conflicting encounters, it is important for caregivers to listen to the patient's explanatory models and experience of illness, even if a medical answer cannot be given.

  13. Restoring the incisal edge.

    PubMed

    Terry, Douglas A

    2005-01-01

    Restorative dentistry evolves with each development of new material and innovative technique. Selection of improved restorative materials that simulate the physical properties and other characteristics of natural teeth, in combination with restorative techniques such as the proximal adaptation and incremental layering, provide the framework that ensures the optimal development of an esthetic restoration. These advanced placement techniques offer benefits such as enhanced chromatic integration, polychromatism, ideal anatomical form and function, optimal proximal contact, improved marginal integrity and longer lasting directly placed composite restorations. The purpose of this article is to give the reader a better understanding of the complex restorative challenge in achieving true harmonization of the primary parameters in esthetics (that is, color, shape and texture) represented by the replacement of a single anterior tooth. The case presented demonstrates the restoration of a Class IV fracture integrating basic adhesive principles with these placement techniques and a recently developed nanoparticle hybrid composite resin system (Premise, Kerr/Sybron, Orange, CA). The clinical presentation describes preoperative considerations, tooth preparation, development of the body layer, internal characterization with tints, development of the artificial enamel layer, shaping and contouring, and polishing of a Class IV composite restoration. The clinical significance is that anterior tooth fractures can be predictably restored using contemporary small particle hybrid composite resin systems with the aforementioned restorative techniques. These placement techniques when used with proper attention to preparation design, adhesive protocol and finishing and polishing procedures, allow the clinician to successfully restore form, function and esthetics to the single anterior tooth replacement.

  14. A comparative study of four coronal obturation materials in endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Uranga, A; Blum, J Y; Esber, S; Parahy, E; Prado, C

    1999-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare, in vitro, the ability of temporary versus permanent materials to seal the access cavity. Eighty human maxillary single-canal teeth were prepared biomechanically and obturated with gutta-percha and an endodontic cement AH Plus, using the warm vertical compaction technique. All access cavities were sealed with 1 of 4 materials (Cavit, Fermit, Tetric, or Dyract). Microleakage was assessed by methylene blue dye penetration. The teeth were submitted to 100 thermocycles, with temperature varying from 0 degree to 55 degrees C. The greatest degree of leakage was observed with the temporary materials (Cavit and Fermit). There was a significant difference (p < 0.05) in leakage between all materials except between Dyract and Tetric. This suggests that it may be more prudent to use a permanent restorative material for provisional restorations to prevent inadequate canal sealing and the resulting risk of fluid penetration.

  15. Evaluation of low-contrast perceptibility in dental restorative materials under the influence of ambient light conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, I C; Lemos, A L B; Aguiar, M F

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess how details on dental restorative composites with different radio-opacities are perceived under the influence of ambient light. Methods: Resin composite step wedges (six steps, each 1-mm thick) were custom manufactured from three materials, respectively: (M1) Filtek™ Z350 (3M/ESPE, Saint Paul, MN); (M2) Prisma AP.H™ (Dentsply International Inc., Brazil) and (M3) Glacier® (SDI Limited, Victoria, Australia). Each step of the manufactured wedge received three standardized drillings of different diameters and depths. An aluminium (Al) step wedge with 12 steps (1-mm thick) was used as an internal standard to calculate the radio-opacity as pixel intensity values. Standardized digital images of the set were obtained, and 11 observers independently recorded the images, noting the number of noticeable details (drillings) under 2 dissimilar conditions: in a light environment (light was turned on in the room) and in low-light conditions (light in the room was turned off). The differences between images in terms of the number of details that were observed were statistically compared using ANOVA, Cronbach's alpha coefficient and Wilcoxon and Kruskal–Wallis tests, with a significance level setting of 5% (α = 0.05). Results: The M2 showed higher radio-opacity, the M1 displayed intermediate radio-opacity and the M3 showed lower radio-opacity, respectively; however, all three were without significance (p > 0.05) compared with each other. The differences in radio-opacity resulted in a significant variation (p < 0.05) in the number of noticeable details in the image, which were influenced by characteristics of details, in addition to the ambient-light level. Conclusions: The radio-opacity of materials and ambient light can affect the perception of details in digital radiographic images. PMID:25629721

  16. Results of the first provisional technical secretariat interlaboratory comparison test

    SciTech Connect

    Stuff, J.R.; Hoffland, L.

    1995-06-01

    The principal task of this laboratory in the first Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) Interlaboratory Comparison Test was to verify and test the extraction and preparation procedures outlined in the Recommended Operating Procedures for Sampling and Analysis in the Verification of Chemical Disarmament in addition to our laboratory extraction methods and our laboratory analysis methods. Sample preparation began on 16 May 1994 and analysis was completed on 12 June 1994. The analytical methods used included NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 31}P) GC/AED, GC/MS (EI and methane CI), GC/IRD, HPLC/IC, HPLC/TSP/MS, MS/MS(Electrospray), and CZE.

  17. Provisional Crown Dislodgement during Scuba Diving: A Case of Barotrauma

    PubMed Central

    Gulve, Meenal Nitin; Gulve, Nitin Dilip

    2013-01-01

    Changes in ambient pressure, for example, during flying, diving, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy, can lead to barotrauma. Although it may seem that this issue was neglected in dental education and research in recent decades, familiarity with and understanding of these facts may be of importance for dental practitioners. We report the case of a patient who experienced barotrauma involving dislodgement of a provisional crown during scuba diving. Patients who are exposed to pressure changes as a part of their jobs or hobbies and their dentists should know the causes of barotrauma. In addition, the clinician must be aware of the possible influence of pressure changes on the retention of dental components. PMID:23984113

  18. Provisional hourly values of equatorial Dst for 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Poros, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    Tables and plots of provisional hourly values of the equatorial Dst index for 1971 are given, a table of daily mean Dst values for 1971 is also provided. The base line values for the four observatories, Hermanus, Kakioka, Honolulu, and San Juan, were obtained from extrapolations using the coefficients for the secular variations determined for the previous years. Examining the Dst values for quiet days, the base lines so determined appear to be slightly low, so that the Dst index for quiet periods tends to be high.

  19. Comparative evaluation of microleakage in Class II restorations using open vs. closed centripetal build-up techniques with different lining materials

    PubMed Central

    Sawani, Shefali; Arora, Vipin; Jaiswal, Shikha; Nikhil, Vineeta

    2014-01-01

    Background: Evaluation of microleakage is important for assessing the success of new restorative materials and methods. Aim and Objectives: Comparative evaluation of microleakage in Class II restorations using open vs. closed centripetal build-up techniques with different lining materials. Materials and Methods: Standardized mesi-occlusal (MO) and distoocclusal (DO) Class II tooth preparations were preparedon 53 molars and samples were randomly divided into six experimental groups and one control group for restorations. Group 1: Open-Sandwich technique (OST) with flowable composite at the gingival seat. Group 2: OST with resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) at the gingival seat. Group 3: Closed-Sandwich technique (CST) with flowable composite at the pulpal floor and axial wall. Group 4: CST with RMGIC at the pulpal floor and axial wall. Group 5: OST with flowable composite at the pulpal floor, axial wall, and gingival seat. Group 6: OST with RMGIC at the pulpal floor, axial wall, and gingival seat. Group 7: Control — no lining material, centripetal technique only. After restorations and thermocycling, apices were sealed and samples were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin dye. Sectioning was followed by stereomicroscopic evaluation. Results: Results were analyzed using Post Hoc Bonferroni test (statistics is not a form of tabulation). Cervical scores of control were more than the exprimental groups (P < 0.05). Less microleakage was observed in CST than OST in all experimental groups (P < 0.05). However, insignificant differences were observed among occlusal scores of different groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Class II composite restorations with centripetal build-up alone or when placed with CST reduces the cervical microleakage when compared to OST. PMID:25125847

  20. CAD/CAM-generated high-density polymer restorations for the pretreatment of complex cases: a case report.

    PubMed

    Edelhoff, Daniel; Beuer, Florian; Schweiger, Josef; Brix, Oliver; Stimmelmayr, Michael; Guth, Jan-Frederik

    2012-06-01

    Complex rehabilitations represent a particular challenge for the restorative team, especially if the vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) needs to be reconstructed or redefined. The use of provisional acrylic or composite materials allows clinicians to evaluate the treatment objective over a certain period of time and therefore generates a high predictability of the definitive rehabilitation in terms of esthetics and function. CAD/CAM technology enables the use of prefabricated polymer materials, which are fabricated under industrial conditions to form a highly homogeneous structure compared with those of direct fabrication. This increases long-term stability, biocompatibility, and resistance to wear. Furthermore, they offer more suitable CAD/CAM processing characteristics and can be used in thinner thicknesses than ceramic restorative materials. Also, based on the improved long-term stability, the transfer into the definitive restoration can be divided into multiple treatment steps. This article presents different clinical cases with minimally invasive indications for CAD/CAM-fabricated temporary restorations for the pretreatment of complex cases.

  1. Evaluation of the effect of tooth and dental restoration material on electron dose distribution and production of photon contamination in electron beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Akbari, Fatemeh; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Sobhkhiz Sabet, Leila

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of tooth and dental restoration materials on electron dose distribution and photon contamination production in electron beams of a medical linac. This evaluation was performed on 8, 12 and 14 MeV electron beams of a Siemens Primus linac. MCNPX Monte Carlo code was utilized and a 10 × 10 cm(2) applicator was simulated in the cases of tooth and combinations of tooth and Ceramco C3 ceramic veneer, tooth and Eclipse alloy and tooth and amalgam restoration materials in a soft tissue phantom. The relative electron and photon contamination doses were calculated for these materials. The presence of tooth and dental restoration material changed the electron dose distribution and photon contamination in phantom, depending on the type of the restoration material and electron beam's energy. The maximum relative electron dose was 1.07 in the presence of tooth including amalgam for 14 MeV electron beam. When 100.00 cGy was prescribed for the reference point, the maximum absolute electron dose was 105.10 cGy in the presence of amalgam for 12 MeV electron beam and the maximum absolute photon contamination dose was 376.67 μGy for tooth in 14 MeV electron beam. The change in electron dose distribution should be considered in treatment planning, when teeth are irradiated in electron beam radiotherapy. If treatment planning can be performed in such a way that the teeth are excluded from primary irradiation, the potential errors in dose delivery to the tumour and normal tissues can be avoided.

  2. Surface topography of composite restorative materials following ultrasonic scaling and its Impact on bacterial plaque accumulation. An in-vitro SEM study

    PubMed Central

    Hossam, A. Eid; Rafi, A. Togoo; Ahmed, A Saleh; Sumanth, Phani CR

    2013-01-01

    Background: This is an in vitro study to investigate the effects of ultrasonic scaling on the surface roughness and quantitative bacterial count on four different types of commonly used composite restorative materials for class V cavities. Materials & Methods: Nanofilled, hybrid, silorane and flowable composites were tested. Forty extracted teeth served as specimen and were divided into 4 groups of 10 specimens, with each group receiving a different treatment and were examined by a Field emission scanning electron microscope. Bacterial suspension was then added to the pellicle-coated specimens, and then bacterial adhesion was analyzed by using image analyzing program. Results: Flowable and silorane-based composites showed considerably smoother surfaces and lesser bacterial count in comparison to other types, proving that bacterial adhesion is directly proportional to surface roughness. Conclusion: The use of ultrasonic scalers affects the surfaces of composite restorative materials. Routine periodontal scaling should be carried out very carefully, and polishing of the scaled surfaces may overcome the alterations in roughness, thus preventing secondary caries, surface staining, plaque accumulation and subsequent periodontal inflammation. How to cite this article: Eid H A, Togoo R A, Saleh A A, Sumanth C R. Surface Topography of Composite Restorative Materials following Ultrasonic Scaling and its Impact on Bacterial Plaque Accumulation. An In-Vitro SEM Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(3):13-19. PMID:24155597

  3. Fracture toughness testing of visible light- and chemical-initiated provisional restoration resins.

    PubMed

    Gegauff, A G; Wilkerson, J J

    1995-01-01

    This in vitro study determined the fracture toughness of four classes of resin using wet and dry test environments, following 48 hours of wet storage. Two of the resins were light initiated, while the other two were chemically initiated. No significant difference in fracture toughness was detected for the wet and dry test environments using miniature compact tension specimens. The light-initiated, urethane dimethacrylate resin demonstrated a significantly higher fracture toughness than the poly(methyl methacrylate) resin.

  4. Evaluation of Flexural Strength of Thermocycled Interim Resin Materials Used in Prosthetic Rehabilitation- An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kadiyala, Krishna Kishore; Anne, Gopinadh; Anche, Sampath Chowdary; Chiramana, Sandeep; Muvva, Suresh Babu; Zakkula, Srujana; Jyothula, Ravi Rakesh Dev

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Provisional restoration is an analytical component of fixed prosthodontics serving as a ground plan for the design of fixed dental prosthesis. Flexural strength is critical in case of long standing fixed dental prosthesis, to appreciate success of full mouth rehabilitation cases and temporomandibular joint dysfunction therapies. Aim The present study was to evaluate the flexural strength of different provisional restorative resins used for prosthetic rehabilitation. Materials and Methods Forty identical samples (n=10 for each material) measuring 25mm×2mm×2mm according to ADA/ANSI specification no. 27 were fabricated using autopolymerizing Poly Methyl Methacrylate (PMMA) (Group A); heat activated PMMA (Group B); autopolymerizing Bis-GMA composite resin (Group C) and light activated Urethane Dimethacrylate Resin (UDMA) (Group D). For 14 days all these samples were stored in artificial saliva. Ten samples from each material were subjected to thermal cycling for 2500 cycles (5°C to 55°C). Later, a standard three point bending test was conducted on all the specimens with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.75mm/min. Statistical analysis used included Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Results The mean flexural strength of specimens confirmed higher flexural strength for Group C (102.98 Mpa) followed by Group B (91.86 Mpa), Group A (79.13 Mpa) and Group D (60.01 Mpa). There were significant differences between any two materials tested (p <0.05). Comparison between mean flexural strength values between four groups revealed significant difference between the interim materials (p <0.05). Conclusion The greatest flexural strength was observed for Bis-GMA composite resins followed by heat cure methacrylate resins, autopolymerizing methacrylate resins and was least for light cure resins. While fabricating provisional restorations, these greater values should be considered for better outcome of the treatment. PMID:27790588

  5. Provisional Admission Practices: Blending Access and Support to Facilitate Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Andrew Howard; Clinedinst, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This report examines provisional admission as an initiative that can expand four-year college access and success for students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Provisional admission policies and programs enable students to enroll at an institution under specific conditions. Students are often required to meet certain academic…

  6. 21 CFR 81.10 - Termination of provisional listings of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Termination of provisional listings of color additives. 81.10 Section 81.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... FOODS, DRUGS, AND COSMETICS § 81.10 Termination of provisional listings of color additives. (a) Ext....

  7. Provisional Assessment of Recent Studies on Health Effects of Particulate Matter Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the findings of EPA’s survey and provisional assessment of studies published since the completion of the 2009 PM ISA. EPA has screened and surveyed the recent literature and developed a provisional assessment that places those studies of potentially greatest ...

  8. 76 FR 55648 - Sunsations Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Sunsations Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order AGENCY: Consumer... settlements which it provisionally accepts under the Consumer Product Safety Act in the Federal Register...

  9. A Technique to Transfer the Emergence Profile Contours of a Provisional Implant Crown to the Definitive Impression.

    PubMed

    Shah, Karnik; Yilmaz, Burak

    2016-01-01

    This clinical report describes a method to create a proper emergence profile and accurately transfer it to the definitive impression, using an indirectly fabricated modified impression post. A provisional screwretained crown was indexed with a polyvinyl siloxane material. An autopolymerizing acrylic resin was used to modify an impression post on the polyvinyl siloxane index, which was then screwed onto the implant for the definitive impression after proper soft tissue healing. The indirectly fabricated modified impression post helped to transfer the contours to the definitive impression with minimal soft tissue irritation.

  10. The merits of artificial selection for the development of restoration-ready plant materials of native perennial grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While seed harvested from remnant stands of grass can be used for restoration in temperate regions, seed recovery in semi-arid and arid environments is often unreliable and of low yield and quality. In addition, ongoing harvest of indigenous populations can be unsustainable, especially for those th...

  11. Clinical Investigation of a New Bulk Fill Composite Resin in the Restoration of Posterior Teeth

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Dental Restoration Failure of Marginal Integrity; Dental Caries; Unrepairable Overhanging of Dental Restorative Materials; Poor Aesthetics of Existing Restoration; Secondary Dental Caries Associated With Failed or Defective Dental Restorations; Fractured Dental Restorative Materials Without Loss of Materials; Fracture of Dental Restorative Materials With Loss of Material

  12. River restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen; Angermeier, Paul L.; Bledsoe, Brian; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Macdonnell, Larry; Merritt, David M.; Palmer, Margaret A.; Poff, N. Leroy; Tarboton, David

    2005-10-01

    River restoration is at the forefront of applied hydrologic science. However, many river restoration projects are conducted with minimal scientific context. We propose two themes around which a research agenda to advance the scientific basis for river restoration can be built. First, because natural variability is an inherent feature of all river systems, we hypothesize that restoration of process is more likely to succeed than restoration aimed at a fixed end point. Second, because physical, chemical, and biological processes are interconnected in complex ways across watersheds and across timescales, we hypothesize that restoration projects are more likely to be successful in achieving goals if undertaken in the context of entire watersheds. To achieve restoration objectives, the science of river restoration must include (1) an explicit recognition of the known complexities and uncertainties, (2) continued development of a theoretical framework that enables us to identify generalities among river systems and to ask relevant questions, (3) enhancing the science and use of restoration monitoring by measuring the most effective set of variables at the correct scales of measurement, (4) linking science and implementation, and (5) developing methods of restoration that are effective within existing constraints. Key limitations to river restoration include a lack of scientific knowledge of watershed-scale process dynamics, institutional structures that are poorly suited to large-scale adaptive management, and a lack of political support to reestablish delivery of the ecosystem amenities lost through river degradation. This paper outlines an approach for addressing these shortcomings.

  13. Influence of carbamide peroxide on the flexural strength of tooth-colored restorative materials: an in vitro study at different environmental temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Li, Qing; Lin, Yao; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Wang, Yining

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated the influence of carbamide peroxide on the flexural strength of tooth-colored restorative materials at two environmental temperatures. Seven restorative materials were used, including four resin composites (Filtek Z350, Filtek Z250, Synergy Flow and Filtek P60), a polyacid-modified composite (Dyract AP), a conventional glass-ionomer cement (Ketac Molar Easymix) and a ceramic (Vitablocs Mark II). For each type of material, 80 bar-shaped specimens were fabricated and divided into four groups (n = 20): bleaching group at 25 degrees C, control group at 25 degrees C, bleaching group at 37 degrees C and control group at 37 degrees C. The specimens in the bleaching groups were treated with 10% carbamide peroxide gel for eight hours/day, while the control specimens in their respective groups were stored in deionized water. After 14-day treatment, the flexural strength of the specimens was determined using a universal testing machine. All the results were analyzed with ANOVA and the Tukey's post-hoc test. The data were also submitted to Weibull distribution. The flexural strength and its Weibull distribution of polyacid-modified composite and glass-ionomer cement were more seriously affected by bleaching agents than the resin composite and ceramic, especially at the higher environmental temperature.

  14. Comparative evaluation of surface properties of enamel and different esthetic restorative materials under erosive and abrasive challenges: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Simranjeet; Makkar, Sameer; Kumar, Rajneesh; Pasricha, Shinam; Gupta, Pranav

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Noncarious tooth surface loss is a normal physiological process occurring throughout the life, but it can often become a problem affecting function, esthetics or cause pain. Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of erosive and abrasive challenges on the surface microhardness and surface wear of enamel and three different restorative materials, that is, nanofilled composite, microfilled composite and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) by using Vickers microhardness tester and profilometer respectively. Subjects and Methods: Nanofilled composite (Filtek™ Z350 × T), microfilled composite (Heliomolar®) and RMGIC (Fuji II LC) were used in the study. Results: Nanofilled composite resin has the best resistance to erosion and/or abrasion among all the materials tested, followed by microfilled composite and RMGIC respectively. Conclusion: Toothbrush abrasion has a synergistic effect with erosion on substance loss of human enamel, composites, and RMGIC. The susceptibility to acid and/or toothbrush abrasion of human enamel was higher compared to restorative materials. PMID:26752876

  15. A Provisional Gene Regulatory Atlas for Mouse Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hailin; VanBuren, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) is one of the most common birth defects. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying normal cardiac development is an important step towards early identification of abnormalities during the developmental program and towards the creation of early intervention strategies. We developed a novel computational strategy for leveraging high-content data sets, including a large selection of microarray data associated with mouse cardiac development, mouse genome sequence, ChIP-seq data of selected mouse transcription factors and Y2H data of mouse protein-protein interactions, to infer the active transcriptional regulatory network of mouse cardiac development. We identified phase-specific expression activity for 765 overlapping gene co-expression modules that were defined for obtained cardiac lineage microarray data. For each co-expression module, we identified the phase of cardiac development where gene expression for that module was higher than other phases. Co-expression modules were found to be consistent with biological pathway knowledge in Wikipathways, and met expectations for enrichment of pathways involved in heart lineage development. Over 359,000 transcription factor-target relationships were inferred by analyzing the promoter sequences within each gene module for overrepresentation against the JASPAR database of Transcription Factor Binding Site (TFBS) motifs. The provisional regulatory network will provide a framework of studying the genetic basis of CHD. PMID:24421884

  16. Provisional tables on the zinc content of foods.

    PubMed

    Murphy, E W; Willis, B W; Watt, B K

    1975-04-01

    A critical and exhaustive review of published and unpublished data on the zinc content of foods showed that, with few exceptions, the major dietary sources of zinc were foods of animal origin. Oysters, which contained more than 5 mg. zinc per 3-oz. cooked portion, were an outstanding source of zinc. Lean beef and beef liver were also among the foods highest in zinc and ground beef was a good source. Dark meat of poultry contained more zinc than light meat, and turkey was higher in zinc than chicken. Egg yolk, but not egg white, was relatively high in zinc, as were nonfat dry milk and Cheddar cheese. Foods of plant origin, like those of animal origin, varied widely in zinc content. Cocoa and the milling fractions of bran and germ of wheat were high in zinc. Seeds of plants, such as muture dry legumes and peanuts, were better sources of zinc than were leaves, stalks, fruits, or roots. Vegetables, fruits, oils, fats, tea, coffee, and carbonated beverages contained little zinc. Factors influencing the zinc content of foods were evaluated. Provisional tables, giving representative values for zinc in more than two hundred foods, both in 100-gm. portions and in common household units, based on this research, are presented.

  17. Comparison of marginal adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate, glass ionomer cement and intermediate restorative material as root-end filling materials, using scanning electron microscope: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Gundam, Sirisha; Patil, Jayaprakash; Venigalla, Bhuvan Shome; Yadanaparti, Sravanthi; Maddu, Radhika; Gurram, Sindhura Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The present study compares the marginal adaption of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA), Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM) as root-end filling materials in extracted human teeth using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods: Thirty single rooted human teeth were obturated with Gutta-percha after cleaning and shaping. Apical 3 mm of roots were resected and retrofilled with MTA, GIC and IRM. One millimeter transverse section of the retrofilled area was used to study the marginal adaptation of the restorative material with the dentin. Mounted specimens were examined using SEM at approximately 15 Kv and 10-6 Torr under high vacuum condition. At 2000 X magnification, the gap size at the material-tooth interface was recorded at 2 points in microns. Statistical Analysis: One way ANOVA Analysis of the data from the experimental group was carried out with gap size as the dependent variable, and material as independent variable. Results: The lowest mean value of gap size was recorded in MTA group (0.722 ± 0.438 μm) and the largest mean gap in GIC group (1.778 ± 0.697 μm). Conclusion: MTA showed least gap size when compared to IRM and GIC suggesting a better marginal adaptation. PMID:25506146

  18. 20 CFR 416.999c - How do we determine provisional benefits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Continuing Or Stopping Disability Or Blindness § 416.999c How do we determine provisional benefits? (a) You may receive up to...

  19. 20 CFR 416.999c - How do we determine provisional benefits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Continuing Or Stopping Disability Or Blindness § 416.999c How do we determine provisional benefits? (a) You may receive up to...

  20. 20 CFR 416.999c - How do we determine provisional benefits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Continuing Or Stopping Disability Or Blindness § 416.999c How do we determine provisional benefits? (a) You may receive up to...

  1. 20 CFR 416.999c - How do we determine provisional benefits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Continuing Or Stopping Disability Or Blindness § 416.999c How do we determine provisional benefits? (a) You may receive up to...

  2. 20 CFR 416.999c - How do we determine provisional benefits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Continuing Or Stopping Disability Or Blindness § 416.999c How do we determine provisional benefits? (a) You may receive up to...

  3. LADTAG Progress 2010 and Plans for 2011 and Provisional PELs from Lavage and Blood Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Assessment Group (LADTAG) plans and progress for 2010 and 2011. Provisional Permissible Exposure Limits (PPELs) from lavage fluid and blood data are also presented.

  4. 77 FR 44593 - Burlington Coat Factory Warehouse Corporation, Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... COMMISSION Burlington Coat Factory Warehouse Corporation, Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement... accepted Settlement Agreement with Burlington Coat Factory Warehouse Corporation, containing a civil... Factory Warehouse Corporation CPSC Docket No. 12-C0008 Settlement Agreement 1. In accordance with...

  5. Provisional hourly values of equatorial Dst for January to June 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Poros, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    Provisional hourly values of equatorial atmospheric radiation conditions for the period January to June 1972 were obtained. The data are presented in numerical tables with graphical presentation of the digital data included.

  6. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen.

  7. Health-based Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs) for Homeland Security

    SciTech Connect

    Adeshina, Femi; Sonich-Mullin, Synthia; Wood, Carol S

    2009-01-01

    In compliance with Homeland Security Presidential Directive No.8, the US EPA National Homeland Security Research Center, in collaboration with the Department of Energy, is developing health-based Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs) for priority toxic industrial chemicals, pesticides, and chemical warfare agents in air and drinking water. The PALs Program will provide exposure levels to assist emergency response decision-making, and to serve as criteria for determining re-use and re-entry into affected areas resulting from transport/storage accidents, natural disasters, and subversive activities. PALs are applicable at federal, state, and local levels, and are intended for use in homeland security efforts, public health, law enforcement, and emergency response, as well as decisions by water utilities, and national and regional EPA offices. PALS have not been promulgated nor have they been formally issued as regulatory guidance. They are intended to be used at the discretion of risk managers in emergency situations when site specific risk assessments are not available. Three levels (PAL 1, PAL 2, and PAL 3), distinguished by severity of toxic effects, are developed for 24-hour, 30-day, 90-day, and 2-year durations of potential drinking water and inhalation exposures for the general public. Draft PALs are evaluated both by an EPA working group, and an external multidisciplinary panel to ensure scientific credibility and wide acceptance. In this issue, we present background information on the PAL program, the methodology used in deriving PALs, and the technical support documents for the derivation of PALs for acrylonitrile, phosgene, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen sulfide.

  8. Estimating provisional acceptable residues for extralabel drug use in livestock.

    PubMed

    Baynes, R E; Martín-Jiménez, T; Craigmill, A L; Riviere, J E

    1999-06-01

    In 1996, the United States Congress passed legislation (Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification Act, AMDUCA), which allows some veterinary or human drugs to be used off label in food-producing animals. In order to implement this Act and protect the U.S. consumer, tolerances or safe concentrations are required before a withdrawal time can be estimated for extralabel drug use. Use of foreign MRLs to satisfy these data needs may not be applicable because of differences in safety standards between the U.S. and other countries. This paper presents strategies that can be used to derive equivalent safe concentrations, referred to as provisional acceptable residues (PARs), that may then be used to estimate drug withdrawal times. Health-based methods are proposed for calculating a PAR for a tissue. Procedure A partitions 50% of the acceptable daily intake (ADI) to edible tissues and reserves the remainder for milk. Procedure B equally partitions the ADI into all edible tissues. Procedure C partitions 50% of the ADI to milk and equally partitions the remaining 50% ADI into edible tissues. Simulations were performed for florfenicol, tetracycline, dexamethasone, azaperone, ivermectin, eprinomectin, and doramectin. In general, these simulations resulted in derivation of conservative PARs, which did not result in daily intakes of residues greater than the health-based ADI. These simulations demonstrated that provided the safe concentrations or equivalent PARs are based on rigorous toxicology safety data (e.g., NOELs, ADIs), the safety of food animal products will not be compromised. It is proposed that these PARs can be used for estimating withdrawal times after extralabel drug use or inadvertent exposure to an environmental contaminant where no approved withdrawal time exists. Finally, implementing similar transparent methods could have a positive impact on international harmonization and trade.

  9. Health-based Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs) for homeland security.

    PubMed

    Adeshina, Femi; Sonich-Mullin, Cynthia; Ross, Robert H; Wood, Carol S

    2009-12-01

    The Homeland Security Presidential Directive #8 (HSPD-8) for National Emergency Preparedness was issued to " establish policies to strengthen the preparedness of the United States to prevent and respond to threatened or actual domestic terrorist attacks, major disasters, and other emergencies by requiring a national domestic all- hazards preparedness goal. "In response to HSPD-8 and HSPD-22 (classified) on Domestic Chemical Defense, the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC) is developing health-based Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs) for priority chemicals (including chemical warfare agents, pesticides, and toxic industrial chemicals) in air and drinking water. PALs are temporary values that will neither be promulgated, nor be formally issued as regulatory guidance. They are intended to be used at the discretion of risk managers in emergency situations. The PAL Program provides advisory exposure levels for chemical agents to assist in emergency planning and response decision-making, and to aid in making informed risk management decisions for evacuation, temporary re-entry into affected areas, and resumed-use of infrastructure, such as water resources. These risk management decisions may be made at the federal, state, and local levels. Three exposure levels (PAL 1, PAL 2, and PAL 3), distinguished by severity of toxic effects, are developed for 24-hour, 30-day, 90-day, and 2-year durations for potential exposure to drinking water and ambient air by the general public. Developed PALs are evaluated both by a US EPA working group, and an external multidisciplinary panel to ensure scientific credibility and wide acceptance. In this Special Issue publication, we present background information on the PAL program, the methodology used in deriving PALs, and the technical support documents for the derivation of PALs for acrylonitrile, hydrogen sulfide, and phosgene.

  10. To Analyse the Erosive Potential of Commercially Available Drinks on Dental Enamel and Various Tooth Coloured Restorative Materials – An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Ritu; Mahajan, Sandeep; Sandhu, Sanam; Sharma, Sunila; Kaur, Rajwinder

    2016-01-01

    Introduction With the enormous change in life style pattern of a common man through the past few decades, there has been proportional variation in the amount and frequency of consumption of drinks. An increased consumption of these drinks will concurrently increase enamel surface roughness by demineralization, resulting in hypersensitivity and elevated caries risk. Aim The present study was designed to evaluate the erosive potential of commercially available drinks on tooth enamel and various tooth coloured restorative materials. Materials and Methods Extracted human teeth were taken and divided into four groups i.e. tooth enamel, glass ionomer cement, composite and compomer. Four commercially available drinks were chosen these were Coca -Cola, Nimbooz, Frooti and Yakult. The pH of each drink was measured. Each group was immersed in various experimental drinks for a period of 14 days. The erosive potential of each drink was measured by calculating the change in average surface roughness of these groups after the immersion protocol in various drinks. The data analysis was done by One Way Anova, Post-Hoc Bonferroni, and paired t –test. Results Group II-GIC showed highest values for mean of change in average surface roughness and the values were statistically significant (p<0.001) with tooth enamel, composite and compomer (p=0.002). Coca-cola showed the highest erosive potential and Yakult showed the lowest, there was no statistical significant difference between the results shown by Yakult and Frooti. Conclusion Characteristics which may promote erosion of enamel and tooth coloured restorative materials were surface texture of the material and pH of the drinks. PMID:27437343

  11. The effect of flowable materials on the microleakage of Class II composite restorations that extend apical to the cemento-enamel junction.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mostafa; Lynch, Christopher D

    2009-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the effects of a thin layer of flowable composite or compomer on microleakage occurring in Class II packable and nanofilled composite restorations that extend apical to the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). The current study also investigated any differences in microleakage that occur between restorations light-cured using a light-emitting diode (LED) and a quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light-curing unit. Standardized Class II "slot" cavity preparations were prepared on the mesial and distal surfaces of 72 extracted, unrestored, non-carious premolars (n = 144). The gingival margins were placed 1 mm apical to the CEJ. The teeth were divided into two groups (n = 72) and restored with a "packable composite" (Filtek P60) or a "nano-filled composite" (Universal Filtek Supreme XT) with or without flowable composite (Flowable Filtek Supreme XT) or flowable composite (Dyract Flow) as gingival liners placed with thicknesses of 1.0 mm. Each increment was cured for 20 seconds before adding the next. One-half of the samples in each group was cured with QTH (Coltolux 75) and the other half with LED (Coltolux LED) LCUs. After a two-week incubation period at 37 degrees C, the specimens were thermocycled (5 degrees C-55 degrees C x 1500), immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours, sectioned and the microleakage was then evaluated at the gingival margin by two examiners using a 0-3 score scale. Within the current study, when flowable liners were used, both the packable (Filtek P60) and nanofilled (Filtek Supreme XT Universal Restorative) composite materials had significantly less microleakage than when flowable liners were not used (p < 0.05). Both flowable liners (Flowable Filtek Supreme XT and Dyract Flow) resulted in a significant reduction of the microleakage occurring under both types of composite materials at the gingival floors ( p < 0.05), but there was no significant difference between them. The choice of light curing technology (LED vs

  12. Effect of exposure time on the color stability of resin-based restorative materials when polymerized with quartz-tungsten halogen and LED light.

    PubMed

    Rüttermann, Stefan; Suyoun, Kim; Raab, Wolfgang H-M; Janda, Ralf

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of exposure time on color stability of resin-based restorative materials when polymerized with quartz-tungsten halogen light (QTH) or light-emitting diode light (LED). Eight samples of Ceram-X Mono, Dyract eXtra, and Tetric EvoCeram each were cured for 10, 20, and 60 s with QTH or LED. The CIE-Lab values (L*, a*, b*) were measured prior to and after performing water storage or a Suntest, and ΔL, Δa, Δb, and ΔE were calculated. Statistical analysis (p < 0.05) showed significant changes of the color values after each of the aging processes as well as between ΔL, Δa, Δb, and ΔE of the materials in dependence of the curing device, exposure time, aging condition, and material formulation. LED performed similarly or even better with 10-s exposure time than QTH with 20 s. No improvement of color stability was achieved with increasing exposure time of 60 s either for LED or for QTH. Exposure time, emission spectrum of the light-curing device, as well as the individual material formulation influence color stability. There is apparently an exposure time above which the individual material formulation, especially type and amount of photoinitiator or synergist, dominate the color stability.

  13. A finite element study of teeth restored with post and core: Effect of design, material, and ferrule

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Viram; Bhargava, Akshay; Parkash, Hari; Chittaranjan, B.; Kumar, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different postdesigns and materials are available; however, no consensus exists regarding superiority for stress distribution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of design and material of post with or without ferrule on stress distribution using finite element analysis. Materials and Methods: A total of 12 three-dimensional (3D) axisymmetric models of postretained central incisors were made: Six with ferrule design and six without it. Three of these six models had tapered posts, and three had parallel posts. The materials tested were titanium post with a composite resin core, nickel chromium cast post and core, and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) post with a composite resin core. The stress analysis was done using ANSYS software. The load of 100 N at an angle of 45΀ was applied 2 mm cervical to incisal edge on the palatal surface and results were analyzed using 3D von Mises criteria. Results: The highest amount of stress was in the cervical region. Overall, the stress in the tapered postsystem was more than the parallel one. FRC post and composite resin core recorded minimal stresses within the post but the stresses transmitted to cervical dentin were more as compared to other systems. Minimal stresses in cervical dentine were observed where the remaining coronal dentin was strengthen by ferrule. Conclusion: A rigid material with high modulus of elasticity for post and core system creates most uniform stress distribution pattern. Ferrule provides uniform distribution of stresses and decreases the cervical stresses. PMID:27274343

  14. The influence of the lining material on the repair of the infected dentin in young permanent molars after restoration: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Eunice; Reis, Alessandra; Chibinski, Ana Claudia Rodrigues; Wambier, Denise Stadler

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated the impact of liner material on the fluorescence, morphological and mineral characteristics of permanent carious dentin after cavity sealing. Methods: Thirty children (11.0 ± 2.7 years old) presenting at least one active deep carious lesion in permanent molars were selected. Fragments of carious dentin were removed from teeth before lining the cavity (baseline samples) with high-viscosity glass ionomer cement (G1) or an inert material (wax - G2). Cavities were restored with composite resin and reopened 60 days later, and other fragments were removed (60-day sample). The laser fluorescence (LF) readings and morphological and mineral changes of both groups were compared. Results: After 60 days, forty teeth were available for evaluation. Lower LF means were obtained (Wilcoxon signed-rank test; P < 0.05), and enhanced calcium and phosphorus levels were detected for both groups (t-test, P < 0.05). An uptake of fluorine was observed only in G1 (t-test; P < 0.05). Regardless of the group, baseline samples exhibited clear signs of bacterial invasion, and the collagen fibers were exposed; the 60-day samples showed a better-organized tissue with a more compact intertubular dentin. Conclusion: Caries arrestment with dentin reorganization occurs regardless of the lining material placed in contact with the infected dentin. PMID:27994311

  15. Effects of various chair-side surface treatment methods on dental restorative materials with respect to contact angles and surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Sturz, Candida R C; Faber, Franz-Josef; Scheer, Martin; Rothamel, Daniel; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Available chair-side surface treatment methods may adversely affect prosthetic materials and promote plaque accumulation. This study investigated the effects of treatment procedures on three resin restorative materials, zirconium-dioxide and polyetheretherketone in terms of surface roughness and hydrophobicity. Treatments were grinding with silicon carbide paper or white Arkansas stone, blasting with prophylaxis powder and polishing with diamond paste. Surface roughness was assessed using confocal laser scanning. Hydrophobicity as measured by water contact angle was determined by computerized image analysis using the sessile drop technique. All of the specific surface treatments performed led to significant changes in contact angle values and surface roughness (Ra) values. Median contact angle values ranged from 51.6° to 114°. Ra values ranged from 0.008 µm to 2.917 µm. Air-polishing as well as other polishing procedures increased surface roughness values in all materials except zirconium dioxide. Polyetheretherketone displayed greatest change in contact angle values after air-polishing treatment.

  16. Longevity of Posterior Composite Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Opdam, N.J.M.; van de Sande, F.H.; Bronkhorst, E.; Cenci, M.S.; Bottenberg, P.; Pallesen, U.; Gaengler, P.; Lindberg, A.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; van Dijken, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis, based on individual participant data from several studies, was to investigate the influence of patient-, materials-, and tooth-related variables on the survival of posterior resin composite restorations. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we conducted a search resulting in 12 longitudinal studies of direct posterior resin composite restorations with at least 5 years’ follow-up. Original datasets were still available, including placement/failure/censoring of restorations, restored surfaces, materials used, reasons for clinical failure, and caries-risk status. A database including all restorations was constructed, and a multivariate Cox regression method was used to analyze variables of interest [patient (age; gender; caries-risk status), jaw (upper; lower), number of restored surfaces, resin composite and adhesive materials, and use of glass-ionomer cement as base/liner (present or absent)]. The hazard ratios with respective 95% confidence intervals were determined, and annual failure rates were calculated for subgroups. Of all restorations, 2,816 (2,585 Class II and 231 Class I) were included in the analysis, of which 569 failed during the observation period. Main reasons for failure were caries and fracture. The regression analyses showed a significantly higher risk of failure for restorations in high-caries-risk individuals and those with a higher number of restored surfaces. PMID:25048250

  17. Polymer-based material containing calcium phosphate particles functionalized with a dimethacrylate monomer for use in restorative dentistry.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marcela C; Xavier, Tathy A; Arana-Chavez, Victor E; Braga, Roberto R

    2016-11-23

    Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate particles functionalized with triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate were synthesized and added to a photocurable mixture of bisphenol-A glycidyl dimethacrylate and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate with the purpose of developing a resin composite capable of releasing calcium and phosphate ions to foster dental remineralization. Particle functionalization would minimize the deleterious effect of adding low cohesive strength nano-structured particles with no chemical interaction with the organic matrix on the material's mechanical properties. The results showed that calcium release over 28 days was not impaired by particle functionalization. A statistically significant 32% increase in strength was recorded with the use of functionalized dicalcium phosphate dihydrate in comparison to the material containing non-functionalized particles. However, the strength of the unfilled resin was not matched by the composite with functionalized particles. Elastic modulus increased with particle incorporation, regardless of functionalization. Degree of conversion and optical properties (total transmittance and color change/ΔE) of the resin-based materials were not affected by the addition of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate particles (functionalized or not).

  18. Restorative Nurse Assistant. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum material covers the basic orientation and necessary skills which would enable the practicing Certified Nurse Assistant to be trained as a Restorative Nurse Assistant. The shift in emphasis from maintenance care to restorative care in the long-term care setting has created a need for trained paraprofessionals who are competent in…

  19. A Comparative Evaluation of the Amount of Fluoride Release and Re-Release after Recharging from Aesthetic Restorative Materials: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ruchika

    2015-01-01

    Aim To measure the amount of fluoride released and re released after recharging from various restorative materials: Conventional Glass Ionomer Cement (Fuji II), Light Cure Resin Modified GIC (Fuji II LC), Giomer (Beautifil II), Compomer (Dyract). Materials and Methods Fifteen cylindrical specimens were prepared from each material. The specimens were immersed in 20 ml of deionized water. The amount of released fluoride was measured during the 1st day, 7th day and on the day15 by using specific fluoride electrode and an ion-analyser. After 15 days each material was divided into three Sub Groups of five samples each. Sub Group A served as control, Sub Group B was exposed to 2% NaF solution, Sub Group C to 1000ppm F toothpaste. The amount of fluoride re-released was measured during the 1st day, 7th day and on the day15 by using specific fluoride electrode and an ion-analyser. The results were statistically analysed using analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA) and Tukey Kramer multiple comparison tests (p≤0.05). Results Independent of the observation time period of the study the Conventional GIC released the highest amount of fluoride followed by RMGIC, Giomer and Compomer. The initial burst effect was seen with GIC’S but not with Giomer and Compomer. After topical fluoride application fluoride re release was highest in Sub Group B and GIC had a greater recharging ability followed by RMGIC, Giomer and Compomer. The fluoride re release was greatest on 1st day followed by rapid return to near exposure levels. Conclusion From the study it was concluded that, the initial Fluoride release was highest from Conventional GIC followed by Resin Modified GIC, Giomer and Compomer. The Fluoride re release was high when recharging with professional regime (2% NaF) as compared to home regime (Toothpaste). Conventional GIC had a greater recharging ability followed by Resin Modified GIC, Giomer and Compomer. PMID:26436037

  20. 75 FR 14144 - Availability for Non-Exclusive, Exclusive, or Partially Exclusive Licensing of U.S. Provisional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... invention. ADDRESSES: Commander, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, ATTN: Command Judge.... Provisional Patent Application Concerning Medical Delivery System AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION.... Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 61/ ] 312,908 entitled ``Medical Delivery System,'' filed March...

  1. Esthetic and function rehabilitation of severely worn dentition with prosthetic-restorative approach and VDO increase. Case report

    PubMed Central

    GARGARI, M.; LORÈ, B.; CERUSO, F.M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective. The aim of this study is to report a case of restorative treatment of severely worn dentition. In this case report, the erosive/abrasive worn dentition have been reconstructed with metal ceramic crown on the posterior teeth and with ceramic veneers on the anterior teeth 1.3 – 2.3 and 3.4 – 4.3. Methods. A prosthetic treatment was proposed to a male patient of 58 years old having a clinically significant tooth wear. After clinical exam, impressions of maxillary and mandible arches were taken with alginate to obtain preliminary casts for diagnostic waxing to all maxillary and mandibular teeth and fabrication of all provisional crowns in acrylic resin for posterior teeth, and from the diagnostic wax-up were fabricated a silicone guide masks for anterior teeth. An increase in VDO should be determined on the basis of a need to accomplish satisfactory and aesthetically pleasing restorations; it was proposed to increase the incisal lenght of the maxillary anterior incisors, together with alteration of the VDO 3 mm anteriorly. The posterior teeth 1.6 - 1.5 - 1.4 - 2.4 - 2.6 - 3.5 - 3.6 - 3.7 - 4.4 - 4.7, where the amount of tissue lost was greater, were recontructed with metal ceramic crowns. Two implants (Nobel replace 4.3x10) was placed. The implant were located in the area 4.5 – 4.6. The anterior teeth were restored with veneers. Discussion and results. The prosthetic challenge with restoring severely worn dentitions is to preserve as much of the already diminished tooth structure as possible for retention while also providing enough interocclusal space for the restorative material. PMID:25694800

  2. Presentation of two cases of immediate restoration of implants in the esthetic region, using facilitate software and guides with stereolithographic model surgery prior to patient surgery.

    PubMed

    Kamposiora, Phophi; Papavasiliou, George; Madianos, Phoebous

    2012-02-01

    Improvements in both implant microsurfaces and placement techniques have reduced healing time and increased survival rates. CAD/CAM technology and improved ceramic materials allow for achievement of improved esthetics at the implant restoration level. Two clinical procedures have the capacity to decrease patient postoperative discomfort and improve esthetics. Flapless surgery reduces surgical trauma and postoperative problems. Placement of the final prosthetic abutment at the time of implant placement stabilizes soft tissue adhesion and position to the implant. Both results require careful presurgical planning with precise implant and abutment placement. This is a clinical report of two cases that are part of a larger ongoing clinical trial of 20 patients. The inclusion criterion was that patients should be missing a single tooth in the esthetic zone. Facilitate™ software was used in conjunction with dicom files transferred from CT scans for diagnosis. Stereolithographic models and surgical guides were fabricated from the digital information. Surgical guides were used preoperatively so implant replicas could be placed in stereolithographic models as simulated surgery. A ZirDesign™ ceramic abutment was adapted on the model, and a provisional crown was fabricated. At the time of actual implant surgery, the same surgical guide was used with a flapless approach. The previously modified ceramic abutment was screw-retained and torqued to place into the implant. The provisional crown was then cemented after blocking out the screw access hole. A final restoration was fabricated from all-ceramic material after several months. Success requires careful patient selection and attention to each step of the technique. Preliminary outcomes from the ongoing clinical trial are promising.

  3. Use of resin-bonded partial coverage ceramic restorations to treat incomplete fractures in posterior teeth: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Liebenberg, W H

    1996-11-01

    The objective of restorative treatment of teeth with incomplete fractures is to minimize flexure of the compromised cusps to prevent propagation of the crack. These goals can be addressed with resin-bonded posterior ceramic restorations, but long-term integrity rests on the efficiency of the restoration's bond to the dental hard tissues. Success is dependent on diligent operative performance throughout the entire procedure. Some tips for achieving successful preparation, provisionalization, and partial-coverage restoration of the incompletely fractured posterior tooth are discussed.

  4. Natural restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Kamlet, K.S.

    1993-02-01

    After a company pays millions of dollars to clean up contaminated site, its liability may not be over. It may have to spend tens of millions more to restore damaged natural resources under an oft-overlooked Superfund program. Examples of liability are cited in this report from the Exxon Valdez oil spill and a pcb leak which contaminated a harbor.

  5. 75 FR 1356 - RC2 Corporation, Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... nationwide, and secondarily through RC2's e-commerce websites or as `sub-components' of retail items... through RC2's e-commerce Web sites or as `sub-components' of retail items distributed independently of RC2... accordance with the terms of 16 CFR 1118.20(e). Published below is a provisionally-accepted...

  6. 75 FR 76405 - Winter Bee, Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... COMMISSION Winter Bee, Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order AGENCY: Consumer... Agreement with Winter Bee, Inc., containing a civil penalty of $200,000.00, to be suspended except for $40.... Settlement Agreement 1. In accordance with 16 CFR 1118.20, Winter Bee, Inc. (``Winter Bee'') and the...

  7. [Virus Manombo (Mg Ar 966), a provisionally new arbovirus isolated from Culicidae in Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Morvan, J; Fontenille, D; Digoutte, J P; Rakotoarivony, I; Coulanges, P

    1991-01-01

    In April 1987, a virus strain was isolated from a pool of Mansonia uniformis caught on human bait, in a tropical primary rain forest area of the South-East coast of Madagascar. Antigenically, this virus may not be related to other known viruses, and constitutes a provisionally new Arbovirus called virus Manombo.

  8. 76 FR 6453 - Raynor Marketing, Ltd., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-04

    ...: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: It is the policy of the Commission to publish settlements which it provisionally accepts under the Consumer Product Safety Act in the Federal Register in... create an unreasonable risk of serious injury or death, and denies that it violated the...

  9. 76 FR 41487 - Macy's, Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: It is the policy of the Commission to publish settlements which it provisionally accepts under the Consumer Product Safety Act in the Federal Register in... agrees that it will not seek or accept, directly or indirectly, indemnification, reimbursement,...

  10. 75 FR 26939 - Target Corporation: Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: It is the policy of the Commission to publish settlements which it provisionally accepts under the Consumer Product Safety Act in the Federal Register in..., 2006, Target submitted a Full Report to CPSC containing information that it had commissioned...

  11. 76 FR 63906 - Henry Gordy International, Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ...: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: It is the policy of the Commission to publish settlements which it provisionally accepts under the Consumer Product Safety Act in the Federal Register in... their mouth, the dart can be inhaled into the throat and it can prevent the child from breathing....

  12. 77 FR 63801 - Aqua-Leisure Industries, Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ...: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: It is the policy of the Commission to publish settlements which it provisionally accepts under the Consumer Product Safety Act in the Federal Register in... filed a Supplemental Full Report in which it reported that the Firm had received at least 28...

  13. 77 FR 4023 - Hewlett-Packard Company, Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ...: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: It is the policy of the Commission to publish settlements which it provisionally accepts under the Consumer Product Safety Act in the Federal Register in.... Between March 2007 and April 2007, HP conducted a study, from which it obtained additional...

  14. 76 FR 49751 - Perfect Fitness, Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ... Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: It is the policy of the Commission to publish settlements which it provisionally accepts under the Consumer Product Safety Act in the Federal Register in... death, and denies that it knowingly violated the reporting requirements of Section 15(b) of the CPSA,...

  15. 76 FR 49453 - CVS Pharmacy, Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: It is the policy of the Commission to publish settlements which it provisionally accepts under the Consumer Product Safety Act in the Federal Register in... knowingly violated the CPSA and asserts that at the time it sold the Jackets, CVS did not have...

  16. 78 FR 27190 - Williams-Sonoma, Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: It is the policy of the Commission to publish settlements which it provisionally accepts under the Consumer Product Safety Act in the Federal Register in..., where it was hidden from view, there sometimes was no outward indication to consumers that the wood...

  17. Radiation safety of crew and passengers of air transportation in civil aviation. Provisional standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aksenov, A. F.; Burnazyan, A. I.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose and application of the provisional standards for radiation safety of crew and passengers in civil aviation are given. The radiation effect of cosmic radiation in flight on civil aviation air transport is described. Standard levels of radiation and conditions of radiation safety are discussed.

  18. 76 FR 37793 - Viking Range Corporation, Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... COMMISSION Viking Range Corporation, Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order AGENCY... Agreement with Viking Range Corporation, containing a civil penalty of $450,000.00. DATES: Any interested... 1. In accordance with 16 CFR 1118.20, Viking Range Corporation (``Viking'') and the staff...

  19. 14 CFR 91.317 - Provisionally certificated civil aircraft: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Provisionally certificated civil aircraft: Operating limitations. 91.317 Section 91.317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Special Flight Operations §...

  20. Student Financial Aid, Academic Year 2011-12. First Look. (Provisional Data). NCES 2013-178

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginder, Scott A.; Kelly-Reid, Janice E.

    2013-01-01

    The Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) collects institution-level data from postsecondary institutions in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia) and other U.S. jurisdictions (see appendix A for a list of other U.S. jurisdictions). This "First Look" presents findings from the provisional data of the…

  1. 10 CFR 903.21 - Completion of rate development; provisional rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 903.21 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY POWER AND TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and Transmission Rate Adjustments and Extensions for the Alaska, Southeastern, Southwestern, and Western Area Power Administrations § 903.21 Completion of rate development; provisional...

  2. 78 FR 535 - Provisional Unlawful Presence Waivers of Inadmissibility for Certain Immediate Relatives

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-03

    ...On April 2, 2012, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) published a proposed rule to amend its regulations to allow certain immediate relatives of U.S. citizens who are physically present in the United States to request provisional unlawful presence waivers prior to departing from the United States for consular processing of their immigrant visa applications. This final rule......

  3. 10 CFR 903.21 - Completion of rate development; provisional rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Completion of rate development; provisional rates. 903.21 Section 903.21 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY POWER AND TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and Transmission Rate Adjustments and Extensions for the Alaska,...

  4. 10 CFR 903.21 - Completion of rate development; provisional rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Completion of rate development; provisional rates. 903.21 Section 903.21 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY POWER AND TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and Transmission Rate Adjustments and Extensions for the Alaska,...

  5. 10 CFR 903.21 - Completion of rate development; provisional rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Completion of rate development; provisional rates. 903.21 Section 903.21 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY POWER AND TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and Transmission Rate Adjustments and Extensions for the Alaska,...

  6. 10 CFR 903.21 - Completion of rate development; provisional rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Completion of rate development; provisional rates. 903.21 Section 903.21 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY POWER AND TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and Transmission Rate Adjustments and Extensions for the Alaska,...

  7. 21 CFR 81.10 - Termination of provisional listings of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Green No. 1. The Commissioner concludes that there are inadequate analytical methods to permit certification of the color additive Ext. D&C Green No. 1. In addition, the Commissioner has found that there was.... The Commissioner of Food and Drugs hereby terminates the provisional listing of Ext. D&C Green No....

  8. 76 FR 10339 - Ms. Bubbles, Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... accordance with the terms of 16 CFR 1118.20(e).\\1\\ Published below is a provisionally-accepted Settlement Agreement with Ms. Bubbles, Inc., containing a civil penalty of $40,000.00. \\1\\ The Commission voted 5-0 to... Matter of Ms. Bubbles, Inc.; SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT 1. In accordance with 16 C.F.R. Sec. 1118.20,...

  9. 76 FR 58784 - Bad Boy Enterprises, LLC, Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... COMMISSION Bad Boy Enterprises, LLC, Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order AGENCY... Agreement with Bad Boy Enterprises, LLC, containing a civil penalty of $715,000.00. DATES: Any interested... accordance with 16 CFR 1118.20, Bad Boy Enterprises, LLC (``Bad Boy'') and staff (``Staff'') of the...

  10. 78 FR 36571 - North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Provisional Official...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Provisional Official Protraction Diagram (OPDs) AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM),...

  11. 78 FR 38298 - Ross Stores, Inc. et al., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY...: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: It is the policy of the Commission to publish settlements which it provisionally accepts under the Consumer Product Safety Act in the Federal Register...

  12. 76 FR 62785 - Nordica USA, Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... COMMISSION Nordica USA, Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order AGENCY: Consumer Product... Agreement with Nordica USA, containing a civil penalty of $214,000.00. DATES: Any interested person may ask... Agreement 1. In accordance with 16 CFR 1118.20, Nordica USA (``Nordica'') and staff of the United...

  13. Provisional hourly values of equatorial dst for July, August, September and October 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Poros, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    The tabulated hourly magnetic storm-time variation (Dst) values were obtained using the four Dst stations of Hermanus, Kakioka, Honolulu, and San Juan. The provisional Dst values for July, August, and September 1972 previously published by World Data Center A and Goddard Space Flight Center are superseded by these values.

  14. 75 FR 55777 - Pro-Pac Distributing Corp., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY...: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: It is the policy of the Commission to publish settlements which it provisionally accepts under the Consumer Product Safety Act in the Federal Register...

  15. Ultrashort pulsed laser (USPL) application in dentistry: basic investigations of ablation rates and thresholds on oral hard tissue and restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Schelle, Florian; Polz, Sebastian; Haloui, Hatim; Braun, Andreas; Dehn, Claudia; Frentzen, Matthias; Meister, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    Modern ultrashort pulse lasers with scanning systems provide a huge set of parameters affecting the suitability for dental applications. The present study investigates thresholds and ablation rates of oral hard tissues and restorative materials with a view towards a clinical application system. The functional system consists of a 10 W Nd:YVO4 laser emitting pulses with a duration of 8 ps at 1,064 nm. Measurements were performed on dentin, enamel, ceramic, composite, and mammoth ivory at a repetition rate of 500 kHz. By employing a scanning system, square-shaped cavities with an edge length of 1 mm were created. Ablation threshold and rate measurements were assessed by variation of the applied fluence. Examinations were carried out employing a scanning electron microscope and optical profilometer. Irradiation time was recorded by the scanner software in order to calculate the overall ablated volume per time. First high power ablation rate measurements were performed employing a laser source with up to 50 W. Threshold values in the range of 0.45 J/cm(2) (composite) to 1.54 J/cm(2) (enamel) were observed. Differences between any two materials are statistically significant (p < 0.05). Preparation speeds up to 37.53 mm(3)/min (composite) were achieved with the 10 W laser source and differed statistically significant for any two materials (p < 0.05) with the exception of dentin and mammoth ivory (p > 0.05). By employing the 50 W laser source, increased rates up to ∼50 mm(3)/min for dentin were obtained. The results indicate that modern USPL systems provide sufficient ablation rates to be seen as a promising technology for dental applications.

  16. Final environmental assessment and Finding-of-No-Significant-Impact - drum storage facility for interim storage of materials generated by environmental restoration operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0995, for the construction and operation of a drum storage facility at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado. The proposal for construction of the facility was generated in response to current and anticipated future needs for interim storage of waste materials generated by environmental restoration operations. A public meeting was held on July 20, 1994, at which the scope and analyses of the EA were presented. The scope of the EA included evaluation of alternative methods of storage, including no action. A comment period from July 5, 1994 through August 4, 1994, was provided to the public and the State of Colorado to submit written comment on the EA. No written comments were received regarding this proposed action, therefore no comment response is included in the Final EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

  17. “Struggle to obtain redress”: Women’s experiences of living with symptoms attributed to dental restorative materials and/or electromagnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Mårell, Lena; Lindgren, Monica; Ternulf Nyhlin, Kerstin; Ahlgren, Christina; Berglund, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of illness and the encounters with health care professionals among women who attributed their symptoms and illness to either dental restorative materials and/or electromagnetic fields, despite the fact that research on health effects from dental fillings or electricity has failed to substantiate the reported symptoms. Thirteen women (aged 37–63 years) were invited to the study and a qualitative approach was chosen as the study design, and data were collected using semi-structured interviews. The analysis was conducted with a constant comparative method, according to Grounded Theory. The analysis of the results can be described with the core category, “Struggle to obtain redress,” the two categories, “Stricken with illness” and “A blot in the protocol,” and five subcategories. The core category represents the women's fight for approval and arose in the conflict between their experience of developing a severe illness and the doctors’ or dentists’ rejection of the symptoms as a disease, which made the women feel like malingerers. The informants experienced better support and confirmation from alternative medicine practitioners. However, sick-leave certificates from alternative medicine practitioners were not approved and this led to a continuous cycle of visits in the health care system. To avoid conflicting encounters, it is important for caregivers to listen to the patient's explanatory models and experience of illness, even if a medical answer cannot be given. PMID:27938629

  18. Comparison of The Effect of Implant Abutment Surface Modifications on Retention of Implant-Supported Restoration with A Polymer Based Cement

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Nabaprakash; Lakshmi, Namratha; Azhagarasan, N.S.; Agnihotri, Yoshaskam; Rajan, Manoj; Hariharan, Ramasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    Background: In cement-retained implant-supported restoration it is important to gain adequate retention of definitive restoration as well as retrievability of prosthesis. The surface of the abutment, alloy of the restoration and the type of cement used influences the retention of the restoration. There is a need to analyze the influence of surface modifications of abutments on the retentive capabilities of provisional implant cements. Purpose of study: To compare the effect of implant abutment surface modifications on retention of implant-supported restoration cemented with polymer based cement. Materials and method: Thirty solid titanium implant abutments (ADIN), 8mm height, were divided into 3 groups. Ten abutments with retentive grooves (Group I) as supplied by the manufacturer, Ten abutments milled to 20 taper circumferentially (Group II), and Ten abutments milled and air-abraded with 110 μm aluminum oxide (Group III) were used in this study. Ni-Cr coping were casted for each abutment and polymer based cement was used to secure them to the respective abutments. Using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 cm/minute, tensile bond strength was recorded (N). Results: Mean tensile bond strength of Group I, II and III were found to be 408.3, 159.9 and 743.8 Newton respectively. The values were statistically different from each other (p<0.001). Conclusion: Abutments with milled and sandblasted surface provide the highest retention followed by abutments with retentive grooves and then by abutments with milled surface when cast copings were cemented to implant abutments with polymer based cement. Clinical implications: Retention of restoration depends on the surface of the abutment as well as the luting agents used. Incorporation of retentive grooves or particle abrasion can enhance retention especially in situation of short clinical crown. PMID:24596785

  19. Restoration Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the accompanying photos, a laboratory technician is restoring the once-obliterated serial number of a revolver. The four-photo sequence shows the gradual progression from total invisibility to clear readability. The technician is using a new process developed in an applications engineering project conducted by NASA's Lewis Research Center in conjunction with Chicago State University. Serial numbers and other markings are frequently eliminated from metal objects to prevent tracing ownership of guns, motor vehicles, bicycles, cameras, appliances and jewelry. To restore obliterated numbers, crime laboratory investigators most often employ a chemical etching technique. It is effective, but it may cause metal corrosion and it requires extensive preparatory grinding and polishing. The NASA-Chicago State process is advantageous because it can be applied without variation to any kind of metal, it needs no preparatory work and number recovery can be accomplished without corrosive chemicals; the liquid used is water.

  20. Analysis of Resin-Dentin Interface Morphology and Bond Strength Evaluation of Core Materials for One Stage Post-Endodontic Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Bitter, Kerstin; Gläser, Christin; Neumann, Konrad; Blunck, Uwe; Frankenberger, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Restoration of endodontically treated teeth using fiber posts in a one-stage procedure gains more popularity and aims to create a secondary monoblock. Data of detailed analyses of so called “post-and-core-systems” with respect to morphological characteristics of the resin-dentin interface in combination with bond strength measurements of fiber posts luted with these materials are scarce. The present study aimed to analyze four different post-and-core-systems with two different adhesive approaches (self-etch and etch-and-rinse). Materials and Methods Human anterior teeth (n = 80) were endodontically treated and post space preparations and post placement were performed using the following systems: Rebilda Post/Rebilda DC/Futurabond DC (Voco) (RB), Luxapost/Luxacore Z/Luxabond Prebond and Luxabond A+B (DMG) (LC), X Post/Core X Flow/XP Bond and Self Cure Activator (Dentsply DeTrey) (CX), FRC Postec/MultiCore Flow/AdheSE DC (Ivoclar Vivadent) (MC). Adhesive systems and core materials of 10 specimens per group were labeled using fluorescent dyes and resin-dentin interfaces were analyzed using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). Bond strengths were evaluated using a push-out test. Data were analyzed using repeated measurement ANOVA and following post-hoc test. Results CLSM analyses revealed significant differences between groups with respect to the factors hybrid layer thickness (p<0.0005) and number of resin tags (p = 0.02; ANOVA). Bond strength was significantly affected by core material (p = 0.001), location inside the root canal (p<0.0005) and incorporation of fluorescent dyes (p = 0.036; ANOVA). CX [7.7 (4.4) MPa] demonstrated significantly lower bond strength compared to LC [14.2 (8.7) MPa] and RB [13.3 (3.7) MPa] (p<0.05; Tukey HSD) but did not differ significantly from MC [11.5 (3.5) MPa]. Conclusion It can be concluded that bond strengths inside the root canal were not affected by the adhesive approach of the post

  1. Effect of a novel commercial potassium-oxalate containing tooth-desensitizing mouthrinse on the microhardness of resin composite restorative materials with different monomer compositions

    PubMed Central

    Karabulut, Barış; Güleç, Serkan; Doğan, Cem M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The effects of mouthrinses on dental resin composites have been investigated extensively. However, there is little information available regarding the effects of ‘newly developed mouthrinse’ formulations on the microhardness of different monomer based composite systems. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a novel potassium-oxalate containing desensitizing mouthrinse on the microhardness of different monomer based composite materials. Material and Methods A hundred and twenty specimens (6mm in diameter and 2mm in height) were prepared for composite resin groups (methacrylate based, DX-511 monomer based and silorane monomer based) and for storage solution groups (artificial saliva and potassium oxalate-containing tooth-desensitizing mouthrinse). After allowing post-polimerization the baseline Knoop microhardness measurements for all specimens were recorded. The specimens were stored in 20 mL mouthwash and artificial saliva for 12 hours at 37ºC. The post-immersion microhardness values of all specimens were also recorded. Data were subjected to ANOVA/Scheffe’s test at a significance level of 0.05. The intra group (pre and post immersion values) comparison of the mean microhardness values of the specimens was done using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results The microhardness of the silorane based composite was not affected significantly (p>0.05). The hardness values of the DX-511 monomer based composite and the methacrylate based composite exhibited a slight but not significant microhardness change compared to the baseline values (p>0.05). Conclusions Studies reported that the effect of mouthrinses on microhardness changes of composite resins may be material dependent, and the hardness change susceptibility of a restorative material may be attributed to its resin matrix or filler type. However, dental monomers as well as the oral care products have an ever-evolving technology and future studies should consider newer products

  2. Class II Resin Composites: Restorative Options.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minesh; Mehta, Shamir B; Banerji, Subir

    2015-10-01

    Tooth-coloured, resin composite restorations are amongst the most frequently prescribed forms of dental restoration to manage defects in posterior teeth. The attainment of a desirable outcome when placing posterior resin composite restorations requires the clinician to have a good understanding of the benefits (as well as the limitations) posed by this material, together with a sound knowledge of placement technique. Numerous protocols and materials have evolved to assist the dental operator with this type of demanding posterior restoration. With the use of case examples, four techniques available are reported here. CPD/Clinical Relevance: This article explores varying techniques for the restoration of Class II cavities using resin composite.

  3. Effect of eliminating administrative radiographs on patient exposure and accuracy of provisional treatment plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kantor, M.L.; Slome, B.A.

    1987-12-01

    Published reports and recommendations suggest that radiographs are often ordered because of administrative policies during the screening and selection of patients for dental school clinics. This study examined the prescription of radiographs for two groups of patients: those who were radiographically examined according to an administrative policy and those whose radiographic needs were determined by a clinical examination. The provisional treatment needs assessment based on the screening examination was compared to the final treatment plan based on a complete diagnostic workup for both groups of patients to assess the effect of a change in school policy. Clinicians ordered half the number of panoramic radiographs as would have been ordered by administrative policy. There was no significant difference in the agreement between the provisional and final treatment plans under the two policies. These results suggest that dental schools can comply with federal recommendations against administrative radiographs without compromising patient selection.

  4. Provisional Reference Dose for the Aromatic Fraction of Jet Fuel: Insight into Complex Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Petroleum Hydrocarbon Criteria Working Group UF uncertainty factor UV ultraviolet light wt% weight percent vi PROVISIONAL REFERENCE DOSE FOR THE AROMATIC...week) included. RBC = red blood cell. UF = total uncertainty factor , including modifying factors when applied. aU.S. EPA (2004). bThis unpublished...approach applied uncertainty factors to NOAELs or LOAELs from the critical 11 studies. The TPHCWG primarily accepted default values of 10 for

  5. The effect of occlusal forces on restorations.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2014-09-01

    This review will focus on the effect occlusal forces, both normal masticatory force and paranormal bruxing and clenching force, have on various restorative materials and their interaction with the teeth through a variety of bonding mechanisms. Salient physical properties of each of the materials will be reviewed, as well as the effect occlusal force has on restoration durability.

  6. Clinical Outcome of Double Kissing Crush Versus Provisional Stenting of Coronary Artery Bifurcation Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Santoso, Teguh; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Ye, Fei; Xu, Ya-Wei; Fu, Qiang; Kan, Jing; Zhang, Feng-Fu; Zhou, Yong; Xie, Du-Jiang; Kwan, Tak W.

    2017-01-01

    Background— Provisional stenting is effective for anatomic simple bifurcation lesions. Double kissing crush stenting reduces the 1-year rate of target lesion revascularization. This study aimed to investigate the 5-year clinical results of the DKCRUSH-II study (Randomized Study on Double Kissing Crush Technique Versus Provisional Stenting Technique for Coronary Artery Bifurcation Lesions). Methods and Results— A total of 370 patients with coronary bifurcation lesions who were randomly assigned to either the double kissing crush or provisional stenting group in the DKCRUSH-II study were followed for 5 years. The primary end point was the occurrence of a major adverse cardiac event at 5 years. Patients were classified by simple and complex bifurcation lesions according to the DEFINITION criteria (Definitions and Impact of Complex Bifurcation Lesions on Clinical Outcomes After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Using Drug-Eluting Stents). At 5 years, the major adverse cardiac event rate (23.8%) in the provisional stenting group was insignificantly different to that of the double kissing group (15.7%; P=0.051). However, the difference in the target lesion revascularization rate between 2 groups was sustained through the 5-year follow-up (16.2% versus 8.6%; P=0.027). The definite and probable stent thrombosis rate was 2.7% in each group (P=1.0). Complex bifurcation was associated with a higher rate of target lesion revascularization (21.6%) at 5 years compared with 11.1% in patients with a simple bifurcation (P=0.037), with an extremely high rate in the provisional stenting group (36.8% versus 12.5%, P=0.005) mainly because of final kissing balloon inflation (19.4% versus 5.2%; P=0.036). Conclusions— The double kissing crush stenting technique for coronary bifurcation lesions is associated with a lower rate of target lesion revascularization. The optimal stenting approach based on the lesions’ complexity may improve the revascularization for patients with

  7. Periodontal considerations in restorative and implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, P V; Higginbottom, F L; Wilson, T G

    2001-01-01

    The successful integration of periodontal and restorative dentistry for both natural teeth and implants requires knowledge and application of both mechanical and biological principles. In areas of aesthetic concern, an adequate band of attached gingiva can increase patient comfort, reduce the probability of gingival recession following tooth preparation and simplify restorative procedures. While some restorative margins need to be placed at or below the margin of the free gingiva, this should be considered to be a compromise, and margins should not be placed more than 0.5 mm into a healthy gingival sulcus. Approximately 2-3 mm of healthy, natural supra-alveolar tooth surface is needed for attachment of the gingival tissues to the tooth. This dimension is called the biological width. If adequate biological width does not exist, surgical or orthodontic procedures to expose healthy tooth structure are recommended before final restorations are placed. Retraction of soft tissues for impressions is best accomplished with mechanical methods rather than lasers or electrosurgery because of the potentially harmful effects of these devices to the cementum, bone and soft tissues surrounding the teeth. Implants function best and withstand occlusal forces optimally when loaded in a vertical direction. Therefore, planning implant placement is critical for success. Because of increased proprioception, it is suggested that natural teeth be used to guide the occlusion in partially edentulous patients. Cantilevers should be used with caution and with appropriate attention to occlusal forces. While occlusal trauma does not cause periodontal disease, it may contribute to bone loss around teeth and implants. In the opinion of the authors, provisional restorations are an integral part of dental and periodontal therapy. They can be used to establish aesthetic and physiological contours that can be easily cleaned by patients and they can also be used as a guide for any needed surgical

  8. A philosophy for restoring virgin caries.

    PubMed

    Henry, Dan B

    2008-01-01

    This paper demonstrates and discusses the clinical relevance for the use of direct gold, especially in restoring virgin caries in the modern restorative dental practice. In addition, this article is intented to highlight the advantages for oral health of placing restorative materials with the highest probability of long-term success. Also, this paper demonstrates the use of the latest formula of direct gold (E-Z Gold), developed by Dr Lloyd Baum of Loma Linda, CA, USA, and how this new product has made it practical to include direct gold restorations as an integral part of an active restorative practice.

  9. Production possibility frontiers and socioecological tradeoffs for restoration of fire adapted forests.

    PubMed

    Ager, Alan A; Day, Michelle A; Vogler, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    We used spatial optimization to analyze alternative restoration scenarios and quantify tradeoffs for a large, multifaceted restoration program to restore resiliency to forest landscapes in the western US. We specifically examined tradeoffs between provisional ecosystem services, fire protection, and the amelioration of key ecological stressors. The results revealed that attainment of multiple restoration objectives was constrained due to the joint spatial patterns of ecological conditions and socioeconomic values. We also found that current restoration projects are substantially suboptimal, perhaps the result of compromises in the collaborative planning process used by federal planners, or operational constraints on forest management activities. The juxtaposition of ecological settings with human values generated sharp tradeoffs, especially with respect to community wildfire protection versus generating revenue to support restoration and fire protection activities. The analysis and methods can be leveraged by ongoing restoration programs in many ways including: 1) integrated prioritization of restoration activities at multiple scales on public and adjoining private lands, 2) identification and mapping of conflicts between ecological restoration and socioeconomic objectives, 3) measuring the efficiency of ongoing restoration projects compared to the optimal production possibility frontier, 4) consideration of fire transmission among public and private land parcels as a prioritization metric, and 5) finding socially optimal regions along the production frontier as part of collaborative restoration planning.

  10. Faults in Paleozoic basement and their participation in Alpine deformation of Greater Caucasus – evidences from materials of restored (balanced) sections in folded sedimentary cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Fedor

    2015-04-01

    Method. As each fold has information about strain, numerous folds (0.1-1 km width) inside of hinterland (stripe about 1000 x 50 km) of Greater Caucasus (GC) allow to restore structure for whole sedimentary cover. Material of 24 detailed sections of 510 km total actual length in three regions was used for restoration of structure. These sections were split on 505 domains as associations of 2-5 folds. Three parameters of morphology were measured in these domains: dip of axial plain, dip of envelope plain, value of shortening as interlimb angle [1, 2, 3]. Because these parameters correlate with ellipsoid (ellipse) of strain for domain, sequence of three kinematic operations allow to restore actual state of domain to pre-folded state (from ellipse to circle): rotation to horizontal position of envelope plain, horizontal simple shear to vertical axial plain and vertical flattening (pure shear). Aggregation of chain of pre-folded domains is forming a pre-folded state of whole section, and it allows to calculate of shortening value. For correct detailing of strain study, 78 "structural cells" were formed by aggregation of 5-10 domains in each cell. Some additional observations and calculations allow to find initial and post-folded thickness of sedimentary cover, depth of cover bottom, virtual position of cover top (amplitude of erosion) for all tectonic cells. The received result for 78 cells allowed to understand the main features of GC structure, to see a distribution of basement top depth, to give behavior pattern of the basement and to find a role of faults in shortening of the basement and of sedimentary cover. Results. Three regions of GC were studied: North-Western Caucasus (NWC) [1], Chiaur tectonic zone in South Ossetia (ChZ) and two zones in South-Eastern Caucasus - Tfan Zone (TZ) and Shakhdag zone (ShZ) [3]. The shortening values for structural cells were found as 49% in average for ShZ (with deviations 37÷62%), 55% for TZ (36÷67%), 57% for ChZ (46÷67%) and

  11. Smooth surface glass ionomer restoration for primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Killian, C M; Croll, T P

    1991-01-01

    Glass ionomer restorative cement offers the clinician an alternative to bonded composite resin for restoration of certain lesions in primary teeth. This article details a step-by-step procedure for restoration of a smooth surface carious lesion in a primary incisor using an encapsulated glass ionomer restorative material and reviews advantages and limitations of the cement. A light-hardened glass ionomer liner/base that has proven useful as an enamel and dentin restorative is also described.

  12. Australian Disaster Research Directory (Including Some Contributions from New Zealand). Provisional--1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    Swanston Street Melbourne 3000 (03) 6536522 A Dr T Keulemans CIRDNH (contd) 21. Acting Dean, School of Social and Behaviouxal St~dis Chisholm Institute of...INFORMATION SERVICR ANDS T HI REPOR Rr[jCLI, S TO I EPR PROVISIONAL- 1983 AL’STRALIAN DISASTER RESEARCH DIRECTCRY CONTENTS Foreword A-2 The Australian...Page Best, Mr R J 51 Dept Civil-Systems Eng, James Cook Univ Bird, Dr T S 49 Lec, Dept Elec Eng, James Cook Univ Bitmead, Dr R R 49 Lec, Dept Elec Eng

  13. Fernald restoration: ecologists and engineers integrate restoration and cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Eric; Homer, John

    2002-07-15

    As cleanup workers excavate pits and tear down buildings at the Fernald site in southwest Ohio, site ecologists are working side-by-side to create thriving wetlands and develop the early stages of forest, prairie, and savanna ecosystems to restore natural resources that were impacted by years of site operations. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy-Fernald Office (DOE-FN) and its cleanup contractor, Fluor Fernald, Inc., initiated several ecological restoration projects in perimeter areas of the site (e.g., areas not used for or impacted by uranium processing or waste management). The projects are part of Fernald's final land use plan to restore natural resources over 904 acres of the 1,050-acre site. Pete Yerace, the DOE-FN Natural Resource Trustee representative is working with the Fernald Natural Resource Trustees in an oversight role to resolve the state of Ohio's 1986 claim against DOE for injuries to natural resources. Fluor Fernald, Inc., and DOE-FN developed the ''Natural Resource Restoration Plan'', which outlines 15 major restoration projects for the site and will restore injured natural resources at the site. In general, Fernald's plan includes grading to maximize the formation of wetlands or expanded floodplain, amending soil where topsoil has been removed during excavation, and establishing native vegetation throughout the site. Today, with cleanup over 35 percent complete and site closure targeted for 2006, Fernald is entering a new phase of restoration that involves heavily remediated areas. By working closely with engineers and cleanup crews, site ecologists can take advantage of remediation fieldwork (e.g., convert an excavated depression into a wetland) and avoid unnecessary costs and duplication. This collaboration has also created opportunities for relatively simple and inexpensive restoration of areas that were discovered during ongoing remediation. To ensure the survival of the plant material in heavily disturbed soils, Fernald will use

  14. Global distribution of atmospheric carbon dioxide 2. A review of provisional background observations, 1978--1980

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, P.J.; Pearman, G.I.; Hyson, P.

    1983-04-20

    An attempt is made to bring together provisional data collected throughout the world to construct a global picture of the background atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration distribution. The uncertainties, calibration and sampling difficulties, and measurement needs are discussed, and it is concluded that in general the accuracy of the provisional data at each sampling location is approx. +- 1 ppmv. Ongoing studies at the main laboratories are likely to significantly improve this accuracy in the near future. The most recent data available (for 1980) indicate annual average northern hemisphere high latitude CO/sub 2/ concentrations 4 to 5 ppmv above those at high latitudes of the southern hemisphere (approx.336 ppmv). The greatest uncertainty in the zonal average concentration exists in the latitude band 10--30 /sup 0/N where surface observations are 2--3 ppmv higher than those measured by continuous analysis at the Mauna Loa Observatory. There is generally good agreement between a model-generated and the observed annual mean global distributions. The seasonality of concentration is small in the southern hemisphere (approx.1--2 ppmv peak to peak) rising to approx.6 ppmv at 20 /sup 0/N and approx.15 ppmv at high latitudes of the northern hemisphere. The total global atmospheric CO/sub 2/ content, averaged through 1980, is estimated to have been 7.15 x 10/sup 14/ kg of carbon with a probable uncertainty of 0.5 to 1.0%.

  15. Prediction of solubility and permeability class membership: provisional BCS classification of the world's top oral drugs.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Arik; Miller, Jonathan M; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-12-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) categorizes drugs into one of four biopharmaceutical classes according to their water solubility and membrane permeability characteristics and broadly allows the prediction of the rate-limiting step in the intestinal absorption process following oral administration. Since its introduction in 1995, the BCS has generated remarkable impact on the global pharmaceutical sciences arena, in drug discovery, development, and regulation, and extensive validation/discussion/extension of the BCS is continuously published in the literature. The BCS has been effectively implanted by drug regulatory agencies around the world in setting bioavailability/bioequivalence standards for immediate-release (IR) oral drug product approval. In this review, we describe the BCS scientific framework and impact on regulatory practice of oral drug products and review the provisional BCS classification of the top drugs on the global market. The Biopharmaceutical Drug Disposition Classification System and its association with the BCS are discussed as well. One notable finding of the provisional BCS classification is that the clinical performance of the majority of approved IR oral drug products essential for human health can be assured with an in vitro dissolution test, rather than empirical in vivo human studies.

  16. Restoring primary anterior teeth: updated for 2014.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, William F

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review the current literature associated with the techniques and materials for the restoration of primary anterior teeth and make clinical recommendations based upon the available literature. A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available to utilize for restoring primary incisors. Awareness of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material can enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are either some type of stainless steel or zirconia crown. There is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, the amount of tooth structure remaining, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables that affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative solution is chosen.

  17. Esthetic restoration of discolored primary incisors.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Fred S

    2005-01-01

    Restoring primary teeth can be a strenuous task for many dentists who would like to have an esthetic, easy-to-use and relatively quick restoration for children. But, the restoration of carious, fractured or discolored primary incisors gives the dentist the satisfaction of knowing that he/she has restored the smile and self-confidence of a growing child. This article describes a technique which is relatively easy and produces a beautiful outcome in a relatively short time. The author has used the technique in hundreds of children for over twenty-five years. Modifications in the technique have been made as newer materials and techniques have evolved.

  18. Minimum thickness anterior porcelain restorations.

    PubMed

    Radz, Gary M

    2011-04-01

    Porcelain laminate veneers (PLVs) provide the dentist and the patient with an opportunity to enhance the patient's smile in a minimally to virtually noninvasive manner. Today's PLV demonstrates excellent clinical performance and as materials and techniques have evolved, the PLV has become one of the most predictable, most esthetic, and least invasive modalities of treatment. This article explores the latest porcelain materials and their use in minimum thickness restoration.

  19. [Clinical examination of the gingival effects of three glass ionomer restorative materials (GC Fuji IX GP, GC Fuji IX GP EXTRA és GC EQUIA)].

    PubMed

    Horváth, Attila; Papp, Zsuzsanna; Dobó-Nagy, Csaba; Gera, István

    2014-12-01

    The restoration of cervical abrasions, erosions or cervical carious lesions is still challenging because of their unpredictable adhesion and possible negative effects on the marginal plaque accumulation. The impact of three different glass ionomer cements (GIC) on the marginal gingiva and root sensitivity was studied. Furthermore, it was investigated in details, whether or not a recently developed light curing varnish (GC Coat - EQUIA) had any additional effect on the gingival tissue. A total number of 30 non-smokers with healthy gingiva having at least one cervical supra/paragingival abrasion/erosion/abfraction defects were enrolled in the present study. The cervical defects were randomly restored by using one of the three GIC and the gingival parameters were recorded and evaluated at baseline, 6 weeks and 6 months. According to our results root sensitivity were substantially decreased in all the three groups. Plaque scores were also reduced in all groups with the greatest improvement at the sites where the new varnish were applied. Although this improvement was not reflected by the gingival parameters, such as bleeding on probing and crevicular fluid flow, since both were slightly increased in the varnish group. However, neither the intra-group, nor the intergroup differences reached statistical significance. Consequently, the three investigated GIC did not significantly affect the gingival health, therefore they might serve as alternative for the treatment of such cervical lesions. Nevertheless, the new light cure varnish-coated GIC did not seem to be either clinically or statistical significantly more favorable.

  20. Developing a provisional standard for clinical supervision in nursing and health visiting: the methodological trail.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Mic; Jenkins, Emrys; Parke, Sian

    2003-12-01

    The authors outline the process that led to the development of a provisional professional standard for clinical supervision, focusing on design, data collection, and analysis methods. The work was undertaken in an ethos of new paradigm/fifth-generation approaches and used the "manifold of subjective knowing" to gain a holistic understanding of supervisors' experience as represented by experiential, presentational, propositional, and practical knowing. They show how they arrived at the indicators of the standard: Professional Support, Learning, and Accountability. Each of these indicators consists of further elements related to Time, Environment, Relationship (Professional Support), Focus, Knowledge, Interventions (Learning), Organizational Support, Recording, and Competency (Accountability). Findings confirm that clinical supervision practice is complex, and the authors describe proportionally complex methods of analysis.

  1. Emergency department external fixation for provisional treatment of pilon and unstable ankle fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lareau, Craig R.; Daniels, Alan H.; Vopat, Bryan G.; Kane, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Unstable ankle fractures and impacted tibial pilon fractures often benefit from provisional external fixation as a temporizing measure prior to definitive fixation. Benefits of external fixation include improved articular alignment, decreased articular impaction, and soft tissue rest. Uniplanar external fixator placement in the Emergency Department (ED ex-fix) is a reliable and safe technique for achieving ankle reduction and stability while awaiting definitive fixation. This procedure involves placing transverse proximal tibial and calcaneal traction pins and connecting the pins with two external fixator rods. This technique is particularly useful in austere environments or when the operating room is not immediately available. Additionally, this bedside intervention prevents the patient from requiring general anesthesia and may be a cost-effective strategy for decreasing valuable operating time. The ED ex-fix is an especially valuable procedure in busy trauma centers and during mass casualty events, in which resources may be limited. PMID:25709258

  2. Refusal to grant provisional General Medical Council registration to U.K. medical graduates.

    PubMed

    David, Timothy J; Ellson, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    In the last five years, 2010-2014, there have been 17 instances when an application for provisional registration by a U.K. medical graduate was refused by the General Medical Council because the Registrar considered that the applicant's fitness to practise was impaired. While this number is small, the fact that this can happen is largely unappreciated by medical students and their teachers, the prevailing false assumption being that passing finals and graduation is the final hurdle before taking up a Foundation Programme post. It is a poorly recognised fact that just because a university fitness to practise committee has concluded that a student is fit to practise there is no guarantee that the General Medical Council will come to the same decision. This paper explains the reasons for these refusals and makes suggestions for students and medical schools.

  3. Breaking up is hard to do: the economic impact of provisional funding contingent upon evidence development.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Duncan; Li, Jing Jing; Watts, Jennifer; Harris, Anthony

    2011-10-01

    Funding contingent upon evidence development (FED) has recently been the subject of some considerable debate in the literature but relatively little has been made of its economic impact. We argue that FED has the potential to shorten the lag between innovation and access but may also (i) crowd-out more valuable interventions in situations in which there is a fixed dedicated budget; or (ii) lead to a de facto increase in the funding threshold and increased expenditure growth in situations in which the programme budget is open-ended. Although FED would typically entail periodic review of provisional or interim listings, it may prove difficult to withdraw funding even at cost/QALY ratios well in excess of current listing thresholds. Further consideration of the design and implementation of FED processes is therefore required to ensure that its introduction yields net benefits over existing processes.

  4. Overview of the Standing Operating Procedures (SOP) for the Development of Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs)

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Robert; Bast, Cheryl B; Wood, Carol S; Adeshina, Femi; Ross, Robert Hord

    2009-01-01

    Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs) are concentrations in air and drinking water for priority toxic chemicals. This article summarizes the Standing Operating Procedures (SOPs) currently in place for the data-driven development of chemical-specific PALs. To provide consistency and transparency, and to avoid faults of arbitrariness, SOPs were developed for guidance in deriving PAL values. The SOPs for PAL development focus on: 1) data acquisition and analysis, 2) identification of a chemical-specific critical effect, 3) selection of a quantitative point-of-departure (POD), 4) uncertainty analysis and adjustments, 5) exposure duration adjustment and extrapolation, 6) identification of special concerns and issues, and 7) verification, documentation and dissemination of PALs. To avoid uncompromising rigidity in deriving PAL values and to allow for incorporation of new or refined methodologies, the overall procedure is fluid and subject to modification. The purpose of this publication is to provide a summary of these SOPs.

  5. Clinical guidelines for occupational lifting in pregnancy: evidence summary and provisional recommendations

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Leslie A.; Waters, Thomas R.; Napolitano, Peter G.; Goddard, Donald E.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Nielsen, Peter; Hudock, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Empirically based lifting criteria established by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to reduce the risk of overexertion injuries in the general US working population were evaluated for application to pregnant workers. This report proposes criteria to guide decisions by medical providers about permissible weights for lifting tasks performed at work over the course of an uncomplicated pregnancy. Our evaluation included an extensive review of the literature linking occupational lifting to maternal and fetal health. Although it has been 29 years since the American Medical Association’s Council on Scientific Affairs published its report on the Effects of Pregnancy on Work Performance, these guidelines continue to influence clinical decisions and workplace policies. Provisional clinical guidelines derived from the NIOSH lifting criteria that account for recent evidence for maternal and fetal health are presented and aim to improve the standard of care for pregnant workers. PMID:23467051

  6. Linaclotide: Promising IBS-C Efficacy in an Era of Provisional Study Endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Sayuk, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent disappointing developments in the pharmacotherapy of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have not dampened the enthusiasm surrounding linaclotide, a novel guanylate cyclase-C agonist for the management of constipation-predominant IBS (IBS-C). Two recent phase 3 studies reporting on a single, daily dose of linaclotide are presented in this issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology. Importantly, these studies are the first to examine a provisional Food and Drug Administration (FDA) combined response endpoint for IBS-C, which mandates improvements of both abdominal pain and defecatory symptoms. Potential limitations of this FDA endpoint relate to a lack of inclusion of other potentially important IBS symptoms and an inability to directly compare findings with other recent IBS-C trials. Both studies successfully reached this endpoint in approximately one-third of study subjects, resulting in numbers needed to treat (NNT) of five to eight, to achieve an FDA responder. Individual symptom responses to linaclotide were seen in nearly 50% of participants, and potential explanations for these discrepancies when compared with the FDA endpoint are offered. Adequate relief measures also were assessed and, with NNTs of 3.4–6.8, compared favorably with other contemporary IBS-C studies. Overall, both linaclotide trials found the medication to be safe in terms of serious adverse events, though the secretagogue mechanism of action led to diarrhea in approximately one in five subjects. Together, these studies inspire several other important questions regarding linaclotide, including its role in the management of IBS-C relative to existing treatment options, such as lubiprostone. Greater clinical use of linaclotide will reveal whether the observed responses measured with the FDA provisional endpoint will translate into real-world experiences of improvement in IBS patients. “ In seeking absolute truth we aim at the unattainable and must be content with broken portions

  7. Linaclotide: promising IBS-C efficacy in an era of provisional study endpoints.

    PubMed

    Sayuk, Gregory S

    2012-11-01

    Recent disappointing developments in the pharmacotherapy of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have not dampened the enthusiasm surrounding linaclotide, a novel guanylate cyclase-C agonist for the management of constipation-predominant IBS (IBS-C). Two recent phase 3 studies reporting on a single, daily dose of linaclotide are presented in this issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology. Importantly, these studies are the first to examine a provisional Food and Drug Administration (FDA) combined response endpoint for IBS-C, which mandates improvements of both abdominal pain and defecatory symptoms. Potential limitations of this FDA endpoint relate to a lack of inclusion of other potentially important IBS symptoms and an inability to directly compare findings with other recent IBS-C trials. Both studies successfully reached this endpoint in approximately one-third of study subjects, resulting in numbers needed to treat (NNT) of five to eight, to achieve an FDA responder. Individual symptom responses to linaclotide were seen in nearly 50% of participants, and potential explanations for these discrepancies when compared with the FDA endpoint are offered. Adequate relief measures also were assessed and, with NNTs of 3.4-6.8, compared favorably with other contemporary IBS-C studies. Overall, both linaclotide trials found the medication to be safe in terms of serious adverse events, though the secretagogue mechanism of action led to diarrhea in approximately one in five subjects. Together, these studies inspire several other important questions regarding linaclotide, including its role in the management of IBS-C relative to existing treatment options, such as lubiprostone. Greater clinical use of linaclotide will reveal whether the observed responses measured with the FDA provisional endpoint will translate into real-world experiences of improvement in IBS patients.

  8. 78 FR 8117 - Whalen Furniture Manufacturing, Inc., d/b/a Bayside Furnishings, Provisional Acceptance of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... Settlement Agreement and Order AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: It is the policy of the Commission to publish settlements which it provisionally accepts under the Consumer Product.... Whalen believed that the report it received did not represent a legitimate incident. Whalen was aware...

  9. 76 FR 48808 - Black & Decker (U.S.) Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ...: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: It is the policy of the Commission to publish settlements which it provisionally accepts under the Consumer Product Safety Act in the Federal Register in... defects in its Grasshog XP spool cover in December 2005. It modified the defective spool...

  10. Provisional standards of radiation safety of flight personnel and passengers in air transport of the civil aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Provisional standards for radiation affecting passenger aircraft are considered. Agencies responsible for seeing that the regulations are enforced are designated while radiation sources and types of radiation are defined. Standard levels of permissible radiation are given and conditions for radiation safety are discussed. Dosimetric equipment on board aircraft is delineated and regulation effective dates are given.

  11. 76 FR 77981 - Build-A-Bear Workshop, Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... COMMISSION Build-A-Bear Workshop, Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order AGENCY... Agreement with Build-A-Bear Workshop, Inc., containing a civil penalty of $600,000.00. DATES: Any interested... Agreement 1. In accordance with 16 CFR 1118.20, Build-A-Bear Workshop, Inc. (``Build-A-Bear'') and staff...

  12. 45 CFR 264.70 - What makes a State eligible to receive a provisional payment of contingency funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What makes a State eligible to receive a provisional payment of contingency funds? 264.70 Section 264.70 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  13. 14 CFR 121.635 - Dispatch to and from refueling or provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dispatch to and from refueling or... OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.635 Dispatch to and from refueling or provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations. No person may dispatch an airplane to or from a refueling...

  14. 14 CFR 121.635 - Dispatch to and from refueling or provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dispatch to and from refueling or... OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.635 Dispatch to and from refueling or provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations. No person may dispatch an airplane to or from a refueling...

  15. 14 CFR 121.635 - Dispatch to and from refueling or provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dispatch to and from refueling or... OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.635 Dispatch to and from refueling or provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations. No person may dispatch an airplane to or from a refueling...

  16. 14 CFR 121.635 - Dispatch to and from refueling or provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dispatch to and from refueling or... OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.635 Dispatch to and from refueling or provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations. No person may dispatch an airplane to or from a refueling...

  17. 14 CFR 121.635 - Dispatch to and from refueling or provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dispatch to and from refueling or... OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.635 Dispatch to and from refueling or provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations. No person may dispatch an airplane to or from a refueling...

  18. 78 FR 3883 - The Bon-Ton Stores, Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY...: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: It is the policy of the Commission to publish settlements which it provisionally accepts under the Consumer Product Safety Act in the Federal Register...

  19. Enhanced aesthetics with all ceramics restoration

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sanjna; Aruna, U.; Bhat, Wasim Manzoor

    2015-01-01

    The demand for the dentist to achieve excellence in esthetics and function has driven modern advances in materials and restoration fabrication. The development of various casting alloys and precise casting systems has contributed to the successful use of metal-based restorations. However, patient requests for more aesthetic and biologically “safe” materials that have led to an increased demand for metal-free restorations. The following case presentation illustrates a successful aesthetic and functional application of this exciting computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-digital zirconia-based system for a natural smile. PMID:26015733

  20. Breuner Marsh Restoration Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the San Francisco Bay Water Quality Project (SFBWQP) Breuner Marsh Restoration Project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  1. Quartermaster Reach Restoration Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP Quartermaster Reach Restoration Project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  2. Association Between Specific Depression Symptoms and Glycemic Control Among Patients With Comorbid Type 2 Diabetes and Provisional Depression

    PubMed Central

    Czech, Stephanie J.; Orsillo, Susan M.; Pirraglia, Paul A.; English, Thomas M.; Connell, Alexa J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether specific depression symptoms are associated with glycemic control independent of potential demographic and clinical covariates among primary care patients with comorbid type 2 diabetes and provisional threshold or subthreshold depression. Method: We examined a convenience sample of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and provisional threshold or subthreshold depression (N = 82) at 2 family health centers. Cases were identified using a population-based registry of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (ICD-9 codes 250.00 for controlled type 2 diabetes and 250.02 for uncontrolled type 2 diabetes). Data from patients with a primary care provider appointment from the beginning of April 2011 through the end of June 2012 and with at least one 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) depression screener and a glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) laboratory test between 2 weeks before and 10 weeks after PHQ-9 screening were eligible for inclusion. We defined provisional threshold or subthreshold depression using PHQ-9 scoring criteria, which were designed to yield provisional diagnostic information about major depressive disorder based on DSM-5 diagnostic criteria. Results: Patients reporting higher severity of sleep problems on the PHQ-9 had significantly higher HbA1c levels (mean = 8.48, SD = 2.17) compared to patients reporting lower severity or absence of this symptom (mean = 7.19, SD = 1.34, t48.88 = −3.13, P = .003). Problems with sleep contributed unique variance on glycemic control (β = 0.27, P = .02) when controlling for potential clinical and demographic covariates, with those reporting more sleep difficulties having higher HbA1c levels. Conclusions: For patients with type 2 diabetes and provisional threshold or subthreshold depression, it may be prudent to aggressively address sleep problems as a potential mechanism toward improving diabetes control. PMID:26835160

  3. Linking restoration ecology with coastal dune restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithgow, D.; Martínez, M. L.; Gallego-Fernández, J. B.; Hesp, P. A.; Flores, P.; Gachuz, S.; Rodríguez-Revelo, N.; Jiménez-Orocio, O.; Mendoza-González, G.; Álvarez-Molina, L. L.

    2013-10-01

    Restoration and preservation of coastal dunes is urgently needed because of the increasingly rapid loss and degradation of these ecosystems because of many human activities. These activities alter natural processes and coastal dynamics, eliminate topographic variability, fragment, degrade or eliminate habitats, reduce diversity and threaten endemic species. The actions of coastal dune restoration that are already taking place span contrasting activities that range from revegetating and stabilizing the mobile substrate, to removing plant cover and increasing substrate mobility. Our goal was to review how the relative progress of the actions of coastal dune restoration has been assessed, according to the ecosystem attributes outlined by the Society of Ecological Restoration: namely, integrity, health and sustainability and that are derived from the ecological theory of succession. We reviewed the peer reviewed literature published since 1988 that is listed in the ISI Web of Science journals as well as additional references, such as key books. We exclusively focused on large coastal dune systems (such as transgressive and parabolic dunefields) located on natural or seminatural coasts. We found 150 articles that included "coastal dune", "restoration" and "revegetation" in areas such as title, keywords and abstract. From these, 67 dealt specifically with coastal dune restoration. Most of the studies were performed in the USA, The Netherlands and South Africa, during the last two decades. Restoration success has been assessed directly and indirectly by measuring one or a few ecosystem variables. Some ecosystem attributes have been monitored more frequently (ecosystem integrity) than others (ecosystem health and sustainability). Finally, it is important to consider that ecological succession is a desirable approach in restoration actions. Natural dynamics and disturbances should be considered as part of the restored system, to improve ecosystem integrity, health and

  4. Iatrogenic Damage to Periodontium by Restorative Treatment Procedures: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sirajuddin, Syed; Narasappa, Kumuda M; Gundapaneni, Veenadharini; Chungkham, Sachidananda; Walikar, Ambica S

    2015-01-01

    The regenerative capability found in most other tissues is not possessed by teeth. Hence, enamel or dentin once lost as a result of caries, trauma, wear, and restorative materials must be replaced to restore form and function. Teeth require preparation to receive restorations, and these preparations must be based on fundamental principles from which basic criteria can be developed to help predict the success of restorative treatment. PMID:26312091

  5. Full mouth rehabilitation of a patient with reduced vertical dimension using multiple metal ce ramic restorations.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ashish R; Nallaswamy, Deepak; Ariga, Padma; Philip, Jacob Mathew

    2013-10-01

    Rehabilitation of a patient with severely worn dentition after restoring the vertical dimension is a complex procedure and assessment of the vertical dimension is an important aspect in these cases. This clinical report describes the full mouth rehabilitation of a patient who was clinically monitored to evaluate the adaptation to a removable occlusal splint to restore vertical dimension for a period 1 month and provisional restorations to determine esthetic and functional outcome for a period of 3 months. It is necessary to recognizing that form follows function and that anterior teeth play a vital role in the maintenance of oral health. Confirmation of tolerance to changes in the vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) is of paramount importance. Articulated study casts and a diagnostic wax-up can provide important information for the evaluation of treatment options. Alteration of the VDO should be conservative and should not be changed without careful consideration.

  6. Full mouth rehabilitation of a patient with reduced vertical dimension using multiple metal ce ramic restorations

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Ashish R; Nallaswamy, Deepak; Ariga, Padma; Philip, Jacob Mathew

    2013-01-01

    Rehabilitation of a patient with severely worn dentition after restoring the vertical dimension is a complex procedure and assessment of the vertical dimension is an important aspect in these cases. This clinical report describes the full mouth rehabilitation of a patient who was clinically monitored to evaluate the adaptation to a removable occlusal splint to restore vertical dimension for a period 1 month and provisional restorations to determine esthetic and functional outcome for a period of 3 months. It is necessary to recognizing that form follows function and that anterior teeth play a vital role in the maintenance of oral health. Confirmation of tolerance to changes in the vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) is of paramount importance. Articulated study casts and a diagnostic wax-up can provide important information for the evaluation of treatment options. Alteration of the VDO should be conservative and should not be changed without careful consideration. PMID:24403804

  7. Tooth-colored CAD/CAM monolithic restorations.

    PubMed

    Reich, S

    2015-01-01

    A monolithic restoration (also known as a full contour restoration) is one that is manufactured from a single material for the fully anatomic replacement of lost tooth structure. Additional staining (followed by glaze firing if ceramic materials are used) may be performed to enhance the appearance of the restoration. For decades, monolithic restoration has been the standard for inlay and partial crown restorations manufactured by both pressing and computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) techniques. A limited selection of monolithic materials is now available for dental crown and bridge restorations. The IDS (2015) provided an opportunity to learn about and evaluate current trends in this field. In addition to new developments, established materials are also mentioned in this article to complete the picture. In line with the strategic focus of the IJCD, the focus here is naturally on CAD/CAM materials.

  8. Power system restoration planning

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M. ); Fink, L.H.

    1994-02-01

    System restoration, as an extraordinary mode of system operation, requires careful planning and operator training. The generic tasks of restoration include determination of system and equipment status, preparation of plants and network for systematic restoration, reenergization of the network, and system rebuilding. The procedures for developing an effective restoration plan include formation of a qualified planning team, review of relevant system characteristics, formulation of assumptions regarding blackout scenarios, agreement on restoration goals, development of strategy and tactics, validation of the plan, training, and documentation.

  9. Assuring restorative integrity in extensive posterior resin composite restorations: pushing the envelope.

    PubMed

    Liebenberg, W H

    2000-03-01

    Clinicians are increasingly being called on to satisfy the restorative demands of patients who request tooth-colored restorations but are unable to afford an optimum indirect restorative option. Consequently, in clinical practice, the limits of the direct posterior resin composite technique are being stretched. There is a need for techniques that will satisfy the complex variables of clinical practice and allow for successful utilization of posterior resin composite in large cavity preparations. The objective of this article is to explain the rationale behind the materials and techniques involved in the delivery of these complicated restorations.

  10. Political and Economic Geomorphology: The Effect of Market Forces on Stream Restoration Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, J.; Doyle, M. W.; Lave, R.; Robertson, M.

    2013-12-01

    disproportionately located in very small catchments, and designs seemed to be only marginally related to the location of the stream. Provisional findings also indicate that the differences between mitigation and non-mitigation designs were less than expected. Interview data support this observation; design engineers and entrepreneurial credit providers (i.e., mitigation bankers) apparently viewed the design process as a somewhat standard, non-malleable practice. Sustaining long-term relationships with regulators, who must approve the sale of restored stream credits, was seen as critically important rather than the marginal gains to be made by manipulating particular stream designs to glean more credits. Overall, preliminary results demonstrate that regulatory frameworks, economic incentives and social relationships played a key role in driving stream restoration design in North Carolina, often homogenizing design practices and limiting ';credit chasing.'

  11. Vital tooth cleaning for cementation of indirect restorations: a review.

    PubMed

    Hill, Edward E; Rubel, Barry

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews factors that must be considered to select the best technique for cleaning a vital tooth prior to cementation of a definitive restoration. The dental literature offers many suggestions with supporting rationales. In cases where provisional cement has been present or contrast powder has been used, some mechanical cleaning (with fine pumice or prophy paste) appears to be justified. The value of soaps or other chemicals is questionable except perhaps as topical disinfectants. Dentists should be aware that a cleansing agent may have a negative or positive effect on bond strength, depending on the adhesive system chosen. It may be necessary to tailor the particular method of tooth cleaning to the cement that is to be used.

  12. Examples of model-free implant restorations using Cerec inLab 4.0 software.

    PubMed

    Reich, S; Schley, J; Kern, T; Fiedler, K; Wolfart, S

    2012-01-01

    This case report demonstrates two ways to fabricate model-free implant restorations with the Cerec inLab 4.0 software. Because the patient, a woman with a history of periodontal disease, did not wish to have a removable partial denture, implant therapy was planned for the restoration of her edentulous areas 14/15 and 24/25. In addition, the restoration was to provide functional relief of the natural maxillary anterior teeth. The two implants for the first quadrant were planned as single-tooth restorations. Each was designed as a full contour implant supra-structure using the Cerec Biogeneric abutment design technique. After completing the design phase, each restoration proposal was split into two parts: a zirconia abutment and a lithium disilicate crown. For the restoration of the second quadrant, custom 20-degree-angled abutments were individualized and acquired with the Cerec camera. A block crown was then designed, milled in burn-out acrylic resin, and fabricated from a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic ingot according to the press ceramic technique. Additionally methods of provisional restorations are discussed.

  13. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for Fentanyl in support of the development of Provisional Advisory Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Adeshina, Femi; Teeguarden, Justin G.

    2013-12-15

    Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs) are tiered exposure limits for toxic chemicals in air and drinking water that are developed to assist in emergency responses. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling can support this process by enabling extrapolations across doses, and exposure routes, thereby addressing gaps in the available toxicity data. Here, we describe the development of a PBPK model for Fentanyl – a synthetic opioid used clinically for pain management – to support the establishment of PALs. Starting from an existing model for intravenous Fentanyl, we first optimized distribution and clearance parameters using several additional IV datasets. We then calibrated the model using pharmacokinetic data for various formulations, and determined the absorbed fraction, F, and time taken for the absorbed amount to reach 90% of its final value, t90. For aerosolized pulmonary Fentanyl, F = 1 and t90 < 1 min indicating complete and rapid absorption. The F value ranged from 0.35 to 0.74 for oral and various transmucosal routes. Oral Fentanyl was absorbed the slowest (t90 ∼ 300 min); the absorption of intranasal Fentanyl was relatively rapid (t90 ∼ 20–40 min); and the various oral transmucosal routes had intermediate absorption rates (t90 ∼ 160–300 min). Based on these results, for inhalation exposures, we assumed that all of the Fentanyl inhaled from the air during each breath directly, and instantaneously enters the arterial circulation. We present model predictions of Fentanyl blood concentrations in oral and inhalation scenarios relevant for PAL development, and provide an analytical expression that can be used to extrapolate between oral and inhalation routes for the derivation of PALs. - Highlights: • We develop a Fentanyl PBPK model for relating external dose to internal levels. • We calibrate the model to oral and inhalation exposures using > 50 human datasets. • Model predictions are in good agreement with the available

  14. Ecological restoration of litter in mined areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teresinha Gonçalves Bizuti, Denise; Nino Diniz, Najara; Schweizer, Daniella; de Marchi Soares, Thaís; Casagrande, José Carlos; Henrique Santin Brancalion, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    The success of ecological restoration projects depends on going monitoring of key ecological variables to determine if a desired trajectory has been established and, in the case of mining sites, nutrient cycling recovery plays an utmost importance. This study aimed to quantify and compare the annual litter production in native forests, and in restoration sites established in bauxite mines. We collected samples in 6 native forest remnants and 6 year-old restoration sites every month for a period of one year, in the city of Poços de Caldas/MG, SE Brazil. 120 wire collectors were used (0,6x0,6) and suspended 30cm above the soil surface. The material was dried until constant weight, weighed and fractionated in leaves, branches and reproductive material. The average annual litter production was 2,6 Mg ha-1 in native forests and 2,1 in forest in restoration sites, differing statistically. Litter production was higher in the rainy season, especially in September. Among the litter components, the largest contributor to total production was the fraction leaves, with 55,4% of the total dry weight of material collected, followed by reproductive material which contributed 24,5% and branches, with 20%. We conclude that the young areas in restoration process already restored important part, but still below the production observed in native areas.

  15. Endo-restorative treatment of a severly discolored upper incisor: resolution of the “aesthetic” problem through Componeer veneering System

    PubMed Central

    Migliau, Guido; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Sofan, Afrah Ali Abdullah; Sofan, Eshrak Ali Abdullah; Romeo, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim Re-establishing a patient’s lost dental aesthetic appearance is one of the most important topics for contemporary dentistry. New treatment materials and methods have been coming on the scene, day by day, in order to achieve such an aim. Most dentists prefer more conservative and aesthetic approaches, such as direct or indirect veneer restorations, instead of full-ceramic crowns for anteriors where aesthetics is really important. The aim of the study is to evaluate clinically the effectiveness of a direct composite veneering system in resolving aesthetic problem of an upper incisor with a multidisciplinary treatment approach. Methods Patient with a severe discolored upper incisor came to our attention; at the X-ray exam there was an evidence of a past not good root canal treatment and also old and incongruent composite obturation. After removing all the material inside the root canal was performed a new correct endodontic filling, then Authors tried to bleach the tooth trough “walking-bleach” technique with a hydrogen peroxide (30 volumes) and sodium perborate solution without excellent results. So it was decided to insert a glass-fiber post and than to perform a direct composite veneer with Componeer System (Coltene). Componeer System is a system of prefabricated composite veneers that are abled to be applied directly in the first appointment: after a conservative preparation of the tooth, it must be used an adhesive agent (for example a “three steps”) and then with composite stratification it’s possible to apply the componeer veneer (choosing the right measure, modified as necessary) as the last covering aesthetic layer. Result The evaluation of result of this multidisciplinary treatment was essentially clinical and radiological; in fact it’s possible to observe, from a clinical point of view, the good aesthetic aspect of the direct composite restoration with componeer veneer that offers also some advantages: conservative preparation with

  16. Ceramics as biomaterials for dental restoration.

    PubMed

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Watzke, Ronny; Peschke, Arnd; Kappert, Heinrich

    2008-11-01

    Sintered ceramics and glass-ceramics are widely used as biomaterials for dental restoration, especially as dental inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns or bridges. Biomaterials were developed either to veneer metal frameworks or to produce metal-free dental restorations. Different types of glass-ceramics and ceramics are available and necessary today to fulfill customers' needs (patients, dentists and dental technicians) regarding the properties of the biomaterials and the processing of the products. All of these different types of biomaterials already cover the entire range of indications of dental restorations. Today, patients are increasingly interested in metal-free restoration. Glass-ceramics are particularly suitable for fabricating inlays, crowns and small bridges, as these materials achieve very strong, esthetic results. High-strength ceramics are preferred in situations where the material is exposed to high masticatory forces.

  17. Atomic Oxygen Used to Restore Artworks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2004-01-01

    Techniques developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to produce atomic oxygen in order to simulate the low-Earth-orbit environment for spacecraft materials testing can also be applied in the field of art restoration. Defaced or fire-damaged artwork can be treated with atomic oxygen to remove the damage and enable restoration that could not be accomplished with conventional methods. The process has been patented (U.S. Patents 5,560,781 and 5,693,241) and has been used to restore several works of art.

  18. Watershed Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Thompson; Betsy Macfarlan

    2007-09-27

    In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy issued the Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition (ENLC) funding to implement ecological restoration in Gleason Creek and Smith Valley Watersheds. This project was made possible by congressionally directed funding that was provided through the US Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the Biomass Program. The Ely District Bureau of Land Management (Ely BLM) manages these watersheds and considers them priority areas within the Ely BLM district. These three entities collaborated to address the issues and concerns of Gleason Creek and Smith Valley and prepared a restoration plan to improve the watersheds’ ecological health and resiliency. The restoration process began with watershed-scale vegetation assessments and state and transition models to focus on restoration sites. Design and implementation of restoration treatments ensued and were completed in January 2007. This report describes the restoration process ENLC undertook from planning to implementation of two watersheds in semi-arid Eastern Nevada.

  19. Provisional Matrix Deposition in Hemostasis and Venous Insufficiency: Tissue Preconditioning for Nonhealing Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Tony J.; Broadbent, James A.; McGovern, Jacqui A.; Broszczak, Daniel A.; Parker, Christina N.; Upton, Zee

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Chronic wounds represent a major burden on global healthcare systems and reduce the quality of life of those affected. Significant advances have been made in our understanding of the biochemistry of wound healing progression. However, knowledge regarding the specific molecular processes influencing chronic wound formation and persistence remains limited. Recent Advances: Generally, healing of acute wounds begins with hemostasis and the deposition of a plasma-derived provisional matrix into the wound. The deposition of plasma matrix proteins is known to occur around the microvasculature of the lower limb as a result of venous insufficiency. This appears to alter limb cutaneous tissue physiology and consequently drives the tissue into a ‘preconditioned’ state that negatively influences the response to wounding. Critical Issues: Processes, such as oxygen and nutrient suppression, edema, inflammatory cell trapping/extravasation, diffuse inflammation, and tissue necrosis are thought to contribute to the advent of a chronic wound. Healing of the wound then becomes difficult in the context of an internally injured limb. Thus, interventions and therapies for promoting healing of the limb is a growing area of interest. For venous ulcers, treatment using compression bandaging encourages venous return and improves healing processes within the limb, critically however, once treatment concludes ulcers often reoccur. Future Directions: Improved understanding of the composition and role of pericapillary matrix deposits in facilitating internal limb injury and subsequent development of chronic wounds will be critical for informing and enhancing current best practice therapies and preventative action in the wound care field. PMID:25785239

  20. Provisional Tic Disorder: What to tell parents when their child first starts ticcing

    PubMed Central

    Black, Kevin J; Black, Elizabeth Rose; Greene, Deanna J.; Schlaggar, Bradley L.

    2016-01-01

    The child with recent onset of tics is a common patient in a pediatrics or child neurology practice. If the child’s first tic was less than a year in the past, the diagnosis is usually Provisional Tic Disorder (PTD). Published reviews by experts reveal substantial consensus on prognosis in this situation: the tics will almost always disappear in a few months, having remained mild while they lasted. Surprisingly, however, the sparse existing data may not support these opinions. PTD may have just as much importance for science as for clinical care. It provides an opportunity to prospectively observe the spontaneous remission of tics. Such prospective studies may aid identification of genes or biomarkers specifically associated with remission rather than onset of tics. A better understanding of tic remission may also suggest novel treatment strategies for Tourette syndrome, or may lead to secondary prevention of tic disorders. This review summarizes the limited existing data on the epidemiology, phenomenology, and outcome of PTD, highlights areas in which prospective study is sorely needed, and proposes that tic disorders may completely remit much less often than is generally believed. PMID:27158458

  1. Soft Tissue Augmentation Techniques in Implants Placed and Provisionalized Immediately: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Prados-Frutos, Juan Carlos; Manchón, Ángel; Rodríguez-Molinero, Jesús; Sammartino, Gilberto; Calvo Guirado, José Luis; Gómez-de Diego, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of techniques for soft tissue augmentation in the placement of immediate implants with and without provisionalization and to assess the quality of the reports in the literature. Randomized clinical trials, prospective clinical trials, and case series were included in this review. Clinical questions were formulated and organised according to the PICOS strategy. An electronic search was performed in PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Scopus, and ISI Web up until June 2016. Interexaminer agreement on eligibility (k = 0.842; p = 0.103) and quality (k = 0.933; p < 0.001) was high. Methodological approaches were assessed using criteria based on design related forms designed by the Dutch Cochrane Collaboration. Finally, 14 papers were identified. In two studies, the implant survival was 90%; for the rest of the studies it was 100%. All studies reported favourable aesthetic, biological, and radiographic outcomes. Surgical and biomechanical complications of this technique were not relevant. This technique effectively compensates for the expected loss of volume of the oral soft tissues and maintains high success rates with good aesthetic results over time. PMID:27517046

  2. En Route Descent Advisor Multi-Sector Planning Using Active and Provisional Controller Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vivona, Robert; Green, Steven

    2003-01-01

    As decision support tools are developed to support controllers in complex air traffic control environments, new approaches to maintaining situation awareness and managing traffic planning must be developed to handle the ever-increasing amounts of alerting and advisory data. Within high-density metering and other environments where flight path changes are the rule, not the exception, and where interactions between these changes are required, current trial planning approaches are limited by potential increases in workload. The Enroute Descent Advisor (EDA) is a set of decision support tool capabilities for managing high-density en route traffic subject to metering restrictions. The EDA system s novel approach builds aircraft plans from combinations of user intent data and builds controller plans from combinations of aircraft plans to effectively maintain situation awareness during traffic planning. By maintaining both active (current) and provisional (proposed) controller plans, EDA supports controllers in coordinated traffic planning both within and between sectors. Ultimately, EDA s multi-sector planning approach will facilitate a transition from current sector-oriented operations to a new trajectory-oriented paradigm, enabling new levels of efficiency and collaboration in air traffic control.

  3. Provisional Tic Disorder: What to tell parents when their child first starts ticcing.

    PubMed

    Black, Kevin J; Black, Elizabeth Rose; Greene, Deanna J; Schlaggar, Bradley L

    2016-01-01

    The child with recent onset of tics is a common patient in a pediatrics or child neurology practice. If the child's first tic was less than a year in the past, the diagnosis is usually Provisional Tic Disorder (PTD). Published reviews by experts reveal substantial consensus on prognosis in this situation: the tics will almost always disappear in a few months, having remained mild while they lasted. Surprisingly, however, the sparse existing data may not support these opinions. PTD may have just as much importance for science as for clinical care. It provides an opportunity to prospectively observe the spontaneous remission of tics. Such prospective studies may aid identification of genes or biomarkers specifically associated with remission rather than onset of tics. A better understanding of tic remission may also suggest novel treatment strategies for Tourette syndrome, or may lead to secondary prevention of tic disorders. This review summarizes the limited existing data on the epidemiology, phenomenology, and outcome of PTD, highlights areas in which prospective study is sorely needed, and proposes that tic disorders may completely remit much less often than is generally believed.

  4. Overview of the Standing Operating Procedure (SOP) for the development of Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs).

    PubMed

    Young, Robert A; Bast, Cheryl B; Wood, Carol S; Adeshina, Femi

    2009-12-01

    Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs) are concentrations in air and drinking water for priority toxic chemicals. This article summarizes the Standing Operating Procedure (SOP) currently in place for the data-driven development of chemical-specific PALs. To provide consistency and transparency, and to avoid faults of arbitrariness, the SOP was developed for guidance in deriving PAL values. Three levels (PAL 1, PAL 2, and PAL 3), distinguished by severity of toxic effects, are developed for 24-hour, 30-day, 90-day, and 2-year durations of potential drinking water and inhalation exposures for the general public. The SOP for PAL development focuses on (1) data acquisition and analysis, (2) identification of a chemical-specific critical effect, (3) selection of a quantitative point-of-departure (POD), (4) uncertainty analysis and adjustments, (5) exposure duration adjustment and extrapolation, (6) identification of special concerns and issues, and (7) verification, documentation, and dissemination of PALs. To avoid uncompromising rigidity in deriving PAL values and to allow for incorporation of new or refined methodologies, the overall procedure is fluid and subject to modification. The purpose of this publication is to provide a summary of this SOP.

  5. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of a novel strongly hemolytic Brachyspira species, provisionally designated "Brachyspira hampsonii".

    PubMed

    Chander, Yogesh; Primus, Alexander; Oliveira, Simone; Gebhart, Connie J

    2012-09-01

    Since 2007, outbreaks of severe bloody diarrhea and hemorrhagic colitis have been reported in the United States and Canada. Though the primary causative agent of swine dysentery is Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, which is strongly hemolytic, the current report describes the isolation of a novel strongly hemolytic Brachyspira sp. This novel Brachyspira sp. was identified from clinical submissions at the Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, and 40 of such isolates were obtained from 22 clinical submissions representing 5 states. Isolates were confirmed to be different from any known Brachyspira sp. on the basis of phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences of nox and 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Phylogenetic analyses grouped all isolates into 2 clades (clades I and II), and grouping patterns were similar for both nox and 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. Phenotypically, all isolates were indole and hippurate negative, and enzymatic profiling indicated 2 types of profiles, irrespective of the phylogenetic grouping, differing only in the production of β-glucosidase. The results suggest that a potentially virulent new species of Brachyspira sp., provisionally named "Brachyspira hampsonii ", is circulating among swine herds in the United States.

  6. Soft Tissue Augmentation Techniques in Implants Placed and Provisionalized Immediately: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Rosa; Prados-Frutos, Juan Carlos; Manchón, Ángel; Rodríguez-Molinero, Jesús; Sammartino, Gilberto; Calvo Guirado, José Luis; Gómez-de Diego, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of techniques for soft tissue augmentation in the placement of immediate implants with and without provisionalization and to assess the quality of the reports in the literature. Randomized clinical trials, prospective clinical trials, and case series were included in this review. Clinical questions were formulated and organised according to the PICOS strategy. An electronic search was performed in PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Scopus, and ISI Web up until June 2016. Interexaminer agreement on eligibility (k = 0.842; p = 0.103) and quality (k = 0.933; p < 0.001) was high. Methodological approaches were assessed using criteria based on design related forms designed by the Dutch Cochrane Collaboration. Finally, 14 papers were identified. In two studies, the implant survival was 90%; for the rest of the studies it was 100%. All studies reported favourable aesthetic, biological, and radiographic outcomes. Surgical and biomechanical complications of this technique were not relevant. This technique effectively compensates for the expected loss of volume of the oral soft tissues and maintains high success rates with good aesthetic results over time.

  7. Materialism.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  8. Glassfiber post: an alternative for restoring grossly decayed primary incisors.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Manjul; Grover, Rashu

    2012-05-01

    Restoration of primary incisors, which have been severely damaged by rampant caries or trauma, is a difficult task for the pediatric dentist. With the introduction of new adhesive systems and restorative materials, alternative approaches for treating these teeth have been proposed. This paper discusses the restoration of carious primary maxillary incisors using composite resin restoration reinforced with fiberglass post. Two case reports are presented here to describe the procedure. Over a 1 year period, the crowns have demonstrated good retention and esthetic results. How to cite this article: Mehra M, Grover R. Glassfiber Post: An Alternative for Restoring Grossly Decayed Primary Incisors. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(2):159-162.

  9. Biologic Restoration: A Treatment Option for Reconstruction of Anterior Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Priyanka; S, Shankar; Chaurasia, Vishwajit Rampratap; Masamatti, Vinaykumar S

    2014-01-01

    Several procedures are advised to manage fractured anterior tooth structure using acrylic resin, composite restoration, ceramic or metal crown with ceramic facing. Biologic restoration is a procedure to restore fractured tooth structure with natural tooth material. In this in vitro case we have made an attempt for aesthetic rehabilitation of maxillary central incisor with similar biologic crown taken form extracted maxillary central incisor. It was observed that biologic restoration is an aesthetic, economical, fast and functional procedure which can be used as an alternative method to restore fractured primary or permanent anteriors. PMID:25584332

  10. Survival of ART restorations assessed using selected FDI and modified ART restoration criteria.

    PubMed

    Farag, Abeer; van der Sanden, Wil J M; Abdelwahab, Hisran; Frencken, Jo E

    2011-06-01

    A new set of criteria for assessing the quality of restorations using modern restorative materials, named FDI criteria, was recently introduced. This study tested the null hypothesis that there is no significant difference in survival estimate percentages of ART restorations assessed using selected FDI and modified ART criteria after 1 and 5 years. One operator placed a total of 60 class I and 30 Class II high-viscosity glass-ionomer ART restorations in ninety 14- to 15-year-olds. Two calibrated and independent evaluators using both criteria evaluated restorations on diestone replicas at baseline and after 1 and 5 years. Statistical analyses were done using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. The survival results of ART restorations assessed using both sets of criteria after 1 and 5 years (p = 0.27) did not differ significantly. Three ART restorations were assessed as failures according to the ART criteria, while they were assessed as survived using the FDI criteria. We conclude that the modified ART criteria enable reliable assessment of ART restorations in permanent teeth from diestone replicas and that there was no significant difference in survival estimates of ART restorations assessed using both sets of criteria. The null hypothesis was accepted.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Fluoride Releasing Ability of Various Restorative Materials after the Application of Surface Coating Agents – An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, GVS; Sai-Sankar, AJ; Sridhar, M; Pranitha, Kakarla; Sai-Krishna, VS

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fluoride plays a key role in prevention of dental caries and is also an essential element for oral health promotion both in children and adults. Aim The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of surface coating (petroleum jelly, G-Coat Plus) on the fluoride releasing property of conventional Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) and Zirconomer. Materials and Methods A total of 30 disk shaped brass mold specimens (6±0.1mm in diameter and 2±0.1mm thickness) for each test group were fabricated with conventional GIC (Group A) and Zirconomer (Group B). These test groups were further divided into three subgroups of 10 each. The unprotected specimens act as control (Group A1 and B1), G-Coat Plus specimens as (Group A2 and B2) and for the remaining specimens petroleum jelly was applied (Group A3 and B3). Fluoride ion concentration was measured with a combination of fluoride ion specific electrode and ion analyzer for every 24 hours for 15 days. The data was statistically analyzed using Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Results The Group B released significantly more fluoride than Group A. Among all the subgroups the greatest amount of fluoride was released from Group B1, in the first 24 hours followed by A1 and B2. The least was observed on 15th day with Group B3 and A3. Conclusion Both the tested materials (GIC and Zirconomer) used in the study exhibited fluoride release whether protected or unprotected with surface coating. Though there was a difference between the groups, the pattern of fluoride release was similar and continuous throughout the study period i.e., first the initial burst followed by sustained release. The results revealed Zirconomer released more fluoride and is comparable to conventional GIC. PMID:28209001

  12. Randomized comparison between provisional and routine kissing-balloon technique after main vessel crossover stenting for coronary bifurcation lesions.

    PubMed

    Yamawaki, Masahiro; Fujita, Masaki; Sasaki, Shinya; Tsurugida, Masanori; Nanasato, Mamoru; Araki, Motoharu; Hirano, Keisuke; Ito, Yoshiaki; Tsukahara, Reiko; Muramatsu, Toshiya

    2017-04-11

    We compared the myocardial ischemic burden of provisional and routine final kissing-balloon inflation (FKI) with the 1-stent strategy using a second-generation drug-eluting stent for coronary bifurcation lesions (CBL). There are no established guidelines for side branch (SB) intervention after main vessel stenting. In total, 113 CBL patients were randomized to receive different SB intervention strategies: provisional-FKI group (n = 57; FKI only when SB flow was TIMI <3) and routine-FKI group (n = 56; mandatory FKI with aggressive treatment until SB-residual stenosis <50%). Dipyridamole-stress myocardial perfusion scintigraphy with (99m)Tc was performed after 8 months. The regional summed-difference score (r-SDS) was calculated according to the coronary territory. The primary endpoint included target vessel ischemia (TVI; r-SDS ≥ 2) at 8 months, whereas the clinical primary endpoint was major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) at 3 years. The percent (%) myocardial ischemia (100 × SDS/68) was also calculated. At 8 months, TVI was identified in 11 and 4% in the provisional-FKI and routine-FKI groups, respectively (p = 0.226). SB-binary restenosis (48 vs. 4%, p < 0.001) and myocardial ischemia at the SB territory (11 vs. 0%, p = 0.030) were more common in the provisional-FKI group; however, in TVI patients, % myocardial ischemia (4.12 ± 1.23% vs. 3.68 ± 1.04%; p = 0.677) did not significantly differ. Moderate/severe ischemia (>10% myocardial ischemia) was not observed in the target vessel in either group. Long-term cumulative MACE were similar between the groups (9 vs. 14%; p = 0.358). Provisional-FKI according to TIMI-SB flow grade led to similar and acceptable myocardial ischemia, in comparison with routine-FKI, which may contribute to the identical long-term follow-up.

  13. Gill's 'History' restored

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurn, Mark

    2009-06-01

    Note about the restoration of the copy of Sir David Gill's 'A History and Description of the Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope' in the Library of the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge. The book was restored with funds provided by the SHA in thanks for facilities for meetings provided to the Institute.

  14. Guiding Restoration Principles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    restoration of important ecosystem functions requires reintegrating landscapes or restorating the func- tional aspects of landscapes ( Risser 1992...51-64. Risser , P. G. 1992. Landscape ecology approach to ecosystem rehabilitation. Pages 37-46 in M. L. Wali (ed.), Ecosystem Rehabilitation

  15. Utah Paiute Tribal Restoration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Allen C.

    The Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah Restoration Act (1980) restored federal recognition of the tribe after a quarter century of ambiguous political status, and resulted in significant improvements of educational status of tribal members and intensification of the political presence of Southern Paiutes. Following the Paiute Indian Termination Act…

  16. Power system restoration issues

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M. ); Kafka, R.J. )

    1991-04-01

    This article describes some of the problems encountered in the three phases of power system restoration (PSR). The three phases of PSR are: Planning for restart and reintegration of the bulk power supply; Actions during system degradation for saving and retaining critical sources of power; Restoration when the power system has stabilized at some degraded level.

  17. Retributive and restorative justice.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Michael; Okimoto, Tyler G; Feather, Norman T; Platow, Michael J

    2008-10-01

    The emergence of restorative justice as an alternative model to Western, court-based criminal justice may have important implications for the psychology of justice. It is proposed that two different notions of justice affect responses to rule-breaking: restorative and retributive justice. Retributive justice essentially refers to the repair of justice through unilateral imposition of punishment, whereas restorative justice means the repair of justice through reaffirming a shared value-consensus in a bilateral process. Among the symbolic implications of transgressions, concerns about status and power are primarily related to retributive justice and concerns about shared values are primarily related to restorative justice. At the core of these processes, however, lies the parties' construal of their identity relation, specifically whether or not respondents perceive to share an identity with the offender. The specific case of intergroup transgressions is discussed, as are implications for future research on restoring a sense of justice after rule-breaking.

  18. Deriving a provisional tolerable intake for intravenous exposure to silver nanoparticles released from medical devices.

    PubMed

    Savery, Laura C; Viñas, René; Nagy, Amber M; Pradeep, Prachi; Merrill, Stephen J; Hood, Alan M; Malghan, Subhas G; Goering, Peter L; Brown, Ronald P

    2017-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are incorporated into medical devices for their anti-microbial characteristics. The potential exposure and toxicity of AgNPs is unknown due to varying physicochemical particle properties and lack of toxicological data. The aim of this safety assessment is to derive a provisional tolerable intake (pTI) value for AgNPs released from blood-contacting medical devices. A literature review of in vivo studies investigating critical health effects induced from intravenous (i. v.) exposure to AgNPs was evaluated by the Annapolis Accords principles and Toxicological Data Reliability Assessment Tool (ToxRTool). The point of departure (POD) was based on an i. v. 28-day repeated AgNP (20 nm) dose toxicity study reporting an increase in relative spleen weight in rats with a 5% lower confidence bound of the benchmark dose (BMDL05) of 0.14 mg/kg bw/day. The POD was extrapolated to humans by a modifying factor of 1,000 to account for intraspecies variability, interspecies differences and lack of long-term toxicity data. The pTI for long-term i. v. exposure to 20 nm AgNPs released from blood-contacting medical devices was 0.14 μg/kg bw/day. This pTI may not be appropriate for nanoparticles of other physicochemical properties or routes of administration. The methodology is appropriate for deriving pTIs for nanoparticles in general.

  19. Fibronectin provides a conduit for fibroblast transmigration from collagenous stroma into fibrin clot provisional matrix.

    PubMed

    Greiling, D; Clark, R A

    1997-04-01

    After injury, the wound space is filled with a fibrin/fibronectin clot containing growth factors released by platelets and monocytes. In response to these factors, fibroblasts migrate into the fibrin clot and contribute to the formation of granulation tissue. The functional mechanisms allowing fibroblasts to leave the collagenous matrix of normal connective tissue and invade the provisional matrix of the fibrin clot have not been fully defined. To investigate these mechanisms we established a new in vitro model which simulates specific aspects of early wound healing, that is, the migration of fibroblasts from a three-dimensional collagen matrix into a fibrin clot. This transmigration could be induced by physiological concentrations of platelet releasate or platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) in a concentration-dependent manner. At 24 hours irradiated fibroblasts invaded the fibrin gel almost as well as non-irradiated cells, indicating that transmigration was independent of proliferation. Plasminogen and its activators appear to be necessary for invasion of the fibrin clot since protease inhibitors decreased the amount of migration. These serine proteases, however, were not necessary for exit from the collagen gel as fibroblasts migrated out of the collagen gel onto a surface coated with fibrin fibrils even in the presence of inhibitors. Removal of fibronectin (FN) from either the collagen gel or the fibrin gel markedly decreased the number of migrating cells, suggesting that FN provides a conduit for transmigration. Cell movement in the in vitro model was inhibited by RGD peptide, and by monoclonal antibodies against the subunits of the alpha5 beta1 and alpha v beta3 integrin receptor. Thus, the functional requirements for fibroblast transmigration from collagen-rich to fibrin-rich matrices, such as occurs in early wound healing, have been partially defined using an in vitro paradigm of this important biologic process.

  20. Provisional in-silico biopharmaceutics classification (BCS) to guide oral drug product development

    PubMed Central

    Wolk, Omri; Agbaria, Riad; Dahan, Arik

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate in-silico predictions of physicochemical properties, in order to guide oral drug development by provisional biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS). Four in-silico methods were used to estimate LogP: group contribution (CLogP) using two different software programs, atom contribution (ALogP), and element contribution (KLogP). The correlations (r2) of CLogP, ALogP and KLogP versus measured LogP data were 0.97, 0.82, and 0.71, respectively. The classification of drugs with reported intestinal permeability in humans was correct for 64.3%–72.4% of the 29 drugs on the dataset, and for 81.82%–90.91% of the 22 drugs that are passively absorbed using the different in-silico algorithms. Similar permeability classification was obtained with the various in-silico methods. The in-silico calculations, along with experimental melting points, were then incorporated into a thermodynamic equation for solubility estimations that largely matched the reference solubility values. It was revealed that the effect of melting point on the solubility is minor compared to the partition coefficient, and an average melting point (162.7°C) could replace the experimental values, with similar results. The in-silico methods classified 20.76% (±3.07%) as Class 1, 41.51% (±3.32%) as Class 2, 30.49% (±4.47%) as Class 3, and 6.27% (±4.39%) as Class 4. In conclusion, in-silico methods can be used for BCS classification of drugs in early development, from merely their molecular formula and without foreknowledge of their chemical structure, which will allow for the improved selection, engineering, and developability of candidates. These in-silico methods could enhance success rates, reduce costs, and accelerate oral drug products development. PMID:25284986

  1. Current aspects of restoring traumatically fractured teeth.

    PubMed

    Krastl, Gabriel; Filippi, Andreas; Zitzmann, Nicola U; Walter, Clemens; Weiger, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Endodontic and restorative considerations are of primary significance in the treatment of tooth fractures. Since exposed dentinal tubules permit invasion of bacteria into the endodontic system, a protective dressing must be applied as part of the emergency treatment. Provided the dentin wound has been sealed, restorative treatment can also be carried out at a later stage. The fractured tooth fragment can be reattached using adhesive protocols in order to restore function and esthetic appearance. If reattachment is difficult or impossible, eg, in cases of multiple or missing fragments, current composite materials enable excellent esthetic results. Minimally-invasive direct composite restorations are preferred over the more invasive indirect restorations, at least in immature teeth with an extensive coronal pulp dimension. Restorative treatment of crown-root fractures is frequently demanding due to inaccessible subgingival fracture margins. Extrusion of the remaining root is an alternative method to surgical crown lengthening for re-establishing the biological width. This can be carried out either orthodontically (forced eruption), or surgically (intra-alveolar transplantation). Although the treatment of crown-root fractures is one of the most technically sensitive procedures in dental traumatology and is frequently considered as a long-term temporary restoration, tooth conservation up to the age at which implants can be placed may be regarded as a success.

  2. Restorative dentistry for the pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Hackmyer, Steven P; Donly, Kevin J

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry sponsored the Pediatric Restorative Dentistry Consensus Conference in 2002. This paper will review the consensus statements that were issued as a result of the conference. Since the conference there have been advances in procedures, materials, and techniques that need to be considered in terms of some of the consensus statements. The introduction of the First Dental Home, interim therapeutic restoration and nanotechnology are examples of some of the materials and techniques that are now part of everyday pediatric dentistry. This paper will discuss the updates as it relates to each of the 2002 consensus statements.

  3. Bearing restoration by grinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanau, H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Chen, S. M.; Bull, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint program was undertaken by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Army Aviation Systems Command to restore by grinding those rolling-element bearings which are currently being discarded at aircraft engine and transmission overhaul. Three bearing types were selected from the UH-1 helicopter engine (T-53) and transmission for the pilot program. No bearing failures occurred related to the restoration by grinding process. The risk and cost of a bearing restoration by grinding programs was analyzed. A microeconomic impact analysis was performed.

  4. Principles of Wetland Restoration

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    the return of a degraded ecosystem to a close approximation of its remaining natural potential - is experiencing a groundswell of support across the United States. The number of stream, river, lake, wetland and estuary restoration projects grows yearly

  5. Ecosystem restoration: Chapter 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cullinane Thomas, Catherine M.; Skrabis, K. E.; Gascoigne, William

    2012-01-01

    The Department of the Interior extensively supports―through its mission, policy, programs, and funding― the study, planning, implementation, and monitoring of ecosystem restoration. This commitment is reflected in the Department's FY2011-2016 Strategic Plan.

  6. The Menominee Restoration Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deer, Ada E.

    1973-01-01

    The article discusses the background and current status of the Menominee Restoration Bill, which will reverse the termination of Federal responsibility effected on the Wisconsin Menominee Tribe in 1961. (KM)

  7. ESTUARINE HABITAT RESTORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.

    2015-09-01

    Restoring estuarine habitats generally means repairing damages caused by humans and natural forces. Because of the extensive human occupation, development, and use of coastal areas for centuries, the extensive estuarine habitats have been either destroyed or significantly impaired.

  8. Restoration of Ailing Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Oswald J.

    2012-01-01

    It is widely held that humankind's destructive tendencies when exploiting natural resources leads to irreparable harm to the environment. Yet, this thinking runs counter to evidence that many ecological systems damaged by severe natural environmental disturbances (e.g., hurricanes) can restore themselves via processes of natural recovery. The emerging field of restoration ecology is capitalizing on the natural restorative tendencies of ecological systems to build a science of repairing the harm inflicted by humans on natural environment. Evidence for this, for example, comes from a new meta-analysis of 124 studies that synthesizes recovery of impacted wetlands worldwide. While it may take up to two human generations to see full recovery, there is promise, given human will, to restore many damaged wetlands worldwide. PMID:22291573

  9. A provisional regulatory gene network for specification of endomesoderm in the sea urchin embryo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Eric H.; Rast, Jonathan P.; Oliveri, Paola; Ransick, Andrew; Calestani, Cristina; Yuh, Chiou-Hwa; Minokawa, Takuya; Amore, Gabriele; Hinman, Veronica; Arenas-Mena, Cesar; Otim, Ochan; Brown, C. Titus; Livi, Carolina B.; Lee, Pei Yun; Revilla, Roger; Schilstra, Maria J.; Clarke, Peter J C.; Rust, Alistair G.; Pan, Zhengjun; Arnone, Maria I.; Rowen, Lee; Cameron, R. Andrew; McClay, David R.; Hood, Leroy; Bolouri, Hamid

    2002-01-01

    We present the current form of a provisional DNA sequence-based regulatory gene network that explains in outline how endomesodermal specification in the sea urchin embryo is controlled. The model of the network is in a continuous process of revision and growth as new genes are added and new experimental results become available; see http://www.its.caltech.edu/mirsky/endomeso.htm (End-mes Gene Network Update) for the latest version. The network contains over 40 genes at present, many newly uncovered in the course of this work, and most encoding DNA-binding transcriptional regulatory factors. The architecture of the network was approached initially by construction of a logic model that integrated the extensive experimental evidence now available on endomesoderm specification. The internal linkages between genes in the network have been determined functionally, by measurement of the effects of regulatory perturbations on the expression of all relevant genes in the network. Five kinds of perturbation have been applied: (1) use of morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeted to many of the key regulatory genes in the network; (2) transformation of other regulatory factors into dominant repressors by construction of Engrailed repressor domain fusions; (3) ectopic expression of given regulatory factors, from genetic expression constructs and from injected mRNAs; (4) blockade of the beta-catenin/Tcf pathway by introduction of mRNA encoding the intracellular domain of cadherin; and (5) blockade of the Notch signaling pathway by introduction of mRNA encoding the extracellular domain of the Notch receptor. The network model predicts the cis-regulatory inputs that link each gene into the network. Therefore, its architecture is testable by cis-regulatory analysis. Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus variegatus genomic BAC recombinants that include a large number of the genes in the network have been sequenced and annotated. Tests of the cis-regulatory predictions of

  10. [Combined crown lengthening surgery with restorative therapy for inducing papilla growth: a case report].

    PubMed

    Le, Di; Hu, Wen-jie; Zhang, Hao

    2013-04-18

    A young lady with unsatisfied restorations of upper anterior teeth and swollen gum wanted to improve aesthetics. Oral examination showed that 12-22 were provisional crowns with normal occlusion, poorly gingival contour and gummy smile. The gingiva was red, light swollen and bleeding on probing. X-ray showed the roots of 11, 21 were short and the alveolar bone absorbed. After the periodontal initial treatment, an ideal location of gingival margin was determined. Then, an esthetic periodontal surgery was performed to recover the biology width and the gingival margin was fitted with the anterior teeth. The temporary restorations were made twice to guide the gingiva growth by changing the shape of the restorations and moving up the contact points of the restorations. The ceramic crowns were completed 3 months after the operation. The gummy smile disappeared and the gingival margin was filled well with the upper anterior ceramic crowns. The 14-month follow-up presented a satisfied effect. Crown lengthening surgery combined restorative therapy could lead papilla to grow well. This process is beneficial for the future treatment plan and clinical esthetic evaluation.

  11. Clinical Evaluation of Dental Restorative Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    of Nonprecious Alloys for Use with Porcelain Veneers . Part One, Physical Properties, J. Prosth Dent, 30: 424-431, 1973. Page 13...manufacturer (Jelenko and Company, Armonk, New York) recommends the use of their "thermotrol" casting set up. Attempt to cast this alloy with this piece of ...Nielsen, J.P. and Tuccillo, J’.J.: Calculations of Interfacial Stress in Dental Porcelain Bonded to Gold Alloy Substrate

  12. Optical properties of direct restorative materials

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Y.; Powers, J.M.; O'Brien, W.J.

    1981-05-01

    The contrast ratio, light reflectivity, scattering coefficient, and absorption coefficient of four composites and an unfilled resin were calculated algebraically from reflection spectrophotometric data using Kubelka's equations. The correlation coefficient between calculated and experimental values of contrast ratio was 0.9996. Values of infinite optical thickness ranged from 4.19 to 6.70 mm.

  13. Conservation, Preservation and Restoration in Nigerian Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojo-Igbinoba, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    Addresses problems involved with the conservation, preservation, and restoration of library materials in Nigeria. Topics discussed include insect pests; light, heat, and humidity; atmospheric pollution and dust; natural disasters including fire and floods; theft and vandalism; acidity of paper; binding and mending; and trained personnel. (15…

  14. Immediate occlusal loading in edentulous jaws, CT-guided surgery and fixed provisional prosthesis: a maxillary arch clinical report.

    PubMed

    Drago, Carl; del Castillo, Robert; Peterson, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Immediate occlusal loading (IOL) in edentulous jaws has been reported in numerous publications with implant cumulative survival rates consistent with conventional, unloaded healing protocols. Computed Tomography (CT)-guided surgery has more recently been developed and accepted as an additional treatment modality for maxillary and mandibular implant placement, with or without IOL. Reports as to the accuracy of planned versus actual implant placement in CT-guided surgeries have indicated that CT-guided surgery is not 100% accurate; standard deviations have been reported with values between 1 and 2 mm in terms of actual versus planned placement. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical parameters associated with IOL, and CT-guided surgery in edentulous jaws; and to present a clinical case illustrating the clinical and laboratory phases of treatment. The illustrated treatment was accomplished with an IOL protocol and includes fabrication and placement of a laboratory-processed provisional maxillary prosthesis. This particular protocol had slightly increased costs relative to conventional implant placement; however, the clinicians and patient benefited from improved accuracy of the provisional prostheses and decreased chairtime for the clinical procedures. The benefits and limitations of this treatment protocol are also discussed.

  15. Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Schoeppner, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has successfully developed an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process, a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF3 process can be used to build a complex, unitized part in a layer-additive fashion, although the more immediate payoff is for use as a manufacturing process for adding details to components fabricated from simplified castings and forgings or plate products. The EBF3 process produces structural metallic parts with strengths comparable to that of wrought product forms and has been demonstrated on aluminum, titanium, and nickel-based alloys to date. The EBF3 process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Operation in a vacuum ensures a clean process environment and eliminates the need for a consumable shield gas. Advanced metal manufacturing methods such as EBF3 are being explored for fabrication and repair of aerospace structures, offering potential for improvements in cost, weight, and performance to enhance mission success for aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. Near-term applications of the EBF3 process are most likely to be implemented for cost reduction and lead time reduction through addition of details onto simplified preforms (casting or forging). This is particularly attractive for components with protruding details that would require a significantly large volume of material to be machined away from an oversized forging, offering significant reductions to the buy-to-fly ratio. Future far-term applications promise improved structural efficiency through reduced weight and improved performance by exploiting the layer-additive nature of the EBF3 process to fabricate tailored unitized structures with functionally graded microstructures and compositions.

  16. Restoring the prairie

    SciTech Connect

    Mlot, C.

    1990-12-01

    The US DOE at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois, prairie restoration is taking place in order to conserve the rich topsoil. This is the largest of many prairie restoration experiments. Big bluestem grass (Andropogon gerardi), blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), and buffalo grass (Buchloe dactyloides) are the main initial grasses grown. After their growth reaches enough biomass to sustain a fire, other prairie plants such as purple prairie clover and dropseed grass appear. The goal of this is to provide a generous refuge for disappearing native plants and animals, a site for scientific research, and a storehouse of genes adapted to a region that produces much of the worlds food. Plans for restoring the marsh and oak savanna, also native to the Fermilab site are also in the works.

  17. Posterior composite restoration update: focus on factors influencing form and function

    PubMed Central

    Bohaty, Brenda S; Ye, Qiang; Misra, Anil; Sene, Fabio; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    Restoring posterior teeth with resin-based composite materials continues to gain popularity among clinicians, and the demand for such aesthetic restorations is increasing. Indeed, the most common aesthetic alternative to dental amalgam is resin composite. Moderate to large posterior composite restorations, however, have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries, and increased frequency of replacement. Investigators across the globe are researching new materials and techniques that will improve the clinical performance, handling characteristics, and mechanical and physical properties of composite resin restorative materials. Despite such attention, large to moderate posterior composite restorations continue to have a clinical lifetime that is approximately one-half that of the dental amalgam. While there are numerous recommendations regarding preparation design, restoration placement, and polymerization technique, current research indicates that restoration longevity depends on several variables that may be difficult for the dentist to control. These variables include the patient’s caries risk, tooth position, patient habits, number of restored surfaces, the quality of the tooth–restoration bond, and the ability of the restorative material to produce a sealed tooth–restoration interface. Although clinicians tend to focus on tooth form when evaluating the success and failure of posterior composite restorations, the emphasis must remain on advancing our understanding of the clinical variables that impact the formation of a durable seal at the restoration–tooth interface. This paper presents an update of existing technology and underscores the mechanisms that negatively impact the durability of posterior composite restorations in permanent teeth. PMID:23750102

  18. Everglades Restoration Critiqued

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    The monitoring and assessment plan for the $7.8-billion effort to restore the hydrologic regime of the remaining wetlands of Florida's Everglades needs to be strengthened, according to a 2 April study by a committee of the National Academy of Sciences. The evolving monitoring and assessment plan of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan is grounded in current scientific theory and practice of adaptive management, according to the report. However, the least-developed aspects of the management are feedback mechanisms to connect monitoring to planning and management, the report notes.

  19. Overvoltage control during restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M. ); Alexander, R.W. ); Avra-Movic, B. )

    1992-11-01

    This paper is one in a series presented on behalf of the System Operation Subcommittee with the intent of focusing industry attention on power system restoration issues. Restoration of a bulk power supply system presents the operator with unique challenges not normally encountered in daily operations. The initial, and even intermediate transmission system topologies are quite different from the well integrated systems during normal operation. There are several problems that pertain to these non-normal topologies that are of common concern to operators and need to be addressed. One of these, the problem of overvoltages, is the subject of this paper.

  20. Vascular restoration therapy and bioresorbable vascular scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunbing; Zhang, Xingdong

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of minimally invasive intervention technologies for vascular restoration therapy from early-stage balloon angioplasty in 1970s, metallic bare metal stent and metallic drug-eluting stent technologies in 1990s and 2000s, to bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) technology in large-scale development in recent years. The history, the current stage, the challenges and the future of BVS development are discussed in detail as the best available approach for vascular restoration therapy. The criteria of materials selection, design and processing principles of BVS, and the corresponding clinical trial results are also summarized in this article. PMID:26816624