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Sample records for proximal tibial physeal

  1. Genu recurvatum caused by partial growth arrest of the proximal tibial physis: simultaneous correction and lengthening with physeal distraction. A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Olerud, C; Danckwardt-Lillieström, G; Olerud, S

    1986-01-01

    Two cases of genu recurvatum deformity and leg length discrepancy after partial growth arrest of the proximal tibial physis are described. The patients are both boys thirteen and fifteen years old respectively. The etiology of the deformity is considered to be local pressure on the tibial tuberosity, in the first case after treatment with plaster cast after correction of an angular deformity in a tibial fracture and in the second case after prolonged treatment with patellar tendon bearing brace. The boys were treated with physeal distraction which corrected both the leg length discrepancy and the angular deformity. The technique is recommended because the correction is done at the site of the deformity and knee motion is possible during the entire treatment period.

  2. MRI Anatomy of the Tibial ACL Attachment and Proximal Epiphysis in a Large Population of Skeletally Immature Knees: Reference Parameters for Planning Anatomic Physeal-Sparing ACL Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Swami, Vimarsha Gopal; Mabee, Myles; Hui, Catherine; Jaremko, Jacob Lester

    2014-07-01

    To aid in performing anatomic physeal-sparing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, it is important for surgeons to have reference data for the native ACL attachment positions and epiphyseal anatomy in skeletally immature knees. To characterize anatomic parameters of the ACL tibial insertion and proximal tibial epiphysis at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a large population of skeletally immature knees. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. The ACL tibial attachment site and proximal epiphysis were examined in 570 skeletally immature knees with an intact ACL (age, 6-15 years) using 1.5-T proton density-weighted sagittal MRI; also measured were the tibial anteroposterior diameter; anterior, central, and posterior ACL attachment positions; vertical height of the epiphysis; and maximum oblique epiphyseal depth extending from the ACL tibial attachment center to the tibial tuberosity. In adolescents (11-15 years of age), the center of the ACL's tibial attachment was 51.5% ± 5.7% of the anteroposterior diameter of the tibia, with no significant differences between sexes or age groups (P > .05 in all cases). Mean vertical epiphyseal height was 15.9 ± 1.7 mm in the adolescent group, with significant differences between 11-year-olds (15.2 ± 1.5 mm) and 15-year-olds (16.6 ± 1.6 mm), P < .001, and between males (16.6 ± 1.5 mm) and females (14.8 ± 1.4), P < .001. Mean maximum oblique depth was 30.0 ± 5.3 mm, with a significant difference between 11-year-olds (26.7 ± 4.9 mm) and 15-year-olds (32.7 ± 5.1 mm), P < .001, and between males (29.7 ± 6.4 mm) and females (27.8 ± 5.2 mm), P < .001. The maximum oblique depth occurred at a mean angle of ~50°, and this angle did not change with age or sex. There was a significant moderate correlation (r = 0.39, P < .001) between epiphyseal vertical height and maximum oblique depth. The center of the ACL tibial attachment was consistently near 51% of the anteroposterior diameter, regardless of age or sex

  3. Growth disturbances after distal tibial physeal fractures.

    PubMed

    Berson, L; Davidson, R S; Dormans, J P; Drummond, D S; Gregg, J R

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-four patients with distal tibial growth disturbance were reviewed. Disturbances were classified as physeal bar (prior to deformity), angular, linear or combined deformities. Treatment consisted of osteotomy in fourteen, epiphyseodesis in seven, excision of bony bar in two, and observation in one patient. Follow up was an average 36.6 months (range 4-129 months) after treatment of growth disturbance. The age at time of injury was 10.4 years of age average (range 3-15 years). There were 12 SH2, 2 SH3, 7 SH4, and 3 SH5 distal tibial physeal fractures. Thirteen of 15 fractures considered high energy and only 1 of 9 fractures considered low energy resulted in angular deformity. Angular and linear deformities presented an average 46 months (range 12-120 months) and physeal bars at an average 14 months (range 6-25 months) after injury. Patients with a delay in presentation of growth disturbance greater than 24 months had angular deformities in 92% compared with 33% in children presenting less than or at 24 months. Treatment based on type of deformity, age at time of injury, and growth remaining was considered successful in 83%. Patients with angular or linear deformities were more likely to present late, have high energy injuries, be male patients and have Salter-Harris types IV and V. Early diagnosis and treatment of growth disturbance can prevent severe deformity.

  4. Physeal growth arrest after tibial lengthening in achondroplasia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Bilateral tibial lengthening has become one of the standard treatments for upper segment-lower segment disproportion and to improve quality of life in achondroplasia. We determined the effect of tibial lengthening on the tibial physis and compared tibial growth that occurred at the physis with that in non-operated patients with acondroplasia. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of serial radiographs until skeletal maturity in 23 achondroplasia patients who underwent bilateral tibial lengthening before skeletal maturity (lengthening group L) and 12 achondroplasia patients of similar height and age who did not undergo tibial lengthening (control group C). The mean amount of lengthening of tibia in group L was 9.2 cm (lengthening percentage: 60%) and the mean age at the time of lengthening was 8.2 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 9.8 years. Results Skeletal maturity (fusion of physis) occurred at 15.2 years in group L and at 16.0 years in group C. The actual length of tibia (without distraction) at skeletal maturity was 238 mm in group L and 277 mm in group C (p = 0.03). The mean growth rates showed a decrease in group L relative to group C from about 2 years after surgery. Physeal closure was most pronounced on the anterolateral proximal tibial physis, with relative preservation of the distal physis. Interpretation Our findings indicate that physeal growth rate can be disturbed after tibial lengthening in achondroplasia, and a close watch should be kept for such an occurrence—especially when lengthening of more than 50% is attempted. PMID:22489887

  5. Proximal Tibial Bone Graft

    MedlinePlus

    ... All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Treatments Proximal Tibial Bone Graft Page Content What is a bone graft? Bone grafts may be needed for various ... the proximal tibia. What is a proximal tibial bone graft? Proximal tibial bone graft (PTBG) is a ...

  6. Intraoperative use of a transarticular circular fixator construct to facilitate reduction and stabilisation of a proximal tibial physeal fracture in a dog.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M D; Lewis, D D; Winter, M D

    2017-05-01

    A 4-month-old female intact American Pit Bull Terrier was presented for right pelvic limb lameness 1 day after the dog had been hit by an all-terrain vehicle. Orthogonal radiographs of the right stifle revealed a Salter-Harris type IV fracture through the proximal tibial physis extending caudodistally through the proximal tibial metaphysis. The distal tibia was markedly displaced cranially, laterally and proximally, resulting in complete overriding of the fracture segments. An open approach was made in order to facilitate direct reduction, but the fracture could not be sufficiently distracted and the epiphyseal segment remained fixed caudal to the remainder of the tibia. Concerns regarding possible iatrogenic trauma to the epiphysis prompted the use of a transarticular circular fixator construct to distract the fracture segments to facilitate reduction. Distraction that facilitated reduction was performed using three TrueLok Rapid Quick Adjust Struts that were positioned between the two ring components. The struts also allowed for multiplanar adjustment of alignment, which allowed the fracture to be maintained in anatomic reduction as divergent interfragmentary Kirschner wires were placed. Radiographic union was confirmed 19 days after surgery. Transient intraoperative application of a circular construct incorporating the TrueLok components facilitated accurate fracture reduction without inflicting further iatrogenic trauma to the epiphysis, after traditional direct reduction techniques proved ineffective, and afforded a successful clinical outcome in the dog reported here. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  7. Do CT scans aid assessment of distal tibial physeal fractures?

    PubMed

    Cutler, L; Molloy, A; Dhukuram, V; Bass, A

    2004-03-01

    Distal tibial physeal fractures are the second most common growth plate injury and the most common cause of growth arrest and deformity. This study assesses the accuracy of pre-operative planning for placement of the screws in these fractures using either standard radiographs or CT scans. We studied 62 consecutive physeal fractures over a period of four years. An outline of a single cut of the CT scan was used for each patient. An ideal position for the screw was determined as being perpendicular to and at the midpoint of the fracture. The difference in entry point and direction of the screw between the ideal and the observers' assessments were compared using the paired Student's t-test. There was a statistically significant improvement (p < 0.0001) in the accuracy of the point of insertion and the direction of the screw on the pre-operative plan when CT scans were used rather than plain radiographs. We would, therefore, recommend that CT scans are routinely used in the pre-operative assessment and treatment of distal tibial physeal fractures.

  8. Physeal growth arrest after tibial lengthening in achondroplasia: 23 children followed to skeletal maturity.

    PubMed

    Song, Sang-Heon; Agashe, Mandar Vikas; Huh, Young-Jae; Hwang, Soon-Young; Song, Hae-Ryong

    2012-06-01

    Bilateral tibial lengthening has become one of the standard treatments for upper segment-lower segment disproportion and to improve quality of life in achondroplasia. We determined the effect of tibial lengthening on the tibial physis and compared tibial growth that occurred at the physis with that in non-operated patients with achondroplasia. We performed a retrospective analysis of serial radiographs until skeletal maturity in 23 achondroplasia patients who underwent bilateral tibial lengthening before skeletal maturity (lengthening group L) and 12 achondroplasia patients of similar height and age who did not undergo tibial lengthening (control group C). The mean amount of lengthening of tibia in group L was 9.2 cm (lengthening percentage: 60%) and the mean age at the time of lengthening was 8.2 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 9.8 years. Skeletal maturity (fusion of physis) occurred at 15.2 years in group L and at 16.0 years in group C. The actual length of tibia (without distraction) at skeletal maturity was 238 mm in group L and 277 mm in group C (p = 0.03). The mean growth rates showed a decrease in group L relative to group C from about 2 years after surgery. Physeal closure was most pronounced on the anterolateral proximal tibial physis, with relative preservation of the distal physis. Our findings indicate that physeal growth rate can be disturbed after tibial lengthening in achondroplasia, and a close watch should be kept for such an occurrence-especially when lengthening of more than 50% is attempted.

  9. Irreducible Salter Harris type II distal tibial physeal fracture secondary to interposition of the posterior tibial tendon: a case report.

    PubMed

    Soulier, Robert; Fallat, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric distal tibial fractures generally occur without significant long-term sequelae, and patients are commonly able to return to their preinjury activities after proper management. The literature reports excellent outcomes after anatomical reduction of distal tibial and ankle physeal fractures with closed or open treatment. Treatment options include simple immobilization of nondisplaced fractures, and closed or open reduction for restoration of anatomic alignment of displaced fractures. Soft tissue interposition within the fracture can threaten successful closed reduction, and may warrant open management if closed reduction fails to produce a satisfactory result. Despite the documented possibility of soft tissue interposition preventing closed reduction of pediatric ankle fractures, there is a paucity of literature reporting this complication. We report a unique case of an irreducible Salter-Harris type II distal tibial physeal fracture secondary to interposition of the posterior tibial tendon. Copyright 2010 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The anatomy of the proximal tibia in pediatric and adolescent patients: implications for ACL reconstruction and prevention of physeal arrest.

    PubMed

    Shea, Kevin G; Apel, Peter J; Pfeiffer, Ronald P; Traughber, Paul D

    2007-04-01

    Although the treatment of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears in skeletally immature patients is still controversial, several studies have advocated ACL reconstruction in selected patients to prevent secondary injury. The proximal tibial physis is a structure at risk during ACL reconstruction in young patients, and physeal growth complications have been reported after surgery in this area. The relationship between the ACL and the proximal tibial physeal/apophyseal regions is poorly understood. This study examined the MRI anatomy of the ACL and the proximal tibia apophysis and epiphysis. MRIs of 59 skeletally immature knees were reviewed (Average age = 12.75 years, range 6-15) to define the anatomy of the epiphyseal and apophyseal regions. Measurements were recorded in three parasagittal planes: (1) at the lateral border of the patellar tendon, (2) the lateral edge of the ACL insertion, and (3) the medial edge of the ACL insertion. A single three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) scan was used to evaluate the position of standard drill holes used in ACL reconstruction to assess for potential degree of injury to the epiphyseal and apophyseal growth plates. In the parasagittal planes, the average height of the epiphysis was 19.6, 20.7, and 21.5 mm at the lateral border of the patellar tendon, the lateral border of the ACL, and the medial border of the ACL, respectively. At the level of the same landmarks, the apophysis extended below the physis at an average of 20.2, 16.8, and 7.0 mm, respectively. Expressed as a percentage of epiphysis height this was an average of 104, 82, and 33%, respectively. Examination of 3D CT images revealed that variations in drill hole placement had effects on the volume of injury to the proximal tibial physis and apophysis. Drill holes that started more medial, distal, and with a steeper angle of inclination reduced the amount of physis and apophysis violated when compared with holes placed more lateral, proximal, and with a

  11. Combined distal tibial rotational osteotomy and proximal growth plate modulation for treatment of infantile Blount's disease.

    PubMed

    Abdelgawad, Amr A

    2013-04-18

    Infantile Blount's disease is a condition that causes genu varum and internal tibial torsion. Treatment options include observation, orthotics, corrective osteotomy, elevation of the medial tibial plateau, resection of a physeal bar, lateral hemi-epiphysiodesis, and guided growth of the proximal tibial physis. Each of these treatment options has its disadvantages. Treating the coronal deformity alone (genu varum) will result in persistence of the internal tibial torsion (the axial deformity). In this report, we describe the combination of lateral growth modulation and distal tibial external rotation osteotomy to correct all the elements of the disease. This has not been described before for treatment of Blount's disease. Both coronal and axial deformities were corrected in this patient. We propose this combination (rather than the lateral growth modulation alone) as the method of treatment for early stages of Blount's disease as it corrects both elements of the disease and in the same time avoids the complications of proximal tibial osteotomy.

  12. Distal tibial physeal arrest after meningococcal septicaemia: management and outcome in seven ankles.

    PubMed

    Monsell, F P; Barnes, J R; Kirubanandan, R; McBride, A M B

    2011-06-01

    Survivors of infantile meningococcal septicaemia often develop progressive skeletal deformity as a result of physeal damage at many sites, particularly in the lower limb. Distal tibial physeal arrest typically occurs with sparing of the distal fibular physis leading to a rapidly progressive varus deformity. There have been reports of isolated cases of this deformity, but to our knowledge there have been no papers which specifically describe the development of the deformity and the options for treatment. Surgery to correct this deformity is complex because of the patient's age, previous scarring and the multiplanar nature of the deformity. The surgical goal is to restore leg-length equality and the mechanical axis at the end of growth. Surgery should be planned and staged throughout growth in order to achieve the best functional results. We report our experience in six patients (seven ankles) with this deformity, who were managed by corrective osteotomy using a programmable circular fixator.

  13. Child abuse in infants with proximal physeal injuries of the femur.

    PubMed

    Jones, Joshua C W; Feldman, Kenneth W; Bruckner, James D

    2004-03-01

    Child abuse has been recognized to be a common cause of femur fractures in infants. Fractures of the proximal femoral physis in abused infants have been less emphasized. Our report seeks to highlight this infrequent but clinically important inflicted injury. Report of 2 cases and a literature review of fractures of the proximal femoral physis in infants, including the role of abuse in this injury. Proximal femoral physeal injuries occur infrequently in infants but often result from abuse. Diagnosis may be difficult due to lack of femoral head ossification before 4 months of age and clinical findings suggesting developmental dysplasia of the hip. Current imaging modalities can differentiate physeal injuries from developmental dysplasia of the hip. Early recognition and treatment can minimize sequelae.

  14. Distal femoral physeal growth arrest secondary to a cemented proximal femoral endoprosthetic replacement.

    PubMed

    Gaston, C L; Tillman, R M; Grimer, R J

    2011-05-01

    We report a case of spontaneous physeal growth arrest of the distal femur in a nine-year-old child with Ewing's sarcoma of the proximal femur treated with chemotherapy and endoprosthetic replacement. Owing to the extent of disuse osteoporosis at the time of surgery, the entire intramedullary canal up to the distal femoral physis was filled with cement. Three years later, the femur remained at its pre-operative length of 19 cm. Pre-operative calculations of further growth failed to account for the growth arrest, and the initial expandable growing prosthesis inserted has been revised to a longer one in order to address the leg-length discrepancy. To our knowledge, this is the only reported case of distal femoral physeal growth arrest following cemented endoprosthetic replacement of the proximal femur.

  15. Growth arrest of the proximal tibial physis with recurvatum and valgus deformity of the knee.

    PubMed

    Domzalski, Marcin; Mackenzie, William

    2009-10-01

    Two cases of asymmetrical closure of the proximal tibial epiphysis without a clear aetiological factor were presented. In both cases premature closure of the growth plate resulted in progressive recurvatum and valgus deformity of the knee with leg length discrepancy. The correction of deformity was obtained using Taylor Spatial frame with excellent results at 2 years follow-up. We hypothesize that repetitive trauma or chronic overloading during sports activities might be a factor of growth arrest in reported cases. Orthopedic surgeons should be aware of the possibility of subtle physeal injuries, causing angular deformities, in the cases of even minor knee trauma in skeletally immature population.

  16. Opening-wedge osteotomy, allografting with dual buttress plate fixation for severe genu recurvatum caused by partial growth arrest of the proximal tibial physis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang-Chin; Chan, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Ching-Jen

    2004-07-01

    Injuries to the proximal tibial physis are among the least common epiphyseal injuries. We present a case of severe genu recurvatum deformity (45 degrees) with leg length discrepancy (4 cm) following a neglected proximal tibial physeal injury incurred 6 years previously. The 16-year-old patient was successfully treated by open-wedge osteotomy, allograft reconstruction, and dual buttress plate fixation. At 3 years' follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic, fully active with a full range of motion (0 - 140 degrees) of the leg, and equal leg lengths. There were no signs of genu recurvatum clinically.

  17. Functional treatment of physeal and periphyseal injuries of the metacarpal and proximal phalangeal bones.

    PubMed

    Ebinger, T; Roesch, M; Wachter, N; Kinzl, L; Mentzel, M

    2001-04-01

    Hand fractures are common injuries in infants. Complications are rare because of potent remodeling dimension and rapid healing of growing bone. There is limited remodeling capacity for angular and rotational deformity so displaced fractures often require open reduction and internal fixation. The authors present a splint system for a protected reduction and mobilization program of displaced proximal phalanx and metacarpal fractures. The custom-molded 2-component thermoplastic splint allows motion of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) and distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints. It has been developed to allow bone healing and recovery of motion at the same time. In this study, the authors evaluated the clinical and radiologic results of a series of 11 consecutive infants with displaced metacarpal fractures and 13 displaced proximal phalanx fractures who received functional treatment. Fracture consolidation and full active motion was achieved simultaneously in 4 weeks in 21 children; 2 infants required physiotherapy, and 1 child was lost to follow-up. No further growth abnormality was seen within a 12-month observation period. When there is no damage of soft tissue the functional mobilization program can lead to good results treating displaced physeal and periphyseal hand injuries of proximal phalanx and metacarpal fractures. J Pediatr Surg 36:611-615. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company.

  18. Combined distal tibial rotational osteotomy and proximal growth plate modulation for treatment of infantile Blount’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Abdelgawad, Amr A

    2013-01-01

    Infantile Blount’s disease is a condition that causes genu varum and internal tibial torsion. Treatment options include observation, orthotics, corrective osteotomy, elevation of the medial tibial plateau, resection of a physeal bar, lateral hemi-epiphysiodesis, and guided growth of the proximal tibial physis. Each of these treatment options has its disadvantages. Treating the coronal deformity alone (genu varum) will result in persistence of the internal tibial torsion (the axial deformity). In this report, we describe the combination of lateral growth modulation and distal tibial external rotation osteotomy to correct all the elements of the disease. This has not been described before for treatment of Blount’s disease. Both coronal and axial deformities were corrected in this patient. We propose this combination (rather than the lateral growth modulation alone) as the method of treatment for early stages of Blount’s disease as it corrects both elements of the disease and in the same time avoids the complications of proximal tibial osteotomy. PMID:23610758

  19. RADIOGRAPHIC ASSESSMENT OF THE OPENING WEDGE PROXIMAL TIBIAL OSTEOTOMY

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Carlos Francisco Bittencourt; Camara, Eduardo Kastrup Bittencourt; Vieira, Luiz Antonio; Adolphsson, Fernando; Rodarte, Rodrigo Ribeiro Pinho

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To radiographically evaluate individuals who underwent opening wedge proximal tibial osteotomy, with the aim of analyzing the proximal tibial slope in the frontal and sagittal planes, and the patellar height. Method: The study included 22 individuals who were operated at the National Traumatology and Orthopedics Institute (INTO) for correction of varus angular tibial deviation using the opening wedge osteotomy (OWO) technique with the Orthofix monolateral external fixator. Patients with OWO whose treatment was completed between January 2000 and December 2006 were analyzed. The measurement technique consisted of using anteroposterior radiographs with loading and lateral views with the operated knees flexed at 30°. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the pre and postoperative tibial slope and patellar height values in the patients evaluated. Conclusion: Opening wedge proximal tibial osteotomy is a technique that avoids the problems presented by high proximal tibial osteotomy, since it is done without causing changes to the extensor mechanism, ligament imbalance or distortions in the proximal tibia. PMID:27022577

  20. Physeal fractures, part I: histologic features of bone, cartilage, and bar formation in a small animal model.

    PubMed

    Wattenbarger, J Michael; Gruber, Helen E; Phieffer, Laura S

    2002-01-01

    Physeal fractures and the formation of physeal bars can pose significant problems in skeletal development for the injured, growing child. Regrettably, little experimental attention has been directed toward this clinical disturbance. The current study documents early histologic changes (days 2-6) and subsequent alterations (day 21) following a physeal fracture in the rat proximal tibia model. The fracture plane was usually contained within the physis but could involve many regions of the physis. In some instances, the fracture plane extended to the physeal epiphyseal border. When the fracture was contained within the physis, healing was uneventful. However, when the fracture extended through the physis to the epiphyseal physeal border, there was greater physeal disorganization and formation of vertical septa leading to physeal bars. Physeal bars appeared to form at sites of vertical fibrotic septa into which marrow cells, osteoclasts, and osteoblasts had migrated. Bar formation mediated by primary osteogenesis (rather than by endochondral bone formation) followed. This study examines the changes in the histologic features of the rat proximal tibial physis, epiphysis, and metaphysis after a physeal fracture and identifies key factors associated with physeal bar formation.

  1. Use of a linear-circular hybrid external skeletal fixator for stabilization of a juxta-physeal proximal radial fracture in a deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Phelps, Holly A; Lewis, Daniel D; Aiken-Palmer, Copper; Winter, Matthew D

    2010-12-01

    This report documents the successful use of a hybrid linear-circular fixator for the stabilization of a closed, oblique, comminuted fracture of the proximal right radial diaphysis in a 3-mo-old female deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Under fluoroscopic guidance, a hybrid fixator was applied for fracture stabilization, with consideration given to the risk of inducing further fissuring of the proximal segment, attaining adequate fixation in the short juxta-physeal segment, and possibly disrupting physeal growth. Three divergent wires were used as ring fixation elements to secure the proximal fracture segment. Mild fissure propagation occurred during fixation pin placement. All subsequent fixation pins chosen were of a smaller diameter and were placed without further deterioration of the existing fissures. Although willing to ambulate upon recovery, the deer placed the dorsum of the hoof on the ground initially after surgery, which resolved by the sixth day. The hybrid fixator was well-tolerated and was removed 4 wk postoperatively. In addition, proximal radial physeal growth was not disrupted and both radii had similar lengths after fixator removal. Hybrid linear-circular external skeletal fixation was advantageous for stabilization of the juxta-physeal fracture in this deer; with appropriate application techniques and configuration, we believe that hybrid fixators can be used successfully in several wildlife species with maximum acceptance and minimal complications.

  2. Stem cell repair of physeal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae I; Terry Canale, S; Butler, Stephanie D; Hasty, Karen A

    2004-11-01

    To evaluate the ability of cultured mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to repair physeal defects, MSC-matrix constructs with 5% gelatin (group A), 10% gelatin/Gelfoam (Pharmacia, Peapack, NJ) (group B), and MSC grown in the presence of TGF-beta3 with Gelfoam (group C) were implanted in proximal tibial physeal defects created in 20 immature rabbits. Control groups (untreated partial defect and partial defect treated with Gelfoam) showed bony bar formation with varus deformities of 30 degrees and 28 degrees, respectively. Group A had an average 23 degrees varus deformity with bony bridge formation, and group B had mild varus angulation (average 14 degrees) of the proximal tibia. In group C, there was no significant varus deformity (average 9 degrees), and histologic examination showed that some of the columnation areas interspersed with chondrocytes were irregularly arranged in the matrix. These findings suggest that repair of physeal defects can be enhanced by the implantation of MSC cultured with TGF-beta3.

  3. Dynamic knee loads during gait predict proximal tibial bone distribution.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, D E; Sumner, D R; Andriacchi, T P; Sugar, D A

    1998-05-01

    This study tested the validity of the prediction of dynamic knee loads based on gait measurements. The relationship between the predicted loads at the knee and the distribution of bone between the medial and lateral sides of the tibia was examined. The motion and external forces and moments at the knee were measured during gait and a statically determinate muscle model was used to predict the corresponding forces on the medial and lateral tibial plateaus. In particular, the relationship between the knee adduction moment during gait and the ratio or distribution of medial to lateral tibial bone mineral content was studied. Bone mineral content was measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in four regions, two proximal regions 20 mm in height, one medial and one lateral and two distal regions 20 mm in height, one medial and one lateral. The best single predictor of the medial lateral ratio of proximal bone mineral content (bone distribution) was the adduction moment (R2=0.31, p=0.003). Adding weight (negative coefficient. p=0.0004) and the ratio of the average predicted peak force on the medial plateau to the predicted peak force on the lateral plateau (positive coefficient, p=0.0033) to the regression model significantly increased the ability to predict the proximal medial lateral bone distribution (R2=0.72, p=0.0001). Distally neither the subject characteristics nor the gait moments and predicted forces were significant predictors of the bone distribution. The lack of a correlation distally may be reflective of the forces being more evenly distributed further from the tibial plateau. While it has long been suggested that the adduction moment is the primary determinate of the distribution of load between the medial and lateral plateaus, this is the first evidence of its relationship to the underlying bone distribution.

  4. A study in vivo of the effects of a static compressive load on the proximal tibial physis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bries, Andrew D; Weiner, Dennis S; Jacquet, Robin; Adamczyk, Mark J; Morscher, Melanie A; Lowder, Elizabeth; Askew, Michael J; Steiner, Richard P; Horne, Walter I; Landis, William J

    2012-08-01

    The effect of compression on the physis is generally defined by the Hueter-Volkmann principle, in which decreased linear growth of the physis results from increased compression. This investigation examined whether mechanically induced compression of rabbit physes causes changes in gene expression, cells, and extracellular components that promote physeal resilience and strength (type-II collagen and aggrecan) and cartilage hypertrophy (type-X collagen and matrix metalloprotease-13). Static compressive loads (10 N or 30 N) were applied for two or six weeks across one hind limb proximal tibial physis of thirteen-week-old female New Zealand White rabbits (n = 18). The contralateral hind limb in all rabbits underwent sham surgery with no load to serve as an internal control. Harvested physes were divided into portions for histological, immunohistochemical, and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Gene expression was statistically analyzed by means of comparisons between loaded samples and unloaded shams with use of analysis of variance and a Tukey post hoc test. Compared with unloaded shams, physes loaded at 10 N or 30 N for two weeks and at 10 N for six weeks showed histological changes in cells and matrices. Physes loaded at 30 N for six weeks were decreased in thickness and had structurally disorganized chondrocyte columns, a decreased extracellular matrix, and less intense type-II and X collagen immunohistochemical staining. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of loaded samples compared with unloaded shams yielded a significantly (p ≤ 0.05) decreased gene expression of aggrecan and type-II and X collagen and no significant (p > 0.05) changes in the matrix metalloprotease-13 gene expression with increasing load. Compressed rabbit physes generate biochemical changes in collagens, proteoglycan, and cellular and tissue matrix architecture. Changes potentially weaken overall physeal strength

  5. Distal tibial physeal bridge: a complication from a tension band plate and screw construct. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Oda, Jon E; Thacker, Mihir M

    2013-05-01

    We report on a case of a tension band plate and screw construct (Eight Plate) used over the anterior distal tibia in an 9-year-old girl in an attempt to induce recurvatum of the ankle joint to correct a recalcitrant equinus deformity. With growth of the distal tibial physis, the epiphyseal screw was drawn through the physis into the distal tibial metaphysis, resulting in the creation of a transphyseal bony bar. Caution should be exercised when attempting temporary hemiepiphyseodesis using a plate and screw construct in small epiphyses or in an osteopenic bone.

  6. Reconstruction and anticipatory Langenskiöld procedure in traumatic defect of tibial medial malleolus with type 6 physeal fracture.

    PubMed

    Abbo, Olivier; Accadbled, Frank; Laffosse, Jean-Michel; De Gauzy, Jérome Sales

    2012-09-01

    Traumatic osteoarticular or ligament defect of the tibial medial malleolus is a rare entity in children. Associated lesions may include soft tissue and joint defect, subsequent instability of the ankle, and growth arrest. We report here, the case of an 11-year-old boy, a victim of a severe trauma to the ankle, managed by an original technique. It combined a reconstruction by a composite iliac crest and gluteal fascia graft, an anticipatory Langenskiold procedure, and a serratus anterior muscle flap. This original technique proved to be a suitable alternative in this type of trauma.

  7. Intra-epiphyseal stress injury of the proximal tibial epiphysis: preliminary experience of magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Tony, G; Charran, A; Tins, B; Lalam, R; Tyrrell, P N M; Singh, J; Cool, P; Kiely, N; Cassar-Pullicino, V N

    2014-11-01

    Stress induced injuries affecting the physeal plate or cortical bone in children and adolescents, especially young athletes, have been well described. However, there are no reports in the current English language literature of stress injury affecting the incompletely ossified epiphyseal cartilage. We present four cases of stress related change to the proximal tibial epiphysis (PTE) along with their respective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances ranging from subtle oedema signal to a pseudo-tumour like appearance within the epiphyseal cartilage. The site and pattern of intra-epiphyseal injury is determined by the type of tissue that is affected, the maturity of the skeleton and the type of forces that are transmitted through the tissue. We demonstrate how an awareness of the morphological spectrum of MRI appearances in intra-epiphyseal stress injury and the ability to identify concomitant signs of stress in other nearby structures can help reduce misdiagnosis, avoid invasive diagnostic procedures like bone biopsy and reassure patients and their families. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The functional results of tibial shaft fractures treated with intramedullary nail compressed by proximal tube.

    PubMed

    Karaarslan, Ahmet Adnan; Acar, Nihat; Aycan, Hakan; Sesli, Erhan

    2016-04-01

    Nailing of tibial shaft fractures is considered the gold standard surgical method by many surgeons. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate and compare the clinical outcome of tibial shaft fractures treated with intramedullary nails compressed by proximal tube and conventional intramedullary interlocking nails. Fifty-seven patients with tibial shaft fractures, treated with intramedullary nails compressed by proximal tube (n = 32) and the conventional interlocking nails (n = 25), were reviewed. All fractures except for one were united without any additional surgical intervention in the proximal compression tube nail group, whereas in the conventional interlocking nail group, six patients needed dynamization surgery (p = 0.005) and three cases of nonunion were recorded. In the proximal compression tube nail group, faster union occurred in 20 ± 2 (16-24) weeks (mean ± SD; range) without failure of locking screws and proximal nail migration, whereas in the conventional interlocking nail group, union occurred in 22 ± 2.5 (17-27) weeks (p = 0.001) with two failures of locking screws and two proximal nail migration. The proximal compression tube nail system is safer than the conventional nailing methods for the treatment for transverse and oblique tibial shaft fractures with a less rate of nonunion, proximal locking screw failure and proximal nail migration.

  9. Early proximal tibial valgus osteotomy as a very important prognostic factor in Thai children with infantile tibia vara.

    PubMed

    Kaewpornsawan, Kamolporn; Tangsataporn, Suksan; Jatunarapit, Ratiporn

    2005-10-01

    To find the effectiveness of the early surgery (2-3 years of age)as a very important prognostic factor affecting the outcomes in Thai children with infantile tibia vara and all the prognostic factors including the usefulness of arthrographic study in correcting the deformity. From 1994 to 2004, sixteen children aged average 3.61 years old (2.08-7.0) were treated in Siriraj Hospital and diagnosed as infantile tibia vara by Langenskiold radiographic staging were included in the present study and retrospectively reviewed with an average of 6.4 years follow up (range 6 month - 11.1 years). All cases were initially treated by surgery because of low compliance for brace or brace failure. They consisted of 3 boys and 13 girls. There were 24 legs including the bilateral involvement in 8 cases (2 boy and 6 girls). After arihrography, the midshaft fibular osteotomy was performed then the proximal tibial dome-shaped valgus osteotomy was done and fixed with 2 pins. The desired position was 12 degree knee valgus . The patients were divided in two groups, 1)group A,the successful group with the knee becoming normal without any deformity after single osteotomy, 2)group B,the recurrent group with recurrence of the varus deformity required further corrective osteotomies to make normal axis of the knee. All variables were analyzed and compared between group A and group B. The general characteristics and radiographic findings were recorded in 1)age, 2)sex, 3)side, 4)weight in kilogram and in percentage of normal or overweight(obesity) compared with the standard Thai weight chart, 5)tibiofemoral angle (TFA) pre and postoperative treatment, 6) metaphyseal diaphyseal angle (MDA), 7)the medial physeal slope angle (MPS, 8)The preoperative arthrographic articulo-diaphyseal angle (ADA), 9.arthrographic articulo-medial physeal angle (AMPA). There were 14 legs in group A and the remaining 10 legs were in group B (average 2.4 operations). All cases healed in good alignment of the legs without

  10. Tibial component considerations in bicruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty: A 3D MRI evaluation of proximal tibial anatomy.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Vishal; Anari, Jason B; Ruutiainen, Alexander T; Voleti, Pramod B; Stephenson, Jason W; Lee, Gwo-Chin

    2016-08-01

    Restoration of normal anatomy and proper ligament balance are theoretical prerequisites for reproducing physiological kinematics with bicruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to use a 3D MRI technique to evaluate the topography of the proximal tibia and outline considerations in tibial component design for bicruciate-retaining TKA. We identified 100 consecutive patients (50 males and 50 females) between ages 20 and 40 years with knee MRIs without arthritis, dysplasia, ACL tears, or prior knee surgery. A novel 3D MRI protocol coordinating axial, coronal, and sagittal images was used to measure: 1) medial and lateral posterior tibial slopes; 2) medial and lateral coronal slopes; and 3) distance from the anterior tibia to the ACL footprint. There was no overall difference in medial and lateral posterior tibial slopes (5.5° (95% CI 5.0 to 6.0°) vs. 5.4° (95% CI 4.8 to 6.0°), respectively (p=0.80)), but 41 patients had side-to-side differences greater than 3°. The medial coronal slope was greater than the lateral coronal slope (4.6° (95% CI 4.0 to 5.1°) vs. 3.3° (95% CI 2.9 to 3.7°), respectively (p<0.0001)). Females had less clearance between the anterior tibia and ACL footprint than males (10.8mm (95% CI 10.4 to 11.2mm) vs. 13.0mm (95% CI 12.5 to 13.5mm), respectively (p<0.0001)). Due to highly variable proximal tibial topography, a monoblock bicruciate-retaining tibial baseplate may not reproduce normal anatomy in all patients. Level IV - Anatomic research study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Transplantation of a Scaffold-Free Cartilage Tissue Analogue for the Treatment of Physeal Cartilage Injury of the Proximal Tibia in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Uk; Lee, Jae-Young; Joo, Sun Young; Lee, Yong Suk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of transplantation of an in vitro-generated, scaffold-free, tissue-engineered cartilage tissue analogue (CTA) using a suspension chondrocyte culture in a rabbit growth-arrest model. Materials and Methods We harvested cartilage cells from the articular cartilage of the joints of white rabbits and made a CTA using a suspension culture of 2×107 cells/mL. An animal growth plate defect model was made on the medial side of the proximal tibial growth plate of both tibias of 6-week-old New Zealand white rabbits (n=10). The allogenic CTA was then transplanted onto the right proximal tibial defect. As a control, no implantation was performed on the left-side defect. Plain radiographs and the medial proximal tibial angle were obtained at 1-week intervals for evaluation of bone bridge formation and the degree of angular deformity until postoperative week 6. We performed a histological evaluation using hematoxylin-eosin and Alcian blue staining at postoperative weeks 4 and 6. Results Radiologic study revealed a median medial proximal tibial angle of 59.0° in the control group and 80.0° in the CTA group at 6 weeks. In the control group, statistically significant angular deformities were seen 3 weeks after transplantation (p<0.05). On histological examination, the transplanted CTA was maintained in the CTA group at 4 and 6 weeks postoperative. Bone bridge formation was observed in the control group. Conclusion In this study, CTA transplantation minimized deformity in the rabbit growth plate injury model, probably via the attenuation of bone bridge formation. PMID:26847298

  12. Ipsilateral distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyseal growth plate injury: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Both the isolated distal femoral epiphysiolysis and the isolated proximal tibial epiphysiolysis are the least common epiphyseal injuries. Even though they are uncommon, they have a high incidence rate of complications. Case presentation We present a case with Gustilo-Anderson grade 3b open and Salter-Harris type 1 epiphysiolysis of the distal femur and proximal tibia caused by a farm machinery accident. The patient was a 10-year-old boy, treated by open reduction and internal fixation. Conclusion Although distal femoral and proximal tibial growth plate injuries are rarely seen benign fractures, their management requires meticulous care. Anatomic reduction is important, especially to minimize the risk of growth arrest and the development of degenerative arthritis. However, there is a high incidence of growth arrest and neurovascular injury with these type of fractures. PMID:23724954

  13. Ipsilateral distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyseal growth plate injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gulabi, Deniz; Erdem, Mehmet; Bulut, Guven; Avci, Cem Coskun; Asci, Murat

    2013-05-31

    Both the isolated distal femoral epiphysiolysis and the isolated proximal tibial epiphysiolysis are the least common epiphyseal injuries. Even though they are uncommon, they have a high incidence rate of complications. We present a case with Gustilo-Anderson grade 3b open and Salter-Harris type 1 epiphysiolysis of the distal femur and proximal tibia caused by a farm machinery accident. The patient was a 10-year-old boy, treated by open reduction and internal fixation. Although distal femoral and proximal tibial growth plate injuries are rarely seen benign fractures, their management requires meticulous care. Anatomic reduction is important, especially to minimize the risk of growth arrest and the development of degenerative arthritis. However, there is a high incidence of growth arrest and neurovascular injury with these type of fractures.

  14. Below-knee amputation through a joint-sparing proximal tibial replacement for recurrent tumour.

    PubMed

    Spiegelberg, B G I; Speigelberg, B G I; Sewell, M D; Coltman, T; Blunn, G W; Flanagan, A M; Cannon, S R; Briggs, T W R

    2009-06-01

    We report a case which highlights the progression of osteofibrous dysplasia to adamantinoma and questions whether intralesional curettage is the appropriate treatment. The role of a joint-sparing massive endoprosthesis using cortical fixation is demonstrated and we describe a unique biomedical design which resulted in the manufacture of an end cap to allow amputation through a custom-made proximal tibial replacement, rather than an above-knee amputation following recurrence.

  15. Physeal bridge resection.

    PubMed

    Khoshhal, Khalid I; Kiefer, Gerhard N

    2005-01-01

    Growth arrest secondary to physeal bridge formation is an uncommon but well-recognized complication of physeal fractures and other injuries. Regardless of the underlying etiology, physeal bridges may cause angular and/or longitudinal growth disturbances, with progression dependent on the remaining physeal growth potential. Physeal bridge resection and insertion of interposition material releases the tethering effect of the bridge. Physeal bridge resection has become an accepted treatment option for patients with existing or developing deformity and for those with at least 2 years or 2 cm of growth remaining. Current experimental research is focused on the use of gene therapy and other factors that enhance chondrocyte proliferation to improve the management of growth arrest. The use of cartilage and cultured chondrocytes as interposition material after physeal bridge resection is an area of active research.

  16. Proximal Tibial Epiphysis Injury (Flexion Type, Salter-Harris Type 1).

    PubMed

    Israni, Pratik; Panat, Mangesh

    2016-01-01

    Fractures of the proximal tibial epiphysis rare. It has been estimated that fractures of the upper tibial epiphysis account for 0.5-3.1% of all epiphyseal injuries. Who had no neurovascular deficit, with fixed extension deformity at the left knee was treated early with closed reduction techniques. We present a case of a 16-year-old boy who while playing cricket on the road was hit by a car. The patient presented in emergency room with extremely swollen knee and soft tissue swelling (hemarthrosis), he was unable to lift his leg actively due to severe pain because of hamstrings spasm, and he had no wound over his left knee and had no other associated injuries. Plain radiographs were taken which revealed, separated proximal tibial epiphysis (salter harris Type 1 injury) The epiphysis was anteriorly displaced fracture line extending beyond growth plate through metaphysis and tibial tuberosity also displaced anteriorly, the proximal fibular epiphysis fragment was displaced anteriorly with no injury to femoral epiphysis and no patellar fracture, radiograph also revealed no intra-articular fracture as joint appears congruent. Under spinal anesthesia, under all aseptic precautions traction was applied for few minutes, the fracture was reduced closed as the hamstring spasm gave way, reduction was confirmed under image intensifier in both AP and lateral planes, and joint congruity was examined. Proximal fibular epiphysis also snapped back in place. Post-operative patient was immobilized with nil weight bearing for 4 weeks, check X-rays taken, he was mobilized in wheelchair. After 4 weeks slab was removed, K-wires were removed, and partial weight bearing was started with rehabilitation for full range of motion of the left knee. At 6 weeks, both the knee joints appeared symmetrical with no abnormalities or limb length discrepancy or instability with knee from 0° to 140°, with full weight bearing. Although less commonly seen, Salter-Harris Type 1 injuries to proximal tibial

  17. Proximal Tibial Epiphysis Injury (Flexion Type, Salter–Harris Type 1)

    PubMed Central

    Israni, Pratik; Panat, Mangesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Fractures of the proximal tibial epiphysis rare. It has been estimated that fractures of the upper tibial epiphysis account for 0.5-3.1% of all epiphyseal injuries. Who had no neurovascular deficit, with fixed extension deformity at the left knee was treated early with closed reduction techniques. Case Report: We present a case of a 16-year-old boy who while playing cricket on the road was hit by a car. The patient presented in emergency room with extremely swollen knee and soft tissue swelling (hemarthrosis), he was unable to lift his leg actively due to severe pain because of hamstrings spasm, and he had no wound over his left knee and had no other associated injuries. Plain radiographs were taken which revealed, separated proximal tibial epiphysis (salter harris Type 1 injury) The epiphysis was anteriorly displaced fracture line extending beyond growth plate through metaphysis and tibial tuberosity also displaced anteriorly, the proximal fibular epiphysis fragment was displaced anteriorly with no injury to femoral epiphysis and no patellar fracture, radiograph also revealed no intra-articular fracture as joint appears congruent. Under spinal anesthesia, under all aseptic precautions traction was applied for few minutes, the fracture was reduced closed as the hamstring spasm gave way, reduction was confirmed under image intensifier in both AP and lateral planes, and joint congruity was examined. Proximal fibular epiphysis also snapped back in place. Post-operative patient was immobilized with nil weight bearing for 4 weeks, check X-rays taken, he was mobilized in wheelchair. After 4 weeks slab was removed, K-wires were removed, and partial weight bearing was started with rehabilitation for full range of motion of the left knee. At 6 weeks, both the knee joints appeared symmetrical with no abnormalities or limb length discrepancy or instability with knee from 0° to 140°, with full weight bearing. Conclusion: Although less commonly seen, Salter

  18. Proximal tibial osteosarcoma in young patients: early diagnosis, modular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ene, Răzvan; Sinescu, Ruxandra Diana; Ene, Patricia; Popescu, Dan; Cîrstoiu, Monica Mihaela; Cîrstoiu, Florin Cătălin

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common bone tumor that occurs in children and young adults with prevalence of teenage. There can be identified many subtypes of osteosarcoma by how they look on X-rays and under the microscope. Osteosarcoma can be classified as high-grade, intermediate grade, or low-grade. This has a significant prognostic value of tumor development suggesting the growth rate and the potential for expansion. Between 2009-2013, in the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, University Emergency Hospital of Bucharest, Romania, were treated seven cases of osteosarcoma of the proximal third of the tibia in young, early-diagnosed cases without metastasis. The treatment involved resection of tumor formation and reconstruction with a modular prosthesis. Postoperative patients were mobilized for a week without charging the operated limb under the protection of orthesis. During this period continued active and passive mobilization of the ankle and foot to prevent stiffness and to reduce postoperative swelling. From the second postoperative week, patients are mobilizing with progressive charging but not being allowed to do any flexion in order to protect de insertion of medial gastrocnemius muscle rotation flap used to cover the prosthesis and to protect the patellar tendon reinsertion. This extensive surgery does not improve survival rate of these patients compared to treatment by amputation of this pathology but greatly increases the comfort of life and in all cases ensure socio-professional reintegration of these patients. To ensure optimal postoperative results perform a complete diagnosis and preoperative oncological treatment before surgery, if applicable.

  19. Insertion of intramedullary nails from the suprapatellar pouch for proximal tibial shaft fractures. A technical note.

    PubMed

    Jakma, Tijs; Reynders-Frederix, Peter; Rajmohan, Rai

    2011-12-01

    Intramedullary nailing of proximal tibial fractures can be difficult when using the standard entry portal. We evaluated the suprapatellar portal, using a midline quadriceps tendon incision, to perform intramedullary nailing of the tibia. Seven patients were treated with this adaptation of the standard intramedullary nailing procedure. An arthroscopy was done before and after the nailing procedure. No special equipment was used to perform the intramedullary nailing. We evaluated the handling and necessary modifications of the standard intramedullary technique to introduce the locked tibial nail through the suprapatellar approach. We found this technique not necessarily more difficult than the standard intramedullary nailing of the tibia through the infrapatellar entry portal. Although the patients did not complain of patellofemoral discomfort after the suprapatellar nailing, definitive scuffing of the cartilage in the lower part of the femoral trochlea was visible. Introduction of a locked tibial nail via the suprapatellar approach was found to be possible and even advantageous for some complex upper tibial shaft fractures in compromised limbs. Some possible downsides of this approach need to be taken into account but, in some cases, they can be outweighed by the benefits.

  20. Premature physeal arrest of the distal tibia associated with temporary arterial insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Peterson, H A

    1993-01-01

    Premature physeal arrest may occur after various insults to the physis. Its association with diaphyseal fracture without obvious physeal damage is well known, but the cause is obscure. The case reported documents premature closure of the distal tibial physis of an infant after a temporary but significant episode of vascular insufficiency. Direct arterial occlusion or arterial spasm may account for some cases of physeal arrest associated with nonphyseal-related trauma.

  1. Tibia-based referencing for standard proximal tibial radiographs during intramedullary nailing.

    PubMed

    Bible, Jesse E; Choxi, Ankeet A; Dhulipala, Sravan C; Evans, Jason M; Mir, Hassan R

    2013-11-01

    Limited information exists to define standard tibial radiographs. The purpose of this study was to define new landmarks on the proximal tibia for standard anteroposterior and lateral radiographs. In 10 cadaveric knees, fibular head bisection was considered the anteroposterior image, and femoral condyle overlap the lateral image. In another 10 knees, a "twin peaks" anteroposterior view, showing the sharpest profile of the tibial spines, was used. The "flat plateau" lateral image was obtained by aligning the femoral condyles then applying a varus adjustment with overlap of the tibial plateaus. Medial peritendinous approaches were performed, and an entry reamer used to open the medullary canal. A priori analysis showed good to excellent intra-/inter-observer reliability with the new technique (intra-class correlation coefficient ICC 0.61-0.90). The "twin peaks" anteroposterior radiograph was externally rotated 2.7±2.1° compared to the standard radiograph with fibular head bisection. Portal position and incidence of damage to intra-articular structures did not significantly differ between groups (P>.05). The "twin peaks" anteroposterior view and "flat plateau" lateral view can safely be used for nail entry portal creation in the anatomic safe zone. Tibia-based radiographic referencing is useful for intramedullary nailing cases in which knee or proximal tibiofibular joint anatomy is altered.

  2. Protecting a Patellar Ligament Reconstruction after Proximal Tibial Resection: A Simplified Approach

    PubMed Central

    Titus, Vijay

    2008-01-01

    Limb salvage in tumor surgery has encouraged the development of megaprostheses. However, reattaching the ligamentum patellae poses a particular problem: avulsion and/or extensor lag may lead to poor function. We describe a new technique of patellar ligament reconstruction. The technique involves reattachment of the patellar ligament to the tibial tuberosity of the proximal tibial megaprosthesis, which has a porous surface created, and the repair is protected with a cerclage wire through the patella and the prosthesis. In 10 consecutive patients, the range of motion averaged 95° (median, 90°; range, 70°–120°), and the mean extension lag averaged 4° (median, 0°; range, 0°–20°). We had one case of patellar ligament avulsion. This technique resulted in good quadriceps function and a low incidence of complications. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18425561

  3. Staged minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis of proximal tibial fractures with acute compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon-Woo; Oh, Chang-Wug; Oh, Jong-Keon; Kyung, Hee-Soo; Park, Kyeong-Hyeon; Kim, Hee-June; Jung, Jae-Wook; Jung, Young-Soo

    2017-06-01

    High-energy proximal tibial fractures often accompany compartment syndrome and are usually treated by fasciotomy with external fixation followed by secondary plating. However, the initial soft tissue injury may affect bony union, the fasciotomy incision or external fixator pin sites may lead to postoperative wound infections, and the staged procedure itself may adversely affect lower limb function. We assess the results of staged minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) for proximal tibial fractures with acute compartment syndrome. Twenty-eight patients with proximal tibial fractures accompanied by acute compartment syndrome who underwent staged MIPO and had a minimum of 12 months follow-up were enrolled. According to the AO/OTA classification, 6 were 41-A, 15 were 41-C, 2 were 42-A and 5 were 42-C fractures; this included 6 cases of open fractures. Immediate fasciotomy was performed once compartment syndrome was diagnosed and stabilization of the fracture followed using external fixation. After the soft tissue condition normalized, internal conversion with MIPO was done on an average of 37 days (range, 9-158) after index trauma. At the time of internal conversion, the external fixator pin site grades were 0 in 3 cases, 1 in 12 cases, 2 in 10 cases and 3 in 3 cases, as described by Dahl. Radiographic assessment of bony union and alignment and a functional assessment using the Knee Society Score and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score were carried out. Twenty-six cases achieved primary bony union at an average of 18.5 weeks. Two cases of nonunion healed after autogenous bone grafting. The mean Knee Society Score and the AOFAS score were 95 and 95.3 respectively, at last follow-up. Complications included 1 case of osteomyelitis in a patient with a grade IIIC open fracture and 1 case of malunion caused by delayed MIPO due to poor wound conditions. Duration of external fixation and the external fixator pin site grade were not related to the

  4. Physeal fractures, part II: fate of interposed periosteum in a physeal fracture.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Helen E; Phieffer, Laura S; Wattenbarger, J Michael

    2002-01-01

    This study describes the histologic features of periosteum interposed into a physeal fracture of the rat proximal tibia. Periosteum was introduced into a physeal fracture in two groups of animals: those with an intact physis after fracture, and those with the medial half of the physis surgically ablated. Specimens of the proximal tibia underwent histologic analysis at 2, 4, 6, 10, and 21 days after fracture to determine the histologic features of interposed periosteum in a physeal fracture. In animals with an intact physis, interposed periosteum underwent one of two fates: it was degraded by giant cells in the fracture plane, which allowed cellular infiltration, or if the periosteum was closely surrounded by physeal cartilage, the physis grew around it and appeared to force it toward the metaphysis. In animals whose physis received surgical ablation, physeal bar formation was always present, with poor organization of the remaining lateral growth plate. Histologic evidence from this study also underscores the fact that physeal bar formation occurs from the migration of osteoblasts and osteoclasts along vertical septa.

  5. Surgical treatment of a proximal diaphyseal tibial deformity associated with partial caudal and cranial cruciate ligament deficiency and patella baja.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, S; Knell, S; Pozzi, A

    2017-04-01

    Caudal cruciate ligament injury can be a complication following tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) (Slocum und Slocum, 1993) especially if the post-operative Tibial Plateau Angle (TPA) is less than 5 degree. We describe a case of negative TPA associated with partial cranial and caudal ligament rupture treated with a center of rotation of angulation (CORA) based cranial tibial opening wedge osteotomy and tibial tuberosity transposition. A 13 kg, mixed breed dog was presented for right pelvic limb lameness. Radiographically a bilateral patella baja and a malformed tibia tuberosity along with a bilateral TPA of -8 degree were detected. Arthroscopically a partial rupture of the cranial and caudal cruciate ligaments were found. A cranial tibial opening wedge osteotomy of 23 degree and a fibular ostectomy were performed. The osteotomy was fixed with a 8 holes ALPS 9 (KYON, Switzerland) and a 3-holes 2.0mm UniLock plate (Synthes, Switzerland). Then a proximal tibial tuberosity transposition of 10mm was performed and fixed with a pin and tension band construct. The postoperative TPA was 15 degree. The radiographic controls at 6, 10 weeks, 6 months and 1 year after surgery revealed an unchanged position of the implants and progressive healing of the osteotomies. At the 6 and 12 months recheck evaluation the dog had no evidence of lameness or stifle pain and radiographs revealed complete healing of the osteotomy site and no implant failure. The diaphyseal CORA based osteotomy allowed accurate correction of a proximal tibial deformity associated with negative TPA.

  6. Relationship between tibial acceleration and proximal anterior tibia shear force across increasing jump distance.

    PubMed

    Sell, Timothy C; Akins, Jonathan S; Opp, Alexis R; Lephart, Scott M

    2014-02-01

    Proximal anterior tibia shear force is a direct loading mechanism of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and is a contributor to ACL strain during injury. Measurement of this force during competition may provide insight into risk factors for ACL injury. Accelerometers may be capable of measuring tibial acceleration during competition. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between acceleration measured by a tibia-mounted accelerometer and proximal anterior tibia shear force as measured through inverse dynamics and peak posterior ground reaction forces during two leg stop-jump tasks. Nineteen healthy male subjects performed stop-jump tasks across increasing jump distances. Correlation coefficients were calculated to determine if a relationship exists between accelerometer data and proximal anterior tibia shear force and peak posterior ground reaction force. An analysis of variance was performed to compare these variables across jump distance. Significant correlations were observed between accelerometer data and peak posterior ground reaction force, but none between accelerometer data and proximal anterior tibia shear force. All variables except peak proximal anterior tibia shear force increased significantly as jump distance increased. Overall, results of this study provide initial, positive support for the use of accelerometers as a useful tool for future injury prevention research.

  7. Evaluation of the posterior tibial slope on MR images in different population groups using the tibial proximal anatomical axis.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Behrooz; Konan, Sujith; Mannan, Ken; Scott, Gareth

    2012-12-01

    We measured the posterior tibial slope for the medial and lateral tibial plateau separately in MR images of 143 knees (71 women, 72 men) and compared the measurements between genders and different ethnic groups. For the whole population the mean medial slope was 5.7 degrees and the mean lateral slope 5.6 degrees. There was a significant difference between the medial and lateral posterior tibial slope in the Asian patients compared with other ethnic groups (p < 0.001). We have shown that measurement of the posterior tibial slope (PTS) could be reliably performed on MR images, revealing a gender difference. These findings might have clinical relevance when performing reconstructive surgery at the knee in determining ideal placement of the tibial component.

  8. Clinical and functional outcomes after operative management of Salter-Harris III and IV fractures of the proximal tibial epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Brian W; Rizkala, Amir R; Li, Mengnai

    2014-09-01

    Pediatric proximal tibial epiphysis fractures are uncommon and have subsequently received little attention in terms of treatment and outcomes. We studied the clinical and functional outcomes of 13 patients with Salter-Harris III and IV fractures of the proximal tibial epiphysis after operative fixation. Associated meniscus, ligamentous, or neurovascular injury was present in 100% of this cohort. Provisional external fixation and locked plating spanning the open physis were used in the majority of cases. The mean clinical follow-up was 15.69 months, where all fractures progressed to union. Good functional outcomes with a low complication rate are possible after operative fixation of these infrequent injuries.

  9. Proximal tibial osteotomy and Taylor Spatial Frame application for correction of tibia vara in morbidly obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Spencer, Samantha A; Hedequist, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Four percent of children and adolescents in the United States are morbidly obese. Treatment for tibia vara includes proximal tibial osteotomy and correction with a Taylor Spatial Frame (TSF). There are no reports that specifically examine the success of this technique in morbidly obese adolescents. A retrospective review was conducted of patients between 12 and 18 years of age with a body mass index for age at or above the 99th percentile who had undergone gradual correction of tibia vara with proximal tibial osteotomy and application of a TSF at our institution between 2005 and 2009. Deformity analysis was performed on full-length standing anteroposterior radiographs of both lower extremities and lateral radiographs of the involved tibia obtained preoperatively and at latest follow-up. All complications were recorded. Fourteen patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 13 years. The average body mass index was 45 kg/m. Preoperative deformity analysis demonstrated a mean mechanical axis deviation of 90 mm, mean mechanical medial proximal tibial angle of 66 degrees, and mean posterior proximal tibial angle of 80 degrees. Analysis at an average follow-up of 14 months demonstrated a mean mechanical axis deviation of 10 mm, mean mechanical medial proximal tibial angle of 88 degrees, and mean posterior proximal tibial angle of 81 degrees. Complications specifically related to the TSF occurred in 2 patients. Both experienced strut disengagement and loss of osteotomy position. This was treated with refastening of the strut and a new program of deformity correction. Complications related to the deformity correction occurred in 3 patients. One had premature fibular consolidation requiring repeat osteotomy, 1 developed a transient partial deep peroneal nerve palsy, and 1 experienced thigh soft tissue irritation from the proximal ring necessitating early TSF removal. One patient had a residual leg-length discrepancy that required tibial lengthening. Correction of

  10. Genu Recurvatum Deformity in a Child due to Salter Harris Type V Fracture of the Proximal Tibial Physis Treated with High Tibial Dome Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Beslikas, Theodoros; Christodoulou, Andreas; Chytas, Anastasios; Gigis, Ioannis; Christoforidis, John

    2012-01-01

    Salter-Harris type V fracture is a very rare injury in the immature skeleton. In most cases, it remains undiagnosed and untreated. We report a case of genu recurvatum deformity in a 15-year-old boy caused by a Salter-Harris type V fracture of the proximal tibial physis. The initial X-ray did not reveal fracture. One year after injury, genu recurvatum deformity was detected associated with significant restriction of knee flexion and limp length discrepancy (2 cm) as well as medial and posterior instability of the joint. Further imaging studies revealed anterior bone bridge of the proximal tibial physis. The deformity was treated with a high tibial dome osteotomy combined with a tibial tubercle osteotomy stabilized with malleolar screws and a cast. Two years after surgery, the patient gained functional knee mobility without clinical instability. Firstly, this case highlights the importance of early identification of this rare lesion (Salter-Harris type V fracture) and, secondly, provides an alternative method of treatment for genu recurvatum deformity.

  11. Genu Recurvatum Deformity in a Child due to Salter Harris Type V Fracture of the Proximal Tibial Physis Treated with High Tibial Dome Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Beslikas, Theodoros; Christodoulou, Andreas; Chytas, Anastasios; Gigis, Ioannis; Christoforidis, John

    2012-01-01

    Salter-Harris type V fracture is a very rare injury in the immature skeleton. In most cases, it remains undiagnosed and untreated. We report a case of genu recurvatum deformity in a 15-year-old boy caused by a Salter-Harris type V fracture of the proximal tibial physis. The initial X-ray did not reveal fracture. One year after injury, genu recurvatum deformity was detected associated with significant restriction of knee flexion and limp length discrepancy (2 cm) as well as medial and posterior instability of the joint. Further imaging studies revealed anterior bone bridge of the proximal tibial physis. The deformity was treated with a high tibial dome osteotomy combined with a tibial tubercle osteotomy stabilized with malleolar screws and a cast. Two years after surgery, the patient gained functional knee mobility without clinical instability. Firstly, this case highlights the importance of early identification of this rare lesion (Salter-Harris type V fracture) and, secondly, provides an alternative method of treatment for genu recurvatum deformity. PMID:23259115

  12. Risk Factors for Deep Infection Following Plate Fixation of Proximal Tibial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Parkkinen, Markus; Madanat, Rami; Lindahl, Jan; Mäkinen, Tatu J

    2016-08-03

    The risk factors are unclear for deep surgical site infection after plate fixation of proximal tibial fractures. The objective of this study was to identify the patient and surgical procedure-related risk factors for infection using established criteria for deep surgical site infection. A total of 655 proximal tibial fractures were treated with open reduction and plate fixation at our center between 2004 and 2013. We identified 34 patients with deep surgical site infection. A control group of 136 patients was randomly selected from the non-infected cohort. Potential risk factors for deep surgical site infection were identified by reviewing surgical, medical, and radiographic records. Independent risk factors for infection were identified from multivariable logistic regression analysis using a stepwise procedure. The prevalence of deep surgical site infection was 5.2%, the mean age of affected patients was 55 years (range, 16 to 84 years), and 35% of patients were female. Twenty-eight of 34 deep infections were diagnosed within 2 months (acute onset), and only 6 infections were diagnosed >6 months after the index surgical procedure. Nine of the 28 acute-onset infections were treated with antibiotic therapy and debridement. Seventeen patients (50%) required muscle flap coverage, and 5 patients (15%) eventually required above-the-knee amputation. In the multivariable logistic regression analysis with odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), independent predictors of infection were patient age of ≥50 years (OR, 3.6 [95% CI, 1.3 to 10.1]); obesity, defined as a body mass index of ≥30 kg/m(2) (OR, 6.5 [95% CI, 2.2 to 18.9]); alcohol abuse (OR, 6.7 [95% CI, 2.4 to 19.2]); OTA/AO-type-C fracture (OR, 2.8 [95% CI, 1.1 to 7.5]); use of a temporary spanning external fixator (OR, 3.9 [95% CI, 1.4 to 11.1]); and a 4-compartment fasciotomy (OR, 4.5 [95% CI, 1.3 to 15.7]). There is high morbidity associated with deep surgical site infection in plated proximal

  13. Ingenious method of external fixator use to maintain alignment for nailing a proximal tibial shaft fracture.

    PubMed

    Behera, Prateek; Aggarwal, Sameer; Kumar, Vishal; Kumar Meena, Umesh; Saibaba, Balaji

    2015-09-01

    Fractures of the tibia are one of the most commonly seen orthopedic injuries. Most of them result from a high velocity trauma. While intramedullary nailing of tibial diaphyseal fractures is considered as the golden standard form of treatment for such cases, many metaphyseal and metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction fractures can also be managed by nailing. Maintenance of alignment of such fractures during surgical procedure is often challenging as the pull of patellar tendon tends to extend the proximal fragment as soon as one flexes the knee for the surgical procedure. Numerous technical modifications have been described in the literature for successfully nailing such fractures including semi extended nailing, use of medial plates and external fixators among others. In this study, it was aimed to report two cases in which we used our ingenious method of applying external fixator for maintaining alignment of the fracture and aiding in the entire process of closed intramedullary nailing of metaphyseal tibial fractures by the conventional method. We were able to get good alignment during and after the closed surgery as observed on post-operative radiographs and believe that further evaluation of this technique may be of help to surgeons who want to avoid other techniques.

  14. Rate of correction after asymmetrical physeal suppression in valgus deformity: analysis using a linear mixed model application.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ki Hyuk; Ahn, Soyeon; Chung, Chin Youb; Lee, Kyoung Min; Kim, Tae Won; Han, Ho Sung; Kim, Dae Ha; Choi, In Ho; Cho, Tae-Joon; Yoo, Won Joon; Park, Moon Seok

    2012-12-01

    This study was performed to estimate the rate of angular correction after asymmetrical physeal suppression and analyze the factors that influence the rate of correction by using a linear mixed model application. A total of 175 physes (72 distal femoral, 70 proximal tibial, and 33 distal tibial) from 78 consecutive patients with valgus angular deformity of the lower limb who underwent asymmetrical physeal suppression were included. The anatomic lateral distal femoral angle, the anatomic lateral proximal tibial angle, and the anatomic lateral distal tibial angle were measured from the teleroentgenograms of the patients' preoperative visit and periodic follow-ups. The rate of angular correction was adjusted by multiple factors by using a linear mixed model with age, sex, and surgical method as the fixed effects and each subject as the random effect. The final model included the age-specific and surgical method-specific rate and sex-specific and surgical method-specific intercept. Multivariate analysis was performed for this model. In younger children (boys 14 y or younger and girls 12 y or younger), the rate of correction of valgus deformity at the distal femur, proximal tibia, and distal tibia was 0.71 degrees/month (8.5 degrees/y), 0.40 degrees/month (4.8 degrees/y), and 0.48 degrees/month (5.8 degrees/y), respectively. In older children, the rate of correction of valgus deformity at the distal femur, proximal tibia, and distal tibia was 0.39 degrees/month (4.7 degrees/y), 0.29 degrees/month (3.5 degrees/y), and 0.48 degrees/month (5.8 degrees/y), respectively. The rate of correction at the distal femur was significantly lower in older children (P = 0.025). The rate of angular correction at the proximal tibia was significantly faster in the screw group than in the staple group (P = 0.046). Asymmetrical physeal suppression with staples, percutaneous transphyseal screws, and permanent method all are effective methods for treating valgus deformity in growing children

  15. Tibial motor nerve conduction studies: an investigation into the mechanism for amplitude drop of the proximal evoked response.

    PubMed

    Barkhaus, Paul E; Kincaid, John C; Nandedkar, Sanjeev D

    2011-11-01

    The amplitude of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) of abductor hallucis (AH) shows the largest drop with proximal stimulation of any routinely studied motor nerves. The cause has not been established. Four experiments of tibial motor nerve conduction in several healthy control subjects were performed using far-field recordings, collision, H-reflex, and intramuscular recordings of foot muscles. The proximal CMAP showed a mean peak-peak amplitude of 66% (range 57-79%) compared with the distal response. Collision and H-reflex recordings in AH did not show evidence of a contribution from the tibial-innervated calf muscle. Needle electrode recordings of CMAPs showed consistently different latencies between different foot muscles. Our experiments indicate that temporal dispersion and phase cancellation between the distal tibial-innervated foot muscles recorded by the E2 (i.e., reference) electrode can explain the drop in amplitude between the proximal and distal tibial evoked CMAP. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Tibial Growth Disturbance Following Distal Femoral Resection and Expandable Endoprosthetic Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Arteau, Annie; Lewis, Valerae O.; Moon, Bryan S.; Satcher, Robert L.; Bird, Justin E.; Lin, Patrick P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In growing children, an expandable endoprosthesis is commonly used after distal femoral resection to compensate for loss of the distal femoral physis. Our hypothesis was that such prostheses can affect proximal tibial growth, which would contribute to an overall leg-length discrepancy and cause angular deformity. Methods: Twenty-three skeletally immature patients underwent the placement of a distal femoral expandable endoprosthesis between 1994 and 2012. Tibial length, femoral length, and mechanical axis were measured radiographically to determine the growth rate. Results: No patient had radiographic evidence of injury to the proximal tibial physis at the time of surgery other than insertion of the tibial stem. Fifteen (65%) of the patients experienced less proximal tibial growth in the operative compared with the contralateral limb. In ten (43%) of the patients, the discrepancy progressively worsened, whereas in five (22%) of the patients, the discrepancy stabilized. Seven patients did not develop tibial length discrepancy, and one patient had overgrowth of the tibia. For the ten patients with progressive shortening, the proximal tibial physis grew an average of 4.0 mm less per year in the operative limb. Five (22%) of the patients had ≥20 mm of tibial length discrepancy at last follow-up. Three of these patients underwent contralateral tibial epiphysiodesis. Three patients required corrective surgery for angular deformity. Conclusions: The tibial growth plate may not resume normal growth after implantation of a distal femoral prosthesis. Physeal bar resection, prosthesis revision, and contralateral tibial epiphysiodesis may be needed to address tibial growth abnormalities. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:26582624

  17. Chondrocalcinosis of Femoro-Tibial and Proximal Tibio-Fibular Joints in Cadaveric Specimens: A High-Resolution CT Imaging Study of the Calcification Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Touraine, Sébastien; Ea, Hang Korng; Bousson, Valérie; Cohen-Solal, Martine; Laouisset, Liess; Chappard, Christine; Lioté, Frédéric; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To analyze calcium deposits by computed tomography (CT) in femoro-tibial compartments and proximal tibio-fibular joints; to assess the relationship with CT-assessed osteoarthritis (OA). Methods 68 (34 pairs) cadaveric knees (mean age of 84) were scanned at high resolution CT. Menisci and hyaline cartilage calcifications in the femoro-tibial and proximal tibio-fibular joints were analyzed. OA was CT-assessed by the Kellgren and Lawrence score. Gross appearance of OA was evaluated on 29 left knees after dissection and India ink staining of tibial plateaus. Results In femoro-tibial joints, meniscal calcifications (MC) and hyaline cartilage calcifications (HCC) were detected in 23(34%) and 14(21%) knees respectively. Calcifications mainly involved the three meniscal segments and were mainly observed in all thirds of the femoro-tibial compartments. In proximal tibio-fibular joints, HCC were detected in 19(28%) knees. The association HCC-MC in femoro-tibial joints and between calcifications in femoro-tibial and proximal tibio-fibular joints was strong (p<0.0001). Femoro-tibial and proximal tibio-fibular CT-assessed OA were respectively found in 23(34%) and 19(28%) knees. HCC were significantly associated with femoro-tibial OA (p = 0.04) while MC were not (p = 0.34). OA macroscopic evaluation showed a mean surface of cartilage lesions of 35% (range 0.13–0.55). No significant difference was demonstrated regarding the CT-detection of MC, HCC or CT-assessed OA. Conclusions This is the first study to report a strong association of chondrocalcinosis between femoro-tibial and tibio-fibular joints in addition to a strong association between MC and HCC in femoro-tibial compartments. No significant relationship between chondrocalcinosis and OA was demonstrated. PMID:23372802

  18. Arthroscopically assisted central physeal bar resection.

    PubMed

    Marsh, James S; Polzhofer, Gert K

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-seven central physeal bars were removed with an arthroscopically assisted technique. Thirty children (32 cases) have been followed to maturity or physeal closure. There were 19 boys and 11 girls, aged 4-14 years (mean, 9.5 years). Site of arrest was distal femur (15), proximal tibia (9), distal tibia (6), and distal radius (2). Mean follow-up was 6.5 years (range, 2-12 years). Adequate longitudinal growth was realized in 21 patients (70%) just after bar resection. Five patients (17%) required osteotomy, lengthening, or epiphysiodesis in addition to bar resection. In 4 patients (13%), bar resection failed. Failures occurred in those patients whose source of growth arrest was infection (3) or degree of physeal trauma approached 50% (1 case). This is the first series that studies and documents the efficacy of the arthroscope in central physeal bar resection. It provides the best visualization with minimal morbidity. The technique is described, including a discussion of technical tips and pitfalls.

  19. Epiphyseal and physeal cartilage: normal gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Wang, Renfa; Li, Yonggang; Tang, Lihua; Hu, Junwu; Xu, Anhui

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the normal appearance of epiphyseal and physeal cartilage on Gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced MR imaging. The appearance and enhancement ratios of 20 proximal and distal femoral epiphyses in 10 normal piglets were analyzed on Gd-enhanced MR images. The correlation of the MR imaging appearance with corresponding histological findings of immature epiphyses was examined. Our results showed that Gd-enhanced MRI could differentiate the differences in enhancement between physeal and epiphyseal cartilage and show vascular canals within the epiphyseal cartilage. Enhanced ratios in the physeal were greater than those in the epiphyseal cartilage (P < 0.005). It is concluded that Gd-enhanced MR imaging reveals epiphyseal vascular canals and shows difference in enhancement of physeal and epiphyseal cartilage.

  20. A comparison of tumor prosthesis implantation and pasteurized autograft-prosthesis composite for proximal tibial tumor.

    PubMed

    Song, Won Seok; Cho, Wan Hyeong; Jeon, Dae-Geun; Kong, Chang-Bae; Duo, Jian; Lee, Soo-Yong

    2012-07-01

    Although previous reports on composite biologic reconstruction in the proximal tibial location vary, we hypothesized that this type of reconstruction may reduce the late infection rate and have advantages in terms of longevity by restoring bone stock. Primary analysis addressed differences between 62 tumor prosthesis (TP) and 25 pasteurized autograft-prosthesis composite (PPC) reconstructions in terms of survival rates, functional outcomes, and temporal patterns of infection. The 10-year survival rates of the TP and PPC groups were 73.9 ± 11.7 and 68.7 ± 20.1 %, respectively (P = 0.64). Reconstructive failure occurred in 16 (25.8 %) in the TP and in 7 (28 %) in the PPC group. The cause of failures in the TP group was infection (16), whereas those of PPC group were infection (5), loosening (1), and local recurrence (1). The mean functional scores of TP (52) and PPC (20) patients that maintained a mobile joint were 24.2 (81 %) and 25.1 (83.6 %), respectively. Infection rates in the two groups were similar (P = 0.328), but infections occurred earlier in the PPC group (P = 0.011). This comparative study suggests composite biological reconstruction shows a comparable long-term survival rate to TP reconstruction; however, the composite method has a tendency to a lower rate of late infection.

  1. Physeal bar equivalent.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Hamlet A; Shaughnessy, William J; Stans, Anthony A

    2016-09-29

    Premature partial physeal arrest without the formation of an osseous bar - physeal bar equivalent (PBE) - is uncommon. Four children with a PBE had an infection near the distal femoral physis before the age of 11 months. Some growth was achieved after resection of the PBE in each case. Of two cases diagnosed and treated early, one required only contralateral physeal arrests to achieve limb-length equality at maturity. The other, currently 8 years and 4 months old, has a 1.1-cm limb-length discrepancy 6 years after PBE resection and will require observation until maturity. Of two cases diagnosed and treated late, one required ipsilateral femoral lengthening and contralateral femoral shortening and physeal arrests to treat the limb-length discrepancy and angular deformity. The other, currently 7 years and 1 month old, has a 4.8-cm discrepancy and will need future surgical limb-length equalization. Early recognition and treatment of PBE is required to avoid severe limb-length inequality and angular deformity.

  2. [Treatment of physeal fractures in children].

    PubMed

    Dorman, Tomasz; Synder, Marek; Grzegorzewski, Andrzej; Adamczyk, Emil; Sibiński, Marcin

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine final clinical and radiological results of epiphyseal fractures treated in our hospital. Thirty-five patients were included in the study (6 girls and 29 boys) aged from 5 to 17 years (mean 12.1 years). Follow up ranged from 2 to 20 years. According to Salter and Harris classification system 15 patients had type I and 20 had type II fracture. According to the Neer-Horowitz classification system of the proximal end of humerus one patient had grade III and three had grade IV fracture. Physeal fractures included: proximal end of humerus (n = 4), distal end of radius (n = 16) (with coexistent distal end of ulna fractures in 6 cases), distal end of femur (n = 4), distal end of tibia (n = 3) and distal end fibula (n = 8). Six patients were treated with open reduction and K-wire fixation, three with skeletal traction and cast, one with closed reduction and K-wire fixation and twenty five with closed reduction and cast. Neurovascular deficit was noted in any of our patients at admission and after reduction. During follow-up we did not notice physeal arrest, changes in limbs axis or limb shortening in any of our patients. All our patients had good clinical results. In 2 cases in early postoperative follow-up limitation of shoulder abduction after physeal fracture of proximal humerus was observed. Restoration of proper anatomical conditions is conducive to restore function of growth plate. Kirschner wire fixation did not increase the risk of growth arrest. Physeal injuries at the end of growth did not cause limb axis changes.

  3. Treating Proximal Tibial Growth Plate Injuries Using Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid) Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Clark, Amanda; Hilt, J Zach; Milbrandt, Todd A; Puleo, David A

    2015-01-01

    Growth plate fractures account for nearly 18.5% of fractures in children. Depending on the type and severity of the injury, inhibited bone growth or angular deformity caused by bone forming in place of the growth plate can occur. The current treatment involves removal of the bony bar and replacing it with a filler substance, such as a free fat graft. Unfortunately, reformation of the bony bar frequently occurs, preventing the native growth plate from regenerating. The goal of this pilot study was to determine whether biodegradable scaffolds can enhance native growth plate regeneration following a simulated injury that resulted in bony bar formation in the proximal tibial growth plate of New Zealand white rabbits. After removing the bony bar, animals received one of the following treatments: porous poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold; PLGA scaffold loaded with insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I); PLGA scaffold loaded with IGF-I and seeded with autogenous bone marrow cells (BMCs) harvested at the time of implantation; or fat graft (as used clinically). The PLGA scaffold group showed an increased chondrocyte population and a reduced loss of the remaining native growth plate compared to the fat graft group (the control group). An additional increase in chondrocyte density was seen in scaffolds loaded with IGF-I, and even more so when BMCs were seeded on the scaffold. While there was no significant reduction in the angular deformation of the limbs, the PLGA scaffolds increased the amount of cartilage and reduced the amount of bony bar reformation.

  4. Treating Proximal Tibial Growth Plate Injuries Using Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid) Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Amanda; Hilt, J. Zach; Milbrandt, Todd A.; Puleo, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Growth plate fractures account for nearly 18.5% of fractures in children. Depending on the type and severity of the injury, inhibited bone growth or angular deformity caused by bone forming in place of the growth plate can occur. The current treatment involves removal of the bony bar and replacing it with a filler substance, such as a free fat graft. Unfortunately, reformation of the bony bar frequently occurs, preventing the native growth plate from regenerating. The goal of this pilot study was to determine whether biodegradable scaffolds can enhance native growth plate regeneration following a simulated injury that resulted in bony bar formation in the proximal tibial growth plate of New Zealand white rabbits. After removing the bony bar, animals received one of the following treatments: porous poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold; PLGA scaffold loaded with insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I); PLGA scaffold loaded with IGF-I and seeded with autogenous bone marrow cells (BMCs) harvested at the time of implantation; or fat graft (as used clinically). The PLGA scaffold group showed an increased chondrocyte population and a reduced loss of the remaining native growth plate compared to the fat graft group (the control group). An additional increase in chondrocyte density was seen in scaffolds loaded with IGF-I, and even more so when BMCs were seeded on the scaffold. While there was no significant reduction in the angular deformation of the limbs, the PLGA scaffolds increased the amount of cartilage and reduced the amount of bony bar reformation. PMID:26309783

  5. Proximal tibial bone harvesting under local anesthesia without intravenous sedation in the dental office: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Ming; Chen, Pai-Li; Wu, Chung-Wei; Huang, I-Yueh; Lee, Kun-Tsung

    2008-02-01

    Maxillary sinus enlargement often occurs in the maxillary posterior edentulous area and reduces the available bone height for implantation. Therefore, maxillary sinus lift and bone graft procedures are necessary to provide sufficient available bone. Autogenous bone grafting is the best base for implant osseointegration. Recently, tibial bone has been recognized as an alternative extraoral donor site. We present a case in which we used a proximal tibia bone graft for maxillary sinus augmentation under local anesthesia without sedation in the dental office. During a 4-year postoperative follow-up, gait was not disturbed and the scar on the donor site remained unremarkable.

  6. Bilateral Simultaneous Avulsion Fractures of the Proximal Tibia in a 14-Year-Old Athlete with Vitamin-D Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Harb, Ziad; Malhi, Arfan

    2015-01-01

    Fractures involving the proximal tibial epiphysis are rare and form 0.5% of all epiphyseal injuries. The specific anatomical and developmental features of the proximal tibial epiphysis make it vulnerable to unique patterns of fractures. Vitamin-D plays a vital role in bone homeostasis and its deficiency has an impact on fracture risk and healing. We present the first ever reported case of simultaneous bilateral proximal tibial physeal fractures in an athlete with vitamin-D deficiency. Treatment consisted of plaster immobilisation, and the patient made a full recovery and returned to preinjury level of activities. We report this case for its uniqueness and as an educational review of the importance of the developmental anatomy of the proximal tibia. We review the literature and discuss how the stages of the growing physis determine the type of fracture sustained. PMID:26425381

  7. Radiological study of the knee joint line position measured from the fibular head and proximal tibial landmarks.

    PubMed

    Havet, Eric; Gabrion, Antoine; Leiber-Wackenheim, Frederic; Vernois, Joël; Olory, Bruno; Mertl, Patrice

    2007-06-01

    Restoring the joint line level is one of the surgical challenges during revision of total knee arthroplasty. The position of the tibial surface is commonly estimated by its distance to the apex of fibular head, but no study evaluating this distance accurately has been published yet. The purpose of this work was to study the distance between the knee joint line and the apex of the fibular head and the proximal tibia, particularly the tibial tuberosity. Variability with clinical data and relations with other local measurements have been evaluated on knee radiographs (an antero-posterior view, a medio-lateral view and an anteroposterior full length view) of 100 subjects (125 knees). Results showed no correlation between the joint line-fibular head apex distance and any clinical data of the patients, or any other performed measurements. Relations between tibial measurements and the sexe or the height of the subjects were noted. Besides, the review of the 25 bilateral cases did not show statistically significant side difference but the descriptive analysis showed too large discrepancies for the joint line-fibular head apex distance to be used as a landmark. We conclude that the fibular head apex cannot be used as a morphologic landmark to determine the knee joint line position. Its interest in clinical and surgical practice must be discussed.

  8. Metal-backed versus all-polyethylene unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: Proximal tibial strain in an experimentally validated finite element model.

    PubMed

    Scott, C E H; Eaton, M J; Nutton, R W; Wade, F A; Evans, S L; Pankaj, P

    2017-01-01

    Up to 40% of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) revisions are performed for unexplained pain which may be caused by elevated proximal tibial bone strain. This study investigates the effect of tibial component metal backing and polyethylene thickness on bone strain in a cemented fixed-bearing medial UKA using a finite element model (FEM) validated experimentally by digital image correlation (DIC) and acoustic emission (AE). A total of ten composite tibias implanted with all-polyethylene (AP) and metal-backed (MB) tibial components were loaded to 2500 N. Cortical strain was measured using DIC and cancellous microdamage using AE. FEMs were created and validated and polyethylene thickness varied from 6 mm to 10 mm. The volume of cancellous bone exposed to < -3000 µε (pathological loading) and < -7000 µε (yield point) minimum principal (compressive) microstrain and > 3000 µε and > 7000 µε maximum principal (tensile) microstrain was computed. Experimental AE data and the FEM volume of cancellous bone with compressive strain < -3000 µε correlated strongly: R = 0.947, R(2) = 0.847, percentage error 12.5% (p < 0.001). DIC and FEM data correlated: R = 0.838, R(2) = 0.702, percentage error 4.5% (p < 0.001). FEM strain patterns included MB lateral edge concentrations; AP concentrations at keel, peg and at the region of load application. Cancellous strains were higher in AP implants at all loads: 2.2- (10 mm) to 3.2-times (6 mm) the volume of cancellous bone compressively strained < -7000 µε. AP tibial components display greater volumes of pathologically overstrained cancellous bone than MB implants of the same geometry. Increasing AP thickness does not overcome these pathological forces and comes at the cost of greater bone resection.Cite this article: C. E. H. Scott, M. J. Eaton, R. W. Nutton, F. A. Wade, S. L. Evans, P. Pankaj. Metal-backed versus all-polyethylene unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: Proximal tibial strain in an experimentally validated

  9. The effect of proximal tibial slope on dynamic stability testing of the posterior cruciate ligament- and posterolateral corner-deficient knee.

    PubMed

    Petrigliano, Frank A; Suero, Eduardo M; Voos, James E; Pearle, Andrew D; Allen, Answorth A

    2012-06-01

    Proximal tibial slope has been shown to influence anteroposterior translation and tibial resting point in the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)-deficient knee. The effect of proximal tibial slope on rotational stability of the knee is unknown. Change in proximal tibial slope produced via osteotomy can influence both static translation and dynamic rotational kinematics in the PCL/posterolateral corner (PLC)-deficient knee. Controlled laboratory study. Posterior drawer, dial, and mechanized reverse pivot-shift (RPS) tests were performed on hip-to-toe specimens and translation of the lateral and medial compartments measured utilizing navigation (n = 10). The PCL and structures of the PLC were then sectioned. Stability testing was repeated, and compartmental translation was recorded. A proximal tibial osteotomy in the sagittal plane was then performed achieving either +5° or -5° of tibial slope variation, after which stability testing was repeated (n = 10). Analysis was performed using 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA; α = .05). Combined sectioning of the PCL and PLC structures resulted in a 10.5-mm increase in the posterior drawer, 15.5-mm increase in the dial test at 30°, 14.5-mm increase in the dial test at 90°, and 17.9-mm increase in the RPS (vs intact; P < .05). Increasing the posterior slope (high tibial osteotomy [HTO] +5°) in the PCL/PLC-deficient knee reduced medial compartment translation by 3.3 mm during posterior drawer (vs deficient; P < .05) but had no significant effect on the dial test at 30°, dial test at 90°, or RPS. Conversely, reversing the slope (HTO -5°) caused a 4.8-mm increase in medial compartment translation (vs deficient state; P < .05) during posterior drawer and an 8.6-mm increase in lateral compartment translation and 9.0-mm increase in medial compartment translation during RPS (vs deficient state; P < .05). Increasing posterior tibial slope diminished static posterior instability of the PCL/PLC-deficient knee as measured by the

  10. Arthroscopic visualization during excision of a central physeal bar.

    PubMed

    Stricker, S

    1992-01-01

    A centrally located developmental physeal bar in the proximal tibia was removed via a metaphyseal window. The use of an arthroscope to assist in the complete removal of the bone bridge is described. The arthroscope improved visualization and allowed reduction in the size of the metaphyseal window. At 2-year follow-up, the growth plate showed no evidence of bar reformation.

  11. TIBIAL PLATEAU PROXIMAL AND DISTAL BONE BEHAVE SIMILARLY: BOTH ARE ASSOCIATED WITH FEATURES OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is a growing imperative to understand how changes in peri-articular bone relate to pathological progression of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Peri-articular bone density can be measured using dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The medial:lateral tibial BMD ratio (M:L BMD) is associated with MRI and...

  12. Imaging of Physeal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jawetz, Shari T.; Shah, Parina H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2015-01-01

    Context: As the intensity of youth participation in athletic activities continues to rise, the number of overuse injuries has also increased. A subset of overuse injuries involves the physis, which is extremely susceptible to injury. This paper aims to review the utility of the various imaging modalities in the diagnosis and management of physeal injuries in the skeletally immature population. Evidence Acquisition: A search for the keywords pediatric, physis, growth plate, x-ray, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and overuse injury was performed using the PubMed database. No limits were set for the years of publication. Articles were reviewed for relevance with an emphasis on the imaging of growth plate injuries. Study Design: Retrospective literature review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Three major imaging modalities (radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) complement each other in the evaluation of pediatric patients with overuse injuries. However, magnetic resonance imaging is the only modality that offers direct visualization of the physis, and it also offers the best soft tissue contrast for evaluating the other periarticular structures for concomitant injury. Conclusion: Imaging has an important role in the diagnosis of physeal injuries, and the information it provides has a tremendous impact on the subsequent management of these patients. PMID:25984260

  13. Physeal-Sparing Technique for Femoral Tunnel Drilling in Pediatric Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Posteromedial Portal

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Stephen E.; Keating, Patrick M.; Scott, Timothy P.; Siwiec, Ryan M.

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears present a technical dilemma for orthopaedic surgeons. Multiple surgical techniques have been described to protect the distal femoral and proximal tibial physes. We present an ACL reconstruction technique performed on a 12-year-old girl with open physes who sustained an ACL tear after a noncontact twisting injury while playing soccer. A hamstring autograft reconstruction was performed by use of a posteromedial portal to drill the femoral tunnel in an all-epiphyseal fashion at the anatomic footprint of the native ACL. This case provides a new surgical technique to achieve anatomic fixation for ACL reconstruction in a skeletally immature individual using a posteromedial portal to drill a physeal-sparing lateral femoral tunnel for anatomic ACL reconstruction. This advancement may make drilling the femoral tunnel less technically challenging compared with other proposed methods while maintaining the lateral wall of the distal femur. PMID:24892013

  14. Effect of interposed periosteum in an animal physeal fracture model.

    PubMed

    Phieffer, L S; Meyer, R A; Gruber, H E; Easley, M; Wattenbarger, J M

    2000-07-01

    To study the effect of interposed periosteum on physeal fracture healing, 52 skeletally immature female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rats, 4 to 5 weeks of age, were randomized to one of three cohort groups. All animals underwent surgical dissection of the left proximal medial tibia; dissection consisted of superficial exposure and incision of a standard periosteal flap. Animals in Group I (fracture alone) underwent physeal fracture; those in Group II (fracture and periosteum) underwent physeal fracture with interposition of periosteum in the fracture site, and those in Group III (positive control) underwent physeal fracture, excision of 1/2 of the growth plate, and interposition of periosteum in the defect. After histologic examination of serial sections, fracture alone resulted in physeal injury frequently associated with small bar formation without a reduction in leg length. With the addition of interposition of periosteum into the fracture site, a small, but statistically significant, increase in leg length discrepancy frequently associated with small histologic bar formation occurred when compared with fracture alone.

  15. Human parathyroid hormone-(1-38) restores cancellous bone to the immobilized, osteopenic proximal tibial metaphysis in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Y. F.; Jee, W. S.; Ke, H. Z.; Lin, B. Y.; Liang, X. G.; Li, M.; Yamamoto, N.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if human parathyroid hormone-(1-38) (hPTH(1-38)) can restore cancellous bone mass to the established osteopenic, immobilized proximal tibial metaphyses of female rats. The right hindlimbs of 6-month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were immobilized by bandaging the right hindlimbs to the abdomen. After 30 days of right hindlimb immobilization, the rats were subcutaneously injected with 200 micrograms hPTH(1-38)/kg/day for 15 days (short-term treatment) or 75 days (longer-term treatment). Static bone histomorphometry was performed on the primary spongiosa, and both static and dynamic histomorphometry were performed on the secondary spongiosa of the right proximal tibial metaphyses. Immobilization for 30 days without treatment decreased trabecular bone area, number, and thickness in both primary and secondary spongiosa, and induced an increase in eroded perimeter and a decrease in tissue referent-bone formation rate in the secondary spongiosa. These changes reached a new steady state thereafter. Treatment with 200 micrograms hPTH(1-38)/kg/day for 15 days, beginning 30 days after immobilization, significantly increased trabecular bone area, thickness, and number in both primary and secondary spongiosa despite continuous immobilization when compared with controls. The short-term PTH treatment (15 days) significantly increased labeling perimeter, mineral apposition rate, and tissue referent-bone formation rate in the secondary spongiosa and stimulated longitudinal bone growth as compared with the controls. Longer PTH treatment (75 days) further increased trabecular bone area, thickness, and number as compared with controls and groups given short-term PTH treatment (15 days). The bone formation indices in the secondary spongiosa of the longer-term treated rats were lower than those of the short-term treated group, but they were still higher than those of controls. Our findings indicate that PTH treatment stimulates cancellous bone

  16. Human parathyroid hormone-(1-38) restores cancellous bone to the immobilized, osteopenic proximal tibial metaphysis in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Y. F.; Jee, W. S.; Ke, H. Z.; Lin, B. Y.; Liang, X. G.; Li, M.; Yamamoto, N.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if human parathyroid hormone-(1-38) (hPTH(1-38)) can restore cancellous bone mass to the established osteopenic, immobilized proximal tibial metaphyses of female rats. The right hindlimbs of 6-month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were immobilized by bandaging the right hindlimbs to the abdomen. After 30 days of right hindlimb immobilization, the rats were subcutaneously injected with 200 micrograms hPTH(1-38)/kg/day for 15 days (short-term treatment) or 75 days (longer-term treatment). Static bone histomorphometry was performed on the primary spongiosa, and both static and dynamic histomorphometry were performed on the secondary spongiosa of the right proximal tibial metaphyses. Immobilization for 30 days without treatment decreased trabecular bone area, number, and thickness in both primary and secondary spongiosa, and induced an increase in eroded perimeter and a decrease in tissue referent-bone formation rate in the secondary spongiosa. These changes reached a new steady state thereafter. Treatment with 200 micrograms hPTH(1-38)/kg/day for 15 days, beginning 30 days after immobilization, significantly increased trabecular bone area, thickness, and number in both primary and secondary spongiosa despite continuous immobilization when compared with controls. The short-term PTH treatment (15 days) significantly increased labeling perimeter, mineral apposition rate, and tissue referent-bone formation rate in the secondary spongiosa and stimulated longitudinal bone growth as compared with the controls. Longer PTH treatment (75 days) further increased trabecular bone area, thickness, and number as compared with controls and groups given short-term PTH treatment (15 days). The bone formation indices in the secondary spongiosa of the longer-term treated rats were lower than those of the short-term treated group, but they were still higher than those of controls. Our findings indicate that PTH treatment stimulates cancellous bone

  17. Metaphyseal screw augmentation of the LISS-PLT plate with polymethylmethacrylate improves angular stability in osteoporotic proximal third tibial fractures: a biomechanical study in human cadaveric tibiae.

    PubMed

    Goetzen, Michael; Nicolino, Tomas; Hofmann-Fliri, Ladina; Blauth, Michael; Windolf, Markus

    2014-05-01

    The incidence of osteoporotic proximal tibial fractures has increased during the last 2 decades. A promising approach in osteoporotic fracture fixation is polymethylmethacrylate-based cement augmentation of implants to gain better implant purchase in the bone. This study investigates the biomechanical benefits of screw augmentation in less invasive stabilization system-proximal lateral tibial (LISS-PLT) plates in cadaveric extraarticular comminuted proximal tibial fractures (OTA-41-A3.3). Standardized extraarticular proximal tibial fractures were stabilized with the LISS-PLT plate in 6 paired osteoporotic cadaveric tibiae. Bone mineral density was measured with high-resolution, quantitative computed tomography scans to identify bone quality. In the augmented group, the 5 proximal screws of the LISS-PLT plate were augmented with 1 mL of bone cement each, whereas the contralateral tibia was instrumented conventionally as the control. Cyclic axial loading was applied to each specimen with a starting load of 150 N, using a ramp of 0.05 N per cycle to 10-mm axial displacement. Varus displacement was identified from anterior-posterior radiographs. Bone mineral density showed no significant difference between the 2 groups (P = 0.47). The nonaugmented group reached 9417 load cycles (SD 753) until failure, compared with 14,792 load cycles (SD 2088) in the augmented group (P = 0.002). In the early-onset failure (deformation at 8250 load cycles), varus displacement was significantly smaller in the augmented group (0.46 degrees, SD 0.6) than in the nonaugmented group (3.23 degrees, SD 1.7) (P = 0.01). This biomechanical study showed that cement augmentation of the LISS-PLT plate screws in osteoporotic proximal extraarticular tibial fractures significantly lowers the propensity toward screw migration and secondary varus displacement.

  18. PROXIMAL TIBIAL OSTEOTOMY: STABILIZATION OF THE MEDIAL OPENING WITH A TRICORTICAL ILIAC BONE GRAFT

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha Luciano, Roberto; de Moura Souza, Getúlio Danival; Rispoli, Juliano; Cardoso, Rodrigo Galvão; do Nascimento, Marcus Vinícius Martins; Domingos, Gustavo Gontijo; Luciano, Dyego Vilela

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Radiographic assessment of lower limb alignment, in the frontal and sagittal planes, after high tibial osteotomy. To stabilize the osteotomy, a tricortical iliac graft was used, along with a positioning screw. Methods: Prospective study on 46 patients with ages ranging from 17 to 61 years. Among them, 42 patients presented genu varum secondary to knee osteoarthritis and four from other causes. Teleradiography was performed for surgical planning, using the Frank Noyes method, as modified by Fugizawa. A conventional surgical access of 3 cm was made to harvest a tricortical iliac graft. Osteotomy was performed under radioscopic control, by means of an anteromedial incision of 3 cm with release of the superficial portion of the medial collateral ligament. The graft was placed in the posterior portion of the osteotomy, to maintain an unaltered tibial slope. The screw crossed the osteotomy orthogonally to protect the lateral cortex. Pre and postoperative radiographic criteria were established to assess the results. Results: There was consolidation in 100% of the cases and maintenance of the mechanical axis, obtained intraoperatively, in 94% of the cases. The posterior slope of the tibial plateau in the sagittal plane ranged from 7° to 12°. Joint mobility was restored in all the patients. Eleven patients presented temporary pain at the site of graft harvesting, but none had paresthesia. The incidence of complications was 8% (infection, loss of correction and joint fracture). Conclusion: The technique was shown to be reproducible, simple, biological, accurate and low-cost, and it may be an alternative to the existing techniques. PMID:27026961

  19. Through-knee amputation for a patient with proximal femur focal deficiency and tibial hemimelia: surgical anatomy and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Selvyn; Rashid, Abdul Halim Abd; Das, Srijit; Ibrahim, Sharaf

    2014-03-01

    Tibial hemimelia is a rare anomaly of unknown etiology. This condition can occur sporadically or may have a familial inheritance. It is characterized by deficiency of the tibia with a relatively intact fibula. The anomaly may be unilateral or bilateral. We report a case of a 2-year-old girl who presented with right lower limb deformity since birth. She was diagnosed with proximal femur focal deficiency with absence of the ipsilateral tibia. She presented with a shorter right lower limb and a deformed foot. She was treated with a through-knee amputation. Anatomical dissection of the amputated limb was carried out to verify the anomalies. The dissection showed that the distal phalanx of the great toe was trifid. The anatomical and clinical significance of this interesting case is discussed.

  20. [Proximal tibial valgus osteotomy semi-invasive technique. A report on 66 cases].

    PubMed

    González Maza, Carlos; Moscoso López, Luis; Magaña García, Ignacio; Mejía Vargas, Gildardo; López Segundo, José Román

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to report sixty six high tibial lateral osteotomies (HTO) make on patients with osteoarthrosis of the medial compartment, using modified semi invasive technique. With this technique the incision is 5-6 mm, fibular head is not resect, biceps femoris tendon is not cut, no internal fixation is place; the median follow-up was 6.4 years. The status of the patient at the final follow-up was analyzed using Knee Society Score (KSS), and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). An average of 85 points was achieved after HTO compared to 55 points preoperative and 83 points after HTO compared to 51 points preoperative, was obtained at the evaluation with KSS. The only complication was superficial infections (4%). Serious complications did not appear. There was not pseudoarthrosis.

  1. A three-dimensional analysis of the geometry and curvature of the proximal tibial articular surface of hominoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Emily K.; Karnick, Pushpak

    2006-02-01

    This study uses new three-dimensional imaging techniques to compare the articular curvature of the proximal tibial articular surface of hominoids. It has been hypothesized that the curvature of the anteroposterior contour of the lateral condyle in particular can be used to differentiate humans and apes and reflect locomotor function. This study draws from a large comparative sample of extant hominoids to obtain quantitative curvature data. Three-dimensional models of the proximal tibiae of 26 human, 15 chimpanzee, 15 gorilla, 17 orangutan, 16 gibbon and four Australopithecus fossil casts (AL 129-1b, AL 288-1aq, AL 333x-26, KNM-KP 29285A) were acquired with a Cyberware Model 15 laser digitizer. Curvature analysis was accomplished using a software program developed at Arizona State University's Partnership for Research In Stereo Modeling (PRISM) lab, which enables the user to extract curvature profiles and compute the difference between analogous curves from different specimens. Results indicate that the curvature of chimpanzee, gorilla and orangutan tibiae is significantly different from the curvature of human tibiae, thus supporting the hypothesized dichotomy between humans and great apes. The non-significant difference between gibbons and all other taxa indicates that gibbons have an intermediate pattern of articular curvature. All four Australopithecus tibia were aligned with the great apes.

  2. Human parathyroid hormone-(1-38) restores cancellous bone to the immobilized, osteopenic proximal tibial metaphysis in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Y. F.; Jee, W. S. S.; Ke, H. Z.; Lin, B. Y.; Liang, X. G.; Li, M.; Yamamoto, N.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if human parathyroid hormone-(1-38) (PTH) can restore cancellous bone mass to the established osteopenic, immobilized proximal tibial metaphyses (PTM) of female rats. The right hindlimbs of six-month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were immobilized by bandaging the right hindlimbs to the abdomen. After 30 days of right hindlimb immobilization (RHLI), the rats were subcutaneously injected with 200 microgram hPTH(1-38)/kg/day for 15 (short-term) or 75 (longer-term) days. Static bone histomorphometry was performed on the primary spongiosa, while both static and dynamic histomorphometry were performed on the secondary spongiosa of the right PTM. Immobilization for 30 days without treatment decreased trabecular bone area, number and thickness in both primary and secondary spongiosa, and induced an increase in eroded perimeter and a decrease in tissue referent-bone formation rate (BFR/TV) in the secondary spongios. These changes reached a new steady state thereafter. Treatment with 200 microgram hPTH(1-38)/kg/day for 15 days, beginning at 30 days post immobilization (IM), significantly increased trabecular bone area, thickness and number in both primary and secondary spongiosa despite continuous IM when compared to the age-related and IM controls. The short-term (15 days) PTH treatment significantly increased labeling perimeter, mineral apposition rate and BFR/TV in the secondary spongiosa and stimulated longitudinal bone growth as compared to the age-related and IM controls. PTH treatment for longer-term (75 days) further increased trabecular bone area, thickness and number as compared to aging and IM controls and short-term (15 days) PTH treated groups. The bone formation indices in the secondary spongiosa of these longer-term treated rats were lower than that of short-term (15 days) PTH treated group, but they were still higher than those of IM and age-related controls. Our findings indicate that PTH treatment stimulates

  3. Early versus late reduction of a physeal fracture in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Egol, Kenneth A; Karunakar, Madhav; Phieffer, Laura; Meyer, Ralph; Wattenbarger, J Michael

    2002-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether delayed reduction of physeal fractures in an animal model causes growth disturbance, and whether final alignment is better in delayed or malreduced fractures. Salter 1 fractures of the proximal tibia were created in 41 immature rats randomized into five groups. The fractures were reduced as follows: group 1, immediately; group 2, 6 hours; group 3, 24 hours; group 4, 48 hours; and group 5, left malreduced. Both legs were analyzed for leg-length discrepancy, angular deformity, and evidence of radiographic bar. No radiographic physeal bar or leg-length discrepancy was seen among any of the groups. Angular deformity was greatest in group 5 and least in group 1. Immediate reduction resulted in the least angular deformity. Delayed reduction showed no evidence of physeal damage, physeal growth disturbance, or radiographic bar formation. Alignment was not improved in delayed reduction versus malreduced fractures.

  4. Physeal Disruption During ACL Reconstruction in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Aristides Ignacio; Lakomkin, Nikita; Fabricant, Peter D.; Lawrence, John Todd R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to radiographically assess differences in distal femoral physeal disruption between transtibial and independent femoral tunnel drilling techniques following ACL reconstruction in skeletally immature patients. Methods: A retrospective, matched comparative cohort study was performed of skeletally immature patients who underwent transphyseal ACL reconstruction between January 1, 2008 and March 31, 2011. All skeletally immature patients between ten and fifteen years old who underwent independent femoral tunnel drilling and had adequate baseline and post-operative radiographs were analyzed. These patients were matched with a transtibial technique cohort based on age and sex. Demographic characteristics and peri-operative metrics were collected. Radiographic measurements were recorded from pre-operative MRI and post-operative plain radiographs. Results: Twenty patients were analyzed. Between groups, there were significant differences between independent tunnel drilling and transtibial tunnel drilling in the estimated area of physeal disruption (1.64 cm2 vs. 0.74 cm2, P<0.001), femoral (32.1º vs. 72.8º, P<0.001) and tibial (50.1º vs. 60.5º, P=0.003) tunnel angles, medial/lateral location of the femoral tunnel (24.2 mm vs. 36.1 mm from lateral cortex, P=0.001), and distance from the lateral aspect of the distal femoral physis and the femoral tunnel exit (4.7 mm vs. 26.7 mm from the perichondrial ring, P<0.001), respectively. All patients who underwent femoral tunnel drilling at an angle of less than 25º from the transverse axis experienced a greater than 6% disruption of physeal area. There was a significant inverse correlation between femoral tunnel angle and estimated area of femoral physeal involvement (r=-0.8255, P=0.003). Conclusion: With femoral tunnel drilling techniques that create more oblique tunnels, the area of distal femoral physeal damage is larger, more eccentric and closer to the perichondrial ring. Since most

  5. The influence of physeal injury upon growth correction of deformed rat tibia.

    PubMed

    Kwon, D J; Moon, M S

    1980-01-01

    Experimentally produced angulatory deformities of rat tibia with and without physeal injury were observed at two to three-week intervals for an eight-week period by x-ray studies, in order to estimate the spontaneous correctability of tibial deformity in growing rats. The results obtained were as follows: 1) In the retrocurvated rat tibia with intact physes or with distal physeal injury, roughly one quarter of the initial angle was corrected during the eight-week observation period, with greater correction occurring during the first five weeks in both groups. 2) Injury of the distal physis hardly influenced the correction capacity of the deformed tibia. 3) The physis and diaphysis played equally important roles in the remodelling process of rat tibia with intact physes. However, early remodelling took place on a considerably larger scale and with greater rapidity through physeal growth, and late remodelling similarly through the diaphyseal appositional growth.

  6. Physeal injuries of the distal tibia: long-term results in 376 patients

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Harald; Platzer, Patrick; Schulz, Martin; Hajdu, Stefan; Vécsei, Vilmos

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate our treatment of distal tibial physeal injuries retrospectively and explain the relationship between the trauma mechanism, the radiographic injury pattern, the subsequent therapy and the functional outcome, as well as to further deduce and verify prognostic criteria. At the Department of Trauma Surgery, Vienna Medical University, 419 children and adolescent patients with physeal injuries of the distal tibia were treated from 1993 to 2007, of these 376 were included in our study and evaluated retrospectively. Seventy-seven displaced physeal fractures of the distal tibia were reconstructed anatomically by open or closed reduction and produced 95% excellent results. A perfect anatomical reduction, if necessary by open means, should be achieved to prevent a bone bridge with subsequent epiphysiodesis and post-traumatic deformities due to growth inhibition and/or retardation. PMID:19662414

  7. Physeal Growth Arrest by Excessive Compression: Histological, Biochemical, and Micro-CT Observations in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won Joon; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Lee, Hye Ran; Cho, Tae-Joon

    2011-01-01

    Background Compressive force across the growth plate may cause retardation and even arrest of physeal growth. The purpose of this study was to investigate histologic changes, metabolic changes in terms of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentration, and contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography (CEMCT) findings of physeal cartilage in a rabbit model of physeal damage caused by excessive compression. Methods Compressive forces were applied via external fixators for two weeks to the growth plates of distal femurs and proximal tibiae of right hind-legs in 8-week-old rabbits. Left hind-legs remained intact and were used as controls. Forty-four bone specimens containing growth plates of distal femurs or proximal tibiae were harvested one week (n = 12) and four weeks (n = 32) after surgery, and examined for histologic findings (H&E staining) and GAGs quantification in physeal cartilage. After incubation in an ionic contrast material for 48 hours, specimens were scanned by CEMCT, and the pixel values of physeal cartilage were measured. Results CEMCT showed a thin, highly attenuated line parallel to the growth plate in compressed specimens harvested at four weeks after surgery, which was found to be transversely connected trabecular bone. In these specimens, GAG content in physeal cartilage was significantly lower, and CEMCT pixel values of physeal cartilage were significantly higher than in the specimens from the contralateral control side. Conclusions Excessive compressive force applied to growth plates produces altered histologic features and metabolic function in terms of decreased GAG content in physeal cartilage, changes that can be demonstrated by CEMCT. PMID:22162794

  8. Osteoporotic risk and physeal closure in prepubertal ovariohysterectomized cats.

    PubMed

    Uçmak, Melih; Yılmaz, Özge Turna; Gündüz, Mehmet Can; Uçmak, Zeynep Günay; Duzgun, Oktay; Eskiyurt, Nurten; Oruç, Coşkun Umut; Genç, Sema; Erzengin, Ömer Mehmet; Karaçam, Esra

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to examine the early effects of prepubertal ovariohysterectomy (P-OHE) on bone loss and proximal physeal closure in cats. Fourteen kittens randomly underwent P-OHE or sham operations (S-OP) at three months (mo) of age and were allocated to group I and group II. Each mo between four and nine mo of age, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans were performed to determine the total body bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC). Proximal radial physeal closure and radial length were determined by radiography. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), carboxy-terminal collagen teleopeptide (CTX), 17-β estradiol, progesterone, calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) were measured in the serum samples. No significant differences were observed between the groups in terms of BMD, BMC, BAP, BAP/CTX, P, progesterone and body weight (BW) (between 4 and 9mo) and for Ca (between 5 and 9mo) and for CTX levels (between 4 and 8mo). The 17-β estradiol was significantly higher at 6, 8 and 9mo of age in the S-OP group due to puberty (P=0.02, P=0.03 and P=0.02 respectively). Although there was a significant difference (P=0.0002) between the P-OHE and S-OP groups in terms of the proximal radial physeal closure times (7.43±0.20mo and 6.14±0.14mo, respectively), no significant difference was observed for the mean radius length (10.59±0.10cm and 10.06±0.27cm, respectively) at the last evaluation time. In conclusion, prepubertal ovariohysterectomized cats do not have any osteoporotic risks until nine mo of age and exhibit a delayed physeal closure time without a change in radius length.

  9. [Mechanical failure of porous hydroxyapatite ceramics 7.5 years after implantation in the proximal tibial].

    PubMed

    Linhart, W; Briem, D; Amling, M; Rueger, J M; Windolf, J

    2004-02-01

    The treatment of osseous defects is widely established in the elderly. The number of positive reports on the successful application of bovine as well as coralline hydroxyapatite ceramics has continuously increased during the last few years. In trauma surgery hydroxyapatite ceramics are most commonly applied in metaphyseal defects evoked by traumatic fractures of the long bones. The bovine and coralline materials applied are biocompatible and exhibit an interconnecting porous system. Good osteoconductive properties of such materials have repeatedly been demonstrated. Due to possible harmful effects caused by abrasion of the material, intra-articular application should be strictly avoided. Biological degradation of the materials does not occur even during long-term follow-up. The application of hydroxyapatite ceramics was introduced at our institution in 1992. Since then, no adverse events have been observed and only a few relevant complications were described in the literature. We report on a patient revealing a mechanical failure of a bovine hydroxyapatite (Endobon) 7.5 years after implantation into a metaphyseal defect of the proximal tibia caused by a traumatic fracture.

  10. The Anteroposterior Axis of the Proximal Tibia Can Change After Tibial Resection in Total Knee Arthroplasty: Computer Simulation Using Asian Osteoarthritis Knees.

    PubMed

    Ushio, Tetsuro; Mizu-Uchi, Hideki; Okazaki, Ken; Ma, Yuan; Kuwashima, Umito; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated the effect of cutting surface on the anteroposterior (AP) axis of the proximal tibia using a 3-dimensional (3D) bone model to ensure proper tibial rotational alignment in total knee arthroplasty. 3D bone models were reconstructed from the preoperative computed tomography data of 93 Japanese osteoarthritis knees with varus deformity. The AP axis was defined as the perpendicular bisector of the medial and lateral condylar centers in a 3D coordinate system. Bone cutting of the proximal tibia was performed with various tibial posterior slopes (0°, 3°, 7°) to the mechanical axis, and we compared the AP axes before and after bone cutting. The AP axis before bone cutting crossed a point at about 16% (one-sixth) of the distance from the medial edge of the patellar tendon at its tibial attachment. The AP axis after bone cutting was significantly internally rotated at all posterior slopes: 4.1° at slope 0°, 3.0° at slope 3°, and 2.1° at slope 7°. The percentages of cases with differences of more than 3° or 5° were 66.7% and 34.4% at slope 0°, 53.8% and 24.7% at slope 3°, and 38.3% and 11.8% at slope 7°, respectively. The AP axis of the proximal tibia may be rotated internally after resection of the proximal tibia in total knee arthroplasty. Hence, surgeons should recognize the effect of changes in the cutting surface on rotational alignment of the proximal tibia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The safety and efficacy of a new adjustable plate used for proximal tibial opening wedge osteotomy in the treatment of unicompartmental knee osteoarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Alex C; Incavo, Stephen J; Beynnon, Bruce D; Abate, Joseph A; Urse, John S; Kelly, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Twenty opening wedge tibial osteotomies were performed using the Osteotrac plate, which consists of a two-piece plate with a one-way ratcheting mechanism with two degrees of freedom. A variety of concomitant procedures were performed including osteochondral transfer, tibial tubercle medialization, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The change in tibiofemoral alignment in the coronal plane and the shift in lower extremity mechanical axis were determined. The average lateral shift in the lower extremity mechanical axis was 24% of the tibial plateau width. The average change in the mechanical tibiofemoral angle was 7 degrees of valgus. Union rate at the osteotomy site was 95%. No deep infections, clinical deep venous thrombosis, or device failures occurred. The Osteotrac plate provides safe and effective fixation and intraoperative adjustability to achieve and maintain a lateral shift of the lower extremity mechanical axis and valgus correction of the tibiofemoral alignment in patients with varus knees undergoing proximal tibial opening wedge osteotomy and associated meniscal and chondral procedures.

  12. Forensic age estimation via 3-T magnetic resonance imaging of ossification of the proximal tibial and distal femoral epiphyses: Use of a T2-weighted fast spin-echo technique.

    PubMed

    Ekizoglu, Oguzhan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Inci, Ercan; Can, Ismail Ozgur; Aksoy, Sema; Kazimoglu, Cemal

    2016-03-01

    Radiation exposure during forensic age estimation is associated with ethical implications. It is important to prevent repetitive radiation exposure when conducting advanced ultrasonography (USG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of 3.0-T MRI in determining the degree of ossification of the distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyses in a group of Turkish population. We retrospectively evaluated coronal T2-weighted and turbo spin-echo sequences taken upon MRI of 503 patients (305 males, 198 females; age 10-30 years) using a five-stage method. Intra- and interobserver variations were very low. (Intraobserver reliability was κ=0.919 for the distal femoral epiphysis and κ=0.961 for the proximal tibial epiphysis, and interobserver reliability was κ=0.836 for the distal femoral epiphysis and κ=0.885 for the proximal tibial epiphysis.) Spearman's rank correlation analysis indicated a significant positive relationship between age and the extent of ossification of the distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyses (p<0.001). Comparison of male and female data revealed significant between-gender differences in the ages at first attainment of stages 2, 3, and 4 ossifications of the distal femoral epiphysis and stage 1 and 4 ossifications of the proximal tibial epiphysis (p<0.05). The earliest ages at which ossification of stages 3, 4, and 5 was evident in the distal femoral epiphysis were 14, 17, and 22 years in males and 13, 16, and 21 years in females, respectively. Proximal tibial epiphysis of stages 3, 4, and 5 ossification was first noted at ages 14, 17, and 18 years in males and 13, 15, and 16 years in females, respectively. MRI of the distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyses is an alternative, noninvasive, and reliable technique to estimate age.

  13. Periosteal entrapment in distal femoral physeal fractures: harbinger for premature physeal arrest ?

    PubMed

    Segal, Lee S; Shrader, M Wade

    2011-10-01

    We report on two patients who sustained Salter-Harris II fractures of the distal femur with physeal widening after being tackled in football games. Preoperative MRI indicated entrapped periosteum at the physeal fracture site for both patients. Both patients underwent open reduction of the physeal fracture with removal of the entrapped periosteum and achieving an anatomic reduction. Follow-up MRI's revealed premature physeal arrest. Subsequent procedures were performed to address sequelae of premature physeal arrest. The presence of physeal widening and entrapped periosteum may reflect high-energy trauma to the physis. This can result in injury to both the epiphyseal blood supply and to the physeal cartilage (germinal zone) resulting in physeal arrest despite anatomic reduction after removal of the entrapped periosteum. Upon literature review, pre-operative MRI demonstrating entrapped periosteum has not been previously reported. We hypothesize that the presence of entrapped periosteum following distal femoral physeal fractures may be associated with an increased risk for premature physeal arrest.

  14. Imaging of physeal injury: overuse.

    PubMed

    Jawetz, Shari T; Shah, Parina H; Potter, Hollis G

    2015-03-01

    As the intensity of youth participation in athletic activities continues to rise, the number of overuse injuries has also increased. A subset of overuse injuries involves the physis, which is extremely susceptible to injury. This paper aims to review the utility of the various imaging modalities in the diagnosis and management of physeal injuries in the skeletally immature population. A search for the keywords pediatric, physis, growth plate, x-ray, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and overuse injury was performed using the PubMed database. No limits were set for the years of publication. Articles were reviewed for relevance with an emphasis on the imaging of growth plate injuries. Retrospective literature review. Level 4. Three major imaging modalities (radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) complement each other in the evaluation of pediatric patients with overuse injuries. However, magnetic resonance imaging is the only modality that offers direct visualization of the physis, and it also offers the best soft tissue contrast for evaluating the other periarticular structures for concomitant injury. Imaging has an important role in the diagnosis of physeal injuries, and the information it provides has a tremendous impact on the subsequent management of these patients.

  15. Prevention of growth arrest by fibrin interposition into physeal injury.

    PubMed

    Jie, Qiang; Hu, Yunyu; Yang, Liu; Lei, Wei; Zhao, Li; Lv, Rong; Wang, Jun

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated the repair effects of fat and fibrin graft interposition through a proximal tibia transphyseal injury model and assessed the effectiveness of treatment to physeal injury with the fibrin. In this study, a unilateral growth plate injury was created in the right proximal tibia of 28 rats without any graft interposition; all left tibias were left untouched. In the other group of 28 rats, a bilateral physeal injury was made with the left tibia filled with autogenously adipose tissue and the right tibia filled with fibrin. To compare the malformed extents induced by different interventions, the length and the metaphyseal-diaphyseal angle of the tibia of three injured groups were examined. Further studies on bone density analysis and histological change were used to compare the bony bridge formation under different interventions. Results showed that the deformity angle and medial length of the tibia were significantly different between the grafted groups and nongrafted group at 4, 16, and 24 weeks postoperative (P<0.01). Results also showed no significant difference between fibrin-graft and fat-graft groups (P>0.05). Furthermore, the bone mineralization density of bony bridge induced by injury was significantly different between the grafted group and nongrafted group at 4, 16, and 24 weeks postoperative (P<0.01). Histological findings showed that bony repair after physeal injury was inhibited by both fibrin and fat interventions. We concluded that fibrin could be a substitute of adipose tissue in preventing the deformities induced by epiphyseal injury. Similar to autogenous fat, fibrin was found to alleviate limb shortness and prevent angular malformation by forming a scar instead of a bony bridge. The use of fibrin can help us to develop effective and compound intervention grafts to prevent skeletal deformity and regenerate normal cartilage tissue in the future.

  16. Physeal arrest of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua M; Little, Kevin; Kozin, Scott H

    2014-06-01

    Fractures of the distal radius are among the most common pediatric fractures. Although most of these fractures heal without complication, some result in partial or complete physeal arrest. The risk of physeal arrest can be reduced by avoiding known risk factors during fracture management, including multiple attempts at fracture reduction. Athletes may place substantial compressive and shear forces across the distal radial physes, making them prone to growth arrest. Timely recognition of physeal arrest can allow for more predictable procedures to be performed, such as distal ulnar epiphysiodesis. In cases of partial arrest, physeal bar excision with interposition grafting can be performed. Once ulnar abutment is present, more invasive procedures may be required, including ulnar shortening osteotomy or radial lengthening.

  17. Overuse Physeal Injuries in Youth Athletes.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Amanda; Thigpen, Charles A; Beattie, Paul F; Kissenberth, Michael J; Shanley, Ellen

    Despite rising awareness of the risks associated with sports participation, overuse injuries continue to increase in youth athlete populations. Physeal injuries are one type of overuse injury exclusive to pediatric populations that are often sustained during athletic practice or competition. Overuse physeal injuries are, in theory, preventable; however, little consensus has been reached surrounding the risk factors, prevention, and treatment strategies. This systematic review summarizes the best available evidence concerning overuse physeal injuries in youth and adolescent athletes. It can be used to develop prevention and treatment programs specific to this population. PubMed and Academic Search Complete (EBSCOhost) were explored using the keyword physeal injuries from January 1950 through May 2015 to identify 24 studies. Original research studies of athletic populations with mechanisms of injury related to sport were chosen. Systematic review. Level 3. Data were extracted as available from 24 eligible studies. Study quality was rated using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine (OCEBM) guidelines. Risk factors for injury include periods of accelerated growth, chronological age, body size, training volume, and previous injury. Injury prevention strategies currently emphasize participation limitations and sport-specific training programs in skeletally immature athletes. The most effective treatment after an overuse physeal injury was an extended period of active rest and joint immobilization when necessary. Overuse physeal injuries are multifactorial in nature. Muscular imbalances after accelerated growth periods predispose young athletes to overuse injuries. Modifiable risk factors such as flexibility, strength, and training volume should be regularly monitored to prevent these injuries.

  18. Optimizing finite element predictions of local subchondral bone structural stiffness using neural network-derived density-modulus relationships for proximal tibial subchondral cortical and trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Nazemi, S Majid; Amini, Morteza; Kontulainen, Saija A; Milner, Jaques S; Holdsworth, David W; Masri, Bassam A; Wilson, David R; Johnston, James D

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative computed tomography based subject-specific finite element modeling has potential to clarify the role of subchondral bone alterations in knee osteoarthritis initiation, progression, and pain. However, it is unclear what density-modulus equation(s) should be applied with subchondral cortical and subchondral trabecular bone when constructing finite element models of the tibia. Using a novel approach applying neural networks, optimization, and back-calculation against in situ experimental testing results, the objective of this study was to identify subchondral-specific equations that optimized finite element predictions of local structural stiffness at the proximal tibial subchondral surface. Thirteen proximal tibial compartments were imaged via quantitative computed tomography. Imaged bone mineral density was converted to elastic moduli using multiple density-modulus equations (93 total variations) then mapped to corresponding finite element models. For each variation, root mean squared error was calculated between finite element prediction and in situ measured stiffness at 47 indentation sites. Resulting errors were used to train an artificial neural network, which provided an unlimited number of model variations, with corresponding error, for predicting stiffness at the subchondral bone surface. Nelder-Mead optimization was used to identify optimum density-modulus equations for predicting stiffness. Finite element modeling predicted 81% of experimental stiffness variance (with 10.5% error) using optimized equations for subchondral cortical and trabecular bone differentiated with a 0.5g/cm(3) density. In comparison with published density-modulus relationships, optimized equations offered improved predictions of local subchondral structural stiffness. Further research is needed with anisotropy inclusion, a smaller voxel size and de-blurring algorithms to improve predictions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Tibial tunnel defect size as a risk factor in growth arrest following paediatric transphyseal anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Pananwala, Hasitha; Jabbar, Yaser; Mills, Leonora; Symes, Michael; Nandapalan, Haren; Sefton, Andrew; Delungahawatte, Lasitha; Dao, Quang

    2016-09-01

    There is ongoing controversy regarding growth disturbances in younger patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Animal models have shown that an injury of 7-9% of the physeal area is a risk factor for growth disturbances. A total of 39 magnetic resonance imaging studies of the knee were examined. The proximal tibial physeal area was determined using a calibrated 'region of interest' ligature encompassing the tibial physis in the axial plane. The potential defect left by commonly used drill sizes was calculated as a percentage of the physeal area. A 7-mm drill leaves a mean defect of 1.45% physeal area (range: 1.11-1.89%, SD: 0.28, 95% CI: ±0.09), 8-mm drill leaves a 1.84% mean defect (range: 1.43-2.49%, SD: 0.38, 95% CI: ±0.12) and a 9-mm drill leaves a 2.30% mean defect (range: 1.83-3.19%, SD: 0.58, 95% CI: ±0.17). At 55°, 7-mm drill leaves a mean defect of 1.96% (range: 1.32-2.28%, SD: 0.37, 95% CI: ±0.12), 8-mm drill leaves a mean defect of 2.19% (range: 1.71-2.95%, SD: 0.46, 95% CI: ±0.14) and a 9-mm drill leaves a mean defect of 2.76% (range: 2.16-3.73%, SD: 0.58, 95% CI: ±0.18). There was a statistically significant difference in the tunnel area with a change of drill angle (7-mm drill P = 0.005, 8-mm drill P = 0.001, 9-mm drill P = 0.001). On the basis of this study in the context of animal model and observational evidence, the area of physeal injury using drill tunnels for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction would not appear to contribute to potential growth disturbances. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  20. [Osseous bridge after physeal-injury to the distal tibia with spontaneous resolution].

    PubMed

    Trnka, J; Sýkora, L; Bibza, J

    2008-12-01

    The risk of osseous bridge development after certain types of physeal injury is well established. Once formed, the bridge continues to grow and results in a progressive deformity. The authors present an unusual case of a five-year-old girl who had a Salter-Harris Type-IV fracture of the distal tibial epiphyseal plate, with subsequent osseous bridge formation and deformity development. The bridge resolved spontaneously in 16 months, and joint mechanical axis alignment was gradually restored with normal growth of the distal tibia. Key words: physis, paediatric fractures, bony bridge, growth arrest.

  1. Spontaneous correction of partial physeal arrest: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gkiokas, Andreas; Brilakis, Emmanuel

    2012-07-01

    This study describes the rare phenomenon of partial physeal arrest spontaneous correction. It concerns a case of a 3.5-year-old girl who suffered from a Salter-Harris IV fracture of the distal tibial epiphysis, which was managed conservatively. After fracture healing an osseous bridge was formed at the medial part of the physis, leading to a varus deformity. The parents refused the operation, but 6 years later, both the ankle's deformity and the shortening of the extremity had been spontaneously corrected. It seems that the growth potential of the physis healthy portion is able to break the already transformed osseous bridge.

  2. Salter-Harris II injury of the proximal tibial epiphysis with both vascular compromise and compartment syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Nicholas D; Goswami, Anukul

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of a Salter-Harris II injury to the proximal tibia associated with both vascular compromise and compartment syndrome. The potential complications of this injury are limb threatening and the neurovasular status of the limb should be continually monitored. Maintaining anatomic reduction is difficult and fixation may be needed to achieve optimal results. PMID:19563664

  3. Salter-Harris II injury of the proximal tibial epiphysis with both vascular compromise and compartment syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Clement, Nicholas D; Goswami, Anukul

    2009-06-29

    We present a case of a Salter-Harris II injury to the proximal tibia associated with both vascular compromise and compartment syndrome. The potential complications of this injury are limb threatening and the neurovasular status of the limb should be continually monitored. Maintaining anatomic reduction is difficult and fixation may be needed to achieve optimal results.

  4. Imaging of physeal bars in children.

    PubMed

    Wang, David C; Deeney, Vincent; Roach, James W; Shah, Amisha J

    2015-08-01

    The growth plate, also known as the physis or epiphyseal plate, is essential for longitudinal growth of bones in the immature skeleton. A variety of insults to the growth plate from trauma to infection to idiopathic causes can lead to physeal bar formation, an interruption in normal growth plate cartilage, where a bony or fibrous bridge develops between the metaphysis and epiphysis. This bridge restricts subsequent bone growth, leading to limb shortening and/or angular deformities. Early recognition of the presence of a physeal bar can help direct appropriate surgical management to restore linear growth of the bone.

  5. Proximal tibial fractures with impending compartment syndrome managed by fasciotomy and internal fixation: A retrospective analysis of 15 cases

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naveen; Singh, Varun; Agrawal, Ashish; Bhargava, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proximal tibia fractures with compartment syndrome present a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. More often than not these patients are subjected to multiple surgeries and are complicated by infection osteomyelitis and poor rehabilitation. There is no consensus in the management of these fractures. Most common mode is to do early fasciotomy with external fixation, followed by second stage definitive fixation. We performed a retrospective study of proximal tibia fractures with impending compartment syndrome treated by single stage fasciotomy and internal fixation. Results in terms of early fracture union, minimum complications and early patient mobilization were very good. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients who were operated between July 2011 and June 2012 were selected for the study. All documents from their admission until the last followup in December 2013 were reviewed, data regarding complications collected and results were evaluated using Oxford Knee scoring system. Results: At the final outcome, there was anatomical or near anatomical alignment with no postoperative problems with range of motion of near complete flexion (>120) in all patients within 3 months. 13 patients started full weight bearing walking at 3 months. Delayed union in two patients and skin necrosis in one patient was observed. Conclusions: Since the results are encouraging and the rehabilitation time is much less when compared to conventional approaches, it is recommended using this protocol to perform early fasciotomy with the definitive internal fixation as single stage surgery to obtain excellent followup results and to reduce rehabilitation time, secondary trauma, expense of treatment and infection rate. PMID:26538755

  6. The effect of proximal tibial corrective osteotomy on menisci, tibia and tarsal bones: a finite element model study of tibia vara.

    PubMed

    Atmaca, Halil; Özkan, Arif; Mutlu, Ibrahim; Celik, Talip; Ugur, Levent; Kisioglu, Yasin

    2014-03-01

    Proximal tibial open wedge osteotomy (PTO) is a corrective operation used in the surgery of lower extremities and is applied to patients with varus deformities for sufficient correction. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether the PTO can achieve decreased stress-bearing on the tibia and tarsal bones in addition to correcting the mechanical axis of the lower limb in patients with tibia vara. Three-dimensional (3D) solid modelling of the lower extremity was carried out using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR)-containing images of all of the bony elements and non-bony structures. PTO was applied to the obtained deformed model in the computer environment and the correction was carried out. Stress distributions in menisci, tibia and tarsal bones were calculated. With respect to loading on the tarsal bones, the maximum equivalent stresses on all bones decreased except for the navicula in the PTO-simulated model in the current study. These results clearly indicate that PTO can achieve decreased stresses on the tarsal bones in patients with tibia vara. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Effects of Long-Term Daily Administration of Prostaglandin-E2 on Maintaining Elevated Proximal Tibial Metaphyseal Cancellous Bone Mass in Male Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ke, Hua Zhu; Jee, Webster S. S.; Mori, Satoshi; Li, Xiao Jian; Kimmel, Donald B.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of long-term prostaglandin E(sub 2) (PGE(sub 2)) on cancellous bone in proximal tibial metaphysis were studied in 7 month old male Sprague-Dawley rats given daily subcutaneous injections of 0, 1, 3, and 6 mg PGE(sub 2)/kg/day and sacrificed after 60, 120, and 180 days. Histomorphometric analyses were performed on double fluorescent-labeled undecalcified bone specimens. After 60 days of treatment, PGE(sub 2) produced diffusely labeled trabecular bone area, increased trabecular bone area, eroded and labeled trabecular perimeter, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate at all dose levels when compared with age-matched controls. In rats given PGE(sub 2) for longer time periods (120 and 180 days), trabecular bone area, diffusely labeled trabecular bone area, labeled perimeter, mineral apposition, and bone formation rates were sustained at the elevated levels achieved earlier at 60-day treatment. The eroded perimeter continued to increase until 120 days, then plateau. The observation that continuous systemic PGE(sub 2) administration to adult male rats elevated metaphyseal cancellous bone mass to 3.5-fold of the control level within 60 days and maintained it for another 120 days indicates that the powerful skeletal anabolic effects of PGE2 can be sustained with continuous administration .

  8. Growth disturbance after lengthening of the lower limb and quantitative assessment of physeal closure in skeletally immature patients with achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Song, S H; Kim, S E; Agashe, M V; Lee, H; Refai, M A; Park, Y E; Choi, H J; Park, J H; Song, H R

    2012-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of limb lengthening on longitudinal growth in patients with achondroplasia. Growth of the lower extremity was assessed retrospectively by serial radiographs in 35 skeletally immature patients with achondroplasia who underwent bilateral limb lengthening (Group 1), and in 12 skeletally immature patients with achondroplasia who did not (Group 2). In Group 1, 23 patients underwent only tibial lengthening (Group 1a) and 12 patients underwent tibial and femoral lengthening sequentially (Group 1b). The mean lengthening in the tibia was 9.2 cm (59.5%) in Group 1a, and 9.0 cm (58.2%) in the tibia and 10.2 cm (54.3%) in the femur in Group 1b. The mean follow-up was 9.3 years (8.6 to 10.3). The final mean total length of lower extremity in Group 1a was 526.6 mm (501.3 to 552.9) at the time of skeletal maturity and 610.1 mm (577.6 to 638.6) in Group 1b, compared with 457.0 mm (411.7 to 502.3) in Group 2. However, the mean actual length, representing the length solely grown from the physis without the length of distraction, showed that there was a significant disturbance of growth after limb lengthening. In Group 1a, a mean decrease of 22.4 mm (21.3 to 23.1) (4.9%) was observed in the actual limb length when compared with Group 2, and a greater mean decrease of 38.9 mm (37.2 to 40.8) (8.5%) was observed in Group 1b when compared with Group 2 at skeletal maturity. In Group 1, the mean actual limb length was 16.5 mm (15.8 to 17.2) (3.6%) shorter in Group 1b when compared with Group 1a at the time of skeletal maturity. Premature physeal closure was seen mostly in the proximal tibia and the distal femur with relative preservation of proximal femur and distal tibia. We suggest that significant disturbance of growth can occur after extensive limb lengthening in patients with achondroplasia, and therefore, this should be included in pre-operative counselling of these patients and their parents.

  9. Varus Deformity of the Distal Tibia From Physeal Growth Arrest Treated Using a Titanium Metal Porous Wedge.

    PubMed

    Bridgforth, Andrew B; Burrus, M Tyrrell; Park, Joseph S

    2016-10-01

    During a cheerleading event, a 14-year-old female sustained a right ankle physeal fracture that was treated nonoperatively with casting. She developed a distal medial tibial physeal arrest, and as the onset of menses was at age 16, she subsequently developed a varus distal tibial deformity. At the age of 19, she was no longer able to participate in collegiate cheerleading due to lateral ankle pain, ankle instability, and peroneal subluxation. After failing conservative treatment, she underwent an ankle arthroscopy, Broström-Gould procedure, peroneal retinacular repair with peroneal tenolysis, and a distal tibial medial opening wedge osteotomy using a porous titanium metal wedge and a one-third tubular plate. At 6-month follow-up, her osteotomy site showed abundant callus formation, and her lateral ankle pain had almost completely resolved. At 22-month follow-up, there were no residual ankle instability or pain complaints, and she had returned to collegiate cheerleading. This case report highlights a very useful, previously not described, application of porous titanium metal wedges for medial supramalleolar opening wedge osteotomies of the tibia. Such wedges are familiar to many foot and ankle orthopaedic surgeons and continue to have expanding indications. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case report. © 2015 The Author(s).

  10. The effect of osteogenic protein-1 in an in vivo physeal injury model.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Edward W; McArthur, Maggie; Solly, Pamela B; Higginson, Kerry; Byers, Sharon; Foster, Bruce K

    2002-02-01

    The physis has limited ability to undergo repair, and injury may result in growth arrest. Osteogenic protein-1 promotes bone formation in diaphyseal defects, chondrocyte proliferation, and matrix synthesis. The authors' goal was to determine if the presence of osteogenic protein-1 in a defect involving the physis would promote cartilage repair, and in doing so, to determine the effect of osteogenic protein-1 on physeal growth. An ovine model of growth plate damage was used, in which the proximal medial physis of the tibia was partially ablated. The defect was filled with a Type I collagen paste containing osteogenic protein-1 (350 microg) or collagen alone. Growth rate was measured at 4, 14, and 56 days, and the defects were analyzed histologically at 4, 14, and 56 days. Bone bridge formation occurred within the defect site. However, osteogenic protein-1 promoted outgrowth of the adjacent physeal cartilage. The physeal cartilage underwent expansion until the mineral forming within the defect site blocked its progress. The effect was localized because only that portion of the physis at the defect margin appeared to be affected.

  11. Free fat interpositional graft in acute physeal injuries: the anticipatory Langenskiöld procedure.

    PubMed

    Foster, B K; John, B; Hasler, C

    2000-01-01

    Free fat graft interposition has been used extensively in management of physeal injuries with established growth disturbances. The use of this technique as part of the management of acute physeal injuries has not been reported. Here we report on its application in acute physeal injuries, where it has prevented the formation of an anticipated physeal arrest.

  12. Physeal injury in a lightning strike survivor.

    PubMed

    Lim, J K; Lee, E H; Chhem, R K

    2001-01-01

    Electrical injuries resulting in physeal injury in children are an uncommon but well-recognized clinical entity. Almost all these injuries are sustained from man-made electrical sources. To date, there have been no published cases of growth arrest after lightning strike. The authors report the case of a 12-year-old girl who survived a lightning strike 2 years ago and who presented with asymmetric growth arrest in both legs. The authors discuss the pathophysiology of lightning strike and consider the evidence for direct electrical injury versus ischemic insult to the physis as explanations for the cause of the growth arrest observed in this patient.

  13. Partial physeal growth arrest treated by bridge resection and artificial dura substitute interposition.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Toshio; Naito, Masatoshi; Fujii, Toshio; Akiyoshi, Yuichiro; Yoshimura, Ichiro; Takamura, Kazuyuki

    2006-01-01

    We treated four cases of partial physeal growth arrest by resecting the bone bridge and interposing an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membrane, which has minimal tissue response. We evaluated three cases with sufficiently long follow-up. No apparent recurrence of the bone bridge and no limb length discrepancy occurred in any of the cases. No remodeling after the operation occurred. In one case, which underwent this operation and corrective osteotomy of the proximal tibia, slight recurrence of the varus deformity occurred which was detected only by radiographs, and did not compromise the alignment of the leg. There were no complications.

  14. [VASCULAR ANATOMICAL STUDY ON TIBIAL OSTEOTOMY LENGTHENING].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Yupeng; Jia, Song; Yang, Huanyou; Yin, Jiali; Jiang, Wenping; Zhao, Gang

    2015-07-01

    To provide the anatomical basis for the selection of osteotomy site in leg lengthening or tibial slip. Between August 2010 and July 2014, 10 adult fresh amputated leg specimens were collected. The pressure perfusion of red latex was performed by the popliteal artery. The anterior tibial artery and its main branches were separated and exposed, and the periosteal branch of anterior tibial artery was adequately exposed; the posterior tibial artery and its main branches were exposed; the peroneal artery was separated and exposed. The tibial and peroneal artery and its branches were observed and measured. When measuring the proximal end, the medial tibial plateau bone margin, the most prominent part of the tibial tuberosity, and the fibular head edge were used as a reference; when measuring the distal end, distal medial condyle of tibia malleolus tip, tibial lateral malleolus lateral tip, and distal tibial articular surface were used as a reference; the vertical distance between tibia proximal and distal main arteries and bone end reference was measured to determine the optimal osteotomy position of upper and lower tibia. The osteotomy index was calculated which was used to represent the relative position of osteotomy site in the whole tibia. The proximal tibial osteotomy site located at (78.2 ± 19.5) mm from medial tibial plateau margin, (41.8 ± 16.0) mm from the tibial tuberosity pole, and (66.7 ± 16.4) mm from the fibular head edge. The distal tibial osteotomy site located at (70.8 ± 12.1) mm above the inferior margin of tibial medial malleolus, (83.3 ± 13.0) mm above the inferior margin of lateral malleolus tip, and (59.1 ± 11.7) mm from distal tibial articular surface. The proximal tibial osteotomy index was 18.45-23.35 (mean, 20.46); the distal tibial osteotomy index was 14.36-23.05 (mean, 18.81). The metaphyseal-diaphyseal connection shold be selected in the proximal and distal tibia osteotomy, the lower one third of the tibia is not suitable for ostetomy.

  15. Physeal injuries in children's and youth sports: reasons for concern?

    PubMed Central

    Caine, D; DiFiori, J; Maffulli, N

    2006-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature on the frequency and characteristics of sports related growth plate injuries affecting children and youth in organised sport was carried out. Both acute and chronic physeal injuries related to participation in sports have been reported to occur, although injury incidence data are somewhat limited. Of particular concern is the growing number of stress related physeal injuries, including those affecting the lower extremities. Although most physeal injuries appeared to resolve with treatment and rest, there is also evidence of growth disturbance and deformity. Possible injury risk factors and countermeasures are discussed, and suggestions for directing future research provided. PMID:16807307

  16. Proximal motor branches from the tibial nerve as direct donors to restore function of the deep fibular nerve for treatment of high sciatic nerve injuries: a cadaveric feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro Pretto

    2009-12-01

    The results of surgical repair of the fibular division of the sciatic nerve have been considered unsatisfactory, especially if grafts are necessary to reconstruct the nerve. To consider the clinical application of the concept of distal nerve transfer for the treatment of high sciatic nerve injuries, this study aimed to determine detailed anatomic data about the possible donor branches from the tibial nerve that are available for reinnervation of the deep fibular nerve at the level of the popliteal fossa. An anatomic study was performed that included the dissection of the popliteal fossa in 12 lower limbs of 6 formalin-fixed adult cadavers. It focused on the detailed anatomy of the tibial nerve and its branches at the level of the proximal leg as well as the anatomy of the common fibular nerve and its largest divisions at the level of the neck of the fibula, i.e., the deep and superficial fibular nerves. The branches of the tibial nerve destined to the lateral and medial head of the gastrocnemius had a mean length of 43 mm and 35 mm, respectively. The branch to the posterior soleus muscle had a mean length of 65 mm. Intraneural dissection of the common fibular nerve, isolating its deep and superficial fibular divisions, was possible to a proximal mean distance of 71 mm. A tensionless direct suture to the deep fibular nerve was made possible by using the nerve to the lateral head of the gastrocnemius and the nerve to the posterior soleus muscle in all specimens. Direct suture of the nerve to the medial head of the gastrocnemius was possible in all cases except 1. The nerve to the lateral and medial heads of the gastrocnemius and the nerve to the posterior soleus muscle can be used as donors to restore function of the deep fibular nerve in cases of high sciatic nerve injury. However, proximal intraneural dissection of the deep fibular division of the common fibular nerve must also be performed. We recommend that the nerve to the posterior soleus muscle should be the

  17. MRI diagnosis of trapped periosteum following incomplete closed reduction of distal tibial Salter-Harris II fracture.

    PubMed

    Raman, Subha; Wallace, E Christine

    2011-12-01

    Irreducible fracture of the distal tibial physis due to interposed soft tissue including periosteum is well documented in the orthopedic literature but is uncommon. This condition has been associated with subsequent growth disturbance and requires open reduction. There are very few prior reports of MRI depiction of soft tissue interposition and none of periosteal interposition in the distal tibial physis. This is a relatively common location of physeal injury and related growth disturbance. We present a case of periosteum trapped in the distal tibial physis, diagnosed on MRI, in a Salter-Harris II fracture and its management implications.

  18. Resection of a physeal bar under computer-assisted guidance.

    PubMed

    Kang, H G; Yoon, S J; Kim, J R

    2010-10-01

    Excision of a physeal bar and filling the space with interposition material may allow resumption of normal growth. Both the extent and the location of the bar and the amount of growth remaining from physis must be determined. Computer-assisted surgery is being used increasingly in various fields of orthopaedics. We describe the management of a patient with premature physeal arrest of the right distal tibia in which resection of a physeal bar was achieved under real-time three-dimensional intra-operative monitoring by computer-assisted navigation. The advantage of this method over other means of imaging is that intra-operative identification can increase the accuracy of resection of the bar.

  19. Endoscopically aided physeal bar takedown and guided growth for the treatment of angular limb deformity.

    PubMed

    Loraas, Erik K; Schmale, Gregory A

    2012-07-01

    The treatment of physeal arrest after infection remains a challenge. This report describes localized endoscopic epiphysiolysis combined with guided growth in the treatment of partial physeal arrest and limb deformity in an infant after infection. Over a year's time, the valgus was corrected and the plate was removed. The patient returned to full activity. Physeal arrest may occur at anytime after physeal trauma, highlighting the importance of long-term follow-up. Endoscopic physeal bar takedown combined with guided growth of the distal femur can be an effective option for the treatment.

  20. Traumatic ulnar physeal arrest after distal forearm fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Ray, T D; Tessler, R H; Dell, P C

    1996-01-01

    A review of the orthopaedic literature suggests that traumatic ulnar physeal arrest associated with radial fracture is a rare occurrence. Twenty-three cases of traumatic ulnar physeal arrest have been reported in patients with distal radius fractures, and we report five additional cases. A classification system for the distal ulnar growth deformities is proposed, and the compensatory radial changes are reviewed. Surgical indications for treatment include cosmetic deformity, progressive carpal subluxation, and decreased range of motion. Surgical options for treatment are discussed and include epiphysiodesis, ulnar lengthening, radial osteotomy, and the Suave-Kapandji procedure.

  1. Salter-Harris I and II fractures of the distal tibia: does mechanism of injury relate to premature physeal closure?

    PubMed

    Rohmiller, Michael T; Gaynor, Tracey P; Pawelek, Jeff; Mubarak, Scott J

    2006-01-01

    The distal tibial physis is the second most commonly injured physis in long bones. Recent reports demonstrate a high rate of premature physeal closure (PPC) in Salter-Harris (SH) type I or II fractures of the distal tibia. At our institution, 137 distal tibial SH type I or II fractures were treated from 1994 to 2002. Reviews were performed on all patients and 91 fractures met inclusion criteria. Patients were categorized according to treatment. We report a PPC rate of 39.6% in SH type I or II fractures of the distal tibial physis. We found a difference in PPC based on injury mechanism. The rate of PPC in patients with a supination-external-rotation-type injury was 35%, whereas patients with pronation-abduction-type injuries developed PPC in 54% of cases. Type of treatment may prevent PPC in some fractures. The most important determinant of PPC is the fracture displacement following reduction. PPC is a common problem following SH type I or II fractures of the distal tibia. Operative treatment may decrease the frequency of PPC in some fractures. Regardless of treatment method, we recommend anatomic reduction to decrease the risk of PPC.

  2. Bilateral double level tibial lengthening in dwarfism☆

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Rolf D.; Yoshino, Koichi; Kashiwagi, Naoya; Yoshino, Shigeo; Bhave, Anil; Paley, Dror; Herzenberg, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Outcome assessment after double level tibial lengthening in patients with dwarfism. Methods Fourteen patients with dwarfism were analyzed after bilateral simultaneous double level tibial lengthening. Results Average age was 15.1 years. Average lengthening was 13.5 cm. The two levels were lengthened by an average of 7.5 cm proximally and 6.0 cm distally. Concomitant deformities were also addressed during lengthening. External fixation treatment time averaged 8.8 months. Healing index averaged 0.7 months/cm. Conclusion Bilateral tibial lengthening for dwarfism is difficult, but the results are usually quite gratifying. PMID:26566326

  3. The effects of different hinge positions on posterior tibial slope in medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Jo, Ho-Seung; Park, Jin-Sung; Byun, June-Ho; Lee, Young-Bok; Choi, Young-Lac; Cho, Seong-Hee; Moon, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Hwang, Sun-Chul

    2017-04-07

    The purpose of this study was to determine the standard hinge position to minimize effects from medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) on the posterior tibial slope. Sixteen cadaveric knees underwent medial open-wedge osteotomy using either the standard or the low hinge position. To define the standard hinge position, a line 3 cm inferior to the medial tibial plateau towards the fibular head and located its intersection with a longitudinal line 1 cm medial to the fibular shaft was drawn. Low hinge position was defined as the point 1 cm inferior to the standard position. After tibial osteotomy, computed tomography scans of each knee were taken and three-dimensional models were constructed to characterize hinge position orientation and measure the osteotomy site effects on posterior tibial slope, medial proximal tibial angle, and gap ratio (the ratio of the anterior to posterior gap in the opened wedge). In two low hinge position specimens, the tibial lateral cortex hinge fracture occurred. Osteotomy through the low hinge position resulted in significantly greater posterior tibial slope compared to the standard hinge position (mean ± standard deviation) (11.2 ± 3.0° and 5.6 ± 2.5°, respectively; p < 0.001). Medial proximal tibial angle was also significantly greater for low compared to standard hinge position (95.4 ± 3.5° and 88.0 ± 3.5°, respectively; p < 0.001). Gap ratio was not significantly different between the two groups. Hinge position significantly affects the posterior tibial slope and medial proximal tibial angle following medial open-wedge HTO. Accurate hinge position is crucial to prevent complications from changes in posterior tibial slope and medial proximal tibial angle after surgery.

  4. Biomechanical strength of the Peri-Loc proximal tibial plate: a comparison of all-locked versus hybrid locked/nonlocked screw configurations.

    PubMed

    Estes, Chris; Rhee, Peter; Shrader, M Wade; Csavina, Kristine; Jacofsky, Marc C; Jacofsky, David J

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical properties of a contoured locking plate instrumented with either an all-locked or hybrid locked/nonlocked screw construct in a proximal metaphyseal fracture of the tibia (AO 41-A3.2). A standardized proximal metaphyseal wedge osteotomy (AO 41-A3.2) was created in five pairs of cadaveric tibia. Each pair was randomly instrumented with either an all-locked or combination locked/nonlocked screw construct using a locked contoured periarticular plate (Peri-Loc periarticular locked plating system, Smith & Nephew, Memphis, TN). Vertical subsidence (irreversible deformation) and deflection (reversible deformation) in each pair were analyzed and compared. Load to failure, defined by complete fracture gap closure, was also determined. There was no statistically significant difference in vertical subsidence (P = 0.19) or deflection (P = 0.19) of the proximal tibia between the all-locked and combination locked/nonlocked screw construct with increasing levels of cyclical axial load from 200 to 1200 N. Failure occurred at a mean value of 2160 N in the locked group and 1760 N in the hybrid group (P = 0.19); the failure mode was plate bending in all specimens. The results indicate that the use of compression screws with locked screws in this particular construct allows a similar amount of irreversible and reversible deformation in response to an axial load when compared to an all-locked screw construct. This suggests that there is no statistically significant difference in the stability in fixation between the two methods, allowing the surgeon the freedom to choose the appropriate screw combination unique to each fracture.

  5. Pathological fracture after migration of cement used to treat distal femur physeal arrest.

    PubMed

    Shea, Kevin G; Rab, George T; Dufurrena, Magen

    2009-07-01

    Treatment of physeal arrest with bar removal and placement of interposition materials in young patients has been shown to restore physeal growth. Among the various materials that have been used to prevent early reformation of the physeal bar (fat, silastic, cartilage), Peterson recommended the use of Cranioplast, as this material can prevent bar reformation, and it is radiolucent because it does not contain barium. Peterson suggested steps be taken to prevent migration of the Cranioplast, as migration of the interposition material might allow for reformation of the physeal bar. Although Peterson had not observed cement migration leading to pathologic fracture, he felt that this was a potential concern. We describe the case of cement migration from the epiphysis into the diaphysis, leading to a pathological femur fracture. Despite migration of the Cranioplast, the physeal bridge did not reform, and the patient had nearly normal growth 7 years after the initial physeal arrest procedure.

  6. Atypical tibial tuberosity fracture in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Jalgaonkar, Azal A; Dachepalli, Sunil; Al-Wattar, Zaid; Rao, Sudhir; Kochhar, Tony

    2011-06-14

    Avulsion fractures of the tibial tuberosity are typically sustained by adolescent males during sporting activities. Tibial tuberosity avulsions with simultaneous proximal tibial epiphyseal fractures are rare injuries. We present an unusual case of Ogden type IIIA avulsion fracture of tibial tuberosity with a Salter Harris type IV posterior fracture of proximal tibial epiphysis in a 13-year-old boy. We believe that the patient sustained the tibial tuberosity avulsion during the take-off phase of a jump while playing basketball due to sudden violent contraction of the quadriceps as the knee was extending. This was then followed by the posterior Salter Harris type IV fracture of proximal tibial physis as he landed on his leg with enormous forces passing through the knee. Although standard radiographs were helpful in diagnosing the complex fracture pattern, precise configuration was only established by computed tomography (CT) scan. The scan also excluded well-recognized concomitant injuries including ligament and meniscal injuries. Unlike other reported cases, our patient did not have compartment syndrome. Anatomic reduction and stabilization with a partially threaded transepiphyseal cannulated screw and a metaphyseal screw followed by early mobilization ensured an excellent recovery by the patient.Our case highlights the importance of vigilance and a high index of suspicion for coexisting fractures or soft tissue injuries when treating avulsion fractures of tibial tuberosity. A CT scan is justified in such patients to recognize complex fracture configurations, and surgical treatment should be directed appropriately to both the fractures followed by early rehabilitation. Patients with such injuries warrant close monitoring for compartment syndrome during the perioperative period.

  7. Medial open wedge high tibial osteotomy: the effect of the cortical hinge on posterior tibial slope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Joon Ho; Bae, Ji Hoon; Lim, Hong Chul; Shon, Won Yong; Kim, Cheol Woong; Cho, Jae Woo

    2009-12-01

    High tibial osteotomy can affect the posterior tibial slope in the sagittal plane because of the triangular configuration of the proximal tibia. However, the effect of the location of cortical hinge on posterior tibial slope has not been previously described. Posterolateral location of the cortical hinge will increase posterior tibial slope after medial open wedge osteotomy, and lateral location of the cortical hinge will not affect the change of the posterior tibial slope. Controlled laboratory study. We performed incomplete valgus open wedge osteotomy on 12 paired knees of 6 fresh-frozen human cadavers (age, 63.4 + or - 7.5 years) using an OrthoPilot navigation system. The left and right legs of each specimen were randomly assigned to a posterolateral (group A) or a lateral (group B) cortical hinge group. Changes in mean medial proximal tibial angle, posterior tibial slope, and opening wedge angle were measured and compared after surgery. In group A, mean medial proximal tibial angle changed from 84.37 degrees + or - 2.8 degrees to 93.48 degrees + or - 3.06 degrees (P = .028); mean posterior tibial slope increased significantly from 8.71 degrees + or - 0.81 degrees to 12.16 degrees + or - 0.84 degrees (P = .031); and mean wedge angle was 1.92 degrees + or - 0.46 degrees . In group B, mean medial proximal tibial angle changed from 82.98 degrees + or - 2.53 degrees to 90.89 degrees + or - 3.25 degrees (P = .027); mean posterior tibial slope changed from 9.19 degrees + or - 1.11 degrees to 9.78 degrees + or - 1.27 degrees (P = .029); and mean wedge angle was 7.25 degrees + or - 0.72 degrees . The location of the intact cortical hinge affects the posterior tibia slope. During medial open wedge osteotomy, the change of posterior tibial slope was larger in the posterolateral than in the lateral cortical hinge group. To prevent the unintentional increase of the posterior tibial slope, special attention should be paid to locate the intact cortical hinge on the lateral

  8. Control of posterior tibial slope and patellar height in open-wedge valgus high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Hinterwimmer, Stefan; Beitzel, Knut; Paul, Jochen; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Sauerschnig, Martin; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger; Imhoff, Andreas B

    2011-04-01

    Valgus-producing open-wedge high tibial osteotomy is an established treatment for varus malalignment and medial osteoarthritis, with reproducible results in the frontal plane. However, an undesirable but often accepted increase in posterior tibial slope and decrease in patellar height are still routinely seen. To evaluate the influence of valgus open-wedge high tibial osteotomy on posterior tibial slope and patellar height when special techniques are used to minimize unwanted changes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Twenty-five patients, 3 women and 22 men (mean age, 40.2 years), underwent valgus open-wedge high tibial osteotomy. Several technical steps were taken to prevent an increase in posterior tibial slope during the osteotomy. To minimize patellar height changes, the tibial tuberosity was left on either the proximal or distal fragment, depending on the desired patellofemoral effect. The medial and lateral posterior slope was measured using the proximal posterior cortex as a reference; the patellar height was assessed with the Caton-Deschamps Index and compared on preoperative and postoperative radiographs. No significant posterior tibial slope changes were observed. Patellar height increased with both types of tibial tuberosity osteotomy. With the proximal osteotomy, the Caton-Deschamps Index increased from 0.95 to 0.97; with the distal osteotomy, it increased from 0.89 to 0.95. The change was not significant with either osteotomy. The posterior tibial slope did not change on the medial side, measuring 4.2 preoperatively and postoperatively. The lateral slope decreased from 5.4 to 5.1. There was no correlation between the correction in the coronal plane and the changes in the sagittal plane. Open-wedge high tibial osteotomy can be performed without significant changes in patellar height or posterior tibial slope if specific intraoperative methods are used to prevent their occurrence. Analysis and control of sagittal changes in valgus open-wedge high

  9. Effect of a carbonated HAP/β-glucan composite bone substitute on healing of drilled bone voids in the proximal tibial metaphysis of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Leszek; Pawłowska, Marta; Radzki, Radosław P; Bieńko, Marek; Polkowska, Izabela; Belcarz, Anna; Karpiński, Mirosław; Słowik, Tymoteusz; Matuszewski, Łukasz; Ślósarczyk, Anna; Ginalska, Grażyna

    2015-08-01

    A novel elastic hydroxyapatite-based composite of high surgical handiness has been developed. Its potential application in orthopedics as a filler of bone defects has been studied. The biomaterial was composed of carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHAP) granules and polysaccharide polymer (β-1,3-glucan). Cylinders of 4mm in diameter and 6mm in length were implanted into bone cavities created in the proximal metaphysis of tibiae of 24 New Zealand white rabbits. 18 sham-operated animals were used as controls. After 1, 3 or 6 months, the rabbits were euthanized, the bones were harvested and subjected to analysis. Radiological images and histological sections revealed integration of implants with bone tissue with no signs of graft rejection. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) indicated the stimulating effect of the biomaterial on bone formation and mineralization. Densitometry (DXA) analysis suggested that biomineralization of bones was preceded by bioresorption and gradual disappearance of porous ceramic granules. The findings suggest that the CHAP-glucan composite material enables regeneration of bone tissue and could serve as a bone defect filler. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The soleal line: a cause of tibial pseudoperiostitis.

    PubMed

    Levine, A H; Pais, M J; Berinson, H; Amenta, P S

    1976-04-01

    An unusually prominent soleal line (a normal anatomic variant) may mimic periosteal reaction along the posterior margin of the proximal tibial shaft. This area of pseudoperiostitis is differentiated from hyperostoses arising from the anterior tibial tubercle and the interosseous membrane. It is always associated with normal, undisturbed architecture of the underlying bone.

  11. Tension band stabilisation of acetabular physeal fractures in four kittens.

    PubMed

    Langley-Hobbs, S J; Sissener, T R; Shales, C J

    2007-06-01

    The surgical repair of acetabular physeal fractures in four kittens using a screw and tension band technique is reported. This was an appropriate method for restoring articular congruency and improving pelvic alignment. All cases had an excellent outcome and full limb use following fracture repair. In kittens younger than 12 weeks, there is a possibility of premature fusion of the acetabular bone resulting in development of a deformed, shallow acetabulum and hip subluxation. However, surgery is still justified when there is pelvic canal narrowing to decrease the risk of future defecatory problems. Early implant removal in such young kittens may decrease the severity of deformity caused by premature physeal closure. In kittens of 16 weeks or older, the prognosis is good for normal acetabular development and implant removal is not necessary.

  12. Analysis of the Tibial Epiphysis in the Skeletally Immature Knee Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Derik L.; Almardawi, Ranyah; Mitchell, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physeal-sparing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is being performed increasingly in skeletally immature knees. Purpose: To determine normal values for the maximum oblique length and “safe” physeal-sparing length and their corresponding angular trajectories across the tibial epiphysis on reconstructed magnetic resonance images (MRIs) in children and adolescents. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: An electronic search for pediatric knee MR examinations from April 2003 to April 2013 was performed at our institution. A 3-dimensional system viewer was used to measure the maximum oblique length, physeal-sparing length, and their corresponding angular trajectories on reconstructed MRIs. Knees were stratified by age into 2 groups: group 1 consisted of boys <13 years and girls <12 years and group 2 consisted of older boys (13-14 years) and girls (12-14 years). Each cohort was further stratified by sex. Group 1 consisted of 36 knees (mean age, 10.9 years) and group 2 consisted of 59 knees (mean age, 13.6 years). Results: Significant differences existed for the maximum oblique length and its angular trajectory for the younger versus older cohort (22.2 ± 2.7 vs 23.8 ± 2.7 mm, P = .007; 42.0° ± 4.0° vs 39.4° ± 4.2°, P = .003) and for the physeal-sparing length and its angular trajectory (19.4 ± 2.8 vs 21.3 ± 2.9 mm, P = .001; 30.1° ± 4.1° vs 28.2° ± 4.5°, P = .042). In group 2, females had shorter maximal oblique length and physeal-sparing length than boys (22.7 ± 2.3 vs 25.0 ± 2.7 mm, P < .001; 20.3 ± 2.6 vs 22.4 ± 2.9 mm, P = .004). Conclusion: The maximum oblique length across the tibial epiphysis is shorter than previously believed, measuring approximately 22 mm and approximately 24 mm for high- and intermediate-risk knees, respectively. However, “safe” physeal-sparing lengths were only approximately 19 mm and 21 mm for the younger and older cohorts, respectively. The angles

  13. [Retrograde nailing in a tibial fracture].

    PubMed

    Valls-Mellado, M; Martí-Garín, D; Fillat-Gomà, F; Marcano-Fernández, F A; González-Vargas, J A

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of a severely comminuted type iiia open tibial fracture, with distal loss of bone stock (7 cm), total involvement of the tibial joint surface, and severe instability of the fibular-talar joint. The treatment performed consisted of thorough cleansing, placing a retrograde reamed calcaneal-talar-tibial nail with proximal and distal blockage, as well as a fibular-talar Kirschner nail. Primary closure of the skin was achieved. After 3 weeks, an autologous iliac crest bone graft was performed to fill the bone defect, and the endomedullary nail, which had protruded distally was reimpacted and dynamized distally. The bone defect was eventually consolidated after 16 weeks. Currently, the patient can walk without pain the tibial-astragal arthrodesis is consolidated. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Tibial osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Lonner, J H; Lotke, P A

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the tibial plateau involves a continuum of change observed in the subchondral zone that is commonly associated with early and mid stages of osteoarthritis. The typical patient is an elderly woman who experiences a sudden onset of pain in the medial aspect of the knee. The diagnosis of this under-appreciated clinical entity may be difficult, but careful examination and judicious use of imaging studies, as well as a high index of suspicion, may facilitate the accurate diagnosis. Although the radiographs may initially be normal (with the exception of mild arthrosis), radionuclide scans and MRI can be of great value. The MRI studies usually show a decreased signal intensity on a T1-weighted image, but may be normal in the early course of the disease. The T2-weighted images and fat suppression views are helpful in establishing a diagnosis and determining the extent of involvement. Recognition of this problem may help to avoid unnecessary intra-articular surgery. Many of these patients have complete or partial resolution of symptoms by 1 year, after a period of protected weight bearing. Nonetheless, surgery may be necessary for more advanced lesions and in those patients with progressive arthrosis.

  15. Stemmed knee replacement in a patient with an irremovable tibial nail.

    PubMed

    Ward, William G; Cooper, Joshua M

    2013-01-01

    A patient with a cemented centrally located intramedullary tibial nail that occluded the proximal tibial canal underwent knee reconstruction with a total knee design utilizing a custom hollow tibial stem. In this oncology case, a rotating-hinge knee design was used that incorporates an intra-articular inverted post-in-channel central rotational post design. This design allowed for a rather straightforward reconstruction that functioned well for 3 years. Although rarely encountered, utilization of a hollow-stemmed tibial total knee component may allow salvage of an extremity with central occlusion of the proximal tibial canal.

  16. Tibial tunnel aperture location during single-bundle posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: comparison of tibial guide positions.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young-Soo; Han, Seung-Beom; Hwang, Yeok-Ku; Suh, Dong-Won; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2015-05-01

    We aimed to compare posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tibial tunnel location after tibial guide insertion medial (between the PCL remnant and the medial femoral condyle) and lateral (between the PCL remnant and the anterior cruciate ligament) to the PCL stump as determined by in vivo 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT). Tibial tunnel aperture location was analyzed by immediate postoperative in vivo CT in 66 patients who underwent single-bundle PCL reconstruction, 31 by over-the-PCL and 35 by under-the-PCL tibial guide insertion techniques. Tibial tunnel positions were measured in the medial to lateral and proximal to distal directions of the posterior proximal tibia. The center of the tibial tunnel aperture was located more laterally (by 2.7 mm) in the over-the-PCL group than in the under-the-PCL group (P = .040) and by a relative percentage (absolute value/tibial width) of 3.2% (P = .031). Tibial tunnel positions in the proximal to distal direction, determined by absolute value and relative percentage, were similar in the 2 groups. Tibial tunnel apertures were located more laterally after lateral-to-the-PCL tibial guide insertion than after medial-to-the-PCL tibial guide insertion. There was, however, no significant difference between these techniques in distance from the joint line to the tibial tunnel aperture. Insertion lateral to the PCL stump may result in better placement of the PCL in its anatomic footprint. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Distal tibial physeal fractures in children that may require open reduction.

    PubMed

    Kling, T F; Bright, R W; Hensinger, R N

    1984-06-01

    Fractures of the distal end of the tibia in children often involve the physis. They are of particular importance because partial growth arrest can occur and result in angular deformity, limb-length discrepancy, or incongruity of the joint surface (or a combination of these). We evaluated the cases of thirty-two children who had a fracture leading to established partial growth arrest of the distal end of the tibia. Most of this group had had a Salter-Harris Type-III or Type-IV fracture. Twenty-eight of the fractures had been treated by gentle closed reduction and immobilization in a plaster cast. We also evaluated the cases of thirty-three children who were seen by us for treatment of an acute fracture; most of these were Salter-Harris Type-III or Type-IV fractures of the distal end of the tibia. Nineteen of the twenty acute Type-III or Type-IV fractures that were treated with accurate open reduction of the physis and internal fixation healed without growth disturbance, while five of the nine fractures that were treated by closed means formed a bone bridge, presaging a disturbance in growth. This study suggests that Salter-Harris Type-III and Type-IV, and perhaps Type-II, fractures of the distal end of the tibia commonly cause disturbance of growth in the tibia, and that anatomical reduction of the physis by closed or open means may decrease the incidence of these disturbances of growth, including shortening and varus angulation of the ankle.

  18. Abnormalities of proximal femoral growth after severe Perthes' disease.

    PubMed

    Sponseller, P D; Desai, S S; Millis, M B

    1989-08-01

    We studied the pattern of proximal femoral growth after severe Perthes' disease (Catterall grade III or IV) by retrospective analysis of serial radiographs in 52 hips (46 patients). Our aim was to determine the relationship between proximal femoral growth abnormalities and metaphyseal cysts, epiphyseal extrusion, physeal narrowing, and extensive epiphyseal necrosis. The average follow-up after treatment was 9.8 years (range 4 to 16 years), and 37 of the hips were followed to skeletal maturity. Slowing of proximal femoral growth was common: symmetrical abnormality was seen in 26 hips and asymmetrical abnormality in nine. However, definite premature closure of the proximal femoral physis was seen in only three hips. Abnormality seemed to be due to altered growth velocity rather than to bar formation in most cases. Metaphyseal cysts, epiphyseal extrusion and physeal narrowing during the active stage of the disease, alone or in combination, were found to be neither sensitive nor specific predictors of the subsequent growth pattern.

  19. What is the best treatment for displaced Salter-Harris II physeal fractures of the distal tibia?

    PubMed

    Park, Hoon; Lee, Dong Hoon; Han, Seung Hwan; Kim, Sungmin; Eom, Nam Kyu; Kim, Hyun Woo

    2017-09-19

    Background and purpose - The optimal treatment of displaced Salter-Harris (SH) II fractures of the distal tibia is controversial. We compared the outcomes of operative and nonoperative treatment of SH II distal tibial fractures with residual gap of >3 mm. Factors that may be associated with the incidence of premature physeal closure (PPC) were analyzed. Patients and methods - We retrospectively reviewed 95 patients who were treated for SH II distal tibial fractures with residual gap of >3 mm after closed reduction. Patients were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: Group 1 included 25 patients with nonoperative treatment, irrespective of size of residual gap (patients treated primarily at other hospitals). Group 2 included 70 patients with operative treatment. All patients were followed for ≥ 12 months after surgery, with a mean follow-up time of 21 months. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors for the occurrence of PPC. Results - The incidence of PPC in patients who received nonoperative treatment was 13/52, whereas PPC incidence in patients who received operative treatment was 24/70 (p = 0.1). Multivariable logistic regression analysis determined that significant risk factors for the occurrence of PPC were age at injury, and injury mechanism. The method of treatment, sex, presence of fibular fracture, residual displacement after closed reduction, and implant type were not predictive factors for the occurrence of PPC. Interpretation - Operative treatment for displaced SH II distal tibial fractures did not seem to reduce the incidence of PPC compared with nonoperative treatment. We cannot exclude that surgery may be of value in younger children with pronation-abduction or pronation-external rotation injuries.

  20. Physeal changes and range-of-motion differences in the dominant shoulders of skeletally immature baseball players.

    PubMed

    Mair, Scott D; Uhl, Tim L; Robbe, Rudy G; Brindle, Kathleen A

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document range-of-motion differences and radiographic changes in the dominant shoulder of skeletally immature throwers and to determine how pain associated with throwing may relate to these changes. Seventy-nine male youth baseball players (aged 8-15 years) completed a questionnaire, a shoulder examination, and a series of radiographs to determine physeal changes and humeral retroversion. Radiographs were reviewed and interpreted by a blinded musculoskeletal radiologist. Measurement of proximal humeral physeal width revealed a significant increase on the dominant side for the entire group, in subjects with a history of symptoms during the current season, and in subjects who had never had symptoms. Visual radiographic changes were commonly found in subjects with a history of pain (16/26 [62%]) as well as in those subjects without symptoms (29/53 [55%]). Subjects had increased external rotation of the dominant arm as compared with the nondominant arm, and this pattern increased in magnitude as the throwers aged. Range-of-motion and radiographic asymmetry of the shoulders is common, is often asymptomatic, and may represent adaptive changes in this population.

  1. Physeal histological morphology after thermal epiphysiodesis using radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Shiguetomi-Medina, Juan Manuel; Møller-Madsen, B; Rahbek, O

    2017-06-01

    Several treatments have been described for leg length discrepancy. Epiphysiodesis is the most commonly used because of its effectiveness. Thermal epiphysiodesis using radiofrequency ablation (RFA) alters the growth plate morphology without damaging the adjacent articular cartilage; it is a minimally invasive method that has shown excellent results in animal models. This study describes the macro and micro morphology after the procedure. Epiphysiodesis using RFA was performed in vivo for 8 min (92-98 °C) at two ablation sites (medial and lateral) in one randomly-selected tibia in eight growing pigs. The contralateral tibia was used as control. After 12 weeks, the pigs were killed and the tibiae harvested. The specimens were studied macroscopically and histology samples were obtained. Physeal morphology, thickness and characteristics were then described. Macroscopically, the articular cartilage was normal in all the treated tibiae. Microscopically, the physis was detected as a discontinuous line on the treated tibiae while it was continuous in all controls. In the control specimens, the mean thickness of the physis was 625 µm (606-639, SD = 14). All the physeal layers were organized. In the ablated specimens, disorganized layers in a heterogeneous line were observed. Bone bridges were identified at the ablation sites. The central part of the physis looked normal. Next to the bone bridge, the physis was thicker and presented fibrosis. The mean thickness was 820 µm (628-949, SD = 130). No abnormalities in the articular cartilage were observed. Thermal epiphysiodesis with RFA disrupts the physeal morphology and causes the formation of bone bridges at the ablation sites. This procedure does not damage the adjacent articular cartilage. The damaged tissue, next to the bone bridges, is characterized by disorganization and fibrosis.

  2. Optimizing the value of the posterior condylar offset, proximal tibial resection and slope in order to achieve the right balance of the posterior cruciate ligament - clinical application of the molding function of the two parts of the PCL

    PubMed Central

    Bogojevski, Ljubomir; Doksevska, Milena Bogojevska

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In order to achieve the right balance of the posterior cruciate ligament using the skeletal method is very difficult, almost impossible (Mahoney). Our hypothesis for the right balance of the PCL by using the skeletal method is based on several defined facts: - PCL is a union based of two anatomically independent, but functionally synergic parts, posteromedial and anterolateral part. - The length of the posteromedial part of the PCL is determined by the belonging of the medial compartment and is shortest in varus and longest in valgus deformation. - The length of the anterolateral part of the PCL, placed centrally is unchangeable (cca 38 mm) in every knee and is independent from the anatomical appearance (deformation). - The cylindrical shape of the distal posterior part of the femur (Ficat) depends of the molding function of the PCL (Kapandji) and is a result of the proportion of the both parts of the PCL that is consisted of: shorter posteromedial part, less bone stock on the medial and more bone stock on the lateral condyle (varus knee) and vice versa, longer posteromedial part, more bone stock on the medial condyle and less on the lateral (valgus knee). According to that, the neutral bone stock is achieved by equalization of the lengths of the two parts (common radius of the cylinder) of the PCL, that is basis for the interligamentary balance of the posterior cruciate ligament. Methods: The basic characteristics of the interligamentary balance of the PCL that we started in 2008 are the following: 1. Posterior condylar offset is equal to the even length of the both part of the PCL. 2. Decrease of the values of proximal tibial resection from 10 in varus to 4-6 in valgus. 3. Femoral valgus cut from 6 in excessive varus deformity to 4 in valgus. Results: The clinical evaluation of the cases divided in groups excessive varus, mean varus, valgus type 1, 2 (Krakow) showed right distribution in the groups of the postoperative ROM and intraoperative

  3. Comparison of volumetric bone mineral density in the tibial region of interest for ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Klein, Scott A; Nyland, John; Caborn, David N M; Kocabey, Yavuz; Nawab, Akbar

    2005-12-01

    Adequate tibial bone mineral density (BMD) is essential to soft tissue graft fixation during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to compare volumetric bone plug density measurements at the tibial region of interest for ACL reconstruction using a standardized immersion technique and Archimedes' principle. Cancellous bone cores were harvested from the proximal, middle, and distal metaphyseal regions of the lateral tibia and from the standard tibial tunnel location used for ACL reconstruction of 18 cadaveric specimens. Proximal tibial cores displayed 32.6% greater BMD than middle tibial cores and 31.8% greater BMD than distal tibial cores, but did not differ from the BMD of the tibial tunnel cores. Correlational analysis confirmed that the cancellous BMD in the tibial tunnel related to the cancellous BMD of the proximal and distal lateral tibial metaphysis. In conjunction with its adjacent cortical bone, the cancellous BMD of the region used for standard tibial tunnel placement provides an effective foundation for ACL graft fixation. In tibia with poor BMD, bicortical fixation that incorporates cortical bone from the distal tibial tunnel region is recommended.

  4. [Primary Ilizarov ankle fusion for nonreconstructable tibial plafond fractures].

    PubMed

    Feibel, Robert J; Uhthoff, Hans K

    2005-10-01

    Ankle arthrodesis in a plantigrade position. In high-energy open injuries with segmental bone loss: proximal tibial metaphyseal corticotomy with distal Ilizarov bone transport for compensation of leg length discrepancy. Posttraumatic loss of the tibial plafond, usually resulting from open fracture type IIIC. Ipsilateral foot injuries impairing ambulation after fusion. Severe injury to the posterior tibial nerve with absent plantar sensation. Soft-tissue injury not manageable surgically. Inadequate patient compliance. Advanced age. Severe osteoporosis. Acute infection. Standard technique: anteromedial longitudinal incision. Removal of remaining articular cartilage. Passing of Ilizarov wires through the distal fibula, talar neck and body. Placement of 5-mm half-pins through stab incisions, perpendicular to the medial face of the tibial shaft. A lateral to medial 1.8-mm Ilizarov wire in the proximal tibial metaphysis is optional. Callus distraction/Ilizarov bone transport: exposure through an anteromedial incision or transverse traumatic wound. Removal of small residual segment of tibial plafond blocking transport. Retain small vascularized bone fragments not blocking transport. For Ilizarov external fixation, two rings in the proximal tibial region. Drill osteoclasis of the tibial metaphysis 1 cm distal to the tibial tuberosity and complete with Ilizarov osteotome. Secure the Ilizarov threaded rods or clickers. Weight bearing as tolerated. Begin distraction 14 days after corticotomy at a rate of 0.5-1 mm per day depending on patient's age. After docking: Ilizarov ankle arthrodesis. Between January 1993 and September 1996, four patients (two men, two women) with severe, nonreconstructable fractures of the tibial plafond were treated. Callus distraction and Ilizarov bone transport in three patients. Age range 19-68 years (average age 45.7 years). Mean follow-up 6.6 years (4 years 9 months to 7 years 4 months). Average duration of the entire treatment in external

  5. [Arthroscopy- assisted resection-interposition of post-traumatic central physeal bridges].

    PubMed

    Moreta, J; Abril, J C; Miranda, C

    2013-01-01

    Physeal bridge resection and insertion of interposition material has had mixed success rates in the literature. Using the arthroscopic approach, some authors have reported good results in their patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the treatment of post-traumatic central physeal bridges with arthroscopically assisted resection and fat interposition. A retrospective study was conducted on 5 patients (6 procedures), who developed a physeal bridge after a traumatic injury. A CT or MRI scan was performed preoperatively in all patients to assess the size of the physeal bridge. Inclusion criteria were patients with documented existing or developing deformities, a physeal bridge <50% of the physeal area, and with at least 2 years of growth remaining. Clinical outcomes were classified according to Marsch and Polzhofer criteria (excellent, good or poor). Excellent results were obtained in two patients, good in one, and the other two cases were rated as poor. In patients with a poor outcome, high energy trauma mechanisms were identified in both cases. Moreover, incorrect initial treatment or delayed physeal bridge resection was identified. The arthroscopically assisted technique provides best visualization with minimal morbidity. Although our results are not as good as previous studies, it cannot be considered that the technique itself is the cause of the failure, as several risk factors associated to bad prognosis of these injuries were found. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of percutaneous pin fixation in the treatment of distal femoral physeal fractures.

    PubMed

    Garrett, B R; Hoffman, E B; Carrara, H

    2011-05-01

    Distal femoral physeal fractures in children have a high incidence of physeal arrest, occurring in a mean of 40% of cases. The underlying nature of the distal femoral physis may be the primary cause, but other factors have been postulated to contribute to the formation of a physeal bar. The purpose of this study was to assess the significance of contributing factors to physeal bar formation, in particular the use of percutaneous pins across the physis. We reviewed 55 patients with a median age of ten years (3 to 13), who had sustained displaced distal femoral physeal fractures. Most (40 of 55) were treated with percutaneous pinning after reduction, four were treated with screws and 11 with plaster. A total of 40 patients were assessed clinically and radiologically after skeletal maturity or at the time of formation of a bar. The remaining 15 were followed up for a minimum of two years. Formation of a physeal bar occurred in 12 (21.8%) patients, with the rate rising to 30.6% in patients with high-energy injuries compared with 5.3% in those with low-energy injuries. There was a significant trend for physeal arrest according to increasing severity using the Salter-Harris classification. Percutaneous smooth pins across the physis were not statistically associated with growth arrest.

  7. [Tibial periostitis ("medial tibial stress syndrome")].

    PubMed

    Fournier, Pierre-Etienne

    2003-06-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome is characterised by complaints along the posteromedial tibia. Runners and athletes involved in jumping activities may develop this syndrome. Increased stress to stabilize the foot especially when excessive pronation is present explain the occurrence this lesion.

  8. Deformity correction during growth after partial physeal arrest.

    PubMed

    Horn, Joachim; Kristiansen, Leif Pål; Steen, Harald

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate our treatment protocol for certain physeal injuries requiring complete epiphysiodesis of an injured physis, angular correction and lengthening with the Ilizarov method and overcorrection of length according to calculated loss of remaining growth. Five patients (age: 12 to 14 years) were operated with angular correction and lengthening in combination with complete epiphysiodesis. Angular deformities measured 12 degrees to 24 degrees and limb length discrepancies (LLD's) 15 to 60 mm. Mean overcorrection of length according to remaining growth of the affected physis was 12 mm (range: 7 to 15). All deformity parameters were fully corrected in all patients. Mechanical axis deviation (MAD) was within +/- 5 mm compared to the healthy side in 4 patients, 20 mm in one patient. Median LLD at maturity was 8 mm (range: 3 to 13). In cases of partial physeal arrest with severe symptomatic deformities, complete epiphysiodesis of the injured physis, angular correction and lengthening with the Ilizarov method with overcorrection of length according to estimated loss of remaining growth of the affected physis is a suitable method.

  9. Radiographic features of the development of the anterior tibial tuberosity.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Amador, E; Davalos Herrera, D; Moreno, L Á

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the radiologic characteristics of the development of the anterior tibial tuberosity. This study aimed to evaluate the radiologic characteristics of the anterior tibial tuberosity in a pediatric population broken down into age groups. We assessed 210 plain-film X-rays of the knee from patients aged from 10 to 17 years, divided into groups according to age and sex, for the presence of ossification of the anterior tibial tuberosity, the distance between the anterior tibial tuberosity and the metaphysis, and fusion with the epiphysis. At 10 years of age, the anterior tibial tuberosity was ossified in 50% of the girls but in only 25% of the boys. In all the girls, the anterior tibial tuberosity was ossified at 11 years, fusion of the anterior tibial tuberosity with the epiphysis had started at 12 years, and fusion was complete by 17 years. In boys, the process is delayed by one year compared to girls. A single center of ossification was found in all cases. The ossification of the anterior tibial tuberosity starts distally, then the proximal part fuses with the rest of the epiphysis, and finally the distal part fuses with the tibia. The results of this study help enable a better analysis of the anterior tibial tuberosity in cases of knee pain. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Multiple Looping Technique for Tibial Fixation in Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jung Ho; Yoon, Kyoung Ho; Song, Sang Jun; Roh, Young Hak; Lee, Jae Woo

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction may be negatively affected by insufficient tibial tunnel fixation due to relatively lower bone density of the proximal tibia. We introduce a new technique of tibial fixation for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using free tendon Achilles allograft that is less affected by the bone density of the tibial metaphysis. PMID:25973367

  11. Partial physeal growth arrest: treatment by bridge resection and fat interposition.

    PubMed

    Williamson, R V; Staheli, L T

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-eight skeletally immature patients underwent 29 primary physeal bridge resections at Children's Hospital and Medical Center in Seattle, Washington. Twenty-two resections were followed for 2 years. There were 11 excellent, five good, two fair, and four poor results. Overall mean growth was 83% with 98% in the excellent group and 96% in the good group. Physeal bridge resection is an effective method of treating partial physeal growth arrest. Results with fat compare favorably with results of other interposition materials without the disadvantages of local reaction and implant removal.

  12. Resection of a physeal bar with complete transverse osteotomy at the metaphysis and Ilizarov external fixation.

    PubMed

    Kim, H T; Lim, K P; Jang, J H; Ahn, T Y

    2015-12-01

    The traditional techniques involving an oblique tunnel or triangular wedge resection to approach a central or mixed-type physeal bar are hindered by poor visualisation of the bar. This may be overcome by a complete transverse osteotomy at the metaphysis near the growth plate or a direct vertical approach to the bar. Ilizarov external fixation using small wires allows firm fixation of the short physis-bearing fragment, and can also correct an associated angular deformity and permit limb lengthening. We accurately approached and successfully excised ten central- or mixed-type bars; six in the distal femur, two in the proximal tibia and two in the distal tibia, without damaging the uninvolved physis, and corrected the associated angular deformity and leg-length discrepancy. Callus formation was slightly delayed because of periosteal elevation and stretching during resection of the bar. The resultant resection of the bar was satisfactory in seven patients and fair in three as assessed using a by a modified Williamson-Staheli classification.

  13. Premature partial physeal arrest. Diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging in two cases.

    PubMed

    Gabel, G T; Peterson, H A; Berquist, T H

    1991-11-01

    The management of premature physeal arrest requires accurate assessment of not only the location but also the extent of the bar. Numerous imaging techniques are available to evaluate the physis. Multiplanar tomography has proven to be the most precise method. The utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of physeal bars has not been demonstrated. This article presents MRI results in two cases of physeal bars. MRI provides a means of assessing physeal bar formation with an accuracy approaching that of multiplanar tomography. In certain instances, its efficacy may exceed that of tomography, specifically when the physis cannot be properly oriented for tomographic evaluation, when more planes are desired, and when radiation exposure is thought to be excessive. With improvement of its capabilities and availability (which may also reduce cost), it may become the diagnostic imaging technique of choice.

  14. Autogenous cultured growth plate chondrocyte transplantation in the treatment of physeal injury in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewski, R.; Bohosiewicz, J.; Gap, A.; Bursig, H.; Wysocka, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this experimental study on New Zealand’s white rabbits was to investigate the transplantation of autogenous growth plate cells in order to treat the injured growth plate. They were assessed in terms of measurements of radiological tibial varus and histological characteristics. Methods An experimental model of plate growth medial partial resection of the tibia in 14 New Zealand white rabbits was created. During this surgical procedure the plate growth cells were collected and cultured. While the second surgery was being performed, the autologous cultured growth plate cells were grafted at the right tibia, whereas the left tibia was used as a control group. Results Histological examinations showed that the grafted right tibia presented the regular shape of the plate growth with hypertrophic maturation, chondrocyte columniation and endochondral calcification. Radiological study shows that the mean tibial deformity at the left angle was 20.29° (6.25 to 33) and 7.21° (5 to 10) in the right angle. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that grafting of autogenous cultured growth plate cells into a defect of the medial aspect of the proximal tibial physis can prevent bone bridge formation, growth arrest and the development of varus deformity. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:310–16 PMID:25376625

  15. Structural differences in epiphyseal and physeal hypertrophic chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Frederic; Flynn, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    We have observed that epiphyseal and physeal hypertrophic chondrocytes in BALB/c mice show considerable differences of light microscopic and ultrastructural appearance, even when the cells are at the same stage of differentiation. In addition, cell structure maintenance improved with tissue preparation controlled for osmolarity and for membrane stabilization using 0.5% ruthenium hexammine trichloride (RHT) for both light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM) or 0.5% lanthanum nitrate for LM. Physeal hypertrophic chondrocytes showed a gradual increase in size closer to the metaphysis and a change in shape as cells elongated along the long axis. The nucleus remained central, with uniformly dispersed chromatin, and the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) was randomly dispersed throughout cytoplasm with little to no presence against the cell membrane. Even the lowermost cells showed thin elongated or dilated cisternae of RER and intact cell membranes. Epiphyseal chondrocytes remained circular to oval with no elongation. Nucleus and RER were positioned as a complete transcellular central nucleocytoplasmic column or as an incomplete bud with RER of the column/bud always continuous with RER peripherally against the intact cell membrane. RER was densely packed with parallel cisternae with adjacent cytoplasm empty of organelles but often filled with circular deposits of moderately electron-dense material consistent with fat. Optimal technique for LM involved fixation using glutaraldehyde (GA) 1.3%, paraformaldehyde (PFA) 1% and RHT 0.5% (mOsm 606) embedded in JB-4 plastic and stained with 0.5% toluidine blue. Optimal technique for EM used fixation with GA 1.3%, PFA 1%, RHT 0.5% and cacodylate buffer 0.03 M (mOsm 511) and post-fixation including 1% osmium tetroxide. These observations lead to the possibility that the same basic cell, the hypertrophic chondrocyte, has differing functional mechanisms at different regions of the developing bone. PMID:25987982

  16. Classification of distal radius physeal fractures not included in the salter-harris system.

    PubMed

    Sferopoulos, Nikolaos K

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly used classification for pediatric physeal fractures has been proposed by Salter and Harris. Among the most suitable classification schemes are those proposed by Ogden and Peterson who added several new types of injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine the value of both schemes to classify all different types of physeal injuries of the distal radius that are not included in the Salter-Harris system and to test a new nomenclature to classify and guide treatment for the whole spectrum of these injuries. A total of 292 children who were admitted for a physeal fracture of the distal radius that could not be classified according to the Salter-Harris system were identified from the hospital database. All radiographs were carefully examined and classified according to the existing classifications of Ogden and Peterson and a modified classification scheme. The results of the treatment were also evaluated. Ninety-six physeal injuries could not be classified using the classification schemes of Ogden and Peterson. All injuries could be classified in five types using the new, modified nomenclature. Growth abnormalities of the distal radius were evaluated after an average follow-up time of 11 years. Growth arrest due to a physeal bar was detected only in one patient. The proposed modified scheme is practical, incorporates all previous classification systems, allows classification of all physeal injuries of the distal radius that are not included in the Salter-Harris system and may assist comparison of treatment outcomes.

  17. Three-dimensional MR imaging in the assessment of physeal growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Sailhan, Frédéric; Chotel, Franck; Guibal, Anne-Laure; Gollogly, Sohrab; Adam, Philippe; Bérard, Jérome; Guibaud, Laurent

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe an imaging method for identifying and characterising physeal growth arrest following physeal plate aggression. The authors describe the use of three-dimensional MRI performed with fat-suppressed three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled echo sequences followed by manual image reconstruction to create a 3D model of the physeal plate. This retrospective series reports the analysis of 33 bony physeal bridges in 28 children (mean age 10.5 years) with the use of fat-suppressed three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled echo imaging and 3D reconstructions from the source images. 3D reconstructions were obtained after the outlining was done manually on each source image. Files of all patients were reviewed for clinical data at the time of MRI, type of injury, age at MRI and bone bridge characteristics on reconstructions. Twenty-one (63%) of the 33 bridges were post-traumatic and were mostly situated in the lower extremities (19/21). The distal tibia was involved in 66% (14/21) of the cases. Bridges due to causes other than trauma were located in the lower extremities in 10/12 cases, and the distal femur represented 60% of these cases. Of the 28 patients, five presented with two bridges involving two different growth plates making a total of 33 physeal bone bars. The location and shape of each bridge was accurately identified in each patient, and in post-traumatic cases, 89% of bone bars were of Ogden type III (central) or I (peripheral). Reconstructions were obtained in 15 min and are easy to interpret. Volumes of the physeal bone bridge(s) and of the remaining normal physis were calculated. The bone bridging represented less than 1% to 47% of the total physeal plate volume. The precise shape and location of the bridge can be visualised on the 3D reconstructions. This information is useful in the surgical management of these deformities; as for the eight patients who underwent bone bar resection, an excellent correspondence was

  18. MRI Based Comparison of Tibial Bone Coverage by Five Knee Prosthesis: Anthropometric Study in Indians.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sourabh; Agarwal, Naresh; Jain, Anuj; Srivastav, Shekhar; Thomas, Simon; Agarwal, Shekhar

    2015-09-01

    This MRI based study evaluates morphological differences of proximal tibia (total cross-sectional area, mediolateral and anteroposterior distance) 8-10 mm distal to the lateral tibial plateau. We evaluated the difference in the coverage of the tibial surface between symmetric and asymmetric tibial trays and difference in coverage between males and females. 150 patients who underwent MRI scans for sports related soft tissue injury without osteoarthritis were studied. The tibial trays of the 5 total knee arthroplasty designs (4 symmetric and 1 asymmetric) were scanned. Mean total tibial coverage of all designs was more than 80%. Asymmetric baseplate had maximum total tibial coverage and maximum rate of optimal fit, with only 2% absolute overhang posterolaterally. Females had better tibial coverage as compared to males.

  19. The Effect of Hinge Position on Posterior Tibial Slope in Medial Open-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sang Won; Park, Sin Hyung; Lee, Byung Hoon; Oh, Minkyung; Chang, Minho; Ahn, Jin Hwan; Wang, Joon Ho

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate whether hinge position affects the change in posterior tibial slope in medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO). We retrospectively evaluated 19 knees from 17 patients who underwent medial open-wedge HTO by 3-dimensional computed tomography scan before and after surgery. A 3-dimensional image model was constructed by applying reverse-engineering software to the computed tomography DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) files. The hinge axis (i.e., the position of the hinge compared with the anteroposterior axis on an axial view), posterior tibial slope, medial-proximal tibial angle, and gap ratio (i.e., the ratio of anterior gap to posterior gap in the opened wedge) were measured. The mean hinge axis was 4.92° ± 3.86°. Posterior tibial slope increased from 7.29° ± 2.56° preoperatively to 10.48° ± 3.01° postoperatively (P = .001). The mean medial-proximal tibial angle was 85.96° ± 1.97° preoperatively and 93.13° ± 3.17° postoperatively (P = .001). The mean gap ratio was 62.48% ± 7.26%. Linear regression analysis determined that the hinge axis (P = .0001) was a significant factor changing posterior tibial slope. Hinge position affected the change in posterior tibial slope in medial open-wedge HTO; in particular, a posterolateral hinge position led to an increase in posterior tibial slope. Level IV, therapeutic study. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pes Anserinus Bursitis due to Tibial Spurs in Children.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vivek; Sampath Kumar, Venkatesan; Poudel, Rishi R; Kumar, Ashok; Khan, Shah Alam

    2017-07-05

    Osteochondromas are the most common bone tumours. Although these tumors are relatively common in the long bones of children, the varied clinical and radiographic presentation of such neoplasms around the knee joint can cause diagnostic delays, especially when not associated with a palpable swelling. Proximal tibial osteochondromas can sometimes unusually present as spurs/ rose thorns leading to pes anserinus bursitis and vague knee pain. We describe the clinico-radiographic features of such proximal tibial metaphyseal osteochondromas giving rise to pes anserinus bursitis in three children, including bilaterally symmetrical osteochondroma in one of the cases, who were treated conservatively with good outcomes.

  1. [Suprapatellar approach to tibial medullary nailing with electromagnetic field-guided distal locking].

    PubMed

    Rueger, J M; Rücker, A H; Hoffmann, M

    2015-04-01

    Closed tibial shaft fractures are the domain of intramedullary nailing. With the introduction of new nail designs and technologies, even small, dislocated distal fragments can be anatomically aligned and safely fixed. Unsolved or to a lesser degree controlled are the problems of distal locking in the freehand technique, which can still be difficult and can lead to a significant radiation exposure, and how to control very short proximal tibial fragments in metaphyseal tibial fractures or tibial segmental fractures, where the proximal fracture line also runs through the metaphysis.By using a suprapatellar approach, i.e. a skin incision proximal to the patella with an entry point into the tibial bone from within the knee at the same site as for a standard infrapatellar approach, and then nailing the tibia in a semi-extended position, i.e. the knee is only flexed 10-20°, the intraoperative dislocation of a short proximal fragment can be avoided. The main indications for semi-extended tibial nailing are a short diaphyseal fragment in an isolated tibial shaft fracture, a segmental fracture where the proximal fracture line is metaphyseal and in patients where infrapatellar soft tissues are compromised.The use of the electromagnetic guidance system SureShot® generates reliable and reproducible results, reduces the operating time and is independent from radiation for distal locking.

  2. The effect of tibial diaphyseal lengthening on the longitudinal growth of the tibia.

    PubMed

    Cai, Gang; Yang, Lang; Saleh, Michael; Coulton, Les

    2007-11-01

    Limb lengthening by tibial callotasis is usually performed in the metaphysis but may cause growth inhibition. Is diaphyseal lengthening more advantageous? Sixteen immature rabbits underwent 30% diaphyseal lengthening by tibial callotasis. The tibial length was measured on radiographs at the end of the distraction period and after an additional 5 weeks. The proximal and distal growth plates were assessed histomorphometrically. Osteotomy stimulated tibial elongation; however, combined with diaphyseal lengthening the stimulation was suppressed resulting in longitudinal growth that matched the control side. In longer lengthenings of limbs diaphyseal callotasis may be more advantageous than metaphyseal by not inhibiting longitudinal growth.

  3. The use of helical computed tomographic scan to assess bony physeal bridges.

    PubMed

    Loder, R T; Swinford, A E; Kuhns, L R

    1997-01-01

    Coronal and sagittal reformatted images of the physis obtained with the helical computed tomography (CT) scanner were studied in five children. This technique allows tomographic slices at 1.0-mm thickness and can be performed in approximately 20 s. The distal femora were studied in two children, the distal tibia in two children, and the distal radius in one child. In three children, after physeal mapping, bar resections were performed. In all cases, the location and size of the bar was accurately predicted by the map constructed from the helical CT scan. We recommend the helical CT scan to prepare physeal maps to determine the extent and location of physeal bony bars because of excellent bony detail, radiation doses one half to one quarter those of conventional tomography, and the rapidity of scanning, which bypasses the need for sedation.

  4. Classification of Distal Radius Physeal Fractures Not Included in the Salter-Harris System

    PubMed Central

    Sferopoulos, Nikolaos K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction : The most commonly used classification for pediatric physeal fractures has been proposed by Salter and Harris. Among the most suitable classification schemes are those proposed by Ogden and Peterson who added several new types of injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine the value of both schemes to classify all different types of physeal injuries of the distal radius that are not included in the Salter-Harris system and to test a new nomenclature to classify and guide treatment for the whole spectrum of these injuries. Methods : A total of 292 children who were admitted for a physeal fracture of the distal radius that could not be classified according to the Salter-Harris system were identified from the hospital database. All radiographs were carefully examined and classified according to the existing classifications of Ogden and Peterson and a modified classification scheme. The results of the treatment were also evaluated. Results : Ninety-six physeal injuries could not be classified using the classification schemes of Ogden and Peterson. All injuries could be classified in five types using the new, modified nomenclature. Growth abnormalities of the distal radius were evaluated after an average follow-up time of 11 years. Growth arrest due to a physeal bar was detected only in one patient. Discussion : The proposed modified scheme is practical, incorporates all previous classification systems, allows classification of all physeal injuries of the distal radius that are not included in the Salter-Harris system and may assist comparison of treatment outcomes. PMID:25132871

  5. Iatrogenic pseudoaneurysm of the popliteal artery following corrective tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Szyber, P; Skóra, J; Rybak, W; Pupka, A

    2011-09-01

    Due to its anatomical location the popliteal artery is exposed to injury during surgical procedures in the region of the knee joint, in particular during high-level corrective osteotomies of the proximal tibial epiphysis. Nevertheless, posttraumatic (iatrogenic) pseudoaneurysm constitutes a very rare complication of the procedure. Only few reports of such complication have been published and they were usually connected with lateral tibial osteotomy - the accidents after medial osteotomy are seldom. The complication we report was observed in a 52-year-old female patient after corrective osteotomy of the medial portion of the proximal tibial epiphysis. The complication was diagnosed 7 days after surgery on US-examination and subsequently confirmed by emergently performed angio-CT. The patient was referred for urgent reconstructive surgery. No significant complications were observed, neither postoperatively nor during follow-up visits.

  6. Chronic Dissection of the Anterior Tibial Artery

    PubMed Central

    De Salazar, Alvaro Ortiz; Muñoz, Fernando; Antoñana, Mirel; Aramendi, José I.; Castellanos, Enrique; Loizate, Alberto; Calderon, Antonio; Llorente, Alberto; Serrano, Alberto

    1991-01-01

    We present a clinical case of chronic dissection of the anterior tibial artery leading to acute aneurysmal dilatation. Our patient, a 22-year-old man, had a history of trauma at the middle third of his left leg. Because of impending ischemia, he was diagnosed by emergency arteriography. We ligated the proximal and distal ends of the dissection and used a reversed saphenous vein for a short end-to-end bypass. Although the evolution of this dilatation had been silent, its clinical presentation was spectacular. The case is worthy of attention because of its extreme rarity, both as a dissection of a peripheral artery caused by trauma and as an aneurysmal dilatation at tibial level. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1991;18:223-5) Images PMID:15227485

  7. The femoral head-neck contour varies as a function of physeal development.

    PubMed

    Vo, A; Beaule, P E; Sampaio, M L; Rotaru, C; Rakhra, K S

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the femoral head-neck contour, characterised by the alpha angle, varies with the stage of physeal maturation using MRI evaluation of an asymptomatic paediatric population. Paediatric volunteers with asymptomatic hips were recruited to undergo MRI of both hips. Femoral head physes were graded from 1 (completely open) to 6 (completely fused). The femoral head-neck contour was evaluated using the alpha angle, measured at the 3:00 (anterior) and 1:30 (anterosuperior) positions and correlated with physeal grade, with gender sub-analysis performed. A total of 43 asymptomatic paediatric volunteers (26 male, 17 female) with mean age 13.0 years (eight to 18) were included with review of bilateral hip MRIs. Correlation between the physeal grade and alpha angle was moderate in males at both the 3:00 (r = 0.477, p < 0.001) and 1:30 (r = 0.509, p < 0.001) positions, whereas there was no significant correlation in females. A significant difference was found between the alpha angles of all the physeal grades (3:00, p = 0.030, 1:30, p = 0.005), but only in males, with the angle increasing with higher grades. For physeal grading, the inter-reader reliability was substantial (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.694), and the intra-reader reliability was also substantial (ICC = 0.788). The femoral head-neck contour varies and correlates with the stage of physeal development, but only in males, with the alpha angle increasing with progressive physeal maturation. This suggests that gender differences exist in the natural physiological growth, development or remodelling of femoral head-neck junction. In males, pre-physeal fusion may be a critical period of vulnerability for development of morphologic abnormalities of the femoral head-neck junction. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:17-22. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  8. Does the Taylor Spatial Frame Accurately Correct Tibial Deformities?

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Kira; Ilizarov, Svetlana; Fragomen, Austin T.; Ilizarov, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    Background Optimal leg alignment is the goal of tibial osteotomy. The Taylor Spatial Frame (TSF) and the Ilizarov method enable gradual realignment of angulation and translation in the coronal, sagittal, and axial planes, therefore, the term six-axis correction. Questions/purposes We asked whether this approach would allow precise correction of tibial deformities. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 102 patients (122 tibiae) with tibial deformities treated with percutaneous osteotomy and gradual correction with the TSF. The proximal osteotomy group was subdivided into two subgroups to distinguish those with an intentional overcorrection of the mechanical axis deviation (MAD). The minimum followup after frame removal was 10 months (average, 48 months; range, 10–98 months). Results In the proximal osteotomy group, patients with varus and valgus deformities for whom the goal of alignment was neutral or overcorrection experienced accurate correction of MAD. In the proximal tibia, the medial proximal tibial angle improved from 80° to 89° in patients with a varus deformity and from 96° to 85° in patients with a valgus deformity. In the middle osteotomy group, all patients had less than 5° coronal plane deformity and 15 of 17 patients had less that 5° sagittal plane deformity. In the distal osteotomy group, the lateral distal tibial angle improved from 77° to 86° in patients with a valgus deformity and from 101° to 90° for patients with a varus deformity. Conclusions Gradual correction of all tibial deformities with the TSF was accurate and with few complications. Level of Evidence Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19911244

  9. Tibial dyschondroplasia associated proteomic changes in chicken growth plate cartilage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) is a poultry leg problem that affects the proximal growth plate of tibia preventing its transition to bone. To understand the disease-induced proteomic changes we compared the protein extracts of cartilage from normal and TD- affected growth plates. TD was induced by fe...

  10. Unusual Tibial Stress Fracture in a Basketball Player.

    PubMed

    Selesnick, H

    1990-09-01

    In brief Stress fractures of the proximal middle third of the tibia are common; those of the distal tibia are less common; and longitudinal stress fractures are rare. The basketball player in this case report had a rare longitudinal tibial pilon stress fracture, for which few diagnostic or treatment guidelines existed.

  11. Changes in posterior tibial slope angle in patients undergoing open-wedge high tibial osteotomy for varus gonarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Omer; Yucel, Bulent; Mutlu, Serhat; Orman, Osman; Mutlu, Harun

    2017-01-01

    In this study, postoperative changes in the posterior tibial slope angle and clinical outcomes following open-wedge high tibial osteotomy were evaluated. This study included 39 knees (18 left, 21 right) of 35 patients (three male, 32 female; median age, 53 years; age range 37-64 years) with symptomatic isolated medial joint osteoarthritis who underwent open-wedge high tibial osteotomy and fixation with a Puddu plate. The patients were clinically assessed according to the Lysholm knee score, a visual analogue pain scale, and a patient satisfaction questionnaire. Radiological assessment was made according to the changes in the posterior tibial slope angle and the correlation between these changes and clinical signs. The median follow-up period was 11 years (range 7-14 years). Significant improvements were observed in the preoperative and postoperative clinical scores of the Lysholm knee scale, visual analogue pain scale, and patient satisfaction questionnaire (p < 0.05). Radiological assessment showed that the posterior tibial slope angle was significantly higher during the postoperative and follow-up periods (p  0.05). There was no correlation between the postoperative Lysholm scores and the increase in the posterior tibial slope angle (p = n.s.). We conclude that both the conventional Puddu plate design and its anteromedial plate placement are what increase the tibial slope after an opening-wedge proximal tibial osteotomy. Therefore, current new plate design may help preserve the posterior tibial slope angle. IV.

  12. Tibial fractures in children

    PubMed Central

    Palmu, Sauli A; Auro, Sampo; Lohman, Martina; Paukku, Reijo T; Peltonen, Jari I; Nietosvaara, Yrjänä

    2014-01-01

    Background Tibial fracture is the third most common long-bone fracture in children. Traditionally, most tibial fractures in children have been treated non-operatively, but there are no long-term results. Methods 94 children (64 boys) were treated for a tibial fracture in Aurora City Hospital during the period 1980–89 but 20 could not be included in the study. 58 of the remaining 74 patients returned a written questionnaire and 45 attended a follow-up examination at mean 27 (23–32) years after the fracture. Results 89 children had been treated by manipulation under anesthesia and cast-immobilization, 4 by skeletal traction, and 1 with pin fixation. 41 fractures had been re-manipulated. The mean length of hospital stay was 5 (1–26) days. Primary complications were recorded in 5 children. The childrens’ memories of treatment were positive in two-thirds of cases. The mean subjective VAS score (range 0–10) for function appearance was 9. Leg-length discrepancy (5–10 mm) was found clinically in 10 of 45 subjects and rotational deformities exceeding 20° in 4. None of the subjects walked with a limp. None had axial malalignment exceeding 10°. Osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee was seen in radiographs from 2 subjects. Interpretation The long-term outcome of tibial fractures in children treated non-operatively is generally good. PMID:24786903

  13. Analysis of an early intervention tibial component for medial osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, M E; Walker, P S

    2014-06-01

    Tibial component loosening is an important failure mode in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) which may be due to the 6-8 mm of bone resection required. To address component loosening and fixation, a new early intervention (EI) design is proposed which reverses the traditional material scheme between femoral and tibial components. The EI design consists of a plastic inlay for the distal femur and a thin metal plate for the proximal tibia. With this reversed materials scheme, the EI design requires minimal tibial bone resection compared with traditional UKA. This study investigated, by means of finite element (FE) simulations, the advantages of a thin metal tibial component compared with traditional UKA tibial components, such as an all-plastic inlay or a metal-backed onlay. We hypothesized that an EI tibial component would produce comparable stress, strain, and strain energy density (SED) characteristics to an intact knee and more favorable values than UKA components, due primarily to the preservation of dense cancellous bone near the surface. Indeed, FE results showed that stresses in the supporting bone for an EI design were close to intact, while stresses, strains, and strain energy densities were reduced compared with an all-plastic UKA component. Analyzed parameters were similar for an EI and a metal-backed onlay, but the EI component had the advantage of minimal resection of the stiffest bone.

  14. Change in Posterior Tibial Slope After Open-Wedge and Closed-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nha, Kyung-Wook; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Ahn, Hyeong-Sik; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-11-01

    It is unclear whether open- or closed-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) results in significant changes in posterior tibial slope, with no consensus on the magnitude of such changes. Furthermore, methods of measuring posterior tibial slope differ among studies. This meta-analysis was therefore designed to evaluate whether posterior tibial slope increases after open-wedge HTO and decreases after closed-wedge HTO and to quantify the magnitudes of the slope changes after open- and closed-wedge HTO using various methods of measuring posterior tibial slope. Posterior tibial slope increases after open-wedge and decreases after closed-wedge HTO. The magnitude of change is similar for the 2 methods, and the value obtained for posterior tibial slope change is affected by the method of measurement. Meta-analysis. Multiple comprehensive databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and KoreaMed, were searched for studies that evaluated the posterior slope of the proximal tibia in patients who had undergone open- and/or closed-wedge HTO. Studies were included that compared pre- and postoperative posterior tibial slopes, regardless of measurement method, including anterior and posterior tibial cortex or tibial shaft axis as a reference line, in patients who underwent open- or closed-wedge HTO. The quality of each included study was appraised with the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Twenty-seven studies were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled data, which included subgroups of 3 methods, showed that posterior tibial slope increased 2.02° (95% CI, 2.66° to 1.38°; P = .005) after open-wedge HTO and decreased 2.35° (95% CI, 1.38° to 3.32°; P < .001) after closed-wedge HTO. This meta-analysis confirmed that posterior tibial slope increased after open-wedge HTO and decreased after closed-wedge HTO when the results of a variety of measurement methods were pooled. The magnitude of change after open- and closed-wedge HTO was similar and small (approximately 2°), suggesting

  15. The effect of the posterior slope of the tibial plateau osteotomy with a rotational error on tibial component malalignment in total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Tsukeoka, T; Tsuneizumi, Y; Lee, T H

    2013-09-01

    We performed a CT-based computer simulation study to determine how the relationship between any inbuilt posterior slope in the proximal tibial osteotomy and cutting jig rotational orientation errors affect tibial component alignment in total knee replacement. Four different posterior slopes (3°, 5°, 7° and 10°), each with a rotational error of 5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, 25° or 30°, were simulated. Tibial cutting block malalignment of 20° of external rotation can produce varus malalignment of 2.4° and 3.5° with a 7° and a 10° sloped cutting jig, respectively. Care must be taken in orientating the cutting jig in the sagittal plane when making a posterior sloped proximal tibial osteotomy in total knee replacement.

  16. Bilateral tibial hemimelia I.

    PubMed

    Suganthy, J; Rassau, Marina; Koshi, Rachel; Battacharjee, Suranjan

    2007-05-01

    Congenital absence of tibia is a rare anomaly. We report a case of bilateral tibial hemimelia born to phenotypically normal parents. The two amputated legs with tibial dysplasia obtained from a 3-year-old boy were studied by radiography and anatomical dissection. The radiological evaluation revealed a normal hip joint. The lower end of femur was normal without any bifurcation, shortening or bowing. Fibula was present on both legs and there was no sign of bowing or doubling. Both right and left tibiae were absent. In addition, on the right side, five tarsal bones, two metatarsals and the corresponding digital rays were absent. On the left side, three tarsal bones were absent. Dissection of the amputated segments showed the presence of extensor digitorum longus, peroneus tertius, peroneus longus and brevis, gastrocnemius, and soleus. Following bilateral knee disarticulation the patient was fitted with prosthesis and is doing well.

  17. Physeal fractures of the distal tibia and fibula (Salter-Harris Type I, II, III, and IV fractures).

    PubMed

    Podeszwa, David A; Mubarak, Scott J

    2012-06-01

    Physeal fractures of the distal tibia and fibula are common and can be seen at any age, although most are seen in the adolescent. An understanding of the unique anatomy of the skeletally immature ankle in relation to the mechanism of injury will help one understand the injury patterns seen in this population. A thorough clinical exam is critical to the diagnosis and treatment of these injuries and the avoidance of potentially catastrophic complications. Nondisplaced physeal fractures of the distal tibia and fibula can be safely treated nonoperatively. Displaced fractures should undergo a gentle reduction with appropriate anesthesia while multiple reduction attempts should be avoided. Gapping of the physis >3 mm after reduction should raise the suspicion of entrapped periosteum that will increase the risk of premature physeal closure. Open reduction of displaced Salter-Harris type III and IV fractures is critical to maintain joint congruity and minimize the risk of physeal arrest.

  18. [Treatment of Tibial Shaft Fractures with the Stable Angle Tibial Nail Targon TX].

    PubMed

    Chmielnicki, M; Prokop, A

    2016-10-01

    Tibial shaft fractures are among the most common long bone fractures in humans. The incidence is 1-2 per 100,000. The gold standard of treatment for AO type 42 A-C fractures is a locking intramedullary nail. The development of new implants has extended the indications for this minimally invasive technique, so that now AO types 41 and 43 can also be treated with special nails. Fixed-angle screw anchors increase primary stability and supplemental locking devices located proximally and distally extend the spectrum of use to metaphyseal fractures. The cannulated Targon TX titanium nail can be introduced, either with or without reaming. Using an operative video, the treatment of a tibial fracture with an intramedullary nail is demonstrated in stages and the operative steps further illustrated on artificial bone. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Posterior tibial nerve lesions in ankle arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cugat, Ramon; Ares, Oscar; Cuscó, Xavier; Garcia, Montserrat; Samitier, Gonzalo; Seijas, Roberto

    2008-05-01

    Ankle arthroscopy provides a minimally invasive approach to the diagnosis and treatment of certain ankle disorders. Neurological complications resulting from ankle arthroscopy have been well documented in orthopaedic and podiatric literature. Owing to the superficial location of the ankle joint and the abundance of overlying periarticular neurovascular structures, complications reported in ankle arthroscopy are greater than those reported for other joints. In particular, all reported neurovascular injuries following ankle arthroscopy have been the direct result of distractor pin or portal placement. The standard posteromedial portal has recognized risks because of the proximity of the posterior neurovascular structures. There can be considerable variability in the course of these portals and their proximity to the neurovascular structures. We found one report of intra-articular damage to the posterior tibial nerve as a result of ankle arthroscopy in the English-language literature and we report this paper as a second case described in the literature.

  20. All-Epiphyseal Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Skeletally Immature Patients: A Surgical Technique Using a Split Tibial Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Lykissas, Marios G.; Nathan, Senthil T.; Wall, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Many techniques have been described for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in skeletally immature patients, including extra-articular, complete or partial transphyseal, and physeal-sparing techniques. An all-epiphyseal technique places the tendon and its tunnels and fixation all within the child's epiphysis, leaving the growth plates untouched. We describe an all-epiphyseal quadruple-hamstring ACL reconstruction using a split tibial tunnel. The split tibial tunnels drop the tunnel size down to 4.5 to 5.5 mm from 7 to 8 mm because only half the total graft diameter passes through each of the split tunnels. This increases the safety margin for keeping the tunnel within the tibial epiphysis, in addition to avoiding damage into the growth plate. The bone bridge between the 2 tunnels serves as a solid low-profile fixation post. Femoral graft fixation is achieved with an interference screw, which allows precise tensioning and low-profile fixation entirely within the femoral tunnel. By placing the graft at the native ACL's anatomic attachment points without spanning or violating the growth plates at any step of the procedure, an all-epiphyseal ACL reconstruction with a split tibial tunnel theoretically minimizes the risk of growth disturbance in an ACL-deficient child. PMID:23766968

  1. Unintended Rotational Changes of the Distal Tibia After Biplane Medial Open-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ki-Mo; Lee, Jong-Hee; Park, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Jeong Lae; Han, Seung-Beom

    2016-01-01

    This study involved 35 knees undergoing biplane medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) to assess the axial rotation of the distal tibia. The distal tibiae were internally rotated by 3.0° ± 7.1° after OWHTO. The opening width showed a Pearson correlation coefficient of -0.743 (P < .001), and the tuberosity osteotomy angle showed that of -0.678 (P < .001) with distal tibial rotation. However, changes in hip-knee-ankle angle, medial proximal tibial angle, and posterior tibial slope were not significantly correlated with the change in distal tibial rotation. In conclusion, there was an unintended tendency of increasing internal rotation of the distal tibia after biplane medial OWHTO, and this tendency was positively related to the opening width and tuberosity osteotomy angle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Tibial fracture after transposition of the tibial tubercle.

    PubMed

    van Haeff, M J; Sauter, A J

    1991-01-01

    Eight weeks after transposition of the tibial tubercle for recurrent subluxation of the patella, the patient sustained a tibial fracture during rope jumping. In spite of consolidation of the osteotomy in the frontal plane, there remained a small gap in the anterior cortex in the transverse plane through which the tibia failed during bending stress.

  3. Suprapatellar nailing of tibial fractures-Indications and technique.

    PubMed

    Franke, J; Hohendorff, B; Alt, V; Thormann, U; Schnettler, R

    2016-02-01

    Intramedullary nailing is the standard procedure for surgical treatment of closed and Gustilo-Anderson Grade I-II° open fractures of the tibial shaft. The use of intramedullary nailing for the treatment of proximal metaphyseal tibia fractures is frequently followed by postoperative malalignment, whereas plate osteosynthesis is associated with higher rates of postoperative infection. Intramedullary nailing of tibial fractures is generally performed through an infrapatellar approach. The injured extremity must be positioned at a minimum of 90° of flexion in the knee joint to achieve optimal exposure of the correct entry point. The tension of the quadriceps tendon causes a typical apex anterior angulation of the proximal fragment. The suprapatellar approach improves reduction of the fracture and reduces the occurrence of malalignment during intramedullary nailing of extra-articular proximal tibial fractures. The knee is positioned in 20° of flexion to neutralise traction forces secondary to the quadriceps muscle, thus preventing an apex anterior angulation of the proximal fragment. An additional advantage of the technique is that it allows the surgeon to avoid or minimise further soft tissue damage because of the distance between the optimal incision point and the usual area of soft tissue damage.

  4. Tibial hypoplasia with a bifid tibia: an unclassified tibial hemimelia.

    PubMed

    Shah, Krupa; Shah, Hitesh

    2016-08-16

    Tibial hemimelia is a rare congenital limb deficiency which is characterised by a hypoplastic/aplastic tibia. It actually represents a spectrum of anomalies, ranging from mild hypoplasia of the tibia to total absence of the tibia. Several classifications based on radiological description exist in the literature. The tibial hemimelia is usually described with preaxial mirror polydactyly, split hand/foot syndrome-ectrodactyly, polydactyly-triphalangeal thumb syndrome (Werner syndrome) and micromelia-trigonal brachycephaly syndrome. We describe a child with unclassified tibial hemimelia. The child had right incomplete tibial hemimelia with bifid tibia, left complete tibial hemimelia, bilateral split hands and left split foot. This is the first report of the bifid tibia in the literature.

  5. Treatment of physeal fractures of the distal radius by volar intrafocal Kapandji method: surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Guy; Orbach, Hagay; Chezar, Avi; Rozen, Nimrod

    2017-01-01

    Distal radial physeal fractures with volar displacement are rare. Several methods of operative treatment include volar plate without inserting distal screws, percutaneous technique using two anterior skin incisions and reversed Kapandji technique with pins introduced through a posterior approach and locked at the anterior cortex of the fracture. We report three cases along with a literature review of the surgical techniques described in the past and a novel surgical technique for this uncommon fracture termed "Volar Kapandji". All patients had anatomic reduction at the last follow-up radiography, and all patients had a full range of motion and VAS 0 at the last follow-up. No complications were recorded. This case study presents the minimally invasive option for treating rare cases of physeal distal radius fractures with volar displacement. V.

  6. Infrequent physeal wrist injury of the ulna and radius: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Eloisa Felíu; Vicente-Franqueira, Javier Roca; Trigueros, Antonio Perez

    2008-01-01

    We describe the case of a 13-year-old patient with a left wrist physeal fracture of the ulna and radius. X-Ray showed a Salter–Harris type II injury of the radius, and CT and MRI identified the following: type II epiphysiolysis of the radius with a metaphyseal wedge and type IV fracture of the ulna, with interposition in the focus of the fracture of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon, as well as a tear in the central area of the triangular fibrocartilage complex. All these injuries were checked intraoperatively during open reduction. We believe that this clinical case illustrates the importance of carefully assessing physeal wrist injuries when they occur, especially in those cases involving the ulna and the radius. Diagnostic methods such as CT and MRI scans are indispensable for through evaluation and treatment of the injury. PMID:19034390

  7. A Finite-Element Study of Metal Backing and Tibial Resection Depth in a Composite Tibia Following Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Susumu; Rogge, Renee D; Small, Scott R; Berend, Michael E; Ritter, Merrill A

    2016-04-01

    Prosthetic alignment, patient characteristics, and implant design are all factors in long-term survival of total knee arthroplasty (TKA), yet the level at which each of these factors contribute to implant loosening has not been fully described. Prior clinical and biomechanical studies have indicated tibial overload as a cause of early TKA revision. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between tibial component design and bone resection on tibial loading. Finite-element analysis (FEA) was performed after simulated implantation of metal backed (MB) and all-polyethylene (AP) TKA components in 5 and 15 mm of tibial resection into a validated intact tibia model. Proximal tibial strains significantly increased between 13% and 199% when implanted with AP components (p < 0.05). Strain significantly increased between 12% and 209% in the posterior tibial compartment with increased bone resection (p < 0.05). This study indicates elevated strains in AP implanted tibias across the entirety of the proximal tibial cortex, as well as a posterior shift in tibial loading in instances of increased resection depth. These results are consistent with trends observed in prior biomechanical studies and may associate the documented device history of tibial collapse in AP components with increased bone strain and overload beneath the prosthesis.

  8. Posterior tibial slope in medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy: 2-D versus 3-D navigation.

    PubMed

    Yim, Ji Hyeon; Seon, Jong Keun; Song, Eun Kyoo

    2012-10-01

    Although opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) is used to correct deformities, it can simultaneously alter tibial slope in the sagittal plane because of the triangular configuration of the proximal tibia, and this undesired change in tibial slope can influence knee kinematics, stability, and joint contact pressure. Therefore, medial opening-wedge HTO is a technically demanding procedure despite the use of 2-dimensional (2-D) navigation. The authors evaluated the posterior tibial slope pre- and postoperatively in patients who underwent navigation-assisted opening-wedge HTO and compared posterior slope changes for 2-D and 3-dimensional (3-D) navigation versions. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups based on the navigation system used: group A (2-D guidance for coronal alignment; 17 patients) and group B (3-D guidance for coronal and sagittal alignments; 17 patients). Postoperatively, the mechanical axis was corrected to a mean valgus of 2.81° (range, 1°-5.4°) in group A and 3.15° (range, 1.5°-5.6°) in group B. A significant intergroup difference existed for the amount of posterior tibial slope change (Δ slope) pre- and postoperatively (P=.04).Opening-wedge HTO using navigation offers accurate alignment of the lower limb. In particular, the use of 3-D navigation results in significantly less change in the posterior tibial slope postoperatively than does the use of 2-D navigation. Accordingly, the authors recommend the use of 3-D navigation systems because they provide real-time intraoperative information about coronal, sagittal, and transverse axes and guide the maintenance of the native posterior tibial slope. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Fracture of the distal radial physis complicated by compartment syndrome and premature physeal closure.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, J; Peterson, H A

    1986-01-01

    Complications after injury to the epiphyseal growth plate of the distal radius are uncommon. An 11-year-8-month-old boy developed two complications--compartment syndrome of the forearm and premature closure of the physis--after a Salter-Harris Type I injury. Treatment included closed reduction, decompression, skin grafting, excision of the physeal bar, and epiphysiodesis of the distal ulna and the remaining open physis of the distal radius.

  10. Adamantinoma of tibial shaft.

    PubMed

    A, Joshi; Kc, B R; Basnet, S B; Panth, R; Shrestha, R L; Chand, P; Thapa, B B

    2009-01-01

    Adamantinoma is an extremely rare primary bony neoplasm. Because of its malignant nature, accurate and early diagnosis is very important. On the other hand adamantinoma mimics many benign conditions, so it is doubly important to establish correct tissue diagnosis to avoid radical surgery with morbidities. Because of its rarity, diagnosing adamantinoma still remains difficult, even if when it occurs in classical sites. We report a case of adamantinoma of tibial shaft diaphysis in a 23 year male. In this case, because of classic clinic-radiological features, we were suspecting adamantinoma from very beginning but final diagnosis was delayed for nine months.

  11. Secondary tethers after physeal bar resection: a common source of failure?

    PubMed

    Hasler, Carol Claudius; Foster, Bruce Kristian

    2002-12-01

    Despite a standardized operative technique and appropriate patient selection for physeal bar resection, a bar size less than 50% of the physis, and a prospective growth period greater than 2 years, failure may result. Limited growth because of poor function of the remaining physis and secondary tethers (incomplete resection or recurrence of the bar) may prevent reestablishment of growth or lead to its premature cessation. The current study investigated patients with insufficient restoration of growth by means of magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography or both. Twenty-two patients had 24 physeal bar resections with interposition of autologous fat as the index procedure (Langenskiöld technique). Fourteen patients had only fair or poor results. Five patients had premature arrest of the affected physis with a postoperative growth period less than 1 year. Radiologic and clinical findings revealed bridge recurrence in four patients but no obvious reasons in the remaining five patients. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography or both detected a secondary tether because of incomplete bar resection (one patient) or recurrence of the bar (four patients). Graft dislocation out of the resection cavity with an associated recurrence of the bar proved to be the underlying problem in three of the eight patients with bar recurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging is not only useful in preoperative mapping of physeal bars but also may help to explain failures after growth plate surgery.

  12. Posttraumatic distal ulnar physeal arrest: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Peter; Hammert, Warren

    2013-03-01

    We report the case of a 12-year-old male who sustained a Salter-Harris (SH) type IV physeal fracture of the distal ulna and a SH type II fracture of the distal radius. At 34 months later, he presented with activity-related wrist pain and ulnar variance of -17 mm. He successfully underwent ulnar distraction osteogenesis with radial closing wedge osteotomy. At 16-month follow-up, the patient denied wrist pain with activity, and imaging demonstrated ulnar variance of -3 mm. Epiphyseal fracture separations of the distal radius and ulna have the potential to cause early growth arrest and may become symptomatic as a result. High-energy mechanism, open fracture, number of reduction attempts, and age at injury can all increase the risk of premature closure. Therefore, we recommend longitudinal follow-up of patients with these injuries as earlier intervention may improve outcomes. When premature physeal closure is discovered early, treatment may include resection of the physeal bar, osteotomy with or without epiphysiodesis, and distraction osteogenesis.

  13. Effects of Suture Choice on Biomechanics and Physeal Status After Bioenhanced Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair in Skeletally Immature Patients: A Large-Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Vavken, Patrick; Proffen, Benedikt; Peterson, Chris; Fleming, Braden C.; Machan, Jason T.; Murray, Martha M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to assess the effect of absorbable or nonabsorbable sutures in bioenhanced anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair in a skeletally immature pig model on suture tunnel and growth plate healing and biomechanical outcomes. Methods Sixteen female skeletally immature Yorkshire pigs were randomly allocated to receive unilateral, bioenhanced ACL repair with an absorbable (Vicryl) or nonabsorbable (Ethibond) suture augmented by an extracellular matrix-based scaffold (MIACH). After 15 weeks of healing, micro–computed tomography was used to measure residual tunnel diameters and growth plate status, and biomechanical outcomes were assessed. Results At 15 weeks postoperatively, there was a significant difference in tunnel diameter with significantly larger diameters in the nonabsorbable suture group (4.4 ± 0.3 mm; mean ± SD) than in the absorbable group (1.8 ± 0.5 mm; P <.001). The growth plate showed a significantly greater affected area in the nonabsorbable group (15.2 ± 3.4 mm2) than in the absorbable group (2.7 ± 0.8 mm2, P < .001). There was no significant difference in the linear stiffness of the repairs (29.0 ± 14.8 N/mm for absorbable v 43.3 ± 28.3 N/mm for nonabsorbable sutures, P = .531), but load to failure was higher in the nonabsorbable suture group (211 ± 121.5 N) than in the absorbable suture group (173 ± 101.4 N, P =.002). There was no difference between the 2 groups in anteroposterior laxity at 30° (P = .5117), 60° (P = .3150), and 90° (P = .4297) of knee flexion. Conclusions The use of absorbable sutures for ACL repair resulted in decreased physeal plate damage after 15 weeks of healing; however, use of nonabsorbable sutures resulted in 20% stronger repairs. Clinical Relevance Choice of suture type for ACL repair or repair of tibial avulsion fractures may depend on patient skeletal age and size, with absorbable sutures preferred in very young, small patients at higher risk with physeal damage and

  14. Computational comparison of reamed versus unreamed intramedullary tibial nails.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Benito, María José; Fornells, Pere; García-Aznar, José Manuel; Seral, Belén; Seral-Iñnigo, Fernando; Doblaré, Manuel

    2007-02-01

    We compared, via a computational model, the biomechanical performance of reamed versus unreamed intramedullary tibial nails to treat fractures in three different locations: proximal, mid-diaphyseal, and distal. Two finite element models were analyzed for the two nail types and the three kinds of fractures. Several biomechanical variables were determined: interfragmentary strains in the fracture site, von Mises stresses in nails and bolts, and strain distributions in the tibia and fibula. Although good mechanical stabilization was achieved in all the simulated fractures, the best results were obtained in the proximal fracture for the unreamed nail and in the mid-diaphyseal and distal fractures for the reamed nail. The interlocking bolts, in general, were subjected to higher stresses in the unreamed tibial nail than in the reamed one; thus the former stabilization technique is more likely to fail due to fatigue.

  15. The Anatomic Relationship of the Tibial Nerve to the Common Peroneal Nerve in the Popliteal Fossa: Implications for Selective Tibial Nerve Block in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Eric R.; Vydyanathan, Amaresh; Gritsenko, Karina; Shaparin, Naum; Singh, Nair; Downie, Sherry A.

    2017-01-01

    Background. A recently described selective tibial nerve block at the popliteal crease presents a viable alternative to sciatic nerve block for patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. In this two-part investigation, we describe the effects of a tibial nerve block at the popliteal crease. Methods. In embalmed cadavers, after the ultrasound-guided dye injection the dissection revealed proximal spread of dye within the paraneural sheath. Consequentially, in the clinical study twenty patients scheduled for total knee arthroplasty received the ultrasound-guided selective tibial nerve block at the popliteal crease, which also resulted in proximal spread of local anesthetic. A sensorimotor exam was performed to monitor the effect on the peroneal nerve. Results. In the cadaver study, dye was observed to spread proximal in the paraneural sheath to reach the sciatic nerve. In the clinical observational study, local anesthetic was observed to spread a mean of 4.7 + 1.9 (SD) cm proximal to popliteal crease. A negative correlation was found between the excess spread of local anesthetic and bifurcation distance. Conclusions. There is significant proximal spread of local anesthetic following tibial nerve block at the popliteal crease with possibility of the undesirable motor blocks of the peroneal nerve. PMID:28260964

  16. Minimizing alteration of posterior tibial slope during opening wedge high tibial osteotomy: a protocol with experimental validation in paired cadaveric knees.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Robert W; DeBerardino, Thomas; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-01-01

    The High Tibial Osteotomy (HTO) is a reliable procedure in addressing uni- compartmental arthritis with associated coronal deformities. With osteotomy of the proximal tibia, there is a risk of altering the tibial slope in the sagittal plane. Surgical techniques continue to evolve with trends towards procedure reproducibility and simplification. We evaluated a modification of the Arthrex iBalance technique in 18 paired cadaveric knees with the goals of maintaining sagittal slope, increasing procedure efficiency, and decreasing use of intraoperative fluoroscopy. Nine paired cadaveric knees (18 legs) underwent iBalance medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomies. In each pair, the right knee underwent an HTO using the modified technique, while all left knees underwent the traditional technique. Independent observers evaluated postoperative factors including tibial slope, placement of hinge pin, and implant placement. Specimens were then dissected to evaluate for any gross muscle, nerve or vessel injury. Changes to posterior tibial slope were similar using each technique. The change in slope in traditional iBalance technique was -0.3° ±2.3° and change in tibial slope using the modified iBalance technique was -0.4° ±2.3° (p=0.29). Furthermore, we detected no differences in posterior tibial slope between preoperative and postoperative specimens (p=0.74 traditional, p=0.75 modified). No differences in implant placement were detected between traditional and modified techniques. (p=0.85). No intraoperative iatrogenic complications (i.e. lateral cortex fracture, blood vessel or nerve injury) were observed in either group after gross dissection. Alterations in posterior tibial slope are associated with HTOs. Both traditional and modified iBalance techniques appear reliable in coronal plane corrections without changing posterior tibial slope. The present modification of the Arthrex iBalance technique may increase the efficiency of the operation and decrease radiation

  17. Minimizing Alteration of Posterior Tibial Slope During Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: a Protocol with Experimental Validation in Paired Cadaveric Knees

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Robert W; DeBerardino, Thomas; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The High Tibial Osteotomy (HTO) is a reliable procedure in addressing uni- compartmental arthritis with associated coronal deformities. With osteotomy of the proximal tibia, there is a risk of altering the tibial slope in the sagittal plane. Surgical techniques continue to evolve with trends towards procedure reproducibility and simplification. We evaluated a modification of the Arthrex iBalance technique in 18 paired cadaveric knees with the goals of maintaining sagittal slope, increasing procedure efficiency, and decreasing use of intraoperative fluoroscopy. Methods Nine paired cadaveric knees (18 legs) underwent iBalance medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomies. In each pair, the right knee underwent an HTO using the modified technique, while all left knees underwent the traditional technique. Independent observers evaluated postoperative factors including tibial slope, placement of hinge pin, and implant placement. Specimens were then dissected to evaluate for any gross muscle, nerve or vessel injury. Results Changes to posterior tibial slope were similar using each technique. The change in slope in traditional iBalance technique was -0.3° ±2.3° and change in tibial slope using the modified iBalance technique was -0.4° ±2.3° (p=0.29). Furthermore, we detected no differences in posterior tibial slope between preoperative and postoperative specimens (p=0.74 traditional, p=0.75 modified). No differences in implant placement were detected between traditional and modified techniques. (p=0.85). No intraoperative iatrogenic complications (i.e. lateral cortex fracture, blood vessel or nerve injury) were observed in either group after gross dissection. Discussion & Conclusions Alterations in posterior tibial slope are associated with HTOs. Both traditional and modified iBalance techniques appear reliable in coronal plane corrections without changing posterior tibial slope. The present modification of the Arthrex iBalance technique may increase the

  18. The risk of sacrificing the PCL in cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty and the relationship to the sagittal inclination of the tibial plateau.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Pasquale; Fioravanti, Giulio; Giannicola, Giuseppe; Cinotti, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    In cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty (TKA), a partial avulsion of PCL may occur when en-bloc tibial osteotomy is performed. We evaluated the effects of a tibial cut performed with different degrees of posterior slope on PCL insertion and whether the results are affected by the sagittal inclination of the patient's tibial plateau. We selected 83 MRIs of knees showing mild or no degenerative changes. The effects of a simulated tibial cut performed with a posterior slope of 0°, 3°, 5° and parallel to the patient's tibial plateau inclination on PCL insertion in the proximal tibia were investigated. The results were correlated with the degree of posterior inclination of the tibial plateau. Every angle we used for the tibial cut caused a PCL avulsion greater than 50%. The percentage of PCL avulsion significantly increased with increasing the posterior slope of the tibial cut. Patients with sagittal tibial plateau inclination <5° showed greater PCL avulsion than those with sagittal inclination >8°. Most of the PCL insertion is likely to be sacrificed when resection of the proximal tibia is performed en-block. The risk of PCL avulsion is reduced in patients showing a marked posterior inclination of the tibial plateau, but even in this group of patients a surgical technique aimed at sparing most of the PCL insertion is necessary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Automated Measurement of Patient-Specific Tibial Slopes from MRI

    PubMed Central

    Amerinatanzi, Amirhesam; Summers, Rodney K.; Ahmadi, Kaveh; Goel, Vijay K.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Nyman, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Background: Multi-planar proximal tibial slopes may be associated with increased likelihood of osteoarthritis and anterior cruciate ligament injury, due in part to their role in checking the anterior-posterior stability of the knee. Established methods suffer repeatability limitations and lack computational efficiency for intuitive clinical adoption. The aims of this study were to develop a novel automated approach and to compare the repeatability and computational efficiency of the approach against previously established methods. Methods: Tibial slope geometries were obtained via MRI and measured using an automated Matlab-based approach. Data were compared for repeatability and evaluated for computational efficiency. Results: Mean lateral tibial slope (LTS) for females (7.2°) was greater than for males (1.66°). Mean LTS in the lateral concavity zone was greater for females (7.8° for females, 4.2° for males). Mean medial tibial slope (MTS) for females was greater (9.3° vs. 4.6°). Along the medial concavity zone, female subjects demonstrated greater MTS. Conclusion: The automated method was more repeatable and computationally efficient than previously identified methods and may aid in the clinical assessment of knee injury risk, inform surgical planning, and implant design efforts. PMID:28952547

  20. Assessment of femoral physeal activity after transitory hemiepiphysiodesis using screws and nonabsorbable filament.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Gino S; Baar, Alejandro Z; Ibañez, Angélica L; Vergara, Pamela G; Carmona, Maximiliano C; Drago, Sebastián P

    2014-03-01

    Different techniques for gradual correction of angular deformities of lower limbs exist. Long-term behavior of the growth plate after hemiepiphysiodesis is not yet well understood. We assessed the restoration of normal physeal activity in New Zealand rabbits, after transitory hemiepiphysiodesis, using screws and nonabsorbable filament. We performed a lateral distal femoral epiphysiodesis using nonabsorbable filament and screws, in the right knees of 14 New Zealand male rabbits, aged 11 weeks. Two groups were created: in group 1, the suture was cut after 1 month, and in group 2 it was left uncut. Simple plain radiographs were taken at the beginning and at 4, 8, and 12 weeks of follow-up to evaluate lower limb deformity rate and femoral length. The left knee of each rabbit served as controls. Angular deformity and femoral length were compared between the groups. Eleven rabbits completed the protocol. The control group had no modification in lower limb mechanical axis. On the fourth week, all operated limbs had a significant valgus tibiofemoral angle variation (mean 24 degrees, P<0.05). When the filament was cut, there was complete restoration of the mechanical axis. When the filament was kept, tibiofemoral angle increased its valgus deformity until the eighth week (mean 32 degrees) without changes thereafter. The final femoral length was shorter in group 2 compared with the other 2 groups (P<0.05), whereas group 1 was slightly longer than the control group (P>0.05). Lateral distal femoral hemiepiphysiodesis with nonabsorbable filament resulted in a valgus deformity on the femur. Once the filament is cut, the femur can restore its normal alignment, while maintaining longitudinal growth. Keeping the physeal tether increases the valgus achieved during the first 8 weeks, and remained stable throughout the study, shortening the bone. This is an effective alternative for the correction of angular limb deformities that maintains physeal function and may be useful for

  1. Premature physeal closure following 13-cis-retinoic acid and prolonged fenretinide administration in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Steineck, Angela; MacKenzie, John D; Twist, Clare J

    2016-11-01

    Retinoid therapy has contributed to improved outcomes in neuroblastoma. Clinical trials of fenretinide report favorable toxicity and disease stabilization in patients with high risk (HR) neuroblastoma. Skeletal effects have been described with other retinoids, but not with fenretinide to date. Two patients with HR, metastatic, refractory neuroblastoma received protracted courses of oral fenretinide for more than 5 years' duration. Both developed premature long bone physeal closure, causing limb length discrepancies; their neuroblastoma remains in remission. The radiographic and clinical findings reported suggest these skeletal abnormalities may be a consequence of treatment with 13-cis-retinoic acid (13cisRA) followed by prolonged oral fenretinide exposure. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Early posttraumatic physeal arrest in distal radius after a compression injury.

    PubMed

    Valverde, J A; Albiñana, J; Certucha, J A

    1996-01-01

    Early posttraumatic arrest of the distal radial physis is an uncommon complication and usually appears after type II physeal injury. We report a 13-year-old boy who sustained an injury to his right wrist, incurring an avulsion fracture of ulnar styloid process. Twenty-one months later, a uniform closure of the distal radial physis was observed. An ulnar shortening osteotomy and distal ulnar epiphysiodesis were performed. We discuss different factors of this complication, but crush injury of germinal cells of the growthplate is considered the main etiology.

  3. Growth disturbance of the proximal part of the femur after treatment for congenital dislocation of the hip.

    PubMed

    Keret, D; MacEwen, G D

    1991-03-01

    The radiographs of ninety patients in whom treatment of unilateral congenital dislocation of the hip was complicated by disturbance of growth of the proximal part of the femur were studied retrospectively. All patients were followed until closure of the affected proximal femoral physis. We divided the patients into three groups, according to the degree of vascular insufficiency: patients who had mild vascular insufficiency of the hip, which had little effect on growth; those who had moderate vascular insufficiency, which produces partial arrest of growth; and those who had severe vascular insufficiency, which causes complete arrest of growth. Good correlation was found between the initial degree of vascular insufficiency and the radiographic results at the most recent follow-up. The radiographic signs that were used to predict the extent of physeal involvement were a crescent-shaped epiphysis, medial bowing of the femoral neck (a shorter and more concave curve between the lesser trochanter and the proximal femoral metaphysis [the lateral portion of the Shenton line]), lateral tilting of the capital epiphysis, and premature physeal closure. Signs that were diagnostic of existing physeal involvement were elevation of the greater trochanter and shortening of the affected extremity. The presence and severity of these signs correlated well with the degree of vascular insufficiency. Medial bowing was the most reliable prognostic factor for the determination of the fate of the hip joint at maturity.

  4. [Investigation of tibial bones of the rats exposed on board "Spacelab-2":histomorphometric analysis].

    PubMed

    Durnova, G N; Kaplanskii, A S; Morey-Holton, E R; Vorobéva, V N

    1996-01-01

    Proximal metaphyses of tibial bones from the Sprague-Dowly rats exposed in US dedicated space life sciences laboratory SLS-2 for 13-14 days and sacrificed on day 13 in microgravity and within 5 hours and 14 days following recovery were the subject of histological, histochemical, and histomorphometric analyses. After the 13-day flight of SLS-2 the rats showed initial signs of osteopenia in the spongy tissue of tibial bones, secondary spongiosis affected first. Resorption of the secondary spongiosis was consequent to enhanced resorption and inhibition of osteogenesis. In rats sacrificed within 5 hours of recovery manifestations of tibial osteopenia were more evident than in rats sacrificed during the flight. Spaceflight-induced changes in tibial spongiosis were reverse by character the amount of spongy bone was fully compensated and following 14 days of readaptation to the terrestrial gravity.

  5. [Investigation of tibial bones of the rats exposed on board "Spacelab-2":histomorphometric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durnova, G. N.; Kaplanskii, A. S.; Morey-Holton, E. R.; Vorobeva, V. N.

    1996-01-01

    Proximal metaphyses of tibial bones from the Sprague-Dowly rats exposed in US dedicated space life sciences laboratory SLS-2 for 13-14 days and sacrificed on day 13 in microgravity and within 5 hours and 14 days following recovery were the subject of histological, histochemical, and histomorphometric analyses. After the 13-day flight of SLS-2 the rats showed initial signs of osteopenia in the spongy tissue of tibial bones, secondary spongiosis affected first. Resorption of the secondary spongiosis was consequent to enhanced resorption and inhibition of osteogenesis. In rats sacrificed within 5 hours of recovery manifestations of tibial osteopenia were more evident than in rats sacrificed during the flight. Spaceflight-induced changes in tibial spongiosis were reverse by character the amount of spongy bone was fully compensated and following 14 days of readaptation to the terrestrial gravity.

  6. Study of the anatomy of the tibial nerve and its branches in the distal medial leg

    PubMed Central

    Torres, André Leal Gonçalves; Ferreira, Marcus Castro

    2012-01-01

    Objective Determine, through dissection in fresh cadavers, the topographic anatomy of the tibial nerve and its branches at the ankle, in relation to the tarsal tunnel. Methods Bilateral dissections were performed on 26 fresh cadavers and the locations of the tibial nerve bifurcation and its branches were measured in millimeters. For the calcaneal branches, the amount and their respective nerves of origin were also analyzed. Results The tibial nerve bifurcation occurred under the tunnel in 88% of the cases and proximally in 12%. As for the calcaneal branches, the medial presented with one (58%), two (34%) and three (8%) branches, with the most common source occurring in the tibial nerve (90%) and the lower with a single branch per leg and lateral plantar nerve as the most common origin (70%). Level of Evidence, V Expert opinion. PMID:24453596

  7. TIBIAL SHAFT FRACTURES.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kodi Edson; Ferreira, Ramon Venzon

    2011-01-01

    The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an association with compartmental syndrome, and early diagnosis can be achieved through evaluating clinical parameters and constant clinical monitoring. Once the diagnosis has been made, fasciotomy should be performed. It is always difficult to assess consolidation, but the RUST method may help in this. Radiography is assessed in two projections, and points are scored for the presence of the fracture line and a visible bone callus. Today, the dogma of six hours for cleaning the exposed fracture is under discussion. It is considered that an early start to intravenous antibiotic therapy and the lesion severity are very important. The question of early or late closure of the lesion in an exposed fracture has gone through several phases: sometimes early closure has been indicated and sometimes late closure. Currently, whenever possible, early closure of the lesion is recommended, since this diminishes the risk of infection. Milling of the canal when the intramedullary nail is introduced is still a controversial subject. Despite strong personal positions in favor of milling, studies have shown that there may be some advantage in relation to closed fractures, but not in exposed fractures.

  8. TIBIAL SHAFT FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Kodi Edson; Ferreira, Ramon Venzon

    2015-01-01

    The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an association with compartmental syndrome, and early diagnosis can be achieved through evaluating clinical parameters and constant clinical monitoring. Once the diagnosis has been made, fasciotomy should be performed. It is always difficult to assess consolidation, but the RUST method may help in this. Radiography is assessed in two projections, and points are scored for the presence of the fracture line and a visible bone callus. Today, the dogma of six hours for cleaning the exposed fracture is under discussion. It is considered that an early start to intravenous antibiotic therapy and the lesion severity are very important. The question of early or late closure of the lesion in an exposed fracture has gone through several phases: sometimes early closure has been indicated and sometimes late closure. Currently, whenever possible, early closure of the lesion is recommended, since this diminishes the risk of infection. Milling of the canal when the intramedullary nail is introduced is still a controversial subject. Despite strong personal positions in favor of milling, studies have shown that there may be some advantage in relation to closed fractures, but not in exposed fractures. PMID:27026999

  9. Medial tibial stress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reshef, Noam; Guelich, David R

    2012-04-01

    MTSS is a benign, though painful, condition, and a common problem in the running athlete. It is prevalent among military personnel, runners, and dancers, showing an incidence of 4% to 35%. Common names for this problem include shin splints, soleus syndrome, tibial stress syndrome, and periostitis. The exact cause of this condition is unknown. Previous theories included an inflammatory response of the periosteum or periosteal traction reaction. More recent evidence suggests a painful stress reaction of bone. The most proven risk factors are hyperpronation of the foot, female sex, and history of previous MTSS. Patient evaluation is based on meticulous history taking and physical examination. Even though the diagnosis remains clinical, imaging studies, such as plain radiographs and bone scans are usually sufficient, although MRI is useful in borderline cases to rule out more significant pathology. Conservative treatment is almost always successful and includes several options; though none has proven more superior to rest. Prevention programs do not seem to influence the rate of MTSS, though shock-absorbing insoles have reduced MTSS rates in military personnel, and ESWT has shortened the duration of symptoms. Surgery is rarely indicated but has shown some promising results in patients who have not responded to all conservative options.

  10. The location of the tibial accelerometer does influence impact acceleration parameters during running.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Cuevas, Angel Gabriel; Encarnación-Martínez, Alberto; Camacho-García, Andrés; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro

    2017-09-01

    Tibial accelerations have been associated with a number of running injuries. However, studies attaching the tibial accelerometer on the proximal section are as numerous as those attaching the accelerometer on the distal section. This study aimed to investigate whether accelerometer location influences acceleration parameters commonly reported in running literature. To fulfil this purpose, 30 athletes ran at 2.22, 2.78 and 3.33 m · s(-1) with three accelerometers attached with double-sided tape and tightened to the participants' tolerance on the forehead, the proximal section of the tibia and the distal section of the tibia. Time-domain (peak acceleration, shock attenuation) and frequency-domain parameters (peak frequency, peak power, signal magnitude and shock attenuation in both the low and high frequency ranges) were calculated for each of the tibial locations. The distal accelerometer registered greater tibial acceleration peak and shock attenuation compared to the proximal accelerometer. With respect to the frequency-domain analysis, the distal accelerometer provided greater values of all the low-frequency parameters, whereas no difference was observed for the high-frequency parameters. These findings suggest that the location of the tibial accelerometer does influence the acceleration signal parameters, and thus, researchers should carefully consider the location they choose to place the accelerometer so that equivalent comparisons across studies can be made.

  11. Radiographic study on the tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament☆

    PubMed Central

    Gali, Julio Cesar; Esquerdo, Paulo; Almagro, Marco Antonio Pires; da Silva, Phelipe Augusto Cintra

    2015-01-01

    Objective To establish the radiographic distances from posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tibial insertions centers to the lateral and medial tibial cortex in the anteroposterior view, and from these centers to the PCL facet most proximal point on the lateral view, in order to guide anatomical tunnels drilling in PCL reconstruction and for tunnel positioning postoperative analysis. Study design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Twenty cadaver knees were evaluated. The PCL's bundles tibial insertions were identified and marked out using metal tags, and the knees were radiographed. On these radiographs, the bundles insertion sites center location relative to the tibial mediolateral measure, and the distances from the most proximal PCL facet point to the bundle's insertion were determined. All measures were calculated using the ImageJ software. Results On the anteroposterior radiographs, the mean distance from the anterolateral (AL) bundle insertion center to the medial tibial edge was 40.68 ± 4.10 mm; the mean distance from the posteromedial (PM) bundle insertion center to the medial tibial edge was 38.74 ± 4.40 mm. On the lateral radiographs, the mean distances from the PCL facet most proximal point to AL and PM bundles insertion centers were 5.49 ± 1.29 mm and 10.53 ± 2.17 mm respectively. Conclusions It was possible to establish a radiographic pattern for PCL tibial bundles insertions, which may be useful for intraoperative tunnels locations control and for postoperative tunnels positions analysis. PMID:26229941

  12. A 3D finite element model to investigate prosthetic interface stresses of different posterior tibial slope.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Li, Xiaomiao; Fu, Xiaodong; Wang, Weili

    2015-11-01

    Posterior tibial slope that is created during proximal tibial resection in total knee arthroplasty has emerged as an important factor in the mechanics of the knee joint and the surgical outcome. But the ideal degree of posterior tibial slope for recovery of the knee joint function and preventions of complications remains controversial and should vary in different racial groups. The objective of this paper is to investigate the effects of posterior tibial slope on contact stresses in the tibial polyethylene component of total knee prostheses. Three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to calculate contact stresses in tibial polyethylene component of total knee prostheses subjected to a compressive load. The 3D finite element model of total knee prosthesis was constructed from the images produced by 3D scanning technology. Stresses in tibial polyethylene component were calculated with four different posterior tibial slopes (0°, 3°, 6° and 9°). The 3D finite element model of total knee prosthesis we presented was well validated. We found that the stress distribution in the polythene as evaluated by the distributions of the von Mises stress, the maximum principle stress, the minimum principle stress and the Cpress were more uniform with 3° and 6° posterior tibial slopes than with 0° and 9° posterior tibial slopes. Moreover, the peaks of the above stresses and trends of changes with increasing degree of knee flexion were more ideal with 3° and 6° posterior slopes. The results suggested that the tibial component inclination might be favourable to 7°-10° so far as the stress distribution is concerned. The range of the tibial component inclination also can decrease the wear of polyethylene. Chinese posterior tibial slope is bigger than in the West, and the current domestic use of prostheses is imported from the West, so their demands to tilt back bone cutting can lead to shorten the service life of prostheses; this experiment result is of important

  13. Factors influencing posterior tibial slope and tibial rotation in opening wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Matthias; Villa, Vincent; Reischl, Nikolaus; Demey, Guillaume; Goy, Damien; Neyret, Philippe; Gautier, Emanuel; Magnussen, Robert A

    2015-09-01

    Opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) is an accepted treatment option for medial compartment knee osteoarthritis with associated varus lower limb axis in younger, more active patients. A concern with the use of this technique is that posterior tibial slope (PTS) and tibial rotation can be altered. We hypothesized that there is a tendency to increase the PTS and internal rotation of the distal tibia during the procedure and that certain intra-operative parameters may influence the amount of change that can be expected. A cadaveric model and surgical navigation system were used to evaluate the influence of certain intra-operative factors of the degree of PTS and tibial rotation change observed during medial opening HTO. Parameters evaluated included: degree of osteotomy opening, knee flexion angle, location of limb support (thigh versus foot), performance of a posteromedial release, the status of the lateral cortical hinge, and the degree of osteoarthritis present in the knee. Combining measurements of all specimens and parameters, a mean PTS increase of 2.7° ± 3.9° and a mean tibial internal rotation of 1.5° ± 2.9° were observed. Clinically, significant changes in tibial slope (>2°) occurred in 50.4 % of corrections, while significant changes in tibial rotation (>5°) occurred in only 11.9 % of corrections. Patients with significant osteoarthritis and concomitant flexion contracture, cases where large corrections were required, and procedures in which the lateral cortical hinge was disrupted were associated with increased PTS change. The other factors evaluated did not exert a significant influence of the degree of PTS change observed. Surgeons should be vigilant for possible PTS change, particularly in high-risk situations as outlined above. Routine use of an intra-operative measure of PTS is recommended to avoid inadvertent slope change.

  14. Open physeal fracture of the distal phalanx of the hallux: Case study, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Morris, Brandon; Mullen, Scott; Schroeppel, Paul; Vopat, Bryan

    2017-02-06

    Open physeal fractures of the distal phalanx of the hallux are the lesser described counterpart to the same fracture of the finger, known by its eponym as a "Seymour fracture". Displaced Salter-Harris phalangeal fractures present with a concomitant nailbed or soft tissue injury. Often these fractures occur in the summer months when open-toe footwear can be worn, however, they may occur indoors as well. Frequently, the injury results from direct axial load of the toe, or "stubbing", which causes the fracture and associated soft tissue injury. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment is necessary to prevent negative sequelae such as osteomyelitis, malunion, nonunion, or premature growth arrest. In this article, we present a 12year-old male who sustained an open physeal fracture of the distal phalanx when he "stubbed" his great toe on a bed post. His injury was initially misdiagnosed at an urgent care facility, thereby delaying appropriate intervention and necessitating an operative surgical procedure. Additionally, we review the existing literature discussing these infrequently reported injuries, as well as present key points as they pertain to the diagnosis and management of this injury in the emergency department.

  15. Tetracycline labeling as an aid to complete excision of partial physeal arrest: a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Post, W R; Jones, E T

    1992-01-01

    We determined whether ultraviolet (UV) visualization of tetracycline-labeled bone allows more complete excision of experimentally created physeal arrests while minimizing required bone resection. Lateral distal femoral growth arrests were surgically created bilaterally in eight 6-week-old New Zealand white rabbits, given 3 daily oxytetracycline doses (10 mg/kg); the animals were killed 6 weeks postoperatively. Femurs were excised and dissected free of soft tissue. Ten of 16 operated femurs randomized into two groups had consistent deformity. In group I, arrest was excised with a high-speed burr without, and, in group II, with ultraviolet visualization. In group II, metaphyseal bone and calcified arrest glowed brightly, contrasting well with the epiphyseal plate. All excised specimens were examined under x 9 magnification to assess remaining bone bridges. Excision defects were filled with modeling clay, which was then removed and weighed. Thorough excision was confirmed in each specimen. Resection was easier and less bone usually was resected in the UV group (difference not statistically significant). This technique would best be used in resection of arrests involving small physes such as the distal radius, in which maximal visualization and minimal resection are essential to preserve all possible growth potential. Tetracycline labeling and intraoperative UV visualization of fluorescence allows thorough excision of partial physeal arrest while minimizing required bone resection.

  16. High tibial osteotomy in varus knees: indications and limits

    PubMed Central

    LOIA, MARCO CORGIAT; VANNI, STEFANIA; ROSSO, FEDERICA; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; BRUZZONE, MATTEO; DETTONI, FEDERICO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2016-01-01

    Opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) is a surgical procedure that aims to correct the weight-bearing axis of the knee, moving the loads laterally from the medial compartment. Conventional indications for OWHTO are medial compartment osteoarthritis and varus malalignment of the knee; recently OWHTO has been used successfully in the treatment of double and triple varus. OWHTO, in contrast to closing wedge high tibial osteotomy, does not require fibular osteotomy or peroneal nerve dissection, or lead to disruption of the proximal tibiofibular joint and bone stock loss. For these reasons, interest in this procedure has grown in recent years. The aim of this study is to review the literature on OWHTO, considering indications and prognostic factors (body mass index, grade of osteoarthritis, instability, range of movement and age), outcomes at mid-term follow-up, and limits of the procedure (slope modifications, patellar height changes and difficulties in conversion to a total knee arthroplasty). PMID:27602350

  17. Bifocal tibial corrective osteotomy with lengthening in achondroplasia: an analysis of results and complications.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Sandeep V; Song, Hae-Ryong; Lee, Seok-Hyun; Suh, Seung-Woo; Keny, Swapnil M; Telang, Shailendra S

    2006-01-01

    The results and complications of bifocal tibial osteotomies with gradual correction and lengthening by Ilizarov ring fixator performed in 47 tibiae in 24 achondroplastic patients were analyzed. Comparison was made between the parameters of angular and torsional deformities of the tibia preoperatively, at fixator removal, and at last follow-up. Of these parameters, statistically significant change was seen postoperatively in the values of medial proximal tibial angle, lateral distal tibial angle, mechanical axis deviation, and tibial torsion, which changed from 78.8 +/- 7.05 degrees, 103.2 +/- 11.8 degrees, 25.1 +/- 14.6 mm (medial), and 22.7 +/- 10 degrees (internal) preoperatively to 87.3 +/- 6.3 degrees, 90.9 +/- 5.4 degrees, 5.3 +/- 10 cm (medial), and 15.8 +/- 4.2 degrees (external), respectively, at the time of fixator removal; and this correction was maintained during the follow-up period. Mean total tibial lengthening was 6.84 +/- 1.3 cm. Average healing index was 26.06 days/cm. Complications observed were 15 pin tract infections, 1 residual varus, 1 overcorrection into valgus, 2 recurrence of varus, 22 equinus contractures, 2 premature consolidations, and 3 fibula malalignments. Recurrence of varus was observed in limbs with a residual abnormal medial mechanical axis deviation due to femoral deformity. A hundred percent incidence of equinus was observed in limbs with tibial lengthening of more than 40%, with distal tibial lengthening of more than 15%. To minimize the risk for occurrence of equinus, we recommend restriction of distal tibial lengthening in achondroplasia to less than 15%, although total tibial lengthening may exceed 40%. Fibula malalignment was not observed after double fibula osteotomy. This procedure is safe and efficacious if performed with strict adherence to prescribed technique.

  18. Surgical reduction and stabilization for repair of femoral capital physeal fractures in cats: 13 cases (1998-2002).

    PubMed

    Fischer, Howard R; Norton, Jeffrey; Kobluk, Calvin N; Reed, Ann L; Rooks, Robert L; Borostyankoi, Frank

    2004-05-01

    To evaluate anatomic reduction and surgical stabilization of femoral capital physeal fractures in cats. Retrospective study. 13 cats. Medical records of cats with unilateral or bilateral femoral capital physeal fractures evaluated from 1998 to 2002 were reviewed. Age and weight of cats at the time of surgery; breed; sex; concurrent injuries; severity of lameness before and 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after surgery; the amount of fracture reduction achieved and number of Kirschner wires (K-wires) used; degree of degenerative joint disease of the hip joint and lysis of the femoral neck and head observed after surgery; whether K-wires were removed after surgery; and complications after surgery were evaluated. Thirteen cats with 16 capital physeal fractures were identified. There was significant improvement in the severity of clinical lameness in all cats from weeks 1 through 4 after surgery. There was no correlation between the scores of the individuals who evaluated radiographs for fracture reduction and placement of K-wires. Results suggested that surgical stabilization and repair of femoral capital physeal fractures facilitate a short recovery period and a good prognosis for return to normal function in cats.

  19. Tibial acceleration profiles during the menstrual cycle in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Erik; Bryant, Adam L; Livingstone, Elisabeth; Reaburn, Peter; Tetsworth, Kevin; Imhoff, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Fluctuating levels of endogenous estrogen are thought to have an adverse effect on lower limb biomechanics, given the observed higher rate of ACL injury at certain phases of the menstrual cycle. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of fluctuating endogenous estrogen levels during the menstrual cycle on acceleration transients at the proximal tibia in young physically active females. Eleven females aged 16-18 years participated in this study and were compared to a male control group. Female subjects were tested at each of the four phases of the menstrual cycle: menses, follicular, ovulation and luteal. On each test occasion, acceleration transients at the proximal tibia were measured while subjects performed an abrupt deceleration task (simulated netball landing). No significant differences were found between the different phases of the menstrual cycle for peak tibial acceleration (PTA; P = 0.57), and time to zero tibial acceleration (TZTA; P = 0.59). However, there was a significant difference for time to peak tibial acceleration (TPTA) between menstruation and follicular (P = 0.04), menstruation and ovulation (P = 0.001), menstruation and luteal phase (P = 0.002), and follicular phase and ovulation (P = 0.007). In the male control group, no significant between-test session differences were observed for PTA (P = 0.48), TZTA (P = 0.08) and TPTA (P = 0.29). While there were no significant between-group differences for PTA (P = 0.21) and TZTA (P = 0.48), significant between-group differences were observed for TPTA (P = 0.001). The results of this project strongly suggest that serum estrogen fluctuations have an effect on tibial acceleration profiles in young female athletes during different phases of the menstrual cycle.

  20. Intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures in the semi-extended position using a suprapatellar portal technique.

    PubMed

    Zelle, Boris A

    2017-03-30

    Intramedullary nail fixation remains the standard treatment for displaced tibial shaft fractures. Establishing an appropriate starting point remains a crucial step in the surgical procedure. Tibial nailing using an infrapatellar starting point with the knee flexed over a radiolucent triangle has been established as a widely-used standard technique. Tibial nail insertion with the knee in the semi-extended position was introduced with the goal to counteract post-operative procurvatum deformities that frequently have been reported as a common problem in proximal third tibial shaft fractures. Early reports on tibial nailing in the semi-extended position used a knee arthrotomy in order to establish the proximal tibial starting point. Recent technological advances have provided the surgical community with instrumentation systems that allow for tibial nailing in the semi-extended position using a suprapatellar portal with nail insertion through the patellofemoral joint. Preliminary clinical studies have suggested favorable outcomes that can be achieved with this technique. This article provides a description of the surgical technique and a review of the currently available evidence.

  1. Thiram-Induced Changes in the Expression of Genes Relating to Vascularization and Tibial Dyschondroplasia.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD), a major metabolic cartilage disease in poultry, is characterized by the distension of proximal growth plates of tibia which fail to form bone, lack blood vessels, and contain nonviable cells. Thiram, a carbamate pesticide, when fed to young broiler chicks induces TD wi...

  2. Do ethnicity and gender influence posterior tibial slope?

    PubMed

    Bisicchia, Salvatore; Scordo, Gavinca M; Prins, Johan; Tudisco, Cosimo

    2017-02-02

    Ethnicity and gender can affect posterior tibial slope; however, studies on this topic have limitations and are in disagreement. The aim of the present study was to evaluate posterior tibial slope in a large group of consecutive patients, determining whether ethnicity and gender can influence its value. Secondly, to determine intra- and inter-rater reliability of the two radiographic methods adopted. Posterior tibial slope was calculated (rater 1) in lateral view X-rays of the knee according to the posterior tibial cortex (PTC) and tibial proximal anatomical axis (TPAA) methods. Data were matched with ethnicity and gender. For determination of intra- and inter-rater reliability, 50 random X-rays were selected, and blindly measured by two other raters (2 and 3). A total of 581 radiographs were included (413 white and 168 black knees). Comparing white and black subjects, a statistically significant difference was found for both PTC (4.9 ± 1.2 vs 7.1 ± 2.9, p < 0.0001), and for TPAA (7.7 ± 1.1 vs 10.2 ± 3.0, p < 0.0001). In white subjects, an influence of gender was found only for TPAA (6.4 ± 1.1 in males vs 7.6 ± 1.1 in females, p < 0.0001). In black subjects, an influence of gender was found only for PTC (7.4 ± 3.0 in males vs 6.2 ± 2.9 in females, p = 0.01). Intra-rater reliability was good for both methods for rater 1, and very good for rater 2. Inter-rater reliability among the 3 raters was very good for both methods. Differences in posterior tibial slope between different ethnic groups exist. Differences observed between genders are conflicting and might be too small to have implications in clinical practice. The TPAA method is recommended for the evaluation of posterior tibial slope because of higher intra- and inter-rater reliability. Level of evidence 3 Case-control study.

  3. Using the anatomical tibial axis for total knee arthroplasty alignment may lead to an internal rotation error.

    PubMed

    Forster-Horvath, Csaba; Kremo, Valerie; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; Nowakowski, Andrej Maria

    2015-12-01

    Despite intensive research, current total knee arthroplasty (TKA) designs do not always provide the correct kinematics for the native joint and thus further optimisation is necessary. Several studies support the importance of malrotation of the tibial components in the failure of TKA. We hypothesise that using the anatomical tibial axis (ATA) to align tibial component rotation on the resected tibial surface may lead to an internal rotation error due to relative anterior shift of the lateral articular surface centre compared to the medial one. The aim of this study was to compare the anatomical tibial axis of the physiological tibial joint surface to the resected one. Twenty formalin-fixed cadaveric knees were obtained for study. After computed tomography scanning the data of each specimen were entered into a standardised coordinate system and virtual bone cuts were performed with 6, 8 and 10 mm resection depths. The positions of the articular surface centres were determined at each resection depth. The lateral articular surface centre had moved anteriorly after the resection by a mean 1.475 mm, while the medial one had not changed significantly. Resecting the tibia at a 6-mm cut and using the transverse tibial axis to align the prosthetic tibial plateau will result in a mean 4.0° (95 % confidence interval, 2.5-5.5°) of internal rotation compared to the uncut tibia. The ATA lies in 6 degrees of external rotation compared to the perpendicular to the posterior tibial condylar axis (PTCA). Graw et al. suggest aligning the tibial component in 10 degrees of external rotation to the latter. Thus, if we accept the above suggestion, the ATA is 4 degrees internally rotated compared to the same line on the resected proximal tibia. These prior studies appear to be in accordance with our findings. We conclude that using the ATA on the resected tibial surface may contribute to an internal rotation error.

  4. Proximal Nephron

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Jia L.; Li, Xiao C.

    2013-01-01

    The kidney plays a fundamental role in maintaining body salt and fluid balance and blood pressure homeostasis through the actions of its proximal and distal tubular segments of nephrons. However, proximal tubules are well recognized to exert a more prominent role than distal counterparts. Proximal tubules are responsible for reabsorbing approximately 65% of filtered load and most, if not all, of filtered amino acids, glucose, solutes, and low molecular weight proteins. Proximal tubules also play a key role in regulating acid-base balance by reabsorbing approximately 80% of filtered bicarbonate. The purpose of this review article is to provide a comprehensive overview of new insights and perspectives into current understanding of proximal tubules of nephrons, with an emphasis on the ultrastructure, molecular biology, cellular and integrative physiology, and the underlying signaling transduction mechanisms. The review is divided into three closely related sections. The first section focuses on the classification of nephrons and recent perspectives on the potential role of nephron numbers in human health and diseases. The second section reviews recent research on the structural and biochemical basis of proximal tubular function. The final section provides a comprehensive overview of new insights and perspectives in the physiological regulation of proximal tubular transport by vasoactive hormones. In the latter section, attention is particularly paid to new insights and perspectives learnt from recent cloning of transporters, development of transgenic animals with knockout or knockin of a particular gene of interest, and mapping of signaling pathways using microarrays and/or physiological proteomic approaches. PMID:23897681

  5. [Evaluation of methods for radiographic measurement of the tibial slope. A study of 83 healthy knees].

    PubMed

    Brazier, J; Migaud, H; Gougeon, F; Cotten, A; Fontaine, C; Duquennoy, A

    1996-01-01

    We compared on lateral X-rays of 83 healthy knees, 6 methods measuring the tibial sagittal slope. Each method determined the tibial slope according to an independent anatomical axis. The goals of the study were to: 1) detect the differences between the 6 methods; 2) determine if any mathematical relation could be observed between the 6 methods; 3) compare accuracy of proximal anatomical axis versus long anatomical axis to evaluate the tibial slope. 50 healthy patients (83 knees) knees were included in the study. The patients (26 male and 24 females) were 39.3 +/- 15.8 years old. We obtained true lateral X-rays orientated with an image intensifier in order to obtain the exact superposition of the femoral condyles. The measurements were carried out by an observer according to two procedures: 1) by manual goniometric measurements twice; the mean value between both lectures was recorded; 2) with a digitizer (Orthographics TM, Salt Lake City, Ut). We measured the angle between the tangent to the medial tibial plateau and the perpendicular direction to each of the studied anatomical axis: tibial proximal anatomical axis (TPAA); tibial shaft anatomical axis (TSAA); posterior tibial cortex (PTC); fibular proximal anatomical axis (FPAA); fibular shaft axis (FSA); anterior tibial cortex (ATC). The values obtained with the digitizer were used to compare the six methods. The values obtained with the TSAA were considered as reference. Tibial slope values were different with the 6 methods. ATC gave the higher values and PTC the smaller. The difference could be 5 degrees between two methods measuring the same posterior tibial slope. However different, the values obtained with the 6 methods were strongly correlated (R > 0.85; p = 0.0001). We determined mathematical relationships between the values obtained with the 6 methods according to the regression analysis. The correlation with the values obtained with TSAA (reference values) was stronger for TPAA and TPC (respectively R = 0

  6. Effect of motion control running shoes compared with neutral shoes on tibial rotation during running.

    PubMed

    Rose, Alice; Birch, Ivan; Kuisma, Raija

    2011-09-01

    To determine whether a motion control running shoe reduces tibial rotation in the transverse plane during treadmill running. An experimental study measuring tibial rotation in volunteer participants using a repeated measures design. Human Movement Laboratory, School of Health Professions, University of Brighton. Twenty-four healthy participants were tested. The group comprised males and females with size 6, 7, 9 and 11 feet. The age range for participants was 19 to 31 years. The total range of proximal tibial rotation was measured using the Codamotion 3-D Movement Analysis System. A one-tailed paired t-test indicated a statistically significant decrease in the total range of proximal tibial rotation when a motion control shoe was worn (mean difference 1.38°, 95% confidence interval 0.03 to 2.73, P=0.04). There is a difference in tibial rotation in the transverse plane between a motion control running shoe and a neutral running shoe. The results from this study have implications for the use of supportive running shoes as a form of injury prevention. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Triple plating of tibia in a complex bicondylar tibial plateau fracture.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Atin; Kachchhap, Naiman-Deepak; Tanwar, Yashwant S; Kumar, Birendra; Yadav, Sachin K

    2014-01-01

    High-energy tibial plateau fracture poses a significant challenge and difficulty for orthopaedic surgeons. Fracture of tibial plateau involves major weight bearing joint and may alter knee kinematics. Anatomic reconstruction of the proximal tibial articular surfaces, restoration of the limb axis (limb alignment) and stable fixation permitting early joint motion are the goals of the treatment. In cases of complex bicondylar tibial plateau fractures, isolated lateral plating is frequently associated with varus malalignment and better results have been obtained with bilateral plating through dual incisions. However sometimes a complex type of bicondylar tibial plateau fractures is encountered in which medial plateau has a biplaner fracture in posterior coronal plane as well as sagittal plane. In such fractures it is imperative to fix the medial plateau with buttressing in both planes. One such fracture pattern of the proximal tibia managed by triple plating through dual posteromedial and anterolateral incisions is discussed in this case report with emphasis on mechanisms of this type of injury, surgical approach and management.

  8. Tibial tubercle osteotomy in patello-femoral instability and in patellar height abnormality.

    PubMed

    Caton, Jacques H; Dejour, David

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to present the different surgical procedures of tibial tubercle osteotomies for patellar instability or patellar mispositioning such as patella alta or patella infera. This study analysed the Caton-Deschamps index used for assessment of vertical patella height in order to make a precise plan for tibial tuberosity osteotomies. This study included 61 knees (50 patients) treated for patellar instability with patella alta and 24 patients treated for patella infera of mechanical origin. The results of medial transfer of the tibial tuberosity, with or without distal transfer in cases of patellar instability with patella alta, gives excellent results for stability in 76.8% of the cases. The results of the proximal transfer of the tibial tuberosity in cases of patella infera were excellent or good in 80% of the cases in our series of 24 patients. A precise preoperative plan is needed with determination of the vertical patellar height using the Caton-Deschamps index and the situation of the tibial tuberosity and the Tibial Tubercle to Trochlear Groove distance (TT-TG) of the knee on CT scan in order to obtain satisfactory results.

  9. Tibial tubercle osteotomy in patello-femoral instability and in patellar height abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Dejour, David

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present the different surgical procedures of tibial tubercle osteotomies for patellar instability or patellar mispositioning such as patella alta or patella infera. This study analysed the Caton–Deschamps index used for assessment of vertical patella height in order to make a precise plan for tibial tuberosity osteotomies. This study included 61 knees (50 patients) treated for patellar instability with patella alta and 24 patients treated for patella infera of mechanical origin. The results of medial transfer of the tibial tuberosity, with or without distal transfer in cases of patellar instability with patella alta, gives excellent results for stability in 76.8% of the cases. The results of the proximal transfer of the tibial tuberosity in cases of patella infera were excellent or good in 80% of the cases in our series of 24 patients. A precise preoperative plan is needed with determination of the vertical patellar height using the Caton–Deschamps index and the situation of the tibial tuberosity and the Tibial Tubercle to Trochlear Groove distance (TT-TG) of the knee on CT scan in order to obtain satisfactory results. PMID:20066411

  10. Surgical Management of Tibial Plateau Fractures With 3.5 mm Simple Plates

    PubMed Central

    Bagherifard, Abolfazl; Jabalameli, Mahmoud; Hadi, Hosseinali; Rahbar, Mohammad; Minator Sajjadi, Mohammadreza; Jahansouz, Ali; Karimi Heris, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background Tibial plateau fractures can be successfully fixed utilizing 3.5 mm locking plates. However, there are some disadvantages to using these plates. Objectives In the current prospective study, we investigated the outcome of treating different types of tibial plateau fractures with 3.5 mm simple plates which, to our knowledge, has not been evaluated in previous studies. Materials and Methods Between 2011 and 2013, 32 patients aged 40 ± 0.2 years underwent open reduction and internal fixation for tibial plateau fractures with 3.5 mm simple plates. The patients were followed for 16.14 ± 2.1 months. At each patient’s final visit, the articular surface depression, medial proximal tibial angle, and slope angle were measured and compared with measurements taken early after the operation. The functional outcomes were measured with the WOMAC and Lysholm knee scores. Results The mean union time was 13 ± 1.2 weeks. The mean knee range of motion was 116.8° ± 3.3°. The mean WOMAC and Lysholm scores were 83.5 ± 1.8 and 76.8 ± 1.6, respectively. On the early postoperative and final X-rays, 87.5% and 84% of patients, respectively, had acceptable reduction. Medial proximal tibial and slope angles did not change significantly by the last visit. No patient was found to have complications related to the type of plate. Conclusions In this case series study, the fixation of different types of tibial plateau fractures with 3.5 mm simple non-locking and non-precontoured plates was associated with acceptable clinical, functional, and radiographic outcomes. Based on the advantages and costs of these plates, the authors recommend using 3.5 mm simple plates for different types of tibial plateau fractures. PMID:27626010

  11. [Structural changes in the tibial bones from an excessive load].

    PubMed

    Moshiashvili, B I

    1977-10-01

    80 cases of pathological reconstruction of the tibia in young men at the age of 18--20 are described. The pathology developed as a result of intense regular physical exercise. In 53 patients the process was localized in the upper third of the tibia, in 20--in the middle third and in 7--in the lower third of the bone. In 6 cases the fracture of the tibial proximal metaphysis happened against the background of pathological reconstruction of the tibia; 3 of them sustained simultaneously a fracture of the fibular head. Some recommendations of practical importance are suggested.

  12. Physeal growth arrest of the distal radius treated by the Ilizarov technique. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Aston, J W; Henley, M B

    1989-07-01

    Growth arrest of the distal radius may follow a severe injury to the growth plate. When the growth of the distal radius ceases in the child, continuing ulnar growth results in radial deviation of the hand and dislocation of the distal radioulnar joint. Treatment options in such a limb-length discrepancy are resection of the physeal bony bridge, lengthening of the shaft of the radius with bone graft using the principle of the Wagner technique, resection or epiphysiodesis of the distal ulna, and lengthening through a metaphyseal corticotomy without the use of bone graft. We report a case of metaphyseal lengthening of the radius employing the Ilizarov external fixator for controlled distraction osteogenesis.

  13. Diagnosis of partial and total physeal arrest by bone single-photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Wioland, M; Bonnerot, V

    1993-09-01

    Bone single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), capable of creating maps of the distribution of osteoblastic activity in every spatial plane of a physis, should provide images of diagnostic value in the case of patients suffering from growth arrests (epiphysiodeses). Seventy-five bone SPECT scans were obtained in 64 children suspected to have developed physeal arrests. The transaxial slices of the physis, in the case of partial epiphysiodeses: (a) indicated the percentage of the remaining normal physis, (b) located the bony bridge within the physis and (c) showed the slowdown of the growth of the remaining normal physis induced by the bony bridge in some children. Misdiagnosis occurred in six patients. For total epiphysiodeses, the radionuclide diagnosis was confirmed in 20 of 21 patients. Radionuclide, x-ray and MRI examinations in the study of growth disturbances were found to be complementary.

  14. Proximal femoral epiphysiolysis during reduction of hip dislocation in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Soto, Jose Antonio; Price, Charles T; Reuss, Bryan L; Riley, Patrick; Kasser, James R; Beaty, James H

    2006-01-01

    Traumatic hip dislocation is an uncommon injury in children. The urgency of closed reduction to prevent possible osteonecrosis may present some pitfalls. Adolescents with open proximal femoral physis may have sustained trauma to the physis at the time of dislocation that can lead to displacement of the epiphysis during the reduction maneuver. The purpose of this study is to report 5 cases with this complication and discuss potential etiology and management. All of the 5 patients were between 12 and 16 years old and underwent closed reduction under conscious sedation. Epiphysiolysis of the femoral head was diagnosed after reduction in all 5 patients. Every patient underwent emergent open reduction and internal fixation of the femur and open hip reduction. Avascular necrosis was identified in all 5 patients within 3 to 15 months postinjury. If there is any suspicion of associated physeal injury or if there is any physeal instability noted under fluoroscopy, an open reduction is recommended in the operating room under radiograph guidance to prevent displacement.

  15. Fluoroscopic determination of the tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament in the sagittal plane.

    PubMed

    Salim, Rodrigo; Salzler, Matthew J; Bergin, Mark A; Zheng, Liying; Carey, Robert E; Kfuri, Mauricio; Zhang, Xudong; Harner, Christopher D

    2015-05-01

    Currently, placement of the tibial tunnel for arthroscopic transtibial posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction relies on a limited arthroscopic view of the native insertion or the use of intraoperative imaging. No widely accepted method exists for intraoperative determination of PCL tibial tunnel placement, and current descriptions are cumbersome. To identify the center of the PCL's anatomic tibial insertion site as a percentage of the PCL facet length on a lateral radiograph of the knee so that it may be reliably located in the sagittal plane during surgical reconstruction. Descriptive laboratory study. Twenty fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were dissected and the tibial insertions of the PCL were digitized with an optical tracing system. The digitized PCL footprints were mapped onto 3-dimensional computed tomography-acquired tibial models, and their center points were determined. A K-wire was then inserted into the center of the PCL's tibial insertion under direct visualization, a direct lateral radiograph was obtained, and the center point was measured. The center locations for both methods were defined as a percentage of PCL facet length from anterior and proximal to posterior and distal, and intraobserver and interobserver reliability was tested with 4 different observers. The average location of the PCL center on the 3-dimensional bone model method was 71.7%±5.6% along the PCL facet from anterior/proximal to posterior/distal. In the lateral radiographic method, the center of the PCL was at an average of 69.7%±4.9% of the facet length. There was no significant difference between the percentage measurements of the 2 methods (P=.13). Interobserver reliability (κ=0.57) and intraobserver reliability (κ=0.71) were moderate to strong. Locating the center of the tibial PCL insertion with fluoroscopy at a point that is 70% of the PCL tibial facet length on a true lateral radiograph is a reliable method for locating the PCL tibial insertion. The method

  16. Bilateral synchronous tibial periosteal osteosarcoma with familial incidence.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Aditya V; Jelinek, James S; Seibel, Nita L; Meloni-Ehrig, Aurelia M; Kumar, Dhruv; Henshaw, Robert M

    2012-08-01

    Multifocal or multicentric osteosarcoma (OS) has been described as tumor occurrence at two or more sites in a patient without visceral metastasis. These may be synchronous (more than one lesion at presentation) or metachronous (new tumor developing after the initial treatment). The incidence of multifocal OS has ranged from 1.5 to 5.4% in large series, with the synchronous type being rarer. Similarly, periosteal OS is another rare subtype of surface OS and constitutes less than 2% of all OS. An 11-year-old female was diagnosed with bilateral synchronous tibial periosteal OS, which were confirmed by CT-guided biopsies. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the patient underwent a staged wide local resection of the tumors. The defect was reconstructed with a proximal tibial replacement on the left side and autologous bone grafting on the right side. The patient did well after surgery and is free of disease at 5.5 years of follow-up. However, her brother also developed a right tibial periosteal osteosarcoma 4 years after her index surgery. Genetic analysis of blood sample from both patients showed a similar missense mutation in at least one allele of TP53 gene (exon 8). To the best of our knowledge, a case of bilateral 'synchronous' periosteal OS with a familial incidence has not been reported before.

  17. A safe zone for the passage of screws through the posterior tibial cortex in tibial tubercle transfer.

    PubMed

    Shetty, A A; Tindall, A J; Nickolaou, N; James, K D; Ignotus, P

    2005-04-01

    In tibial tubercle transfer, surgery drills and screws can put the popliteal vessels at risk if the posterior cortex is breached. This complication can be devastating. We have looked at arteriograms of 50 knees and identified a safe zone through which an instrument can be passed with more confidence. In our study we found no vessels directly posterior to the supero-medial aspect of the proximal metaphysis in any knee. Whilst care must still be taken, this area will allow surgeons greater confidence to obtain a stronger bicortical hold with any fixation device.

  18. Advances in Intramedullary Nailing: Suprapatellar Nailing of Tibial Shaft Fractures in the Semiextended Position.

    PubMed

    Zelle, Boris A; Boni, Guilherme; Hak, David J; Stahel, Philip F

    2015-12-01

    Reamed locked intramedullary nailing remains the standard treatment for displaced tibial shaft fractures. Supra-patellar tibial nailing in the semiextended position has been suggested as a safe and effective surgical technique that allows mitigating certain challenges of the standard subpatellar approach. Suprapatellar nailing seems to facilitate achieving and maintaining fracture reduction, particularly in proximal third tibia fractures. Preliminary investigations have suggested that this technique is associated with a low rate of complications, including a reduced incidence of postoperative anterior knee pain. Further clinical investigations are necessary to establish overall complication rates and long-term subjective outcomes.

  19. Fatigue load of current tibial intramedullary nail designs: a simulated study.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Mark; Liu, Qi; Ellis, Thomas J

    2011-06-14

    Comminuted tibial shaft fractures are traditionally treated with statically locked intramedullary nailing and protected weight bearing until fracture callous is evident. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that a simulation of immediate full weight bearing following intramedullary nailing of these fractures does not result in implant failure.A comminuted fracture model was created using 2 pieces of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe. Ten-millimeter-diameter tibial nails (Synthes, Paoli, Pennsylvania; Styker, Mahwah, New Jersey; Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana; Smith & Nephew, Memphis, Tennessee) were inserted within the PVC pipe and secured proximally and distally with 2 or 3 locking bolts. The constructs were cycled in axial compression for 500,000 cycles or until implant failure. The tests were conducted using a modified staircase method (200 N per step), and the fatigue strength was identified for each of the tibial nail designs. When 2 interlocking bolts were placed proximally and distally, the fatigue strength was between 900 and 1100 N for the Stryker nail, 1100 and 1300 N for the Zimmer nail, 1200 and 1400 N for the Synthes nail, and 1400 and 1600 N for the Smith & Nephew nail. Adding a third interlocking bolt proximally and distally to the Smith & Nephew nail increased the fatigue strength by 13% to between 1700 and 1900 N. In all cases, implant failures occurred through the proximal or distal interlocking bolts.Biomechanical tests suggest that current tibial nail designs may permit immediate full weight bearing of comminuted tibial shaft fractures with minimal risk of implant failure. This may facilitate mobilization in the early postoperative period, especially in the multiply injured patient.

  20. Double metal tibial blocks augmentation in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyu Sung; Lee, Jin Kyu; Lee, Hee Jae; Choi, Choong Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Severe uncontained tibial bone defects occurring during total knee arthroplasty are challenging, and which treatment method is the best remains unknown. In this study, clinical and radiographic outcomes of double metal blocks augmentation were examined. Between 2004 and 2012, double metal blocks augmentation was carried out in 17 patients with severe asymmetric uncontained tibial bone defects. The first block was attached to the tibial tray with screws, and then the second block was cemented to the first block. Out of 17 patients, 13 (8 primary, 5 revision) were available for final follow-up at a median of 69 months (range 24-99). For clinical assessment, range of motion and Knee Society score were evaluated preoperatively and annually thereafter. At the final follow-up, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Oxford knee, Short Form-36, Lower extremity functional scale, and Lower extremity activity scale scores were evaluated. Radiographic assessment for radiolucent lines at the block-cement-bone interfaces and signs of failure was performed annually using fluoroscopy and standard radiographs. Range of motion and Knee Society score were significantly improved post-operatively. Other clinical outcomes were favourable. Radiolucent lines were seen on fluoroscopy in three knees, but no sign of failure, such as loosening, collapse, or instability, was observed at the final follow-up. Double metal blocks augmentation is a favourable and useful method, which does not cause mechanical failure or protrusion of the prosthetic because of its modularity, to manage severe asymmetric uncontained proximal tibial bone defects >15 mm in total knee arthroplasty. Case series, Level IV.

  1. The use of a robotic tibial rotation device and an electromagnetic tracking system to accurately reproduce the clinical dial test.

    PubMed

    Stinton, S K; Siebold, R; Freedberg, H; Jacobs, C; Branch, T P

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine whether a robotic tibial rotation device and an electromagnetic tracking system could accurately reproduce the clinical dial test at 30° of knee flexion; (2) compare rotation data captured at the footplates of the robotic device to tibial rotation data measured using an electromagnetic sensor on the proximal tibia. Thirty-two unilateral ACL-reconstructed patients were examined using a robotic tibial rotation device that mimicked the dial test. The data reported in this study is only from the healthy legs of these patients. Torque was applied through footplates and was measured using servomotors. Lower leg motion was measured at the foot using the motors. Tibial motion was also measured through an electromagnetic tracking system and a sensor on the proximal tibia. Load-deformation curves representing rotational motion of the foot and tibia were compared using Pearson's correlation coefficients. Off-axis motions including medial-lateral translation and anterior-posterior translation were also measured using the electromagnetic system. The robotic device and electromagnetic system were able to provide axial rotation data and translational data for the tibia during the dial test. Motion measured at the foot was not correlated to motion of the tibial tubercle in internal rotation or in external rotation. The position of the tibial tubercle was 26.9° ± 11.6° more internally rotated than the foot at torque 0 Nm. Medial-lateral translation and anterior-posterior translation were combined to show the path of the tubercle in the coronal plane during tibial rotation. The information captured during a manual dial test includes both rotation of the tibia and proximal tibia translation. All of this information can be captured using a robotic tibial axial rotation device with an electromagnetic tracking system. The pathway of the tibial tubercle during tibial axial rotation can provide additional information about knee

  2. [The value of methods of bone regeneration evaluation in limb lengthening by the Wagner, Ilizarov methods and by physeal distraction].

    PubMed

    Tesiorowski, Maciej; Kacki, Wojciech; Jasiewicz, Barbara; Rymarczyk, Adrian; Sebastianowicz, Piotr

    2005-01-01

    Limb lengthening is a long-lasting process, and during new bone formation different complications may occur. Due to this, early diagnosis of disturbances of new bone formation leading to such complications is of importance. The goal of this study is to analyze already used methods of regenerate evaluation. Material consists of retrospective data of 237 patients, who underwent limb lengthening between 1983 and 2002 by one of three methods: Wagner method, Ilizarow method and physeal distraction. During femoral lengthening by Wagner method appropriate shape of regenerate according to Hamanishi was observed in 9 cases (29.0%), and during tibia lengthening--only in 1 case (6.7%). During femoral lengthening by physeal distraction appropriate shape of regenerate (A or B according to Hamanishi) was observed in 24 cases (77.4%), and during tibia lengthening--in 11 cases (78.6%). During femoral lengthening by Ilizarow method appropriate shape of regenerate was observed in 51 cases (72.9%), and during tibia lengthening--in 46 cases (66.7%). Only in Wagner method a correlation between abnormal regenerate shape and bone consolidation complications was noted. Methods of evaluation of bone regeneration during distraction osteogenesis give only descriptive assessment. So far parameters applied for evaluation of distraction osteogenesis in Ilizarow method and physeal distraction do not allow for detailed assessment of bone regeneration process.

  3. Tibial tuberosity fractures in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Frey, Steven; Hosalkar, Harish; Cameron, Danielle B; Heath, Aaron; David Horn, B; Ganley, Theodore J

    2008-12-01

    Tibial tuberosity fractures in adolescents are uncommon. We retrospectively reviewed all tibial tuberosity fractures in adolescents (10-19) who presented to our level 1 pediatric trauma center over a 7-year period to review fracture morphology, mechanism of injury, fracture management including return to play, as well as complications. Additionally, we present a review of the literature and treatment algorithm. We reviewed the clinical charts and radiographs of consecutive patients with tibial tuberosity fractures between 01 January 2000 and 01 January 2007. Data parameters included the following: patients age and gender, involved side, injury classification, co-morbidities, mechanism of injury, treatment, return to activity and complications. Data were extracted and reviewed, and a treatment algorithm is proposed with some additional insights into the epidemiology of the injury. Nineteen patients met the inclusion criteria. There were 19 patients with 20 tibial tuberosity fractures. The mean age was 13.7 years. There were 18 males and 1 female patient. There were nine left-sided injuries and eleven right-sided including one patient with bilateral fractures. Mechanism of injuries included basketball injury (8), running injury (5), football injury (3), fall from a scooter (2), high jump (1) and fall (1). Co-morbidities included three patients with concurrent Osgood-Schlatter disease and one with osteogenesis imperfecta. All were treated with ORIF, including arthroscopic-assisted techniques in two cases. Complications included four patients with pre-operative presentation of compartment syndrome all requiring fasciotomy, one post-operative stiffness and one painful hardware requiring removal. Range of motion was started an average of 4.3 weeks post-operatively and return to play was an average of 3.9 months post-operatively. Although uncommon, tibial tuberosity fractures in adolescents are clinically important injuries. Early recognition and treatment (closed or open

  4. Fibula-related complications during bilateral tibial lengthening

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Complications related to the fibula during distraction osteogenesis could cause malalignment. Most published studies have analyzed only migration of the fibula during lengthening, with few studies examining the effects of fibular complications. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed 120 segments (in 60 patients) between 2002 and 2009. All patients underwent bilateral tibial lengthening of more than 5 cm. The mean follow-up time was 4.9 (2.5–6.9) years. Results The average lengthening percentage was 34% (21–65). The ratio of mean fibular length to tibial length was 1.05 (0.91–1.11) preoperatively and 0.83 (0.65–0.95) postoperatively. The mean proximal fibular migration (PFM) was 15 (4–31) mm and mean distal fibular migration (DFM) was 9.7 (0–24) mm. Premature consolidation occurred in 10 segments, nonunion occurred in 12, and angulation of fibula occurred in 8 segments after lengthening. Valgus deformities of the knee occurred in 10 segments. Interpretation PFM induced valgus deformity of the knee, and premature consolidation of the fibula was associated with the distal migration of the proximal fibula. These mechanical malalignments could sometimes be serious enough to warrant surgical correction. Thus, during lengthening repeated radiographic examinations of the fibula are necessary to avoid complications. PMID:22329670

  5. An observational, prospective study comparing tibial and humeral intraosseous access using the EZ-IO.

    PubMed

    Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Chan, Yiong Huak; Oh, Jen Jen; Ngo, Adeline Su-Yin

    2009-01-01

    Intraosseous (IO) access is an alternative to conventional intravenous access. The proximal tibia and proximal humerus have been proposed as suitable sites for IO access. A nonrandomized, prospective, observational study comparing flow rates and insertion success with tibial and humeral IO access in adults using the EZ-IO-powered drill device was conducted. The tibia was the first site of insertion, and a second IO was inserted in the humerus if clinically indicated for the same patient. Twenty-four patients were recruited, with 24 tibial and 11 humeral insertions. All EZ-IO insertions were successful at the first attempt except for 1 tibial insertion that was successful on the second attempt. All insertions were achieved within 20 seconds. Mean ease of IO insertion score (1=easiest to 10=most difficult) was 1.1 for both sites. We found tibial flow rates to be significantly faster using a pressure bag (165 mL/min) compared with those achieved without a pressure bag (73 mL/min), with a difference of 92 mL/min (95% confidence interval [CI]: 52, 132). Similarly, humeral flow rates were significantly faster using a pressure bag (153 mL/min) compared with humeral those achieved without pressure bag (84 mL/min), with a difference of 69 mL/min (95% CI: 39, 99). Comparing matched pairs (same patient), there was no significant difference in flow rates between tibial and humeral sites, with or without pressure bag infusion. Both sites had high-insertion success rates. Flow rates were significantly faster with a pressure bag infusion than without. However, we did not find any significant difference in tibial or humeral flow rates.

  6. Porous tantalum tibial component prevents periprosthetic loss of bone mineral density after total knee arthroplasty for five years-a matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Yukihide; Kobayashi, Akio; Ikebuchi, Mitsuhiko; Iwaki, Hiroyoshi; Inori, Fumiaki; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2013-12-01

    In 21 knees receiving porous tantalum tibial component and 21 knees receiving a cemented cobalt-chromium tibial component, dual x-ray absorptiometry scans were performed for five years post-operatively. The postoperative decrease in the bone mineral density in the lateral aspect of the tibia was significantly less in knees with porous tantalum tibial components (11.6%) than in knees with cemented cobalt-chromium tibial components (29.6%) at five years (p < 0.05). No prosthetic migration or periprosthetic fracture was detected in either group. The present study is one of the studies with the longest follow-up period on bone mineral density after total knee arthroplasty. Porous tantalum tibial component has a favorable effect on the bone mineral density of the proximal tibia after total knee arthroplasty up to five years. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Reconstruction of the Pediatric Lateral Malleolus and Physis by Free Microvascular Transfer of the Proximal Fibular Physis.

    PubMed

    Bibbo, Christopher; Ehrlich, David A; Kovach, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the pediatric growth plate can result in growth disturbances, late angular deformity, and limb length inequalities. Complete traumatic loss the entire growth plate complex (physis, epiphysis, and distal metaphysis) of the ankle can lead to severe joint instability and loss of function. In the growing child, physeal preservation is paramount; however, the reconstructive options are limited. We report a case of post-traumatic loss of the distal fibular physis resulting in severe ankle valgus in a pediatric patient after a Gustilo grade 3B open injury. Ankle valgus secondary to post-traumatic necrosis of the lateral ankle physeal complex was successfully managed by microvascular free transfer of the ipsilateral proximal fibula physis. The 24-month follow-up examination demonstrated continued growth of the free vascularized physeal graft and a stable ankle. The donor site had healed without incident. The patient was able to return to age-appropriate play, sports, and social integration. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Improved tibial component rotation in TKA using patient-specific instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Heyse, Thomas J; Tibesku, Carsten O

    2015-05-01

    Patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) was introduced in an attempt to reduce positional outliers of components in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It was hypothesized that PSI could help with the positioning of tibial components in optimal rotational alignment. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis of 58 patients following TKA was conducted. Of these, 30 operations were performed using PSI and 28 using conventional instrumentation. The rotation of the tibial components was determined in MRI using three different reference lines: a tangent to the dorsal tibial condyles, the tibial epicondylar line, and the tibial tubercle. Deviations >9° were considered outliers. Also internal rotation >1° was considered an outlier. Data were analyzed statistically for positional outliers using the Chi-squared test. There was excellent inter- and intraobserver reliability with low standard deviations for the determination of tibial component rotation using the tangent to the dorsal condyles and the tibial epicondylar line as reference. Using the dorsal tangent as reference, there were eight components in excessive external rotation (28.6 %) and one component being in relative internal rotation (5.4°) in the conventional group, while there were two components in excessive external rotation in the PSI group (6.7 %). Using the tibial epicondyles as reference, there were seven components in excessive external rotation (21.4 %) and one component being in relative internal rotation (4.4°) in the conventional group; while there were two components in excessive external rotation in the PSI group (6.7 %). These differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Measurements based on the tibial tubercle showed poor reproducibility in terms of intra- and interobserver reliability and was of little use in the context of the research question. In this setup, PSI was effective in significantly reducing outliers of optimal rotational tibial component alignment during TKA. Anatomy of

  9. Fixator-assisted Technique Enables Less Invasive Plate Osteosynthesis in Medial Opening-wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: A Novel Technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Ryu, Keun Jung; Kim, Jae Hwa; Kim, Hae Hwa; Soung, Sahyun; Shin, Soowan

    2015-10-01

    Opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy is a well-established procedure in the management of medial osteoarthritis of the knee and correction of proximal tibia vara. Recently, surgical approaches using less invasive plate osteosynthesis have been used with the goal of minimizing complications from more extensive soft tissue exposures. However, to our knowledge, less invasive fixator-assisted plate osteosynthesis has not been tested in the setting of opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy. The purposes of this study were (1) to assess the complications associated with use of a fixator-assisted less invasive plate osteosynthesis technique to stabilize an opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy in the treatment of proximal tibial vara; and (2) to evaluate the ability of this technique to achieve correction of the proximal tibial deformity and achieve osseous union. From June 2011 to June 2013, a total of 157 limbs in 83 patients who underwent fixator-assisted high tibial osteotomy for (1) idiopathic genu vara; or (2) osteoarthritis of the knee with proximal tibia vara were initially enrolled. Of these, eight limbs (5%) were excluded on the way; thus, 149 limbs in 77 patients were evaluated. During the period in question, no other techniques were used for proximal tibial osteotomy. The surgical procedures included less preparation of soft tissue, proximal tibial osteotomy, application of a temporary external fixator, correction of alignment, and final fixation with the help of an external fixator. Complications were assessed by chart review and the alignment in both coronal and sagittal planes was compared pre- and postoperatively. Radiographic review to confirm osseous union and alignment was performed by two of the authors not involved in clinical care of the patient. Delayed union was described as union occurring later than 4 months. Thirty limbs out of 149 tibiae (20%) showed complications, all of which were resolved without leaving any sequela. Twenty-seven limbs out of 149

  10. The biomechanical characteristics of arthroscopic tibial inlay techniques for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: in vitro comparison of tibial graft tunnel placement.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, Karl Peter; Hoffelner, Thomas; Osti, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The hypothesis of the present study was that the biomechanical properties of arthroscopic tibial inlay procedures depend on tibial graft bone block position. Five paired fresh-frozen human cadaveric knee specimens were randomized to a reconstruction with quadriceps tendon placing the replicated footprint either to the more proximal margin of the remnants of the anatomical PCL fibrous attachments (group A) or to the distal margin of the anatomical PCL fibrous attachments at the edge of the posterior tibial facet to the posterior tibial cortex in level with the previous physis line (group B). The relative graft-tibia motions, post cycling pull-out failure load and failure properties of the tibia-graft fixation were measured. Cyclic displacement at 5, 500 and 1,000 cycles, stiffness and yield strength were calculated. The cyclic displacement at 5, 500 and 1,000 cycles measured consistently more in group A without statistically significant difference (4.11 ± 1.37, 7.73 ± 2.73 and 8.18 ± 2.75 mm versus 2.81 ± 1.33, 6.01 ± 2.37 and 6.46 ± 2.37 mm). Mean ultimate load to failure (564.6 ± 212.3) and yield strength (500.2 ± 185.9 N) were significantly higher in group B (p < 0.05). Replicating the anatomical PCL footprint at the posterior edge of the posterior tibial facet yields higher pull-out strength and less cycling loading displacement compared to a tunnel position at the centre of the posterior tibial facet.

  11. Effect of tibial tuberosity advancement on femorotibial contact mechanics and stifle kinematics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Stanley E; Pozzi, Antonio; Banks, Scott A; Conrad, Bryan P; Lewis, Daniel D

    2009-01-01

    Objective- To evaluate the effects of tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) on femorotibial contact mechanics and 3-dimensional kinematics in cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-deficient stifles of dogs. Study Design- In vitro biomechanical study. Animals- Unpaired pelvic limbs from 8 dogs, weighing 28-35 kg. Methods- Digital pressure sensors placed subjacent to the menisci were used to measure femorotibial contact force, contact area, peak and mean contact pressure, and peak pressure location with the limb under an axial load of 30% body weight and a stifle angle of 135 degrees . Three-dimensional static poses of the stifle were obtained using a Microscribe digitizing arm. Each specimen was tested under normal, CrCL-deficient, and TTA-treated conditions. Repeated measures analysis of variance with a Tukey post hoc test (P<.05) was used for statistical comparison. Results- Significant disturbances to all measured contact mechanic parameters were evident after CrCL transection, which corresponded to marked cranial tibial subluxation and internal tibial rotation in the CrCL-deficient stifle. No significant differences in any contact mechanic and kinematic parameters were detected between normal and TTA-treated stifles. Conclusion- TTA eliminates craniocaudal stifle instability during simulated weight-bearing and concurrently restores femorotibial contact mechanics to normal. Clinical Relevance- TTA may mitigate the progression of stifle osteoarthritis in dogs afflicted with CrCL insufficiency by eliminating cranial tibial thrust while preserving the normal orientation of the proximal tibial articulating surface.

  12. Does Tibial Slope Affect Perception of Coronal Alignment on a Standing Anteroposterior Radiograph?

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Adam J; Ravi, Bheeshma; Kransdorf, Mark J; Clarke, Henry D

    2017-07-01

    A standing anteroposterior (AP) radiograph is commonly used to evaluate coronal alignment following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The impact of coronal alignment on TKA outcomes is controversial, perhaps due to variability in imaging and/or measurement technique. We sought to quantify the effect of image rotation and tibial slope on coronal alignment. Using a standard extramedullary tibial alignment guide, 3 cadaver legs were cut to accept a tibial tray at 0°, 3°, and 7° of slope. A computed tomography scan of the entire tibia was obtained for each specimen to confirm neutral coronal alignment. Images were then obtained at progressive 10° intervals of internal and external rotation up to 40° maximum in each direction. Images were then randomized and 5 blinded TKA surgeons were asked to determine coronal alignment. Continuous data values were transformed to categorical data (neutral [0], valgus [L], and varus [R]). Each 10° interval of external rotation of a 7° sloped tibial cut (or relative internal rotation of a tibial component viewed in the AP plane) resulted in perception of an additional 0.75° of varus. The slope of the proximal tibia bone cut should be taken into account when measuring coronal alignment on a standing AP radiograph. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Posterior tibial slope and further anterior cruciate ligament injuries in the anterior cruciate ligament-reconstructed patient.

    PubMed

    Webb, Justin M; Salmon, Lucy J; Leclerc, Etienne; Pinczewski, Leo A; Roe, Justin P

    2013-12-01

    An injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a multifactorial event influenced by intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors. Recently, the geometry of the proximal tibia has come under focus as a possible risk factor for an ACL injury. An increased posterior tibial slope is associated with an increased risk of further ACL injuries in the previously ACL-reconstructed patient. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 200 consecutive patients with isolated ACL ruptures who underwent primary reconstruction with hamstring autografts were enrolled in a prospective longitudinal study over 15 years. The posterior tibial slope was measured from a lateral knee radiograph by 2 blinded observers. The data were analyzed for the association between an increased posterior tibial slope and the incidence of further ACL injuries. Interobserver reliability of the posterior tibial slope measurements was assessed. Radiographs and follow-up were available for 181 of the 200 enrolled patients. Fifty patients had a further injury to either the ACL graft or the contralateral knee. The mean posterior tibial slope of those with a further ACL injury was 9.9° compared with 8.5° for those with no further injury (P = .001). The mean posterior tibial slope for those with both an ACL graft and contralateral ACL rupture was 12.9°. The odds of further ACL injuries after reconstruction were increased by a factor of 5, to an incidence of 59%, in those with a posterior tibial slope of ≥12°. An increased posterior tibial slope is associated with increased odds of a further ACL injury after ACL reconstruction. The increased risk is most pronounced in those with a posterior tibial slope of ≥12°.

  14. Finite Element Analysis of Mobile-bearing Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: The Influence of Tibial Component Coronal Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guang-Duo; Guo, Wan-Shou; Zhang, Qi-Dong; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Cheng, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background: Controversies about the rational positioning of the tibial component in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) still exist. Previous finite element (FE) studies were rare, and the results varied. This FE study aimed to analyze the influence of the tibial component coronal alignment on knee biomechanics in mobile-bearing UKA and find a ration range of inclination angles. Methods: A three-dimensional FE model of the intact knee was constructed from image data of one normal subject. A 1000 N compressive load was applied to the intact knee model for validating. Then a set of eleven UKA FE models was developed with the coronal inclination angles of the tibial tray ranging from 10° valgus to 10° varus. Tibial bone stresses and strains, contact pressures and load distribution in all UKA models were calculated and analyzed under the unified loading and boundary conditions. Results: Load distribution, contact pressures, and contact areas in intact knee model were validated. In UKA models, von Mises stress and compressive strain at proximal medial cortical bone increased significantly as the tibial tray was in valgus inclination >4°, which may increase the risk of residual pain. Compressive strains at tibial keel slot were above the high threshold with varus inclination >4°, which may result in greater risk of component migration. Tibial bone resection corner acted as a strain-raiser regardless of the inclination angles. Compressive strains at the resected surface slightly changed with the varying inclinations and were not supposed to induce bone resorption and component loosening. Contact pressures and load percentage in lateral compartment increased with the more varus inclination, which may lead to osteoarthritis progression. Conclusions: Static knee biomechanics after UKA can be greatly affected by tibial component coronal alignment. A range from 4° valgus to 4° varus inclination of tibial component can be recommended in mobile-bearing UKA. PMID

  15. High altitude hypoxia as a factor that promotes tibial growth plate development in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shucheng; Zhang, Lihong; Rehman, Mujeeb Ur; Iqbal, Muhammad Kashif; Lan, Yanfang; Mehmood, Khalid; Zhang, Hui; Qiu, Gang; Nabi, Fazul; Yao, Wangyuan; Wang, Meng; Li, Jiakui

    2017-01-01

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) is one of the most common problems in the poultry industry and leads to lameness by affecting the proximal growth plate of the tibia. However, due to the unique environmental and geographical conditions of Tibet, no case of TD has been reported in Tibetan chickens (TBCs). The present study was designed to investigate the effect of high altitude hypoxia on blood parameters and tibial growth plate development in chickens using the complete blood count, morphology, and histological examination. The results of this study showed an undesirable impact on the overall performance, body weight, and mortality of Arbor Acres chickens (AACs) exposed to a high altitude hypoxic environment. However, AACs raised under hypoxic conditions showed an elevated number of red blood cells (RBCs) and an increase in hemoglobin and hematocrit values on day 14 compared to the hypobaric normoxia group. Notably, the morphology and histology analyses showed that the size of tibial growth plates in AACs was enlarged and that the blood vessel density was also higher after exposure to the hypoxic environment for 14 days, while no such change was observed in TBCs. Altogether, our results revealed that the hypoxic environment has a potentially new role in increasing the blood vessel density of proximal tibial growth plates to strengthen and enhance the size of the growth plates, which may provide new insights for the therapeutic manipulation of hypoxia in poultry TD.

  16. High altitude hypoxia as a factor that promotes tibial growth plate development in broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shucheng; Zhang, Lihong; Rehman, Mujeeb Ur; Iqbal, Muhammad Kashif; Lan, Yanfang; Mehmood, Khalid; Zhang, Hui; Qiu, Gang; Nabi, Fazul; Yao, Wangyuan; Wang, Meng; Li, Jiakui

    2017-01-01

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) is one of the most common problems in the poultry industry and leads to lameness by affecting the proximal growth plate of the tibia. However, due to the unique environmental and geographical conditions of Tibet, no case of TD has been reported in Tibetan chickens (TBCs). The present study was designed to investigate the effect of high altitude hypoxia on blood parameters and tibial growth plate development in chickens using the complete blood count, morphology, and histological examination. The results of this study showed an undesirable impact on the overall performance, body weight, and mortality of Arbor Acres chickens (AACs) exposed to a high altitude hypoxic environment. However, AACs raised under hypoxic conditions showed an elevated number of red blood cells (RBCs) and an increase in hemoglobin and hematocrit values on day 14 compared to the hypobaric normoxia group. Notably, the morphology and histology analyses showed that the size of tibial growth plates in AACs was enlarged and that the blood vessel density was also higher after exposure to the hypoxic environment for 14 days, while no such change was observed in TBCs. Altogether, our results revealed that the hypoxic environment has a potentially new role in increasing the blood vessel density of proximal tibial growth plates to strengthen and enhance the size of the growth plates, which may provide new insights for the therapeutic manipulation of hypoxia in poultry TD. PMID:28282429

  17. Management of osteonecrosis of proximal tibia using trabecular osteonecrotic rods.

    PubMed

    Rao, Biyyam; Kamal, Tamer

    2012-06-01

    Osteonecrosis of the knee is a well-described cause of acute knee pain. It can lead to significant functional impairment, rapid arthritic joint changes and subsequent collapse. Several hypotheses exist different treatment options are used ranging from conservative management to joint arthroplasty. The majority of cases involve the distal femoral condyle and to a much lesser extent the medial tibial plateau. We are presenting a rare case of osteonecrosis of the proximal tibia affecting the lateral tibial condyle in 44 years old Caucasian male which was treated successfully using osteonecrotic tantalum rods with 26 month follow-up.

  18. Management of osteonecrosis of proximal tibia using trabecular osteonecrotic rods

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Biyyam; Kamal, Tamer

    2012-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the knee is a well-described cause of acute knee pain. It can lead to significant functional impairment, rapid arthritic joint changes and subsequent collapse. Several hypotheses exist different treatment options are used ranging from conservative management to joint arthroplasty. The majority of cases involve the distal femoral condyle and to a much lesser extent the medial tibial plateau. We are presenting a rare case of osteonecrosis of the proximal tibia affecting the lateral tibial condyle in 44 years old Caucasian male which was treated successfully using osteonecrotic tantalum rods with 26 month follow-up. PMID:25983460

  19. Three-column fixation for complex tibial plateau fractures.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cong-Feng; Sun, Hui; Zhang, Bo; Zeng, Bing-Fang

    2010-11-01

    1) To introduce a computed tomography-based "three-column fixation" concept; and 2) to evaluate clinical outcomes (by using a column-specific fixation technique) for complex tibial plateau fractures (Schatzker classification Types V and VI). Prospective cohort study. Level 1 trauma center. Twenty-nine cases of complex tibial plateau fractures were included. Based on routine x-ray and computed tomography images, all the fractures were classified as a "three-column fracture," which means at least one separate fragment was found in lateral, medial, and posterior columns in the proximal tibia (Schatzker classification Types V and VI). The patients were operated on in a "floating position" with a combined approach, an inverted L-shaped posterior approach combined with an anterior-lateral approach. All three columns of fractures were fixed. Operative time, blood loss, quality of reduction and alignment, fracture healing, complications, and functional outcomes based on Hospital for Special Surgery score and lower-extremity measure were recorded. All the cases were followed for average 27.3 months (range, 24-36 months). All the cases had satisfactory reduction except one case, which had a 4-mm stepoff at the anterior ridge of the tibial plateau postoperatively. No case of secondary articular depression was found. One case had secondary varus deformity, one case had secondary valgus deformity, and two cases of screw loosening occurred postoperatively. No revision surgery was performed. Two cases had culture-negative wound drainage. No infection was noted. The average radiographic bony union time and full weightbearing time were 13.1 weeks (range, 11-16 weeks) and 16.7 weeks (range, 12-24 weeks), respectively. The mean Short Form 36, Hospital for Special Surgery score, and lower-extremity measure at 24 months postoperatively were 89 (range, 80-98), 90 (range, 84-98), and 87 (range, 80-95), respectively. The average range of motion of the affected knee was 2.7° to 123.4° at

  20. Analysis of Knee Joint Line Obliquity after High Tibial Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Jun; Ko, Young Bong; Bae, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Suk Tae; Kim, Jae Gyoon

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate which lower extremity alignment (knee and ankle joint) parameters affect knee joint line obliquity (KJLO) in the coronal plane after open wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO). Overall, 69 knees of patients that underwent OWHTO were evaluated using radiographs obtained preoperatively and from 6 weeks to 3 months postoperatively. We measured multiple parameters of knee and ankle joint alignment (hip-knee-ankle angle [HKA], joint line height [JLH], posterior tibial slope [PS], femoral condyle-tibial plateau angle [FCTP], medial proximal tibial angle [MPTA], mechanical lateral distal femoral angle [mLDFA], KJLO, talar tilt angle [TTA], ankle joint obliquity [AJO], and the lateral distal tibial ground surface angle [LDTGA]; preoperative [-pre], postoperative [-post], and the difference between -pre and -post values [-Δ]). We categorized patients into two groups according to the KJLO-post value (the normal group [within ± 4 degrees, 56 knees] and the abnormal group [greater than ± 4 degrees, 13 knees]), and compared their -pre parameters. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine the contribution of the -pre parameters to abnormal KJLO-post. The mean HKA-Δ (-9.4 ± 4.7 degrees) was larger than the mean KJLO-Δ (-2.1 ± 3.2 degrees). The knee joint alignment parameters (the HKA-pre, FCTP-pre) differed significantly between the two groups (p < 0.05). In addition, the HKA-pre (odds ratio [OR] = 1.27, p = 0.006) and FCTP-pre (OR = 2.13, p = 0.006) were significant predictors of abnormal KJLO-post. However, -pre ankle joint parameters (TTA, AJO, and LDTGA) did not differ significantly between the two groups and were not significantly associated with the abnormal KJLO-post. The -pre knee joint alignment and knee joint convergence angle evaluated by HKA-pre and FCTP-pre angle, respectively, were significant predictors of abnormal KJLO after OWHTO. However, -pre ankle joint parameters

  1. Anatomic ACL reconstruction: the normal central tibial footprint position and a standardised technique for measuring tibial tunnel location on 3D CT.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, B; Gogna, R; Robb, C; Thompson, P; Spalding, T

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to define the normal ACL central tibial footprint position and describe a standardised technique of measuring tibial tunnel location on 3D CT for anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction. The central position of the ACL tibial attachment site was determined on 76 MRI scans of young individuals. The central footprint position was referenced in the anterior-posterior (A-P) and medial-lateral (M-L) planes on a grid system over the widest portion of the proximal tibia. 3D CT images of 26 young individuals had a simulated tibial tunnel centred within the bony landmarks of the ACL footprint, and the same grid system was applied over the widest portion of the proximal tibia. The MRI central footprint position was compared to the 3D CT central footprint position to validate the technique and results. The median age of the 76 MRI subjects was 24 years, with 32 females and 44 males. The ACL central footprint position was at 39 (±3 %) and 48 (±2 %), in the A-P and M-L planes, respectively. There was no significant difference in this position between sexes. The median age of the 26 CT subjects was 25.5 years, with 10 females and 16 males. The central position of the bony ACL footprint was at 38 (±2 %) and 48 (±2 %), in the A-P and M-L planes, respectively. The MRI and CT central footprint positions were not significantly different in relation to the medial position, but were different in relation to the anterior position (A-P 39 % vs. 38 %, p = 0.01). The absolute difference between the central MRI and CT reference positions was 0.45 mm. The ACL's normal central tibial footprint reference position has been defined, and the technique of measuring tibial tunnel location with a standardised grid system is described. This study will assist surgeons in evaluating tibial tunnel position in anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction. III.

  2. [Partial replantation following proximal limb injury].

    PubMed

    Dubert, T; Malikov, S A; Dinh, A; Kupatadze, D D; Oberlin, C; Alnot, J Y; Nabokov, B B

    2000-11-01

    Proximal replantation is a technically feasible but life-threatening procedure. Indications must be restricted to patients in good condition with a good functional prognosis. The goal of replantation must be focused not only on reimplanting the amputated limb but also on achieving a good functional outcome. For the lower limb, simple terminalization remains the best choice in many cases. When a proximal amputation is not suitable for replantation, the main aim of the surgical procedure must be to reconstruct a stump long enough to permit fitting a prosthesis preserving the function of the adjacent joint. If the proximal stump beyond the last joint is very short, it may be possible to restore some length by partial replantation of spared tissues from the amputated part. We present here the results we obtained following this policy. This series included 16 cases of partial replantations, 14 involving the lower limb and 2 the upper limb. All were osteocutaneous microsurgical transfers. For the lower limb, all transfers recovered protective sensitivity following tibial nerve repair. The functional calcaeoplantar unit was used in 13 cases. The transfer of this specialized weight bearing tissue provided a stable distal surface making higher support unnecessary. In one case, we raised a 13-cm vascularized tibial segment covered with foot skin for additional length. For the upper limb, the osteocutaneous transfer, based on the radial artery, was not reinnervated, but this lack of sensitivity did not impair prosthesis fitting. One vascular failure was finally amputated. This was the only unsuccessful result. For all other patients, the surgical procedure facilitated prosthesis fitting and preserved the proximal joint function despite an initially very proximal amputation. The advantages of partial replantation are obvious compared with simple terminalization or secondary reconstruction. There is no secondary donor site and, because there is no major muscle mass in the

  3. Patellar height and posterior tibial slope after open- and closed-wedge high tibial osteotomy: a radiological study on 100 patients.

    PubMed

    El-Azab, Hosam; Glabgly, Parpakorn; Paul, Jochen; Imhoff, Andreas B; Hinterwimmer, Stefan

    2010-02-01

    posterior tibial slope changes after valgus HTO. However, there is no strong correlation between PH changes and the degree of frontal plane HTO correction. The incidence of patella infera increases after OW HTO, whereas the incidence of patella alta increases after CW HTO. Therefore, we recommend performing CW HTO or OW HTO with the tuberosity left at the proximal tibia in cases of patellofemoral complaints or patella infera. Neither technique leads to patellar lowering. It should be borne in mind that PH and posterior tibial slope may have been altered before planning total knee replacement after HTO.

  4. Intrusion Characteristics of Three Bone Cements for Tibial Component of Total Knee Arthroplasty in a Cadaveric Bone Model.

    PubMed

    Walden, Justin K; Chong, Alexander C M; Dinh, Nam L; Adrian, Scott; Cusick, Robert; Wooley, Paul H

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the intrusion characteristics of Simplex-HV to Simplex-P and Palacos-R in cadaveric proximal tibial bone. Eighteen fresh-frozen cadaver proximal tibiae were examined with standard arthroplasty tibial cuts. Each tibia was randomly assigned to receive one of the three bone cements for use with finger packing technique. Sagittal sections were prepared and analyzed using digital photography and stereoscopic micrographs to evaluate cement intrusion characteristics. The cement penetration depth was measured from the tibial bone cut surface, which did not include the cement thickness under the tibial base plate. Significant differences were detected in the bone cement penetration between the three cements. Penetration was increased using the Simplex-HV (average, 2.7 mm; range, 2.0-3.0 mm) compared with Simplex-P (average, 2.2 mm) and Palacos-R (average, 1.8 mm). These depths approximate to 3.7, 3.2, and 2.8 mm of total cement penetration, respectively. The data suggest that high-viscosity bone cement may provide good fixation of the tibial component of a total knee arthroplasty when using the finger packing technique.

  5. Treatment strategy for tibial plateau fractures: an update

    PubMed Central

    Prat-Fabregat, Salvi; Camacho-Carrasco, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Tibial plateau fractures are complex injuries produced by high- or low-energy trauma. They principally affect young adults or the ‘third age’ population. These fractures usually have associated soft-tissue lesions that will affect their treatment. Sequential (staged) treatment (external fixation followed by definitive osteosynthesis) is recommended in more complex fracture patterns. But one should remember that any type of tibial plateau fracture can present with soft-tissue complications. Typically the Schatzker or AO/OTA classification is used, but the concept of the proximal tibia as a three-column structure and the detailed study of the posteromedial and posterolateral fragment morphology has changed its treatment strategy. Limb alignment and articular surface restoration, allowing early knee motion, are the main goals of surgical treatment. Partially articular factures can be treated by minimally-invasive methods and arthroscopy is useful to assist and control the fracture reduction and to treat intra-articular soft-tissue injuries. Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) is the gold standard treatment for these fractures. Complex articular fractures can be treated by ring external fixators and minimally-invasive osteosynthesis (EFMO) or by ORIF. EFMO can be related to suboptimal articular reduction; however, outcome analysis shows results that are equal to, or even superior to, ORIF. The ORIF strategy should also include the optimal reduction of the articular surface. Anterolateral and anteromedial surgical approaches do not permit adequate reduction and fixation of posterolateral and posteromedial fragments. To achieve this, it is necessary to reduce and fix them through specific posterolateral or posteromedial approaches that allow optimal reduction and plate/screw placement. Some authors have also suggested that primary total knee arthroplasty could be an option in specific patients and with specific fracture patterns. Cite this article: Prat

  6. Assessing Tibial Tray Rotation in TKA: A Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Hakki, Sam; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Gabriel, Christian; Mihalko, William M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2016-05-01

    Tibial anatomical landmarks for transverse plane rotation of the tibial tray have not been validated. The current authors propose aligning the tibial tray with both the anterior tibial center point of rotation (ATCPR) and the femoral trochlear groove (FTG) to establish the ideal tibial tray rotation in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). When the tibial tray centerline was aligned with ATCPR and FTG lines, the mean range of motion (ROM) was 144.3° (preoperatively 145°) and tibial rotation range was 22.8 mm (preoperatively, 24.9 mm). When the tibial component was rotated 5 mm medially to the ATCPR, the knee ROM decreased in flexion with patellar subluxation, while it decreased in extension when rotated 5 mm laterally. This method identifies the ideal tibial tray rotation in TKA, at which maximal range of tibial rotation and knee ROM are achieved without obvious overriding of components. [Orthopedics, 2016; 39(3):S67-S71.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Compartment syndrome after tibial plateau fracture.

    PubMed

    Pitta, Guilherme Benjamin Brandão; Dos Santos, Thays Fernanda Avelino; Dos Santos, Fernanda Thaysa Avelino; da Costa Filho, Edelson Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of the tibial plateau are relatively rare, representing around 1.2% of all fractures. The tibia, due to its subcutaneous location and poor muscle coverage, is exposed and suffers large numbers of traumas, not only fractures, but also crush injuries and severe bruising, among others, which at any given moment, could lead compartment syndrome in the patient. The case is reported of a 58-year-old patient who, following a tibial plateau fracture, presented compartment syndrome of the leg and was submitted to decompressive fasciotomy of the four right compartments. After osteosynthesis with internal fixation of the tibial plateau using an L-plate, the patient again developed compartment syndrome.

  8. Distal realignment (tibial tuberosity transfer).

    PubMed

    Feller, Julian Ashley

    2012-09-01

    Although tibial tuberosity (TT) transfer has for many years been the basis of many protocols for the management of patellar instability, the role of pure medial transfer in particular appears to be declining. In contrast, the greater recognition of the importance of patella alta as a predisposing factor to recurrent patellar dislocation has resulted in a resurgence in the popularity of distal TT transfer. When TT transfer is performed, the direction and amount of transfer is based on the patellar height and the lateralization of the TT relative to the trochlear groove. Patellar height is best assessed on a lateral radiograph with the knee in flexion using a ratio that uses the articular surface of the patella in relation to the height above the tibia. Assessment of lateralization of the TT relative to the trochlear groove can be made using either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scans.

  9. [TIBIAL PERIOSTEAL FLAP PEDICLED WITH INTERMUSCULAR BRANCH OF POSTERIOR TIBIAL VESSELS COMBINED WITH AUTOLOGOUS BONE GRAFT FOR TIBIAL BONE DEFECT].

    PubMed

    Ni, Yulong; Gao, Shunhong; Zhang, Jingyu; Dong, Huishuang; Zhang, Yunpeng; Fu, Jiansong

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of tibial periosteal flap pedicled with intermuscular branch of posterior tibial vessels combined with autologous bone graft in the treatment of tibial bone defects. Between January 2007 and December 2013, 19 cases of traumatic tibia bone and soft tissue defects were treated. There were 14 males and 5 females, aged from 18 to 49 years (mean, 28 years). The tibial fracture site located at the middle tibia in 6 cases and at the distal tibia in 13 cases. According to Gustilo type, 4 cases were rated as type III A, 14 cases as type III B, and 1 case as type III C (injury of anterior tibial artery). The length of bone defect ranged from 4.3 to 8.5 cm (mean, 6.3 cm). The soft tissue defects ranged from 8 cm x 5 cm to 17 cm x 9 cm. The time from injury to operation was 3 to 8 hours (mean, 4 hours). One-stage operation included debridement, external fixation, and vacuum sealing drainage. After formation of granulation tissue, the fresh wound was repaired with sural neurovascular flap or posterior tibial artery perforator flap. The flap size ranged from 10 cmx6 cm to 19 cm x 11 cm. In two-stage operation, tibial periosteal flap pedicled with intermuscular branch of posterior tibial vessels combined with autologous bone graft was used to repair tibial defect. The periosteal flap ranged from 6.5 cm x 4.0 cm to 9.0 cm x 5.0 cm; bone graft ranged from 4.5 to 9.0 cm in length. External fixation was changed to internal fixation. All flaps survived with soft texture, and no ulcer and infection occurred. All incisions healed by the first intention. All patients were followed up 18-40 months (mean, between normal and affected sides.The function of the knee an ankle joint was good without infection, malunion, and equinus. According to the Johner standard at last follow-up, the results were excellent in 15 cases, good in 3 cases, and fair in 1 case, with an excellent and good rate of 94.7%. Tibial periosteal flap pedicled with intermuscular branch of

  10. Centre of the posterior cruciate ligament and the sulcus between tubercle spines are reliable landmarks for tibial component placement.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Namık; Atıcı, Teoman; Kurtoğlu, Ünal; Turgut, Ali; Ozkaya, Güven; Ozkan, Yüksel

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the axes aligned with the sulcus between the tibial spines and the middle of the posterior cruciate ligament at the knee and with the tibialis anterior tendon at the ankle provide a neutral rotational and coronal alignment of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In a cohort of 45 TKA patients, CT scans were taken to quantify coronal and rotational positioning of the components. All patients received a posterior stabilised total knee replacement with a fixed insert (PFC Sigma; DePuy Orthopaedics, Inc; Warsaw, IN, USA). The tibial guide was aligned with the sulcus between the tibial spines and the middle of the posterior cruciate ligament at the knee and with the tibialis anterior tendon at the ankle. The average post-operative coronal mechanical alignment was 1° varus (range 4.5° varus-1.5° valgus; SD ±1.51). The average post-operative rotational deviation from the transepicondylar axes (TEA) was 0.78° of internal rotation (1.50° of internal rotation - 3.5° of external rotation) for the tibial component. The whole-extremity mechanical axis deviation was outside the tolerance range of 3° in 4 patients (8.9 %). Deviation of the tibial component rotational position relative to the TEA was 3° or less in 94.5 % of the patients. When the tibial component is aligned using the axis drawn from the centre of the PCL to the sulcus between the tibial spines on the proximal tibia and to the tibialis anterior tendon at the ankle, good alignment will be achieved in both the coronal and axial planes. IV.

  11. Chondroclasts in fusarium-induced tibial dyschondroplasia. A histomorphometric study.

    PubMed Central

    Lawler, E. M.; Fletcher, T. F.; Walser, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    The role of chondroclasts in the pathogenesis of Fusarium roseum-induced tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) was examined in a histomorphometric study. TD developed rapidly in broiler chickens placed at 1 day of age on rations containing either 3% (Experiment 1) or 2% (Experiment 2) F roseum cultures. In Experiment 1 the frequency of TD in birds killed at 4 weeks of age was 90%. In Experiment 2, birds were killed at intervals from 4 days until 4 weeks of age. By 1 week of age, 70% of birds examined had characteristic accumulations of prehypertrophic cartilage at the proximal tibial physis, and the frequency of TD in 4-week-old birds was 80%. Sections of hypertrophic cartilage from F roseum-fed and control birds from both experiments were examined for determination of the volume density of chondroclasts along the vascular channel boundary. Chondroclast density was consistently lower in F roseum-fed than in control birds, but the difference was significant only at 4 weeks of age. The fact that gross lesions were evident before a significant decrease in chondroclast density occurred indicates that a decrease in the density of chondroclasts was not an essential factor in the accumulation of cartilage characteristic of TD. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:4025512

  12. Correction of genu recurvatum secondary to Osgood-Schlatter disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bellicini, Christopher; Khoury, Joseph G

    2006-01-01

    Complications secondary to Osgood-Schlatter disease are rare, and there have been few reports on their treatment. Partial growth arrest of the proximal tibial physis as a result of Osgood-Schlatter disease has been infrequently described. Genu recurvatum from partial physeal arrest can cause cosmetic deformity, instability, pain, and weakness. We report a case of genu recurvatum secondary to Osgood-Schlatter disease treated successfully with proximal tibial osteotomy and distraction with a Taylor spatial frame.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: tibial muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... more common in particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes Mutations in the TTN gene cause tibial muscular dystrophy . ... in chemical signaling and in assembling new sarcomeres. Mutations in the TTN gene alter the structure and ...

  14. Proximity fuze

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.R.

    1989-08-22

    A proximity fuze system is described. It includes an optical ranging apparatus, a detonation circuit controlled by the optical ranging apparatus, and an explosive charge detonated by the detonation circuit. The optical ranging apparatus includes a pulsed laser light source for generating target ranging light pulses and optical reference light pulses. A single lens directs ranging pulses to a target and collects reflected light from the target. An optical fiber bundle is used for delaying the optical reference pulses to correspond to a predetermined distance from the target. The optical ranging apparatus includes circuitry for providing a first signal depending upon the light pulses reflected from the target, a second signal depending upon the light pulses from the optical delay fiber bundle, and an output signal when the first and second signals coincide with each other. The output signal occurs when the distance from the target is equal to the predetermined distance from the target. Additional circuitry distinguishes pulses reflected from the target from background solar radiation.

  15. Proximity fuze

    DOEpatents

    Harrison, T.R.

    1987-07-10

    A proximity fuze system includes an optical ranging apparatus, a detonation circuit controlled by the optical ranging apparatus, and an explosive charge detonated by the detonation circuit. The optical ranging apparatus includes a pulsed laser light source for generating target ranging light pulses and optical reference light pulses. A single lens directs ranging pulses to a target and collects reflected light from the target. An optical fiber bundle is used for delaying the optical reference pulses to correspond to a predetermined distance from the target. The optical ranging apparatus includes circuitry for providing a first signal depending upon the light pulses reflected from the target, a second signal depending upon the light pulses from the optical delay fiber bundle, and an output signal when the first and second signals coincide with each other. The output signal occurs when the distance from the target is equal to the predetermined distance from the target. Additional circuitry distinguishes pulses reflected from the target from background solar radiation. 3 figs.

  16. Proximity fuze

    DOEpatents

    Harrison, Thomas R.

    1989-08-22

    A proximity fuze system includes an optical ranging apparatus, a detonation circuit controlled by the optical ranging apparatus, and an explosive charge detonated by the detonation cirtcuit. The optical ranging apparatus includes a pulsed laser light source for generating target ranging light pulses and optical reference light pulses. A single lens directs ranging pulses to a target and collects reflected light from the target. An optical fiber bundle is used for delaying the optical reference pulses to correspond to a predetermined distance from the target. The optical ranging apparatus includes circuitry for providing a first signal depending upon the light pulses reflected from the target, a second signal depending upon the light pulses from the optical delay fiber bundle, and an output signal when the first and second signals coincide with each other. The output signal occurs when the distance from the target is equal to the predetermined distance form the target. Additional circuitry distinguishes pulses reflected from the target from background solar radiation.

  17. Biomechanical Factors in Tibial Stress Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    The Effect of a Single Treatment of the Protonics System on Lower Extremity Kinematics during Gait and the Lateral Step Up Exercise . (in review) Gait...section in a comparison with a matched control group of subjects who have not sustained a fracture. Due to the low number of tibial stress fractures...fractures must be confirmed by x-rays, bone scans or MRIs. Tibial stress reactions have been operationally defined as bony pain specifically along the

  18. Optimizing femorotibial alignment in high tibial osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Rudan, John; Harrison, Mark; Simurda, Michael A

    Objective To study factors that affect femorotibial (F-T) alignment after valgus closing wedge tibial osteotomy. Study design A review of standardized standing radiographs. Femorotibial alignment was measured 1 year postoperatively for over- and under-correction. Changes in F–T alignment and in tibial plateau angle were measured. Setting An urban hospital and orthopedic clinic. Patients Eighty-two patients with osteoarthritis and varus femorotibial alignment underwent valgus closing wedge tibial osteotomy. Patients having a diagnosis of inflammatory arthritis or a prior osteotomy about the knee were excluded. Results A 1° wedge removed from the tibia resulted in an average correction of F–T alignment of 1.2°. A knee that had increased valgus orientation of the distal femur had a greater degree of correction, averaging 1.46° in F–T alignment per degree of tibial wedge. This resulted in excessive postoperative valgus alignment for some patients who had increased valgus tilt of the distal femur. Optimal F–T alignment of 6° to 14° of valgus occurred when the postoperative tibial inclination was 4° to 8° of valgus. Conclusions There was a trend for knees with increased valgus orientation of the distal femur to have greater correction in F–T alignment after tibial osteotomy, likely because of a greater opening up of the medial joint space during stance. Surgeons need to account for this in their preoperative planning. PMID:10526522

  19. Increasing posterior tibial slope does not raise anterior cruciate ligament strain but decreases tibial rotation ability.

    PubMed

    Nelitz, Manfred; Seitz, Andreas M; Bauer, Jasmin; Reichel, Heiko; Ignatius, Anita; Dürselen, Lutz

    2013-03-01

    It was investigated whether the strain of the anterior cruciate ligament and tibial kinematics are affected by increasing posterior tibial slope. 9 human cadaveric knee joints were passively moved between full extension and 120° flexion in a motion and loading simulator under various loading conditions and at 0°, 5°, 10° and 15° posterior tibial slope angles. The anterior cruciate ligament strain and the tibial rotation angle were registered. To assess the influence of posterior tibial slope on the anterior cruciate ligament strain at a fixed flexion angle the anterior cruciate ligament strain was recorded at three different flexion angles of 0°, 30° and 90° while continuously increasing the osteotomy angle from 5° to 15°. The anterior cruciate ligament strain was either not affected by the posterior tibial slope angle or, in some load cases, was decreased for increasing posterior tibial slope (P<0.05). There was a significant decrease of tibial rotation when the posterior tibial slope was increased to 15° for many of the load cases tested (P<0.05). The mean maximum decrease was from 17.4° (SD 5.7°) to 11.2° (SD 4.7°) observed for flexion-extension motion under 30N axial load in combination with an internal rotation moment. The hypothesis that increasing posterior tibial slope results in higher anterior cruciate ligament strain was not confirmed. However, knee kinematics were affected in terms of a reduced tibial rotation. From a biomechanical point of view the data do not support the efficacy of sagittal osteotomies as performed to stabilize anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Closed reduction and fluoroscopic-assisted percutaneous pinning of 42 physeal fractures in 37 dogs and 4 cats.

    PubMed

    Boekhout-Ta, Christina L; Kim, Stanley E; Cross, Alan R; Evans, Richard; Pozzi, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    To report complications and clinical outcome of dogs and cats that underwent fluoroscopic-assisted percutaneous pinning (FAPP) of physeal fractures. Retrospective study. Client-owned dogs (n = 37) and cats (n = 4). Records (August 2007-August 2014) of physeal fractures treated with FAPP in 3 hospitals were evaluated. Data collected included signalment, fracture characteristics (etiology, location, duration, Salter-Harris classification, preoperative and postoperative displacement), surgical information (implant size, surgical duration), and outcome assessment information (functional outcome, radiographic outcome, and complications). The majority of animals (92%) were classified as full functional outcome. No significant predictors of functional outcome were identified. The overall complication rate was 15% (n = 6). Elective pin removal rate was 41% (n = 17). Goniometry and limb circumference measurements of the affected and contralateral limbs were not significantly different in dogs for which measurements were obtained. Seventeen of 18 animals (16 dogs, 2 cats) measured had bone length changes on follow-up radiographs. FAPP is associated with an excellent functional outcome in a narrow selection of fracture configurations, specifically those with minimal displacement and for which anatomical alignment can be achieved with closed reduction. © 2016 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  1. Neuroanatomy of the complex tibial organ of Stenopelmatus (Orthoptera: Ensifera: Stenopelmatidae).

    PubMed

    Strauss, Johannes; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2008-11-01

    Stenopelmatidae (or "Jerusalem crickets") belong to the atympanate Ensifera, lacking hearing organs in the foreleg tibiae. Their phylogenetic position is controversial, either as a taxon in Tettigonioidea or within the clade of Gryllacridoidea. Similarly, the origin of tibial auditory systems in Ensifera is controversial. Therefore, we investigated the neuronal structures of the proximal tibiae of Stenopelmatus spec. with the hypothesis that internal sensory structures are similar to those in tympanate Ensifera. In Stenopelmatus the complex tibial organ consists of three neuronal parts: the subgenual organ, the intermediate organ, and a third part with linearly arranged neurons. This tripartite organization is also found in tympanate Ensifera, verifying our hypothesis. The third part of the sense organ found in Stenopelmatus can be regarded by the criterion of position as homologous to auditory receptors of hearing Tettigonioidea. This crista acustica homolog is found serially in all thoracic leg pairs and contains 20 +/- 2 chordotonal neurons in the foreleg. The tibial organ was shown to be responsive to vibration, with a broad threshold of about 0.06 ms(-2) in a frequency range from 100-600 Hz. The central projection of tibial sensory neurons terminates into two equally sized lobes in the primary sensory neuropil, the medial ventral association center. The data are discussed comparatively to those of other Ensifera and mapped phylogenetically onto recently proposed phylogenies for Ensifera. The crista acustica homolog could represent a neuronal rudiment of a secondarily reduced ear, but neuronal features are also consistent with an evolutionary preadaptation.

  2. Progressive cubitus varus due to a bony physeal bar in a 4-year-old girl following a supracondylar fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Theruvil, Bipin; Kapoor, Vikas; Fairhurst, Jo; Taylor, Graeme R

    2005-10-01

    We report a case of progressive cubitus varus deformity caused by a physeal bar following a supracondylar humeral fracture in a 4-year-old girl. Malreduction is thought to be the commonest cause of this deformity, which is nonprogressive. A corrective osteotomy in cases like ours should be deferred until skeletal maturity.

  3. Increased lateral tibial posterior slope is related to tibial tunnel widening after primary ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sabzevari, Soheil; Rahnemai-Azar, Amir Ata; Shaikh, Humza S; Arner, Justin W; Irrgang, James J; Fu, Freddie H

    2017-03-04

    The purpose of the study was to determine the influence of femoral and tibial bone morphology on the amount of femoral and tibial tunnel widening after primary anatomic ACL reconstruction. It was hypothesized that tibial and femoral bone morphology would be significantly correlated with tunnel widening after anatomic ACL reconstruction. Forty-nine consecutive patients (mean age 21.8 ± 8.1 years) who underwent primary single-bundle anatomic ACL reconstruction with hamstring autograft were enrolled. Two blinded observers measured the bone morphology of tibia and femur including, medial and lateral tibial posterior slope, medial and lateral tibial plateau width, medial and lateral femoral condyle width, femoral notch width, and bicondylar width on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Tibial and femoral tunnel width at three points (aperture, mid-section, and exit) were measured on standard anteroposterior radiograph from 1 week and 1 year postoperatively (mean 12.5 ± 2 months). Tunnel width measurements at each point were compared between 1 week and 1 year to calculate percent of tunnel widening over time. Multivariable linear regression was used to analyze correlations between bone morphology and tunnel widening. Increase in lateral tibial posterior slope was the only independent bony morphology characteristics that was significantly correlated with an increased tibial tunnel exit widening (R = 0.58). For every degree increase in lateral tibial posterior slope, a 3.2% increase in tibial tunnel exit width was predicted (p = 0.003). Excellent inter-observer and intra-observer reliability were determined for the measurements (ICC = 0.91 and 0.88, respectively). Increased lateral tibial posterior slope is an important preoperative anatomic factor that may predict tunnel widening at the tibial tunnel exit. In regard to clinical relevance, the results of this study suggest that lateral tibial posterior slope be measured

  4. Posterior lateral meniscal root tear due to a malpositioned double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction tibial tunnel.

    PubMed

    LaPrade, Christopher M; Jisa, Kyle A; Cram, Tyler R; LaPrade, Robert F

    2015-12-01

    The posterior lateral (PL) meniscal root plays an essential role in ensuring the health of the articular cartilage of the knee joint. Injuring the PL meniscal root has been demonstrated to result in significant deleterious changes to tibiofemoral contact mechanics. Anatomic studies have reported that the posterolateral bundle of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and PL root lie in close proximity on the tibial plateau. Therefore, during a double-bundle ACL reconstruction, the PL root may be inadvertently injured during the reaming of the posterior ACL double-bundle reconstruction tibial tunnel that is intended to recreate the posterolateral bundle of the ACL. This case report describes an occurrence of iatrogenic injury to the PL root due to a posteriorly malpositioned double-bundle ACL tibial tunnel. This report is the first known description of this mechanism of injury in the literature. Case report, Level IV.

  5. [Fractures of the tibial shaft].

    PubMed

    Märdian, S; Schwabe, P; Schaser, K-D

    2015-02-01

    The tibia shaft is the most often fractured long bone of human beings. Among others traffic accidents (37.5 %), falls (17.8 %), sport accidents (30.9 %) and assaults (4.5 %) are typical mechanisms. A brief clinical examination including the correct classification of the fracture pattern and even more important the degree of the soft tissue damage are the most crucial factors for the following therapeutic cascade. This follows a defined algorithm based on the degree of soft tissue damage. As biplanar X-ray diagnostics are obligatory, CT scans are subject to complex fracture patterns and accompanying intraarticular pathologies.The treatment of tibial shaft fractures is the preserve of operative stabilization, which should be done primarily depending on the degree of the soft tissue injury. Here intramedullary methods - especially intramedullary nailing - are the golden standard.The most serious complication of these fractures is the development of a compartment syndrome. This requires rapid diagnosis and an adequate surgical management in order to avoid extensive muscle necrosis with ischaemic contractures and irreversible neurovascular deficits. Apart from postoperative infections, which are the predominant complication especially in open injuries, non union provide typical and late complications which are partly difficult to treat. These should, depending on their type, follow a dedicated treatment algorithm.

  6. Topography of human ankle joint: focused on posterior tibial artery and tibial nerve

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog-Im; Kim, Yi-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Most of foot pain occurs by the entrapment of the tibial nerve and its branches. Some studies have reported the location of the tibial nerve; however, textbooks and researches have not described the posterior tibial artery and the relationship between the tibal nerve and the posterior tibial artery in detail. The purpose of this study was to analyze the location of neurovascular structures and bifurcations of the nerve and artery in the ankle region based on the anatomical landmarks. Ninety feet of embalmed human cadavers were examined. All measurements were evaluated based on a reference line. Neurovascular structures were classified based on the relationship between the tibial nerve and the posterior tibial artery. The bifurcation of arteries and nerves were expressed by X- and Y-coordinates. Based on the reference line, 9 measurements were examined. The most common type I (55.6%), was the posterior tibial artery located medial to the tibial nerve. Neurovascular structures were located less than 50% of the distance between M and C from M at the reference line. The bifurcation of the posterior tibial artery was 41% in X-coordinate, -38% in Y-coordinate, and that of the tibial nerve was 48%, and -10%, respectively. Thirteen measurements and classification showed statistically significant differences between both sexes (P<0.05). It is determined the average position of neurovascular structures in the human ankle region and recorded the differences between the sexes and amongst the populations. These results would be helpful for the diagnosis and treatment of foot pain. PMID:26140224

  7. Development of cortical bone geometry in the human femoral and tibial diaphysis.

    PubMed

    Gosman, James H; Hubbell, Zachariah R; Shaw, Colin N; Ryan, Timothy M

    2013-05-01

    Ontogenetic growth processes in human long bones are key elements, determining the variability of adult bone structure. This study seeks to identify and describe the interaction between ontogenetic growth periods and changes in femoral and tibial diaphyseal shape. Femora and tibiae (n = 46) ranging developmentally from neonate to skeletally mature were obtained from the Norris Farms No. 36 archeological skeletal series. High-resolution X-ray computed tomography scans were collected. Whole-diaphysis cortical bone drift patterns and relative bone envelope modeling activity across ages were assessed in five cross-sections per bone (total bone length: 20%, 35%, 50%, 65%, and 80%) by measuring the distance from the section centroid to the endosteal and periosteal margins in eight sectors using ImageJ. Pearson correlations were performed to document and interpret the relationship between the cross-sectional shape (Imax /Imin ), total subperiosteal area, cortical area, and medullary cavity area for each slice location and age for both the femur and the tibia. Differences in cross-sectional shape between age groups at each cross-sectional position were assessed using nonparametric Mann-Whitney U tests. The data reveal that the femoral and tibial midshaft shape are relatively conserved throughout growth; yet, conversely, the proximal and distal femoral diaphysis and proximal tibial diaphysis appear more sensitive to developmentally induced changes in mechanical loading. Two time periods of accelerated change are identified: early childhood and prepuberty/adolescence.

  8. Endoscopic Resection of Avulsed Fragment of Tibial Tuberosity and Endoscopic-Assisted Repair of Patellar Tendon.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    An avulsion fracture of part of the tibial tuberosity can occur as a result of a tophaceous tuberosity or Osgood-Schlatter disease. We describe an endoscopic technique of debridement, bone fragment resection, and tendon repair. This technique has the potential advantage of fewer wound complications. It is performed through proximal and distal portals on the sides of the patellar tendon. The working space is deep to the tendon. After debridement of the tendon and resection of the bone fragment, the tendon gap is assessed. Endoscopic-assisted side-by-side repair is performed to close the gap if the gap is less than 30% of the width of the tendon. If the gap is more than 30% of the width of the tendon, the proximal stump of the avulsed tendon can be retrieved through the proximal portal. Krackow suture with stay stitches is applied to the proximal stump. The stump is put back and sutured to the tibial insertion through a bone tunnel or suture anchor. This is augmented by side-by-side suturing of the avulsed tendon with the adjacent normal tendon.

  9. AN EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT METHODS FOR MEASURING LATERAL TIBIAL SLOPE USING MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Lipps, David B.; Wilson, Annie M.; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Wojtys, Edward M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Since lateral tibial slope (LTS) affects the amount of anterior tibial translation and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) strain during a dynamic maneuver, accurate measurements of lateral tibial slope may be beneficial in screening individuals at a higher risk for ACL injury. Methods for measuring LTS on magnetic resonance imaging scans of the proximal tibia include the midpoint and circle methods. There are no current studies that have validated different LTS measurements methods using a proximal tibia magnetic resonance imaging scan. Hypothesis We tested the null hypotheses that (1) LTS measurements were independent of the length of tibia imaged using the midpoint method, and (2) LTS measurements calculated from different methods (‘midpoint’, ‘circle’, and ‘full tibia’) would not differ significantly. Study Design Descriptive Laboratory Study Methods Blinded observers measured LTS from 3-Tesla 3D magnetic resonance images from 40 size-matched donors according to one circle method and three midpoint methods. Outcomes were then compared to the full tibial anatomical axis (line connecting the center of two circles fit within the proximal and distal tibia) in 11 donors. Bonferroni-correct paired t-tests (p < 0.005 significant) were used to compare the five methods. Results The circle and full tibia methods had the lowest inter- and intra-observer variability, while the midpoint method with 10 cm tibia was the most variable. The midpoint method with 10cm and 15 cm proximal tibia closely resembled LTS measurements with the full tibia anatomic axis. The circle method, while repeatable, provided smaller numerical LTS measurements than the full tibia and midpoint methods. Conclusions While LTS measurements using the midpoint method can resemble measurements made using the full tibia, the reliability of the midpoint method depends on the length of proximal tibia used. The circle method may be the preferred method for future studies since it was the

  10. [Proximal and total femur replacement].

    PubMed

    Pennekamp, P H; Wirtz, D C; Dürr, H R

    2012-07-01

    Reconstruction of segmental bone defects of the proximal femur following wide tumor resection or revision arthroplasty. Aggressive benign or primary malignant bone tumors of the proximal femur; destructive metastases; massive segmental bone defects of the proximal femur; periprosthetic fractures. Local infection; very short life expectancy (< 3 months); massive deficiency of acetabular bone stock. Anterolateral approach. Exposure and detachment of the iliopsoas and gluteus medius muscle from the proximal femur with a sufficient safety margin to the bone; distal transsection of the vastus lateralis/intermedius and rectus femoris muscle according to the extraosseous tumor extension; distal femur osteotomy al least 3 cm beyond the farthest point of tumor extension; in case of total femur replacement, additional lateral arthrotomy of the knee with resection of the ligaments and menisci; reaming of the medullary canal after securing the shaft with a Verbrugge clamp; trial assembly and reduction followed by the definitive implantation of the prosthesis with adjustment of the femoral neck anteversion in 5° increments; soft tissue reconstruction and fixation to an attachment tube covering the prosthesis; in case of total femur replacement, the preparation of the tibia is followed by the coupling of the tibial and femoral components. Infection prophylaxis, 20 kg partial weight bearing, continuous passive motion. A total of 20  patients with proximal femur replacement and 2 patients with total femur replacement implanted between June 2007 and December 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Three patients had primary malignant bone tumors, while 19 patients underwent resection for metastatic disease. The mean age at surgery was 62.0 ± 18.1 years (18-82 years). Fifteen patients with a mean follow-up of 20.3 ± 17.2 months (4-51 months) were studied. Among the 22 cases, periprosthetic infection occurred in 3 patients (13.6%), dislocation in 2 patients (9

  11. Posterior cruciate ligament tibial insertion anatomy and implications for tibial tunnel placement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Seuk; Ra, Ho Jong; Ahn, Jin Hwan; Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Jin Goo

    2011-02-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to predict the tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and posterior cortex that aligned with the tibial tunnel (PCTT) by use of 2-dimensional plain radiographs by evaluating the relation between plain radiograph and computed tomography (CT) images and (2) to determine the safe angle of the tibial guide for preventing breakage of the posterior cortex. In 10 fresh cadaveric tibias, the soft tissues were dissected and the tibial footprint of the PCL was identified. The insertion of the PCL, the longest distance from the PCTT to the posterior cortex that aligned with the tibial plateau (PCTP), and the possible maximum angle of the tibial guide to the most posteriorly positioned cortical line were measured from simple anteroposterior (AP) and lateral radiographs, as well as CT. The mean tibial insertion of the PCL from the joint line was located between 5.9 ± 1.1 and 17.4 ± 2.4 mm on the simple AP radiographs and between 2.2 ± 1.2 and 12.3 ± 1.5 mm on the simple lateral radiographs (P = .005). The PCL insertion was from the posterior 48% of the area of the posterior intercondylar fossa to the posterior cortex. The longest distance from the PCTT to the PCTP was 10.8 ± 2.2 mm. The maximum angle of the tibial guide to the PCTT possible on CT and the PCTP on lateral radiographs was 52° ± 5° and 62° ± 4.5°, respectively (P = .005). The mean tibial insertion of the PCL from the joint line was located higher on the lateral radiographs than on the AP radiographs, and the PCL insertion was in the posterior 48% of the area of the PCL fovea to the posterior cortex. The maximum possible angle of the tibial guide to the PCTT based on CT was 52°. Therefore the angle of the tibial guide pin must be limited for tibial footprint reconstruction to prevent posterior wall breakage. Increasing the tibial guide angle may have some advantages, but there is a limit because of posterior wall breakage. Copyright © 2011

  12. Single incision pediatric flexible intramedullary tibial nailing.

    PubMed

    Coury, John G; Lum, Zachary C; O'Neill, Nicholas P; Gerardi, Joseph A

    2017-09-01

    There has been a trend towards flexible intramedullary nailing for unstable tibial shaft fractures in the pediatric population, traditionally, utilizing a 2-incision technique with passage of one nail medially and one nail laterally. Our study aims to compare a single incision approach for flexible nailing of unstable tibial shaft fractures in pediatric patients to the traditional 2-incision approach. Patients were selected for operative fixation if they had a length unstable tibial shaft fracture confirmed by fluoroscopy. Exclusion criteria included length stable tibial fractures that could undergo nonoperative treatment. Single incision technique utilized the medial incision only. Patients were monitored in the hospital for one postoperative day and followed up at 4 week, 8 week, and 12 week marks. Radiographic analysis was performed to evaluate for malunion or nonunion. Operative times, infection rates and complications were recorded and analyzed. All patients achieved complete fracture healing at the 12-week follow up. There were no delayed unions, nonunions or malunions in either treatment group. Single medial incision for tibial flexible nails had equivalent outcomes with no difference in primary healing rate, malunion or nonunion rate when compared to the dual incision technique.

  13. Prolonged infection at the tibial bone tunnel after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Numazaki, Hironori; Kobayashi, Hideo; Yoshida, Katsuhiro; Hakozaki, Michiyuki; Konno, Shin-Ichi

    2017-08-09

    A 24-year-old man with severe atopic dermatitis underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction of the right knee seven years earlier but developed a surgical site infection. The infection did not heal after removal of the metal implants, and a fistula eventually developed. This condition was left untreated for six years before he was referred to our hospital. Magnetic resonance imaging showed fluid in the tibial bone tunnel and extensive bone marrow edema surrounding the bone tunnel. Based on these findings, abscess formation within the tibial bone tunnel and osteomyelitis spreading to the proximal tibia were suspected. During the surgery, a portion of artificial ligament and non-absorbable suture were observed in the bone tunnel, and the infection healed immediately after removal of this complex. When surgical site infection occurs after ACL reconstruction, it is important to completely remove all artificial materials as early as possible.

  14. [The choice of operative method for the arterial occlusion in the femoro-popliteo-tibial segment].

    PubMed

    Nikul'nikov, P I; Guch, A A; Bytsaĭ, A N; Akhmad, D; Danilets, A O

    2006-10-01

    The results of surgical treatment of 198 patients suffering atherosclerotic occlusion of the femoro-popliteo-tibial segment arteries were analyzed, of them endarterectomy from superficial femoral artery was performed in 75 (37.9%) patients, femoro-popliteal shunting using autovena--in 93 (47%), synthetic prosthesis--in 17 (8.6%), in 4 (2%)--distal anastomosis was formatted with "hanged" segment of popliteal artery, revascularization of the limb via the deep femoral artery system was done in 9 (4.5%) patients. Good immediate result was noted in 86.4% patients, in 2 years and more--in 68.6%. Comparative analysis of methods of the femoro-popliteo-tibial segment arteries reconstruction had trusted, that more stable indices of hemodynamics were achieved after performance of autovenous shunting with formation of distal anastomosis via proximally than the knee joint fissure localisation.

  15. Concomitant tibial shaft and posterior malleolar fractures can be readily diagnosed from plain radiographs: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chuan-En; Su, Yu-Ping; Feng, Chi-Kuang; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Chiu, Fang-Yao; Liu, Chien-Lin

    2014-02-01

    Concomitant tibial shaft and posterior malleolar fractures (PMFs) are often encountered in clinical settings. Plain films were reviewed for concomitant PMF, and fracture patterns were analyzed by focusing on the integrity of the fibula and the location of the fibular fracture. A retrospective review of patients who presented with tibial shaft fractures between January 2005 and January 2010 was performed. Patients were included if they were at least 18 years of age and had a tibial diaphyseal fracture. Exclusion criteria were age less than 18 years, previous surgery on the same leg, and pathological fractures. Medical records were reviewed for information on injury mechanisms. Pre- and post-operative radiographs were analyzed for PMFs, tibial fracture pattern, fibular integrity, fibular fracture pattern, treatment type, and time to fracture union. Descriptive statistical tests were used. Among 240 patients, there were 20 cases (15 male and 5 female) of concomitant PMF, all detected in lateral radiograph views. The incidence of PMF was 8.3%. Most patients had a motorcycle injury (n = 15, 75%). Distal tibia spiral fracture was the most common fracture pattern (85%) and there was no proximal tibia fracture (0%). Combined fibular fractures were found in 17 patients (85%). There were nine proximal fibular fractures (45%). Intact fibulas were found in three patients (15%). Only one PMF was treated with screw fixation. All PMFs showed radiographic evidence of healing within 5 months post-operatively. We recommend careful radiographic examination to evaluate PMF, especially in patients with distal tibial spiral fractures combined with proximal fibular fractures or intact fibulas. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. The "Hoop" Plate for Posterior Bicondylar Shear Tibial Plateau Fractures: Description of a New Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Vincenzo; Schatzker, Joseph; Kfuri, Mauricio

    2017-07-01

    High-energy fractures of the proximal tibia with extensive fragmentation of the posterior rim of the tibial plateau are challenging. This technique aims to describe a method on how to embrace the posterior rim of the tibial plateau by placing a horizontal precontoured one-third tubular plate wrapped around its corners. This method, which we named "hoop plating," is mainly indicated for cases of crushed juxta-articular rim fractures, aiming to restore cortical containment of the tibial plateau. Through a lateral approach with a fibular head osteotomy (Lobenhoffer approach), both anterolateral and posterolateral fragments are directly reduced and supported by a one-third tubular plate of adequate length. The plate is inserted from lateral to medial deep to all soft tissues, and its position is checked with fluoroscopy. The implant sits exactly on the posterior cortex of the tibial plateau and provides containment for the reduced juxta-articular posterior cortex and rim. We begin with immediate range of motion. Toe-touch weight-bearing with crutches is allowed with the operated knee in full extension. Weight-bearing is gradually increased only after 6 weeks as bone healing is taking place. Clinical follow-up is performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 weeks. If the radiological exam confirms that the fracture is healed, the patient is allowed to proceed to muscle strengthening and bear weight entirely. The "hoop plating" may be a good option for the management in cases of extensive posterior tibial plateau articular surface fracture and impaction with rim and posterior cortical wall fragmentation. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Open Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy and Combined Arthroscopic Surgery in Severe Medial Osteoarthritis and Varus Malalignment: Minimum 5-Year Results

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Moon-Jib; Shin, Yong-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the radiologic and functional outcomes of medial open wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) combined with arthroscopic procedure in patients with medial osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods From June 1996 to March 2010, 26 patients (32 knees) who underwent medial open wedge osteotomy and arthroscopic operation for medial osteoarthritis were retrospectively reviewed. Measurements included hip-knee-ankle (HKA) angle, femorotibial angle, medial proximal tibial angle, posterior tibial slope angle, and Kellgren-Lawrence grade. Clinical evaluation was performed using Lysholm knee scoring scale and knee and function score of the American Knee Society. Results Differences between the mean preoperative and postoperative measurements were significant in all angles including the HKA angle (−5.7° and +5.5°), femorotibial angle (−1.9° and +9.8°), and medial proximal tibial angle (82.9° and 90.5°) (p<0.05). Mean Lysholm knee scoring scale was 63.6 preoperatively and 88.7 at the last follow-up, mean Knee Society knee score was 61.2 and 86.6, and mean function score was 59.3 and 87.2, respectively. All differences were significant (p<0.05). Conclusions Medial open wedge HTO in combination with arthroscopic procedure is an effective treatment method for medial osteoarthritis to treat varus deformity and an intra-articular lesion. PMID:27894173

  18. Compartment syndrome after tibial plateau fracture☆

    PubMed Central

    Pitta, Guilherme Benjamin Brandão; dos Santos, Thays Fernanda Avelino; dos Santos, Fernanda Thaysa Avelino; da Costa Filho, Edelson Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of the tibial plateau are relatively rare, representing around 1.2% of all fractures. The tibia, due to its subcutaneous location and poor muscle coverage, is exposed and suffers large numbers of traumas, not only fractures, but also crush injuries and severe bruising, among others, which at any given moment, could lead compartment syndrome in the patient. The case is reported of a 58-year-old patient who, following a tibial plateau fracture, presented compartment syndrome of the leg and was submitted to decompressive fasciotomy of the four right compartments. After osteosynthesis with internal fixation of the tibial plateau using an L-plate, the patient again developed compartment syndrome. PMID:26229779

  19. Osteochondritis of the Distal Tibial Epiphysis

    PubMed Central

    EL Hajj, Firass; Sebaaly, Amer; Kharrat, Khalil; Ghanem, Ismat

    2012-01-01

    Osteochondritis of the distal tibial epiphysis is a very rare entity. 9 cases have been described in 7 articles and 8 other cases have been mentioned in textbooks. This paper describes the 10th case of osteochondritis of the distal tibial epiphysis and summarizes the clinical and radiological presentations of the 9 other cases. The etiology of this entity is well debated in the literature. We believe that it results from a vascular abnormality in the distal tibial epiphysis associated with a mechanical stress (trauma, excessive overload, etc.). Since it is a self-limited disease, the prognosis is good and the younger the patient is the better the prognosis will be. In general, this entity responds well to conservative treatment. PMID:23193412

  20. Injury to the Anterior Tibial Artery during Bicortical Tibial Drilling in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bum; Lim, Jin Woo; Seo, Jeong Gook

    2016-01-01

    Many complications have been reported during or after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, including infection, bleeding, tibial tunnel widening, arthrofibrosis, and graft failure. However, arterial injury has been rarely reported. This paper reports a case of an anterior tibial arterial injury during bicortical tibial drilling in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, associated with an asymptomatic occlusion of the popliteal artery. The patient had a vague pain which led to delayed diagnosis of compartment syndrome and delayed treatment with fasciotomy. All surgeons should be aware of these rare but critical complications because the results may be disastrous like muscle necrosis as in this case. PMID:26929808

  1. The importance of tibial alignment: finite element analysis of tibial malalignment.

    PubMed

    Perillo-Marcone, A; Barrett, D S; Taylor, M

    2000-12-01

    The influence of the tibial plateau orientation on cancellous bone stress was examined by finite element analysis for a cemented device. The objectives of the study were i) to examine the effect of the plateau-ankle angle on the cancellous bone stress, ii) to analyze the significance of the anteroposterior angles of the tibial component on these stresses, and iii) to compare the finite element predictions with clinical data. In general, positioning the tibial plateau in valgus resulted in lower cancellous bone stresses. These results support previous clinical studies, which suggest that overall alignment in valgus results in lower migration rates and lower incidence of loosening.

  2. Tibial Stress Injuries: Decisive Diagnosis and Treatment of "Shin Splints."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couture, Christopher J.; Karlson, Kristine A.

    2002-01-01

    Tibial stress injuries, commonly called shin splints, often result when bone remodeling processes adopt inadequately to repetitive stress. Physicians who are caring for athletic patients must have a thorough understanding of this continuum of injuries, including medial tibial stress syndrome and tibial stress fractures, because there are…

  3. Tibial Stress Injuries: Decisive Diagnosis and Treatment of "Shin Splints."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couture, Christopher J.; Karlson, Kristine A.

    2002-01-01

    Tibial stress injuries, commonly called shin splints, often result when bone remodeling processes adopt inadequately to repetitive stress. Physicians who are caring for athletic patients must have a thorough understanding of this continuum of injuries, including medial tibial stress syndrome and tibial stress fractures, because there are…

  4. Tibial tubercle-posterior cruciate ligament distance: a new measurement to define the position of the tibial tubercle in patients with patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Seitlinger, Gerd; Scheurecker, Georg; Högler, Richard; Labey, Luc; Innocenti, Bernardo; Hofmann, Siegfried

    2012-05-01

    In patients with patellar instability, a pathological tibial tubercle-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance is a risk factor. However, the TT-TG distance gives no information about the location of the malformation. Not all patients with a pathological TT-TG distance (≥20 mm) had lateralization of the tibial tubercle. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Fifty-eight knees in 49 patients with 2 or more patellar dislocations and 60 knees in 30 volunteers with no history of dislocation were analyzed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The tibial tubercle-posterior cruciate ligament (TT-PCL) distance was defined as the mediolateral distance between the tibial tubercle midpoint and the medial border of the posterior cruciate ligament. The distance was measured parallel to the dorsal aspect of the proximal tibia (dorsal tibia condylar line). Three observers performed the measurements. Significant differences in the TT-PCL distance between the patient and the control group were estimated using an unpaired t test. The inter- and intraobserver variability of the measurement was performed. The intraclass correlation coefficients for inter- and intraobserver variability of the TT-PCL distance were higher than 0.74 and 0.93, respectively. A statistically significant difference (P < .05) was found between the TT-PCL distance in the control group (mean [SD], 18.4 [3.35] mm) and in patients (21.9 [4.30] mm). The mean (SD) TT-TG was 18.9 (5.16) mm in the patient group and 11.9 (4.67) mm in the control group (P < .05). In the control group, 95% had a TT-PCL distance <24 mm. In the patient group, 22 of 58 knee joints (38%) had a TT-PCL distance ≥24 mm. Seventeen of 40 knee joints (43%) with a TT-TG distance ≥20 mm had a TT-PCL distance <24 mm. Only 57% of the patients with a pathological TT-TG distance (≥20 mm) had lateralization of the tibial tubercle in relation to the posterior cruciate ligament. The TT-PCL distance is an alternative method for determining the

  5. The 'trampoline ankle': severe medial malleolar physeal injuries in children and adolescents secondary to multioccupant use of trampolines.

    PubMed

    Blumetti, Francesco C; Gauthier, Luke; Moroz, Paul J

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a series of patients presenting with medial malleolus Salter-Harris types III and IV fractures (MacFarland fractures) related to trampoline use. In total, 11 patients were reviewed retrospectively (mean age: 11.8 years; four boys and seven girls). Salter-Harris type III fractures were more commonly seen (n=7). Undisplaced fractures were more prevalent (n=6). Six children underwent surgical treatment. Average follow-up time was 17.8 months. A medial physeal bar with subsequent growth arrest and ankle deformity was observed in two patients. More than one user was present on the trampoline at the time of the injury in nine of the reported cases. Medial malleolus growth-plate injuries can be seen after trampoline injuries where multiple users were involved. Potential complications including growth arrest can occur.

  6. Role of MRI in detecting early physeal changes due to acute osteoarticular infection around the knee joint: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Shivinder; Wardak, Mussa; Sen, Ramesh; Singh, Paramjeet; Kumar, Vishal; Saini, Raghav; Jha, Namita

    2008-01-01

    Physeal changes of any aetiology in children are usually diagnosed once the deformity is clinically evident. Between January 2006 and June 2007, 15 children who suffered from acute osteoarticular infection around the knee joint were studied. They were called up for follow-up six months after the onset of infection. All patients were evaluated by clinical and roentgenographic examination before undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of both knees “with the unaffected knee serving as control”. Abnormal findings in the physis, metaphysis and/or epiphysis on MRI were observed in five children. This group of five children was compared with the other ten children for clinical presentation and course of disease. We believe that MRI is a useful tool in the evaluation of growth plate insult in the early period following acute osteoarticular infection, and we can diagnose and prevent the catastrophic complications of the same. PMID:18670775

  7. Stress-induced Salter-Harris I growth plate injury of the proximal tibia: first report.

    PubMed

    Nanni, M; Butt, S; Mansour, R; Muthukumar, T; Cassar-Pullicino, V N; Roberts, A

    2005-07-01

    We describe a case of chronic Salter-Harris I injury of the proximal tibial epiphysis. To our knowledge such an injury has not been described in the English language literature. The radiological appearance can mimic chronic infection. The possibility of chronic athletic stress-related change should be considered in such scenarios to avoid a misdiagnosis.

  8. Insufficiency fractures of the tibial plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Manco, L.G.; Schneider, R.; Pavlov, H.

    1983-06-01

    An insufficiency fracture of the tibial plateau may be the cause of knee pain in patients with osteoporosis. The diagnosis is usually not suspected until a bone scan is done, as initial radiographs are often negative or inconclusive and clinical findings are nonspecific and may simulate osteoarthritis or spontaneous osteonecrosis. In five of 165 patients referred for bone scans due to nontraumatic knee pain, a characteristic pattern of intense augmented uptake of radionuclide confined to the tibial plateau led to a presumptive diagnosis of insufficiency fracture, later confirmed on radiographs.

  9. Fracture of tibial tuberosity in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires e; Campos, André Siqueira; de Araújo, Gabriel Costa Serrão; Gameiro, Vinícius Schott

    2013-01-01

    The fracture of tibial tuberosity is a rare lesion and still more unusual in adults. We describe a case in an adult who suffered a left knee injury due to a fall from height. No risk factors were identified. The lesion was treated with surgical reduction and internal fixation. The rehabilitation method was successful, resulting in excellent function and rage of motion of the knee. The aim of this study was to present an unusual case of direct trauma of the tibial tuberosity in an adult and the therapy performed. PMID:24293543

  10. Outcome of Posterior Tibial Plateau Fixation.

    PubMed

    Jiwanlal, Aneel; Jeray, Kyle James

    2016-01-01

    Isolated posterior tibial plateau fractures are rare injuries that encompass a wide variety of fracture patterns. Based on the variation in fracture pattern, the surgical approach varies, with both anterior and posterior approaches described for surgical fixation. Postoperative protocol also varies among studies. The aim of this article is to summarize the outcomes related to posterior column tibial plateau fractures. The papers reviewed, primarily small retrospective case series, showed functional knee range of motion is preserved, a low incidence of wound complications, and patient outcome scores comparable to other reported lower extremity injury outcome scores. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. In vitro evaluation of free-form biodegradable bone plates for fixation of distal femoral physeal fractures in dogs.

    PubMed

    Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Sutherland, Brian J; Harrysson, Ola L A; Lee, Erica S

    2010-12-01

    To design and manufacture free-form biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) bone plates and to compare mechanical properties of femoral constructs with a distal physeal fracture repaired by use of 5 stabilization methods. 40 canine femoral replicas created by use of additive manufacturing and rapid tooling. Surgery duration, mediolateral and craniocaudal bending stiffness, and torsional stiffness of femoral physeal fracture repair constructs made by use of 5 stabilization methods were assessed. The implants included 2 Kirschner wires inserted medially and 2 inserted laterally (4KW), a commercial stainless steel plate (CSP), a custom free-form titanium plate (CTP), thin (2-mm-thick) biodegradable PCL plates (TNP) placed medially and laterally, and thick (4-mm-thick) PCL plates (TKP) placed medially and laterally. Surgical placement of 4KW was more rapid than placement of other implants The mean caudal cantilever bending stiffness of CTP and CSP constructs was greater than that for TNP TKP and 4KW constructs, and the mean caudal cantilever bending stiffness of TNP and TKP constructs was greater than that for 4KW constructs. The mean lateral cantilever bending stiffness of TKP constructs was greater than that for 4KW constructs. Differences among construct types were not significant in yield strength, ultimate strength, yield torque, and ultimate torque. The mechanical properties of fracture repair constructs made from free-form PCL biodegradable plates compared favorably with those of constructs made from Kirschner wires. The impact of PCL plates on musculoskeletal soft tissues, bone healing, and bone growth should be evaluated before clinical use.

  12. Simultaneous Bilateral Flexion-Type Salter-Harris II Fractures of the Proximal Tibia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Potenza, V.; Caterini, R; Maglione, P; Bisicchia, S; Farsetti, P

    2011-01-01

    A rare case is reported of bilateral physeal lesions of the proximal tibia classified as Salter-Harris type II, which occurred simultaneously after a “flexion type” injury in a 14-year-old boy. Treatment was conservative on the nondisplaced side and surgical, by closed reduction and internal fixation, on the displaced side. There was no previous diagnosis of Osgood-Schlatter disease. After reviewing all the cases described previously, which occurred either consecutively or simultaneously, we conclude that less resistance of the growth plate, typical of late adolescence, likely represents the cause of this type of lesion. PMID:21886687

  13. Simultaneous Bilateral Flexion-Type Salter-Harris II Fractures of the Proximal Tibia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Potenza, V; Caterini, R; Maglione, P; Bisicchia, S; Farsetti, P

    2011-01-01

    A rare case is reported of bilateral physeal lesions of the proximal tibia classified as Salter-Harris type II, which occurred simultaneously after a "flexion type" injury in a 14-year-old boy. Treatment was conservative on the nondisplaced side and surgical, by closed reduction and internal fixation, on the displaced side. There was no previous diagnosis of Osgood-Schlatter disease. After reviewing all the cases described previously, which occurred either consecutively or simultaneously, we conclude that less resistance of the growth plate, typical of late adolescence, likely represents the cause of this type of lesion.

  14. Infantile tibia vara: correction of recurrent varus deformity following epiphyseolysis.

    PubMed

    Gary, Joshua; Richards, B Stephens

    2008-05-01

    Infantile tibia vara (infantile Blount's disease) is a condition in which progressive varus of the knee develops due to diminished physeal growth of the medial aspect of the proximal tibia. A 6-year-old boy with severe bilateral infantile tibia vara (Langenskiold stage V) underwent operative correction of his deformities. Surgery consisted of epiphyseolyses of the medial proximal tibiae and valgus-producing corrective tibial osteotomies. Nearly 5 years after symmetric growth, he again developed progressive varus involving his left knee. Usually, a repeat proximal tibial osteotomy is required along with consideration for completion of epiphyseodesis. In this case report, a simpler approach using staples was taken to successfully regain correction in a patient with recurrent deformity who was treated previously by a combination of epiphyseolysis and proximal tibial osteotomy. Stapling of the lateral aspect of the physis allowed the limited remaining growth potential within the abnormal medial physeal region to correct the angular deformity. A small overcorrection into valgus corrected after subsequent removal of the staple. At 14 years, with clinical and radiologic alignment normal, bilateral proximal tibial epiphysiodeses were performed. The patient returned to playing football at a high school level and had no functional limitations. To our knowledge, this is the first report of growth modulation (physeal stapling) resulting in successful correction of recurring genu varum in a knee that had previously undergone epiphyseolysis of the medial proximal tibial physis in advanced infantile tibia vara.

  15. Tibial plateau fracture following gracilis-semitendinosus anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: The tibial tunnel stress-riser.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, R O; Cohen, D; Barton-Hanson, N

    2006-06-01

    Tibial plateau fractures following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are extremely rare. This is the first reported case of a tibial plateau fracture following four-strand gracilis-semitendinosus autograft ACL reconstruction. The tibial tunnel alone may behave as a stress riser which can significantly reduce bone strength.

  16. Load along the tibial shaft during activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    D'Angeli, V; Belvedere, C; Ortolani, M; Giannini, S; Leardini, A

    2014-03-21

    External load at the tibia during activities of daily living provides baseline measures for the improvement of the design of the bone-implant interface for relevant internal and external prostheses. A motion analysis system was used together with an established protocol with skin markers to estimate three-dimensional forces and moments acting on ten equidistant points along the tibial shaft. Twenty young and able-bodied volunteers were analysed while performing three repetitions of the following tasks: level walking at three different speeds, in a straight-line and with sudden changes of direction to the right and to the left, stair ascending and descending, squatting, rising from a chair and sitting down. Moment and force patterns were normalised to the percentage of body weight per height and body weight, respectively, and then averaged over all subjects for each point, about the three tibial anatomical axes, and for each task. Load patterns were found to be consistent over subjects, but different among the anatomical axes, tasks and points. Generally, moments were higher in the medio/lateral axis and influenced by walking speed. In all five walking tasks and in ascending stairs with alternating feet, the more proximal the point was the smaller the mean moment was. For the remaining tasks the opposite trend was observed. The overall largest value was observed in the medio/lateral direction at the ankle centre in level walking at high speed (9.1% body weight * height on average), nearly three times larger than that of the anterior/posterior axis (2.9) during level walking with a sidestep turn. The present results should be of value also for in-vitro mechanical tests and finite element models.

  17. Posterior tibial slope changes after opening- and closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy: a comparative prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Ducat, A; Sariali, E; Lebel, B; Mertl, P; Hernigou, P; Flecher, X; Zayni, R; Bonnin, M; Jalil, R; Amzallag, J; Rosset, P; Servien, E; Gaudot, F; Judet, T; Catonné, Y

    2012-02-01

    Valgus high tibial osteotomy is considered to be an effective treatment for unicompartmental medial osteoarthritis. It is generally admitted that tibial slope increases after open-wedge high tibial osteotomy and decreases after closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy. However, the effects on posterior tibial slope of closing- or opening-wedge osteotomies remain controversial. We analyzed the modifications of tibial slope after opening- and closing-wedge high tibial osteotomies and compared the results of these two procedures. We hypothesized that there was no difference in postoperative tibial slope between opening and closing-wedge osteotomies. This prospective consecutive nonrandomized multicenter study was conducted between January 2008 and March 2009 and included 321 patients: 205 men and 116 women. A total of 224 patients underwent an opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy and 97 a closing-wedge osteotomy. The mean age was 52 years ± 9 and the mean body mass index was 28kg/m(2) ± 5. The main etiology was primary arthritis. Posterior tibial slope was measured preoperatively and at the last follow-up on a lateral radiograph in relation to the posterior tibial cortex. In the opening-wedge group, a definite 0.6° increase in tibial slope (P=0.016) was observed. In the closing-wedge group, a definite 0.7° decrease in tibial slope (P=0.02) was found. Fourteen percent of the opening-wedge osteotomies increased tibial slope by 5° or more versus only 2% of the closed-wedge osteotomies (P<0.001). Twelve percent of the closing-wedge high tibial osteotomies led to a decrease of 5° or more of the tibial slope versus 7% of the opening-wedge osteotomies (P<0.02). These results confirm what is generally reported in the literature, i.e., an increase in tibial slope in opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy and a decrease in the slope in closing-wedge osteotomies. These tibial slope changes appear to be very limited in this series, less than 1° on average. However, there was a bias

  18. Kinematically aligned total knee arthroplasty limits high tibial forces, differences in tibial forces between compartments, and abnormal tibial contact kinematics during passive flexion.

    PubMed

    Roth, Joshua D; Howell, Stephen M; Hull, Maury L

    2017-09-07

    Following total knee arthroplasty (TKA), high tibial forces, large differences in tibial forces between the medial and lateral compartments, and anterior translation of the contact locations of the femoral component on the tibial component during passive flexion indicate abnormal knee function. Because the goal of kinematically aligned TKA is to restore native knee function without soft tissue release, the objectives were to determine how well kinematically aligned TKA limits high tibial forces, differences in tibial forces between compartments, and anterior translation of the contact locations of the femoral component on the tibial component during passive flexion. Using cruciate retaining components, kinematically aligned TKA was performed on thirteen human cadaveric knee specimens with use of manual instruments without soft tissue release. The tibial forces and tibial contact locations were measured in both the medial and lateral compartments from 0° to 120° of passive flexion using a custom tibial force sensor. The average total tibial force (i.e. sum of medial + lateral) ranged from 5 to 116 N. The only significant average differences in tibial force between compartments occurred at 0° of flexion (29 N, p = 0.0008). The contact locations in both compartments translated posteriorly in all thirteen kinematically aligned TKAs by an average of 14 mm (p < 0.0001) and 18 mm (p < 0.0001) in the medial and lateral compartments, respectively, from 0° to 120° of flexion. After kinematically aligned TKA, average total tibial forces due to the soft tissue restraints were limited to 116 N, average differences in tibial forces between compartments were limited to 29 N, and a net posterior translation of the tibial contact locations was observed in all kinematically aligned TKAs during passive flexion from 0° to 120°, which are similar to what has been measured previously in native knees. While confirmation in vivo is warranted, these findings give

  19. Computer-assisted navigation decreases the change in the tibial posterior slope angle after closed-wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Bae, Dae Kyung; Ko, Young Wan; Kim, Sang Jun; Baek, Jong Hun; Song, Sang Jun

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the change in tibial posterior slope angle (PSA) between patients treated via computer-assisted and conventional closed-wedge high tibial osteotomy (CWHTO). It was hypothesized that a decrease in the PSA would be less in the computer-assisted group than in the conventional group. Data on a total of 75 computer-assisted CWHTOs (60 patients) and 75 conventional CWHTOs (49 patients) were retrospectively compared using matched pair analysis. The pre- and postoperative mechanical axis (MA) and the PSA were radiographically evaluated. The parallel angle was defined as the angle between the joint line and the osteotomy surface. The data were compared between the two groups. The postoperative radiographic MA averaged 1.3° ± 2.6° valgus in the computer-assisted group and 0.3° ± 3.1° varus in the conventional group. The change in PSA averaged -0.8° ± 0.9° in the computer-assisted group and -4.0° ± 2.2° in the conventional group. The parallel angle averaged 0.2° ± 3.0° in the computer-assisted group and 6.2° ± 5.3° in the conventional group. Computer-assisted CWHTO using four guide pins could avoid inadvertent change in the PSA. The navigation can be used in anticipation of decreasing the risk of change in the PSA in CWHTO, especially in patients whose preoperative PSA is small. The special attention should be paid to locate the hinge axis acutely and to make the parallel proximal and distal osteotomy surfaces during CWHTO. III.

  20. Biomechanical Factors in Tibial Stress Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    Gluteal strain/ tendinitis Greater trochanteritis TOTAL Groin sfrain/ tendinitis Hip/ groin injury other Pelvic sfress fracture 32 19 Thigh...Medial collateral sfrain 79 28 27 Medial plica syndrome 1 Patellar tendinitis 7 Patellofemoral pain syndrome 16 Pes Anserinus tendinitis 1...Knee other 24 Lower leg TOTAL 127 Achilles tendinitis 19 Acute fibular fracture 3 Acute tibial fracture 1 Anterior compartment syndrome 7

  1. [Medial proximal tibia donor site: contribution to alveolar cleft repair in children].

    PubMed

    Corre, P; Khonsari, R H; Laure, B; Cordova Jara, L; Bonnet, R; Mercier, J-M

    2011-11-01

    Cancellous bone is the best material for alveolar cleft repair (or secondary alveolar cleft repair). It is usually harvested from the iliac bone but morbidity of this donor site is high. Among the other possible donor sites the tibial harvesting procedure seems safe with lower morbidity. The authors assessed the medio-proximal tibial harvesting procedure on a consecutive series of 55 children having undergone secondary alveoloplasty. An individual questionnaire was used to assess retrospectively the intensity and duration of postoperative pain, functional impotence, possible late complications, and scar length. Postoperative tibial in frontal and profile radiographs were used to assess corticotomy diameter, the distance between corticotomy and growth plate, and local complications. The mean patient age was nine years. No complications were reported. Sixty nine percent of patients complained of postoperative pain with an average intensity of four out of 10 for a period of 17 days. Sixty five percent of patients complained of discomfort in walking for an average of 12 days. The average scar length was 10 mm. Two patients (3.6%) presented with sequels two years after surgery, residual scar pain for one, and painless ectopic tibial ossification next to the sampling site for the other. The medio-proximal tibial site bone harvesting morbidity is low. The surgical procedure is easy, rapid, and safe. The amount of cancellous bone collected is sufficient for two simultaneous alveolar defect grafts. This site seems especially well adapted for secondary alveoloplasty in children. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Is there an Increase in Valgus Deviation in Tibial Distraction Using the Lengthening Over Nail Technique?

    PubMed

    Park, Hoon; Ryu, Keun Jung; Kim, Hyun Woo; Hwang, Jin Ho; Han, Joon Woo; Lee, Dong Hoon

    2016-05-01

    During tibial lengthening, the soft tissues of the posterolateral compartment produce distraction-resisting forces causing valgus angulation. Although this occurs with the classic Ilizarov method, whether a valgus deformity develops with the lengthening over nail (LON) technique is questioned, because the intramedullary nail is thought to resist deforming forces and adequately maintain alignment of the distracted bone. The purposes of this study were to (1) determine the amount of valgus deviation during tibial lengthening with the LON technique; and (2) analyze the factors that may be associated with valgus deviation with the LON technique. Between June 2009 and September 2013, we performed 346 tibial lengthenings using the LON technique, lengthening and then nail technique, or lengthening with an intramedullary lengthening device. Sixty patients (120 tibias) who underwent bilateral lower leg lengthening with the LON technique were enrolled in this retrospective study. To limit the number of variables, we analyzed only the right tibia in all patients (60 tibias). The mean followup was 42 months (range, 26-71 months). The mean age of the patients was 25 years (range, 18-40 years). There were 36 male and 24 female patients. The mean final length gain was 67 ± 9 mm. The mean time for distraction was 100 ± 25 days. The overall valgus deviation was assessed by measuring the change in the medial proximal tibial angle and mechanical femorotibial angle on radiographs obtained before and after surgery and after completion of lengthening. Several demographic, surgical, and distraction-related variables were considered possible factors to prevent valgus deviation: proximal fixation method; presence of a blocking screw; diameter and length of the intramedullary nail; degree of nail insertion; length of the nail in the distal segment after completion of distraction; final length gain; and patient's BMI. During the period studied, the blocking screw was to maintain the

  3. Somatotopic mapping of chordotonal organ neurons in a primitive ensiferan, the New Zealand tree weta Hemideina femorata: II. complex tibial organ.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Hiroshi; Field, Laurence H

    2003-09-22

    Most ensiferan insects possess sets of highly specialized chordotonal organs in the proximal tibiae to detect conspecific auditory/vibratory signals or approach of predators. To date, most auditory/vibratory afferents have been classified according to their physiological properties and axonal projection morphology, but not to somatotopic origins. Hence, the functional specialization of identified receptor cells in the tibial organs remains uncertain. To address this question from an anatomical aspect, we investigated the structure of the weta, Hemideina femorata, tibial organs (the most elaborated tibial chordotonal organs among ensiferans) and their central projections by staining small numbers of receptor afferents from identified tibial organs. These organs comprise the "complex tibial organ," including the subgenual organ (primary vibration detector) and its posterior complement, the accessory organ, and the crista acustica (primary auditory organ) and its proximal complement, the intermediate organ. Unlike reports of a membranous organ structure for homologs in other ensiferans, weta tibial organs contain receptor cells embedded in thick solid masses. Primary afferents project ipsilaterally to the medial ventral association center of thoracic ganglia, where axon terminals are arrayed topographically in different areas specific to each organ, except for almost complete overlap of afferents originating from the distal part of the crista acustica and from the intermediate organ. In contrast to somatotopic reflection of sensilla position on limbs, as known for mechanoreceptor hairs, the somatotopic projection map of the insect ear reveals topographic association with acoustic tracheae or tibial cuticular attachment sites, which in turn must reflect determinants of response sensitivity (e.g., frequency or threshold).

  4. Physeal Bystander Effects in Rhabdomyosarcoma Radiotherapy: Experiments in a New Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jason A.; Strauss, Judith A.; Allen, Matthew J.; Damron, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy used in the treatment of pediatric musculoskeletal sarcomas may result in crippling defects of skeletal growth. Several radioprotective strategies have shown potential for preserving function of the irradiated epiphysis but have not been evaluated in a tumor-bearing animal model. We developed two bioluminescent human rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines that were used to establish xenograft tumors in skeletally immature mice. Bioluminescence imaging and radiography allowed serial evaluation of tumor growth and tibial elongation following localized radiotherapy. High-dose (10 Gy) radiotherapy significantly reduced tumor growth velocity and prolonged the median survival of tumor-bearing mice but also resulted in a significant 3.3% shortening of the irradiated limb. Exposure to a lower, 2 Gy dose resulted in 4.1% decrease in limb length but did not extend survival. This new model provides a clinically relevant means to test the efficacy and safety of novel radioprotectant and radiorecovery strategies for use in this context. PMID:21559211

  5. High tibial slope correlates with increased posterior tibial translation in healthy knees.

    PubMed

    Schatka, Imke; Weiler, Andreas; Jung, Tobias M; Walter, Thula C; Gwinner, Clemens

    2017-09-09

    Notwithstanding the importance of the tibial slope (TS) for anterior tibial translation, little information is available regarding the implications on posterior laxity, particularly in healthy subjects. It was hypothesized that increased TS is associated with decreased posterior tibial translation (PTT) in healthy knees. A total of 124 stress radiographs of healthy knees were enrolled in this study. Tibial slope and the posterior tibial translation were evaluated using a Telos device with a 150-N force at 90° of knee flexion. Two blinded observers reviewed independently on two different occasions. One hundred and twenty-four patients [35 females and 89 males; 41 (range 18-75) years] were enrolled in this study, with a mean PTT of 2.8 mm (±1.9 mm; range 0-8 mm) and a mean TS of 8.6° (±2.6°; range 1°-14°). Pearson correlation showed a significant correlation between the PTT and TS in the overall patient cohort (P < 0.0001) with r = 0.76 and R (2) = 0.58. There was no statistical difference between female and male patients regarding the PTT or the TS. Subgrouping of the patient cohort (four groups with n = 31) according to their TS (groups I < 7°; II = 7°-8.5°; III = 9°-10.5°; IV ≥ 11°) revealed significant differences between each subgroup, respectively. Furthermore, there was a weak but significant correlation between age and PTT (P = 0.004, r = 0.26). In addition to the substantial variance in tibial slope and posterior laxity among healthy knees, high tibial slope significantly correlates with increased posterior tibial translation. Increasing age is further associated with a greater magnitude of posterior tibial translation. Consequently, knowledge of the tibial slope facilitates simple estimation of posterior knee laxity, which is mandatory for PCL reconstruction and knee arthroplasty.

  6. Treatment of fractures of the tibial tuberosity in adolescent soccer players.

    PubMed

    Ares, Oscar; Seijas, Roberto; Cugat, Ramón; Alvarez, Pedro; Aguirre, Mario; Catala, Jordi

    2011-02-01

    Fractures of the tibial tuberosity are uncommon injuries that mainly occur in 14 to 16 year-old adolescents involved in sports activities. The mechanism of injury is related to jumping while practicing sports. This retrospective study presents the outcome of fractures of the tibial tuberosity in a series of 18 adolescent soccer players treated with the same surgical technique in one center. The hypothesis was that our surgical technique with two parallel screws, one proximal and one distal to the physis, avoids physis injury and has no repercussions on growth. The average age was 14.7 years. All patients were male. The fractures included 4 type IIA, 3 type IIB, 6 type IIIA, and 5 type IIIB (Ogden classification). All patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation consisting of screw placement parallel to the joint surface, sparing the tibial physis. There were no complications in any case, and all patients were able to resume their previous sports activities. The technique used appeared to be safe. Screws were removed in 8 patients owing to local discomfort. All patients achieved the same competition level as before the injury.

  7. Bone transport with an external fixator and a locking plate for segmental tibial defects.

    PubMed

    Oh, C-W; Apivatthakakul, T; Oh, J-K; Kim, J-W; Lee, H-J; Kyung, H-S; Baek, S-G; Jung, G-H

    2013-12-01

    Although gradual bone transport may permit the restoration of large-diameter bones, complications are common owing to the long duration of external fixation. In order to reduce such complications, a new technique of bone transport involving the use of an external fixator and a locking plate was devised for segmental tibial bone defects. A total of ten patients (nine men, one woman) with a mean age at operation of 40.4 years (16 to 64) underwent distraction osteogenesis with a locking plate to treat previously infected post-traumatic segmental tibial defects. The locking plate was fixed percutaneously to bridge proximal and distal segments, and was followed by external fixation. After docking, percutaneous screws were fixed at the transported segment through plate holes. At the same time, bone grafting was performed at the docking site with the external fixator removed. The mean defect size was 5.9 cm (3.8 to 9.3) and mean external fixation index was 13.4 days/cm (11.8 to 19.5). In all cases, primary union of the docking site and distraction callus was achieved, with an excellent bony result. There was no recurrence of deep infection or osteomyelitis, and with the exception of one patient with a pre-existing peroneal nerve injury, all achieved an excellent or good functional result. With short external fixation times and low complication rates, bone transport with a locking plate could be recommended for patients with segmental tibial defects.

  8. Selective activation of the human tibial and common peroneal nerves with a flat interface nerve electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiefer, M. A.; Freeberg, M.; Pinault, G. J. C.; Anderson, J.; Hoyen, H.; Tyler, D. J.; Triolo, R. J.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation has been shown effective in restoring basic lower extremity motor function in individuals with paralysis. We tested the hypothesis that a flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) placed around the human tibial or common peroneal nerve above the knee can selectively activate each of the most important muscles these nerves innervate for use in a neuroprosthesis to control ankle motion. Approach. During intraoperative trials involving three subjects, an eight-contact FINE was placed around the tibial and/or common peroneal nerve, proximal to the popliteal fossa. The FINE's ability to selectively recruit muscles innervated by these nerves was assessed. Data were used to estimate the potential to restore active plantarflexion or dorsiflexion while balancing inversion and eversion using a biomechanical simulation. Main results. With minimal spillover to non-targets, at least three of the four targets in the tibial nerve, including two of the three muscles constituting the triceps surae, were independently and selectively recruited in all subjects. As acceptable levels of spillover increased, recruitment of the target muscles increased. Selective activation of muscles innervated by the peroneal nerve was more challenging. Significance. Estimated joint moments suggest that plantarflexion sufficient for propulsion during stance phase of gait and dorsiflexion sufficient to prevent foot drop during swing can be achieved, accompanied by a small but tolerable inversion or eversion moment.

  9. Proximal tibiofibular dislocation associated with fracture of the tibia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction We report a case of proximal tibiofibular dislocation associated with an ipsilateral tibial fracture, a rare association of injuries that can remain undiagnosed. Case presentation A white 23-year-old man experienced a road accident and was diagnosed with proximal tibiofibular dislocation associated with an open fracture of the tibia and injury to the external popliteus sciatic nerve. He was treated immediately with an intramedullary tibial nail and a cancellous screw at the level of the proximal tibiofibular articulation. Conclusion In addition to this case and the surgical treatment, a review of the clinical cases described in the literature is provided, assessing the type of injury and the therapeutic options used, which depend mainly on the stage in which the condition is diagnosed. PMID:20062704

  10. Effect of the Osteotomy Length on the Change of the Posterior Tibial Slope With a Simple Distraction of the Posterior Gap in the Uni- and Biplanar Open-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Seuk; Kang, Jong Yeal; Lee, Myung Chul; Oh, Won Seok; Elazab, Ashraf; Song, Min Kyu

    2016-02-01

    To (1) determine the length of the osteotomy at the anterior and posterior cortex, (2) compare between uni- and biplanar osteotomy, and (3) evaluate the relationship between the extent of the osteotomy and change of the posterior tibial slope. A prospective comparative study of 24 uniplanar and 30 biplanar osteotomies was performed. To evaluate the length of osteotomy, osteotomy lines of the anterior and posterior cortex were analyzed in the 3-dimensional surface models. For slope measurement, the intramedullary axis of the proximal tibia (slope P), posterior cortical line of the proximal tibia (slope C), and anterior cortical line of the proximal fibula (slope F) were used. An analysis of the changes in the posterior tibial slope was performed independently using a pre- and postoperative lateral plane radiograph. In the uniplanar osteotomy, ratios of the osteotomized length to the total cortical length aligned with the osteotomized plane were larger in the anterior cortex (0.91 in uniplanar v 0.46 in biplanar; P = 0) and posterior cortex (0.97 in uniplanar v 0.79 ratio in biplanar; P = 0). Furthermore, the posterior tibial slope was maintained in both groups and the ratios between the anterior and posterior gap in both groups were 0.57 and 0.63, respectively. The maintenance of the slope was not related to any specific variables. Additionally, these phenomena did not differ between those patients who underwent uni- and those who underwent biplanar osteotomy. Increase in the posterior tibial slope was prevented with appropriate uni- or biplanar osteotomy with a simple distraction at the most posterior gap. However, in the uniplanar osteotomy, the ratio of the osteotomized length to the total cortical length was larger in both the anterior and posterior cortex. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Magnetic resonance study on the anatomical relationship between the posterior proximal region of the tibia and the popliteal artery☆

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo Goes, Rogério Franco; Filho, Augusto Cardoso; de Oliveira Castro, Gabriel Novaes Pillar; Loures, Fabricio Bolpato; Da Palma, Idemar Monteiro; Kinder, André; Labronici, Pedro José

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze and describe the distance from the popliteal artery to three specific areas of the proximal region of the tibia, with the knee extended, by means of magnetic resonance. Methods Images of 100 knees of patients who underwent magnetic resonance examinations were analyzed. The location of the popliteal artery was measured in three different areas of the posterior proximal region of the tibia. The first measurement was made at the level of the knee joint (tibial plateau). The second was 9 mm distally to the tibial plateau. The third was at the level of the anterior tuberosity of the tibia (ATT). Results The distances between the popliteal artery and the tibial plateau and ATT region were significantly greater in males than in females. The distances between the popliteal artery and the regions 9 mm distally to the tibial plateau and the ATT were significantly greater in the age group over 36 years than in the group ≤36 years. Conclusion Knowledge of the anatomical position of the popliteal artery, as demonstrated through magnetic resonance studies, is of great relevance in planning surgical procedures that involve the knee joint. In this manner, devastating iatrogenic injuries can be avoided, particularly in regions that are proximal to the tibial plateau and in young patients. PMID:26417569

  12. [Influencing factors for trauma-induced tibial infection in underground coal mine].

    PubMed

    Meng, W Z; Guo, Y J; Liu, Z K; Li, Y F; Wang, G Z

    2016-07-20

    Objective: To investigate the influencing factors for trauma-induced tibial infection in underground coal mine. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 1 090 patients with tibial fracture complicated by bone infection who were injured in underground coal mine and admitted to our hospital from January 1995 to August 2015, including the type of trauma, injured parts, severity, and treatment outcome. The association between risk factors and infection was analyzed. Results: Among the 1 090 patients, 357 had the clinical manifestations of acute and chronic bone infection, 219 had red and swollen legs with heat pain, and 138 experienced skin necrosis, rupture, and discharge of pus. The incidence rates of tibial infection from 1995 to 2001, from 2002 to 2008, and from 2009 to 2015 were 31%, 26.9%, and 20.2%, respectively. The incidence rate of bone infection in the proximal segment of the tibia was significantly higher than that in the middle and distal segments (42.1% vs 18.9%/27.1%, P<0.01) . As for patients with different types of trauma (Gustilo typing) , the patients with type III fracture had a significantly higher incidence rate of bone infection than those with type I/II infection (52.8% vs 21.8%/24.6%, P<0.01) . The incidence rates of bone infection after bone traction, internal fixation with steel plates, fixation with external fixator, and fixation with intramedullary nail were 20.7%, 43.5%, 21.4%, and 26.1%, respectively, suggesting that internal fixation with steel plates had a significantly higher incidence rate of bone infection than other fixation methods (P<0.01) . The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the position of tibial fracture and type of fracture were independent risk factors for bone infection. Conclusion: There is a high incidence rate of trauma-induced tibial infection in workers in underground coal mine. The position of tibial fracture and type of fracture are independent risk factors for

  13. Size correlation between the tibial anterior cruciate ligament footprint and the tibia plateau.

    PubMed

    Iriuchishima, Takanori; Ryu, Keinosuke; Aizawa, Shin; Fu, Freddie H

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to reveal the correlation between the size of the native anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) footprint and the size of the tibia plateau. Twenty-four non-paired human cadaver knees were used. All soft tissues around the knee were resected except the ACL. The ACL was cut in the middle, and the femoral bone was cut at the most proximal point of the femoral notch. The ACL was carefully dissected, and the periphery of the ACL insertion site was outlined on both the femoral and tibial sides. An accurate lateral view of the femoral condyle and the tibial plateau was photographed with a digital camera, and the images were downloaded to a personal computer. The size of the femoral and tibial ACL footprints, and anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML), lengths of the tibia plateau and area of tibia plateau were measured with Image J software (National Institution of Health). The sizes of the native femoral and tibial ACL footprints were 72.3 ± 24.4 and 134.1 ± 32.4 mm(2), respectively. The AP lengths of the whole, medial and lateral facet of the tibia plateau were as follows: 44.5 ± 4.1, 40.8 ± 4.1 and 36.8 ± 4 mm, respectively. The ML length of the tibia plateau was 68.3 ± 5.5 mm. Total area of tibia plateau was 2,282.9 ± 378.7 mm(2). The AP length of the lateral facet of the tibia plateau (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.508, p = 0.011) and the total area of tibia plateau (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.442, p = 0.031) were significantly correlated with the size of the tibial ACL footprint. For clinical relevance, the AP length of lateral facet of the tibia plateau and total area of tibia plateau are significantly correlated with the size of the tibial ACL footprint. It might be possible to predict the size of the ACL measuring these parameters.

  14. A Randomized Cadaver Study Comparing First-Attempt Success Between Tibial and Humeral Intraosseous Insertions Using NIO Device by Paramedics

    PubMed Central

    Szarpak, Lukasz; Truszewski, Zenon; Smereka, Jacek; Krajewski, Paweł; Fudalej, Marcin; Adamczyk, Piotr; Czyzewski, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Medical personnel may encounter difficulties in obtaining intravenous (IV) access during cardiac arrest. The 2015 American Heart Association guidelines and the 2015 European Resuscitation Council guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) suggest that rescuers establish intraosseous (IO) access if an IV line is not easily obtainable. The aim of the study was to compare the success rates of the IO proximal tibia and proximal humerus head access performed by paramedics using the New Intraosseous access device (NIO; Persys Medical, Houston, TX, USA) in an adult cadaver model during simulated CPR. In an interventional, randomized, crossover, single-center cadaver study, a semi-automatic spring-load driven NIO access device was investigated. In total, 84 paramedics with less than 5-year experience in Emergency Medical Service participated in the study. The trial was performed on 42 adult cadavers. In each cadaver, 2 IO accesses to the humerus head, and 2 IO accesses to the proximal tibia were obtained. The success rate of the first IO attempt was 89.3% (75/84) for tibial access, and 73.8% (62/84) for humeral access (P = 0.017). The procedure times were significantly faster for tibial access [16.8 (interquartile range, IQR, 15.1–19.9] s] than humeral access [26.7 (IQR, 22.1–30.9) s] (P < 0.001). Tibial IO access is easier and faster to put in place than humeral IO access. Humeral IO access can be an alternative method to tibial IO access. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02700867. PMID:27196493

  15. Full and surface tibial cementation in total knee arthroplasty: a biomechanical investigation of stress distribution and remodeling in the tibia.

    PubMed

    Cawley, Derek T; Kelly, Nicola; Simpkin, Andrew; Shannon, Fintan J; McGarry, J Patrick

    2012-05-01

    Aseptic tibial component loosening remains a major cause of total knee arthroplasty failure. The cementation technique used to achieve fixation may play a major role in loosening. Despite this, the optimum technique remains unanswered. This study aims to investigate stress and strain distributions in the proximal tibia for full cementation and surface cementation of the Genesis II tibial component. Principal cortical bone strains were measured experimentally in intact, surface cemented and fully cemented synthetic tibiae using strain gauges. Both axial and 15° flexion loading were considered. Finite element models were used to assess both cortical and cancellous bone stresses and strains. Using a bone remodeling algorithm potential sites of bone formation and resorption were identified post-implantation. Principal cortical bone strain results demonstrate strong correlations between the experimental and finite element analyses (R(2)≥0.81, RMSE(%)≤17.5%). Higher cortical strains are measured for surface cementation, as full cementation creates a stiffer proximal tibial structure. Simulations reveal that both cementation techniques result in lower cancellous stresses under the baseplate compared to the intact tibia, with greater reductions being computed for full cementation. The surface cementation model displays the closest cancellous stress distribution to the intact model. In addition, bone remodeling simulations predict more extensive bone resorption under the baseplate for full cementation (43%) than for surface cementation (29%). Full cementation results in greater stress reduction under the tibial baseplate than surface cementation, suggesting that surface cementation will result in less proximal bone resorption, thus reducing the possibility of aseptic loosening. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tibial Lengthening Using a Fixator-Assisted Lengthening Plate: A New Technique

    PubMed Central

    Tosun, Haci Bayram; Agir, Ismail; Gumustas, Seyitali; Serbest, Sancar; Uludag, Abuzer; Celik, Suat

    2016-01-01

    Background There are many techniques that are used for limb lengthening. Lengthening a limb over a plate is an alternative choice used in children or when using an intramedullary nail is difficult. Objectives In this study, we presented a new technique for tibial lengthening using a monolateral external fixator over a lengthening plate. Materials and Methods For tibial lengthening, a monolateral external fixator was attached to the composite bone model medially. After a corticotomy was performed, the lengthening plate was placed laterally. Three locking screws were inserted proximally, and two cortical screws were inserted into a lengthening hole that was 1 cm below the osteotomy site. We avoided contact between the screws of the lengthening plate and the pins of the external fixator. During bone lengthening with the monolateral external fixator, the screws at the lengthening hole were able to slide distally with the distal segment of the tibia to allow for tibial elongation. Two locking screws were fixed at the distal locking holes of the plate when the bone elongation was complete. The external fixator was then removed. Results The fixator-assisted lengthening plate allowed bone lengthening without malalignment. There were no mechanical problems associated with the external fixator during the lengthening process. Plate osteosynthesis was stable after the fixator was removed. There was no contact between the screws of plate and the Schanz pins of the external fixator under C-arm fluoroscopy. Conclusions The fixator-assisted lengthening plate technique helps to maintain the stability and alignment at both sides of an osteotomy during tibial elongation. It allows the early removal of the external fixator immediately after lengthening is completed. This technique can be applied in children with open physes and in patients with a narrow medullary canal who are unsuitable for limb lengthening over an intramedullary nail. PMID:28184364

  17. Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Analysis of the Posterior Tibial Slope in 100 Knees.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jade Pei Yuik; Merican, Azhar M; Hashim, Muhammad Sufian; Abbas, Azlina A; Chan, Chee Ken; Mohamad, Jamal A

    2017-10-01

    The posterior tibial slope (PTS) is an important consideration in knee arthroplasty. However, there is still no consensus for the optimal slope. The objectives of this study were (1) to reliably determine the native PTS in this population using 3-dimensional computed tomography scans and (2) to determine the normal reference range for PTS in this population. One hundred computed tomography scans of disease-free knees were analyzed. A 3-dimensional reconstructed image of the tibia was generated and aligned to its anatomic axis in the coronal and sagittal planes. The tibia was then rotationally aligned to the tibial plateau (tibial centroid axis) and PTS was measured from best-fit planes on the surface of the proximal tibia and individually for the medial and lateral plateaus. This was then repeated with the tibia rotationally aligned to the ankle (transmalleolar axis). When rotationally aligned to the tibial plateau, the mean PTS, medial PTS, and lateral PTS were 11.2° ± 3.0 (range, 4.7°-17.7°), 11.3° ± 3.2 (range, 2.7°-19.7°), and 10.9° ± 3.7 (range, 3.5°-19.4°), respectively. When rotationally aligned to the ankle, the mean PTS, medial PTS, and lateral PTS were 11.4° ± 3.0 (range, 5.3°-19.3°), 13.9° ± 3.7 (range, 3.1°-24.4°), and 9.7° ± 3.6 (range, 0.8°-17.7°), respectively. The PTS in the normal Asian knee is on average 11° (mean) with a reference range of 5°-17° (mean ± 2 standard deviation). This has implications to surgery and implant design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Anatomical variation of posterior slope of tibial plateau in adult Eastern Indian population.

    PubMed

    Medda, Shyamalendu; Kundu, Rajib; Sengupta, Sohini; Pal, Ananda Kisor

    2017-01-01

    Upper surface of the proximal tibial end, tibial plateau, has a slope directed posteroinferiorly relative to the long axis of the middle of the shaft. It has important consideration in surgeries such as knee arthroplasty, high tibial osteotomy, and medical imaging of the knee joint. The aim of the present study was to estimate the tibial plateau angle (TPA) by plain radiograph in the adult Eastern Indian population as during literature review, we were unable to find any study, except one (without specific reference axis), on this variable among the Indian population. A sample was taken from adult patients attending the outpatient department of orthopedics of the institute with minor knee problems. Measurement of the TPA was done in the true lateral radiographs of the knee joints of the selected subjects by a standardized method. TPA varied widely from 6° to 24°, with the mean ± standard deviation value 13.6° ±3.5°. Student's unpaired t-test revealed no significant difference of TPA between left and right knees, both in male (P = 0.748) and female (P = 0.917) separately and in the entire study population irrespective of gender (P = 0.768). Comparison of TPA between male (13.3° ± 3.3°) and female (13.9° ± 3.4°) by Student's unpaired t-test showed no sexual dimorphism (P = 0.248). There were poor correlations of TPA with age and body mass index. The present study described the variations of the TPA in the adult Eastern Indian population (range 6°-24°, mean ± SD 13.6° ± 3.5°, no laterality, no sexual dimorphism, poor correlation with age and BMI). Knowledge of this study could be used in different orthopedic surgeries and imaging technique in or around the knee joint.

  19. Anatomical variation of posterior slope of tibial plateau in adult Eastern Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Medda, Shyamalendu; Kundu, Rajib; Sengupta, Sohini; Pal, Ananda Kisor

    2017-01-01

    Background: Upper surface of the proximal tibial end, tibial plateau, has a slope directed posteroinferiorly relative to the long axis of the middle of the shaft. It has important consideration in surgeries such as knee arthroplasty, high tibial osteotomy, and medical imaging of the knee joint. The aim of the present study was to estimate the tibial plateau angle (TPA) by plain radiograph in the adult Eastern Indian population as during literature review, we were unable to find any study, except one (without specific reference axis), on this variable among the Indian population. Materials and Methods: A sample was taken from adult patients attending the outpatient department of orthopedics of the institute with minor knee problems. Measurement of the TPA was done in the true lateral radiographs of the knee joints of the selected subjects by a standardized method. Results: TPA varied widely from 6° to 24°, with the mean ± standard deviation value 13.6° ±3.5°. Student's unpaired t-test revealed no significant difference of TPA between left and right knees, both in male (P = 0.748) and female (P = 0.917) separately and in the entire study population irrespective of gender (P = 0.768). Comparison of TPA between male (13.3° ± 3.3°) and female (13.9° ± 3.4°) by Student's unpaired t-test showed no sexual dimorphism (P = 0.248). There were poor correlations of TPA with age and body mass index. Conclusion: The present study described the variations of the TPA in the adult Eastern Indian population (range 6°–24°, mean ± SD 13.6° ± 3.5°, no laterality, no sexual dimorphism, poor correlation with age and BMI). Knowledge of this study could be used in different orthopedic surgeries and imaging technique in or around the knee joint. PMID:28216753

  20. Intraneural ganglion cyst of the tibial nerve.

    PubMed

    Adn, M; Hamlat, A; Morandi, X; Guegan, Y

    2006-08-01

    Intraneural ganglion cyst of the tibial nerve is very rare. To date, only 5 cases of this entity in the popliteal fossa have been reported. We report a new case and review the previously reported cases. A 40-year-old man experienced a mild vague pain in the medial half of his right foot for 3 years. Magnetic resonance imaging scan demonstrated a soft-tissue mass along the right tibial nerve. At surgery, an intraneural ganglion cyst was evacuated. After 12 months, the patient was pain-free with no signs of recurrence. Trauma might be a contributing factor to the development of intraneural ganglion cysts. Application of microsurgical techniques is encouraged.

  1. [Magnetic resonance imaging of tibial periostitis].

    PubMed

    Meyer, X; Boscagli, G; Tavernier, T; Aczel, F; Weber, F; Legros, R; Charlopain, P; Martin, J P

    1998-01-01

    Tibial periostitis frequently occurs in athletes. We present our experience with MRI in a series of 7 patients (11 legs) with this condition. The clinical presentation and scintigraphic scanning suggested the diagnosis. MRI exploration of 11 legs demonstrated a high band-like juxta-osseous signal enhancement of SE and IR T2 weighted sequences in 6 cases, a signal enhancement after i.v. contrast administration in 4. Tibial periostitis is a clinical diagnosis and MRI and scintigraphic findings can be used to assure the differential diagnosis in difficult cases with stress fracture. MRI can visualize juxta-osseous edematous and inflammatory reactions and an increased signal would appear to be characteristic when the band-like image is fixed to the periosteum.

  2. Effect of an anterior-sloped brace joint on anterior tibial translation and axial tibial rotation: a motion analysis study.

    PubMed

    Yeow, C H; Gan, W L; Lee, P V S; Goh, J C H

    2010-12-01

    Anterior tibial translation and axial tibial rotation are major biomechanical factors involved in anterior cruciate ligament injuries. This study sought to evaluate a brace prototype designed with an anterior-sloped joint, in terms of its efficacy in attenuating anterior tibial translation and axial tibial rotation during landing, using a motion analysis approach. Ten healthy male subjects performed single-leg landing tasks from a 0.6-m height with and without the brace prototype. Ground reaction force and kinematics data were obtained using a motion-capture system and force-plates. Anterior tibial translation and axial tibial rotation were determined based on tibial and femoral marker reference frames. Vertical and anterior-posterior ground reaction forces, hip, knee and ankle joint range-of-motions and angular velocities, anterior tibial translation and axial tibial rotation were compared between unbraced and braced conditions using Wilcoxon signed-rank test. We found no significant difference in peak vertical and anterior-posterior ground reaction forces (p=0.770 and p=0.332 respectively) between unbraced and braced conditions. Knee joint range-of-motion and angular velocity were lower (p=0.037 and p=0.038 respectively) for braced condition than unbraced condition. Anterior tibial translation and axial tibial rotation were reduced (p=0.027 and p=0.006 respectively) in braced condition, compared to unbraced condition. The anterior-sloped brace joint helps to attenuate anterior tibial translation and axial tibial rotation present in the knee joint during landing. It is necessary to test the brace prototype in a sporting population with realistic sports landing situations in order to assess its effectiveness in lowering anterior cruciate ligament injury risk. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Biomechanical Factors in Tibial Stress Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    patellofemoral joint pain during running. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise , 36, S56. Dierks, T.A., Davis, I.S. & Hamill, J. (2004). Lower extremity...knee flexion / extension , and knee internal/external rotation were assessed. Timing difference values of 0% stance indicated synchronous coupling. CRP...and continuous excursion ratios. Differences were primarily observed between the tibial internal/external rotation with knee flexion / extension

  4. Treatment of growth arrest by transfer of cultured chondrocytes into physeal defects.

    PubMed

    Lee, E H; Chen, F; Chan, J; Bose, K

    1998-01-01

    Chondrocytes were cultured from cartilage harvested from the iliac apophysis and knee joints of New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. An experimental model for growth arrest was created by excising the medial half of the proximal growth plate of the tibia of 6-week-old NZW rabbits. The cultured chondrocytes were embedded in agarose and transferred into the growth-plate defect after excision of the physis. Transfer also was performed after excision of the bony bridge in established growth arrest. In both cases, growth arrest with angular deformation of the tibia was prevented. Histologic studies confirmed the viability of the chondrocytes in the new host physis.

  5. Impingement of the Mobile Bearing on the Lateral Wall of the Tibial Tray in Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Inui, Hiroshi; Taketomi, Shuji; Yamagami, Ryota; Sanada, Takaki; Shirakawa, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-07-01

    Tilting of the mobile bearing relative to the tibial tray in the flexion position may result from the implantation of femoral components more laterally relative to tibial components during unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) using the Oxford Knee. The purpose of the present study was to compare femoral component positions after UKA using the phase 3 device and a novel device. We further evaluated the placement of the femoral components with the new device in the flexion position to determine the association with short-term prognosis. The location of femoral and tibial components in the flexion position of 38 knees implanted using the phase 3 device and 49 knees using a novel device was assessed at 1 year postoperatively using radiography of the proximal tibia and distal femur in the flexion position. The femoral component was implanted more laterally using the new device than using the phase 3 device in the flexion position (P = .012), which caused the impingement of the mobile bearing against the lateral wall of the tibial tray. After UKA using the new device, 10% of patients exhibited the tilting phenomenon of the mobile bearing because of the lateral implantation of the femoral implant. To prevent implantation of the femoral component too laterally using the new device during UKA, knee surgeons should set the drill guide more medially such that the center of the drill is aligned with the middle of the medial femoral condyle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of thiuram, disulfiram and a trace element mixture on the incidence of tibial dyschondroplasia in chickens

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, H.M. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effect of dietary addition of 30 ppm of thiuram or disulfiram on the development of tibial dyschondroplasia (a large mass of cartilage in the proximal end of the tibia) in chicks in the presence and absence of trace element supplementation: B, Ni, Al, Sr, Br, V, Si, Sn, Cr, F, Mo, Li, Mn, Zn, Fe, Cu and I. In two experiments, the incidence and severity of tibial dyschondroplasia were lower in chicks fed the diet containing the trace element supplement than in those fed the basal diet. Adding thiuram or disulfiram to the diet caused a significantly higher incidence and severity of tibial dyschondroplasia in chicks regardless of the presence or absence of the trace element supplement. In a third experiment not involving thiuram or disulfiram the addition of trace elements had no significant effect on tibial dyschondroplasia. Adding thiuram or disulfiram to the diet in a fourth experiment lowered the absorption of /sup 47/Ca from the gastrointestinal tract but did not influence the biological half-life of /sup 47/Ca in the chick.

  7. Tibial forces measured in vivo after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    D'Lima, Darryl D; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Slamin, John E; Colwell, Clifford W

    2006-02-01

    An instrumented tibial prosthesis was developed to measure forces in vivo after total tibial arthroplasty. This prosthesis was implanted in a 67-kg, 80-year-old man. The prosthesis measured forces at the 4 quadrants of the tibial tray. Tibial forces were measured postoperatively during rehabilitation, rising from a chair, standing, walking, and climbing stairs. By the sixth postoperative week, the peak tibial forces during walking averaged 2.2 times body weight (BW). Stair climbing increased from 1.9 times BW on day 6 to 2.5 times BW at 6 weeks. This represents the first direct in vivo measurement of tibial forces, which should lead to refined surgical techniques and enhanced prosthetic designs. Technical design improvements will enhance function, quality of life, and longevity of total knee arthroplasty.

  8. Unreamed intramedullary nailing in distal tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Salem, Khaled Hamed

    2013-10-01

    Unreamed nailing has gained acceptance in the treatment of diaphyseal long bone fractures, especially in cases with polytrauma or high-energy injuries. Its application in distal tibial fractures, however, remains controversial. In this study, 101 distal tibial fractures treated using closed unreamed nailing were reviewed after a mean follow-up of 32 months. There were 59 type A und 42 type B fractures. The most common fracture pattern was the A1 spiral fracture (n = 40) followed by the B2 wedge fracture (n = 18). Intra-articular extension was encountered in 14 cases. One-fourth of the patients (n = 24) had open injuries. Forty-seven patients had additional injuries, and nearly one-third of them were polytraumatised. Union occurred after a mean time of 23.9 (range, 11-134) weeks. There were 13 cases of delayed union and seven non-unions; all healed eventually with additional surgery in only six fractures. Malunion was seen in 12 cases (five valgus, two varus and five external torsion), ten of which were associated with unplated fibular fractures. Three fractures (two open) were treated for deep infection. The most common complication seen was fatigue failure of the locking screws (27 cases). Unreamed nailing of distal tibial fractures is associated with a rather high rate of bone healing complications and locking screw failure. The decision for its use in the notoriously challenging fractures of this segment should be critically considered.

  9. The Retrograde Tibial Nail: presentation and biomechanical evaluation of a new concept in the treatment of distal tibia fractures.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Sebastian; Appelmann, Philipp; Pairon, Philip; Mehler, Dorothea; Rommens, Pol M

    2014-01-01

    Displaced distal tibia fractures require stable fixation while minimizing secondary damage to the soft tissues by the surgical approach and implants. Antegrade intramedullary nailing has become an alternative to plate osteosynthesis for the treatment of distal metaphyseal fractures over the past two decades. While retrograde intramedullary nailing is a standard procedure in other long bone fractures, only few attempts have been made on retrograde nailing of tibial fractures. The main reasons are difficulties of finding an ideal entry portal and the lack of an ideal implant for retrograde insertion. The Retrograde Tibial Nail (RTN) is a prototype intramedullary implant developed by our group. The implant offers double proximal and triple distal interlocking with an end cap leading to an angle-stable screw-nail construct of the most distal interlocking screw. Its design meets the requirements of a minimally invasive surgical approach, with a stable fracture fixation by multiple locking options. The 8mm diameter curved nail, with a length of 120 mm, is introduced through an entry portal at the medial malleolus. We see possible indications for the RTN in far distal tibial shaft fractures, distal extraarticular metaphyseal tibial fractures and in distal tibia fractures with simple extension into the ankle joint when the nail is combined lag screw fixation. A biomechanical comparison of the current RTN prototype against antegrade nailing (Expert Tibial Nail, Synthes(®), ETN) was performed. Both implants were fixed with double proximal and triple distal interlocking. Seven biomechanical composite tibiae were treated with either osteosynthesis techniques. A 10mm defect osteotomy 40 mm proximal to the joint line served as an AO 43-A3 type distal tibial fracture model. The stiffness of the implant-bone constructs was measured under low and high extra-axial compression (350 and 600 N) and under torsional load (8 Nm). Results show a comparable stability during axial loading

  10. Tibial revision knee arthroplasty with metaphyseal sleeves: The effect of stems on implant fixation and bone flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Nadorf, Jan; Kinkel, Stefan; Gantz, Simone; Jakubowitz, Eike; Kretzer, J. Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Revision total knee arthoplasty often requires modular implants to treat bone defects of varying severity. In some cases, it may not be clear which module size and implant combination (e.g. sleeve and stem) should be chosen for a specific defect. When balancing implant stability and osseointegration against stress-shielding, it is important to choose an appropriate implant combination in order to match the given level of bone loss. Therefore, the necessity of stems in less extensive tibial defects and the advantage of different stems (lengths and stiffnesses) in combination with large metaphyseal sleeves on implant fixation and bone flexibility using a modular tibial revision knee system, were analyzed. Materials and methods Four different stem combinations for a tibial revision implant (Sigma TC3, DePuy) were compared to an intact bone. Standardized implantation with n = 4 synthetic tibial bones was performed after generating an Anderson Orthopaedic Research Institute (AORI) Type T1 bone defect. Axial torques around the longitudinal stem axis and varus-valgus torques were separately applied to the implant. Micromotions of bone and implant were tracked using a digital image correlation system to calculate relative micromotions at the implant-bone-interface and bone deformation. Results Overall, using stems reduced the proximal micromotions of tray and sleeve compared to no stem, while reducing bone deformation proximally at the same time, indicating some potential for proximal stress-shielding compared to no stem. The potential for increased proximal stress-shield due to reduced proximal deformation appeared to be greater when using the longer stems. The location of lowest relative micromotions was also more distal when using long stems as opposed to short stems. A short stem (especially a smaller diameter short stem which still achieves diaphyseal fixation) displayed less potential for stress-shielding, but greater bone deformation distal to the tip

  11. Stress and stability comparison between different systems for high tibial osteotomies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High tibial osteotomy (HTO) with a medial opening wedge has been used to treat medial compartment osteoarthritis. However, this makes the proximal tibia a highly unstable structure and causes plate and screws to be the potentials sources for mechanical failure. Consequently, proper design and use of the fixation device are essential to the HTO especially for overweight or full weight-bearing patients. Methods Based on the CT-based images, a tibial finite-element model with medial opening was simulated and instrumented with one-leg and two-leg plate systems. The construct was subjected to physiological and surgical loads. Construct stresses and wedge micromotions were chosen as the comparison indices. Results The use of locking screws can stabilize the construct and decrease the implant and bone stresses. Comparatively, the two-leg design provides a wider load-sharing base to form a force-couple mechanism that effectively reduces construct stresses and wedge micromotions. However, the incision size, muscular stripping, and structural rigidity are the major concerns of using the two-leg systems. The one-leg plates behave as the fulcrum of the leverage system and make the wedge tip the zone of tension and thus have been reported to negatively affect the callus formation. Conclusions The choice of the HTO plates involved the trade-off between surgical convenience, construct stability, and stress-shielding effect. If the stability of the medial opening is the major concern, the two-leg system is suggested for the patients with heavy load demands and greater proximal tibial size. The one-leg system with locking screws can be used for the majority of the patients without heavy bodyweight and poor bone quality. PMID:23530858

  12. Taylor spatial frame in the treatment of open tibial shaft fractures

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sayyad, Mohammed J

    2008-01-01

    Background: The Taylor spatial frame (TSF) is a modern multiplanar external fixator that combines the ease of application and computer accuracy in the reduction of fractures. A retrospective review of our prospective TSF database for the use of this device for treating open tibial fractures in pediatric, adolescent, and adult patients was carried out to determine the effectiveness and complications of TSF in the treatment of these fractures. Materials and Methods: Nineteen male patients with open tibial fractures were included. Of these fractures, 10 were Gustilo Type II, five were Gustilo Type IIIA (two had delayed primary closure and three had split thickness skin grafting), and four were Gustilo Type IIIB (all had rotational flaps). Twelve of our patients presented immediately to the emergency room, and the remaining seven cases presented at a mean of 3 months (range, 2.2-4.5 months) after the initial injury. The fractures were located in proximal third (n=1), proximal/middle junction (n=2), middle third (n=3), middle/distal junction (n=8), distal third (n=3), and segmental fractures (n=2). Patients were of an average age of 26 years (range, 6-45years). Mean duration of follow-up was 3.5 years. Results: All fractures healed over a mean of 25 weeks (range, 9-46 weeks). All were able to participate in the activities of daily living without any difficulty and most were involved in sports during the last follow-up. Postoperative complications included pin tract infection in 12 patients. Conclusion: The TSF is an effective definitive method of open tibial fracture care with the advantage of early mobilization, ease of soft tissue management through gradual fracture reduction, and the ability to postoperatively manipulate the fracture into excellent alignment. PMID:19753231

  13. Modification of the alignment between the tibial tubercle and the trochlear groove induced by temporary hemiepiphysiodesis for lower extremity angular deformities: a trigonometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Ceroni, Dimitri; Dhouib, Amira; Merlini, Laura; Kampouroglou, Georgios

    2016-12-09

    This study aimed to predict the modification of the alignment between the tibial tubercle (TT) and the trochlear groove (TG) that occurs during femoral or tibial hemiepiphysiodesis. MRI scans of 541 knees were retrospectively reviewed to determine the distances between the cranial insertion of the patellar tendon on the TT and the femoral physis (FP)/tibial physis (TP). Thereafter, we developed a trigonometric formula to calculate the predicted change of the TT-TG distance that occurs during hemiepiphysiodesis around the knee using both the planned angular correction as well as the length between the physis (both distal femoral and proximal tibial) and the insertion of the patellar tendon of the TT. This study showed that TT-FP and TT-TP distances vary very little with sex and age during growth and the mean values of FP-TT and TP-TT distances (55 and 7 mm, respectively) can thus be used in clinical settings for calculating a rough estimate of the translation of the TT position that will occur during 'guided growth'. On this subject, one can expect a 1 mm simultaneous lateral or medial transfer of the TT for every 1° of angular correction during distal femoral hemiepiphysiodesis. For proximal tibial hemiepiphysiodesis, an angular correction of 8° should roughly translate into a simultaneous 1 mm transfer of the TT. This study puts forward the hypothesis that a simultaneous modification of the TT-TG distance has to be expected following hemiepiphysiodesis, whether femoral or tibial.

  14. Tibial Tray Thickness Significantly Increases Medial Tibial Bone Resorption in Cobalt-Chromium Total Knee Arthroplasty Implants.

    PubMed

    Martin, J Ryan; Watts, Chad D; Levy, Daniel L; Miner, Todd M; Springer, Bryan D; Kim, Raymond H

    2017-01-01

    Stress shielding is an uncommon complication associated with primary total knee arthroplasty. Patients are frequently identified radiographically with minimal clinical symptoms. Very few studies have evaluated risk factors for postoperative medial tibial bone loss. We hypothesized that thicker cobalt-chromium tibial trays are associated with increased bone loss. We performed a retrospective review of 100 posterior stabilized, fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty where 50 patients had a 4-mm-thick tibial tray (thick tray cohort) and 50 patients had a 2.7-mm-thick tibial tray (thin tray cohort). A clinical evaluation and a radiographic assessment of medial tibial bone loss were performed on both cohorts at a minimum of 2 years postoperatively. Mean medial tibial bone loss was significantly higher in the thick tray cohort (1.07 vs 0.16 mm; P = .0001). In addition, there were significantly more patients with medial tibial bone loss in the thick tray group compared with the thin tray group (44% vs 10%, P = .0002). Despite these differences, there were no statistically significant differences in range of motion, knee society score, complications, or revision surgeries performed. A thicker cobalt-chromium tray was associated with significantly more medial tibial bone loss. Despite these radiographic findings, we found no discernable differences in clinical outcomes in our patient cohort. Further study and longer follow-up are needed to understand the effects and clinical significance of medial tibial bone loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Histological analysis of the tibial anterior cruciate ligament insertion.

    PubMed

    Oka, Shinya; Schuhmacher, Peter; Brehmer, Axel; Traut, Ulrike; Kirsch, Joachim; Siebold, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    This study was performed to investigate the morphology of the tibial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) by histological assessment. The native (undissected) tibial ACL insertion of six fresh-frozen cadaveric knees was cut into four sagittal sections parallel to the long axis of the medial tibial spine. For histological evaluation, the slices were stained with haematoxylin and eosin, Safranin O and Russell-Movat pentachrome. All slices were digitalized and analysed at a magnification of 20×. The anterior tibial ACL insertion was bordered by a bony anterior ridge. The most medial ACL fibres inserted from the medial tibial spine and were adjacent to the articular cartilage of the medial tibial plateau. Parts of the bony insertions of the anterior and posterior horns of the lateral meniscus were in close contact with the lateral part of the tibial ACL insertion. A small fat pad was located just posterior to the functional ACL fibres. The anterior-posterior length of the medial ACL insertion was an average of 10.8 ± 1.1 mm compared with the lateral, which was only 6.2 ± 1.1 mm (p < 0.001). There were no central or posterolateral inserting ACL fibres. The shape of the bony tibial ACL insertion was 'duck-foot-like'. In contrast to previous findings, the functional mid-substance fibres arose from the most posterior part of the 'duck-foot' in a flat and 'c-shaped' way. The most anterior part of the tibial ACL insertion was bordered by a bony anterior ridge and the most medial by the medial tibial spine. No posterolateral fibres nor ACL bundles have been found histologically. This histological investigation may improve our understanding of the tibial ACL insertion and may provide important information for anatomical ACL reconstruction.

  16. Characterization of tibial velocities by duplex ultrasound in severe peripheral arterial disease and controls.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jeffrey D; Robbins, Nicholas G; Harry, Lauren A; Wilson, Dale G; McLafferty, Robert B; Mitchell, Erica L; Landry, Gregory J; Moneta, Gregory L

    2016-03-01

    The relationship between tibiopopliteal velocities and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) severity is not well understood. We sought to characterize tibiopopliteal velocities in severe PAD and non-PAD control patients. Patients with an arterial duplex ultrasound (DUS) examination with PAD evaluated during a 5-year period were retrospectively compared with non-PAD controls. Control DUS examinations were collected sequentially during a 6-month period, retrospectively. PAD patients included those with lifestyle-limiting intermittent claudication warranting revascularization and patients with critical limb ischemia, defined as ischemic rest pain, gangrene, or a nonhealing ischemic ulcer. For each, tibial and popliteal artery peak systolic velocity (PSV) was measured at the proximal, mid, and distal segment of each artery, and a mean PSV for each artery was calculated. Mean PSV, ankle-brachial indices, peak ankle velocity (PAV), average ankle velocity (AAV), mean tibial velocity (MTV), and ankle-profunda index (API) were compared between the two groups using independent t-tests. PAV is the maximum PSV of the distal peroneal, posterior tibial (PT), or anterior tibial (AT) artery; AAV is the average PSV of the distal peroneal, PT, and AT arteries; MTV is calculated by first averaging the proximal, mid, and distal PSV for each tibial artery and then averaging the three means together; API is the AAV divided by proximal PSV of the profunda. DUS was available in 103 patients with PAD (68 patients with critical limb ischemia and 35 patients with intermittent claudication) and 68 controls. Mean ankle-brachial index in the PAD group was 0.64 ± 0.25 compared with 1.08 ± 0.09 in controls (P = .006). Mean PSVs were significantly lower in PAD patients than in controls at the popliteal (64.6 ± 42.2 vs 76.2 ± 29.6; P = .037), peroneal (34.3 ± 26.4 vs 53.8 ± 23.3; P < .001), AT (43.7 ± 31.4 vs 65.4 ± 25.0; P < .001), and PT (43.4 ± 42.3 vs 74.1 ± 30.6; P < .001) and higher at

  17. Osteotomy at the distal third of tibial tuberosity with LCP L-buttress plate for correction of tibia vara

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many osteotomy methods and fixation types have been used to correct the misalignment observed in tibia vara and to achieve a more uniform distribution of weight across the knee joint. Purpose The aim of this study is to test the efficacy and safety of a modified closing wedge high tibial osteotomy (CWHTO) procedure for tibia vara. Methods In this prospective study, young adults with tibia vara and mild medial arthritic changes were included. A CWHTO was performed at the distal third of the tibial tuberosity, instead of the conventional proximal site. An L-shaped locking compression plate was used for internal fixation. Before/after evaluation of femoro-tibial angle (FTA), pain relief, patellar height, and posterior tibial slope were evaluated. Adverse events were monitored. Results Seventy-five knees from 46 patients aged 27.2 ± 5.8 years (range, 14–43 years) underwent the modified CWHTO procedure. After a follow-up of 26.3 ± 7.4 months (range, 15–46 months), FTA correction was 12.4° ± 4.7° (range, 7°–31°), and pain was relieved. Reduction in the posterior tibial slope was 3.0° ± 2.3° (p < 0.001), while there was no significant change in patella height. Bone union was observed in all patients. There were a delayed union in four knees, a peroneal nerve lesion in five knees causing partial paralysis and/or sensory loss, and infections in two knees. Three patients underwent a second surgery. All adverse events were successfully treated except for a case of extensor hallucis longus muscle paralysis. Conclusions The modified CWHTO procedure is efficient and safe for the correction of tibia vara in young patients. PMID:24521174

  18. Osteotomy at the distal third of tibial tuberosity with LCP L-buttress plate for correction of tibia vara.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ye; Gu, Jianming; Zhou, Yixin; Li, Yujun

    2014-02-13

    Many osteotomy methods and fixation types have been used to correct the misalignment observed in tibia vara and to achieve a more uniform distribution of weight across the knee joint. The aim of this study is to test the efficacy and safety of a modified closing wedge high tibial osteotomy (CWHTO) procedure for tibia vara. In this prospective study, young adults with tibia vara and mild medial arthritic changes were included. A CWHTO was performed at the distal third of the tibial tuberosity, instead of the conventional proximal site. An L-shaped locking compression plate was used for internal fixation. Before/after evaluation of femoro-tibial angle (FTA), pain relief, patellar height, and posterior tibial slope were evaluated. Adverse events were monitored. Seventy-five knees from 46 patients aged 27.2 ± 5.8 years (range, 14-43 years) underwent the modified CWHTO procedure. After a follow-up of 26.3 ± 7.4 months (range, 15-46 months), FTA correction was 12.4° ± 4.7° (range, 7°-31°), and pain was relieved. Reduction in the posterior tibial slope was 3.0° ± 2.3° (p<0.001), while there was no significant change in patella height. Bone union was observed in all patients. There were a delayed union in four knees, a peroneal nerve lesion in five knees causing partial paralysis and/or sensory loss, and infections in two knees. Three patients underwent a second surgery. All adverse events were successfully treated except for a case of extensor hallucis longus muscle paralysis. The modified CWHTO procedure is efficient and safe for the correction of tibia vara in young patients.

  19. Medial tibial stress syndrome: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Moen, Maarten H; Tol, Johannes L; Weir, Adam; Steunebrink, Miriam; De Winter, Theodorus C

    2009-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is one of the most common leg injuries in athletes and soldiers. The incidence of MTSS is reported as being between 4% and 35% in military personnel and athletes. The name given to this condition refers to pain on the posteromedial tibial border during exercise, with pain on palpation of the tibia over a length of at least 5 cm. Histological studies fail to provide evidence that MTSS is caused by periostitis as a result of traction. It is caused by bony resorption that outpaces bone formation of the tibial cortex. Evidence for this overloaded adaptation of the cortex is found in several studies describing MTSS findings on bone scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scan and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. The diagnosis is made based on physical examination, although only one study has been conducted on this subject. Additional imaging such as bone, CT and MRI scans has been well studied but is of limited value. The prevalence of abnormal findings in asymptomatic subjects means that results should be interpreted with caution. Excessive pronation of the foot while standing and female sex were found to be intrinsic risk factors in multiple prospective studies. Other intrinsic risk factors found in single prospective studies are higher body mass index, greater internal and external ranges of hip motion, and calf girth. Previous history of MTSS was shown to be an extrinsic risk factor. The treatment of MTSS has been examined in three randomized controlled studies. In these studies rest is equal to any intervention. The use of neoprene or semi-rigid orthotics may help prevent MTSS, as evidenced by two large prospective studies.

  20. Comparison of the operation of arthroscopic tibial inlay and traditional tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Daifeng; Xiao, Mochao; Lian, Yongyun; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To perform dual-bundle reconstruction of posterior cruciate ligament using full arthroscopic tibial inlay technology with self-designed tibia tunnel drilling system and to compare the effect of arthroscopic tibial inlay versus traditional technique for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Material and methods: 32 patients were randomly divided into experiment group (improved tibial inlay, n = 17) and control group (traditional tibial inlay, n = 15). Self-designed tibia tunnel drill system was used to produce intraoperative deep-limited bone tunnel. During follow-up, the location of the bone block and the healing situation were checked by knee X-ray and spiral CT scan. Blood loss, operation time and nerve vascular injuries were evaluated. Results: Mean intraoperative blood loss was 123.53 ± 74.05 ml in the improved tibial inlay group compared with 332 ± 114.26 ml in the traditional tibial inlay group (t = 6.12, P < 0.05). Mean operation time was 235.27 ± 58.88 min in the improved tibial inlay group compared with 346.37 ± 59.67 min in the traditional tibial inlay group (t = 5.19, P < 0.05). Posterior drawer test were negative in 15 cases, slight positive in 2 with improved tibial inlay technique compared with 14 negative cases and 2 positive cases of traditional tibial Inlay technique. The X-ray and spiral CT scan showed the location of the bone block were perfect and healed well with the patent who received improved tibial inlay technology after 12 weeks postoperatively. Conclusion: Accurate depth-limited bone tunnel can be produced by the tibia tunnel drill system with minor trauma, less bleeding and reducing of nerves or vessels and the recent clinical effects of PCL reconstruction were pretty good. PMID:25419349

  1. Evaluation of upper-extremity function following surgical treatment of displaced proximal humerus fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Canavese, Federico; Athlani, Lionel; Marengo, Lorenza; Rousset, Marie; Rouel-Rabiau, Nadege; Samba, Antoine; Andreacchio, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    This study aims to assess the functional outcome of children treated with elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) for displaced proximal humerus fractures using the short version of the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand outcome questionnaire (Quick DASH). Fifty-eight consecutive children with displaced proximal humerus fractures were treated with ESIN. Fifty-two children (89.7%) were available for follow-up and responded to the questionnaire after hardware removal. Average age at time of injury was 11.1 ± 2.8 years (range, 4-15.9). Among the 52 patients available for evaluation, 37 had a Quick DASH score of 0 (71.1%), seven a score of 2.3 (13.5%), four a score of 4.5 (7.7%), and four a score of 6.5 (7.7%). Shoulder and elbow ranges of motion were comparable with the noninjured side. No skin irritation or local infections were observed. There was no radiographic evidence of delayed union, refracture, hardware migration, or secondary displacement. Mean follow-up was 18.3 ± 8.3 months (range, 6-39.5). Our study reports good functional outcomes in children with closed isolated fractures, both physeal and metaphyseal, of the proximal humerus treated with ESIN. The use of a standardized rating scale is recommended to homogeneously compare functional outcome and may facilitate the comparison of clinical outcome in different patient populations.

  2. Can Tibial Cementation Be Enhanced in Knee Arthroplasty Surgery?

    PubMed

    Westerman, Richard W

    2016-07-01

    Aseptic loosening of the tibial component continues to be a significant mode of failure in total knee arthroplasty surgery. Surface cemented components preserve tibial bone stock, but are reliant on a strong bone-cement interface. This study compares standard surface cemented tibial component design to a tibial component with the addition of an undersurface cement containment skirt. The hypothesis was that the addition of a 2-mm underside skirt would allow cement containment and pressurization during implantation, which might improve the overall survival. Two identical tibial components were used, out of which one had the 2-mm underside skirt removed for the purposes of this study. Overall, 12 tibial Sawbones were prepared identically and transducers placed in the medial and lateral plateau. Each component was implanted six times, according to the manufacturer's operative technique. The series of implantation experiments showed no difference in cement pressurization (p = 0.86) regardless of the tibial component design used, with a wide variation in pressure measurements occurring in both groups. The tibial component skirt has not demonstrated any enhancement in cement pressurization. The cement containment skirt might still be advantageous by increasing the cement mantle thickness without causing excessive bone penetration; however, the biological effects cannot be predicted without further clinical evaluation. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. High tibial osteotomy in knee laxities: Concepts review and results

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Jonathan G.; Neyret, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Patients with unstable, malaligned knees often present a challenging management scenario, and careful attention must be paid to the clinical history and examination to determine the priorities of treatment. Isolated knee instability treated with ligament reconstruction and isolated knee malalignment treated with periarticular osteotomy have both been well studied in the past. More recently, the effects of high tibial osteotomy on knee instability have been studied. Lateral closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy tends to reduce the posterior tibial slope, which has a stabilising effect on anterior tibial instability that occurs with ACL deficiency. Medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy tends to increase the posterior tibia slope, which has a stabilising effect in posterior tibial instability that occurs with PCL deficiency. Overall results from recent studies indicate that there is a role for combined ligament reconstruction and periarticular knee osteotomy. The use of high tibial osteotomy has been able to extend the indication for ligament reconstruction which, when combined, may ultimately halt the evolution of arthritis and preserve their natural knee joint for a longer period of time. Cite this article: Robin JG, Neyret P. High tibial osteotomy in knee laxities: Concepts review and results. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:3-11. doi: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000001. PMID:28461908

  4. Effects of tibial rotation on Ober's test and patellar tracking.

    PubMed

    Park, Joo-Hee; Kang, Sun-Young; Choung, Sung-Dae; Jeon, Hye-Seon; Kwon, Oh-Yun

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of tibial position on ITB flexibility and patellar position. A total of 31 asymptomatic subjects (21 males, 10 females) were recruited for this investigation. Adduction angle was measured by Ober's test, and PCD was measured by ultrasonography in three different tibial rotation conditions: N, IR, and ER. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant difference in adduction angle and PCD among three different tibial positions (P<0.05). Adduction angle was significantly greater in the N tibial position than in ER (P<0.05). The PCD was significantly greater in N position than in IR (P<0.05). However, the PCD was significantly smaller in IR compared with the N position (P<0.05). These findings support that tibial rotation influences the flexibility of ITB and patellar positions. Therefore, excessive tibial rotation can cause inappropriate patellar positions that eventually lead to knee injury. Therapists should consider tibial rotation when measuring adduction angles because tibial rotation can change Ober's test results and contribute to the consistency of ITB length measurements. Level IV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Synostosis of the Proximal Tibiofibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Sferopoulos, Nikolaos K.

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of synostosis of the proximal tibiofibular joint (TFJ) was assessed among 1029 patients examined for osteoarthritis of the knee in a 4-year period. Radiographic evidence of a synostosis of the proximal TFJ was demonstrated in 3 knees (3 patients). The synostosis appeared incidental and was not the cause of symptoms in any of them. These patients were further examined with MRI and/or CT scans. In two cases, which were found to be primary (idiopathic), the synostosis was complete and bony. In a third case the lesion was secondary (acquired) to surgical reconstruction for a depressed fracture of the lateral tibial plateau. This iatrogenic complication followed open reduction, internal fixation, and grafting with synthetic bone. The bridging of the joint on the CT views was partial and compatible with ectopic calcification rather than ossification. The patients were treated conservatively and were followed for an average period of 3 years. No evidence that the synostosis accelerated the onset or progression of the degenerative changes to the ipsilateral knee could be verified. PMID:20592991

  6. Magnetic Resonance Neurography Visualizes Abnormalities in Sciatic and Tibial Nerves in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes and Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vaeggemose, Michael; Pham, Mirko; Ringgaard, Steffen; Tankisi, Hatice; Ejskjaer, Niels; Heiland, Sabine; Poulsen, Per L; Andersen, Henning

    2017-07-01

    This study evaluates whether diffusion tensor imaging magnetic resonance neurography (DTI-MRN), T2 relaxation time, and proton spin density can detect and grade neuropathic abnormalities in patients with type 1 diabetes. Patients with type 1 diabetes (n = 49) were included-11 with severe polyneuropathy (sDPN), 13 with mild polyneuropathy (mDPN), and 25 without polyneuropathy (nDPN)-along with 30 healthy control subjects (HCs). Clinical examinations, nerve conduction studies, and vibratory perception thresholds determined the presence and severity of DPN. DTI-MRN covered proximal (sciatic nerve) and distal (tibial nerve) nerve segments of the lower extremity. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were calculated, as were T2 relaxation time and proton spin density obtained from DTI-MRN. All magnetic resonance findings were related to the presence and severity of neuropathy. FA of the sciatic and tibial nerves was lowest in the sDPN group. Corresponding with this, proximal and distal ADCs were highest in patients with sDPN compared with patients with mDPN and nDPN, as well as the HCs. DTI-MRN correlated closely with the severity of neuropathy, demonstrating strong associations with sciatic and tibial nerve findings. Quantitative group differences in proton spin density were also significant, but less pronounced than those for DTI-MRN. In conclusion, DTI-MRN enables detection in peripheral nerves of abnormalities related to DPN, more so than proton spin density or T2 relaxation time. These abnormalities are likely to reflect pathology in sciatic and tibial nerve fibers. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  7. [Establishment of Schatzker classification digital models of tibial plateau fractures and its application on virtual surgery].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-gang; Zuo, Li-xin; Pei, Guo-xian; Dai, Ke; Sang, Jing-wei

    2013-08-20

    To explore the establishment of Schatzker classification digital model of tibial plateau fractures and its application in virtual surgery. Proximal tibial of one healthy male volunteer was examined with 64-slice spiral computed tomography (CT). The data were processed by software Mimics 10.01 and a model of proximal tibia was reconstructed. According to the Schatzker classification criteria of tibial plateau fractures, each type of fracture model was simulated.Screen-captures of fracture model were saved from different directions.Each type of fracture model was exported as video mode.Fracture model was imported into FreeForm modeling system.With a force feedback device, a surgeon could conduct virtual fracture operation simulation.Utilizing the GHOST of FreeForm modeling system, the software of virtual cutting, fracture reduction and fixation was developed.With a force feedback device PHANTOM, a surgeon could manipulate virtual surgical instruments and fracture classification model and simulate surgical actions such as assembly of surgical instruments, drilling, implantation of screw, reduction of fracture, bone grafting and fracture fixation, etc. The digital fracture model was intuitive, three-dimensional and realistic and it had excellent visual effect.Fracture could be observed and charted from optional direction and angle.Fracture model could rotate 360 ° in the corresponding video mode. The virtual surgical environment had a strong sense of reality, immersion and telepresence as well as good interaction and force feedback function in the FreeForm modeling system. The user could make the corresponding decisions about surgical method and choice of internal fixation according to the specific type of tibial plateau fracture as well as repeated operational practice in virtual surgery system. The digital fracture model of Schatzker classification is intuitive, three-dimensional, realistic and dynamic. The virtual surgery systems of Schatzker classifications make

  8. Correction of Tibial Torsion in Children With Cerebral Palsy by Isolated Distal Tibia Rotation Osteotomy: A Short-term, In Vivo Anatomic Study.

    PubMed

    Andrisevic, Emily; Westberry, David E; Pugh, Linda I; Bagley, Anita M; Tanner, Stephanie; Davids, Jon R

    2016-01-01

    Excessive internal or external tibial torsion is frequently present in children with cerebral palsy. Several surgical techniques have been described to correct excessive tibial torsion, including isolated distal tibial rotation osteotomy (TRO). The anatomic changes surrounding this technique are poorly understood. The goal of the study was to examine the anatomic relationship between the tibia and fibula following isolated distal TRO in children with cerebral palsy. Twenty patients with 29 limbs were prospectively entered for study. CT scans of the proximal and distal tibiofibular (TF) articulations were obtained preoperatively, at 6 weeks, and 1 year postoperatively. Measurements of tibia and fibula torsion were performed at each interval. Qualitative assessments of proximal and distal TF joint congruency were also performed. The subjects with internal tibia torsion (ITT, 19 limbs) showed significant torsional changes for the tibia between preoperative, postoperative, and 1 year time points (mean torsion 13.21, 31.05, 34.84 degrees, respectively). Measurement of fibular torsion in the ITT treatment group also showed significant differences between time points (mean -36.77, -26.77, -18.54 degrees, respectively). Proximal and distal TF joints remained congruent at all time points in the study.Subjects with external tibia torsion (ETT, 10 limbs) showed significant differences between preoperative and postoperative tibial torsion, but not between postoperative and 1 year (mean torsion 54, 19.3, 23.3 degrees, respectively). Measurement of fibular torsion in the ETT treatment group did not change significantly between preoperative and postoperative, but did change significantly between postoperative and 1 year (mean torsion -9.8,-16.9, -30.7 degrees, respectively). Nine of 10 proximal TF joints were found to be subluxated at 6 weeks postoperatively. At 1 year, all 9 of these joints had reduced. Correction of ITT by isolated distal tibial external rotation osteotomy

  9. Tibial lengthening over humeral and tibial intramedullary nails in patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daoyun; Chen, Jianmin; Jiang, Yao; Liu, Fanggang

    2011-06-01

    Leg discrepancy is common after poliomyelitis. Tibial lengthening is an effective way to solve this problem. It is believed lengthening over a tibial intramedullary nail can provide a more comfortable lengthening process than by the conventional technique. However, patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis typically have narrow intramedullary canals allowing limited space for inserting a tibial intramedullary nail and Kirschner wires. To overcome this problem, we tried using humeral nails instead of tibial nails in the lengthening procedure. In this study, we used humeral nails in 20 tibial lengthening procedures and compared the results with another group of patients who were treated with tibial lengthening over tibial intramedullary nails. The mean consolidation index, percentage of increase and external fixation index did not show significant differences between the two groups. However, less blood loss and shorter operating time were noted in the humeral nail group. More patients encountered difficulty with the inserted intramedullary nail in the tibial nail group procedure. The complications did not show a statistically significant difference between the two techniques on follow-up. In conclusion, we found the humeral nail lengthening technique was more suitable in leg discrepancy patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis.

  10. Sagittal realignment osteotomy for increased posterior tibial slope after opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A 40 year old welder who underwent opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy for correction of alignment in a varus knee developed persistent pain with loss of knee extension. The posterior tibial slope increased from 9 degrees to 20 degrees after the osteotomy and caused the anteromedial knee pain and limited extension. The patient then underwent a revision osteotomy using a closing wedge technique to correct tibial slope. The osteotomy was performed, first from the medial cortex in the lateral direction, and second in the anteroposterior direction to remove the tibial bone in wedge shape and obtain full extension of the knee. The posterior tibial slope decreased to 8 degrees after the revision osteotomy and the patients returned to pain-free daily life. We reviewed this unique technique for correction of sagittal malalignment using a closing-wedge osteotomy for revision after opening-wedge osteotomy. PMID:19941664

  11. Proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    Price, Matthew C; Horn, Pamela L; Latshaw, James C

    2013-01-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are among the most common fractures associated with osteoporosis. With an aging population, incidence of these fractures will only increase. The proximal humerus not only forms the lateral portion of the shoulder articulation but also has significant associations with musculoskeletal and neurovascular structures. As a result, fractures of the proximal humerus can significantly impact not only the function of the shoulder joint, but the health and function of the entire upper extremity as well. Understanding of these fractures, the management options, and associated nursing care, can help reduce morbidity rate and improve functional outcomes.

  12. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction Computed Tomography Evaluation of Tunnel Location during Single-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Comparison of Transtibial and 2-Incision Tibial Tunnel-Independent Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Ko, Chun-Suk; Ko, Taeg Su; Kim, Jang Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Background Anatomic tunnel positioning is important in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructive surgery. Recent studies have suggested the limitations of a traditional transtibial technique to place the ACL graft within the anatomic tunnel position of the ACL on the femur. The purpose of this study is to determine if the 2-incision tibial tunnel-independent technique can place femoral tunnel to native ACL center when compared with the transtibial technique, as the placement with the tibial tunnel-independent technique is unconstrained by tibial tunnel. Methods In sixty-nine patients, single-bundle ACL reconstruction with preservation of remnant bundle using hamstring tendon autograft was performed. Femoral tunnel locations were measured with quadrant methods on the medial to lateral view of the lateral femoral condyle. Tibial tunnel locations were measured in the anatomical coordinates axis on the top view of the proximal tibia. These measurements were compared with reference data on anatomical tunnel position. Results With the quadrant method, the femoral tunnel centers of the transtibial technique and tibial tunnel-independent technique were located. The mean (± standard deviation) was 36.49% ± 7.65% and 24.71% ± 4.90%, respectively, from the over-the-top, along the notch roof (parallel to the Blumensaat line); and at 7.71% ± 7.25% and 27.08% ± 7.05%, from the notch roof (perpendicular to the Blumensaat line). The tibial tunnel centers of the transtibial technique and tibial tunnel-independent technique were located at 39.83% ± 8.20% and 36.32% ± 8.10%, respectively, of the anterior to posterior tibial plateau depth; and at 49.13% ± 4.02% and 47.75% ± 4.04%, of the medial to lateral tibial plateau width. There was no statistical difference between the two techniques in tibial tunnel position. The tibial tunnel-independent technique used in this study placed femoral tunnel closer to the anatomical ACL anteromedial bundle center. In contrast, the

  13. Double tibial osteotomy for bow leg patients: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Nazem, Khalilollah; Fouladi, Arash; Chinigarzadeh, Mozhdeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: High tibia osteotomy (HTO) is a common surgical operation for correction of genu varum deformity. In some patients, there are concurrent tibia vara and genu varum (bow leg). This study aimed to consider the possibility of better correction of bow leg deformity after double level tibial osteotomy (DLTO). Materials and Methods: A case series of 10 patients of genu varum in addition to tibia vara (bow leg) deformity who were referred to orthopedic ward of an academic hospital of Isfahan- Iran during 2009–2011 were included in the study. The mean age was 17.3 ± 3.1 years and all of them underwent DLTO. The results of treatment have been assessed based on clinical and radiological parameters before and after surgery. Results: The mean pre- and post operative values for Tibia-Femoral Angle, Medial Proximal of Tibia Angle (MPTA), and Lateral Distal of Tibia Angle (LDTA) were 18.13 ± 3.05° vs. 3.93 ± 0.66°, 79.13 ± 3.4° vs. 89.7 ± 1.8° and 96.40 ± 1.8° vs. 88.73 ± 3.0° respectively (P < 0.05). Improvement of all radiological parameters was meaningful. Seventy three percent of patients had normal mechanical axis of limb after surgery. The remaining cases had varus deformity in distal femur that was corrected by valgus supracondylar osteotomy in an additional operation. Limited range of motion (ROM) near knee and ankle was not observed. Conclusion: DLTO correct bow leg deformity in the point of alignment of limb and paralleling of knee and ankle joint more effectively. This method can be used in metabolic and congenital bow leg which deformities are present in throughout of the lower limb. We described this technique for the first time. PMID:24523802

  14. Full versus surface tibial baseplate cementation in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Galasso, Olimpio; Jenny, Jean-Yves; Saragaglia, Dominique; Miehlke, Rolf K

    2013-02-01

    The use of a keel in the tibial component during modern primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has become common, and its cementation may affect the future performance of the prosthesis. Although proponents of cementing the entire tibial component argue that this technique provides better initial fixation and may prevent aseptic loosening, reasons exist to apply cement only to the tibial baseplate. In this study, 232 patients who underwent TKA using full or surface cementation of the tibial baseplate were evaluated at an average 5.6-year follow-up to assess survivorship and clinical results. The cumulative survival rate at 8 years was 97.1%. With revision of either component for any reason considered the endpoint, no significant difference was noted between full and surface cemented groups. Knee Society Score, range of motion, and femoro-tibial mechanical angle significantly increased postoperatively. Multivariate analysis revealed that good preoperative range of motion and Knee Society Scores were related to good postoperative range of motion and Knee Society Scores. Follow-up length was a negative predictor of postoperative Knee Society Score. The use of full or surface cementation of the baseplate was unrelated to the postoperative clinical outcomes. Clinical outcomes did not differ according to the tibial component cementation technique. The results of this study suggest that cementing the keel of the tibial component during primary TKA has no advantage for patients. Longer-term follow-up and proper patient randomization are required to confirm these findings.

  15. Trabecular metal tibial knee component still stable at 10 years.

    PubMed

    Henricson, Anders; Nilsson, Kjell G

    2016-10-01

    Background and purpose - Total knee replacement (TKR) in younger patients using cemented components has shown inferior results, mainly due to aseptic loosening. Excellent clinical results have been reported with components made of trabecular metal (TM). In a previous report, we have shown stabilization of the TM tibial implants for up to 5 years. In this study, we compared the clinical and RSA results of these uncemented implants with those of cemented implants. Patients and methods - 41 patients (47 knees) aged ≤ 60 years underwent TKR. 22 patients (26 knees) received an uncemented monoblock cruciate-retaining (CR) tibial component (TM) and 19 patients (21 knees) received a cemented NexGen Option CR tibial component. Follow-up examination was done at 10 years, and 16 patients (19 knees) with TM tibial components and 17 patients (18 knees) with cemented tibial components remained for analysis. Results - 1 of 19 TM implants was revised for infection, 2 of 18 cemented components were revised for knee instability, and no revisions were done for loosening. Both types of tibial components migrated in the first 3 months, the TM group to a greater extent than the cemented group. After 3 months, both groups were stable during the next 10 years. Interpretation - The patterns of migration for uncemented TM implants and cemented tibial implants over the first 10 years indicate that they have a good long-term prognosis regarding fixation.

  16. Trabecular metal tibial knee component still stable at 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Henricson, Anders; Nilsson, Kjell G

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Total knee replacement (TKR) in younger patients using cemented components has shown inferior results, mainly due to aseptic loosening. Excellent clinical results have been reported with components made of trabecular metal (TM). In a previous report, we have shown stabilization of the TM tibial implants for up to 5 years. In this study, we compared the clinical and RSA results of these uncemented implants with those of cemented implants. Patients and methods 41 patients (47 knees) aged ≤ 60 years underwent TKR. 22 patients (26 knees) received an uncemented monoblock cruciate-retaining (CR) tibial component (TM) and 19 patients (21 knees) received a cemented NexGen Option CR tibial component. Follow-up examination was done at 10 years, and 16 patients (19 knees) with TM tibial components and 17 patients (18 knees) with cemented tibial components remained for analysis. Results 1 of 19 TM implants was revised for infection, 2 of 18 cemented components were revised for knee instability, and no revisions were done for loosening. Both types of tibial components migrated in the first 3 months, the TM group to a greater extent than the cemented group. After 3 months, both groups were stable during the next 10 years. Interpretation The patterns of migration for uncemented TM implants and cemented tibial implants over the first 10 years indicate that they have a good long-term prognosis regarding fixation PMID:27357222

  17. Quantification of spatial structure of human proximal tibial bone biopsies using 3D measures of complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saparin, Peter I.; Skovhus Thomsen, Jesper; Prohaska, Steffen; Zaikin, Alexei; Kurths, Jürgen; Hege, Hans-Christian; Gowin, Wolfgang

    2005-05-01

    Changes in trabecular bone composition during development of osteoporosis are used as a model for bone loss in microgravity conditions during a space flight. Symbolic dynamics and measures of complexity are proposed and applied to assess quantitatively the structural composition of bone tissue from 3D data sets of human tibia bone biopsies acquired by a micro-CT scanner. In order to justify the newly proposed approach, the measures of complexity of the bone architecture were compared with the results of traditional 2D bone histomorphometry. The proposed technique is able to quantify the structural loss of the bone tissue and may help to diagnose and to monitor changes in bone structure of patients on Earth as well as of the space-flying personnel.

  18. Computationally efficient prediction of bone-implant interface micromotion of a cementless tibial tray during gait.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Clare K; Hemelaar, Pleun; Taylor, Mark

    2014-05-07

    Cementless tibial fixation in total knee replacement (TKR) has potential for improved fixation and ease of revision. Achieving primary stability in cementless TKR is critical to the performance of the components. Excessive micromotion may prevent osseointegration at the bone-implant interface. Computational finite element (FE) studies have been used to predict micromotion at the interface, but analysis of an entire activity cycle is computational expensive, prohibiting large numbers of analyses. Surrogate modeling methods can be used to train a numerical model to predict the response of an FE model. These models are computationally efficient and are suitable for high-volume or iterative analyses requiring probabilistic, statistical or optimization methods. The objective of this work was to train a surrogate model capable of predicting micromotion over the entire bone-implant interface. A proximal tibial bone with mapped material properties was virtually implanted with a tibial tray. A FE model, with six-degree-of-freedom loads sampled from telemetric patients during walking, was used to generate training data for the surrogate model. The linear response surrogate model was evaluated for six full gait cycles; the average and peak micromotion across the interface, and the percentage of bone-implant interface surface area experiencing micromotions less than 50 and greater than 150µm were calculated both as a function of the activity cycle and as the composite peak micromotion throughout the cycle. Differences in root-mean-square (RMS) micromotion between FE and surrogate models were less than 14µm. FE analysis time for a complete gait cycle was 15h, compared to 30s for the surrogate model. Surrogate models have significant potential to rapidly predict micromotion over the entire bone-implant interface, allowing greater range in loading conditions to be explored than is possible through conventional methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cartilage health in high tibial osteotomy using dGEMRIC: Relationships with joint kinematics.

    PubMed

    d'Entremont, Agnes G; McCormack, Robert G; Agbanlog, Kenard; Horlick, Simon G D; Stone, Trevor B; Manzary, Mojieb M; Wilson, David R

    2015-06-01

    The aims of this study are to determine how opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) affects cartilage health in the tibiofemoral (TF) joint and patella, and to explore relationships between TF and patellofemoral (PF) joint kinematics and cartilage health in HTO. 14 knees (13 subjects) with medial TF osteoarthritis (OA) were examined before HTO and 6 and 12 months after HTO using delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) to evaluate cartilage health at the TF joint and patella. They were also examined using a validated 3D MR knee kinematics measurement to obtain 11 rotations and translations at both TF and PF joints. No statistically significant differences in overall TF or patellar dGEMRIC score were found at 6 or 12 months after HTO. However three subjects had large decreases (mean 105 ms) in TF dGEMRIC at 6 months that recovered at 12 months. Kinematics for these subjects were compared to subjects who did not have decreases in TF dGEMRIC at 6 months (n=5). Differences were observed between groups with HTO in anterior and proximal tibial translation (mean differences 3.05 mm and 1.35 mm), and patellar flexion (mean difference 3.65°). These changes were consistent between 6 and 12 months, despite recovery of TF dGEMRIC values. We did not find significant differences in TF or patellar dGEMRIC before and after HTO with all subjects, however there were differences in kinematics between subjects who had a decrease in TF dGEMRIC at 6 months and those who did not. This suggests a link between joint kinematics and cartilage health in HTO. The effect of opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy on cartilage GAG concentration may be linked to specific changes in knee kinematics following surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Periosteal versus true cross-sectional geometry: a comparison along humeral, femoral, and tibial diaphyses.

    PubMed

    Macintosh, Alison A; Davies, Thomas G; Ryan, Timothy M; Shaw, Colin N; Stock, Jay T

    2013-03-01

    Cross-sectional geometric (CSG) properties of human long bone diaphyses are typically calculated from both periosteal and endosteal contours. Though quantification of both is desirable, periosteal contours alone have provided accurate predictions of CSG properties at the midshaft in previous studies. The relationship between CSG properties calculated from external contours and "true" (endosteal and periosteal) CSG properties, however, has yet to be examined along the whole diaphysis. Cross-sectional computed tomography scans were taken from 21 locations along humeral, femoral, and tibial diaphyses in 20 adults from a late prehistoric central Illinois Valley cemetery. Mechanical properties calculated from images with (a) artificially filled medullary cavities ("solid") and (b) true unaltered cross-sections were compared at each section location using least squares regression. Results indicate that, in this sample, polar second moments of area (J), polar section moduli (Z(p) ), and cross-sectional shape (I(max) /I(min) ) calculated from periosteal contours correspond strongly with those calculated from cross-sections that include the medullary cavity. Correlations are high throughout most of the humeral diaphysis and throughout large portions of femoral and tibial diaphyses (R(2) = 0.855-0.998, all P < 0.001, %SEE ≤ 8.0, %PE ≤ 5.0), the major exception being the proximal quarter of the tibial diaphysis for J and Z(p). The main source of error was identified as variation in %CA. Results reveal that CSG properties quantified from periosteal contours provide comparable results to (and are likely to detect the same differences among individuals as) true CSG properties along large portions of long bone diaphyses.

  1. Inflammatory cytokine response is greater in acute tibial plafond fractures than acute tibial plateau fractures.

    PubMed

    Haller, Justin M; Marchand, Lucas; Rothberg, David L; Kubiak, Erik N; Higgins, Thomas F

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the inflammatory cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) concentrations in synovial fluid after acute plafond fracture with acute tibial plateau fracture. Between December 2011 and August 2014, we prospectively enrolled patients with acute tibial plateau and plafond fractures. Synovial fluid aspirations were obtained from injured and uninjured joints. The concentrations of IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, MCP-1, TNF-α, MMP-1, -3, -9, -10, -12, and -13 were quantified using multiplex assays. A Bonferroni correction was used so that the adjusted alpha level for significance was p < 0.004. We enrolled 45 tibial plateau fractures and 19 plafond fractures. Mean patient age was 42 years (range, 20-60) and 64% were male patients. There were 24 low-energy (OTA 41B) plateau fractures and eight low-energy (OTA 43B) plafond fractures. There were 21 high-energy (6 OTA 41B3 and 15 OTA 41C) plateau fractures and 11 high-energy (OTA43C) plafond fractures. All cytokines and MMPs except MMP-13 were significantly elevated in plafond fractures compared to uninjured ankles. When comparing acutely injured joints, IL-8 (p < 0.001), IL-1β (p = 0.002), and MMP-12 (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in plafond fractures compared to plateau fractures. Concentrations of IL-1RA (p = 0.008) and MCP-1 (p = 0.005) were higher in plafond fractures, and MMP-10 (p = 0.01) was higher in plateau fractures, but these differences did not reach significance. In conclusion, several cytokines and MMPs were significantly elevated in acute plafond fractures as compared to acute tibial plateau fractures. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Fibular segment bone bridging in trans-tibial amputation.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M A G S; Harris, W W

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an alternative method of achieving a synostosis between tibia and fibula in trans-tibial amputations by means of a fibular segment in place of tibial osteoperiosteal flaps as described by Ertl, in 1949. From May 1997 through to February 2003, 15 patients were submitted to the proposed procedure. As a result, all patients produced a solid synostosis between tibia and fibula and were rehabilitated with the use of prostheses. The capacity of these patients for distal weight-bearing on the stump was remarkable when compared to patients submitted to the conventional trans-tibial amputation technique.

  3. Suprapatellar Nailing of Tibial Shaft Fractures in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Woyski, Dustin; Emerson, Jason

    2016-12-01

    Fractures of the tibial shaft in patients with ipsilateral total knee arthroplasty are rare but difficult to treat. Nonoperative treatment of these fractures with casting or bracing limits weight bearing for an extended period and can result in unacceptable malalignment. Operative fixation with plate and screws also limits early weight bearing and requires healing of soft tissue that is of poor quality. The authors present a method of internal fixation that uses a standard intramedullary tibial nail and suprapatellar instrumentation. This method can easily be performed, avoids the tibial baseplate, and does not require alteration of the instrumentation or intramedullary nail.

  4. In vitro comparison of tibial plateau leveling osteotomy with and without use of a tibial plateau leveling jig.

    PubMed

    Schmerbach, Kay Ingo; Boeltzig, Christian Konrad Matthias; Reif, Ullrich; Wieser, Jan Carsten; Keller, Thomas; Grevel, Vera

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate the influence of a tibial plateau leveling jig on osteotomy orientation, fragment reduction, and postoperative tibial plateau angle (TPA) during tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO). In vitro experimental study. Large-breed canine cadavers (n=20). TPLO was performed on 40 hindlimbs using 4 methods. Group 1: Jig; dogs in dorsal recumbency with the osteotomy parallel to the distal jig pin. Groups 2-4: No jig; dogs in lateral recumbency with the osteotomy in a vertical orientation (group 2: tibia parallel to the table top; group 3: controlled superimposition of the femoral condyles; group 4: internal rotation of the tibia). Postoperative TPA, fragment reduction, and osteotomy orientation relative to the tibial plateau were compared. Positive or negative values denoted deviation from parallel relative to the tibial plateau. Postoperative TPA, fragment reduction, and proximodistal osteotomy orientation were not significantly different between groups. Craniocaudal osteotomy orientation was significantly different (P<.005) from the tibial plateau. Median deviations were -4.0 degrees (group 1), 11.8 degrees (group 2), 11.2 degrees (group 3), and 0.2 degrees (group 4). Group 1 was not significantly different from group 4. A jig is not essential for osteotomy orientation, tibial plateau rotation, or fragment reduction. Comparable results were achieved performing a vertical osteotomy with the tibia slightly internally rotated (10 degrees -15 degrees) and parallel to the table surface. TPLO without use of a jig reduces surgical trauma, is less time consuming, and reduces cost.

  5. [Tibial abscess caused by histoplasma capsulatum].

    PubMed

    de Fernández, M I; Negroni, R; Arechavala, A

    2001-01-01

    Disseminated histoplasmosis is the most serious form of the disease produced by the fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. Histoplasmosis was first described by Darling in 1906, and it is endemic in certain areas of Central and Southeastern regions of USA, and most Latin America countries, including the Pampa húmeda and Mesopotamia regions in Argentina, but in other continents it has a limited regional distribution. Lung involvement predominates in 90% of cases, but H. capsulatum may involve bone and soft tissues. Bone lesions without other signs of infection are very rare, and are often misdiagnosed as cancer. We report a case of disseminated histoplasmosis in a man with a myelodysplasia who presented a left tibial abscess, without any clinical evidence of pulmonary involvement. The patient was successfully treated with itraconazole.

  6. Automated fit quantification of tibial nail designs during the insertion using computer three-dimensional modelling.

    PubMed

    Amarathunga, Jayani P; Schuetz, Michael A; Yarlagadda, Prasad Kvd; Schmutz, Beat

    2014-12-01

    Intramedullary nailing is the standard fixation method for displaced diaphyseal fractures of the tibia. An optimal nail design should both facilitate insertion and anatomically fit the bone geometry at its final position in order to reduce the risk of stress fractures and malalignments. Due to the nonexistence of suitable commercial software, we developed a software tool for the automated fit assessment of nail designs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that an optimised nail, which fits better at the final position, is also easier to insert. Three-dimensional models of two nail designs and 20 tibiae were used. The fitting was quantified in terms of surface area, maximum distance, sum of surface areas and sum of maximum distances by which the nail was protruding into the cortex. The software was programmed to insert the nail into the bone model and to quantify the fit at defined increment levels. On average, the misfit during the insertion in terms of the four fitting parameters was smaller for the Expert Tibial Nail Proximal bend (476.3 mm(2), 1.5 mm, 2029.8 mm(2), 6.5 mm) than the Expert Tibial Nail (736.7 mm(2), 2.2 mm, 2491.4 mm(2), 8.0 mm). The differences were statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05). The software could be used by nail implant manufacturers for the purpose of implant design validation.

  7. Partial proximal tibia fractures

    PubMed Central

    Raschke, Michael J.; Kittl, Christoph; Domnick, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Partial tibial plateau fractures may occur as a consequence of either valgus or varus trauma combined with a rotational and axial compression component. High-energy trauma may result in a more complex and multi-fragmented fracture pattern, which occurs predominantly in young people. Conversely, a low-energy mechanism may lead to a pure depression fracture in the older population with weaker bone density. Pre-operative classification of these fractures, by Müller AO, Schatzker or novel CT-based methods, helps to understand the fracture pattern and choose the surgical approach and treatment strategy in accordance with estimated bone mineral density and the individual history of each patient. Non-operative treatment may be considered for non-displaced intra-articular fractures of the lateral tibial condyle. Intra-articular joint displacement ⩾ 2 mm, open fractures or fractures of the medial condyle should be reduced and fixed operatively. Autologous, allogenic and synthetic bone substitutes can be used to fill bone defects. A variety of minimally invasive approaches, temporary osteotomies and novel techniques (e.g. arthroscopically assisted reduction or ‘jail-type’ screw osteosynthesis) offer a range of choices for the individual and are potentially less invasive treatments. Rehabilitation protocols should be carefully planned according to the degree of stability achieved by internal fixation, bone mineral density and other patient-specific factors (age, compliance, mobility). To avoid stiffness, early functional mobilisation plays a major role in rehabilitation. In the elderly, low-energy trauma and impression fractures are indicators for the further screening and treatment of osteoporosis. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160067. Originally published online at www.efortopenreviews.org PMID:28630761

  8. [The role of the posterior tibial slope on rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament].

    PubMed

    Stijak, Lazar; Blagojević, Zoran; Kadija, Marko; Stanković, Gordana; Djulejić, Vuk; Milovanović, Darko; Filipović, Branislav

    2012-10-01

    Posterior tibial slope is one of the most citated factors wich cause rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The aim of this study was to determine the association of a greather posterior tibial slope on the lateral condyle, that is a lesser posterior tibial slope on the medial condyle, with ACL rupture. The patients were divided into two groups. The study group included the patients with chronic instability of the knee besause of a previous rupture of ACL. The control group included the patients with knee lesion, but without ACL rupture. Posterior tibial slope measuring was performed by sagittal MR slices supported by lateral radiograph of the knee. We measured posterior tibial slope on lateral and medial condyles of the tibia. Using these values we calculated an average posterior tibial slope as well as the difference between slopes on lateral and medial condyles. Patients with ACL rupture have highly statistically significantly greather posterior tibial slope (p < 0.01) on lateral tibial condyle (7.1 degrees : 4.5 degrees) as well as statistically significantly lesser posterior tibial slope (p < 0.05) on medial tibial condyle (5.9 degrees : 6.6 degrees) than patients with intact ACL. Great posterior tibial slope on lateral tibial condyle associated with the small posterior tibial slope on the medial tibial condyle, that is a positive differentce between lateral and medial tibial condyles are factors wich may cause ACL rupture.

  9. Safe surgical technique: intramedullary nail fixation of tibial shaft fractures.

    PubMed

    Zelle, Boris A; Boni, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Statically locked, reamed intramedullary nailing remains the standard treatment for displaced tibial shaft fractures. Establishing an appropriate starting point is a crucial part of the surgical procedure. Recently, suprapatellar nailing in the semi-extended position has been suggested as a safe and effective surgical technique. Numerous reduction techiques are available to achieve an anatomic fracture alignment and the treating surgeon should be familiar with these maneuvers. Open reduction techniques should be considered if anatomic fracture alignment cannot be achieved by closed means. Favorable union rates above 90 % can be achieved by both reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing. Despite favorable union rates, patients continue to have functional long-term impairments. In particular, anterior knee pain remains a common complaint following intramedullary tibial nailing. Malrotation remains a commonly reported complication after tibial nailing. The effect of postoperative tibial malalignment on the clinical and radiographic outcome requires further investigation.

  10. Total knee arthroplasty and fractures of the tibial plateau

    PubMed Central

    Softness, Kenneth A; Murray, Ryan S; Evans, Brian G

    2017-01-01

    Tibial plateau fractures are common injuries that occur in a bimodal age distribution. While there are various treatment options for displaced tibial plateau fractures, the standard of care is open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). In physiologically young patients with higher demand and better bone quality, ORIF is the preferred method of treating these fractures. However, future total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a consideration in these patients as post-traumatic osteoarthritis is a common long-term complication of tibial plateau fractures. In older, lower demand patients, ORIF is potentially less favorable for a variety of reasons, namely fixation failure and the need for delayed weight bearing. In some of these patients, TKA can be considered as primary mode of treatment. This paper will review the literature surrounding TKA as both primary treatment and as a salvage measure in patients with fractures of the tibial plateau. The outcomes, complications, techniques and surgical challenges are also discussed. PMID:28251061

  11. Rotational alignment of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Graceffa, Angelo; Marcucci, Massimiliano; Baldini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Many surgical techniques, correlated to different anatomical landmarks, have been proposed to allow a satisfactory rotational alignment of the tibial component in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Unfortunately, an accurate landmark has not yet been established although many computer models using CT reconstructions and standard radiologic studies have been performed. In this review article, the authors propose a new anatomical rotational reference for a correct positioning of the tibial component during primary TKA; the authors compared the results of their studies with the current literature on rotational alignment references and previously proposed surgical techniques. The authors also analyzed the correlation between classic and newer tibial baseplate designs and different tibial rotational landmarks. PMID:26855939

  12. Tibial tubercle osteotomy for patello-femoral joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Hall, Matthew J; Mandalia, Vipul I

    2016-03-01

    Tibial tubercle osteotomy has a long history in the management of patella instability and patello-femoral arthritis. This review aims to provide a comprehensive review of the literature describing the biomechanics of the patello-femoral joint and the rationale behind the use of the tibial tubercle osteotomy in modern day practice. Several different tibial tubercle osteotomies are available and we aim to detail the concepts behind their use and the subsequent clinical results. With continued developments of chondrocyte implantation techniques, the potential to fill defects on the chondral surface of either the patella or trochlea in conjunction with a tibial tubercle osteotomy may well become more commonplace in a group that is commonly young and difficult to manage. Level of evidence III.

  13. [The effect of tibial transphyseal reinforcement on the growth and response of leg tissues].

    PubMed

    Popkov, D A; Kononovich, N A; Shutov, R B

    2014-07-01

    Transphyseal reinforcement of right intact tibia performed with thin steel rods in six mongrel dogs at the age of six months. Contralateral segment served as control. The leg growth and blood supply studied under the created conditions for the next six months. Radiographic, physiologic (surface thermometry, photoplethysmography), and statistical methods used for studying. The significant effect of transphyseally inserted rods on the leg longitudinal growth and blood supply has not been revealed. The changes in natural shape-formation oftibial proximal and distal meta-epiphyses observed influenced by the transphyseal rods in the experiment. In order to evaluate the tissue response and the degree of the functional activity of leg bone meta-epiphyseal zones the most informative areas considered to be the following: the area of medial malleolus in the early period of physiological growth completion, and the area of the tibial lateral condyle--at the late stage.

  14. Tibial Bowing and Pseudarthrosis in Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    observed in 5% of children with neurofibromatosis type 1 ( NF1 ), typically identified in infancy. The majority of NF1 individuals with tibial bowing...will sustain a fracture that will not heal (i.e. pseudarthrosis) resulting in multiple surgeries, poor limb function, and amputation. Some NF1 ...pseudarthrosis and better understand its pathophysiology. We have begun recruitment and assessed many individuals with NF1 with and with tibial bowing. QUS

  15. TIBIAL TUBERCLE AVULSION FRACTURE IN A MALE ADOLESCENT.

    PubMed

    Matoković, Damir; Šimić-Klarić, Andrea; Rajić, Marijana Tomić; Crnković, Helena Tesari; Jurinić, Mislav; Jovanović, Savo

    2015-06-01

    Tibial tuberosity fractures are rare in childhood, most frequently due to excessive quadriceps muscle contraction. On performing long jump, a 15-year-old boy sustained tibial tuberosity avulsion fracture type II according to Watson-Jones. The patient was treated operatively with fragment repositioning and screw fixation. Ten months after the injury and rehabilitation, he resumed his sports activities with full range knee motion.

  16. Tibial Bowing and Pseudarthrosis in Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    anterolateral bowing of the lower leg prior to fracture in neurofibromatosis type 1. J Pediatr Orthop 2009;29:385-92. 3. Stevenson DA, Yan J, He Y, Li H...neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), typically identified in infancy. The majority of NF1 individuals with tibial bowing will sustain a fracture that will not...not fracture and the bowing improves over time. Clinical predictors to help drive management are lacking, and the pathophysiology of tibial bowing

  17. The medial tibial stress syndrome. A cause of shin splints.

    PubMed

    Mubarak, S J; Gould, R N; Lee, Y F; Schmidt, D A; Hargens, A R

    1982-01-01

    The medial tibial stress syndrome is a symptom complex seen in athletes who complain of exercise-induced pain along the distal posterior-medial aspect of the tibia. Intramuscular pressures within the posterior compartments of the leg were measured in 12 patients with this disorder. These pressures were not elevated and therefore this syndrome is a not a compartment syndrome. Available information suggests that the medial tibial stress syndrome most likely represents a periostitis at this location of the leg.

  18. Patient-specific instrumentation improves tibial component rotation in TKA.

    PubMed

    Silva, Alcindo; Sampaio, Ricardo; Pinto, Elisabete

    2014-03-01

    To compare the femoral and tibial components rotational alignment in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) performed either with conventional or with patient-specific instrumentation. Forty-five patients underwent primary TKA and were prospectively randomized into two groups: 22 patients into the conventional instrumentation group (group A) and 23 patients into the Signature™ patient-specific instrumentation group (group B). All patients underwent computed tomography of the operated knee in the first week after surgery to measure the components rotation. The femoral component rotation was 0.0° (-0.25, 1.0) in group A, and 0.0° (0.0, 1.0) in group B. The tibial component rotation was -16.0° (-18.5, 11.8) in group A, and -16.0° (-19.0, -14.0) in group B. There were no significant differences between the two groups in tibial and femoral components rotation. The difference between the tibial component rotation and the neutral tibial rotation was similar in both groups [2.0° (-0.5, 6.3) in group A and 2.0° (-1.0, 4.0) in group B], but the dispersion around the median was different between the two groups. The amplitude of the difference between tibial rotation and neutral position was 27° (-13, 14) in group A and 9° (-3, 6) in group B. There is a smaller chance of internal malrotation of the tibial component with the Signature™ patient-specific instrumentation system, with less dispersion and amplitude of the tibial component rotation around the neutral position. II.

  19. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change.

  20. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit is disclosed. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change. 14 figs.

  1. Understanding the etiology of the posteromedial tibial stress fracture.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Charles; Burr, David B; Finestone, Aharon S; Voloshin, Arkady

    2015-09-01

    Previous human in vivo tibial strain measurements from surface strain gauges during vigorous activities were found to be below the threshold value of repetitive cyclical loading at 2500 microstrain in tension necessary to reduce the fatigue life of bone, based on ex vivo studies. Therefore it has been hypothesized that an intermediate bone remodeling response might play a role in the development of tibial stress fractures. In young adults tibial stress fractures are usually oblique, suggesting that they are the result of failure under shear strain. Strains were measured using surface mounted unstacked 45° rosette strain gauges on the posterior aspect of the flat medial cortex just below the tibial midshaft, in a 48year old male subject while performing vertical jumps, staircase jumps and running up and down stadium stairs. Shear strains approaching 5000 microstrain were recorded during stair jumping and vertical standing jumps. Shear strains above 1250 microstrain were recorded during runs up and down stadium steps. Based on predictions from ex vivo studies, stair and vertical jumping tibial shear strain in the test subject was high enough to potentially produce tibial stress fracture subsequent to repetitive cyclic loading without necessarily requiring an intermediate remodeling response to microdamage.

  2. A Randomized Cadaver Study Comparing First-Attempt Success Between Tibial and Humeral Intraosseous Insertions Using NIO Device by Paramedics: A Preliminary Investigation.

    PubMed

    Szarpak, Lukasz; Truszewski, Zenon; Smereka, Jacek; Krajewski, Paweł; Fudalej, Marcin; Adamczyk, Piotr; Czyzewski, Lukasz

    2016-05-01

    Medical personnel may encounter difficulties in obtaining intravenous (IV) access during cardiac arrest. The 2015 American Heart Association guidelines and the 2015 European Resuscitation Council guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) suggest that rescuers establish intraosseous (IO) access if an IV line is not easily obtainable.The aim of the study was to compare the success rates of the IO proximal tibia and proximal humerus head access performed by paramedics using the New Intraosseous access device (NIO; Persys Medical, Houston, TX, USA) in an adult cadaver model during simulated CPR.In an interventional, randomized, crossover, single-center cadaver study, a semi-automatic spring-load driven NIO access device was investigated. In total, 84 paramedics with less than 5-year experience in Emergency Medical Service participated in the study. The trial was performed on 42 adult cadavers. In each cadaver, 2 IO accesses to the humerus head, and 2 IO accesses to the proximal tibia were obtained.The success rate of the first IO attempt was 89.3% (75/84) for tibial access, and 73.8% (62/84) for humeral access (P = 0.017). The procedure times were significantly faster for tibial access [16.8 (interquartile range, IQR, 15.1-19.9] s] than humeral access [26.7 (IQR, 22.1-30.9) s] (P < 0.001).Tibial IO access is easier and faster to put in place than humeral IO access. Humeral IO access can be an alternative method to tibial IO access. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02700867.

  3. Proximal Hamstring Repair Strength

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Margaret Ann; Singh, Hardeep; Obopilwe, Elifho; Charette, Ryan; Miller, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proximal hamstring repair for complete ruptures has become a common treatment. There is no consensus in the literature about postoperative rehabilitation protocols following proximal hamstring repair. Some protocols describe bracing to prevent hip flexion or knee extension while others describe no immobilization. There are currently no biomechanical studies evaluating proximal hamstring repairs; nor are there any studies evaluating the effect of different hip flexion angles on these repairs. Hypothesis: As hip flexion increases from 0° to 90°, there will be a greater gap with cyclical loading. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Proximal hamstring insertions were detached from the ischial tuberosity in 24 cadavers and were repaired with 3 single-loaded suture anchors in the hamstring footprint with a Krakow suture technique. Cyclic loading from 10 to 125 N at 1 Hz was then performed for 0°, 45°, and 90° of hip flexion for 1500 cycles. Gap formation, stiffness, yield load, ultimate load, and energy to ultimate load were compared between groups using paired t tests. Results: Cyclic loading demonstrated the least amount of gap formation (P < .05) at 0° of hip flexion (2.39 mm) and most at 90° of hip flexion (4.19 mm). There was no significant difference in ultimate load between hip flexion angles (326, 309, and 338 N at 0°, 45°, and 90°, respectively). The most common mode of failure occurred with knot/suture failure (n = 17). Conclusion: Increasing hip flexion from 0° to 90° increases the displacement across proximal hamstring repairs. Postoperative bracing that limits hip flexion should be considered. Clinical Relevance: Repetitive motion involving hip flexion after a proximal hamstring repair may cause compromise of the repair. PMID:26665049

  4. [Salter and Harris type-II distal femoral physeal fracture-separations at adolescent age: a new therapeutic approach (preliminary study)].

    PubMed

    Edgard-Rosa, G; Launay, F; Glard, Y; Guillaume, J-M; Jouve, J-L; Bollini, G

    2008-10-01

    The prognosis of distal femoral physeal fracture-separation is poor in children. In adolescents, more than half of the cases are classified as Salter and Harris type-II. The gold-standard treatment for a displaced fracture combines anatomic reduction with internal fixation with a pin or screw, preserving the growth cartilage. Despite this treatment, the rate of mid- and long-term complications has been high in the literature, most problems being related to leg length discrepancy and misalignments (genu valgum and genu varum). In order to avoid these problems, for adolescents, we propose and osteosynthesis system which bridges the entire growth cartilage with a blade-plate. Depending on the bone age, puberty and thus potential for further growth, we combine this osteosynthesis with a contralateral distal femoral epiphysiodesis to prevent invalidating leg length discrepancy. We reviewed retrospectively the cases of 21 patients aged 11 to 15 years treated between 1990 and 2005 for Salter and Harris type-II distal femoral physeal fracture- separation. Clinical and radiographic outcome was compared between the 16 patients treated with the classical internal fixation system or cast immobilization and the five patients treated with a blade-plate. A complete physical examination was available for the follow-up in all cases. A full stance view was used for the radiographic analysis. The mean follow-up was 6.7 years (range 2-17), minimal two years. In patients treated with the classical fixation system or a plaster cast, four of 16 (25 %) developed frontal misalignment of more than 5 degrees and five of 16 (32 %) leg length discrepancy of more than 2cm. No misalignment or leg length discrepancy (>2cm) was observed among the five patients treated with a blade-plate. The results observed in our patients treated with the classical fixation systems are comparable with those reported by others. Our patients treated with the blade-plate system constitute the only series with no

  5. Increased revision rate with posterior tibial tunnel placement after using the 70-degree tibial guide in ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Inderhaug, Eivind; Raknes, Sveinung; Østvold, Thomas; Solheim, Eirik; Strand, Torbjørn

    2017-01-01

    To map knee morphology radiographically in a population with a torn ACL and to investigate whether anatomic factors could be related to outcomes after ACL reconstruction at mid- to long-term follow-up. Further, we wanted to assess tibial tunnel placement after using the 70-degree "anti-impingement" tibial tunnel guide and investigate any relation between tunnel placement and revision surgery. Patients undergoing ACL reconstruction involving the 70-degree tibial guide from 2003 to 2008 were included. Two independent investigators analysed pre- and post-operative radiographs. Demographic data and information on revision surgery were collected from an internal database. Anatomic factors and post-operative tibial tunnel placements were investigated as predictors of revision. Three-hundred and seventy-seven patients were included in the study. A large anatomic variation with significant differences between men and women was seen. None of the anatomic factors could be related to a significant increase in revision rate. Patients with a posterior tibial tunnel placement, defined as 50 % or more posterior on the Amis and Jakob line, did, however, have a higher risk of revision surgery compared to patients with an anterior tunnel placement (P = 0.03). Use of the 70-degree tibial guide did result in a high incidence (47 %) of posterior tibial tunnel placements associated with an increased rate of revision surgery. The current study was, however, not able to identify any anatomic variation that could be related to a higher risk of revision surgery. Avoiding graft impingement from the femoral roof in anterior tibial tunnel placements is important, but the insight that overly posterior tunnel placement can lead to inferior outcome should also be kept in mind when performing ACL surgery. IV.

  6. Opening wedge high tibial osteotomy: plate position and biomechanics of the medial tibial plateau.

    PubMed

    Martinez de Albornoz, Pilar; Leyes, Manuel; Forriol, Francisco; Del Buono, Angelo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2014-11-01

    To ascertain whether changing position and size of the spacer may modify the load and displacement of the tibial plateau when performing an opening wedge high tibial osteotomy. Fifteen sawbones tibia models were used. In the axial plane, the anterior, medial, and posterior thirds of the tibial plateau were marked, and the medial and posterior thirds were called "point 1" and "point 2", respectively. A 7.5-mm-stainless steel indenter was used to apply the load over these two points: the load applied to point 1 simulated the load to that site when the knee was extended, and the load to point 2 simulated the load to the same area when the knee was flexed. Maximum load (N) and displacement (mm) were calculated. The system was shown to withstand higher loads with less displacement when the plate was posterior than it could do with the plate in the middle position. Significant differences were also found when comparing the anterior and middle position of the plate with the greatest displacement when the plate was anterior. The differences were increased when comparing the anterior and posterior positions of the plate. No statistical differences (n.s.) were found when using different spacers. The maximum stiffness was achieved if the plate was posterior and in point 1 indenter position, in which the force vector stands on the points of the lateral and medial supports (Fμ = 198.8 ± 61.5 N). The lowest stiffness was observed when the plate was anterior, and the force was applied to point 2 (Fμ = 29.7 ± 5.1 N). Application of the plate in a more posterior position provides greater stability.

  7. The accuracy of two different extra-medullary tibial cutting guides for posterior tibial slope in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bek, Doğan; Ege, Tolga; Yıldız, Cemil; Tunay, Servet; Başbozkurt, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of two different external tibial cutting guides with and without a spike anchoring to the intercondylar eminentia to achieve a desired posterior tibial slope. Between January 2008 and December 2011, 120 posterior cruciate ligament protecting total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgeries of 83 patients in which two different external tibial cutting guides used were included. Fifty-nine knees were included into the spiked and 61 knees were included into the spikeless cutting guide group. Posterior tibial slope angles were measured using the postoperative X-rays. There was no significant difference between two groups in terms of age, sex, and body mass indexes (p<0.05). While the mean postoperative slope angle was 2.66°±2.001°(range 0°-7°) in spiked group, it was 2.46°±2.277° (range 0°-7°) in spikeless group. Both systems had identical accuracy, indicating a low rate. The comparison of variances of two groups showed that both cutting guides had similar precision (p=0.234). There was no effect of body mass index on the results in both groups. Although different extra-medullary tibial cutting guides with and without a spike can reproducibly impart a desired posterior tibial slope in TKA, we concluded that a spiked guide was considered user-friendly.

  8. Proximate Analysis of Coal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Craig J.; Rais, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    This lab experiment illustrates the use of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to perform proximate analysis on a series of coal samples of different rank. Peat and coke are also examined. A total of four exercises are described. These are dry exercises as students interpret previously recorded scans. The weight percent moisture, volatile matter,…

  9. Traumatic proximal tibiofibular dislocation.

    PubMed

    Burgos, J; Alvarez-Montero, R; Gonzalez-Herranz, P; Rapariz, J M

    1997-01-01

    Proximal tibiofibular dislocation is an exceptional lesion. Rarer still is its presentation in childhood. We describe the clinical case of a 6-year-old boy, the victim of a road accident. He had a tibiofibular dislocation associated with a metaphyseal fracture of the tibia.

  10. Steerable Capacitive Proximity Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenstrom, Del T.; Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    Steerable capacitive proximity sensor of "capaciflector" type based partly on sensing units described in GSC-13377 and GSC-13475. Position of maximum sensitivity adjusted without moving sensor. Voltage of each driven shield adjusted separately to concentrate sensing electric field more toward one side or other.

  11. Proximate Analysis of Coal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Craig J.; Rais, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    This lab experiment illustrates the use of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to perform proximate analysis on a series of coal samples of different rank. Peat and coke are also examined. A total of four exercises are described. These are dry exercises as students interpret previously recorded scans. The weight percent moisture, volatile matter,…

  12. Treatment of distal intraarticular tibial fractures: A biomechanical evaluation of intramedullary nailing vs. angle-stable plate osteosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Sebastian; Greenfield, Julia; Arand, Charlotte; Jarmolaew, Andrey; Appelmann, Philipp; Mehler, Dorothea; Rommens, Pol M

    2015-10-01

    In factures of the distal tibia with simple articular extension, the optimal surgical treatment remains debatable. In clinical practice, minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis and intramedullary nailing are both routinely performed. Comparative biomechanical studies of different types of osteosynthesis of intraarticular distal tibial fractures are missing due to the lack of an established model. The goal of this study was first to establish a biomechanical model and second to investigate, which are the biomechanical advantages of angle-stable plate osteosynthesis and intramedullary nailing of distal intraarticular tibial fractures. Seven 4(th) generation biomechanical composite tibiae featuring an AO 43-C2 type fracture were implanted with either osteosynthesis technique. After primary lag screw fixation, 4-hole Medial Distal Tibial Plate (MDTP) with triple proximal and quadruple distal screws or intramedullary nailing with double proximal and triple 4.0mm distal interlocking were implanted. The stiffness of the implant-bone constructs and interfragmentary movement were measured under non-destructive axial compression (350 and 600 N) and torsion (1.5 and 3Nm). Destructive axial compression testing was conducted with a maximal load of up to 1,200 N. No overall superior biomechanical results can be proclaimed for either implant type. Intramedullary nailing displays statistically superior results for axial loading in comparison to the MDTP. Torsional loading resulted in non-statistically significant differences for the two-implant types with higher stability in the MDTP group. From a biomechanical view, the load sharing intramedullary nail might be more forgiving and allow for earlier weight bearing in patients with limited compliance.

  13. Subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascoe, M. K.; Low, P. A.; Windebank, A. J.; Litchy, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrophysiologic, autonomic, and neuropathologic characteristics and the natural history of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy and its response to immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the 12-year period from 1983 to 1995, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of Mayo Clinic patients with diabetes who had subacute onset and progression of proximal weakness. The responses of treated versus untreated patients were compared statistically. RESULTS: During the designated study period, 44 patients with subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy were encountered. Most patients were middle-aged or elderly, and no sex preponderance was noted. The proximal muscle weakness often was associated with reduced or absent lower extremity reflexes. Associated weight loss was a common finding. Frequently, patients had some evidence of demyelination on nerve conduction studies, but it invariably was accompanied by concomitant axonal degeneration. The cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration was usually increased. Diffuse and substantial autonomic failure was generally present. In most cases, a sural nerve biopsy specimen suggested demyelination, although evidence of an inflammatory infiltrate was less common. Of 12 patients who received treatment (with prednisone, intravenous immune globulin, or plasma exchange), 9 had improvement of their conditions, but 17 of 29 untreated patients (59%) with follow-up also eventually had improvement, albeit at a much slower rate. Improvement was usually incomplete. CONCLUSION: We suggest that the entity of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy is an extensive and severe variant of bilateral lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy, with some features suggestive of an immune-mediated cause. It differs from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in that most cases have a more restricted distribution and seem to be monophasic and self-limiting. The efficacy of immunotherapy is unproved

  14. Subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascoe, M. K.; Low, P. A.; Windebank, A. J.; Litchy, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrophysiologic, autonomic, and neuropathologic characteristics and the natural history of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy and its response to immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the 12-year period from 1983 to 1995, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of Mayo Clinic patients with diabetes who had subacute onset and progression of proximal weakness. The responses of treated versus untreated patients were compared statistically. RESULTS: During the designated study period, 44 patients with subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy were encountered. Most patients were middle-aged or elderly, and no sex preponderance was noted. The proximal muscle weakness often was associated with reduced or absent lower extremity reflexes. Associated weight loss was a common finding. Frequently, patients had some evidence of demyelination on nerve conduction studies, but it invariably was accompanied by concomitant axonal degeneration. The cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration was usually increased. Diffuse and substantial autonomic failure was generally present. In most cases, a sural nerve biopsy specimen suggested demyelination, although evidence of an inflammatory infiltrate was less common. Of 12 patients who received treatment (with prednisone, intravenous immune globulin, or plasma exchange), 9 had improvement of their conditions, but 17 of 29 untreated patients (59%) with follow-up also eventually had improvement, albeit at a much slower rate. Improvement was usually incomplete. CONCLUSION: We suggest that the entity of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy is an extensive and severe variant of bilateral lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy, with some features suggestive of an immune-mediated cause. It differs from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in that most cases have a more restricted distribution and seem to be monophasic and self-limiting. The efficacy of immunotherapy is unproved

  15. Correction of severe wrist deformity following physeal arrest of the distal radius with the aid of a three-dimensional computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Murase, Tsuyoshi; Oka, Kunihiro; Moritomo, Hisao; Goto, Akira; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2009-11-01

    Growth arrest following physeal injury may result in severe limb deformity. We report a case of complex wrist deformity caused by injury to the distal radial physis resulting in radial shortening and abnormal inclination of the radial articular surface, which was successfully treated by gradual correction after computer simulation. The simulation enabled us to develop an appropriate operative plan by accurately calculating the axis of the three-dimensional (3D) deformity using computer bone models. In the simulative surgery with a full-size stereolithography bone model, an Ilizarov external fixator was applied to the radius such that its two hinges were located on the virtual axis of the deformity, which was reproduced in the actual surgery. This technique of 3D computer simulation is a useful alternative to plan accurate correction of complex limb deformities following growth arrest.

  16. Tibial osteotomy for the varus osteoarthritic knee.

    PubMed

    Aglietti, P; Rinonapoli, E; Stringa, G; Taviani, A

    1983-06-01

    High tibial osteotomy is a reliable method for relieving pain in the varus osteoarthritic knee. In a review of 139 osteotomies, excellent and good results were noted in 64% of the knees after a follow-up period of at least ten years. The ideal candidate for this operation has Grade I or II osteoarthritis; less than 10 degrees of varus deformity, as measured by a single leg standing roentgenogram; no lateral subluxation; and no instability. The lateral closed wedge osteotomy without internal fixation is the preferred technique, and correction beyond the normal anatomic position, to 5 degrees of valgus, is advised. Protected weight-bearing after the second postoperative day is allowed. Complications have been infrequent and minor. Forty-seven knees were managed in this manner, and 88% had an excellent or good result at a four-year follow-up evaluation. In the majority of the well corrected knees, the alignment did not change with time, and the osteoarthritis did not progress. No failures in this series were attributable to the associated patellofemoral osteoarthritis; the reaction of the patellofemoral joint to osteotomy is obscure.

  17. Shape optimization of tibial prosthesis components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1993-01-01

    NASA technology and optimal design methodologies originally developed for the optimization of composite structures (engine blades) are adapted and applied to the optimization of orthopaedic knee implants. A method is developed enabling the shape tailoring of the tibial components of a total knee replacement implant for optimal interaction within the environment of the tibia. The shape of the implant components are optimized such that the stresses in the bone are favorably controlled to minimize bone degradation, to improve the mechanical integrity of the implant/interface/bone system, and to prevent failures of the implant components. A pilot tailoring system is developed and the feasibility of the concept is demonstrated and evaluated. The methodology and evolution of the existing aerospace technology from which this pilot optimization code was developed is also presented and discussed. Both symmetric and unsymmetric in-plane loading conditions are investigated. The results of the optimization process indicate a trend toward wider and tapered posts as well as thicker backing trays. Unique component geometries were obtained for the different load cases.

  18. Salter-Harris II fractures of the distal tibia: does surgical management reduce the risk of premature physeal closure?

    PubMed

    Russo, Franco; Moor, Molly A; Mubarak, Scott J; Pennock, Andrew T

    2013-01-01

    Premature physeal closure (PPC) is a common complication resulting from the management of a displaced Salter-Harris II (SH II) fracture of the distal tibia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate our institution's treatment approach to assess PPC and complication rates of fractures treated both surgically and nonsurgically. We performed a retrospective review of all patients presenting with a displaced SH II fracture between 2004 and 2010. Initial treatment was closed reduction in the emergency department. Further treatment and subsequent categorization was based on amount of residual displacement. Patients with <2 mm of postreduction displacement were treated with a non-weight-bearing long-leg cast (LLC; group 1), patients with residual displacement between 2 and 4 mm were treated with one of 2 approaches based on surgeon preference: either LLC (group 2) or open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with removal of any interposed tissue (group 3). Patients with >4 mm of residual displacement were treated with ORIF (group 4). Follow-up radiographs were performed for a minimum of 6 months. If there was clinical concern about PPC, computed tomography imaging was performed to assess for a bony bar. In total, 96 patients with a mean age of 12.6 years at presentation were included in the study. Among the 14 patients with <2 mm of postreduction displacement, 29% had a PPC and 7% had to undergo a subsequent procedure (epiphsyiodesis, osteotomy, etc.). Of the 33 patients with 2 to 4 mm of displacement who were treated with a LLC, 33% had a PPC and 15% had to undergo a subsequent procedure. Of the 11 patients with 2 to 4 mm of displacement treated with ORIF 46% had a PPC and 18% had a second procedure. Finally, 38 patients with >4 mm of displacement treated with ORIF had a PPC rate of 55% and 23% had a subsequent procedure. No statistical differences in PPC (P=0.19) or subsequent surgeries (P=0.57) were observed between groups. Among those with 2 to 4 mm of

  19. Comparison of Poly-L-Lactic Acid and Poly-L-Lactic Acid/Hydroxyapatite Bioabsorbable Screws for Tibial Fixation in ACL Reconstruction: Clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Results

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dhong Won; Lee, Ji Whan; Kim, Sang Bum; Park, Jung Ho; Chung, Kyu Sung; Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Woo Jong

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical and radiological results of 2 different tibial fixations performed using bioabsorbable screws with added hydroxyapatite (HA) and pure poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) screws in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Methods A total of 394 patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction between March 2009 and June 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Of those, 172 patients who took the radiological and clinical evaluations at more than 2 years after surgery were enrolled and divided into 2 groups: PLLA group (n = 86) and PLLA-HA group (n = 86). Both groups were assessed by means of the Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee score, and Tegner activity score. Stability was evaluated using the KT-2000 arthrometer. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to evaluate tibial tunnel widening, screw resorption, osteoingeration, and foreign body reactions. Results The PLLA-HA group showed significant reduction in the extent of tibial tunnel widening and foreign body reactions and significant increase in screw resorption compared to the pure PLLA group (p < 0.001 for both). In contrast, postoperative Lysholm score, Tegner activity score, IKDC score, and side-to-side difference on the KT-2000 arthrometer showed no significant differences between groups (p = 0.478, p = 0.906, p = 0.362, and p = 0.078, respectively). The PLLA group showed more significant widening in the proximal tibial tunnel than the PLLA-HA group (p = 0.001). In the correlation analysis, proximal tibial tunnel widening revealed a positive correlation with knee laxity (r = 0.866) and a negative correlation with Lysholm score (r = −0.753) (p < 0.01 for both). Conclusions The HA added PLLA screws would be advantageous for tibial graft fixation by reducing tibial tunnel widening, improving osteointegration, and lowering foreign body reactions. Even though no clinically significant differences

  20. Comparison of Poly-L-Lactic Acid and Poly-L-Lactic Acid/Hydroxyapatite Bioabsorbable Screws for Tibial Fixation in ACL Reconstruction: Clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Results.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dhong Won; Lee, Ji Whan; Kim, Sang Bum; Park, Jung Ho; Chung, Kyu Sung; Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Jin Goo; Kim, Woo Jong

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical and radiological results of 2 different tibial fixations performed using bioabsorbable screws with added hydroxyapatite (HA) and pure poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) screws in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. A total of 394 patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction between March 2009 and June 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Of those, 172 patients who took the radiological and clinical evaluations at more than 2 years after surgery were enrolled and divided into 2 groups: PLLA group (n = 86) and PLLA-HA group (n = 86). Both groups were assessed by means of the Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee score, and Tegner activity score. Stability was evaluated using the KT-2000 arthrometer. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to evaluate tibial tunnel widening, screw resorption, osteoingeration, and foreign body reactions. The PLLA-HA group showed significant reduction in the extent of tibial tunnel widening and foreign body reactions and significant increase in screw resorption compared to the pure PLLA group (p < 0.001 for both). In contrast, postoperative Lysholm score, Tegner activity score, IKDC score, and side-to-side difference on the KT-2000 arthrometer showed no significant differences between groups (p = 0.478, p = 0.906, p = 0.362, and p = 0.078, respectively). The PLLA group showed more significant widening in the proximal tibial tunnel than the PLLA-HA group (p = 0.001). In the correlation analysis, proximal tibial tunnel widening revealed a positive correlation with knee laxity (r = 0.866) and a negative correlation with Lysholm score (r = -0.753) (p < 0.01 for both). The HA added PLLA screws would be advantageous for tibial graft fixation by reducing tibial tunnel widening, improving osteointegration, and lowering foreign body reactions. Even though no clinically significant differences were noted between the pure PLLA group and

  1. Fractures of the tibial plateau involve similar energies as the tibial pilon but greater articular surface involvement.

    PubMed

    Dibbern, Kevin; Kempton, Laurence B; Higgins, Thomas F; Morshed, Saam; McKinley, Todd O; Marsh, J Lawrence; Anderson, Donald D

    2017-03-01

    Patients with tibial pilon fractures have a higher incidence of post-traumatic osteoarthritis than those with fractures of the tibial plateau. This may indicate that pilon fractures present a greater mechanical insult to the joint than do plateau fractures. We tested the hypothesis that fracture energy and articular fracture edge length, two independent indicators of severity, are higher in pilon than plateau fractures. We also evaluated whether clinical fracture classification systems accurately reflect severity. Seventy-five tibial plateau fractures and 52 tibial pilon fractures from a multi-institutional study were selected to span the spectrum of severity. Fracture severity measures were calculated using objective CT-based image analysis methods. The ranges of fracture energies measured for tibial plateau and pilon fractures were 3.2-33.2 Joules (J) and 3.6-32.2 J, respectively, and articular fracture edge lengths were 68.0-493.0 mm and 56.1-288.6 mm, respectively. There were no differences in the fracture energies between the two fracture types, but plateau fractures had greater articular fracture edge lengths (p < 0.001). The clinical fracture classifications generally reflected severity, but there was substantial overlap of fracture severity measures between different classes. Similar fracture energies with different degrees of articular surface involvement suggest a possible explanation for dissimilar rates of post-traumatic osteoarthritis for fractures of the tibial plateau compared to the tibial pilon. The substantial overlap of severity measures between different fracture classes may well have confounded prior clinical studies relying on fracture classification as a surrogate for severity. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:618-624, 2017.

  2. Proximity Networks and Epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guclu, Hasan; Toroczkai, Zoltán

    2007-03-01

    We presented the basis of a framework to account for the dynamics of contacts in epidemic processes, through the notion of dynamic proximity graphs. By varying the integration time-parameter T, which is the period of infectivity one can give a simple account for some of the differences in the observed contact networks for different diseases, such as smallpox, or AIDS. Our simplistic model also seems to shed some light on the shape of the degree distribution of the measured people-people contact network from the EPISIM data. We certainly do not claim that the simplistic graph integration model above is a good model for dynamic contact graphs. It only contains the essential ingredients for such processes to produce a qualitative agreement with some observations. We expect that further refinements and extensions to this picture, in particular deriving the link-probabilities in the dynamic proximity graph from more realistic contact dynamics should improve the agreement between models and data.

  3. Properties of the tibial component regarding impact load.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Kazunori; Koga, Yoshio; Segawa, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Yuichi; Tanabe, Yuji; Endo, Naoto; Omori, Go

    2004-06-01

    Load transmission through knee prostheses was examined to clarify how the tibial component behaves under dynamic loading conditions. We did Genesis II total knee arthroplasty using sawbones and measured impact load transmission ratios using the split-Hopkinson pressure bar technique. We also measured the polyethylene strain when an impact load was applied using a strain gauge bonded to the anterior surface of the polyethylene. The impact load transmission ratios of metal-backed and all-polyethylene tibial components were less than 4%. Greater load transmission was observed with metal-backed components, which suggests that some of the applied dynamic load is transferred directly to the tibial cortical bone. Increasing polyethylene thickness decreased impact load transmission ratios in both components, which might lower the cancellous bone stresses beneath tibial implants. Greater strain in the tibial component was observed in all-polyethylene components. Increased polyethylene thickness did not significantly decrease the polyethylene strain, probably because of the nonlinear elastic behavior of the polyethylene material. The distant positioning of the strain gauge may, however, have prevented the detection of local contact strains. Recent clinical studies did not confirm our theoretical predictions, suggesting that other factors contribute more significantly to the clinical outcome in current total knee arthroplasty.

  4. Biomechanical evaluation of tibial eminence fractures using suture fixation.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Stephen K; Curtis, Stuart H

    2011-12-06

    This study evaluates the initial fixation strength of tibial eminence fracture repair using 1, 2, 3, and 4 sutures to determine the optimal number of sutures required to adequately secure the avulsed fragment to the tibia. Sixteen skeletally immature porcine knees were stripped of all soft tissues, isolating the femur-anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-tibia complex. Type III tibial eminence fractures were simulated in the specimens, and each specimen was randomly assigned to a repair group using 1, 2, 3, or 4 #2 FiberWire sutures (Arthrex, Inc, Naples, Florida). Initial fixation strength of the repair was measured by single cycle pull to failure testing using a materials testing machine (Instron, Norwood, Massachusetts). The mean ultimate failure force during anterior tibial translation was 389±128, 627±66, 703±77, and 802±29 N for 1, 2, 3, and 4 sutures, respectively. The lower limit of the 95% confidence interval was >500 N (estimated force of native ACL during activities of daily living) for each group with ≥2 sutures. In this study, at least 2 high-strength sutures were needed for tibial eminence fracture repairs to withstand potential forces seen across the ACL in the postoperative period. Suture fixation of tibial eminence fractures is a reproducible method requiring a minimum of 2 high-strength polyester sutures to resist forces seen during early rehabilitation.

  5. Forefoot flexibility and medial tibial stress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Shintarou; Hatanaka, Yasuhiko

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the association between medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) and morphology and flexibility of the foot arches. 131 feet from 74 healthy subjects and 31 feet from 27 patients with MTSS were classified as normal feet (n=78 in 40 subjects), flat feet (n=53 in 34 subjects), or MTSS feet (n=31 in 27 patients). The medial longitudinal arch (MLA) ratio and the transverse arch length (TAL) were measured in both rearfoot and forefoot loading positions. The difference between the 2 positions indicated the flexibility of the MLA (diff-MLA ratio) and the transverse arch (diff- TAL). The MLA ratio was higher in normal feet than MTSS feet or flat feet (15.1% vs. 12.8% vs. 12.3%, p<0.001). The diff-TAL was lower in MTSS feet than normal feet or flat feet (0.4% vs. 0.8% vs. 0.9%, p<0.001]). The 3 groups were comparable in terms of the diff-MLA ratio and the TAL. Respectively for the MLA ratio and the diff-TAL, the cut-off value was 11.9% and 0.61% based on the Youden index. The sensitivity, specificity, and odds ratio of the cut-off value were 0.4, 0.9, and 4.8 for the MLA ratio, and 0.6, 0.7, and 9.8 for the diff-TAL, respectively. Decreased flexibility of the transverse arch and decreased MLA ratio are risk factors for MTSS. In contrast, the flexibility of the MLA and the height of the transverse arch were not risk factors for MTSS.

  6. Distal tibial tuberosity translation using TTA implants for the treatment of patella alta in large breed dogs. Surgical technique and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, L C; Pike, F S; Aiken, S W

    2015-01-01

    Medial patellar luxation frequently occurs in dogs resulting in lameness with increasing incidence in large breed dogs. Patella alta has been defined as a patellar ligament length to patellar length ratio that is greater than two and may predispose to patellar luxation. To describe the surgical technique for stabilization of the distal translation of the tibial tuberosity using tibial tuberosity advancement plates and the clinical outcomes with follow-up for clinical cases of dogs. Dogs that were presented with the complaint of patellar luxation and that were concurrently diagnosed with patella alta and were greater than 20 kg in body weight underwent surgery using a tibial tuberosity advancement plate to stabilize the osteotomy. Radiographic assessment of A:PL distance (the ratio of the proximal aspect of the patella to the femoral condyle [A] to the patellar length [PL]), L:P ratio (ratio of the length of the patellar ligament to the diagonal length of the patella), and owner assessment were obtained. Eleven stifles in nine dogs underwent surgical correction with a mean preoperative L:P ratio of 2.47. There were no complications and the lameness resolved clinically. The mean A:PL ratios preoperatively (2.6 ± 0.22) and postoperatively (2.1 ± 0.25) were significantly different (p = 0.0003). All owners were satisfied with the outcome and all dogs had a resolution of lameness with no recurrence of patellar luxation. Stabilization of distal translation of the tibial tuberosity using tibial tuberosity advancement implants to correct patella alta in large breed dogs was feasible and resulted in good clinical outcome.

  7. Tibial nerve neuropathy following medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy-case report of a rare technical complication.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young-Soo; Sim, Hyun-Bo; Yoon, Jung-Ro

    2017-03-21

    A 63-year-old woman developed tibial nerve injury caused by an overlong K wire and 4.5-mm cortical lag screw through the first distal hole below the osteotomy during medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO), leading to a lack of sensation on the sole of the foot with no disturbances in motor functions. The temporary lag screw in the first distal hole below the osteotomy is often inserted by an excessive length in order to compress the potentially fractured opposite cortex. By doing so, posterior neurovascular structures including the tibial nerve and the popliteal vessels can be injured. To avoid this type of injury during medial opening-wedge HTO, proper knee position and appropriate Hohmann retractor position in combination with meticulous insertion of the K wire or screw under fluoroscopic control are essential. In addition, our study reinforces the fact that different presentations of injury to the tibial nerve should be carefully considered in the absence of common diagnostic features, including weakness of the toe flexors and posterior tibial muscle of the leg with intractable pain.

  8. Effect of Wedge Insertion Angle on Posterior Tibial Slope in Medial Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Matsumoto, Kazu; Ogawa, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Kentaro; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a well-established surgery for medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) wherein the lower extremity is realigned to shift the load distribution from the medial compartment of the knee to the lateral compartment. However, this surgery is known to affect the posterior tibial slope angle (PTSA), which could lead to abnormal knee kinematics and instability, and eventually to knee OA. Although PTSA control is as important as coronal realignment, few appropriate measurements for this parameter have been reported. The placement of a wedge spacer might have an effect on PTSA. Purpose: To elucidate the relationship between the PTSA and the direction of insertion of a wedge spacer. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This study assessed 43 knees from 34 patients who underwent medial opening wedge HTO for knee OA. Pre- and postoperative lateral radiographs of the knee as well as postoperative computed tomography scans were performed to evaluate the relationship among PTSA, wedge insertion angle (WIA), and opening gap ratio (distance of the anterior opening gap/distance of the posterior opening gap at the osteotomy site). Results: The PTSA significantly increased from 9.0° ± 2.8° preoperatively to 13.2° ± 4.1° postoperatively (P < .001), resulting in a mean ΔPTSA of 4.7° ± 4.5°. The mean opening gap ratio was 0.86 ± 0.11, and the mean WIA was 25.9° ± 8.4°. The WIA and opening gap ratio were both highly correlated with ΔPTSA (r = 0.71 and 0.72, respectively), implying that a smaller WIA or smaller gap ratio leads to less increase in posterior slope. Conclusion: The direction of wedge insertion is highly correlated with PTSA increase, which suggests that the PTSA can be controlled for by adjusting the direction of wedge insertion during surgery. Clinical Relevance: Study results suggest that it is possible to adjust the PTSA by controlling the WIA during surgery. Proper

  9. The use of by-pass grafts for obstructive lesions of tibial and peroneal arteries.

    PubMed

    Danza, R

    1982-01-01

    Lesions of the distal arteries of the leg are of similar frequency and importance as proximal lesions. Most frequently distal and proximal lesions are present. When distal intraoperative arteriography is carried out before a femoropopliteal by-pass, 68% of cases have associated distal lesions. When the popliteal artery is occluded, the by-pass must extend to the tibio-peroneal trunk, a tibial artery or the peroneal artery. In this paper 79 of these distal by-passes are reported, together with the results. Although there are arterial lesions limited to the ankle, it is not frequent to find this type of pathology. Of 900 patients with occlusive disease treated surgically, we only found 35 such cases (3.9%). However, the presence of this lesion may endanger the function and the integrity of the limb. This paper describes the clinical picture and pathology of the disease process, as well as the treatment by short venous by-pass at the ankle.

  10. Intermittent Parathyroid Hormone Enhances Cancellous Osseointegration of a Novel Murine Tibial Implant

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xu; Ricciardi, Benjamin F.; Dvorzhinskiy, Aleksey; Brial, Caroline; Lane, Zachary; Bhimani, Samrath; Burket, Jayme C.; Hu, Bin; Sarkisian, Alexander M.; Ross, F. Patrick; van der Meulen, Marjolein C.H.; Bostrom, Mathias P.G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term fixation of uncemented joint implants requires early mechanical stability and implant osseointegration. To date, osseointegration has been unreliable and remains a major challenge in cementless total knee arthroplasty. We developed a murine model in which an intra-articular proximal tibial titanium implant with a roughened stem can be loaded through the knee joint. Using this model, we tested the hypothesis that intermittent injection of parathyroid hormone (iPTH) would increase proximal tibial cancellous osseointegration. Methods: Ten-week-old female C57BL/6 mice received a subcutaneous injection of PTH (40 μg/kg/day) or a vehicle (n = 45 per treatment group) five days per week for six weeks, at which time the baseline group was killed (n = 6 per treatment group) and an implant was inserted into the proximal part of the tibiae of the remaining mice. Injections were continued until the animals were killed at one week (n = 7 per treatment group), two weeks (n = 14 per treatment group), or four weeks (n = 17 per treatment group) after implantation. Outcomes included peri-implant bone morphology as analyzed with micro-computed tomography (microCT), osseointegration percentage and bone area fraction as shown with backscattered electron microscopy, cellular composition as demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis, and pullout strength as measured with mechanical testing. Results: Preimplantation iPTH increased the epiphyseal bone volume fraction by 31.6%. When the data at post-implantation weeks 1, 2, and 4 were averaged for the iPTH-treated mice, the bone volume fraction was 74.5% higher in the peri-implant region and 168% higher distal to the implant compared with the bone volume fractions in the same regions in the vehicle-treated mice. Additionally, the trabecular number was 84.8% greater in the peri-implant region and 74.3% greater distal to the implant. Metaphyseal osseointegration and bone area fraction were 28.1% and 70.1% higher

  11. Bilateral tibial agenesis and syndactyly in a cat.

    PubMed

    Di Dona, Francesco; Murino, Carla; Della Valle, Giovanni; Fatone, Gerardo

    2016-07-19

    A three-year-old cat was referred to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Naples, Italy. The cat had severe pelvic limb deformity, and abnormal development of all four paws. Radiographs revealed bilateral tibial agenesis, syndactyly, and digital hypoplasia. No treatment was instituted because of the severity of the injury, the adaptation of the cat to the abnormal condition, and the owner's refusal to permit any treatment. Congenital limb deformities are rarely reported in the cat and tibial agenesis is considered a very rare disease. This congenital anomaly is well documented and classified in man, and it has been associated with other abnormalities in more complex syndromes. This paper reports clinical and radiographic findings in a cat affected by bilateral complete tibial agenesis associated with other congenital anomalies.

  12. [Anatomical quantification of the tibial part of the plantar aponeurosis].

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Y

    1983-03-01

    The metrical analysis of the anatomical characteristics is important because of its objectiveness. As it is concerned with the organs belonging to the locomotor system, the metrical method of the bones has already been systematized by Martin (1928), whereas the same kind of method for use on other organs remains undeveloped. The author aims to establish the metrical method of the plantar aponeurosis. The method for measuring the tibial part of the aponeurosis developed in this paper is sufficiently applicable for obtaining its principal anatomical characteristics. The results show that the tibial portion of the plantar aponeurosis becomes statistically significantly wider and thinner in its anterior part, and that the thickness of the tibial portion of the aponeurosis in the anterior part is larger on the right side than on the left side.

  13. Primary Ankle Arthrodesis for Severely Comminuted Tibial Pilon Fractures.

    PubMed

    Al-Ashhab, Mohamed E

    2017-03-01

    Management of severely comminuted, complete articular tibial pilon fractures (Rüedi and Allgöwer type III) remains a challenge, with few treatment options providing good clinical outcomes. Twenty patients with severely comminuted tibial pilon fractures underwent primary ankle arthrodesis with a retrograde calcaneal nail and autogenous fibular bone graft. The fusion rate was 100% and the varus malunion rate was 10%. Fracture union occurred at a mean of 16 weeks (range, 13-18 weeks) postoperatively. Primary ankle arthrodesis is a successful method for treating highly comminuted tibial pilon fractures, having a low complication rate and a high satisfaction score. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e378-e381.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Computer-Assisted Navigation in High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang Jun

    2016-01-01

    Computer-assisted navigation is used to improve the accuracy and precision of correction angles during high tibial osteotomy. Most studies have reported that this technique reduces the outliers of coronal alignment and unintended changes in the tibial posterior slope angle. However, more sophisticated studies are necessary to determine whether the technique will improve the clinical results and long-term survival rates. Knowledge of the navigation technology, surgical techniques and potential pitfalls, the clinical results of previous studies, and understanding of the advantages and limitations of the computer-assisted navigation are crucial to successful application of this new technique in high tibial osteotomy. Herein, we review the evidence concerning this technique from previous studies. PMID:27904715

  15. The Role of Fibers in the Femoral Attachment of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament in Resisting Tibial Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Yasuyuki; Kondo, Eiji; Takeda, Ryo; Akita, Keiichi; Yasuda, Kazunori; Amis, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to clarify the load-bearing functions of the fibers of the femoral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) attachment in resisting tibial anterior drawer and rotation. Methods A sequential cutting study was performed on 8 fresh-frozen human knees. The femoral attachment of the ACL was divided into a central area that had dense fibers inserting directly into the femur and anterior and posterior fan-like extension areas. The ACL fibers were cut sequentially from the bone: the posterior fan-like area in 2 stages, the central dense area in 4 stages, and then the anterior fan-like area in 2 stages. Each knee was mounted in a robotic joint testing system that applied tibial anteroposterior 6-mm translations and 10° or 15° of internal rotation at 0° to 90° of flexion. The reduction of restraining force or moment was measured after each cut. Results The central area resisted 82% to 90% of the anterior drawer force; the anterior fan-like area, 2% to 3%; and the posterior fan-like area, 11% to 15%. Among the 4 central areas, most load was carried close to the roof of the intercondylar notch: the anteromedial bundle resisted 66% to 84% of the force and the posterolateral bundle resisted 16% to 9% from 0° to 90° of flexion. There was no clear pattern for tibial internal rotation, with the load shared among the posterodistal and central areas near extension and mostly the central areas in flexion. Conclusions Under the experimental conditions described, 66% to 84% of the resistance to tibial anterior drawer arose from the ACL fibers at the central-proximal area of the femoral attachment, corresponding to the anteromedial bundle; the fan-like extension fibers contributed very little. This work did not support moving a single-bundle ACL graft to the side wall of the notch or attempting to cover the whole attachment area if the intention was to mimic how the natural ACL resists tibial displacements. Clinical Relevance There is ongoing debate about how best

  16. Metaphyseal locking plate as a definitive external fixator for treating open tibial fractures--clinical outcome and a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ching-Hou; Wu, Chin-Hsien; Tu, Yuan-Kun; Lin, Ting-Sheng

    2013-08-01

    We evaluated both the outcome of using a locking plate as a definitive external fixator for treating open tibial fractures and, using finite element analysis, the biomechanical performance of external and internal metaphyseal locked plates in treating proximal tibial fractures. Eight open tibial patients were treated using a metaphyseal locked plate as a low-profile definitive external fixator. Then, finite element models of internal (IPF) as well as two different external plate fixations (EPFs) for proximal tibial fractures were reconstructed. The offset distances from the bone surface to the EPFs were 6 cm and 10 cm. Both axial stiffness and angular stiffness were calculated to evaluate the biomechanical performance of these three models. The mean follow-up period was 31 months (range, 18-43 months). All the fractures united and the mean bone healing time was 37.5 weeks (range, 20-52 weeks). All patients had excellent or good functional results and were walking freely at the final follow-up. The finite element finding revealed that axial stiffness and angular stiffness decreased as the offset distance from the bone surface increased. Compared to the IPF models, in the two EPF models, axial stiffness decreased by 84-94%, whereas the angular stiffness decreased by 12-21%. The locking plate used as a definitive external fixator provided a high rate of union. While the locking plate is not totally rigid, it is clinically stable and may be advisable for stiffness reduction of plating constructs, thus promoting fracture healing by callus formation. Our patients experienced a comfortable clinical course, excellent knee and ankle joint motion, satisfactory functional results and an acceptable complication rate.

  17. The radiographic union scale in tibial (RUST) fractures

    PubMed Central

    Clement, N. D.; Tawonsawatruk, T.; Simpson, C. J.; Simpson, A. H. R. W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The radiographic union score for tibial (RUST) fractures was developed by Whelan et al to assess the healing of tibial fractures following intramedullary nailing. In the current study, the repeatability and reliability of the RUST score was evaluated in an independent centre (a) using the original description, (b) after further interpretation of the description of the score, and (c) with the immediate post-operative radiograph available for comparison. Methods A total of 15 radiographs of tibial shaft fractures treated by intramedullary nailing (IM) were scored by three observers using the RUST system. Following discussion on how the criteria of the RUST system should be implemented, 45 sets (i.e. AP and lateral) of radiographs of IM nailed tibial fractures were scored by five observers. Finally, these 45 sets of radiographs were rescored with the baseline post-operative radiograph available for comparison. Results The initial intraclass correlation (ICC) on the first 15 sets of radiographs was 0.67 (95% CI 0.63 to 0.71). However, the original description was being interpreted in different ways. After agreeing on the interpretation, the ICC on the second cohort improved to 0.75. The ICC improved even further to 0.79, when the baseline post-operative radiographs were available for comparison. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the RUST scoring system is a reliable and repeatable outcome measure for assessing tibial fracture healing. Further improvement in the reliability of the scoring system can be obtained if the radiographs are compared with the baseline post-operative radiographs. Cite this article: Mr J.M. Leow. The radiographic union scale in tibial (RUST) fractures: Reliability of the outcome measure at an independent centre. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:116–121. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000628. PMID:27073210

  18. Periprosthetic tibial bone mineral density changes after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jaroma, Antti; Soininvaara, Tarja; Kröger, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may cause postoperative periprosthetic bone loss due to stress shielding. Bone also adapts to mechanical alterations such as correction of malalignment. We investigated medium-term changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in tibial periprosthetic bone after TKA. Patients and methods 86 TKA patients were prospectively measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the baseline measurement being within 1 week after TKA and the follow-up measurements being at 3 and 6 months, and at 1, 2, 4, and 7 years postoperatively. Long standing radiographs were taken and clinical evaluation was done with the American Knee Society (AKS) score. Results The baseline BMD of the medial tibial metaphyseal region of interest (ROI) was higher in the varus aligned knees (25%; p < 0.001). Medial metaphyseal BMD decreased in subjects with preoperatively varus aligned knees (13%, p < 0.001) and in those with preoperatively valgus aligned knees (12%, p = 0.02) between the baseline and 7-year measurements. No statistically significant changes in BMD were detected in lateral metaphyseal ROIs. No implant failures or revision surgery due to tibial problems occurred. Interpretation Tibial metaphyseal periprosthetic bone is remodeled after TKA due to mechanical axis correction, resulting in more balanced bone stock below the tibial tray. The diaphyseal BMD remains unchanged after the initial drop, within 3–6 months. This remodeling process was related to good component survival, as there were no implant failures or revision operations due to tibial problems in this medium-term follow-up. PMID:27120266

  19. Bone stress in runners with tibial stress fracture.

    PubMed

    Meardon, Stacey A; Willson, John D; Gries, Samantha R; Kernozek, Thomas W; Derrick, Timothy R

    2015-11-01

    Combinations of smaller bone geometry and greater applied loads may contribute to tibial stress fracture. We examined tibial bone stress, accounting for geometry and applied loads, in runners with stress fracture. 23 runners with a history of tibial stress fracture & 23 matched controls ran over a force platform while 3-D kinematic and kinetic data were collected. An elliptical model of the distal 1/3 tibia cross section was used to estimate stress at 4 locations (anterior, posterior, medial and lateral). Inner and outer radii for the model were obtained from 2 planar x-ray images. Bone stress differences were assessed using two-factor ANOVA (α=0.05). Key contributors to observed stress differences between groups were examined using stepwise regression. Runners with tibial stress fracture experienced greater anterior tension and posterior compression at the distal tibia. Location, but not group, differences in shear stress were observed. Stepwise regression revealed that anterior-posterior outer diameter of the tibia and the sagittal plane bending moment explained >80% of the variance in anterior and posterior bone stress. Runners with tibial stress fracture displayed greater stress anteriorly and posteriorly at the distal tibia. Elevated tibial stress was associated with smaller bone geometry and greater bending moments about the medial-lateral axis of the tibia. Future research needs to identify key running mechanics associated with the sagittal plane bending moment at the distal tibia as well as to identify ways to improve bone geometry in runners in order to better guide preventative and rehabilitative efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Periprosthetic tibial bone mineral density changes after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jaroma, Antti; Soininvaara, Tarja; Kröger, Heikki

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may cause postoperative periprosthetic bone loss due to stress shielding. Bone also adapts to mechanical alterations such as correction of malalignment. We investigated medium-term changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in tibial periprosthetic bone after TKA. Patients and methods - 86 TKA patients were prospectively measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the baseline measurement being within 1 week after TKA and the follow-up measurements being at 3 and 6 months, and at 1, 2, 4, and 7 years postoperatively. Long standing radiographs were taken and clinical evaluation was done with the American Knee Society (AKS) score. Results - The baseline BMD of the medial tibial metaphyseal region of interest (ROI) was higher in the varus aligned knees (25%; p < 0.001). Medial metaphyseal BMD decreased in subjects with preoperatively varus aligned knees (13%, p < 0.001) and in those with preoperatively valgus aligned knees (12%, p = 0.02) between the baseline and 7-year measurements. No statistically significant changes in BMD were detected in lateral metaphyseal ROIs. No implant failures or revision surgery due to tibial problems occurred. Interpretation - Tibial metaphyseal periprosthetic bone is remodeled after TKA due to mechanical axis correction, resulting in more balanced bone stock below the tibial tray. The diaphyseal BMD remains unchanged after the initial drop, within 3-6 months. This remodeling process was related to good component survival, as there were no implant failures or revision operations due to tibial problems in this medium-term follow-up.

  1. Cortical and trabecular bone adaptation to incremental load magnitudes using the mouse tibial axial compression loading model.

    PubMed

    Weatherholt, Alyssa M; Fuchs, Robyn K; Warden, Stuart J

    2013-01-01

    The mouse tibial axial compression loading model has recently been described to allow simultaneous exploration of cortical and trabecular bone adaptation within the same loaded element. However, the model frequently induces cortical woven bone formation and has produced inconsistent results with regards to trabecular bone adaptation. The aim of this study was to investigate bone adaptation to incremental load magnitudes using the mouse tibial axial compression loading model, with the ultimate goal of revealing a load that simultaneously induced lamellar cortical and trabecular bone adaptation. Adult (16 weeks old) female C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into three load magnitude groups (5, 7 and 9N), and had their right tibia axially loaded using a continuous 2-Hz haversine waveform for 360 cycles/day, 3 days/week for 4 consecutive weeks. In vivo peripheral quantitative computed tomography was used to longitudinally assess midshaft tibia cortical bone adaptation, while ex vivo micro-computed tomography and histomorphometry were used to assess both midshaft tibia cortical and proximal tibia trabecular bone adaptation. A dose response to loading magnitude was observed within cortical bone, with increasing load magnitude inducing increasing levels of lamellar cortical bone adaptation within the upper two thirds of the tibial diaphysis. Greatest cortical bone adaptation was observed at the midshaft where there was a 42% increase in estimated mechanical properties (polar moment of inertia) in the highest (9N) load group. A dose response to load magnitude was not clearly evident within trabecular bone, with only the highest load (9N) being able to induce measureable adaptation (31% increase in trabecular bone volume fraction at the proximal tibia). The ultimate finding was that a load of 9N (engendering a tensile strain of 1833 με on medial surface of the midshaft tibia) was able to simultaneously induce measurable lamellar cortical and trabecular bone adaptation

  2. Principles of tibial fracture management with circular external fixation.

    PubMed

    Lowenberg, David W; Githens, Michael; Boone, Christopher

    2014-04-01

    There is a growing mass of literature to suggest that circular external fixation for high-energy tibial fractures has advantages over traditional internal fixation, with potential improved rates of union, decreased incidence of posttraumatic osteomyelitis, and decreased soft tissue problems. To further advance our understanding of the role of circular external fixation in the management of these tibial fractures, randomized controlled trials should be implemented. In addition to complication rates and radiographic outcomes, validated functional outcome tools and cost analysis of this method should be compared with open reduction with internal fixation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Posterior tibial vein aneurysm presenting as tarsal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ayad, Micheal; Whisenhunt, Anumeha; Hong, EnYaw; Heller, Josh; Salvatore, Dawn; Abai, Babak; DiMuzio, Paul J

    2015-06-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome is a compressive neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve within the tarsal tunnel. Its etiology varies, including space occupying lesions, trauma, inflammation, anatomic deformity, iatrogenic injury, and idiopathic and systemic causes. Herein, we describe a 46-year-old man who presented with left foot pain. Work up revealed a venous aneurysm impinging on the posterior tibial nerve. Following resection of the aneurysm and lysis of the nerve, his symptoms were alleviated. Review of the literature reveals an association between venous disease and tarsal tunnel syndrome; however, this report represents the first case of venous aneurysm causing symptomatic compression of the nerve.

  4. Suprapatellar nailing of tibial fractures: surgical hints.

    PubMed

    Brink, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Intramedullary nailing of the tibia with suprapatellar entry and semi-extended positioning makes it technically easier to nail the proximal and distal fractures. The purpose of this article was to describe a simple method for suprapatellar nailing (SPN). A step-by-step run through of the surgical technique is described, including positioning of the patient. There are as yet only a few clinical studies that illustrate the complications with this method, and there has been no increased frequency of intraarticular damage. Within the body of the manuscript, information is included about intraarticular damage and comments with references about anterior knee pain.

  5. Suprapatellar nailing of tibial fractures: surgical hints

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Intramedullary nailing of the tibia with suprapatellar entry and semi-extended positioning makes it technically easier to nail the proximal and distal fractures. The purpose of this article was to describe a simple method for suprapatellar nailing (SPN). A step-by-step run through of the surgical technique is described, including positioning of the patient. There are as yet only a few clinical studies that illustrate the complications with this method, and there has been no increased frequency of intraarticular damage. Within the body of the manuscript, information is included about intraarticular damage and comments with references about anterior knee pain. PMID:27340503

  6. Corrective osteotomy for procurvatum deformity caused by distal femoral physeal fracture malunion stabilised with String-of-Pearls locking plates: results in two dogs and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kim, S E; Lewis, D D

    2014-03-01

    This report describes the treatment of severe procurvatum because of distal femoral physeal fracture malunion in two skeletally immature dogs. Both dogs presented with severe right hindlimb lameness and markedly reduced stifle extension at less than 5 months of age. Severe distal femoral procurvatum and mild-to-moderate femoral shortening secondary to distal femoral physeal fracture malunion were evident on radiographs. The sagittal plane deformities were addressed with a caudal opening-wedge osteotomy in one dog and cranial closing wedge ostectomy in the other dog. String-of-Pearls locking plates were used to stabilise the osteotomies. Functional stifle extension range of motion and femoral length were improved post surgery in both dogs. Explantation of the plates was required in both dogs because of local soft tissue irritation. Both dogs had excellent outcomes based on subjective and objective measures (pressure sensitive walkway, force platform analysis) when assessed at skeletal maturity. Corrective osteotomy stabilised with String-of-Pearls locking plates is a viable treatment option for improving limb function in dogs with severe procurvatum deformities caused by distal femoral physeal fracture malunion. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  7. Preliminary report on amputation versus reconstruction in treatment of tibial hemimelia.

    PubMed

    Balcı, Halil İbrahim; Sağlam, Yavuz; Bilgili, Fuat; Şen, Cengiz; Kocaoğlu, Mehmet; Eralp, Levent

    2015-01-01

    Tibial hemimelia is a rare disorder characterized by the absence or hypoplasia of the tibia with associated rigidity. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the affectivity of reconstructive surgeries including centralization of the knee-ankle joints and lengthening with Ilizarov principles, as well as physical and functional results of amputation and reconstruction. This is an IRB-approved retrospective review of all patients diagnosed with tibial hemimelia who required surgery at a single institution between 1998 and 2011. Charts were analyzed for clinical and radiographical findings. At final follow-up, patients underwent physical and radiographic examination. Patients and their parents were asked to complete the SF-10™ health survey (QualityMetric Inc., Lincoln, RI, USA). Twenty-one patients (12 male, 9 female) with 30 affected extremities were included. Mean age was 4.8±3.1 years at initial surgery. Knee level disarticulation was performed in 6 extremities of 4 patients. One patient with type III underwent transtibial amputation. Mean number of surgeries for each patient was 6.4±3.3, and mean duration of external fixator and casting was 17±6 months. Mean lengthening was 4.9±1.3 cm, and mean limb length discrepancy was 3.1±1.7 cm at 5.8±3.7 years at follow-up. SF-10™ scores were similar in disarticulated and reconstructed patients (p=0.63). All scores were significantly higher when disarticulation was performed in cases of knee instability (p<0.01). When stability of the knee joint is present, treatment modality should be chosen according to the existence of the proximal tibia. Amputation should be preferred in cases of knee joint instability.

  8. Hsp90 inhibitor celastrol reinstates growth plate angiogenesis in thiram-induced tibial dyschondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Nabi, Fazul; Shahzad, Muhammad; Liu, Jingying; Li, Kun; Han, Zhaoqing; Zhang, Ding; Iqbal, Muhammad Kashif; Li, Jiakui

    2016-01-01

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) is an important long bone defect of broiler chickens that disturbs the proximal growth plate and is characterized by non-vascularized cartilage, a distended growth plate and lameness. Celastrol, a medicinal root extract from the plant Tripterygium wilfordii, is reported widely as a well-known heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor. Recently, Hsp90 inhibition in chondrocyte differentiation and growth-plate vascularization were effective in restoring the morphology of the growth plate. The present study was aimed at investigating Hsp90 inhibition in TD using celastrol. The broiler chicks were divided into three groups; Control; TD induced (40 mg/kg thiram) and celastrol treatment. Hsp90, vascular endothelial growth factor and Flk-1 expressions were evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and the protein levels of Hsp90 were measured by Western blot analysis. Antioxidant enzymes were determined to assess the liver damage caused by thiram and the protective effects of the medicine were evaluated by levels of serum biomarkers. The expression levels of Hsp90 and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA transcripts were increased while Flk-1 receptor was decreased in TD-affected chicks. Celastrol therapy inhibited Hsp90 mRNA and protein levels and up-regulated the expressions of receptor Flk-1 in TD-affected tibial growth plates significantly (P < 0.05) in addition to rectifying the damaging effects of thiram on the liver by decreasing the levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and malondialdehyde and correcting the oxidative imbalance. In conclusion, administering celastrol to dyschondroplastic chicks prevented un-vascularized growth plate, lameness and reinstated angiogenesis. Celastrol may be efficacious for the treatment of TD through the inhibition of Hsp90 expression and limiting the liver damage caused by thiram in broiler chickens.

  9. Modified biplanar open-wedge high tibial osteotomy with rigid locking plate to treat varus knee*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-ning; Zhang, Jie; Lv, Cheng-yu; Leng, Ping; Wang, Ying-zhen; Wang, Xiang-da; Wang, Chang-yao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To introduce and characterize the modified biplanar opening high tibial osteotomy with rigid fixation to treat varus knee in young and active patients. Methods: Between June 2001 to July 2008, 18 patients with monocompartmental degeneration of the knee combined with a varus malalignment of the leg had the modified biplanar opening high tibial osteotomy and the osteotomy was fixed with the locking plates (Locking Compression Plate System). The mean varus deformity before operation was 11.5° (5°~19°) and no degenerative changes were found in other departments. Stability of the knee was normal in 15 patients, but ruptures in anterior cruciate ligaments or lateral collateral ligament were presented in the remaining 3 patients. Preoperative symptom was mainly limited in the pain of medial compartment. The preoperative and follow-up data for the range of motion and Lysholm score were determined. Subjective satisfactory examination was also applied to the patients for the operation they selected. Results: All of the patients were followed up with an average of 32.5 months (12~82 months). There was no ununion or delayed union in this group during the follow-up period. No complications like broken plate, nerve injury, or blood vessel injury occurred. The postoperative average corrected degree was 9.5° (5.5°~18°). No degenerations developed in the three departments of the knee. The Lysholm scores before and after surgery were 42.5 and 77.5, respectively (P<0.01). The overall fineness rate was 83.3%. The subjective satisfactory survey demonstrated that about 83.3% patients showed satisfactory on the operation. There was no obvious difference in the range of motion before and after operation, but significant changes were found in the Lysholm score and varus degree from preoperative to follow-up. Conclusion: Proximal opening high tibial osteotomy performed in conjunction with the special rigid locking plate yielded good results for symptomatic genu varum. This

  10. Echosonography with proximity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaisiam, W.; Laithong, T.; Meekhun, S.; Chaiwathyothin, N.; Thanlarp, P.; Danworaphong, S.

    2013-03-01

    We propose the use of a commercial ultrasonic proximity sensor kit for profiling an altitude-varying surface by employing echosonography. The proximity sensor kit, two identical transducers together with its dedicated operating circuit, is used as a profiler for the construction of an image. Ultrasonic pulses are emitted from one of the transducers and received by the other. The time duration between the pulses allows us to determine the traveling distance of each pulse. In the experiment, the circuit is used with the addition of two copper wires for directing the outgoing and incoming signals to an oscilloscope. The time of flight of ultrasonic pulses can thus be determined. Square grids of 5 × 5 cm2 are made from fishing lines, forming pixels in the image. The grids are designed to hold the detection unit in place, about 30 cm above a flat surface. The surface to be imaged is constructed to be height varying and placed on the flat surface underneath the grids. Our result shows that an image of the profiled surface can be created by varying the location of the detection unit along the grid. We also investigate the deviation in relation to the time of flight of the ultrasonic pulse. Such an experiment should be valuable for conveying the concept of ultrasonic imaging to physical and medical science undergraduate students. Due to its simplicity, the setup could be made in any undergraduate laboratory relatively inexpensively and it requires no complex parts. The results illustrate the concept of echosonography.

  11. Proximity networks and epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toroczkai, Zoltán; Guclu, Hasan

    2007-05-01

    Disease spread in most biological populations requires the proximity of agents. In populations where the individuals have spatial mobility, the contact graph is generated by the “collision dynamics” of the agents, and thus the evolution of epidemics couples directly to the spatial dynamics of the population. We first briefly review the properties and the methodology of an agent-based simulation (EPISIMS) to model disease spread in realistic urban dynamic contact networks. Using the data generated by this simulation, we introduce the notion of dynamic proximity networks which takes into account the relevant time-scales for disease spread: contact duration, infectivity period, and rate of contact creation. This approach promises to be a good candidate for a unified treatment of epidemic types that are driven by agent collision dynamics. In particular, using a simple model, we show that it can account for the observed qualitative differences between the degree distributions of contact graphs of diseases with short infectivity period (such as air-transmitted diseases) or long infectivity periods (such as HIV).

  12. An unusual case of proximal humeral simple bone cyst in an adult from secondary cystic change.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Mamer S; Yamamoto, Norio; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Takeuchi, Akihiko; Kimura, Hiroaki; Miwa, Shinji; Higuchi, Takashi; Inatani, Hiroyuki; Abe, Kensaku; Taniguchi, Yuta; Aiba, Hisaki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2017-05-15

    Simple bone cysts (SBC) have been documented to occur in adults with closed physeal plates, most commonly affecting the calcaneus in this patient subset. Although most authors theorize an association to trauma, etiology of simple bone cysts remains an enigma up to now. A 26-year-old kickboxing coach sought consult for a painful right shoulder which on radiographs and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed a proximal humeral lesion with signs of ossification. The patient was lost to follow-up but again sought consult after 3 years for the recurring complaint. On repeat radiographs, computed tomography (CT) scan, and MR images, tumor enlargement with cystic findings typical of simple bone cyst were documented. Diagnostic aspiration of the lesion was firstly done, revealing straw-colored fluid. The patient then underwent intralesional curettage with alpha-tricalcium phosphate cement reconstruction of the lytic defect. No perioperative complications were incurred, and on latest follow-up at 3 years postoperatively, Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) and visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores were 30/30 and 0/10, respectively. The authors believe their report provides support to a possible association to trauma of simple bone cysts occurring in the adult population with closed physes and suggest this subset of patients may require a different treatment approach from that for juvenile simple bone cysts.

  13. Leg Muscle Usage Effects on Tibial Elasticity during Running

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    appear to show an association between low elasticity and fracture incidence in osteoporotic patients treated with bisphosphonate [3]. In this study...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Tibial stress fractures (TSFs...strength but has not been tested in TSF, or even studied in runners. However, clinical studies of osteoporotic patients given bisphosphonates have shown

  14. Treatment results of bicondylar tibial fractures using hybrid external fixator.

    PubMed

    Sales, Jafar Ganjpour; Soleymaopour, Jafar; Ansari, Maroof; Afaghi, Farhad; Goldust, Mohamad

    2013-05-15

    Tibial condyle fractures affect knee stability and motion. Treatment of bicondylar type of tibial plateau fracture is a challenging problem. This study aimed at evaluating the application of hybrid external fixators with minimum deformation in these patients and the resulted outcomes. In this descriptive analytical study, 28 patients with bicondylar tibial plateau fractures treated by HEF device were evaluated. The surgeon used a semicircular and one circular wire instead of the one or two loop of conventional HEF device for a better range of motion of the knee joint. Treatment outcomes including quality of walking, union condition, knee range of motion, complications and the final outcome according to the knee score (rusmussen) were checked. Twenty-eight male patients, with the mean age of 40.54 +/- 13.83 years were enrolled in the study. Complications occurred in 8 (28.6%) patients; 7 cases with superficial infection and 1 patient with deep vein thrombosis. All complications were managed medically with no significant consequences left. All the patients were able to walk with no aid except in one case. In 96.4% and 89.3% of the cases, the clinical and radiological outcomes were good to excellent, respectively according to the knee score. In 85.7% of the patients, the knee range of motion was in normal limits. Application of hybrid external fixator using one and half ring instead of one or two fixator rings in treating bicondylar tibial fractures was associated with desired clinical and radiological results.

  15. Wear patterns on tibial plateau from varus osteoarthritic knees.

    PubMed

    Moschella, D; Blasi, A; Leardini, A; Ensini, A; Catani, F

    2006-02-01

    The knowledge of cartilage wear patterns at the medial tibial plateau is important to understand the main causes of arthritis in varus knees. The most important factors influencing knee arthritis in fact seem to be the severity of the degenerative changes determined by the lower limb mechanical axis and the abnormal knee joint kinematics which frequently results from dysfunction of the anterior cruciate ligament. We studied the wear patterns of cartilage damage in 70 medial tibial plateaus resected at operation during total knee arthroplasty indicated for varus osteoarthritic knee. Anterior cruciate ligament and medial meniscus integrity was assessed intra-operatively. Calibrated digital images were used to measure the wear patterns with a standard software tool. The medial compartment of the tibial plateau was divided into six zones, and the amount of cartilage and bone destruction in each zone was classified into two grades. The wear pattern was found to be highly dependent upon knee varus deformity (Mann Whitney P<0.001) and anterior cruciate ligament integrity (Friedman P<0.0005). Anterior cruciate ligament was found intact in 35.7% of the cases. Wear patterns on intact anterior cruciate ligament knees occurred in the central to medial aspect of the tibial plateau. Anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees had significantly larger wear patterns anteriorly and posteriorly in the most medial region of the medial plateau. These observations suggest altered joint mechanics exist in anterior cruciate ligament deficient varus knees, which would worsen cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis progression.

  16. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation for patients with faecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Allison, Marion

    Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) is a new, non-invasive treatment for faecal incontinence. It is given in an outpatient setting and has few side effects. An increasing number of studies confirm its efficacy. This article discusses the procedure, reports early experiences of using PTNS at one centre in the UK and considers cost effectiveness.

  17. Tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Papalia, Rocco; Osti, Leonardo; Del Buono, Angelo; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-08-01

    Although no consensus has been reached regarding the management of PCL deficiency, in vitro and in vivo studies have investigated whether the tibial inlay technique restores the anatomical site of insertion of the PCL, prevents elongation, stretching, graft failure, and improves long-term PCL stability. A systematic search using PubMed, Ovid, the Cochrane Reviews, and Google Scholar databases using 'posterior cruciate ligament tear', 'Tibial inlay technique' and 'posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction' as keywords identified 71 publications, of which 10 were relevant to the topic, and included a total of 255 patients. The tibial inlay technique restores the anatomic insertion site of the PCL, eliminates the killer turn effect, and places the graft at lower potential risk for abrasion and subsequent rupture. It has the disadvantages of increased operating time and risk to the posterior neurovascular structures. There was no evidence of an association between outcome results and Coleman methodology score, but the Coleman methodology scores correlated positively with the level-of-evidence rating. The methodological quality of the studies included has not improved over the years. Given the few reported published findings, we cannot ascertain whether this procedure may provide a consistent alternative to commonly used PCL surgical strategies. The lack of published randomized clinical trials and few reported findings did not allow to ascertain whether the tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction may provide a consistent alternative to commonly used PCL surgical strategies and to demonstrate procedure efficacy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Leg Muscle Usage on Tibial Elasticity During Running

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Tibial stress fractures (TSFs) are a substantial problem for military recruits, elite athletes, and adults transitioning from a sedentary lifestyle to...were being taken by the co-investigators to minimize the Greater than Minimal Risk assigned to the transition from a sedentary lifestyle to moderate-to

  19. Changes in serum protein profiles of chickens with tibial dyschondroplasia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Differences in serum protein profiles were analyzed to identify biomarkers associated with a poultry leg problem named tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) that can cause lameness. We used a bead-based affinity matrix containing a combinatorial library of hexapeptides (ProteoMinerTM) to deplete high abundan...

  20. Arteriovenous fistula complicating operative treatment of an ununited tibial fracture.

    PubMed

    Ward, A S; Carty, N J

    1995-01-01

    We report the case of a traumatic arteriovenous fistula of the peroneal vessels following a bone graft operation for an un-united tibial fracture. The fistula was recognised as a result of a bruit at the site of the fracture. The fistula was repaired and the fracture subsequently united.

  1. Biomechanical techniques to evaluate tibial rotation. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lam, Mak-Ham; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2012-09-01

    This article systematically reviewed the biomechanical techniques to quantify tibial rotation, for an overview of how to choose a suitable technique for specific clinical application. A systematic search was conducted and finally 110 articles were included in this study. The articles were categorized by the conditions of how the knee was examined: external load application, physical examination and dynamic task. The results showed that two-thirds of the included studies measured tibial rotation under external load application, of which over 80% of the experiments employed a cadaveric model. The common techniques used included direct displacement measurement, motion sensor, optical tracking system and universal force moment sensor. Intra-operative navigation system was used to document tibial rotation when the knee was examined by clinical tests. For dynamic assessment of knee rotational stability, motion analysis with skin reflective markers was frequently used although this technique is less accurate due to the skin movement when compared with radiographic measurement. This study reports various biomechanical measurement techniques to quantify tibial rotation in the literatures. To choose a suitable measurement technique for a specific clinical application, it is suggested to quantify the effectiveness of a new designed surgical technique by using a cadaveric model before applying to living human subjects for intra-operative evaluation or long-time functional stability assessment. Attention should also be paid on the study's purpose, whether to employ a cadaveric model and the way of stress applied to the knee. IV.

  2. Load transfer in the proximal tibia following implantation with a unicompartmental knee replacement: a static snapshot.

    PubMed

    Simpson, D J; Kendrick, B J L; Dodd, C A F; Price, A J; Gill, H S; Murray, D W

    2011-05-01

    Unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR) is an appealing alternative to total knee replacement when the patient has isolated medial compartment osteoarthritis. A common observation post-operatively is radiolucency between the tibial tray wall and the bone. In addition, some patients complain of persistent pain over the proximal tibia antero-medially; this may be related to elevated bone strains in the tibia. Currently, there is no intentionally made mechanical bond between the vertical wall of an Oxford UKR and the adjacent bone; whether one exists or not will influence the load transmission in the proximal tibia and may affect the elevated tibia strain. The aim of this study was to investigate how introducing a mechanical tie between the tibial tray wall and the adjacent bone might alter the load carried into the tibia for both cemented and cementless UKRs. Strain energy density in the region of bone adjacent to the tray wall was considerably increased when a mechanical tie was introduced; this has the potential of reducing the likelihood of a radiolucency occurring in that region. Moreover, a mechanical tie had the effect of reducing proximal tibia strain, which may decrease the incidence of pain following implantation with a UKR.

  3. The Effect of Malrotation of Tibial Component of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Tibial Insert during High Flexion Using a Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Todo, Mitsugu

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common errors of total knee arthroplasty procedure is a malrotation of tibial component. The stress on tibial insert is closely related to polyethylene failure. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of malrotation of tibial component for the stress on tibial insert during high flexion using a finite element analysis. We used Stryker NRG PS for analysis. Three different initial conditions of tibial component including normal, 15° internal malrotation, and 15° external malrotation were analyzed. The tibial insert made from ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene was assumed to be elastic-plastic while femoral and tibial metal components were assumed to be rigid. Four nonlinear springs attached to tibial component represented soft tissues around the knee. Vertical load was applied to femoral component which rotated from 0° to 135° while horizontal load along the anterior posterior axis was applied to tibial component during flexion. Maximum equivalent stresses on the surface were analyzed. Internal malrotation caused the highest stress which arose up to 160% of normal position. External malrotation also caused higher stress. Implanting prosthesis in correct position is important for reducing the risk of abnormal wear and failure. PMID:24895658

  4. Tibial tunnel placement in posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nicodeme, J-D; Löcherbach, C; Jolles, B M

    2014-07-01

    Reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) yields less satisfying results than anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with respect to laxity control. Accurate tibial tunnel placement is crucial for successful PCL reconstruction using arthroscopic tibial tunnel techniques. A discrepancy between anatomical studies of the tibial PCL insertion site and surgical recommendations for tibial tunnel placement remains. The objective of this study was to identify the optimal placement of the tibial tunnel in PCL reconstruction based on clinical studies. In a systematic review of the literature, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Review, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were screened for articles about PCL reconstruction from January 1990 to September 2011. Clinical trials comparing at least two PCL reconstruction techniques were extracted and independently analysed by each author. Only studies comparing different tibial tunnel placements in the retrospinal area were included. This systematic review found no comparative clinical trial for tibial tunnel placement in PCL reconstruction. Several anatomical, radiological, and biomechanical studies have described the tibial insertion sites of the native PCL and have led to recommendations for placement of the tibial tunnel outlet in the retrospinal area. However, surgical recommendations and the results of morphological studies are often contradictory. Reliable anatomical landmarks for tunnel placement are lacking. Future randomized controlled trials could compare precisely defined tibial tunnel placements in PCL reconstruction, which would require an established mapping of the retrospinal area of the tibial plateau with defined anatomical and radiological landmarks.

  5. Intraepiphyseal resection of the proximal tibia and its impact on lower limb growth.

    PubMed

    Manfrini, M; Gasbarrini, A; Malaguti, C; Ceruso, M; Innocenti, M; Bini, S; Capanna, R; Campanacci, M

    1999-01-01

    From 1989 through 1996, 10 children affected by high grade bone tumors of the proximal tibia underwent an intraepiphyseal intercalary resection. The residual epiphyseal bone segment measured less than 2 cm in thickness in all cases and reconstruction always was performed using the combination of a vascularized fibular autograft and a massive bone allograft. The proximal epiphyseal osteosynthesis was fixed by small fragment screws. The aim of this study was to report the growth pattern of the residual proximal tibial epiphysis and to evaluate any possible lower limb discrepancy and/or deformity after the end of skeletal maturity. At current followup six patients were available for the final evaluation. Radiographic documentation included computed tomography scan of both knees before surgery, a panoramic radiographic view and a computed tomography scan of both lower limbs after the end of skeletal growth. The length of both femurs and tibias, the size of the tibial plateau and of the opposite distal femur, and any possible deformity of femur or tibia were measured and compared with the preoperative data. No patient had a limb length discrepancy greater than 3.5 cm. In all cases the ipsilateral femur had a valgus deformity of the hip develop. In two patients this deformity was associated with an elongation of the femur, partially compensating for the shortening of the tibia. The tibial plateau close to reconstruction grew less than the contralateral one (range 2%-8%) but maintained its normal relationship with the distal femur. None of these patients reported any restriction in recreational activities. They could walk, run, and jump. Their functional result according the International Society of Limb Salvage functional grading system was satisfactory in all cases.

  6. Total knee arthroplasty after failed high tibial osteotomy: a systematic review of open versus closed wedge osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae Hwi; Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Bhandare, Nikhl N; Suh, Dong Won; Lee, Jong Seong; Chang, Yong Suk; Yeom, Ji Woong; Nha, Kyung Wook

    2016-08-01

    Medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) has become increasingly popular as an alternative to lateral closing wedge osteotomy for the treatment of medial compartment knee osteoarthritis with varus deformity. The present systematic review was conducted to provide an objective analysis of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) outcomes following previous knee osteotomy (medial opening wedge vs. lateral closing wedge). A literature search of online databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library database) was made, in addition to manual search of major orthopaedic journals. The methodological quality of each of the studies was assessed on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale and Effective Practice and Organization of Care. A total of ten studies were included in the review. There were eight studies with Level IV and two studies with Level III evidence. Eight studies reported clinical and radiologic scores. Comparative studies between TKA following medial opening and lateral closing wedge HTO did not demonstrate statistically significant clinical and radiologic differences. The revision rates were similar. However, more technical issues during TKA surgery after lateral closing wedge HTO were mentioned than the medial open wedge group. The quadriceps snip, tibial tubercle osteotomy, and lateral soft tissue release were more frequently needed in the lateral closing wedge HTO group. In addition, because of loss of proximal tibia bone geometry in the lateral closing wedge HTO group, concerns such as tibia stem impingement in the lateral tibial cortex was noted. The present systematic review suggests that TKA after medial opening and lateral closing wedge HTO showed similar performance. Clinical and radiologic outcome including revision rates did not statistically differ from included studies. However, there are more surgical technical concerns in TKA conversion from lateral closing wedge HTO than from the medial opening wedge HTO group. IV.

  7. Sagittal plane deformity in bicondylar tibial plateau fractures.

    PubMed

    Streubel, Philipp N; Glasgow, Donald; Wong, Ambrose; Barei, David P; Ricci, William M; Gardner, Michael J

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and magnitude of sagittal plane deformity in bicondylar tibial plateau fractures. Retrospective radiographic review. Two Level I trauma centers. Sagittal inclination of the medial and lateral plateau measured in relation to the longitudinal axis of the tibia using computed tomographic reconstruction images. Seventy-four patients (mean age, 49 years; range, 16-82 years; 64% male) with acute bicondylar tibial plateau fractures (Orthopaedic Trauma Association 41C, Schatzker VI) treated from October 2006 to July 2009. The average sagittal plane angulation of the lateral plateau was 9.8° posteriorly (range, 17° anteriorly to 37° posteriorly). The medial plateau was angulated 4.1° posteriorly on average (range, 16° anteriorly to 31° posteriorly). Forty-two lateral plateaus were angulated more than 5° from the "normal" anatomic slope (defined as 5° of posterior tibial slope). Of these, 76% were angulated posteriorly. Forty-three (58%) of the medial plateaus were angulated greater than 5° from normal, of which only 47% were inclined posteriorly (P = 0.019 compared with lateral plateaus). In 68% of patients, the difference between medial and lateral plateaus was greater than 5°; the average intercondylar slope difference was 9° (range, 0°-31°; P < 0.001). Spanning external fixation did not affect the slope of either the medial or lateral tibial plateau. Intraobserver and interobserver correlations were high for both the medial and lateral plateaus (r > 0.81, P < 0.01). Considerable sagittal plane deformity exists in the majority of bicondylar tibial plateau fractures. The lateral plateau has a higher propensity for sagittal angulation and tends to have increased posterior slope. Most patients have a substantial difference between the lateral and medial plateau slopes. The identification of this deformity allows for accurate preoperative planning and specific reduction maneuvers to restore anatomic alignment.

  8. Some Properties of Fuzzy Soft Proximity Spaces

    PubMed Central

    Demir, İzzettin; Özbakır, Oya Bedre

    2015-01-01

    We study the fuzzy soft proximity spaces in Katsaras's sense. First, we show how a fuzzy soft topology is derived from a fuzzy soft proximity. Also, we define the notion of fuzzy soft δ-neighborhood in the fuzzy soft proximity space which offers an alternative approach to the study of fuzzy soft proximity spaces. Later, we obtain the initial fuzzy soft proximity determined by a family of fuzzy soft proximities. Finally, we investigate relationship between fuzzy soft proximities and proximities. PMID:25793224

  9. Some properties of fuzzy soft proximity spaces.

    PubMed

    Demir, İzzettin; Özbakır, Oya Bedre

    2015-01-01

    We study the fuzzy soft proximity spaces in Katsaras's sense. First, we show how a fuzzy soft topology is derived from a fuzzy soft proximity. Also, we define the notion of fuzzy soft δ-neighborhood in the fuzzy soft proximity space which offers an alternative approach to the study of fuzzy soft proximity spaces. Later, we obtain the initial fuzzy soft proximity determined by a family of fuzzy soft proximities. Finally, we investigate relationship between fuzzy soft proximities and proximities.

  10. The extramedullary guide of the proximal tibia resection should be seen straight in front during total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Ryuji; Matsunobu, Tomoya; Takayama, Masanobu; Miura, Hiromasa; Matsuda, Shuichi; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2006-05-01

    If surgeons see the shaft of the extramedullary guide from lateral to the guide during preparation of the proximal tibia resection during total knee arthroplasty, the tibial component may be implanted in varus position in the frontal plane. In order to clarify the effect of the angle of the surgeons' sight relative to the sagittal plane and the posterior slope angle of the resected surface on varus position of the tibial component in the frontal plane, mathematical analysis was performed. Three-dimensional coordinate system was utilized so that the central axis of the tibial shaft on the Z-axis and the shaft of the guide were skew. The relationship between two lines was analyzed solving equations on three dimensional planes. When the posterior slope angle is 10 degrees, and if surgeons see the shaft of the guide 10 degrees, 20 degrees and 30 degrees lateral to the sagittal plane, and the shaft and the central axis of the tibial shaft would seem to be parallel, the true varus tilt angle of the shaft on the frontal plane is 1.8 degrees, 3.7 degrees and 5.8 degrees, respectively. The extramedullary guide should be seen straight in front of the guide.

  11. Long-term follow up of single-stage anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and high tibial osteotomy and its relation with posterior tibial slope.

    PubMed

    Arun, G R; Kumaraswamy, Vinay; Rajan, David; Vinodh, K; Singh, Ashutosh Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Chandrasekaran, Karthik; Santosh, Sahanand; Kishore, Chandan

    2016-04-01

    Open-wedge high tibial osteotomy is considered to be an effective treatment for medial compartmental osteoarthritis. It is generally admitted that tibial slope increases after open-wedge high tibial osteotomy and decreases after closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy. Young patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency along with medial compartment osteoarthritis need a combined procedure of ACL reconstruction along with high tibial osteotomy to regain physiological knee kinematics and to avoid chondral damage. We retrospectively analysed data from 30 patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction along with medial opening-wedge osteotomy from Jan 2004 to June 2012 with a minimum follow up of 2 years. The pre-operative and post-operative posterior tibial slopes were measured. Functional outcome was analysed using clinico-radiological criteria, IKDC scoring and Lysholm score. Post-operative patients improved both clinically and functionally. The patients who had posterior tibial slope >5° decrease, compared to patients who had less <5° decrease, had better functional scores (IKDC and Lysholm score), which was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Our study has shown that decreasing the tibial slope >5° compared to pre-operative value has functionally favourable effect on the reconstructed ACL graft and outcome. It is known that increasing slope causes an anterior shift in tibial resting position that is accentuated under axial loads. This suggests that decreasing tibial slope may be protective in an ACL deficient knee. Hence by placing the tricortical graft posterior to midline in the opening wedge reduces the posterior tibial slope and thereby reduces the stress on the graft leading to better functional outcome.

  12. Biomechanical evaluation of tibial bone adaptation after revision total knee arthroplasty: A comparison of different implant systems.

    PubMed

    Quilez, María Paz; Seral, Belen; Pérez, María Angeles

    2017-01-01

    The best methods to manage tibial bone defects following total knee arthroplasty remain under debate. Different fixation systems exist to help surgeons reconstruct knee osseous bone loss (such as tantalum cones, cement, modular metal augments, autografts, allografts and porous metaphyseal sleeves) However, the effects of the various solutions on the long-term outcome remain unknown. In the present work, a bone remodeling mathematical model was used to predict bone remodeling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) revision. Five different types of prostheses were analyzed: one with a straight stem; two with offset stems, with and without supplements; and two with sleeves, with and without stems. Alterations in tibia bone density distribution and implant Von Mises stresses were quantified. In all cases, the bone density decreased in the proximal epiphysis and medullary channels, and an increase in bone density was predicted in the diaphysis and around stem tips. The highest bone resorption was predicted for the offset prosthesis without the supplement, and the highest bone formation was computed for the straight stem. The highest Von Mises stress was obtained for the straight tibial stem, and the lowest was observed for the stemless metaphyseal sleeves prosthesis. The computational model predicted different behaviors among the five systems. We were able to demonstrate the importance of choosing an adequate revision system and that in silico models may help surgeons choose patient-specific treatments.

  13. A new technique for femoral and tibial tunnel bone grafting using the OATS harvesters in revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Said, Hatem G; Baloch, Khalid; Green, Marcus

    2006-07-01

    Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is becoming more frequent, especially in specialized centers, because of the large numbers of primary ACL procedures performed. In 2-stage revisions, bone grafting of the tunnels may be undertaken if the primary position was inaccurate or if osteolysis has caused widening of the tunnels. This will allow the desired placement of the new tunnels without the risk of loss of structural integrity. It is technically difficult to deliver and impact bone graft into the femoral tunnel with the standard surgical and arthroscopic instruments. We describe a new technique for femoral and tibial tunnel impaction grafting in 2-stage ACL revisions, using the OATS grafting instruments (Osteochondral Autologous Transfer System; Arthrex, Naples, FL). The appropriately sized OATS harvester is chosen 1 mm larger than the tunnel size and is used to harvest bone graft from the iliac crest through a percutaneous approach. This provides a cylindrical graft, which is delivered to the femoral tunnel through the arthroscopic portal. The inside punch of the harvester is tapped and this allows delivery of the graft in a controlled manner and its impaction into the tunnel. The same is repeated for the tibial tunnel while providing support for the proximal end of the tunnel.

  14. Proximal Biceps Tenodesis

    PubMed Central

    Kovack, Thomas J.; Idoine, John D.; Jacob, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To (1) better define the anatomy of the proximal shoulder in relation to the long head of the biceps tendon, (2) compare the length-tension relationship of the biceps tendon in the native shoulder with that after arthroscopic and open tenodesis techniques using interference screws, and (3) provide surgical recommendations for both procedures based on study findings. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Twenty fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were dissected for analysi