Science.gov

Sample records for proyecto sin casa

  1. El proyecto AUGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etchegoyen, A.

    Hace ya más de 30 años en Volcano Ranch, EE.UU., un extenso chubasco cósmico (ECC) fue detectado con energía en exceso de 1020 eV. Desde entonces, observatorios ubicados en Haverah Park del Reino Unido, Yakutsk de Rusia, AGASA de Japón y Dugway de EE.UU. también han observado ECC con energías mayores que 1020 eV. Poco se sabe de dichos rayos, y en particular cuál es la naturaleza del primario, de dónde provienen, y cómo son acelerados, pero su naturaleza ultrarelativista excluye la mayoría de las respuestas dejando sólo algunas plausibles de ser investigadas experimentalmente. Grupos de científicos de 20 países están trabajando con el fin de construir dos arreglos de detectores gigantes, uno en cada hemisferio a lo largo de 3000 km2 c/u. Dichas dimensiones son necesarias debido al flujo estimado de 1 rayo cósmico/centuria/km2/sr. La sede del Observatorio del Sur es la Argentina. El proyecto fue nombrado Pierre Auger en conmemoración del célebre físico francés que detectó por primera vez chubascos cósmicos en 1938. El proyecto focaliza su interés en rayos cósmicos con energías mayores que 1020 eV.

  2. Managing asbestos: Ten costly sins

    SciTech Connect

    Denson, F.A.; Onderick, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes how to build an ongoing, continuous, and improved asbestos management program. Asbestos management is one of the toughest jobs facing a plant or environmental engineer today; even seasoned engineers can make mistakes. Much confusion exists about how best to manage this issue, especially in plant settings. Whether the company is small, medium, or large, asbestos has the power to steal from profits if not managed properly. To help POWER readers examine their current asbestos management programs, here are 10 common errors that could be stopped or avoided by practicing preventive techniques. The 10 costly sins presented are not mutually exclusive, and they certainly are not all-inclusive. They are offered as a way to stimulate ideas on how to build an ongoing, continuous, and improved asbestos management program. These include Sin 1: No written policy. Sin 2: Lack of corporate guidance. Sin 3: Not complying with regulations. Sin 4: Not worrying about other respirable fibers. Sin 5: Lawsuits--not culpable. Sin 6: No visible emissions, no problems. Sin 7: Managing asbestos manually.

  3. CASAS: A Smart Home in a Box.

    PubMed

    Cook, Diane J; Crandall, Aaron S; Thomas, Brian L; Krishnan, Narayanan C

    2013-07-01

    While the potential benefits of smart home technology are widely recognized, a lightweight design is needed for the benefits to be realized at a large scale. We introduce the CASAS "smart home in a box", a lightweight smart home design that is easy to install and provides smart home capabilities out of the box with no customization or training. We discuss types of data analysis that have been performed by the CASAS group and can be pursued in the future by using this approach to designing and implementing smart home technologies.

  4. Casa De La Solidaridad: A Pedagogy of Solidarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonkers-Talz, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Casa de la Solidaridad has been recognized as an innovative and effective educational model within Jesuit higher education yet, until now, there have only been verbal presentations of the unique attributes of the Casa de la Solidaridad model. In addition, there has been a lack of information regarding the influence of the Casa experience on the…

  5. Study of the CASAS Relationship to GED 2002. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CASAS - Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems (NJ1), 2003

    2003-01-01

    CASAS, in cooperation with the CASAS National Consortium Policy Council, conducted a study to provide guidance to program and instructional staff regarding student readiness to take the GED Tests. The study looked at the relationship of CASAS reading and math scores to official 2002 GED test results from five states--California, Hawaii, Iowa,…

  6. The Effectiveness of CASAs in Achieving Positive Outcomes for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litzelfelner, Pat

    2000-01-01

    Evaluated effectiveness of court-appointed special advocates (CASAs) in achieving positive outcomes for children in the child welfare system, using data from court and CASA program files on 200 children. Found that CASAs may have reduced the number of placements and court continuances children experienced. More services were provided to children…

  7. Radiocarbon dates from the Casa Grande. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    This report suggests a very early Civano construction date for Casa Grande, Casa Grande Ruins National Monument, Arizona on the basis of C14 dates from fragments of two primary roof beams. The radiocarbon dates presented are seen as a positive contribution to an understanding of the history of Casa Grande.

  8. The "Casa dei Bambini": A Century Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the early history of Montessori education from the Italian State Orthophrenic School to the opening of the original Casa dei Bambini in San Lorenzo, Italy on January 6, 1907. Includes a synopsis of Maria Montessori's progressive revelations of the child's developing self over the past century. (JPB)

  9. CASA Central and South America GPS geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, James; Dixon, Timothy; Neilan, Ruth

    In January 1988, scientists from over 25 organizations in 13 countries and territories cooperated in the largest Global Positioning System (GPS) campaign in the world to date (Table 1) [Neilan et al., 1988]. From January 18 to February 5, 1988, 43 GPS receivers collected about 590 station-days of data in American Samoa, Australia, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Sweden, United States, West Germany, and Venezuela. The experiment was entitled CASA UNO, an acronym for Central and South America—and “uno” is Spanish for “one,” designating first-epoch measurements. The CASA UNO experiment was the first civilian effort at implementing an extended GPS satellite-tracking network and established the first major GPS network in the northern Andean margin and the western Caribbean.

  10. Proyecto Leer Bulletin Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tome, Martha V., Ed.

    This annotated, cumulative bibliography, developed by the Proyecto Leer Program, of more than 600 selected works in Spanish focuses on works which meet the following criteria: (1) reading difficulty does not exceed 10th grade level, and (2) selections are suitable for a Spanish-American community. Books for children are listed separately from…

  11. Casa-Blanca: A Large non-imaging Cerenkov Detector at Casa-Mia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, M.; Fortson, L. F.; Fowler, J. W.; Jui, C. H.; Kieda, D. B.; Loh, E. C.; Ong, R. A.; Sommers, P.

    The lateral distribution of Cherenkov light at ground level records important information on the development of the cosmic ray air shower which produces it. We have constructed an array of 144 non-imaging Cherenkov detectors at the CASA-MIA experiment site in Dugway, Utah. The various arrays can sample simultaneously the lateral distributions of electrons, muons, and Cherenkov light at many locations. We describe the design and operation of the CASA-BLANCA experiment and its potential to address the composition of primary cosmic rays between 300 and 30,000 TeV.

  12. The ethics of sin taxes.

    PubMed

    Green, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The current global economic crisis is forcing governments to consider a variety of methods to generate funds for infrastructure. In the United States, smoking-related illness and an obesity epidemic are forcing public health institutions to consider a variety of methods to influence health behaviors of entire target groups. In this paper, the author uses a public health nursing model, the Public Health Code of Ethics (Public Health Leadership Society, 2002), the American Nurses' Association (ANA) Code of Ethics (2001), and other relevant ethical theory to weigh and balance the arguments for and against the use of sin taxes. A position advocating the limited use of sin taxes is supported as a reasonable stance for the public health professional.

  13. Gamma-Ray Hold-up Measurements and Results for Casa 2 and Casa 3 at TA-18

    SciTech Connect

    Desimone, David J.; Vo, Duc Ta

    2016-03-10

    Numerous critical assembly experiments were performed at TA-18 beginning in the 1940’s. Several buildings, Casa 2 and Casa 3, were constructed to house these experiments. All gamma-ray hold-up measurements and analysis were performed for Casa 2 and Casa 3 in November/December 2015 to support decommissioning and demolition of the facilities. A technique called room hold-up was used to measure the nuclear materials. A grid pattern was laid out on the large room floor approximately every 9-10 feet. A three- to five-minute measurement was taken with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector at each location. Also, several measurements were taken in two storage vaults of Casa 3. A calibration check of the detectors showed that the efficiency and energy scale were stable. The final results of the hold-up measurements for Casa 2 and 3 are given.

  14. IN GRAMMAR'S FALL, WE SINNED ALL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TIBBETTS, A.M.

    THROUGH THEIR LOSS OF FAITH IN TRADITIONAL GRAMMAR, MEN HAVE "SINNED" AND CONTRIBUTED SLIGHTLY BUT IMPORTANTLY TO THE CREATION OF AN AMORAL AND RELATIVISTIC SOCIETY. PROMPTED BY THE SIN OF INTELLECTUAL PRIDE, SOME LINGUISTS SEEM TO ASSUME THAT GRAMMATICAL PROBLEMS CAN BE SOLVED BY RATIOCINATION ALONE. IGNORANCE OF THE PAST--ANOTHER SIN--AND…

  15. Testing Ionospheric Faraday Rotation Corrections in CASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Moellenbrock, George

    2015-04-01

    The Earth’s ionosphere introduces direction- and time-dependent effects over a range of physical and temporal scales and so is a major source for unmodeled phase offsets for low frequency radioastronomical observations. Ionospheric effects are often the limiting factor to making sensitive radioastronomical measurements to probe the solar corona or coronal mass ejections at low frequencies (< 5 GHz). It has become common practice to use global ionospheric models derived from the Global Positioning System (GPS) to provide a means of externally calibrating low frequency data. We have developed a new calibration algorithm in the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) package. CASA, which was developed to meet the data post-processing needs of next generation telescopes such as the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), did not previously have the capability to mitigate ionospheric effects. This algorithm uses GPS-based global ionosphere maps to mitigate the first and second order ionospheric effects (dispersion delay and Faraday rotation, respectively). We investigated several data centers as potential sources for global ionospheric models and chose the International Global Navigation Satellite System Service data product because data from other sources are generally too sparse to use without additional interpolation schemes. This implementation of ionospheric corrections in CASA has been tested on several sets of VLA observations and all of them showed a significant reduction of the dispersion delay. In order to rigorously test CASA’s ability to mitigate ionospheric Faraday rotation, we made VLA full-polarization observations of the standard VLA phase calibrators J0359+5057 and J0423+4150 in August 2014, using L band (1 - 2 GHz), S band (2 - 4 GHz), and C band (4 - 6 GHz) frequencies in the D array configuration. The observations were 4 hours in duration, beginning near local sunrise. In this paper, we give a general description of how these corrections are

  16. CASA Uno GPS orbit and baseline experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, B. E.; Ho, C. S.; Abusali, P. A. M.; Tapley, B. D.

    1990-01-01

    CASA Uno data from sites distributed in longitude from Australia to Europe have been used to determine orbits of the GPS satellites. The characteristics of the orbits determined from double difference phase have been evaluated through comparisons of two-week solutions with one-week solutions and by comparisons of predicted and estimated orbits. Evidence of unmodeled effects is demonstrated, particularly associated with the orbit planes that experience solar eclipse. The orbit accuracy has been assessed through the repeatability of unconstrained estimated baseline vectors ranging from 245 km to 5400 km. Both the baseline repeatability and the comparison with independent space geodetic methods give results at the level of 1-2 parts in 100,000,000. In addition, the Mojave/Owens Valley (245 km) and Kokee Park/Ft. Davis (5409 km) estimates agree with VLBI and SLR to better than 1 part in 100,000,000.

  17. Mi Casa Es Su Casa: Sandra Tauler--City Librarian, Calexico, CA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Sandra Tauler has tailored her collection and services to the needs of a community that is 97 percent Hispanic. Unfortunately, that's only half the job. The other half is getting potential users through the door. The solution Tauler and other Imperial Valley librarians came up with was Proyecto Televista. With LSTA funding, and the assistance of…

  18. SIN3A and SIN3B differentially regulate breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Monica J.; Liu, Jianzhong; Libby, Emily Falk; Lee, Minnkyong; Crawford, Nigel P.S.; Hurst, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    SIN3 corepressor complexes play important roles in both normal development and breast cancer. Mammalian cells have two paralogs of SIN3 (SIN3A and SIN3B) that are encoded by distinct genes and have unique functions in many developmental processes. However, specific roles for SIN3A and SIN3B in breast cancer progression have not been characterized. We generated stable knockdown cells of SIN3 paralogs individually and in combination using three non-overlapping shRNA. Stable knockdown of SIN3B caused a significant decrease in transwell invasion through Matrigel and decreased the number of invasive colonies when grown in a 3D extracellular matrix. Conversely, stable knockdown of SIN3A significantly increased transwell invasion and increased the number of invasive colonies. These results were corroborated in vivo in which SIN3B knockdown significantly decreased and SIN3A knockdown increased experimental lung metastases. RNA sequencing was used to identify unique targets and biological pathways that were altered upon knockdown of SIN3A compared to SIN3B. Additionally, we analyzed microarray data sets to identify correlations of SIN3A and SIN3B expression with survival in patients with breast cancer. These data sets indicated that high mRNA expression of SIN3A as well as low mRNA expression of SIN3B correlates with longer relapse free survival specifically in patients with triple negative breast cancer which corresponds with our in vitro and in vivo data. These results demonstrate key functional differences between SIN3 paralogs in regulating the process of breast cancer metastasis and suggest metastasis suppressive roles of SIN3A and metastasis promoting roles of SIN3B. PMID:27780928

  19. Archaeological Investigations at Pueblo Sin Casas (FB6273), a Multicomponent Site in the Hueco Bolson, Fort Bliss, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Astragalus .............................................................................................................. 59 Amaranth ...The report, titled , oil - Geomorphic and Paleoclimatic Characteristics of the Fort Bliss Maneuver A•as, is being published as Report No. 10 in this...feasibility of thermoluminescence dating of the ubiquitous burned caliche. Cultural resources staffalso are working to refine and establish better

  20. Signal Processing System for the CASA Integrated Project I Radars

    SciTech Connect

    Bharadwaj, Nitin; Chandrasekar, V.; Junyent, Francesc

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes the waveform design space and signal processing system for dual-polarization Doppler weather radar operating at X band. The performance of the waveforms is presented with ground clutter suppression capability and mitigation of range velocity ambiguity. The operational waveform is designed based on operational requirements and system/hardware requirements. A dual Pulse Repetition Frequency (PRF) waveform was developed and implemented for the first generation X-band radars deployed by the Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA). This paper presents an evaluation of the performance of the waveforms based on simulations and data collected by the first-generation CASA radars during operations.

  1. Computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA): capabilities and potential developments.

    PubMed

    Amann, Rupert P; Waberski, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) systems have evolved over approximately 40 years, through advances in devices to capture the image from a microscope, huge increases in computational power concurrent with amazing reduction in size of computers, new computer languages, and updated/expanded software algorithms. Remarkably, basic concepts for identifying sperm and their motion patterns are little changed. Older and slower systems remain in use. Most major spermatology laboratories and semen processing facilities have a CASA system, but the extent of reliance thereon ranges widely. This review describes capabilities and limitations of present CASA technology used with boar, bull, and stallion sperm, followed by possible future developments. Each marketed system is different. Modern CASA systems can automatically view multiple fields in a shallow specimen chamber to capture strobe-like images of 500 to >2000 sperm, at 50 or 60 frames per second, in clear or complex extenders, and in <2 minutes, store information for ≥ 30 frames and provide summary data for each spermatozoon and the population. A few systems evaluate sperm morphology concurrent with motion. CASA cannot accurately predict 'fertility' that will be obtained with a semen sample or subject. However, when carefully validated, current CASA systems provide information important for quality assurance of semen planned for marketing, and for the understanding of the diversity of sperm responses to changes in the microenvironment in research. The four take-home messages from this review are: (1) animal species, extender or medium, specimen chamber, intensity of illumination, imaging hardware and software, instrument settings, technician, etc., all affect accuracy and precision of output values; (2) semen production facilities probably do not need a substantially different CASA system whereas biology laboratories would benefit from systems capable of imaging and tracking sperm in deep chambers for a flexible

  2. 78 FR 19066 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel MI CASA; Invitation for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel MI CASA... of the vessel MI CASA is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: Passenger charters. Geographic...

  3. 75 FR 37339 - Airworthiness Directives; EADS CASA (Type Certificate Previously Held by Construcciones...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; EADS CASA (Type... this proposed AD, contact EADS-CASA, Military Transport Aircraft Division (MTAD), Integrated Customer...; fax +34 91 585 55 05; e-mail MTA.TechnicalService@casa.eads.net ; Internet http://www.eads.net ....

  4. Original Sin and T. E. Hulme's Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishler, Thomas C.

    1976-01-01

    T. E. Hulme, a vigorous opponent of romanticism in art, poetry, and philosophy, insisted that the underlying flaw of the romantic view was its rejection of the dogma of Original Sin and the fall of man. His views are explored for the significant bearing they have on the development of aesthetic insight and indirectly on value and outlook.…

  5. "Proyecto Sherezade": Teaching Spanish Literature Interactively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Enrique

    2001-01-01

    Describes "Proyecto Sherezade," an Internet-based project publicly available to anyone. Founded in 1996 by a group of Spanish language and literature academics in Canada and the United States, the project began as an Internet literary magazine that published non-established writers's short stories in Spanish and commentaries sent by readers.…

  6. Proyecto Aurora: Building a Community of Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noya, Gladys R. Capella

    1997-01-01

    Describes the development of Proyecto Aurora, a program to develop and implement educational, support, and research programs to benefit low-income women in Puerto Rico. Portraits of some clients illustrate the rewards and challenges of working with this community and furthering their educational experiences and opportunities. (SLD)

  7. Differential compaction mechanism for earth fissures near Casa Grande, Arizona.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jachens, R.C.; Holzer, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Precise gravity measurements indicate that earth fissures or tension cracks caused by ground-water withdrawal within a 10km2 area SE of Casa Grande are associated with relief on the buried interface between the alluvial aquifer and underlying bedrock. These relations suggest that the fissures are forming in response to localized differential compaction caused by localized variations of aquifer-system thickness. -from Authors

  8. Babar: Sin(2beta) With Charm

    SciTech Connect

    Grenier, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /Clermont-Ferrand U.

    2006-04-12

    We present measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries of neutral B decays to several charm and charmonium final states. Data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. In the absence of penguin contribution, the Standard Model predicts the time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters S and C are to be {eta}{sub CP} sin(2{beta}) and 0, respectively.

  9. Sin3b Interacts with Myc and Decreases Myc Levels*

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Sanz, Pablo; Quintanilla, Andrea; Lafita, M. Carmen; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; García-Gutierrez, Lucia; Tabor, Vedrana; Varela, Ignacio; Shiio, Yuzuru; Larsson, Lars-Gunnar; Portillo, Francisco; Leon, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Myc expression is deregulated in many human cancers. A yeast two-hybrid screen has revealed that the transcriptional repressor Sin3b interacts with Myc protein. Endogenous Myc and Sin3b co-localize and interact in the nuclei of human and rat cells, as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and proximity ligation assay. The interaction is Max-independent. A conserved Myc region (amino acids 186–203) is required for the interaction with Sin3 proteins. Histone deacetylase 1 is recruited to Myc-Sin3b complexes, and its deacetylase activity is required for the effects of Sin3b on Myc. Myc and Sin3a/b co-occupied many sites on the chromatin of human leukemia cells, although the presence of Sin3 was not associated with gene down-regulation. In leukemia cells and fibroblasts, Sin3b silencing led to Myc up-regulation, whereas Sin3b overexpression induced Myc deacetylation and degradation. An analysis of Sin3b expression in breast tumors revealed an association between low Sin3b expression and disease progression. The data suggest that Sin3b decreases Myc protein levels upon Myc deacetylation. As Sin3b is also required for transcriptional repression by Mxd-Max complexes, our results suggest that, at least in some cell types, Sin3b limits Myc activity through two complementary activities: Mxd-dependent gene repression and reduction of Myc levels. PMID:24951594

  10. Composition Results at the Knee from CASA-BLANCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortson, Lucy

    1999-08-01

    We present preliminary results on the energy spectrum and composition of cosmic rays between 0.3 and 30 PeV from the CASA-BLANCA experiment. The technique relies on measurements of the lateral distribution of air shower Cherenkov light. It is shown that conversion of the experimental data to a mean depth of shower maximum is highly independent of the choice of nuclear interaction model. The mean primary mass is also inferred directly from the measurements, and ÐÒ plotted for a number of hadronic interaction models.

  11. eXtended CASA Line Analysis Software Suite (XCLASS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, T.; Endres, C.; Schilke, P.

    2017-01-01

    The eXtended CASA Line Analysis Software Suite (XCLASS) is a toolbox for the Common Astronomy Software Applications package (CASA) containing new functions for modeling interferometric and single dish data. Among the tools is the myXCLASS program which calculates synthetic spectra by solving the radiative transfer equation for an isothermal object in one dimension, whereas the finite source size and dust attenuation are considered as well. Molecular data required by the myXCLASS program are taken from an embedded SQLite3 database containing entries from the Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy (CDMS) and JPL using the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center (VAMDC) portal. Additionally, the toolbox provides an interface for the model optimizer package Modeling and Analysis Generic Interface for eXternal numerical codes (MAGIX), which helps to find the best description of observational data using myXCLASS (or another external model program), that is, finding the parameter set that most closely reproduces the data. http://www.astro.uni-koeln.de/projects/schilke/myXCLASSInterface A copy of the code is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/598/A7

  12. Casa de la Esperanza: A Case Study of Service Coordination at Work in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franquiz, Maria E.; Hernandez, Carlota Loya

    This chapter describes how a federally funded farmworker housing facility in northern Colorado--Casa de la Esperanza--has changed the lives of migrant students and their families. The history of migrant workers in Colorado is described, as well as the struggle to construct a permanent farmworker housing facility. Casa was built in Boulder County,…

  13. Aligning CASAS Competencies and Assessments to Basic Skills Content Standards. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CASAS - Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Since its inception, the Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System (CASAS) has focused on teaching and assessing basic skills in contexts that are relevant and important to adult learners. CASAS has developed and continues to refine a highly formalized hierarchy of competencies, the application of basic skills that adults need to be fully…

  14. SMART USE OF COMPUTER-AIDED SPERM ANALYSIS (CASA) TO CHARACTERIZE SPERM MOTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA) has evolved over the past fifteen years to provide an objective, practical means of measuring and characterizing the velocity and parttern of sperm motion. CASA instruments use video frame-grabber boards to capture multiple images of spermato...

  15. Casa De La Raza: Separatism or Segregation -- Chicanos in Public Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwest Network, Hayward, CA.

    Casa de la Raza, a K-12 grade school, operated from September 1971 to June 1973 as part of the Berkeley Unified School District's Experimental Schools Program. Based on the belief that using the student's home culture and language within the instructional program would foster personal growth and academic advancement, Casa used a bilingual…

  16. Disease, suffering, and sin: one Anglican's perspective.

    PubMed

    Foster, Claire

    2006-08-01

    This article explores some of the implications of understanding sin as failure of perception. The theological underpinning of the argument is the choice made in the Garden of Eden to eat the fruit of the tree of knowledge rather than the fruit of the tree of life, or wisdom. This has led to distorted perception, in which all things are seen as having separate, independent existences rather than joined together by their common divine source and their deep interrelatedness in the covenant made with God. The article discusses the fascination with the principle of respect for autonomy in the light of this theology. It also looks at perceptions of the HIV/AIDS crisis in Africa. It finishes with a definition of repentance that makes right perception possible.

  17. Proyecto para la medición sistemática de seeing en CASLEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Lajus, E.; Forte, J. C.

    La calidad del seeing astronómico es ciertamente uno de los parámetros mas importantes que caracterizan el sitio de un observatorio. Por tanto se desea determinar si el alto valor de seeing observado con el telescopio de 2.15 m se debe a efectos internos y/o del entorno a la cupula o si se debe simplemente al seeing propio del lugar. El actual mecanismo de refrigeración del espejo primario del 2.15, parece haber mejorado notablemente la calidad del seeing. Sin embargo se hace necesario saber hasta que punto el valor del seeing puede ser mejorado. La primera etapa del proyecto consistió en la puesta a punto del telescopio emplazado para este propósito y la adquisición de las primeras medidas tentativas de seeing.

  18. Students Informing Now (S.I.N.) Challenge the Racial State in California without Shame..."SIN Verguenza!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Foundations, 2007

    2007-01-01

    On a cold and wet Friday night in January of 2006, thirteen undergraduate students gathered together in a small room on campus at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) to found Students Informing Now (S.I.N.). S.I.N. was created to support the AB 504 students, labeled in this country as "illegal aliens." Inspired by Paulo…

  19. Development and Validation of the Single Item Narcissism Scale (SINS)

    PubMed Central

    Konrath, Sara; Meier, Brian P.; Bushman, Brad J.

    2014-01-01

    Main Objectives The narcissistic personality is characterized by grandiosity, entitlement, and low empathy. This paper describes the development and validation of the Single Item Narcissism Scale (SINS). Although the use of longer instruments is superior in most circumstances, we recommend the SINS in some circumstances (e.g. under serious time constraints, online studies). Methods In 11 independent studies (total N = 2,250), we demonstrate the SINS' psychometric properties. Results The SINS is significantly correlated with longer narcissism scales, but uncorrelated with self-esteem. It also has high test-retest reliability. We validate the SINS in a variety of samples (e.g., undergraduates, nationally representative adults), intrapersonal correlates (e.g., positive affect, depression), and interpersonal correlates (e.g., aggression, relationship quality, prosocial behavior). The SINS taps into the more fragile and less desirable components of narcissism. Significance The SINS can be a useful tool for researchers, especially when it is important to measure narcissism with constraints preventing the use of longer measures. PMID:25093508

  20. Description and evaluation of the CASA dual-Doppler system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Matthew

    2011-12-01

    Long range weather surveillance radars are designed for observing weather events for hundreds of kilometers from the radar and operate over a large coverage domain independently of weather conditions. As a result a loss in spatial resolution and limited temporal sampling of the weather phenomenon occurs. Due to the curvature of the Earth, long-range weather radars tend to make the majority of their precipitation and wind observations in the middle to upper troposphere, resulting in missed features associates with severe weather occurring in the lowest three kilometers of the troposphere. The spacing of long-range weather radars in the United States limits the feasibility of using dual-Doppler wind retrievals that would provide valuable information on the kinematics of weather events to end-users and researchers. The National Science Foundation Center for Collaborative Adapting Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) aims to change the current weather sensing model by increasing coverage of the lowest three kilometers of the troposphere by using densely spaced networked short-range weather radars. CASA has deployed a network of these radars in south-western Oklahoma, known as Integrated Project 1 (IP1). The individual radars are adaptively steered by an automated system known as the Meteorological Command and Control (MCC). The geometry of the IP1 network is such that the coverage domains of the individual radars are overlapping. A dual-Doppler system has been developed for the IP1 network which takes advantage of the overlapping coverage domains. The system is comprised of two subsystems, scan optimization and wind field retrieval. The scan strategy subsystem uses the DCAS model and the number of dual-Doppler pairs in the IP1 network to minimizes the normalized standard deviation in the wind field retrieval. The scan strategy subsystem also minimizes the synchronization error between two radars. The retrieval itself is comprised of two steps, data resampling and the

  1. A comparison of several computational auditory scene analysis (CASA) techniques for monaural speech segregation.

    PubMed

    Zeremdini, Jihen; Ben Messaoud, Mohamed Anouar; Bouzid, Aicha

    2015-09-01

    Humans have the ability to easily separate a composed speech and to form perceptual representations of the constituent sources in an acoustic mixture thanks to their ears. Until recently, researchers attempt to build computer models of high-level functions of the auditory system. The problem of the composed speech segregation is still a very challenging problem for these researchers. In our case, we are interested in approaches that are addressed to the monaural speech segregation. For this purpose, we study in this paper the computational auditory scene analysis (CASA) to segregate speech from monaural mixtures. CASA is the reproduction of the source organization achieved by listeners. It is based on two main stages: segmentation and grouping. In this work, we have presented, and compared several studies that have used CASA for speech separation and recognition.

  2. The human dark side: evolutionary psychology and original sin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joseph; Theol, M

    2014-04-01

    Human nature has a dark side, something important to religions. Evolutionary psychology has been used to illuminate the human shadow side, although as a discipline it has attracted criticism. This article seeks to examine the evolutionary psychology's understanding of human nature and to propose an unexpected dialog with an enduring account of human evil known as original sin. Two cases are briefly considered: murder and rape. To further the exchange, numerous theoretical and methodological criticisms and replies of evolutionary psychology are explored jointly with original sin. Evolutionary psychology can partner with original sin since they share some theoretical likenesses and together they offer insights into the nature of what it means to be human.

  3. Sin, suffering, and the need for the theological virtues.

    PubMed

    Jones, David Albert

    2006-08-01

    This article examines the account of the relationship between sin and suffering provided by J. L. A. Garcia in "Sin and Suffering in a Catholic Understanding of Medical Ethics," in this issue. Garcia draws on the (Roman) Catholic tradition and particularly on the thought of Thomas Aquinas, who remains an important resource for Catholic theology. Nevertheless, his interpretation of Thomas is open to criticism, both in terms of omissions and in terms of positive claims. Garcia includes those elements of Thomas that are purely philosophical, such as natural law and acquired virtue, but neglects the theological and infused virtues, the gifts and fruits of the Holy Spirit, and the beatitudes. These omissions distort his account of the Christian life so that he underplays both the radical problem posed by sin (and suffering), and the radical character of the ultimate solution: redemption in Christ through the grace of the Holy Spirit.

  4. [Serotonin dysfunctions in the background of the seven deadly sins].

    PubMed

    Janka, Zoltán

    2003-11-20

    The symbolic characters of the Seven Deadly Sins can be traced from time to time in the cultural history of human mankind, being directly specified in certain artistic products. Such are, among others, the painting entitled "The Seven Deadly Sins and the Four Lost Things" by Hieronymus Bosch and the poems Divina Commedia and The Foerie Queene by Dante Alighieri and Edmund Spenser, respectively. However, there are several paragraphs referring to these behaviours of the Seven Deadly Sins in the Bible and in the dramas of William Shakespeare. The objective of the present review is to propose that dysfunctions in the central serotonergic system might be involved in the neurobiology of these 'sinful' behaviour patterns. Evidences indicate that behaviour traits such as Accidia (Sloth), Luxuria (Lust, Lechery), Superbia (Pride), Ira (Wrath, Anger), Invidia (Envy), Avaritia (Greed, Avarice), and Gula (Gluttony) can relate to the functional alterations of serotonin in the brain. Results of biochemical and molecular genetic (polymorphism) studies on the human serotonergic system (receptor, transporter, enzyme), findings of functional imaging techniques, effects of depletion (or supplementation) of the serotonin precursor tryptophan, data of challenge probe investigations directed to testing central serotonergic functions, alterations in the peripheral serotonin measures (platelet), and the changes in the CSF 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid content indicate such serotonergic involvement. Furthermore, results of animal experiments on behaviour change (aggressive, dominant or submissive, appetite, alcohol preference) attributed to serotonin status modification and the clinically evidenced therapeutic efficacy of pharmacological interventions, based on the modulation and perturbation of the serotonergic system (e.g. selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors), in treating the 'sinful' behaviour forms and analogous pathological states reaching the severity of psychiatric disorders

  5. Content Analysis Schedule for Bilingual Education Programs: Proyecto PAL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Castor

    This content analysis schedule for "Proyecto PAL" in San Jose, California, presents information on the history, funding, and scope of the project. Included are sociolinguistic process variables such as the native and dominant languages of students and their interaction. Information is provided on staff selection and the linguistic…

  6. What's New in CASA: 'tclean' and the Cycle 4 ALMA Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan Meyer, Jennifer; CASA Development Team; ALMA Pipeline Working Group; NAASC Software Support Team

    2017-01-01

    CASA, the Common Astronomy Software Applications package, undergoes continuous development to support calibration and imaging of astronomical data at radio wavelengths for both single dish and interferometric telescopes. It is largely focused on supporting the post-processing needs of the next generation of radio telescopes such as ALMA and the JVLA. The most recent release of CASA, version 4.7, includes major upgrades in its imaging capabilities via the implementation of a task called 'tclean', which will eventually replace the current imaging task 'clean'. It has a new, more straightforward interface, allows more combinations of imaging algorithms, has a more flexible outlier approach, and includes algorithms for autoboxing. Further, the new 'tclean' task has been implemented in the Cycle 4 ALMA Interferometric Pipeline with great success; this pipeline software can be obtained bundled with CASA 4.7 at https://casa.nrao.edu/. A major goal of the ALMA project [and the National Radio Astronomical Observatory (NRAO)] is to provide Science-Ready Data Products to our user community, and the ALMA Cycle 4 Pipeline is a major step forward in that direction.

  7. Guidelines for Providing Accommodations Using CASAS Assessment for Learners with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CASAS - Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems (NJ1), 2005

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines address methods for administering Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System (CASAS) assessments using accommodations for learners with documented disabilities. The suggested accommodations for disability categories include provisions for: (1) Accommodations in test administration procedures; and (2) Use of appropriate CASAS…

  8. Peer Assessment and Compliance Review (PACR) Innovative Strategies Report. California Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macro, Bronwen; Huang, Lee Ann

    2005-01-01

    This report focuses on the innovative strategies study component of the Peer Assessment and Compliance Review (PACR) project. California (Court Appointed Special Advocates) CASA programs have developed many innovative strategies to serve children in their communities. At each of the programs visited during the PACR project, the team identified at…

  9. CASAS Competencies: Essential Life and Work Skills for Youth and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CASAS - Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    The CASAS Competencies identify more than 360 essential life skills that youth and adults need to be functionally competent members of their community, their family, and the workforce. Competencies are relevant across the full range of instructional levels, from beginning literacy through high school completion including transition to…

  10. Project Cuatro Casas. Final Evaluation Report, 1993-94. OER Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Andrew

    Project Cuatro Casas was an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project in its first year in 1993-94. The project operated at one high school in the Bronx (New York) and served 1,074 students of limited English proficiency. Participating students received instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL); native language arts;…

  11. 78 FR 76050 - Airworthiness Directives; EADS CASA (Type Certificate Previously Held by Construcciones...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... (Type Certificate Previously Held by Construcciones Aeron uticas, S.A.) Airplanes AGENCY: Federal... adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain EADS CASA (Type Certificate Previously Held by... engine due to a missing bolt. This AD requires modifying the PPC lever attachment system. We are...

  12. Project CASAS: Facilitating the Adaptation of Recent Immigrant Students through Complex Community-Wide Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoorman, Dilys; Jean-Jacques, Velouse

    2003-01-01

    The primary focus of this article is a community-based project initiated under the auspices of the Palm Beach County School District's Office of Multicultural Affairs. The students in this district represent 150 countries and 104 language groups. The nation with the highest representation among this population is Haiti. Project CASAS (Community…

  13. The Cinematic Genesis of the Mel Casas Humanscape, 1965-1967

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordova, Ruben C.

    2011-01-01

    The 153 paintings that San Antonio-based artist Mel Casas calls Humanscapes were inspired by a glimpse of a drive-in movie screen. This article treats the first three years of work on this series, a period in which the artist referenced cinematic settings and audiences while registering aspects of the sexual revolution. Marshall McLuhan's…

  14. Geologic quadrangle maps of the United States: geology of the Casa Diablo Mountain quadrangle, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rinehart, C. Dean; Ross, Donald Clarence

    1957-01-01

    The Casa Diablo Mountain quadrangle was mapped in the summers of 1952 and 1953 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the California State Division of Mines as part of a study of potential tungsten-bearing areas.

  15. Virtues of SIN: Can Intensified Public Efforts Help Disadvantaged Immigrants?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aslund, Olof; Johansson, Per

    2011-01-01

    The labor market integration of immigrants is a top political priority throughout the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. Social and fiscal gains, as well as sustained future labor supply make governments search for effective policies to increase employment among the mostly disadvantaged. The author studies SIN,…

  16. CasA mediates Cas3-catalyzed target degradation during CRISPR RNA-guided interference.

    PubMed

    Hochstrasser, Megan L; Taylor, David W; Bhat, Prashant; Guegler, Chantal K; Sternberg, Samuel H; Nogales, Eva; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-05-06

    In bacteria, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated (Cas) DNA-targeting complex Cascade (CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense) uses CRISPR RNA (crRNA) guides to bind complementary DNA targets at sites adjacent to a trinucleotide signature sequence called the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). The Cascade complex then recruits Cas3, a nuclease-helicase that catalyzes unwinding and cleavage of foreign double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bearing a sequence matching that of the crRNA. Cascade comprises the CasA-E proteins and one crRNA, forming a structure that binds and unwinds dsDNA to form an R loop in which the target strand of the DNA base pairs with the 32-nt RNA guide sequence. Single-particle electron microscopy reconstructions of dsDNA-bound Cascade with and without Cas3 reveal that Cascade positions the PAM-proximal end of the DNA duplex at the CasA subunit and near the site of Cas3 association. The finding that the DNA target and Cas3 colocalize with CasA implicates this subunit in a key target-validation step during DNA interference. We show biochemically that base pairing of the PAM region is unnecessary for target binding but critical for Cas3-mediated degradation. In addition, the L1 loop of CasA, previously implicated in PAM recognition, is essential for Cas3 activation following target binding by Cascade. Together, these data show that the CasA subunit of Cascade functions as an essential partner of Cas3 by recognizing DNA target sites and positioning Cas3 adjacent to the PAM to ensure cleavage.

  17. Subgap conductivity in SIN-junctions of high barrier transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotkhov, S. V.; Balashov, D. V.; Khabipov, M. I.; Buchholz, F.-I.; Zorin, A. B.

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the current-voltage characteristics of high-transparency superconductor-insulator-normal metal (SIN) junctions with the specific tunnel resistance ρ ≲ 30 Ω μm2. The junctions were fabricated from different superconducting and normal conducting materials, including Nb, Al, AuPd and Cu. The subgap leakage currents were found to be appreciably larger than those given by the standard tunnelling model. We explain our results using the model of two-electron tunnelling in the coherent diffusive transport regime. We demonstrate that even in the high-transparency SIN-junctions, a noticeable reduction of the subgap current can be achieved by splitting a junction into several submicron sub-junctions. These structures can be used as nonlinear low-noise shunts in rapid-single-flux-quantum (RSFQ) circuitry for controlling Josephson qubits.

  18. Original Antigenic Sin Response to RNA Viruses and Antiviral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mee Sook; Kim, Jin Il; Park, Sehee; Lee, Ilseob

    2016-01-01

    The human immune system has evolved to fight against foreign pathogens. It plays a central role in the body's defense mechanism. However, the immune memory geared to fight off a previously recognized pathogen, tends to remember an original form of the pathogen when a variant form subsequently invades. This has been termed 'original antigenic sin'. This adverse immunological effect can alter vaccine effectiveness and sometimes cause enhanced pathogenicity or additional inflammatory responses, according to the type of pathogen and the circumstances of infection. Here we aim to give a simplified conceptual understanding of virus infection and original antigenic sin by comparing and contrasting the two examples of recurring infections such as influenza and dengue viruses in humans. PMID:27799871

  19. A New Analytic Alignment Method for a SINS.

    PubMed

    Tan, Caiming; Zhu, Xinhua; Su, Yan; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhiqiang; Gu, Dongbing

    2015-11-04

    Analytic alignment is a type of self-alignment for a Strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) that is based solely on two non-collinear vectors, which are the gravity and rotational velocity vectors of the Earth at a stationary base on the ground. The attitude of the SINS with respect to the Earth can be obtained directly using the TRIAD algorithm given two vector measurements. For a traditional analytic coarse alignment, all six outputs from the inertial measurement unit (IMU) are used to compute the attitude. In this study, a novel analytic alignment method called selective alignment is presented. This method uses only three outputs of the IMU and a few properties from the remaining outputs such as the sign and the approximate value to calculate the attitude. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the validity of this method, and the precision of yaw is improved using the selective alignment method compared to the traditional analytic coarse alignment method in the vehicle experiment. The selective alignment principle provides an accurate relationship between the outputs and the attitude of the SINS relative to the Earth for a stationary base, and it is an extension of the TRIAD algorithm. The selective alignment approach has potential uses in applications such as self-alignment, fault detection, and self-calibration.

  20. Some tests of wet tropospheric calibration for the CASA Uno Global Positioning System experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, T. H.; Wolf, S. Kornreich

    1990-01-01

    Wet tropospheric path delay can be a major error source for Global Positioning System (GPS) geodetic experiments. Strategies for minimizing this error are investigted using data from CASA Uno, the first major GPS experiment in Central and South America, where wet path delays may be both high and variable. Wet path delay calibration using water vapor radiometers (WVRs) and residual delay estimation is compared with strategies where the entire wet path delay is estimated stochastically without prior calibration, using data from a 270-km test baseline in Costa Rica. Both approaches yield centimeter-level baseline repeatability and similar tropospheric estimates, suggesting that WVR calibration is not critical for obtaining high precision results with GPS in the CASA region.

  1. Chimenea and other tools: Automated imaging of multi-epoch radio-synthesis data with CASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, T. D.; Anderson, G. E.

    2015-11-01

    In preparing the way for the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders, there is a pressing need to begin probing the transient sky in a fully robotic fashion using the current generation of radio telescopes. Effective exploitation of such surveys requires a largely automated data-reduction process. This paper introduces an end-to-end automated reduction pipeline, AMIsurvey, used for calibrating and imaging data from the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager Large Array. AMIsurvey makes use of several component libraries which have been packaged separately for open-source release. The most scientifically significant of these is chimenea, which implements a telescope-agnostic algorithm for automated imaging of pre-calibrated multi-epoch radio-synthesis data, of the sort typically acquired for transient surveys or follow-up. The algorithm aims to improve upon standard imaging pipelines by utilizing iterative RMS-estimation and automated source-detection to avoid so called 'Clean-bias', and makes use of CASA subroutines for the underlying image-synthesis operations. At a lower level, AMIsurvey relies upon two libraries, drive-ami and drive-casa, built to allow use of mature radio-astronomy software packages from within Python scripts. While targeted at automated imaging, the drive-casa interface can also be used to automate interaction with any of the CASA subroutines from a generic Python process. Additionally, these packages may be of wider technical interest beyond radio-astronomy, since they demonstrate use of the Python library pexpect to emulate terminal interaction with an external process. This approach allows for rapid development of a Python interface to any legacy or externally-maintained pipeline which accepts command-line input, without requiring alterations to the original code.

  2. Usefulness of hemocytometer as a counting chamber in a computer assisted sperm analyzer (CASA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eljarah, A.; Chandler, J.; Jenkins, J.A.; Chenevert, J.; Alcanal, A.

    2013-01-01

    Several methods are used to determine sperm cell concentration, such as the haemocytometer, spectrophotometer, electronic cell counter and computer-assisted semen analysers (CASA). The utility of CASA systems has been limited due to the lack of characterization of individual systems and the absence of standardization among laboratories. The aims of this study were to: 1) validate and establish setup conditions for the CASA system utilizing the haemocytometer as a counting chamber, and 2) compare the different methods used for the determination of sperm cell concentration in bull semen. Two ejaculates were collected and the sperm cell concentration was determined using spectrophotometer and haemocytometer. For the Hamilton-Thorn method, the haemocytometer was used as a counting chamber. Sperm concentration was determined three times per ejaculate samples. A difference (P 0.05) or between the haemocytometer count and the spectrophotometer. Based on the results of this study, we concluded that the haemocytometer can be used in computerized semen analysis systems as a substitute for the commercially available disposable counting chambers, therefore avoiding disadvantageous high costs and slower procedures.

  3. Is n sin θ conserved along the light path?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorbala, Mahdiyar; Sepehrinia, Reza

    2016-03-01

    Snell’s law states that the quantity n{sin}θ is unchanged in refraction of light passing from one medium to another. We inquire whether this is true in the general case where the speed of light varies continuously within a medium. It turns out to be an instructive exercise in application of Snell’s law and Fermat’s principle. It also provides good pedagogical problems in calculus of variations to deal with the subtleties of a variable domain of integration and inclusion of constraints. The final result of these exercises is that, contrary to an initial expectation, the answer to the question in the title is negative.

  4. SInCRe—structural interactome computational resource for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Metri, Rahul; Hariharaputran, Sridhar; Ramakrishnan, Gayatri; Anand, Praveen; Raghavender, Upadhyayula S.; Ochoa-Montaño, Bernardo; Higueruelo, Alicia P.; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan; Chandra, Nagasuma R.; Blundell, Tom L.; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an integrated database for Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (Mtb) that collates information on protein sequences, domain assignments, functional annotation and 3D structural information along with protein–protein and protein–small molecule interactions. SInCRe (Structural Interactome Computational Resource) is developed out of CamBan (Cambridge and Bangalore) collaboration. The motivation for development of this database is to provide an integrated platform to allow easily access and interpretation of data and results obtained by all the groups in CamBan in the field of Mtb informatics. In-house algorithms and databases developed independently by various academic groups in CamBan are used to generate Mtb-specific datasets and are integrated in this database to provide a structural dimension to studies on tuberculosis. The SInCRe database readily provides information on identification of functional domains, genome-scale modelling of structures of Mtb proteins and characterization of the small-molecule binding sites within Mtb. The resource also provides structure-based function annotation, information on small-molecule binders including FDA (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drugs, protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and natural compounds that bind to pathogen proteins potentially and result in weakening or elimination of host–pathogen protein–protein interactions. Together they provide prerequisites for identification of off-target binding. Database URL: http://proline.biochem.iisc.ernet.in/sincre PMID:26130660

  5. Sinning against nature: the theory of background conditions

    PubMed Central

    Blackford, R

    2006-01-01

    Debates about the moral and political acceptability of particular sexual practices and new technologies often include appeals to a supposed imperative to follow nature. If nature is understood as the totality of all phenomena or as those things that are not artificial, there is little prospect of developing a successful argument to impugn interference with it or sinning against it. At the same time, there are serious difficulties with approaches that seek to identify "proper" human functioning. An alternative approach is to understand interference with nature as acting in a manner that threatens basic background conditions to human choice. Arguably, the theory of background conditions helps explain much of the hostility to practices and technologies that allegedly sin against nature. The theory does not, however, entail that appeals to nature are relevant or rational. Such appeals should be subjected to sceptical scrutiny. Indeed, the theory suggests that arguments against practices and technologies that can be seen as contrary to nature sometimes exercise a psychological attraction that is disproportional to their actual cogency. PMID:17074819

  6. Sinning against nature: the theory of background conditions.

    PubMed

    Blackford, R

    2006-11-01

    Debates about the moral and political acceptability of particular sexual practices and new technologies often include appeals to a supposed imperative to follow nature. If nature is understood as the totality of all phenomena or as those things that are not artificial, there is little prospect of developing a successful argument to impugn interference with it or sinning against it. At the same time, there are serious difficulties with approaches that seek to identify "proper" human functioning. An alternative approach is to understand interference with nature as acting in a manner that threatens basic background conditions to human choice. Arguably, the theory of background conditions helps explain much of the hostility to practices and technologies that allegedly sin against nature. The theory does not, however, entail that appeals to nature are relevant or rational. Such appeals should be subjected to sceptical scrutiny. Indeed, the theory suggests that arguments against practices and technologies that can be seen as contrary to nature sometimes exercise a psychological attraction that is disproportional to their actual cogency.

  7. Sin and mental illness in the Middle Ages.

    PubMed

    Kroll, J; Bachrach, B

    1984-08-01

    The modern stereotype that in the Middle Ages there was a general belief that mental illness was caused by sin is reviewed. The authors examined 57 descriptions of mental illness (madness, possession, alcoholism, epilepsy, and combinations thereof) from pre-Crusade chronicles and saints' lives. In only 9 (16%) of these descriptions did the sources attribute the mental illness to sin or wrongdoing, and in these cases the medieval authors appeared to use this attribution for its propaganda value against an enemy of their patron saints, their monastery lands, or their religious values. The medieval sources indicate that the authors were well aware of the proximate causes of mental illness, such as humoral imbalance, intemperate diet and alcohol intake, overwork, and grief. The banality that, since God causes all things he also causes mental illness, was only used by medieval authors under special circumstances and in a minority of cases. It does not constitute evidence of superstitious and primitive notions about mental illness in the early Middle Ages.

  8. Instantaneous Observability of Tightly Coupled SINS/GPS during Maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junxiang; Yu, Fei; Lan, Haiyu; Dong, Qianhui

    2016-05-27

    The tightly coupled strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS)/global position system (GPS) has been widely used. The system observability determines whether the system state can be estimated by a filter efficiently or not. In this paper, the observability analysis of a two-channel and a three-channel tightly coupled SINS/GPS are performed, respectively, during arbitrary translational maneuvers and angle maneuvers, where the translational maneuver and angle maneuver are modeled. A novel instantaneous observability matrix (IOM) based on a reconstructed psi-angle model is proposed to make the theoretical analysis simpler, which starts from the observability definition directly. Based on the IOM, a series of theoretical analysis are performed. Analysis results show that almost all kinds of translational maneuver and angle maneuver can make a three-channel system instantaneously observable, but there is no one translational maneuver or angle maneuver can make a two-channel system instantaneously observable. The system's performance is investigated when the system is not instantaneously observable. A series of simulation studies based on EKF are performed to confirm the analytic conclusions.

  9. Instantaneous Observability of Tightly Coupled SINS/GPS during Maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Junxiang; Yu, Fei; Lan, Haiyu; Dong, Qianhui

    2016-01-01

    The tightly coupled strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS)/global position system (GPS) has been widely used. The system observability determines whether the system state can be estimated by a filter efficiently or not. In this paper, the observability analysis of a two-channel and a three-channel tightly coupled SINS/GPS are performed, respectively, during arbitrary translational maneuvers and angle maneuvers, where the translational maneuver and angle maneuver are modeled. A novel instantaneous observability matrix (IOM) based on a reconstructed psi-angle model is proposed to make the theoretical analysis simpler, which starts from the observability definition directly. Based on the IOM, a series of theoretical analysis are performed. Analysis results show that almost all kinds of translational maneuver and angle maneuver can make a three-channel system instantaneously observable, but there is no one translational maneuver or angle maneuver can make a two-channel system instantaneously observable. The system’s performance is investigated when the system is not instantaneously observable. A series of simulation studies based on EKF are performed to confirm the analytic conclusions. PMID:27240369

  10. [Acedia or the depressed between sin and illness].

    PubMed

    Alliez, J; Huber, J P

    1987-05-01

    Acedia is a term of the classical greek vocabulary that a christian author of the IVth century, Evagre the Pontic, uses in a special sense, to describe a mental state characterized among other things, by disgust and dejection, and which, according to him, falls into what became the first list of deadly sins. The word was conveyed to us by another monk of the egyptian deserts, Jean Cassien, with a change of meaning which made it very difficult to distinguish from sadness: his audience being very different from his predecessor's, as he wrote for Latins, little inclined to anachoretic life but among which developed the first great coenobitic institutions of the Occident. One century later, Pope Gregory the great removes acedia from the list of deadly sins, either because he does not distinguish it from sadness (and laziness) or because he considers it a morbid state and, as such, depending on medical care. The word has nevertheless survived until Thomas Aquinas and later, and its study provides valuable data on the mental states prefiguring our modern depressions.

  11. Structure and Organisation of SinR, the Master Regulator of Biofilm Formation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Colledge, Vicki L.; Fogg, Mark J.; Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Leech, Andrew; Dodson, Eleanor J.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    sinR encodes a tetrameric repressor of genes required for biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis. sinI, which is transcribed under Spo0A control, encodes a dimeric protein that binds to SinR to form a SinR–SinI heterodimer in which the DNA-binding functions of SinR are abrogated and repression of biofilm genes is relieved. The heterodimer-forming surface comprises residues conserved between SinR and SinI. Each forms a pair of α-helices that hook together to form an intermolecular four-helix bundle. Here, we are interested in the assembly of the SinR tetramer and its binding to DNA. Size-exclusion chromatography with multi-angle laser light scattering and crystallographic analysis reveal that a DNA-binding fragment of SinR (residues 1–69) is a monomer, while a SinI-binding fragment (residues 74–111) is a tetramer arranged as a dimer of dimers. The SinR(74–111) chain forms two α-helices with the organisation of the dimer similar to that observed in the SinR–SinI complex. The tetramer is formed through interactions of residues at the C-termini of the four chains. A model of the intact SinR tetramer in which the DNA binding domains surround the tetramerisation core was built. Fluorescence anisotropy and surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that SinR binds to an oligonucleotide duplex, 5′-TTTGTTCTCTAAAGAGAACTTA-3′, containing a pair of SinR consensus sequences in inverted orientation with a Kd of 300 nM. The implications of these data for promoter binding and the curious quaternary structural transitions of SinR upon binding to (i) SinI and (ii) the SinR-like protein SlrR, which “repurposes” SinR as a repressor of autolysin and motility genes, are discussed. PMID:21708175

  12. Modification of computational auditory scene analysis (CASA) for noise-robust acoustic feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Minseok

    While there have been many attempts to mitigate interferences of background noise, the performance of automatic speech recognition (ASR) still can be deteriorated by various factors with ease. However, normal hearing listeners can accurately perceive sounds of their interests, which is believed to be a result of Auditory Scene Analysis (ASA). As a first attempt, the simulation of the human auditory processing, called computational auditory scene analysis (CASA), was fulfilled through physiological and psychological investigations of ASA. CASA comprised of Zilany-Bruce auditory model, followed by tracking fundamental frequency for voice segmentation and detecting pairs of onset/offset at each characteristic frequency (CF) for unvoiced segmentation. The resulting Time-Frequency (T-F) representation of acoustic stimulation was converted into acoustic feature, gammachirp-tone frequency cepstral coefficients (GFCC). 11 keywords with various environmental conditions are used and the robustness of GFCC was evaluated by spectral distance (SD) and dynamic time warping distance (DTW). In "clean" and "noisy" conditions, the application of CASA generally improved noise robustness of the acoustic feature compared to a conventional method with or without noise suppression using MMSE estimator. The intial study, however, not only showed the noise-type dependency at low SNR, but also called the evaluation methods in question. Some modifications were made to capture better spectral continuity from an acoustic feature matrix, to obtain faster processing speed, and to describe the human auditory system more precisely. The proposed framework includes: 1) multi-scale integration to capture more accurate continuity in feature extraction, 2) contrast enhancement (CE) of each CF by competition with neighboring frequency bands, and 3) auditory model modifications. The model modifications contain the introduction of higher Q factor, middle ear filter more analogous to human auditory system

  13. Composition and spectrum of cosmic rays at the knee measured by the CASA-BLANCA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Joseph Westbrook

    2000-07-01

    The energy spectrum and primary composition of cosmic rays with energy between 0.25PeV and 30PeV have been studied using the CASA-BLANCA detector. In this energy range, a ``knee'' in the spectrum has been recognized for over 40 years, but the astrophysical origins of the knee remain unknown. Measuring the spectrum and elemental composition of cosmic rays near the knee can help to address the problem. The favored model of acceleration in supernova shock waves predicts that cosmic rays with energy above 10PeV are heavy nuclei. The measurements were made by BLANCA, a new array of 144 angle-integrating Cherenkov light detectors located at the CASA-MIA site in Utah. CASA data on particle density are used to find the core and direction of air showers, while BLANCA measures the lateral distribution of Cherenkov light about the core. The advantages of Cherenkov light allow BLANCA to measure shower energy with minimal composition bias and to estimate accurately the depth of shower maximum. The cosmic ray flux measured by BLANCA exhibits a knee in the range of 2-3PeV with a width of approximately 0.5 decades in primary energy. The power law indices of the differential flux above and below the knee are -2.72 +/- 0.02 and -2.95 +/- 0.02. The data on mean shower depth indicate that the composition is lighter at 3 PeV than below the knee and that it becomes heavier with increasing energy above 3PeV. Cherenkov measurements are interpreted using the predictions of the CORSIKA Monte Carlo air shower simulation coupled with each of four hadronic interaction codes (QGSJET, VENUS, SIBYLL, and HDPM). The distribution of air shower depths can be reproduced well at all energies by the QGSJET and VENUS models, and these distributions suggest the same composition trends exhibited by the mean depth of maximum results.

  14. On the Design of Reinforced Hull Panels (Del Proyecto de Paneles Renforzados),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-05

    Proyecto de Paneles Renforzados S AUTHOR(S) AND/ORk EDITOR(S): Francisco Gonzalez Gonzales SOURCE: Ingenieria Naval, No. 561 (undated); PP. 78-88 ORIGINAL... Proyecto de Paneles Renforzados; Ingenieria Naval, No. 561 (undated); pp 78-88; Spanish] Author’s Abstract /78* The arrangement of transverse stiffeners

  15. Suppression of Sin3A activity promotes differentiation of pluripotent cells into functional neurons

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Debasish; Lee, Chang-Hee; Hyun, Ji Young; Chang, Gyeong-Eon; Cheong, Eunji; Shin, Injae

    2017-01-01

    Sin3 is a transcriptional corepressor for REST silencing machinery that represses multiple neuronal genes in non-neuronal cells. However, functions of Sin3 (Sin3A and Sin3B) in suppression of neuronal phenotypes are not well characterized. Herein we show that Sin3A knockdown impedes the repressive activity of REST and enhances differentiation of pluripotent P19 cells into electrophysiologically active neurons without inducing astrogenesis. It is also found that silencing Sin3B induces neurogenesis of P19 cells with a lower efficiency than Sin3A knockdown. The results suggest that Sin3A has a more profound effect on REST repressive machinery for silencing neuronal genes in P19 cells than Sin3B. Furthermore, we show that a peptide inhibitor of Sin3A-REST interactions promotes differentiation of P19 cells into functional neurons. Observations made in studies using genetic deletion and a synthetic inhibitor suggests that Sin3A plays an important role in the repression of neuronal genes by the REST regulatory mechanism. PMID:28303954

  16. The effect of tracking network configuration on GPS baseline estimates for the CASA Uno experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, S. Kornreich; Dixon, T. H.; Freymueller, J. T.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of the tracking network on long (greater than 100 km) GPS baseline estimates was estimated using various subsets of the global tracking network initiated by the first Central and South America (CASA Uno) experiment. It was found that best results could be obtained with a global tacking network consisting of three U.S. stations, two sites in the southwestern Pacific, and two sites in Europe. In comparison with smaller subsets, this global network improved the baseline repeatability, the resolution of carrier phase cycle ambiguities, and formal errors of the orbit estimates.

  17. Vascular Plant and Vertebrate Inventory of Casa Grande Ruins National Monument

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Brian F.; Albrecht, Eric W.; Schmidt, Cecilia A.; Halvorson, William L.; Anning, Pamela; Docherty, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary This report summarizes results of the first comprehensive biological inventory of Casa Grande Ruins National Monument (NM) in southern Arizona. Surveys at the monument were part of a larger effort to inventory vascular plants and vertebrates in eight National Park Service units in Arizona and New Mexico. In 2001 and 2002 we surveyed for vascular plants and vertebrates (amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals) at Casa Grande Ruins NM to document the presence, and in some cases relative abundance, of species. By using repeatable study designs and standardized field techniques, which included quantified survey effort, we produced inventories that can serve as the basis for a biological monitoring program. Of the National Park Service units in the region, no other has experienced as much recent ecological change as Casa Grande Ruins NM. Once situated in a large and biologically diverse mesquite bosque near the perennially flowing Gila River, the monument is now a patch of sparse desert vegetation surrounded by urban and commercial development that is rapidly replacing agriculture as the dominant land use in the area. Roads, highways, and canals surround the monument. Development, and its associated impacts, has important implications for the plants and animals that live in the monument. The plant species list is small and the distribution and number of non-native plants appears to be increasing. Terrestrial vertebrates are also being impacted by the changing landscape, which is increasing the isolation of these populations from nearby natural areas and thereby reducing the number of species at the monument. These observations are alarming and are based on our review of previous studies, our research in the monument, and our knowledge of the biogeography and ecology of the Sonoran Desert. Together, these data suggest that the monument has lost a significant portion of its historic complement of species and these changes will likely intensify as

  18. Documenting Modern Mexican Architectural Heritage for Posterity: Barragan's Casa Cristo, in Guadalajara, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzino, D.; Pei, W.; Santana Quintero, M.; Reyes Rodriguez, R.

    2015-08-01

    This contribution describes the results of an International workshop on documentation of historic and cultural heritage developed jointly between Universidad de Guadalajara's Centro Universitario de Arte, Arquitectura y Diseño (CUAAD) and Carleton University's Architectural Conservation and Sustainability Program. The objective of the workshop was to create a learning environment for emerging heritage professionals through the use of advanced recording techniques for the documentation of modern architectural heritage in Guadalajara, Mexico. The selected site was Casa Cristo, one of the several architectural projects by Luis Barragán in Guadalajara. The house was built between 1927 and 1929 for Gustavo R. Cristo, mayor of the city. The style of the building reflects the European influences derived from the architect's travel experience, as well as the close connection with local craftsmanship. All of these make the house an outstanding example of modern regional architecture. A systematic documentation strategy was developed for the site, using different survey equipment and techniques to capture the shape, colour, spatial configuration, and current conditions of Casa Cristo for its eventual rehabilitation and conservation.

  19. 48 CFR 225.7704 - Acquisitions of products and services from South Caucasus/Central and South Asian (SC/CASA) state...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Acquisitions of products and services from South Caucasus/Central and South Asian (SC/CASA) state in support of operations in... and South Asian (SC/CASA) state in support of operations in Afghanistan....

  20. Development and Validation of the Coping with Acculturative Stress in American Schools (Casas-A) Scale on a Latino Adolescent Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro-Olivo, Sara M.; Palardy, Gregory J.; Albeg, Loren; Williamson, Ariel A.

    2014-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Coping With Acculturative Stress in American Schools (CASAS-A) scale were examined using a sample of 148 Latino middle school students. CASAS-A is a self-report scale designed to identify students in need of culturally responsive social-emotional interventions due to having high levels of school-related…

  1. Predictive and prognostic values of cancer-associated serum antigen (CASA) and cancer antigen 125 (CA 125) levels prior to second-look laparotomy for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, O; Mogensen, O; Mogensen, B; Jakobsen, A

    1995-11-01

    CA 125 and cancer-associated serum antigen (CASA) were measured prior to second-look laparotomy (SLL) to investigate their predictive and prognostic values in 93 patients treated for epithelial ovarian cancer FIGO stage II, III, or IV. Residual tumor was diagnosed at the SLL in 58 patients (62%). The optimal cutoff level was 15 U/ml for CA 125 and 8 U/ml for CASA. Using these levels, the sensitivity for detection of residual tumor was 40% for CA 125 and 22% for CASA. The combined use of the markers resulted in a sensitivity of 47% (diagnostic gain 6.9%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.14-13.44%). Microscopic tumor volumes were equally diagnosed by CASA and CA 125. The independent prognostic value of CA 125 (RR = 2.6; 95% CI, 2.0-3.2) and CASA (RR = 2.2; CI, 1.5-2.9) was established by means of Cox regression analysis of the covariation between survival, age, FIGO stage, histopathology, tumor grade, and bulk of residual tumor at the primary operation and CA 125 and CASA before the SLL. In conclusion, we found that CASA could supplement CA 125 measurement prior to SLL and reduce the number of SLLs. Furthermore, CASA had an independent prognostic value for survival which may be used together with other information in the planning of further treatment of the individual patient.

  2. Electronic properties of a new structured Sin/O superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S.; Zhang, L.; Xu, Y. X.; Wu, S. Q.; Zhu, Z. Z.

    2016-11-01

    Silicon is a material which dominants the semiconductor industry and has a well-established processing technology based on it. However, silicon has an indirect-bandgap and is not efficient in light emitting. This limits its applications in optoelectronics. In this paper, we proposed a new structural model for the silicon-based superlattice, i.e., the Sin/O one. The model consists of alternating films of n-layers of Si and a monolayer of oxygen along z-direction, together with a surface cell of Si(001) (2×1) reconstruction in the x-y plane. The importance of employing such a Si(001) (2×1) reconstruction is that all the electrons at interface can be strongly bonded. Our results showed interesting electronic properties, e.g., the band folding and large band gap of bulk Si, when the thickness of the silicon layers was increased (but still thin). Our structure might also offer other interesting properties.

  3. Sin and suffering in a Catholic understanding of medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J L A

    2006-08-01

    Drawing chiefly on recent sources, in Part One I sketch an untraditional way of articulating what I claim to be central elements of traditional Catholic morality, treating it as based in virtues, focused on the recipients ("patients") of our attention and concern, and centered in certain person-to-person role-relationships. I show the limited and derivative places of "natural law," and therefore of sin, within that framework. I also sketch out some possible implications for medical ethics of this approach to moral theory, and briefly contrast these with the influential alternative offered by the "principlism" of Beauchamp and Childress. In Part Two, I turn to a Catholic understanding of the nature and meaning of human suffering, drawing especially on writings and addresses of the late Pope John Paul II. He reminds us that physical and mental suffering can provide an opportunity to share in Christ's salvific sacrifice, better to see the nature of our earthly vocation, and to reflect on the dependence that inheres in human existence. At various places, and especially in my conclusion, I suggest a few ways in which this can inform bioethical reflection on morally appropriate responses to those afflicted by physical or mental pain, disability, mental impairment, disease, illness, and poor health prospects. My general point is that mercy must be informed by appreciation of the person's dignity and status. Throughout, my approach is philosophical rather than theological.

  4. Identification of Genetic Suppressors of the Sin3A Knockdown Wing Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Stephanie; Gammouh, Sarah; Pile, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    The role of the Sin3A transcriptional corepressor in regulating the cell cycle is established in various metazoans. Little is known, however, about the signaling pathways that trigger or are triggered by Sin3A function. To discover genes that work in similar or opposing pathways to Sin3A during development, we have performed an unbiased screen of deficiencies of the Drosophila third chromosome. Additionally, we have performed a targeted loss of function screen to identify cell cycle genes that genetically interact with Sin3A. We have identified genes that encode proteins involved in regulation of gene expression, signaling pathways and cell cycle that can suppress the curved wing phenotype caused by the knockdown of Sin3A. These data indicate that Sin3A function is quite diverse and impacts a wide variety of cellular processes. PMID:23166712

  5. 76 FR 15936 - Designation for the Owensboro, KY; Bloomington, IL; Iowa Falls, IA; Casa Grande, AZ; Fargo, ND...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration Designation for the Owensboro, KY; Bloomington, IL; Iowa Falls, IA; Casa Grande, AZ; Fargo, ND; Grand Forks, ND; and Plainview, TX Areas...

  6. 75 FR 52925 - Opportunity for Designation in the Owensboro, KY; Bloomington, IL; Iowa Falls, IA; Casa Grande...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ...; Bloomington, IL; Iowa Falls, IA; Casa Grande, AZ; Fargo, ND; Grand Forks, ND; and Plainview, TX Areas; Request for Comments on the Official Agencies Servicing These Areas AGENCY: Grain Inspection, Packers and... official services in the areas presently served by these agencies to submit an application for...

  7. Influence of chamber type integrated with computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) system on the results of boar semen evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gączarzewicz, D

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of different types of chambers used in computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) on boar sperm concentration and motility parameters. CASA measurements were performed on 45 ejaculates by comparing three commonly used chambers: Leja chamber (LJ), Makler chamber (MK) and microscopic slide-coverslip (SL). Concentration results obtained with CASA were verified by manual counting on a Bürker hemocytometer (BH). No significant differences were found between the concentrations determined with BH vs. LJ and SL, whereas higher (p<0.01) values of this parameter were obtained with MK. Compared to MK and SL, significantly higher values were recorded in LJ for velocity (VCL and VAP) as well as amplitude of the lateral head displacement (ALH) and beat cross frequency (BCF), which was associated with significantly higher percentages of motile, progressively motile and rapidly progressive motile spermatozoa. Higher values for the linearity (LIN) and straightness (STR) of sperm movement were obtained for the analysis performed in MK and SL. In both these chambers, the results of all the linearity and kinetic parameters of sperm were similar (p>0.05). The results obtained show that CASA assessment of boar semen should account for the effect of counting chamber on the results of sperm motility and concentration, which confirms the need for further study on standardizing the automatic analysis of boar semen.

  8. Obsidian in the Casas Grandes world: Procurement, exchange, and interaction in Chihuahua, Mexico, CE 1200-1450

    DOE PAGES

    Dolan, Sean Gregory; Whalen, Michael E.; Minnis, Paul E.; ...

    2017-01-09

    The Casas Grandes area in Chihuahua, Mexico and the site of Paquime was the center of one the largest regional systems in the U.S. Southwest and Mexican Northwest (SW/NW) during the Medio period (CE 1200-1450). People participated in local and distant exchange networks with groups in the SW/NW, Mesoamerica, and West Mexico. Our knowledge of which obsidian sources people used in Casas Grandes is limited, despite how obsidian could have derived from many different places. We examine how the use of specific obsidian sources may relate to broader political and economic relationships within the Casas Grandes regional system and itsmore » association with the Mimbres and Animas regions of the SW/NW. We sourced 116 artifacts using EDXRF spectrometry from four sites that neighbor Paquime. Results demonstrate people used obsidian from Chihuahua, Sonora, and New Mexico. Furthermore, there were varying levels of social interaction and regional integration because there is diversity in source use at the site level, and Casas Grandes were more connected to the Animas region than Mimbres regarding obsidian resource procurement.« less

  9. Bartolome de Las Casas; Protector of the Indians. The Tinker Pamphlet Series for the Teaching of Mexican American Heritage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Hubert J.

    Bartolome de las Casas devoted himself completely to crusading for the rights of the Indians. Although he was never a missionary among Indians, he began projects such as the Indians' conversion in the Land of War in Guatemala, which later became the task of his Dominican colleagues. However, his true importance lay in his role as the Indians'…

  10. Bacillus anthracis sin Locus and Regulation of Secreted Proteases ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pflughoeft, Kathryn J.; Sumby, Paul; Koehler, Theresa M.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis shares many regulatory loci with the nonpathogenic Bacillus species Bacillus subtilis. One such locus is sinIR, which in B. subtilis controls sporulation, biofilm formation, motility, and competency. As B. anthracis is not known to be motile, to be naturally competent, or to readily form biofilms, we hypothesized that the B. anthracis sinIR regulon is distinct from that of B. subtilis. A genome-wide expression microarray analysis of B. anthracis parental and sinR mutant strains indicated limited convergence of the B. anthracis and B. subtilis SinR regulons. The B. anthracis regulon includes homologues of some B. subtilis SinR-regulated genes, including the signal peptidase gene sipW near the sinIR locus and the sporulation gene spoIIE. The B. anthracis SinR protein also negatively regulates transcription of genes adjacent to the sinIR locus that are unique to the Bacillus cereus group species. These include calY and inhA1, structural genes for the metalloproteases camelysin and immune inhibitor A1 (InhA1), which have been suggested to be associated with virulence in B. cereus and B. anthracis, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed direct binding of B. anthracis SinR to promoter DNA from strongly regulated genes, such as calY and sipW, but not to the weakly regulated inhA1 gene. Assessment of camelysin and InhA1 levels in culture supernates from sinR-, inhA1-, and calY-null mutants showed that the concentration of InhA1 in the culture supernatant is inversely proportional to the concentration of camelysin. Our data are consistent with a model in which InhA1 protease levels are controlled at the transcriptional level by SinR and at the posttranslational level by camelysin. PMID:21131488

  11. Automated analysis of calcium spiking profiles with CaSA software: two case studies from root-microbe symbioses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Repeated oscillations in intracellular calcium (Ca2+) concentration, known as Ca2+ spiking signals, have been described in plants for a limited number of cellular responses to biotic or abiotic stimuli and most notably the common symbiotic signaling pathway (CSSP) which mediates the recognition by their plant hosts of two endosymbiotic microbes, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and nitrogen fixing rhizobia. The detailed analysis of the complexity and variability of the Ca2+ spiking patterns which have been revealed in recent studies requires both extensive datasets and sophisticated statistical tools. Results As a contribution, we have developed automated Ca2+ spiking analysis (CaSA) software that performs i) automated peak detection, ii) statistical analyses based on the detected peaks, iii) autocorrelation analysis of peak-to-peak intervals to highlight major traits in the spiking pattern. We have evaluated CaSA in two experimental studies. In the first, CaSA highlighted unpredicted differences in the spiking patterns induced in Medicago truncatula root epidermal cells by exudates of the AM fungus Gigaspora margarita as a function of the phosphate concentration in the growth medium of both host and fungus. In the second study we compared the spiking patterns triggered by either AM fungal or rhizobial symbiotic signals. CaSA revealed the existence of different patterns in signal periodicity, which are thought to contribute to the so-called Ca2+ signature. Conclusions We therefore propose CaSA as a useful tool for characterizing oscillatory biological phenomena such as Ca2+ spiking. PMID:24369773

  12. Involvement of the SIN4 global transcriptional regulator in the chromatin structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Y W; Stillman, D J

    1992-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the SIN4 gene and determined that SIN4 is identical to TSF3, identified as a negative regulator of GAL1 gene transcription (S. Chen, R.W. West, Jr., S.L. Johnson, H. Gans, and J. Ma, submitted for publication). Yeast strains bearing a sin4 delta null mutation have been constructed and are temperature sensitive for growth and display defects in both negative and positive regulation of transcription. Transcription of the CTS1 gene is reduced in sin4 delta mutants, suggesting that Sin4 functions as a positive transcriptional regulator. Additionally, a Sin4-LexA fusion protein activates transcription from test promoters containing LexA binding sites. The sin4 delta mutant also shows phenotypes common to histone and spt mutants, including suppression of delta insertion mutations in the HIS4 and LYS2 promoters, expression of promoters lacking upstream activation sequence elements, and decreased superhelical density of circular DNA molecules. These results suggest that the sin4 delta mutation may alter the structure of chromatin, and these changes in chromatin structure may affect transcriptional regulation. Images PMID:1406639

  13. Modeling net primary productivity of terrestrial ecosystems in the semi-arid climate of the Mongolian Plateau using LSWI-based CASA ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Gang; Bao, Yuhai; Qin, Zhihao; Xin, Xiaoping; Bao, Yulong; Bayarsaikan, Sainbuyin; Zhou, Yi; Chuntai, Bilegtmandakh

    2016-04-01

    Since the estimate of moisture stress coefficients (MSC) in the current Carnegie-Ames-Stanford-Approach (CASA) model still requires considerable inputs from ground meteorological data and many soil parameters, here we present a modified CASA model by introducing the land-surface water index (LSWI) and scaled precipitation to model the vegetation net primary productivity (NPP) in the arid and semiarid climate of the Mongolian Plateau. The field-observed NPP data and a previously proposed model (the Yu-CASA model) were used to evaluate the performance of our LSWI-based CASA model. The results show that the NPP predicted by both the LSWI-based CASA model and the Yu-CASA model showed good agreement with the observed NPP in the grassland ecosystems in the study area, with coefficients of determination of 0.717 and 0.714, respectively. The LSWI-based CASA model also performed comparably with the Yu-CASA model at both biome and per-pixel scales when keeping other inputs unchanged, with a difference of approximately 16 g C in the growing-season total NPP and an average value of 2.3 g C bias for each month. This indicates that, unlike an earlier method that estimated MSC based entirely on climatic variables or a soil moisture model, the method proposed here simplifies the model structure, reduces the need for ground measurements, and can provide results comparable with those from earlier models. The LSWI-based CASA model is potentially an alternative method for modelling NPP for a wide range of vegetation types in the Mongolian Plateau.

  14. Dma1-dependent degradation of SIN proteins during meiosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Krapp, Andrea; Simanis, Viesturs

    2014-07-15

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe septation initiation network (SIN) is required for cytokinesis during vegetative growth and for spore formation during meiosis. Regulation of the SIN during mitosis has been studied extensively, but less is known about its meiotic regulation. Here, we show that several aspects of SIN regulation differ between mitosis and meiosis. First, the presence of GTP-bound Spg1p is not the main determinant of the timing of Cdc7p and Sid1p association with the spindle pole body (SPB) during meiosis. Second, the localisation dependencies of SIN proteins differ from those in mitotic cells, suggesting a modified functional organisation of the SIN during meiosis. Third, there is stage-specific degradation of SIN components in meiosis; Byr4p is degraded after meiosis I, whereas the degradation of Cdc7p, Cdc11p and Sid4p occurs after the second meiotic division and depends upon the ubiquitin ligase Dma1p. Finally, Dma1p-dependent degradation is not restricted to the SIN, as we show that Dma1p is needed for the degradation of Mcp6p (also known as Hrs1p) during meiosis I. Taken together, these data suggest that stage-specific targeted proteolysis plays an important role in regulating meiotic progression.

  15. Ceramic Technology Project database: September 1990 summary report. [SiC, SiN, whisker-reinforced SiN, ZrO-toughened aluminas, zirconias, joints

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-06-01

    Data generated within the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) represent a valuable resource for both research and industry. The CTP database was created to provide easy access to this information in electronic and hardcopy forms by using a computerized database and by issuing periodic hardcopy reports on the database contents. This report is the sixth in a series of semiannual database summaries and covers recent additions to the database, including joined brazed specimen test data. It covers 1 SiC, 34 SiN, 10 whisker-reinforced SiN, 2 zirconia-toughened aluminas, 8 zirconias, and 34 joints.

  16. Distinct requirements for Sin3a in perinatal male gonocytes and differentiating spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Shannon J; Kofman, Amber E; Huszar, Jessica M; Dannenberg, Jan-Hermen; DePinho, Ronald A; Braun, Robert E; Payne, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin modifier Swi-independent 3a (SIN3A), together with associated histone deacetylases, influences gene expression during development and differentiation through a variety of transcription factors in a cell-specific manner. Sin3a is essential for the maintenance of inner cell mass cells of mouse blastocysts, embryonic fibroblasts, and myoblasts, but is not required for the survival of trophectoderm or Sertoli cells. To better understand how this transcriptional regulator modulates cells at different developmental stages within a single lineage, we used conditional gene targeting in mice to ablate Sin3a from perinatal quiescent male gonocytes and from postnatal differentiating spermatogonia. Mitotic germ cells expressing stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8 (Stra8) that lacked Sin3a exhibited increased DNA damage and apoptosis, yet collectively progressed through meiosis and spermiogenesis and generated epididymal sperm at approximately 50% of control levels, sufficient for normal fertility. In contrast, perinatal gonocytes lacking Sin3a underwent rapid depletion that coincided with cell cycle reentry, exhibiting 2.5-fold increased histone H3 phosphorylation upon cycling that suggested a prophase/metaphase block; germ cells were almost entirely absent two weeks after birth, resulting in sterility. Gene expression profiling of neonatal testes containing Sin3a-deleted gonocytes identified upregulated transcripts highly associated with developmental processes and pattern formation, and downregulated transcripts involved in nuclear receptor activity, including Nr4a1 (Nur77). Interestingly, Nr4a1 levels were elevated in testes containing Stra8-expressing, Sin3a-deleted spermatogonia. SIN3A directly binds to the Nr4a1 promoter, and Nr4a1 expression is diminished upon spermatogonial differentiation in vitro. We conclude that within the male germline, Sin3a is required for the mitotic reentry of gonocytes, but is dispensable for the maintenance of differentiating

  17. Radon Outgassing in the Casa Diablo Region, Long Valley Caldera, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adarkwah, N.; Cuff, K.

    2003-12-01

    A radon outgassing survey has been conducted in the Casa Diablo region of the Long Valley Caldera. The Long Valley Caldera (LVC) is an active volcanic system situated along the eastern front of the Sierra Nevada mountain range in east-central California. The survey was centered in an area .4 km northwest of the Casa Diablo geothermal power plant, located along the southwestern-most rim of the caldera?s resurgent dome. Results from previous radon emission studies in LVC indicate that high degrees of outgassing occur in association with relatively narrow networks of unsealed fractures (Cuff, et al., 2000 and Hoyos, et al., 2001). These fracture networks act as pathways for radon and other gases generated at depth as they migrate toward the surface. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether or not a relationship exists between radon emissions in the current survey area and that in a previously surveyed area approximately .8 km west of the geothermal plant. To accomplish this, we measured radon concentration in soil-gas at 35 separate sites. These sites were located within a 140 by 100 meter grid, with 20 meter spacing between each sample site. A radon outgassing map was then created using measured concentration values along with longitude and latitude values for each sample location. Geologic maps of the area were also analyzed and compared with radon outgassing maps. Analysis of these maps indicates that radon outgassing occurs through a set of crisscrossing fractures, trending southwest-northeast and northwest-southeast respectively. The northwest trending fractures are related to mapped normal faults in the area, while those with a southwest-northeast orientation are associated with an unmapped zone of faulting that is roughly perpendicular to the other faults. The latter set of fractures has a trend similar to that discovered in the previously surveyed area to the west. In both areas the highest readings were in excess of three times background

  18. Casas Maternas in the Rural Highlands of Guatemala: A Mixed-Methods Case Study of the Introduction and Utilization of Birthing Facilities by an Indigenous Population

    PubMed Central

    Stollak, Ira; Valdez, Mario; Rivas, Karin; Perry, Henry

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: An international NGO, with financial and managerial support from “partner” communities, established Casas Maternas (birthing facilities) in 3 municipalities in the isolated northwestern highlands of the department of Huehuetenango in Guatemala—an area with high maternal mortality ratio (338 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births). Traditional birth attendants are encouraged to bring patients for delivery at the Casas Maternas, where trained staff are present and access to referral care is facilitated. Methods: We conducted a mixed-methods study in San Sebastian Coatán municipality to assess the contribution of 2 Casas Maternas to health facility deliveries among partner and non-partner communities, with particular emphasis on equity in access. We surveyed all women who delivered in the study area between April 2013 and March 2014, the first full year in which both Casas Maternas in the study area were operating. In addition, using purposive sampling, we conducted in-depth interviews with 22 women who delivered and 6 focus group discussions with 42 community leaders, traditional birth attendants, and Casas Maternas staff members. We analyzed the quantitative data using descriptive statstics and the qualitative data with descriptive content analysis. Results: Of the 321 women eligible for inclusion in the study, we surveyed 275 women (14.3% could not be located or refused to participate). Between April 2013 and March 2014, 70% of women living in partner communities delivered in a health facility (54% in a Casa Materna) compared with 30% of women living in non-partner communities (17% in a Casa Materna). There was no statistically significant difference in uptake of the Casa Materna by maternal education and only a weak effect by household wealth. In contrast, distance from the Casa Materna had a pronounced effect. Traditional birth attendants were strong advocates for utilization of the Casa Materna and played an important role in the

  19. Performance analysis of device-level SINS/ACFSS deeply integrated navigation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Qin, Shiqiao; Wang, Xingshu; Jiang, Guangwen; Tan, Wenfeng

    2016-10-01

    The Strap-Down Inertial Navigation System (SINS) is a widely used navigation system. The combination of SINS and the Celestial Navigation System (CNS) is one of the popular measures to constitute the integrated navigation system. A Star Sensor (SS) is used as a precise attitude determination device in CNS. To solve the problem that the star image obtained by SS under dynamic conditions is motion-blurred, the Attitude Correlated Frames (ACF) is presented and the star sensor which works based on ACF approach is named ACFSS. Depending on the ACF approach, a novel device-level SINS/ACFSS deeply integrated navigation method is proposed in this paper. Feedback to the ACF process from the error of the gyro is one of the typical characters of the SINS/CNS deeply integrated navigation method. Herein, simulation results have verified its validity and efficiency in improving the accuracy of gyro and it can be proved that this method is feasible in theory.

  20. Analysis of production and reservoir performance at the CASA Diablo geothermal project

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Richard J.; Vasquez, Rosalinda

    1988-01-01

    The Mammoth-Pacific geothermal project at Casa Diablo has been in production since January, 1985. The plant generates 7-8 MW of electric power using a binary system supplied by geothermal fluid production from four wells that produce about 3500 GPM of 340º F, low salinity geothermal fluid. The wells produce from a fault/fracture system that is apparently continually recharged from a deep "reservoir" with no significant drawdown in pressure or decline in flow rate over the 2 year period. Prior to the start of production a series of well tests were conducted to determine the pumped flow capacity of the original four wells and to determine reservoir properties from pressured drawdown and build-up analysis. Since the start of operations a continuous record of production rate, flowing bottom-hole pressure, and temperature has been maintained. The well tests and production records have been evaluated to determine the nature of the reservoir and reservoir permeability and other properties. This paper presents the results of that evaluation.

  1. Carbon Management and Decision Support Systems for the CASA Ecosystem Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klooster, S.; Potter, C.; Fladeland, M.; Genovese, V.; Kramer, M.

    2003-12-01

    Ecosystem modeling and satellite remote sensing can link human activities such as land use change and forest management to the spatial distribution of carbon pools and fluxes at regional scales. The main objectives of this research and application are to: 1) evaluate major forest and agricultural sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide in the U. S. using NASA EOS satellite data and ecosystem modeling, 2) support the U. S. Government interagency program for registration of voluntary greenhouse gas emissions reductions under section 1605(b) of the 1992 Energy Policy Act, and 3) develop an internet-based decision support system (DSS) of carbon sequestration in U. S. ecosystems for users nationwide. We report on the first results of this DSS to assess the impacts of forest stand age on potential carbon sequestration, as predicted by the CASA (Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach) biosphere model. Estimates of carbon storage in woody plant pools are compared before and after adjustment for management of stand age based on U. S. Forest Service map products. These predictions of historical forest carbon storage are subsequently compared to the potential annual increment of ecosystem carbon gain or loss under conditions of future climate variation.

  2. Sin(x)**2 + cos(x)**2 = 1. [programming identities using comparative combinatorial substitutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoutemyer, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    Attempts to achieve tasteful automatic employment of the identities sin sq x + cos sq x = 1 and cos sq h x -sin sq h x = 1 in a manner which truly minimizes the complexity of the resulting expression are described. The disappointments of trigonometric reduction, trigonometric expansion, pattern matching, Poisson series, and Demoivre's theorem are related. The advantages of using the method of comparative combinatorial substitutions are illustrated.

  3. People Who Have Committed a Certain Sin Ought to Be Dead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenaars, Antoon A.

    2006-01-01

    People who have committed a certain sin ought to be dead; I am a person who has committed that sin; therefore, I ought to be dead. Thus is the logic of a suicidal mind. Lester, Szaz, and others argue the "sinner" should always be allowed to kill him/herself. Shneidman, Leenaars and others do not agree. Once one knows the suicidal mind, it is easy…

  4. Pits, a protein interacting with Ttk69 and Sin3A, has links to histone deacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, Gwo-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylation plays an important role in transcriptional repression. Previous results showed that the genetic interaction between ttk and rpd3, which encodes a class I histone deacetylase, is required for tll repression. This study investigated the molecular mechanism by which Ttk69 recruits Rpd3. Using yeast two-hybrid screening and datamining, one novel protein was found that weakly interacts with Ttk69 and Sin3A, designated as Protein interacting with Ttk69 and Sin3A (Pits). Pits protein expressed in the early stages of embryos and bound to the region of the tor response element in vivo. Expanded tll expression patterns were observed in embryos lacking maternal pits activity and the expansion was not widened by reducing either maternal ttk or sin3A activity. However, in embryos with simultaneously reduced maternal pits and sin3A activities or maternal pits, sin3A and ttk activities, the proportions of the embryos with expanded tll expression were significantly increased. These results indicate that all three gene activities are involved in tll repression. Level of histone H3 acetylation in the tll proximal region was found to be elevated in embryo with reduced these three gene activities. In conclusion, Ttk69 causes the histone deacetylation-mediated repression of tll via the interaction of Pits and Sin3A. PMID:27622813

  5. Pits, a protein interacting with Ttk69 and Sin3A, has links to histone deacetylation.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Gwo-Jen

    2016-09-13

    Histone deacetylation plays an important role in transcriptional repression. Previous results showed that the genetic interaction between ttk and rpd3, which encodes a class I histone deacetylase, is required for tll repression. This study investigated the molecular mechanism by which Ttk69 recruits Rpd3. Using yeast two-hybrid screening and datamining, one novel protein was found that weakly interacts with Ttk69 and Sin3A, designated as Protein interacting with Ttk69 and Sin3A (Pits). Pits protein expressed in the early stages of embryos and bound to the region of the tor response element in vivo. Expanded tll expression patterns were observed in embryos lacking maternal pits activity and the expansion was not widened by reducing either maternal ttk or sin3A activity. However, in embryos with simultaneously reduced maternal pits and sin3A activities or maternal pits, sin3A and ttk activities, the proportions of the embryos with expanded tll expression were significantly increased. These results indicate that all three gene activities are involved in tll repression. Level of histone H3 acetylation in the tll proximal region was found to be elevated in embryo with reduced these three gene activities. In conclusion, Ttk69 causes the histone deacetylation-mediated repression of tll via the interaction of Pits and Sin3A.

  6. Widespread Collaboration of Isw2 and Sin3-Rpd3 Chromatin Remodeling Complexes in Transcriptional Repression

    PubMed Central

    Fazzio, Thomas G.; Kooperberg, Charles; Goldmark, Jesse P.; Neal, Cassandra; Basom, Ryan; Delrow, Jeffrey; Tsukiyama, Toshio

    2001-01-01

    The yeast Isw2 chromatin remodeling complex functions in parallel with the Sin3-Rpd3 histone deacetylase complex to repress early meiotic genes upon recruitment by Ume6p. For many of these genes, the effect of an isw2 mutation is partially masked by a functional Sin3-Rpd3 complex. To identify the full range of genes repressed or activated by these factors and uncover hidden targets of Isw2-dependent regulation, we performed full genome expression analyses using cDNA microarrays. We find that the Isw2 complex functions mainly in repression of transcription in a parallel pathway with the Sin3-Rpd3 complex. In addition to Ume6 target genes, we find that many Ume6-independent genes are derepressed in mutants lacking functional Isw2 and Sin3-Rpd3 complexes. Conversely, we find that ume6 mutants, but not isw2 sin3 or isw2 rpd3 double mutants, have reduced fidelity of mitotic chromosome segregation, suggesting that one or more functions of Ume6p are independent of Sin3-Rpd3 and Isw2 complexes. Chromatin structure analyses of two nonmeiotic genes reveals increased DNase I sensitivity within their regulatory regions in an isw2 mutant, as seen previously for one meiotic locus. These data suggest that the Isw2 complex functions at Ume6-dependent and -independent loci to create DNase I-inaccessible chromatin structure by regulating the positioning or placement of nucleosomes. PMID:11533234

  7. AUV Positioning Method Based on Tightly Coupled SINS/LBL for Underwater Acoustic Multipath Propagation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Shi, Hongfei; Chen, Liping; Li, Yao; Tong, Jinwu

    2016-03-11

    This paper researches an AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) positioning method based on SINS (Strapdown Inertial Navigation System)/LBL (Long Base Line) tightly coupled algorithm. This algorithm mainly includes SINS-assisted searching method of optimum slant-range of underwater acoustic propagation multipath, SINS/LBL tightly coupled model and multi-sensor information fusion algorithm. Fuzzy correlation peak problem of underwater LBL acoustic propagation multipath could be solved based on SINS positional information, thus improving LBL positional accuracy. Moreover, introduction of SINS-centered LBL locating information could compensate accumulative AUV position error effectively and regularly. Compared to loosely coupled algorithm, this tightly coupled algorithm can still provide accurate location information when there are fewer than four available hydrophones (or within the signal receiving range). Therefore, effective positional calibration area of tightly coupled system based on LBL array is wider and has higher reliability and fault tolerance than loosely coupled. It is more applicable to AUV positioning based on SINS/LBL.

  8. Specific requirement of the chromatin modifier mSin3B in cell cycle exit and cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    David, Gregory; Grandinetti, Kathryn B; Finnerty, Patricia M; Simpson, Natalie; Chu, Gerald C; Depinho, Ronald A

    2008-03-18

    The Sin3-histone deacetylase (HDAC) corepressor complex is conserved from yeast to humans. Mammals possess two highly related Sin3 proteins, mSin3A and mSin3B, which serve as scaffolds tethering HDAC enzymatic activity, and numerous sequence-specific transcription factors to enable local chromatin regulation at specific gene targets. Despite broad overlapping expression of mSin3A and mSin3B, mSin3A is cell-essential and vital for early embryonic development. Here, genetic disruption of mSin3B reveals a very different phenotype characterized by the survival of cultured cells and lethality at late stages of embryonic development with defective differentiation of multiple lineages-phenotypes that are strikingly reminiscent of those associated with loss of retinoblastoma family members or E2F transcriptional repressors. Additionally, we observe that, whereas mSin3B(-/-) cells cycle normally under standard growth conditions, they show an impaired ability to exit the cell cycle with limiting growth factors. Correspondingly, mSin3B interacts physically with the promoters of known E2F target genes, and its deficiency is associated with derepression of these gene targets in vivo. Together, these results reveal a critical role for mSin3B in the control of cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation in mammals and establish contrasting roles for the mSin3 proteins in the growth and development of specific lineages.

  9. Opposite side jet charge tagging and measurement of CP asymmetry parameter $\\sin_{2\\beta}$ at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojian

    2004-01-01

    This dissertation describes the first CP asymmetry parameter sin(2β) measurement by the DO collaboration, sing the opposite side jet charge tagging algorithm in determining B-flavor. The time integrated measurement yields sin(2β) = 0.82 ± 1.80, and the time dependent measurement gives sin(2β) = 1.80 ± 1.15.

  10. Deformation near the Casa Diablo geothermal well field and related processes Long Valley caldera, Eastern California, 1993-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howle, J.F.; Langbein, J.O.; Farrar, C.D.; Wilkinson, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    Regional first-order leveling lines, which extend from Lee Vining, CA, to Tom's Place, CA, have been surveyed periodically since 1957 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Geodetic Survey (NGS), and Caltrans. Two of the regional survey lines, or leveling networks, intersect at the Casa Diablo geothermal well field. These leveling networks, referenced to a distant bench mark (C916) near Lee Vining, provide time-series vertical control data of land-surface deformation that began around 1980. These data are also useful for delineating localized subsidence at Casa Diablo related to reservoir pressure and temperature changes owing to geothermal development that began in 1985. A comparison of differences in bench-mark elevations for five time periods between 1983 and 1997 shows the development and expansion of a subsidence bowl at Casa Diablo. The subsidence coincides spatially with the geothermal well field and temporally with the increased production rates and the deepening of injection wells in 1991, which resulted in an increase in the rate of pressure decline. The subsidence, superimposed on a broad area of uplift, totaled about 310 mm by 1997. The USGS established orthogonal tilt arrays in 1983 to better monitor deformation across the caldera. One tilt array (DBR) was established near what would later become the Casa Diablo geothermal well field. This array responded to magmatic intrusions prior to geothermal development, tilting away from the well field. With the start of geothermal fluid extraction in 1985, tilt at the DBR array reversed direction and began tilting into the well field. In 1991, geothermal power production was increased by a factor of four, and reservoir pressures began a period of steep decline. These changes caused a temporary three-fold increase in the tilt rate. The tilt rate became stable in 1993 and was about 40% lower than that measured in 1991-1992, but still greater than the rates measured during 1985-1990. Data from the

  11. First-principles study on the structural, elastic and electronic properties of Ti2SiN under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Zhenjun; Sun, Guodong; Yu, Pengfei; Zhang, Wenxue

    2016-07-01

    The structural, elastic and electronic properties of Ti2SiN under pressure range of 0-50 GPa have been systemically investigated by first-principles calculations. It is found that both Poisson's ratio and shear anisotropy factor of Ti2SiN increase with pressure, and Ti2SiN is elastic anisotropic. The DOS and Mulliken population analysis have been explored, which indicts that Ti2SiN is metallic-covalent-ionic in nature. The present calculations may contribute preliminary results and a better understanding of Ti2SiN for its applications under high pressure environments.

  12. Roles for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SDS3, CBK1 and HYM1 genes in transcriptional repression by SIN3.

    PubMed Central

    Dorland, S; Deegenaars, M L; Stillman, D J

    2000-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sin3 transcriptional repressor is part of a large multiprotein complex that includes the Rpd3 histone deacetylase. A LexA-Sin3 fusion protein represses transcription of promoters with LexA binding sites. To identify genes involved in repression by Sin3, we conducted a screen for mutations that reduce repression by LexA-Sin3. One of the mutations identified that reduces LexA-Sin3 repression is in the RPD3 gene, consistent with the known roles of Rpd3 in transcriptional repression. Mutations in CBK1 and HYM1 reduce repression by LexA-Sin3 and also cause defects in cell separation and altered colony morphology. cbk1 and hym1 mutations affect some but not all genes regulated by SIN3 and RPD3, but the effect on transcription is much weaker. Genetic analysis suggests that CBK1 and HYM1 function in the same pathway, but this genetic pathway is separable from that of SIN3 and RPD3. The remaining gene from this screen described in this report is SDS3, previously identified in a screen for mutations that increase silencing at HML, HMR, and telomere-linked genes, a phenotype also seen in sin3 and rpd3 mutants. Genetic analysis demonstrates that SDS3 functions in the same genetic pathway as SIN3 and RPD3, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments show that Sds3 is physically present in the Sin3 complex. PMID:10655212

  13. sinI- and expR-dependent quorum sensing in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mengsheng; Chen, Hancai; Eberhard, Anatol; Gronquist, Matthew R; Robinson, Jayne B; Rolfe, Barry G; Bauer, Wolfgang D

    2005-12-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) in Sinorhizobium meliloti, the N-fixing bacterial symbiont of Medicago host plants, involves at least half a dozen different N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals and perhaps an equal number of AHL receptors. The accumulation of 55 proteins was found to be dependent on SinI, the AHL synthase, and/or on ExpR, one of the AHL receptors. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry identified 3-oxo-C(14)-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C(14)-HSL), C(16)-HSL, 3-oxo-C(16)-HSL, C(16:1)-HSL, and 3-oxo-C(16:1)-HSL as the sinI-dependent AHL QS signals accumulated by the 8530 expR(+) strain under the conditions used for proteome analysis. The 8530 expR(+) strain secretes additional, unidentified QS-active compounds. Addition of 200 nM C(14)-HSL or C(16:1)-HSL, two of the known SinI AHLs, affected the levels of 75% of the proteins, confirming that their accumulation is QS regulated. A number of the QS-regulated proteins have functions plausibly related to symbiotic interactions with the host, including ExpE6, IdhA, MocB, Gor, PckA, LeuC, and AglE. Seven of 10 single-crossover beta-glucuronidase (GUS) transcriptional reporters in genes corresponding to QS-regulated proteins showed significantly different activities in the sinI and expR mutant backgrounds and in response to added SinI AHLs. The sinI mutant and several of the single-crossover strains were significantly delayed in the ability to initiate nodules on the primary root of the host plant, Medicago truncatula, indicating that sinI-dependent QS regulation and QS-regulated proteins contribute importantly to the rate or efficiency of nodule initiation. The sinI and expR mutants were also defective in surface swarming motility. The sinI mutant was restored to normal swarming by 5 nM C(16:1)-HSL.

  14. SinEx DB: a database for single exon coding sequences in mammalian genomes.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Roddy; Ortiz, Rodrigo; Ossandon, F; Cárdenas, Juan Pablo; Sepúlveda, Rene; González, Carolina; Holmes, David S

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes are typically interrupted by intragenic, noncoding sequences termed introns. However, some genes lack introns in their coding sequence (CDS) and are generally known as 'single exon genes' (SEGs). In this work, a SEG is defined as a nuclear, protein-coding gene that lacks introns in its CDS. Whereas, many public databases of Eukaryotic multi-exon genes are available, there are only two specialized databases for SEGs. The present work addresses the need for a more extensive and diverse database by creating SinEx DB, a publicly available, searchable database of predicted SEGs from 10 completely sequenced mammalian genomes including human. SinEx DB houses the DNA and protein sequence information of these SEGs and includes their functional predictions (KOG) and the relative distribution of these functions within species. The information is stored in a relational database built with My SQL Server 5.1.33 and the complete dataset of SEG sequences and their functional predictions are available for downloading. SinEx DB can be interrogated by: (i) a browsable phylogenetic schema, (ii) carrying out BLAST searches to the in-house SinEx DB of SEGs and (iii) via an advanced search mode in which the database can be searched by key words and any combination of searches by species and predicted functions. SinEx DB provides a rich source of information for advancing our understanding of the evolution and function of SEGs.Database URL: www.sinex.cl.

  15. SinEx DB: a database for single exon coding sequences in mammalian genomes

    PubMed Central

    Jorquera, Roddy; Ortiz, Rodrigo; Ossandon, F.; Cárdenas, Juan Pablo; Sepúlveda, Rene; González, Carolina; Holmes, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes are typically interrupted by intragenic, noncoding sequences termed introns. However, some genes lack introns in their coding sequence (CDS) and are generally known as ‘single exon genes’ (SEGs). In this work, a SEG is defined as a nuclear, protein-coding gene that lacks introns in its CDS. Whereas, many public databases of Eukaryotic multi-exon genes are available, there are only two specialized databases for SEGs. The present work addresses the need for a more extensive and diverse database by creating SinEx DB, a publicly available, searchable database of predicted SEGs from 10 completely sequenced mammalian genomes including human. SinEx DB houses the DNA and protein sequence information of these SEGs and includes their functional predictions (KOG) and the relative distribution of these functions within species. The information is stored in a relational database built with My SQL Server 5.1.33 and the complete dataset of SEG sequences and their functional predictions are available for downloading. SinEx DB can be interrogated by: (i) a browsable phylogenetic schema, (ii) carrying out BLAST searches to the in-house SinEx DB of SEGs and (iii) via an advanced search mode in which the database can be searched by key words and any combination of searches by species and predicted functions. SinEx DB provides a rich source of information for advancing our understanding of the evolution and function of SEGs. Database URL: www.sinex.cl PMID:27278816

  16. A Positive Feedback Loop between Akt and mTORC2 via SIN1 Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Murashige, Danielle S; Humphrey, Sean J; James, David E

    2015-08-11

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) regulates cell survival and cytoskeletal organization by phosphorylating its AGC kinase substrates; however, little is known about the regulation of mTORC2 itself. It was previously reported that Akt phosphorylates the mTORC2 subunit SIN1 at T86, activating mTORC2 through a positive feedback loop, though another study reported that S6K phosphorylates SIN1 at the same site, inhibiting mTORC2 activity. We performed extensive analysis of SIN1 phosphorylation upon inhibition of Akt, S6K, and mTOR under diverse cellular contexts, and we found that, in all cell lines and conditions studied, Akt is the major kinase responsible for SIN1 phosphorylation. These findings refine the activation mechanism of the Akt-mTORC2 signaling branch as follows: PDK1 phosphorylates Akt at T308, increasing Akt kinase activity. Akt phosphorylates SIN1 at T86, enhancing mTORC2 kinase activity, which leads to phosphorylation of Akt S473 by mTORC2, thereby catalyzing full activation of Akt.

  17. 76 FR 37820 - Proyecto Informar: Food and Drug Administration Hispanic Outreach Initiative (U01)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Proyecto Informar: Food and Drug Administration Hispanic Outreach Initiative (U01) AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and... cooperative agreement for the National Alliance for Hispanic Health. The goal of the Food and...

  18. James Monroe High School Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes, 1986-1987. OEA Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Ana L.; And Others

    In its second year of Title VII funding, James Monroe High Schools's Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes (Project New Horizons) served 344 limited-English-speaking recent arrivals from Latin America and the Caribbean, in grades 9 through 12. The program has built on the strengths of the high school's extensive computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program,…

  19. James Monroe High School Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes, 1985-1986. OEA Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes, a 3-year Title VII-funded bilingual education program, serves 287 Spanish speaking students at James Monroe High School (Bronx, New York). This report evaluates the project's first year of operation, 1985-86. The report contains an introduction describing the school and project goals; information on student…

  20. Monitoring ground-surface heating during expansion of the Casa Diablo production well field at Mammoth Lakes, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergfeld, D.; Vaughan, R. Greg; Evans, William C.; Olsen, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The Long Valley hydrothermal system supports geothermal power production from 3 binary plants (Casa Diablo) near the town of Mammoth Lakes, California. Development and growth of thermal ground at sites west of Casa Diablo have created concerns over planned expansion of a new well field and the associated increases in geothermal fluid production. To ensure that all areas of ground heating are identified prior to new geothermal development, we obtained high-resolution aerial thermal infrared imagery across the region. The imagery covers the existing and proposed well fields and part of the town of Mammoth Lakes. Imagery results from a predawn flight on Oct. 9, 2014 readily identified the Shady Rest thermal area (SRST), one of two large areas of ground heating west of Casa Diablo, as well as other known thermal areas smaller in size. Maximum surface temperatures at 3 thermal areas were 26–28 °C. Numerous small areas with ground temperatures >16 °C were also identified and slated for field investigations in summer 2015. Some thermal anomalies in the town of Mammoth Lakes clearly reflect human activity.Previously established projects to monitor impacts from geothermal power production include yearly surveys of soil temperatures and diffuse CO2 emissions at SRST, and less regular surveys to collect samples from fumaroles and gas vents across the region. Soil temperatures at 20 cm depth at SRST are well correlated with diffuse CO2 flux, and both parameters show little variation during the 2011–14 field surveys. Maximum temperatures were between 55–67 °C and associated CO2 discharge was around 12–18 tonnes per day. The carbon isotope composition of CO2 is fairly uniform across the area ranging between –3.7 to –4.4 ‰. The gas composition of the Shady Rest fumarole however has varied with time, and H2S concentrations in the gas have been increasing since 2009.

  1. Vegetation NPP distribution based on MODIS data and CASA model: a case study in the Haihe River Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Gan, Hong; Zhou, Caiping; Zhang, Haitao; Lin, Chao; Zhu, Qilin

    2008-03-01

    Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is one of the most important sensors onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites and can be used in observing the air, the sea and the land quickly, timely and multi-temporally, which makes it an attractive and powerful tool for ecosystem pattern and process study. Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CASA) model is one of the most quick, convenient and accurate models to estimate the NPP (Net Primary Productivity) of vegetation. In this paper, the estimation and analysis of spatial and temporal distribution of vegetation NPP of the Haihe River Basin, the most man-interfered area in China, was made by using the CASA model based on the data of MODIS sensor onboard on the Terra satellites from the beginning of 2000 (the first year of delivering data) to the end of 2006. The result shows that the total NPP of the study area ranged from 1.25 × 10 14 to 1.54 × 10 14 gC/a during 2000 to 2006. The crop yields measured in the study area and the NPP value of the agriculture area from the CASA model were compared for testing the model's applicability in this study. The testing result shows that the NPP forecasted by using MODIS data and CASA model is acceptable. The NPP of the study area in all the years accumulated mainly from May to September, in which the maximum NPP appears in July and in August. The average NPP of the seven years of the main four vegetation types varied differently: values of two ripe crops a year or three ripe crops two years (519 gC/m2•a) > value of temperate deciduous shrub (428 gC/m2•a) > value of crop of one ripe a year and value of cold tolerating economic crop (293 gC/m2•a) > value of temperate grassland (195 gC/m2•a). From the results of the time series, it shows that the NPP varied irregularly with the time, but the NPP of all vegetation types in 2001 is lower than those in any other years. It relates to the drought climate in 2000 and 2001.

  2. Characterization of Si-N films prepared by reactive ion beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Ashok, S.; Fonash, S. J.

    1982-05-01

    Application of silicon-nitride (Si-N) as a passivant in com-pound semiconductor technology requires a low-temperature deposition process to prevent dissociation of the volatile constituents of the semiconductor. With this in mind, an exploratory study of Si-N films prepared at room temperature using low-energy, reactive ion-beam sputtering has been carried out. The electrical and optical characteristics of the films have been studied, and an annealing step is found necessary to reduce the conductivity of the nitride and im-prove the interfacial properties.

  3. Measurement of sin 2β with hadronic and previously unused muonic J/ψ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Ford, K.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Morgan, S. E.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Kelly, M. P.; Latham, T. E.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Shen, B. C.; del Re, D.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Abe, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Chen, S.; Clark, P. J.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; Legendre, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Grenier, P.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Azzolini, V.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Won, E.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Gaillard, J. R.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Taylor, G. P.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Biasini, M.; Pioppi, M.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flack, R. L.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Hart, P. A.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Cote-Ahern, D.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Raven, G.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Pulliam, T.; Wong, Q. K.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; T'jampens, S.; Therin, G.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Behera, P. K.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; del Gamba, V.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Cavoto, G.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Tanaka, H. A.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Meyer, T. I.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Saleem, M.; Wappler, F. R.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2004-03-01

    We report a measurement of the CP-violation parameter sin 2β with B0→J/ψK0S decays in which the J/ψ decays to hadrons or to muons that do not satisfy our standard identification criteria. With a sample of 88 million BB¯ events collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC, we reconstruct 100±17 such events, with J/ψ→π+π-π0 being the most prevalent, and measure sin 2β=1.56±0.42(stat)±0.21(syst).

  4. Plasmid-amplified comS enhances genetic competence and suppresses sinR in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Nakano, M M; Lee, O H; Zuber, P

    1996-09-01

    The establishment of genetic competence in Bacillus subtilis is controlled by a vast signal transduction network involving the products of genes that function in several postexponential-phase processes. Two of these proteins, SinR and DegU, serve as molecular switches that influence a cell's decision to undergo either sporulation or genetic competence development. In order to determine the roles of SinR and DegU in competence control, multicopy suppression experiments with plasmid-amplified comS, SinR, and degU genes were undertaken. Multicopy comS was found to elevate competence gene transcription and transformation efficiency in both wild-type and sinR mutant cells but not in degU mutant cells. Multicopy degU failed to suppress comS or sinR mutations. No suppression of comS or degU by multicopy sinR was observed. The expression of a comS'::'lacZ translational fusion and srf-lacZ operon fusion was examined in sinR cells and cells bearing plasmid-amplified sinR. The expression of comS'::'lacZ gene fusion was reduced by the sinR mutation, but both comS'::'lacZ and srf-lacZ were repressed by multicopy sinR. Cells bearing plasmid-amplified sinR were poorly competent. These results suggest that sinR is required for optimal comS expression but not transcription from the srf promoter and that SinR at high concentrations represses srf transcription initiation.

  5. [Santa Casa de Misericórdia and hygienist policies in Belém do Pará in the late nineteenth century].

    PubMed

    Miranda, Cybelle Salvador; Beltrão, Jane Felipe; Henrique, Márcio Couto; Bessa, Brena Tavares

    2015-01-01

    The article analyzes the relationship between hygienist policies in effect in Belém in the late nineteenth century and the expansion of activities of the Santa Casa de Misericórdia do Pará. Considered one of the first hospital institutions in the former Grão-Pará Province, in addition to its own hospital, the Brotherhood administered several other health facilities in the capital, and the study of its physical displacement made it possible to "map" three health centers in Belém: Pioneer, Expansion and the Santa Casa, which reinforce the growth vectors of the city. The expansion of its activities is configured as the expansion of the Santa Casa de Misericórdia to serve the underprivileged and sick, preceding the establishment of a public health system in Pará.

  6. [Santa Casa de Misericórdia and hygienist policies in Belém do Pará in the late nineteenth century].

    PubMed

    Miranda, Cybelle Salvador; Beltrão, Jane Felipe; Henrique, Márcio Couto; Bessa, Brena Tavares

    2015-03-20

    The article analyzes the relationship between hygienist policies in effect in Belém in the late nineteenth century and the expansion of activities of the Santa Casa de Misericórdia do Pará. Considered one of the first hospital institutions in the former Grão-Pará Province, in addition to its own hospital, the Brotherhood administered several other health facilities in the capital, and the study of its physical displacement made it possible to "map" three health centers in Belém: Pioneer, Expansion and the Santa Casa, which reinforce the growth vectors of the city. The expansion of its activities is configured as the expansion of the Santa Casa de Misericórdia to serve the underprivileged and sick, preceding the establishment of a public health system in Pará.

  7. The Aspergillus fumigatus metacaspases CasA and CasB facilitate growth under conditions of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Richie, Daryl L; Miley, Michael D; Bhabhra, Ruchi; Robson, Geoffrey D; Rhodes, Judith C; Askew, David S

    2007-01-01

    We have examined the contribution of metacaspases to the growth and stress response of the opportunistic human mould pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, based on increasing evidence implicating the yeast metacaspase Yca1p in apoptotic-like programmed cell death. Single metacaspase-deficient mutants were constructed by targeted disruption of each of the two metacaspase genes in A. fumigatus, casA and casB, and a metacaspase-deficient mutant, DeltacasA/DeltacasB, was constructed by disrupting both genes. Stationary phase cultures of wild-type A. fumigatus were associated with the appearance of typical markers of apoptosis, including elevated proteolytic activity against caspase substrates, phosphatidylserine exposure on the outer leaflet of the membrane, and loss of viability. By contrast, phosphatidylserine exposure was not observed in stationary phase cultures of the DeltacasA/DeltacasB mutant, although caspase activity and viability was indistinguishable from wild type. The mutant retained wild-type virulence and showed no difference in sensitivity to a range of pro-apoptotic stimuli that have been reported to initiate yeast apoptosis. However, the DeltacasA/DeltacasB mutant showed a growth detriment in the presence of agents that disrupt endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. These findings demonstrate that metacaspase activity in A. fumigatus contributes to the apoptotic-like loss of membrane phospholipid asymmetry at stationary phase, and suggest that CasA and CasB have functions that support growth under conditions of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  8. Development of a novel CASA system based on open source software for characterization of zebrafish sperm motility parameters.

    PubMed

    Wilson-Leedy, Jonas G; Ingermann, Rolf L

    2007-02-01

    Although computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) outperforms manual techniques, many investigators rely on non-automated analysis due to the high cost of commercial options. In this study, we have written and validated a free CASA software primarily for analysis of fish sperm. This software is a plugin for the free National Institutes of Health software ImageJ and is available with documentation at . That it is open source makes possible external validation, should improve quality control and enhance the comparative value of data obtained among laboratories. In addition, we have improved upon the traditional velocity straight line (VSL) algorithm, eliminating inaccurate characterization of highly curved fish sperm paths. Using this system, the motion of zebrafish (Danio rerio) sperm was characterized relative to time post-activation and the impact of acquisition conditions upon data analysis determined. There were decreases in velocity and path straightness (STR), but not linearity (LIN), relative to time. From 30 to 300 frames/s, frame rate significantly affected curvilinear velocity (VCL) and STR measurements. Sperm density in the field of view did not affect any measured parameter. There was significant inter-male variation for VCL, VSL, velocity average path (VAP), percent motility, path character (STR, LIN), and duration of motility. Furthermore, relative sperm output (a measure reflecting both semen volume and concentration) was positively correlated to percent motility. For all motion parameters measured (except duration), the average CV was < or =10%, comparable to values obtained using commercial systems.

  9. Modeling Studies of Carbon Cycling at the Tapajos National Forest using the NASA-CASA Ecosystem Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klooster, S.; Potter, C.; Oliveira, R.; Carvalho, C.; Kramer, M.

    2004-12-01

    The NASA-CASA model is being compared to measurements of energy, water, and carbon exchange at Tapajos National Forest (TNF) tower sites. Daily and monthly model estimates of plant water flux and soil water content, ecosystem productivity, biogeochemical processes, trace gas emissions, and net carbon sequestration are evaluated here for prediction errors and seasonal trends. High resolution (less than 1-km) land cover images for 'footprint' areas of LBA tower sites are being used to define ecosystem model estimates and validation of predictions against measured tower fluxes of carbon and water exchange. Initial model results replicate the seasonal patterns in measured NEE fluxes at km 67, and are consistent with the findings that trees in the eastern Amazon are deeply rooted and their carbon fluxes are not highly stressed during relatively dry seasonal periods. Increased woody debris from past disturbance events could increase the CASA model's predicted loss of carbon to the atmosphere (increase NEE flux). Hence, LBA ecosystem models must better account for recent changes in the forest floor and soil carbon pools at tropical forest sites, specifically those related to disturbance.

  10. Using African languages for democracy and lifelong learning in Africa: A post-2015 challenge and the work of CASAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock-Utne, Birgit; Mercer, Malcolm

    2014-12-01

    Africans speak African languages in their everyday lives while lessons in school are delivered in an exogenous language. In many places adult education is also carried out in a language the majority of people do not speak. The exogenous languages, which are the languages of the former colonial powers and mastered just by a small African elite, are used in most parliaments in Africa and in most newspapers. This problem is largely ignored by the international community. An argument often put forward against using African languages as Languages of Instruction (LOIs) is that there are so many of them, and it may be problematic to select one as an LOI. But is this really the case? And does one need to select one language? The main work of the Centre for Advanced Studies of African Society (CASAS) located in Cape Town has been to harmonise the written forms of most African languages so that these languages can be used as LOIs and as languages of government and the press. This paper examines in some detail the work undertaken by CASAS, its successes and challenges. It shows that the political process of getting the harmonised languages adopted is more difficult and unpredictable than the linguistic work itself.

  11. Estimation of aboveground net primary productivity in secondary tropical dry forests using the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford approach (CASA) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, S.; Sanchez-Azofeifa, GA; Duran, SM; Calvo-Rodriguez, S.

    2016-07-01

    Although tropical dry forests (TDFs) cover roughly 42% of all tropical ecosystems, extensive deforestation and habitat fragmentation pose important limitations for their conservation and restoration worldwide. In order to develop conservation policies for this endangered ecosystem, it is necessary to quantify their provision of ecosystems services such as carbon sequestration and primary production. In this paper we explore the potential of the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford approach (CASA) for estimating aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) in a secondary TDF located at the Santa Rosa National Park (SRNP), Costa Rica. We calculated ANPP using the CASA model (ANPPCASA) in three successional stages (early, intermediate, and late). Each stage has a stand age of 21 years, 32 years, and 50+ years, respectively, estimated as the age since land abandonment. Our results showed that the ANPPCASA for early, intermediate, and late successional stages were 3.22 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, 8.90 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, and 7.59 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, respectively, which are comparable with rates of carbon uptake in other TDFs. Our results indicate that key variables that influence ANPP in our dry forest site were stand age and precipitation seasonality. Incident photosynthetically active radiation and temperature were not dominant in the ANPPCASA. The results of this study highlight the potential of the use of remote sensing techniques and the importance of incorporating successional stage in accurate regional TDF ANPP estimation.

  12. Coupling the NASA-CASA ecosystem model with a hydrologic routing algorithm for improved water management in Yosemite National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teaby, A.; Johnson, E. R.; Griffin, M.; Carrillo, C.; Kannan, T.; Shupe, J. W.; Schmidt, C.

    2013-12-01

    Historic trends reveal extreme precipitation variability within the Yosemite National Park (YNP) geographic region. While California obtains greater than half of its annual water supply from the Sierra Nevada, snowpack, precipitation, and runoff can fluctuate between less than 50% and greater than 200% of climatological averages. Advances in hydrological modeling are crucial to improving water-use efficiency at the local, state, and national levels. The NASA Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach (CASA) is a global simulation model that combines multi-year satellite, climate, and other land surface databases to estimate biosphere-atmosphere exchange of energy, water, and trace gases from plants and soils. By coupling CASA with a Hydrological Routing Algorithm known as HYDRA, it is possible to calculate current water availability and observe hydrological trends within YNP. Satellite-derived inputs such as surface evapotranspiration, temperature, precipitation, land cover, and elevation were included to create a valuable decision support tool for YNP's water resource managers. These results will be of enhanced importance given current efforts to restore 81 miles of the Merced River within the park's boundary. Validations of model results were conducted using in situ stream gage measurements. The model accurately simulated observed streamflow values, achieving a relatively strong Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient. This geospatial assessment provides a standardized method which may be repeated in both national and international water-stressed regions.

  13. Formation of SiN Films by Plazma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Using [(CH3)2N]3SiN3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitoh, Hideyuki; Muroyama, Masakazu

    1994-12-01

    An organic source gas, tris-dimethyl-amino-silyl-azide (TDSA, [(CH3)2N]3SiN3), was newly synthesized and utilized for the deposition of a passivation film of sub-half-micrometer devices. Deposition temperature dependence of the film formed by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using TDSA was investigated and step coverage of the TDSA film was examined. As a result, it was clarified that hydrocarbon content in the film decreased with increasing deposition temperature. The bottom step coverage of the films formed using TDSA was greatly improved compared to that of the conventional silicon nitride film.

  14. Ten Sins Challenging Education in the Contemporary Global Era: A Philosophical Essay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinagatullin, Ilghiz M.

    2004-01-01

    According to this author, the modern epoch is characterized by a decrease of vital spirituality and an increase of materialistic values and virtues. This article discusses what the author views as the ten sins challenging education in the contemporary global era. These are: (1) the shrinking of spiritual values; (2) corruption; (3) sexual…

  15. How Secondary Schools Can Avoid the Seven Deadly School "Sins" of Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrell, Jamie L.

    2008-01-01

    As more students with disabilities are included in general education classrooms, many obstacles must be overcome before parents, teachers, students, and administrators deem inclusion effective. This article identifies seven "sins", which are barriers to inclusive practices in secondary schools: Negative teacher perspectives; lack of knowledge…

  16. Sin Fronteras Boy: Students Create Collaborative Websites to Explore the Border

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Grace

    2012-01-01

    Around one table, four 4th-grade girls chat quietly as they write on their laptops: Ruby interviews Alejandra about her experience crossing the U.S.-Mexico border as a 6-year-old. Meanwhile, Cindy turns notes from an interview with her uncle into a narrative about his immigration experience. Next to them, four boys work on the "Sin Fronteras…

  17. Plagiarism and Other Sins Seem Rife in Science Journals, a Digital Sleuth Finds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guterman, Lila

    2008-01-01

    Faculty members gnash their teeth and wring their hands when students plagiarize. They cry for offenders to be punished. But now an online text-search program directed at their own work suggests that professors in biomedicine may be just as guilty of paper-writing sins. More than 70,000 article abstracts appeared disturbingly similar to other…

  18. Roots of Sin and Destruction of the Religious Education in the Shia Belief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeghiyan, Mehri

    2016-01-01

    The religious Education is one of the key components of the present age detachment from which poses numerous problems for the society Islamic. One of the factors effective in the destruction of the religious Education is the roots of sin avoiding which can lead to the improvement of the religious Education of the members of the society. Thus, the…

  19. Structural and electronic properties of Si(n), Si(n)-, and PSi(n-1) clusters (2 < or = n < or = 13): Theoretical investigation based on ab initio molecular orbital theory.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Sandeep; Majumder, Chiranjib; Kulshreshtha, S K

    2006-08-21

    The geometric and electronic structures of Si(n), Si(n)-, and PSi(n-1) clusters (2 < or = n < or = 13) have been investigated using the ab initio molecular orbital theory formalism. The hybrid exchange-correlation energy functional (B3LYP) and a standard split-valence basis set with polarization functions (6-31+G(d)) were employed to optimize geometrical configurations. The total energies of the lowest energy isomers thus obtained were recalculated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. Unlike positively charged clusters, which showed similar structural behavior as that of neutral clusters [Nigam et al., J. Chem. Phys. 121, 7756 (2004)], significant geometrical changes were observed between Si(n) and Si(n)- clusters for n = 6, 8, 11, and 13. However, the geometries of P substituted silicon clusters show similar growth as that of negatively charged Si(n) clusters with small local distortions. The relative stability as a function of cluster size has been verified based on their binding energies, second difference in energy (Delta2 E), and fragmentation behavior. In general, the average binding energy of Si(n)- clusters is found to be higher than that of Si(n) clusters. For isoelectronic PSi(n-1) clusters, it is found that although for small clusters (n < 4) substitution of P atom improves the binding energy of Si(n) clusters, for larger clusters (n > or = 4) the effect is opposite. The fragmentation behavior of these clusters reveals that while small clusters prefer to evaporate monomer, the larger ones dissociate into two stable clusters of smaller size. The adiabatic electron affinities of Si(n) clusters and vertical detachment energies of Si(n)- clusters were calculated and compared with available experimental results. Finally, a good agreement between experimental and our theoretical results suggests good prediction of the lowest energy isomeric structures for all clusters calculated in the present study.

  20. Aprendiendo en Casa: Media as a Resource for Learning among Hispanic-Latino Families. A Report of the Families and Media Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, June; Barron, Brigid

    2015-01-01

    The Hispanic-Latino population is one of the largest--and most diverse--demographics in the U.S. Aprendiendo en casa reveals findings from a national survey of Hispanic parents about their home media environments and practices, and their perceptions of their children's use of educational media across a range of different platforms. The report…

  1. "Do You Hear with Your Ears or with Your Eyes?": The Education of the Deaf Pupils at Casa Pia De Lisboa (c.1820-1950)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Catarina S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the education of the deaf pupils at Casa Pia de Lisboa, a Portuguese boarding-school, covering the period from 1820 to 1950. The intention is to show that a historical sedimentation of a scientific discourse about deafness is an effect of a new rationality of government begun by modernity and perfectly fitting a bio-political…

  2. European Influences in Spanish Popular Education: The Case of the Socialist "Casa Del Pueblo" of Madrid and the Belgian Model (1897-1929)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerena, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    In Spain from the late nineteenth century, the "People's Houses" (Casas del Pueblo) corresponded to a desire to provide and organize a space of sociability for workers and their families. This formed part of the diverse Spanish popular education movement. This article focuses on the project to translate the model of the Belgian Maison du…

  3. Bicarbonate Plays a Critical Role in the Generation of Cytotoxicity during SIN-1 Decomposition in Culture Medium

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Kyo; Okada, Tatsumi; Konishi, Kanako; Murata, Hiroshi; Akashi, Soichiro; Sugawara, Fumio; Watanabe, Nobuo; Arai, Takao

    2012-01-01

    3-Morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) is used as a donor of peroxynitrite (ONOO−) in various studies. We demonstrated, however, that, the cell-culture medium remains cytotoxic to PC12 cells even after almost complete SIN-1 decomposition, suggesting that reaction product(s) in the medium, rather than ONOO−, exert cytotoxic effects. Here, we clarified that significant cytotoxicity persists after SIN-1 decomposes in bicarbonate, a component of the culture medium, but not in NaOH. Cytotoxic SIN-1-decomposed bicarbonate, which lacks both oxidizing and nitrosating activities, degrades to innocuous state over time. The extent of SIN-1 cytotoxicity, irrespective of its fresh or decomposed state, appears to depend on the total number of initial SIN-1 molecules per cell, rather than its concentration, and involves oxidative/nitrosative stress-related cell damage. These results suggest that, despite its low abundance, the bicarbonate-dependent cytotoxic substance that accumulates in the medium during SIN-1 breakdown is the cytotoxic entity of SIN-1. PMID:22848780

  4. Constructing a Counternarrative: Students Informing Now (S.I.N.) Reframes Immigration and Education in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez, Neidi; Duarte, Yazmin; Espinosa, Pedro Joel; Martinez, Luis; Nygreen, Kysa; Perez, Renato; Ramirez, Izel; Saba, Mariella

    2009-01-01

    The work of Students Informing Now (S.I.N.), an immigrant student organization at the University of California, Santa Cruz, is described in this column. The authors argue that S.I.N.'s diverse activities and textual products construct a counternarrative that challenges and reframes the debate on undocumented students and immigration. Focusing on…

  5. Rapid Transfer Alignment of MEMS SINS Based on Adaptive Incremental Kalman Filter

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Hairong; Sun, Tingting; Zhang, Baiqiang; Zhang, Hongwei; Chen, Yang

    2017-01-01

    In airborne MEMS SINS transfer alignment, the error of MEMS IMU is highly environment-dependent and the parameters of the system model are also uncertain, which may lead to large error and bad convergence of the Kalman filter. In order to solve this problem, an improved adaptive incremental Kalman filter (AIKF) algorithm is proposed. First, the model of SINS transfer alignment is defined based on the “Velocity and Attitude” matching method. Then the detailed algorithm progress of AIKF and its recurrence formulas are presented. The performance and calculation amount of AKF and AIKF are also compared. Finally, a simulation test is designed to verify the accuracy and the rapidity of the AIKF algorithm by comparing it with KF and AKF. The results show that the AIKF algorithm has better estimation accuracy and shorter convergence time, especially for the bias of the gyroscope and the accelerometer, which can meet the accuracy and rapidity requirement of transfer alignment. PMID:28098829

  6. AUV Underwater Positioning Algorithm Based on Interactive Assistance of SINS and LBL

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Chen, Liping; Li, Yao

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies an underwater positioning algorithm based on the interactive assistance of a strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) and LBL, and this algorithm mainly includes an optimal correlation algorithm with aided tracking of an SINS/Doppler velocity log (DVL)/magnetic compass pilot (MCP), a three-dimensional TDOA positioning algorithm of Taylor series expansion and a multi-sensor information fusion algorithm. The final simulation results show that compared to traditional underwater positioning algorithms, this scheme can not only directly correct accumulative errors caused by a dead reckoning algorithm, but also solves the problem of ambiguous correlation peaks caused by multipath transmission of underwater acoustic signals. The proposed method can calibrate the accumulative error of the AUV position more directly and effectively, which prolongs the underwater operating duration of the AUV. PMID:26729120

  7. Rapid Transfer Alignment of MEMS SINS Based on Adaptive Incremental Kalman Filter.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hairong; Sun, Tingting; Zhang, Baiqiang; Zhang, Hongwei; Chen, Yang

    2017-01-14

    In airborne MEMS SINS transfer alignment, the error of MEMS IMU is highly environment-dependent and the parameters of the system model are also uncertain, which may lead to large error and bad convergence of the Kalman filter. In order to solve this problem, an improved adaptive incremental Kalman filter (AIKF) algorithm is proposed. First, the model of SINS transfer alignment is defined based on the "Velocity and Attitude" matching method. Then the detailed algorithm progress of AIKF and its recurrence formulas are presented. The performance and calculation amount of AKF and AIKF are also compared. Finally, a simulation test is designed to verify the accuracy and the rapidity of the AIKF algorithm by comparing it with KF and AKF. The results show that the AIKF algorithm has better estimation accuracy and shorter convergence time, especially for the bias of the gyroscope and the accelerometer, which can meet the accuracy and rapidity requirement of transfer alignment.

  8. An Improved Inertial Frame Alignment Algorithm Based on Horizontal Alignment Information for Marine SINS.

    PubMed

    Che, Yanting; Wang, Qiuying; Gao, Wei; Yu, Fei

    2015-10-05

    In this paper, an improved inertial frame alignment algorithm for a marine SINS under mooring conditions is proposed, which significantly improves accuracy. Since the horizontal alignment is easy to complete, and a characteristic of gravity is that its component in the horizontal plane is zero, we use a clever method to improve the conventional inertial alignment algorithm. Firstly, a large misalignment angle model and a dimensionality reduction Gauss-Hermite filter are employed to establish the fine horizontal reference frame. Based on this, the projection of the gravity in the body inertial coordinate frame can be calculated easily. Then, the initial alignment algorithm is accomplished through an inertial frame alignment algorithm. The simulation and experiment results show that the improved initial alignment algorithm performs better than the conventional inertial alignment algorithm, and meets the accuracy requirements of a medium-accuracy marine SINS.

  9. AUV Underwater Positioning Algorithm Based on Interactive Assistance of SINS and LBL.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Chen, Liping; Li, Yao

    2015-12-30

    This paper studies an underwater positioning algorithm based on the interactive assistance of a strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) and LBL, and this algorithm mainly includes an optimal correlation algorithm with aided tracking of an SINS/Doppler velocity log (DVL)/magnetic compass pilot (MCP), a three-dimensional TDOA positioning algorithm of Taylor series expansion and a multi-sensor information fusion algorithm. The final simulation results show that compared to traditional underwater positioning algorithms, this scheme can not only directly correct accumulative errors caused by a dead reckoning algorithm, but also solves the problem of ambiguous correlation peaks caused by multipath transmission of underwater acoustic signals. The proposed method can calibrate the accumulative error of the AUV position more directly and effectively, which prolongs the underwater operating duration of the AUV.

  10. Deacetylase inhibitors dissociate the histone-targeting ING2 subunit from the Sin3 complex

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Karen T.; Martin-Brown, Skylar A.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are in clinical development for several diseases, including cancers and neurodegenerative disorders. HDACs1 and 2 are among the targets of these inhibitors and are part of multisubunit protein complexes. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) block the activity of HDACs by chelating a zinc molecule in their catalytic sites. It is not known if the inhibitors have any additional functional effects on the multisubunit HDAC complexes. Here, we find that suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), the recently FDA approved HDACi, causes the dissociation of the PHD-finger containing ING2 subunit from the Sin3 deacetylase complex. Loss of ING2 disrupts the in vivo binding of the Sin3 complex to the p21 promoter, an important target gene for cell growth inhibition by SAHA. Our findings reveal a new molecular mechanism by which HDAC inhibitors disrupt deacetylase function. PMID:20142042

  11. Simulating spatiotemporal dynamics of sichuan grassland net primary productivity using the CASA model and in situ observations.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chuanjiang; Fu, Xinyu; Jiang, Dong; Fu, Jingying; Zhang, Xinyue; Zhou, Su

    2014-01-01

    Net primary productivity (NPP) is an important indicator for grassland resource management and sustainable development. In this paper, the NPP of Sichuan grasslands was estimated by the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CASA) model. The results were validated with in situ data. The overall precision reached 70%; alpine meadow had the highest precision at greater than 75%, among the three types of grasslands validated. The spatial and temporal variations of Sichuan grasslands were analyzed. The absorbed photosynthetic active radiation (APAR), light use efficiency (ε), and NPP of Sichuan grasslands peaked in August, which was a vigorous growth period during 2011. High values of APAR existed in the southwest regions in altitudes from 2000 m to 4000 m. Light use efficiency (ε) varied in the different types of grasslands. The Sichuan grassland NPP was mainly distributed in the region of 3000-5000 m altitude. The NPP of alpine meadow accounted for 50% of the total NPP of Sichuan grasslands.

  12. A Novel Scheme for DVL-Aided SINS In-Motion Alignment Using UKF Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanli; Wang, Jinling; Lu, Liangqing; Wu, Wenqi

    2013-01-01

    In-motion alignment of Strapdown Inertial Navigation Systems (SINS) without any geodetic-frame observations is one of the toughest challenges for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV). This paper presents a novel scheme for Doppler Velocity Log (DVL) aided SINS alignment using Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF) which allows large initial misalignments. With the proposed mechanism, a nonlinear SINS error model is presented and the measurement model is derived under the assumption that large misalignments may exist. Since a priori knowledge of the measurement noise covariance is of great importance to robustness of the UKF, the covariance-matching methods widely used in the Adaptive KF (AKF) are extended for use in Adaptive UKF (AUKF). Experimental results show that the proposed DVL-aided alignment model is effective with any initial heading errors. The performances of the adaptive filtering methods are evaluated with regards to their parameter estimation stability. Furthermore, it is clearly shown that the measurement noise covariance can be estimated reliably by the adaptive UKF methods and hence improve the performance of the alignment. PMID:23322105

  13. Methylglyoxal modification of mSin3A links glycolysis to angiopoietin-2 transcription.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dachun; Taguchi, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Takeshi; Pestell, Richard; Edelstein, Diane; Giardino, Ida; Suske, Guntram; Ahmed, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J; Sarthy, Vijay P; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Brownlee, Michael

    2006-01-27

    Methylglyoxal is a highly reactive dicarbonyl degradation product formed from triose phosphates during glycolysis. Methylglyoxal forms stable adducts primarily with arginine residues of intracellular proteins. The biologic role of this covalent modification in regulating cell function is not known. Here, we report that in retinal Müller cells, increased glycolytic flux causes increased methylglyoxal modification of the corepressor mSin3A. Methylglyoxal modification of mSin3A results in increased recruitment of O-GlcNAc transferase to an mSin3A-Sp3 complex, with consequent increased modification of Sp3 by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine. This modification of Sp3 causes decreased binding of the repressor complex to a glucose-responsive GC box in the angiopoietin-2 promoter, resulting in increased Ang-2 expression. A similar mechanism involving methylglyoxal-modification of other coregulator proteins may play a role in the pathobiology of a variety of conditions associated with changes in methylglyoxal concentration, including cancer and diabetic vascular disease.

  14. Initial Alignment of Large Azimuth Misalignment Angles in SINS Based on Adaptive UPF

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jin; Xu, Xiao-Su; Liu, Yi-Ting; Zhang, Tao; Li, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The case of large azimuth misalignment angles in a strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) is analyzed, and a method of using the adaptive UPF for the initial alignment is proposed. The filter is based on the idea of a strong tracking filter; through the introduction of the attenuation memory factor to effectively enhance the corrections of the current information residual error on the system, it reduces the influence on the system due to the system simplification, and the uncertainty of noise statistical properties to a certain extent; meanwhile, the UPF particle degradation phenomenon is better overcome. Finally, two kinds of non-linear filters, UPF and adaptive UPF, are adopted in the initial alignment of large azimuth misalignment angles in SINS, and the filtering effects of the two kinds of nonlinear filter on the initial alignment were compared by simulation and turntable experiments. The simulation and turntable experiment results show that the speed and precision of the initial alignment using adaptive UPF for a large azimuth misalignment angle in SINS under the circumstance that the statistical properties of the system noise are certain or not have been improved to some extent. PMID:26334277

  15. Initial Alignment of Large Azimuth Misalignment Angles in SINS Based on Adaptive UPF.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Xu, Xiao-Su; Liu, Yi-Ting; Zhang, Tao; Li, Yao

    2015-08-31

    The case of large azimuth misalignment angles in a strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) is analyzed, and a method of using the adaptive UPF for the initial alignment is proposed. The filter is based on the idea of a strong tracking filter; through the introduction of the attenuation memory factor to effectively enhance the corrections of the current information residual error on the system, it reduces the influence on the system due to the system simplification, and the uncertainty of noise statistical properties to a certain extent; meanwhile, the UPF particle degradation phenomenon is better overcome. Finally, two kinds of non-linear filters, UPF and adaptive UPF, are adopted in the initial alignment of large azimuth misalignment angles in SINS, and the filtering effects of the two kinds of nonlinear filter on the initial alignment were compared by simulation and turntable experiments. The simulation and turntable experiment results show that the speed and precision of the initial alignment using adaptive UPF for a large azimuth misalignment angle in SINS under the circumstance that the statistical properties of the system noise are certain or not have been improved to some extent.

  16. Regulatory mutations in Sin recombinase support a structure-based model of the synaptosome

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Sally-J; Boocock, Martin R; McPherson, Arlene L; Mouw, Kent W; Rice, Phoebe A; Stark, W Marshall

    2009-01-01

    The resolvase Sin regulates DNA strand exchange by assembling an elaborate interwound synaptosome containing catalytic and regulatory Sin tetramers, and an architectural DNA-bending protein. The crystal structure of the regulatory tetramer was recently solved, providing new insights into the structural basis for regulation. Here we describe the selection and characterization of two classes of Sin mutations that, respectively, bypass or disrupt the functions of the regulatory tetramer. Activating mutations, which allow the catalytic tetramer to assemble and function independently at site I (the crossover site), were found at ∼20% of residues in the N-terminal domain. The most strongly activating mutation (Q115R) stabilized a catalytically active synaptic tetramer in vitro. The positions of these mutations suggest that they act by destabilizing the conformation of the ground-state site I-bound dimers, or by stabilizing the altered conformation of the active catalytic tetramer. Mutations that block activation by the regulatory tetramer mapped to just two residues, F52 and R54, supporting a functional role for a previously reported crystallographic dimer–dimer interface. We suggest how F52/R54 contacts between regulatory and catalytic subunits might promote assembly of the active catalytic tetramer within the synaptosome. PMID:19508283

  17. RNase E affects the expression of the acyl-homoserine lactone synthase gene sinI in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Baumgardt, Kathrin; Charoenpanich, Pornsri; McIntosh, Matthew; Schikora, Adam; Stein, Elke; Thalmann, Sebastian; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Klug, Gabriele; Becker, Anke; Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena

    2014-04-01

    Quorum sensing of Sinorhizobium meliloti relies on N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as autoinducers. AHL production increases at high population density, and this depends on the AHL synthase SinI and two transcriptional regulators, SinR and ExpR. Our study demonstrates that ectopic expression of the gene rne, coding for RNase E, an endoribonuclease that is probably essential for growth, prevents the accumulation of AHLs at detectable levels. The ectopic rne expression led to a higher level of rne mRNA and a lower level of sinI mRNA independently of the presence of ExpR, the AHL receptor, and AHLs. In line with this, IPTG (isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside)-induced overexpression of rne resulted in a shorter half-life of sinI mRNA and a strong reduction of AHL accumulation. Moreover, using translational sinI-egfp fusions, we found that sinI expression is specifically decreased upon induced overexpression of rne, independently of the presence of the global posttranscriptional regulator Hfq. The 28-nucleotide 5' untranslated region (UTR) of sinI mRNA was sufficient for this effect. Random amplification of 5' cDNA ends (5'-RACE) analyses revealed a potential RNase E cleavage site at position +24 between the Shine-Dalgarno site and the translation start site. We postulate therefore that RNase E-dependent degradation of sinI mRNA from the 5' end is one of the steps mediating a high turnover of sinI mRNA, which allows the Sin quorum-sensing system to respond rapidly to changes in transcriptional control of AHL production.

  18. Substrate specificity of TOR complex 2 is determined by a ubiquitin-fold domain of the Sin1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Tatebe, Hisashi; Murayama, Shinichi; Yonekura, Toshiya; Hatano, Tomoyuki; Richter, David; Furuya, Tomomi; Kataoka, Saori; Furuita, Kyoko; Kojima, Chojiro; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2017-03-07

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) protein kinase forms multi-subunit TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TOR complex 2 (TORC2), which exhibit distinct substrate specificities. Sin1 is one of the TORC2-specific subunit essential for phosphorylation and activation of certain AGC-family kinases. Here, we show that Sin1 is dispensable for the catalytic activity of TORC2, but its conserved region in the middle (Sin1CRIM) forms a discrete domain that specifically binds the TORC2 substrate kinases. Sin1CRIM fused to a different TORC2 subunit can recruit the TORC2 substrate Gad8 for phosphorylation even in the sin1 null mutant of fission yeast. The solution structure of Sin1CRIM shows a ubiquitin-like fold with a characteristic acidic loop, which is essential for interaction with the TORC2 substrates. The specific substrate-recognition function is conserved in human Sin1CRIM, which may represent a potential target for novel anticancer drugs that prevent activation of the mTORC2 substrates such as AKT.

  19. Substrate specificity of TOR complex 2 is determined by a ubiquitin-fold domain of the Sin1 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Tatebe, Hisashi; Murayama, Shinichi; Yonekura, Toshiya; Hatano, Tomoyuki; Richter, David; Furuya, Tomomi; Kataoka, Saori; Furuita, Kyoko; Kojima, Chojiro; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) protein kinase forms multi-subunit TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TOR complex 2 (TORC2), which exhibit distinct substrate specificities. Sin1 is one of the TORC2-specific subunit essential for phosphorylation and activation of certain AGC-family kinases. Here, we show that Sin1 is dispensable for the catalytic activity of TORC2, but its conserved region in the middle (Sin1CRIM) forms a discrete domain that specifically binds the TORC2 substrate kinases. Sin1CRIM fused to a different TORC2 subunit can recruit the TORC2 substrate Gad8 for phosphorylation even in the sin1 null mutant of fission yeast. The solution structure of Sin1CRIM shows a ubiquitin-like fold with a characteristic acidic loop, which is essential for interaction with the TORC2 substrates. The specific substrate-recognition function is conserved in human Sin1CRIM, which may represent a potential target for novel anticancer drugs that prevent activation of the mTORC2 substrates such as AKT. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19594.001 PMID:28264193

  20. Proyecto "LLAMA"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, E. M.; Mirabel, I. F.; Morras, R.; Romero, G. E.; Abraham, Z.; de Gouveira Dal Pino, E. M.; Lepine, J.

    In this paper we briefly describe a joint scientific and technological effort between Argentina and Brazil, whose first goal is to install and run, in the northwestern part of Argentina, a millimetre and submillimetre observa- tional facility. In the long run, we would like to incorporate this dish to existing ones (ALMA, APEX, ASTE) in the northern extreme of Chile, to be able to carry out, for the first time in Latinamerican soil, very long base- line interferometry at mm/submm wavelengths. We also succintly mention a long term campaign that is under way in order to monitor the transparency of the atmosphere at those wavelengths. The science that can be accom- plished with this instrument, the technology transfer spin-offs related to this project, and the scientific and strategic importance of this project within both the Argentinean and Latinamerican radioastronomy is described. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  1. A strange and surprising debate: mountains, original sin and 'science' in seventeenth-century England.

    PubMed

    Wragge-Morley, Alexander

    2009-06-01

    It could come as a shock to learn that some seventeenth-century men of science and learning thought that mountains were bad. Even more alarmingly, some thought that God had imposed them on the earth to punish man for his sins. By the end of the seventeenth century, surprisingly many English natural philosophers and theologians were engaged in a debate about whether mountains were 'good' or 'bad', useful or useless. At stake in this debate were not just the careers of its participants, but arguments about the best ways of looking at and reckoning with 'nature' itself.

  2. Measurement of sin(2beta) in Tree-dominated B^0-Decays and Ambiguity Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Lacker, Heiko

    2007-03-05

    The most recent results from the B-factories on the time-dependent CP asymmetries measured in B{sup 0}-decays mediated by b {yields} c{bar c}s quark-transitions are reviewed. The Standard Model interpretation of the results in terms of the parameter sin 2{beta} leads to a four-fold ambiguity on the unitarity triangle {beta} which can be reduced to a two-fold ambiguity by measuring the sign of the parameter cos 2{beta}. The results on cos 2{beta} obtained so far are reviewed.

  3. Measurement of Sin(2beta) in Tree Dominated B0 Decays And Ambiguity Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Lacker, H.; /Dresden, Tech. U.

    2007-11-20

    The most recent results from the B-factories on the time-dependent CP asymmetries measured in B{sup 0}-decays mediated by b {yields} c{bar c}s quark-transitions are reviewed. The Standard Model interpretation of the results in terms of the parameter sin 2{beta} leads to a four-fold ambiguity on the unitarity triangle {beta} which can be reduced to a two-fold ambiguity by measuring the sign of the parameter cos 2{beta}. The results on cos2{beta} obtained so far are reviewed.

  4. Totally asymmetric simple exclusion process with entrance rate sin(x)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yifan; Chen, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yanna; Xiao, Song

    2017-03-01

    In recently, traffic jams have become the focus and one used different approaches to study them. In this paper, the function of sin(x) is used to simulate the enter rate α of the peak period to work. The mean field approach has been used to calculate the phase diagrams and these results were compared with Monte Carlo simulations. They are good agreement. When traffic accidents occur at the exit, the exit rate β will be less than 1 and traffic jams will occur. Different fixed the exit rate β is used to calculate the additional energy consumption. The additional energy consumption will increase with the reducing of the exit rate β.

  5. Effects of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha on Sin Nombre Virus Infection In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Khaiboullina, Svetlana F.; Netski, Dale M.; Krumpe, Peter; St. Jeor, Stephen C.

    2000-01-01

    Previous data indicate that immune mechanisms may be involved in developing capillary leakage during Sin Nombre virus (SNV) infection. Therefore, we investigated production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) by human alveolar macrophages and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) after infection with SNV. In addition, we examined the effect of TNF-α on HUVEC monolayer leakage. Our results reveal that although TNF-α decreases accumulation of viral nucleoproteins, TNF-α levels do not change in SNV-infected cells. In addition, supernatants from SNV-infected human alveolar macrophages did not cause a significant increase in endothelial monolayer permeability. PMID:11090198

  6. First Insertions of Carbene Ligands into Ge-N and Si-N Bonds.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Rodríguez, Lucía; Cabeza, Javier A; García-Álvarez, Pablo; Gómez-Gallego, Mar; Merinero, Alba D; Sierra, Miguel A

    2017-03-28

    The insertion of carbene ligands into Ge-N (three examples) and Si-N (one example) bonds has been achieved for the first time by treating Fischer carbene complexes (M=W, Cr) with bulky amidinatotetrylenes (E=Ge, Si). These reactions, which start with a nucleophilic attack of the amidinatotetrylene heavier group 14 atom to the carbene C atom, proceed through a stereoselective insertion of the carbene fragment into an E-N bond of the amidinatotetrylene ENCN four-membered ring, leading to [M(CO)5 L] derivatives in which L belongs to a novel family of tetrylene ligands comprising an ECNCN five-membered ring.

  7. Towards a Casa Segura: A Consumer Product Study of the Effect of Insecticide-Treated Curtains on Aedes aegypti and Dengue Virus Infections in the Home

    PubMed Central

    Loroño-Pino, María Alba; García-Rejón, Julián E.; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Gomez-Carro, Salvador; Nuñez-Ayala, Guadalupe; del Rosario Nájera-Vázquez, Maria; Losoya, Arturo; Aguilar, Lyla; Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul; Beaty, Meaghan K.; Black, William C.; Keefe, Thomas J.; Eisen, Lars; Beaty, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    The home, or domicile, is the principal environment for transmission of dengue virus (DENV) between humans and mosquito vectors. Community-wide distribution of insecticide-treated curtains (ITCs), mimicking vector control program-driven interventions, has shown promise to reduce DENV infections. We conducted a Casa Segura consumer product intervention study in Mérida, Mexico to determine the potential to reduce intradomicillary DENV transmission through ITC use in individual homes. Dengue virus infections in mosquitoes and in humans were reduced in homes with ITCs in one of two study subareas. Overall, ITCs reduced intradomicillary DENV transmission; ITC homes were significantly less likely to experience multiple DENV infections in humans than NTC homes. Dengue virus–infected Aedes aegypti females were reduced within the ITC homes where curtain use was highest. Some homes yielded up to nine infected Ae. aegypti females. This study provides insights regarding best practices for Casa Segura interventions to protect homes from intradomicillary DENV transmission. PMID:23732254

  8. An SINS/GNSS Ground Vehicle Gravimetry Test Based on SGA-WZ02.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ruihang; Cai, Shaokun; Wu, Meiping; Cao, Juliang; Zhang, Kaidong

    2015-09-16

    In March 2015, a ground vehicle gravimetry test was implemented in eastern Changsha to assess the repeatability and accuracy of ground vehicle SINS/GNSS gravimeter-SGA-WZ02. The gravity system developed by NUDT consisted of a Strapdown Inertial Navigation System (SINS), a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) remote station on test vehicle, a GNSS static master station on the ground, and a data logging subsystem. A south-north profile of 35 km along the highway in eastern Changsha was chosen and four repeated available measure lines were obtained. The average speed of a vehicle is 40 km/h. To assess the external ground gravity disturbances, precise ground gravity data was built by CG-5 precise gravimeter as the reference. Under relative smooth conditions, internal accuracy among repeated lines shows an average agreement at the level of 1.86 mGal for half wavelengths about 1.1 km, and 1.22 mGal for 1.7 km. The root-mean-square (RMS) of difference between calculated gravity data and reference data is about 2.27 mGal/1.1 km, and 1.74 mGal/1.7 km. Not all of the noises caused by vehicle itself and experiments environments were eliminated in the primary results. By means of selecting reasonable filters and improving the GNSS observation conditions, further developments in ground vehicle gravimetry are promising.

  9. An SINS/GNSS Ground Vehicle Gravimetry Test Based on SGA-WZ02

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ruihang; Cai, Shaokun; Wu, Meiping; Cao, Juliang; Zhang, Kaidong

    2015-01-01

    In March 2015, a ground vehicle gravimetry test was implemented in eastern Changsha to assess the repeatability and accuracy of ground vehicle SINS/GNSS gravimeter—SGA-WZ02. The gravity system developed by NUDT consisted of a Strapdown Inertial Navigation System (SINS), a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) remote station on test vehicle, a GNSS static master station on the ground, and a data logging subsystem. A south-north profile of 35 km along the highway in eastern Changsha was chosen and four repeated available measure lines were obtained. The average speed of a vehicle is 40 km/h. To assess the external ground gravity disturbances, precise ground gravity data was built by CG-5 precise gravimeter as the reference. Under relative smooth conditions, internal accuracy among repeated lines shows an average agreement at the level of 1.86 mGal for half wavelengths about 1.1 km, and 1.22 mGal for 1.7 km. The root-mean-square (RMS) of difference between calculated gravity data and reference data is about 2.27 mGal/1.1 km, and 1.74 mGal/1.7 km. Not all of the noises caused by vehicle itself and experiments environments were eliminated in the primary results. By means of selecting reasonable filters and improving the GNSS observation conditions, further developments in ground vehicle gravimetry are promising. PMID:26389916

  10. Preparation and combustion of coal-water fuel from the Sin Pun coal deposit, southern Thailand

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    In response to an inquiry by the Department of Mineral Resources in Thailand, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) prepared a program to assess the responsiveness of Sin Pun lignite to the temperature and pressure conditions of hot-water drying. The results indicate that drying made several improvements in the coal, notably increases in heating value and carbon content and reductions in equilibrium moisture and oxygen content. The equilibrium moisture content decreased from 27 wt% for the raw coal to about 15 wt% for the hot-water-dried (HWD) coals. The energy density for a pumpable coal-water fuel (CWF) indicates an increase from 4500 to 6100 Btu/lb by hot-water drying. Approximately 650 lb of HWD Sin Pun CWF were fired in the EERC`s combustion test facility. The fuel burned extremely well, with no feed problems noted during the course of the test. Fouling and slagging deposits each indicated a very low rate of ash deposition, with only a dusty layer formed on the cooled metal surfaces. The combustor was operated at between 20% and 25% excess air, resulting in a flue gas SO{sub 2} concentration averaging approximately 6500 parts per million.

  11. Measurement of the CP Asymmetry Amplitude sin(2β with B0 Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; O'Neale, S. W.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Goetzen, K.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Clark, P. J.; Cottingham, W. N.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Jolly, S.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; McMahon, S.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Chun, S.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H.; Prell, S.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Raven, G.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Hart, P. A.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Pulliam, T.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Barillari, T.; Bloom, P.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Ferrag, S.; T'jampens, S.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Tinslay, J.; Falbo, M.; Borean, C.; Bozzi, C.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Bartoldus, R.; Grenier, G. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Lange, D. J.; van Bibber, K.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, M.; Kay, M.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Smith, D.; Taylor, G. P.; Back, J. J.; Bellodi, G.; Dixon, P.; Harrison, P. F.; Potter, R. J.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Forti, A. C.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Savvas, N.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Schieck, J. R.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Brau, B.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Hast, C.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Losecco, J. M.; Alsmiller, J. R.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Campagna, E.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Triggiani, G.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Turnbull, L.; Wagoner, D. E.; Albert, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Schaffner, S. F.; Smith, A. J.; Tumanov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; del Re, D.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Leonardi, E.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Giraud, P.-F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Serfass, B.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Adam, I.; Aston, D.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges, E.; Haas, T.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Himel, T.; Hryn'ova, T.; Huffer, M. E.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Quinn, H.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schietinger, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Cheng, C. H.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Henderson, R.; Bugg, W.; Cohn, H.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gamba, D.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Mohapatra, A.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Scott, I. J.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2002-10-01

    We present results on time-dependent CP asymmetries in neutral B decays to several CP eigenstates. The measurements use a data sample of about 88×106 ϒ(4S)-->BB¯ decays collected between 1999 and 2002 with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. We study events in which one neutral B meson is fully reconstructed in a final state containing a charmonium meson and the other B meson is determined to be either a B0 or B¯0 from its decay products. The amplitude of the CP asymmetry, which in the standard model is proportional to sin(2β, is derived from the decay-time distributions in such events. We measure sin(2β=0.741+/-0.067(stat)+/-0.034(syst) and |λ|=0.948+/-0.051(stat)+/-0.030(syst). The magnitude of λ is consistent with unity, in agreement with the standard model expectation of no direct CP violation in these modes.

  12. The two-loop electroweak bosonic corrections to sin2 ⁡ θeffb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovyk, Ievgen; Freitas, Ayres; Gluza, Janusz; Riemann, Tord; Usovitsch, Johann

    2016-11-01

    The prediction of the effective electroweak mixing angle sin2 ⁡θeffb in the Standard Model at two-loop accuracy has now been completed by the first calculation of the bosonic two-loop corrections to the Z b bar b vertex. Numerical predictions are presented in the form of a fitting formula as function of MZ ,MW ,MH ,mt and Δα, αs. For central input values, we obtain a relative correction of Δκb(α2 , bos) = - 0.9855 ×10-4, amounting to about a quarter of the fermionic corrections, and corresponding to sin2 ⁡ θeffb = 0.232704. The integration of the corresponding two-loop vertex Feynman integrals with up to three dimensionless parameters in Minkowskian kinematics has been performed with two approaches: (i) Sector decomposition, implemented in the packages FIESTA 3 and SecDec 3, and (ii) Mellin-Barnes representations, implemented in AMBRE 3/MB and the new package MBnumerics.

  13. Stress engineering in GaN structures grown on Si(111) substrates by SiN masking layer application

    SciTech Connect

    Szymański, Tomasz Wośko, Mateusz; Paszkiewicz, Bogdan; Paszkiewicz, Regina

    2015-07-15

    GaN layers without and with an in-situ SiN mask were grown by using metal organic vapor phase epitaxy for three different approaches used in GaN on silicon(111) growth, and the physical and optical properties of the GaN layers were studied. For each approach applied, GaN layers of 1.4 μm total thickness were grown, using silan SiH{sub 4} as Si source in order to grow Si{sub x}N{sub x} masking layer. The optical micrographs, scanning electron microscope images, and atomic force microscope images of the grown samples revealed cracks for samples without SiN mask, and micropits, which were characteristic for the samples grown with SiN mask. In situ reflectance signal traces were studied showing a decrease of layer coalescence time and higher degree of 3D growth mode for samples with SiN masking layer. Stress measurements were conducted by two methods—by recording micro-Raman spectra and ex-situ curvature radius measurement—additionally PLs spectra were obtained revealing blueshift of PL peak positions with increasing stress. The authors have shown that a SiN mask significantly improves physical and optical properties of GaN multilayer systems reducing stress in comparison to samples grown applying the same approaches but without SiN masking layer.

  14. Deformations along the Caribbean - South American Plate Boundary From Nine Years Repeated GPS Observations in the CASA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewes, H.; Kaniuth, K.; Stuber, K.; Tremel, H.; Hernandez, J. N.; Hoyer, M.

    2002-05-01

    The first GPS observations along the Caribbean - South American plate boundary were carried out within the Central and South American Geodynamics Project (CASA UNO) in 1988. The precision of the results was quite poor due to the imperfect operation of the GPS system at that time. Since 1993 regular re-measurements of more than 20 stations in the eastern part of the network along the Bocono - El Pilar fault system in Venezuela have been performed. The paper presents the continuous deformations derived from the 1993, 1996, 1999 and 2002 complete network observations and some additional partial measurements. The long-term deformations in the order of one to two centimeters per year are now significantly confirmed and may be interpreted in the context of regional plate tectonics and geodynamics. The co-seismic displacements during the Cariaco (Sucre) 1997 earthquake are analyzed separately using detailed GPS observations in 1997. They are discussed as well as the local post-seismic deformations from 1997 to 2002.

  15. Profile of Heart Donors from the Human Valve Bank of the Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Curitiba

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Renata Maria; da Costa, Marise Teresinha Brenner Affonso; Canciglieri Junior, Osiris; Sant'Anna, Ângelo Márcio Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Human heart valves are used as replacement valves and have satisfactory functional results compared with conventional prostheses. Objective Characterize the profile of effective heart donors from the human valve bank of the santa casa de misericórdia de curitiba and analyze the association between the profile variables. Methods It consists of a retrospective and quantitative study of electronic medical records from heart donors for heart valves. every heart donation made to the bank between january 2004 and december 2014 was studied. Results 2,149 donations were analyzed, from donors aged 0 to 71 years old, with an average of 34.9 ± 15.03 years old. most donors were male 65.7% (n=1,411) and 34.3% (n=738) were female. among the most frequent causes of the donors' death are trauma at 53% (n=1,139) and cerebral vascular accident at 34.2% (n=735). there was significant statistical association between the analyzed variables. Conclusion There has been an improvement in brazil's donation rate, being essential that the tissue banks work together with the state and federal district centers for notification, procurement and distribution of organs in order to increase the number of donors. PMID:27556322

  16. Incidence and Remission of Parasomnias among Adolescent Children in the Tucson Children's Assessment of Sleep Apnea (TuCASA) Study.

    PubMed

    Furet, Oscar; Goodwin, James L; Quan, Stuart F

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Longitudinal assessments of parasomnias in the adolescent population are scarce. This analysis aims to identify the incidence and remission of parasomnias in the adolescent age group. METHODS: The TuCASA study is a prospective cohort study that initially enrolled children between the ages of 6 and 11 years (Time 1) and subsequently restudied them approximately 5 years later (Time 2). At both time points parents were asked to complete a comprehensive sleep habits questionnaire designed to assess the severity of sleep-related symptoms that included questions about enuresis (EN), sleep terrors (TR), sleep walking (SW) and sleep talking (ST). RESULTS: There were 350 children participating at Time 1 who were studied as adolescents at time 2. The mean interval between measurements was (4.6 years). The incidence of EN, TR, ST, and SW in these 10-18 year old children was 0.3%, 0.6%, 6.0% and 1.1% respectively. Remission rates were 70.8%, 100%, 64.8% and 50.0% respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence rates of EN, TR, and SW were relatively low moving from childhood to adolescence while remission rates were high across all parasomnias.

  17. Simulating Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Sichuan Grassland Net Primary Productivity Using the CASA Model and In Situ Observations

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chuanjiang; Fu, Xinyu; Jiang, Dong; Zhang, Xinyue; Zhou, Su

    2014-01-01

    Net primary productivity (NPP) is an important indicator for grassland resource management and sustainable development. In this paper, the NPP of Sichuan grasslands was estimated by the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CASA) model. The results were validated with in situ data. The overall precision reached 70%; alpine meadow had the highest precision at greater than 75%, among the three types of grasslands validated. The spatial and temporal variations of Sichuan grasslands were analyzed. The absorbed photosynthetic active radiation (APAR), light use efficiency (ε), and NPP of Sichuan grasslands peaked in August, which was a vigorous growth period during 2011. High values of APAR existed in the southwest regions in altitudes from 2000 m to 4000 m. Light use efficiency (ε) varied in the different types of grasslands. The Sichuan grassland NPP was mainly distributed in the region of 3000–5000 m altitude. The NPP of alpine meadow accounted for 50% of the total NPP of Sichuan grasslands. PMID:25250396

  18. Palynological analysis of camelid coprolites: seasonality in the use of the site Cerro Casa de Piedra 7 (Santa Cruz, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez, Nadia Jimena; Burry, Lidia Susana; Fugassa, Martín Horacio; Civalero, María Teresa; Aschero, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Palynological, palaeoparasitological and paleobotanical studies of coprolites found in archaeological sites from Perito Moreno National Park (47°57‧S72°05‧W) yielded information on diet, palaeoenvironment and health. These studies allowed adding evidence to the reconstruction of life history of the hunter-gatherers that inhabited Patagonia during the Holocene. We examined the season of the year when camelid Lama guanicoe coprolites (5400 ± 64 yr 14C BP to 9640 ± 190 yr 14C BP) were deposited at Cerro Casa de Piedra 7 (site CCP7). The study used palynological evidence and comparison with pollen spectra of modern feces collected during summer, fall, winter and spring of 2010. The dominant types were: pollen of Nothofagus, Empetrum rubrum, Asteraceae subfam. Asteroideae, Nassauvia, Caryophyllaceae and Poaceae; fern spores; remains of Eimeria macusaniensis; and plant remains of Poaceae, Festuca pallescens, Stipa speciosa, Armeria maritima, Gaultheria mucronata and E. rubrum. Pollen spectra of modern and fossil feces were used for multivariate analysis. Coprolites associated to fall and winter modern feces. These results and those obtained from pollen concentration values and the presence of pollen types indicators of seasonality, allowed the determination of summer, fall and winter coprolites. However, caution must be taken with the seasonality results of coprolites dated earlier than 9000 years BP since the environmental conditions differed from now. The site was probably a camelid shelter during the unfavorable seasons.

  19. Material and optical properties of low-temperature NH3-free PECVD SiN x layers for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez Bucio, Thalía; Khokhar, Ali Z.; Lacava, Cosimo; Stankovic, Stevan; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Petropoulos, Periklis; Gardes, Frederic Y.

    2017-01-01

    SiN x layers intended for photonic applications are typically fabricated using LPCVD and PECVD. These techniques rely on high-temperature processing (>400 °C) to obtain low propagation losses. An alternative version of PECVD SiN x layers deposited at temperatures below 400 °C with a recipe that does not use ammonia (NH3-free PECVD) was previously demonstrated to be a good option to fabricate strip waveguides with propagation losses   <3 dB cm-1. We have conducted a systematic investigation of the influence of the deposition parameters on the material and optical properties of NH3-free PECVD SiN x layers fabricated at 350 °C using a design of experiments methodology. In particular, this paper discusses the effect of the SiH4 flow, RF power, chamber pressure and substrate on the structure, uniformity, roughness, deposition rate, refractive index, chemical composition, bond structure and H content of NH3-free PECVD SiN x layers. The results show that the properties and the propagation losses of the studied SiN x layers depend entirely on their compositional N/Si ratio, which is in fact the only parameter that can be directly tuned using the deposition parameters along with the film uniformity and deposition rate. These observations provide the means to optimise the propagation losses of the layers for photonic applications through the deposition parameters. In fact, we have been able to fabricate SiN x waveguides with H content  <20%, good uniformity and propagation losses of 1.5 dB cm-1 at 1550 nm and   <1 dB cm-1 at 1310 nm. As a result, this study can potentially help optimise the properties of the studied SiN x layers for different applications.

  20. Conserved themes in target recognition by the PAH1 and PAH2 domains of the Sin3 transcriptional corepressor.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Sarata C; Swanson, Kurt A; Kang, Richard S; Huang, Kai; Brubaker, Kurt; Ratcliff, Kathleen; Radhakrishnan, Ishwar

    2008-02-01

    The recruitment of chromatin-modifying coregulator complexes by transcription factors to specific sites of the genome constitutes an important step in many eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory pathways. The histone deacetylase-associated Sin3 corepressor complex is recruited by a large and diverse array of transcription factors through direct interactions with the N-terminal PAH domains of Sin3. Here, we describe the solution structures of the mSin3A PAH1 domain in the apo form and when bound to SAP25, a component of the corepressor complex. Unlike the apo-mSin3A PAH2 domain, the apo-PAH1 domain is conformationally pure and is largely, but not completely, folded. Portions of the interacting segments of both mSin3A PAH1 and SAP25 undergo folding upon complex formation. SAP25 binds through an amphipathic helix to a predominantly hydrophobic cleft on the surface of PAH1. Remarkably, the orientation of the helix is reversed compared to that adopted by NRSF, a transcription factor unrelated to SAP25, upon binding to the mSin3B PAH1 domain. The reversal in helical orientations is correlated with a reversal in the underlying PAH1-interaction motifs, echoing a theme previously described for the mSin3A PAH2 domain. The definition of these so-called type I and type II PAH1-interaction motifs has allowed us to predict the precise location of these motifs within previously experimentally characterized PAH1 binders. Finally, we explore the specificity determinants of protein-protein interactions involving the PAH1 and PAH2 domains. These studies reveal that even conservative replacements of PAH2 residues with equivalent PAH1 residues are sufficient to alter the affinity and specificity of these protein-protein interactions dramatically.

  1. A Self-Alignment Algorithm for SINS Based on Gravitational Apparent Motion and Sensor Data Denoising

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiting; Xu, Xiaosu; Liu, Xixiang; Yao, Yiqing; Wu, Liang; Sun, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Initial alignment is always a key topic and difficult to achieve in an inertial navigation system (INS). In this paper a novel self-initial alignment algorithm is proposed using gravitational apparent motion vectors at three different moments and vector-operation. Simulation and analysis showed that this method easily suffers from the random noise contained in accelerometer measurements which are used to construct apparent motion directly. Aiming to resolve this problem, an online sensor data denoising method based on a Kalman filter is proposed and a novel reconstruction method for apparent motion is designed to avoid the collinearity among vectors participating in the alignment solution. Simulation, turntable tests and vehicle tests indicate that the proposed alignment algorithm can fulfill initial alignment of strapdown INS (SINS) under both static and swinging conditions. The accuracy can either reach or approach the theoretical values determined by sensor precision under static or swinging conditions. PMID:25923932

  2. Neutralizing Antibodies and Sin Nombre Virus RNA after Recovery from Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Chunyan; Prescott, Joseph; Nofchissey, Robert; Goade, Diane

    2004-01-01

    Patients who later have a mild course of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) are more likely to exhibit a high titer of neutralizing antibodies against Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the etiologic agent of HCPS, at the time of hospital admission. Because administering plasma from patients who have recovered from HCPS to those in the early stages of disease may be an advantageous form of passive immunotherapy, we examined the neutralizing antibody titers of 21 patients who had recovered from SNV infection. Even 1,000 days after admission to the hospital, 6 of 10 patients had titers of 800 or higher, with one sample retaining a titer of 3,200 after more than 1,400 days. None of the convalescent-phase serum samples contained detectable viral RNA. These results confirm that patients retain high titers of neutralizing antibodies long after recovery from SNV infection. PMID:15109416

  3. Avoiding the horrid and beastly sin of drunkenness: does dissuasion make a difference?

    PubMed

    Babor, T F

    1994-12-01

    Nearly 3 centuries ago, an anonymous English author prepared an educational brochure to dissuade problem drinkers from the "horrid and beastly sin of drunkenness" (Anonymous, 1705). During the past 2 decades, more than 25 randomized trials have been conducted in 12 countries to evaluate 2 basic questions: (a) Does dissuasion make a difference, and (b) What kinds of dissuasion work best? In response to the first question, studies indicate that dissuasion does make a difference with heavy drinkers who have not developed severe alcohol dependence. In response to the second question, the evidence is more equivocal because of the practical and methodological problems encountered in the comparison of different interventions. It is concluded that changes sometimes attributed to specific behavioral and psychological interventions may be due to a combination of advice, individual motivation, and nonspecific social influence.

  4. A longitudinal study of Sin Nombre virus prevalence in rodents, southeastern Arizona.

    PubMed Central

    Kuenzi, A. J.; Morrison, M. L.; Swann, D. E.; Hardy, P. C.; Downard, G. T.

    1999-01-01

    We determined the prevalence of Sin Nombre virus antibodies in small mammals in southeastern Arizona. Of 1,234 rodents (from 13 species) captured each month from May through December 1995, only mice in the genus Peromyscus were seropositive. Antibody prevalence was 14.3% in 21 white-footed mice (P. leucopus), 13.3% in 98 brush mice (P. boylii), 0.8% in 118 cactus mice (P. eremicus), and 0% in 2 deer mice (P. maniculatus). Most antibody-positive mice were adult male Peromyscus captured close to one another early in the study. Population dynamics of brush mice suggest a correlation between population size and hantavirus-antibody prevalence. PMID:10081678

  5. The volunteer and the sannyăsin: archetypes of retirement in America and India.

    PubMed

    Savishinsky, Joel

    2004-01-01

    Cultures differ in their models of the life course, including the number and the content of the stages through which people are expected to pass. Among those societies that recognize a period of retirement, the developmental tasks and opportunities that older individuals face are shaped by cultural ideas about morality, spirituality, passion, and fulfillment. This article examines two archetypes for retirement: the American volunteer, and the Indian sannyăsin or "renouncer." Drawing on ethnographic data from a study of American retirees and descriptions of spiritual seekers in India, it considers the social roles these ideal types play, their self and their public images, the congruence between cultural expectations and their actual experiences, and the underlying values these people embody. It suggests that while older American volunteers view retirement as an entitlement, they also stress their obligation to use free time to pay back their society for the benefits they have enjoyed. They thus add a moral dimension to a period often stereotypically characterized by a "busy ethic" and a mindframe of self-indulgence. India's sannyăsins, however, enter a life-stage of social withdrawal and spiritual pursuit after years of fulfilling their adult commitments to family and community. Yet, in their self-denial and renunciation of worldly engagements, they model for others the religious rewards that can follow after leading a dutiful life. These archetypes of aging thus bring out their cultures' contrasting emphases on inner- versus outer-directedness, self-development versus self-effacement, and personal freedom versus social responsibility.

  6. Proyecto Bilingüe: Constructing a Figured World of Bilingual Education for Latina/o Bilingual Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ek, Lucila D.; Chávez, Guadalupe Domínguez

    2015-01-01

    Using theories of figured worlds, we demonstrate how Proyecto Bilingüe, a Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction program, constructs a figured world of bilingual education for Latina/o bilingual teachers. We drew from a larger qualitative study to conduct a thematic analysis of interviews with Latina/o bilingual teachers, their written…

  7. A Feasibility Analysis of Land-Based SINS/GNSS Gravimetry for Groundwater Resource Detection in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Lin, Cheng-An; Kuo, Chung-Yen

    2015-09-29

    The integration of the Strapdown Inertial Navigation System and Global Navigation Satellite System (SINS/GNSS) has been implemented for land-based gravimetry and has been proven to perform well in estimating gravity. Based on the mGal-level gravimetry results, this research aims to construct and develop a land-based SINS/GNSS gravimetry device containing a navigation-grade Inertial Measurement Unit. This research also presents a feasibility analysis for groundwater resource detection. A preliminary comparison of the kinematic velocities and accelerations using multi-combination of GNSS data including Global Positioning System, Global Navigation Satellite System, and BeiDou Navigation Satellite System, indicates that three-system observations performed better than two-system data in the computation. A comparison of gravity derived from SINS/GNSS and measured using a relative gravimeter also shows that both agree reasonably well with a mean difference of 2.30 mGal. The mean difference between repeat measurements of gravity disturbance using SINS/GNSS is 2.46 mGal with a standard deviation of 1.32 mGal. The gravity variation because of the groundwater at Pingtung Plain, Taiwan could reach 2.72 mGal. Hence, the developed land-based SINS/GNSS gravimetry can sufficiently and effectively detect groundwater resources.

  8. Unintentional doping of a-plane GaN by insertion of in situ SiN masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, H.; Wieneke, M.; Rohrbeck, A.; Guenther, K.-M.; Dadgar, A.; Krost, A.

    2011-03-01

    Undoped a-plane GaN layers grown by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy on sapphire (1 0 - 1 2) substrates using low temperature (LT) GaN seed layers and in situ SiN masks were characterized by Hall-effect measurements, CV-characteristics and photovoltage spectroscopy. With increasing deposition time of the SiN masks the electron concentrations of the GaN layers are enhanced. The dominant activation energy between 14 and 22 meV determined by temperature-dependent Hall effect is very similar to the donor silicon on gallium site. Two other activation energies at 30 meV and between 50 and 70 meV were found corresponding well with OGa and VN defects, respectively. The depth profiles of the net donor densities show a strong increase towards the substrate/LT-GaN/high temperature(HT)-GaN interface indicating diffusion of silicon from the SiN mask towards the surface. Therefore, the Si doping is attributed to the dissolution of the SiN masks during the following HT GaN layer growth. The Si doping from the SiN masks also explains the deterioration of the band bending within the LT-GaN/HT-GaN junction found by photovoltage spectroscopy.

  9. A Novel Robust H∞ Filter Based on Krein Space Theory in the SINS/CNS Attitude Reference System

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fei; Lv, Chongyang; Dong, Qianhui

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their numerous merits, such as compact, autonomous and independence, the strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) and celestial navigation system (CNS) can be used in marine applications. What is more, due to the complementary navigation information obtained from two different kinds of sensors, the accuracy of the SINS/CNS integrated navigation system can be enhanced availably. Thus, the SINS/CNS system is widely used in the marine navigation field. However, the CNS is easily interfered with by the surroundings, which will lead to the output being discontinuous. Thus, the uncertainty problem caused by the lost measurement will reduce the system accuracy. In this paper, a robust H∞ filter based on the Krein space theory is proposed. The Krein space theory is introduced firstly, and then, the linear state and observation models of the SINS/CNS integrated navigation system are established reasonably. By taking the uncertainty problem into account, in this paper, a new robust H∞ filter is proposed to improve the robustness of the integrated system. At last, this new robust filter based on the Krein space theory is estimated by numerical simulations and actual experiments. Additionally, the simulation and experiment results and analysis show that the attitude errors can be reduced by utilizing the proposed robust filter effectively when the measurements are missing discontinuous. Compared to the traditional Kalman filter (KF) method, the accuracy of the SINS/CNS integrated system is improved, verifying the robustness and the availability of the proposed robust H∞ filter. PMID:26999153

  10. A Feasibility Analysis of Land-Based SINS/GNSS Gravimetry for Groundwater Resource Detection in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Lin, Cheng-An; Kuo, Chung-Yen

    2015-01-01

    The integration of the Strapdown Inertial Navigation System and Global Navigation Satellite System (SINS/GNSS) has been implemented for land-based gravimetry and has been proven to perform well in estimating gravity. Based on the mGal-level gravimetry results, this research aims to construct and develop a land-based SINS/GNSS gravimetry device containing a navigation-grade Inertial Measurement Unit. This research also presents a feasibility analysis for groundwater resource detection. A preliminary comparison of the kinematic velocities and accelerations using multi-combination of GNSS data including Global Positioning System, Global Navigation Satellite System, and BeiDou Navigation Satellite System, indicates that three-system observations performed better than two-system data in the computation. A comparison of gravity derived from SINS/GNSS and measured using a relative gravimeter also shows that both agree reasonably well with a mean difference of 2.30 mGal. The mean difference between repeat measurements of gravity disturbance using SINS/GNSS is 2.46 mGal with a standard deviation of 1.32 mGal. The gravity variation because of the groundwater at Pingtung Plain, Taiwan could reach 2.72 mGal. Hence, the developed land-based SINS/GNSS gravimetry can sufficiently and effectively detect groundwater resources. PMID:26426019

  11. A Novel Robust H∞ Filter Based on Krein Space Theory in the SINS/CNS Attitude Reference System.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Lv, Chongyang; Dong, Qianhui

    2016-03-18

    Owing to their numerous merits, such as compact, autonomous and independence, the strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) and celestial navigation system (CNS) can be used in marine applications. What is more, due to the complementary navigation information obtained from two different kinds of sensors, the accuracy of the SINS/CNS integrated navigation system can be enhanced availably. Thus, the SINS/CNS system is widely used in the marine navigation field. However, the CNS is easily interfered with by the surroundings, which will lead to the output being discontinuous. Thus, the uncertainty problem caused by the lost measurement will reduce the system accuracy. In this paper, a robust H∞ filter based on the Krein space theory is proposed. The Krein space theory is introduced firstly, and then, the linear state and observation models of the SINS/CNS integrated navigation system are established reasonably. By taking the uncertainty problem into account, in this paper, a new robust H∞ filter is proposed to improve the robustness of the integrated system. At last, this new robust filter based on the Krein space theory is estimated by numerical simulations and actual experiments. Additionally, the simulation and experiment results and analysis show that the attitude errors can be reduced by utilizing the proposed robust filter effectively when the measurements are missing discontinuous. Compared to the traditional Kalman filter (KF) method, the accuracy of the SINS/CNS integrated system is improved, verifying the robustness and the availability of the proposed robust H∞ filter.

  12. A density functional study of small sized silver-doped silicon clusters: Ag2Sin (n = 1-13)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cai; Hao Jia, Song; Ma, Mao Fen; Zhang, Shuai; Lu, Cheng; Li, Gen Quan

    2015-11-01

    The structures and electronic properties for global minimum geometric structures of small-sized neutral Ag2Sin (n = 1-13) clusters have been investigated using the CALYPSO structure searching method coupled with density functional theory calculations. A great deal of low-energy geometric isomers are optimised at the B3LYP / GENECP theory level. The optimised structures suggest that the ground state Ag2Sin clusters are visibly distorted compared with the corresponding pure silicon clusters and favor a three-dimensional configuration. Starting with Ag2Si12, one Ag atom is fully encapsulated by the Si outer cages. Based on the averaged binding energy, fragmentation energy, second-order energy difference and HOMO-LUMO energy gap, it is seen that Ag2Si2 and Ag2Si5 are tested to be the most stable clusters, and the chemical stabilities of pure Sin+2 clusters can be reduced to some extent after doping two Ag atoms. Additionally, natural population and natural electronic configuration are discussed and the results reveal that charges transfer from the Ag atoms to the silicon frames and the spd hybridisations are present in all Ag2Sin clusters. Lastly, the results of natural bonds show that the Ag-Si bond in Ag2Sin clusters is dominated by small ionic character. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2015-60404-1

  13. GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS AFFECTING SUSCEPTIBILITY TO MERCURY NEUROTOXICITY IN CHILDREN: SUMMARY FINDINGS FROM THE CASA PIA CHILDREN's AMALGAM CLINICAL TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Woods, James S.; Heyer, Nicholas J.; Russo, Joan E.; Martin, Michael D.; Farin, Federico M.

    2014-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is neurotoxic, and children may be particularly susceptible to this effect. A current major challenge is identification of children who may be uniquely susceptible to Hg toxicity because of genetic predisposition. We examined the possibility that common genetic variants that are known to affect neurologic functions or Hg handling in adults would modify the adverse neurobehavioral effects of Hg exposure in children. Three hundred thirty subjects who participated as children in the recently completed Casa Pia Clinical Trial of Dental Amalgams in Children were genotyped for 27 variants of 13 genes that are reported to affect neurologic functions and/or Hg disposition in adults. Urinary Hg concentrations, reflecting Hg exposure from any source, served as the Hg exposure index. Regression modeling strategies were employed to evaluate potential associations between allelic status for individual genes or combinations of genes, Hg exposure, and neurobehavioral test outcomes assessed at baseline and for 7 subsequent years during the clinical trial. Among boys, significant modification of Hg effects on neurobehavioral outcomes over a broad range of neurologic domains was observed with variant genotypes for 4 of 13 genes evaluated. Modification of Hg effects on a more limited number of neurobehavioral outcomes was also observed for variants of another 8 genes. Cluster analyses suggested some genes interacting in common processes to affect Hg neurotoxicity. In contrast, significant modification of Hg effects on neurobehavioral functions among girls with the same genotypes was substantially more limited. These observations suggest increased susceptibility to the adverse neurobehavioral effects of Hg among children, particularly boys, with genetic variants that are relatively common to the general human population. These findings advance public health goals to identify factors underlying susceptibility to Hg toxicity and may contribute to strategies for preventing

  14. Simulated performance of SIS and SIN junctions as heterodyne receivers in waveguide and open antenna mixer mounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, S. R.; Shafiee, R.; Little, L. T.

    1990-02-01

    Tucker's quantum theory of mixing (in the 3-port approximation) is employed to calculate the gain over a wide range of frequencies of model mixers employing SIS and SIN junctions with both real and ideal I V characteristics. A comparison is made between the performance of junctions in waveguide and open antenna mounts. It is concluded that ideal junctions give gain 1.5 to 2 times higher than real ones, SIS junctions have gain approximately three times greater than otherwise similar SIN junctions, and that junction areas need to be typically three times smaller in open antenna structures to provide comparable gain to those in waveguide mounts.

  15. Natural Radioactivity at the Sin Quyen Iron-Oxide-Copper-Gold Deposit in North Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Dinh Chau; Khanh, Phon Le; Jodłowski, Paweł; Pieczonka, Jadwiga; Piestrzyński, Adam; Van, Hao Duong; Nowak, Jakub

    2016-12-01

    The field radiometric and laboratory measurements were performed at the Sin Quyen copper deposit in North Vietnam. The field gamma-ray spectrometry indicated the concentration of uranium ranging from 5.5 to 87 ppm, thorium from 5.6 to 33.2 ppm, and potassium from 0.3 to 4.7%. The measured dose rates ranged from 115 to 582 nGy/h, the highest doses being at the copper ore. Concentrations in the solid samples were in the range of 20-1700 Bq/kg for uranium, 20-92.7 Bq/kg for thorium, and 7-1345 Bq/kg for potassium. The calculated doses were from 22 to 896 nGy/h; both measured and calculated dose rates are mostly related to uranium. Concentrations of radium in water samples were below 0. 17 Bq/L. Uranium in water samples was significantly higher than the hydrogeological background; the maximum of 13 Bq/L was at the waste zone pool, but neither radium nor uranium were present in tap water. Radon concentration in the dwelling air was from 42 to 278 Bq/m3 for 222Rn and from 8 to 193 Bq/m3 for 220Rn. The estimated committed dose rates were principally related to 222Rn concentration and ranged from 1.1 to 8.1 mSv/y.

  16. Molar ratio S/In effect on properties of sprayed In2S3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouguila, Nourredine; Timoumi, Abdelmajid; Bouzouita, Hassen; Lacaze, Emmanuelle; Bouchriha, Habib; Rezig, Bahri

    2013-08-01

    We have studied the structural, morphological and optical properties of In2S3 layers deposited on glass substrate by the spray pyrolysis method with the molar ratio S/In varies from 1 to 4. The substrate temperature was maintained at 613 K. The characteristics of these films have been determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical absorption-transmission and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Their structure is strongly dependent on the molar ratio. The deposit is mainly constituted by the β phase towards (4 0 0) direction. No characteristic peaks were observed for other impurities such as In2O3, S or In2(OH)3. The best crystallinity and surface morphology are obtained at molar ratio equal to 2.5. At this ratio, the crystallites coalesce and the local roughness is of the order of 1 nm. Optical transmission of 80% has been achieved in the visible spectrum. In2S3 band gap energy reached 2.63 eV from layers with x = 2 and deposited at Ts = 613 K.

  17. Contact heterogeneity in deer mice: implications for Sin Nombre virus transmission

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Christine A.; Lehmer, Erin M.; Previtali, Andrea; St. Jeor, Stephen; Dearing, M. Denise

    2009-01-01

    Heterogeneities within disease hosts suggest that not all individuals have the same probability of transmitting disease or becoming infected. This heterogeneity is thought to be due to dissimilarity in susceptibility and exposure among hosts. As such, it has been proposed that many host–pathogen systems follow the general pattern whereby a small fraction of the population accounts for a large fraction of the pathogen transmission. This disparity in transmission dynamics is often referred to as ‘20/80 Rule’, i.e. approximately 20 per cent of the hosts are responsible for 80 per cent of pathogen transmission. We investigated the role of heterogeneity in contact rates among potential hosts of a directly transmitted pathogen by examining Sin Nombre virus (SNV) in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). Using foraging arenas and powder marking, we documented contacts between wild deer mice in Great Basin Desert, central Utah. Our findings demonstrated heterogeneity among deer mice, both in frequency and in duration of contacts with other deer mice. Contact dynamics appear to follow the general pattern that a minority of the population accounts for a majority of the contacts. We found that 20 per cent of individuals in the population were responsible for roughly 80 per cent of the contacts observed. Larger-bodied individuals appear to be the functional group with the greatest SNV transmission potential. Contrary to our predictions, transmission potential was not influenced by breeding condition or sex. PMID:19129136

  18. Research on the airborne SINS/CNS integrated navigation system assisted by BD navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Mei-lin; Yang, Xiao-xu; Han, Jun-feng; Wei, Yu; Yue, Peng; Deng, Xiao-guo; Huang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    When the star navigation system working during the day, the strong sky background radiation lead to a result that the detect target light is too weak, in the field of view, because of the limitation on the number of the navigation star, usually choose the single star navigation work mode. In order to improve the reliability of the airborne SINS/CNS integrated navigation system, meet the demand of the long-endurance and high precision navigation, use the tight combination way, single star patrol algorithm to get the position and attitude. There exists filtering divergence problem because of the model error and the system measurement noise is uncertain, put forward a new fuzzy adaptive kalman filtering algorithm. Adjust the size of measurement noise to prevent the filter divergence; the positioning accuracy of integrated navigation system can be improved through BeiDou satellite. Without the information of BeiDou satellite, based on the level of the virtual reference, the navigation precision of integrated navigation system can be ensured over a period of time.

  19. Satellite imagery characterizes local animal reservoir populations of Sin Nombre virus in the southwestern United States

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Gregory E.; Yates, Terry L.; Fine, Joshua B.; Shields, Timothy M.; Kendall, John B.; Hope, Andrew G.; Parmenter, Cheryl A.; Peters, C. J.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Li, Chung-Sheng; Patz, Jonathan A.; Mills, James N.

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between the risk of hantaviral pulmonary syndrome (HPS), as estimated from satellite imagery, and local rodent populations was examined. HPS risk, predicted before rodent sampling, was highly associated with the abundance of Peromyscus maniculatus, the reservoir of Sin Nombre virus (SNV). P. maniculatus were common in high-risk sites, and populations in high-risk areas were skewed toward adult males, the subclass most frequently infected with SNV. In the year after an El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), captures of P. maniculatus increased only in high-risk areas. During 1998, few sites had infected mice, but by 1999, 18/20 of the high-risk sites contained infected mice and the crude prevalence was 30.8%. Only 1/18 of the low-risk sites contained infected rodents, and the prevalence of infection was lower (8.3%). Satellite imagery identified environmental features associated with SNV transmission within its reservoir population, but at least 2 years of high-risk conditions were needed for SNV to reach high prevalence. Areas with persistently high-risk environmental conditions may serve as refugia for the survival of SNV in local mouse populations. PMID:12473747

  20. Optimization Algorithm for Kalman Filter Exploiting the Numerical Characteristics of SINS/GPS Integrated Navigation Systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaoxing; Xu, Shike; Wang, Duhu; Zhang, Aiwu

    2015-11-11

    Aiming at addressing the problem of high computational cost of the traditional Kalman filter in SINS/GPS, a practical optimization algorithm with offline-derivation and parallel processing methods based on the numerical characteristics of the system is presented in this paper. The algorithm exploits the sparseness and/or symmetry of matrices to simplify the computational procedure. Thus plenty of invalid operations can be avoided by offline derivation using a block matrix technique. For enhanced efficiency, a new parallel computational mechanism is established by subdividing and restructuring calculation processes after analyzing the extracted "useful" data. As a result, the algorithm saves about 90% of the CPU processing time and 66% of the memory usage needed in a classical Kalman filter. Meanwhile, the method as a numerical approach needs no precise-loss transformation/approximation of system modules and the accuracy suffers little in comparison with the filter before computational optimization. Furthermore, since no complicated matrix theories are needed, the algorithm can be easily transplanted into other modified filters as a secondary optimization method to achieve further efficiency.

  1. New York 1 and Sin Nombre Viruses Are Serotypically Distinct Viruses Associated with Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilovskaya, Irina; LaMonica, Rachel; Fay, Mary-Ellen; Hjelle, Brian; Schmaljohn, Connie; Shaw, Robert; Mackow, Erich R.

    1999-01-01

    New York 1 virus (NY-1) and Sin Nombre virus (SN) are associated with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). NY-1 and SN are derived from unique mammalian hosts and geographic locations but have similar G1 and G2 surface proteins (93 and 97% identical, respectively). Focus reduction neutralization assays were used to define the serotypic relationship between NY-1 and SN. Sera from NY-1-positive Peromyscus leucopus neutralized NY-1 and SN at titers of ≥1/3,200 and ≤1/400, respectively (n = 12). Conversely, SN-specific rodent sera neutralized NY-1 and SN at titers of <1/400 and 1/6,400, respectively (n = 13). Acute-phase serum from a New York HPS patient neutralized NY-1 (1/640) but not SN (<1/20), while sera from HPS patients from the southwestern United States had 4- to >16-fold-lower neutralizing titers to NY-1 than to SN. Reference sera to Hantaan, Seoul, and Prospect Hill viruses also failed to neutralize NY-1. These results indicate that SN and NY-1 define unique hantavirus serotypes and implicate the presence of additional HPS-associated hantavirus serotypes in the Americas. PMID:9854075

  2. Smokers' strategic responses to sin taxes: evidence from panel data in Thailand.

    PubMed

    White, Justin S; Ross, Hana

    2015-02-01

    In addition to quitting and cutting consumption, smokers faced with higher cigarette prices may compensate in several ways that mute the health impact of cigarette taxes. This study examines three price avoidance strategies among adult male smokers in Thailand: trading down to a lower-priced brand, buying individual sticks of cigarettes instead of packs, and substituting roll-your-own tobacco for factory-manufactured cigarettes. Using two panels of microlevel data from the International Tobacco Control Southeast Asia Study, collected in 2005 and 2006, we estimate the effects of a substantial excise tax increase implemented throughout Thailand in December 2005. We present estimates of the marginal effects and price elasticities for each of five consumer behaviors. We find that, controlling for baseline smoking characteristics, sociodemographics, and policy variables, quitting is highly sensitive to changes in cigarette prices, but so are brand choice, stick-buying, and use of roll-your-own tobacco. Neglecting such strategic responses leads to overestimates of a sin tax's health impact, and neglecting product substitution distorts estimates of the price elasticity of cigarette demand. We discuss the implications for consumer welfare and several policies that mitigate the adverse impact of consumer responses.

  3. Stigmatisation and commercialisation of abortion services in Poland: turning sin into gold.

    PubMed

    Chełstowska, Agata

    2011-05-01

    This paper is about the economic consequences of the stigmatisation and illegality of abortion and its almost complete removal from public health services in Poland since the late 1980s. Once abortion left the public sphere, it entered the grey zone of private arrangements, in which a woman's private worries became someone else's private gain, and her sin turned into gold. The most important consequence was social inequality, as the right to health, life, information and safety became commodities on the free market. Women with money, who are more likely to have political influence, find this bearable, while working class women lack the political capital to protest. In the private sector, there are no government controls on price, quality of care or accountability, and almost no prosecutions. With an estimated 150,000 abortions per year, a rough estimate of US$ 95 million is being generated annually for doctors, unregistered and tax-free. Thus, the combined forces of right-wing ideology and neoliberal economic reforms have created reproductive and social injustice. To address this, stigmatisation of abortion must be countered. But a change in the political climate, a less restrictive interpretation of the law, or even a new law would not resolve the problem. Given reductions in public health care spending, abortion would remain excluded from state coverage unless neoliberal health care reforms could be reversed.

  4. How might global health master deadly sins and strive for greater virtues?

    PubMed Central

    Panter-Brick, Catherine; Eggerman, Mark; Tomlinson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In the spirit of critical reflection, we examine how the field of global health might surmount current challenges and prioritize its ethical mandate, namely to achieve, for all people, equity in health. We use the parlance of mastering deadly sins and striving for greater virtues in an effort to review what is needed to transform global health action. Global health falls prey to four main temptations: coveting silo gains, lusting for technological solutions, leaving broad promises largely unfulfilled, and boasting of narrow successes. This necessitates a change of heart: to keep faith with the promise it made, global health requires a realignment of core values and a sharper focus on the primacy of relationships with the communities it serves. Based on the literature to date, we highlight six steps to re-orienting global health action. Articulating a coherent global health agenda will come from principled action, enacted through courage and prudence in decision-making to foster people-centered systems of care over the entire lifespan. PMID:24685169

  5. Optimization Algorithm for Kalman Filter Exploiting the Numerical Characteristics of SINS/GPS Integrated Navigation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shaoxing; Xu, Shike; Wang, Duhu; Zhang, Aiwu

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at addressing the problem of high computational cost of the traditional Kalman filter in SINS/GPS, a practical optimization algorithm with offline-derivation and parallel processing methods based on the numerical characteristics of the system is presented in this paper. The algorithm exploits the sparseness and/or symmetry of matrices to simplify the computational procedure. Thus plenty of invalid operations can be avoided by offline derivation using a block matrix technique. For enhanced efficiency, a new parallel computational mechanism is established by subdividing and restructuring calculation processes after analyzing the extracted “useful” data. As a result, the algorithm saves about 90% of the CPU processing time and 66% of the memory usage needed in a classical Kalman filter. Meanwhile, the method as a numerical approach needs no precise-loss transformation/approximation of system modules and the accuracy suffers little in comparison with the filter before computational optimization. Furthermore, since no complicated matrix theories are needed, the algorithm can be easily transplanted into other modified filters as a secondary optimization method to achieve further efficiency. PMID:26569247

  6. Photoelectron imaging of small silicon cluster anions, Sin- (n=2-7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peppernick, Samuel J.; Gunaratne, K. D. Dasitha; Sayres, Scott G.; Castleman, A. W.

    2010-01-01

    Photoelectron imaging experiments were conducted on small silicon cluster anions, Sin- (n =2-7), acquired at a photon energy of 3.49 eV (355 nm). Electronic transitions arising from the anion ground states are observed, and the evaluated vertical detachment energies agree well with previous measurements and theoretical calculations. The anisotropy β parameters have also been determined for each unique feature appearing in the photoelectron angular distributions at the employed photon energy. Separate calculations using density functional theory are also undertaken to determine the relative atomic orbital contributions constructing the interrogated highest occupied and low-lying molecular orbitals of a specific cluster. A method to interpret the observed cluster angular distributions, term the β-wave approach, is then implemented which provides quantitative predictions of the anisotropy β parameter for partial wave emission from molecular orbitals partitioned by varying contributions of atomic orbital angular momenta. Highlighted in the β-wave analysis is the ability of discriminating between disparate molecular orbitals from two nearly isoenergetic structural isomers of opposing point group symmetry for the Si4- and Si6- cluster ions, respectively.

  7. An Improved Alignment Method for the Strapdown Inertial Navigation System (SINS)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng; Gao, Yanbin; Li, Guangchun; Guang, Xingxing; Li, Shutong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an innovative inertial navigation system (INS) mechanization and the associated Kalman filter (KF) are developed to implement a fine alignment for the strapdown INS (SINS) on stationary base. The improved mechanization is established in the pseudo-geographic frame, which is rebuilt based on the initial position. The new mechanization eliminates the effects of linear movement errors on the heading by decoupling. Compared with the traditional local-level mechanization, it has more advantages. The proposed algorithm requires lower coarse alignment accuracy in both the open-loop and closed-loop KFs and hence can improve the system reliability and decrease the total alignment time. Moreover, for the closed-loop KF, it can decrease oscillation caused by the system errors and improve the closed-loop system stability. In addition, the proposed algorithm can also be applied to polar alignment. The performance of the proposed algorithm is verified by both simulations and experiments and the results exhibit the superior performance of the proposed approach. PMID:27136565

  8. Smokers’ Strategic Responses to Sin Taxes: Evidence from Panel Data in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    White, Justin S.; Ross, Hana

    2014-01-01

    In addition to quitting and cutting consumption, smokers faced with higher cigarette prices may compensate in several ways that mute the health impact of cigarette taxes. This study examines three price avoidance strategies among adult male smokers in Thailand: trading down to a lower-priced brand, buying individual sticks of cigarettes instead of packs, and substituting roll-your-own (RYO) tobacco for factory-manufactured cigarettes. Using two panels of microlevel data from the International Tobacco Control Southeast Asia Study, collected in 2005 and 2006, we estimate the effects of a substantial excise tax increase implemented throughout Thailand in December 2005. We present estimates of the marginal effects and price elasticities for each of five consumer behaviors. We find that, controlling for baseline smoking characteristics, socio-demographics, and policy variables, quitting is highly sensitive to changes in cigarette prices, but so are brand choice, stick-buying, and use of RYO tobacco. Neglecting such strategic responses leads to over-estimates of a sin tax’s health impact, and neglecting product substitution distorts estimates of the price elasticity of cigarette demand. We discuss the implications for consumer welfare and several policies that mitigate the adverse impact of consumer responses. PMID:24677731

  9. Natural history of Sin Nombre virus infection in deer mice in urban parks in Oregon.

    PubMed

    Dizney, Laurie; Jones, Philip D; Ruedas, Luis A

    2010-04-01

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV), one of at least 45 hantaviruses described worldwide, is hosted by the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, a common species throughout most of North America. Herein, we describe general life-history characteristics of deer mice and the ways in which these factors relate to the incidence of SNV infections among populations of this host species in and around Portland, Oregon. In total, 3,175 deer mice were captured from October 2002 to September 2005. Transmission of SNV appears to be associated with male breeding behaviors, as more males and adults were infected than expected by capture rate; spring and summer had the highest infection prevalence, as well as scrotal male captures. Wounding rates between infected and uninfected deer mice were not different in any age or sex class. Capture rates were significantly and positively related to the interaction of temperature departure from normal, total precipitation, and number of clear days from two seasons previous (P=0.029), while infection prevalence was significantly and negatively related to the capture rate of juveniles from two seasons previous (P=0.029).

  10. An Improved Alignment Method for the Strapdown Inertial Navigation System (SINS).

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Gao, Yanbin; Li, Guangchun; Guang, Xingxing; Li, Shutong

    2016-04-29

    In this paper, an innovative inertial navigation system (INS) mechanization and the associated Kalman filter (KF) are developed to implement a fine alignment for the strapdown INS (SINS) on stationary base. The improved mechanization is established in the pseudo-geographic frame, which is rebuilt based on the initial position. The new mechanization eliminates the effects of linear movement errors on the heading by decoupling. Compared with the traditional local-level mechanization, it has more advantages. The proposed algorithm requires lower coarse alignment accuracy in both the open-loop and closed-loop KFs and hence can improve the system reliability and decrease the total alignment time. Moreover, for the closed-loop KF, it can decrease oscillation caused by the system errors and improve the closed-loop system stability. In addition, the proposed algorithm can also be applied to polar alignment. The performance of the proposed algorithm is verified by both simulations and experiments and the results exhibit the superior performance of the proposed approach.

  11. Satellite imagery characterizes local animal reservoir populations of Sin Nombre virus in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glass, Gregory E; Yates, Terry L.; Fine, Joshua B.; Shields, Timothy M.; Kendall, John B.; Hope, Andrew G.; Parmenter, Cheryl A.; Peters, C.J.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Li, Chung-Sheng; Patz, Jonathan A.; Mills, James N.

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between the risk of hantaviral pulmonary syndrome (HPS), as estimated from satellite imagery, and local rodent populations was examined. HPS risk, predicted before rodent sampling, was highly associated with the abundance of Peromyscus maniculatus, the reservoir of Sin Nombre virus (SNV). P. maniculatus were common in high-risk sites, and populations in high-risk areas were skewed toward adult males, the subclass most frequently infected with SNV. In the year after an El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), captures of P. maniculatus increased only in high-risk areas. During 1998, few sites had infected mice, but by 1999, 18/20 of the high-risk sites contained infected mice and the crude prevalence was 30.8%. Only 1/18 of the low-risk sites contained infected rodents, and the prevalence of infection was lower (8.3%). Satellite imagery identified environmental features associated with SNV transmission within its reservoir population, but at least 2 years of high-risk conditions were needed for SNV to reach high prevalence. Areas with persistently high-risk environmental conditions may serve as refugia for the survival of SNV in local mouse populations.

  12. Transmission ecology of Sin Nombre hantavirus in naturally infected North American deermouse populations in outdoor enclosures.

    PubMed

    Bagamian, Karoun H; Towner, Jonathan S; Kuenzi, Amy J; Douglass, Richard J; Rollin, Pierre E; Waller, Lance A; Mills, James N

    2012-01-01

    Sin Nombre hantavirus (SNV), hosted by the North American deermouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in North America. Most transmission studies in the host were conducted under artificial conditions, or extrapolated information from mark-recapture data. Previous studies using experimentally infected deermice were unable to demonstrate SNV transmission. We explored SNV transmission in outdoor enclosures using naturally infected deermice. Deermice acquiring SNV in enclosures had detectable viral RNA in blood throughout the acute phase of infection and acquired significantly more new wounds (indicating aggressive encounters) than uninfected deermice. Naturally-infected wild deermice had a highly variable antibody response to infection, and levels of viral RNA sustained in blood varied as much as 100-fold, even in individuals infected with identical strains of virus. Deermice that infected other susceptible individuals tended to have a higher viral RNA load than those that did not infect other deermice. Our study is a first step in exploring the transmission ecology of SNV infection in deermice and provides new knowledge about the factors contributing to the increase of the prevalence of a zoonotic pathogen in its reservoir host and to changes in the risk of HPS to human populations. The techniques pioneered in this study have implications for a wide range of zoonotic disease studies.

  13. Deer mouse movements in peridomestic and sylvan settings in relation to Sin Nombre virus antibody prevalence.

    PubMed

    Douglass, Richard J; Semmens, William J; Matlock-Cooley, Stephanie Jo; Kuenzi, Amy J

    2006-10-01

    Prevalence of antibody to Sin Nombre virus (SNV) has been found to be nearly twice as high in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) in peridomestic settings as in sylvan settings in two studies in Montana and one in New Mexico. We investigated whether this difference may be related to a difference in deer mouse movements in the two settings. We used radiotelemetry to determine home range size and length of movement for 22 sylvan (1991-1992) and 40 peridomestic deer mice (1995-1999). We also determined the percentage of locations inside versus outside of buildings for peridomestic mice. Though variable, average home range size for female deer mice was significantly smaller for peridomestic deer mice than for sylvan deer mice. The smaller home range in peridomestic settings may concentrate shed SNV, and protection from solar ultraviolet radiation inside buildings may increase environmental persistence of SNV. Both these factors could lead to increased SNV exposure of deer mice within peridomestic populations and result in higher antibody prevalence. Peridomestic deer mice moved between buildings and outside areas, which is evidence that SNV can be transmitted between peridomestic and sylvan populations.

  14. Long-term dynamics of Sin Nombre viral RNA and antibody in deer mice in Montana.

    PubMed

    Kuenzi, Amy J; Douglass, Richard J; Bond, Clifford W; Calisher, Charles H; Mills, James N

    2005-07-01

    Infections with hantaviruses in the natural host rodent may result in persistent, asymptomatic infections involving shedding of virus into the environment. Laboratory studies have partially characterized the acute and persistent infection by Sin Nombre virus (SNV) in its natural host, the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus). However, these studies have posed questions that may best be addressed using longitudinal studies involving sequential sampling of individual wild-caught, naturally infected mice. Using enzyme immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of monthly blood samples, we followed the infection status of deer mice in a mark-recapture study in Montana for 2 yr. Only six of 907 samples without IgG antibody to SNV contained detectable SNV RNA, suggesting that there is a very brief period of viremia before the host develops detectable antibody. The simultaneous presence of both antibody and viral RNA in blood was detected in consecutive monthly samples for as long as 3 mo. However, chronic infection was typified by alternating characteristics of PCR positivity and PCR negativity. Two possible interpretations of these results are that 1) viral RNA may be consistently present in the blood of chronically infected deer mouse, but that viral RNA is near the limits of PCR detectability or 2) SNV RNA sporadically appears in blood as a consequence of unknown physiological events. The occurrence of seasonal patterns in the proportion of samples that contains antibody and that also contained SNV RNA demonstrated a temporal association between recent infection (antibody acquisition) and presence of viral RNA in blood.

  15. Rotation-Activity Correlations in K and M Dwarfs. I. Stellar Parameters and Compilations of v sin i and P/sin i for a Large Sample of Late-K and M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdebine, E. R.; Mullan, D. J.; Paletou, F.; Gebran, M.

    2016-05-01

    The reliable determination of rotation-activity correlations (RACs) depends on precise measurements of the following stellar parameters: T eff, parallax, radius, metallicity, and rotational speed v sin i. In this paper, our goal is to focus on the determination of these parameters for a sample of K and M dwarfs. In a future paper (Paper II), we will combine our rotational data with activity data in order to construct RACs. Here, we report on a determination of effective temperatures based on the (R-I) C color from the calibrations of Mann et al. and Kenyon & Hartmann for four samples of late-K, dM2, dM3, and dM4 stars. We also determine stellar parameters (T eff, log(g), and [M/H]) using the principal component analysis-based inversion technique for a sample of 105 late-K dwarfs. We compile all effective temperatures from the literature for this sample. We determine empirical radius-[M/H] correlations in our stellar samples. This allows us to propose new effective temperatures, stellar radii, and metallicities for a large sample of 612 late-K and M dwarfs. Our mean radii agree well with those of Boyajian et al. We analyze HARPS and SOPHIE spectra of 105 late-K dwarfs, and we have detected v sin i in 92 stars. In combination with our previous v sin i measurements in M and K dwarfs, we now derive P/sin i measures for a sample of 418 K and M dwarfs. We investigate the distributions of P/sin i, and we show that they are different from one spectral subtype to another at a 99.9% confidence level. Based on observations available at Observatoire de Haute Provence and the European Southern Observatory databases and on Hipparcos parallax measurements.

  16. El aprendizaje significativo en las ciencias al participar en proyectos de investigacion cientifica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora Polanco, Miguelena

    La ciencia es el eje fundamental a traves del cual se desarrollan las habilidades necesarias para el pensar cientifico que va a la busqueda del conocimiento cientifico. La intencion de este estudio fue indagar en el tema de investigacion cientifica desde el punto de vista de los participantes en los siguientes aspectos relacionados con la experiencia de investigacion cientifica: a) conceptos, b) proceso, c) destrezas y d) disposicion. Tambien se analizaron: a) las perspectivas del metodo cientifico, b) la estrategia de ensenanza, c) la cultura cientifica y d) la exposicion del proyecto investigativo en la Feria Cientifica; como parte del aprendizaje significativo de la ciencias de los participantes. Esta investigacion cualitativa propuso como diseno el estudio de caso. Los aspectos relacionados a la experiencia de participar en proyecto de investigacion cientifica son el fenomeno o caso bajo estudio. En el estudio participaron cinco (5) estudiantes egresados de escuela publica o privada que cursaban hasta el tercer ano de estudios universitarios, conducentes a un bachillerato en educacion secundaria en ciencias o en ciencias naturales. Las tecnicas utilizadas para recopilar los datos fueron: analisis de documentos del DEPR, revision de artefactos y entrevistas profundas. Para el analisis de los datos de las entrevistas se utilizo el modelo de Wolcott (1994). Del analisis de documentos del DEPR se identificaron areas a mejorar en las guias de las cartas circulares con relacion a la investigacion escolar y la feria cientifica. El analisis de los artefactos proveyo evidencia de como los internados, simposios e investigaciones fomentan el que los estudiantes se superen en el aspecto cognitivo, se conviertan en creadores del conocimiento, al hacer suyo los conceptos para poder explicarlos al publico. De las entrevistas los participantes manifestaron que la experiencia de investigacion fue una de aprendizaje significativo que los marco para toda la vida y les expandio su

  17. Development of SCAR markers linked to sin-2, the stringless pod locus in pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With increasing consumer demand for vegetables, edible-podded peas have become more popular. Stringlessness is one of most important traits for snap peas. A single recessive gene, sin-2, controls this trait. Because pollen carrying the stringless gene is less competitive than pollen carrying the str...

  18. Density-functional study of structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of the EuSin (n=1-13) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Gao-feng; Sun, Jian-min; Gu, Yu-zong; Wang, Yuan-xu

    2009-09-01

    The geometries, stabilities, and electronic and magnetic properties of europium encapsulated EuSin (n =1-13) clusters have been investigated systematically by using relativistic density functional theory with generalized gradient approximation. Starting from n =12, the Eu atom completely falls into the center of the Si frame, i.e., EuSi12 is the smallest fully endohedral Eu silicon cluster. The interesting finding is in good agreement with the recent experimental results on the photoelectron spectroscopy of the europium silicon clusters [A. Grubisic, H. P. Wang, Y. J. Ko, and K. H. Bowen, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 054302 (2008)]. The magnetic moments of the EuSin (n =1-13) clusters are also studied, and the results show that the total magnetic moments of the EuSin clusters and the magnetic moments on Eu do not quench when the Eu is encapsulated in the Si outer frame cage. It is concluded that most of the 4f electrons of the Eu atom in the EuSi12 cluster do not interact with the silicon cage and the total magnetic moments are overwhelming majority contributed by the 4f electrons of the Eu atom. According to the binding energy per atom, the second difference in energy (Δ2E), and vertical ionization potential, the EuSin (n =4,9,12) clusters are very stable.

  19. Agonistic and antagonistic properties of a Rhizobium sin-1 lipid A modified by an ether-linked lipid

    PubMed Central

    Vasan, Mahalakshmi; Wolfert, Margreet A.; Boons, Geert-Jan

    2010-01-01

    LPS from Rhizobium sin-1 (R. sin-1) can antagonize the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) by E. coli LPS in human monocytic cells. Therefore these compounds provide interesting leads for the development of therapeutics for the prevention or treatment of septic shock. Detailed structure activity relationship studies have, however, been hampered by the propensity of these compounds to undergo β-elimination to give biological inactive enone derivatives. To address this problem, we have chemically synthesized in a convergent manner a R. sin-1 lipid A derivative in which the β-hydroxy ester at C-3 of the proximal sugar unit has been replaced by an ether linked moiety. As expected, this derivative exhibited a much-improved chemical stability. Furthermore, its ability to antagonize TNF-α production induced by enteric LPS was only slightly smaller than that of the parent ester modified derivative demonstrating that the ether-linked lipids affect biological activities only marginally. Furthermore, it has been shown for the first time that R. sin-1 LPS and the ether modified lipid A are also able to antagonize the production of the cytokine interferon-inducible protein 10, which arises from the TRIF-dependent pathway. The latter pathway was somewhat more potently inhibited than the MyD88-dependent pathway. Furthermore, it was observed that the natural LPS possesses much greater activity than the synthetic and isolated lipid As, which indicates that di-KDO moiety is important for optimal biological activity. It has also been found that isolated R. sin-1 LPS and lipid A agonize a mouse macrophage cell line to induce the production of TNF-α and interferon beta in a Toll-like receptor 4-dependent manner demonstrating species specific properties. PMID:17581652

  20. THE SINS/zC-SINF SURVEY of z {approx} 2 GALAXY KINEMATICS: OUTFLOW PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Sarah F.; Genzel, Reinhard; Foerster-Schreiber, Natascha M.; Buschkamp, Peter; Davies, Ric; Eisenhauer, Frank; Kurk, Jaron; Lutz, Dieter; Griffin, Kristen Shapiro; Mancini, Chiara; Renzini, Alvio; Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Peng, Yingjie; Bouche, Nicolas; Burkert, Andreas; Cresci, Giovanni; Genel, Shy; Hicks, Erin K. S.; Naab, Thorsten; and others

    2012-12-10

    Using SINFONI H{alpha}, [N II], and [S II] AO data of 27 z {approx} 2 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from the SINS and zC-SINF surveys, we explore the dependence of outflow strength (via the broad flux fraction) on various galaxy parameters. For galaxies that have evidence for strong outflows, we find that the broad emission is spatially extended to at least the half-light radius ({approx}a few kpc). Decomposition of the [S II] doublet into broad and narrow components suggests that this outflowing gas probably has a density of {approx}10-100 cm{sup -3}, less than that of the star-forming gas (600 cm{sup -3}). There is a strong correlation of the H{alpha} broad flux fraction with the star formation surface density of the galaxy, with an apparent threshold for strong outflows occurring at 1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. Above this threshold, we find that SFGs with log m{sub *} > 10 have similar or perhaps greater wind mass-loading factors ({eta} = M-dot{sub out}/SFR) and faster outflow velocities than lower mass SFGs, suggesting that the majority of outflowing gas at z {approx} 2 may derive from high-mass SFGs. The mass-loading factor is also correlated with the star formation rate (SFR), galaxy size, and inclination, such that smaller, more star-forming, and face-on galaxies launch more powerful outflows. We propose that the observed threshold for strong outflows and the observed mass loading of these winds can be explained by a simple model wherein break-out of winds is governed by pressure balance in the disk.

  1. Temporal Analysis of Andes Virus and Sin Nombre Virus Infections of Syrian Hamsters▿

    PubMed Central

    Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Chapman, Jennifer; Asher, Ludmila; Fisher, Robert; Zimmerman, Michael; Larsen, Tom; Hooper, Jay W.

    2007-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) and Sin Nombre virus (SNV) are rodent-borne hantaviruses that cause a highly lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans known as hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). There are no vaccines or specific drugs to prevent or treat HPS, and the pathogenesis is not understood. Syrian hamsters infected with ANDV, but not SNV, develop a highly lethal disease that closely resembles HPS in humans. Here, we performed a temporal pathogenesis study comparing ANDV and SNV infections in hamsters. SNV was nonpathogenic and viremia was not detected despite the fact that all animals were infected. ANDV was uniformly lethal with a mean time to death of 11 days. The first pathology detected was lymphocyte apoptosis starting on day 4. Animals were viremic and viral antigen was first observed in multiple organs by days 6 and 8, respectively. Levels of infectious virus in the blood increased 4 to 5 logs between days 6 and 8. Pulmonary edema was first detected ultrastructurally on day 6. Ultrastructural analysis of lung tissues revealed the presence of large inclusion bodies and substantial numbers of vacuoles within infected endothelial cells. Paraendothelial gaps were not observed, suggesting that fluid leakage was transcellular and directly attributable to infecting virus. Taken together, these data imply that HPS treatment strategies aimed at preventing virus replication and dissemination will have the greatest probability of success if administered before the viremic phase; however, because vascular leakage is associated with infected endothelial cells, a therapeutic strategy targeting viral replication might be effective even at later times (e.g., after disease onset). PMID:17475651

  2. Fluorescent multiple staining and CASA system to assess boar sperm viability and membranes integrity in short and long-term extenders

    PubMed Central

    Lange-Consiglio, A.; Meucci, A.; Cremonesi, F.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect on boar spermatozoa quality of in vitro storage in short and long-term extenders by fluorescent multiple staining (FMS) and computer assisted semen analyzer (CASA). Fresh ejaculates from three healthy, sexually mature boars were diluted with equal volumes of six short-term or three long-term commercial extenders and stored at 19°C for 6 days (short-term) or 12 days (long-term). The integrity of spermatozoa membranes was analyzed by FMS using propidium iodide, 5,5’,6,6’-tetrachloro-1,1’,3,3’ tetraethylbenzimidazolyl-carbocyanine iodide (JC-1) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated peanut agglutinin (PNA). The results obtained from this staining were compared with spermatozoa motility assessed by CASA. Our study showed that the number of viable spermatozoa with non-reacted acrosomes and intact mitochondria was positively correlated with the rate of motile spermatozoa (r2>0.9) irrespective of the extender used. In all extenders the number of motile spermatozoa significantly decreased as preservation period increased (P<0.05). FMS test is a potent indicator of sperm motility because it analyses mitochondrial integrity independently from observable alterations in motility. The best performing extenders were BTS for short-term storage and TRI-x-Cell for long-term storage. PMID:26623308

  3. SIN3A, generally regarded as a transcriptional repressor, is required for induction of gene transcription by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Solaimani, Parrisa; Wang, Feng; Hankinson, Oliver

    2014-11-28

    CYP1A1 bioactivates several procarcinogens and detoxifies several xenobiotic compounds. Transcription of CYP1A1 is highly induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. We recently described an RNAi high throughput screening performed in the Hepa-1 mouse hepatoma cell line, which revealed that SIN3A is necessary for the induction of CYP1A1-dependent ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) enzymatic activity by TCDD. In the current studies, we sought to provide insight into the role of SIN3A in this process, particularly because studies on SIN3A have usually focused on its repressive activity on transcription. We report that ectopic expression of human SIN3A in Hepa-1 cells enhanced EROD induction by TCDD and efficiently rescued TCDD induction of EROD activity in cells treated with an siRNA to mouse SIN3A, thus validating a role for SIN3A in CYP1A1 induction. We demonstrate that SIN3A is required for TCDD induction of the CYP1A1 protein in Hepa-1 cells but not for expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor protein. In addition, siRNAs for SIN3A decreased TCDD-mediated induction of CYP1A1 mRNA and EROD activity in human hepatoma cell line Hep3B. We establish that TCDD treatment of Hepa-1 cells rapidly increases the degree of SIN3A binding to both the proximal promoter and enhancer of the Cyp1a1 gene and demonstrate that increased binding to the promoter also occurs in human Hep3B, HepG2, and MCF-7 cells. These studies establish that SIN3A physically interacts with the CYP1A1 gene and extends the transcriptional role of SIN3A to a gene that is very rapidly and dramatically induced.

  4. SIN3A, Generally Regarded as a Transcriptional Repressor, Is Required for Induction of Gene Transcription by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Solaimani, Parrisa; Wang, Feng; Hankinson, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    CYP1A1 bioactivates several procarcinogens and detoxifies several xenobiotic compounds. Transcription of CYP1A1 is highly induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. We recently described an RNAi high throughput screening performed in the Hepa-1 mouse hepatoma cell line, which revealed that SIN3A is necessary for the induction of CYP1A1-dependent ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) enzymatic activity by TCDD. In the current studies, we sought to provide insight into the role of SIN3A in this process, particularly because studies on SIN3A have usually focused on its repressive activity on transcription. We report that ectopic expression of human SIN3A in Hepa-1 cells enhanced EROD induction by TCDD and efficiently rescued TCDD induction of EROD activity in cells treated with an siRNA to mouse SIN3A, thus validating a role for SIN3A in CYP1A1 induction. We demonstrate that SIN3A is required for TCDD induction of the CYP1A1 protein in Hepa-1 cells but not for expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor protein. In addition, siRNAs for SIN3A decreased TCDD-mediated induction of CYP1A1 mRNA and EROD activity in human hepatoma cell line Hep3B. We establish that TCDD treatment of Hepa-1 cells rapidly increases the degree of SIN3A binding to both the proximal promoter and enhancer of the Cyp1a1 gene and demonstrate that increased binding to the promoter also occurs in human Hep3B, HepG2, and MCF-7 cells. These studies establish that SIN3A physically interacts with the CYP1A1 gene and extends the transcriptional role of SIN3A to a gene that is very rapidly and dramatically induced. PMID:25305016

  5. Seven deadly sins in confronting endemic iodine deficiency, and how to avoid them.

    PubMed

    Dunn, J T

    1996-04-01

    and apportioned fairly; and 7) nonsustainability: for permanent success, an iodization program must be fair to all relevant parties and accompanied by a regular system of appropriate monitoring. Only with careful avoidance of these seven "deadly sins" can the goal of sustainable elimination of iodine deficiency be achieved.

  6. Synthesis of In2S3 thin films by spray pyrolysis from precursors with different [S]/[In] ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sall, Thierno; Nafidi, A.; Marí Soucase, Bernabé; Mollar, Miguel; Hartitti, Bouchaib; Fahoume, Mounir

    2014-06-01

    Indium sulfide (In2S3) thin films were prepared by chemical spray pyrolysis technique from solutions with different [S]/[In] ratios on glass substrates at a constant temperature of 250 °C. Thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Raman spectroscopy and optical transmittance spectroscopy. All samples exhibit a polycrystalline structure with a preferential orientation along (0, 0, 12). A good stoichiometry was attained for all samples. The morphology of thin film surfaces, as seen by SEM, was dense and no cracks or pinholes were observed. Raman spectroscopy analysis shows active modes belonging to β-ln2S3 phase. The optical transmittance in the visible range is higher than 60% and the band gap energy slightly increases with the sulfur to indium ratio, attaining a value of 2.63 eV for [S]/[In] = 4.5.

  7. Precise Measurement of the CP Violation Parameter sin2Φ1 in B⁰→(cc̄)K⁰ Decays

    DOE PAGES

    Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; ...

    2012-04-23

    We present a precise measurement of the CP violation parameter sin2Φ1 and the direct CP violation parameter Af using the final data sample of 772×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e⁺e⁻ collider. One neutral B meson is reconstructed in a J/ψK0S, ψ(2S)K0S, χc1K0S, or J/ψK0L CP eigenstate and its flavor is identified from the decay products of the accompanying B meson. From the distribution of proper-time intervals between the two B decays, we obtain the following CP violation parameters: sin2Φ1=0.667±0.023(stat)±0.012(syst) and Af=0.006±0.016(stat)±0.012(syst).

  8. MEASUREMENT OF sin 2φ1 IN b → c And b → s DECAYS AT Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Nicholas C.

    Measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries in B0 → J/ψK0, φK0, K+K- KS, η' KS, f0 (980) KS and ωKS decays based on 386 × 106 Bbar{B} pairs collected by the Belle detector are presented. With this data sample, the J/ψK0 mode provides a precision measurement of sin2 φ1. The other modes, which proceed via b → s penguin (loop) diagrams are sensitive to new physics phases which may appear within the loop. Differing sin2 φ1 measurements between J/ψK0 and the b → s penguin modes could be a signature of such phases.

  9. Dispersive optomechanical coupling between a SiN nanomechanical oscillator and evanescent fields of a silica optical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chunhua; Htay Oo, Thein; Fiore, Victor; Wang, Hailin

    2013-03-01

    Tensile stressed SiN nanostrings can feature a picogram effective mass and a mechanical Q-factor exceeding a million. These remarkable nanomechanical oscillators can be dispersively-coupled to an ultra-high finesse optical microresonator via its evanescent field. This composite optomechanical system can potentially lead to a cooperativity that far exceeds that of monolithic optomechanical resonators. Here, we report an experimental study coupling a SiN nanostring to evanescent fields of a whispering gallery mode (WGM) in a silica microsphere. The slight deformation of the microsphere enables us to use free-space optical excitation to probe the optomechanical coupling. The dispersive coupling between a nanostring and the evanescent field of a WGM is generally expected to lead to a red shift in the resonance frequency of the WGM. Our experiments, however, reveal a blue frequency shift of the WGM. Detailed experimental studies and possible physical mechanisms for the blue shift will be presented.

  10. Transition from exo- to endo- Cu absorption in CuSin clusters: A Genetic Algorithms Density Functional Theory (DFT) Study

    PubMed Central

    Oña, Ofelia B.; Ferraro, Marta B.; Facelli, Julio C.

    2010-01-01

    The characterization and prediction of the structures of metal silicon clusters is important for nanotechnology research because these clusters can be used as building blocks for nano devices, integrated circuits and solar cells. Several authors have postulated that there is a transition between exo to endo absorption of Cu in Sin clusters and showed that for n larger than 9 it is possible to find endohedral clusters. Unfortunately, no global searchers have confirmed this observation, which is based on local optimizations of plausible structures. Here we use parallel Genetic Algorithms (GA), as implemented in our MGAC software, directly coupled with DFT energy calculations to show that the global search of CuSin cluster structures does not find endohedral clusters for n < 8 but finds them for n ≥ 10. PMID:21785526

  11. Replication and clearance of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus from the brains of animals vaccinated with chimeric SIN/VEE viruses.

    PubMed

    Paessler, Slobodan; Ni, Haolin; Petrakova, Olga; Fayzulin, Rafik Z; Yun, Nadezhda; Anishchenko, Michael; Weaver, Scott C; Frolov, Ilya

    2006-03-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is an important, naturally emerging zoonotic pathogen. Recent outbreaks in Venezuela and Colombia in 1995, involving an estimated 100,000 human cases, indicate that VEEV still poses a serious public health threat. To develop a safe, efficient vaccine that protects against disease resulting from VEEV infection, we generated chimeric Sindbis (SIN) viruses expressing structural proteins of different strains of VEEV and analyzed their replication in vitro and in vivo, as well as the characteristics of the induced immune responses. None of the chimeric SIN/VEE viruses caused any detectable disease in adult mice after either intracerebral (i.c.) or subcutaneous (s.c.) inoculation, and all chimeras were more attenuated than the vaccine strain, VEEV TC83, in 6-day-old mice after i.c. infection. All vaccinated mice were protected against lethal encephalitis following i.c., s.c., or intranasal (i.n.) challenge with the virulent VEEV ZPC738 strain (ZPC738). In spite of the absence of clinical encephalitis in vaccinated mice challenged with ZPC738 via i.n. or i.c. route, we regularly detected high levels of infectious challenge virus in the central nervous system (CNS). However, infectious virus was undetectable in the brains of all immunized animals at 28 days after challenge. Hamsters vaccinated with chimeric SIN/VEE viruses were also protected against s.c. challenge with ZPC738. Taken together, our findings suggest that these chimeric SIN/VEE viruses are safe and efficacious in adult mice and hamsters and are potentially useful as VEEV vaccines. In addition, immunized animals provide a useful model for studying the mechanisms of the anti-VEEV neuroinflammatory response, leading to the reduction of viral titers in the CNS and survival of animals.

  12. Structures and electronic properties of B3Sin- (n = 4-10) clusters: A combined ab initio and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xue; Lu, Sheng-Jie; Liang, Xiaoqing; Huang, Xiaoming; Qin, Ying; Chen, Maodu; Zhao, Jijun; Xu, Hong-Guang; King, R. Bruce; Zheng, Weijun

    2017-01-01

    The anionic silicon clusters doped with three boron atoms, B3Sin- (n = 4-10), have been generated by laser vaporization and investigated by anion photoelectron spectroscopy. The vertical detachment energies (VDEs) and adiabatic detachment energies (ADEs) of these anionic clusters are determined. The lowest energy structures of B3Sin- (n = 4-10) clusters are globally searched using genetic algorithm incorporated with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The photoelectron spectra, VDEs, ADEs of these B3Sin- clusters (n = 4-10) are simulated using B3LYP/6-311+G(d) calculations. Satisfactory agreement is found between theory and experiment. Most of the lowest-energy structures of B3Sin- (n = 4-10) clusters can be derived by using the squashed pentagonal bipyramid structure of B3Si4- as the major building unit. Analyses of natural charge populations show that the boron atoms always possess negative charges, and that the electrons transfer from the 3s orbital of silicon and the 2s orbital of boron to the 2p orbital of boron. The calculated average binding energies, second-order differences of energies, and the HOMO-LUMO gaps show that B3Si6- and B3Si9- clusters have relatively high stability and enhanced chemical inertness. In particular, the B3Si9- cluster with high symmetry (C3v) stands out as an interesting superatom cluster with a magic number of 40 skeletal electrons and a closed-shell electronic configuration of 1S21P61D102S22P61F14 for superatom orbitals.

  13. The Legacy of Hideki Yukawa, Sin-itiro Tomonaga, and Shoichi Sakata: Some Aspects from their Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konuma, Michiji; Bando, Masako; Gotoh, Haruyoshi; Hayakawa, Hisao; Hirata, Kohji; Ito, Kazuyuki; Ito, Kenji; Kanaya, Kazuyuki; Konagaya, Daisuke; Kugo, Taichiro; Namba, Chusei; Nishitani, Tadashi; Takaiwa, Yoshinobu; Tanabashi, Masaharu; Tanaka, Kio; Tanaka, Sho; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Yoshikawa, Tadashi

    Hideki Yukawa, Sin-itiro Tomonaga and Shoichi Sakata pioneered nuclear and particle physics and left enduring legacies. Their friendly collaboration and severe competition laid the foundation to bring up the active postwar generation of nuclear and particle physicists in Japan. In this presentation we illustrate milestones of nuclear and particle physics in Japan from 1930's to mid-1940's which have been clarified in Yukawa Hall Archival Library, Tomonaga Memorial Room and Sakata Memorial Archival Library.

  14. Blocking the PAH2 domain of Sin3A inhibits tumorigenesis and confers retinoid sensitivity in triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Nidhi; Pereira, Lutecia; Cubedo, Elena; Yu, Jianshi; Pierzchalski, Keely; Jones, Jace W.; Fishel, Melissa; Kane, Maureen; Zelent, Arthur; Waxman, Samuel; Farias, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) frequently relapses locally, regionally or as systemic metastases. Development of targeted therapy that offers significant survival benefit in TNBC is an unmet clinical need. We have previously reported that blocking interactions between PAH2 domain of chromatin regulator Sin3A and the Sin3 interaction domain (SID) containing proteins by SID decoys result in EMT reversal, and re-expression of genes associated with differentiation. Here we report a novel and therapeutically relevant combinatorial use of SID decoys. SID decoys activate RARα/β pathways that are enhanced in combination with RARα-selective agonist AM80 to induce morphogenesis and inhibit tumorsphere formation. These findings correlate with inhibition of mammary hyperplasia and a significant increase in tumor-free survival in MMTV-Myc oncomice treated with a small molecule mimetic of SID (C16). Further, in two well-established mouse TNBC models we show that treatment with C16-AM80 combination has marked anti-tumor effects, prevents lung metastases and seeding of tumor cells to bone marrow. This correlated to a remarkable 100% increase in disease-free survival with a possibility of “cure” in mice bearing a TNBC-like tumor. Targeting Sin3A by C16 alone or in combination with AM80 may thus be a promising adjuvant therapy for treating or preventing metastatic TNBC. PMID:27286261

  15. The devil is in the details: the seven deadly sins of organizing and continuing interprofessional education in the US.

    PubMed

    Clark, Phillip G

    2011-09-01

    In spite of increased calls for expanding interprofessional practice (IPP) in the US health care system to address concerns about patient safety and quality of care, there has not been a corresponding dramatic growth in interprofessional education (IPE) programs. Indeed, the history of IPE in the US has been a roller-coaster ride of gains and losses, successes and failures. Understanding why this has been so requires the development of a personal and political economy framework, based on an understanding of the structural, ideological, and economic factors and forces that characterize IPE in American higher education. Using a metaphor of the seven deadly sins (lust, pride, greed, gluttony, envy, sloth, and wrath), this discussion focuses on both things that should not be done (sins of commission) and those that should be done but are not (sins of omission) to create successful and sustainable IPE programs. Taken together, these factors help to frame a perspective on IPE that highlights the essential knowledge, attitudes, and skills needed by faculty and administrators to create, implement, and - most importantly - sustain successful programs. Implications of this framework for promoting increased IPE are discussed, particularly with respect to insuring its successful continuation into the future.

  16. The influence of the long chain fatty acid on the antagonistic activities of Rhizobium sin-1 lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanghui; Wolfert, Margreet A.; Boons, Geert-Jan

    2007-01-01

    The lipid A from nitrogen-fixing bacterial species R. sin-1 is structurally unusual due to lack of phosphates and the presence of a 2-aminogluconolactone and a very long chain fatty acid, 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid (27OHC28:0), moiety. This structurally unusual lipid A can antagonize TNF-α production by human monocytes induced by E. coli LPS. To establish the relevance of the unusual long chain 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid for antagonistic properties, a highly convergent strategy for the synthesis of several derivatives of the lipid A of Rhizobium sin-1 has been developed. Compound 1 is a natural R. sin-1 lipid A having a 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid at C-2′, compound 2 contains an octacosanoic acid moiety at this position, and compound 3 is modified by a short chain tetradecanoic acid. Cellular activation studies with a human monocytic cell line have shown that the octacosanoic acid is important for optimal antagonistic properties. The hydroxyl of the natural 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic moiety does, however, not account for inhibitory activity. The resulting structure activity relationships are important for the design of compounds for the treatment of septic shock. PMID:17513113

  17. Freedom in responsibility: on the relevance of "sin" as a hermeneutic guiding principle in bioethical decision making.

    PubMed

    Gräb-Schmidt, Elisabeth

    2005-08-01

    This essay deals with questions of responsibility concerning technology, in particular, gene technology and the special problem of research on embryos. I raise issues concerning the extent of humans' authority to act and the limits of human freedom. In what way is that freedom given, and what kind of responsibility results from it? By discussing various concepts of human freedom in the tradition of European philosophy, as juxtaposed to the Protestant understanding of freedom, this essay discusses the restricting limits, and the obligation to take responsibility. It will turn out that the question concerning freedom cannot be answered without understanding what being human involves. From a Christian perspective, this implies that the foundational relationship between human freedom and sin will be central to an assessment of the human ability to take responsibility. By obliterating the limits of human freedom, sin jeopardizes the very essence of that freedom. The project of taking into account the sinful state of the human condition thus aims at developing a realistic picture of the authority of humans in action, even in view of the human tasks of promoting science and research.

  18. Rationale and study design of a patient-centered intervention to improve health status in chronic heart failure: The Collaborative Care to Alleviate Symptoms and Adjust to Illness (CASA) randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Bekelman, David B; Allen, Larry A; Peterson, Jamie; Hattler, Brack; Havranek, Edward P; Fairclough, Diane L; McBryde, Connor F; Meek, Paula M

    2016-11-01

    While contemporary heart failure management has led to some improvements in morbidity and mortality, patients continue to report poor health status (i.e., burdensome symptoms, impaired function, and poor quality of life). The Collaborative Care to Alleviate Symptoms and Adjust to Illness (CASA) trial is a NIH-funded, three-site, randomized clinical trial that examines the effect of the CASA intervention compared to usual care on the primary outcome of patient-reported health status at 6months in patients with heart failure and poor health status. The CASA intervention involves a nurse who works with patients to treat symptoms (e.g., shortness of breath, fatigue, pain) using disease-specific and palliative approaches, and a social worker who provides psychosocial care targeting depression and adjustment to illness. The intervention uses a collaborative care team model of health care delivery and is structured and primarily phone-based to enhance reproducibility and scalability. This article describes the rationale and design of the CASA trial, including several decision points: (1) how to design a patient-centered intervention to improve health status; (2) how to structure the intervention so that it is reproducible and scalable; and (3) how to systematically identify outpatients with heart failure most likely to need and benefit from the intervention. The results should provide valuable information to providers and health systems about the use of team care to manage symptoms and provide psychosocial care in chronic illness.

  19. The 11S globulin Sin a 2 from yellow mustard seeds shows IgE cross-reactivity with homologous counterparts from tree nuts and peanut

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The 11S globulin Sin a 2 is a marker to predict severity of symptoms in mustard allergic patients. The potential implication of Sin a 2 in cross-reactivity with tree nuts and peanut has not been investigated so far. In this work, we studied at the IgG and IgE level the involvement of the 11S globulin Sin a 2 in cross-reactivity among mustard, tree nuts and peanut. Methods Eleven well-characterized mustard-allergic patients sensitized to Sin a 2 were included in the study. A specific anti-Sin a 2 serum was obtained in rabbit. Skin prick tests (SPT), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunoblotting and IgG or IgE-inhibition immunoblotting experiments using purified Sin a 2, Sin a 1, Sin a 3, mustard, almond, hazelnut, pistachio, walnut or peanut extracts were performed. Results The rabbit anti-Sin a 2 serum showed high affinity and specificity to Sin a 2, which allowed us to demonstrate that Sin a 2 shares IgG epitopes with allergenic 11S globulins from tree nuts (almond, hazelnut, pistachio and walnut) but not from peanut. All the patients included in the study had positive skin prick test to tree nuts and/or peanut and we subdivided them into two different groups according to their clinical symptoms after ingestion of such allergenic sources. We showed that 11S globulins contain conserved IgE epitopes involved in cross-reactivity among mustard, tree nuts and peanut as well as species-specific IgE epitopes. Conclusions The allergenic 11S globulin Sin a 2 from mustard is involved in cross-reactivity at the IgE level with tree nuts and peanut. Although the clinical relevance of the cross-reactive IgE epitopes present in 11S globulins needs to be investigated in further detail, our results contribute to improve the diagnosis and management of mustard allergic patients sensitized to Sin a 2. PMID:23231956

  20. Production of sulfur gases and carbon dioxide by synthetic weathering of crushed drill cores from the Santa Cruz porphyry copper deposit near Casa Grande, Pinal County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, M.E.; Ryder, J.L.; Sutley, S.J.; Botinelly, T.

    1990-01-01

    Samples of ground drill cores from the southern part of the Santa Cruz porphyry copper deposit, Casa Grande, Arizona, were oxidized in simulated weathering experiments. The samples were also separated into various mineral fractions and analyzed for contents of metals and sulfide minerals. The principal sulfide mineral present was pyrite. Gases produced in the weathering experiments were measured by gas chromatography. Carbon dioxide, oxygen, carbonyl sulfide, sulfur dioxide and carbon disulfide were found in the gases; no hydrogen sulfide, organic sulfides, or mercaptans were detected. Oxygen concentration was very important for production of the volatiles measured; in general, oxygen concentration was more important to gas production than were metallic element content, sulfide mineral content, or mineral fraction (oxide or sulfide) of the sample. The various volatile species also appeared to be interactive; some of the volatiles measured may have been formed through gas reactions. ?? 1990.

  1. Effect of chamber characteristics, loading and analysis time on motility and kinetic variables analysed with the CASA-mot system in goat sperm.

    PubMed

    Del Gallego, R; Sadeghi, S; Blasco, E; Soler, C; Yániz, J L; Silvestre, M A

    2017-02-01

    Several factors unrelated to the semen samples could be influencing in the sperm motility analysis. The aim of the present research was to study the effect of four chambers with different characteristics, namely; slide-coverslip, Spermtrack, ISAS D4C10, and ISAS D4C20 on the sperm motility. The filling procedure (drop or capillarity) and analysis time (0, 120 and 240s), depth of chamber (10 or 20μm) and field on motility variables were analysed by use of the CASA-mot system in goat sperm. Use of the drop-filling chambers resulted in greater values than capillarity-filling chambers for all sperm motility and kinetic variables, except for LIN (64.5% compared with 56.3% of motility for drop- and capillarity-filling chambers respectively, P<0.05). There were no significant differences in total sperm motility between different chamber depths, however, use of the 20μm-chambers resulted in greater sperm progressive motility rate, VSL and LIN, and less VCL and VAP than chambers with a lesser depth. There was less sperm motility and lesser values for kinetic variables as time that elapsed increased between sample loading and sperm evaluation. For sperm motility, use of droplet-loaded chambers resulted in similar values of MOT in all microscopic fields, but sperm motility assessed in capillarity-loaded chambers was less in the central fields than in the outermost microscopic fields. For goats, it is recommended that sperm motility be analysed using the CASA-mot system with a drop-loaded chamber within 2min after filling the chamber.

  2. pH might play a role in regulating the function of paired amphipathic helices domains of human Sin3B by altering structure and thermodynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Tauheed; Ali, Mashook; Saluja, Daman; Singh, Laishram Rajendrakumar

    2015-04-01

    Human Sin3B (hSin3B), a transcription regulator, is a scaffold protein that binds to different transcription factors and regulates transcription. It consists of six conserved domains that include four paired amphipathic helices (PAH 1-4), histone deacetylase interaction domain (HID), and highly conserved region (HCR). Interestingly, the PAH domains of hSin3B are significantly homologous to each other, yet each one interacts with a specific set of unique transcription factors. Though various partners interacting with hSin3B PAH domains have been characterized, there is no structural information available on the individual PAH domains of hSin3B. Here we characterize the structure and stability of different PAH domains of hSin3B at both nuclear and physiological pH values by using different optical probes. We found that the native state structure and stability of different PAH domains are different at nuclear pH where hSin3B performs its biological function. We also found that PAH2 and PAH3 behave differently at both nuclear and physiological pH in terms of native state structure and thermodynamic stability, while the structural identity of PAH1 remains unaltered at both pH values. The study indicates that the structural heterogeneity of different PAH domains might be responsible for having a unique set of interacting transcription factors.

  3. Selective Inhibition of SIN3 Corepressor with Avermectins as a Novel Therapeutic Strategy in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yeon-Jin; Petrie, Kevin; Leibovitch, Boris A; Zeng, Lei; Mezei, Mihaly; Howell, Louise; Gil, Veronica; Christova, Rossitza; Bansal, Nidhi; Yang, Shuai; Sharma, Rajal; Ariztia, Edgardo V; Frankum, Jessica; Brough, Rachel; Sbirkov, Yordan; Ashworth, Alan; Lord, Christopher J; Zelent, Arthur; Farias, Eduardo; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Waxman, Samuel

    2015-08-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) lacking estrogen, progesterone, and HER2 receptors account for 10% to 20% of breast cancer and are indicative of poor prognosis. The development of effective treatment strategies therefore represents a pressing unmet clinical need. We previously identified a molecularly targeted approach to target aberrant epigenetics of TNBC using a peptide corresponding to the SIN3 interaction domain (SID) of MAD. SID peptide selectively blocked binding of SID-containing proteins to the paired α-helix (PAH2) domain of SIN3, resulting in epigenetic and transcriptional modulation of genes associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). To find small molecule inhibitor (SMI) mimetics of SID peptide, we performed an in silico screen for PAH2 domain-binding compounds. This led to the identification of the avermectin macrocyclic lactone derivatives selamectin and ivermectin (Mectizan) as candidate compounds. Both selamectin and ivermectin phenocopied the effects of SID peptide to block SIN3-PAH2 interaction with MAD, induce expression of CDH1 and ESR1, and restore tamoxifen sensitivity in MDA-MB-231 human and MMTV-Myc mouse TNBC cells in vitro. Treatment with selamectin or ivermectin led to transcriptional modulation of genes associated with EMT and maintenance of a cancer stem cell phenotype in TNBC cells. This resulted in impairment of clonogenic self-renewal in vitro and inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. Underlining the potential of avermectins in TNBC, pathway analysis revealed that selamectin also modulated the expression of therapeutically targetable genes. Consistent with this, an unbiased drug screen in TNBC cells identified selamectin-induced sensitization to a number of drugs, including those targeting modulated genes.

  4. Surface donor states distribution post SiN passivation of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Nitin; Fjeldly, Tor A.

    2014-07-21

    In this paper, we present a physics based analytical model to describe the effect of SiN passivation on two-dimensional electron gas density and surface barrier height in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. The model is based on an extraction technique to calculate surface donor density and surface donor level at the SiN/AlGaN interface. The model is in good agreement with the experimental results and promises to become a useful tool in advanced design and characterization of GaN based heterostructures.

  5. The stress-related, rhizobial small RNA RcsR1 destabilizes the autoinducer synthase encoding mRNA sinI in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Baumgardt, Kathrin; Šmídová, Klára; Rahn, Helen; Lochnit, Günter; Robledo, Marta; Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Quorum sensing is a cell density-dependent communication system of bacteria relying on autoinducer molecules. During the analysis of the post-transcriptional regulation of quorum sensing in the nitrogen fixing plant symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti, we predicted and verified a direct interaction between the 5'-UTR of sinI mRNA encoding the autoinducer synthase and a small RNA (sRNA), which we named RcsR1. In vitro, RcsR1 prevented cleavage in the 5'-UTR of sinI by RNase E and impaired sinI translation. In line with low ribosomal occupancy and transcript destabilization upon binding of RcsR1 to sinI, overproduction of RcsR1 in S. meliloti resulted in lower level and shorter half-life of sinI mRNA, and in decreased autoinducer amount. Although RcsR1 can influence quorum sensing via sinI, its level did not vary at different cell densities, but decreased under salt stress and increased at low temperature. We found that RcsR1 and its stress-related expression pattern, but not the interaction with sinI homologs, are conserved in Sinorhizobium, Rhizobium and Agrobacterium. Consistently, overproduction of RcsR1 in S. meliloti and Agrobacterium tumefaciens inhibited growth at high salinity. We identified conserved targets of RcsR1 and showed that most conserved interactions and the effect on growth under salt stress are mediated by the first stem-loop of RcsR1, while its central part is responsible for the species-specific interaction with sinI. We conclude that RcsR1 is an ancient, stress-related riboregulator in rhizobia and propose that it links stress responses to quorum sensing in S. meliloti. PMID:26588798

  6. The stress-related, rhizobial small RNA RcsR1 destabilizes the autoinducer synthase encoding mRNA sinI in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Baumgardt, Kathrin; Šmídová, Klára; Rahn, Helen; Lochnit, Günter; Robledo, Marta; Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena

    2016-05-03

    Quorum sensing is a cell density-dependent communication system of bacteria relying on autoinducer molecules. During the analysis of the post-transcriptional regulation of quorum sensing in the nitrogen fixing plant symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti, we predicted and verified a direct interaction between the 5'-UTR of sinI mRNA encoding the autoinducer synthase and a small RNA (sRNA), which we named RcsR1. In vitro, RcsR1 prevented cleavage in the 5'-UTR of sinI by RNase E and impaired sinI translation. In line with low ribosomal occupancy and transcript destabilization upon binding of RcsR1 to sinI, overproduction of RcsR1 in S. meliloti resulted in lower level and shorter half-life of sinI mRNA, and in decreased autoinducer amount. Although RcsR1 can influence quorum sensing via sinI, its level did not vary at different cell densities, but decreased under salt stress and increased at low temperature. We found that RcsR1 and its stress-related expression pattern, but not the interaction with sinI homologs, are conserved in Sinorhizobium, Rhizobium and Agrobacterium. Consistently, overproduction of RcsR1 in S. meliloti and Agrobacterium tumefaciens inhibited growth at high salinity. We identified conserved targets of RcsR1 and showed that most conserved interactions and the effect on growth under salt stress are mediated by the first stem-loop of RcsR1, while its central part is responsible for the species-specific interaction with sinI. We conclude that RcsR1 is an ancient, stress-related riboregulator in rhizobia and propose that it links stress responses to quorum sensing in S. meliloti.

  7. Tube-shaped Pirani gauge for in situ hermeticity monitoring of SiN thin-film encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santagata, F.; Creemer, J. F.; Iervolino, E.; Sarro, P. M.

    2012-10-01

    Here the integration of a tube-shaped Pirani gauge with a SiN thin-film encapsulation process is presented. The tube geometry gives the sensor a very low detection limit with a small footprint, since the tube is buried under the silicon surface. The Pirani tube is very suitable for in situ evaluation of MEMS vacuum packaging. Moreover, since the Pirani gap is all around the tube and deep below the silicon surface, the deflection of the encapsulation shell is not a concern and wafer-level measurement of the device is possible. Pirani tubes with different lengths are encapsulated inside SiN micropackages in order to measure the resulting vacuum level achieved after the encapsulation step. The longest tube shows a detection limit of 0.1 Pa for a noise level of 50 μV and it has a footprint of only 0.006 mm2. The pressure inside the sealed micropackage was extracted to be 0.7 kPa. Furthermore, the pressure is monitored over time to evaluate the hermeticity of the packages. A leak rate of 8× 10-18 Pa m3 s-1 was measured over four months time.

  8. On the Error State Selection for Stationary SINS Alignment and Calibration Kalman Filters—Part II: Observability/Estimability Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Felipe O.; Hemerly, Elder M.; Leite Filho, Waldemar C.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the second part of a study aiming at the error state selection in Kalman filters applied to the stationary self-alignment and calibration (SSAC) problem of strapdown inertial navigation systems (SINS). The observability properties of the system are systematically investigated, and the number of unobservable modes is established. Through the analytical manipulation of the full SINS error model, the unobservable modes of the system are determined, and the SSAC error states (except the velocity errors) are proven to be individually unobservable. The estimability of the system is determined through the examination of the major diagonal terms of the covariance matrix and their eigenvalues/eigenvectors. Filter order reduction based on observability analysis is shown to be inadequate, and several misconceptions regarding SSAC observability and estimability deficiencies are removed. As the main contributions of this paper, we demonstrate that, except for the position errors, all error states can be minimally estimated in the SSAC problem and, hence, should not be removed from the filter. Corroborating the conclusions of the first part of this study, a 12-state Kalman filter is found to be the optimal error state selection for SSAC purposes. Results from simulated and experimental tests support the outlined conclusions. PMID:28241494

  9. Thickness-dependent dielectric breakdown and nanopore creation on sub-10-nm-thick SiN membranes in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Itaru; Fujisaki, Koji; Hamamura, Hirotaka; Takeda, Ken-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Recently, dielectric breakdown of solid-state membranes in solution has come to be known as a powerful method for fabricating nanopore sensors. This method has enabled a stable fabrication of nanopores down to sub-2 nm in diameter, which can be used to detect the sizes and structures of small molecules. Until now, the behavior of dielectric breakdown for nanopore creation in SiN membranes with thicknesses of less than 10 nm has not been studied, while the thinner nanopore membranes are preferable for nanopore sensors in terms of spatial resolution. In the present study, the thickness dependence of the dielectric breakdown of sub-10-nm-thick SiN membranes in solution was investigated using gradually increased voltage pulses. The increment in leakage current through the membrane at the breakdown was found to become smaller with a decrease in the thickness of the membrane, which resulted in the creation of smaller nanopores. In addition, the electric field for dielectric breakdown drastically decreased when the thickness of the membrane was less than 5 nm. These breakdown behaviors are quite similar to those observed in gate insulators of metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. Finally, stable ionic-current blockades were observed when single-stranded DNA passed through the nanopores created on the membranes with thicknesses of 3-7 nm.

  10. On the Error State Selection for Stationary SINS Alignment and Calibration Kalman Filters-Part II: Observability/Estimability Analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Felipe O; Hemerly, Elder M; Leite Filho, Waldemar C

    2017-02-23

    This paper presents the second part of a study aiming at the error state selection in Kalman filters applied to the stationary self-alignment and calibration (SSAC) problem of strapdown inertial navigation systems (SINS). The observability properties of the system are systematically investigated, and the number of unobservable modes is established. Through the analytical manipulation of the full SINS error model, the unobservable modes of the system are determined, and the SSAC error states (except the velocity errors) are proven to be individually unobservable. The estimability of the system is determined through the examination of the major diagonal terms of the covariance matrix and their eigenvalues/eigenvectors. Filter order reduction based on observability analysis is shown to be inadequate, and several misconceptions regarding SSAC observability and estimability deficiencies are removed. As the main contributions of this paper, we demonstrate that, except for the position errors, all error states can be minimally estimated in the SSAC problem and, hence, should not be removed from the filter. Corroborating the conclusions of the first part of this study, a 12-state Kalman filter is found to be the optimal error state selection for SSAC purposes. Results from simulated and experimental tests support the outlined conclusions.

  11. Review of the chronostratigraphic charts in the Sinú-San Jacinto basin based on new seismic stratigraphic interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, Esteban; Holz, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Disperse and punctual studies; absence of integration of data ranging from local to regional focus; interpretations based only on lithostratigraphic features; and interpretation of data premised on an allochthonous origin of the Caribbean plate, are some of factors that increase the confusion and uncertainty in understanding the Sinú-San Jacinto Basin. The sedimentary record of Upper Cretaceous to Eocene has been traditionally interpreted as the record of deep-water settings. However, recently these sediments have been related to shallow marine and deltaic settings. Second problematic point is about the deposition environment of the Oligocene to Late Miocene succession. Some studies suggest canyons, turbidites and sediments deposited in deep-water settings. However, recent studies propose deltaic and shallow marine settings. The last stratigraphic problem is related to the controversial fluvial vs. shallow marine interpretations of the Pliocene sediments. Based upon seismic stratigraphic analysis in recent and reprocessed 2D seismic data, integrated with well data, we propose chronostratigraphic charts for the northern, central and southern zones of the Sinú-San Jacinto Basin. Twenty seismic facies based on amplitude, continuity, frequency and geometry of seismic reflectors and twelve seismic sequences were recognized. The seismic stratigraphic analysis in this study suggests that the sediments of Upper Cretaceous to Paleocene/Eocene were associated to continental to shallow marine settings. Lagoons, coastal plain and carbonate platform dominated during this period. The Oligocene to Middle Miocene record was characterized by deep-water deposition, whereas the Late Miocene to recent sedimentation was characterized by falling base level, characterized by deltaic and fluvial deposits. Five syn-rift sequences with wedge-shaped geometry were identified in this study. Three Triassic to Jurassic syn-rift sequences were characterized by seismic facies typical of fluvial

  12. A theoretical study of the structures and electronic transitions of small silicon nitride clusters (SinNm, n + m ⩽ 4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owusu-Ansah, E.; Wang, Y. M.; Shi, Y. J.

    2016-12-01

    A quantum mechanical study of small silicon nitride clusters (SinNm, n + m ⩽ 4) was performed for both the ground and excited electronic states. The diatomic SiN as well as the tri-atomic SiN2 and Si2N clusters were chosen as our benchmark systems for an extensive investigation of the various methods, functionals and basis sets. Among the methods investigated for the ground-state geometry optimization and vibrational frequency calculations, density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP functional was found to be the best performed method overall. For the basis set, 6-311G(d) is chosen for its nice balance between accuracy and efficiency in time. At the B3LYP/6-311G(d) level of theory, the most stable isomers of SiN2, Si2N, SiN3, Si3N and Si2N2, were determined to be the triplet (3Σ-) asymmetric linear isomer (Sisbnd Ndbnd N), the doublet (2Πg) symmetric linear isomer (Sidbnd Ndbnd Si), the doublet (2A‧) nonlinear isomer (Sidbnd Nsbnd Ndbnd N), the doublet (2B1) Y-type isomer, and the singlet (1Σg+) symmetric linear isomer (Sidbnd Ndbnd Ndbnd Si), respectively. Analysis of the relative energies of various stable isomers shows that Nsbnd N bonding is the most favored one and Sisbnd Si bonding is least favored. Due to its good performance in predicting the electronic transitions from the X2Σ+ ground state of SiN to three low-lying excited states A2 Π , B2Σ+ , and D2 Π , TDDFT/B3LYP/6-311G(d) was chosen over EOMCCSD/6-311G(d) for the excited state calculations. The first ten electronic transitions for the most stable isomers of all SinNm (n + m ⩽ 4) clusters were calculated.

  13. A time for dogma, a time for the Bible, a time for condoms: Building a Catholic theology of prevention in the face of public health policies at Casa Fonte Colombo in Porto Alegre, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Seffner, Fernando; Garcia, Jonathan; Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Parker, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Casa Fonte Colombo (CFC) is a religious organisation that assists people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). The funding for its activities comes from public sources such as the Brazilian National STD/AIDS Program as well as the Catholic Church. Capuchin (Franciscan) priests run the CFC, and it has an extensive group of volunteers made up mostly of women. Between 2006 and 2009, we observed daily life at the Casa Fonte Colombo and interviewed priests, volunteers, employees, service providers, and clients. We also attended meetings, group sessions, and celebrations. Everyday actions carried out by the CFC reveal the efforts to resolve the tension between the position of the Catholic Church and the Brazilian state in the politics of AIDS. These efforts affirm that the Casa Fonte Colombo presents itself as a space where the position of the Catholic Church, as much as the politics of public health, are re-worked, giving way to a progressive act of Catholic prevention and assistance for AIDS, that we call “theology of prevention.” PMID:21834734

  14. Characterization of chaos generated by bistable optical systems with a nonlinearity of the form sin2(x)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A. K.; Verma, P.

    2011-03-01

    Generation of chaos from nonlinear optical systems with an optical or electronic feedback has been studied for several years. Such chaotic signals have an important application in providing secure encryption in free-space optical communication systems. Lyapunov exponent is an important parameter for analysis of chaos generated by a nonlinear system. The Lyapunov exponent of a class of a nonlinear optical system showing a nonlinear transfer characteristics of the form sin2(x) is determined and calculated in this paper to understand the dependence of the chaotic response on the system parameters such as bias, feedback gain, input intensity and initial condition exciting the optical system. Analysis of chaos using Lyapunov exponent is consistent with bifurcation analysis and is useful in encrypting data signal.

  15. Determination of sin{sup 2}θ{sub W} using ν (ν{sup ¯})-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, H.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Simo, I. Ruiz

    2015-05-15

    We have studied nonisoscalarity and medium effects in the extraction of weak mixing angle using Paschos and Wolfenstein relation in the iron nucleus. Paschos and Wolfenstein(PW) relation is valid for an isoscalar target. We have modified the PW relation for nonisoscalar target as well as incorporated the medium effects like Pauli blocking, Fermi motion, nuclear binding energy and pion rho cloud contributions. In our calculations we have used the relativistic nuclear spectral function which includes nucleon correlations. Finally local density approximation is applied to translate the numerical results to the finite nuclei. We have studied the dependence of sin{sup 2}θ{sub W} on Bjorken variables x and y, four momentum transfer square (Q{sup 2}), energy of the neutrino and antineutrino, and effect of excess neutrons over protons in the nuclear target.

  16. Ab initio study of neutral and charged SinNap(+) (n

    PubMed

    Sporea, C; Rabilloud, F; Allouche, A R; Frécon, M

    2006-01-26

    Ab initio calculations in the framework of the density functional theory, with B3LYP functional, are performed to study the lowest-energy isomers of silicon sodium clusters Si(n)Na(p)(+) (n Si(n) cluster unchanged, and the electronic structure of Si(n)Na(p) is similar to that of the corresponding negative system Si(n)(p-). Adsorption energies, vertical and adiabatic ionization potentials, electric dipole moments, and static dipolar polarizabilities are calculated for each considered isomer.

  17. Influence of SST from Pacific and Atlantic Ocean and atmospheric circulation in the precipitation regime of basin from Brazilian SIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custodio, M. D.; Ramos, C. G.; Madeira, P.; de Macedo, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    The South American climate presents tropical, subtropical and extratropical features because of its territorial extension, being influenced by a variety of dynamical systems with different spatial and temporal scales which result in different climatic regimes in their subregions. Furthermore, the precipitation regime in South America is influenced by low-frequency phenomena as El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Atlantic dipole and the Madden Julian Oscilation (MJO), in other words, is directly influenced by variations of the Sea Surface Temperature (SST). Due to the importance of the precipitation for many sectors including the planning of productive activities, such as agriculture, livestock and hydropower energy, many studies about climate variations in Brazil have tried to determine and explain the mechanisms that affect the precipitation regime. However, because of complexity of the climate system, and consequently of their impacts on the global precipitation regime, its interactions are not totally understood and therefore misrepresented in numerical models used to forecast climate. The precipitation pattern over hydrographic basin which form the Brasilian National Interconnected System (Sistema Interligado Nacional-SIN) are not yet known and therefore the climate forecast of these regions still presents considerable failure that need to be corrected due to its economic importance. In this context, the purpose here is to determine the precipitation patterns on the Brazilian SIN, based on SST and circulation observed data. In a second phase a forecast climate model for these regions will be produced. In this first moment 30 years (1983 to 2012) of SST over Pacific and Atlantic Ocean were analyzed, along with wind in 850 and 200 hPa and precipitation observed data. The precipitation patterns were analyzed through statistical analyses for interannual (ENSO) and intraseasonal (MJO) anomalies for these variables over the SIN basin. Subsequently, these

  18. [The impact of AIDS on the organizational development of nongovernmental organizations: a case study on Casa de Assistência Filadélfia].

    PubMed

    Bochio, Ieda Maria Siebra; Fortes, Paulo Antonio de Carvalho

    2008-11-01

    AIDS has been a unique event due not only to its devastating effects, but also to the ways in which it has stimulated solidarity and mobilization of society in the defense of the rights of persons living with HIV/AIDS and their families, friends, and contacts. Beginning as initiatives to ensure dignity in death, AIDS NGOs have undergone structural changes to respond to the demands raised by the epidemic. The current study describes the history of the Brazilian AIDS NGO "Casa de Assistência Filadélfia" in relation to the evolution of the AIDS epidemic, highlighting the issue of organizational development. A qualitative case study methodology was used, and the data were collected from document analysis and semi-structured interviews with key informants identified by the organization. Data analysis was based on the theoretical premises of organizational development and shows how the organization made the transition from the pioneering phase marked by improvisation and expanded to a phase of regulation until reaching flexibility and innovation by diversifying its projects. The study highlights the importance of organizational development as an essential element in building healthy, agile organizations in the response to their demands.

  19. Morphometric comparison by the ISAS(®) CASA-DNAf system of two techniques for the evaluation of DNA fragmentation in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Sara; García-Molina, Almudena; Celma, Ferran; Valverde, Anthony; Fereidounfar, Sogol; Soler, Carles

    2016-01-01

    DNA fragmentation has been shown to be one of the causes of male infertility, particularly related to repeated abortions, and different methods have been developed to analyze it. In the present study, two commercial kits based on the SCD technique (Halosperm ® and SDFA) were evaluated by the use of the DNA fragmentation module of the ISAS ® v1 CASA system. Seven semen samples from volunteers were analyzed. To compare the results between techniques, the Kruskal-Wallis test was used. Data were used for calculation of Principal Components (two PCs were obtained), and subsequent subpopulations were identified using the Halo, Halo/Core Ratio, and PC data. Results from both kits were significantly different (P < 0.001). In each case, four subpopulations were obtained, independently of the classification method used. The distribution of subpopulations differed depending on the kit used. From the PC data, a discriminant analysis matrix was obtained and a good a posteriori classification was obtained (97.1% for Halosperm and 96.6% for SDFA). The present results are the first approach on morphometric evaluation of DNA fragmentation from the SCD technique. This approach could be used for the future definition of a classification matrix surpassing the current subjective evaluation of this important sperm factor.

  20. Paleoparasitological finding of eggs of nematodes in rodent coprolites dated at the early Holocene from the archaeological site Cerro Casa de Piedra 7, Santa Cruz, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Sardella, N H; Fugassa, M H

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the parasite remains present in rodent coprolites collected from the archaeological site Cerro Casa de Piedra 7 (CCP7), located in the Perito Moreno National Park (47°57'S, 72°05'W), Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. Eight coprolites obtained from the layer 17, dated at 10,620 ± 40 to 9,390 ± 40 yr B.P., were examined for parasites. Feces were processed whole, rehydrated, homogenized, subjected to spontaneous sedimentation, and examined via light microscopy. Eggs of parasites were measured and photographed. Seven of 8 coprolites possessed 199 eggs of 2, probably new, species of nematodes, including 43 eggs of Heteroxynema sp. Hall, 1916 (Cavioxyura sp. Quentin, 1975) (Oxyurida, Heteroxynematidae), and 156 eggs of Trichuris sp. Roederer, 1761 (Trichinellida, Trichuridae). Heteroxynema sp. is cited for the first time from ancient material worldwide. The finding of Trichuris spp. in both rodents and other host samples from the area under study is indicative of the stability of the biological and environmental conditions for this nematode genus to establish in the Patagonian Early Holocene. The rodent host was assigned to an unknown species of Caviomorpha (Hystricognathi) that lived during the Pleistocenic transition in Patagonia.

  1. Morphometric comparison by the ISAS® CASA-DNAf system of two techniques for the evaluation of DNA fragmentation in human spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Sara; García-Molina, Almudena; Celma, Ferran; Valverde, Anthony; Fereidounfar, Sogol; Soler, Carles

    2016-01-01

    DNA fragmentation has been shown to be one of the causes of male infertility, particularly related to repeated abortions, and different methods have been developed to analyze it. In the present study, two commercial kits based on the SCD technique (Halosperm® and SDFA) were evaluated by the use of the DNA fragmentation module of the ISAS® v1 CASA system. Seven semen samples from volunteers were analyzed. To compare the results between techniques, the Kruskal–Wallis test was used. Data were used for calculation of Principal Components (two PCs were obtained), and subsequent subpopulations were identified using the Halo, Halo/Core Ratio, and PC data. Results from both kits were significantly different (P < 0.001). In each case, four subpopulations were obtained, independently of the classification method used. The distribution of subpopulations differed depending on the kit used. From the PC data, a discriminant analysis matrix was obtained and a good a posteriori classification was obtained (97.1% for Halosperm and 96.6% for SDFA). The present results are the first approach on morphometric evaluation of DNA fragmentation from the SCD technique. This approach could be used for the future definition of a classification matrix surpassing the current subjective evaluation of this important sperm factor. PMID:27678463

  2. Adjuvant pegylated liposomal doxorubicin for older women with endocrine nonresponsive breast cancer who are NOT suitable for a “standard chemotherapy regimen”: the CASA randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Crivellari, Diana; Gray, Kathryn P; Dellapasqua, Silvia; Puglisi, Fabio; Ribi, Karin; Price, Karen N; Láng, István; Gianni, Lorenzo; Spazzapan, Simon; Pinotti, Graziella; Lüthi, Jean-Marc; Gelber, Richard D; Regan, Meredith M; Colleoni, Marco; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Maibach, Rudolf; Rabaglio, Manuela; Coates, Alan S; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2013-01-01

    Summary There is no optimal treatment for breast cancers lacking estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PgR) receptors in elderly women with co-morbidities that prevent use of “standard chemotherapy regimens” such as AC or CMF. The CASA trial studied pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and low dose, metronomic cyclophosphamide+ methotrexate (CM) for older (>65), vulnerable women with operable, ER and PgR-negative breast cancer. After two years the trial closed early, due to slow and inadequate accrual, with 77 patients (38:PLD, 36:CM, 3:nil). Sixty-eight percent completed PLD; 83% completed CM (both 16-weeks). Patients on PLD reported worse quality of life, cognitive and physical functioning than non-PLD regimens (primarily CM). At a median follow-up of 42 months, 78% of randomized patients remained free of any breast cancer recurrence. Based on our limited experience, PLD and CM may be reasonable options for further study for elderly vulnerable patients with endocrine non-responsive breast cancer. PMID:23453899

  3. Efficient construction of producer cell lines for a SIN lentiviral vector for SCID-X1 gene therapy by concatemeric array transfection.

    PubMed

    Throm, Robert E; Ouma, Annastasia A; Zhou, Sheng; Chandrasekaran, Anantharaman; Lockey, Timothy; Greene, Michael; De Ravin, Suk See; Moayeri, Morvarid; Malech, Harry L; Sorrentino, Brian P; Gray, John T

    2009-05-21

    Retroviral vectors containing internal promoters, chromatin insulators, and self-inactivating (SIN) long terminal repeats (LTRs) may have significantly reduced genotoxicity relative to the conventional retroviral vectors used in recent, otherwise successful clinical trials. Large-scale production of such vectors is problematic, however, as the introduction of SIN vectors into packaging cells cannot be accomplished with the traditional method of viral transduction. We have derived a set of packaging cell lines for HIV-based lentiviral vectors and developed a novel concatemeric array transfection technique for the introduction of SIN vector genomes devoid of enhancer and promoter sequences in the LTR. We used this method to derive a producer cell clone for a SIN lentiviral vector expressing green fluorescent protein, which when grown in a bioreactor generated more than 20 L of supernatant with titers above 10(7) transducing units (TU) per milliliter. Further refinement of our technique enabled the rapid generation of whole populations of stably transformed cells that produced similar titers. Finally, we describe the construction of an insulated, SIN lentiviral vector encoding the human interleukin 2 receptor common gamma chain (IL2RG) gene and the efficient derivation of cloned producer cells that generate supernatants with titers greater than 5 x 10(7) TU/mL and that are suitable for use in a clinical trial for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1).

  4. Targeted interference of SIN3A-TGIF1 function by SID decoy treatment inhibits Wnt signaling and invasion in triple negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yeon-Jin; Leibovitch, Boris A; Bansal, Nidhi; Pereira, Lutecia; Chung, Chi-Yeh; Ariztia, Edgardo V; Zelent, Arthur; Farias, Eduardo F; Waxman, Samuel

    2016-08-19

    Cancer cell invasion is an obligatory step for metastatic dissemination that contributes to rapid relapse and a poorer survival in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients. Development of novel therapeutic strategies to block tumor invasion is an unmet need in the treatment of cancer. We reported that the selective inhibition of the PAH2 domain of SIN3A protein function markedly suppressed metastatic dissemination to the lungs in TNBC xenograft bearing mice. Here, we show that TNBC cell lines treated with Sin3 interaction domain (SID) decoy peptides that bind to PAH2 display a strong in vitro inhibition of transwell invasion. This is accompanied by actin cytoskeleton reorganization with increased cortical actin deposition and downregulation of known Wnt target genes that are associated with epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer cell invasion. Wnt pathway inhibition by SID decoy peptide was confirmed by decreased Wnt reporter activity and altered cytoplasmic localization of nuclear β-catenin. TGIF1, a transcription factor that modulates Wnt signaling and known to interact with the PAH2 domain of SIN3A, can be dissociated from the SIN3A complex by SID decoys. TGIF1 knockdown inhibits WNT target genes and in vitro cell invasion suggesting that TGIF1 might be a key target of the SID decoys to block tumor invasion. Taken together, targeting SIN3 function using SID decoys is a novel strategy to reverse invasion and the EMT program in TNBC translating into the inhibition of metastasis dissemination and eradication of residual disease.

  5. Haploinsufficiency of MeCP2-interacting transcriptional co-repressor SIN3A causes mild intellectual disability by affecting the development of cortical integrity.

    PubMed

    Witteveen, Josefine S; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Dombroski, Thaís C D; van Bakel, Nick H M; Nillesen, Willy M; van Hulten, Josephus A; Jansen, Eric J R; Verkaik, Dave; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Wassink-Ruiter, Jolien S Klein; Vincent, Marie; David, Albert; Le Caignec, Cedric; Schieving, Jolanda; Gilissen, Christian; Foulds, Nicola; Rump, Patrick; Strom, Tim; Cremer, Kirsten; Zink, Alexander M; Engels, Hartmut; de Munnik, Sonja A; Visser, Jasper E; Brunner, Han G; Martens, Gerard J M; Pfundt, Rolph; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Kolk, Sharon M

    2016-08-01

    Numerous genes are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders such as intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but their dysfunction is often poorly characterized. Here we identified dominant mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional repressor and MeCP2 interactor switch-insensitive 3 family member A (SIN3A; chromosome 15q24.2) in individuals who, in addition to mild intellectual disability and ASD, share striking features, including facial dysmorphisms, microcephaly and short stature. This phenotype is highly related to that of individuals with atypical 15q24 microdeletions, linking SIN3A to this microdeletion syndrome. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed subtle abnormalities, including corpus callosum hypoplasia and ventriculomegaly. Intriguingly, in vivo functional knockdown of Sin3a led to reduced cortical neurogenesis, altered neuronal identity and aberrant corticocortical projections in the developing mouse brain. Together, our data establish that haploinsufficiency of SIN3A is associated with mild syndromic intellectual disability and that SIN3A can be considered to be a key transcriptional regulator of cortical brain development.

  6. CRL4B interacts with and coordinates the SIN3A-HDAC complex to repress CDKN1A and drive cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qinghong; Hu, Huili; Yang, Fan; Yuan, Jupeng; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Liangqian; Qian, Yanyan; Jiang, Baichun; Zou, Yongxin; Wang, Yan; Shao, Changshun; Gong, Yaoqin

    2014-11-01

    CUL4B, a scaffold protein that assembles the CRL4B ubiquitin ligase complex, participates in the regulation of a broad spectrum of biological processes. Here, we demonstrate a crucial role of CUL4B in driving cell cycle progression. We show that loss of CUL4B results in a significant reduction in cell proliferation and causes G1 cell cycle arrest, accompanied by the upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors (CKIs) p21 and p57 (encoded by CDKN1A and CDKN1C, respectively). Strikingly, CUL4B was found to negatively regulate the function of p21 through transcriptional repression, but not through proteolysis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CRL4B and SIN3A-HDAC complexes interact with each other and co-occupy the CDKN1A and CDKN1C promoters. Lack of CUL4B led to a decreased retention of SIN3A-HDAC components and increased levels of acetylated H3 and H4. Interestingly, the ubiquitylation function of CRL4B is not required for the stable retention of SIN3A-HDAC on the promoters of target genes. Thus, in addition to directly contributing to epigenetic silencing by catalyzing H2AK119 monoubiquitylation, CRL4B also facilitates the deacetylation function of SIN3A-HDAC. Our findings reveal a coordinated action between CRL4B and SIN3A-HDAC complexes in transcriptional repression.

  7. $\\sin^2\\theta^{\\rm lept}_{\\rm eff}$ and $M_W$(indirect) extracted from 9 fb$^{-1}$ $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ event sample at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Bodek, A.

    2016-06-02

    We report on the extraction of $\\sin^2\\theta^{\\rm lept}_{\\rm eff}$ and indirect measurement of the mass of the W boson from the forward-backward asymmetry of $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ events in the $Z$ boson mass region. The data sample collected by the CDF detector corresponds to the full 9 fb$^{-1}$ run II sample. We measure $\\sin^2 \\theta^{\\rm lept}_{\\rm eff} = 0.2315 \\pm 0.0010$, $ \\sin^2 \\theta_W = 0.2233 \\pm 0.0009$ and $M_W ({\\rm indirect}) = 80.365 \\pm 0.047 \\;{\\rm GeV}/c^2$, where each uncertainty includes both statistical and systematic contributions. Comparison with the results of the D0 collaboration are presented.

  8. Chronic kidney disease certification process manual by the Italian Society of Nephrology (SIN): Part I: clinical care delivery and performance measurements and improvement.

    PubMed

    Quintaliani, Giuseppe; Cappelli, Gianni; Lodetti, Laura; Manno, Corrado; Petrucci, Virgilio; Spinelli, Cosimo; Tarchini, Renzo; Virgilio, Michele; Faini, Mario; Alloatti, Sandro; Cancarini, Giovanni; Zoccali, Carmine

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney diseases (CKD) has now emerged as a public health priority, and there is an increasing demand by patients and health care organisations that the quality of care delivered by renal units to CKD patients be systematically monitored and evaluated. The Italian Society of Nephrology (SIN) has started an initiative aimed at promoting a quality certification process specifically focused on CKD. To this end, SIN started a collaboration with an independent Italian company which is a partner of Joint Commission International (JCI), a nonprofit international organisation dedicated to the promotion of quality improvement and safety of health services. As a result of this collaboration, a document describing a voluntary certification process developed based on JCI criteria was produced by SIN. This document comprises 2 parts. Herein (Part I) we deal with standards for clinical care delivery and performance measurements related to CKD care. Programme management and clinical information management will be presented in a separate manuscript (Part II).

  9. Adsorption mechanisms of isoxazole and oxazole on Si(100)-2 × 1 surface: Si-N dative bond addition vs. [4+2] cycloaddition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumer Ghosh, Manik; Choi, Cheol Ho

    2011-12-01

    The surface reaction pathways of isoxazole and oxazole on Si(100)-2 × 1 surface were theoretically investigated. They both form a weakly bound Si-N dative bond adduct on Si(100)-2 × 1 surface. In the case of isoxazole, the barrierlessly formed Si-N adduct is the most important surface product, that cannot be easily converted into other species. On the other hand, a facile concerted [4+2]CC cycloaddition without involving the initial Si-N dative bond adduct was also found in the case of oxazole adsorption. The existence of Diels-Alder reactions is attributed to the particular arrangement of the two heteroatoms of oxazole in such a way that the two Si-C σ-bonds can be formed in a [4+2] fashion. In short, the unique geometric arrangements and electronegativity of these similar heteroatomic molecules yielded distinctively different surface reaction characteristics.

  10. Human Family with Sequence Similarity 60 Member A (FAM60A) Protein: a New Subunit of the Sin3 Deacetylase Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Karen T.; Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Martin-Brown, Skylar A.; Seidel, Chris; Mushegian, Arcady; Egidy, Rhonda; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2012-01-01

    Here we describe the function of a previously uncharacterized protein, named family with sequence similarity 60 member A (FAM60A) that maps to chromosome 12p11 in humans. We use quantitative proteomics to determine that the main biochemical partners of FAM60A are subunits of the Sin3 deacetylase complex and show that FAM60A resides in active HDAC complexes. In addition, we conduct gene expression pathway analysis and find that FAM60A regulates expression of genes that encode components of the TGF-beta signaling pathway. Moreover, our studies reveal that loss of FAM60A or another component of the Sin3 complex, SDS3, leads to a change in cell morphology and an increase in cell migration. These studies reveal the function of a previously uncharacterized protein and implicate the Sin3 complex in suppressing cell migration. PMID:22984288

  11. Impacts of SiN passivation on the degradation modes of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors under reverse-bias stress

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei-Wei; Ma, Xiao-Hua E-mail: yhao@xidian.edu.cn; Hou, Bin; Zhu, Jie-Jie; Chen, Yong-He; Zheng, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Hao, Yue E-mail: yhao@xidian.edu.cn

    2014-10-27

    Impacts of SiN passivation on the degradation modes of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors are investigated. The gate leakage current decreases significantly upon removing the SiN layer and no clear critical voltage for the sudden degradation of the gate leakage current can be observed in the reverse-bias step-stress experiments. Gate-lag measurements reveal the decrease of the fast-state surface traps and the increase of slow-state traps after the passivation layer removal. It is postulated that consistent surface charging relieves the electric field peak on the gate edge, thus the inverse piezoelectric effect is shielded.

  12. God's Punishment for Sin?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiest, Walter E.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the issue of moral blame as it relates to the AIDS epidemic. Argues that regarding AIDS as divine punishment for immorality is ethically and theologically unsound, resulting in a poor response to the AIDS crisis. States that self-righteous moral judgment is an inappropriate and un-Christian reaction toward AIDS victims. (GEA)

  13. Sins of emission

    SciTech Connect

    Keough, J.

    1986-01-01

    Air pollution from the burning of wood fuels has become a concern to the wood stove industry and to the EPA. Wood smoke contains a mixture of carbon monoxide, volatile organic gases, and polycyclic organic matter which reduces the air quality and exposes increasing numbers of residential neighborhoods to heavy levels of these hazardous pollutants. Two states and numerous municipalities have developed emission standards for new stoves or have banned wood-burning during certain weather conditions. The EPA plans to propose national emission standards during January 1987 and promulgate final rules by January 1988. Catalytic converters for wood stoves have been tested with good results: reduction of particulate emissions by as much as 86%; increase in thermal efficiency of 20 to 30%; and elimination of 85 to 90% of the creosote accumulation in the flue.

  14. Seven Survey Sins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehlbach, Hunter

    2015-01-01

    As pressure builds to assess students, teachers, and schools, educational practitioners and policy makers are increasingly looking toward student perception surveys as a promising means to collect high-quality, useful data. For instance, the widely cited Measures of Effective Teaching study lists student perception surveys as one of the three key…

  15. Analytical investigation of Mudéjar polychrome on the carpentry in the Casa de Pilatos palace in Seville using non-destructive XRF and complementary techniques.

    PubMed

    Garrote, M A; Robador, M D; Perez-Rodriguez, J L

    2017-02-15

    The pigments, execution technique and repainting used on the polychrome wood ceilings and doors in the Casa de Pilatos (Seville, Spain) were studied using portable X-ray fluorescence equipment. Cross-sections of small samples were also analysed by optical microscopy, SEM with EDX analysis, micro-Raman and micro-infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. These carpentry works are magnificent examples of the Mudéjar art made in Spain in the early 16th century. Portable X-ray fluorescence gave good information on the different components of the polychrome. The SEM-EDX study of the surfaces of small samples gave information on their components and also characterized the compounds that had been deposited or formed by environmental contamination or by the alteration of some pigments. The SEM-EDX study of cross-sections facilitated the characterization of all layers and pigments from the support to the most external layer. The following pigments were characterized: red (cinnabar/vermillion, lead oxide, iron oxides and orpiment/realgar), black (carbon black), white (white lead and titanium barium white), yellow-orange-red-brown (orpiment/realgar and iron oxides), green (chromium oxide), blue (indigo blue and ultramarine blue), and gilding (gold leaf on bole). False gold, bronze and brass were also found. The pigments were applied with the oil painting technique over a support layer that had been primed with animal glue. This support layer was gypsum in some cases and white lead in others. This study is essential to the polychrome conservation of the studied artwork, and it will help clarify uncertainties in the history and painting of Mudéjar art.

  16. Analytical investigation of Mudéjar polychrome on the carpentry in the Casa de Pilatos palace in Seville using non-destructive XRF and complementary techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrote, M. A.; Robador, M. D.; Perez-Rodriguez, J. L.

    2017-02-01

    The pigments, execution technique and repainting used on the polychrome wood ceilings and doors in the Casa de Pilatos (Seville, Spain) were studied using portable X-ray fluorescence equipment. Cross-sections of small samples were also analysed by optical microscopy, SEM with EDX analysis, micro-Raman and micro-infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. These carpentry works are magnificent examples of the Mudéjar art made in Spain in the early 16th century. Portable X-ray fluorescence gave good information on the different components of the polychrome. The SEM-EDX study of the surfaces of small samples gave information on their components and also characterized the compounds that had been deposited or formed by environmental contamination or by the alteration of some pigments. The SEM-EDX study of cross-sections facilitated the characterization of all layers and pigments from the support to the most external layer. The following pigments were characterized: red (cinnabar/vermillion, lead oxide, iron oxides and orpiment/realgar), black (carbon black), white (white lead and titanium barium white), yellow-orange-red-brown (orpiment/realgar and iron oxides), green (chromium oxide), blue (indigo blue and ultramarine blue), and gilding (gold leaf on bole). False gold, bronze and brass were also found. The pigments were applied with the oil painting technique over a support layer that had been primed with animal glue. This support layer was gypsum in some cases and white lead in others. This study is essential to the polychrome conservation of the studied artwork, and it will help clarify uncertainties in the history and painting of Mudéjar art.

  17. Dynamics of a surface-modified miniaturized SiN mechanical resonator via a nanometer-scale pore array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun Joong; Cho, Myung Rae; Kim, Seunghwan; Park, Yun Daniel; Kouh, Taejoon

    2016-05-01

    We have fabricated porous miniaturized SiN resonators with various dimensions and studied their mechanical dynamics at their resonant modes. The surface modification of the resonators has been achieved by etching through a thin porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) mask, prepared by two-step anodization. Even though these porous resonators show well-defined Lorentzian line-shapes at their resonant modes, the corresponding fundamental flexural resonance frequencies are lower than those from typical non-porous resonators. The change in the resonance frequency is due to the presence of the pores on the surface, which reduces the effective tensile stress across the beam structure, as shown from both experimental measurements and the computational model. In addition, the observed quality factor reveals the level of dissipation originating from the surface modification. The principal dissipation mechanism is found to be gas damping in the free molecular flow regime. Based on the dissipation measurement, one can see an increase in the surface-to-mass ratio, which is responsible for the increased dissipation in the porous beam structure. The work presented here demonstrates simple integration of mechanical elements with a nanopatterning technique based on an AAO as well as the tuning of mechanics via surface modification at a small scale. Such a scheme could provide an additional degree of freedom in developing a mechanical sensing element with enhanced effective surface area.

  18. Assessment of heavy metal pollution, spatial distribution and origin in agricultural soils along the Sinú River Basin, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Marrugo-Negrete, José; Pinedo-Hernández, José; Díez, Sergi

    2017-04-01

    The presence of metals in agricultural soils from anthropogenic activities such as mining and agricultural use of metals and metal-containing compounds is a potential threat for human health through the food chain. In this study, the concentration of heavy metals in 83 agricultural soils irrigated by the Sinú River, in northern Colombia, affected by mining areas upstream and inundated during seasonal floods events were determined to evaluate their sources and levels of pollution. The average concentrations of Cu, Ni, Pb, Cd, Hg and Zn were 1149, 661, 0.071, 0.040, 0.159 and 1365mg/kg respectively and exceeded the world normal averages, with the exception of Pb and Cd. Moreover, all values surpassed the background levels of soils in the same region. Soil pollution assessment was carried out using contamination factor (CF), enrichment factor (EF), geoaccumulation index (Igeo) and a risk assessment code (RAC). According to these indexes, the soils show a high degree of pollution of Ni and a moderate to high contamination of Zn and Cu; whereas, Pb, Cd and Hg present moderate pollution. However, based on the RAC index, a low environmental risk is found for all the analysed heavy metals. Multivariate statistical analyses, principal component and cluster analyses, suggest that soil contamination was mainly derived from agricultural practices, except for Hg, which was caused probably by atmospheric and river flow transport from upstream gold mining. Finally, high concentrations of Ni indicate a mixed pollution source from agricultural and ferronickel mining activities.

  19. THE SINS/zC-SINF SURVEY OF z {approx} 2GALAXY KINEMATICS: THE NATURE OF DISPERSION-DOMINATED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Sarah F.; Genzel, Reinhard; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Buschkamp, Peter; Davies, Ric; Eisenhauer, Frank; Kurk, Jaron; Lutz, Dieter; Shapiro Griffin, Kristen; Mancini, Chiara; Renzini, Alvio; Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Peng, Yingjie; Bouche, Nicolas; Burkert, Andreas; Cresci, Giovanni; Genel, Shy; Hicks, Erin K. S.; Naab, Thorsten; and others

    2013-04-20

    We analyze the spectra, spatial distributions, and kinematics of H{alpha}, [N II], and [S II] emission in a sample of 38, z {approx} 2.2 UV/optically selected star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from the SINS and zC-SINF surveys, 34 of which were observed in the adaptive optics mode of SINFONI and 30 of those contain data presented for the first time here. This is supplemented by kinematic data from 43 z {approx} 1-2.5 galaxies from the literature. None of these 81 galaxies is an obvious major merger. We find that the kinematic classification of high-z SFGs as ''dispersion dominated'' or ''rotation dominated'' correlates most strongly with their intrinsic sizes. Smaller galaxies are more likely ''dispersion-dominated'' for two main reasons: (1) the rotation velocity scales linearly with galaxy size but intrinsic velocity dispersion does not depend on size or may even increase in smaller galaxies, and as such, their ratio is systematically lower for smaller galaxies, and (2) beam smearing strongly decreases large-scale velocity gradients and increases observed dispersion much more for galaxies with sizes at or below the resolution. Dispersion-dominated SFGs may thus have intrinsic properties similar to ''rotation-dominated'' SFGs, but are primarily more compact, lower mass, less metal enriched, and may have higher gas fractions, plausibly because they represent an earlier evolutionary state.

  20. Sampling Frequency Differentially Influences Interpretation of Zoonotic Pathogen and Host Dynamics: Sin Nombre Virus and Deer Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mills, James N.; Kuenzi, Amy; Flietstra, Timothy; Douglass, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Reports of novel emerging and resurging wildlife and zoonotic diseases have increased. Consequently, integration of pathogen sampling into wildlife monitoring programs has grown. Sampling frequency influences interpretations of coupled host–pathogen dynamics, with direct implication to human exposure risk, but has received little empirical attention. To address this, a 15-year study, based on monthly sampling, of deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) populations and Sin Nombre virus (SNV; a virulent disease in humans) dynamics was evaluated. Estimates of deer mouse abundance, number infected with SNV, and SNV prevalence from sampling less frequently than each month (achieved by deletion of months and recalculation of these parameters) were compared to monthly sampling frequencies. Deer mouse abundance was underestimated (10%–20%), SNV prevalence was overestimated when prevalence was high (>15%), and fewer annual extremes of abundance and infection were detected when sampling frequency was less than monthly. Effort necessary to detect temporal dynamics of SNV differed from effort to detect demographic patterns in deer mouse abundance. Findings here are applicable to sampling strategies for other host–pathogen dynamics and have direct implications for allocation of public health resources and intervention programs. PMID:20528169

  1. A lethal disease model for hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters infected with Sin Nombre virus.

    PubMed

    Brocato, Rebecca L; Hammerbeck, Christopher D; Bell, Todd M; Wells, Jay B; Queen, Laurie A; Hooper, Jay W

    2014-01-01

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV) is a rodent-borne hantavirus that causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) predominantly in North America. SNV infection of immunocompetent hamsters results in an asymptomatic infection; the only lethal disease model for a pathogenic hantavirus is Andes virus (ANDV) infection of Syrian hamsters. Efforts to create a lethal SNV disease model in hamsters by repeatedly passaging virus through the hamster have demonstrated increased dissemination of the virus but no signs of disease. In this study, we demonstrate that immunosuppression of hamsters through the administration of a combination of dexamethasone and cyclophosphamide, followed by infection with SNV, results in a vascular leak syndrome that accurately mimics both HPS disease in humans and ANDV infection of hamsters. Immunosuppressed hamsters infected with SNV have a mean number of days to death of 13 and display clinical signs associated with HPS, including pulmonary edema. Viral antigen was widely detectable throughout the pulmonary endothelium. Histologic analysis of lung sections showed marked inflammation and edema within the alveolar septa of SNV-infected hamsters, results which are similar to what is exhibited by hamsters infected with ANDV. Importantly, SNV-specific neutralizing polyclonal antibody administered 5 days after SNV infection conferred significant protection against disease. This experiment not only demonstrated that the disease was caused by SNV, it also demonstrated the utility of this animal model for testing candidate medical countermeasures. This is the first report of lethal disease caused by SNV in an adult small-animal model.

  2. Truncated Hantavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins for Serotyping Sin Nombre, Andes, and Laguna Negra Hantavirus Infections in Humans and Rodents▿

    PubMed Central

    Koma, Takaaki; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Pini, Noemi; Safronetz, David; Taruishi, Midori; Levis, Silvana; Endo, Rika; Shimizu, Kenta; Yasuda, Shumpei P.; Ebihara, Hideki; Feldmann, Heinz; Enria, Delia; Arikawa, Jiro

    2010-01-01

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV), Andes virus (ANDV), and Laguna Negra virus (LANV) have been known as the dominant causative agents of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). ANDV and LANV, with different patterns of pathogenicity, exist in a sympatric relationship. Moreover, there is documented evidence of person-to-person transmission of ANDV. Therefore, it is important in clinical medicine and epidemiology to know the serotype of a hantavirus causing infection. Truncated SNV, ANDV, and LANV recombinant nucleocapsid proteins (trNs) missing 99 N-terminal amino acids (trN100) were expressed using a baculovirus system, and their applicability for serotyping SNV, ANDV, and LANV infection by the use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) was examined. HPS patient sera and natural-reservoir rodent sera infected with SNV, ANDV, and LANV showed the highest optical density (OD) values for homologous trN100 antigens. Since even patient sera with lower IgM and IgG antibody titers were serotyped, the trN100s are therefore considered useful for serotyping with early-acute-phase sera. In contrast, assays testing whole recombinant nucleocapsid protein antigens of SNV, ANDV, and LANV expressed in Escherichia coli detected homologous and heterologous antibodies equally. These results indicated that a screening ELISA using an E. coli-expressed antigen followed by a serotyping ELISA using trN100s is useful for epidemiological surveillance in regions where two or more hantavirus species cocirculate. PMID:20335425

  3. Reduced PM2.5 in Trujillo, Peru, on El Dia Sin Autos ("The Day Without Cars").

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Brandon E; Aguilar-Villalobos, Manuel; Ryan, P Barry; Naeher, Luke P

    2010-01-01

    Street-level and rooftop (three-story building) concentrations of particulate matter < or = 2.5 microm in diameter (PM2.5) were measured in downtown Trujillo, Peru, in July and August 2003 to determine the PM2.5 concentration reduction on days with normal traffic conditions (32 days) versus a day when motor vehicles were temporarily banned from the downtown district (8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., July 15) known as El Dia Sin Autos ("The Day Without Cars"). The mean 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. street-level PM2.5 concentration during the motor vehicle ban (21.4 microg/m3; one day) was 49% lower than when vehicles were not impeded (42.2 +/- 7.8 microg/m3--mean +/- 1 standard deviation; 20 days). The rooftop monitoring station indicated a 20% decrease in PM2.5 concentrations (24.8 +/- 2.6 microg/m3 vs. 19.9 +/- 6.0 microg/m3) when motor vehicles were not present within historic downtown Trujillo. Temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed during the motor vehicle ban and during normal traffic were not significantly different (p > .05).

  4. Population density and seasonality effects on Sin Nombre virus transmission in North American deermice (Peromyscus maniculatus) in outdoor enclosures.

    PubMed

    Bagamian, Karoun H; Douglass, Richard J; Alvarado, Arlene; Kuenzi, Amy J; Amman, Brian R; Waller, Lance A; Mills, James N

    2012-01-01

    Surveys of wildlife host-pathogen systems often document clear seasonal variation in transmission; conclusions concerning the relationship between host population density and transmission vary. In the field, effects of seasonality and population density on natural disease cycles are challenging to measure independently, but laboratory experiments may poorly reflect what happens in nature. Outdoor manipulative experiments are an alternative that controls for some variables in a relatively natural environment. Using outdoor enclosures, we tested effects of North American deermouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) population density and season on transmission dynamics of Sin Nombre hantavirus. In early summer, mid-summer, late summer, and fall 2007-2008, predetermined numbers of infected and uninfected adult wild deermice were released into enclosures and trapped weekly or bi-weekly. We documented 18 transmission events and observed significant seasonal effects on transmission, wounding frequency, and host breeding condition. Apparent differences in transmission incidence or wounding frequency between high- and low-density treatments were not statistically significant. However, high host density was associated with a lower proportion of males with scrotal testes. Seasonality may have a stronger influence on disease transmission dynamics than host population density, and density effects cannot be considered independent of seasonality.

  5. A three axis turntable's online initial state measurement method based on the high-accuracy laser gyro SINS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chunfeng; Wei, Guo; Wang, Qi; Xiong, Zhenyu; Wang, Qun; Long, Xingwu

    2016-10-01

    As an indispensable equipment in inertial technology tests, the three-axis turntable is widely used in the calibration of various types inertial navigation systems (INS). In order to ensure the calibration accuracy of INS, we need to accurately measure the initial state of the turntable. However, the traditional measuring method needs a lot of exterior equipment (such as level instrument, north seeker, autocollimator, etc.), and the test processing is complex, low efficiency. Therefore, it is relatively difficult for the inertial measurement equipment manufacturers to realize the self-inspection of the turntable. Owing to the high precision attitude information provided by the laser gyro strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) after fine alignment, we can use it as the attitude reference of initial state measurement of three-axis turntable. For the principle that the fixed rotation vector increment is not affected by measuring point, we use the laser gyro INS and the encoder of the turntable to provide the attitudes of turntable mounting plat. Through this way, the high accuracy measurement of perpendicularity error and initial attitude of the three-axis turntable has been achieved.

  6. pSIN: A scalable, Parallel algorithm for Seismic INterferometry of large-N ambient-noise data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po; Taylor, Nicholas J.; Dueker, Ken G.; Keifer, Ian S.; Wilson, Andra K.; McGuffy, Casey L.; Novitsky, Christopher G.; Spears, Alec J.; Holbrook, W. Steven

    2016-08-01

    Seismic interferometry is a technique for extracting deterministic signals (i.e., ambient-noise Green's functions) from recordings of ambient-noise wavefields through cross-correlation and other related signal processing techniques. The extracted ambient-noise Green's functions can be used in ambient-noise tomography for constructing seismic structure models of the Earth's interior. The amount of calculations involved in the seismic interferometry procedure can be significant, especially for ambient-noise datasets collected by large seismic sensor arrays (i.e., "large-N" data). We present an efficient parallel algorithm, named pSIN (Parallel Seismic INterferometry), for solving seismic interferometry problems on conventional distributed-memory computer clusters. The design of the algorithm is based on a two-dimensional partition of the ambient-noise data recorded by a seismic sensor array. We pay special attention to the balance of the computational load, inter-process communication overhead and memory usage across all MPI processes and we minimize the total number of I/O operations. We have tested the algorithm using a real ambient-noise dataset and obtained a significant amount of savings in processing time. Scaling tests have shown excellent strong scalability from 80 cores to over 2000 cores.

  7. Dynamics of a surface-modified miniaturized SiN mechanical resonator via a nanometer-scale pore array.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Joong; Cho, Myung Rae; Kim, Seunghwan; Park, Yun Daniel; Kouh, Taejoon

    2016-05-13

    We have fabricated porous miniaturized SiN resonators with various dimensions and studied their mechanical dynamics at their resonant modes. The surface modification of the resonators has been achieved by etching through a thin porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) mask, prepared by two-step anodization. Even though these porous resonators show well-defined Lorentzian line-shapes at their resonant modes, the corresponding fundamental flexural resonance frequencies are lower than those from typical non-porous resonators. The change in the resonance frequency is due to the presence of the pores on the surface, which reduces the effective tensile stress across the beam structure, as shown from both experimental measurements and the computational model. In addition, the observed quality factor reveals the level of dissipation originating from the surface modification. The principal dissipation mechanism is found to be gas damping in the free molecular flow regime. Based on the dissipation measurement, one can see an increase in the surface-to-mass ratio, which is responsible for the increased dissipation in the porous beam structure. The work presented here demonstrates simple integration of mechanical elements with a nanopatterning technique based on an AAO as well as the tuning of mechanics via surface modification at a small scale. Such a scheme could provide an additional degree of freedom in developing a mechanical sensing element with enhanced effective surface area.

  8. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction based on palynofacies analyses of the Cansona Formation (Late Cretaceous), Sinú-San Jacinto Basin, northwest Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliao-Lemus, Tatiana; Carvalho, Marcelo de Araujo; Torres, Diego; Plata, Angelo; Parra, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    To reconstruct the paleoenvironments of the Cansona Formation, a Cretaceous succession in Colombia that has controversial paleoenvironmental interpretation, occasionally deep marine and occasionally shallow marine, palynofacies analyses were conducted on 93 samples from four sections of the Sinú San Jacinto Basin in the north, midwest, and southwest sectors. For the palynofacies analyses, the kerogen categories were counted and subjected to cluster analyses. Four palynofacies associations were revealed for the four sections: Palynofacies Association I (PA I), which consisted of microforaminiferal linings, scolecodonts, dinoflagellate cysts, pollen grains, and fungi hyphae; PA II, which consisted of phytoclast translucent non-biostructured and biostructured, opaque phytoclasts (equidimensional and lath shaped); PA III, which consisted of pseudoamorphous particles, cuticles, resin, and fungal spores; and PA IV, which consisted of fluorescent and non-fluorescent amorphous organic matter and the fresh-water algae Botryococcus. In contrast to early studies that suggested a generalization of the depositional environment for the Cansona Formation (deep or shallow conditions), this study suggests that the formation reflects conspicuous stratigraphic and lateral changes and hence different depositional environments. The Cerro Cansona (CC4 section) and Chalán (AP section) areas are a more marine proximal settings (Early Campanian-Maastrichtian), and there is an intermediate setting for the Lorica area (SC section) and deeper conditions for the Montería area (CP2 section).

  9. RPD1 (SIN3/UME4) is required for maximal activation and repression of diverse yeast genes

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal, M.; Gaber, R.F. ); Strich, R.; Esposito, R.E. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors show that the extent of transcriptional regulation of many, apparently unrelated, genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is dependent on RPD1 (and RPD3). Genes regulated by stimuli as diverse as external signals (PH05), cell differentiation processes (SPO11 and SPO13), cell type (RME1, FUS1, H0, TY2, STE6, STE3, and BAR1), and genes whose regulatory signals remain unknown (TRK2) depend on RPD1 to achieve maximal states of transcriptional regulation. RPD1 enhances both positive and negative regulation of these genes: in rpdl{Delta} mutants, higher levels of expression are observed under repression conditions and lower levels are observed under activation conditions. They show that several independent genetic screens, designed to identify yeast transcriptional regulator, have detected the RPD1 locus (also known as SIN3, SD11, and UME4). The inferred RPD1 protein contains four regions predicted to take on helix-loop-helix-like secondary structures and three regions (acidic, glutamine rich, and proline rich) reminiscent of the activating domains of transcriptional activators.

  10. Local Observability Analysis of Star Sensor Installation Errors in a SINS/CNS Integration System for Near-Earth Flight Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Chunxi; Lu, Jiazhen

    2017-01-01

    Strapdown inertial navigation system/celestial navigation system (SINS/CNS) integrated navigation is a fully autonomous and high precision method, which has been widely used to improve the hitting accuracy and quick reaction capability of near-Earth flight vehicles. The installation errors between SINS and star sensors have been one of the main factors that restrict the actual accuracy of SINS/CNS. In this paper, an integration algorithm based on the star vector observations is derived considering the star sensor installation error. Then, the star sensor installation error is accurately estimated based on Kalman Filtering (KF). Meanwhile, a local observability analysis is performed on the rank of observability matrix obtained via linearization observation equation, and the observable conditions are presented and validated. The number of star vectors should be greater than or equal to 2, and the times of posture adjustment also should be greater than or equal to 2. Simulations indicate that the star sensor installation error could be readily observable based on the maneuvering condition; moreover, the attitude errors of SINS are less than 7 arc-seconds. This analysis method and conclusion are useful in the ballistic trajectory design of near-Earth flight vehicles. PMID:28275211

  11. Sin3A-associated protein, 18 kDa, a novel binding partner of TRIB1, regulates MTTP expression[S

    PubMed Central

    Makishima, Saho; Boonvisut, Supichaya; Ishizuka, Yuumi; Watanabe, Kazuhisa; Nakayama, Kazuhiro; Iwamoto, Sadahiko

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian tribbles homolog 1 (TRIB1) is a human locus that has been shown to significantly impact plasma lipid levels across several ethnic groups. In addition, the gene has been associated with the occurrence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. In the present study, a yeast-two-hybrid system was used to screen for novel molecular targets of TRIB1 binding. Loci corresponding to clones that were positive for TRIB1 binding subsequently were assessed for roles in lipid metabolism in mice using adenoviral constructs to induce knockdown or overexpression. Sin3A-associated protein, 18 kDa (SAP18) was identified as a novel binding partner of TRIB1. Knockdown of the Sap18 in mouse liver decreased plasma lipid levels and increased hepatic lipid levels; SAP18 overexpression showed the opposite effects. Transcriptome analysis of the mouse liver revealed that Sap18 knockdown decreased and SAP18 overexpression increased microsomal TG transfer protein (MTTP) expression levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that halo-tagged SAP18, halo-tagged TRIB1, and anti-mSin3A antibody enriched precipitates for regulatory sequences of the MTTP gene. Enforced expression of SAP18 enhanced and SAP18 knockdown conversely attenuated the enrichment of MTTP regulatory sequences seen with anti-mSin3A antibody. These studies indicated that SAP18 expression enhanced the recruitment of mSin3A in coordination with TRIB1 to MTTP regulatory elements and increased MTTP expression. PMID:25921304

  12. The LuxR Homolog ExpR, in Combination with the Sin Quorum Sensing System, Plays a Central Role in Sinorhizobium meliloti Gene Expression†

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Hanh H.; Becker, Anke; González, Juan E.

    2004-01-01

    Quorum sensing, a population density-dependent mechanism for bacterial communication and gene regulation, plays a crucial role in the symbiosis between alfalfa and its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. The Sin system, one of three quorum sensing systems present in S. meliloti, controls the production of the symbiotically active exopolysaccharide EPS II. Based on DNA microarray data, the Sin system also seems to regulate a multitude of S. meliloti genes, including genes that participate in low-molecular-weight succinoglycan production, motility, and chemotaxis, as well as other cellular processes. Most of the regulation by the Sin system is dependent on the presence of the ExpR regulator, a LuxR homolog. Gene expression profiling data indicate that ExpR participates in additional cellular processes that include nitrogen fixation, metabolism, and metal transport. Based on our microarray analysis we propose a model for the regulation of gene expression by the Sin/ExpR quorum sensing system and another possible quorum sensing system(s) in S. meliloti. PMID:15292148

  13. Local Observability Analysis of Star Sensor Installation Errors in a SINS/CNS Integration System for Near-Earth Flight Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Chunxi; Lu, Jiazhen

    2017-01-16

    Strapdown inertial navigation system/celestial navigation system (SINS/CNS) integrated navigation is a fully autonomous and high precision method, which has been widely used to improve the hitting accuracy and quick reaction capability of near-Earth flight vehicles. The installation errors between SINS and star sensors have been one of the main factors that restrict the actual accuracy of SINS/CNS. In this paper, an integration algorithm based on the star vector observations is derived considering the star sensor installation error. Then, the star sensor installation error is accurately estimated based on Kalman Filtering (KF). Meanwhile, a local observability analysis is performed on the rank of observability matrix obtained via linearization observation equation, and the observable conditions are presented and validated. The number of star vectors should be greater than or equal to 2, and the times of posture adjustment also should be greater than or equal to 2. Simulations indicate that the star sensor installation error could be readily observable based on the maneuvering condition; moreover, the attitude errors of SINS are less than 7 arc-seconds. This analysis method and conclusion are useful in the ballistic trajectory design of near-Earth flight vehicles.

  14. Evidence That the Transcriptional Regulators Sin3 and Rpd3, and a Novel Gene (Sds3) with Similar Functions, Are Involved in Transcriptional Silencing in S. Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Vannier, D.; Balderes, D.; Shore, D.

    1996-01-01

    In a screen for extragenic suppressors of a silencing defective rap1(s) hmrΔA strain, recessive mutations in 21 different genes were found that restored repression to HMR. We describe the characterization of three of these SDS (suppressors of defective silencing) genes. SDS16 and SDS6 are known transcriptional modifiers, SIN3(RPD1/UME4/SDI1/GAM2) and RPD3(SDI2), respectively, while the third is a novel gene, SDS3. SDS3 shares the meiotic functions of SIN3 and RPD3 in that it represses IME2 in haploid cells and is necessary for sporulation in diploid cells. However, sds3 mutations differ from sin3 and rpd3 mutations in that they do not derepress TRK2. These sds mutations suppress a variety of cis- and trans-defects, which impair the establishment of silencing at HMR. Any one of the sds mutations slightly increases telomere position effect while a striking synergistic increase in repression is observed in a rap1(s) background. Epistasis studies suggest that SDS3 works in a different pathway from RPD3 and SIN3 to affect silencing at HMR. Together these results show that defects in certain general transcriptional modifiers can have a pronounced influence on position-effect gene silencing in yeast. Mechanisms for this increase in postion effect are discussed. PMID:8978024

  15. Consuming English: How Mexican Transmigrants form Identities and Construct Symbolic Citizenship through the English-Language Program Ingles Sin Barreras [English without Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullman, Char

    2010-01-01

    "Ingles Sin Barreras" is an English-language program that is highly advertised on Spanish-language television in the United States, to the point that it has become a pop-culture phenomenon. In this article, I argue that few people actually use it to learn English, but instead consume it as a symbol of national belonging. This article…

  16. El Proyecto Gémini: informe actualizado y técnica de observación

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahade, J.; Lapasset, E.; Levato, H.

    Se describirá la situación actual en lo que se refiere al desarrollo del Proyecto Gémini en cuanto a su estructura, faz constructiva y programación general. Se informará sobre los planes a desarrollar en el tiempo de verificación científica y puesta a punto del instrumental, a partir de la primera imagen que se obtenga con el telescopio Gemini Norte. Se presentará, además, el plan operativo para observar con los telescopios Gemini tal cual está concebido hasta la fecha, describiéndose el proceso desde el mismo momento en que un investigador decide presentar una propuesta para observar con uno de los telescopios, hasta el archivo y derechos de propiedad sobre los datos. Se decribe también el ``soft" denominado Observing Tool (OT) que es clave en la planificación científica de Gemini y que puede ser utilizado ``off-line" en cualquier PC con un entorno windows.

  17. rAvis: An R-Package for Downloading Information Stored in Proyecto AVIS, a Citizen Science Bird Project

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Sara; González-Hernández, Javier; Casabella, Eduardo; Barrientos, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Citizen science projects store an enormous amount of information about species distribution, diversity and characteristics. Researchers are now beginning to make use of this rich collection of data. However, access to these databases is not always straightforward. Apart from the largest and international projects, citizen science repositories often lack specific Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) to connect them to the scientific environments. Thus, it is necessary to develop simple routines to allow researchers to take advantage of the information collected by smaller citizen science projects, for instance, programming specific packages to connect them to popular scientific environments (like R). Here, we present rAvis, an R-package to connect R-users with Proyecto AVIS (http://proyectoavis.com), a Spanish citizen science project with more than 82,000 bird observation records. We develop several functions to explore the database, to plot the geographic distribution of the species occurrences, and to generate personal queries to the database about species occurrences (number of individuals, distribution, etc.) and birdwatcher observations (number of species recorded by each collaborator, UTMs visited, etc.). This new R-package will allow scientists to access this database and to exploit the information generated by Spanish birdwatchers over the last 40 years. PMID:24626233

  18. rAvis: an R-package for downloading information stored in Proyecto AVIS, a citizen science bird project.

    PubMed

    Varela, Sara; González-Hernández, Javier; Casabella, Eduardo; Barrientos, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Citizen science projects store an enormous amount of information about species distribution, diversity and characteristics. Researchers are now beginning to make use of this rich collection of data. However, access to these databases is not always straightforward. Apart from the largest and international projects, citizen science repositories often lack specific Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) to connect them to the scientific environments. Thus, it is necessary to develop simple routines to allow researchers to take advantage of the information collected by smaller citizen science projects, for instance, programming specific packages to connect them to popular scientific environments (like R). Here, we present rAvis, an R-package to connect R-users with Proyecto AVIS (http://proyectoavis.com), a Spanish citizen science project with more than 82,000 bird observation records. We develop several functions to explore the database, to plot the geographic distribution of the species occurrences, and to generate personal queries to the database about species occurrences (number of individuals, distribution, etc.) and birdwatcher observations (number of species recorded by each collaborator, UTMs visited, etc.). This new R-package will allow scientists to access this database and to exploit the information generated by Spanish birdwatchers over the last 40 years.

  19. The sin in the aetiological concept of Johann Christian August Heinroth (1773-1843). Part 1: Between theology and psychiatry. Heinroth's concepts of 'whose being', 'freedom', 'reason' and 'disturbance of the soul'.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Holger

    2004-09-01

    Throughout his work Johann Christian August Heinroth regarded sin to be the cause of mental illness. The present two-part paper investigates what exactly Heinroth understood by sin. Based on a thorough analysis of his own texts, this study shows that on the one hand Heinroth referred to sin in a Christian-Protestant sense. On the other, however, a moral-ethical code of conduct was also involved. Thus, Heinroth did not regard sin as a singular event, but rather as a life conducted in a wrong way for years or even decades, by which he meant a steady striving towards earthly, bodily satisfaction.

  20. Reversal of SIN-1-induced eNOS dysfunction by the spin trap, DMPO, in bovine aortic endothelial cells via eNOS phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Amlan; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Druhan, Lawrence J; Wang, Tse-Yao; De Pascali, Francesco; Rockenbauer, Antal; Racoma, Ira; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Zweier, Jay L; Cardounel, Arturo J; Villamena, Frederick A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Nitric oxide (NO) derived from eNOS is mostly responsible for the maintenance of vascular homeostasis and its decreased bioavailability is characteristic of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced endothelial dysfunction (ED). Because 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO), a commonly used spin trap, can control intracellular nitroso-redox balance by scavenging ROS and donating NO, it was employed as a cardioprotective agent against ED but the mechanism of its protection is still not clear. This study elucidated the mechanism of protection by DMPO against SIN-1-induced oxidative injury to bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Experimental Approach BAEC were treated with SIN-1, as a source of peroxynitrite anion (ONOO−), and then incubated with DMPO. Cytotoxicity following SIN-1 alone and cytoprotection by adding DMPO was assessed by MTT assay. Levels of ROS and NO generation from HEK293 cells transfected with wild-type and mutant eNOS cDNAs, tetrahydrobiopterin bioavailability, eNOS activity, eNOS and Akt kinase phosphorylation were measured. Key Results Post-treatment of cells with DMPO attenuated SIN-1-mediated cytotoxicity and ROS generation, restoration of NO levels via increased in eNOS activity and phospho-eNOS levels. Treatment with DMPO alone significantly increased NO levels and induced phosphorylation of eNOS Ser1179 via Akt kinase. Transfection studies with wild-type and mutant human eNOS confirmed the dual role of eNOS as a producer of superoxide anion (O2−) with SIN-1 treatment, and a producer of NO in the presence of DMPO. Conclusion and Implications Post-treatment with DMPO of oxidatively challenged cells reversed eNOS dysfunction and could have pharmacological implications in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24405159

  1. Fabrication of hydrophilic S/In2O3 core-shell nanocomposite for enhancement of photocatalytic performance under visible light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Sugang; Cao, Zhisheng; Fu, Xianliang; Chen, Shifu

    2015-01-01

    Recently, elemental semiconductors as new photocatalysts excited by visible light have attracted great attention due to their potential applications for environmental remediation and clean energy generation. However, it is still a challenge to fabricate elemental photocatalysts with high activity and stability. In this paper, a straightforward ball-milling method was carried out to fabricate core-shell S/In2O3 nanocomposite photocatalyst with high performance. The photocatalyst was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method, photoluminescence spectra (PL) and super-hydrophilic experiment. The results showed that In2O3 nanoparticles were successfully grown round of S blocks and formed core-shell heterostructures. The 10% S/In2O3 core-shell nanocomposite exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity for degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under visible light irradiation. The reaction rate constant (k) of the 10% S/In2O3 core-shell nanocomposite is about 8.7 times as high as the sum of pure In2O3 and S because of the formation of core-shell S/In2O3 heterostructures, which might remedy the drawbacks of poor hydrophilicity of S, enhance visible light absorption and separate the photogenerated carriers efficiently. Furthermore, the mechanism of influence on the photocatalytic activity of the S/In2O3 core-shell nanocomposite was also discussed. It is anticipated that our work may open up a new direction for the fabrication of core-shell heterostructure to remedy the drawbacks of a photocatalyst and expand its application in the field of photocatalysis.

  2. The developmental regulator protein Gon4l associates with protein YY1, co-repressor Sin3a, and histone deacetylase 1 and mediates transcriptional repression.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Hankel, Isaiah L; Hostager, Bruce S; Swartzendruber, Julie A; Friedman, Ann D; Brenton, Janet L; Rothman, Paul B; Colgan, John D

    2011-05-20

    Genetic studies involving zebrafish and mice have demonstrated that the protein Gon4l (Gon4-like) is essential for hematopoiesis. These studies also suggested that Gon4l regulates gene expression during hematopoietic development, yet the biochemical function of Gon4l has not been defined. Here, we describe the identification of factors that interact with Gon4l and may cooperate with this protein to regulate gene expression. As predicted by polypeptide sequence conservation, Gon4l interacted and co-localized with the DNA-binding protein YY1 (Yin Yang 1). Density gradient sedimentation analysis of protein lysates from mouse M12 B cells showed that Gon4l and YY1 co-sediment with the transcriptional co-repressor Sin3a and its functional partner histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1. Consistent with these results, immunoprecipitation studies showed that Gon4l associates with Sin3a, HDAC1, and YY1 as a part of complexes that form in M12 cells. Sequential immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that Gon4l, YY1, Sin3a, and HDAC1 could all associate as components of a single complex and that a conserved domain spanning the central portion of Gon4l was required for formation of this complex. When targeted to DNA, Gon4l repressed the activity of a nearby promoter, which correlated with the ability to interact with Sin3a and HDAC1. Our data suggest that Sin3a, HDAC1, and YY1 are co-factors for Gon4l and that Gon4l may function as a platform for the assembly of complexes that regulate gene expression.

  3. The SINS/zC-SINF survey of z ∼ 2 galaxy kinematics: Evidence for gravitational quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Genzel, R.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Lang, P.; Tacconi, L. J.; Wuyts, S.; Bandara, K.; Burkert, A.; Buschkamp, P.; Davies, R.; Eisenhauer, F.; Kurk, J.; Lutz, D.; Tacchella, S.; Carollo, C. M.; Lilly, S. J.; Cresci, G.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Mancini, C.; Naab, T.; Newman, S.; and others

    2014-04-10

    As part of the SINS/zC-SINF surveys of high-z galaxy kinematics, we derive the radial distributions of Hα surface brightness, stellar mass surface density, and dynamical mass at ∼2 kpc resolution in 19 z ∼ 2 star-forming disks with deep SINFONI adaptive optics spectroscopy at the ESO Very Large Telescope. From these data we infer the radial distribution of the Toomre Q-parameter for these main-sequence star-forming galaxies (SFGs), covering almost two decades of stellar mass (10{sup 9.6}-10{sup 11.5} M {sub ☉}). In more than half of our SFGs, the Hα distributions cannot be fit by a centrally peaked distribution, such as an exponential, but are better described by a ring, or the combination of a ring and an exponential. At the same time the kinematic data indicate the presence of a mass distribution more centrally concentrated than a single exponential distribution for 5 of the 19 galaxies. The resulting Q-distributions are centrally peaked for all, and significantly exceed unity there for three-quarters of the SFGs. The occurrence of Hα rings and of large nuclear Q-values appears to be more common for the more massive SFGs. While our sample is small and biased to larger SFGs, and there remain uncertainties and caveats, our observations are consistent with a scenario in which cloud fragmentation and global star formation are secularly suppressed in gas-rich high-z disks from the inside out, as the central stellar mass density of the disks grows.

  4. Study of Rare B-Meson Decays Related to the CPObservable sin(2beta+gamma) at the BABAR Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Orimoto, Toyoko Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    This study reports the observation of the decays B0→D$*+\\atop{s}$π- and B0→D(*)-K+ in a sample of 230 x 106 Y(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- storage ring, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The branching fractions β(B0 → D$+\\atop{S}$π-) = (1.3 ± 0.3 (stat) ± 0.2 (syst)) x 10-5, β(B0 → D$+\\atop{S}$K+) = (2.5 ± 0.4 (stat) ± 0.4 (syst)) x 10-5, β(B0→D$*+\\atop{s}$π-) = (2.8 ± 0.6 (stat) ± 0.5 (syst)) x 10-5, and β(B0→D(*)-K+) = (2.0 ± 0.5 (stat) ± 0.4 (syst)) x 10-5 are measured. The significance of the measurements to differ from zero are 5, 9, 6, and 5 standard deviations, respectively. This is a first observation of the decaysB+→D$*+\\atop{s}$π- and B0→D(*)-K+. These results may potentially be useful in determining the CP asymmetry parameter sin(2β + γ) in the decays B0→D$*+\\atop{s}$π-.

  5. Incidence and clinical characteristics of the infection by the respiratory syncytial virus in children admitted in Santa Casa de São Paulo Hospital.

    PubMed

    Pecchini, Rogério; Berezin, Eitan N; Felício, Maria C Calahani; Passos, Saulo D; Souza, Maria Cândido O de; Lima, Lourdes Rehder de Andrade Vaz de; Ueda, Mirthes; Matsumoto, Tokiko Kyomen; Durigon, Edison L

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the rate of infections due to RSV and other viruses in children. In addition we have analyzed demographic data and clinical characteristics of the RSV-positive patients comparing with patients infected by other respiratory viruses. We also described the seasonality of the RSV occurrence in a hospital in São Paulo. Children below 5 years old admitted in Santa Casa de São Paulo Hospital between February 2005 and September 2006 due to acute respiratory infections (ARI) were included. A nasopharyngeal specimens were obtained with sterile No. 5 French feeding catheters as soon as possible (usually within 24 h). Specimens were kept refrigerated at 4 degrees C and transported to Adolfo Lutz Institute, where the indirect immunofluorescent assay was performed. Virus identified by these assay included RSV, Adenovirus, Influenza A and B virus and Parainfluenza 1, 2, and 3. Clinical data from each group was compared. Four hundred and fifty five cases were included in the study, with 30% positive for some type of virus. Viruses that were identified included Respiratory Syncytial Virus (73.03%), Influenza (8.42%), Parainfluenza (8.42%) and Adenovirus (3.37%). We divided the subjects in 3 groups: Group 1 RSV-Positive, Group 2 Other Positive Viruses and Group 3 Negative for Respiratory Virus. Mean age (months) was of 7.5 for RSV-positive children, 7.6 for other viruses, and 8 for negative for respiratory virus. The RSV-Positive Group was significantly younger than the Group Negative for Respiratory Virus (p<0.05). Signs of UAI were more present in the Positive RSV Group (p<0.05). General mortality was of 2.41%. There was a higher incidence of RSV between the months of March and August in the two years of the study. Our study indicates RSV as the most prevalent viral agent in children admitted due to (ARI), especially in infants below 3 months old. We have also found that infections due to RSV can occur in months others than the classic

  6. DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation mediates low-dose X-ray irradiation (LDI)-induced Akt activation and osteoblast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yong; Fang, Shi-ji; Zhu, Li-juan; Zhu, Lun-qing; Zhou, Xiao-zhong

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • LDI increases ALP activity, promotes type I collagen (Col I)/Runx2 mRNA expression. • LDI induces DNA–PKcs activation, which is required for osteoblast differentiation. • Akt activation mediates LDI-induced ALP activity and Col I/Runx2 mRNA increase. • DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation mediates LDI-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation. • DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation is important for osteoblast differentiation. - Abstract: Low-dose irradiation (LDI) induces osteoblast differentiation, however the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we explored the potential role of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA–PKcs)–Akt signaling in LDI-induced osteoblast differentiation. We confirmed that LDI promoted mouse calvarial osteoblast differentiation, which was detected by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as well as mRNA expression of type I collagen (Col I) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). In mouse osteoblasts, LDI (1 Gy) induced phosphorylation of DNA–PKcs and Akt (mainly at Ser-473). The kinase inhibitors against DNA–PKcs (NU-7026 and NU-7441) or Akt (LY294002, perifosine and MK-2206), as well as partial depletion of DNA–PKcs or Akt1 by targeted-shRNA, dramatically inhibited LDI-induced Akt activation and mouse osteoblast differentiation. Further, siRNA-knockdown of SIN1, a key component of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), also inhibited LDI-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation as well as ALP activity increase and Col I/Runx2 expression in mouse osteoblasts. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assay results demonstrated that LDI-induced DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation, which was inhibited by NU-7441 or SIN1 siRNA-knockdown in mouse osteoblasts. In summary, our data suggest that DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation-mediated Akt activation (Ser-473 phosphorylation) is required for mouse osteoblast differentiation.

  7. The "Casa" of Sevres, France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltuch, Margot

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the author's teaching experiences during the 1930s at "La Maison des Enfants," a Montessori school in Sevres, France. Provides photographs and descriptions of the school day, outdoor activities, gardening, cooking and eating, practical activities, and creative activities. (MDM)

  8. t(15;21) translocations leading to the concurrent downregulation of RUNX1 and its transcription factor partner genes SIN3A and TCF12 in myeloid disorders.

    PubMed

    L'Abbate, Alberto; Tolomeo, Doron; De Astis, Francesca; Lonoce, Angelo; Lo Cunsolo, Crocifissa; Mühlematter, Dominique; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Vandenberghe, Peter; Van Hoof, Achilles; Palumbo, Orazio; Carella, Massimo; Mazza, Tommaso; Storlazzi, Clelia Tiziana

    2015-12-16

    Through a combined approach integrating RNA-Seq, SNP-array, FISH and PCR techniques, we identified two novel t(15;21) translocations leading to the inactivation of RUNX1 and its partners SIN3A and TCF12. One is a complex t(15;21)(q24;q22), with both breakpoints mapped at the nucleotide level, joining RUNX1 to SIN3A and UBL7-AS1 in a patient with myelodysplasia. The other is a recurrent t(15;21)(q21;q22), juxtaposing RUNX1 and TCF12, with an opposite transcriptional orientation, in three myeloid leukemia cases. Since our transcriptome analysis indicated a significant number of differentially expressed genes associated with both translocations, we speculate an important pathogenetic role for these alterations involving RUNX1.

  9. Binding of the repressor complex REST-mSIN3b by small molecules restores neuronal gene transcription in Huntington's disease models.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Paola; Zuccato, Chiara; Gaudenzi, Germano; Ieraci, Alessandro; Camnasio, Stefano; Buckley, Noel J; Mutti, Cesare; Cotelli, Franco; Contini, Alessandro; Cattaneo, Elena

    2013-10-01

    Transcriptional dysregulation is a hallmark of Huntington's disease (HD) and one cause of this dysregulation is enhanced activity of the REST-mSIN3a-mSIN3b-CoREST-HDAC repressor complex, which silences transcription through REST binding to the RE1/NRSE silencer. Normally, huntingtin (HTT) prevents this binding, allowing expressing of REST target genes. Here, we aimed to identify HTT mimetics that disrupt REST complex formation in HD. From a structure-based virtual screening of 7 million molecules, we selected 94 compounds predicted to interfere with REST complex formation by targeting the PAH1 domain of mSIN3b. Primary screening using DiaNRSELuc8 cells revealed two classes of compounds causing a greater than two-fold increase in luciferase. In particular, quinolone-like compound 91 (C91) at a non-toxic nanomolar concentration reduced mSIN3b nuclear entry and occupancy at the RE1/NRSE within the Bdnf locus, and restored brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein levels in HD cells. The mRNA levels of other RE1/NRSE-regulated genes were similarly increased while non-REST-regulated genes were unaffected. C91 stimulated REST-regulated gene expression in HTT-knockdown Zebrafish and increased BDNF mRNA in the presence of mutant HTT. Thus, a combination of virtual screening and biological approaches can lead to compounds reducing REST complex formation, which may be useful in HD and in other pathological conditions.

  10. Chronic kidney disease certification process manual by the Italian Society of Nephrology (SIN): part II: programme management and clinical information management.

    PubMed

    Quintaliani, Giuseppe; Cappelli, Gianni; Lodetti, Laura; Manno, Corrado; Petrucci, Virgilio; Spinelli, Cosimo; Tarchini, Renzo; Virgilio, Michele; Faini, Mario; Alloatti, Sandro; Cancarini, Giovanni; Zoccali, Carmine

    2009-01-01

    This is the second part of a document describing a voluntary certification process based on Joint Commission International (JCI) criteria developed by the Italian Society of Nephrology (SIN) and JCI representatives. In the first part we discussed standards for clinical care delivery and performance measurements related to chronic kidney disease care. Herein (Part II), we complete the description of Performace measurements and CKD care by describing issues related the management and clinical information management.

  11. Ionic ASi2N3 (A=Li, Na, K and Rb) stabilized by the covalent Si-N bonding: First-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huijun; Ren, Jiadong; Wu, Lailei; Zhang, Jingwu

    2017-01-01

    The structural, elastic and electronic properties of LiSi2N3 and its substitutions by Na, K and Rb were investigated through first-principles computations. The expansion of lattice parameters of ASi2N3 from Li, Na, K to Rb is found to be determined by the bond angle of Si-N1-Si, which suggests a possible way to improve the lithium ionic conductivity by substitutions. ASi2N3 (A=Li, Na, K and Rb) shows the similar elastic behaviors, while the electronic band gap gradually decreases from 5.1 to 3.4 eV from LiSi2N3 to RbSi2N3. Interestingly, the analysis of electronic structure, crystal orbital Hamiltonian populations and Bader charges shows that the covalence of Si-N bonding is critical for the stability of ASi2N3 phase. Among ASi2N3 phases, there is a relatively high ionicity in NaSi2N3; the Si-N bond strength in [Si2N3]- net for KSi2N3 and RbSi2N3 is comparable to LiSi2N3, but stronger than NaSi2N3.

  12. Neuroprotective effects of Cyperus rotundus on SIN-1 induced nitric oxide generation and protein nitration: ameliorative effect against apoptosis mediated neuronal cell damage.

    PubMed

    Hemanth Kumar, Kandikattu; Tamatam, Anand; Pal, Ajay; Khanum, Farhath

    2013-01-01

    Nitrosylation of tyrosine (3-nitro tyrosine, 3-NT) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of various disorders particularly neurodegenerative conditions and aging. Cyperus rotundus rhizome is being used as a traditional folk medicine to alleviate a variety of disorders including neuronal stress. The herb has recently found applications in food and confectionary industries also. In current study, we have explored the protective effects of C. rotundus rhizome extract (CRE) through its oxido-nitrosative and anti apoptotic mechanism to attenuate peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) induced neurotoxicity using human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Our results elucidate that pre-treatment of neurons with CRE ameliorates the mitochondrial and plasma membrane damage induced by 500 μM SIN-1 to 80% and 24% as evidenced by MTT and LDH assays. CRE inhibited NO generation by downregulating i-NOS expression. SIN-1 induced depletion of antioxidant enzyme status was also replenished by CRE which was confirmed by immunoblot analysis of SOD and CAT. The CRE pre-treatment efficiently potentiated the SIN-1 induced apoptotic biomarkers such as bcl-2 and caspase-3 which orchestrate the proteolytic damage of the cell. The ONOO(-) induced damage to cellular, nuclear and mitochondrial integrity was also restored by CRE. Furthermore, CRE pre-treatment also regulated the 3-NT formation which shows the potential of plant extract against tyrosine nitration. Taken together, our findings suggest that CRE might be developed as a preventive agent against ONOO(-) induced apoptosis.

  13. The Ras/PKA signaling pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits a functional interaction with the Sin4p complex of the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, S C; Chang, Y W; Budovskaya, Y V; Herman, P K

    2001-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells enter into the G(0)-like resting state, stationary phase, in response to specific types of nutrient limitation. We have initiated a genetic analysis of this resting state and have identified a collection of rye mutants that exhibit a defective transcriptional response to nutrient deprivation. These transcriptional defects appear to disrupt the control of normal growth because the rye mutants are unable to enter into a normal stationary phase upon nutrient deprivation. In this study, we examined the mutants in the rye1 complementation group and found that rye1 mutants were also defective for stationary phase entry. Interestingly, the RYE1 gene was found to be identical to SIN4, a gene that encodes a component of the yeast Mediator complex within the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme. Moreover, mutations that affected proteins within the Sin4p module of the Mediator exhibited specific genetic interactions with the Ras protein signaling pathway. For example, mutations that elevated the levels of Ras signaling, like RAS2(val19), were synthetic lethal with sin4. In all, our data suggest that specific proteins within the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme might be targets of signal transduction pathways that are responsible for coordinating gene expression with cell growth. PMID:11560888

  14. Precision measurement of sin(squared) {theta}{sub W} from {nu}-N scattering at NuTeV and direct measurements of M{sub W}

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J. FNAL

    1998-08-01

    We present the preliminary result of sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} from {nu}-N deep inelastic scattering experiment, NuTeV, at Fermilab. This measurement of sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} comes from measuring the Paschos-Wolfenstein parameter R=({sigma}{sup {nu}}{sub NC}-{sigma}{sup {anti {nu}}}{sub NC}), using separate beams of {nu} and {anti {nu}}, utilizing the SSQT. The resulting value of sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup on-shell} is 0.2253 {+-} 0.0019(stat) {+-} 0.0010(syst). This value is equivalent to the mass of the W boson, M{sub W} = 80.26 {+-} 0.11 GeV/c{sup 2}. We also summarize the direct measurements of M{sub W} from the Tevatron {anti p}p collider experiments, D0 and CDF. Combining these two direct measurements yields M{sub W} = 80.37 {+-} 0.08 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  15. EL PROCESO DE MENTORÍA DENTRO DE UN PROYECTO PARA EL DESARROLLO DE INFRAESTRUCTURA DE INVESTIGACIÓN A NIVEL UNIVERSITARIO

    PubMed Central

    MÁRQUEZ, LILLIAN ARVELO; SANTIAGO, NILDA G. MEDINA

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to describe the experience of Proyecto VIAS - RIMI (Violence & Asthma - Research Infrastructure in Minority Institutions) of Universidad del Este in Puerto Rico to achieve one of its main objectives: the development and promotion of mentoring in research. It describes the way the project has operationalized the mentoring process to empower mentees, as well as the innovative ways in which university professors have received training to become better mentors. The authors argue that mentoring has been fundamental to achieve the goals of the students who have participated in the project and recommend continuing such initiatives in academia. PMID:27066161

  16. Proyecto Costa Escondida: Interdisciplinary Research at the Ancient Maya Port Site of Vista Alegre, Quintana Roo, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, J.; Rissolo, D.; Beddows, P. A.; Goodman, B.; Smith, D.

    2013-05-01

    At the northeast tip of the Yucatan Peninsula - where the Caribbean meets the Gulf - lies the ancient Maya port site of Vista Alegre. The inhabitants of this site, much like the people living nearby today, were forced to contend with the challenging coastal environment of Laguna Holbox. The sediment-rich, low gradient of the north coast presents a contrasting landscape compared to the Caribbean coast, where water resources are of much larger magnitude and evident in the extensive systems of cenotes (sinkholes) and underground rivers that supported pre-Columbian sites along this eastern rocky sediment-poor coastline. For past inhabitants the north coast was a mosaic of low-lying, non-arable zones where access to potable water was a challenge for inhabitants well into the 20th century. By bringing together scholars from the fields of archaeology, coastal ecology, geoarchaeology, and hydrogeology, the Proyecto Costa Escondida is focusing on the dynamic relationship between the Maya and their coastal landscape over the past 3000 years. To date we have collected 12 manual push-cores from the shallow waters surrounding Vista Alegre, which have been analyzed at 1 cm resolution using standard methods for Loss on Ignition (LOI), δ18Ocarb and δ13Ccarb of bulk carbonate, granulometry, micropalentology, and AMS radiocarbon dating. In addition to have baseline comparative data, we have conducted near-shore and terrestrial coastal ecological surveys along with the mapping of coastal water salinity and temperatures in the dry and wet seasons. Overall, the chemical proxies, lithology, and paleosalinity model reconstructed to date reveal four onlapping parasequences representing an overall transgression of the coastline with strong seasonality of water chemistry that has been changing under the control of rising sea levels over the past 3000 years. The sedimentation rate and timing of the transition to marine is in reasonable agreement with local sea level curves meaning that the

  17. Geometries and electronic properties of the neutral and charged rare earth Yb-doped Si(n) (n = 1-6) clusters: a relativistic density functional investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Run-Ning; Ren, Zhao-Yu; Guo, Ping; Bai, Jin-Tao; Zhang, Chong-Hui; Han, Ju-Guang

    2006-03-23

    The neutral and charged YbSi(n) (n = 1-6) clusters considering different spin configurations have been systematically investigated by using the relativistic density functional theory with generalized gradient approximation. The total bonding energies, equilibrium geometries, Mulliken populations (MP), Hirshfeld charges (HC), fragmentation energies, and highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO) gaps are calculated and discussed. The optimized geometries indicate that the most stable YbSi(n) (n = 1-6) clusters keep basically the analogous frameworks as the low-lying Si(n)(+1) clusters, while the charged species deviate from their neutral counterparts, and that the doped Yb tends to occupy the substitutional site of the neutral and charged YbSi(n) isomers. The relative stabilities are investigated in terms of the calculated fragmentation energies, exhibiting enhanced stabilities for the remarkably stable neutral and charged YbSi2 and YbSi5 clusters. Furthermore, the calculated MP and HC values show that the charges of the neutral and charged YbSi(n) clusters transfer from the Yb atom to Si(n) atoms and the Yb atom acts as an electron donor, and that the f orbitals of the Yb atom in the neutral and charged YbSi(n) clusters behave as core without involvement in chemical bonding. The calculated HOMO-LUMO gaps indicate that the YbSi2 and YbSi4+ clusters have stronger chemical stabilities. Comparisons of the Yb-doped Si(n) (n = 1-6) with available theoretical results of transition-metal-doped silicon clusters are made. The growth pattern is investigated also.

  18. Sin3a is required by sertoli cells to establish a niche for undifferentiated spermatogonia, germ cell tumors, and spermatid elongation.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christopher J; Gallagher, Shannon J; Foreman, Oded; Dannenberg, Jan Hermen; Depinho, Ronald A; Braun, Robert E

    2010-08-01

    Microenvironments support the maintenance of stem cells and the growth of tumors through largely unknown mechanisms. While cell-autonomous chromatin modifications have emerged as important determinants for self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells, a role for non-cell autonomous epigenetic contributions is not well established. Here, we genetically ablated the chromatin modifier Swi-independent 3a (Sin3a) in fetal Sertoli cells, which partly comprise the niche for male germline stem cells, and investigated its impact on spermatogenic cell fate and teratoma formation in vivo. Sertoli cell-specific Sin3a deletion resulted in the formation of few undifferentiated spermatogonia after birth while initially maintaining spermatogenic differentiation. Stem cell-associated markers Plzf, Gfra1, and Oct4 were downregulated in the mutant fetal gonad, while Sertoli cell markers Steel and Gdnf, which support germ cells, were not diminished. Following birth, markers of differentiating spermatogonia, Kit and Sohlh2, exhibited normal levels, but chemokine-signaling molecules chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12)/stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4), expressed in Sertoli cells and germ cells, respectively, were not detected. In the juvenile, mutant testes exhibited a progressive loss of differentiating spermatogonia and a block in spermatid elongation, followed by extensive germ cell degeneration. Sertoli cell-specific Sin3a deletion also suppressed teratoma formation by fetal germ cells in an in vivo transplantation assay. We conclude that the epigenome of Sertoli cells influences the establishment of a niche for germline stem cells as well as for tumor initiating cells.

  19. Measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and constraints on sin(2beta+gamma) with partial reconstruction of B0-->D*-/+pi+/- decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Layter, J; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Erwin, R J; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Diberder, F Le; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; SafaiTehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-06-25

    We present a measurement of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in decays of neutral B mesons to the final states D(*-/+)pi(+/-), using approximately 82x10(6) BBmacr; events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e(+)e(-) storage ring. Events containing these decays are selected with a partial reconstruction technique, in which only the high-momentum pi(+/-) from the B decay and the low-momentum pi(-/+) from the D(*-/+) decay are used. We measure the amplitude of the asymmetry to be -0.063+/-0.024(stat)+/-0.014(syst) and compute bounds on |sin((2beta+gamma)|.

  20. Measurement of the CP Violating Phase $\\boldsymbol{\\sin(2\\beta_{s})}$ using $\\boldsymbol{B^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\phi}$ Decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Pueschel, Elisa

    2010-05-01

    A B0 s meson can oscillate into its anti-particle, the $\\bar{B}$0 s meson, before decaying. CP violation in this system is made possible by the presence of amplitudes from both mixed and unmixed B0 s meson decays. The CP violating phase βs appears in the interference between the decay amplitudes. The quantity sin(2βs) is expected to be small in the standard model. Thus, measuring a large value for sin(2βs) would be an unequivocal sign of new physics participation in the B0 s mixing loop diagram. In this thesis, we present a latest measurement of sin(2βs), using 5.2 fb-1 of data collected at CDF from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center of mass energy of √s=1.96 TeV. A time-dependent angular analysis, with the production flavor of the B0 s meson identified with flavor tagging methods, is used to extract sin(2βs) from ~6500 B0 s→ J/ψφ decays. Other parameters of interest, such as the B0 s lifetime and the decay width difference between the heavy and light B0 s mass eigenstates are determined to high precision. Also, the effect of potential contributions to the final state from B0 s → J/ψf0 and B0 s→ J/ψK+K- decays is considered for the first time. We present 68% and 95% confidence regions in the βs plane. The probability that the observed central value is a fluctuation of the data from the standard model expected value of βs is calculated to be 44%. The observed confidence region shows better agreement with the standard model prediction than previous measurements.

  1. Measurement of the CP-Violation Parameter sin2Φ₁ with a New Tagging Method at the Υ(5S) Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Y.; Yamamoto, H.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Cho, K.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Julius, T.; Kapusta, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, N.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, R.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Liu, C.; Liu, Z. Q.; Louvot, R.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Muramatsu, N.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Poluektov, A.; Röhrken, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sanuki, T.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seidl, R.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tanaka, S.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Wicht, J.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2012-04-23

    We report a measurement of the CP-violation parameter sin2Φ₁ at the Υ(5S) resonance using a new tagging method, called “B-π tagging.” In Υ(5S) decays containing a neutral B meson, a charged B, and a charged pion, the neutral B is reconstructed in the J/ψK0SCP-eigenstate decay channel. The initial flavor of the neutral B meson at the moment of the Υ(5S) decay is opposite to that of the charged B and may thus be inferred from the charge of the pion without reconstructing the charged B. From the asymmetry between B-π⁺ and Bπ⁻ tagged J/ψK0S yields, we determine sin2Φ₁=0.57±0.58(stat)±0.06(syst). The results are based on 121 fb⁻¹ of data recorded by the Belle detector at the KEKB e⁺e⁻ collider.

  2. Precise Measurement of the CP Violation Parameter sin1 in B⁰→(cc̄)K⁰ Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bay, A.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, K.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Higuchi, T.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Julius, T.; Kapusta, P.; Katayama, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Koblitz, S.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, R.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Liu, C.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z. Q.; Liventsev, D.; Louvot, R.; Matvienko, D.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mori, T.; Muramatsu, N.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Neubauer, S.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Onuki, Y.; Ozaki, H.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, H. K.; Park, K. S.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Poluektov, A.; Röhrken, M.; Rozanska, M.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, K.; Sakai, Y.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Singh, J. B.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tanaka, S.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Tikhomirov, I.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Ushiroda, Y.; Vahsen, S. E.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.; Zyukova, O.

    2012-04-23

    We present a precise measurement of the CP violation parameter sin1 and the direct CP violation parameter Af using the final data sample of 772×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e⁺e⁻ collider. One neutral B meson is reconstructed in a J/ψK0S, ψ(2S)K0S, χc1K0S, or J/ψK0L CP eigenstate and its flavor is identified from the decay products of the accompanying B meson. From the distribution of proper-time intervals between the two B decays, we obtain the following CP violation parameters: sin1=0.667±0.023(stat)±0.012(syst) and Af=0.006±0.016(stat)±0.012(syst).

  3. SIN retroviral vectors expressing COL7A1 under human promoters for ex vivo gene therapy of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Titeux, Matthias; Pendaries, Valérie; Zanta-Boussif, Maria A; Décha, Audrey; Pironon, Nathalie; Tonasso, Laure; Mejia, José E; Brice, Agnes; Danos, Olivier; Hovnanian, Alain

    2010-08-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in COL7A1 encoding type VII collagen which forms key structures (anchoring fibrils) for dermal-epidermal adherence. Patients suffer since birth from skin blistering, and develop severe local and systemic complications resulting in poor prognosis. We lack a specific treatment for RDEB, but ex vivo gene transfer to epidermal stem cells shows a therapeutic potential. To minimize the risk of oncogenic events, we have developed new minimal self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral vectors in which the COL7A1 complementary DNA (cDNA) is under the control of the human elongation factor 1alpha (EF1alpha) or COL7A1 promoters. We show efficient ex vivo genetic correction of primary RDEB keratinocytes and fibroblasts without antibiotic selection, and use either of these genetically corrected cells to generate human skin equivalents (SEs) which were grafted onto immunodeficient mice. We achieved long-term expression of recombinant type VII collagen with restored dermal-epidermal adherence and anchoring fibril formation, demonstrating in vivo functional correction. In few cases, rearranged proviruses were detected, which were probably generated during the retrotranscription process. Despite this observation which should be taken under consideration for clinical application, this preclinical study paves the way for a therapy based on grafting the most severely affected skin areas of patients with fully autologous SEs genetically corrected using a SIN COL7A1 retroviral vector.

  4. SIN Retroviral Vectors Expressing COL7A1 Under Human Promoters for Ex Vivo Gene Therapy of Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Titeux, Matthias; Pendaries, Valérie; Zanta-Boussif, Maria A; Décha, Audrey; Pironon, Nathalie; Tonasso, Laure; Mejia, José E; Brice, Agnes; Danos, Olivier; Hovnanian, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in COL7A1 encoding type VII collagen which forms key structures (anchoring fibrils) for dermal–epidermal adherence. Patients suffer since birth from skin blistering, and develop severe local and systemic complications resulting in poor prognosis. We lack a specific treatment for RDEB, but ex vivo gene transfer to epidermal stem cells shows a therapeutic potential. To minimize the risk of oncogenic events, we have developed new minimal self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral vectors in which the COL7A1 complementary DNA (cDNA) is under the control of the human elongation factor 1α (EF1α) or COL7A1 promoters. We show efficient ex vivo genetic correction of primary RDEB keratinocytes and fibroblasts without antibiotic selection, and use either of these genetically corrected cells to generate human skin equivalents (SEs) which were grafted onto immunodeficient mice. We achieved long-term expression of recombinant type VII collagen with restored dermal–epidermal adherence and anchoring fibril formation, demonstrating in vivo functional correction. In few cases, rearranged proviruses were detected, which were probably generated during the retrotranscription process. Despite this observation which should be taken under consideration for clinical application, this preclinical study paves the way for a therapy based on grafting the most severely affected skin areas of patients with fully autologous SEs genetically corrected using a SIN COL7A1 retroviral vector. PMID:20485266

  5. Measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries in B0-->D(*)+/-pi-/+ decays and constraints on sin(2beta+gamma).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Layter, J; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Erwin, R J; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Biasini, M; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Pioppi, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-06-25

    We present a measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in fully reconstructed B0-->D(*)+/-pi-/+ decays in approximately 88 x 10(6) upsilon(4S)-->BBmacr; decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. From a time-dependent maximum-likelihood fit we obtain the following for the CP-violating parameters: a=-0.022+/-0.038 (stat)+/-0.020 (syst), a*=-0.068+/-0.038 (stat)+/-0.020 (syst), c(lep)=+0.025+/-0.068 (stat)+/-0.033 (syst), and c*(lep)=+0.031+/-0.070 (stat)+/-0.033 (syst). Using other measurements and theoretical assumptions we interpret the results in terms of the angles of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa unitarity triangle, and find |sin((2beta+gamma)|>0.69 at 68% confidence level. We exclude the hypothesis of no CP violation [sin(2beta+gamma)=0] at 83% confidence level.

  6. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries in B0→D(*)±π∓ Decays and Constraints on sin((2β+γ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Ford, K.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Morgan, S. E.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Kelly, M. P.; Latham, T. E.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Gary, J. W.; Layter, J.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; del Re, D.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Erwin, R. J.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Abe, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Chen, S.; Clark, P. J.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Grenier, P.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Azzolini, V.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Biasini, M.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Pioppi, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Vetere, M. Lo; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Won, E.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Gaillard, J. R.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Taylor, G. P.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Diberder, F. Le; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Simani, M. C.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Vidal, P. B.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flack, R. L.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Hart, P. A.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Cote-Ahern, D.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; Nardo, G. De; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Pulliam, T.; Wong, Q. K.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; T'jampens, S.; Therin, G.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Behera, P. K.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; del Gamba, V.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Tanaka, H. A.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; Legendre, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Libby, J.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Meyer, T. I.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Saeed, M. A.; Saleem, M.; Wappler, F. R.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2004-06-01

    We present a measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in fully reconstructed B0→D(*)±π∓ decays in approximately 88×106 υ(4S)→BB¯ decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. From a time-dependent maximum-likelihood fit we obtain the following for the CP-violating parameters: a=-0.022±0.038 (stat)±0.020 (syst), a*=-0.068±0.038 (stat)±0.020 (syst), clep=+0.025±0.068 (stat)±0.033 (syst), and c*lep=+0.031±0.070 (stat)±0.033 (syst). Using other measurements and theoretical assumptions we interpret the results in terms of the angles of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa unitarity triangle, and find |sin((2β+γ)|>0.69 at 68% confidence level. We exclude the hypothesis of no CP violation [sin((2β+γ)=0] at 83% confidence level.

  7. Measurement of the CP-Violation Parameter sin2Φ₁ with a New Tagging Method at the Υ(5S) Resonance

    DOE PAGES

    Sato, Y.; Yamamoto, H.; Aihara, H.; ...

    2012-04-23

    We report a measurement of the CP-violation parameter sin2Φ₁ at the Υ(5S) resonance using a new tagging method, called “B-π tagging.” In Υ(5S) decays containing a neutral B meson, a charged B, and a charged pion, the neutral B is reconstructed in the J/ψK0SCP-eigenstate decay channel. The initial flavor of the neutral B meson at the moment of the Υ(5S) decay is opposite to that of the charged B and may thus be inferred from the charge of the pion without reconstructing the charged B. From the asymmetry between B-π⁺ and Bπ⁻ tagged J/ψK0S yields, we determine sin2Φ₁=0.57±0.58(stat)±0.06(syst). The resultsmore » are based on 121 fb⁻¹ of data recorded by the Belle detector at the KEKB e⁺e⁻ collider.« less

  8. High-efficiency and wideband interlayer grating couplers in multilayer Si/SiO2/SiN platform for 3D integration of optical functionalities.

    PubMed

    Sodagar, Majid; Pourabolghasem, Reza; Eftekhar, Ali A; Adibi, Ali

    2014-07-14

    We have designed interlayer grating couplers with single/double metallic reflectors for Si/SiO(2)/SiN multilayer material platform. Out-of-plane diffractive grating couplers separated by 1.6 μm thick buffer SiO(2) layer are vertically stacked against each other in Si and SiN layers. Geometrical optimization using genetic algorithm coupled with electromagnetic simulations using two-dimensional (2D) finite element method (FEM) results in coupler designs with high peak coupling efficiency of up to 89% for double- mirror and 64% for single-mirror structures at telecom wavelength. Also, 3-dB bandwidths of 40 nm and 50 nm are theoretically predicted for the two designs, respectively. We have fabricated the grating coupler structure with single mirror. Measured values for insertion loss and 3-dB bandwidth in the fabricated single-mirror coupler confirms the theoretical results. This opens up the possibility of low-loss 3D dense integration of optical functionalities in hybrid material platforms.

  9. The Yeast Hrs1 Gene Is Involved in Positive and Negative Regulation of Transcription and Shows Genetic Characteristics Similar to Sin4 and Gal11

    PubMed Central

    Piruat, J. I.; Chavez, S.; Aguilera, A.

    1997-01-01

    We provide genetic evidence that HRS1/PGD1, a yeast gene previously identified as a suppressor of the hyper-recombination phenotype of hpr1, has positive and negative roles in transcriptional regulation. We have analyzed three differently regulated promoters, GAL1, PHO5 and HSP26, by β-galactosidase assays of lacZ-fused promoters and by Northern analysis of the endogenous genes. Transcription of these promoters was derepressed in hrs1δ mutants under conditions in which it is normally repressed in wild type. Under induced conditions it was either strongly reduced or significantly enhanced depending on the promoter system analyzed. Constitutive transcription was not affected, as determined in ADH1 and TEF2. In addition, Hrs1p was required for mating-factor expression, telomere-linked DNA silencing and DNA supercoiling of plasmids. Furthermore, hrs1δ suppressed Ty-insertion mutations and conferred a Gal(-) phenotype. Many of these phenotypes also result from mutations in GAL11, SIN4 or RGR1, which encode proteins of the RNA polII mediator. We also show that gal11δ and sin4δ partially suppress the hyper-rec phenotype of hpr1 mutants, although to a lesser extent than hrs1δ. Our results provide new evidence for the connection between hpr1δ-induced deletions and transcription. We discuss the possibility that Hrs1p might be a component of the RNA polII transcription machinery. PMID:9409823

  10. Thermal, mechanical and ionic conductive behaviour of gamma-radiation induced PEO/PVDF(SIN)-LiClO 4 polymer electrolyte system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongxian; Wu, Shuyun; Jing, Xiabing; Sun, Jiazhen; Chen, Donglin

    1997-05-01

    An effort has been made to modify the mechanical behaviour of our previously reported gel-type gamma-radiation crosslinked polyethylene oxide (PEO)-LiClO 4 polymer electrolyte. A highly polar and gamma-radiation crosslinkable crystalline polymer, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), was selected to blend with PEO and then subjected to gamma-irradiation in order to make an simultaneous interpenetrating network (SIN), which was used as a polymer host to impart stiffness to the plasticized system. Experimental results have shown that the presence of PVDF in the system, through gamma-radiation induced SIN formation, could not only give a rather high mechanical modulus of 10 7 Pa at ambient temperature, but also maintain the room temperature ionic conductivity at a high level (greater than 10 -4 S/cm). DSC, DMA and conductivity measurement techniques were used to examine the effects of blending, gamma-irradiation and plasticization on the variations of glass transition and melting endotherm, on the appearance of high elastic plateau and on the temperature dependence of ionic conductivity. In addition, it was found that, in contrast with the unplasticized system, the ionic conductivity mechanism of this gel-type electrolyte seems to conform to the Arrhenius model, suggesting that, as a result of the high degree of plasticization, the polymer chains act mainly as the skeleton of the networks or polymer cages to immobilize the liquid electrolyte solution, whereas the ionic species migrate as if they were in a liquid medium.

  11. Epigenetic silencing of the proapoptotic gene BIM in anaplastic large cell lymphoma through an MeCP2/SIN3a deacetylating complex.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Rocco; Magistroni, Vera; Mogavero, Angela; Andreoni, Federica; Ambrogio, Chiara; Chiarle, Roberto; Mologni, Luca; Bachmann, Petra S; Lock, Richard B; Collini, Paola; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2013-05-01

    BIM is a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family. Here, we investigated the epigenetic status of the BIM locus in NPM/ALK+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) cell lines and in lymph node biopsies from NPM/ALK+ ALCL patients. We show that BIM is epigenetically silenced in cell lines and lymph node specimens and that treatment with the deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A restores the histone acetylation, strongly upregulates BIM expression, and induces cell death. BIM silencing occurs through recruitment of MeCP2 and the SIN3a/histone deacetylase 1/2 (HDAC1/2) corepressor complex. This event requires BIM CpG methylation/demethylation with 5-azacytidine that leads to detachment of the MeCP2 corepressor complex and reacetylation of the histone tails. Treatment with the ALK inhibitor PF2341066 or with an inducible shRNA targeting NPM/ALK does not restore BIM locus reacetylation; however, enforced expression of NPM/ALK in an NPM/ALK-negative cell line significantly increases the methylation at the BIM locus. This study demonstrates that BIM is epigenetically silenced in NPM/ALK-positive cells through recruitment of the SIN3a/HDAC1/2 corepressor complex and that NPM/ALK is dispensable to maintain BIM epigenetic silencing but is able to act as an inducer of BIM methylation.

  12. In Vitro Targeting Reveals Intrinsic Histone Tail Specificity of the Sin3/Histone Deacetylase and N-CoR/SMRT Corepressor Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Michiel; Carrozza, Michael J.; Lasonder, Edwin; Workman, Jerry L.; Logie, Colin; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.

    2004-01-01

    The histone code is among others established via differential acetylation catalyzed by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). To unambiguously determine the histone tail specificity of HDAC-containing complexes, we have established an in vitro system consisting of nucleosomal templates reconstituted with hyperacetylated histones or recombinant histones followed by acetylation with native SAGA or NuA4. Selective targeting of the mammalian Sin3/HDAC and N-CoR/SMRT corepressor complexes by using specific chimeric repressors created a near physiological setting to assess their histone tail specificity. Recruitment of the Sin3/HDAC complex to nucleosomal templates preacetylated with SAGA or NuA4 resulted in deacetylation of histones H3 and H4, whereas recruitment of N-CoR/SMRT resulted in deacetylation of histone H3 only. These results provide solid evidence that HDAC-containing complexes display distinct, intrinsic histone tail specificities and hence may function differently to regulate chromatin structure and transcription. PMID:14993276

  13. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries and Constraints on sin((2β+γ) with Partial Reconstruction of B0→D*∓π± Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Ford, K.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Morgan, S. E.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Kelly, M. P.; Latham, T. E.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Gary, J. W.; Layter, J.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; del Re, D.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spradlin, P.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Erwin, R. J.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Abe, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Chen, S.; Clark, P. J.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Grenier, P.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Azzolini, V.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Vetere, M. Lo; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Won, E.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Gaillard, J. R.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Taylor, G. P.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Diberder, F. Le; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Simani, M. C.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Vidal, P. B.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flack, R. L.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Hart, P. A.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Cote-Ahern, D.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; Nardo, G. De; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Pulliam, T.; Wong, Q. K.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; T'jampens, S.; Therin, G.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Behera, P. K.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Anulli, F.; Biasini, M.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Pioppi, M.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; del Gamba, V.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Tanaka, H. A.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; Legendre, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Cristinziani, M.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Elsen, E. E.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Libby, J.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Meyer, T. I.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Saeed, M. A.; Saleem, M.; Wappler, F. R.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2004-06-01

    We present a measurement of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in decays of neutral B mesons to the final states D*∓π±, using approximately 82×106 BB¯ events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e+e- storage ring. Events containing these decays are selected with a partial reconstruction technique, in which only the high-momentum π± from the B decay and the low-momentum π∓ from the D*∓ decay are used. We measure the amplitude of the asymmetry to be -0.063±0.024(stat)±0.014(syst) and compute bounds on |sin((2β+γ)|.

  14. Biogeographic and ecological regulation of disease: Prevalence of Sin Nombre virus in island mice is related to island area, precipitation, and predator richness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orrock, John L.; Allan, Brian F.; Drost, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    The relative roles of top-down and bottom-up forces in affecting disease prevalence in wild hosts is important for understanding disease dynamics and human disease risk. We found that the prevalence of Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the agent of a severe disease in humans (hantavirus pulmonary syndrome), in island deer mice from the eight California Channel Islands was greater with increased precipitation (a measure of productivity), greater island area, and fewer species of rodent predators. In finding a strong signal of the ecological forces affecting SNV prevalence, our work highlights the need for future work to understand the relative importance of average rodent density, population fluctuations, behavior, and specialist predators as they affect SNV prevalence. In addition to illustrating the importance of both bottom-up and top-down limitation of disease prevalence, our results suggest that predator richness may have important bearing on the risk of exposure to animal-borne diseases that affect humans.

  15. Pincharse sin infectarse: estrategias para prevenir la infección por el VIH y el VHC entre usuarios de drogas inyectables

    PubMed Central

    MATEU-GELABERT, P.; FRIEDMAN, S.; SANDOVAL, M.

    2011-01-01

    Resumen Objetivo Desde principios de los noventa, en la ciudad de Nueva York se han implementado con éxito programas para reducir la incidencia del virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH) y, en menor medida, del virus de la hepatitis C (VHC). A pesar de ello, aproximadamente el 70% de los usuario de drogas inyectables (UDI) están infectados por el VHC. Queremos investigar cómo el 30% restante se las ha arreglado para no infectarse. El Staying safe (nombre original del estudio) explora los comportamientos y mecanismos que ayudan a evitar la infección por el VHC y el VIH a largo plazo. Material y métodos Hemos utilizado el concepto de «desviación positiva» aplicado en otros campos de salud pública. Estudiamos las estrategias, prácticas y tácticas de prevención de aquellos UDI que, viviendo en contextos de alta prevalencia, se mantienen sin infectar por VIH y el VHC, a pesar de haberse inyectado heroína durante años. Los resultados preliminares presentados en este artículo incluyen el análisis de las entrevistas realizadas a 25 UDI (17 doble negativos, 3 doble positivos y 5 con infección por el VHC y sin infección por el VIH). Se usaron entrevistas semiestructuradas que exploraban con detalle la historia de vida de los sujetos, incluyendo su consumo de drogas, redes sociales, contacto con instituciones, relaciones sexuales y estrategias de protección y vigilancia. Resultados La intencionalidad es importante para no infectarse, especialmente durante períodos de involución (períodos donde hay un deterioro económico y/o social que llevan al que se inyecta a situaciones de mayor riesgo). Presentamos tres dimensiones independientes de intencionalidad que conllevan comportamientos que pueden ayudar a prevenir la infección: a) evitar «el mono» (síntomas de abstención) asegurando el acceso a la droga; b) «llevarlo bien» para no convertirse en un junkie y así evitar la «muerte social» y la falta de acceso a los recursos, y c) seguir sin

  16. Stars with discrepant v sin i as derived from the Ca II 3933 and Mg II 4481 Å lines. VI. HD 199892 — an SB2 spectroscopic binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zverko, J.; Romanyuk, I.; Iliev, I.; Kudryavtsev, D.; Stateva, I.; Semenko, E.

    2017-01-01

    We analyzed the spectra of a well known SB1 binary HD199892 for which the projected rotational velocity v sin i, introduced in the literature, significantly differs when determined from the lines of Ca II at 3933 Å and ofMg II at 4481 Å. Contrary to the former findings, we discovered the signs of spectral lines of a companion star in the profile of Hβ as well as weak metallic lines in the high resolution high S/N spectra covering the most of the visual region. We estimated the secondary star to be a main sequence A4V star with a mass of 2.2 M ⊙ and derived its radial velocity which resulted in the mass of the primary M = 4.6 M ⊙. Short sections of the spectra in the Mg II 4481 Å and Ca II 3933 Å regions are analyzed as well.

  17. Silencing of the Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Membrane Protein 1 Gene by the Max-Mad1-mSin3A Modulator of Chromatin Structure

    PubMed Central

    Sjöblom-Hallén, Anna; Yang, Weiwen; Jansson, Ann; Rymo, Lars

    1999-01-01

    The tumor-associated latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) gene in the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome is activated by EBV-encoded proteins and cellular factors that are part of general signal transduction pathways. As previously demonstrated, the proximal region of the LMP1 promoter regulatory sequence (LRS) contains a negative cis element with a major role in EBNA2-mediated regulation of LMP1 gene expression in B cells. Here, we show that this silencing activity overlaps with a transcriptional enhancer in an LRS sequence that contains an E-box-homologous motif. Mutation of the putative repressor binding site relieved the repression both in a promoter-proximal context and in a complete LRS context, indicating a functional role of the repressor. Gel retardation assays showed that members of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor family, including Max, Mad1, USF, E12, and E47, and the corepressor mSin3A bound to the E-box-containing sequence. The enhancer activity correlated with the binding of USF. Moreover, the activity of the LMP1 promoter in reporter constructs was upregulated by overexpression of USF1 and USF2a, and the transactivation was inhibited by the concurrent expression of Max and Mad1. This suggests that Max-Mad1-mediated anchorage of a multiprotein complex including mSin3A and histone deacetylases to the E-box site constitutes the basis for the repression. Removal of acetyl moieties from histones H3 and H4 should result in a chromatin structure that is inaccessible to transcription factors. Accordingly, inhibition of deacetylase activity with trichostatin A induced expression of the endogenous LMP1 gene in EBV-transformed cells. PMID:10074148

  18. Effect of SiN x diffusion barrier thickness on the structural properties and photocatalytic activity of TiO2 films obtained by sol-gel dip coating and reactive magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Ghazzal, Mohamed Nawfal; Aubry, Eric; Chaoui, Nouari; Robert, Didier

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of the thickness of the silicon nitride (SiN x ) diffusion barrier on the structural and photocatalytic efficiency of TiO2 films obtained with different processes. We show that the structural and photocatalytic efficiency of TiO2 films produced using soft chemistry (sol-gel) and physical methods (reactive sputtering) are affected differentially by the intercalating SiN x diffusion barrier. Increasing the thickness of the SiN x diffusion barrier induced a gradual decrease of the crystallite size of TiO2 films obtained by the sol-gel process. However, TiO2 obtained using the reactive sputtering method showed no dependence on the thickness of the SiN x barrier diffusion. The SiN x barrier diffusion showed a beneficial effect on the photocatalytic efficiency of TiO2 films regardless of the synthesis method used. The proposed mechanism leading to the improvement in the photocatalytic efficiency of the TiO2 films obtained by each process was discussed.

  19. Extraction of $\\sin^2\\theta^{\\rm lept}_{\\rm eff}$ and indirect measurement of $m_w$ from the 9 fb$^{-1}$ full run ii sample of $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ events at cdf

    SciTech Connect

    Bodek, A.

    2014-09-19

    We report on the extraction of $\\sin^2\\theta^{\\rm lept}_{\\rm eff}$ and indirect measurement of the mass of the W boson from the forward-backward asymmetry of $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ events in the $Z$ boson mass region. The data sample collected by the CDF detector corresponds to the full 9 fb$^{-1}$ run II sample. We measure $\\sin^2 \\theta^{\\rm lept}_{\\rm eff} = 0.2315 \\pm 0.0010$,$ \\sin^2 \\theta_W = 0.2233 \\pm 0.0009$ and $M_W ({\\rm indirect}) = 80.365 \\pm 0.047 \\;{\\rm GeV}/c^2$, where each uncertainty includes both statistical and systematic contributions.

  20. A time for dogma, a time for the Bible, a time for condoms: building a Catholic theology of prevention in the face of public health policies at Casa Fonte Colombo in Porto Alegre, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Seffner, Fernando; Garcia, Jonathan; Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Parker, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Casa Fonte Colombo (CFC) is a religious organisation that assists people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). The funding for its activities comes from public sources such as the Brazilian National STD/AIDS Program as well as the Catholic Church. Capuchin (Franciscan) priests run the CFC and it has an extensive group of volunteers made up mostly of women. Between 2006 and 2009, we observed daily life at the CFC and interviewed priests, volunteers, employees, service providers, and clients. We also attended meetings, group sessions, and celebrations. Everyday actions carried out by the CFC reveal the efforts to resolve the tension between the position of the Catholic Church and the Brazilian state in the politics of AIDS. These efforts affirm that the CFC presents itself as a space where the position of the Catholic Church, as much as the politics of public health, are re-worked, giving way to a progressive act of Catholic prevention and assistance for AIDS that we call 'theology of prevention'.

  1. Geochemical distribution of harmful elements in top soils of an Italian National Interest Area (S.I.N.): the Domizio-Flegreo Littoral and Agro Aversano case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bove, M.; Grezzi, G.; Albanese, S.; de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.

    2009-04-01

    The Domizio-Flegreo Littoral and Agro Aversano area has been classified by the Italian Ministry of Environment (Italian Ministero dell'Ambiente e della Tutela del Territorio e del Mare) as a S.I.N. (Sito di Interesse Nazionale, L. 426/98 - Decreto 10 Gennaio 2000 - G.U. 29/5/01). In this category have been included all those contaminated lands that, both for their extension and their historical and present land use, are considered to be particularly harmful for human health. In Italy have been selected a total of 54 S.I.N.; among all of these, the Domizio-Flegreo Littoral and Agro Aversano S.I.N. is one of the widest (1564 Km2). The study area is located in north-western Campania region, from the Avella Mountain to the coastline, and from the Campi Flegrei area to the northern boundaries between Campania and Latium Regions. It includes a total of 77 towns from both Naples and Caserta provinces. The Domizio-Flegreo Littoral and Agro Aversano S.I.N. is characterized by a strongly urbanization in its internal portions, and by intensive agricultural activities in its northern and coastal portions. During past years this wide area has been the set of an unknown number of illegal activities controlled by the organized crime, including toxic waste disposal of unknown sources from different Regions of Italy, unauthorized building, intensive uncontrolled agricultural practices and so on. Part of these environmental crimes have been and are under investigations by Italian Authorities. For a geochemical characterization of this contaminated land, between May 2006 and January 2008, a total of 292 (179 in the Litorale Domizio-Flegreo and 113 in the Agro Aversano) top soils (5-15 cm depth) have been collected, with a sampling density of about 1 sample/5 Km2. The <100 mesh soil fraction has been analyzed with ICP-MS to determine the concentration of the 39 elements: Ag, Al, As, Au, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Sn

  2. The reduction of EPSC amplitude in CA1 pyramidal neurons by the peroxynitrite donor SIN-1 requires Ca2+ influx via postsynaptic non-L-type voltage gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhaowei, Liu; Yongling, Xie; Jiajia, Yang; Zhuo, Yang

    2014-02-01

    The peroxynitrite free radical (ONOO(-)) modulation of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) was investigated in rat CA1 pyramidal neurons using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. SIN-1(3-morpholino-sydnonimine), which can lead the simultaneous generation of superoxide anion and nitric oxide, and then form the highly reactive species ONOO(-), induced dose-dependent inhibition in amplitudes of both mEPSCs and sEPSCs. The SIN-1 action on mEPSC amplitude was completely blocked by U0126, a selective MEK inhibitor, suggesting that MEK contributed to the action of ONOO(-) on mEPSCs. The effect of SIN-1 was completely occluded either in the presence of the calcium chelator EGTA or the non-selective calcium channel antagonist Cd(2+). Furthermore, the application of nifedipine (20 μM), the L-type calcium channel blocker, had no effect on the ONOO(-)-induced decrease in mEPSC amplitude, excluding a role for L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in this process. SIN-1 inhibited the frequency of sEPSCs but had no effect on mEPSC frequency, which suggested a presynaptic action potential-dependent the action of ONOO(-) at CA1 pyramidal neuron synapses. The best-known glutamatergic input to CA1 pyramidal neurons is via Schaffer collaterals from CA3 area. However, no changes were observed in slices treated with SIN-1 on the spontaneous firing rates of CA3 pyramidal neurons. These findings suggested that SIN-1 inhibited glutamatergic synaptic transmission of CA1 pyramidal neurons by a postsynaptic non-L-type voltage gated calcium channel-dependent mechanism.

  3. Measurement of sin2θefflept using e+e- pairs from γ*/Z bosons produced in pp¯ collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; ...

    2016-06-28

    Here, at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton (pmore » $$\\bar{p}$$) collider, Drell-Yan lepton pairs are produced in the process p$$\\bar{p}$$→e+e-+X through an intermediate γ*/Z boson. The forward-backward asymmetry in the polar-angle distribution of the e- as a function of the e+e--pair mass is used to obtain sin2θ$$lept\\atop{eff}$$, the effective leptonic determination of the electroweak-mixing parameter sin2θW. The measurement sample, recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), corresponds to 9.4 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from p$$\\bar{p}$$ collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96 TeV, and is the full CDF Run II data set. The value of sin2θ$$lept\\atop{eff}$$ is found to be 0.23248±0.00053. The combination with the previous CDF measurement based on μ+μ- pairs yields sin2θ$$lept\\atop{eff}$$=0.23221±0.00046. This result, when interpreted within the specified context of the standard model assuming sin2θW=1-M$$2\\atop{W}$$/M$$2\\atop{Z}$$ and that the W- and Z-boson masses are on-shell, yields sin2θW=0.22400±0.00045, or equivalently a W-boson mass of 80.328±0.024 GeV/c2.« less

  4. The Sins/zC-Sinf Survey of z ~ 2 Galaxy Kinematics: Evidence for Powerful Active Galactic Nucleus-Driven Nuclear Outflows in Massive Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Newman, S. F.; Kurk, J. D.; Lutz, D.; Tacconi, L. J.; Wuyts, S.; Bandara, K.; Burkert, A.; Buschkamp, P.; Carollo, C. M.; Cresci, G.; Daddi, E.; Davies, R.; Eisenhauer, F.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Lang, P.; Lilly, S. J.; Mainieri, V.; Mancini, C.; Naab, T.; Peng, Y.; Renzini, A.; Rosario, D.; Shapiro Griffin, K.; Shapley, A. E.; Sternberg, A.; Tacchella, S.; Vergani, D.; Wisnioski, E.; Wuyts, E.; Zamorani, G.

    2014-05-01

    We report the detection of ubiquitous powerful nuclear outflows in massive (>=1011 M ⊙) z ~ 2 star-forming galaxies (SFGs), which are plausibly driven by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The sample consists of the eight most massive SFGs from our SINS/zC-SINF survey of galaxy kinematics with the imaging spectrometer SINFONI, six of which have sensitive high-resolution adaptive optics-assisted observations. All of the objects are disks hosting a significant stellar bulge. The spectra in their central regions exhibit a broad component in Hα and forbidden [N II] and [S II] line emission, with typical velocity FWHM ~ 1500 km s-1, [N II]/Hα ratio ≈ 0.6, and intrinsic extent of 2-3 kpc. These properties are consistent with warm ionized gas outflows associated with Type 2 AGN, the presence of which is confirmed via independent diagnostics in half the galaxies. The data imply a median ionized gas mass outflow rate of ~60 M ⊙ yr-1 and mass loading of ~3. At larger radii, a weaker broad component is detected but with lower FWHM ~485 km s-1 and [N II]/Hα ≈ 0.35, characteristic for star formation-driven outflows as found in the lower-mass SINS/zC-SINF galaxies. The high inferred mass outflow rates and frequent occurrence suggest that the nuclear outflows efficiently expel gas out of the centers of the galaxies with high duty cycles and may thus contribute to the process of star formation quenching in massive galaxies. Larger samples at high masses will be crucial in confirming the importance and energetics of the nuclear outflow phenomenon and its connection to AGN activity and bulge growth. Based on observations obtained at the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO program IDs 074.A-0911, 075.A-0466, 076.A-0527, 078.A-0600, 082.A-0396, 183.A-0781, 088.A-0202, 091.A-0126). Also based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the

  5. Transport mechanism of reverse surface leakage current in AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistor with SiN passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xue-Feng; Fan, Shuang; Chen, Yong-He; Kang, Di; Zhang, Jian-Kun; Wang, Chong; Mo, Jiang-Hui; Li, Liang; Ma, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Hao, Yue

    2015-02-01

    The transport mechanism of reverse surface leakage current in the AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistor (HEMT) becomes one of the most important reliability issues with the downscaling of feature size. In this paper, the research results show that the reverse surface leakage current in AlGaN/GaN HEMT with SiN passivation increases with the enhancement of temperature in the range from 298 K to 423 K. Three possible transport mechanisms are proposed and examined to explain the generation of reverse surface leakage current. By comparing the experimental data with the numerical transport models, it is found that neither Fowler-Nordheim tunneling nor Frenkel-Poole emission can describe the transport of reverse surface leakage current. However, good agreement is found between the experimental data and the two-dimensional variable range hopping (2D-VRH) model. Therefore, it is concluded that the reverse surface leakage current is dominated by the electron hopping through the surface states at the barrier layer. Moreover, the activation energy of surface leakage current is extracted, which is around 0.083 eV. Finally, the SiN passivated HEMT with a high Al composition and a thin AlGaN barrier layer is also studied. It is observed that 2D-VRH still dominates the reverse surface leakage current and the activation energy is around 0.10 eV, which demonstrates that the alteration of the AlGaN barrier layer does not affect the transport mechanism of reverse surface leakage current in this paper. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61334002, 61106106, and 61474091), the Opening Project of Science and Technology on Reliability Physics and Application Technology of Electronic Component Laboratory, China (Grant No. ZHD201206), the New Experiment Development Funds for Xidian University, China (Grant No. SY1213), the 111 Project, China (Grant No. B12026), the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars

  6. Identified Sins in Teaching Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    This paper cites as selected taboos in teaching reading (identified by educators very frequently) the following: (1) homogeneous grouping; (2) round robin reading; (3) use of textbooks and workbooks in the curriculum; (4) individual endeavors in school work; (5) memorization of content; and (6) the controlled vocabulary in reading. The paper…

  7. Knockdown of selenocysteine-specific elongation factor in Amblyomma maculatum alters the pathogen burden of Rickettsia parkeri with epigenetic control by the Sin3 histone deacetylase corepressor complex.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Steven W; Browning, Rebecca E; Budachetri, Khemraj; Ribeiro, José M C; Karim, Shahid

    2013-01-01

    Selenocysteine is the 21st naturally-occurring amino acid. Selenoproteins have diverse functions and many remain uncharacterized, but they are typically associated with antioxidant activity. The incorporation of selenocysteine into the nascent polypeptide chain recodes the TGA stop codon and this process depends upon a number of essential factors including the selenocysteine elongation factor (SEF). The transcriptional expression of SEF did not change significantly in tick midguts throughout the blood meal, but decreased in salivary glands to 20% at the end of the fast feeding phase. Since selenoprotein translation requires this specialized elongation factor, we targeted this gene for knockdown by RNAi to gain a global view of the role selenoproteins play in tick physiology. We found no significant differences in tick engorgement and embryogenesis but detected no antioxidant capacity in tick saliva. The transcriptional profile of selenoproteins in R. parkeri-infected Amblyomma maculatum revealed declined activity of selenoprotein M and catalase and increased activity of selenoprotein O, selenoprotein S, and selenoprotein T. Furthermore, the pathogen burden was significantly altered in SEF-knockdowns. We then determined the global impact of SEF-knockdown by RNA-seq, and mapped huge shifts in secretory gene expression that could be the result of downregulation of the Sin3 histone deacetylase corepressor complex.

  8. A SIN lentiviral vector containing PIGA cDNA allows long-term phenotypic correction of CD34+-derived cells from patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.

    PubMed

    Robert, David; Mahon, François-Xavier; Richard, Emmanuel; Etienne, Gabriel; de Verneuil, Hubert; Moreau-Gaudry, François

    2003-03-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) disorder in which an acquired somatic mutation of the X-linked PIGA gene results in a deficiency in GPI-anchored surface proteins. Clinically, PNH is dominated by a chronic hemolytic anemia, often associated with recurrent nocturnal exacerbations, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and thrombotic tendency. Allogenic bone marrow transplantation is the only potentially curative treatment for severe forms of PNH but is associated with a high treatment-related morbidity and mortality. HSC gene therapy could provide a new therapeutic option, especially when an HLA-matched donor is not available. To develop an efficient gene transfer approach, we have designed a new SIN lentiviral vector (TEPW) that contains the PIGA cDNA driven by the human elongation factor 1 alpha promoter, the central DNA flap of HIV-1, and the WPRE cassette. TEPW transduction led to a complete surface expression of the GPI anchor and CD59 in PIGA-deficient cell lines without any selection procedure. Moreover, efficient gene transfer was achieved in bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood CD34(+) cells derived from two patients with severe PNH disease. This expression was stable during erythroid, myeloid, and megakaryocytic liquid culture differentiation. CD59 surface cell expression was fully restored during 5 weeks of long-term culture.

  9. Knockdown of Selenocysteine-Specific Elongation Factor in Amblyomma maculatum Alters the Pathogen Burden of Rickettsia parkeri with Epigenetic Control by the Sin3 Histone Deacetylase Corepressor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Steven W.; Browning, Rebecca E.; Budachetri, Khemraj; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Karim, Shahid

    2013-01-01

    Selenocysteine is the 21st naturally-occurring amino acid. Selenoproteins have diverse functions and many remain uncharacterized, but they are typically associated with antioxidant activity. The incorporation of selenocysteine into the nascent polypeptide chain recodes the TGA stop codon and this process depends upon a number of essential factors including the selenocysteine elongation factor (SEF). The transcriptional expression of SEF did not change significantly in tick midguts throughout the blood meal, but decreased in salivary glands to 20% at the end of the fast feeding phase. Since selenoprotein translation requires this specialized elongation factor, we targeted this gene for knockdown by RNAi to gain a global view of the role selenoproteins play in tick physiology. We found no significant differences in tick engorgement and embryogenesis but detected no antioxidant capacity in tick saliva. The transcriptional profile of selenoproteins in R. parkeri-infected Amblyomma maculatum revealed declined activity of selenoprotein M and catalase and increased activity of selenoprotein O, selenoprotein S, and selenoprotein T. Furthermore, the pathogen burden was significantly altered in SEF-knockdowns. We then determined the global impact of SEF-knockdown by RNA-seq, and mapped huge shifts in secretory gene expression that could be the result of downregulation of the Sin3 histone deacetylase corepressor complex. PMID:24282621

  10. Falling outer rotation curves of star-forming galaxies at 0.7 < z < 2.6 probed with KMOS3D and SINS/zC-SINF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Philipp; Schreiber, Natascha M. Förster; Genzel, Reinhard; Burkert, Andreas; Lutz, Dieter; Tacconi, Linda; Wisnioski, Emily; Wuyts, Stijn; KMOS 3D Team

    2017-03-01

    We exploit the deep Hα IFU kinematic data from the KMOS3D and SINS/zC-SINF surveys to explore the so far unconstrained outer rotation curves of star-forming disk galaxies at high redshift. Through stacking the signal of ~ 100 massive disks at 0.7 < z < 2.6, we construct a representative rotation curve reaching out to several effective radii. Our stacked rotation curve exhibits a turnover with a steep falloff in the outer regions, significantly strengthening the tantalizing evidence previously hinted at in a handful only of individual disks among the sample with the deepest data. This finding confirms the high baryon fractions found by comparing the stellar, gas and dynamical masses of high redshift galaxies independently of assumptions on the light-to-mass conversion and Initial stellar Mass Function (IMF). The rapid falloff of the stacked rotation curve is most naturally explained by the effects of pressure gradients, which are significant in the gas-rich, turbulent high-z disks and which would imply a possible pressure-driven truncation of the outer disk.

  11. Analysis of Anti-Influenza Virus Neuraminidase Antibodies in Children, Adults, and the Elderly by ELISA and Enzyme Inhibition: Evidence for Original Antigenic Sin

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Madhusudan; Ermler, Megan E.; Bunduc, Paul; Amanat, Fatima; Izikson, Ruvim; Cox, Manon; Palese, Peter; Eichelberger, Maryna

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibody responses to influenza virus hemagglutinin provide protection against infection and are well studied. Less is known about the human antibody responses to the second surface glycoprotein, neuraminidase. Here, we assessed human antibody reactivity to a panel of N1, N2, and influenza B virus neuraminidases in different age groups, including children, adults, and the elderly. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), we determined the breadth, magnitude, and isotype distribution of neuraminidase antibody responses to historic, current, and avian strains, as well as to recent isolates to which these individuals have not been exposed. It appears that antibody levels against N1 neuraminidases were lower than those against N2 or B neuraminidases. The anti-neuraminidase antibody levels increased with age and were, in general, highest against strains that circulated during the childhood of the tested individuals, providing evidence for “original antigenic sin.” Titers measured by ELISA correlated well with titers measured by the neuraminidase inhibition assays. However, in the case of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, we found evidence of interference from antibodies binding to the conserved stalk domain of the hemagglutinin. In conclusion, we found that antibodies against the neuraminidase differ in magnitude and breadth between subtypes and age groups in the human population. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00336453, NCT00539981, and NCT00395174.) PMID:28325769

  12. The effect of seasonality, density and climate on the population dynamics of Montana deer mice, important reservoir hosts for Sin Nombre hantavirus.

    PubMed

    Luis, Angela D; Douglass, Richard J; Mills, James N; Bjørnstad, Ottar N

    2010-03-01

    1. Since Sin Nombre virus was discovered in the U.S. in 1993, longitudinal studies of the rodent reservoir host, the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) have demonstrated a qualitative correlation among mouse population dynamics and risk of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in humans, indicating the importance of understanding deer mouse population dynamics for evaluating risk of HPS. 2. Using capture-mark-recapture statistical methods on a 15-year data set from Montana, we estimated deer mouse survival, maturation and recruitment rates and tested the relative importance of seasonality, population density and local climate in explaining temporal variation in deer mouse demography. 3. From these estimates, we designed a population model to simulate deer mouse population dynamics given climatic variables and compared the model to observed patterns. 4. Month, precipitation 5 months previously, temperature 5 months previously and to a lesser extent precipitation and temperature in the current month, were important in determining deer mouse survival. Month, the sum of precipitation over the last 4 months, and the sum of the temperature over the last 4 months were important in determining recruitment rates. Survival was more important in determining the growth rate of the population than recruitment. 5. While climatic drivers appear to have a complex influence on dynamics, our forecasts were good. Our quantitative model may allow public health officials to better predict increased human risk from basic climatic data.

  13. Foreign-Born Latinos Living in Rural Areas are more likely to Experience Health Care Discrimination: Results from Proyecto de Salud para Latinos.

    PubMed

    López-Cevallos, Daniel F; Harvey, S Marie

    2016-08-01

    Health care discrimination is increasingly considered a significant barrier to accessing health services among minority populations, including Latinos. However, little is known about the role of immigration status. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between immigration status and perceived health care discrimination among Latinos living in rural areas. Interviews were conducted among 349 young-adult Latinos (ages 18 to 25) living in rural Oregon, as part of Proyecto de Salud para Latinos. Over a third of participants experienced health care discrimination (39.5 %). Discrimination was higher among foreign-born (44.9 %) rather than US-born Latinos (31.9 %). Multivariate results showed that foreign-born Latinos were significantly more likely to experience health care discrimination, even after controlling for other relevant factors (OR = 2.10, 95 % CI 1.16-3.82). This study provides evidence that health care discrimination is prevalent among young-adult Latinos living in rural areas, particularly the foreign-born. Effective approaches towards reducing discrimination in health care settings should take into consideration the need to reform our broken immigration system.

  14. 'Proyecto Orgullo', an HIV prevention, empowerment and community mobilisation intervention for gay men and transgender women in Callao/Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Maiorana, Andres; Kegeles, Susan; Salazar, Ximena; Konda, Kelika; Silva-Santisteban, Alfonso; Cáceres, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    We used qualitative, quantitative, and observational methods to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and potential efficacy of Proyecto Orgullo (PO), a pilot community mobilisation intervention to decrease sexual risk, promote health-seeking behaviours, and facilitate personal and community empowerment among gay men (GM) and transgender women (TW) in Peru. PO was adapted from Mpowerment and Hermanos de Luna y Sol, two US interventions. PO included six interrelated core elements: (1) Self-reflection Small Group sessions; (2) Supporting peers in HIV prevention; (3) Mobilisation Activities addressing HIV, GM/TW issues, and community empowerment; (4) A Core Group (staff + GM/TW volunteers) designing/implementing those activities; (5) A Project Space; (6) Publicity. PO included specific components for TW, but promoted that GM/TW, who historically have not worked well together, collaborate for a common goal. We found that PO was embraced by GM/TW. PO positively influenced GM/TW's HIV prevention beliefs, self-efficacy, and behaviours; provided social support and created community; facilitated individual and community empowerment; achieved that GM/TW collaborate; and established a functional Community Centre for socialising/conducting mobilisation activities. Community mobilisation strategies, lacking from HIV prevention efforts in Peru but considered key to HIV prevention, can help improve health-seeking behaviours and consolidate social norms supporting preventive behaviours among GM/TW.

  15. Proyecto MercadoFRESCO: A Multi-level, Community-Engaged Corner Store Intervention in East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Stephanie L.; Sharif, Mienah Z.; Langellier, Brent A.; Garcia, Rosa Elena; Glik, Deborah C.; Brookmeyer, Ron; Chan-Golston, Alec M.; Friedlander, Scott; Prelip, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Urban food swamps are typically situated in low-income, minority communities and contribute to overweight and obesity. Changing the food landscape in low income and underserved communities is one strategy to combat the negative health consequences associated with the lack of access to healthy food resources and an abundance of unhealthy food venues. In this paper, we describe Proyecto MercadoFRESCO (Fresh Market Project), a corner store intervention project in East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights in California that used a multi-level approach with a broad range of community, business, and academic partners. These are two neighboring, predominantly Latino communities that have high rates of overweight and obesity. Located in these two communities are approximately 150 corner stores. The project used a community-engaged approach to select, recruit, and convert four corner stores, so that they could become healthy community assets in order to improve residents’ access to and awareness of fresh and affordable fruits and vegetables in their immediate neighborhoods. We describe the study framework for the multi-level intervention, which includes having multiple stakeholders, expertise in corner store operations, community and youth engagement strategies, and social marketing campaigns. We also describe the evaluation and survey methodology to determine community and patron impact of the intervention. This paper provides a framework useful to a variety of public health stakeholders for implementing a community-engaged corner store conversion, particularly in an urban food swamp. PMID:25209600

  16. Proyecto MercadoFRESCO: a multi-level, community-engaged corner store intervention in East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Alexander N; Albert, Stephanie L; Sharif, Mienah Z; Langellier, Brent A; Garcia, Rosa Elena; Glik, Deborah C; Brookmeyer, Ron; Chan-Golston, Alec M; Friedlander, Scott; Prelip, Michael L

    2015-04-01

    Urban food swamps are typically situated in low-income, minority communities and contribute to overweight and obesity. Changing the food landscape in low income and underserved communities is one strategy to combat the negative health consequences associated with the lack of access to healthy food resources and an abundance of unhealthy food venues. In this paper, we describe Proyecto MercadoFRESCO (Fresh Market Project), a corner store intervention project in East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights in California that used a multi-level approach with a broad range of community, business, and academic partners. These are two neighboring, predominantly Latino communities that have high rates of overweight and obesity. Located in these two communities are approximately 150 corner stores. The project used a community-engaged approach to select, recruit, and convert four corner stores, so that they could become healthy community assets in order to improve residents' access to and awareness of fresh and affordable fruits and vegetables in their immediate neighborhoods. We describe the study framework for the multi-level intervention, which includes having multiple stakeholders, expertise in corner store operations, community and youth engagement strategies, and social marketing campaigns. We also describe the evaluation and survey methodology to determine community and patron impact of the intervention. This paper provides a framework useful to a variety of public health stakeholders for implementing a community-engaged corner store conversion, particularly in an urban food swamp.

  17. Efeito do Solo do Materias Organicos E do Adubo Formula 4N:14P:8K Para Producao DA Batata (Solanum tuberosum L.) Semente Pre-Basica no Casa de Vegetacao

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    László, Márton

    2010-05-01

    hard effect (57%). Our results are shown that it was possible developing of the seed potato production under tropical greenhouse conditions by optimalised soil-organic matter-fertilizer system. This datas should be as indicators to sustainable field potato advisory systems. Keywords: potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), greenhouse, latossolo vermelho soil, farmyard manure, burnt rice straw, 4N:14P:8K fertilizer, sustainability, yield RESUMO A batata é atualmente uma das hortaliças de maior importância no Brasíl. Nos conduzirémos os três experimentos para aumentár-se do produção e produtividade da batata (Solanum tuberosum L.) semente pré- básica no casa de vegetação da Brazília-DF, no Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria- Centro Nacional de Pesquisas de Hortaliças no 1990. Os três experimentos (latossolo vermelho novo x esterco de curral x palha de arroz queimado, latossolo vermelho novo x adubo 4:14:8 NPK, latossolo vermelho novo x esterco de curral x palha de arroz queimado x adubo 4:14:8 NPK) no casa de vegetação foram conduzidos com total 29 combinações, no 5-5-3 repetições com total parcelas de 116. Os resultados foram submetidos a analise de variáncia, ANOVA e MANOVA. Nossos principal resultados estam apresentándo abaixo. 1. A mistura de 80% latossolo vermelho novo, 10% palha de arroz queimado e 10% de esterco de curral, apresentou os maiores valores para numero de tuberculos com 0-20 mm, peso total de tuberculos com 0-20 mm e peso total de tuberculos por vaso. 2. Há um efeito grande crescente das doses de 4N:14P:8K nos caracteres observados. 3. Analise-se do latossolo vermelho novo x esterco de curral x palha de arroz queimado x adubo 4:14:8 NPK experimento os resultados apresentárám-se que entre nas misturas também foi melhor a 80% latossolo vermelho novo, 10% palha de arroz queimado, 10% esterco de curral. Examinando-se 15 fatores, entre 11 casos afirmou-se a mistura como para melhor que a outra mistura. Nossos resultados

  18. Nebular excitation in z ∼ 2 star-forming galaxies from the SINS and LUCI surveys: The influence of shocks and active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Sarah F.; Genzel, Reinhard; Buschkamp, Peter; Förster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Kurk, Jaron; Rosario, David; Davies, Ric; Eisenhauer, Frank; Lutz, Dieter; Sternberg, Amiel; Gnat, Orly; Mancini, Chiara; Renzini, Alvio; Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Burkert, Andreas; Cresci, Giovanni; Genel, Shy; Shapiro Griffin, Kristen; Hicks, Erin K. S.; and others

    2014-01-20

    Based on high-resolution, spatially resolved data of 10 z ∼ 2 star-forming galaxies from the SINS/zC-SINF survey and LUCI data for 12 additional galaxies, we probe the excitation properties of high-z galaxies and the impact of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), shocks, and photoionization. We explore how these spatially resolved line ratios can inform our interpretation of integrated emission line ratios obtained at high redshift. Many of our galaxies fall in the 'composite' region of the z ∼ 0 [N II]/Hα versus [O III]/Hβ diagnostic (BPT) diagram, between star-forming galaxies and those with AGNs. Based on our resolved measurements, we find that some of these galaxies likely host an AGN, while others appear to be affected by the presence of shocks possibly caused by an outflow or from an enhanced ionization parameter as compared with H II regions in normal, local star-forming galaxies. We find that the Mass-Excitation (MEx) diagnostic, which separates purely star-forming and AGN hosting local galaxies in the [O III]/Hβ versus stellar mass plane, does not properly separate z ∼ 2 galaxies classified according to the BPT diagram. However, if we shift the galaxies based on the offset between the local and z ∼ 2 mass-metallicity relation (i.e., to the mass they would have at z ∼ 0 with the same metallicity), we find better agreement between the MEx and BPT diagnostics. Finally, we find that metallicity calibrations based on [N II]/Hα are more biased by shocks and AGNs at high-z than the [O III]/Hβ/[N II]/Hα calibration.

  19. Si-N membrane microcalorimetry: Thermal conductivity and specific heat of thin films from 2-500K in magnetic fields to 8 Tesla.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, Barry

    2003-03-01

    Understanding the thermal behavior of mesoscopic systems and thin films is a critical issue of both fundamental and technological solid state science. Despite the wealth of knowledge in principle available from accurate measurement of specific heat and thermal conductivity of thin films, there are relatively few results of this type, due to the difficulty of isolating the small heat capacities and thermal conductivities from the typically large background contribution of conventional apparatus. Our group at UC San Diego uses amorphous Si-N membranes to thermally isolate small samples from their environment and allow accurate thermal measurements. Recent work adds the ability to measure thermal conductivity of films as thin as 150 Angstrom over a broad temperature range [1] to our well-established techniques for measuring Cp of small samples.[2] Our microcalorimeter is also particularly well-suited for measurements of both Cp and k in high magnetic fields [3]. The micromachining techniques used to fabricate the calorimeter allow production of significant numbers of calorimeters with well-controlled dimensions and highly reproducible properties which facilitates studies of the thermal properties of thin film and tiny crystals. In this talk I will briefly review the fabrication of our microcalorimeter and the techniques for measuring Cp and k. I will present example data and results of numerical heat flow simulations used to further our understanding of heat flow in the microcalorimeter [1] B. L. Zink, B. Revaz, J. J. Cherry and F. Hellman, Submitted to RSI, Sept. 2002 [2] D. W. Denlinger et al., Rev. Sci. Inst 65, 946-59 (1994) [3] B. L. Zink, B. Revaz, R. Sappey and F. Hellman, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 1841 (2002)

  20. Delayed density-dependent prevalence of Sin Nombre virus antibody in Montana deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and implications for human disease risk.

    PubMed

    Madhav, Nita K; Wagoner, Kent D; Douglass, Richard J; Mills, James N

    2007-01-01

    American hantaviruses cause a severe respiratory disease known as hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). In the United States, Sin Nombre virus (SNV), carried by the deer mouse ( Peromyscus maniculatus), is the etiologic agent in the majority of HPS cases. The relationship between deer mouse population density and SNV infection prevalence in deer mice is poorly understood. Our purpose was to clarify this relationship by demonstrating the existence of delayed-density-dependent prevalence of SNV infection in populations of wild deer mice. We also explored the relationship between SNV infection in deer mouse populations and the incidence of human HPS. The study population was 3,616 deer mice captured on 10 mark-recapture grids in Montana during May and September, 1994-2004. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, we found a strong association between deer mouse population density in fall (September) and SNV antibody prevalence in deer mice the following spring (May). Other characteristics associated with SNV infection in deer mice in spring were: (1) presence of at least one infected deer mouse in the population the previous fall, (2) male gender, (3) adult age class, (4) presence of scars, (5) grassland and logged habitats, and (6) elevations below 1,300 m. There was a strong association between concurrently measured SNV antibody prevalence in deer mice and probable exposure of human HPS cases during the same time period. Human cases were more likely to occur during seasons when SNV antibody prevalence was at least 10% in deer mouse populations. These findings suggest that fall rodent population parameters could be used to help guide prevention efforts the following spring.

  1. Silicon impacts on structure, stability and aromaticity of C20-nSin heterofullerenes (n = 1-10): A density functional perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koohi, M.; Soleimani Amiri, S.; Shariati, M.

    2017-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are applied to compare and contrast silicon atom substitution doped C20-nSin heterofullerene analogous with n = 1-10, at B3LYP/AUG-cc-pVTZ. Vibrational frequency analysis confirms that all studied systems are true minima. Isolating the dopants is an applicable strategy for obtaining highly doped stable heterofullerenes, since it avoids weak silicon―silicon single bonds. Comparing and contrasting the optimized geometries shows that except C11Si9 and C10Si10 species (with deformed cages of segregated analogous), all eight fullerenic cages are the complete isolated-pentagon analogous. Hence, the dopants must be completely isolated from each other by means of strong Cdbnd C double bonds. Isolable or extractable fullerene isomers must be not only thermodynamically but also stable against electronic excitations. We then predicted that these isomers must have not only relatively large heats of atomization per carbon as a criterion of thermodynamic stability but also relatively large HOMO-LUMO energy separation against electronic excitations. The calculated the highest binding energy (6.52 eV/atom), heat of atomization per carbon (3193.2 kcal mol-1), band gap (2.86 eV) and nucleus independent chemical shift at the cage center (-50.00 ppm) for C18Si2 reveals it as the most stable heterofullerene. It has Ci symmetry and contains two silicon atoms in equatorial. High charge transfer on the surfaces of our scrutinized heterofullerenes provokes further investigations on their possible application for hydrogen storage. We hope that the present study will stimulate new experiments.

  2. Astronomía para ciegos y amblíopes. Proyecto de construcción de un planetario especial en la ciudad de Mar del Plata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musso, S.

    ?`Qué es la Astronomía para Ciegos?. El trabajo es una adaptación en base a la escala de magnitudes de Hipparco que cambia el concepto de luz por una adaptación sonora, donde las estrellas de magnitud 6 se escuchan en 10 dB, más o menos lo que consideramos el umbral de la audición humana. Quienes no escuchan muy bien no pueden escuchar las magnitudes 6, de la misma manera que muchos de nosotros, que no poseemos una visión perfecta, no podemos observar esas mismas estrellas en el cielo (más allá de la polución). A los astros de magnitud 5 vamos a relacionarlos a un sonido en 20 dB. Y así sucesivamente. También los colores estarán representados en una convención de graves a agudos y lo mismo algunas características del cielo. Por ejemplo, la Vía Láctea se mostrará como un ``ruido", como bien nos lo hicieron ver nuestros futuros destinatarios. En Mar del Plata nos encontramos ya trabajando en un proyecto que tiene como objetivo final la construcción del Primer Planetario Acústico del Mundo, una herramienta para la enseñanza de la astronomía, un espacio para la lucha contra la discriminación del discapacitado y una posibilidad de ``ver el cielo de un modo diferente".

  3. SINS/zC-SINF Survey of z ˜ 2 Galaxy Kinematics: Rest-frame Morphology, Structure, and Colors from Near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacchella, S.; Lang, P.; Carollo, C. M.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Renzini, A.; Shapley, A. E.; Wuyts, S.; Cresci, G.; Genzel, R.; Lilly, S. J.; Mancini, C.; Newman, S. F.; Tacconi, L. J.; Zamorani, G.; Davies, R. I.; Kurk, J.; Pozzetti, L.

    2015-04-01

    We present the analysis of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) J- and H-band imaging for 29 galaxies on the star-forming main sequence at z ˜ 2, which have adaptive optics Very Large Telescope SINFONI integral field spectroscopy from our SINS/zC-SINF program. The SINFONI Hα data resolve the ongoing star formation and the ionized gas kinematics on scales of 1-2 kpc; the near-IR images trace the galaxies’ rest-frame optical morphologies and distributions of stellar mass in old stellar populations at a similar resolution. The global light profiles of most galaxies show disk-like properties well described by a single Sérsic profile with n˜ 1, with only ˜ 15% requiring a high n\\gt 3 Sérsic index, all more massive than {{10}10} {{M}⊙ }. In bulge+disk fits, about 40% of galaxies have a measurable bulge component in the light profiles, with ˜ 15% showing a substantial bulge-to-total ratio (B/T) B/T≳ 0.3. This is a lower limit to the frequency of z ˜ 2 massive galaxies with a developed bulge component in stellar mass because it could be hidden by dust and/or outshined by a thick actively star-forming disk component. The galaxies’ rest-optical half-light radii range between 1 and 7 kpc, with a median of 2.1 kpc, and lie slightly above the size-mass relation at these epochs reported in the literature. This is attributed to differences in sample selection and definitions of size and/or mass measurements. The {{(u-g)}rest} color gradient and scatter within individual z ˜ 2 massive galaxies with ≳ {{10}11} {{M}⊙ } are as high as in z = 0 low-mass, late-type galaxies and are consistent with the high star formation rates of massive z ˜ 2 galaxies being sustained at large galactocentric distances. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  4. [Trend in PD in non-pediatric public centers in Italy: results of the 2010 GSDP-SIN census and comparison with the 2008 and 2005 censuses].

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, Giancarlo; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Neri, Loris; Viglino, Giusto; Amici, Gianpaolo; Iadarola, Gian Maria; Santarelli, Stefano; Virga, Giovambattista; La Milia, Vincenzo; Corciulo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The 2010 Italian Society of Nephrology Peritoneal Dialysis Study Group (GSPD-SIN) census (Cs-10) involved the 224 Centers performing PD in Italy. PD was used as 1st treatment in 23.3% (1429/4695) of pts (Cs-08:22.8%; Cs-05:24.2%), with 53.4% of them using CAPD. The use of incremental CAPD increased in Cs-10 (Cs-10:35.3%; Cs-08:25.7%; Cs-05:13.6%; p<0.0001). The number of prevalent pts was 4,222 (Cs-10:16.6%; Cs-08:16.6%; Cs-05:16.8%; p=NS), 45.7% of whom were on CAPD; 24.4% (Cs-08:21.8%; p<0.05) required assistance (family member:80.6%; caregiver:12.6%; nurse: 3.0%; RSA:3.4%). In Cs-10 the PD out rate (1,354 pts, of whom ep/100pt-yrs for drop-out: 12.4; death: 12.9; Tx: 7.5) was not different to previous years. The peritonitis rate was 0.30 ep/yr/pt, 18.5% of which with negative culture. There were 44 episodes of EPS in the period 2009-10 (0.53 ep/100yrs); while in the previous 5-year period there were 146 (0.70 ep/100pt-yrs). PET is performed by 98% of the centers, mostly using 2.27% (70.5%). Home visits are carried out by 59.1% of the centers. If regular (8.9% of the centers), they are associated with fewer ep/mth of peritonitis (61.2 vs 38.8) and lower drop-out (8.6 vs 12.8 ep/100 pt/yr - p<0.05) Cs-10 confirms the good results PD is having in the Centers that use it. Incremental CAPD and assisted PD are increasing. EPS remains a rare event. Standard PET is the most frequently-used evaluation of the peritoneal membrane. Though home visits are associated with lower peritonitis and drop-out rates, they are carried out regularly by a minority of the Centers.

  5. High f T and f max AlGaN/GaN HFETs achieved by using thin and high-Al-composition AlGaN barrier layers and Cat-CVD SiN passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiwaki, M.; Onojima, N.; Matsui, T.; Mimura, T.

    2006-05-01

    We fabricated sub-0.1 m-gate Al0.4Ga0.6N/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors (HFETs) with AlGaN barrier thicknesses of 4-10 nm. The devices were passivated with 2 nm-thick SiN layers formed by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD). The Cat-CVD SiN passivation greatly increased electron density, and the effect became more significant with decreasing AlGaN barrier thickness. The HFETs had maximum drain current densities of 1.1-1.5 A/mm and peak extrinsic transconductances of 305-438 mS/mm. Peak current-gain cutoff frequency of 163 GHz and maximum oscillation frequency of 192 GHz were obtained for the devices with 8 nm-thick AlGaN barriers.

  6. The dependency of different stress-level SiN capping films and the optimization of D-SMT process for the device performance booster in Ge n-FinFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, M.-H. Chen, P.-G.

    2015-08-17

    The capping stressed SiN film is one of the most important process steps for the dislocation stress memorization technique (D-SMT), which has been used widely in the current industry, for the electron mobility booster in the n-type transistor beyond the 32/28 nm technology node. In this work, we found that the different stress-level SiN capping films influence the crystal re-growth velocities along different directions including [100] and [110] directions in Ge a lot. It can be further used to optimize the dislocation angle in the transistor during the D-SMT process and then results in the largest channel stress distribution to boost the device performance in the Ge n-FinFETs. Based on the theoretical calculation and experimental demonstration, it shows that the Ge three dimensional (3D) n-FinFETs device performance is improved ∼55% with the usage of +3 GPa tensile stressed SiN capping film. The channel stress and dislocation angle is ∼2.5 GPa and 30°, measured by the atomic force microscope-Raman technique and transmission electron microscopy, respectively.

  7. Manual para Compradores de Casas (Homebuyer's Guide).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sindt, Roger P.; Harris, Jack

    Designed to assist prospective buyers in making such important decisions as whether to buy a new or older home and within what price range, the guide, written in Spanish, provides information on the purchase process. Discussion of the purchase process covers the life-cycle costs (recurring homeownership costs that must be met every month);…

  8. CASA Forest Cover Change Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    Deforestation and forest fires are global land cover changes that can be caused by both natural and human factors. Although monitoring forest fires in near-real time is critical for operational wildfire management, mapping historical wildfires in a spatially explicit fashion is also important for a number of reasons, including climate change studies (e.g., examining the relationship between rising temperatures and frequency of fires), fuel load management (e.g., deciding when and where to conduct controlled burns), and carbon cycle studies (e.g., quantifying how much CO2 is emitted by fires and for emissions reduction efforts under the United Nations programs for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation -- REDD).

  9. Proyecto Leer Bulletin, Number 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Susan Shattuck

    This guide to instructional materials for teachers of Spanish contains references to commercially-prepared works in several classified areas. The works listed are intended for use in grades ranging from kindergarten through senior high school and also include materials for adult education. The 10 categories cover: (1) audiovisual materials, (2)…

  10. Proyecto Leer Bulletin, Number 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Susan Shattuck

    This bulletin lists educational materials for the Spanish speaking. Several hundred documents are listed in three main sections: (1) organizations, programs, laws, and news related to the Spanish speaking; (2) a list of books selected; and (3) a list of publishers and distributors with their addresses. Several bibliographies are included. Entries…

  11. Proyecto Leer Bulletin, Number 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tome, Martha V., Ed.

    This bulletin is designed to serve the Spanish-speaking population of the United States. This issue contains a list of popular magazines in Spanish for children and adults. Another section provides the names of comics for children. Titles to be found under "Publications in Series and Collections" are the popular type of romantic, western, or…

  12. Proyecto Leer Bulletin, Number 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tome, Martha V., Ed.

    Educational materials for students of Spanish and the Spanish speaking are listed in this bulletin. A general information section lists reference materials on bilingual children, the blind and physically handicapped, comics, consumer education, employment, health, heritage of the Spanish speaking, Mexican American biography, Mexican American film…

  13. Proyecto Leer Bulletin, Number 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Susan Shattuck

    This bulletin lists addresses of publishers and distributors of audiovisual instructional materials in Spanish in the United States and Latin America. Sources are listed in four categories: (1) federal sources of materials, information on materials, names of resource people, programs, and proposal guidelines concerning the Spanish speaking; (2)…

  14. Proyecto multidisciplinar `Marte nos visita'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, D.; Merlo, N.; Parodi, B.; Garis, A.; Peralta, G.; Rovessi, V.; Urrutia, S.; Calderón, J.; Bustos Fierro, I.; Melia, R.

    The planets Earth and Mars reached in August 2003 the most approximation in the last 58,000 years. In order to that we carried out a transversal study of red planet, joining the knowledges from several subjects of second school year of unified basic cycle (eighth basic general education) at I.P.E.M. No 249 "Nicolás Copérnico" (a public secondary institution from Córdoba, Argentine). In this study, activities in accordance with current contents has been proposed by common consents of each teacher. Besides, students visited Córdoba Astronomical Observatory in order to search informations and received a multimedia exposition about of astronomical event and a performance of the "Carl Sagan" Moveable Planetary. Finally, each student carried out practical works and wrote an integrative report, which one has been evaluated and exposed at ExpoIPEM 2003, an annual exhibition of several specialities that Institution offers in its specialization cycle (10-12 grade), where the annual students' activities are exhibited too (workshops, school projects, etc.).

  15. Multiple embryos in the Lepidocyclina pustulosa group as possible indicators of palaeoenvironmental conditions: The case of the Late Eocene Toluviejo Formation (Sinú Domain, Caribbean, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner-Mora, Claudia; Baumgartner, Peter O.; Rincón Martínez, Daniel; Salazar Ortiz, Edward A.

    2016-04-01

    The Middle-Late Eocene Toluviejo Formation of the Sinú-San Jacinto folded belt (Caribbean, Colombia) contains 15-75 m thick, grey, massive limestone sequences that are interbedded with terrigenous nearshore to offshore mudstones to quartzose sandstones and conglomerates. The formation accumulated in a transitional continent-ocean setting, probably on oceanic crust. We studied over 80 polished thin sections under light microscopy and cathodoluminescence (CL) to analyse carbonate microfacies and Larger Benthic Foraminifera (LBF). The overall facies distribution is 3-fold: (1) Facies close to the shoreline are dominated by low diversity operculinid assemblages, rich in detrital elements. (2) Shallow offshore facies are characterized by round lepidocyclinids, associated with, and often encrusted by, corallinacean algae, Sporolithon and structureless microbial crusts. The matrix is rich in carbonate/detrital mud and sand-sized detritals. (3) Distal offshore facies on structural highs show abundance of flat, current-sorted lepidoclinids without a noticeable detrital component. Facies 1 and 2 are clearly under the influence of suspension- and dissolved-nutrient input, probably carried offshore by freshwater lids of river plumes. Facies (2) contains abundant specimens of the Lepidocyclina pustulosa group of which the macrospheric forms show complicated embryonic apparatuses, which suppose double or multiple embryos. Detailed observation under CL allows to count up to 6-8 embryos, often seen aligned in the equatorial plane. The embryonic apparatus occupies often more than half of the diameter of specimens. The tendency towards large, very flat embryonic apparatuses (diameter measured in axial cuts up to 2,5 mm for a thickness of 0.2-0.3 mm) is closely correlated with abundant coralgal and microbial encrustations, oxide-stained carbonate/detrital mud and probably some preserved organic matter. The presence of multiple embryos has been reported by several authors and has

  16. Grape and grape seed extract capacities at protecting LDL against oxidation generated by Cu2+, AAPH or SIN-1 and at decreasing superoxide THP-1 cell production. A comparison to other extracts or compounds.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Manijeh; Carbonneau, Marie-Annette; Urban, Nelly; Descomps, Bernard; Leger, Claude L

    2003-05-01

    A large body of evidence supports the key role of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to compare the capacity of natural polyphenols (PP) from Vitis vinifera and Olea europea at protecting LDL against oxidation brought about by Cu2+, oxygen-centered radical-generating AAPH, or peroxynitrite-generating SIN-1 in vitro systems, or at impairing superoxide production in promonocyte cells (THP-1) conveniently differentiated into adherent macrophages. PP were either from the whole grape (fraction A) containing mainly procyanidins, (epi)-catechin and anthocyanins, or from grape seed extracts (fractions B and C) consisting of tannins and procyanidin oligomers with a higher content in B than in C, or from a grape skin extract (fraction D) consisting mainly of anthocyanins, or from a hydrosoluble olive mill wastewater PP extract (fraction E) containing hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein. Chlorogenic acid (F) and catechin (G) were taken as archetypes of PP preventing oxidation partly as copper scavenger and as radical scavenger only, respectively. All grape fractions were efficient towards Cu2+ system (equally or more efficient than F), whereas they were rather poorly efficient towards AAPH and SIN-1 (less efficient than G but as efficient as F). Among the PP fractions, B was the most effective at protecting LDL in the SIN-1 system and at impairing THP-1 superoxide production. Taken together, these data suggest that the PP fraction from grape seed rich in procyanidins achieves the best compromise between the direct and indirect (i.e. cell-mediated) types of action in protecting LDL against oxidation, strengthening the need for improving the knowledge of its bioavailability in humans.

  17. Measurement of the forward-backward charge asymmetry and extraction of sin2thetaWeff in pp-->Z/gamma* + X-->e+e- +X events produced at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalk, J M; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-11-07

    We present a measurement of the forward-backward charge asymmetry (A FB) in pp-->Z/gamma* + X-->e+e(-) + X events at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using 1.1 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. A FB is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the electron-positron pair, and found to be consistent with the standard model prediction. We use the A FB measurement to extract the effective weak mixing angle sin2thetaWeff = 0.2326+/-0.0018(stat)+/-0.0006(syst).

  18. El rol de Ia colaboracion y el Modelo de Aprendizaje Basado en Proyectos (ABPr) mediante el lente de la Teoria de Actividad (CHAT): un estudio de caso con estudiantes de 9no grado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Isabel C.

    Los modelos de eensenanza y aprendizaje constructivistas conceptualizan el aprendizaje como un proceso activo. El modelo de Aprendizaje Basado en Proyectos (ABPr) se distingue por una serie de componentes, entre los cuales se destaca el aspecto colaborativo y cooperativo como un reto al momento de su implantacion. Son pocas las investigaciones que se concentran en este aspecto del modelo. En este estudio, se analizaron las diversas interacciones que surgen durante la implantacion de una unidad curricular sobre el tema de Geologia de Puerto Rico, la cual se diseno con el modelo ABPr cuyo enfoque es orientacion a proyectos. Particularmente, se examinaron las interacciones sociales que surgen entre los pares y entre pares y docente durante el proceso de planificacion y desarrollo de los productos finales, al igual que las interacciones entre los estudiantes y el material didactico en estas etapas del modelo. La investigacion es de tipo cualitativo e incorpora como diseno el estudio de caso. Las diversas interacciones constituyen la unidad de analisis. En el estudio participaron 19 estudiantes de 9no grado, a quienes se organizaron en 5 grupos colaborativos por temas de interes (Pangea, Placas tectonicas, Volcanes, Tsunamis y Terremotos). Las tecnicas que se utilizaron para recopilar los datos fueron: observaciones participativas, grupos focales y analisis de documentos (cuadernos reflexivos y respuestas de los estudiantes a la pregunta central del proyecto). Para el analisis de los datos se aplico la teoria de actividad (CHAT) que concentra la unidad de analisis en la actividad humana en un contexto particular. Los resultados del estudio senalan que las interacciones entre pares, entre pares y docente, asi como entre estudiantes y material didactico son fundamentales en el proceso de aprendizaje. Una mayor interaccion entre pares durante las etapas de planificar y desarrollar los productos finales de la unidad, promueve una mejor comprension de los conceptos de la

  19. RBP1 Recruits the mSIN3-Histone Deacetylase Complex to the Pocket of Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor Family Proteins Found in Limited Discrete Regions of the Nucleus at Growth Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Albert; Kennedy, Brian K.; Barbie, David A.; Bertos, Nicholas R.; Yang, Xiang Jiao; Theberge, Marie-Christine; Tsai, Shih-Chang; Seto, Edward; Zhang, Yi; Kuzmichev, Andrei; Lane, William S.; Reinberg, Danny; Harlow, Ed; Branton, Philip E.

    2001-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor family pocket proteins induce cell cycle arrest by repressing transcription of E2F-regulated genes through both histone deacetylase (HDAC)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. In this study we have identified a stable complex that accounts for the recruitment of both repression activities to the pocket. One component of this complex is RBP1, a known pocket-binding protein that exhibits both HDAC-dependent and -independent repression functions. RB family proteins were shown to associate via the pocket with previously identified mSIN3-SAP30-HDAC complexes containing exclusively class I HDACs. Such enzymes do not interact directly with RB family proteins but rather utilize RBP1 to target the pocket. This mechanism was shown to account for the majority of RB-associated HDAC activity. We also show that in quiescent normal human cells this entire RBP1-mSIN3-SAP30-HDAC complex colocalizes with both RB family members and E2F4 in a limited number of discrete regions of the nucleus that in other studies have been shown to represent the initial origins of DNA replication following growth stimulation. These results suggest that RB family members, at least in part, drive exit from the cell cycle by recruitment of this HDAC complex via RBP1 to repress transcription from E2F-dependent promoters and possibly to alter chromatin structure at DNA origins. PMID:11283269

  20. Volkswagen retirará 83,000 vehículos diesel de 3.0 litros y financiará proyectos de mitigación para resolver alegaciones de falsificar pruebas de emisiones en vehículos Volkswagen, Audi y Porsche

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Comunicado de prensa de EPA: Volkswagen retirará 83,000 vehículos diesel de 3.0 litros y financiará proyectos de mitigación para resolver alegaciones de falsificar pruebas de emisiones en vehículos Volkswagen, Audi y Porsche

  1. Belonging in the Academy: Building a "Casa Away from Casa" for Latino/a Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Sandra M.; Brammer, Ethriam Cash; Sawilowsky, Shlomo

    2015-01-01

    This action research study, supported by a quantitative data analysis, presents a counternarrative to the deficit discourse regarding Latino/a First Time in Any College (FTIAC) departure during the first year of college. It argues that an intentional learning community model, that is culturally and linguistically responsive to Latino/a student…

  2. Insights into the genetic organization of the Bacillus mycoides cryptic plasmids pDx14.2 and pSin9.7 deduced from their complete nucleotide sequence.

    PubMed

    Di Franco, Carmen; Santini, Tiziana; Pisaneschi, Giuseppe; Beccari, Elena

    2005-11-01

    Bacillus mycoides, a member of the Bacillus cereus group of bacteria, can be easily distinguished from close species because of colony shape, made by filaments of cells, resembling fungal hyphae, curving clock- or counterclockwise depending on the strain. Two plasmids, one from a strain curving to the right (pDx14.2), the other from a strain curving to the left (pSin9.7), were sequenced and analyzed for gene content and replication mode. Rolling-circle replication modules and mobilization proteins were found, very similar to those of other plasmids of the B. cereus group bacilli, mostly Bacillus thuringiensis living in the same ecosystem, suggesting active plasmid exchange in nature.

  3. Repression of transcription at the human T-cell receptor Vbeta2.2 segment is mediated by a MAX/MAD/mSin3 complex acting as a scaffold for HDAC activity.

    PubMed

    Font, Marie-Pierre; Cubizolles, Myriam; Dombret, Hervé; Cazes, Lucien; Brenac, Virginie; Sigaux, François; Buckle, Malcolm

    2004-12-17

    The identification of protein components in complex networks of co-regulators responsible for the modulation of proliferation versus differentiation modes of cell growth is a major problem. We use a combination of surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry, and immunoelectromobility shift assays to identify members of the MAX/MAD family binding to a specific DNA silencer fragment involved in the regulation of transcription for the human T-cell receptor Vbeta2.2 segment. We also identify the cofactors mSin3 and N-CoR known to interact with histone deacetylases. Inhibition of deacetylase activity in Jurkat cells prevented transcription inhibitor complex formation at the Vbeta2.2 segment, suggesting that this is either directly or indirectly dependent on the presence of HDACs.

  4. Effect of ion implantation energy for the synthesis of Ge nanocrystals in SiN films with HfO2/SiO2 stack tunnel dielectrics for memory application

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Ge nanocrystals (Ge-NCs) embedded in SiN dielectrics with HfO2/SiO2 stack tunnel dielectrics were synthesized by utilizing low-energy (≤5 keV) ion implantation method followed by conventional thermal annealing at 800°C, the key variable being Ge+ ion implantation energy. Two different energies (3 and 5 keV) have been chosen for the evolution of Ge-NCs, which have been found to possess significant changes in structural and chemical properties of the Ge+-implanted dielectric films, and well reflected in the charge storage properties of the Al/SiN/Ge-NC + SiN/HfO2/SiO2/Si metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) memory structures. No Ge-NC was detected with a lower implantation energy of 3 keV at a dose of 1.5 × 1016 cm-2, whereas a well-defined 2D-array of nearly spherical and well-separated Ge-NCs within the SiN matrix was observed for the higher-energy-implanted (5 keV) sample for the same implanted dose. The MIS memory structures implanted with 5 keV exhibits better charge storage and retention characteristics compared to the low-energy-implanted sample, indicating that the charge storage is predominantly in Ge-NCs in the memory capacitor. A significant memory window of 3.95 V has been observed under the low operating voltage of ± 6 V with good retention properties, indicating the feasibility of these stack structures for low operating voltage, non-volatile memory devices. PMID:21711708

  5. The SINS/zC-SINF survey of z ∼ 2 galaxy kinematics: Evidence for powerful active galactic nucleus-driven nuclear outflows in massive star-forming galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Kurk, J. D.; Lutz, D.; Tacconi, L. J.; Wuyts, S.; Bandara, K.; Buschkamp, P.; Davies, R.; Eisenhauer, F.; Lang, P.; Newman, S. F.; Burkert, A.; Carollo, C. M.; Lilly, S. J.; Cresci, G.; Daddi, E.; Mainieri, V.; Mancini, C.; and others

    2014-05-20

    We report the detection of ubiquitous powerful nuclear outflows in massive (≥10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}) z ∼ 2 star-forming galaxies (SFGs), which are plausibly driven by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The sample consists of the eight most massive SFGs from our SINS/zC-SINF survey of galaxy kinematics with the imaging spectrometer SINFONI, six of which have sensitive high-resolution adaptive optics-assisted observations. All of the objects are disks hosting a significant stellar bulge. The spectra in their central regions exhibit a broad component in Hα and forbidden [N II] and [S II] line emission, with typical velocity FWHM ∼ 1500 km s{sup –1}, [N II]/Hα ratio ≈ 0.6, and intrinsic extent of 2-3 kpc. These properties are consistent with warm ionized gas outflows associated with Type 2 AGN, the presence of which is confirmed via independent diagnostics in half the galaxies. The data imply a median ionized gas mass outflow rate of ∼60 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} and mass loading of ∼3. At larger radii, a weaker broad component is detected but with lower FWHM ∼485 km s{sup –1} and [N II]/Hα ≈ 0.35, characteristic for star formation-driven outflows as found in the lower-mass SINS/zC-SINF galaxies. The high inferred mass outflow rates and frequent occurrence suggest that the nuclear outflows efficiently expel gas out of the centers of the galaxies with high duty cycles and may thus contribute to the process of star formation quenching in massive galaxies. Larger samples at high masses will be crucial in confirming the importance and energetics of the nuclear outflow phenomenon and its connection to AGN activity and bulge growth.

  6. Human Herpesvirus 8 LANA Interacts with Proteins of the mSin3 Corepressor Complex and Negatively Regulates Epstein-Barr Virus Gene Expression in Dually Infected PEL Cells

    PubMed Central

    Krithivas, Anita; Young, David B.; Liao, Gangling; Greene, Deborah; Hayward, S. Diane

    2000-01-01

    The human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is expressed in all latently HHV-8 infected cells and in HHV-8-associated tumors, including primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). To better understand the contribution of LANA to tumorigenesis and to the PEL phenotype, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen which identified the corepressor protein SAP30 as a LANA binding protein. SAP30 is a constituent of a large multicomponent complex that brings histone deacetylases to the promoter. Glutathione S-transferase affinity assays confirmed interaction between LANA and SAP30 and also demonstrated interactions between LANA and two other members of the corepressor complex, mSin3A and CIR. The corepressors bound to the amino-terminal 340-amino-acid domain of LANA. In transient expression assays, this same domain of LANA mediated repression when targeted to a 5×Gal4tk-CAT reporter as a GAL4-LANA fusion. PEL cells have the unusual feature that they are frequently dually infected with both HHV-8 and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We found that EBV EBNA-1 expression is downregulated in PEL cells at both the RNA and protein levels. In transient expression assays, LANA repressed activated expression from the EBV Qp and Cp latency promoters. Reduction of endogenous Qp activity could also be demonstrated in EBV-infected Rael cells transfected with a LANA expression plasmid. In contrast to the effect of LANA on EBV latency promoters, LANA activated expression from its own promoter. The data indicate that LANA can mediate transcriptional repression through recruitment of an mSin3 corepressor complex and further that LANA-mediated repression is likely to contribute to the low level of EBV latency gene expression seen in dually infected PEL cells. PMID:11000236

  7. Computed self-consistent field and singles and doubles configuration interaction spectroscopic data and dissociation energies for the diatomics B2, C2, N2, O2, F2, CN, CP, CS, PN, SiC, SiN, SiO, SiP, and their ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, A. D.; Liu, B.; Chandler, G. S.

    1992-12-01

    Results are presented for single-configuration self-consistent field (SCF) calculations near the Hartree-Fock limit. Singles and doubles configuration-interaction calculations from this single SCF configuration were performed for the ground states and selected excited states of the molecules B2, B2(+), C2, C2(+), N2, N2(+), O2, O2(+), F2, F2(+), CN, CN(-), CP, CS, PN, SiC, SiC(-), SiN, SiN(-), SiO, and SiP. Results include potential energy curves, equilibrium bond lengths, vibrational energies, ionization potentials, and dissociation energies.

  8. The Sin of Science: Ignorance of Ignorance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravetz, Jerome R.

    1993-01-01

    Considers the idea of ignorance of ignorance in the scientific culture. Topics discussed include a historical background of ignorance in science, including the ideas of Socrates, Galileo, Descartes, and Bacon; teaching and practice; and philosophical reconstruction and the relationship between knowledge and ignorance. (Contains six references.)…

  9. Seven sins in publishing (but who's counting…)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    'Oh what a tangled web we weave, When first we practise to deceive.’ Sir Walter Scott (Marmion, 1808) Think of scientific misconduct in the UK and Malcolm Pearce – one of the most high-profile cases – comes immediately to mind. Malcolm Pearce was an assistant editor of the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, and a senior lecturer at St George's Medical School, when two fraudulent papers were published in the journal. A whistleblower at the hospital was the catalyst for an investigation that led to Pearce being fired, found guilty of serious professional misconduct by the General Medical Council, and struck off.1 The professor of the department, Geoffrey Chamberlain, who was also President of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and Editor of the journal, resigned from both positions as he was named as an author on one of the fraudulent papers. He reportedly did not know that his name was on the manuscript and, in his defence, it was not unusual at the time for Heads of Department to have ‘gift’ authorship on the department’s publications, despite not making any contribution. Regardless, both were disgraced. Scientific misconduct has many faces and its true prevalence is unknown, although many agree that it is increasing. Is it because researchers are committing more publication crimes, or are we just better at discovering them? In the race to find a home for articles, are authors getting lazy, sloppy and making more mistakes? In the era of online publications reaching wider audiences, mistakes are easier to detect and report, and beware if Clare Francis stumbles across such misdemeanours… Since 2010 an individual (or perhaps even a group) whose gender, identity and occupation are unknown, but who operate under the name ‘Clare Francis’, has upped the ante and flagged hundreds of suspected cases of potential fraud across the globe. Notorious among journal editors as a relentless whistleblower and crusader against text and image fraud, some of Francis’ tips have resulted in corrections and retractions. For example, a 2006 paper in the Journal of Cell Biology was retracted after Francis raised concerns years after publication about image manipulation, which were validated by the publisher..2 But why does it happen? Why not? Researchers are human and subject to the same frailties as in other walks of life. If a measure of a good academic is solely the number of articles they have published, then – when quantity is rewarded over quality – scientific misconduct may reveal a glimpse of the pressure researchers are under. It is worth remembering that, despite the stress of the ‘publish or perish’ culture, scientific misconduct is unacceptable in any guise and likely to be discovered, with embarrassing if not downright career- and reputation-destroying consequences. Good publishing etiquette is ultimately down to the integrity and moral sensibilities of researchers and authors. In this excellent article about some of the ‘sins’ of publishing, Philippa Benson, who has kindly written for this series before, provides a thought-provoking insight into scientific misconduct. Jyoti Shah Commissioning Editor References Lock S. Lessons from the Pearce affair: handling scientific fraud. BMJ 1995; 310: 1,547. Retraction notice. J Cell Biol 2013; 200: 359. doi:10.1083/jcb.2005070832003r. PMID:26688391

  10. Sin boldly: ethical issues of DRGs.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Chuck

    1986-01-01

    The current system of diagnostic related groups poses a series of ethical concerns for patients, practitioners, and hospital administrators. In addition to reducing access to health care by those groups most in need, the system results in diminished quality, health care rationing based on cost/benefit projections, and en eventual two-tiered method of health care delivery. Most important, the author suggests that a radical change is occurring in the image of health care from service/mission to production/business with concomitant attitudinal changes in staff and administration. Capitulation to the business ethic results in the devaluation of "patients as products." Guidelines are offered to continue prudent fiscal management with service-oriented delivery to recover the historical mission of health care provision in hospitals.

  11. The five deadly sins of science publishing

    PubMed Central

    Tracz, Vitek

    2015-01-01

    Science cannot progress without scientists reporting their findings. And yet researchers have given control of this central pillar of the scientific process to science publishers, who are in the business of serving the interests of their journals; these are not always the same as the interests of science. This editorial describes the problems with the process of preparing and publishing research findings, and with judging their veracity and significance, and then explains how we at Faculty of 1000 are starting to tackle the ‘deadly sins’ of science publishing. PMID:26097694

  12. Radical Constructivism, and the Sin of Relativism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quale, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The epistemology of "relativism" that is featured by the theory of radical constructivism is addressed. In particular, I examine several objections, all based on this epistemic position of relativism, that are often raised by critics of the theory: the charge of "reality denial" (which, it is often claimed, must lead ultimately to the…

  13. The Postmodern Sin of Intelligent Design Creationism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennock, Robert T.

    2010-06-01

    That Intelligent Design Creationism rejects the methodological naturalism of modern science in favor of a premodern supernaturalist worldview is well documented and by now well known. An irony that has not been sufficiently appreciated, however, is the way that ID Creationists try to advance their premodern view by adopting (if only tactically) a radical postmodern perspective. This paper will reveal the deep threads of postmodernism that run through the ID Creationist movement’s arguments, as evidenced in the writings and interviews of its key leaders. Seeing their arguments and activities from this perspective highlights the danger to science posed by both ID Creationism and radical postmodernism.

  14. The Postmodern Sin of Intelligent Design Creationism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennock, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    That Intelligent Design Creationism rejects the methodological naturalism of modern science in favor of a premodern supernaturalist worldview is well documented and by now well known. An irony that has not been sufficiently appreciated, however, is the way that ID Creationists try to advance their premodern view by adopting (if only tactically) a…

  15. Scripture, Sin and Salvation: Theological Conservatism Reconsidered

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hempel, Lynn M.; Bartkowski, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Using insights from ethnographic studies of conservative Protestant congregations, the authors propose and test a refined conceptual model of theological conservatism that accounts for three key components of a theologically conservative worldview: (1. epistemology, a belief in the Bible as the inspired word of God, (2. ontology, assumptions about…

  16. The Function sin x/x.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gearhart, William B.; Shultz, Harris S.

    1990-01-01

    Presents some examples from geometry: area of a circle; centroid of a sector; Buffon's needle problem; and expression for pi. Describes several roles of the trigonometric function in mathematics and applications, including Fourier analysis, spectral theory, approximation theory, and numerical analysis. (YP)

  17. The Seven Deadly Sins of Online Microcomputing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Offers suggestions for avoiding common errors in online microcomputer use. Areas discussed include learning the basics; hardware protection; backup options; hard disk organization; software selection; file security; and the use of dedicated communications lines. (CLB)

  18. Experimental and theoretical rationalization of the growth mechanism of silicon quantum dots in non-stoichiometric SiN x : role of chlorine in plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Mon-Pérez, E; Salazar, J; Ramos, E; Salazar, J Santoyo; Suárez, A López; Dutt, A; Santana, G; Monroy, B Marel

    2016-11-11

    Silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs) embedded in an insulator matrix are important from a technological and application point of view. Thus, being able to synthesize them in situ during the matrix growth process is technologically advantageous. The use of SiH2Cl2 as the silicon precursor in the plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process allows us to obtain Si-QDs without post-thermal annealing. Foremost in this work, is a theoretical rationalization of the mechanism responsible for Si-QD generation in a film including an analysis of the energy released by the extraction of HCl and the insertion of silylene species into the terminal surface bonds. From the results obtained using density functional theory (DFT), we propose an explanation of the mechanism responsible for the formation of Si-QDs in non-stoichiometric SiN x starting from chlorinated precursors in a PECVD system. Micrograph images obtained through transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of Si-QDs, even in nitrogen-rich (N-rich) samples. The film stoichiometry was controlled by varying the growth parameters, in particular the NH3/SiH2Cl2 ratio and hydrogen dilution. Experimental and theoretical results together show that using a PECVD system, along with chlorinated precursors it is possible to obtain Si-QDs at a low substrate temperature without annealing treatment. The optical property studies carried out in the present work highlight the prospects of these thin films for down shifting and as an antireflection coating in silicon solar cells.

  19. Experimental and theoretical rationalization of the growth mechanism of silicon quantum dots in non-stoichiometric SiN x : role of chlorine in plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mon-Pérez, E.; Salazar, J.; Ramos, E.; Santoyo Salazar, J.; López Suárez, A.; Dutt, A.; Santana, G.; Marel Monroy, B.

    2016-11-01

    Silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs) embedded in an insulator matrix are important from a technological and application point of view. Thus, being able to synthesize them in situ during the matrix growth process is technologically advantageous. The use of SiH2Cl2 as the silicon precursor in the plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process allows us to obtain Si-QDs without post-thermal annealing. Foremost in this work, is a theoretical rationalization of the mechanism responsible for Si-QD generation in a film including an analysis of the energy released by the extraction of HCl and the insertion of silylene species into the terminal surface bonds. From the results obtained using density functional theory (DFT), we propose an explanation of the mechanism responsible for the formation of Si-QDs in non-stoichiometric SiN x starting from chlorinated precursors in a PECVD system. Micrograph images obtained through transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of Si-QDs, even in nitrogen-rich (N-rich) samples. The film stoichiometry was controlled by varying the growth parameters, in particular the NH3/SiH2Cl2 ratio and hydrogen dilution. Experimental and theoretical results together show that using a PECVD system, along with chlorinated precursors it is possible to obtain Si-QDs at a low substrate temperature without annealing treatment. The optical property studies carried out in the present work highlight the prospects of these thin films for down shifting and as an antireflection coating in silicon solar cells.

  20. Intermixing and thermal oxidation of ZrO2 thin films grown on a-Si, SiN, and SiO2 by metallic and oxidic mode magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloma Ribera, R.; van de Kruijs, R. W. E.; Sturm, J. M.; Yakshin, A. E.; Bijkerk, F.

    2017-03-01

    The initial growth of DC sputtered ZrO2 on top of a-Si, SiN, and SiO2 layers has been studied by in vacuo high-sensitivity low energy ion scattering for two gas deposition conditions with different oxygen contents (high-O and low-O conditions). This unique surface sensitive technique allowed the determination of surface composition and thicknesses required to close the ZrO2 layer on all three substrates for both conditions. The ZrO2 layer closes similarly on all substrates due to more favorable enthalpies of formation for ZrO2 and ZrSiO4, resulting in passivation of the Si from the substrate. However, this layer closes at about half of the thickness (˜1.7 nm) for low-O conditions due to less oxidative conditions and less energetic particles arriving at the sample, which leads to less intermixing via silicate formation. In contrast, for high-O conditions, there is more ZrSiO4 and/or SiOx formation, giving more intermixing (˜3.4 nm). In vacuo X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements revealed similar stoichiometric ZrO2 layers deposited by both conditions and a higher interaction of the ZrO2 layer with the underlying a-Si for high-O conditions. In addition, oxygen diffusion through low-O ZrO2 films on a-Si has been investigated by ex situ angular-resolved XPS of samples annealed in atmospheric oxygen. For temperatures below 400 °C, no additional oxidation of the underlying a-Si was observed. This, together with the amorphous nature and smoothness of these samples, makes ZrO2 a good candidate as an oxidation protective layer on top of a-Si.

  1. A novel Sin Nombre virus DNA vaccine and its inclusion in a candidate pan-hantavirus vaccine against hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS).

    PubMed

    Hooper, Jay W; Josleyn, Matthew; Ballantyne, John; Brocato, Rebecca

    2013-09-13

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV; family Bunyaviridae, genus Hantavirus) causes a hemorrhagic fever known as hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in North America. There have been approximately 200 fatal cases of HPS in the United States since 1993, predominantly in healthy working-age males (case fatality rate 35%). There are no FDA-approved vaccines or drugs to prevent or treat HPS. Previously, we reported that hantavirus vaccines based on the full-length M gene segment of Andes virus (ANDV) for HPS in South America, and Hantaan virus (HTNV) and Puumala virus (PUUV) for hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Eurasia, all elicited high-titer neutralizing antibodies in animal models. HFRS is more prevalent than HPS (>20,000 cases per year) but less pathogenic (case fatality rate 1-15%). Here, we report the construction and testing of a SNV full-length M gene-based DNA vaccine to prevent HPS. Rabbits vaccinated with the SNV DNA vaccine by muscle electroporation (mEP) developed high titers of neutralizing antibodies. Furthermore, hamsters vaccinated three times with the SNV DNA vaccine using a gene gun were completely protected against SNV infection. This is the first vaccine of any kind that specifically elicits high-titer neutralizing antibodies against SNV. To test the possibility of producing a pan-hantavirus vaccine, rabbits were vaccinated by mEP with an HPS mix (ANDV and SNV plasmids), or HFRS mix (HTNV and PUUV plasmids), or HPS/HFRS mix (all four plasmids). The HPS mix and HFRS mix elicited neutralizing antibodies predominantly against ANDV/SNV and HTNV/PUUV, respectively. Furthermore, the HPS/HFRS mix elicited neutralizing antibodies against all four viruses. These findings demonstrate a pan-hantavirus vaccine using a mixed-plasmid DNA vaccine approach is feasible and warrants further development.

  2. Proyectos de Educacion Migrante (Migrant Education Projects).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Ramon; Garcia, Jose D.

    Written in Spanish and English for project personnel, parents, and others interested in migrant education, the booklet summarizes general concepts and requirements behind Title I-Migrant activities in Oregon, which has been allocated $4,439,341 in Title I-Migrant funds for fiscal year 1980. Following brief definitions of important terms,…

  3. Proyecto Del Progreso De La Mujer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Oralia T.

    1979-01-01

    Women farmworkers and staff members of farmworker organizations revealed barriers (e.g. lack of education, training, transportation, family responsibility, spouse's cooperation) that limit women's participation in all levels of farmworker organizational structure. Available from Farmworker Data Network, 7905 W. 44th, Wheat Ridge, Colorado 80033…

  4. Practical Life for the Older Children in the Casa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soholt, Polli

    2013-01-01

    Polli Soholt writes about advanced practical life and demonstrates that adding more challenge and complexity for older children leads to more social cooperation. Activities such as washing dishes, polishing, sewing, and food preparation take the child beyond the need to refine basic skills. The older primary children find more reality in tasks…

  5. Casa Grande Ruins National Monument Boundary Modification Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Kirkpatrick, Ann [D-AZ-1

    2010-04-22

    09/23/2010 On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended Failed by the Yeas and Nays: (2/3 required): 244 - 174 (Roll no. 537). (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Failed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. "Preescolar Na Casa": Teaching Parents To Teach Children. Chapter 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Ermitas

    This chapter describes a school readiness program that has been implemented in rural Galicia (Spain) since 1977. Data reveal that 70 percent of Galicia's population lives in rural areas, the economy remains primarily agricultural, Galicians earn less than the national average and have the largest number of public assistance recipients, and there…

  7. Measurement of sin2 θeff and Z-light quark couplings using the forward-backward charge asymmetry in pp -> Z/gamma* -> e+e- events with L=5.0 fb-1 at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.

    2011-07-26

    We measure the mass dependence of the forward-backward charge asymmetry in 157,553 pp = Z/γ* = e+e- interactions, corresponding to 5.0 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV. The effective weak mixing angle (θeff) from this process involving predominantly the first generation of quarks is extracted as sin2 θeff = 0.2309 ± 0.0008 (stat.) ± 0.0006 (syst.). We also present the most precise direct measurement of the vector and axial-vector couplings of u and d quarks to the Z boson.

  8. Measurement of sin2 θℓeff and Z-light quark couplings using the forward-backward charge asymmetry in pp -> Z/gamma* -> e+e- events with L=5.0 fb-1 at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Abazov, V. M.

    2011-07-26

    We measure the mass dependence of the forward-backward charge asymmetry in 157,553 pp = Z/γ* = e+e- interactions, corresponding to 5.0 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV. The effective weak mixing angle (θℓeff) from this process involving predominantly the first generation of quarks is extracted as sin2 θℓeff = 0.2309 ± 0.0008 (stat.) ± 0.0006 (syst.). We also present the most precise direct measurement of the vector and axial-vector couplings of u and d quarks to the Z boson.

  9. "Cuidate Sin Pena": Mexican Mother-Adolescent Sexuality Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moncloa, Fe; Wilkinson-Lee, Ada M.; Russell, Stephen T.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores perceptions of Mexican mother-adolescent communication about sexuality. Participants interviewed included four mother-expecting son pairs and four mother-pregnant daughter pairs. Our interviews revealed important adolescent gender differences. Pena (shame/embarrassment) played a major role vis-a-vis indirect communication about…

  10. The Problem of Propagation: Original Sin as Inherited Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stillwaggon, James

    2014-01-01

    As Modernist doctrines emphasizing the unity and agency of the educated self are increasingly set up as the straw men of contemporary educational discourses, premodern and Medieval theories of selfhood tend to disappear from the horizon of educational thought altogether. In this essay, in order to subvert this overcoming of our intellectual past,…

  11. [Being a mother affected with AIDS: reliving the original sin].

    PubMed

    Pereira, M L; Chaves, E C

    1999-12-01

    This study aimed to understand the meaning of being with AIDS among HIV/AIDS mothers. It looks for to identify the emotions and the way of cope with the situation as a mother has a healthy son. This study was conducted based on the Social Representations Theory. The findings showed "to be mother" and "to have AIDS" represented as a process that does not finish in the disease itself. Also it was found that there is a polarize link between the good and the evil. Indeed, this study brought the sexuality likewise the polarized link, being AIDS linked to evil aspect. These women from this study had perceived themselves as guilty of something, as a result, they deserved the punishment that the AIDS imposed on them.

  12. From Right to Sin: Laws on Infanticide in Antiquity.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This is the first of three papers investigating changes in infanticide legislation as indicators of the attitude of states towards the neonate. In ancient East Asian societies in which the bride's family had to pay an excessive dowry, selective female infanticide was the rule, despite formal interdiction by the law. In Greece and Rome children's lives had little value, and the father's rights included killing his own children. The proportion of men greatly exceeding that of women found in many cultures and epochs suggests that girls suffered infanticide more often than boys. A kind of social birth, the ritual right to survive, rested on the procedure of name giving in the Roman culture and on the start of oral feeding in the Germanic tradition. Legislative efforts to protect the newborn began with Trajan's 'alimentaria' laws in 103 CE and Constantine's laws following his conversion to Christianity in 313 CE. Malformed newborns were not regarded as human infants and were usually killed immediately after birth. Infanticide was formally outlawed in 374 CE by Emperor Valentinian.

  13. Twelve mortal sins of the turbulence propagation science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2011-09-01

    In this review paper we discuss a series of typical mistakes and omissions that are made by engineers and scientists involved in the theoretical research and modeling of the optical propagation through atmospheric turbulence. We show how the use of the oversimplified Gaussian spectral model of turbulence delivers the completely erroneous results for the beam wander. We address a series of common omissions related to calculations of the average beam intensity: unnecessary use of the approximations when rigorous result is available, invalid application of the RMS beam size to the turbulence-distorted beams, overlooking the simple theoretical result - average beam intensity is a convolution with the turbulent Point Spread Function (PSF). We discuss the meaning and potential dangers of the use of the quadratic structure function for modeling of the turbulent perturbations. We will also address the issues related to the energy conservation principle and reciprocity that have very important consequences for the turbulence propagation, but are frequently overlooked in the current literature. We discuss a series of misconceptions that very common in of the Scintillation Index (SI) calculations. We will clarify the infamous misunderstanding of the Rytov's approximation: vanishing scintillation at the beam focus, and show the correct weak and strong scintillation solutions for the SI at the beam focus. We discuss the flaws of the Fried model of the short-term PSF, and direct to the more accurate PSF model. We will briefly review the propagation of the polarized optical waves through turbulence and discuss the inadequacy of the recently published calculations of the electromagnetic beams calculations. We discuss some common errors in representation of the calculation results for the non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

  14. Sin and pleasure: the history of chocolate in medicine.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Donatella

    2015-11-18

    In ancient Mayan texts cocoa is considered a gift of the gods: Pre-Columbian populations used chocolate as medicine, too. After the discovery of America, chocolate was introduced in Europe, but Christian Europe looked to this new exhilarating drink with extreme suspiciousness and criticism. From this reaction, the necessity derived to appeal to the reasons of health, with which doctors and scientists committed themselves to explain that chocolate was good for the body. However, during the Enlightment, the road of therapy separated from that of taste, and chocolate mainly maintained its leading role of excipient, bearing the burden, over time, of a negative valence, being associated with obesity, dental problems, unhealthy lifestyle, and so forth. The rehabilitation of chocolate has arisen only in recent times, re-establishing that value that Linnaeus himself credited to chocolate, calling the generous plant Theobroma cacao, food of the gods.

  15. The UNSIN Project: Exploring the Molecular Physiology of Sins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naji, Faysal; Salci, Lauren; Hoit, Graeme; Rangachari, P. K.

    2012-01-01

    Although active learning works, promoting it in large undergraduate science classes is difficult. Here, three students (F. Naji, L. Salci, and G. Hoit) join their teacher (P. K. Rangachari) in describing one such attempt. Two cohorts in a first-year undergraduate biology course explored the molecular underpinnings of human misbehavior. Students…

  16. The Trauma of Racism: America's Original Sin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponds, Kenneth T.

    2013-01-01

    With the election of Barack Obama as President, many believed that this nation was entering into a post-racial America, a color-blind society where racism could begin to be healed if not totally dismissed. However, a recent Associated Press poll has shown that this is not the case (AP, 2012). In fact, racial prejudice has increased slightly since…

  17. Recent Measurements of sin2beta at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Sciolla, Gabriella; /MIT

    2005-12-14

    The angle {beta} is the most accurately measured quantity that determines the Unitarity Triangle. In this article I review the various measurements of this angle performed by the BaBar Collaboration, and discuss their implications in the search for new physics.

  18. The Seven Deadly Sins of Public Outreach Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Kivi Leroux

    2003-01-01

    Lists seven approaches not to take when developing a public outreach campaign on recycling. Methods include: (1) environmental education will increase participation; (2) everyone cares about recycling; (3) guilt works; (4) keep repeating the same ads; (5) non-English speakers need translated literature; (6) scheduling workshops; and (7) kids will…

  19. Going Too Far?: Sex, Sin and Social Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Susan

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of the Religious Right on American social policy as it relates to family, sexuality and reproductive health. The article focuses on the current debates and practices of abstinence-until-marriage programs vs. comprehensive sex education programs--and the ways in which they reflect and affect cultural attitudes about…

  20. The Seven Deadly Sins of No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, Paul D.

    2007-01-01

    For five years the major school reform agenda in America has been the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, which was part of the most recent reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). Now ESEA is up for another reauthorization by Congress, and everyone is wondering what is going to happen next. One could argue that there is…

  1. Sin, Sickness or Status? Homosexual Gender Identity and Psychoneuroendocrinology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Money, John

    1987-01-01

    Sex hormones in the prenatal brain of humans influence the subsequent sexual status or orientation of the individual as bisexual, heterosexual, or homosexual. Postnatal socialization is another contributing factor. Sexual orientation is not under the direct governance of chromosomes and genes. (Author/VM)

  2. Ausencia estudiantil sin permiso (Student Truancy). ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKalb, Jay

    This Digest in Spanish examines some of the ways that truancy affects both individuals and society. It identifies factors that may place students at greater risk of becoming truant and lists some consequences of nonattendance, including delayed promotion and graduation, lowered self-esteem, and lessened employment potential. The causes of truancy…

  3. Thinking before sinning: reasoning processes in hedonic consumption

    PubMed Central

    de Witt Huberts, Jessie; Evers, Catharine; de Ridder, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Whereas hedonic consumption is often labeled as impulsive, findings from self-licensing research suggest that people sometimes rely on reasons to justify hedonic consumption. Although the concept of self-licensing assumes the involvement of reasoning processes, this has not been demonstrated explicitly. Two studies investigated whether people indeed rely on reasons to allow themselves a guilty pleasure. Participants were exposed to a food temptation after which passive and active reasoning was assessed by asking participants to indicate the justifications that applied to them for indulging in that temptation (Study 1) or having them construe reasons to consume the hedonic product (Study 2). Regression analyses indicated that higher levels of temptation predicted the number of reasons employed and construed to justify consumption. By providing evidence for the involvement of reasoning processes, these findings support the assumption of self-licensing theory that temptations not only exert their influence by making us more impulsive, but can also facilitate gratification by triggering deliberative reasoning processes. PMID:25408680

  4. The Red Blood Cell Transfusion Trigger: Has the Sin of Commission Now Become a Sin of Omission?.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-05-01

    concentration of 10 to 12 g/dl. Human recombinant erythropoietin is also recommended for the reduction of allogeneic blood transfusions in surgical...patients. Human recombinant erythropoietin is recommended for anemic patients with hemoglobin concentrations of ■, greater than 10 g/dl and less than 13...with recombinant erythropoietin also reduces the defects in platelet adhesion and aggregation caused by uremic plasma. Thromb. Haemost. 1991;66:638

  5. Un Bosquejo del Proyecto Bilingue (Outline of a Bilingual Project).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton City Schools, CA.

    Bilingual education in English and Spanish is intended to give native speakers of both languages insights into two cultures, a broader background, and greater life opportunities. Spanish-speaking students in bilingual programs can retain their language ties and the ability to communicate with their families and older relatives. The directors of…

  6. El Metodo Llamado Proyecto (The Project Approach). ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Lilian G.

    A project is an in-depth investigation of a topic worth learning more about, usually undertaken by a group of children within a class. The goal of a project is to learn more about a topic rather than to find answers to questions posed by a teacher. Project work is complementary to the systematic parts of a curriculum. Whereas systematic…

  7. Proyecto Kuatiahe'e: Saving a Language for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aquino, Almidio; Kirylo, James

    2005-01-01

    Nearly 20 years ago, the powerful motion picture The Mission, starring Robert De Niro and Jeremy Irons, was released, bringing worldwide exposure to the Guarani aboriginal people. Based on historical events from the 1700s and set in Paraguay, Brazil, and Argentina, the film was simultaneously moving and inspiring, yet also a disturbing…

  8. Latino/a Students' Perceptions of Their Sense of Belonging at Kansas State University: Mi Casa Es Su Casa... or Is It Really?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esquivel, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative multiple case study explored the campus climate and sense of belonging of Latino/a undergraduate student participants at a predominately White university. Guided by the work of Hurtado and Carter (1997), relationships among several aspects of the college environment and sense of belonging were examined. In depth interviews…

  9. Measurement of sin2θefflept using e+e- pairs from γ*/Z bosons produced in pp¯ collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D’Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. -M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-06-28

    Here, at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton (p$\\bar{p}$) collider, Drell-Yan lepton pairs are produced in the process p$\\bar{p}$→e+e-+X through an intermediate γ*/Z boson. The forward-backward asymmetry in the polar-angle distribution of the e- as a function of the e+e--pair mass is used to obtain sin2θ$lept\\atop{eff}$, the effective leptonic determination of the electroweak-mixing parameter sin2θW. The measurement sample, recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), corresponds to 9.4 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96 TeV, and is the full CDF Run II data set. The value of sin2θ$lept\\atop{eff}$ is found to be 0.23248±0.00053. The combination with the previous CDF measurement based on μ+μ- pairs yields sin2θ$lept\\atop{eff}$=0.23221±0.00046. This result, when interpreted within the specified context of the standard model assuming sin2θW=1-M$2\\atop{W}$/M$2\\atop{Z}$ and that the W- and Z-boson masses are on-shell, yields sin2θW=0.22400±0.00045, or equivalently a W-boson mass of 80.328±0.024 GeV/c2.

  10. Story to Action: A Conversation about Literacy and Organizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldblatt, Eli

    2008-01-01

    In the summer of 2006, Open Borders Project/Proyecto Sin Fronteras, a small educational center in the heart of Latino North Philadelphia, sponsored a six-week program to teach teens from Philadelphia public schools how to plan and conduct interviews, edit audio files, and write the necessary preparatory material to produce short pieces about…

  11. Physical Measurements of Water Properties Across the Mouth of the Gulf of California during April 2013 (PESCAR24 Cruise) (Mediciones Fisicas de las Propiedades del Agua a Traves de la Boca del Golfo de California Durante Abril de 2013 (Crucero PESCAR24)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-26

    interés en determinar la estructura de la Corriente de California en el área (Rago et al., 1992). Un aspecto relevante del proyecto fue la medición...salinómetros y las mediciones de conductividad por el CTD en el momento que las botellas Niskin fueron disparadas. En este punto, sin embargo, fue

  12. XMM-Newton X-ray Observatory Guest Observer program (AO-1) at CASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.

    2003-01-01

    In this research program, we obtained and analyzed X-ray observations of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 110 (HD 165688) using the XMM-Newton space-based observatory. Radio observations were also obtained using the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope located in New Mexico and operated by the Natl. Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). This star was targeted for observations primarily because it is believed to be a single WR star without a companion. Single WR stars are thought to emit X-rays from cool plasma in shocks distributed throughout their powerful stellar winds. However, there has been little observational work done to test this idea since single WR stars are relatively weak X-ray sources and have been difficult to detect with previous generation telescopes. The launch of XMM-Newton provides a new telescope that is much more sensitive than its predecessors, allowing single WR stars to be studied in detail for the first time. X-ray emission was clearly detected from WR 110. Analysis of its spectrum yields a surprising result. Its X-ray emitting plasma is distributed over a range of temperatures and is dominated by relatively cool plasma with a characteristic temperature T is approximately 6 million K. Such plasma can be explained by existing theoretical wind shock models. However, the spectrum also shows hotter plasma whose temperature is uncertain but is thought to be in excess of T approximately 30 million K. The origin of this hotter plasma is yet unknown, but possible mechanisms are identified

  13. Los Ninos Aprenden en Casa: Valuing and Connecting Home Cultural Knowledge with an Early Childhood Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riojas-Cortez, Mari; Flores, Belinda; Clark, Ellen

    2003-01-01

    For Week of the Young Child, a Texas school offers a bilingual parent institute to nurture school-family relationships, demonstrate and build on school respect for home cultures, and foster community awareness of early childhood education. Families recognize the learning for children inherent in daily routines, learn teaching techniques, and feel…

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Sunspots catalogues, 1853-1870 (Casas+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, R.; Vaquero, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    In the 19th century, several astronomers observed sunspots obtaining their positions and, occasionaly, their areas. These observations were published in large tables that have remained in the anonymity until now. The observations made by Richard C. Carrington, Christian H. F. Peters and Warren de la Rue (and their respective collaborators) were published in different articles. The total number of positions evaluated by these three observers was of 26,641 (Carrington: 4,900; Peters: 14,040; and de la Rue: 7,701). In this work, we transformed more of 400 pages of numerical tables to a machine readable format. Moreover, we carried out a cursory analysis to detect possible mistakes in the reading or in the original transcription. (7 data files).

  15. Calibration Study of POWER Performance Levels to the CASAS Scale. Research Brief No. 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posey, Virginia

    2005-01-01

    The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act, as part of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, requires programs to use standardized assessments to report learning gains for students in adult education programs. In addition, local and state agencies need an accountability tool for students who are difficult to assess adequately with a…

  16. Test Review: The Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System (CASAS) Life Skills Reading Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, David; Ernst, Megan L.

    2004-01-01

    Lifelong learning has become an important goal of education over the last decade. According to the United States Department of Education (2001), nearly 3 million students over age 17 (excluding those institutionalized) enrolled in adult basic education, adult secondary education, or English as a second language classes in the United States.…

  17. Teaching Note-CASA Volunteerism: Preparing MSW Students for Public Child Welfare Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrick, Jill Duerr; Durst, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to reform public child welfare systems across the nation, Title IV-E child welfare training programs were established over 2 decades ago. Participating students typically engage in a customized educational experience as part of their MSW program that prepares them to work in the field of child welfare upon graduation. This article…

  18. The Hungry Mind: From the Casa dei Bambini to Cosmic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grazzini, Baiba Krumins

    2016-01-01

    Baiba Krumins Grazzini has generously transformed her lecture, delivered at the AMI-USA Refresher Course in 2014, into a legacy article. This article establishes the role of storytelling in Cosmic Education while capturing both the whole and the detailed parts of Montessori Cosmic Education. Working from the early childhood transition into the…

  19. 78 FR 49235 - Airworthiness Directives; EADS CASA (Type Certificate Previously Held by Construcciones...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ...), Integrated Customer Services (ICS), Technical Services, Avenida de Arag n 404, 28022 Madrid, Spain; telephone... regulatory, economic, environmental, and energy aspects of this proposed AD. We will consider all comments... Services, Avenida de Arag n 404, 28022 Madrid, Spain; telephone +34 91 585 55 84; fax +34 91 585 55...

  20. 77 FR 5998 - Airworthiness Directives; EADS CASA (Type Certificate Previously Held by Construcciones...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of.... List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39 Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by... Condition Control,'' Block 601 (Configuration 1), ``Inspection/Check,'' Paragraph 1.B., of the...

  1. [Severe anemia caused by haemorrhoids: the casae of a young man with toxic cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Kovács, Erzsébet; Palatka, Károly; Németh, Attila; Pásztor, Éva; Pfliegler, György

    2013-03-10

    A 38-year-old alcoholic man with severe iron deficient anaemia, and bloody-mucous stool was found to have haemorrhoidal bleeding. In spite of intravenous iron supplements haemoglobin levels were falling. He was admitted because of deteriorating condition, jaundice, severe anaemia (haemoglobin, 38 g/l) and iron deficiency. Except of toxic (alcohol) agent all other causes of liver disease could be excluded. Sclero-, and medical therapy, and abstinence resulted in a rapid improvement in his condition and subsequently rectal bleeding also disappeared. Bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract is a well known and serious complication in liver cirrhosis, however, a voluminous blood loss resulting in a life-threatening anaemia from lower gastrointestinal tract or haemorrhoids, as it was detected in this patient, is quite rare. Sclerotherapy seems to be an effective method with only minor complications when compared with other invasive techniques. However, the patient's compliance even in liver cirrhosis with haemorrhoidal nodes is essential for long-term success.

  2. The Scientist in the Casa: The Child as Scientist in the Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sackett, Ginni

    2016-01-01

    If a parent were to ask what science and technology are offered in a Montessori preschool, Ginni Sackett provides a comprehensive reply. By precisely defining the words science and technology with an expansion of those definitions from renowned biologist E. O. Wilson, alongside the "experiences we offer every day to the children in our…

  3. 78 FR 68688 - Airworthiness Directives; EADS CASA (Type Certificate Previously Held by Construcciones...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... tank vapor space, and result in a fuel tank explosion and consequent loss of the airplane. DATES: This... detected and corrected, could create an ignition source in the fuel tank vapour space, possibly resulting... tank vapor space, which could result in a fuel tank explosion and consequent loss of the...

  4. 78 FR 73742 - Airworthiness Directives; EADS CASA (Type Certificate Previously Held by Construcciones...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... panel was identified. The affected panel is used as the lower part of the fuselage between Frame (FR... AD would not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between the...

  5. 75 FR 68185 - Airworthiness Directives; EADS CASA (Type Certificate Previously Held by Construcciones...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... control Zodiac Intertechnique 3 September 25, 2006. unit. CMM with Illustrated Parts List 28-41-05. Note 1... Illustrated Parts Revision B November 20, 2006. List CM 1C7-20, -21. Zodiac Intertechnique CMM...

  6. Home before You Know It = De regres en casa en un dos por tres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vida Health Communications, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

    The arrival of a newborn requires a great deal of adjustment. Intended for new and expectant parents, this booklet and companion video provide practical advice and hands-on demonstrations of the essentials of mother and baby care, from birth to the first visit to the pediatrician. The first part of the booklet, which comes in both English- and…

  7. 78 FR 7262 - Airworthiness Directives; EADS CASA (Type Certificate Previously Held by Construcciones...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... reports of incorrect electrical polarity connections on engine fire extinguishing discharge cartridges. This AD requires a one-time inspection to identify the correct polarity for each pair of electrical... detect and correct incorrect polarity connections, which could prevent the actuation of the...

  8. 77 FR 64053 - Airworthiness Directives; EADS CASA (Type Certificate Previously Held by Construcciones...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of incorrect electrical polarity connections on engine... identify the correct polarity for each pair of electrical connectors on each engine fire extinguisher cartridge, and repair if necessary. We are proposing this AD to detect and correct incorrect...

  9. A Research Study of Casa Del Sol: A Viable Chicano Bilingual-Bicultural Alcoholism Treatment Modality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bueno, Domingo

    Alcoholism among Chicanos is principally due to structural deficiencies in the surrounding society. The frustrations and limitations brought on by the social structure constitute the principal cause of Chicano alcoholism. These include the major causative factors of poverty, racism and acculturation. In an attempt to address the problem of…

  10. 76 FR 65995 - Airworthiness Directives; EADS CASA (Type Certificate Previously Held by Construcciones...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... revealed that the cable failure is due to a fracture in the area of the pulley * * *. The root cause of the fracture is an unsuitable ratio between the diameter of the pulley and the cable type and diameter. This.... The investigation revealed that the cable failure is due to a fracture in the area of the pulley...

  11. So Help Me God: Substance Abuse, Religion and Spirituality. A CASA White Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

    There is a powerful religious commitment among people in America; nearly 92% of the population is affiliated with a specific religion. This report presents findings from a 2-year study of the attitudes and experiences of clergy regarding substance abuse and the training they received in schools of theology or in seminaries. Too often clergy and…

  12. Operational aspects of CASA UNO '88-The first large scale international GPS geodetic network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilan, Ruth E.; Dixon, T. H.; Meehan, Thomas K.; Melbourne, William G.; Scheid, John A.; Kellogg, J. N.; Stowell, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    For three weeks, from January 18 to February 5, 1988, scientists and engineers from 13 countries and 30 international agencies and institutions cooperated in the most extensive GPS (Global Positioning System) field campaign, and the largest geodynamics experiment, in the world to date. This collaborative eperiment concentrated GPS receivers in Central and South America. The predicted rates of motions are on the order of 5-10 cm/yr. Global coverage of GPS observations spanned 220 deg of longitude and 125 deg of latitude using a total of 43 GPS receivers. The experiment was the first civilian effort at implementing an extended international GPS satellite tracking network. Covariance analyses incorporating the extended tracking network predicted significant improvement in precise orbit determination, allowing accurate long-baseline geodesy in the science areas.

  13. OBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF HYPERACTIVATED MOTILITY IN RAT SPERMATOZA USING COMPUTER-ASSISTED SPERM ANALYSIS (CASA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objective evaluation of hyperactivated motility in rat spermatozoa using computer-assisted sperm analysis.

    Cancel AM, Lobdell D, Mendola P, Perreault SD.

    Toxicology Program, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

    The aim of this study was t...

  14. An Evaluation of the BKB-SIN, HINT, QuickSIN, and WIN Materials on Listeners with Normal Hearing and Listeners with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Richard H.; McArdle, Rachel A.; Smith, Sherri L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine in listeners with normal hearing and listeners with sensorineural hearing loss the within- and between-group differences obtained with 4 commonly available speech-in-noise protocols. Method: Recognition performances by 24 listeners with normal hearing and 72 listeners with sensorineural hearing…

  15. A Kalman Filter for SINS Self-Alignment Based on Vector Observation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiang; Xu, Xiaosu; Zhang, Tao; Li, Yao; Tong, Jinwu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a self-alignment method for strapdown inertial navigation systems based on the q-method is studied. In addition, an improved method based on integrating gravitational apparent motion to form apparent velocity is designed, which can reduce the random noises of the observation vectors. For further analysis, a novel self-alignment method using a Kalman filter based on adaptive filter technology is proposed, which transforms the self-alignment procedure into an attitude estimation using the observation vectors. In the proposed method, a linear psuedo-measurement equation is adopted by employing the transfer method between the quaternion and the observation vectors. Analysis and simulation indicate that the accuracy of the self-alignment is improved. Meanwhile, to improve the convergence rate of the proposed method, a new method based on parameter recognition and a reconstruction algorithm for apparent gravitation is devised, which can reduce the influence of the random noises of the observation vectors. Simulations and turntable tests are carried out, and the results indicate that the proposed method can acquire sound alignment results with lower standard variances, and can obtain higher alignment accuracy and a faster convergence rate. PMID:28146059

  16. The Color of SinWhite and Black Are Perceptual Symbols of Moral Purity and Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Gary D.; Clore, Gerald L.

    2009-01-01

    Three studies examined automatic associations between words with moral and immoral meanings and the colors black and white. The speed of color naming in a Stroop task was faster when words in black concerned immorality (e.g., greed), rather than morality, and when words in white concerned morality (e.g., honesty), rather than immorality. In addition, priming immorality by having participants hand-copy an unethical statement speeded identification of words in the black font. Making immorality salient in this way also increased the moral Stroop effect among participants who had not previously shown it. In the final study, participants also rated consumer products. Moral meanings interfered with color naming most strongly among those participants who rated personal cleaning products as especially desirable. The moderation of the moral Stroop effect by individual differences in concerns about personal cleanliness suggests that ideas about purity and pollution are central to seeing morality in black and white. PMID:19619180

  17. Escuelas sin Drogas. Como Actuar. Edicion 1992. (Schools without Drugs. What Works. 1992 Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    Across the United States, schools and communities have found ways to turn the tide in the battle against drugs. This guidebook describes the methods they have used and the actions they have taken. The first section, "Children and Drugs" outlines the nature and extent of the drug problem and summarizes the latest research on the effects of drugs on…

  18. The Depths of Depression: Sin and Salvation as Seen by the Radical Press, 1930-1939.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortner, Robert S.

    Through an analysis of the products of the radical press, this paper presents the rhetorical outlines of a cultural history of the 1930s. Following an overview of the "reportage" of the radical press, the paper focuses on that medium's rhetoric, specifically its conscious and unconscious use of religious symbolism. Among the publications…

  19. Operation of bolometer system using Pt foil on SiN substrate detector for EAST tokamak.

    PubMed

    Duan, Y M; Mao, S T; Hu, L Q; Xu, P; Xu, L Q; Zhang, J Z; Lin, S Y

    2016-11-01

    The foil resistive bolometer diagnostic on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak has been upgraded partly with a new generation of detectors. The new detectors have faster response time. However, the microwave interference is still a serious issue for the bolometer system. The system response to microwave is tested, and the test results show that the closed Wheatstone bridge circuit in the detector is the most sensitive component to high power microwave field. Simulation results of microwave transmission by the high frequency structure simulator software and shielding design are also presented.

  20. Sin Verguenza: Addressing Shame with Latino Victims of Child Sexual Abuse and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Lisa Aronson

    2007-01-01

    This article explores shame issues for Latino children who have been sexually abused and their families. Latino cultural concerns around shame that are associated with sexual abuse include: attributions for the abuse, fatalism, virginity, sexual taboos, predictions of a shameful future, revictimization, machismo, and fears of homosexuality for boy…

  1. Renovando la Esperanza por una Educacion sin Exclusiones (Rekindling the Hope for an Education without Exclusion).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revista Interamericana de Educacion de Adultos, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Articles in this issue, written in Spanish, focus on the following: current status and outlook of youth and adult education; opening statement of the 50th anniversary commemoration; regional framework for the education of youth and adults in Latin America and the Caribbean; interculturalism and the education of youth and adults; participation of…

  2. Who Sinned? Parents' Knowledge of the Causes of Disability in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tungaraza, Frida D.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at finding out from parents what they knew to be the causes of their children's disabilities. One hundred and twenty six parents from four regions, namely Dar es Salaam, Dodoma, Kilimanjaro and Morogoro were involved in this study. Data was collected through interview, narratives and observation. It was obvious from the findings…

  3. Intimate Partner Violence, Relationship Status, and Protective Orders: Does "Living in Sin" Entail a Different Experience?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Lisa; Logan, T. K.; Cole, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    The legal status of women's intimate relationships may allow for different experiences with intimate partner violence (IPV) and the protections received from the criminal justice system. There has been limited research examining differences in IPV and protective orders for women in marital and cohabiting intimate relationships. This study examines…

  4. Fast two-position initial alignment for SINS using velocity plus angular rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Guobin

    2015-10-01

    An improved two-position initial alignment model for strapdown inertial navigation system is proposed. In addition to the velocity, angular rates are incorporated as measurements. The measurement equations in full three channels are derived in both navigation and body frames and the latter of which is found to be preferred. The cross-correlation between the process and the measurement noises is analyzed and addressed in the Kalman filter. The incorporation of the angular rates, without introducing additional device or external signal, speeds up the convergence of estimating the attitudes, especially the heading. In the simulation study, different algorithms are tested with different initial errors, and the advantages of the proposed method compared to the conventional one are validated by the simulation results.

  5. Polar transfer alignment of shipborne SINS with a large misalignment angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jianhua; Wang, Tongda; Guan, Dongxue; Li, Meiling

    2016-03-01

    Existing polar transfer alignment (TA) algorithms are designed based on linear Kalman filters (KF) to estimate misalignment angles. In the case of a large misalignment angle, these algorithms cannot be applied in order to achieve accurate TA. In this paper, a TA algorithm based on an unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed to solve the problem of the large misalignment angle in the polar region. Based on a large misalignment angle, nonlinear navigation error equations, which are the UKF dynamic models, are derived under grid frames. This paper chooses the velocity plus attitude matching method as the TA matching method and errors of velocity and attitude as observations. The misalignment angle can be estimated by the designed UKF. The simulation results have demonstrated that the polar TA algorithm can be effective in improving the TA accuracy, especially when large misalignment angles occur.

  6. Avoiding the Horrid and Beastly Sin of Drunkenness: Does Dissuasion Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babor, Thomas F.

    1994-01-01

    Studies indicate dissuasion does make a difference with heavy drinkers who have not developed severe alcohol dependence. There are practical and methodological problems encountered in comparison of different interventions. Concluded changes sometimes attributed to specific behavioral and psychological interventions may be due to a combination of…

  7. Taxing sin and saving lives: Can alcohol taxation reduce female homicides?

    PubMed

    Durrance, Christine Piette; Golden, Shelley; Perreira, Krista; Cook, Philip

    2011-07-01

    With costs exceeding $5.8 billion per year, violence against women has significant ramifications for victims, their families, the health care systems that treat them, and the employers who depend on their labor. Prior research has found that alcohol abuse contributes to violence against both men and women, and that stringent alcohol control policies can reduce alcohol consumption and in turn some forms of violence. In this paper, we estimate the direct relationship between an important alcohol control measure, excise taxes, and the most extreme form of violence, homicide. We use female homicide rates as our measure of severe violence, as this measure is consistently and accurately reported across multiple years. Our results provide evidence that increased alcohol taxes reduce alcohol consumption and that reductions in alcohol consumption can reduce femicide. Unfortunately, a direct test of the relationship does not have the power to determine whether alcohol taxes effectively reduce female homicide rates. We conclude that while alcohol taxes have been shown to effectively reduce other forms of violence against women, policy makers may need alternative policy levers to reduce the most severe form of violence against women.

  8. Mastery Without Mystery: Why there is no Promethean Sin in Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Kahane, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Several authors have suggested that we cannot fully grapple with the ethics of human enhancement unless we address neglected questions about our place in the world, questions that verge on theology but can be pursued independently of religion. A prominent example is Michael Sandel, who argues that the deepest objection to enhancement is that it expresses a Promethean drive to mastery which deprives us of openness to the unbidden and leaves us with nothing to affirm outside our own wills. Sandel's argument against enhancement has been criticized, but his claims about mastery and the unbidden, and their relation to religion, have not yet received sufficient attention. I argue that Sandel misunderstands the notions of mastery and the unbidden and their significance. Once these notions are properly understood, they have surprising implications. It turns out that the value of openness to the unbidden is not just independent of theism, as Sandel claims, but is in fact not even fully compatible with it. But in any case that value cannot support Sandel's objection to enhancement. This is because it is not enhancement but certain forms of opposition to enhancement that are most likely to express a pernicious drive to mastery. PMID:22318775

  9. Fabrication of highly dense SiN4 ceramics without additives by high pressure sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takatori, K.; Shimade, M.; Koizumi, M.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) is one of candidate materials for the engineering ceramics which is used at high temperatures. The mechanical strengths of hot pressed or sintered Si2N4 ceramics containing some amount of additives, however, are deteriorated at elevated temperatures. To improve the high temperature strength of Si3N4 ceramics, an attempt to consolidate Si3N4 without additives was made by high pressure sintering technique. Scanning electron micrographs of fracture surfaces of the sintered bodies showed the bodies had finely grained and fully self-bonded sintered bodies were 310N sq m at room temperature and 174N/sq m at 1200 C.

  10. Quizzes--A Sin against the Sixth Commandment? In Defense of MReader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robb, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The "Ten Principles Teaching Extensive Reading" has appeared in a number of forms, initially as "The characteristics of an extensive reading approach" in Day and Bamford (1998) and later in an article in Reading in a Foreign Language (2002) but in a slightly different form and ordering. What was originally intended to be a…

  11. Temporal Analysis of Andes Virus and Sin Nombre Virus Infections of Syrian Hamsters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    4 to 5 logs between days 6 and 8. Pulmonary edema was first detected ultrastructurally on day 6. Ultrastructural analysis of lung tissues revealed...leakage and kidney dysfunction are associated with HFRS, while HPS-associated hantaviruses cause acute pulmonary edema (16, 44). Cardiac dysfunction...logs between days 6 and 9. Pulomonary edema was first detected ultrastructurally on day 6. Ultrastructural analysis of lumg tisssues revealed the

  12. Three Major Sins of Professional Development: How Can We Make It Better?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varela, Alejandra M.

    2012-01-01

    Teachers often complain about the professional development opportunities. And it is not uncommon for absenteeism to increase among teachers and staff during in-service days. The biggest problem that professional development has encountered is that it is usually developed as an isolated requirement, with no real connection to daily teaching and…

  13. Sta-Ai-Tsi-Nix-Sin: Ghost Stories. Blackfeet Heritage Program: Browning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noether, Lauren, Ed.; LaFromboise, Mary Ellen, Ed.

    Ghost stories are universal. They are told and heard in different cultures throughout the world. They generally center around an incident or experience that is true, but that cannot be explained as an everyday occurence. True but unexplained experiences on the Blackfeet Reservation are told and retold in the winter months. In contemporary…

  14. BaBar: sin(2beta) with Charmless and Radiative Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Dujmic, Denis; /SLAC

    2006-02-27

    We present new measurements of time-dependent CP-violation parameters in hadronic penguin decays: B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub L}{sup 0}, K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}, {omega}K{sub L}{sup 0}, and a radiative penguin decay B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} in a dataset of around 230 {center_dot} 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the asymmetric B Factory at SLAC. These CP asymmetry measurements probe for amplitudes beyond the Standard Model in loop-dominated decays of neutral B mesons. While we find a puzzling deviation of CP-asymmetry parameters from predicted values, a full confirmation still awaits more data.

  15. Measurements of sin2{beta} at BABAR with charmonium and penguin decays

    SciTech Connect

    George, Katherine

    2006-07-11

    This article summarises measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries in decays of neutral B mesons to charmonium, open-charm and gluonic penguin-dominated charmless final states. Unless otherwise stated, these measurements are based on a sample of approximately 230 million {upsilon}(4S){yields} BB(bar sign) decays collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B -factory.

  16. Measurements of sin2beta at BaBar with Charmonium and Penguin Decays

    SciTech Connect

    George, Katherine A.; /Liverpool U.

    2005-12-14

    This article summarizes measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries in decays of neutral B mesons to charmonium, open-charm and gluonic penguin-dominated charmless final states. Unless otherwise stated, these measurements are based on a sample of approximately 230 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B-factory.

  17. Fascinating Machismo: Toward an Unmasking of Heterosexual Masculinity in Arturo Ripstein's "El Lugar sin Limites."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Mora, Sergio

    1993-01-01

    Provides a genealogy of the "fichera" (cabaret dancer/prostitute) genre in Mexican cinema, moving from the figure of the female prostitute to that of the "queen" homosexual type. Discusses the ideological function of homosexual stereotyping and to the way the queen homosexual stereotype is deployed to very different ends in…

  18. America's Original Sin. A Study Guide on White Racism. New, Expanded Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulteen, Bob, Ed.; Wallis, Jim, Ed.

    This study guide offers 53 essays and articles in 9 study sessions on the causes and consequences of racism and a vision for change from a Christian perspective. The guide is updated to include articles addressing issues raised by the riots in Los Angeles (California), the 25th anniversary of the legislative victories of the Civil Rights Movement,…

  19. Developmental origins of disruptive behaviour problems: the 'original sin' hypothesis, epigenetics and their consequences for prevention.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Richard E

    2010-04-01

    This paper reviews publications on developmental trajectories of disruptive behaviour (DB) problems (aggression, opposition-defiance, rule breaking, and stealing-vandalism) over the past decade. Prior to these studies two theoretical models had strongly influenced research on DB: social learning and disease onset. According to these developmental perspectives, children learn DB from their environment and onset of the disease is triggered by accumulated exposition to disruptive models in the environment, including the media. Most of the evidence came from studies of school age children and adolescents. Longitudinal studies tracing developmental trajectories of DB from early childhood onwards suggest an inversed developmental process. DB are universal during early childhood. With age, children learn socially acceptable behaviours from interactions with their environment. A 'disease' status is given to children who fail to learn the socially acceptable behaviours. The mechanisms that lead to deficits in using socially accepted behaviours are strongly intergenerational, based on complex genetic and environmental contributions, including epigenetic mechanisms. Prevention of these deficits requires early, intensive and long-term support to parents and child. Newly discovered epigenetic mechanisms suggest that intensive perinatal interventions will have impacts on numerous aspects of physical and mental health, including DB. This review also concludes that: a) subtypes of disruptive behaviours should not be aggregated because they have different developmental trajectories and require specific corrective interventions; b) the overt-covert and destructive-nondestructive dimensions appear the most useful to create DB subtypes; c) overt DB onset before covert DB because the latter require more brain maturation; d) DB subtype taxonomies are more useful for clinicians than developmental taxonomies because the latter are post mortem diagnoses and clinicians' retrospective information is unreliable; e) we need large-scale collaborative preventive experimental interventions starting during early pregnancy to advance knowledge on causes and prevention of DB problems.

  20. Secret Sins of the Orient: Creating a (Homo)Textual Context for Reading Byron's "The Giaour."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the way sexual excesses inscribed in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Oriental discourses served to open up "queer" spaces in Romantic literature, while analyzing the degree to which the master narrative of British colonial domination was in part dependent on narratives of the sexual degeneracy of the Other. Focuses on…

  1. Of neoliberalism and global health: human capital, market failure and sin/social taxes.

    PubMed

    Reubi, David

    2016-10-19

    This article tells a different but equally important story about neoliberalism and global health than the narrative on structural adjustment policies usually found in the literature. Rather than focus on macroeconomic structural adjustment policies, this story draws our attention to microeconomic taxation policies on tobacco, alcohol and sugar now widely recognised as the best strategy to control the global non-communicable disease epidemic. Structural adjustment policies are the product of the shift from statist to market-based development models, which was brought about by neoliberal thinkers like Peter Blau and Deepak Lal. In contrast, taxation policies are the result of a different epistemological rupture in international development: the move from economies and physical capital to people and human capital, advocated by Gary Becker and others. This move was part of wider change, which saw Chicago School economists, under the influence of rational choice theory, redefine the object of their discipline, from the study of markets to individual choices. It was this concern with people and their choices that made it possible for Becker and others to identify the importance of price for the demand for tobacco, alcohol and sugar. The same concern also made it easier for them to recognise that there were inefficiencies in the tobacco, alcohol and sugar markets that required government intervention. This story, I suggest, shows that structural adjustment policies and pro-market ideology do not exhaust the relationship between neoliberalism and global health and should not monopolise how we, as political and social scientists, conceive it.

  2. Paramagnetic nitrogen defects in silicon nitride. [Amorphous hydrogenated SiN

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, W.L. ); Kanicki, J. . Thomas J. Watson Research Center); Robertson, J. ); Poindexter, E.H. )

    1992-01-01

    Photocreation mechanisms and properties of nitrogen dangling bonds in amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride (a-SiN[sub x]:H) thin films are investigated. We find that the creation kinetics are strongly dependent on the post-deposition anneal; this thermal process can be described by a simple exponential function which yields an activation energy of 0.8 eV. The compositional dependence of the nitrogen dangling bond center suggests that its energy level lies close to the valence band edge, in agreement with theoretical calculations. This energy level position can explain why a-SiN[sub x]:H films often become conducting following a high post-deposition anneal.

  3. Bless me reader for I have sinned: physicians and confessional writing.

    PubMed

    Wear, Delese; Jones, Therese

    2010-01-01

    From the poetry of William Carlos Williams, the novels of Walker Percy, and the short stories of Anton Chekov to the contemporary essays of Atul Gawande, physicians' contributions to literary genres have been significant. This article explores the specific form of confessional writing offered by physicians during the past half century, writing that often exposes medical error or negative feelings towards patients. A history of confessional practices as a legal tool, as religious practice, and as literary genre is offered, followed by analyses of selected confessional writings by physicians, many of them found in clinical journals such as Journal of the American Medical Association, Annals of Internal Medicine, and the Lancet. The authors of the narratives described here are engaged in several or all elements of the confessional sequence, which may offer them some resolution through the exposure and acknowledgment of their shared humanity with their patients and their expression of regret for any harm done.

  4. Mastery Without Mystery: Why there is no Promethean Sin in Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kahane, Guy

    2011-11-01

    Several authors have suggested that we cannot fully grapple with the ethics of human enhancement unless we address neglected questions about our place in the world, questions that verge on theology but can be pursued independently of religion. A prominent example is Michael Sandel, who argues that the deepest objection to enhancement is that it expresses a Promethean drive to mastery which deprives us of openness to the unbidden and leaves us with nothing to affirm outside our own wills. Sandel's argument against enhancement has been criticized, but his claims about mastery and the unbidden, and their relation to religion, have not yet received sufficient attention. I argue that Sandel misunderstands the notions of mastery and the unbidden and their significance. Once these notions are properly understood, they have surprising implications. It turns out that the value of openness to the unbidden is not just independent of theism, as Sandel claims, but is in fact not even fully compatible with it. But in any case that value cannot support Sandel's objection to enhancement.This is because it is not enhancement but certain forms of opposition to enhancement that are most likely to express a pernicious drive to mastery.

  5. A Kalman Filter for SINS Self-Alignment Based on Vector Observation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiang; Xu, Xiaosu; Zhang, Tao; Li, Yao; Tong, Jinwu

    2017-01-29

    In this paper, a self-alignment method for strapdown inertial navigation systems based on the q-method is studied. In addition, an improved method based on integrating gravitational apparent motion to form apparent velocity is designed, which can reduce the random noises of the observation vectors. For further analysis, a novel self-alignment method using a Kalman filter based on adaptive filter technology is proposed, which transforms the self-alignment procedure into an attitude estimation using the observation vectors. In the proposed method, a linear psuedo-measurement equation is adopted by employing the transfer method between the quaternion and the observation vectors. Analysis and simulation indicate that the accuracy of the self-alignment is improved. Meanwhile, to improve the convergence rate of the proposed method, a new method based on parameter recognition and a reconstruction algorithm for apparent gravitation is devised, which can reduce the influence of the random noises of the observation vectors. Simulations and turntable tests are carried out, and the results indicate that the proposed method can acquire sound alignment results with lower standard variances, and can obtain higher alignment accuracy and a faster convergence rate.

  6. Of neoliberalism and global health: human capital, market failure and sin/social taxes

    PubMed Central

    Reubi, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article tells a different but equally important story about neoliberalism and global health than the narrative on structural adjustment policies usually found in the literature. Rather than focus on macroeconomic structural adjustment policies, this story draws our attention to microeconomic taxation policies on tobacco, alcohol and sugar now widely recognised as the best strategy to control the global non-communicable disease epidemic. Structural adjustment policies are the product of the shift from statist to market-based development models, which was brought about by neoliberal thinkers like Peter Blau and Deepak Lal. In contrast, taxation policies are the result of a different epistemological rupture in international development: the move from economies and physical capital to people and human capital, advocated by Gary Becker and others. This move was part of wider change, which saw Chicago School economists, under the influence of rational choice theory, redefine the object of their discipline, from the study of markets to individual choices. It was this concern with people and their choices that made it possible for Becker and others to identify the importance of price for the demand for tobacco, alcohol and sugar. The same concern also made it easier for them to recognise that there were inefficiencies in the tobacco, alcohol and sugar markets that required government intervention. This story, I suggest, shows that structural adjustment policies and pro-market ideology do not exhaust the relationship between neoliberalism and global health and should not monopolise how we, as political and social scientists, conceive it. PMID:27721572

  7. Sex, Sin, and Swaggart: Conflict-Management through the Rhetoric of Compliance-Gaining Apologia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Christa L.; Fadely, Dean

    Television evangelist Jimmy Swaggart's public speech of apology following revelations of his sexual relationship with a prostitute provides the basis for a study of the rhetorical genres of apologia and compliance-gaining discourse. Apologia is public speech used by prominent persons to repair damage done to their reputations by allegations of…

  8. Locus of Control, Attribution Theory, and the "Five Deadly Sins" of Aviation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    negative correlation between internality and self -reported involvement in hazardous events, as indicated by the Hazardous Events Scale (HES; Hunter...one’s self esteem ; it can lead to a cavalier attitude toward safety and consequent laxity in following safety precautions. The concept of... Testing . Chapin, J. (2001). Self -protective pessimism: Optimistic bias in reverse. North American Journal of Psychology, 3, 253-262. Cravens, R. W

  9. The Seven Deadly Sins of World University Ranking: A Summary from Several Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soh, Kaycheng

    2017-01-01

    World university rankings use the weight-and-sum approach to process data. Although this seems to pass the common sense test, it has statistical problems. In recent years, seven such problems have been uncovered: spurious precision, weight discrepancies, assumed mutual compensation, indictor redundancy, inter-system discrepancy, negligence of…

  10. Materials Data on Ca5(SiN3)2 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. The tango of two deadly sins: The social-functional relation of envy and pride.

    PubMed

    Lange, Jens; Crusius, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Envy stems from a social comparison with a superior standard. Its 2 distinct forms are directed at changing this situation in different ways, either by becoming as successful as the envied person (in benign envy) or by lowering the envied person's advantage (in malicious envy). In essence, envy is thus a social phenomenon. Nevertheless, most previous research has focused on its underlying intrapersonal processes, overlooking envy's interpersonal core. In contrast, we show in 6 studies (N = 1,513) that envy and pride are intertwined in a social-functional relationship. Envy and pride often co-occur (Study 1) and pride displays enhance envious feelings (Studies 2 and 3). Specifically, authentic (success attributed to effort) and hubristic pride (success attributed to talent) modulate envious intentions and behavior toward their benign and malicious form (Study 2 to 6). This effect is mediated via liking, perceived prestige, and perceived dominance (Study 4). In accordance with a social-functional approach, the effects emerge only when authentic and hubristic pride are expressed by the superior person and not when the respective information about the superior person's feelings is simply available in the environment (Study 5). These effects are present when participants recall envy situations (Study 1), when they imagine being in a competitive situation (Studies 3, 4, and 5), or when envy is elicited in situ (Studies 2 and 6). Our findings show the value of studying envy as a social phenomenon and open up numerous avenues for research on envy at the interpersonal and intergroup level.

  12. The Great Sexologists: John Money on Sin, Science, and the Sex Police.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Money, John

    This paper discusses the role of sex police in society from the 14th century to the present and their affect on sex education in the schools. Jean Gerson, Chancellor of the University of Paris and Dean of the Cathedral School of Notre Dame, was one of the first to publish information concerning nocturnal wet dreams and boyhood masturbation. His…

  13. Electrical properties of nanostructured SiN films for MEMS capacitive switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsoureli, M.; Xavier, S.; Michalas, L.; Lioutas, C.; Bansropun, S.; Papaioannou, G.; Ziaei, A.

    2017-01-01

    The electrical properties of gold nanorods nanostructured silicon nitride films are comprehensively investigated with the aid of metal-insulator-metal capacitors and RF MEMS capacitive switches. Different nanorod diameters and densities were grown on the bottom electrode and with orientation normal to dielectric film surface. A simple physical model, which does not take the effect of electric field fringing into account, was developed to describe both the DC and low frequency electrical properties. It has been shown that the nanorods distribution and dimensions determine the electrical properties as well as the dielectric charging phenomena of the nanostructured films. Finally, in MEMS switches it has been shown that the nanorods presence does not affect the capacitance variance nor the RF characteristics of the device.

  14. Using African Languages for Democracy and Lifelong Learning in Africa: A Post-2015 Challenge and the Work of CASAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock-Utne, Birgit; Mercer, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Africans speak African languages in their everyday lives while lessons in school are delivered in an exogenous language. In many places adult education is also carried out in a language the majority of people do not speak. The exogenous languages, which are the languages of the former colonial powers and mastered just by a small African elite, are…

  15. Little Houses and Casas Pequenas: Message Formulation and Syntactic Form in Unscripted Speech with Speakers of English and Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown-Schmidt, Sarah; Konopka, Agnieszka E.

    2008-01-01

    During unscripted speech, speakers coordinate the formulation of pre-linguistic messages with the linguistic processes that implement those messages into speech. We examine the process of constructing a contextually appropriate message and interfacing that message with utterance planning in English ("the small butterfly") and Spanish ("la mariposa…

  16. Review and comparison of methods using spectral characteristics for the purposes of CASA, Computational Auditory Scene Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoire, Jerry

    2003-10-01

    The brain has a remarkable ability to separate signals from a mixture. Although much progress has been made, the goal of replicating this has eluded us. Bregman (90) suggests that the brain divides this analysis into low or primitive, and high or schema processes. Schema processes require memory and subsequent interpretation. Conversely, primitive processes operate only on the innate properties of the incoming mixture and the sources that created it. The major parameters are intra aural time differences, spectrum, onset and offset, phase, and amplitude of each source. In this paper I review and compare previously proposed methods to analyze the frequency spectrum. This includes estimation of the fundamental frequency and partials produced by each source in the mixture.

  17. 78 FR 50097 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Casa...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    .... The 39 associated funerary objects are 25 sherds, 3 ceramic vessels, 6 faunal bone fragments, 1 bag of faunal bone fragments, 1 piece of turquoise, 1 pestle, 1 bag of charcoal, and 1 unworked cone...

  18. The CASA Trauma and Attachment Group (TAG) Program for Children who have Attachment Issues Following Early Developmental Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Chandra K.; O’Brien-Langer, Anna; Silverstone, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There is relatively little research about effective therapeutic approaches for children in middle childhood who have attachment related diagnoses as a result of experiencing significant, early developmental trauma. This study describes findings from an intensive, dyad-based intervention, aimed at stabilizing attachment relationships with primary caregivers, increasing caregiver reflective function skills, and reducing children’s trauma-related behavioural sequelae. Method: We analyzed retrospective data from 51 caregiver/child dyads who participated in the Trauma and Attachment Group (TAG) Program from September 2011–December 2014. This data included pre- and post-intervention scores retrieved from the Parenting Relationship Questionnaire (PRQ), the Parent Report of Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms (PROPS), and the Parental Reflective Functioning Questionnaire (PRFQ-1) Results: The preliminary findings show statistically significant improvements in attachment, communication, discipline practices, involvement, and relational frustration. Additionally there were statistically significant improvements in parental reflective functioning, and a trend towards a reduction in symptoms typical of post-traumatic stress disorder. Conclusion: Poor quality or inconsistent interactions with early caregivers can lead to life-long impairments in physical and mental health. This intensive program shows potential as a way to improve longer-term outcomes for children exposed to early developmental trauma. Longer-term research is required to further substantiate outcomes, appraise cost analysis, as well as to consider evaluation with appropriate comparison groups. PMID:27047555

  19. 78 FR 43850 - Opportunity for Designation in Owensboro, KY; Bloomington, IL; Iowa Falls, IA; Casa Grande, AZ...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... on the West by the western Taylor County line; the southern Montgomery County line west to State Route 48; State Route 48 north to M47; M47 north to the Montgomery County line; the northern Montgomery..., Montgomery County and two Scoular elevators, Griswold, Cass County, Iowa. Farwell SW Pursuant to Section...

  20. CASAWORKS for Families: A Promising Approach to Welfare Reform and Substance-Abusing Women. A CASA White Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

    CASAWORKS for Families is the first national demonstration program to provide simultaneously drug and alcohol treatment; literacy, job, parenting, and social skills training; family violence prevention; and health care to help substance-abusing welfare parents recover. Its mission is to help women on welfare with substance abuse problems achieve…