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Sample records for pseudo-continuous arterial spin

  1. Real-Time Functional MRI Using Pseudo-Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Garcia, Luis; Jahanian, Hesamoddin; Greenwald, Mark K.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Peltier, Scott J.

    2011-01-01

    The first implementation of real-time acquisition and analysis of Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) based functional MRI time series is presented in this article. The implementation uses a pseudo-continuous labeling scheme followed by a spiral k-space acquisition trajectory. Real-time reconstruction of the images, preprocessing and regression analysis of the fMRI data were implemented on a laptop computer interfaced with the MRI scanner. The method allows the user to track the current raw data, subtraction images, and the cumulative t-statistic map overlaid on a cumulative subtraction image. The user is also able to track the time course of individual time courses, and interactively select an ROI as a nuisance covariate. The pulse sequence allows the user to adjust acquisition and labeling parameters while observing their effect on the image within two successive TRs. This method is illustrated on a stimulation paradigm consisting of simultaneous finger-tapping and visual stimulation and on a bimanual finger tapping task alternating hands. PMID:21446035

  2. Real-time functional MRI using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Garcia, Luis; Jahanian, Hesamoddin; Greenwald, Mark K; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Peltier, Scott J

    2011-06-01

    The first implementation of real-time acquisition and analysis of arterial spin labeling-based functional magnetic resonance imaging time series is presented in this article. The implementation uses a pseudo-continuous labeling scheme followed by a spiral k-space acquisition trajectory. Real-time reconstruction of the images, preprocessing, and regression analysis of the functional magnetic resonance imaging data were implemented on a laptop computer interfaced with the MRI scanner. The method allows the user to track the current raw data, subtraction images, and the cumulative t-statistic map overlaid on a cumulative subtraction image. The user is also able to track the time course of individual time courses and interactively selects a region of interest as a nuisance covariate. The pulse sequence allows the user to adjust acquisition and labeling parameters while observing their effect on the image within two successive pulse repetition times. This method is demonstrated by two functional imaging experiments: a simultaneous finger-tapping and visual stimulation paradigm, and a bimanual finger-tapping task.

  3. Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling technique for measuring CBF dynamics with high temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Silva, A C; Kim, S G

    1999-09-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) can be measured noninvasively with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by using arterial water as an endogenous perfusion tracer. However, the arterial spin labeling (ASL) techniques suffer from poor temporal resolution due to the need to wait for the exchange of labeled arterial spins with tissue spins to produce contrast. In this work, a new ASL technique is introduced, which allows the measurement of CBF dynamics with high temporal and spatial resolution. This novel method was used in rats to determine the dynamics of CBF changes elicited by somatosensory stimulation with a temporal resolution of 108 ms. The onset time of the CBF response was 0.6 +/- 0.4 sec (mean +/- SD) after onset of stimulation (n = 10). The peak response was observed 4.4 +/- 3.7 sec (mean +/- SD) after stimulation began. These results are in excellent agreement with previous data obtained with invasive techniques, such as laser-Doppler flowmetry and hydrogen clearance, and suggest the appropriateness of this novel technique to probe CBF dynamics in functional and pathological studies with high temporal and spatial resolution. Magn Reson Med 42:425-429, 1999.

  4. Unilateral fetal-type circle of Willis anatomy causes right-left asymmetry in cerebral blood flow with pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling: A limitation of arterial spin labeling-based cerebral blood flow measurements?

    PubMed

    Barkeij Wolf, Jurriaan Jh; Foster-Dingley, Jessica C; Moonen, Justine Ef; van Osch, Matthias Jp; de Craen, Anton Jm; de Ruijter, Wouter; van der Mast, Roos C; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    The accuracy of cerebral blood flow measurements using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling can be affected by vascular factors other than cerebral blood flow, such as flow velocity and arterial transit time. We aimed to elucidate the effects of common variations in vascular anatomy of the circle of Willis on pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling signal. In addition, we investigated whether possible differences in pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling signal could be mediated by differences in flow velocities. Two hundred and three elderly participants underwent magnetic resonance angiography of the circle of Willis and pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling scans. Mean pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling-cerebral blood flow signal was calculated for the gray matter of the main cerebral flow territories. Mean cerebellar gray matter pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling-cerebral blood flow was significantly lower in subjects having a posterior fetal circle of Willis variant with an absent P1 segment. The posterior fetal circle of Willis variants also showed a significantly higher pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling-cerebral blood flow signal in the ipsilateral flow territory of the posterior cerebral artery. Flow velocity in the basilar artery was significantly lower in these posterior fetal circle of Willis variants. This study indicates that pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling measurements underestimate cerebral blood flow in the posterior flow territories and cerebellum of subjects with a highly prevalent variation in circle of Willis morphology. Additionally, our data suggest that this effect is mediated by concomitant differences in flow velocity between the supplying arteries.

  5. Optimization and reliability of multiple postlabeling delay pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling during rest and stimulus-induced functional task activation

    PubMed Central

    Mezue, Melvin; Segerdahl, Andrew R; Okell, Thomas W; Chappell, Michael A; Kelly, Michael E; Tracey, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequences that incorporate multiple postlabeling delay (PLD) times allow estimation of when arterial blood signal arrives within a region of interest. Sequences that account for such variability may improve the reliability of ASL and therefore make the technique well suited for future clinical and experimental investigations of cerebral perfusion. This study assessed the within- and between-session reproducibility of an optimized pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) sequence that incorporates multiple postlabeling delays (multi-PLD pCASL). Healthy subjects underwent four identical scans separated by 30 minutes, 1 week, and 1 month using multi-PLD pCASL to image absolute perfusion (cerebral blood flow (CBF) and arterial arrival time (AAT)) during both rest and a visual-cued motor task. We show good test-retest reliability, with strong consistency across subjects and sessions during rest (inter-session within-subject coefficient of variation: gray matter (GM) CBF=6.44% GM AAT=2.20%). We also report high sensitivity and reproducibility during the functional task, where we show robust task-related decreases in AAT corresponding with regions of increased CBF. Importantly, these results give insight into optimal PLD selection for future investigations using single-PLD ASL to image different brain regions, and highlight the necessity of multi-PLD ASL when imaging perfusion in the whole brain. PMID:25269517

  6. Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling imaging of cerebral blood perfusion asymmetry in drug-naïve patients with first-episode major depression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangdong; Bian, Haiman; Jiang, Deguo; Cui, Mingwei; Ji, Shengzhang; Liu, Mei; Lang, Xu; Zhuo, Chuanjun

    2016-01-01

    Many previous studies have reported that regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) aberrations may be one of the pathological characteristics of depression and rCBF has demonstrated a certain degree of asymmetry. However, studies investigating the cerebral blood perfusion asymmetry changes of drug-naïve patients experiencing their first episode of major depression using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) are rare. Ten drug-naïve patients experiencing their first major depression episode and 15 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the current study. A novel pCASL method was applied to whole brain MRI scans of all of the samples. The Statistics Parameter Mapping and Relative Expression Software Tool software packages were used for the pre-processing and statistical analysis of the two sets of images, and the differences in the cerebral blood perfusion at the whole brain level were compared between the two groups. Compared with the healthy control group, the cerebral perfusion of the depression patients showed an asymmetric pattern. Decreased cerebral blood perfusion regions were primarily located in the left hemisphere, specifically in the left temporal lobe, frontal lobe and cingulate cortex [P<0.05 and cluster size ≥30 with false discovery rate (FDR) correction]. Simultaneously, increased perfusion regions were predominantly located in the right hemisphere, specifically in the right cerebellum, thalamus, frontal lobe and anterior cingulate cortex (P<0.05 and cluster size ≥30, with FDR correction). Thus, pCASL may characterize the alterations in cerebral blood perfusion of patients with depression. PMID:28101340

  7. Simultaneous Multi-slice Turbo-FLASH Imaging with CAIPIRINHA for Whole Brain Distortion-Free Pseudo-Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling at 3 and 7T

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Moeller, Steen; Li, Xiufeng; Vu, An T.; Krasileva, Kate; Ugurbil, Kamil; Yacoub, Essa; Wang, Danny JJ

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) or multiband (MB) imaging has recently been attempted for arterial spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI in conjunction with echo-planar imaging (EPI) readout. It was found that SMS-EPI can reduce the T1 relaxation effect of the label, improve image coverage and resolution with little penalty in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, EPI still suffers from geometric distortion and signal dropout from field inhomogeneity effects especially at high and ultrahigh magnetic fields. Here we present a novel scheme for achieving high fidelity distortion-free quantitative perfusion imaging by combining pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) with SMS Turbo-FLASH (TFL) readout at both 3 and 7 Tesla. Bloch equation simulation was performed to characterize and optimize the TFL-based pCASL perfusion signal. Two MB factors (3 and 5) were implemented in SMS-TFL pCASL and compared with standard 2D TFL and EPI pCASL sequences. The temporal SNR of SMS-TFL pCASL relative to that of standard TFL pCASL was 0.76±0.10 and 0.74±0.11 at 7T, 0.70±0.05 and 0.65±0.05 at 3T for MB factor of 3 and 5, respectively. By implementing background suppression in conjunction with SMS-TFL at 3T, the relative temporal SNR improved to 0.84±0.09 and 0.79±0.10 for MB factor of 3 and 5 respectively. Compared to EPI pCASL, significantly increased temporal SNR (p<0.001) and improved visualization of orbitofrontal cortex were achieved using SMS-TFL pCASL. By combining SMS acceleration with TFL pCASL, we demonstrated the feasibility for whole brain distortion-free quantitative mapping of cerebral blood flow at high and ultrahigh magnetic fields. PMID:25837601

  8. Three-dimensional whole-brain perfusion quantification using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling MRI at multiple post-labeling delays: accounting for both arterial transit time and impulse response function.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qin; Huang, Alan J; Hua, Jun; Desmond, John E; Stevens, Robert D; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2014-02-01

    Measurement of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) with whole-brain coverage is challenging in terms of both acquisition and quantitative analysis. In order to fit arterial spin labeling-based perfusion kinetic curves, an empirical three-parameter model which characterizes the effective impulse response function (IRF) is introduced, which allows the determination of CBF, the arterial transit time (ATT) and T(1,eff). The accuracy and precision of the proposed model were compared with those of more complicated models with four or five parameters through Monte Carlo simulations. Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling images were acquired on a clinical 3-T scanner in 10 normal volunteers using a three-dimensional multi-shot gradient and spin echo scheme at multiple post-labeling delays to sample the kinetic curves. Voxel-wise fitting was performed using the three-parameter model and other models that contain two, four or five unknown parameters. For the two-parameter model, T(1,eff) values close to tissue and blood were assumed separately. Standard statistical analysis was conducted to compare these fitting models in various brain regions. The fitted results indicated that: (i) the estimated CBF values using the two-parameter model show appreciable dependence on the assumed T(1,eff) values; (ii) the proposed three-parameter model achieves the optimal balance between the goodness of fit and model complexity when compared among the models with explicit IRF fitting; (iii) both the two-parameter model using fixed blood T1 values for T(1,eff) and the three-parameter model provide reasonable fitting results. Using the proposed three-parameter model, the estimated CBF (46 ± 14 mL/100 g/min) and ATT (1.4 ± 0.3 s) values averaged from different brain regions are close to the literature reports; the estimated T(1,eff) values (1.9 ± 0.4 s) are higher than the tissue T1 values, possibly reflecting a contribution from the microvascular arterial blood compartment.

  9. A longitudinal study of cerebral blood flow under hypoxia at high altitude using 3D pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjia; Liu, Jie; Lou, Xin; Zheng, Dandan; Wu, Bing; Wang, Danny J J; Ma, Lin

    2017-02-27

    Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) may occur with acute exposure to high altitude; however, the CBF of the brain parenchyma has not been studied to date. In this study, identical magnetic resonance scans using arterial spin labeling (ASL) were performed to study the haemodynamic changes at both sea level and high altitude. We found that with acute exposure to high altitude, the CBF in acute mountain sickness (AMS) subjects was higher (P < 0.05), while the CBF of non-AMS subjects was lower (P > 0.05) compared with those at sea level. Moreover, magnetic resonance angiography in both AMS and non-AMS subjects showed a significant increase in the cross-sectional areas of the internal carotid, basilar, and middle cerebral arteries on the first day at high altitude. These findings support that AMS may be related to increased CBF rather than vasodilation; these results contradict most previous studies that reported no relationship between CBF changes and the occurrence of AMS. This discrepancy may be attributed to the use of ASL for CBF measurement at both sea level and high altitude in this study, which has substantial advantages over transcranial Doppler for the assessment of CBF.

  10. A longitudinal study of cerebral blood flow under hypoxia at high altitude using 3D pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenjia; Liu, Jie; Lou, Xin; Zheng, Dandan; Wu, Bing; Wang, Danny J. J.; Ma, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) may occur with acute exposure to high altitude; however, the CBF of the brain parenchyma has not been studied to date. In this study, identical magnetic resonance scans using arterial spin labeling (ASL) were performed to study the haemodynamic changes at both sea level and high altitude. We found that with acute exposure to high altitude, the CBF in acute mountain sickness (AMS) subjects was higher (P < 0.05), while the CBF of non-AMS subjects was lower (P > 0.05) compared with those at sea level. Moreover, magnetic resonance angiography in both AMS and non-AMS subjects showed a significant increase in the cross-sectional areas of the internal carotid, basilar, and middle cerebral arteries on the first day at high altitude. These findings support that AMS may be related to increased CBF rather than vasodilation; these results contradict most previous studies that reported no relationship between CBF changes and the occurrence of AMS. This discrepancy may be attributed to the use of ASL for CBF measurement at both sea level and high altitude in this study, which has substantial advantages over transcranial Doppler for the assessment of CBF. PMID:28240265

  11. Accuracy and precision of pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling perfusion during baseline and hypercapnia: a head-to-head comparison with ¹⁵O H₂O positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Heijtel, D F R; Mutsaerts, H J M M; Bakker, E; Schober, P; Stevens, M F; Petersen, E T; van Berckel, B N M; Majoie, C B L M; Booij, J; van Osch, M J P; Vanbavel, E; Boellaard, R; Lammertsma, A A; Nederveen, A J

    2014-05-15

    Measurements of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) provide useful information about cerebrovascular condition and regional metabolism. Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) is a promising non-invasive MRI technique to quantitatively measure the CBF, whereas additional hypercapnic pCASL measurements are currently showing great promise to quantitatively assess the CVR. However, the introduction of pCASL at a larger scale awaits further evaluation of the exact accuracy and precision compared to the gold standard. (15)O H₂O positron emission tomography (PET) is currently regarded as the most accurate and precise method to quantitatively measure both CBF and CVR, though it is one of the more invasive methods as well. In this study we therefore assessed the accuracy and precision of quantitative pCASL-based CBF and CVR measurements by performing a head-to-head comparison with (15)O H₂O PET, based on quantitative CBF measurements during baseline and hypercapnia. We demonstrate that pCASL CBF imaging is accurate during both baseline and hypercapnia with respect to (15)O H₂O PET with a comparable precision. These results pave the way for quantitative usage of pCASL MRI in both clinical and research settings.

  12. Acceleration-selective arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Sophie; Ghariq, Eidrees; Teeuwisse, Wouter M; Webb, Andrew; van Osch, Matthias J P

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a new arterial spin labeling (ASL) method with spatially nonselective labeling is introduced, based on the acceleration of flowing spins, which is able to image brain perfusion with minimal contamination from venous signal. This method is termed acceleration-selective ASL (AccASL) and resembles velocity-selective ASL (VSASL), with the difference that AccASL is able to discriminate between arterial and venous components in a single preparation module due to the higher acceleration on the arterial side of the microvasculature, whereas VSASL cannot make this distinction unless a second labeling module is used. A difference between AccASL and VSASL is that AccASL is mainly cerebral blood volume weighted, whereas VSASL is cerebral blood flow weighted. AccASL exploits the principles of acceleration-encoded magnetic resonance angiography by using motion-sensitizing gradients in a T2 -preparation module. This method is demonstrated in healthy volunteers for a range of cutoff accelerations. Additionally, AccASL is compared with VSASL and pseudo-continuous ASL, and its feasibility in functional MRI is demonstrated. Compared with VSASL with a single labeling module, a strong and significant reduction in venous label is observed. The resulting signal-to-noise ratio is comparable to pseudo-continuous ASL and robust activation of the visual cortex is observed.

  13. SU-E-I-65: Estimation of Tagging Efficiency in Pseudo-Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling (pCASL) MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, M; Yan, F; Tseng, Y; Chen, C; Lin, C; Liu, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: pCASL was recommended as a potent approach for absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) quantification in clinical practice. However, uncertainties of tagging efficiency in pCASL remain an issue. This study aimed to estimate tagging efficiency by using short quantitative pulsed ASL scan (FAIR-QUIPSSII) and compare resultant CBF values with those calibrated by using 2D Phase Contrast (PC) MRI. Methods: Fourteen normal volunteers participated in this study. All images, including whole brain (WB) pCASL, WB FAIR-QUIPSSII and single-slice 2D PC, were collected on a 3T clinical MRI scanner with a 8-channel head coil. DeltaM map was calculated by averaging the subtraction of tag/control pairs in pCASL and FAIR-QUIPSSII images and used for CBF calculation. Tagging efficiency was then calculated by the ratio of mean gray matter CBF obtained from pCASL and FAIR-QUIPSSII. For comparison, tagging efficiency was also estimated with 2D PC, a previously established method, by contrast WB CBF in pCASL and 2D PC. Feasibility of estimation from a short FAIR-QUIPSSII scan was evaluated by number of averages required for obtaining a stable deltaM value. Setting deltaM calculated by maximum number of averaging (50 pairs) as reference, stable results were defined within ±10% variation. Results: Tagging efficiencies obtained by 2D PC MRI (0.732±0.092) were significantly lower than which obtained by FAIRQUIPPSSII (0.846±0.097) (P<0.05). Feasibility results revealed that four pairs of images in FAIR-QUIPPSSII scan were sufficient to obtain a robust calibration of less than 10% differences from using 50 pairs. Conclusion: This study found that reliable estimation of tagging efficiency could be obtained by a few pairs of FAIR-QUIPSSII images, which suggested that calibration scan in a short duration (within 30s) was feasible. Considering recent reports concerning variability of PC MRI-based calibration, this study proposed an effective alternative for CBF quantification with pCASL.

  14. Tonotopic maps in human auditory cortex using arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Gardumi, Anna; Ivanov, Dimo; Havlicek, Martin; Formisano, Elia; Uludağ, Kâmil

    2017-03-01

    A tonotopic organization of the human auditory cortex (AC) has been reliably found by neuroimaging studies. However, a full characterization and parcellation of the AC is still lacking. In this study, we employed pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) to map tonotopy and voice selective regions using, for the first time, cerebral blood flow (CBF). We demonstrated the feasibility of CBF-based tonotopy and found a good agreement with BOLD signal-based tonotopy, despite the lower contrast-to-noise ratio of CBF. Quantitative perfusion mapping of baseline CBF showed a region of high perfusion centered on Heschl's gyrus and corresponding to the main high-low-high frequency gradients, co-located to the presumed primary auditory core and suggesting baseline CBF as a novel marker for AC parcellation. Furthermore, susceptibility weighted imaging was employed to investigate the tissue specificity of CBF and BOLD signal and the possible venous bias of BOLD-based tonotopy. For BOLD only active voxels, we found a higher percentage of vein contamination than for CBF only active voxels. Taken together, we demonstrated that both baseline and stimulus-induced CBF is an alternative fMRI approach to the standard BOLD signal to study auditory processing and delineate the functional organization of the auditory cortex. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1140-1154, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Rapid 3D dynamic arterial spin labeling with a sparse model-based image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Fielden, Samuel W; Feng, Xue; Wintermark, Max; Mugler, John P; Meyer, Craig H

    2015-11-01

    Dynamic arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI measures the perfusion bolus at multiple observation times and yields accurate estimates of cerebral blood flow in the presence of variations in arterial transit time. ASL has intrinsically low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and is sensitive to motion, so that extensive signal averaging is typically required, leading to long scan times for dynamic ASL. The goal of this study was to develop an accelerated dynamic ASL method with improved SNR and robustness to motion using a model-based image reconstruction that exploits the inherent sparsity of dynamic ASL data. The first component of this method is a single-shot 3D turbo spin echo spiral pulse sequence accelerated using a combination of parallel imaging and compressed sensing. This pulse sequence was then incorporated into a dynamic pseudo continuous ASL acquisition acquired at multiple observation times, and the resulting images were jointly reconstructed enforcing a model of potential perfusion time courses. Performance of the technique was verified using a numerical phantom and it was validated on normal volunteers on a 3-Tesla scanner. In simulation, a spatial sparsity constraint improved SNR and reduced estimation errors. Combined with a model-based sparsity constraint, the proposed method further improved SNR, reduced estimation error and suppressed motion artifacts. Experimentally, the proposed method resulted in significant improvements, with scan times as short as 20s per time point. These results suggest that the model-based image reconstruction enables rapid dynamic ASL with improved accuracy and robustness.

  16. Postischemic hyperperfusion on arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI is linked to hemorrhagic transformation in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Songlin; Liebeskind, David S; Dua, Sumit; Wilhalme, Holly; Elashoff, David; Qiao, Xin J; Alger, Jeffry R; Sanossian, Nerses; Starkman, Sidney; Ali, Latisha K; Scalzo, Fabien; Lou, Xin; Yoo, Bryan; Saver, Jeffrey L; Salamon, Noriko; Wang, Danny JJ

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between hyperperfusion and hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (ASL) with background suppressed 3D GRASE was performed during routine clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on AIS patients at various time points. Arterial spin labeling cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps were visually inspected for the presence of hyperperfusion. Hemorrhagic transformation was followed during hospitalization and was graded on gradient recalled echo (GRE) scans into hemorrhagic infarction (HI) and parenchymal hematoma (PH). A total of 361 ASL scans were collected from 221 consecutive patients with middle cerebral artery stroke from May 2010 to September 2013. Hyperperfusion was more frequently detected posttreatment (odds ratio (OR)=4.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.5 to 8.9, P<0.001) and with high National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores at admission (P<0.001). There was a significant association between having hyperperfusion at any time point and HT (OR=3.5, 95% CI 2.0 to 6.3, P<0.001). There was a positive relationship between the grade of HT and time–hyperperfusion with the Spearman's rank correlation of 0.44 (P=0.003). Arterial spin labeling hyperperfusion may provide an imaging marker of HT, which may guide the management of AIS patients post tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and/or endovascular treatments. Late hyperperfusion should be given more attention to prevent high-grade HT. PMID:25564233

  17. Pain response measured with arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Nasim; Brawn, Jennifer; Barmettler, Gabi; Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino

    2013-06-01

    The majority of functional MRI studies of pain processing in the brain use the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) imaging approach. However, the BOLD signal is complex as it depends on simultaneous changes in blood flow, vascular volume and oxygen metabolism. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging is another imaging approach in which the magnetically labeled arterial water is used as an endogenous tracer that allows for direct measurement of cerebral blood flow. In this study, we assessed the pain response in the brain using a pulsed-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) approach and a thermal stimulation paradigm. Using pCASL, response to noxious stimulation was detected in somatosensory cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula, hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus and precuneus, consistent with the pain response activation patterns detected using the BOLD imaging approach. We suggest that pCASL is a reliable alternative for functional MRI pain studies in conditions in which blood flow, volume or oxygen extraction are altered or compromised.

  18. Mapping of cerebral perfusion territories using territorial arterial spin labeling: techniques and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Hartkamp, Nolan S; Petersen, Esben T; De Vis, Jill B; Bokkers, Reinoud P H; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2013-08-01

    A knowledge of the exact cerebral perfusion territory which is supplied by any artery is of great importance in the understanding and diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease. The development and optimization of territorial arterial spin labeling (T-ASL) MRI techniques in the past two decades have made it possible to visualize and determine the cerebral perfusion territories in individual patients and, more importantly, to do so without contrast agents or otherwise invasive procedures. This review provides an overview of the development of ASL techniques that aim to visualize the general cerebral perfusion territories or the territory of a specific artery of interest. The first efforts of T-ASL with pulsed, continuous and pseudo-continuous techniques are summarized and subsequent clinical studies using T-ASL are highlighted. In the healthy population, the perfusion territories of the brain-feeding arteries are highly variable. This high variability requires special consideration in specific patient groups, such as patients with cerebrovascular disease, stroke, steno-occlusive disease of the large arteries and arteriovenous malformations. In the past, catheter angiography with selective contrast injection was the only available method to visualize the cerebral perfusion territories in vivo. Several T-ASL methods, sometimes referred to as regional perfusion imaging, are now available that can easily be combined with conventional brain MRI examinations to show the relationship between the cerebral perfusion territories, vascular anatomy and brain infarcts or other pathology. Increased availability of T-ASL techniques on clinical MRI scanners will allow radiologists and other clinicians to gain further knowledge of the relationship between vasculature and patient diagnosis and prognosis. Treatment decisions, such as surgical revascularization, may, in the near future, be guided by information provided by T-ASL MRI in close correlation with structural MRI and quantitative

  19. Noninvasive MRI measurement of CBF: evaluating an arterial spin labelling sequence with 99mTc-HMPAO CBF autoradiography in a rat stroke model.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, Tracey A; McCabe, Christopher; Weir, Christopher J; Macrae, I Mhairi; Holmes, William M

    2012-06-01

    Arterial spin labelling (ASL) is increasingly available for noninvasive cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurement in stroke research. Here, a pseudo-continuous ASL technique (pCASL) was evaluated against (99m)Tc-D, L-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime ((99m)Tc-HMPAO) autoradiography in a rat stroke model. The (99m)Tc-HMPAO was injected (intravenously, 225 MBq) during pCASL acquisition. The pCASL and (99m)Tc-HMPAO autoradiography CBF measures, relative to the contralateral hemisphere, were in good agreement across the spectrum of flow values in normal and ischemic tissues. The pCASL-derived quantitative regional CBF values (contralateral: 157 to 177 mL/100 g per minute; ipsilateral: 9 to 104 mL/100 g per minute) were consistent with the literature values. The data show the potential utility of pCASL for CBF assessment in a rat stroke model.

  20. Recommended implementation of arterial spin-labeled perfusion MRI for clinical applications: A consensus of the ISMRM perfusion study group and the European consortium for ASL in dementia.

    PubMed

    Alsop, David C; Detre, John A; Golay, Xavier; Günther, Matthias; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Hernandez-Garcia, Luis; Lu, Hanzhang; MacIntosh, Bradley J; Parkes, Laura M; Smits, Marion; van Osch, Matthias J P; Wang, Danny J J; Wong, Eric C; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a summary statement of recommended implementations of arterial spin labeling (ASL) for clinical applications. It is a consensus of the ISMRM Perfusion Study Group and the European ASL in Dementia consortium, both of whom met to reach this consensus in October 2012 in Amsterdam. Although ASL continues to undergo rapid technical development, we believe that current ASL methods are robust and ready to provide useful clinical information, and that a consensus statement on recommended implementations will help the clinical community to adopt a standardized approach. In this review, we describe the major considerations and trade-offs in implementing an ASL protocol and provide specific recommendations for a standard approach. Our conclusion is that as an optimal default implementation, we recommend pseudo-continuous labeling, background suppression, a segmented three-dimensional readout without vascular crushing gradients, and calculation and presentation of both label/control difference images and cerebral blood flow in absolute units using a simplified model.

  1. Arterial spin labeling perfusion predicts longitudinal decline in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    Olm, Christopher A; Kandel, Benjamin M; Avants, Brian B; Detre, John A; Gee, James C; Grossman, Murray; McMillan, Corey T

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the prognostic value of regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured by arterial spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI in patients with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA). We acquired pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) MRI and whole-brain T1-weighted structural MRI in svPPA patients (N = 13) with cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers consistent with frontotemporal lobar degeneration pathology. Follow-up T1-weighted MRI was available in a subset of patients (N = 8). We performed whole-brain comparisons of partial volume-corrected CBF and cortical thickness between svPPA and controls, and compared baseline and follow-up cortical thickness in regions of significant hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion. Patients with svPPA showed partial volume-corrected hypoperfusion relative to controls in left temporal lobe and insula. svPPA patients also had typical cortical thinning in anterior temporal, insula, and inferior frontal regions at baseline. Volume-corrected hypoperfusion was seen in areas of significant cortical thinning such as the left temporal lobe and insula. Additional regions of hypoperfusion corresponded to areas without cortical thinning. We also observed regions of hyperperfusion, some associated with cortical thinning and others without cortical thinning, including right superior temporal, inferior parietal, and orbitofrontal cortices. Regions of hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion near cortical thinning at baseline had significant longitudinal thinning between baseline and follow-up scans, but perfusion changes in distant areas did not show progressive thinning. Our findings suggest ASL MRI may be sensitive to functional changes not readily apparent in structural MRI, and specific changes in perfusion may be prognostic markers of disease progression in a manner consistent with cell-to-cell spreading pathology.

  2. Increased SNR Efficiency in Velocity Selective Arterial Spin Labeling using Multiple Velocity Selective Saturation Modules (mm-VSASL)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Wong, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Velocity-selective arterial spin labeling (VSASL) is theoretically insensitive to transit delay (TD) effects. However, it uses saturation instead of inversion, resulting in compromised signal to noise ratio (SNR). In this study we explore the use of multiple velocity-selective saturation (VSS) modules in VSASL (mm-VSASL) to improve SNR. Methods Theoretical SNR efficiency improvement and optimized parameters were calculated from simulations for mm-VSASL. VSASL with two VSS modules (VSASL-2VSS) was implemented to measure cerebral blood flow in vivo, compared with conventional VSASL (VSASL-1VSS), Pulsed ASL and Pseudo-Continuous ASL. TDs and bolus durations (BDs) were measured to validate the simulations and to examine the TD sensitivity of these preparations. Results Compared with VSASL-1VSS, VSASL-2VSS achieved a significant improvement of SNR (22.1 ± 1.9%, P = 1.7 × 10−6) in vivo, consistent with a 22.7% improvement predicted from simulations. The SNR was comparable to or higher (in GM, P = 4.3 × 10−3) than that using PCASL. VSASL was experimentally verified to have minimal TD effects. Conclusion Utilizing multiple VSS modules can improve the SNR efficiency of VSASL. Mm-VSASL may result in an SNR that is comparable to or even higher than that of PCASL in applications where long PLDs are required. PMID:25251933

  3. Robust method for 3D arterial spin labeling in mice.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Brige Paul; Bishop, Jonathan; Zhou, Yu-Qing; Wu, Jian; Henkelman, R Mark; Sled, John G

    2012-07-01

    Arterial spin labeling is a versatile perfusion quantification methodology, which has the potential to provide accurate characterization of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in mouse models. However, a paucity of physiological data needed for accurate modeling, more stringent requirements for gradient performance, and strong artifacts introduced by magnetization transfer present special challenges for accurate CBF mapping in the mouse. This article describes robust mapping of CBF over three-dimensional brain regions using amplitude-modulated continuous arterial spin labeling. To provide physiological data for CBF modeling, the carotid artery blood velocity distribution was characterized using pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound. These blood velocity measurements were used in simulations that optimize inversion efficiency for parameters meeting MRI gradient duty cycle constraints. A rapid slice positioning algorithm was developed and evaluated to provide accurate positioning of the labeling plane. To account for enhancement of T(1) due to magnetization transfer, a binary spin bath model of magnetization transfer was used to provide a more accurate estimate of CBF. Finally, a study of CBF was conducted on 10 mice with findings of highly reproducible inversion efficiency (mean ± standard-error-of-the-mean, 0.67 ± 0.03), statistically significant variation in CBF over 12 brain regions (P < 0.0001) and a mean ± standard-error-of-the-mean whole brain CBF of 219 ± 6 mL/100 g/min.

  4. Noise Reduction in Arterial Spin Labeling Based Functional Connectivity Using Nuisance Variables.

    PubMed

    Jann, Kay; Smith, Robert X; Rios Piedra, Edgar A; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2016-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion image series have recently been utilized for functional connectivity (FC) analysis in healthy volunteers and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Noise reduction by using nuisance variables has been shown to be necessary to minimize potential confounding effects of head motion and physiological signals on BOLD based FC analysis. The purpose of the present study is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of different noise reduction strategies (NRS) using nuisance variables to improve perfusion based FC analysis in two cohorts of healthy adults using state of the art 3D background-suppressed (BS) GRASE pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) and dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL sequences. Five different NRS were performed in healthy volunteers to compare their performance. We then compared seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in a cohort of 12 children with ASD (3f/9m, age 12.8 ± 1.3 years) and 13 typically developing (TD) children (1f/12m; age 13.9 ± 3 years) in conjunction with NRS. Regression of different combinations of nuisance variables affected FC analysis from a seed in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to other areas of the default mode network (DMN) in both BOLD and pCASL data sets. Consistent with existing literature on BOLD-FC, we observed improved spatial specificity after physiological noise reduction and improved long-range connectivity using head movement related regressors. Furthermore, 3D BS GRASE pCASL shows much higher temporal SNR compared to dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL and similar effects of noise reduction as those observed for BOLD. Seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in children with ASD and TD children showed that noise reduction including physiological and motion related signals as nuisance variables is crucial for identifying altered long-range connectivity from PCC to frontal brain areas associated with ASD. This is the first study that systematically evaluated the effects of

  5. Noise Reduction in Arterial Spin Labeling Based Functional Connectivity Using Nuisance Variables

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Kay; Smith, Robert X.; Rios Piedra, Edgar A.; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion image series have recently been utilized for functional connectivity (FC) analysis in healthy volunteers and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Noise reduction by using nuisance variables has been shown to be necessary to minimize potential confounding effects of head motion and physiological signals on BOLD based FC analysis. The purpose of the present study is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of different noise reduction strategies (NRS) using nuisance variables to improve perfusion based FC analysis in two cohorts of healthy adults using state of the art 3D background-suppressed (BS) GRASE pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) and dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL sequences. Five different NRS were performed in healthy volunteers to compare their performance. We then compared seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in a cohort of 12 children with ASD (3f/9m, age 12.8 ± 1.3 years) and 13 typically developing (TD) children (1f/12m; age 13.9 ± 3 years) in conjunction with NRS. Regression of different combinations of nuisance variables affected FC analysis from a seed in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to other areas of the default mode network (DMN) in both BOLD and pCASL data sets. Consistent with existing literature on BOLD-FC, we observed improved spatial specificity after physiological noise reduction and improved long-range connectivity using head movement related regressors. Furthermore, 3D BS GRASE pCASL shows much higher temporal SNR compared to dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL and similar effects of noise reduction as those observed for BOLD. Seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in children with ASD and TD children showed that noise reduction including physiological and motion related signals as nuisance variables is crucial for identifying altered long-range connectivity from PCC to frontal brain areas associated with ASD. This is the first study that systematically evaluated the effects of

  6. [Clinical applications of arterial spin labeling technique in brain diseases].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zheng, Gang; Zhao, Tiezhu; Guo, Chao; Li, Lin; Lu, Guangming

    2013-02-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique is a kind of perfusion functional magnetic resonance imaging method that is based on endogenous contrast, and it can measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) noninvasively. The ASL technique has advantages of noninvasiveness, simplicity and relatively lower costs so that it is more suitable for longitudinal studies compared with previous perfusion methods, such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), CT and the contrast agent based magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. This paper mainly discusses the current clinical applications of ASL in brain diseases as cerebrovascular diseases, brain tumors, Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy, etc.

  7. Impact of pseudo-continuous fermentation on the ethanol tolerance of Scheffersomyces stipitis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Meng; Kim, Min Hea; He, Qinghua Peter; Wang, Jin

    2013-09-01

    In this work we conducted the pseudo-continuous fermentation, i.e., continuous fermentation with cell retention, using Scheffersomyces stipitis, and studied its effect on ethanol tolerance of the strain. During the fermentation experiments, S. stipitis was adapted to a mild concentration of ethanol (20-26 g/L) for two weeks. Two substrates (glucose and xylose) were used in different fermentation experiments. After fermentation, various experiments were performed to evaluate the ethanol tolerance of adapted cells and unadapted cells. Compared to the unadapted cells, the viability of adapted cells increased by 8 folds with glucose as the carbon source and 6 folds with xylose as the carbon source following exposure to 60 g/L ethanol for 2 h. Improved ethanol tolerance of the adapted cells was also revealed in the effects of ethanol on plasma membrane permeability, extracellular alkalization and acidification. The mathematical modeling of cell leakage, extracellular alkalization and acidification revealed that cells cultured on glucose show better ethanol tolerance than cells cultured on xylose but the differences become smaller for adapted cells. The results show that pseudo-continuous fermentation can effectively improve cell's ethanol tolerance due to the environmental pressure during the fermentation process.

  8. Hepatic arterial spin labelling MRI: an initial evaluation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ramasawmy, R; Campbell-Washburn, A E; Wells, J A; Johnson, S P; Pedley, R B; Walker-Samuel, S; Lythgoe, M F

    2015-01-01

    The development of strategies to combat hepatic disease and augment tissue regeneration has created a need for methods to assess regional liver function. Liver perfusion imaging has the potential to fulfil this need, across a range of hepatic diseases, alongside the assessment of therapeutic response. In this study, the feasibility of hepatic arterial spin labelling (HASL) was assessed for the first time in mice at 9.4 T, its variability and repeatability were evaluated, and it was applied to a model of colorectal liver metastasis. Data were acquired using flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery-arterial spin labelling (FAIR-ASL) with a Look–Locker readout, and analysed using retrospective respiratory gating and a T1-based quantification. This study shows that preclinical HASL is feasible and exhibits good repeatability and reproducibility. Mean estimated liver perfusion was 2.2 ± 0.8 mL/g/min (mean ± standard error, n = 10), which agrees well with previous measurements using invasive approaches. Estimates of the variation gave a within-session coefficient of variation (CVWS) of 7%, a between-session coefficient of variation (CVBS) of 9% and a between-animal coefficient of variation (CVA) of 15%. The within-session Bland–Altman repeatability coefficient (RCWS) was 18% and the between-session repeatability coefficient (RCBS) was 29%. Finally, the HASL method was applied to a mouse model of liver metastasis, in which significantly lower mean perfusion (1.1 ± 0.5 mL/g/min, n = 6) was measured within the tumours, as seen by fluorescence histology. These data indicate that precise and accurate liver perfusion estimates can be achieved using ASL techniques, and provide a platform for future studies investigating hepatic perfusion in mouse models of disease. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25522098

  9. Using arterial spin labeling to examine mood states in youth

    PubMed Central

    Mikita, Nina; Mehta, Mitul A; Zelaya, Fernando O; Stringaris, Argyris

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about the neural correlates of mood states and the specific physiological changes associated with their valence and duration, especially in young people. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) imaging is particularly well-suited to study sustained cerebral states in young people, due to its robustness to low-frequency drift, excellent interscan reliability, and noninvasiveness. Yet, it has so far been underutilized for understanding the neural mechanisms underlying mood states in youth. Methods In this exploratory study, 21 healthy adolescents aged 16 to 18 took part in a mood induction experiment. Neutral, sad, and happy mood states were induced using film clips and explicit instructions. An ASL scan was obtained following presentation of each film clip. Results Mood induction led to robust changes in self-reported mood ratings. Compared to neutral, sad mood was associated with increased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the left middle frontal gyrus and anterior prefrontal cortex, and decreased rCBF in the right middle frontal gyrus and the inferior parietal lobule. A decrease in self-reported mood from neutral to sad condition was associated with increased rCBF in the precuneus. Happy mood was associated with increased rCBF in medial frontal and cingulate gyri, the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, and ventral striatum, and decreased rCBF in the inferior parietal lobule. The level of current self-reported depressive symptoms was negatively associated with rCBF change in the cerebellum and lingual gyrus following both sad and happy mood inductions. Conclusions Arterial spin labeling is sensitive to experimentally induced mood changes in healthy young people. The effects of happy mood on rCBF patterns were generally stronger than the effects of sad mood. PMID:26085964

  10. Bolus-tracking arterial spin labelling: theoretical and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, M. E.; Blau, C. W.; Kerskens, C. M.

    2009-03-01

    Arterial spin labelling (ASL) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that can be used to provide a quantitative assessment of cerebral perfusion. Despite the development of a number of theoretical models to facilitate quantitative ASL, some key challenges still remain. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel quantitative ASL method based on a macroscopic model that reduces the number of variables required to describe the physiological processes involved. To this end, a novel Fokker-Planck equation consisting of stochastically varying macroscopic variables was derived from a general Langevin equation. ASL data from the rat brain was acquired using a bolus-tracking ASL protocol where a bolus of labelled spins flowing from an inversion plane in the neck into an imaging plane in the brain can be observed. Bolus durations of 1.5 s, 2.0 s and 3.0 s were used and the solution to the Fokker-Planck equation for the boundary conditions of bolus-tracking ASL was fitted to the experimental data using a least-squares fit. The mean transit time (MTT) and capillary transit time (CTT) were calculated from the first and second moments of the resultant curve respectively and the arterial transit time (ATT) was calculated by subtracting the CTT from the MTT. The average MTT, CTT and ATT values were 1.75 ± 0.22 s, 1.43 ± 0.12 s and 0.32 ± 0.04 s respectively. In conclusion, a new ASL protocol has been developed by combining the theoretical model with ASL experiments. The technique has the unique ability to provide solutions for varying bolus volumes and the generality of the new model is demonstrated by the derivation of additional solutions for the continuous and pulsed ASL (CASL and PASL) techniques.

  11. Tonotopic maps in human auditory cortex using arterial spin labeling

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Dimo; Havlicek, Martin; Formisano, Elia; Uludağ, Kâmil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A tonotopic organization of the human auditory cortex (AC) has been reliably found by neuroimaging studies. However, a full characterization and parcellation of the AC is still lacking. In this study, we employed pseudo‐continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) to map tonotopy and voice selective regions using, for the first time, cerebral blood flow (CBF). We demonstrated the feasibility of CBF‐based tonotopy and found a good agreement with BOLD signal‐based tonotopy, despite the lower contrast‐to‐noise ratio of CBF. Quantitative perfusion mapping of baseline CBF showed a region of high perfusion centered on Heschl's gyrus and corresponding to the main high‐low‐high frequency gradients, co‐located to the presumed primary auditory core and suggesting baseline CBF as a novel marker for AC parcellation. Furthermore, susceptibility weighted imaging was employed to investigate the tissue specificity of CBF and BOLD signal and the possible venous bias of BOLD‐based tonotopy. For BOLD only active voxels, we found a higher percentage of vein contamination than for CBF only active voxels. Taken together, we demonstrated that both baseline and stimulus‐induced CBF is an alternative fMRI approach to the standard BOLD signal to study auditory processing and delineate the functional organization of the auditory cortex. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1140–1154, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27790786

  12. Characterizing Resting-State Brain Function Using Arterial Spin Labeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, J Jean; Jann, Kay; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-11-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an increasingly established magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that is finding broader applications in studying the healthy and diseased brain. This review addresses the use of ASL to assess brain function in the resting state. Following a brief technical description, we discuss the use of ASL in the following main categories: (1) resting-state functional connectivity (FC) measurement: the use of ASL-based cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements as an alternative to the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) technique to assess resting-state FC; (2) the link between network CBF and FC measurements: the use of network CBF as a surrogate of the metabolic activity within corresponding networks; and (3) the study of resting-state dynamic CBF-BOLD coupling and cerebral metabolism: the use of dynamic CBF information obtained using ASL to assess dynamic CBF-BOLD coupling and oxidative metabolism in the resting state. In addition, we summarize some future challenges and interesting research directions for ASL, including slice-accelerated (multiband) imaging as well as the effects of motion and other physiological confounds on perfusion-based FC measurement. In summary, this work reviews the state-of-the-art of ASL and establishes it as an increasingly viable MRI technique with high translational value in studying resting-state brain function.

  13. Diagnostic Potential of Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Trebeschi, Stefano; Riederer, Isabelle; Preibisch, Christine; Bohn, Karl P.; Förster, Stefan; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Zimmer, Claus; Kirschke, Jan S.; Valentinitsch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimers disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. Although the underlying pathology is still not completely understood, several diagnostic methods are available. Frequently, the most accurate methods are also the most invasive. The present work investigates the diagnostic potential of Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling (PASL) for AD: a non-invasive, MRI-based technique for the quantification of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). In particular, we propose a pilot computer aided diagnostic (CAD) procedure able to discriminate between healthy and diseased subjects, and at the same time, providing visual informative results. This method encompasses the creation of a healthy model, the computation of a voxel-wise likelihood function as comparison between the healthy model and the subject under examination, and the correction of the likelihood function via prior distributions. The discriminant analysis is carried out to maximize the accuracy of the classification. The algorithm has been trained on a dataset of 81 subjects and achieved a sensitivity of 0.750 and a specificity of 0.875. Moreover, in accordance with the current pathological knowledge, the parietal lobe, and limbic system are shown to be the main discriminant factors. PMID:27147946

  14. Clinical utility of arterial spin-labeling as a confirmatory test for suspected brain death.

    PubMed

    Kang, K M; Yun, T J; Yoon, B-W; Jeon, B S; Choi, S H; Kim, J-H; Kim, J E; Sohn, C-H; Han, M H

    2015-05-01

    Diagnosis of brain death is made on the basis of 3 essential findings: coma, absence of brain stem reflexes, and apnea. Although confirmatory tests are not mandatory in most situations, additional testing may be necessary to declare brain death in patients in whom results of specific components of clinical testing cannot be reliably evaluated. Recently, arterial spin-labeling has been incorporated as part of MR imaging to evaluate cerebral perfusion. Advantages of arterial spin-labeling include being completely noninvasive and providing information about absolute CBF. We retrospectively reviewed arterial spin-labeling findings according to the following modified criteria based on previously established confirmatory tests to determine brain death: 1) extremely decreased perfusion in the whole brain, 2) bright vessel signal intensity around the entry of the carotid artery to the skull, 3) patent external carotid circulation, and 4) "hollow skull sign" in a series of 5 patients. Arterial spin-labeling findings satisfied the criteria for brain death in all patients. Arterial spin-labeling imaging has the potential to be a completely noninvasive confirmatory test to provide additional information to assist in the diagnosis of brain death.

  15. Characterizing pulmonary blood flow distribution measured using arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Henderson, A Cortney; Prisk, G Kim; Levin, David L; Hopkins, Susan R; Buxton, Richard B

    2009-12-01

    The arterial spin labeling (ASL) method provides images in which, ideally, the signal intensity of each image voxel is proportional to the local perfusion. For studies of pulmonary perfusion, the relative dispersion (RD, standard deviation/mean) of the ASL signal across a lung section is used as a reliable measure of flow heterogeneity. However, the RD of the ASL signals within the lung may systematically differ from the true RD of perfusion because the ASL image also includes signals from larger vessels, which can reflect the blood volume rather than blood flow if the vessels are filled with tagged blood during the imaging time. Theoretical studies suggest that the pulmonary vasculature exhibits a lognormal distribution for blood flow and thus an appropriate measure of heterogeneity is the geometric standard deviation (GSD). To test whether the ASL signal exhibits a lognormal distribution for pulmonary blood flow, determine whether larger vessels play an important role in the distribution, and extract physiologically relevant measures of heterogeneity from the ASL signal, we quantified the ASL signal before and after an intervention (head-down tilt) in six subjects. The distribution of ASL signal was better characterized by a lognormal distribution than a normal distribution, reducing the mean squared error by 72% (p < 0.005). Head-down tilt significantly reduced the lognormal scale parameter (p = 0.01) but not the shape parameter or GSD. The RD increased post-tilt and remained significantly elevated (by 17%, p < 0.05). Test case results and mathematical simulations suggest that RD is more sensitive than the GSD to ASL signal from tagged blood in larger vessels, a probable explanation of the change in RD without a statistically significant change in GSD. This suggests that the GSD is a useful measure of pulmonary blood flow heterogeneity with the advantage of being less affected by the ASL signal from tagged blood in larger vessels.

  16. Arterial spin labelling reveals prolonged arterial arrival time in idiopathic Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bachari, Sarah; Parkes, Laura M.; Vidyasagar, Rishma; Hanby, Martha F.; Tharaken, Vivek; Leroi, Iracema; Emsley, Hedley C.A.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, yet effective disease modifying treatments are still lacking. Neurodegeneration involves multiple interacting pathological pathways. The extent to which neurovascular mechanisms are involved is not well defined in IPD. We aimed to determine whether novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, including arterial spin labelling (ASL) quantification of cerebral perfusion, can reveal altered neurovascular status (NVS) in IPD. Fourteen participants with IPD (mean ± SD age 65.1 ± 5.9 years) and 14 age and cardiovascular risk factor matched control participants (mean ± SD age 64.6 ± 4.2 years) underwent a 3T MRI scan protocol. ASL images were collected before, during and after a 6 minute hypercapnic challenge. FLAIR images were used to determine white matter lesion score. Quantitative images of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and arterial arrival time (AAT) were calculated from the ASL data both at rest and during hypercapnia. Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) images were calculated, depicting the change in CBF and AAT relative to the change in end-tidal CO2. A significant (p = 0.005) increase in whole brain averaged baseline AAT was observed in IPD participants (mean ± SD age 1532 ± 138 ms) compared to controls (mean ± SD age 1335 ± 165 ms). Voxel-wise analysis revealed this to be widespread across the brain. However, there were no statistically significant differences in white matter lesion score, CBF, or CVR between patients and controls. Regional CBF, but not AAT, in the IPD group was found to correlate positively with Montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA) scores. These findings provide further evidence of alterations in NVS in IPD. PMID:25379411

  17. Arterial spin labeling imaging reveals widespread and Aβ-independent reductions in cerebral blood flow in elderly apolipoprotein epsilon-4 carriers.

    PubMed

    Michels, Lars; Warnock, Geoffrey; Buck, Alfred; Macauda, Gianluca; Leh, Sandra E; Kaelin, Andrea M; Riese, Florian; Meyer, Rafael; O'Gorman, Ruth; Hock, Christoph; Kollias, Spyros; Gietl, Anton F

    2016-03-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow are an essential feature of Alzheimer's disease and have been linked to apolipoprotein E-genotype and cerebral amyloid-deposition. These factors could be interdependent or influence cerebral blood flow via different mechanisms. We examined apolipoprotein E-genotype, amyloid beta-deposition, and cerebral blood flow in amnestic mild cognitive impairment using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling MRI in 27 cognitively normal elderly and 16 amnestic mild cognitive impairment participants. Subjects underwent Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) positron emission tomography and apolipoprotein E-genotyping. Global cerebral blood flow was lower in apolipoprotein E ɛ4-allele carriers (apolipoprotein E4+) than in apolipoprotein E4- across all subjects (including cognitively normal participants) and within the group of cognitively normal elderly. Global cerebral blood flow was lower in subjects with mild cognitive impairment compared with cognitively normal. Subjects with elevated cerebral amyloid-deposition (PiB+) showed a trend for lower global cerebral blood flow. Apolipoprotein E-status exerted the strongest effect on global cerebral blood flow. Regional analysis indicated that local cerebral blood flow reductions were more widespread for the contrasts apolipoprotein E4+ versus apolipoprotein E4- compared with the contrasts PiB+ versus PiB- or mild cognitive impairment versus cognitively normal. These findings suggest that apolipoprotein E-genotype exerts its impact on cerebral blood flow at least partly independently from amyloid beta-deposition, suggesting that apolipoprotein E also contributes to cerebral blood flow changes outside the context of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Arterial spin labeling imaging reveals widespread and Aβ-independent reductions in cerebral blood flow in elderly apolipoprotein epsilon-4 carriers

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, Geoffrey; Buck, Alfred; Macauda, Gianluca; Leh, Sandra E; Kaelin, Andrea M; Riese, Florian; Meyer, Rafael; O’Gorman, Ruth; Hock, Christoph; Kollias, Spyros; Gietl, Anton F

    2015-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow are an essential feature of Alzheimer’s disease and have been linked to apolipoprotein E-genotype and cerebral amyloid-deposition. These factors could be interdependent or influence cerebral blood flow via different mechanisms. We examined apolipoprotein E-genotype, amyloid beta-deposition, and cerebral blood flow in amnestic mild cognitive impairment using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling MRI in 27 cognitively normal elderly and 16 amnestic mild cognitive impairment participants. Subjects underwent Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) positron emission tomography and apolipoprotein E-genotyping. Global cerebral blood flow was lower in apolipoprotein E ɛ4-allele carriers (apolipoprotein E4+) than in apolipoprotein E4− across all subjects (including cognitively normal participants) and within the group of cognitively normal elderly. Global cerebral blood flow was lower in subjects with mild cognitive impairment compared with cognitively normal. Subjects with elevated cerebral amyloid-deposition (PiB+) showed a trend for lower global cerebral blood flow. Apolipoprotein E-status exerted the strongest effect on global cerebral blood flow. Regional analysis indicated that local cerebral blood flow reductions were more widespread for the contrasts apolipoprotein E4+ versus apolipoprotein E4− compared with the contrasts PiB+ versus PiB− or mild cognitive impairment versus cognitively normal. These findings suggest that apolipoprotein E-genotype exerts its impact on cerebral blood flow at least partly independently from amyloid beta-deposition, suggesting that apolipoprotein E also contributes to cerebral blood flow changes outside the context of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26661143

  19. Changes in cerebral blood flow and vasoreactivity to CO2 measured by arterial spin labeling after 6days at 4350m.

    PubMed

    Villien, Marjorie; Bouzat, Pierre; Rupp, Thomas; Robach, Paul; Lamalle, Laurent; Troprès, Irène; Estève, François; Krainik, Alexandre; Lévy, Patrick; Warnking, Jan M; Verges, Samuel

    2013-05-15

    Changes in cerebral perfusion and CO2 cerebrovascular reactivity during and immediately after a sojourn at high altitude remain unclear but may be critical for acclimatization. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of 6days at 4350m on cerebral perfusion and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) to CO2 by arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging at sea level and to compare it with transcranial Doppler (TCD) results at altitude. Eleven healthy male subjects, non-acclimatized to altitude, stayed for 6days at 4350m (Observatoire Vallot, massif du Mont-Blanc). Prior to the stay and within 6h after returning to sea level, subjects were investigated using pseudo-continuous ASL at 3T during a block-design inhalation paradigm to measure basal cerebral blood flow (CBF) and CO2 CVR. End-tidal CO2 (PetCO2), respiratory rate, heart rate and oxygen saturation were recorded during the exam. Subjects were also examined using TCD prior to and on day 5 of the stay at altitude to measure blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCAv) and CO2 CVR. CO2 CVR was expressed as percent change in ASL CBF or TCD MCAv per mmHg change in PetCO2. PetCO2 was significantly decreased during and after altitude. Significant increases in TCD MCAv compared to before altitude measurements were observed on day 5 at altitude (+20.5±15.5%). Interestingly, ASL CBF remained increased in the MCA and anterior vascular territories (+22.0±24.1% and 20.5±20.3%, respectively) after altitude under normoxic conditions. TCD CVR tended to decrease on day 5 at 4350m (-12.3±54.5% in the MCA) while the ASL CVR was significantly decreased after altitude (-29.5±19.8% in the MCA). No correlation was observed between cerebral hemodynamic changes and symptoms of acute mountain sickness at high altitude. In conclusion, prolonged exposure to high altitude significantly increases blood flow during the altitude stay and within 6h after returning to sea level. Decreased CO2 CVR after prolonged

  20. Choroid Plexus Neoplasms: Toward a Distinction between Carcinoma and Papilloma Using Arterial Spin-Labeling.

    PubMed

    Dangouloff-Ros, V; Grevent, D; Pagès, M; Blauwblomme, T; Calmon, R; Elie, C; Puget, S; Sainte-Rose, C; Brunelle, F; Varlet, P; Boddaert, N

    2015-09-01

    Pediatric choroid plexus papillomas and carcinomas are highly vascularized neoplasms, which are difficult to distinguish with conventional imaging. We aimed to analyze the diagnostic accuracy of PWI, by using both pseudocontinuous arterial spin-labeling and DSC-PWI. We reviewed the PWI of 13 children with choroid plexus neoplasms (7 papillomas and 6 carcinomas). We quantified CBF, relative CBF, and relative CBV in each lesion and compared papillomas and carcinomas. Relative CBF values by using arterial spin-labeling were significantly higher for carcinomas (P = .028). The median value of relative CBF was 1.7 (range, 1.4-1.9) for carcinomas and 0.4 (range, 0.3-0.6) for papillomas. The CBF median value was 115 mL/min/100 g (range, 90-140 mL/min/100 g) for carcinomas and 41 mL/min/100 g (range, 10-73 mL/min/100 g) for papillomas (P = .056). Measures with DSC-PWI were more variable and not significantly different (P = .393). Arterial spin-labeling is a promising technique to differentiate choroid plexus carcinomas and papillomas.

  1. Arterial Spin Label Imaging of Acute Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Zaharchuk, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Since acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) are fundamentally disruptions of brain hemodynamics, neuroimaging of brain perfusion might be expected to be of clinical utility. Recently, a noncontrast method of measuring CBF using arterial spin labeling (ASL) has become feasible in the clinical setting. It has advantages when compared to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) bolus contrast perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) that include lack of exposure to gadolinium-based contrast materials, improved quantitation, and decreased sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts and motion. Drawbacks of ASL include reduced signal-to-noise (SNR) and high sensitivity to arterial transit delays. While deleterious for quantitative perfusion measurements, the sensitivity of ASL to late arriving blood can be beneficial to visualize collateral flow. This chapter will discuss ASL imaging findings in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke and TIA, focusing on typical appearances, common artifacts, and comparisons with bolus contrast PWI. PMID:21640300

  2. Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) fMRI: Advantages, Theoretical Constrains and Experimental Challenges in Neurosciences

    PubMed Central

    Borogovac, Ajna; Asllani, Iris

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is a well-established correlate of brain function and therefore an essential parameter for studying the brain at both normal and diseased states. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a noninvasive fMRI technique that uses arterial water as an endogenous tracer to measure CBF. ASL provides reliable absolute quantification of CBF with higher spatial and temporal resolution than other techniques. And yet, the routine application of ASL has been somewhat limited. In this review, we start by highlighting theoretical complexities and technical challenges of ASL fMRI for basic and clinical research. While underscoring the main advantages of ASL versus other techniques such as BOLD, we also expound on inherent challenges and confounds in ASL perfusion imaging. In closing, we expound on several exciting developments in the field that we believe will make ASL reach its full potential in neuroscience research. PMID:22966219

  3. Comparison of gradient echo with spin echo magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography in the evaluation of major aortopulmonary collateral arteries.

    PubMed

    Vick, G W; Wendt, R E; Rokey, R

    1994-05-01

    This study compared gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging, spin echo magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, and echocardiography with x-ray cineangiography in the evaluation of major aortopulmonary collateral arteries. Twelve patients (ages 9 months to 35 years, mean 11 +/- 11 years) with known or suspected major aortopulmonary collateral arteries were studied. The aortic insertion and proximal course of 29 major aortopulmonary collateral arteries demonstrated by x-ray contrast angiography were shown in all 29 cases by gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging but in only 23 of the 29 cases by spin echo magnetic resonance imaging. Color Doppler-echocardiography detected aortopulmonary collateral arteries in four patients but did not define the proximal course or distal anatomy. Gradient echo images of distal aortopulmonary collateral anatomy were qualitatively superior to spin echo images. The contrast-to-noise ratio between the vessel lumen and adjacent lung was greater for gradient echo (6.06 +/- 2.91) than for spin echo (1.45 +/- 1.13)(p < 0.05). Gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging is a useful method for identification and characterization of aortopulmonary collateral arteries in patients of all ages and is superior to spin echo magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography.

  4. Additive global cerebral blood flow normalization in arterial spin labeling perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Stephanie B; Koller, Jonathan M; Campbell, Meghan C; Perlmutter, Joel S; Black, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    To determine how different methods of normalizing for global cerebral blood flow (gCBF) affect image quality and sensitivity to cortical activation, pulsed arterial spin labeling (pASL) scans obtained during a visual task were normalized by either additive or multiplicative normalization of modal gCBF. Normalization by either method increased the statistical significance of cortical activation by a visual stimulus. However, image quality was superior with additive normalization, whether judged by intensity histograms or by reduced variability within gray and white matter.

  5. Detection of crossed cerebellar diaschisis in hyperacute ischemic stroke using arterial spin-labeled MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Koung Mi; Sohn, Chul-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Arterial spin-labeling (ASL) was recently introduced as a noninvasive method to evaluate cerebral hemodynamics. The purposes of this study were to assess the ability of ASL imaging to detect crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) in patients with their first unilateral supratentorial hyperacute stroke and to identify imaging or clinical factors significantly associated with CCD. Materials and methods We reviewed 204 consecutive patients who underwent MRI less than 8 hours after the onset of stroke symptoms. The inclusion criteria were supratentorial abnormality in diffusion-weighted images in the absence of a cerebellar or brain stem lesion, bilateral supratentorial infarction, subacute or chronic infarction, and MR angiography showing vertebrobasilar system disease. For qualitative analysis, asymmetric cerebellar hypoperfusion in ASL images was categorized into 3 grades. Quantitative analysis was performed to calculate the asymmetric index (AI). The patients’ demographic and clinical features and outcomes were recorded. Univariate and multivariate analyses were also performed. Results A total of 32 patients met the inclusion criteria, and 24 (75%) presented CCD. Univariate analyses revealed more frequent arterial occlusions, higher diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) lesion volumes and higher initial NIHSS and mRS scores in the CCD-positive group compared with the CCD-negative group (all p < .05). The presence of arterial occlusion and the initial mRS scores were related with the AI (all p < .05). Multivariate analyses revealed that arterial occlusion and the initial mRS scores were significantly associated with CCD and AI. Conclusion ASL imaging could detect CCD in 75% of patients with hyperacute infarction. We found that CCD was more prevalent in patients with arterial occlusion, larger ischemic brain volumes, and higher initial NIHSS and mRS scores. In particular, vessel occlusion and initial mRS score appeared to be significantly related

  6. Sickle cell anemia: reference values of cerebral blood flow determined by continuous arterial spin labeling MRI.

    PubMed

    Arkuszewski, M; Krejza, J; Chen, R; Melhem, E R

    2013-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a chronic illness associated with progressive deterioration in patients' quality of life. The major complications of SCA are cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) such as asymptomatic cerebral infarct or overt stroke. The risk of CVA may be related to chronic disturbances in cerebral blood flow (CBF), but the thresholds of "normal" steady-state CBF are not well established. The reference tolerance limits of CBF can be useful to estimate the risk of CVA in asymptomatic children with SCA, who are negative for hyperemia or evidence of arterial narrowing. Continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) MR perfusion allows for non-invasive quantification of global and regional CBF. To establish such reference tolerance limits we performed CASL MR examinations on a 3-Tesla MR scanner in a carefully selected cohort of 42 children with SCA (mean age, 8.1±3.3 years; range limits, 2.3-14.4 years; 24 females), who were not on chronic transfusion therapy, had no history of overt stroke or transient ischemic attack, were free of signs and symptoms of focal vascular territory ischemic brain injury, did not have intracranial arterial narrowing on MR angiography and were at low risk for stroke as determined by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography.

  7. Reduction in cerebral perfusion after heroin administration: a resting state arterial spin labeling study.

    PubMed

    Denier, Niklaus; Gerber, Hana; Vogel, Marc; Klarhöfer, Markus; Riecher-Rossler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Lang, Undine E; Borgwardt, Stefan; Walter, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Heroin dependence is a chronic relapsing brain disorder, characterized by the compulsion to seek and use heroin. Heroin itself has a strong potential to produce subjective experiences characterized by intense euphoria, relaxation and release from craving. The neurofunctional foundations of these perceived effects are not well known. In this study, we have used pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) in 15 heroin-dependent patients from a stable heroin-assisted treatment program to observe the steady state effects of heroin (60 min after administration). Patients were scanned in a cross-over and placebo controlled design. They received an injection of their regular dose of heroin or saline (placebo) before or after the scan. As phMRI method, we used a pulsed arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequence based on a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) spin labeling scheme combined with a single-shot 3D GRASE (gradient-spin echo) readout on a 3 Tesla scanner. Analysis was performed with Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM 8), using a general linear model for whole brain comparison between the heroin and placebo conditions. We found that compared to placebo, heroin was associated with reduced perfusion in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), the left medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and in the insula (both hemispheres). Analysis of extracted perfusion values indicate strong effect sizes and no gender related differences. Reduced perfusion in these brain areas may indicate self- and emotional regulation effects of heroin in maintenance treatment.

  8. Measurement of vascular water transport in human subjects using time-resolved pulsed arterial spin labelling.

    PubMed

    Bibic, Adnan; Knutsson, Linda; Schmidt, Anders; Henningsson, Erik; Månsson, Sven; Abul-Kasim, Kasim; Åkeson, Jonas; Gunther, Matthias; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Wirestam, Ronnie

    2015-08-01

    Most approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) data analysis aim to provide a quantitative measure of the cerebral blood flow (CBF). This study, however, focuses on the measurement of the transfer time of blood water through the capillaries to the parenchyma (referred to as the capillary transfer time, CTT) as an alternative parameter to characterise the haemodynamics of the system. The method employed is based on a non-compartmental model, and no measurements need to be added to a common time-resolved ASL experiment. Brownian motion of labelled spins in a potential was described by a one-dimensional general Langevin equation as the starting point, and as a Fokker-Planck differential equation for the averaged distribution of labelled spins at the end point, which takes into account the effects of flow and dispersion of labelled water by the pseudorandom nature of the microvasculature and the transcapillary permeability. Multi-inversion time (multi-TI) ASL data were acquired in 14 healthy subjects on two occasions in a test-retest design, using a pulsed ASL sequence and three-dimensional gradient and spin echo (3D-GRASE) readout. Based on an error analysis to predict the size of a region of interest (ROI) required to obtain reasonably precise parameter estimates, data were analysed in two relatively large ROIs, i.e. the occipital lobe (OC) and the insular cortex (IC). The average values of CTT in OC were 260 ± 60 ms in the first experiment and 270 ± 60 ms in the second experiment. The corresponding IC values were 460 ± 130 ms and 420 ± 139 ms, respectively. Information related to the water transfer time may be important for diagnostics and follow-up of cerebral conditions or diseases characterised by a disrupted blood-brain barrier or disturbed capillary blood flow.

  9. Comparing model-based and model-free analysis methods for QUASAR arterial spin labeling perfusion quantification.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Michael A; Woolrich, Mark W; Petersen, Esben T; Golay, Xavier; Payne, Stephen J

    2013-05-01

    Amongst the various implementations of arterial spin labeling MRI methods for quantifying cerebral perfusion, the QUASAR method is unique. By using a combination of labeling with and without flow suppression gradients, the QUASAR method offers the separation of macrovascular and tissue signals. This permits local arterial input functions to be defined and "model-free" analysis, using numerical deconvolution, to be used. However, it remains unclear whether arterial spin labeling data are best treated using model-free or model-based analysis. This work provides a critical comparison of these two approaches for QUASAR arterial spin labeling in the healthy brain. An existing two-component (arterial and tissue) model was extended to the mixed flow suppression scheme of QUASAR to provide an optimal model-based analysis. The model-based analysis was extended to incorporate dispersion of the labeled bolus, generally regarded as the major source of discrepancy between the two analysis approaches. Model-free and model-based analyses were compared for perfusion quantification including absolute measurements, uncertainty estimation, and spatial variation in cerebral blood flow estimates. Major sources of discrepancies between model-free and model-based analysis were attributed to the effects of dispersion and the degree to which the two methods can separate macrovascular and tissue signal.

  10. Cerebral Blood Flow in Ischemic Vascular Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease By Arterial Spin Labeling MRI

    PubMed Central

    Schuff, N.; Matsumoto, S.; Kmiecik, J.; Studholme, C.; Du, A.T.; Ezekiel, F.; Miller, B.L.; Kramer, J.H.; Jagust, W.J.; Chui, H.C.; Weiner, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    Background The objectives were first to compare the effects of subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and second to analyze the relationship between CBF and subcortical vascular disease, measured as volume of white matter lesions (WML). Methods Eight mildly demented patients with SIVD (77 ± 8 years, 26 ± 3 MMSE) and 14 patients with AD were compared to 18 cognitively normal elderly. All subjects had CBF measured using arterial spin labeling MRI and brain volumes assessed using structural MRI. Results AD and SIVD showed marked CBF reductions in frontal (p = 0.001) and parietal (p = 0.001) cortex. In SIVD, increased subcortical WML were associated with reduced CBF in frontal cortex (p = 0.04) in addition to cortical atrophy (frontal: p = 0.05; parietal: p = 0.03). Conclusions Subcortical vascular disease is associated with reduced CBF in the cortex, irrespective of brain atrophy. PMID:19896584

  11. Arterial spin-labeling in routine clinical practice, part 3: hyperperfusion patterns.

    PubMed

    Deibler, A R; Pollock, J M; Kraft, R A; Tan, H; Burdette, J H; Maldjian, J A

    2008-09-01

    Arterial spin-labeled (ASL) perfusion imaging can be implemented successfully into a routine clinical neuroimaging protocol and can accurately demonstrate alterations in brain perfusion. We have observed patterns of focal, regional, and global hyperperfusion in a wide variety of disease processes. The causes of hyperperfusion at clinical ASL have not been previously characterized. Focal lesions such as brain tumors and vascular malformations with increased perfusion can be well depicted by ASL. More global causes of hyperperfusion, including postanoxia vasodilation and hypercapnia, may go undetected on conventional MR images, whereas the regional hyperperfusion, which may occur in reversible encephalopathies and luxury perfusion, has been consistently illustrated on ASL cerebral blood flow maps at our institution.

  12. Quantification of Serial Cerebral Blood Flow in Acute Stroke Using Arterial Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Okell, Thomas W.; Sheerin, Fintan; Schulz, Ursula; Mathieson, Phil; Reckless, Ian; Shah, Kunal; Ford, Gary A.; Chappell, Michael A.; Jezzard, Peter; Kennedy, James

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Perfusion-weighted imaging is used to select patients with acute ischemic stroke for intervention, but knowledge of cerebral perfusion can also inform the understanding of ischemic injury. Arterial spin labeling allows repeated measurement of absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) without the need for exogenous contrast. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between dynamic CBF and tissue outcome in the month after stroke onset. Methods— Patients with nonlacunar ischemic stroke underwent ≤5 repeated magnetic resonance imaging scans at presentation, 2 hours, 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month. Imaging included vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling using multiple postlabeling delays to quantify CBF in gray matter regions of interest. Receiver–operator characteristic curves were used to predict tissue outcome using CBF. Repeatability was assessed in 6 healthy volunteers and compared with contralateral regions of patients. Diffusion-weighted and T2-weighted fluid attenuated inversion recovery imaging were used to define tissue outcome. Results— Forty patients were included. In contralateral regions of patients, there was significant variation of CBF between individuals, but not between scan times (mean±SD: 53±42 mL/100 g/min). Within ischemic regions, mean CBF was lowest in ischemic core (17±23 mL/100 g/min), followed by regions of early (21±26 mL/100 g/min) and late infarct growth (25±35 mL/100 g/min; ANOVA P<0.0001). Between patients, there was marked overlap in presenting and serial CBF values. Conclusions— Knowledge of perfusion dynamics partially explained tissue fate. Factors such as metabolism and tissue susceptibility are also likely to influence tissue outcome. PMID:27879446

  13. Multimodality evaluation of dural arteriovenous fistula with CT angiography, MR with arterial spin labeling, and digital subtraction angiography: case report.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew; McTaggart, Ryan; Santarelli, Justin; Fischbein, Nancy; Marks, Michael; Zaharchuk, Greg; Do, Huy

    2014-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVF) are cerebrovascular lesions with pathologic shunting into the venous system from arterial feeders. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) has long been considered the gold standard for diagnosis, but advances in noninvasive imaging techniques now play a role in the diagnosis of these complex lesions. Herein, we describe the case of a patient with right-side pulsatile tinnitus and DAVF diagnosed using computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance with arterial spin labeling, and DSA. Implications for imaging analysis of DAVFs and further research are discussed.

  14. Signal changes on magnetic resonance perfusion images with arterial spin labeling after carotid endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shimogawa, Takafumi; Morioka, Takato; Sayama, Tetsuro; Haga, Sei; Akiyama, Tomoaki; Murao, Kei; Kanazawa, Yuka; Furuta, Yoshihiko; Sakata, Ayumi; Arakawa, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cerebral hyperperfusion after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is defined as an increase in ipsilateral cerebral blood flow (CBF). Practically, however, prompt and precise assessment of cerebral hyperperfusion is difficult because of limitations in the methodology of CBF measurement during the perioperative period. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a completely noninvasive and repeatable magnetic resonance perfusion imaging technique that uses magnetically-labelled blood water as an endogenous tracer. To clarify the usefulness of ASL in the management of cerebral hyperperfusion, we investigated signal changes by ASL with a single 1.5-s post-labeling delay on visual inspection. Methods: Thirty-two consecutive patients who underwent CEA were enrolled in this retrospective study. Results: On postoperative day 1, 22 (68.8%) and 4 (12.5%) patients exhibited increased ASL signals bilaterally (Group A) and on the operated side (Group B), respectively. Follow-up ASL showed improvement in these findings. Six (18.8%) patients showed no change (Group C). There was no apparent correlation between ASL signals on postoperative day 1 and the preoperative hemodynamic state, including the cerebrovascular reserve (P = 0.2062). Three (9.4%) patients developed cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (two in Group A and one in Group B). Coincidence in the localization of increased ASL signals and electroencephalographic abnormalities was noted in these patients. Conclusion: Visual analysis of ASL with a single post-labeling delay overestimates CBF and cannot identify patients at risk of cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome probably because of the strong effect of the shortened arterial transit time immediately after CEA. However, ASL may be used as for screening. PMID:28144479

  15. Mapping Long-Term Functional Changes in Cerebral Blood Flow by Arterial Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Ssali, Tracy; Anazodo, Udunna C.; Bureau, Yves; MacIntosh, Bradley J.; Günther, Matthias; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Although arterial spin labeling (ASL) is appealing for mapping long-term changes in functional activity, inter-sessional variations in basal blood flow, arterial transit times (ATTs), and alignment errors, can result in significant false activation when comparing images from separate sessions. By taking steps to reduce these sources of noise, this study assessed the ability of ASL to detect functional CBF changes between sessions. ASL data were collected in three sessions to image ATT, resting CBF and CBF changes associated with motor activation (7 participants). Activation maps were generated using rest and task images acquired in the same session and from sessions separated by up to a month. Good agreement was found when comparing between-session activation maps to within-session activation maps with only a 16% decrease in precision (within-session: 90 ± 7%) and a 13% decrease in the Dice similarity (within-session: 0.75 ± 0.07) coefficient after a month. In addition, voxel-wise reproducibility (within-session: 4.7 ± 4.5%) and reliability (within-session: 0.89 ± 0.20) of resting grey-matter CBF decreased by less than 18% for the between-session analysis relative to within-session values. ATT variability between sessions (5.0 ± 2.7%) was roughly half the between-subject variability, indicating that its effects on longitudinal CBF were minimal. These results demonstrate that conducting voxel-wise analysis on CBF images acquired on different days is feasible with only modest loss in precision, highlighting the potential of ASL for longitudinal studies. PMID:27706218

  16. Discrete Li-occupation versus pseudo-continuous Na-occupation and their relationship with structural change behaviors in Fe₂(MoO₄)₃

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Ji-Li; Zhou, Yong-Ning; Shi, Si-Qi; Shadike, Zulipiya; Huang, Xuan-Qi; Luo, Jun; Yang, Zhen-Zhong; Li, Hong; Gu, Lin; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Fu, Zheng-Wen

    2015-03-06

    The key factors governing the single-phase or multi-phase structural change behaviors during the intercalation/deintercalation of guest ions have not been well studied and understood yet. Through systematic studies of orthorhombic Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ electrode, two distinct guest ion occupation paths, namely discrete one for Li and pseudo-continuous one for Na, as well as their relationship with single-phase and two-phase modes for Na⁺ and Li⁺, respectively during the intercalation/deintercalation process have been demonstrated. For the first time, the direct atomic-scale observation of biphasic domains (discrete occupation) in partially lithiated Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ and the one by one Na occupation (pseudo-continuous occupation) at 8d sites in partially sodiated Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ are obtained during the discharge processes of Li/Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ and Na/Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ cells respectively. Our combined experimental and theoretical studies bring the new insights for the research and development of intercalation compounds as electrode materials for secondary batteries.

  17. Discrete Li-occupation versus pseudo-continuous Na-occupation and their relationship with structural change behaviors in Fe₂(MoO₄)₃

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Ji-Li; Zhou, Yong-Ning; Shi, Si-Qi; ...

    2015-03-06

    The key factors governing the single-phase or multi-phase structural change behaviors during the intercalation/deintercalation of guest ions have not been well studied and understood yet. Through systematic studies of orthorhombic Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ electrode, two distinct guest ion occupation paths, namely discrete one for Li and pseudo-continuous one for Na, as well as their relationship with single-phase and two-phase modes for Na⁺ and Li⁺, respectively during the intercalation/deintercalation process have been demonstrated. For the first time, the direct atomic-scale observation of biphasic domains (discrete occupation) in partially lithiated Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ and the one by one Na occupation (pseudo-continuous occupation) at 8d sites inmore » partially sodiated Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ are obtained during the discharge processes of Li/Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ and Na/Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ cells respectively. Our combined experimental and theoretical studies bring the new insights for the research and development of intercalation compounds as electrode materials for secondary batteries.« less

  18. Discrete Li-occupation versus pseudo-continuous Na-occupation and their relationship with structural change behaviors in Fe2(MoO4)3

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Ji-Li; Zhou, Yong-Ning; Shi, Si-Qi; Shadike, Zulipiya; Huang, Xuan-Qi; Luo, Jun; Yang, Zhen-Zhong; Li, Hong; Gu, Lin; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Fu, Zheng-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The key factors governing the single-phase or multi-phase structural change behaviors during the intercalation/deintercalation of guest ions have not been well studied and understood yet. Through systematic studies of orthorhombic Fe2(MoO4)3 electrode, two distinct guest ion occupation paths, namely discrete one for Li and pseudo-continuous one for Na, as well as their relationship with single-phase and two-phase modes for Na+ and Li+, respectively during the intercalation/deintercalation process have been demonstrated. For the first time, the direct atomic-scale observation of biphasic domains (discrete occupation) in partially lithiated Fe2(MoO4)3 and the one by one Na occupation (pseudo-continuous occupation) at 8d sites in partially sodiated Fe2(MoO4)3 are obtained during the discharge processes of Li/Fe2(MoO4)3 and Na/Fe2(MoO4)3 cells respectively. Our combined experimental and theoretical studies bring the new insights for the research and development of intercalation compounds as electrode materials for secondary batteries. PMID:25744589

  19. Early development of arterial spin labeling to measure regional brain blood flow by MRI.

    PubMed

    Koretsky, Alan P

    2012-08-15

    Two major avenues of work converged in the late 1980's and early 1990's to give rise to brain perfusion MRI. The development of anatomical brain MRI quickly had as a major goal the generation of angiograms using tricks to label flowing blood in macroscopic vessels. These ideas were aimed at getting information about microcirculatory flow as well. Over the same time course the development of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy had as its primary goal the assessment of tissue function and in particular, tissue energetics. For this the measurement of the delivery of water to tissue was critical for assessing tissue oxygenation and viability. The measurement of the washin/washout of "freely" diffusible tracers by spectroscopic based techniques pointed the way for quantitative approaches to measure regional blood flow by MRI. These two avenues came together in the development of arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI techniques to measure regional cerebral blood flow. The early use of ASL to measure brain activation to help verify BOLD fMRI led to a rapid development of ASL based perfusion MRI. Today development and applications of regional brain blood flow measurements with ASL continues to be a major area of activity.

  20. Measurement of blood flow in arteriovenous malformations before and after embolization using arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Suazo, L; Foerster, B; Fermin, R; Speckter, H; Vilchez, C; Oviedo, J; Stoeter, P

    2012-03-01

    The assessment of shunt reduction after an embolization of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) or fistula (AVF) from conventional angiography is often difficult and may be subjective. Here we present a completely non-invasive method using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure shunt reduction. Using pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL), we determined the relative amount of signal attributed to the shunt over 1.75 s and 6 different slices covering the lesion. This amount of signal from the shunt was related to the total signal from all slices and measured before and after embolization. The method showed a fair agreement between the PASL results and the judgement from conventional angiography. In the case of a total or subtotal shunt occlusion, PASL showed a shunt reduction between 69% and 92%, whereas in minimal shunt reduction as judged by conventional angiography, the ASL result was -6% (indicating slightly increased flow) to 35% in a partially occluded vein of Galen aneurysm. The PASL method proved to be fairly reproducible (up to 2% deviation between three measurements without interventions). On conclusion, PASL is able to reliably measure the amount of shunt reduction achieved by embolization of AVMs and AVFs.

  1. Measurement of Blood Flow in Arteriovenous Malformations before and after Embolization Using Arterial Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Suazo, L.; Foerster, B.; Fermin, R.; Speckter, H.; Vilchez, C.; Oviedo, J.; Stoeter, P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The assessment of shunt reduction after an embolization of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) or fistula (AVF) from conventional angiography is often difficult and may be subjective. Here we present a completely non-invasive method using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure shunt reduction. Using pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL), we determined the relative amount of signal attributed to the shunt over 1.75 s and 6 different slices covering the lesion. This amount of signal from the shunt was related to the total signal from all slices and measured before and after embolization. The method showed a fair agreement between the PASL results and the judgement from conventional angiography. In the case of a total or subtotal shunt occlusion, PASL showed a shunt reduction between 69% and 92%, whereas in minimal shunt reduction as judged by conventional angiography, the ASL result was –6% (indicating slightly increased flow) to 35% in a partially occluded vein of Galen aneurysm. The PASL method proved to be fairly reproducible (up to 2% deviation between three measurements without interventions). On conclusion, PASL is able to reliably measure the amount of shunt reduction achieved by embolization of AVMs and AVFs PMID:22440600

  2. Arterial Spin Labeling Magnetic Resonance Perfusion for Traumatic Brain Injury: Technical Challenges and Potentials.

    PubMed

    Andre, Jalal B

    2015-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), including concussion, is a public health concern, as it affects over 1.7 million persons in the United States per year. Yet, the diagnosis of TBI, particularly mild TBI (mTBI), can be controversial, as neuroimaging findings can be sparse on conventional magnetic resonance and computed tomography examinations, and when present, often poorly correlate with clinical signs and symptoms. Furthermore, the discussion of TBI, concussion, and head impact exposure is immediately complicated by the many differing opinions of what constitutes each, their respective severities, and how the underlying biomechanics of the inciting head impact might alter the distribution, severity, and prognosis of the underlying brain injury. Advanced imaging methodologies hold promise in improving the sensitivity and detectability of associated imaging biomarkers that might better correlate with patient outcome and prognostication, allowing for improved triage and therapeutic guidance in the setting of TBI, particularly in mTBI. This work will examine the defining symptom complex associated with mTBI and explore changes in cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labeling, as a potential imaging biomarker for TBI, and briefly correlate these observations with findings identified by single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography imaging.

  3. Identification of cerebral perfusion using arterial spin labeling in patients with seizures in acute settings

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Roh-Eul; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Lee, Sang Kun; Lee, Soon-Tae; Kang, Koung Mi; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Ji-hoon; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Sun-Won; Han, Moon Hee

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the utility of arterial spin labeling perfusion-weighted imaging (ASL-PWI) in patients with suspected seizures in acute settings. A total of 164 patients who underwent ASL-PWI for suspected seizures in acute settings (with final diagnoses of seizure [n = 129], poststroke seizure [n = 18], and seizure mimickers [n = 17]), were included in this retrospective study. Perfusion abnormality was analyzed for: (1) pattern, (2) multifocality, and (3) atypical distribution against vascular territories. Perfusion abnormality was detected in 39% (50/129) of the seizure patients, most (94%, 47/50) being the hyperperfusion pattern. Of the patients with perfusion abnormality, multifocality or hemispheric involvement and atypical distribution against vascular territory were revealed in 46% (23/50) and 98% (49/50), respectively. In addition, seizures showed characteristic features including hyperperfusion (with or without non-territorial distribution) on ASL-PWI, thus differentiating them from poststroke seizures or seizure mimickers. In patients in whom seizure focus could be localized on both EEG and ASL-PWI, the concordance rate was 77%. The present study demonstrates that ASL-PWI can provide information regarding cerebral perfusion status in patients with seizures in acute settings and has the potential to be used as a non-invasive imaging tool to identify the cerebral perfusion in patients with seizures. PMID:28291816

  4. Application of Arterial Spin Labelling in the Assessment of Ocular Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Pontré, B.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial spin labelling (ASL) is a noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modality, capable of measuring blood perfusion without the use of a contrast agent. While ASL implementation for imaging the brain and monitoring cerebral blood flow has been reviewed in depth, the technique is yet to be widely used for ocular tissue imaging. The human retina is a very thin but highly stratified structure and it is also situated close to the surface of the body which is not ideal for MR imaging. Hence, the application of MR imaging and ASL in particular has been very challenging for ocular tissues and retina. That is despite the fact that almost all of retinal pathologies are accompanied by blood perfusion irregularities. In this review article, we have focused on the technical aspects of the ASL and their implications for its optimum adaptation for retinal blood perfusion monitoring. Retinal blood perfusion has been assessed through qualitative or invasive quantitative methods but the prospect of imaging flow using ASL would increase monitoring and assessment of retinal pathologies. The review provides details of ASL application in human ocular blood flow assessment. PMID:27066501

  5. Regression algorithm correcting for partial volume effects in arterial spin labeling MRI.

    PubMed

    Asllani, Iris; Borogovac, Ajna; Brown, Truman R

    2008-12-01

    Partial volume effects (PVE) are a consequence of limited spatial resolution in brain imaging. In arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI, the problem is exacerbated by the nonlinear dependency of the ASL signal on magnetization contributions from each tissue within an imaged voxel. We have developed an algorithm that corrects for PVE in ASL imaging. The algorithm is based on a model that represents the voxel intensity as a weighted sum of pure tissue contribution, where the weighting coefficients are the tissue's fractional volume in the voxel. Using this algorithm, we were able to estimate cerebral blood flow (CBF) for gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) independently. The average voxelwise ratio of GM to WM CBF was approximately 3.2, in good agreement with reports in the literature. As proof of concept, data from PVE-corrected method were compared with those from the conventional, PVE-uncorrected method. As hypothesized, the two yielded similar CBF values for voxels containing >95% GM and differed in proportion with the voxels' heterogeneity. More importantly, the GM CBF assessed with the PVE-corrected method was independent of the voxels' heterogeneity, implying that estimation of flow was unaffected by PVE. An example of application of this algorithm in motor-activation data is also given.

  6. Partial volume correction for arterial spin labeling data using spatial-temporal information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Baojuan; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Linchuan; Liang, Zhengrong; Lu, Hongbing

    2015-03-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) provides a noninvasive measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Due to relatively low spatial resolution, the accuracy of CBF measurement is affected by the partial volume (PV) effect. In general ASL sequence, multiple scans of perfusion image pairs are acquired temporally to improve the signal to noise ratio. Several spatial PV correction methods have been proposed for the simple averaging of pair-difference images, while the perfusion information of gray matter and white matter existed in multiple image pairs was totally ignored. In this study, a statistical model of perfusion mixtures inside each voxel for the 4D ASL sequence is first proposed. To solve the model, a simplified method is proposed, in which the linear regression (LR) method is first used to obtain initial estimates of spatial correction, then an EM (expectation maximization) method is used to obtain accurate estimation using temporal information. The combination of LR and EM method (EM-LR) can effectively utilize the spatial-temporal information of ASL data for PV correction and provide a theoretical solution to estimate the perfusion mixtures. Both simulated and in vivo data were used to evaluate the performance of proposed method, which demonstrated its superiority on PV correction, edge preserving, and noise suppression.

  7. Combined Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Arterial Spin Labeling as Markers of Early Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaobo; Yan, Ronghua; Chen, Zhaoyu; Weng, Ruihui; Liu, Xu; Gao, Huimin; Xu, Xiaofeng; Kang, Zhuang; Liu, Zhexing; Guo, Yan; Liu, Zhenhua; Larsen, Jan Petter; Wang, Jin; Tang, Beisha; Hallett, Mark; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify a PD-specific MRI pattern using combined diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) to discriminate patients with early PD from healthy subjects and evaluate disease status. Twenty-one early and 22 mid-late PD patients, and 22 healthy, age/gender-matched controls underwent 3-T MRI with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA), fiber number (FN) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements. We found that compared with healthy subjects, there was a profound reduction in FN passing through the SN in PD. FA in the SN and CBF in the caudate nucleus were inversely correlated with motor dysfunction. A negative correlation was observed between FA in the hippocampus (Hip) and the NMSS-Mood score, whereas CBF in the Hip and the prefrontal cortex(PFC) correlated with declined cognition. Stratified five-fold cross-validation identified FA in the SN(FA-SNAv), CBF in the PFC(CBF-PFCAv) and FA in the parietal white matter(FA-PWMAv), and the combination of these measurements offered relatively high accuracy (AUC 0.975, 90% sensitivity and 100% specificity) in distinguishing those with early PD from healthy subjects. We demonstrate that the decreased FNs through SN in combination with changes in FA-SNAv, CBF-PFCAv and FA-PWMAv values might serve as potential markers of early-stage PD. PMID:27646647

  8. Propofol allows precise quantitative arterial spin labelling functional magnetic resonance imaging in the rat.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Karen M; Blau, Christoph W; Kelly, Michael E; O'Herlihy, Colm; O'Connell, P R; Jones, James F X; Kerskens, Christian M

    2010-07-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques highlight cerebral vascular responses which are coupled to changes in neural activation. However, two major difficulties arise when employing these techniques in animal studies. First is the disturbance of cerebral blood flow due to anaesthesia and second is the difficulty of precise reproducible quantitative measurements. These difficulties were surmounted in the current study by using propofol and quantitative arterial spin labelling (QASL) to measure relative cerebral blood volume of labelled water (rCBV(lw),) mean transit time (MTT) and capillary transit time (CTT). The ASL method was applied to measure the haemodynamic response in the primary somatosensory cortex following forepaw stimulation in the rat. Following stimulation an increase in signal intensity and rCBV(lw) was recorded, this was accompanied by a significant decrease in MTT (1.97+/-0.06s to 1.44+/-0.04s) and CTT (1.76+/-0.06s to 1.39+/-0.07s). Two animals were scanned repeatedly on two different experimental days. Stimulation in the first animal was applied to the same forepaw during the initial and repeat scan. In the second animal stimulation was applied to different forepaws on the first and second days. The control and activated ASL signal intensities, rCBVlw on both days were almost identical in both animals. The basal MTT and CTT during the second scan were also very similar to the values obtained during the first scan. The MTT recorded from the animal that underwent stimulation to the same paw during both scanning sessions was very similar on the first and second days. In conclusion, propofol induces little physiological disturbance and holds potential for longitudinal QASL fMRI studies.

  9. Cerebral blood flow and vasoreactivity in aging: an arterial spin labeling study.

    PubMed

    Leoni, R F; Oliveira, I A F; Pontes-Neto, O M; Santos, A C; Leite, J P

    2017-03-23

    Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) in young and elderly participants were assessed using pulsed arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques in combination with inhalation of CO2. Pulsed ASL and BOLD-MRI were acquired in seventeen asymptomatic volunteers (10 young adults, age: 30±7 years; 7 elderly adults, age: 64±8 years) with no history of diabetes, hypertension, and neurological diseases. Data from one elderly participant was excluded due to the incorrigible head motion. Average baseline CBF in gray matter was significantly reduced in elderly (46±9 mL·100 g-1·min-1) compared to young adults (57±8 mL·100 g-1·min-1; P=0.02). Decreased pulsed ASL-CVR and BOLD-CVR in gray matter were also observed in elderly (2.12±1.30 and 0.13±0.06 %/mmHg, respectively) compared to young adults (3.28±1.43 and 0.28±0.11 %/mmHg, respectively; P<0.05), suggesting some degree of vascular impairment with aging. Moreover, age-related decrease in baseline CBF was observed in different brain regions (inferior, middle and superior frontal gyri; precentral and postcentral gyri; superior temporal gyrus; cingulate gyri; insula, putamen, caudate, and supramarginal gyrus). In conclusion, CBF and CVR were successfully investigated using a protocol that causes minimal or no discomfort for the participants. Age-related decreases in baseline CBF and CVR were observed in the cerebral cortex, which may be related to the vulnerability for neurological disorders in aging.

  10. Differentiation of Glioblastoma from Brain Metastasis: Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis Using Arterial Spin Labeling MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sunwoo, Leonard; You, Sung-Hye; Yoo, Roh-Eul; Kang, Koung Mi; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Ji-hoon; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Sun-Won; Jung, Cheolkyu; Park, Chul-Kee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic performance of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by using arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to differentiate glioblastoma (GBM) from brain metastasis. Materials and Methods The institutional review board of our hospital approved this retrospective study. The study population consisted of 128 consecutive patients who underwent surgical resection and were diagnosed as either GBM (n = 89) or brain metastasis (n = 39). All participants underwent preoperative MR imaging including ASL. For qualitative analysis, the tumors were visually graded into five categories based on ASL-CBF maps by two blinded reviewers. For quantitative analysis, the reviewers drew regions of interest (ROIs) on ASL-CBF maps upon the most hyperperfused portion within the tumor and upon peritumoral T2 hyperintensity area. Signal intensities of intratumoral and peritumoral ROIs for each subject were normalized by dividing the values by those of contralateral normal gray matter (nCBFintratumoral and nCBFperitumoral, respectively). Visual grading scales and quantitative parameters between GBM and brain metastasis were compared. In addition, the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve was used to evaluate the diagnostic performance of ASL-driven CBF to differentiate GBM from brain metastasis. Results For qualitative analysis, GBM group showed significantly higher grade compared to metastasis group (p = 0.001). For quantitative analysis, both nCBFintratumoral and nCBFperitumoral in GBM were significantly higher than those in metastasis (both p < 0.001). The areas under the curve were 0.677, 0.714, and 0.835 for visual grading, nCBFintratumoral, and nCBFperitumoral, respectively (all p < 0.001). Conclusion ASL perfusion MR imaging can aid in the differentiation of GBM from brain metastasis. PMID:27861605

  11. Assessment of Arterial Wall Enhancement for Differentiation of Parent Artery Disease from Small Artery Disease: Comparison between Histogram Analysis and Visual Analysis on 3-Dimensional Contrast-Enhanced T1-Weighted Turbo Spin Echo MR Images at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jinhee; Kim, Tae-Won; Hwang, Eo-Jin; Koo, Jaseong; Shin, Yong Sam; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Kim, Bum-soo

    2017-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the histogram analysis and visual scores in 3T MRI assessment of middle cerebral arterial wall enhancement in patients with acute stroke, for the differentiation of parent artery disease (PAD) from small artery disease (SAD). Materials and Methods Among the 82 consecutive patients in a tertiary hospital for one year, 25 patients with acute infarcts in middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory were included in this study including 15 patients with PAD and 10 patients with SAD. Three-dimensional contrast-enhanced T1-weighted turbo spin echo MR images with black-blood preparation at 3T were analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively. The degree of MCA stenosis, and visual and histogram assessments on MCA wall enhancement were evaluated. A statistical analysis was performed to compare diagnostic accuracy between qualitative and quantitative metrics. Results The degree of stenosis, visual enhancement score, geometric mean (GM), and the 90th percentile (90P) value from the histogram analysis were significantly higher in PAD than in SAD (p = 0.006 for stenosis, < 0.001 for others). The receiver operating characteristic curve area of GM and 90P were 1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86–1.00). Conclusion A histogram analysis of a relevant arterial wall enhancement allows differentiation between PAD and SAD in patients with acute stroke within the MCA territory. PMID:28246519

  12. Arterial Spin Labeling Blood Flow MRI: Its Role in the Early Characterization of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alsop, David C.; Dai, Weiying; Grossman, Murray; Detre, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) enables the noninvasive, quantitative imaging of cerebral blood flow using standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment. Because it requires no contrast injection, ASL can add resting functional information to MRI studies measuring atrophy and signs of ischemic injury. Key features of ASL technology that may affect studies in Alzheimer’s disease are described. The existing literature describing ASL blood flow imaging applied to Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia is reviewed, and the potential role of ASL in treatment and prevention studies of early Alzheimer’s disease is discussed. PMID:20413865

  13. Comparison of cerebral blood flow measurement with [15O]-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fan, Audrey P; Jahanian, Hesamoddin; Holdsworth, Samantha J; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2016-05-01

    Noninvasive imaging of cerebral blood flow provides critical information to understand normal brain physiology as well as to identify and manage patients with neurological disorders. To date, the reference standard for cerebral blood flow measurements is considered to be positron emission tomography using injection of the [(15)O]-water radiotracer. Although [(15)O]-water has been used to study brain perfusion under normal and pathological conditions, it is not widely used in clinical settings due to the need for an on-site cyclotron, the invasive nature of arterial blood sampling, and experimental complexity. As an alternative, arterial spin labeling is a promising magnetic resonance imaging technique that magnetically labels arterial blood as it flows into the brain to map cerebral blood flow. As arterial spin labeling becomes more widely adopted in research and clinical settings, efforts have sought to standardize the method and validate its cerebral blood flow values against positron emission tomography-based cerebral blood flow measurements. The purpose of this work is to critically review studies that performed both [(15)O]-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling to measure brain perfusion, with the aim of better understanding the accuracy and reproducibility of arterial spin labeling relative to the positron emission tomography reference standard.

  14. Pulsed arterial spin labeling effectively and dynamically observes changes in cerebral blood flow after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shu-Ping; Li, Yi-Ning; Liu, Jun; Wang, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Zi-Shu; Zhou, Shun-Ke; Tao, Fang-Xu; Zhang, Zhi-Xue

    2016-02-01

    Cerebral blood flow is strongly associated with brain function, and is the main symptom and diagnostic basis for a variety of encephalopathies. However, changes in cerebral blood flow after mild traumatic brain injury remain poorly understood. This study sought to observe changes in cerebral blood flow in different regions after mild traumatic brain injury using pulsed arterial spin labeling. Our results demonstrate maximal cerebral blood flow in gray matter and minimal in the white matter of patients with mild traumatic brain injury. At the acute and subacute stages, cerebral blood flow was reduced in the occipital lobe, parietal lobe, central region, subcutaneous region, and frontal lobe. Cerebral blood flow was restored at the chronic stage. At the acute, subacute, and chronic stages, changes in cerebral blood flow were not apparent in the insula. Cerebral blood flow in the temporal lobe and limbic lobe diminished at the acute and subacute stages, but was restored at the chronic stage. These findings suggest that pulsed arterial spin labeling can precisely measure cerebral blood flow in various brain regions, and may play a reference role in evaluating a patient's condition and judging prognosis after traumatic brain injury.

  15. Pseudo continuous wave instrument. [ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic properties and their changes in a sample of liquid, gas, plasma or solid are measured by applying a variable frequency source to the sample by means of a transducer to produce sound waves within the sample. The application of the variable frequency source to the sample is periodically interrupted for a short duration. Means are connected to the transducer for receiving the resulting acoustic signals during the interruptions for producing a control signal indicative of a difference in the frequency of the output of the variable frequency source and the frequency of a mechanical resonant peak in the sample. The control signal is applied to the variable frequency source to maintain its output frequency at the frequency of the mechanical resonant peak. The change in frequency of the variable frequency source indicates the shift in frequency of the mechanical resonant peak and the amplitude of the acoustic signals indicates the attenuation of the acoustic signals in the sample.

  16. Arterial Transit Time Effects in Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling CBF Mapping: Insight From a PET and MR Study in Normal Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Maolin; Maguire, R. Paul; Arora, Jagriti; Planeta-Wilson, Beata; Weinzimmer, David; Wang, Jinghua; Wang, Yuenan; Kim, Hyeonjin; Rajeevan, Nallakkandi; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E.; Constable, R. Todd

    2010-01-01

    Arterial transit time (ATT), a key parameter required to calculate absolute cerebral blood flow in arterial spin labeling (ASL), is subject to much uncertainty. In this study, ASL ATTs were estimated on a per-voxel basis using data measured by both ASL and positron emission tomography in the same subjects. The mean ATT increased by 260 ± 20 (standard error of the mean) ms when the imaging slab shifted downwards by 54 mm, and increased from 630 ± 30 to 1220 ± 30 ms for the first slice, with an increase of 610 ± 20 ms over a four-slice slab when the gap between the imaging and labeling slab increased from 20 to 74 mm. When the per-slice ATTs were employed in ASL cerebral blood flow quantification and the in-slice ATT variations ignored, regional cerebral blood flow could be significantly different from the positron emission tomography measures. ATT also decreased with focal activation by the same amount for both visual and motor tasks (~80 ms). These results provide a quantitative relationship between ATT and the ASL imaging geometry and yield an assessment of the assumptions commonly used in ASL imaging. These findings should be considered in the interpretation of, and comparisons between, different ASL-based cerebral blood flow studies. The results also provide spatially specific ATT data that may aid in optimizing the ASL imaging parameters. PMID:19953506

  17. Arterial spin labeling versus BOLD in direct challenge and drug-task interaction pharmacological fMRI.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Stephanie B; Koller, Jonathan M; Campbell, Meghan C; Black, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    A carefully controlled study allowed us to compare the sensitivity of ASL (arterial spin labeling) and BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) fMRI for detecting the effects of the adenosine A2a antagonist tozadenant in Parkinson disease. The study compared the effect of drug directly or the interaction of the drug with a cognitive task. Only ASL detected the direct effect of tozadenant. BOLD was more sensitive to the cognitive task, which (unlike most drugs) allows on-off comparisons over short periods of time. Neither ASL nor BOLD could detect a cognitive-pharmacological interaction. These results are consistent with the known relative advantages of each fMRI method, and suggest that for drug development, directly imaging pharmacodynamic effects with ASL may have advantages over cognitive-pharmacological interaction BOLD, which has hitherto been the more common approach to pharmacological fMRI.

  18. SU-D-18C-05: Variable Bolus Arterial Spin Labeling MRI for Accurate Cerebral Blood Flow and Arterial Transit Time Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M; Jung, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MRI perfusion imaging method from which quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps can be calculated. Acquisition with variable post-labeling delays (PLD) and variable TRs allows for arterial transit time (ATT) mapping and leads to more accurate CBF quantification with a scan time saving of 48%. In addition, T1 and M0 maps can be obtained without a separate scan. In order to accurately estimate ATT and T1 of brain tissue from the ASL data, variable labeling durations were invented, entitled variable-bolus ASL. Methods: All images were collected on a healthy subject with a 3T Siemens Skyra scanner. Variable-bolus Psuedo-continuous ASL (PCASL) images were collected with 7 TI times ranging 100-4300ms in increments of 700ms with TR ranging 1000-5200ms. All boluses were 1600ms when the TI allowed, otherwise the bolus duration was 100ms shorter than the TI. All TI times were interleaved to reduce sensitivity to motion. Voxel-wise T1 and M0 maps were estimated using a linear least squares fitting routine from the average singal from each TI time. Then pairwise subtraction of each label/control pair and averaging for each TI time was performed. CBF and ATT maps were created using the standard model by Buxton et al. with a nonlinear fitting routine using the T1 tissue map. Results: CBF maps insensitive to ATT were produced along with ATT maps. Both maps show patterns and averages consistent with literature. The T1 map also shows typical T1 contrast. Conclusion: It has been demonstrated that variablebolus ASL produces CBF maps free from the errors due to ATT and tissue T1 variations and provides M0, T1, and ATT maps which have potential utility. This is accomplished with a single scan in a feasible scan time (under 6 minutes) with low sensivity to motion.

  19. Quantitative, dynamic and noninvasive determination of skeletal muscle perfusion in mouse leg by NMR arterial spin-labeled imaging.

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, Didier; Loureiro de Sousa, Paulo; Fromes, Yves; Wary, Claire; Carlier, Pierre G

    2008-11-01

    Because mouse may relatively easily be genetically tailored to develop equivalent of human muscular diseases or to present controlled alterations of mechanisms involved in vasoregulation, it has become the prevalent species to explore such questions. However, the very small size of the animals represents a serious limitation when evaluating the functional consequences of these genetic manipulations. In this context, the recourse to arterial spin labeling (ASL) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods in which arterial water spins act as an endogenous and freely diffusible tracer of perfusion is tempting but challenging. This article shows that despite the small size of the animal, mouse muscle perfusion may be measured, at rest and in conditions of reactive hyperemia, using saturation inversion recovery sequence, a pulsed ASL variant, combined with NMR imaging. Baseline perfusion values in the mouse leg were 17+/-11 ml.min(-1).100 g(-1) (n=11) and were comparable to microsphere data from the literature. Under ischemia, leg perfusion was 1.2+/-9.3 ml.min(-1).100 g(-1) (n=11). The difference observed between basal and ischemic measurements was statistically different (P=.0001). The temporal pattern of hyperemia in mouse muscle was coherent with previously published measurements in humans and in rats. The mean peak perfusion was 62+/-24 ml.min(-1).100 g(-1) (n=6) occurring 48+/-27 s after the end of occlusion. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the ability of ASL combined to NMR imaging to quantify skeletal muscle perfusion in mice legs, both at rest and dynamically.

  20. Tumor Vascularity in Renal Masses: Correlation of Arterial Spin-Labeled and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MR Imaging Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Kapur, Payal; Yuan, Qing; Xi, Yin; Carvo, Ingrid; Signoretti, Sabina; Dimitrov, Ivan; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.; Margulis, Vitaly; Muradyan, Naira; Brugarolas, James; Madhuranthakam, Ananth J.; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate potential correlations between perfusion by arterial spin-labeled (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI derived quantitative measures of vascularity in renal masses >2 cm and to correlate these with microvessel density (MVD) in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Methods Informed written consent was obtained from all patients before imaging in this HIPAA-compliant, IRB-approved, prospective study. 36 consecutive patients scheduled for surgery of a known renal mass >2 cm underwent 3T ASL and DCE MRI. ASL measures (PASL) of mean, peak, and low perfusion areas within the mass were correlated to DCE-derived Ktrans, Kep, and Ve in the same locations using a region of interest analysis. MRI data were correlated to MVD measures in the same tumor regions in ccRCC. Spearman correlation was used to evaluate the correlation between PASL and DCE-derived measurements, and MVD. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Histopathologic diagnosis was obtained in 36 patients (25 men; mean age 58 ±12 years). PASL correlated with Ktrans (ρ=0.48, P=0.0091 for the entire tumor and ρ=0.43, P=0.03 for the high flow area, respectively) and Kep (ρ=0.46, P=0.01 for the entire tumor and ρ=0.52, P=0.008 for the high flow area, respectively). PASL (ρ=0.66, P=0.0002), Ktrans (ρ=0.61, P=0.001), and Kep (ρ=0.64, P=0.0006) also correlated with MVD in high and low perfusion areas in ccRCC. Conclusions PASL correlate with the DCE-derived measures of vascular permeability and flow, Ktrans and Kep, in renal masses >2cm in size. Both measures correlate to MVD in clear cell histology. MICROABSTRACT Arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been proposed to quantitatively assess vascularity in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However there are intrinsic differences between these two imaging methods, such as the relative contribution of vascular permeability

  1. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi-center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest study.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is a method to measure perfusion using magnetically labeled blood water as an endogenous tracer. Being fully non-invasive, this technique is attractive for longitudinal studies of cerebral blood flow in healthy and diseased individuals, or as a surrogate marker of metabolism. So far, ASL has been restricted mostly to specialist centers due to a generally low SNR of the method and potential issues with user-dependent analysis needed to obtain quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Here, we evaluated a particular implementation of ASL (called Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed "The QUASAR reproducibility study". Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated and a total of 284 healthy volunteers were scanned. Minimal operator dependence was assured by using an automatic planning tool and its accuracy and potential usefulness in multi-center trials was evaluated as well. Accurate repositioning between sessions was achieved with the automatic planning tool showing mean displacements of 1.87+/-0.95 mm and rotations of 1.56+/-0.66 degrees . Mean gray matter CBF was 47.4+/-7.5 [ml/100 g/min] with a between-subject standard variation SD(b)=5.5 [ml/100 g/min] and a within-subject standard deviation SD(w)=4.7 [ml/100 g/min]. The corresponding repeatability was 13.0 [ml/100 g/min] and was found to be within the range of previous studies.

  2. Determination of skeletal muscle perfusion using arterial spin labeling NMRI: validation by comparison with venous occlusion plethysmography.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, J S; Duteil, S; Vaughan, J T; Hennel, F; Wary, C; Leroy-Willig, A; Carlier, P G

    2001-08-01

    T(1)-based determination of perfusion was performed with the high temporal and spatial resolution that monitoring of exercise physiology requires. As no data were available on the validation of this approach in human muscles, T(1)-based NMRI of perfusion was compared to standard strain-gauge venous occlusion plethysmography performed simultaneously within a 4 T magnet. Two different situations were investigated in 21 healthy young volunteers: 1) a 5-min ischemia of the leg, or 2) a 2-3 min ischemic exercise consisting of a plantar flexion on an amagnetic ergometer. Leg perfusion was monitored over 5-15 min of the recovery phase, after the air-cuff arterial occlusion had been released. The interesting features of the sequence were the use of a saturation-recovery module for the introduction of a T(1) modulation and of single-shot spin echo for imaging. Spatial resolution was 1.7 x 2.0 mm and temporal resolution was 2 s. For data analysis, ROIs were traced on different muscles and perfusion was calculated from the differences in muscle signal intensity in successive images. To allow comparison with the global measurement of perfusion by plethysmography, the T(1)-based NMR measurements in exercising muscles were rescaled to the leg cross-section. The perfusion measurements obtained by plethysmography and NMRI were in close agreement with a correlation coefficient between 0.87 and 0.92. This indicates that pulsed arterial techniques provide determination of muscle perfusion not only with superior spatial and temporal resolution but also with exactitude.

  3. Arterial Spin-Labeling MRI Can Identify the Presence and Intensity of Collateral Perfusion in Patients With Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zaharchuk, Greg; Do, Huy M.; Marks, Michael P.; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Moseley, Michael E.; Steinberg, Gary K.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Determining the presence and adequacy of collateral blood flow is important in cerebrovascular disease. Therefore, we explored whether a noninvasive imaging modality, arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI, could be used to detect the presence and intensity of collateral flow using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and stable xenon CT cerebral blood flow as gold standards for collaterals and cerebral blood flow, respectively. Methods ASL and DSA were obtained within 4 days of each other in 18 patients with Moyamoya disease. Two neurointerventionalists scored DSA images using a collateral grading scale in regions of interest corresponding to ASPECTS methodology. Two neuroradiologists similarly scored ASL images based on the presence of arterial transit artifact. Agreement of ASL and DSA consensus scores was determined, including kappa statistics. In 15 patients, additional quantitative xenon CT cerebral blood flow measurements were performed and compared with collateral grades. Results The agreement between ASL and DSA consensus readings was moderate to strong, with a weighted kappa value of 0.58 (95% confidence interval, 0.52–0.64), but there was better agreement between readers for ASL compared with DSA. Sensitivity and specificity for identifying collaterals with ASL were 0.83 (95% confidence interval, 0.77–0.88) and 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.76–0.87), respectively. Xenon CT cerebral blood flow increased with increasing DSA and ASL collateral grade (P<0.05). Conclusions ASL can noninvasively predict the presence and intensity of collateral flow in patients with Moyamoya disease using DSA as a gold standard. Further study of other cerebrovascular diseases, including acute ischemic stroke, is warranted. PMID:21799169

  4. Improving cerebral blood flow quantification for arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI by removing residual motion artifacts and global signal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ze

    2012-12-01

    Denoising is critical to improving the quality and stability of cerebral blood flow (CBF) quantification in arterial spin labeled (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) due to the intrinsic low signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) of ASL data. Previous studies have been focused on reducing the spatial or temporal noise using standard filtering techniques, and less attention has been paid to two global nuisance effects, the residual motion artifacts and the global signal fluctuations. Since both nuisances affect the whole brain, removing them in advance should enhance the CBF quantification quality for ASL MRI. The purpose of this paper was to assess this potential benefit. Three methods were proposed to suppress each or both of the two global nuisances. Their performances for CBF quantification were validated using ASL data acquired from 13 subjects. Evaluation results showed that covarying out both global nuisances significantly improved temporal SNR and test-retest stability of CBF measurement. Although the concept of removing both nuisances is not technically novel per se, this paper clearly showed the benefits for ASL CBF quantification. Dissemination of the proposed methods in a free ASL data processing toolbox should be of interest to a broad range of ASL users.

  5. Acute effects of alcohol on brain perfusion monitored with arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging in young adults.

    PubMed

    Marxen, Michael; Gan, Gabriela; Schwarz, Daniel; Mennigen, Eva; Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Guenther, Matthias; Smolka, Michael N

    2014-03-01

    While a number of studies have established that moderate doses of alcohol increase brain perfusion, the time course of such an increase as a function of breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) has not yet been investigated, and studies differ about regional effects. Using arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated (1) the time course of the perfusion increase during a 15-minute linear increase of BrAC up to 0.6 g/kg followed by a steady exposure of 100 minutes, (2) the regional distribution, (3) a potential gender effect, and (4) the temporal stability of perfusion effects. In 48 young adults who participated in the Dresden longitudinal study on alcohol effects in young adults, we observed (1) a 7% increase of global perfusion as compared with placebo and that perfusion and BrAC are tightly coupled in time, (2) that the increase reaches significance in most regions of the brain, (3) that the effect is stronger in women than in men, and (4) that an acute tolerance effect is not observable on the time scale of 2 hours. Larger studies are needed to investigate the origin and the consequences of the effect, as well as the correlates of inter-subject variations.

  6. Simultaneous laser Doppler flowmetry and arterial spin labeling MRI for measurement of functional perfusion changes in the cortex.

    PubMed

    He, Jiabao; Devonshire, Ian M; Mayhew, John E W; Papadakis, Nikos G

    2007-02-15

    This study compares laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) for the measurement of functional changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). The two methods were applied concurrently in a paradigm of electrical whisker stimulation in the anaesthetised rat. Multi-channel LDF was used, with each channel corresponding to different fiber separation (and thus measurement depth). Continuous ASL was applied using separate imaging and labeling coils at 3 T. Careful experimental set up ensured that both techniques recorded from spatially concordant regions of the barrel cortex, where functional responses were maximal. Strong correlations were demonstrated between CBF changes measured by each LDF channel and ASL in terms of maximum response magnitude and response time-course within a 6-s-long temporal resolution imposed by ASL. Quantitatively, the measurements of the most superficial LDF channels agreed strongly with those of ASL, whereas the deeper LDF channels underestimated consistently the ASL measurement. It was thus confirmed that LDF quantifies CBF changes consistently at a superficial level, and for this case the two methods provided concordant measures of functional CBF changes, despite their essentially different physical principles and spatiotemporal characteristics.

  7. The attention network changes in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy: Evidence from an arterial spin labeling perfusion study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xingui; He, Xiaoxuan; Tao, Longxiang; Cheng, Huaidong; Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Jingjie; Qiu, Bensheng; Yu, Yongqiang; Wang, Kai

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the neural mechanisms underlying attention deficits that are related to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in combination with cerebral perfusion. Thirty one patients with breast cancer who were scheduled to receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 34 healthy control subjects were included. The patients completed two assessments of the attention network tasks (ANT), neuropsychological background tests, and the arterial spin labeling scan, which were performed before neoadjuvant chemotherapy and after completing chemotherapy. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the patients exhibited reduced performance in the alerting and executive control attention networks but not the orienting network (p < 0.05) and showed significant increases in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the left posterior cingulate gyrus, left middle occipital gyrus, bilateral precentral gyrus, inferior parietal gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, angular gyrus, precuneus, cuneus, superior occipital gyrus, calcarine cortex, and temporal gyrus (p < 0.01 corrected) when compared with patients before chemotherapy and healthy controls. A significant correlation was found between the decrease performance of ANT and the increase in CBF changes in some brain regions of the patients with breast cancer. The results demonstrated that neoadjuvant chemotherapy influences hemodynamic activity in different brain areas through increasing cerebral perfusion, which reduces the attention abilities in breast cancer patients. PMID:28209975

  8. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis after stroke identified noninvasively with cerebral blood flow-weighted arterial spin labeling MRI

    PubMed Central

    Strother, Megan K.; Buckingham, Cari; Faraco, Carlos C.; Arteaga, Daniel; Lu, Pengcheng; Xu, Yaomin; Donahue, Manus J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) is most commonly investigated using hemodynamic PET and SPECT imaging. However, noninvasive MRI offers advantages of improved spatial resolution, allowing hemodynamic changes to be compared directly with structural findings and without concerns related to ionizing radiation exposure. The aim of this study was to evaluate relationships between CCD identified from cerebral blood flow (CBF)-weighted arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI with cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR)-weighted blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) MRI, Wallerian degeneration, clinical motor impairment, and corticospinal tract involvement. Methods Subjects (n=74) enrolled in an ongoing observational stroke trial underwent CBF-weighted ASL and hypercapnic CVR-weighted BOLD MRI. Hemispheric asymmetry indices for basal cerebellar CBF, cerebellar CVR, and cerebral peduncular area were compared between subjects with unilateral supratentorial infarcts (n=18) and control subjects without infarcts (n=16). CCD required (1) supratentorial infarct and (2) asymmetric cerebellar CBF (>95% confidence interval relative to controls). Results In CCD subjects (n=9), CVR (p=0.04) and cerebral peduncular area (p < 0.01) were significantly asymmetric compared to controls. Compared to infarct subjects not meeting CCD criteria (n=9), CCD subjects had no difference in corticospinal tract location for infarct (p=1.0) or motor impairment (p=0.08). Conclusions CCD correlated with cerebellar CVR asymmetry and Wallerian degeneration. These findings suggest that noninvasive MRI may be a useful alternative to PET or SPECT to study structural correlates and clinical consequences of CCD following supratentorial stroke. PMID:26724658

  9. Hippocampal blood flow in normal aging measured with arterial spin labeling at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Rusinek, Henry; Brys, Miroslaw; Glodzik, Lidia; Switalski, Remigiusz; Tsui, Wai-Hon; Haas, Francois; Mcgorty, Kellyanne; Chen, Qun; de Leon, Mony J.

    2011-01-01

    Due to methodological difficulties related to the small size, variable distribution of hippocampal arteries, and the location of the hippocampus in the proximity of middle cranial fossa, little is known about hippocampal blood flow (HBF). We have tested the utility of a pulsed ASL sequence based on multi-shot TrueFISP to measure HBF in 34 normal volunteers (17 women, 17 men, 26-92 years old). Flow sensitivity to a mild hypercapnic challenge was also examined. Coregistered 3D MPRAGE sequence was used to eliminate from hippocampal and cortical regions of interest all voxel with <75% of gray matter. Large blood vessels were also excluded. HBF in normal volunteers averaged 61.2±9.0 ml/(100g min). There was no statistically significant age or gender effect. Under a mild hypercapnia challenge (end tidal CO2 pressure increase of 6.8±1.9 mg Hg over the baseline), HBF response was 14.1±10.8 ml/(100g min), whereas cortical gray matter flow increased by 18.0±12.2 ml/(100g min). Flow response among women was significantly larger than in the men. The average absolute difference between two successive HBF measures was 3.6 ml/(100g min), or 5.4%. The 3T TrueFISP ASL method offers a HBF measurement strategy that combines good spatial resolution, sensitivity, and minimal image distortions. PMID:20939094

  10. Partial volume correction of brain perfusion estimates using the inherent signal data of time-resolved arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, André; Wirestam, Ronnie; Petersen, Esben Thade; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Knutsson, Linda

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative perfusion MRI based on arterial spin labeling (ASL) is hampered by partial volume effects (PVEs), arising due to voxel signal cross-contamination between different compartments. To address this issue, several partial volume correction (PVC) methods have been presented. Most previous methods rely on segmentation of a high-resolution T1 -weighted morphological image volume that is coregistered to the low-resolution ASL data, making the result sensitive to errors in the segmentation and coregistration. In this work, we present a methodology for partial volume estimation and correction, using only low-resolution ASL data acquired with the QUASAR sequence. The methodology consists of a T1 -based segmentation method, with no spatial priors, and a modified PVC method based on linear regression. The presented approach thus avoids prior assumptions about the spatial distribution of brain compartments, while also avoiding coregistration between different image volumes. Simulations based on a digital phantom as well as in vivo measurements in 10 volunteers were used to assess the performance of the proposed segmentation approach. The simulation results indicated that QUASAR data can be used for robust partial volume estimation, and this was confirmed by the in vivo experiments. The proposed PVC method yielded probable perfusion maps, comparable to a reference method based on segmentation of a high-resolution morphological scan. Corrected gray matter (GM) perfusion was 47% higher than uncorrected values, suggesting a significant amount of PVEs in the data. Whereas the reference method failed to completely eliminate the dependence of perfusion estimates on the volume fraction, the novel approach produced GM perfusion values independent of GM volume fraction. The intra-subject coefficient of variation of corrected perfusion values was lowest for the proposed PVC method. As shown in this work, low-resolution partial volume estimation in connection with ASL perfusion

  11. Assessment of Alzheimer’s Disease Risk with Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: An Arterial Spin Labeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Bangen, Katherine J.; Restom, Khaled; Liu, Thomas T.; Wierenga, Christina E.; Jak, Amy J.; Salmon, David P.; Bondi, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of older adults at risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by virtue of their cognitive (i.e., mild cognitive impairment [MCI]) and/or genetic (i.e., apolipoprotein E [APOE] ε4 allele) status demonstrate divergent brain response patterns during memory encoding across studies. Using arterial spin labeling MRI, we examined the influence of AD risk on resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) as well as the CBF and blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal response to memory encoding in the medial temporal lobes (MTL) in 45 older adults (29 cognitively normal [14 APOE ε4 carriers and 15 noncarriers]; 16 MCI [8 APOE ε4 carriers, 8 noncarriers]). Risk groups were comparable in terms of mean age, years of education, gender distribution, and vascular risk burden. Individuals at genetic risk for AD by virtue of the APOE ε4 allele demonstrated increased MTL resting state CBF relative to ε4 noncarriers, whereas individuals characterized as MCI showed decreased MTL resting state CBF relative to their cognitively normal peers. For percent change CBF, there was a trend toward a cognitive status by genotype interaction. In the cognitively normal group, there was no difference in percent change CBF based on APOE genotype. In contrast, in the MCI group, APOE ε4 carriers demonstrated significantly greater percent change in CBF relative to ε4 noncarriers. No group differences were found for BOLD response. Findings suggest that abnormal resting state CBF and CBF response to memory encoding may be early indicators of brain dysfunction in individuals at risk for developing AD. PMID:22531427

  12. The Cerebral Blood Flow Biomedical Informatics Research Network (CBFBIRN) database and analysis pipeline for arterial spin labeling MRI data

    PubMed Central

    Shin, David D.; Ozyurt, I. Burak; Liu, Thomas T.

    2013-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a magnetic resonance imaging technique that provides a non-invasive and quantitative measure of cerebral blood flow (CBF). After more than a decade of active research, ASL is now emerging as a robust and reliable CBF measurement technique with increased availability and ease of use. There is a growing number of research and clinical sites using ASL for neuroscience research and clinical care. In this paper, we present an online CBF Database and Analysis Pipeline, collectively called the Cerebral Blood Flow Biomedical Informatics Research Network (CBFBIRN) that allows researchers to upload and share ASL and clinical data. In addition to serving the role as a central data repository, the CBFBIRN provides a streamlined data processing infrastructure for CBF quantification and group analysis, which has the potential to accelerate the discovery of new scientific and clinical knowledge. All capabilities and features built into the CBFBIRN are accessed online using a web browser through a secure login. In this work, we begin with a general description of the CBFBIRN system data model and its architecture, then devote the remainder of the paper to the CBFBIRN capabilities. The latter part of our work is divided into two processing modules: (1) Data Upload and CBF Quantification Module; (2) Group Analysis Module that supports three types of analysis commonly used in neuroscience research. To date, the CBFBIRN hosts CBF maps and associated clinical data from more than 1,300 individual subjects. The data have been contributed by more than 20 different research studies, investigating the effect of various conditions on CBF including Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, traumatic brain injury, HIV, caffeine usage, and methamphetamine abuse. Several example results, generated by the CBFBIRN processing modules, are presented. We conclude with the lessons learned during implementation and deployment of the CBFBIRN and our

  13. Static and dynamic functional connectivity in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: use of arterial spin labelling fMRI.

    PubMed

    Boissoneault, Jeff; Letzen, Janelle; Lai, Song; Robinson, Michael E; Staud, Roland

    2016-09-28

    Studies using arterial spin labelling (ASL) have shown that individuals with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have decreased regional cerebral blood flow, which may be associated with changes in functional neural networks. Indeed, recent studies indicate disruptions in functional connectivity (FC) at rest in chronically fatigued patients including perturbations in static FC (sFC), that is average FC at rest between several brain regions subserving neurocognitive, motor and affect-related networks. Whereas sFC often provides information of functional network reorganization in chronic illnesses, investigations of temporal changes in functional connectivity between multiple brain areas may shed light on the dynamic characteristics of brain network activation associated with such maladies. We used ASL fMRI in 19 patients with CFS and 15 healthy controls (HC) to examine both static and dynamic changes in FC among several a priori selected brain regions during a fatiguing cognitive task. HC showed greater increases than CFS in static FC (sFC) between insula and temporo-occipital structures and between precuneus and thalamus/striatum. Furthermore, inferior frontal gyrus connectivity to cerebellum, occipital and temporal structures declined in HC but increased in CFS. Patients also showed lower dynamic FC (dFC) between hippocampus and right superior parietal lobule. Both sFC and dFC correlated with task-related fatigue increases. These data provide the first evidence that perturbations in static and dynamic FC may underlie chronically fatigued patients' report of task-induced fatigue. Further research will determine whether such changes in sFC and dFC are also characteristic for other fatigued individuals, including patients with chronic pain, cancer and multiple sclerosis.

  14. Resting cerebral blood flow alterations in chronic traumatic brain injury: an arterial spin labeling perfusion FMRI study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghoon; Whyte, John; Patel, Sunil; Avants, Brian; Europa, Eduardo; Wang, Jiongjiong; Slattery, John; Gee, James C; Coslett, H Branch; Detre, John A

    2010-08-01

    Non-invasive measurement of resting state cerebral blood flow (CBF) may reflect alterations of brain structure and function after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, previous imaging studies of resting state brain in chronic TBI have been limited by several factors, including measurement in relative rather than absolute units, use of crude spatial registration methods, exclusion of subjects with substantial focal lesions, and exposure to ionizing radiation, which limits repeated assessments. This study aimed to overcome those obstacles by measuring absolute CBF with an arterial spin labeling perfusion fMRI technique, and using an image preprocessing protocol that is optimized for brains with mixed diffuse and focal injuries characteristic of moderate and severe TBI. Resting state CBF was quantified in 27 individuals with moderate to severe TBI in the chronic stage, and 22 demographically matched healthy controls. In addition to global CBF reductions in the TBI subjects, more prominent regional hypoperfusion was found in the posterior cingulate cortices, the thalami, and multiple locations in the frontal cortices. Diffuse injury, as assessed by tensor-based morphometry, was mainly associated with reduced CBF in the posterior cingulate cortices and the thalami, where the greatest volume losses were detected. Hypoperfusion in superior and middle frontal cortices, in contrast, was associated with focal lesions. These results suggest that structural lesions, both focal and diffuse, are the main contributors to the absolute CBF alterations seen in chronic TBI, and that CBF may serve as a tool to assess functioning neuronal volume. We also speculate that resting reductions in posterior cingulate perfusion may reflect alterations in the default-mode network, and may contribute to the attentional deficits common in TBI.

  15. Comparison of Arterial Spin Labeling and Bolus Perfusion-Weighted Imaging for Detecting Mismatch in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zaharchuk, Greg; El Mogy, Ibraheem S.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Albers, Gregory W.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) – diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) mismatch paradigm is widely used in stroke imaging studies. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an alternative perfusion method that does not require contrast. This study compares the agreement of ASL-DWI and PWI-DWI mismatch classification in stroke patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a retrospective study drawn from all 1.5T MRI studies performed in 2010 at a single institution. Inclusion criteria were: symptom onset<5 days, DWI lesion>10 ml, acquisition of both PWI and ASL. DWI and PWI-Tmax>6 sec lesion volumes were determined using automated software. Patients were classified into reperfused, matched, or mismatch groups. Two radiologists classified ASL-DWI qualitatively into the same categories, blinded to DWI-PWI. Agreement between both individual readers and methods was assessed. RESULTS 51 studies met the inclusion criteria. Seven cases were excluded (1 due to PWI susceptibility artifact, 2 due to motion, and 4 due to severe ASL borderzone sign), resulting in 44 studies for comparison. Inter-rater agreement for ASL–DWI mismatch status was high (κ =0.92, 95% CI 0.80–1.00). ASL-DWI and PWI-DWI mismatch categories agreed in 25/44 cases (57%). In the 16 of 19 discrepant cases (84%), ASL overestimated the PWI lesion size. In 34/44 cases (77%), they agreed regarding the presence of mismatch versus no mismatch. CONCLUSION Mismatch classification based on ASL and PWI agree frequently but not perfectly. ASL tends to overestimate the PWI-Tmax lesion volume. Improved ASL methodologies and/or higher field strength are necessary before ASL can be recommended for routine use in acute stroke. PMID:22539548

  16. Implication of cerebral circulation time in intracranial stenosis measured by digital subtraction angiography on cerebral blood flow estimation measured by arterial spin labeling

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Kay; Hauf, Martinus; Kellner-Weldon, Frauke; El-Koussy, Marwan; Kiefer, Claus; Federspiel, Andrea; Schroth, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging to assess cerebral blood flow (CBF) is of increasing interest in basic research and in diagnostic applications, since ASL provides similar information to positron emission tomography about perfusion in vascular territories. However, in patients with steno-occlusive arterial disease (SOAD), CBF as measured by ASL might be underestimated due to delayed bolus arrival, and thus increased spin relaxation. We aimed to estimate the extent to which bolus arrival time (BAT) was delayed in patients with SOAD and whether this resulted in underestimation of CBF. METHODS BAT was measured using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in ten patients with high-grade stenosis of the middle carotid artery (MCA). Regional CBF was assessed with pseudocontinuous ASL. RESULTS BATs were nonsignificantly prolonged in the stenotic hemisphere 4.1±2.0 s compared with the healthy hemisphere 3.3±0.9 s; however, there were substantial individual differences on the stenotic side. CBF in the anterior and posterior MCA territories were significantly reduced on the stenotic hemisphere. Severe stenosis was correlated with longer BAT and lower quantified CBF. CONCLUSION ASL-based perfusion measurement involves a race between the decay of the spins and the delivery of labeled blood to the region of interest. Special caution is needed when interpreting CBF values quantified in individuals with altered blood flow and delayed circulation times. However, from a clinician’s point of view, an accentuation of hypoperfusion (even if caused by underestimation of CBF due to prolonged BATs) might be desirable since it indexes potentially harmful physiologic deficits. PMID:27411297

  17. 3.0 T MRI arterial spin labeling and magnetic resonance spectroscopy technology in the application of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jian-Xun; Wang, Ming-Jie; Lei, Xin-Jun; Chen, Xu-Gao

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and spectrum variables in the posterior cingulate region of patients with AD under the detection of arterial spin labeling (ASL) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). A total of 20 AD patients (8 males and 12 females; mean age, 64.84±8.82 years) and 20 healthy controls (9 males and 11 females; mean age, 64.94±7.93 years) were included in this study for analysis. All images were obtained using a 3.0-T MR imager and an 8-channel head array receiving coil. MRS measurements were conducted exploring variables of metabolite ratios. Statistical analyses were conducted with the SPSS 11.0 statistical software package. Findings in the present study revealed a significant difference in the mean MMSE scores between the AD group and the healthy control group (16.21±4.01 vs. 27.35±1.01, P<0.01). Compared with the healthy control group, CBF in the bilateral frontal region showed a significant decrease in the AD group (right frontal: 83.5±7.2 vs. 110±11.5, P<0.05; left frontal: 85.6±8.1 vs. 108.7±12.2, P<0.05, respectively), and a similar association was also observed in the TL, TPJ, parietal, and hippocampal regions (all P<0.05). MRS imaging in the posterior cingulate region showed a significant reduction in the NAA/Cr ratio in the AD group (1.43±0.1 vs. 1.49±0.0, P<0.05). Additionally, we found that the MI/Cr and Cho/Cr ratios were higher than normal controls in patients with AD (all P<0.05). Our results suggested that 3D ASL detection combined with MRS in studying AD could show the regional hypo-perfusion with the decrease of CBF and the abnormal metabolic changes of the posterior cingulate cortex.

  18. Arterial spin labeling in combination with a look-locker sampling strategy: inflow turbo-sampling EPI-FAIR (ITS-FAIR).

    PubMed

    Günther, M; Bock, M; Schad, L R

    2001-11-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) permits quantification of tissue perfusion without the use of MR contrast agents. With standard ASL techniques such as flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) the signal from arterial blood is measured at a fixed inversion delay after magnetic labeling. As no image information is sampled during this delay, FAIR measurements are inefficient and time-consuming. In this work the FAIR preparation was combined with a Look-Locker acquisition to sample not one but a series of images after each labeling pulse. This new method allows monitoring of the temporal dynamics of blood inflow. To quantify perfusion, a theoretical model for the signal dynamics during the Look-Locker readout was developed and applied. Also, the imaging parameters of the new ITS-FAIR technique were optimized using an expression for the variance of the calculated perfusion. For the given scanner hardware the parameters were: temporal resolution 100 ms, 23 images, flip-angle 25.4 degrees. In a normal volunteer experiment with these parameters an average perfusion value of 48.2 +/- 12.1 ml/100 g/min was measured in the brain. With the ability to obtain ITS-FAIR time series with high temporal resolution arterial transit times in the range of -138 - 1054 ms were measured, where nonphysical negative values were found in voxels containing large vessels.

  19. Regional and voxel-wise comparisons of blood flow measurements between dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    White, Carissa M; Pope, Whitney B; Zaw, Taryar; Qiao, Joe; Naeini, Kourosh M; Lai, Albert; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Wang, J J; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the regional and voxel-wise correlation between dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with brain tumors. Thirty patients with histologically verified brain tumors were evaluated in the current study. DSC-MRI was performed by first using a preload dose of gadolinium contrast, then collecting a dynamic image acquisition during a bolus of contrast, followed by posthoc contrast agent leakage correction. Pseudocontinuous ASL was collected using 30 pairs of tag and control acquisition using a 3-dimensional gradient-echo spin-echo (GRASE) acquisition. All images were registered to a high-resolution anatomical atlas. Average CBF measurements within regions of contrast-enhancement and T2 hyperintensity were evaluated between the two modalities. Additionally, voxel-wise correlation between CBF measurements obtained with DSC and ASL were assessed. Results demonstrated a positive linear correlation between DSC and ASL measurements of CBF when regional average values were compared; however, a statistically significant voxel-wise correlation was only observed in around 30-40% of patients. These results suggest DSC and ASL may provide regionally similar, but spatially different measurements of CBF.

  20. Quantitative assessment of cerebral hemodynamic parameters by QUASAR arterial spin labeling in Alzheimer's disease and cognitively normal Elderly adults at 3-tesla.

    PubMed

    Mak, Henry K F; Chan, Queenie; Zhang, Zhipeng; Petersen, Esben T; Qiu, Deqiang; Zhang, Linda; Yau, Kelvin K W; Chu, Leung-Wing; Golay, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    QUASAR arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to investigate the role of vascular impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We hypothesized that the hemodynamic parameters monitoring cerebrovascular integrity, i.e., cerebral blood flow (CBF), arterial blood volume (aBV), and arterial transit time (aTT), would be affected. 13 AD patients and 15 healthy control (HC) subjects underwent 3T MRI scanning. Two separate blood flow acquisitions were obtained with 1 slice overlap for whole brain coverage. CBF, aBV, and aTT maps were calculated using in-house software. Preprocessing and statistical analyses were performed on SPM5. Region-of-interest (ROI) studies of ten selected cerebral regions were also conducted. There were significant differences in mini mental status exam (MMSE) (AD: 16.3 ± 4.55, HC: 28.5 ± 2.00) and Alzheimer's disease assessment scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) scores (AD: 25.25 ± 9.64, HC: 5.51 ± 2.62) between the 2 groups (p < 0.001) but none in age (p = 0.068). CBF decreased significantly (p < 0.01) in AD compared to controls in the right middle cingulate, left cuneus, left inferior and middle frontal, right superior frontal, left inferior parietal, and right supramarginal gyri. ROI studies confirmed significant hemodynamic impairments in AD compared to HC (p < 0.05): CBF in middle and posterior cingulate, aBV in left superior temporal, right inferior parietal, and posterior cingulate, and aTT in left inferior frontal and middle cingulate gyri. CBF correlated positively while aTT correlated negatively to MMSE, and vice versa for ADAS-cog. Using QUASAR ASL, we found patterns of regional hemodynamic impairment typical of moderate AD, suggesting underlying vascular abnormality. As potential biomarkers, these hemodynamic parameters could differentiate patients from volunteers, and possibly indicate the conversion from healthy aging to mild cognitive impairment to AD.

  1. The free radical spin-trap alpha-PBN attenuates periinfarct depolarizations following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats without reducing infarct volume.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Thomas; Bruhn, Torben; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    2003-11-14

    The effect of the free radical spin-trap alpha-phenyl-butyl-tert-nitrone (alpha-PBN) in permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rats was examined in two series of experiments. In the first, rats were subjected to permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO) and treated 1 h after occlusion with a single dose of alpha-PBN (100 mg/kg) or saline. Body temperature was measured and controlled for the first 24 h to obtain identical temperature curves in the two groups. Cortical infarct volumes were determined on histological sections 7 days later. alpha-PBN did not significantly reduce infarct volume (control: 28.3+/-16.3 mm3 vs. alpha-PBN 23.7+/-7.4 mm3). In the second series of experiments, periinfarct depolarizations (PIDs) were recorded with an extracellular DC electrode at two locations in the ischemic penumbra for the initial 3 h following MCAO. alpha-PBN (100 mg/kg, single dose in conjunction with occlusion) significantly reduced the total number (median value of 3 PIDs in the control groups vs. 1 PID in alpha-PBN groups, p<0.001) and total duration of the PIDs (median value 662 s in the control groups vs. 162 s in the alpha-PBN groups, p<0.006). In spite of this, cortical infarct volumes determined 7 days later in the same rats were not smaller in alpha-PBN-treated rats. The study thus demonstrates that attenuation of PIDs does not always lead to smaller infarcts if permanent arterial occlusion is followed by long survival time and does not support the hypothesis that PIDs per se are critical determinants of infarct size in this situation.

  2. Quantitative measurement of blood flow in paediatric brain tumours—a comparative study of dynamic susceptibility contrast and multi time-point arterial spin labelled MRI

    PubMed Central

    Abernethy, Laurence; Pizer, Barry; Avula, Shivaram; Parkes, Laura M

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Arterial spin-labelling (ASL) MRI uses intrinsic blood water to quantify the cerebral blood flow (CBF), removing the need for the injection of a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for conventional perfusion imaging such as dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC). Owing to the non-invasive nature of the technique, ASL is an attractive option for use in paediatric patients. This work compared DSC and multi-timepoint ASL measures of CBF in paediatric brain tumours. Methods: Patients (n = 23; 20 low-grade tumours and 3 high-grade tumours) had DSC and multi-timepoint ASL with and without vascular crushers (VC). VC removes the contribution from larger vessel blood flow. Mean perfusion metrics were extracted from control and T1-enhanced tumour regions of interest (ROIs): arterial arrival time (AAT) and CBF from the ASL images with and without VC, relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF), relative cerebral blood volume, delay time (DT) and mean transit time (MTT) from the DSC images. Results: Significant correlations existed for: AAT and DT (r = 0.77, p = 0.0002) and CBF and rCBF (r = 0.56, p = 0.02) in control ROIs for ASL-noVC. No significant correlations existed between DSC and ASL measures in the tumour region. Significant differences between control and tumour ROI were found for MTT (p < 0.001) and rCBF (p < 0.005) measures. Conclusion: Significant correlations between ASL-noVC and DSC measures in the normal brain suggest that DSC is most sensitive to macrovascular blood flow. The absence of significant correlations within the tumour ROI suggests that ASL is sensitive to different physiological mechanisms compared with DSC measures. Advances in knowledge: ASL provides information which is comparable with that of DSC in healthy tissues, but appears to reflect a different physiology in tumour tissues. PMID:26975495

  3. Optimization of 4D vessel‐selective arterial spin labeling angiography using balanced steady‐state free precession and vessel‐encoding

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Peter; Bi, Xiaoming; Chappell, Michael A.; Tijssen, Rob H. N.; Sheerin, Fintan; Miller, Karla L.; Jezzard, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Vessel‐selective dynamic angiograms provide a wealth of useful information about the anatomical and functional status of arteries, including information about collateral flow and blood supply to lesions. Conventional x‐ray techniques are invasive and carry some risks to the patient, so non‐invasive alternatives are desirable. Previously, non‐contrast dynamic MRI angiograms based on arterial spin labeling (ASL) have been demonstrated using both spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) and balanced steady‐state free precession (bSSFP) readout modules, but no direct comparison has been made, and bSSFP optimization over a long readout period has not been fully explored. In this study bSSFP and SPGR are theoretically and experimentally compared for dynamic ASL angiography. Unlike SPGR, bSSFP was found to have a very low ASL signal attenuation rate, even when a relatively large flip angle and short repetition time were used, leading to a threefold improvement in the measured signal‐to‐noise ratio (SNR) efficiency compared with SPGR. For vessel‐selective applications, SNR efficiency can be further improved over single‐artery labeling methods by using a vessel‐encoded pseudo‐continuous ASL (VEPCASL) approach. The combination of a VEPCASL preparation with a time‐resolved bSSFP readout allowed the generation of four‐dimensional (4D; time‐resolved three‐dimensional, 3D) vessel‐selective cerebral angiograms in healthy volunteers with 59 ms temporal resolution. Good quality 4D angiograms were obtained in all subjects, providing comparable structural information to 3D time‐of‐flight images, as well as dynamic information and vessel selectivity, which was shown to be high. A rapid 1.5 min dynamic two‐dimensional version of the sequence yielded similar image features and would be suitable for a busy clinical protocol. Preliminary experiments with bSSFP that included the extracranial vessels showed signal loss in regions of poor magnetic field

  4. Quantitative spatial comparison of diffuse optical imaging with blood oxygen level-dependent and arterial spin labeling-based functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, Theodore J.; Hoge, Rick D.; Dale, Anders M.; Franceschini, Maria A.; Boas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Akin to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), diffuse optical imaging (DOI) is a noninvasive method for measuring localized changes in hemoglobin levels within the brain. When combined with fMRI methods, multimodality approaches could offer an integrated perspective on the biophysics, anatomy, and physiology underlying each of the imaging modalities. Vital to the correct interpretation of such studies, control experiments to test the consistency of both modalities must be performed. Here, we compare DOI with blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) and arterial spin labeling fMRI-based methods in order to explore the spatial agreement of the response amplitudes recorded by these two methods. Rather than creating optical images by regularized, tomographic reconstructions, we project the fMRI image into optical measurement space using the optical forward problem. We report statistically better spatial correlation between the fMRI-BOLD response and the optically measured deoxyhemoglobin (R=0.71, p=1 × 10−7) than between the BOLD and oxyhemoglobin or total hemoglobin measures (R=0.38, p=0.04|0.37, p=0.05, respectively). Similarly, we find that the correlation between the ASL measured blood flow and optically measured total and oxyhemoglobin is stronger (R=0.73, p=5 × 10−6 and R=0.71, p=9 × 10−6, respectively) than the flow to deoxyhemoglobin spatial correlation (R=0.26, p=0.10). PMID:17212541

  5. Noncontrast-enhanced three-dimensional (3D) intracranial MR angiography using pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling and accelerated 3D radial acquisition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huimin; Block, Walter F; Turski, Patrick A; Mistretta, Charles A; Johnson, Kevin M

    2013-03-01

    Pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL) can be used to generate noncontrast magnetic resonance angiograms of the cerebrovascular structures. Previously described PCASL-based angiography techniques were limited to two-dimensional projection images or relatively low-resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging due to long acquisition time. This work proposes a new PCASL-based 3D magnetic resonance angiography method that uses an accelerated 3D radial acquisition technique (VIPR, spoiled gradient echo) as the readout. Benefiting from the sparsity provided by PCASL and noise-like artifacts of VIPR, this new method is able to obtain submillimeter 3D isotropic resolution and whole head coverage with a 8-min scan. Intracranial angiography feasibility studies in healthy (N = 5) and diseased (N = 5) subjects show reduced saturation artifacts in PCASL-VIPR compared with a standard time-of-flight protocol. These initial results show great promise for PCASL-VIPR for static, dynamic, and vessel selective 3D intracranial angiography.

  6. Inverse correlation between cerebral blood flow measured by continuous arterial spin-labeling (CASL) MRI and neurocognitive function in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA).

    PubMed

    Strouse, John J; Cox, Christiane S; Melhem, Elias R; Lu, Hanzhang; Kraut, Michael A; Razumovsky, Alexander; Yohay, Kaleb; van Zijl, Peter C; Casella, James F

    2006-07-01

    Overt stroke, clinically "silent" cerebral infarct, and neurocognitive impairment are frequent complications of sickle cell anemia (SCA). Current imaging techniques have limited sensitivity and specificity to identify children at risk for neurocognitive impairment. We prospectively evaluated 24 children with SCA with a neurologic exam, complete blood count, transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD), measurement of intelligence quotient (IQ), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) using continuous arterial spin-labeling (CASL) MRI. Average CBF to gray matter was 112 +/- 36 mL/100 g/min. We identified a strong inverse relationship between performance IQ and CBF (-1.5 points per 10 mL/100 g/min increase in CBF, P = .013). Elevated steady-state white blood cell count (> or = 14 x 10(9)/L [14,000/microL]) was associated with lower full scale IQ (86 +/- 9 vs 99 +/- 10, P = .005). CASL MRI may identify children with neurocognitive impairment, before damage is evident by structural MRI or TCD.

  7. Dopaminergic Therapy Modulates Cortical Perfusion in Parkinson Disease With and Without Dementia According to Arterial Spin Labeled Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Che; Chen, Pei-Chin; Huang, Yung-Cheng; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Wang, Hung-Chen; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lu, Cheng-Hsien

    2016-02-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging analyses allow for the quantification of altered cerebral blood flow, and provide a novel means of examining the impact of dopaminergic treatments. The authors examined the cerebral perfusion differences among 17 Parkinson disease (PD) patients, 17 PD with dementia (PDD) patients, and 17 healthy controls and used ASL-MRI to assess the effects of dopaminergic therapies on perfusion in the patients. The authors demonstrated progressive widespread cortical hypoperfusion in PD and PDD and robust effects for the dopaminergic therapies. Specifically, dopaminergic medications further decreased frontal lobe and cerebellum perfusion in the PD and PDD groups, respectively. These patterns of hypoperfusion could be related to cognitive dysfunctions and disease severity. Furthermore, desensitization to dopaminergic therapies in terms of cortical perfusion was found as the disease progressed, supporting the concept that long-term therapies are associated with the therapeutic window narrowing. The highly sensitive pharmaceutical response of ASL allows clinicians and researchers to easily and effectively quantify the absolute perfusion status, which might prove helpful for therapeutic planning.

  8. Renal plasma flow (RPF) measured with multiple-inversion-time arterial spin labeling (ASL) and tracer kinetic analysis: Validation against a dynamic contrast-enhancement method

    PubMed Central

    Conlin, Christopher C.; Oesingmann, Niels; Bolster, Bradley; Huang, Yufeng; Lee, Vivian S.; Zhang, Jeff L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To propose and validate a method for accurately quantifying renal plasma flow (RPF) with arterial spin labeling (ASL). Materials and methods The proposed method employs a tracer–kinetic approach and derives perfusion from the slope of the ASL difference signal sampled at multiple inversion-times (TIs). To validate the method's accuracy, we performed a HIPAA-compliant and IRB-approved study with 15 subjects (9 male, 6 female; age range 24– 73) to compare RPF estimates obtained from ASL to those from a more established dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI method. We also investigated the impact of TI-sampling density on the accuracy of estimated RPF. Results Good agreement was found between ASL- and DCE-measured RPF, with a mean difference of 9 ± 30 ml/min and a correlation coefficient R = 0.92 when ASL signals were acquired at 16 TIs and a mean difference of 9 ± 57 ml/min and R = 0.81 when ASL signals were acquired at 5 TIs. RPF estimated from ASL signals acquired at only 2 TIs (400 and 1200 ms) showed a low correlation with DCE-measured values (R = 0.30). Conclusion The proposed ASL method is capable of measuring RPF with an accuracy that is comparable to DCE MRI. At least 5 TIs are recommended for the ASL acquisition to ensure reliability of RPF measurements. PMID:27864008

  9. Computer-aided classification of patients with dementia of Alzheimer's type based on cerebral blood flow determined with arterial spin labeling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yasuo; Arimura, Hidetaka; Yoshiura, Takashi; Tokunaga, Chiaki; Magome, Taiki; Monji, Akira; Noguchi, Tomoyuki; Toyofuku, Fukai; Oki, Masafumi; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Honda, Hiroshi

    2010-03-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is one of promising non-invasive magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF). The aim of this study was to develop a computer-aided classification system for AD patients based on CBFs measured by the ASL technique. The average CBFs in cortical regions were determined as functional image features based on the CBF map image, which was non-linearly transformed to a Talairach brain atlas by using a free-form deformation. An artificial neural network (ANN) was trained with the CBF functional features in 10 cortical regions, and was employed for distinguishing patients with AD from control subjects. For evaluation of the method, we applied the proposed method to 20 cases including ten AD patients and ten control subjects, who were scanned a 3.0-Tesla MR unit. As a result, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve obtained by the proposed method was 0.893 based on a leave-one-out-by-case test in identification of AD cases among 20 cases. The proposed method would be feasible for classification of patients with AD.

  10. Arterial Spin-Labeled Perfusion Combined with Segmentation Techniques to Evaluate Cerebral Blood Flow in White and Gray Matter of Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Helton, Kathleen J.; Paydar, Amir; Glass, John; Weirich, Eric M.; Hankins, Jane; Li, Chin-Shang; Smeltzer, Matthew P.; Wang, Winfred C.; Ware, Russell E.; Ogg, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Changes in cerebral perfusion are an important feature of the pathophysiology of sickle cell anemia (SCA); cerebrovascular ischemia occurs frequently and leads to neurocognitive deficits, silent infarcts, and overt stroke. Non-invasive MRI methods to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) by arterial spin labeling (ASL) afford new opportunities to characterize disease- and therapy-induced changes in cerebral hemodynamics in patients with SCA. Recent studies have documented elevated gray matter (GM) CBF in untreated children with SCA, but no measurements of white matter (WM) CBF have been reported. Procedures Pulsed ASL with automated brain image segmentation-classification techniques were used to determine the CBF in GM, WM, and abnormal white matter (ABWM) of 21 children with SCA, 18 of whom were receiving hydroxyurea therapy. Results GM and WM CBF were highly associated (R2 =.76, p< 0.0001) and the GM to WM CBF ratio was 1.6 (95% confidence interval: 1.43-1.83). Global GM CBF in our treated cohort was 87 ± 24 mL/min/100 g, a value lower than previously reported in untreated patients with SCA. CBF was elevated in normal appearing WM (43 ± 14 mL/min/100 g) but decreased in ABWM (6 ± 12 mL/min/100 g), compared to published normal pediatric controls. Hemispheric asymmetry in CBF was noted in most patients. Conclusions These perfusion measurements suggest that hydroxyurea may normalize GM CBF in children with SCA, but altered perfusion in WM may persist. This novel combined approach for CBF quantification will facilitate prospective studies of cerebral vasculopathy in SCA, particularly regarding the effects of treatments such as hydroxyurea. PMID:18937311

  11. Using Anatomic Magnetic Resonance Image Information to Enhance Visualization and Interpretation of Functional Images: A Comparison of Methods Applied to Clinical Arterial Spin Labeling Images.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Dai, Weiying; Soman, Salil; Hackney, David B; Wong, Eric T; Robson, Philip M; Alsop, David C

    2017-02-01

    Functional imaging provides hemodynamic and metabolic information and is increasingly being incorporated into clinical diagnostic and research studies. Typically functional images have reduced signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution compared to other non-functional cross sectional images obtained as part of a routine clinical protocol. We hypothesized that enhancing visualization and interpretation of functional images with anatomic information could provide preferable quality and superior diagnostic value. In this work, we implemented five methods (frequency addition, frequency multiplication, wavelet transform, nonsubsampled contourlet transform and intensity-hue-saturation) and a newly proposed ShArpening by Local Similarity with Anatomic images (SALSA) method to enhance the visualization of functional images, while preserving the original functional contrast and quantitative signal intensity characteristics over larger spatial scales. Arterial spin labeling blood flow MR images of the brain were visualization enhanced using anatomic images with multiple contrasts. The algorithms were validated on a numerical phantom and their performance on images of brain tumor patients were assessed by quantitative metrics and neuroradiologist subjective ratings. The frequency multiplication method had the lowest residual error for preserving the original functional image contrast at larger spatial scales (55%-98% of the other methods with simulated data and 64%-86% with experimental data). It was also significantly more highly graded by the radiologists (p<0.005 for clear brain anatomy around the tumor). Compared to other methods, the SALSA provided 11%-133% higher similarity with ground truth images in the simulation and showed just slightly lower neuroradiologist grading score. Most of these monochrome methods do not require any prior knowledge about the functional and anatomic image characteristics, except the acquired resolution. Hence, automatic implementation on

  12. OP04QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENT OF BLOOD FLOW IN PAEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOURS - A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF DYNAMIC SUSCEPTIBILITY CONTRAST AND MULTI-TIMEPOINT ARTERIAL SPIN LABEL IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Abernethy, L.J.; Vidyasagar, R.; Pizer, B.L.; Mallucci, C.L.; Avula, S.; Parkes, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a MR technique that allows for noninvasive quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF). This technique, predominately used in research, has seen significant technical developments in the last few years that have led to more clinical applications. Currently, the main MR method used to provide perfusion measures in brain tumours is dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC). DSC traces the signal changes caused by the transit of a bolus of gadolinium contrast agent. ASL has the advantage of not requiring bolus injection of contrast. We have performed a comparative study of DSC and multi-timepoint ASL in paediatric brain tumours (PBT). METHOD: Data from a total of 19 PBT patients (mean age: 9 ± 5 years; 10 females, 9 males) were included in the analyses for this study. Data used were from first presentation scans performed before any surgical intervention. Comparisons of the quantitative measures of CBF and blood arrival time between the two techniques were carried out to test the feasibility of ASL to provide useful quantification measures of CBF in PBT. RESULTS: DSC measurements of tumour blood flow showed a significant decrease in flow in comparison with normal brain, but this is not seen with ASL. There was a strong correlation between ASL and DSC measures of blood flow in normal brain (r = 0.65, p = 0.009), but not in tumour blood flow (r = 0.33, p = 0.2). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the feasibility and potential utility of ASL as a non-invasive technique for measuring blood flow in PBT. However, there is a discrepancy between ASL and DSC measures, that may be due to leakage of gadolinium contrast, reflecting the abnormal characteristics of tumour blood vessels in PBT.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of blood-brain barrier permeability in ischemic stroke using diffusion-weighted arterial spin labeling in rats.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Yash V; Lu, Jianfei; Shen, Qiang; Cerqueira, Bianca; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging has recently been proposed to quantify the rate of water exchange (Kw) across the blood-brain barrier in humans. This study aimed to evaluate the blood-brain barrier disruption in transient (60 min) ischemic stroke using Kw magnetic resonance imaging with cross-validation by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and Evans blue histology in the same rats. The major findings were: (i) at 90 min after stroke (30 min after reperfusion), group Kw magnetic resonance imaging data showed no significant blood-brain barrier permeability changes, although a few animals showed slightly abnormal Kw. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging confirmed this finding in the same animals. (ii) At two days after stroke, Kw magnetic resonance imaging revealed significant blood-brain barrier disruption. Regions with abnormal Kw showed substantial overlap with regions of hyperintense T2 (vasogenic edema) and hyperperfusion. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and Evans blue histology confirmed these findings in the same animals. The Kw values in the normal contralesional hemisphere and the ipsilesional ischemic core two days after stroke were: 363 ± 17 and 261 ± 18 min(-1), respectively (P < 0.05, n = 9). Kw magnetic resonance imaging is sensitive to blood-brain barrier permeability changes in stroke, consistent with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and Evans blue extravasation. Kw magnetic resonance imaging offers advantages over existing techniques because contrast agent is not needed and repeated measurements can be made for longitudinal monitoring or averaging.

  14. Patient-Specific Detection of Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations as Assessed by Arterial Spin Labeling in Drug-Resistant Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boscolo Galazzo, Ilaria; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Del Felice, Alessandra; Pizzini, Francesca Benedetta; Arcaro, Chiara; Formaggio, Emanuela; Mai, Roberto; Chappell, Michael; Beltramello, Alberto; Manganotti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological and hemodynamic data can be integrated to accurately and precisely identify the generators of abnormal electrical activity in drug-resistant focal epilepsy. Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for quantitative noninvasive measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), can provide a direct measure of variations in cerebral perfusion associated with the epileptic focus. In this study, we aimed to confirm the ASL diagnostic value in the identification of the epileptogenic zone, as compared to electrical source imaging (ESI) results, and to apply a template-based approach to depict statistically significant CBF alterations. Standard video-electroencephalography (EEG), high-density EEG, and ASL were performed to identify clinical seizure semiology and noninvasively localize the epileptic focus in 12 drug-resistant focal epilepsy patients. The same ASL protocol was applied to a control group of 17 healthy volunteers from which a normal perfusion template was constructed using a mixed-effect approach. CBF maps of each patient were then statistically compared to the reference template to identify perfusion alterations. Significant hypo- and hyperperfused areas were identified in all cases, showing good agreement between ASL and ESI results. Interictal hypoperfusion was observed at the site of the seizure in 10/12 patients and early postictal hyperperfusion in 2/12. The epileptic focus was correctly identified within the surgical resection margins in the 5 patients who underwent lobectomy, all of which had good postsurgical outcomes. The combined use of ESI and ASL can aid in the noninvasive evaluation of drug-resistant epileptic patients. PMID:25946055

  15. Reproducibility of Kidney Perfusion Measurements With Arterial Spin Labeling at 1.5 Tesla MRI Combined With Semiautomatic Segmentation for Differential Cortical and Medullary Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Hammon, Matthias; Janka, Rolf; Siegl, Christian; Seuss, Hannes; Grosso, Roberto; Martirosian, Petros; Schmieder, Roland E.; Uder, Michael; Kistner, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic resonance imaging with arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a noninvasive approach to measure organ perfusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of ASL kidney perfusion measurements with semiautomatic segmentation, which allows separate quantification of cortical and medullary perfusion. The right kidneys of 14 healthy volunteers were examined 6 times on 2 occasions (3 times at each occasion). There was a 10-minute pause between each examination and a 14-day interval between the 2 occasions. Cortical, medullary, and whole kidney parenchymal perfusion was determined with customized semiautomatic segmentation software. Coefficient of variances (CVs) and intraclass correlations (ICCs) were calculated. Mean whole, cortical, and medullary kidney perfusion was 307.26 ± 25.65, 337.10 ± 34.83, and 279.61 ± 26.73 mL/min/100 g, respectively. On session 1, mean perfusion for the whole kidney, cortex, and medulla was 307.08 ± 26.91, 336.79 ± 36.54, and 279.60 ± 27.81 mL/min/100 g, respectively, and on session 2, 307.45 ± 24.65, 337.41 ± 33.48, and 279.61 ± 25.94 mL/min/100 g, respectively (P > 0.05; R2 = 0.60/0.59/0.54). For whole, cortical, and medullary kidney perfusion, the total ICC/CV were 0.97/3.43 ± 0.86%, 0.97/4.19 ± 1.33%, and 0.96/4.12 ± 1.36%, respectively. Measurements did not differ significantly and showed a very good correlation (P > 0.05; R2 = 0.75/0.76/0.65). ASL kidney measurements combined with operator-independent semiautomatic segmentation revealed high correlation and low variance of cortical, medullary, and whole kidney perfusion. PMID:26986143

  16. The Effects of Acutely Administered 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine on Spontaneous Brain Function in Healthy Volunteers Measured with Arterial Spin Labeling and Blood Oxygen Level–Dependent Resting State Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Carhart-Harris, Robin L.; Murphy, Kevin; Leech, Robert; Erritzoe, David; Wall, Matthew B.; Ferguson, Bart; Williams, Luke T.J.; Roseman, Leor; Brugger, Stefan; De Meer, Ineke; Tanner, Mark; Tyacke, Robin; Wolff, Kim; Sethi, Ajun; Bloomfield, Michael A.P.; Williams, Tim M.; Bolstridge, Mark; Stewart, Lorna; Morgan, Celia; Newbould, Rexford D.; Feilding, Amanda; Curran, H. Val; Nutt, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The compound 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a potent monoamine releaser that produces an acute euphoria in most individuals. Methods In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced-order study, MDMA was orally administered to 25 physically and mentally healthy individuals. Arterial spin labeling and seed-based resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) were used to produce spatial maps displaying changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and RSFC after MDMA administration. Participants underwent two arterial spin labeling and two blood oxygen level–dependent scans in a 90-minute scan session; MDMA and placebo study days were separated by 1 week. Results Marked increases in positive mood were produced by MDMA. Decreased CBF only was observed after MDMA, and this was localized to the right medial temporal lobe (MTL), thalamus, inferior visual cortex, and the somatosensory cortex. Decreased CBF in the right amygdala and hippocampus correlated with ratings of the intensity of global subjective effects of MDMA. The RSFC results complemented the CBF results, with decreases in RSFC between midline cortical regions, the medial prefrontal cortex, and MTL regions, and increases between the amygdala and hippocampus. There were trend-level correlations between these effects and ratings of intense and positive subjective effects. Conclusions The MTLs appear to be specifically implicated in the mechanism of action of MDMA, but further work is required to elucidate how the drug’s characteristic subjective effects arise from its modulation of spontaneous brain activity. PMID:24495461

  17. Coronary Arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... and animations for grades K-6. The Coronary Arteries Coronary Circulation The heart muscle, like every other ... into two main coronary blood vessels (also called arteries). These coronary arteries branch off into smaller arteries, ...

  18. Spin foams without spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnybida, Jeff

    2016-10-01

    We formulate the spin foam representation of discrete SU(2) gauge theory as a product of vertex amplitudes each of which is the spin network generating function of the boundary graph dual to the vertex. In doing so the sums over spins have been carried out. The boundary data of each n-valent node is explicitly reduced with respect to the local gauge invariance and has a manifest geometrical interpretation as a framed polyhedron of fixed total area. Ultimately, sums over spins are traded for contour integrals over simple poles and recoupling theory is avoided using generating functions.

  19. Arterial insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most common causes of arterial insufficiency is atherosclerosis or "hardening of the arteries." Fatty material (called ... Images Arteries of the brain Developmental process of atherosclerosis References Hansson GK, Hamsten A. Atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and ...

  20. Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance hybrid scanner imaging of cerebral blood flow using (15)O-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging in newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Julie B; Henning, William S; Lindberg, Ulrich; Ladefoged, Claes N; Højgaard, Liselotte; Greisen, Gorm; Law, Ian

    2015-11-01

    Abnormality in cerebral blood flow (CBF) distribution can lead to hypoxic-ischemic cerebral damage in newborn infants. The aim of the study was to investigate minimally invasive approaches to measure CBF by comparing simultaneous (15)O-water positron emission tomography (PET) and single TI pulsed arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MR) on a hybrid PET/MR in seven newborn piglets. Positron emission tomography was performed with IV injections of 20 MBq and 100 MBq (15)O-water to confirm CBF reliability at low activity. Cerebral blood flow was quantified using a one-tissue-compartment-model using two input functions: an arterial input function (AIF) or an image-derived input function (IDIF). The mean global CBF (95% CI) PET-AIF, PET-IDIF, and ASL at baseline were 27 (23; 32), 34 (31; 37), and 27 (22; 32) mL/100 g per minute, respectively. At acetazolamide stimulus, PET-AIF, PET-IDIF, and ASL were 64 (55; 74), 76 (70; 83) and 79 (67; 92) mL/100 g per minute, respectively. At baseline, differences between PET-AIF, PET-IDIF, and ASL were 22% (P<0.0001) and -0.7% (P=0.9). At acetazolamide, differences between PET-AIF, PET-IDIF, and ASL were 19% (P=0.001) and 24% (P=0.0003). In conclusion, PET-IDIF overestimated CBF. Injected activity of 20 MBq (15)O-water had acceptable concordance with 100 MBq, without compromising image quality. Single TI ASL was questionable for regional CBF measurements. Global ASL CBF and PET CBF were congruent during baseline but not during hyperperfusion.

  1. Arterial Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... The arterial catheter allows accurate, second-to-second measurement of the blood pressure; repeated meas- urement is ... pressure must be lowered gradually in steps, and measurements with an arterial catheter help guide the treatment. ■ ...

  2. Pattern of cerebral hyperperfusion in Alzheimer’s disease and amnestic mild cognitive impairment using voxel-based analysis of 3D arterial spin-labeling imaging: initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Bei; Ling, Hua-wei; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Juan; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Tao; Yan, Fu Hua

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A three-dimensional (3D) continuous pulse arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique was used to investigate cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), and age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Materials and methods Three groups were recruited for comparison, 24 AD patients, 17 MCI patients, and 21 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Three-dimensional ASL scans covering the entire brain were acquired with a 3.0 T magnetic resonance scanner. Spatial processing was performed with statistical parametric mapping 8. A second-level one-way analysis of variance analysis (threshold at P<0.05) was performed on the preprocessed ASL data. An average whole-brain CBF for each subject was also included as group-level covariates for the perfusion data, to control for individual CBF variations. Results Significantly increased CBF was detected in bilateral frontal lobes and right temporal subgyral regions in aMCI compared with controls. When comparing AD with aMCI, the major hyperperfusion regions were the right limbic lobe and basal ganglia regions, including the putamen, caudate, lentiform nucleus, and thalamus, and hypoperfusion was found in the left medial frontal lobe, parietal cortex, the right middle temporo-occipital lobe, and particularly, the left anterior cingulate gyrus. We also found decreased CBF in the bilateral temporo-parieto-occipital cortices and left limbic lobe in AD patients, relative to the control group. aMCI subjects showed decreased blood flow in the left occipital lobe, bilateral inferior temporal cortex, and right middle temporal cortex. Conclusion Our results indicated that ASL provided useful perfusion information in AD disease and may be used as an appealing alternative for further pathologic and neuropsychological studies, especially of compensatory mechanisms for cerebral hypoperfusion. PMID:24707173

  3. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  4. Brachioradial arteries with anastomotic arteries connecting to brachial arteries bilaterally.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tong; Qiuhong, Dan; Haipeng, Cai

    2010-01-01

    We present a patient with a failed radial coronary angioplasty as a result of bilateral brachioradial arteries, the radial arteries anomalously originating from the axillary arteries. We review the literature concerning abnormal origins of the radial artery and propose the left ulnar artery as optimal access of choice in cases with a right brachioradial artery of relatively small size in its proximal part.

  5. Arterial calcifications

    PubMed Central

    Rennenberg, Roger J M W; Schurgers, Leon J; Kroon, Abraham A; Stehouwer, Coen D A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Arterial calcifications as found with various imaging techniques, like plain X-ray, computed tomography or ultrasound are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The prevalence of arterial calcification increases with age and is stimulated by several common cardiovascular risk factors. In this review, the clinical importance of arterial calcification and the currently known proteins involved are discussed. Arterial calcification is the result of a complex interplay between stimulating (bone morphogenetic protein type 2 [BMP-2], RANKL) and inhibitory (matrix Gla protein, BMP-7, osteoprotegerin, fetuin-A, osteopontin) proteins. Vascular calcification is especially prevalent and related to adverse outcome in patients with renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. We address the special circumstances and mechanisms in these patient groups. Treatment and prevention of arterial calcification is possible by the use of specific drugs. However, it remains to be proven that reduction of vascular calcification in itself leads to a reduced cardiovascular risk. PMID:20716128

  6. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to ... is peripheral artery disease treated? What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, refers ...

  7. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowel - mesenteric; Dead gut - mesenteric; Atherosclerosis - mesenteric artery; Hardening of the arteries - mesenteric artery ... the aorta, the main artery from the heart. Hardening of the arteries occurs when fat, cholesterol, and ...

  8. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting? Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is ... bypass multiple coronary arteries during one surgery. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Figure A shows the location of ...

  9. Arterial embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... for embolization (especially to the brain) is mitral stenosis . Endocarditis (infection of the inside of the heart) can also cause arterial emboli. A common source for an embolus is from areas of hardening (atherosclerosis) in the aorta and other large blood vessels. These clots can ...

  10. Spin ejector

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, John A.; Flanigan, John J.; Kindley, Robert J.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus for spin ejecting a body having a flat plate base containing bosses. The apparatus has a base plate and a main ejection shaft extending perpendicularly from the base plate. A compressible cylindrical spring is disposed about the shaft. Bearings are located between the shaft and the spring. A housing containing a helical aperture releasably engages the base plate and surrounds the shaft bearings and the spring. A piston having an aperture follower disposed in the housing aperture is seated on the spring and is guided by the shaft and the aperture. The spring is compressed and when released causes the piston to spin eject the body.

  11. Spin pumping and spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Eiji

    2012-02-01

    Utilization of a spin current, a flow of electrons' spins in a solid, is the key technology in spintronics that will allow the achievement of efficient magnetic memories and computing devices. In this technology, generation and detection of spin currents are necessary. Here, we review inverse spin-Hall effect and spin-current-generation phenomena recently discovered both in metals and insulators: inverse spin-Hall effect, spin pumping, and spin Seebeck effect. (1)Spin pumping and spin torque in a Mott insulator system We found that spin pumping and spin torque effects appear also at an interface between Pt and an insulator YIG.. This means that we can connect a spin current carried by conduction electrons and a spin-wave spin current flowing in insulators. We demonstrate electric signal transmission by using these effects and interconversion of the spin currents [1]. (2) Spin Seebeck effect We have observed, by using the inverse spin-Hall effect [2], spin voltage generation from a heat current in a NiFe, named the spin-Seebeck effect [3]. Surprisingly, spin-Seebeck effect was found to appear even in insulators [4], a situation completely different from conventional charge Seebeck effect. The result implies an important role of elementary excitation in solids beside charge in the spin Seebeck effect. In the talk, we review the recent progress of the research on this effect. This research is collaboration with K. Ando, K. Uchida, Y. Kajiwara, S. Maekawa, G. E. W. Bauer, S. Takahashi, and J. Ieda. [4pt] [1] Y. Kajiwara and E. Saitoh et al. Nature 464 (2010) 262. [0pt] [2] E. Saitoh et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 (2006) 182509. [0pt] [3] K. Uchida and E. Saitoh et al., Nature 455 (2008)778. [0pt] [4] K. Uchida and E. Saitoh et al.,Nature materials 9 (2010) 894 - 897.

  12. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  13. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection

    MedlinePlus

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Spontaneous coronary artery dissection — sometimes referred to as SCAD — is an ... the blood vessels in the heart. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) can slow or block blood flow ...

  14. Coronary artery fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart defect - coronary artery fistula; Birth defect heart - coronary artery fistula ... A coronary artery fistula is often congenital, meaning that it is present at birth. It generally occurs when one of the ...

  15. Blood Tracer Kinetics in the Arterial Tree

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Elias; Gall, Peter; Günther, Matthias; Reisert, Marco; Mader, Irina; Fleysher, Roman; Kiselev, Valerij G.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of blood supply of different organs relies on labeling blood with a suitable tracer. The tracer kinetics is linear: Tracer concentration at an observation site is a linear response to an input somewhere upstream the arterial flow. The corresponding impulse response functions are currently treated empirically without incorporating the relation to the vascular morphology of an organ. In this work we address this relation for the first time. We demonstrate that the form of the response function in the entire arterial tree is reduced to that of individual vessel segments under approximation of good blood mixing at vessel bifurcations. The resulting expression simplifies significantly when the geometric scaling of the vascular tree is taken into account. This suggests a new way to access the vascular morphology in vivo using experimentally determined response functions. However, it is an ill-posed inverse problem as demonstrated by an example using measured arterial spin labeling in large brain arteries. We further analyze transport in individual vessel segments and demonstrate that experimentally accessible tracer concentration in vessel segments depends on the measurement principle. Explicit expressions for the response functions are obtained for the major middle part of the arterial tree in which the blood flow in individual vessel segments can be treated as laminar. When applied to the analysis of regional cerebral blood flow measurements for which the necessary arterial input is evaluated in the carotid arteries, present theory predicts about 20% underestimation, which is in agreement with recent experimental data. PMID:25299048

  16. Hardening of the arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Atherosclerosis; Arteriosclerosis; Plaque buildup - arteries; Hyperlipidemia - atherosclerosis; Cholesterol - atherosclerosis ... cause of heart attack and stroke. High blood cholesterol levels can cause hardening of the arteries at ...

  17. Spin Electronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    spectroscopy laboratory including high pulse power capabilities (regenerative amplifiers and optical parametric amplifiers ) and broad spectral range ...The data identify narrow ranges of doping concentrations where spin lifetimes in semiconductors are enhanced by orders of magnitude, culminating in... dynamic measurements in the 10 to 100 picoseconds (ps) range . • A second program, which will come to fruition within one to two years, has the name

  18. spin pumping occurred under nonlinear spin precession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hengan; Fan, Xiaolong; Ma, Li; Zhou, Shiming; Xue, Desheng

    Spin pumping occurs when a pure-spin current is injected into a normal metal thin layer by an adjacent ferromagnetic metal layer undergoing ferromagnetic resonance, which can be understood as the inverse effect of spin torque, and gives access to the physics of magnetization dynamics and damping. An interesting question is that whether spin pumping occurring under nonlinear spin dynamics would differ from linear case. It is known that nonlinear spin dynamics differ distinctly from linear response, a variety of amplitude dependent nonlinear effect would present. It has been found that for spin precession angle above a few degrees, nonlinear damping term would present and dominated the dynamic energy/spin-moment dissipation. Since spin pumping are closely related to the damping process, it is interesting to ask whether the nonlinear damping term could be involved in spin pumping process. We studied the spin pumping effect occurring under nonlinear spin precession. A device which is a Pt/YIG microstrip coupled with coplanar waveguide was used. High power excitation resulted in spin precession entering in a nonlinear regime. Foldover resonance lineshape and nonlinear damping have been observed. Based on those nonlinear effects, we determined the values of the precession cone angles, and the maximum cone angle can reach a values as high as 21.5 degrees. We found that even in nonlinear regime, spin pumping is still linear, which means the nonlinear damping and foldover would not affect spin pumping process.

  19. Carotid artery anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    There are four carotid arteries, two on each side of the neck: right and left internal carotid arteries, and right and left external carotid arteries. The carotid arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the head and brain.

  20. Vapor resistant arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor); Dussinger, Peter M. (Inventor); Buchko, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A vapor block resistant liquid artery structure for heat pipes. A solid tube artery with openings is encased in the sintered material of a heat pipe wick. The openings are limited to that side of the artery which is most remote from the heat source. The liquid in the artery can thus exit the artery through the openings and wet the sintered sheath, but vapor generated at the heat source is unlikely to move around the solid wall of the artery and reverse its direction in order to penetrate the artery through the openings. An alternate embodiment uses finer pore size wick material to resist vapor entry.

  1. Spin superfluidity and coherent spin precession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunkov, Yuriy M.

    2009-04-01

    The spontaneous phase coherent precession of the magnetization in superfluid 3He-B was discovered experimentally in 1984 at the Institute for Physical Problems, Moscow by Borovik-Romanov, Bunkov, Dmitriev and Mukharsky and simultaneously explained theoretically by Fomin (Institut Landau, Moscow). Its formation is a direct manifestation of spin superfluidity. The latter is the magnetic counterpart of mass superfluidity and superconductivity. It is also an example of the Bose-Einstein condensation of spin-wave excitations (magnons). The coherent spin precession opened the way for investigations of spin supercurrent magnetization transport and other related phenomena, such as spin-current Josephson effect, process of phase slippage at a critical value of spin supercurrent, spin-current vortices, non-topological solitons (analogous to Q-balls in high energy physics) etc. New measuring techniques based on coherent spin precession made the investigation of mass counterflow and mass vortices possible owing to the spin-mass interaction. New phenomena were observed: mass-spin vortices, the Goldstone mode of the mass vortex with non-axisymmetric core, superfluid density anisotropy etc. Different types of coherent spin precession were later found in superfluid 3He-A and 3He-B confined in anisotropic aerogel, in the states with counterflow and in 3He with reduced magnetization. Finally, spin superfluidity investigations developed the basis for a modern investigation of electron spin supercurrent and spintronics.

  2. Cooled artery extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artery vapor trap. A heat pipe artery is constructed with an extension protruding from the evaporator end of the heat pipe beyond the active area of the evaporator. The vapor migrates into the artery extension because of gravity or liquid displacement, and cooling the extension condenses the vapor to liquid, thus preventing vapor lock in the working portion of the artery by removing vapor from within the active artery. The condensed liquid is then transported back to the evaporator by the capillary action of the artery extension itself or by wick located within the extension.

  3. Spin-Spin Coupling in Asteroidal Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    Gravitationally bound binaries constitute a substantial fraction of the small body population of the solar system, and characterization of their rotational states is instrumental to understanding their formation and dynamical evolution. Unlike planets, numerous small bodies can maintain a perpetual aspheroidal shape, giving rise to a richer array of non-trivial gravitational dynamics. In this work, we explore the rotational evolution of triaxial satellites that orbit permanently deformed central objects, with specific emphasis on quadrupole-quadrupole interactions. Our analysis shows that in addition to conventional spin-orbit resonances, both prograde and retrograde spin-spin resonances naturally arise for closely orbiting, highly deformed bodies. Application of our results to the illustrative examples of (87) Sylvia and (216) Kleopatra multi-asteroid systems implies capture probabilities slightly below ~10% for leading-order spin-spin resonances. Cumulatively, our results suggest that spin-spin coupling may be consequential for highly elongated, tightly orbiting binary objects.

  4. RHIC SPIN FLIPPER

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; ROSER, T.

    2007-06-25

    This paper proposes a new design of spin flipper for RHIC to obtain full spin flip with the spin tune staying at half integer. The traditional technique of using an rf dipole or solenoid as spin flipper to achieve full spin flip in the presence of full Siberian snake requires one to change the snake configuration to move the spin tune away from half integer. This is not practical for an operational high energy polarized proton collider like RHIC where beam lifetime is sensitive to small betatron tune change. The design of the new spin flipper as well as numerical simulations are presented.

  5. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a process called atherosclerosis ...

  6. Carotid artery surgery - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100124.htm Carotid artery surgery - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... out of 4 Overview There are four carotid arteries, with a pair located on each side of ...

  7. Peripheral artery bypass - leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007394.htm Peripheral artery bypass - leg To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Peripheral artery bypass is surgery to reroute the blood supply ...

  8. Coronary Artery Bypass

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview Aneurysm Repair Balloon Angioplasty and Stents Carotid Artery Angioplasty and Stents Carotid Endarterectomy Catheter Ablation Heart ... Limited-Access Heart Surgery Maze Surgery Pacemakers Radial Artery Access Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization Valve Repair or Replacement ...

  9. Uterine artery embolization - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000161.htm Uterine artery embolization - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had uterine artery embolization (UAE). UAE is a procedure to treat ...

  10. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death ... both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened ...

  11. Retinal artery occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... These blockages are more likely if there is hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ) in the eye. Clots ... Blindness and vision loss Blood clots Diabetes Glaucoma Hardening of the arteries High blood cholesterol levels High ...

  12. Radial Artery Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the radial artery for cardiac catheterization procedures. Advantages of Radial Artery Catheterization Any catheter placement into ... walk, and eat immediately. This is a particular advantage for patients with back problems because there is ...

  13. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... sites within the artery. This process is called atherosclerosis. Carotid arteries that are clogged with plaques are ... at greater risk of high blood pressure and atherosclerosis. High blood-fat levels. High levels of low- ...

  14. What Is Peripheral Artery Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Peripheral Artery Disease? Peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.) is ... that affects blood flow to the legs. Normal Artery and Artery With Plaque Buildup The illustration shows ...

  15. Spin-1 quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Daichi; Kubo, Toshihiro; Tokura, Yasuhiro; Yamashita, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    We study the quantum walks of two interacting spin-1 bosons. We derive an exact solution for the time-dependent wave function, which describes the two-particle dynamics governed by the one-dimensional spin-1 Bose-Hubbard model. We show that propagation dynamics in real space and mixing dynamics in spin space are correlated via the spin-dependent interaction in this system. The spin-mixing dynamics has two characteristic frequencies in the limit of large spin-dependent interactions. One of the characteristic frequencies is determined by the energy difference between two bound states, and the other frequency relates to the cotunneling process of a pair of spin-1 bosons. Furthermore, we numerically analyze the growth of the spin correlations in quantum walks. We find that long-range spin correlations emerge showing a clear dependence on the sign of the spin-dependent interaction and the initial state.

  16. Magnons, Spin Current and Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2012-02-01

    When metals and semiconductors are placed in a temperature gradient, the electric voltage is generated. This mechanism to convert heat into electricity, the so-called Seebeck effect, has attracted much attention recently as the mechanism for utilizing wasted heat energy. [1]. Ferromagnetic insulators are good conductors of spin current, i.e., the flow of electron spins [2]. When they are placed in a temperature gradient, generated are magnons, spin current and the spin voltage [3], i.e., spin accumulation. Once the spin voltage is converted into the electric voltage by inverse spin Hall effect in attached metal films such as Pt, the electric voltage is obtained from heat energy [4-5]. This is called the spin Seebeck effect. Here, we present the linear-response theory of spin Seebeck effect based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem [6-8] and discuss a variety of the devices. [4pt] [1] S. Maekawa et al, Physics of Transition Metal Oxides (Springer, 2004). [0pt] [2] S. Maekawa: Nature Materials 8, 777 (2009). [0pt] [3] Concept in Spin Electronics, eds. S. Maekawa (Oxford University Press, 2006). [0pt] [4] K. Uchida et al., Nature 455, 778 (2008). [0pt] [5] K. Uchida et al., Nature Materials 9, 894 (2010) [0pt] [6] H. Adachi et al., APL 97, 252506 (2010) and Phys. Rev. B 83, 094410 (2011). [0pt] [7] J. Ohe et al., Phys. Rev. B (2011) [0pt] [8] K. Uchida et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 104419 (2010).

  17. External artery heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor); Ernst, Donald M. (Inventor); Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved heat pipe with an external artery. The longitudinal slot in the heat pipe wall which interconnects the heat pipe vapor space with the external artery is completely filled with sintered wick material and the wall of the external artery is also covered with sintered wick material. This added wick structure assures that the external artery will continue to feed liquid to the heat pipe evaporator even if a vapor bubble forms within and would otherwise block the liquid transport function of the external artery.

  18. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  19. Renal artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    González, J; Esteban, M; Andrés, G; Linares, E; Martínez-Salamanca, J I

    2014-01-01

    A renal artery aneurysm is defined as a dilated segment of renal artery that exceeds twice the diameter of a normal renal artery. Although rare, the diagnosis and incidence of this entity have been steadily increasing due to the routine use of cross-sectional imaging. In certain cases, renal artery aneurysms may be clinically important and potentially lethal. However, knowledge of their occurrence, their natural history, and their prognosis with or without treatment is still limited. This article aims to review the recent literature concerning renal artery aneurysms, with special consideration given to physiopathology, indications for treatment, different technical options, post-procedure complications and treatment outcomes.

  20. Extracranial vertebral artery intervention.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Debabrata; Pineda, Guillermo

    2007-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is the commonest cause of vertebral artery stenosis and has a predilection for the origin and proximal section of the extracranial portion of the vessel and also the intracranial portion of the vessel. Although it has generally been thought that extracranial vertebral artery (ECVA) disease has a more benign outcome compared to intracranial vertebral artery disease, significant occlusive disease of the proximal vertebral artery is the primary cause of vertebral artery ischemia in a significant proportion of patients. We focus on the interventional management of patients with proximal ECVA disease in this article.

  1. Spin Rotation of Formalism for Spin Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio,A.

    2008-02-01

    The problem of which coefficients are adequate to correctly represent the spin rotation in vector spin tracking for polarized proton and deuteron beams in synchrotrons is here re-examined in the light of recent discussions. The main aim of this note is to show where some previous erroneous results originated and how to code spin rotation in a tracking code. Some analysis of a recent experiment is presented that confirm the correctness of the assumptions.

  2. Transradial artery coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Kiemeneij, F; Laarman, G J; de Melker, E

    1995-01-01

    This study explored the feasibility and safety of percutaneous coronary balloon angioplasty (PTCA) with miniaturized PTCA equipment via the radial artery. Coronary angioplasty (PTCA) via the femoral or brachial arteries may be associated with rare vascular complications such as bleeding and damage to the artery and adjacent structures. It was postulated that PTCA via the radial artery with miniaturized angioplasty equipment is feasible and that no major puncture site-related complications occur because hemostasis is obtained easily and because no major structures are near the radial artery. With double blood supply to the hand, radial artery occlusion is well tolerated. In 100 patients with collateral blood supply to the right hand, PTCA was attempted with 6F guiding catheters and rapid-exchange balloon catheters for exertional angina (87 patients) or nonexertional angina (13 patients). Angioplasty was attempted in 122 lesions (type A n = 67 [55%], Type B n = 37 [30%], and type C n = 18 [15%]). Pre- and post-PTCA computerized quantitative coronary analysis was performed. Radial artery function and structure were assessed clinically and with Doppler and two-dimensional ultrasound on the day of discharge. Coronary catheterization via the radial artery was successful in 94 patients (94%). The 6 remaining patients had successful PTCA via the femoral artery (n = 5) or the brachial artery (n = 1). Procedural success (120 of 122 lesions) was achieved in 92 patients (98%) via the radial artery and in 98 patients of the total study population.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Spin Seebeck power generators

    SciTech Connect

    Cahaya, Adam B.; Tretiakov, O. A.; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2014-01-27

    We derive expressions for the efficiency and figure of merit of two spin caloritronic devices based on the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), i.e., the generation of spin currents by a temperature gradient. The inverse spin Hall effect is conventionally used to detect the SSE and offers advantages for large area applications. We also propose a device that converts spin current into electric one by means of a spin-valve detector, which scales favorably to small sizes and approaches a figure of merit of 0.5 at room temperature.

  4. Spin-Mechatronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Mamoru; Saitoh, Eiji; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the interconversion phenomena between spin and mechanical angular momentum in moving objects. In particular, the recent results on spin manipulation and spin-current generation by mechanical motion are examined. In accelerating systems, spin-dependent gauge fields emerge, which enable the conversion from mechanical angular momentum into spins. Such a spin-mechanical effect is predicted by quantum theory in a non-inertial frame. Experiments which confirm the effect, i.e., the resonance frequency shift in nuclear magnetic resonance, the stray field measurement of rotating metals, and electric voltage generation in liquid metals, are discussed.

  5. Spinning eggs and ballerinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2013-01-01

    Measurements are presented on the rise of a spinning egg. It was found that the spin, the angular momentum and the kinetic energy all decrease as the egg rises, unlike the case of a ballerina who can increase her spin and kinetic energy by reducing her moment of inertia. The observed effects can be explained, in part, in terms of rolling friction between the egg and the surface on which it spins.

  6. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery - discharge; PTA - peripheral artery - discharge; Angioplasty - peripheral artery - discharge; Balloon angioplasty - peripheral artery- discharge; PAD - PTA discharge; PVD - PTA discharge

  7. Duplicated middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion.

  8. Spinning Eggs and Ballerinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2013-01-01

    Measurements are presented on the rise of a spinning egg. It was found that the spin, the angular momentum and the kinetic energy all decrease as the egg rises, unlike the case of a ballerina who can increase her spin and kinetic energy by reducing her moment of inertia. The observed effects can be explained, in part, in terms of rolling friction…

  9. Wurtzite spin lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria Junior, Paulo E.; Xu, Gaofeng; Chen, Yang-Fang; Sipahi, Guilherme M.; Žutić, Igor

    2017-03-01

    Semiconductor lasers are strongly altered by adding spin-polarized carriers. Such spin lasers could overcome many limitations of their conventional (spin-unpolarized) counterparts. While the vast majority of experiments in spin lasers employed zinc-blende semiconductors, the room-temperature electrical manipulation was first demonstrated in wurtzite GaN-based lasers. However, the underlying theoretical description of wurtzite spin lasers is still missing. To address this situation, focusing on (In,Ga)N-based wurtzite quantum wells, we develop a theoretical framework in which the calculated microscopic spin-dependent gain is combined with a simple rate equation model. A small spin-orbit coupling in these wurtzites supports simultaneous spin polarizations of electrons and holes, providing unexplored opportunities to control spin lasers. For example, the gain asymmetry, as one of the key figures of merit related to spin amplification, can change the sign by simply increasing the carrier density. The lasing threshold reduction has a nonmonotonic dependence on electron-spin polarization, even for a nonvanishing hole spin polarization.

  10. Palmar artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Shutze, Ryan A.; Liechty, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Aneurysms of the hand are rarely encountered and more rarely reported. The least common locations of these aneurysms are the palmar and digital arteries. The etiologies of these entities are quite varied, although they usually present as a pulsatile mass. Following a thorough evaluation, including arterial anatomic imaging, they should be repaired. The reported results following repair have been good. Herein we report a girl with a spontaneous palmar artery aneurysm and its management. PMID:28127131

  11. Arterial waveform analysis.

    PubMed

    Esper, Stephen A; Pinsky, Michael R

    2014-12-01

    The bedside measurement of continuous arterial pressure values from waveform analysis has been routinely available via indwelling arterial catheterization for >50 years. Invasive blood pressure monitoring has been utilized in critically ill patients, in both the operating room and critical care units, to facilitate rapid diagnoses of cardiovascular insufficiency and monitor response to treatments aimed at correcting abnormalities before the consequences of either hypo- or hypertension are seen. Minimally invasive techniques to estimate cardiac output (CO) have gained increased appeal. This has led to the increased interest in arterial waveform analysis to provide this important information, as it is measured continuously in many operating rooms and intensive care units. Arterial waveform analysis also allows for the calculation of many so-called derived parameters intrinsically created by this pulse pressure profile. These include estimates of left ventricular stroke volume (SV), CO, vascular resistance, and during positive-pressure breathing, SV variation, and pulse pressure variation. This article focuses on the principles of arterial waveform analysis and their determinants, components of the arterial system, and arterial pulse contour. It will also address the advantage of measuring real-time CO by the arterial waveform and the benefits to measuring SV variation. Arterial waveform analysis has gained a large interest in the overall assessment and management of the critically ill and those at a risk of hemodynamic deterioration.

  12. Buckling instability in arteries.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Rebecca M

    2015-04-21

    Arteries can become tortuous in response to abnormal growth stimuli, genetic defects and aging. It is suggested that a buckling instability is a mechanism that might lead to artery tortuosity. Here, the buckling instability in arteries is studied by examining asymmetric modes of bifurcation of two-layer cylindrical structures that are residually stressed. These structures are loaded by an axial force, internal pressure and have nonlinear, anisotropic, hyperelastic responses to stresses. Strain-softening and reduced opening angle are shown to lower the critical internal pressure leading to buckling. In addition, the ratio of the media thickness to the adventitia thickness is shown to have a dramatic impact on arterial instability.

  13. Single Umbilical Artery

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, J. David; McKee, James

    1964-01-01

    A prospective study of 2000 obstetrical deliveries was undertaken to establish the incidence of single umbilical artery in the newborn and the frequency of congenital malformations reported to be associated with this disorder. Twenty cases of single umbilical artery were discovered; two proved to have an associated congenital malformation. In neither of these cases was medical management affected by the discovery of a single artery. In addition, the vascular arrangement in the cords of 31 concurrently occurring congenitally malformed babies was examined, and in no instance was a single umbilical artery found. PMID:14214230

  14. Hemorheological abnormalities in human arterial hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presti, Rosalia; Hopps, Eugenia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-05-01

    Blood rheology is impaired in hypertensive patients. The alteration involves blood and plasma viscosity, and the erythrocyte behaviour is often abnormal. The hemorheological pattern appears to be related to some pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertension and to organ damage, in particular left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia. Abnormalities have been observed in erythrocyte membrane fluidity, explored by fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance. This may be relevant for red cell flow in microvessels and oxygen delivery to tissues. Although blood viscosity is not a direct target of antihypertensive therapy, the rheological properties of blood play a role in the pathophysiology of arterial hypertension and its vascular complications.

  15. The Steady Spin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, Richard; Schmidt, Wilhelm

    1931-01-01

    With the object of further clarifying the problem of spinning, the equilibrium of the forces and moments acting on an airplane is discussed in light of the most recent test data. Convinced that in a spin the flight attitude by only small angles of yaw is more or less completely steady, the study is primarily devoted to an investigation of steady spin with no side slip. At small angles, wholly arbitrary and perfectly steady spins may be forced, depending on the type of control displacements. But at large angles only very steep and only "approaching steady" spins are possible, no matter what the control displacements.

  16. Spin supplementary conditions for spinning compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikóczi, Balázs

    2017-03-01

    We consider different spin supplementary conditions (SSC) for a spinning compact binary with the leading-order spin-orbit (SO) interaction. The Lagrangian of the binary system can be constructed, but it is acceleration-dependent in two cases of SSC. We rewrite the generalized Hamiltonian formalism proposed by Ostrogradsky and compute the conserved quantities and the dissipative part of relative motion during the gravitational radiation of each SSC. We give the orbital elements and observed quantities of the SO dynamics, for instance, the energy and the orbital angular momentum losses and waveforms, and discuss their SSC dependence.

  17. Inverse spin Hall effect by spin injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. Y.; Horing, Norman J. M.; Lei, X. L.

    2007-09-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment [S. O. Valenzuela and M. Tinkham, Nature (London) 442, 176 (2006)], the authors present a quantitative microscopic theory to investigate the inverse spin-Hall effect with spin injection into aluminum considering both intrinsic and extrinsic spin-orbit couplings using the orthogonalized-plane-wave method. Their theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. It is also clear that the magnitude of the anomalous Hall resistivity is mainly due to contributions from extrinsic skew scattering.

  18. Measuring How Elastic Arteries Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMont, M. Edwin; MacGillivray, Patrick S.; Davison, Ian G.; McConnell, Colin J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a procedure used to measure force and pressure in elastic arteries. Discusses the physics of the procedure and recommends the use of bovine arteries. Explains the preparation of the arteries for the procedure. (DDR)

  19. Living with Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Carotid Artery Disease If you have carotid artery disease, you can take steps to manage the ... treatment plan, and getting ongoing care. Having carotid artery disease raises your risk of having a stroke . ...

  20. What Is Carotid Artery Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease is a disease in ... blood to your face, scalp, and neck. Carotid Arteries Figure A shows the location of the right ...

  1. Peripheral Artery Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Peripheral Artery Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 People with ... developing atherosclerosis, the most common cause of peripheral artery disease (PAD) . And individuals with PAD have a ...

  2. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of screening for carotid artery stenosis: Health professionals ... blood flow through the arteries. Potential Benefits and Harms of Carotid Artery Stenosis Screening and Treatment The ...

  3. Spin-transfer torque induced spin waves in antiferromagnetic insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, Matthew W.; Guo, Wei; Stocks, George Malcolm; Xiao, Di; Xiao, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibility of exciting spin waves in insulating antiferromagnetic films by injecting spin current at the surface. We analyze both magnetically compensated and uncompensated interfaces. We find that the spin current induced spin-transfer torque can excite spin waves in insulating antiferromagnetic materials and that the chirality of the excited spin wave is determined by the polarization of the injected spin current. Furthermore, the presence of magnetic surface anisotropy can greatly increase the accessibility of these excitations.

  4. Coronary artery stent (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open. ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open.

  5. Arterial Pressure Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heusner, A. A.; Tracy, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a simple hydraulic analog which allows students to explore some physical aspects of the cardiovascular system and provides them with a means to visualize and conceptualize these basic principles. Simulates the behavior of arterial pressure in response to changes in heart rate, stroke volume, arterial compliance, and peripheral…

  6. [Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Bourry, N; Chabrot, P; Jeannin, G; Filaire, M; Charpy, C; Bay, J O; Kemeny, J L; Caillaud, D; Escande, G; Boyer, L

    2008-02-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma is a rare tumor. We present a case of intimal sarcoma arising from right pulmonary artery and left lower pulmonary vein observed in a 44-year-old man with a non-productive cough. Computed tomographic scans and magnetic resonance imaging showing filling defect enhancement contributed early, suggesting the diagnosis of primary vascular tumor, hypothesis confirmed by pathologist findings.

  7. Coronary artery disease (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... through these arteries is critical for the heart. Coronary artery disease usually results from the build-up of fatty material and plaque, a condition called atherosclerosis. As the ... blood to the heart can slow or stop, causing chest pain (stable ...

  8. Genetics in Arterial Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Rutsch, Frank; Nitschke, Yvonne; Terkeltaub, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Artery calcification reflects an admixture of factors such as ectopic osteochondral differentiation with primary host pathological conditions. We review how genetic factors, as identified by human genome-wide association studies, and incomplete correlations with various mouse studies, including knockout and strain analyses, fit into “pieces of the puzzle” in intimal calcification in human atherosclerosis, and artery tunica media calcification in aging, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. We also describe in sharp contrast how ENPP1, CD73, and ABCC6 serve as “cogs in a wheel” of arterial calcification. Specifically, each is a minor component in the function of a much larger network of factors that exert balanced effects to promote and suppress arterial calcification. For the network to normally suppress spontaneous arterial calcification, the “cogs” ENPP1, CD73, and ABCC6 must be present and in working order. Monogenic ENPP1, CD73, and ABCC6 deficiencies each drive a molecular pathophysiology of closely related but phenotypically different diseases (generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI), pseudoxan-thoma elasticum (PXE) and arterial calcification caused by CD73 deficiency (ACDC)), in which premature onset arterial calcification is a prominent but not the sole feature. PMID:21852556

  9. Slow spin relaxation in dipolar spin ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orendac, Martin; Sedlakova, Lucia; Orendacova, Alzbeta; Vrabel, Peter; Feher, Alexander; Pajerowski, Daniel M.; Cohen, Justin D.; Meisel, Mark W.; Shirai, Masae; Bramwell, Steven T.

    2009-03-01

    Spin relaxation in dipolar spin ice Dy2Ti2O7 and Ho2Ti2O7 was investigated using the magnetocaloric effect and susceptibility. The magnetocaloric behavior of Dy2Ti2O7 at temperatures where the orientation of spins is governed by ``ice rules`` (T < Tice) revealed thermally activated relaxation; however, the resulting temperature dependence of the relaxation time is more complicated than anticipated by a mere extrapolation of the corresponding high temperature data [1]. A susceptibility study of Ho2Ti2O7 was performed at T > Tice and in high magnetic fields, and the results suggest a slow relaxation of spins analogous to the behavior reported in a highly polarized cooperative paramagnet [2]. [1] J. Snyder et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 107201. [2] B. G. Ueland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 (2006) 027216.

  10. Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tao; Zhang, Chong; Feng, Zhiying; Ni, Yiming

    2008-08-01

    Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is an uncommon tumor. We report a case of a 73-year-old male patient with a two-week history of palpitations and shortness of breath, aggravated for two days and was believed to be pulmonary hypertension. Emergency heart ultrasound after admission presented a massive pulmonary embolism in the pulmonary artery. The patient's condition was successfully managed with urgent pulmonary artery embolectomy. The patient demonstrated improvement in hemodynamics after the operation. Histologic and immunohistochemical assays were performed and a diagnosis was made as primary pulmonary artery sarcoma arising from the left pulmonary artery. Resection of the tumor is recommended for the treatment of this rare malignant tumor. The corresponding chemotherapy, follow-up and prognosis are described as well in this case report.

  11. Spin Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinova, Jairo; Valenzuela, Sergio O.; Wunderlich, J.; Back, C. H.; Jungwirth, T.

    2015-10-01

    Spin Hall effects are a collection of relativistic spin-orbit coupling phenomena in which electrical currents can generate transverse spin currents and vice versa. Despite being observed only a decade ago, these effects are already ubiquitous within spintronics, as standard spin-current generators and detectors. Here the theoretical and experimental results that have established this subfield of spintronics are reviewed. The focus is on the results that have converged to give us the current understanding of the phenomena, which has evolved from a qualitative to a more quantitative measurement of spin currents and their associated spin accumulation. Within the experimental framework, optical-, transport-, and magnetization-dynamics-based measurements are reviewed and linked to both phenomenological and microscopic theories of the effect. Within the theoretical framework, the basic mechanisms in both the extrinsic and intrinsic regimes are reviewed, which are linked to the mechanisms present in their closely related phenomenon in ferromagnets, the anomalous Hall effect. Also reviewed is the connection to the phenomenological treatment based on spin-diffusion equations applicable to certain regimes, as well as the spin-pumping theory of spin generation used in many measurements of the spin Hall angle. A further connection to the spin-current-generating spin Hall effect to the inverse spin galvanic effect is given, in which an electrical current induces a nonequilibrium spin polarization. This effect often accompanies the spin Hall effect since they share common microscopic origins. Both can exhibit the same symmetries when present in structures comprising ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers through their induced current-driven spin torques or induced voltages. Although a short chronological overview of the evolution of the spin Hall effect field and the resolution of some early controversies is given, the main body of this review is structured from a pedagogical

  12. Spin caloritronics in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Angsula; Frota, H. O.

    2015-06-14

    Spin caloritronics, the combination of spintronics with thermoelectrics, exploiting both the intrinsic spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment in addition to its fundamental electronic charge and temperature, is an emerging technology mainly in the development of low-power-consumption technology. In this work, we study the thermoelectric properties of a Rashba dot attached to two single layer/bilayer graphene sheets as leads. The temperature difference on the two graphene leads induces a spin current, which depends on the temperature and chemical potential. We demonstrate that the Rashba dot behaves as a spin filter for selected values of the chemical potential and is able to filter electrons by their spin orientation. The spin thermopower has also been studied where the effects of the chemical potential, temperature, and also the Rashba term have been observed.

  13. Picosecond Spin Caloritronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, David G.

    The coupling of spin and heat, i.e., spin caloritronics, gives rise to new physical phenomena in nanoscale spin devices and new ways to manipulate local magnetization. Our work in this field takes advantage of recent advances in the measurement and understanding of heat transport at the nanoscale using ultrafast lasers. We use a picosecond duration pump laser pulses as a source of heat and picosecond duration probe laser pulses to detect changes in temperature, spin accumulation, and spin transfer torque using a combination of time-domain thermoreflectance and time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect Our pump-probe optical methods enable us to change the temperature of ferromagnetic layers on a picosecond time-scale and generate enormous heat fluxes on the order of 100 GW m-2 that persist for ~ 30 ps. Thermally-driven ultrafast demagnetization of a perpendicular ferromagnet leads to spin accumulation in a normal metal and spin transfer torque in an in-plane ferromagnet. The data are well described by models of spin generation and transport based on differences and gradients of thermodynamic parameters. The spin-dependent Seebeck effect of a perpendicular ferromagnetic layer converts a heat current into spin current, which in turn can be used to exert a spin transfer torque (STT) on a second ferromagnetic layer with in-plane magnetization. Using a [Co,Ni] multilayer as the source of spin, an energy fluence of ~ 4 J m-2 creates thermal STT sufficient to induce ~ 1 % tilting of the magnetization of a 2 nm-thick CoFeB layer.

  14. Spin coating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Torczynski, John R.

    2000-01-01

    A spin coating apparatus requires less cleanroom air flow than prior spin coating apparatus to minimize cleanroom contamination. A shaped exhaust duct from the spin coater maintains process quality while requiring reduced cleanroom air flow. The exhaust duct can decrease in cross section as it extends from the wafer, minimizing eddy formation. The exhaust duct can conform to entrainment streamlines to minimize eddy formation and reduce interprocess contamination at minimal cleanroom air flow rates.

  15. Mesenteric Artery Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Coles, John C.; Walker, John B.; Gergely, N. F.; Buttigliero, Jorge

    1963-01-01

    The syndromes of superior mesenteric artery insufficiency are briefly reviewed. Three cases associated with infarction of bowel which were treated with restoration of arterial flow and resection of residual irretrievable bowel are reported. In two patients an embolectomy and in one patient a bypass graft were used to restore arterial continuity. The importance of the recognition and removal of irretrievable bowel at the time of vascular reconstruction is emphasized. Success is not necessarily predicated by the time factor alone, although the importance of early diagnosis and surgical intervention cannot be denied. PMID:14042788

  16. Rockets for spin recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The potential effectiveness of rockets as an auxiliary means for an aircraft to effect recovery from spins was investigated. The advances in rocket technology produced by the space effort suggested that currently available systems might obviate many of the problems encountered in earlier rocket systems. A modern fighter configuration known to exhibit a flat spin mode was selected. An analytical study was made of the thrust requirements for a rocket spin recovery system for the subject configuration. These results were then applied to a preliminary systems study of rocket components appropriate to the problem. Subsequent spin tunnel tests were run to evaluate the analytical results.

  17. Operator spin foam models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Benjamin; Hellmann, Frank; Kamiński, Wojciech; Kisielowski, Marcin; Lewandowski, Jerzy

    2011-05-01

    The goal of this paper is to introduce a systematic approach to spin foams. We define operator spin foams, that is foams labelled by group representations and operators, as our main tool. A set of moves we define in the set of the operator spin foams (among other operations) allows us to split the faces and the edges of the foams. We assign to each operator spin foam a contracted operator, by using the contractions at the vertices and suitably adjusted face amplitudes. The emergence of the face amplitudes is the consequence of assuming the invariance of the contracted operator with respect to the moves. Next, we define spin foam models and consider the class of models assumed to be symmetric with respect to the moves we have introduced, and assuming their partition functions (state sums) are defined by the contracted operators. Briefly speaking, those operator spin foam models are invariant with respect to the cellular decomposition, and are sensitive only to the topology and colouring of the foam. Imposing an extra symmetry leads to a family we call natural operator spin foam models. This symmetry, combined with assumed invariance with respect to the edge splitting move, determines a complete characterization of a general natural model. It can be obtained by applying arbitrary (quantum) constraints on an arbitrary BF spin foam model. In particular, imposing suitable constraints on a spin(4) BF spin foam model is exactly the way we tend to view 4D quantum gravity, starting with the BC model and continuing with the Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine (EPRL) or Freidel-Krasnov (FK) models. That makes our framework directly applicable to those models. Specifically, our operator spin foam framework can be translated into the language of spin foams and partition functions. Among our natural spin foam models there are the BF spin foam model, the BC model, and a model corresponding to the EPRL intertwiners. Our operator spin foam framework can also be used for more general spin

  18. PREFACE: Spin Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieny, B.; Sousa, R.; Prejbeanu, L.

    2007-04-01

    Conventional electronics has in the past ignored the spin on the electron, however things began to change in 1988 with the discovery of giant magnetoresistance in metallic thin film stacks which led to the development of a new research area, so called spin-electronics. In the last 10 years, spin-electronics has achieved a number of breakthroughs from the point of view of both basic science and application. Materials research has led to several major discoveries: very large tunnel magnetoresistance effects in tunnel junctions with crystalline barriers due to a new spin-filtering mechanism associated with the spin-dependent symmetry of the electron wave functions new magnetic tunnelling barriers leading to spin-dependent tunnelling barrier heights and acting as spin-filters magnetic semiconductors with increasingly high ordering temperature. New phenomena have been predicted and observed: the possibility of acting on the magnetization of a magnetic nanostructure with a spin-polarized current. This effect, due to a transfer of angular momentum between the spin polarized conduction electrons and the local magnetization, can be viewed as the reciprocal of giant or tunnel magnetoresistance. It can be used to switch the magnetization of a magnetic nanostructure or to generate steady magnetic excitations in the system. the possibility of generating and manipulating spin current without charge current by creating non-equilibrium local accumulation of spin up or spin down electrons. The range of applications of spin electronics materials and phenomena is expanding: the first devices based on giant magnetoresistance were the magnetoresistive read-heads for computer disk drives. These heads, introduced in 1998 with current-in plane spin-valves, have evolved towards low resistance tunnel magnetoresistice heads in 2005. Besides magnetic recording technology, these very sensitive magnetoresistive sensors are finding applications in other areas, in particular in biology. magnetic

  19. SPIN FLIPPING IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; LEHRACH,A.; LUCCIO,A.; MACKAY,W.W.; ROSER,T.; TSOUPAS,N.

    2001-06-18

    At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), polarized protons will be accelerated and stored for spin physics experiments. Two full helical snakes will be used to eliminate the depolarization due to imperfection and intrinsic spin resonances. Since no resonances are crossed in RHIC, the beam polarization remains fixed through acceleration. However, in order to reduce systematic errors, the experiment often requires the polarization direction reversed. This paper presents a method of using an ac dipole to obtain a full spin flip in the presence of two full snakes [1]. A similar method of using an rf solenoid for spin flip was tested at IUCF [2,3].

  20. Picosecond Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimling, Johannes; Choi, Gyung-Min; Brangham, Jack T.; Matalla-Wagner, Tristan; Huebner, Torsten; Kuschel, Timo; Yang, Fengyuan; Cahill, David G.

    2017-02-01

    We report time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in normal metal /Y3Fe5 O12 bilayers driven by an interfacial temperature difference between electrons and magnons. The measured time evolution of spin accumulation induced by laser excitation indicates transfer of angular momentum across normal metal /Y3Fe5 O12 interfaces on a picosecond time scale, too short for contributions from a bulk temperature gradient in an yttrium iron garnet. The product of spin-mixing conductance and the interfacial spin Seebeck coefficient determined is of the order of 108 A m-2 K-1 .

  1. Anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery with mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Das, Mrinalendu; Mahindrakar, Pallavi; Das, Debasis; Behera, Sukanta Kumar; Chowdhury, Saibal Roy; Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit

    2011-08-01

    The usual presentation of anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery is severe left-sided heart failure and mitral valve insufficiency presenting during the first months of life. The manifestations of left heart failure may be masked if pulmonary artery pressure remains high. We believe this is a rarest of rare case of anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery with severe mitral stenosis and pulmonary hypertension in which pulmonary hypertension, along with good collateral circulation helped to preserve left ventricular function.

  2. Renal arteries (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A renal angiogram is a test used to examine the blood vessels of the kidneys. The test is performed ... main vessel of the pelvis, up to the renal artery that leads into the kidney. Contrast medium ...

  3. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... needed to restore blood flow: Angioplasty : In an angioplasty procedure, an interventional radiologist threads a catheter through a blood vessel to the affected artery and inflates a small balloon to reopen it. In some cases, the insertion ...

  4. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    MedlinePlus

    ... legs; Arterial insufficiency of the legs; Recurrent leg pain and cramping; Calf pain with exercise ... The main symptoms of PAD are pain, achiness, fatigue, burning, or ... or thighs. These symptoms most often appear during walking or ...

  5. Carotid Artery Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... plaque and the injury it causes is called atherosclerosis . Over time, the walls of affected arteries thicken ... disease (CAD) obesity physical inactivity family history of atherosclerosis and/or stroke Screening Recommendations Carotid Duplex US ...

  6. Carotid artery disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a stroke recover most or all of their functions. Others die of the stroke itself or from complications. About half of people ... patients with extracranial carotid and vertebral artery disease: executive summary: ... American Association of Neuroscience Nurses, American Association ...

  7. Coronary artery spasm

    MedlinePlus

    ... blocker or a long-acting nitrate long-term. Beta-blockers are another type of medicine that is used with other coronary artery problems. However, beta-blockers may make this problem worse. They should be ...

  8. Spin Pumping and Measurement of Spin Currents in Optical Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, C.; Lohse, M.; Citro, R.; Bloch, I.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the experimental implementation of a spin pump with ultracold bosonic atoms in an optical superlattice. In the limit of isolated double wells, it represents a 1D dynamical version of the quantum spin Hall effect. Starting from an antiferromagnetically ordered spin chain, we periodically vary the underlying spin-dependent Hamiltonian and observe a spin current without charge transport. We demonstrate a novel detection method to measure spin currents in optical lattices via superexchange oscillations emerging after a projection onto static double wells. Furthermore, we directly verify spin transport through in situ measurements of the spins' center-of-mass displacement.

  9. Spin Pumping and Measurement of Spin Currents in Optical Superlattices.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, C; Lohse, M; Citro, R; Bloch, I

    2016-10-21

    We report on the experimental implementation of a spin pump with ultracold bosonic atoms in an optical superlattice. In the limit of isolated double wells, it represents a 1D dynamical version of the quantum spin Hall effect. Starting from an antiferromagnetically ordered spin chain, we periodically vary the underlying spin-dependent Hamiltonian and observe a spin current without charge transport. We demonstrate a novel detection method to measure spin currents in optical lattices via superexchange oscillations emerging after a projection onto static double wells. Furthermore, we directly verify spin transport through in situ measurements of the spins' center-of-mass displacement.

  10. Effect of spin rotation coupling on spin transport

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Debashree Basu, B.

    2013-12-15

    We have studied the spin rotation coupling (SRC) as an ingredient to explain different spin-related issues. This special kind of coupling can play the role of a Dresselhaus like coupling in certain conditions. Consequently, one can control the spin splitting, induced by the Dresselhaus like term, which is unusual in a semiconductor heterostructure. Within this framework, we also study the renormalization of the spin-dependent electric field and spin current due to the k{sup →}⋅p{sup →} perturbation, by taking into account the interband mixing in the rotating system. In this paper we predict the enhancement of the spin-dependent electric field resulting from the renormalized spin rotation coupling. The renormalization factor of the spin electric field is different from that of the SRC or Zeeman coupling. The effect of renormalized SRC on spin current and Berry curvature is also studied. Interestingly, in the presence of this SRC-induced SOC it is possible to describe spin splitting as well as spin galvanic effect in semiconductors. -- Highlights: •Studied effect of spin rotation coupling on the spin electric field, spin current and Berry curvature. •In the k{sup →}⋅p{sup →} framework we study the renormalization of spin electric field and spin current. •For an inertial system we have discussed the spin splitting. •Expression for the Berry phase in the inertial system is discussed. •The inertial spin galvanic effect is studied.

  11. Coronary Artery Fistula

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    Figure 1A; oblique, Figure 1B), the left circumflex artery was identified by its black central lumen and noted to arise normally from the left main...but the mid left circumflex coronary artery was less well seen because of volume averaging with the left atrium and pulmonary venous confluence which...Figures 1C-D. Select oblique conventional x-ray views (C, early phase; D, late phase) from a coronary catheterization study following injection of

  12. Spin Waves in Quasiequilibrium Spin Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, Kevin S.; Dahal, Hari P.

    2006-07-28

    Using the Landau Fermi liquid theory we discovered a new propagating transverse spin wave in a paramagnetic system which is driven slightly out of equilibrium without applying an external magnetic field. We find a gapless mode which describes the uniform precession of the magnetization in the absence of a magnetic field. We also find a gapped mode associated with the precession of the spin current around the internal field. The gapless mode has a quadratic dispersion leading to a T{sup 3/2} contribution to the specific heat. These modes significantly contribute to the dynamic structure function.

  13. Topological Spin Glass in Diluted Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Arnab; Moessner, R.

    2015-06-01

    It is a salient experimental fact that a large fraction of candidate spin liquid materials freeze as the temperature is lowered. The question naturally arises whether such freezing is intrinsic to the spin liquid ("disorder-free glassiness") or extrinsic, in the sense that a topological phase simply coexists with standard freezing of impurities. Here, we demonstrate a surprising third alternative, namely, that freezing and topological liquidity are inseparably linked. The topological phase reacts to the introduction of disorder by generating degrees of freedom of a new type (along with interactions between them), which in turn undergo a freezing transition while the topological phase supporting them remains intact.

  14. Topological Spin Glass in Diluted Spin Ice.

    PubMed

    Sen, Arnab; Moessner, R

    2015-06-19

    It is a salient experimental fact that a large fraction of candidate spin liquid materials freeze as the temperature is lowered. The question naturally arises whether such freezing is intrinsic to the spin liquid ("disorder-free glassiness") or extrinsic, in the sense that a topological phase simply coexists with standard freezing of impurities. Here, we demonstrate a surprising third alternative, namely, that freezing and topological liquidity are inseparably linked. The topological phase reacts to the introduction of disorder by generating degrees of freedom of a new type (along with interactions between them), which in turn undergo a freezing transition while the topological phase supporting them remains intact.

  15. Antiferromagnetic spin Seebeck effect.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Stephen M.; Zhang, Wei; KC, Amit; Borisov, Pavel; Pearson, John E.; Jiang, J. Samuel; Lederman, David; Hoffmann, Axel; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2016-03-03

    We report on the observation of the spin Seebeck effect in antiferromagnetic MnF2. A device scale on-chip heater is deposited on a bilayer of MnF2 (110) (30nm)/Pt (4 nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgF2(110) substrate. Using Pt as a spin detector layer, it is possible to measure the thermally generated spin current from MnF2 through the inverse spin Hall effect. The low temperature (2–80 K) and high magnetic field (up to 140 kOe) regime is explored. A clear spin-flop transition corresponding to the sudden rotation of antiferromagnetic spins out of the easy axis is observed in the spin Seebeck signal when large magnetic fields (>9T) are applied parallel to the easy axis of the MnF2 thin film. When the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the easy axis, the spin-flop transition is absent, as expected.

  16. Spin coating of electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Stetter, Joseph R.; Maclay, G. Jordan

    1989-01-01

    Methods for spin coating electrolytic materials onto substrates are disclosed. More particularly, methods for depositing solid coatings of ion-conducting material onto planar substrates and onto electrodes are disclosed. These spin coating methods are employed to fabricate electrochemical sensors for use in measuring, detecting and quantifying gases and liquids.

  17. Single spin magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  18. Antiferromagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect.

    PubMed

    Wu, Stephen M; Zhang, Wei; Kc, Amit; Borisov, Pavel; Pearson, John E; Jiang, J Samuel; Lederman, David; Hoffmann, Axel; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2016-03-04

    We report on the observation of the spin Seebeck effect in antiferromagnetic MnF_{2}. A device scale on-chip heater is deposited on a bilayer of MnF_{2} (110) (30  nm)/Pt (4 nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgF_{2} (110) substrate. Using Pt as a spin detector layer, it is possible to measure the thermally generated spin current from MnF_{2} through the inverse spin Hall effect. The low temperature (2-80 K) and high magnetic field (up to 140 kOe) regime is explored. A clear spin-flop transition corresponding to the sudden rotation of antiferromagnetic spins out of the easy axis is observed in the spin Seebeck signal when large magnetic fields (>9  T) are applied parallel to the easy axis of the MnF_{2} thin film. When the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the easy axis, the spin-flop transition is absent, as expected.

  19. Antiferromagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Stephen M.; Zhang, Wei; KC, Amit; Borisov, Pavel; Pearson, John E.; Jiang, J. Samuel; Lederman, David; Hoffmann, Axel; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2016-03-01

    We report on the observation of the spin Seebeck effect in antiferromagnetic MnF2 . A device scale on-chip heater is deposited on a bilayer of MnF2 (110) (30 nm )/Pt (4 nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgF2 (110) substrate. Using Pt as a spin detector layer, it is possible to measure the thermally generated spin current from MnF2 through the inverse spin Hall effect. The low temperature (2-80 K) and high magnetic field (up to 140 kOe) regime is explored. A clear spin-flop transition corresponding to the sudden rotation of antiferromagnetic spins out of the easy axis is observed in the spin Seebeck signal when large magnetic fields (>9 T ) are applied parallel to the easy axis of the MnF2 thin film. When the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the easy axis, the spin-flop transition is absent, as expected.

  20. Sparkling and Spinning Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Ruth Kearney

    1964-01-01

    Teachers should foster in children's writing the use of words with "sparkle" and "spin"--"sparkle" implying brightness and vitality, "spin" connoting industry, patience, and painstaking work. By providing creative listening experiences with good children's or adult literature, the teacher can encourage students to broaden their imaginations and…

  1. Single spin magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  2. Spin Seebeck insulator.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Xiao, J; Adachi, H; Ohe, J; Takahashi, S; Ieda, J; Ota, T; Kajiwara, Y; Umezawa, H; Kawai, H; Bauer, G E W; Maekawa, S; Saitoh, E

    2010-11-01

    Thermoelectric generation is an essential function in future energy-saving technologies. However, it has so far been an exclusive feature of electric conductors, a situation which limits its application; conduction electrons are often problematic in the thermal design of devices. Here we report electric voltage generation from heat flowing in an insulator. We reveal that, despite the absence of conduction electrons, the magnetic insulator LaY(2)Fe(5)O(12) can convert a heat flow into a spin voltage. Attached Pt films can then transform this spin voltage into an electric voltage as a result of the inverse spin Hall effect. The experimental results require us to introduce a thermally activated interface spin exchange between LaY(2)Fe(5)O(12) and Pt. Our findings extend the range of potential materials for thermoelectric applications and provide a crucial piece of information for understanding the physics of the spin Seebeck effect.

  3. Observing Black Hole Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2015-08-01

    Black hole spin is important in both the fundamental physics and astrophysics realms. In fundamental terms, many extensions and alternatives to General Relativity (GR) reveal themselves through effects related to (or at least of the same order as) spin. Astrophysically, spin is a fossil record of how black holes have grown and may, in addition, be an important source of energy (e.g., powering relativistic jets from black hole systems). I shall review recent progress on observational studies of black hole spin, especially those made in the X-ray waveband. We now have multiple techniques that can be applied in our search for black hole spin; I shall discuss the concordance (or, sometimes, lack thereof) between these techniques. Finally, I shall discuss what we can expect in the next few years with the launch of new X-ray instrumentation as well as the deployment of the Event Horizon Telescope.

  4. Arterial stump pressure: a determinant of arterial patency?

    PubMed

    Nunley, J A; Goldner, R D; Koman, L A; Gelberman, R; Urbaniak, J R

    1987-03-01

    Twenty-seven patients with acute injuries to the radial or ulnar arteries had arterial repairs using microvascular techniques. No patient had an ischemic hand secondary to his arterial injury. The overall patency rate for all repaired vessels was 56%. For sharp, clean lacerations, the success rate for repairs was 55%. Repairs of acute, sharp lacerations yielded no better results than delayed reconstructions. The average distal end arterial stump pressure for patent arteries was 66% of mean, while for thrombosed vessels it was 76% of mean; this was not a statistically significant difference (p = 0.9). There was no statistical correlation between forearm arterial patency, age, sex, vessel injured, mechanism of injury, time of repair, or clinically measured distal arterial stump pressure. At the present time, it does not appear to be possible to predict arterial patency by measuring arterial stump pressure at the time of definitive repair.

  5. Synchronization of spin-transfer torque oscillators by spin pumping, inverse spin Hall, and spin Hall effects

    SciTech Connect

    Elyasi, Mehrdad; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2015-02-14

    We have proposed a method to synchronize multiple spin-transfer torque oscillators based on spin pumping, inverse spin Hall, and spin Hall effects. The proposed oscillator system consists of a series of nano-magnets in junction with a normal metal with high spin-orbit coupling, and an accumulative feedback loop. We conduct simulations to demonstrate the effect of modulated charge currents in the normal metal due to spin pumping from each nano-magnet. We show that the interplay between the spin Hall effect and inverse spin Hall effect results in synchronization of the nano-magnets.

  6. Transverse Spin Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, William

    2014-05-01

    Transverse spin diffusion is a relatively new transport coefficient and a review of its history and physical basis will be presented. In NMR spin diffusion is often measured by spin echo techniques, which involve spin currents perpendicular to the direction of the magnetization, in contrast with the usual longitudinal case where the current is parallel to the magnetization. The first indication that this involved new physics was the Leggett-Rice effect (1970) in which spin waves, new spin-echo behavior, and an altered spin diffusion coefficient were predicted in liquid 3He. This effect gave the possibility of the first measurement of F1a, the parameter of the Landau Fermi-liquid theory mean-field responsible for the effect. In 1982 Lhuillier and Laloe found a transport equation very similar to the Leggett equation, but valid for highly-polarized dilute Boltzmann Bose and Fermi gases, and describing the ``identical spin rotation effect'' (ISRE), the analog of a Landau mean field. Coincidentally Bashkin and Meyerovich had also given equivalent descriptions of transport in polarized Boltzmann gases. That a mean-field effect could exists in dilute Boltzmann gases was theoretically surprising, but was confirmed experimentally. At low polarization the basic transverse diffusion constant D⊥ coincides with the longitudinal value D∥ however Meyerovich first pointed out that they could differ in highly polarized degenerate gases. Indeed detailed calculations (Jeon and Mullin) showed that, while D∥ is proportional to T-2, D⊥ approaches a constant (depending on polarization) at low T. Considerable controversy existed until experimental verification was achieved in 2004. The importance of ISRE again arose in 2008 as the basis of ``anomalous spin-state segregation'' in Duke and JILA experiments. More recently application of the ideas of transverse spin diffusion to strongly interacting Fermi gases has resulted in the observation of the diffusion constants at the quantum

  7. Spin transport at interfaces with spin-orbit coupling: Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, V. P.; Stiles, M. D.

    2016-09-01

    We generalize magnetoelectronic circuit theory to account for spin transfer to and from the atomic lattice via interfacial spin-orbit coupling. This enables a proper treatment of spin transport at interfaces between a ferromagnet and a heavy-metal nonmagnet. This generalized approach describes spin transport in terms of drops in spin and charge accumulations across the interface (as in the standard approach), but additionally includes the responses from in-plane electric fields and offsets in spin accumulations. A key finding is that in-plane electric fields give rise to spin accumulations and spin currents that can be polarized in any direction, generalizing the Rashba-Edelstein and spin Hall effects. The spin accumulations exert torques on the magnetization at the interface when they are misaligned from the magnetization. The additional out-of-plane spin currents exert torques via the spin-transfer mechanism on the ferromagnetic layer. To account for these phenomena we also describe spin torques within the generalized circuit theory. The additional effects included in this generalized circuit theory suggest modifications in the interpretations of experiments involving spin-orbit torques, spin pumping, spin memory loss, the Rashba-Edelstein effect, and the spin Hall magnetoresistance.

  8. Spin Polarized Transport and Spin Relaxation in Quantum Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenk, Paul; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Ohe, Jun-Ichiro; Ohtsuki, Tomi; Kramer, Bernhard; Kettemann, Stefan

    We give an introduction to spin dynamics in quantum wires. After a review of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) mechanisms in semiconductors, the spin diffusion equation with SOC is introduced. We discuss the particular conditions in which solutions of the spin diffusion equation with vanishing spin relaxation rates exist, where the spin density forms persistent spin helices. We give an overview of spin relaxation mechanisms, with particular emphasis on the motional narrowing mechanism in disordered conductors, the D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation. The solution of the spin diffusion equation in quantum wires shows that the spin relaxation becomes diminished when reducing the wire width below the spin precession length L SO. This corresponds to an effective alignment of the spin-orbit field in quantum wires and the formation of persistent spin helices whose form as well as amplitude is a measure of the particular SOCs, the linear Rashba and the linear Dresselhaus coupling. Cubic Dresselhaus coupling is found to yield in diffusive wires an undiminished contribution to the spin relaxation rate, however. We discuss recent experimental results which confirm the reduction of the spin relaxation rate. We next review theoretical proposals for creating spin-polarized currents in a T-shape structure with Rashba-SOC. For relatively small SOC, high spin polarization can be obtained. However, the corresponding conductance has been found to be small. Due to the self-duality of the scattering matrix for a system with spin-orbit interaction, no spin polarization of the current can be obtained for single-channel transport in two-terminal devices. Therefore, one has to consider at least a conductor with three terminals. We review results showing that the amplitude of the spin polarization becomes large if the SOC is sufficiently strong. We argue that the predicted effect should be experimentally accessible in InAs. For a possible experimental realization of InAs spin filters, see [1].

  9. Spin forming development

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, W.G.

    1982-05-01

    Bendix product applications require the capability of fabricating heavy gage, high strength materials. Five commercial sources have been identified that have the capability of spin forming metal thicknesses greater than 9.5 mm and four equiment manufacturers produce machines with this capability. Twelve assemblies selected as candidates for spin forming applications require spin forming of titanium, 250 maraging steel, 17-4 pH stainless steel, Nitronic 40 steel, 304 L stainless steel, and 6061 aluminum. Twelve parts have been cold spin formed from a 250 maraging steel 8.1 mm wall thickness machine preform, and six have been hot spin formed directly from 31.8-mm-thick flat plate. Thirty-three Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy parts and 26 17-4 pH stainless steel parts have been hot spin formed directly from 31.8-mm-thick plate. Hot spin forming directly from plate has demonstrated the feasibility and favorable economics of this fabrication technique for Bendix applications.

  10. Towards a Compositional SPIN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.; Giannakopoulou, Dimitra

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses our initial experience with introducing automated assume-guarantee verification based on learning in the SPIN tool. We believe that compositional verification techniques such as assume-guarantee reasoning could complement the state-reduction techniques that SPIN already supports, thus increasing the size of systems that SPIN can handle. We present a "light-weight" approach to evaluating the benefits of learning-based assume-guarantee reasoning in the context of SPIN: we turn our previous implementation of learning for the LTSA tool into a main program that externally invokes SPIN to provide the model checking-related answers. Despite its performance overheads (which mandate a future implementation within SPIN itself), this approach provides accurate information about the savings in memory. We have experimented with several versions of learning-based assume guarantee reasoning, including a novel heuristic introduced here for generating component assumptions when their environment is unavailable. We illustrate the benefits of learning-based assume-guarantee reasoning in SPIN through the example of a resource arbiter for a spacecraft. Keywords: assume-guarantee reasoning, model checking, learning.

  11. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  12. The Scattering of Particles with Spin from Targets with Spin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Noel M.

    1978-01-01

    The density matrix is used to obtain an expression for the mean value of any spin operator in the scattering of particles with arbitrary spin. The example of spin-1/2-spin-1 scattering is developed and physical information obtained by establishing connections with the polarization tensor and Wolfenstein observables. (Author/GA)

  13. Blood Flow in Arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, David N.

    Blood flow in arteries is dominated by unsteady flow phenomena. The cardiovascular system is an internal flow loop with multiple branches in which a complex liquid circulates. A nondimensional frequency parameter, the Womersley number, governs the relationship between the unsteady and viscous forces. Normal arterial flow is laminar with secondary flows generated at curves and branches. The arteries are living organs that can adapt to and change with the varying hemodynamic conditions. In certain circumstances, unusual hemodynamic conditions create an abnormal biological response. Velocity profile skewing can create pockets in which the direction of the wall shear stress oscillates. Atherosclerotic disease tends to be localized in these sites and results in a narrowing of the artery lumena stenosis. The stenosis can cause turbulence and reduce flow by means of viscous head losses and flow choking. Very high shear stresses near the throat of the stenosis can activate platelets and thereby induce thrombosis, which can totally block blood flow to the heart or brain. Detection and quantification of stenosis serve as the basis for surgical intervention. In the future, the study of arterial blood flow will lead to the prediction of individual hemodynamic flows in any patient, the development of diagnostic tools to quantify disease, and the design of devices that mimic or alter blood flow. This field is rich with challenging problems in fluid mechanics involving three-dimensional, pulsatile flows at the edge of turbulence.

  14. Spin transport in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özyilmaz, Barbaros

    2012-02-01

    Conventional electronic transistors involve the control of electronic charge at the nanoscale to realize memory, logic and communication functions. All these electronic charges, however, also carry a spin that remains unutilized in present commercial devices. This has motivated the search for new materials that propagate spin-polarized currents over large distances. Among the most promising materials for spintronics has been graphene. Micron-scale spin relaxation lengths have been previously demonstrated in single-layer graphene. Recently, we showed that bilayer graphene is a far more interesting candidate for spintronics. By fabricating spin valves on bilayer graphene we have achieved at room temperature spin relaxation times up to 2 nanoseconds, which are an order of magnitude higher than for single layer graphene [1]. Furthermore, the spin-relaxation time scales inversely with the mobility of BLG sample. This indicates the importance of D'yakonov-Perel' spin scattering in BLG. Last not but least, the presence of an electric field tunable band gap in bilayer graphene makes it particularly appealing. Our work provides fundamental insight into the unique properties of bilayer graphene for spintronic applications. Remarkably, a similar difference between single layer and bilayer graphene is also observed in large area graphene grown by the CVD method on copper. These results demonstrate the potential of CVD graphene in realistic spintronics devices [2]. [4pt] [1] T - Y. Yang et al., Observation of Long Spin-Relaxation Times in Bilayer Graphene at Room Temperature, PRL (2011). [0pt] [2] A. Avsar et al., Towards Wafer Scale Fabrication of Graphene Based Spin Valve Devices, Nano Lett. (2011).

  15. Higher spins and holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Per; Ross, Simon F.

    2013-05-01

    The principles of quantum mechanics and relativity impose rigid constraints on theories of massless particles with nonzero spin. Indeed, Yang-Mills theory and General Relativity are the unique solution in the case of spin-1 and spin-2. In asymptotically flat spacetime, there are fundamental obstacles to formulating fully consistent interacting theories of particles of spin greater than 2. However, indications are that such theories are just barely possible in asymptotically anti-de Sitter or de Sitter spacetimes, where the non-existence of an S-matrix provides an escape from the theorems restricting theories in Minkowski spacetime. These higher spin gravity theories are therefore of great intrinsic interest, since they, along with supergravity, provide the only known field theories generalizing the local invariance principles of Yang-Mills theory and General Relativity. While work on higher spin gravity goes back several decades, the subject has gained broader appeal in recent years due to its appearance in the AdS/CFT correspondence. In three and four spacetime dimensions, there exist duality proposals linking higher spin gravity theories to specific conformal field theories living in two and three dimensions respectively. The enlarged symmetry algebra of the conformal field theories renders them exactly soluble, which makes them excellent laboratories for understanding in detail the holographic mechanism behind AdS/CFT duality. Steady progress is also being made on better understanding the space of possible higher spin gravity theories and their physical content. This work includes classifying the possible field multiplets and their interactions, constructing exact solutions of the nonlinear field equations, and relating higher spin theories to string theory. A full understanding of these theories will involve coming to grips with the novel symmetry principles that enlarge those of General Relativity and Yang-Mills theory, and one can hope that this will provide

  16. Nonlocality without inequality for spin-s systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkri, Samir; Choudhary, Sujit K.

    2005-08-15

    We critically review earlier works on Hardy's nonlocality argument for two spin-s systems and show that solutions previously found in this regard were restricted due to imposition of some conditions which have no role in the argument of nonlocality. We provide a compact form of the nonlocality condition for two spin-s particles, and we also extend it to n number of spin-s particles. Finally we apply a more general kind of nonlocality argument, still without an inequality, to higher-spin systems.

  17. Traumatic Distal Ulnar Artery Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Karaarslan, Ahmet A.; Karakaşlı, Ahmet; Mayda, Aslan; Karcı, Tolga; Aycan, Hakan; Kobak, Şenol

    2014-01-01

    This paper is about a posttraumatic distal ulnar artery thrombosis case that has occurred after a single blunt trauma. The ulnar artery thrombosis because of chronic trauma is a frequent condition (hypothenar hammer syndrome) but an ulnar artery thrombosis because of a single direct blunt trauma is rare. Our patient who has been affected by a single blunt trauma to his hand and developed ulnar artery thrombosis has been treated by resection of the thrombosed ulnar artery segment. This report shows that a single blunt trauma can cause distal ulnar artery thrombosis in the hand and it can be treated merely by thrombosed segment resection in suitable cases. PMID:25276455

  18. Absolutely classical spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

  19. Spin line groups.

    PubMed

    Lazić, Nataša; Milivojević, Marko; Damnjanović, Milan

    2013-11-01

    Spin line groups describe the symmetries of spin arrangements in quasi-one-dimensional systems. These groups are derived for the first family of line groups. Among them, magnetic groups are singled out as a special case. Spin arrangements generated by the derived groups are first discussed for single-orbit systems and then the conclusions are extended to multi-orbit cases. The results are illustrated by the examples of a CuO2 zigzag chain, a (13)C nanotube and the hexaferrite Ba2Mg2Fe12O22. Applications to neutron diffraction and classical ground-state determination are indicated.

  20. Method for estimating spin-spin interactions from magnetization curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Ryo; Hukushima, Koji

    2017-02-01

    We develop a method to estimate the spin-spin interactions in the Hamiltonian from the observed magnetization curve by machine learning based on Bayesian inference. In our method, plausible spin-spin interactions are determined by maximizing the posterior distribution, which is the conditional probability of the spin-spin interactions in the Hamiltonian for a given magnetization curve with observation noise. The conditional probability is obtained with the Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations combined with an exchange Monte Carlo method. The efficiency of our method is tested using synthetic magnetization curve data, and the results show that spin-spin interactions are estimated with a high accuracy. In particular, the relevant terms of the spin-spin interactions are successfully selected from the redundant interaction candidates by the l1 regularization in the prior distribution.

  1. Spin pumping and inverse spin Hall effects—Insights for future spin-orbitronics (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Jiang, Wanjun; Fradin, Frank Y.; Pearson, John E.; Hoffmann, Axel; Sklenar, Joseph; Ketterson, John B.

    2015-05-07

    Quantification of spin-charge interconversion has become increasingly important in the fast-developing field of spin-orbitronics. Pure spin current generated by spin pumping acts as a sensitive probe for many bulk and interface spin-orbit effects, which has been indispensable for the discovery of many promising new spin-orbit materials. We apply spin pumping and inverse spin Hall effect experiments, as a useful metrology, and study spin-orbit effects in a variety of metals and metal interfaces. We quantify the spin Hall effects in Ir and W using the conventional bilayer structures and discuss the self-induced voltage in a single layer of ferromagnetic permalloy. Finally, we extend our discussions to multilayer structures and quantitatively reveal the spin current flow in two consecutive normal metal layers.

  2. Spin pumping and inverse spin Hall effects—Insights for future spin-orbitronics (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Jiang, Wanjun; Sklenar, Joseph; Fradin, Frank Y.; Pearson, John E.; Ketterson, John B.; Hoffmann, Axel

    2015-05-01

    Quantification of spin-charge interconversion has become increasingly important in the fast-developing field of spin-orbitronics. Pure spin current generated by spin pumping acts as a sensitive probe for many bulk and interface spin-orbit effects, which has been indispensable for the discovery of many promising new spin-orbit materials. We apply spin pumping and inverse spin Hall effect experiments, as a useful metrology, and study spin-orbit effects in a variety of metals and metal interfaces. We quantify the spin Hall effects in Ir and W using the conventional bilayer structures and discuss the self-induced voltage in a single layer of ferromagnetic permalloy. Finally, we extend our discussions to multilayer structures and quantitatively reveal the spin current flow in two consecutive normal metal layers.

  3. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Spontaneous Rupture of the Omental Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Yamagami, Takuji; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Iida, Shigeharu; Tazoe, Jun; Asai, Shunsuke; Masui, Koji; Ikeda, Jun; Nagata, Akihiro; Sato, Osamu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2011-02-15

    We encountered a rare case of spontaneous rupture of the omental artery. A 25-year-old man without any episode of abdominal trauma or bleeding disorders came to the emergency unit with left upper abdominal pain. Hematoma with extravasation of the greater omentum and a hemoperitoneum was confirmed on abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Bleeding from the omental artery was suspected based on these findings. Transcatheter arterial embolization was successfully performed after extravasation of the omental artery, which arises from the left gastroepiploic artery, was confirmed on arteriography. Partial ometectomy was performed 10 days after transcatheter arterial embolization, revealing that the hematoma measured 10 cm in diameter in the greater omentum. Pathological examination showed rupture of the branch of an omental artery without abnormal findings, such as an aneurysm or neoplasm. Thus, we diagnosed him with spontaneous rupture of the omental artery. The patient recovered and was discharged from the hospital 10 days after the surgery, with a favorable postoperative course.

  4. Ruptured jejunal artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sílvia; Costa, Alexandre; Pereira, Tiago; Maciel, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Visceral artery aneurysms (VAAs), unlike aortic aneurysms, are very rare, but are also a potentially lethal vascular disease. Jejunal artery aneurysms only account for less than 3% of VAAs, but have a 30% risk of rupture, with 20% death rate, presenting with only few and vague symptoms. We report the case of a 76-year-old man presenting at the emergency department (ED) with a crampy epigastric pain and vomiting. An ultrasound performed diagnosed free abdominal fluid and immediate CT scan diagnosed jejunal artery aneurysm spontaneously rupturing, followed by hypovolaemic shock. Emergent surgery was undertaken, and aneurysmectomy, followed by partial enterectomy with primary anastomosis were performed, because of segmentary jejunal ischaemia. The patient's recovery was unremarkable. High level of suspicion, rapid diagnosis capability and prompt surgical or endovascular intervention, as well as an effective teamwork in the ED are critical to avoid the devastating consequences of ruptured VAAs. PMID:23771962

  5. When measured spin polarization is not spin polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowben, P. A.; Wu, Ning; Binek, Christian

    2011-05-01

    Spin polarization is an unusually ambiguous scientific idiom and, as such, is rarely well defined. A given experimental methodology may allow one to quantify a spin polarization but only in its particular context. As one might expect, these ambiguities sometimes give rise to inappropriate interpretations when comparing the spin polarizations determined through different methods. The spin polarization of CrO2 and Cr2O3 illustrate some of the complications which hinders comparisons of spin polarization values.

  6. Algebraic spin liquid in an exactly solvable spin model

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Hong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Kivelson, Steven A.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25

    We have proposed an exactly solvable quantum spin-3/2 model on a square lattice. Its ground state is a quantum spin liquid with a half integer spin per unit cell. The fermionic excitations are gapless with a linear dispersion, while the topological 'vison' excitations are gapped. Moreover, the massless Dirac fermions are stable. Thus, this model is, to the best of our knowledge, the first exactly solvable model of half-integer spins whose ground state is an 'algebraic spin liquid.'

  7. Spin waves in a persistent spin-current Fermi liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmann, J. D.; Bedell, K. S.

    2010-06-15

    We report two theoretical results for transverse spin waves, which arise in a system with a persistent spin current. Using Fermi liquid theory, we introduce a spin current in the ground state of a polarized or unpolarized Fermi liquid, and we derive the resultant spin waves using the Landau kinetic equation. The resulting spin waves have a q{sup 1} and q{sup 1/2} dispersion to leading order for the polarized and unpolarized systems, respectively.

  8. When measured spin polarization is not spin polarization.

    PubMed

    Dowben, P A; Wu, Ning; Binek, Christian

    2011-05-04

    Spin polarization is an unusually ambiguous scientific idiom and, as such, is rarely well defined. A given experimental methodology may allow one to quantify a spin polarization but only in its particular context. As one might expect, these ambiguities sometimes give rise to inappropriate interpretations when comparing the spin polarizations determined through different methods. The spin polarization of CrO(2) and Cr(2)O(3) illustrate some of the complications which hinders comparisons of spin polarization values.

  9. Understanding Arteries | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Understanding Arteries Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Below: ... the arteries and veins are healthy. A Healthy Artery An artery is a muscular tube. It has ...

  10. On nonlinear higher spin curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manvelyan, Ruben; Mkrtchyan, Karapet; Rühl, Werner; Tovmasyan, Murad

    2011-05-01

    We present the first nonlinear term of the higher spin curvature which is covariant with respect to deformed gauge transformations that are linear in the field. We consider the case of spin 3 after presenting spin 2 as an example, and then construct the general spin s quadratic term of the de Wit-Freedman curvature.

  11. Splenic artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tcbc-Rj, Rui Antônio Ferreira; Ferreira, Myriam Christina Lopes; Ferreira, Daniel Antônio Lopes; Ferreira, André Gustavo Lopes; Ramos, Flávia Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Splenic artery aneurysms - the most common visceral artery aneurysms - are found most often in multiparous women and in patients with portal hypertension. Indications for treatment of splenic artery aneurysm or pseudoaneurysm include specific symptoms, female gender and childbearing age, presence of portal hypertension, planned liver transplantation, a pseudoaneurysm of any size, and an aneurysm with a diameter of more than 2.5cm. Historically, the treatment of splenic artery aneurysm has been surgical ligation of the splenic artery, ligation of the aneurysm, or aneurysmectomy with or without splenectomy, depending on the aneurysm location. There are other percutaneous interventional techniques. The authors present a case of a splenic artery aneurysm in a 51-year-old woman, detected incidentally. RESUMO Aneurismas da artéria esplênica - os aneurismas arteriais viscerais mais comuns - são encontrados mais frequentemente em mulheres multíparas e em pacientes com hipertensão portal. As indicações para o seu tratamento incluem sintomas específicos, sexo feminino e idade fértil, presença de hipertensão portal, paciente em fila de transplante hepático, um pseudoaneurisma de qualquer tamanho, e um aneurisma com um diâmetro superior a 2,5cm. Historicamente, o tratamento do aneurisma da artéria esplênica tem sido a ligadura cirúrgica da artéria esplênica, a ligadura do aneurisma ou a aneurismectomia, com ou sem esplenectomia, dependendo do local do aneurisma. Existem outras técnicas intervencionistas percutâneas. Os autores apresentam o caso de um aneurisma de artéria esplênica em uma mulher de 51 anos de idade, diagnosticado incidentalmente.

  12. Microscopic studies of nonlocal spin dynamics and spin transport (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Adur, Rohan; Du, Chunhui; Cardellino, Jeremy; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Wolfe, Christopher S.; Wang, Hailong; Herman, Michael; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    2015-05-07

    Understanding the behavior of spins coupling across interfaces in the study of spin current generation and transport is a fundamental challenge that is important for spintronics applications. The transfer of spin angular momentum from a ferromagnet into an adjacent normal material as a consequence of the precession of the magnetization of the ferromagnet is a process known as spin pumping. We find that, in certain circumstances, the insertion of an intervening normal metal can enhance spin pumping between an excited ferromagnetic magnetization and a normal metal layer as a consequence of improved spin conductance matching. We have studied this using inverse spin Hall effect and enhanced damping measurements. Scanned probe magnetic resonance techniques are a complementary tool in this context offering high resolution magnetic resonance imaging, localized spin excitation, and direct measurement of spin lifetimes or damping. Localized magnetic resonance studies of size-dependent spin dynamics in the absence of lithographic confinement in both ferromagnets and paramagnets reveal the close relationship between spin transport and spin lifetime at microscopic length scales. Finally, detection of ferromagnetic resonance of a ferromagnetic film using the photoluminescence of nitrogen vacancy spins in neighboring nanodiamonds demonstrates long-range spin transport between insulating materials, indicating the complexity and generality of spin transport in diverse, spatially separated, material systems.

  13. Spin Hall effect and spin swapping in diffusive superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espedal, Camilla; Lange, Peter; Sadjina, Severin; Mal'shukov, A. G.; Brataas, Arne

    2017-02-01

    We consider the spin-orbit-induced spin Hall effect and spin swapping in diffusive superconductors. By employing the nonequilibrium Keldysh Green's function technique in the quasiclassical approximation, we derive coupled transport equations for the spectral spin and particle distributions and for the energy density in the elastic scattering regime. We compute four contributions to the spin Hall conductivity, namely, skew scattering, side jump, anomalous velocity, and the Yafet contribution. The reduced density of states in the superconductor causes a renormalization of the spin Hall angle. We demonstrate that all four of these contributions to the spin Hall conductivity are renormalized in the same way in the superconducting state. In its simplest manifestation, spin swapping transforms a primary spin current into a secondary spin current with swapped current and polarization directions. We find that the spin-swapping coefficient is not explicitly but only implicitly affected by the superconducting gap through the renormalized diffusion coefficients. We discuss experimental consequences for measurements of the (inverse) spin Hall effect and spin swapping in four-terminal geometries. In our geometry, below the superconducting transition temperature, the spin-swapping signal is increased an order of magnitude while changes in the (inverse) spin Hall signal are moderate.

  14. Microscopic studies of nonlocal spin dynamics and spin transport (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Rohan; Du, Chunhui; Cardellino, Jeremy; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Wolfe, Christopher S.; Wang, Hailong; Herman, Michael; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the behavior of spins coupling across interfaces in the study of spin current generation and transport is a fundamental challenge that is important for spintronics applications. The transfer of spin angular momentum from a ferromagnet into an adjacent normal material as a consequence of the precession of the magnetization of the ferromagnet is a process known as spin pumping. We find that, in certain circumstances, the insertion of an intervening normal metal can enhance spin pumping between an excited ferromagnetic magnetization and a normal metal layer as a consequence of improved spin conductance matching. We have studied this using inverse spin Hall effect and enhanced damping measurements. Scanned probe magnetic resonance techniques are a complementary tool in this context offering high resolution magnetic resonance imaging, localized spin excitation, and direct measurement of spin lifetimes or damping. Localized magnetic resonance studies of size-dependent spin dynamics in the absence of lithographic confinement in both ferromagnets and paramagnets reveal the close relationship between spin transport and spin lifetime at microscopic length scales. Finally, detection of ferromagnetic resonance of a ferromagnetic film using the photoluminescence of nitrogen vacancy spins in neighboring nanodiamonds demonstrates long-range spin transport between insulating materials, indicating the complexity and generality of spin transport in diverse, spatially separated, material systems.

  15. Idiopathic pulmonary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kotwica, Tomasz; Szumarska, Joanna; Staniszewska-Marszalek, Edyta; Mazurek, Walentyna; Kosmala, Wojciech

    2009-05-01

    Pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA) is an uncommon lesion, which may be associated with different etiologies including congenital cardiovascular diseases, systemic vasculitis, connective tissue diseases, infections, and trauma. Idiopathic PAA is sporadically diagnosed by exclusion of concomitant major pathology. We report a case of a 56-year-old female with an idiopathic pulmonary artery dilatation identified fortuitously by echocardiography and confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Neither significant pulmonary valve dysfunction nor pulmonary hypertension and other cardiac abnormalities which might contribute to the PAA development were found. Here, we describe echocardiographic and computed tomography findings and review the literature on PAA management.

  16. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Shomaf, Maha; Obeidat, Nathir; Najjar, Saleh

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcomas (PAS) are extremely rare sarcomas of uncertain histogenesis that often mimic pulmonary thromboemboli. This is a report of a 60-year-old female patient who presented with recurrent chest pain and cough. The patient was first diagnosed with pulmonary embolism but she did not improve on anticoagulant therapy. Follow-up imaging studies revealed a mass in the left hilar region extending into the pulmonary trunk and branches of the left pulmonary artery. The tru-cut biopsy revealed an undifferentiated sarcoma. The patient died 10 months after her initial presentation. PMID:26425600

  17. Pluto's Spinning Moons

    NASA Video Gallery

    Most inner moons in the solar system keep one face pointed toward their central planet; this animation shows that certainly isn’t the case with the small moons of Pluto, which behave like spinning ...

  18. Compact photonic spin filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Yougang; Liu, Zhenxing; Liu, Yachao; Zhou, Junxiao; Shu, Weixing; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2016-10-01

    In this letter, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a compact photonic spin filter formed by integrating a Pancharatnam-Berry phase lens (focal length of ±f ) into a conventional plano-concave lens (focal length of -f). By choosing the input port of the filter, photons with a desired spin state, such as the right-handed component or the left-handed one, propagate alone its original propagation direction, while the unwanted spin component is quickly diverged after passing through the filter. One application of the filter, sorting the spin-dependent components of vector vortex beams on higher-order Poincaré sphere, is also demonstrated. Our scheme provides a simple method to manipulate light, and thereby enables potential applications for photonic devices.

  19. Picosecond Spin Seebeck Effect.

    PubMed

    Kimling, Johannes; Choi, Gyung-Min; Brangham, Jack T; Matalla-Wagner, Tristan; Huebner, Torsten; Kuschel, Timo; Yang, Fengyuan; Cahill, David G

    2017-02-03

    We report time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in normal metal/Y_{3}Fe_{5}O_{12} bilayers driven by an interfacial temperature difference between electrons and magnons. The measured time evolution of spin accumulation induced by laser excitation indicates transfer of angular momentum across normal metal/Y_{3}Fe_{5}O_{12} interfaces on a picosecond time scale, too short for contributions from a bulk temperature gradient in an yttrium iron garnet. The product of spin-mixing conductance and the interfacial spin Seebeck coefficient determined is of the order of 10^{8}  A m^{-2} K^{-1}.

  20. MMS Spin Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    The four Magnetospheric Multiscale observatories all undergo what's called a spin test, to learn how well the spacecraft are balanced. It also provides information on how well the mass properties o...

  1. Reconstructive surgery for segmental arterial mediolysis involving both the internal carotid artery and visceral arteries.

    PubMed

    Obara, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Kenji; Narimatsu, Yoshiaki; Sugiura, Hitoshi; Kitajima, Masaki; Kakefuda, Toshihiro

    2006-03-01

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is a rare, nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory arteriopathy. A 52-year-old man with sudden hemiparesis of the right side was found to have an aneurysm of the left internal carotid artery and concomitant multiple aneurysms of the extrahepatic, celiac, and superior mesenteric arteries. Reconstructive operations using autologous vein graft were performed to treat the aneurysms. The histopathology analyses of resected arterial and aneurysmal specimens showed characteristics consistent with SAM. To our knowledge, a successfully treated case of SAM affecting both the carotid artery and visceral arteries has not previously been described.

  2. Litter-Spinning Retarders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C.

    1995-01-01

    Aerodynamic plates stop litter from spinning during hoisting by helicopter. Features of proposed litter-spinning retarders include convenience of deployment and independence from ground restraint. Retarder plate(s) folded flat against bottom of litter during storage or while litter is loaded. Plate(s) held in storage position by latch that releases manually or automatically as litter is hoisted. Upon release, springs move plates into deployed position.

  3. Spider Spinning for Dummies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Richard S.

    Spider spinning is a snappy name for the problem of listing the ideals of a totally acyclic poset in such a way that each ideal is computed from its predecessor in constant time. Such an algorithm is said to be loopless. Our aim in these lectures is to show how to calculate a loopless algorithm for spider spinning. The calculation makes use of the fundamental laws of functional programming and the real purpose of the exercise is to show these laws in action.

  4. Coronary artery balloon angioplasty - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100160.htm Coronary artery balloon angioplasty - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... slide 9 out of 9 Overview The coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle. The right ...

  5. Peripheral artery bypass - leg - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000239.htm Peripheral artery bypass - leg - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. You had peripheral artery bypass surgery to re-route the blood supply ...

  6. Peripheral Arterial Disease and Claudication

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fatty deposits inside them. This is called atherosclerosis. If you have PAD, your arms, and more ... also more likely in people who already have atherosclerosis in other arteries, such as the arteries in ...

  7. A rare case report of subscapular artery.

    PubMed

    Khaki, Amir Afshin; Shoja, M A Mohagjel; Khaki, Arash

    2011-01-01

    Axillary artery is one of the most important arteries of the upper limb, which is a continua- tion of the subclavian artery. It begins at the lateral border of the first rib and ends at the inferior border of the teres major where it becomes the brachial artery. Axillary artery has six important branches included: 1) Superior thoracic artery 2) Thoracoacromial artery 3) Lateral thoracic artery 4) Subscapular artery 5) Posterior circumflex humeral artery 6) Anterior circumflex humeral artery. Subscapular artery arises from the third part of axillary artery normally and then divides into cir- cumflex scapular artery that extremely enters the triangular space. The other branch of subscapular artery, the thoracodorsal artery, accompanies thracodorsal nerve to lateral border of scapula and supplies and innervates that region. In this case the subscapular artery was absent in both sides and instead of that the circumflex scapular artery was directly derived from axillary artery and the thoracodorsal artery is separated from circumflex scapular artery as a thin and short branch, too. It seemed that the lateral thoracic artery, which was thicker than its normal condition, supplied the muscles of the lateral part of scapula and the thoracodorsal muscle. Other branches of the axillary artery demonstrated without any abnormally. Since axillary artery has the highest rate of rapture and damage coming after the popliteal artery, knowing the variations is important and essential for surgeons, radiologist and anatomist.

  8. Quantum model of spin noise.

    PubMed

    Annabestani, R; Cory, D G; Emerson, J

    2015-03-01

    Any ensemble of quantum particles exhibits statistical fluctuations known as spin noise. Here, we provide a description of spin noise in the language of open quantum systems. The description unifies the signatures of spin noise under both strong and weak measurements. Further, the model accounts for arbitrary spin dynamics from an arbitrary initial state. In all cases we can find both the spin noise and its time correlation function.

  9. Oscillatory spin transport in spin Hall multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsukov, Igor; Gonçalves, A. M.; Soledade, P.; Passos, C. A. C.; Costa, M.; Souza-Neto, N. M.; Garcia, F.; Lee, H. K.; Smith, A.; Tretiakov, O.; Krivorotov, I. N.; Sampaio, L. C.

    We study multilayers of sputtered Pt/(d)Cu/Py as a function of the Cu thickness d using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). The FMR linewidth reveals a linear dependence on the frequency with negligible inhomogeneous contribution. The Gilbert damping falls smoothly with increasing d, but presents a strong superimposed oscillation with a period of ~1.5nm. We attribute this behavior to RKKY-like spin transport in the confinement of the Cu layer. The induced perpendicular anisotropy due to the proximity effect shows a similar behavior. We evaluate the induced magnetic moment on Pt using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and find that it decreases with increasing Cu thickness smoothly. Again, we see oscillations of the magnetic moment and show that the oscillatory spin transport affects proximity induced magnetism in Pt. We extend our study to multilayer systems with increased oxidation levels and with out-of-plane crystal texture, in order to investigate the effects of disorder and electron's k-vectors that are responsible for the oscillatory spin transport.

  10. Testing Reciprocity of Spin Pumping and Spin Transfer Torque in Ferromagnet/Spin-Orbit Metal Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Carl; Emori, Satoru; Nan, Tianxiang; Sun, Nian

    2015-03-01

    Spin pumping from a ferromagnet (FM) to a normal metal (NM) and spin transfer torque (STT) generated in a FM from an injected spin current should be reciprocal processes governed by the spin mixing conductance. The same should be true for the spin Hall effect (SHE) and inverse SHE, which are used to generate and measure spin currents. Past experiments on multilayer thin films involving FM and NM interfaces have measured only spin pumping or spin injection, and have utilized incomplete modeling that results in different effective values for the same parameter such as the spin mixing conductance or spin Hall angle. This gives rise to a large range of values reported in the literature. Here we develop a complete model for spin flow in the FM/NM system including SHE, spin diffusion and spin pumping that allows us to determine the true values of the spin transport parameters. To explore the physcis we use STT-ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) experiments of NM/FM/NM trilayers, and FMR spectroscopy of FM/NM bilayers where we simultaneously measure damping changes due to spin pumping, voltage generated by the inverse SHE, and STT generated by the SHE. These experiments, combined with the complete modeling, allow us to test the reciprocity of spin pumping and STT plus the SHE and its inverse.

  11. Contact-Induced Spin Relaxation in Graphene Nonlocal Spin Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stecklein, Gordon; Crowell, Paul A.; Li, Jing; Anugrah, Yoska; Su, Qun; Koester, Steven J.

    2016-11-01

    We report on a systematic study of contact-induced spin relaxation in gated graphene nonlocal spin valves. We demonstrate the enhancement of the nonlocal magnetoresistance (Δ RNL) as the Co /Al Ox/graphene interface resistance increases relative to the graphene spin resistance. We measure Hanle precession at many gate voltages on 14 separate spin-valve devices fabricated from graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). These measurements are compared by normalizing Δ RNL to the ideal limit of large contact resistance, and the result is shown to be consistent with isotropic contact-induced spin relaxation caused by spin current flowing from the graphene into the Co contacts. After accounting for this source of spin relaxation, we extract spin lifetimes of up to 600 ps in CVD graphene with a gate-voltage dependence which can be described by a combination of both Elliott-Yafet and D'yakonov-Perel' spin-relaxation mechanisms.

  12. Spin-current emission governed by nonlinear spin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Takaharu; Matsuura, Saki; Nomura, Akiyo; Watanabe, Shun; Kang, Keehoon; Sirringhaus, Henning; Ando, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Coupling between conduction electrons and localized magnetization is responsible for a variety of phenomena in spintronic devices. This coupling enables to generate spin currents from dynamical magnetization. Due to the nonlinearity of magnetization dynamics, the spin-current emission through the dynamical spin-exchange coupling offers a route for nonlinear generation of spin currents. Here, we demonstrate spin-current emission governed by nonlinear magnetization dynamics in a metal/magnetic insulator bilayer. The spin-current emission from the magnetic insulator is probed by the inverse spin Hall effect, which demonstrates nontrivial temperature and excitation power dependences of the voltage generation. The experimental results reveal that nonlinear magnetization dynamics and enhanced spin-current emission due to magnon scatterings are triggered by decreasing temperature. This result illustrates the crucial role of the nonlinear magnon interactions in the spin-current emission driven by dynamical magnetization, or nonequilibrium magnons, from magnetic insulators. PMID:26472712

  13. Pancreaticoduodenal arterial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Verta, M J; Dean, R H; Yao, J S; Conn, J; Mehn, W H; Bergan, J J

    1977-01-01

    Experience with four aneurysms of the pancreaticoduodenal artery is reviewed and compared to the reported experience of 19 other cases. In view of the common presentation of such lesions as intra-abdominal hemorrhage preceded by non-specific abdominal pain and other digestive symptoms, it is suggested that angiography perfomed preoperatively or intraoperatively allows definitive diagnosis and leads to specific therapy. PMID:406863

  14. Traumatic Brachial Artery Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Ergunes, Kazim; Yilik, Levent; Ozsoyler, Ibrahim; Kestelli, Mert; Ozbek, Cengiz; Gurbuz, Ali

    2006-01-01

    We performed this retrospective study to analyze our strategies for managing and surgically treating brachial artery injuries. Fifty-seven patients with a total of 58 traumatic brachial artery injuries underwent surgery at our institution, from August 1996 through November 2004. Fifty-four patients were male and 3 were female (age range, 7 to 75 years; mean, 29.4 years). Forty-four of the patients had penetrating injuries (18 had stab wounds; 16, window glass injuries; and 10, industrial accidents), 10 had blunt trauma injuries (traffic accidents), and 3 had gunshot injuries. Fourteen patients (24.6%) had peripheral nerve injury. All patients underwent Doppler ultrasonographic examination. The repair of the 58 arterial injuries involved end-to-end anastomosis for 32 injuries (55.2%), reverse saphenous vein graft interpositional grafts for 18 (31%), and primary repair for 8 (13.8%). Venous continuity was achieved in 11 (84.6%) of 13 patients who had major venous injuries. Nine of the 57 patients (15.8%) required primary fasciotomy. Follow-up showed that 5 of the 14 patients with peripheral nerve injury had apparent disabilities due to nerve injury. One patient underwent amputation. There were no deaths. We believe that good results can be achieved in patients with brachial artery injuries by use of careful physical examination, Doppler ultrasonography, and restoration of viability with vascular repair and dbridement of nonviable tissues. Traumatic neurologic injury frequently leads to disability of the extremities. PMID:16572866

  15. Hepatic Artery Infusion Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schüller, J.; Kroiss, A.; Dinstl, K.

    1990-01-01

    Hepatic artery chemotherapy was given to 36 patients, using totally implantable devices consisting of a port and external pump. Twenty-seven patients had inoperable liver metastases of colorectal origin. The infusion system was inserted by laparotomy into the hepatic artery via the gastroduodenal artery. There was no operative mortality. Thirteen infusion systems could not be used for chemotherapy due to dislodgement, early death and lack of follow-up. FUdR was infused every two weeks. There were minor local complications like thrombosis of the system and dislodgement of the port. Toxic effects could be managed by reducing the dose. Response to chemotherapy was evaluated by survival, clinical condition, CEA, ultrasound and CT six months after onset of arterial chemotherapy. Ten/twenty-three patients (43%) responded to therapy, eight of them died on the average 19 months after initial chemotherapy. Six patients were non-responders, seven had stable disease. Five/ten patients developed extrahepatic metastases. Mean survival time was 13.1 months, mean interval until relapse 10.6 months. PMID:2149279

  16. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... may help lower your chance of having a stroke. But you will need to make lifestyle changes to help prevent plaque buildup, blood clots, and other problems in your carotid arteries over time. You may need to change your diet and start an exercise program, if your doctor tells you exercise is ...

  17. Absent or occult pulmonary artery.

    PubMed Central

    Presbitero, P; Bull, C; Haworth, S G; de Leval, M R

    1984-01-01

    Of 12 patients with angiographically absent pulmonary artery, 11 were investigated surgically. The previously occult pulmonary artery was found in 10 patients, in five of whom a vestige of an intrapericardial artery was present and in five the artery was patent only at the hilus, a gap existing between the main pulmonary artery and the hilar vessel, and no artery was found in one. All patients with an intrapericardial artery had right ventricular outflow tract obstruction and a ductus descending vertically from underneath the aortic arch. In those without an intrapericardial vessel the occult artery was on the side opposite the aortic arch, and there was evidence of a ductus coming from the innominate artery on the side of the interruption. The occult pulmonary artery, where identified at operation, was usually joined initially to the systemic circulation. Ultimately, continuity between the hilar and main pulmonary artery may be established surgically. Where no intrapericardial vessel exists, however, a conduit may be required to bridge the gap. It seems advisable to search for the occult artery as early in life as is feasible in the hope that providing a blood supply will ensure development of the vessel and normal lung growth. Images PMID:6743435

  18. Spin-Current and Spin-Splitting in Helicoidal Molecules Due to Spin-Orbit Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of organic materials in spintronic devices has been seriously considered after recent experimental works have shown unexpected spin-dependent electrical properties. The basis for the confection of any spintronic device is ability of selecting the appropriated spin polarization. In this direction, DNA has been pointed out as a potential candidate for spin selection due to the spin-orbit coupling originating from the electric field generated by accumulated electrical charges along the helix. Here, we demonstrate that spin-orbit coupling is the minimum ingredient necessary to promote a spatial spin separation and the generation of spin-current. We show that the up and down spin components have different velocities that give rise to a spin-current. By using a simple situation where spin-orbit coupling is present, we provide qualitative justifications to our results that clearly point to helicoidal molecules as serious candidates to integrate spintronic devices. PMID:27009836

  19. Electrical spin manipulation in spin-orbit coupling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Akihito; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2014-03-01

    Generation of spin by applying as electric current in a spin-orbit coupling system has been investigated with much theoretical and experimental attention in spintronics. Although the electronic spin is the well-defined quantity, the spin is not conserved in the presence of spin-orbit interaction and therefore the theoretical definition of spin current is not uniquely given. To resolve this ambiguity in the definition, the non-Abelian gauge theory is one of the possible solutions. By associating the spin-orbit interaction with the non-Abelian vector potential, a proper definition of spin current is given on the basis of the SU(2) gauge invariance and the electronic spin is covariantly conserved. In this context, we present theoretically a general form of spin polarization in terms of an effective Yang-Mills field corresponding to the spin-orbit interaction and usual U(1) Maxwell electromagnetic field. In particular, we focus on a purely electrical spin manipulation, and we find that both of the spin Hall effect and the inverse of the spin galvanic effect arise from the same origin, i.e., the SU(2) ×U(1) Hall effect.

  20. Cerebral Arterial Fenestrations

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Daniel L; Stout, Charles E; Kim, Warren T; Kansagra, Akash P; Yu, John Paul; Gu, Amy; Jewell, Nicholas P; Hetts, Steven W; Higashida, Randall T; Dowd, Christopher F; Halbach, Van V

    2014-01-01

    Summary Arterial fenestrations are an anatomic variant with indeterminate significance. Given the controversy surrounding fenestrations we sought their prevalence within our practice along with their association with other cerebrovascular anomalies. We retrospectively reviewed 10,927 patients undergoing digital subtraction angiography between 1992 and 2011. Dictated reports were searched for the terms “fenestration” or “fenestrated” with images reviewed for relevance, yielding 228 unique cases. A Medline database search from February 1964 to January 2013 generated 304 citations, 127 cases of which were selected for analysis. Cerebral arterial fenestrations were identified in 228 patients (2.1%). At least one aneurysm was noted in 60.5% of patients, with an aneurysm arising from the fenestration in 19.6% of patients. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage or non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage were present in 60.1% and 15.8%, respectively. For the subset of patients with an aneurysm arising directly from a fenestration relative to those patients with an aneurysm not immediately associated with a fenestration, the prevalence of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage was 66.7% vs. 58.6% (p = 0.58). Fenestrations were more often within the posterior circulation (73.2%) than the anterior circulation (24.6%), though there was no difference in the prevalence of aneurysms within these groups (61.1% vs. 60.7%, p = 1.0). Cerebral arterial fenestrations are an anatomic variant more often manifesting at the anterior communicating arterial complex and basilar artery and with no definite pathological relationship with aneurysms. PMID:24976087

  1. Spasm in Arterial Grafts in Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Surgery.

    PubMed

    He, Guo-Wei; Taggart, David P

    2016-03-01

    Spasm of arterial grafts in coronary artery bypass grafting surgery is still a clinical problem, and refractory spasm can occasionally be lethal. Perioperative spasm in bypass grafts and coronary arteries has been reported in 0.43% of all coronary artery bypass grafting surgery, but this may be an underestimate. Spasm can develop not only in the internal mammary artery but more frequently in the right gastroepiploic and radial artery. The mechanism of spasm can involve many pathways, particularly those involving regulation of the intracellular calcium concentration. Endothelial dysfunction also plays a role in spasm. Depending on the clinical scenario, the possibility of spasm during and after coronary artery bypass grafting should be confirmed by angiography. If present, immediate intraluminal injection of vasodilators is often effective, although other procedures such as an intraaortic balloon pump or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation may also become necessary to salvage the patient. Prevention of spasm involves many considerations, and the principles are discussed in this review article.

  2. Measurements of nuclear spin dynamics by spin-noise spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhov, I. I.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Kozlov, G. G.; Zapasskii, V. S.; Kavokin, K. V.; Glazov, M. M.; Vladimirova, M.; Scalbert, D.; Cronenberger, S.; Lemaître, A.; Bloch, J.

    2015-06-15

    We exploit the potential of the spin noise spectroscopy (SNS) for studies of nuclear spin dynamics in n-GaAs. The SNS experiments were performed on bulk n-type GaAs layers embedded into a high-finesse microcavity at negative detuning. In our experiments, nuclear spin polarisation initially prepared by optical pumping is monitored in real time via a shift of the peak position in the electron spin noise spectrum. We demonstrate that this shift is a direct measure of the Overhauser field acting on the electron spin. The dynamics of nuclear spin is shown to be strongly dependent on the electron concentration.

  3. Planning-free cerebral blood flow territory mapping in patients with intracranial arterial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Daniel F; Strother, Megan K; Davis, L Taylor; Fusco, Matthew R; Faraco, Carlos C; Roach, Brent A; Scott, Allison O; Donahue, Manus J

    2016-01-01

    A noninvasive method for quantifying cerebral blood flow and simultaneously visualizing cerebral blood flow territories is vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling MRI. However, obstacles to acquiring such information include limited access to the methodology in clinical centers and limited work on how clinically acquired vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling data correlate with gold-standard methods. The purpose of this work is to develop and validate a semiautomated pipeline for the online quantification of cerebral blood flow maps and cerebral blood flow territories from planning-free vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling MRI with gold-standard digital subtraction angiography. Healthy controls (n = 10) and intracranial atherosclerotic disease patients (n = 34) underwent 3.0 T MRI imaging including vascular (MR angiography) and hemodynamic (cerebral blood flow-weighted arterial spin labeling) MRI. Patients additionally underwent catheter and/or CT angiography. Variations in cross-territorial filling were grouped according to diameters of circle of Willis vessels in controls. In patients, Cohen's k-statistics were computed to quantify agreement in perfusion patterns between vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling and angiography. Cross-territorial filling patterns were consistent with circle of Willis anatomy. The intraobserver Cohen's k-statistics for cerebral blood flow territory and digital subtraction angiography perfusion agreement were 0.730 (95% CI = 0.593-0.867; reader one) and 0.708 (95% CI = 0.561-0.855; reader two). These results support the feasibility of a semiautomated pipeline for evaluating major neurovascular cerebral blood flow territories in patients with intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

  4. Overview of spin physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yokosawa, A.

    1992-12-23

    Spin physics activities at medium and high energies became significantly active when polarized targets and polarized beams became accessible for hadron-hadron scattering experiments. My overview of spin physics will be inclined to the study of strong interaction using facilities at Argonne ZGS, Brookhaven AGS (including RHIC), CERN, Fermilab, LAMPF, an SATURNE. In 1960 accelerator physicists had already been convinced that the ZGS could be unique in accelerating a polarized beam; polarized beams were being accelerated through linear accelerators elsewhere at that time. However, there was much concern about going ahead with the construction of a polarized beam because (i) the source intensity was not high enough to accelerate in the accelerator, (ii) the use of the accelerator would be limited to only polarized-beam physics, that is, proton-proton interaction, and (iii) p-p elastic scattering was not the most popular topic in high-energy physics. In fact, within spin physics, [pi]-nucleon physics looked attractive, since the determination of spin and parity of possible [pi]p resonances attracted much attention. To proceed we needed more data beside total cross sections and elastic differential cross sections; measurements of polarization and other parameters were urgently needed. Polarization measurements had traditionally been performed by analyzing the spin of recoil protons. The drawbacks of this technique are: (i) it involves double scattering, resulting in poor accuracy of the data, and (ii) a carbon analyzer can only be used for a limited region of energy.

  5. Thromboembolism in pulmonary artery sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Farsad, Mohsen; Pernter, Patrizia; Triani, Antonio; Osele, Luzian; Wiedermann, Christian J

    2009-04-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma, although rare, must be considered in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism. Clinically and radiologically, it may imitate pulmonary embolism, making diagnosis difficult and delaying treatment. Patients often have no symptom resolution despite therapeutic anticoagulation. Visualization of filling defects within a pulmonary artery on contrast-enhanced CT cannot reliably differentiate between pulmonary thromboembolism and malignant lesions like leiomyosarcoma. FDG PET-CT offers the potential for identification of malignant lesions. The authors report a case with pulmonary artery thromboembolism due to thrombi formed on a pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma. Integrated FDG PET-CT showed no FDG-uptake along the major part of the filling defect within the right main pulmonary artery suggesting blood clot and increased uptake along the posterior wall of the right main pulmonary artery and the left lower lobar artery suggesting malignancy.

  6. Harnessing spin precession with dissipation.

    PubMed

    Crisan, A D; Datta, S; Viennot, J J; Delbecq, M R; Cottet, A; Kontos, T

    2016-01-27

    Non-collinear spin transport is at the heart of spin or magnetization control in spintronics devices. The use of nanoscale conductors exhibiting quantum effects in transport could provide new paths for that purpose. Here we study non-collinear spin transport in a quantum dot. We use a device made out of a single-wall carbon nanotube connected to orthogonal ferromagnetic electrodes. In the spin transport signals, we observe signatures of out of equilibrium spin precession that are electrically tunable through dissipation. This could provide a new path to harness spin precession in nanoscale conductors.

  7. Harnessing spin precession with dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisan, A. D.; Datta, S.; Viennot, J. J.; Delbecq, M. R.; Cottet, A.; Kontos, T.

    2016-01-01

    Non-collinear spin transport is at the heart of spin or magnetization control in spintronics devices. The use of nanoscale conductors exhibiting quantum effects in transport could provide new paths for that purpose. Here we study non-collinear spin transport in a quantum dot. We use a device made out of a single-wall carbon nanotube connected to orthogonal ferromagnetic electrodes. In the spin transport signals, we observe signatures of out of equilibrium spin precession that are electrically tunable through dissipation. This could provide a new path to harness spin precession in nanoscale conductors.

  8. Arterial conduits for hepatic artery revascularisation in adult liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Vijayaragavan; Imber, Charles; Leelaudomlipi, Surasak; Gunson, Bridget K; Buckels, John A C; Mirza, Darius F; Mayer, A David; Bramhall, Simon R

    2004-05-01

    Arterial complications after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), including hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT), are important causes of early graft failure. The use of an arterial conduit is an accepted alternative to the utilisation of native recipient hepatic artery for specific indications. This study aims to determine the efficacy of arterial conduits and the outcome in OLT. We retrospectively reviewed 1,575 cadaveric adult OLTs and identified those in which an arterial conduit was used for hepatic revascularisation. Data on the primary disease, indication for using arterial conduit, type of vascular graft, operative technique and outcome were obtained. Thirty-six (2.3%) patients underwent OLT in which arterial conduits were used for hepatic artery (HA) revascularisation. Six of these were performed on the primary transplant, while the rest (n=30) were performed in patients undergoing re-transplantation, including six who had developed hepatic artery aneurysms. The incidence of arterial conduits was 0.4% (6/1,426 cases) in all primary OLTs and 20.1% (30/149 cases) in all re-transplants. Twenty-nine procedures utilised iliac artery grafts from the same donor as the liver, six used iliac artery grafts from a different donor, and a single patient underwent a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft. Two techniques were used: infra-renal aorto-hepatic artery conduit and interposition between the donor and recipient native HAs, or branches of the HAs. The 30-day mortality rate for operations using an arterial conduit was 30.6%. Three conduits thrombosed at 9, 25 and 155 months, respectively, but one liver graft survived without re-transplantation. The arterial conduits had 1- and 5-year patency rates of 88.5% and 80.8%. The 1- and 5-year patient survival rates were 66.7% and 44%. We can thus conclude that an arterial conduit is a viable alternative option for hepatic revascularisation in both primary and re-transplantation. Despite a lower patency rate than that of

  9. Evaluation of Anomalous Coronary Arteries from the Pulmonary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Guzeltas, Alper; Ozturk, Erkut; Tanidir, Ibrahim Cansaran; Kasar, Taner; Haydin, Sertac

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated clinical and diagnostic findings, treatment methods, and follow-up of cases of anomalous coronary arteries from the pulmonary artery. Methods The study included all cases diagnosed with anomalous coronary arteries from the pulmonary artery between January 2012 and January 2016. Data from patients’ demographic characteristics, electrocardiography, echocardiography, angiographic findings, operation, intensive care unit stay, and follow-up were evaluated. Results The study included 12 patients (8 male, 4 female), 10 with anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) and 2 with anomalous right coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ARCAPA). Median age at diagnosis was 4 months (range, 1 month - 10 years old) and median weight was 5.5 kg (range, 3-30 kg). The most common complaints were murmur (n=7) and respiratory distress (n=5). In 4 cases, the initial diagnosis was dilated cardiomyopathy. Electrocardiographs were pathologic in all cases. Echocardiographic examination revealed medium to severe mitral valve regurgitation in 4 cases and reduced (< 40%) ejection fraction in 6 patients. Of the 12 patients, 8 underwent direct implantation of the left coronary artery into the aorta, 2 underwent implantation of the right coronary artery into the aorta, and the remaining 2 underwent a Takeuchi procedure. There were no early mortalities. Median hospital stay was 20 days (range, 5-35 days). Median follow-up duration was 18 months (range, 5-36 months), and no cases required further surgery during follow-up. Conclusions Anomalous coronary arteries from the pulmonary artery can be successfully repaired providing there is early diagnosis and effective, appropriate intensive care unit follow-up. Therefore, coronary artery origins should be evaluated carefully, especially in cases with dilated cardiomyopathies.

  10. Design of spin-Seebeck diode with spin semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao-Qian; Yang, Yu-Rong; Fu, Hua-Hua; Wu, Ruqian

    2016-12-01

    We report a new design of spin-Seebeck diode using two-dimensional spin semiconductors such as sawtooth-like (ST) silicence nanoribbons (SiNRs), to generate unidirectional spin currents with a temperature gradient. ST SiNRs have subbands with opposite spins across the Fermi level and hence the flow of thermally excited carriers may produce a net spin current but not charge current. Moreover, we found that even-width ST SiNRs display a remarkable negative differential thermoelectric resistance due to a charge-current compensation mechanism. In contrast, odd-width ST SiNRs manifest features of a thermoelectric diode and can be used to produce both charge and spin currents with temperature gradient. These findings can be extended to other spin semiconductors and open the door for designs of new materials and spin caloritronic devices.

  11. Quantum spin transistor with a Heisenberg spin chain

    PubMed Central

    Marchukov, O. V.; Volosniev, A. G.; Valiente, M.; Petrosyan, D.; Zinner, N. T.

    2016-01-01

    Spin chains are paradigmatic systems for the studies of quantum phases and phase transitions, and for quantum information applications, including quantum computation and short-distance quantum communication. Here we propose and analyse a scheme for conditional state transfer in a Heisenberg XXZ spin chain which realizes a quantum spin transistor. In our scheme, the absence or presence of a control spin excitation in the central gate part of the spin chain results in either perfect transfer of an arbitrary state of a target spin between the weakly coupled input and output ports, or its complete blockade at the input port. We also discuss a possible proof-of-concept realization of the corresponding spin chain with a one-dimensional ensemble of cold atoms with strong contact interactions. Our scheme is generally applicable to various implementations of tunable spin chains, and it paves the way for the realization of integrated quantum logic elements. PMID:27721438

  12. Spin filter and spin valve in ferromagnetic graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yu Dai, Gang

    2015-06-01

    We propose and demonstrate that a EuO-induced and top-gated graphene ferromagnetic junction can be simultaneously operated as a spin filter and a spin valve. We attribute such a remarkable result to a coexistence of a half-metal band and a common energy gap for opposite spins in ferromagnetic graphene. We show that both the spin filter and the spin valve can be effectively controlled by a back gate voltage, and they survive for practical metal contacts and finite temperature. Specifically, larger single spin currents and on-state currents can be reached with contacts with work functions similar to graphene, and the spin filter can operate at higher temperature than the spin valve.

  13. Design of spin-Seebeck diode with spin semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao-Qian; Yang, Yu-Rong; Fu, Hua-Hua; Wu, Ruqian

    2016-12-16

    We report a new design of spin-Seebeck diode using two-dimensional spin semiconductors such as sawtooth-like (ST) silicence nanoribbons (SiNRs), to generate unidirectional spin currents with a temperature gradient. ST SiNRs have subbands with opposite spins across the Fermi level and hence the flow of thermally excited carriers may produce a net spin current but not charge current. Moreover, we found that even-width ST SiNRs display a remarkable negative differential thermoelectric resistance due to a charge-current compensation mechanism. In contrast, odd-width ST SiNRs manifest features of a thermoelectric diode and can be used to produce both charge and spin currents with temperature gradient. These findings can be extended to other spin semiconductors and open the door for designs of new materials and spin caloritronic devices.

  14. Spin-Orbit Twisted Spin Waves: Group Velocity Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, F.; Baboux, F.; Ullrich, C. A.; D'Amico, I.; Vignale, G.; Karczewski, G.; Wojtowicz, T.

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of the interplay between spin-orbit coupling (SOC), Coulomb interaction, and motion of conduction electrons in a magnetized two-dimensional electron gas. Via a transformation of the many-body Hamiltonian we introduce the concept of spin-orbit twisted spin waves, whose energy dispersions and damping rates are obtained by a simple wave-vector shift of the spin waves without SOC. These theoretical predictions are validated by Raman scattering measurements. With optical gating of the density, we vary the strength of the SOC to alter the group velocity of the spin wave. The findings presented here differ from that of spin systems subject to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Our results pave the way for novel applications in spin-wave routing devices and for the realization of lenses for spin waves.

  15. Spin-orbit coupling and spin relaxation in phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurpas, Marcin; Gmitra, Martin; Fabian, Jaroslav

    We employ first principles density functional theory calculations to study intrinsic and extrinsic spin-orbit coupling in monolayer phosphorene. We also extract the spin-mixing amplitudes of the Bloch wave functions to give realistic estimates of the Elliott-Yafet spin relaxation rate. The most remarkable result is the striking anisotropy in both spin-orbit coupling and spin relaxation rates, which could be tested experimentally in spin injection experiments. We also identify spin hot spots in the electronic structure of phosphorene at accidental bands anticrossings. We compare the Elliott-Yafet with Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation times, obtained from extrinsic couplings in an applied electric field. We also compare the results in phosphorene with those of black phosphorous. This work is supported by the DFG SPP 1538, SFB 689, and by the EU Seventh Framework Programme under Grant Agreement No. 604391 Graphene Flagship.

  16. Spatially Separated Spin Carriers in Spin-Semiconducting Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. F.; Jin, Shuo; Liu, Feng

    2013-08-01

    A graphene nanoribbon with sawtooth edges has a ferromagnetic ground state. Using first-principles and tight-binding model calculations, we show that, under a transverse electrical field, the sawtooth graphene nanoribbons become a spin semiconductor whose charge carriers are not only spin polarized in energy space but also spatially separated at different edges. Low-energy excitation produces spin-up electrons localized at one edge and spin-down holes at the opposite edge, and the excitation energy of spin carries can be tuned by the electric field to reach a new state of spin gapless semiconductor. Also, the spin semiconducting states are shown to be robust against at least 10% edge disorder. These features demonstrate a good tunability of spin carriers for spintronics applications.

  17. Spatially Separated Spin Carriers in Spin-Semiconducting Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengfei; Jin, Shuo; Liu, Feng

    2014-03-01

    A graphene nanoribbon with sawtooth edges has a ferromagnetic ground state. Using first-principles and tight-binding model calculations, we show that, under a transverse electrical field, the sawtooth graphene nanoribbons become a spin semiconductor whose charge carriers are not only spin polarized in energy space but also spatially separated at different edges. Low-energy excitation produces spin-up electrons localized at one edge and spin-down holes at the opposite edge, and the excitation energy of spin carries can be tuned by the electric field to reach a new state of spin gapless semiconductor. Also, the spin semiconducting states are shown to be robust against at least 10% edge disorder. These features demonstrate a good tunability of spin carriers for spintronics applications. This work was supported by DOE-BES (No. DE-FG02-04ER46148) and NSF-MRSEC (No. DMR-1121252).

  18. Mechanical spin bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spin bearing assembly including, a pair of mutually opposing complementary bearing support members having mutually spaced apart bearing support surfaces which may be, for example, bearing races and a set of spin bearings located therebetween. Each spin bearing includes a pair of end faces, a central rotational axis passing through the end faces, a waist region substantially mid-way between the end faces and having a first thickness dimension, and discrete side surface regions located between the waist region and the end faces and having a second thickness dimension different from the first thickness dimension of the waist region and wherein the side surface regions further have respective curvilinear contact surfaces adapted to provide a plurality of bearing contact points on the bearing support members.

  19. Spinning fluids reactor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  20. Exertional Rhabdomyolysis after Spinning

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Youjin; Oh, Eun-Jung; Ahn, Ah-Leum; Choi, Jae-Kyung; Cho, Dong-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Any strenuous muscular exercise may trigger rhabdomyolysis. We report an episode of clinically manifested exertional rhabdomyolysis due to stationary cycling, commonly known as spinning. Reports of spinning-related rhabdomyolysis are rare in the English literature, and the current case appears to be the first such case reported in South Korea. A previously healthy 21-year-old Asian woman presented with severe thigh pain and reddish-brown urinary discoloration 24–48 hours after attending a spinning class at a local gymnasium. Paired with key laboratory findings, her symptoms were suggestive of rhabdomyolysis. She required hospital admission to sustain renal function through fluid resuscitation therapy and fluid balance monitoring. Because exertional rhabdomyolysis may occur in any unfit but otherwise healthy individual who indulges in stationary cycling, the potential health risks of this activity must be considered. PMID:27900075

  1. Paramagnetic spin seebeck effect.

    PubMed

    Wu, Stephen M; Pearson, John E; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2015-05-08

    We report the observation of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in paramagnetic insulators. By using a microscale on-chip local heater, we generate a large thermal gradient confined to the chip surface without a large increase in the total sample temperature. Using this technique at low temperatures (<20  K), we resolve the paramagnetic spin Seebeck effect in the insulating paramagnets Gd3Ga5O12 (gadolinium gallium garnet) and DyScO3 (DSO), using either W or Pt as the spin detector layer. By taking advantage of the strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy of DSO, we eliminate contributions from the Nernst effect in W or Pt, which produces a phenomenologically similar signal.

  2. Paramagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Stephen M.; Pearson, John E.; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2015-05-01

    We report the observation of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in paramagnetic insulators. By using a microscale on-chip local heater, we generate a large thermal gradient confined to the chip surface without a large increase in the total sample temperature. Using this technique at low temperatures (<20 K ), we resolve the paramagnetic spin Seebeck effect in the insulating paramagnets Gd3Ga5O12 (gadolinium gallium garnet) and DyScO3 (DSO), using either W or Pt as the spin detector layer. By taking advantage of the strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy of DSO, we eliminate contributions from the Nernst effect in W or Pt, which produces a phenomenologically similar signal.

  3. Segmental arterial mediolysis.

    PubMed

    Chao, Christine P

    2009-09-01

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory arteriopathy, which is characterized by dissecting aneurysms resulting from lysis of the outer media of the arterial wall. The most common presentation is abdominal pain and hemorrhage in the elderly. Computed tomography (CT) and angiography imaging findings overlap with various vasculitides and include segmental changes of aneurysm and stenosis. A key distinguishing feature is the presence of dissections, the principle morphologic expression of SAM. Differentiation and exclusion of an inflammatory arteritis is crucial in appropriate management, as immunosuppressants generally used for treatment of vasculitis may be ineffective or even worsen the vasculopathy. Although the disease can be self-limiting without treatment or with conservative medical therapy, the acute process carries a 50% mortality rate and may necessitate urgent surgical and/or endovascular therapy. Prompt recognition and diagnosis are therefore of utmost importance in appropriate management of this rare entity.

  4. Coronary artery fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Said, S.A.M.; Thiadens, A.A.H.J.; Fieren, M.J.C.H.; Meijboom, E.J.; van der Werf, T.; Bennink, G.B.W.E.

    2002-01-01

    The aetiology of congenital coronary artery fistulas remains a challenging issue. Coronary arteries with an anatomically normal origin may, for obscure reasons, terminate abnormally and communicate with different single or multiple cardiac chambers or great vessels. When this occurs, the angiographic morphological appearance may vary greatly from discrete channels to plexiform network of vessels. Coronary arteriovenous fistulas (CAVFs) have neither specific signs nor pathognomonic symptoms; the spectrum of clinical features varies considerably. The clinical presentation of symptomatic cases can include angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, fatigue, dyspnoea, CHF, SBE, ventricular and supraventricular tachyarrhythmias or even sudden cardiac death. CAVFs may, however, be a coincidental finding during diagnostic coronary angiography (CAG). CAG is considered the gold standard for diagnosing and delineating the morphological anatomy and pathway of CAVFs. There are various tailored therapeutic modalities for the wide spectrum of clinical manifestations of CAVFs, including conservative pharmacological strategy, percutaneous transluminal embolisation and surgical ligation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696067

  5. Renal Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Sauk, Steven; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is an effective minimally invasive alternative procedure for the treatment of a variety of conditions. Since the 1970s when RAE was first developed, technical advances and growing experience have expanded the indications to not only include treatment of conditions such as symptomatic hematuria and palliation for metastatic renal cancer, but also preoperative infarction of renal tumors, treatment of angiomyolipomas, vascular malformations, medical renal disease, and complications following renal transplantation. With the drastically improved morbidity associated with this technique in part due to the introduction of more precise embolic agents and smaller delivery catheters, RAE continues to gain popularity for various urologic conditions. The indications and techniques for renal artery embolization are reviewed in the following sections. PMID:23204638

  6. Squeezed spin states: Squeezing the spin uncertainty relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitagawa, Masahiro; Ueda, Masahito

    1993-01-01

    The notion of squeezing in spin systems is clarified, and the principle for spin squeezing is shown. Two twisting schemes are proposed as building blocks for spin squeezing and are shown to reduce the standard quantum noise, s/2, of the coherent S-spin state down to the order of S(sup 1/3) and 1/2. Applications to partition noise suppression are briefly discussed.

  7. Renal Artery Stent Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy P.; Cooper, Christopher J.; Matsumoto, Alan H.; Cutlip, Donald E.; Pencina, Karol M.; Jamerson, Kenneth; Tuttle, Katherine R.; Shapiro, Joseph I.; D’Agostino, Ralph; Massaro, Joseph; Henrich, William; Dworkin, Lance D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Multiple randomized clinical trials comparing renal artery stent placement plus medical therapy with medical therapy alone have not shown any benefit of stent placement. However, debate continues whether patients with extreme pressure gradients, stenosis severity, or baseline blood pressure benefit from stent revascularization. OBJECTIVES The study sought to test the hypothesis that pressure gradients, stenosis severity, and/or baseline blood pressure affects outcomes after renal artery stent placement. METHODS Using data from 947 patients with a history of hypertension or chronic kidney disease from the largest randomized trial of renal artery stent placement, the CORAL (Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions) study, we performed exploratory analyses to determine if subsets of patients experienced better outcomes after stent placement than the overall cohort. We examined baseline stenosis severity, systolic blood pressure, and translesion pressure gradient (peak systolic and mean) and performed interaction tests and Cox proportional hazards analyses for the occurrence of the primary endpoint through all follow-up, to examine the effect of these variables on outcomes by treatment group. RESULTS There were no statistically significant differences in outcomes based on the examined variables nor were there any consistent nonsignificant trends. CONCLUSIONS Based on data from the CORAL randomized trial, there is no evidence of a significant treatment effect of the renal artery stent procedure compared with medical therapy alone based on stenosis severity, level of systolic blood pressure elevation, or according to the magnitude of the transstenotic pressure gradient. (Benefits of Medical Therapy Plus Stenting for Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions [CORAL]; NCT00081731) PMID:26653621

  8. Fragmentation of spinning branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, D.

    2008-07-01

    The near-horizon geometries of spinning D3-, M2- and M5-branes are examined by the probes immersed in a co-rotating frame. It is found that the geometries become unstable at critical values of the spin angular velocity by emitting the branes. We show that this instability corresponds to the metastability of the black hole systems and different from the known (local) thermodynamic instability. For the D3 case, the instability found here is in complete agreement with the known metastability of the \\mathcal{N}=4 super-Yang Mills theory with R-symmetry chemical potentials.

  9. Spin echo in synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Alexander W.; Courant, Ernest D.

    2007-01-01

    As a polarized beam is accelerated through a depolarization resonance, its polarization is reduced by a well-defined calculable reduction factor. When the beam subsequently crosses a second resonance, the final beam polarization is considered to be reduced by the product of the two reduction factors corresponding to the two crossings, each calculated independently of the other. This is a good approximation when the spread of spin precession frequency Δνspin of the beam (particularly due to its energy spread) is sufficiently large that the spin precession phases of individual particles smear out completely during the time τ between the two crossings. This approximate picture, however, ignores two spin dynamics effects: an interference-overlap effect and a spin echo effect. This paper is to address these two effects. The interference-overlap effect occurs when Δνspin is too small, or when τ is too short, to complete the smearing process. In this case, the two resonance crossings overlap each other, and the final polarization exhibits constructive or destructive interference patterns depending on the exact value of τ. Typically, the beam’s energy spread is large and this interference-overlap effect does not occur. To study this effect, therefore, it is necessary to reduce the beam energy spread and to consider two resonance crossings very close to each other. The other mechanism, also due to the interplay between two resonance crossings, is spin echo. It turns out that even when the precession phases appear to be completely smeared between the two crossings, there will still be a sudden and short-lived echo signal of beam polarization at a time τ after the second crossing; the magnitude of which can be as large as 57%. This echo signal exists even when the beam has a sizable energy spread and when τ is very large, and could be a sensitive (albeit challenging) way to experimentally test the intricate spin dynamics in a synchrotron. After giving an analysis

  10. Spin Wave Genie

    SciTech Connect

    2015-02-16

    The four-dimensional scattering function S(Q,w) obtained by inelastic neutron scattering measurements provides unique "dynamical fingerprints" of the spin state and interactions present in complex magnetic materials. Extracting this information however is currently a slow and complex process that may take an expert -depending on the complexity of the system- up to several weeks of painstaking work to complete. Spin Wave Genie was created to abstract and automate this process. It strives to both reduce the time to complete this analysis and make these calculations more accessible to a broader group of scientists and engineers.

  11. Measuring Black Hole Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon

    1999-09-01

    WE PROPOSE TO CARRY OUT A SYSTEMATIC STUDY OF EMISSION AND ABSORPTION SPECTRAL FEATURES THAT ARE OFTEN SEEN IN X-RAY SPECTRA OF BLACK HOLE BINARIES. THE EXCELLENT SENSITIVITY AND ENERGY RESOLUTION OF THE ACIS/HETG COMBINATION WILL NOT ONLY HELP RESOLVE AMBIGUITIES IN INTERPRETING THESE FEATURES, BUT MAY ALLOW MODELLING OF THE EMISSION LINE PROFILES IN DETAIL. THE PROFILES MAY CONTAIN INFORMATION ON SUCH FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES AS THE SPIN OF BLACK HOLES. THEREFORE, THIS STUDY COULD LEAD TO A MEASUREMENT OF BLACK HOLE SPIN FOR SELECTED SOURCES. THE RESULT CAN THEN BE DIRECTLY COMPARED WITH THOSE FROM PREVIOUS STUDIES BASED ON INDEPENDENT METHODS.

  12. Spin Physics at NICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaytsev, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    The NICA-SPD project is under preparation at the 2nd interaction point of the NICA collider. The main purpose of this experiment is the study of the nucleon spin structure with high intensity polarized proton and deuteron beams. The design of the collider can allow us to reach a very high collision proton (deuteron) energy up to √s ˜26 (12) GeV with the average luminosity up to 1032 (1031) cm2/s. Both proton and deuteron beams will be effectively polarized. The one gives us unique possibilities to investigate the polarized phenomena and nucleon spin structure at NICA. The comprehensive program of these studies is presented.

  13. Spin Echo in Synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alexander W.; Courant, Ernest D.; /Brookhaven

    2006-12-01

    As a polarized beam is accelerated through a depolarization resonance, its polarization is reduced by a well-defined calculable reduction factor. When the beam subsequently crosses a second resonance, the final beam polarization is considered to be reduced by the product of the two reduction factors corresponding to the two crossings, each calculated independently of the other. This is a good approximation when the spread of spin precession frequency {Delta}{nu}{sub spin} of the beam (particularly due to its energy spread) is sufficiently large that the spin precession phases of individual particles smear out completely during the time {tau} between the two crossings. This approximate picture, however, ignores two spin dynamics effects: an interference effect and a spin echo effect. This paper is to address these two effects. The interference effect occurs when {Delta}{nu}{sub spin} is too small, or when {tau} is too short, to complete the smearing process. In this case, the two resonance crossings interfere with each other, and the final polarization exhibits constructive or destructive patterns depending on the exact value of {tau}. Typically, the beam's energy spread is large and this interference effect does not occur. To study this effect, therefore, it is necessary to reduce the beam energy spread and to consider two resonance crossings very close to each other. The other mechanism, also due to the interplay between two resonance crossings, is spin echo. It turns out that even when the precession phases appear to be completely smeared between the two crossings, there will still be a sudden and short-lived echo signal of beam polarization at a time {tau} after the second crossing; the magnitude of which can be as large as 57%. This echo signal exists even when the beam has a sizable energy spread and when {tau} is very large, and could be a sensitive (albeit challenging) way to experimentally test the intricate spin dynamics in a synchrotron. After giving an

  14. Segmental arterial mediolysis.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Anil Kumar; Iqbal, Shams I; Liu, Raymond W; Rachamreddy, Niranjan; Kalva, Sanjeeva P

    2014-06-01

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is an uncommon, nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory, large- to medium-sized arteriopathy first described in 1976. It is characterized histologically by vacuolization and lysis of the outer arterial media leading to dissecting aneurysms and vessel rupture presenting clinically with self-limiting abdominal pain or catastrophic hemorrhages in the abdomen. Patients of all ages are affected with a greater incidence at the fifth and sixth decades. There is a slight male predominance. Imaging findings overlap with inflammatory vasculitis, collagen vascular disease, and fibromuscular dysplasia. The presence of segmental dissections involving the celiac, mesenteric, and/or renal arteries is the key distinguishing features of SAM. Inflammatory markers, genetic tests for collagen vascular disorders, and hypercoagulable studies are negative. Anti-inflammatory agents and immunosuppressants are not effective. A mortality rate of 50 % has been attributed to the acute presentation with aneurysmal rupture necessitating urgent surgical or endovascular treatments; in the absence of the acute presentation, SAM is a self-limiting disease and is treated conservatively. There are no established guidelines on medical therapy, although optimal control of blood pressure is considered the main cornerstone of medical therapy. The long-term prognosis is not known.

  15. LATENT LIFE OF ARTERIES.

    PubMed

    Carrel, A

    1910-07-23

    When a segment of artery, killed by heat, formalin or glycerin is transplanted, it undergoes a rapid degeneration. Its muscle fibers disappear while the tissue of the host reacts by building a new wall of connective tissue. When the transplanted vessel has been preserved in a condition of latent life, no degeneration of the wall occurs, or the wall undergoes only partial degeneration. The muscle fibers can keep their normal appearance, even for a long time after the operation. It is, therefore, demonstrated that arteries can be preserved outside of the body in a condition of unmanifested actual life. The best method of preservation consists of placing the vessels, immersed in vaselin, in an ice box, the temperature of which is slightly above the freezing point. From a surgical standpoint, the transplantation of preserved vessels can be used with some safety. When the arteries were kept in defibrinated blood or vaselin and in cold storage, the proportion of positive results was 75 and 80 per cent., and this can probably be increased.

  16. Peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Up to 20% of adults aged over 55 years have detectable peripheral arterial disease of the legs, but this may cause symptoms of intermittent claudication in only a small proportion of affected people. The main risk factors are smoking and diabetes mellitus, but other risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also associated with peripheral arterial disease. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for people with chronic peripheral arterial disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2010. Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review. We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 70 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiplatelet agents, bypass surgery, cilostazol, exercise, pentoxifylline, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), prostaglandins, smoking cessation, and statins. PMID:21477401

  17. Peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Up to 20% of adults aged over 55 years have detectable peripheral arterial disease of the legs, but this may cause symptoms of intermittent claudication in only a small proportion of affected people. The main risk factors are smoking and diabetes mellitus, but other risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also associated with peripheral arterial disease. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for people with chronic peripheral arterial disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2009. (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 59 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiplatelet agents; bypass surgery; cilostazol; exercise; pentoxifylline; percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA); prostaglandins; smoking cessation; and statins. PMID:19454099

  18. Stop the World from Spinning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Taste, Smell, Hearing, Language, Voice, Balance Stop the World from Spinning Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of ... Children / Smartphone App for Voice Disorders / Stop the World from Spinning / Screening Newborns' Hearing Now Standard Fall ...

  19. Transverse Spin Physics: Recent Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2008-12-10

    Transverse-spin physics has been very active and rapidly developing in the last few years. In this talk, I will briefly summarize recent theoretical developments, focusing on the associated QCD dynamics in transverse spin physics.

  20. Spin Coherence in Semiconductor Nanostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-10

    qubit states encoded in the electron spin of quantum dots via single photons ”, Physical Review Letters 94... quantum dot to the spin state in another quantum dot . The process involves sequential entanglement of a single photon with a single spin . First a...circular polarization as a measure of spin polarization in quantum dot qubits ”, Physical Review Letters 91, 257901 (2003). (15/22) O. Z. Karimov,

  1. Spin waves and magnetic excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Borovik-Romanov, A.S.; Sinha, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    This book describes both simple spin waves (magnons) and complicated excitations in magnetic systems. The following subjects are covered: - various methods of magnetic excitation investigations such as neutron scattering on magnetic excitations, spin-wave excitation by radio-frequency, power light scattering on magnons and magnetic excitation observation within the light-absorption spectrum; - oscillations of magnetic electron systems coupled with phonons, nuclear spin systems and localized impurity modes: - low-dimensional magnetics, amorphous magnetics and spin glasses.

  2. TRANSVERSITY SINGLE SPIN ASYMMETRIES.

    SciTech Connect

    BOER,D.

    2001-04-27

    The theoretical aspects of two leading twist transversity single spin asymmetries, one arising from the Collins effect and one from the interference fragmentation functions, are reviewed. Issues of factorization, evolution and Sudakov factors for the relevant observables are discussed. These theoretical considerations pinpoint the most realistic scenarios towards measurements of transversity.

  3. Stabilizing a spinning Skylab.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, S. M.; Justice, D. W.; Schweitzer, G.; Patel, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the dynamics of a spinning Skylab space station. The stability of motion of several simplified models with flexible appendages was investigated. A digital simulation model that more accurately portrays the complex Skylab vehicle is described, and simulation results are compared with analytically derived results.

  4. Stabilizing a spinning Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, S. M.; Patel, J. S.; Justice, D. W.; Schweitzer, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of a study of the dynamics of a spinning Skylab space station. The stability of motion of several simplified models with flexible appendages was investigated. A digital simulation model that more accurately portrays the complex Skylab vehicle is described, and simulation results are compared with analytically derived results.

  5. Does the Moon Spin?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Robert; Simpson, Frances

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore the question, "Does the Moon spin?", and show how the question is investigated. They emphasise the importance of the process by which people work out what they know, by "learning from the inside out." They stress that those involved in science education have to challenge current conceptions and ideas, making…

  6. An overview of spin physics

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1991-07-01

    Spin physics is playing an increasingly important role in high energy experiments and theory. This review looks at selected topics in high energy spin physics that were discussed at the 9th International Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics at Bonn in September 1990.

  7. Lifting SU(2) spin networks to projected spin networks

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, Maiete; Livine, Etera R.

    2010-09-15

    Projected spin network states are the canonical basis of quantum states of geometry for the recent EPRL-FK spinfoam models for quantum gravity introduced by Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine and Freidel-Krasnov. They are functionals of both the Lorentz connection and the time-normal field. We analyze in detail the map from these projected spin networks to the standard SU(2) spin networks of loop quantum gravity. We show that this map is not one to one and that the corresponding ambiguity is parameterized by the Immirzi parameter. We conclude with a comparison of the scalar products between projected spin networks and SU(2) spin network states.

  8. Microwave generation by spin Hall nanooscillators with nanopatterned spin injector

    SciTech Connect

    Zholud, A. Urazhdin, S.

    2014-09-15

    We experimentally study spin Hall nano-oscillators based on Pt/ferromagnet bilayers with nanopatterned Pt spin injection layer. We demonstrate that both the spectral characteristics and the electrical current requirements can be simultaneously improved by reducing the spin injection area. Moreover, devices with nanopatterned Pt spin injector exhibit microwave generation over a wide temperature range that extends to room temperature. Studies of devices with additional Pt spacers under the device electrodes show that the oscillation characteristics are affected not only by the spin injection geometry but also by the effects of Pt/ferromagnet interface on the dynamical properties of the ferromagnet.

  9. Spin rectification in thermally driven XXZ spin chain via the spin-Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thingna, Juzar; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    We study the phenomenon of spin-current rectification in a one-dimensional XXZ spin chain in the presence of a thermal drive. In our model a pure spin current is generated by a temperature difference between two harmonic heat baths which in turn creates a spin voltage via the spin-Seebeck effect. Along with a local spin-current operator definition and the nonequilibrium modified Redfield solution we study the spin-rectification ratio as a function of system size and external magnetic field. Intriguing effects are observed at low temperatures such as oscillations with system size and high range of tunability with external magnetic field making magnetic insulators, which are well described by the XXZ model, ideal candidates to build spin devices based on rectification.

  10. Inertial effect on spin-orbit coupling and spin transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, B.; Chowdhury, Debashree

    2013-08-01

    We theoretically study the renormalization of inertial effects on the spin dependent transport of conduction electrons in a semiconductor by taking into account the interband mixing on the basis of k→ṡp→ perturbation theory. In our analysis, for the generation of spin current we have used the extended Drude model where the spin-orbit coupling plays an important role. We predict enhancement of the spin current resulting from the renormalized spin-orbit coupling effective in our model in cubic and non-cubic crystals. Attention has been paid to clarify the importance of gauge fields in the spin transport of this inertial system. A theoretical proposition of a perfect spin filter has been done through the Aharonov-Casher like phase corresponding to this inertial system. For a time dependent acceleration, effect of k→ ṡp→ perturbation on the spin current and spin polarization has also been addressed. Furthermore, achievement of a tunable source of polarized spin current through the non uniformity of the inertial spin-orbit coupling strength has also been discussed.

  11. Characterization of spin relaxation anisotropy in Co using spin pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Cao, Wei; Bailey, W. E.

    2016-11-01

    Ferromagnets are believed to exhibit strongly anisotropic spin relaxation, with relaxation lengths for spin longitudinal to the magnetization significantly longer than those for spin transverse to the magnetization. Here, we characterize the anisotropy of spin relaxation in Co using the spin pumping contribution to Gilbert damping in noncollinearly magnetized Py1 -xCux /Cu/Co trilayer structures. The static magnetization angle between Py1 -xCux and Co, adjusted under field bias perpendicular to film planes, controls the projections of longitudinal and transverse spin current pumped from Py1 -xCux into Co. We find nearly isotropic absorption of pure spin current in Co using this technique; fits to a diffusive transport model yield the longitudinal spin relaxation length <2 nm in Co. The longitudinal spin relaxation lengths found are an order of magnitude smaller than those determined by current-perpendicular-to-planes giant magnetoresistance measurements, but comparable with transverse spin relaxation lengths in Co determined by spin pumping.

  12. Excitation of coherent propagating spin waves by pure spin currents

    PubMed Central

    Demidov, Vladislav E.; Urazhdin, Sergei; Liu, Ronghua; Divinskiy, Boris; Telegin, Andrey; Demokritov, Sergej O.

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of pure spin currents not accompanied by the flow of electrical charge provides unprecedented opportunities for the emerging technologies based on the electron's spin degree of freedom, such as spintronics and magnonics. It was recently shown that pure spin currents can be used to excite coherent magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanostructures. However, because of the intrinsic nonlinear self-localization effects, magnetic auto-oscillations in the demonstrated devices were spatially confined, preventing their applications as sources of propagating spin waves in magnonic circuits using these waves as signal carriers. Here, we experimentally demonstrate efficient excitation and directional propagation of coherent spin waves generated by pure spin current. We show that this can be achieved by using the nonlocal spin injection mechanism, which enables flexible design of magnetic nanosystems and allows one to efficiently control their dynamic characteristics. PMID:26818232

  13. State diagram of an orthogonal spin transfer spin valve device

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Li; Wolf, Georg; Pinna, Daniele; Chaves-O'Flynn, Gabriel D.; Kent, Andrew D.

    2015-05-21

    We present the switching characteristics of a spin-transfer device that incorporates a perpendicularly magnetized spin-polarizing layer with an in-plane magnetized free and fixed magnetic layer, known as an orthogonal spin transfer spin valve device. This device shows clear switching between parallel (P) and antiparallel (AP) resistance states and the reverse transition (AP → P) for both current polarities. Further, hysteretic transitions are shown to occur into a state with a resistance intermediate between that of the P and AP states, again for both current polarities. These unusual spin-transfer switching characteristics can be explained within a simple macrospin model that incorporates thermal fluctuations and considers a spin-polarized current that is tilted with respect to the free layer's plane, due to the presence of the spin-transfer torque from the polarizing layer.

  14. Spin-wave-induced spin torque in Rashba ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetsu, Nobuyuki; Miura, Daisuke; Sakuma, Akimasa

    2015-05-01

    We study the effects of Rashba spin-orbit coupling on the spin torque induced by spin waves, which are the plane-wave dynamics of magnetization. The spin torque is derived from linear-response theory, and we calculate the dynamic spin torque by considering the impurity-ladder-sum vertex corrections. This dynamic spin torque is divided into three terms: a damping term, a distortion term, and a correction term for the equation of motion. The distorting torque describes a phenomenon unique to the Rashba spin-orbit coupling system, where the distorted motion of magnetization precession is subjected to the anisotropic force from the Rashba coupling. The oscillation mode of the precession exhibits an elliptical trajectory, and the ellipticity depends on the strength of the nesting effects, which could be reduced by decreasing the electron lifetime.

  15. Hydrodynamics of spin-polarized transport and spin pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Gurzhi, R. N. Kalinenko, A. N.; Kopeliovich, A. I.; Pyshkin, P. V.; Yanovsky, A. V.

    2007-07-15

    The dynamics of a nonequilibrium spin system dominated by collisions preserving the total quasimomentum of the interacting electrons and quasiparticles is considered. An analysis of the derived hydrodynamic equations shows that weakly attenuated spin-polarization waves associated with an oscillating drift current can exist in a magnetically inhomogeneous conducting ring. Spin-polarized transport in a ballistic regime of wave propagation through a conductor is also considered, and a simple method is proposed for distinguishing these waves from spin and current oscillations that develop in the hydrodynamic regime. It is shown that a potential difference arises between the leads of an open nonuniformly spin-polarized conductor as a manifestation of spin polarization of electron density. This spin-mediated electrical phenomenon occurs in both hydrodynamic and diffusive limits.

  16. Spin-optical metamaterial route to spin-controlled photonics.

    PubMed

    Shitrit, Nir; Yulevich, Igor; Maguid, Elhanan; Ozeri, Dror; Veksler, Dekel; Kleiner, Vladimir; Hasman, Erez

    2013-05-10

    Spin optics provides a route to control light, whereby the photon helicity (spin angular momentum) degeneracy is removed due to a geometric gradient onto a metasurface. The alliance of spin optics and metamaterials offers the dispersion engineering of a structured matter in a polarization helicity-dependent manner. We show that polarization-controlled optical modes of metamaterials arise where the spatial inversion symmetry is violated. The emerged spin-split dispersion of spontaneous emission originates from the spin-orbit interaction of light, generating a selection rule based on symmetry restrictions in a spin-optical metamaterial. The inversion asymmetric metasurface is obtained via anisotropic optical antenna patterns. This type of metamaterial provides a route for spin-controlled nanophotonic applications based on the design of the metasurface symmetry properties.

  17. Age, hypertension and arterial function.

    PubMed

    McEniery, Carmel M; Wilkinson, Ian B; Avolio, Albert P

    2007-07-01

    1. Ageing exerts a marked effect on the cardiovascular system and, in particular, the large arteries. Using a variety of techniques to assess arterial stiffness, many cross-sectional studies have demonstrated a significant relationship between age and aortic stiffness, although the age-related changes observed in peripheral arteries appear to be less marked. 2. The relationship between arterial stiffness and hypertension is more complex. The distending, or mean arterial, pressure is an important confounder of measurements of arterial stiffness and, therefore, must be taken into consideration when assessing arterial stiffness in hypertensive subjects or investigating the effect of antihypertensive agents. Current methods for correcting for differences in distending pressure involve pharmacological manipulation, statistical correction or mathematical manipulation of stiffness indices. 3. Many studies have provided evidence that both peripheral (muscular) and central (elastic) arteries are stiffer in subjects with mixed (systolic/diastolic) hypertension compared with normotensive subjects. However, it is unclear to what extent differences in mean arterial pressure explain the observed differences in hypertensive subjects. In contrast, isolated systolic hypertension is associated with increased aortic, but not peripheral artery, stiffness, although the underlying mechanisms are somewhat unclear. 4. Traditional antihypertensive agents appear to reduce arterial stiffness, but mostly via an indirect effect of lowering mean pressure. Therefore, therapies that target the large arteries to reduce stiffness directly are urgently required. Agents such as nitric oxide donors and phosphodiesterase inhibitors may be useful in reducing stiffness via functional mechanisms. In addition, inhibitors or breakers of advanced glycation end-product cross-links between proteins, such as collagen and elastin, hold substantial promise.

  18. Arterial spasm during renal angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Beinart, C.; Sos, T.A.; Saddekni, S.; Weiner, M.A.; Sniderman, K.W.

    1983-10-01

    Spasm of the renal arteries during transluminal angioplasty is a well-documented phenomenon with serious potential sequelae, particularly in young patients with fibromusclar dysplasia. The authors report their experience in 98 cases (105 arteries). Tolazoline, lidocaine, nitrates (or calcium blockers, if available), and heparin should be administered either directly into the renal artery or systemically prior to angioplasty to decrease the incidence and severity of spasm.

  19. Arterial Abnormalities Leading to Tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Timothy R; Serulle, Yafell; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2016-05-01

    Tinnitus is a common symptom that usually originates in the middle ear. Vascular causes of pulsatile tinnitus are categorized by the location of the source of the noise within the cerebral-cervical vasculature: arterial, arteriovenous, and venous. Arterial stenosis secondary to atherosclerotic disease or dissection, arterial anatomic variants at the skull base, and vascular skull base tumors are some of the more common causes of arterial and arteriovenous pulsatile tinnitus. Noninvasive imaging is indicated to evaluate for possible causes of pulsatile tinnitus, and should be followed by catheter angiography if there is a strong clinical suspicion for a dural arteriovenous fistula.

  20. Intracranial Arteries - Anatomy and Collaterals.

    PubMed

    Liebeskind, David S; Caplan, Louis R

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology are inextricably linked in patients with intracranial atherosclerosis. Knowledge of abnormal or pathological conditions such as intracranial atherosclerosis stems from detailed recognition of the normal pattern of vascular anatomy. The vascular anatomy of the intracranial arteries, both at the level of the vessel wall and as a larger structure or conduit, is a reflection of physiology over time, from in utero stages through adult life. The unique characteristics of arteries at the base of the brain may help our understanding of atherosclerotic lesions that tend to afflict specific arterial segments. Although much of the knowledge regarding intracranial arteries originates from pathology and angiography series over several centuries, evolving noninvasive techniques have rapidly expanded our perspective. As each imaging modality provides a depiction that combines anatomy and flow physiology, it is important to interpret each image with a solid understanding of typical arterial anatomy and corresponding collateral routes. Compensatory collateral perfusion and downstream flow status have recently emerged as pivotal variables in the clinical management of patients with atherosclerosis. Ongoing studies that illustrate the anatomy and pathophysiology of these proximal arterial segments across modalities will help refine our knowledge of the interplay between vascular anatomy and cerebral blood flow. Future studies may help elucidate pivotal arterial factors far beyond the degree of stenosis, examining downstream influences on cerebral perfusion, artery-to-artery thromboembolic potential, amenability to endovascular therapies and stent conformation, and the propensity for restenosis due to biophysical factors.

  1. Utilization of laser arterial angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Steg, P G; Ménasché, P

    1989-01-01

    Arterial angioplasty with continuous wave laser radiation is now available in clinical practice and, coupled with balloon catheter angioplasty, has been successful in the treatment of lower limb arterial disease. It appears premature to apply laser angioplasty to coronary artery lesions because of the high incidence of severe complications observed in clinical trials. Experimental studies suggest that some of these complications are related to thermal injury induced by continuous wave laser energy and that they could be minimized by the utilization of pulsed laser sources. Because of recent technologic advances, pulsed laser sources coupled with flexible fiberoptic devices will soon be available for peripheral arterial angioplasty in clinical practice.

  2. Arterial stiffness in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Prenner, Stuart B; Chirinos, Julio A

    2015-02-01

    Arterial stiffness is an age-related process that is a shared consequence of numerous diseases including diabetes mellitus (DM), and is an independent predictor of mortality both in this population and in the general population. While much has been published about arterial stiffness in patients with DM, a thorough review of the current literature is lacking. Using a systematic literature search strategy, we aimed to summarize our current understanding related to arterial stiffness in DM. We review key studies demonstrating that, among patients with established DM, arterial stiffness is closely related to the progression of complications of DM, including nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy. It is also becoming clear that arterial stiffness can be increased even in pre-diabetic populations with impaired glucose tolerance, and in those with the metabolic syndrome (METS), well before the onset of overt DM. Some data suggests that arterial stiffness can predict the onset of DM. However, future work is needed to further clarify whether large artery stiffness and the pulsatile hemodynamic changes that accompany it are involved in the pathogenesis of DM, and whether interventions targeting arterial stiffness are associated with improved clinical outcomes in DM. We also review of the potential mechanisms of arterial stiffness in DM, with particular emphasis on the role of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and nitric oxide dysregulation, and address potential future directions for research.

  3. Radiative transport in large arteries

    PubMed Central

    Ruh, Dominic; Subramanian, Sivaraman; Theodor, Michael; Zappe, Hans; Seifert, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A refined model for the photon energy distribution in a living artery is established by solving the radiative transfer equation in a cylindrical geometry, using the Monte Carlo method. Combining this model with the most recent experimental values for the optical properties of flowing blood and the biomechanics of a blood-filled artery subject to a pulsatile pressure, we find that the optical intensity transmitted through large arteries decreases linearly with increasing arterial distension. This finding provides a solid theoretical foundation for measuring photoplethysmograms. PMID:24466476

  4. Electrical spin injection and detection of spin precession in room temperature bulk GaN lateral spin valves

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Aniruddha; Baten, Md Zunaid; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2016-01-25

    We report the measurement of diffusive electronic spin transport characteristics in an epitaxial wurtzite GaN lateral spin valve at room temperature. Hanle spin precession and non-local spin accumulation measurements have been performed with the spin valves fabricated with FeCo/MgO spin contacts. Electron spin relaxation length and spin-flip lifetime of 176 nm and 37 ps, respectively, are derived from analysis of results obtained from four-terminal Hanle spin precession measurements at 300 K. The role of dislocations and defects in bulk GaN has also been examined in the context of electronic spin relaxation dynamics.

  5. Quantum dissipative Rashba spin ratchets.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Sergey; Bercioux, Dario; Grifoni, Milena; Richter, Klaus

    2008-06-13

    We predict the possibility to generate a finite stationary spin current by applying an unbiased ac driving to a quasi-one-dimensional asymmetric periodic structure with Rashba spin-orbit interaction and strong dissipation. We show that under a finite coupling strength between the orbital degrees of freedom the electron dynamics at low temperatures exhibits a pure spin ratchet behavior, i.e., a finite spin current and the absence of charge transport in spatially asymmetric structures. It is also found that the equilibrium spin currents are not destroyed by the presence of strong dissipation.

  6. RHIC spin flipper commissioning results

    SciTech Connect

    Bai M.; Roser, T.; Dawson, C.; Kewisch, J.; Makdisi, Y.; Oddo, P.; Pai, C.; Pile, P.

    2012-05-20

    The five AC dipole RHIC spin flipper design in the RHIC Blue ring was first tested during the RHIC 2012 polarized proton operation. The advantage of this design is to eliminate the vertical coherent betatron oscillations outside the spin flipper. The closure of each ac dipole vertical bump was measured with orbital response as well as spin. The effect of the rotating field on the spin motion by the spin flipper was also confirmed by measuring the suppressed resonance at Q{sub s} = 1 - Q{sub osc}.

  7. Artery of Percheron Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Vinod, K.V.; Kaaviya, R.; Arpita, Bhaumik

    2016-01-01

    Artery of Percheron (AOP) occlusion is a rare cause of ischemic stroke characterized by bilateral paramedian thalamic infarcts, with or without mesencephalic infarction. Clinically it presents with mental state disturbances, hypersomnolence, aphasia/dysarthria, amnesia and ocular movement disorders, including vertical gaze palsy. Here, we report a case of cardioembolic AOP infarction in a 37-year-old woman with rheumatic mitral valvular stenosis. This case is being reported to highlight the interesting clinical and neuroimaging features of this rare condition, and the differential diagnosis of AOP infarction on imaging have been discussed. PMID:27647964

  8. Right hepatic artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Astrid Del Pilar Ardila; Loures, Paulo; Calle, Juan Cristóbal Ospina; Cunha, Beatriz; Córdoba, Juan Camilo

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of an aneurysm of the right hepatic artery and its multidisciplinary management by general surgery, endoscopy and radiology services. Being a case of extremely low incidence, it is important to show its diagnostic and therapeutic approach. RESUMO Relatamos um caso de aneurisma da artéria hepática direita conduzido de forma multidisciplinar pelos Serviços de Cirurgia Geral, Endoscopia e Radiologia. Em se tratando de caso de incidência baixíssima, é importante mostrar o enfoque diagnóstico e terapêutico usado em seu manejo.

  9. Efficient spin transport through polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, J. B. S.; Alves Santos, O.; Gomes, J. P.; Assis, H. S.; Felix, J. F.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Rezende, S. M.; Azevedo, A.

    2017-01-01

    By using the spin pumping process, we show that it is possible to transport a pure spin current across layers of conducting polyaniline (PANI) with several hundred nanometers sandwiched between a film of the ferrimagnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and a thin layer of platinum. The spin current generated by microwave-driven ferromagnetic resonance of the YIG film, injected through the YIG/PANI interface, crosses the whole PANI layer and then is injected into the Pt layer. By means of the inverse spin Hall effect in the Pt, the spin current is converted into charge current and electrically detected as a dc voltage. We measured a spin diffusion length in PANI of 590 ± 40 nm, which is very large compared with normal metals, demonstrating that PANI can be used as an efficient spin current conductor and poor charge current conductor, opening the path towards spintronics applications based in this very attractive material.

  10. Topologically massive higher spin gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Arjun; Lal, Shailesh; Saha, Arunabha; Sahoo, Bindusar

    2011-10-01

    We look at the generalisation of topologically massive gravity (TMG) to higher spins, specifically spin-3. We find a special "chiral" point for the spin-three, analogous to the spin-two example, which actually coincides with the usual spin-two chiral point. But in contrast to usual TMG, there is the presence of a non-trivial trace and its logarithmic partner at the chiral point. The trace modes carry energy opposite in sign to the traceless modes. The logarithmic partner of the traceless mode carries negative energy indicating an instability at the chiral point. We make several comments on the asymptotic symmetry and its possible deformations at this chiral point and speculate on the higher spin generalisation of LCFT2 dual to the spin-3 massive gravity at the chiral point.

  11. Inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm associated with common hepatic artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Bracale, G; Porcellini, M; Bernardo, B; Selvetella, L; Renda, A

    1996-12-01

    A unique case of true inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm (IPDA) associated with occlusion of common hepatic artery is reported. Radiological and MRI findings are described. Because of high risk of visceral ischemia that contraindicated a percutaneous transluminal embolization, a successful tangential resection of aneurysm was performed.

  12. Spin ice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Joseph William

    2003-07-01

    Geometrically frustrated magnets (GFMs) are materials in which it is impossible to satisfy all exchange interactions due the geometry of the lattice. The frustration of interactions is the origin of many unique and interesting material properties. GFMs are typified by large ground state degeneracy and will undergo spin fluctuations down to temperatures well below theta W, where un-frustrated materials display long-range order. This results in the development of correlated magnetic states that are analogous to various structural phases of matter such as spin glasses and spin liquids. Very recently, another magnetic-structural analog has been discovered where the magnetic properties show distinct similarities with the structural properties of a common substance that has itself long perplexed scientists, water ice. The aptly named spin ice compounds have been shown to exhibit the same "ground state entropy" as water ice and to be well characterized by consideration in terms of the "ice model". In this thesis, we explore the low temperature dynamics of the spins in the spin ice compound Dy2Ti2O7 through measurements of the magnetization and ac susceptibility. We show that the ground state represents a unique form of glassiness in a dense magnetic system. Our results show the onset of irreversibility and the development of a metastable state where the dynamics are significantly slowed but no long-range order is achieved below Tirr ˜ 650 mK. The system is also shown to display unique properties at higher temperatures with a partial freezing of the ac susceptibility at T ˜ 16 K. This freezing is shown to be thermally activated in nature above Tcross ˜ 12 K below which it is driven by quantum tunneling until it assumes faster than activated behavior at T ice ˜ 4 K. The freezing is shown to occur over a very narrow range of relaxation time constants, similar to that seen in the dielectric constants of ice. Measurements of Dy2-xYxTi2O 7, where the J = 15/2 Dy3+ ions were

  13. Determination of the spin diffusion length in germanium by spin optical orientation and electrical spin injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, C.; Bertoli, S.; Asa, M.; Baldrati, L.; Manzoni, C.; Marangoni, M.; Cerullo, G.; Bianchi, M.; Sordan, R.; Bertacco, R.; Cantoni, M.

    2016-10-01

    The measurement of the spin diffusion length and/or lifetime in semiconductors is a key issue for the realisation of spintronic devices, exploiting the spin degree of freedom of carriers for storing and manipulating information. In this paper, we address such parameters in germanium (0 0 1) at room temperature (RT) by three different measurement methods. Exploiting optical spin orientation in the semiconductor and spin filtering across an insulating MgO barrier, the dependence of the resistivity on the spin of photo-excited carriers in Fe/MgO/Ge spin photodiodes (spin-PDs) was electrically detected. A spin diffusion length of 0.9  ±  0.2 µm was obtained by fitting the photon energy dependence of the spin signal by a mathematical model. Electrical techniques, comprising non-local four-terminal and Hanle measurements performed on CoFeB/MgO/Ge lateral devices, led to spin diffusion lengths of 1.3  ±  0.2 µm and 1.3  ±  0.08 µm, respectively. Despite minor differences due to experimental details, the order of magnitude of the spin diffusion length is the same for the three techniques. Although standard electrical methods are the most employed in semiconductor spintronics for spin diffusion length measurements, here we demonstrate optical spin orientation as a viable alternative for the determination of the spin diffusion length in semiconductors allowing for optical spin orientation.

  14. Pulmonary artery sarcoma mimicking a pulmonary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Terra, Ricardo M; Fernandez, Angelo; Bammann, Ricardo H; Junqueira, Jader J M; Capelozzi, Vera L

    2008-10-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma is an uncommon neoplasm, and its clinical and radiological presentation usually simulates chronic thromboembolic disease. We present the case of a 77-year-old woman admitted with dyspnea, chest pain, and hemoptysis. A chest computed tomographic scan showed moderate right-sided pleural effusion and a saccular dilatation of the interlobar portion of the right pulmonary artery, which was filled with contrast and surrounded by an irregular soft-tissue attenuation mass, suggesting a ruptured pulmonary artery aneurysm. The patient was operated on. Intraoperatively, a pseudoaneurysm and a solid mass were identified within the oblique fissure around the interlobar artery. Therefore, a right pneumonectomy was performed. Definitive pathologic examination was consistent with pulmonary artery sarcoma. The patient had a good outcome and is free of disease 2 years after surgery.

  15. Spin noise in the anisotropic central spin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackmann, Johannes; Anders, Frithjof B.

    2014-01-01

    Spin-noise measurements can serve as a direct probe for the microscopic decoherence mechanism of an electronic spin in semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). We have calculated the spin-noise spectrum in the anisotropic central spin model using a Chebyshev expansion technique which exactly accounts for the dynamics up to an arbitrary long but fixed time in a finite-size system. In the isotropic case, describing QD charge with a single electron, the short-time dynamics is in good agreement with quasistatic approximations for the thermodynamic limit. The spin-noise spectrum, however, shows strong deviations at low frequencies with a power-law behavior of ω-3/4 corresponding to a t-1/4 decay at intermediate and long times. In the Ising limit, applicable to QDs with heavy-hole spins, the spin-noise spectrum exhibits a threshold behavior of (ω-ωL)-1/2 above the Larmor frequency ωL=gμBB. In the generic anisotropic central spin model we have found a crossover from a Gaussian type of spin-noise spectrum to a more Ising-type spectrum with increasing anisotropy in a finite magnetic field. In order to make contact with experiments, we present ensemble averaged spin-noise spectra for QD ensembles charged with single electrons or holes. The Gaussian-type noise spectrum evolves to a more Lorentzian shape spectrum with increasing spread of characteristic time scales and g factors of the individual QDs.

  16. Spin Funneling for Enhanced Spin Injection into Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, Shehrin; Diep, Vinh Q.; Camsari, Kerem Yunus; Datta, Supriyo

    2016-07-01

    It is well-established that high spin-orbit coupling (SOC) materials convert a charge current density into a spin current density which can be used to switch a magnet efficiently and there is increasing interest in identifying materials with large spin Hall angle for lower switching current. Using experimentally benchmarked models, we show that composite structures can be designed using existing spin Hall materials such that the effective spin Hall angle is larger by an order of magnitude. The basic idea is to funnel spins from a large area of spin Hall material into a small area of ferromagnet using a normal metal with large spin diffusion length and low resistivity like Cu or Al. We show that this approach is increasingly effective as magnets get smaller. We avoid unwanted charge current shunting by the low resistive NM layer utilizing the newly discovered phenomenon of pure spin conduction in ferromagnetic insulators via magnon diffusion. We provide a spin circuit model for magnon diffusion in FMI that is benchmarked against recent experiments and theory.

  17. Spin Funneling for Enhanced Spin Injection into Ferromagnets

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, Shehrin; Diep, Vinh Q.; Camsari, Kerem Yunus; Datta, Supriyo

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that high spin-orbit coupling (SOC) materials convert a charge current density into a spin current density which can be used to switch a magnet efficiently and there is increasing interest in identifying materials with large spin Hall angle for lower switching current. Using experimentally benchmarked models, we show that composite structures can be designed using existing spin Hall materials such that the effective spin Hall angle is larger by an order of magnitude. The basic idea is to funnel spins from a large area of spin Hall material into a small area of ferromagnet using a normal metal with large spin diffusion length and low resistivity like Cu or Al. We show that this approach is increasingly effective as magnets get smaller. We avoid unwanted charge current shunting by the low resistive NM layer utilizing the newly discovered phenomenon of pure spin conduction in ferromagnetic insulators via magnon diffusion. We provide a spin circuit model for magnon diffusion in FMI that is benchmarked against recent experiments and theory. PMID:27374496

  18. Spontaneous Arterial Dissection.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Tobias; Caplan, Louis

    2001-09-01

    There is no controlled study for the best treatment or management of cervico-cerebral artery dissection (CAD). Rationale initial empiric treatment in acute CAD to prevent secondary embolism is partial thromboplastin time (PTT)-guided anticoagulation by intravenous heparin followed by anticoagulation with warfarin. Carotid surgery for treatment of CAD is not recommended anymore with the possible exception of persisting severe stenosis of the proximal internal carotid artery (ICA). There could be use of carotid angioplasty by balloon dilatation and stenting in selected cases of severe cerebral hemodynamic impairment by bilateral CAD. Duration of secondary prophylaxis by anticoagulation is best guided by Doppler sonography follow-up, and should be continued until normalization of blood flow or until at least 1 year after the vessel is occluded. There is no evidence that pseudoaneurysms increase the risk for embolic complication, and there is no evidence for surgery or continuation of anticoagulation in patients with pseudoaneurysms. Caution should be recommended for exercises that involve excessive head movements (eg, bungee jumping, trampoline jumping, and chiropractic maneuvers). The patient should be informed that recurrent rate is low in nonfamilial cases. Doppler sonography is a low-cost and high-sensitivity method for patients at risk.

  19. How Is Carotid Artery Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Carotid Artery Disease Treated? Treatments for carotid artery disease may ... plaque removed and normal blood flow restored. Carotid Artery Angioplasty and Stenting Doctors use a procedure called ...

  20. How Can Carotid Artery Disease Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Carotid Artery Disease Be Prevented? Taking action to control your risk factors can help prevent or delay carotid artery disease and stroke . Your risk for carotid artery ...

  1. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... angioplasty and stenting - discharge; CAS - discharge; Endarterectomy - carotid artery - discharge; Angioplasty - carotid artery - discharge ... were done to open a narrowed or blocked artery that supplies blood to your brain. Your health ...

  2. Who Needs Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Needs Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting? Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is used to treat people ... or after a heart attack to treat blocked arteries. Your doctor may recommend CABG if other treatments, ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: pulmonary arterial hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions pulmonary arterial hypertension pulmonary arterial hypertension Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive disorder characterized by abnormally high ...

  4. Art of spin decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xiangsong; Sun Weimin; Wang Fan; Goldman, T.

    2011-04-01

    We analyze the problem of spin decomposition for an interacting system from a natural perspective of constructing angular-momentum eigenstates. We split, from the total angular-momentum operator, a proper part which can be separately conserved for a stationary state. This part commutes with the total Hamiltonian and thus specifies the quantum angular momentum. We first show how this can be done in a gauge-dependent way, by seeking a specific gauge in which part of the total angular-momentum operator vanishes identically. We then construct a gauge-invariant operator with the desired property. Our analysis clarifies what is the most pertinent choice among the various proposals for decomposing the nucleon spin. A similar analysis is performed for extracting a proper part from the total Hamiltonian to construct energy eigenstates.

  5. Dusty spin plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Brodin, G.; Marklund, M.; Zamanian, J.

    2008-09-07

    A fluid model is derived, taking into account the effect of spin magnetization of electrons as well as of magnetized dust grains. The model is analyzed, and it is found that both the acoustic velocity and the Alfven velocity is decreased due to the magnetization effects. Furthermore, for low-temperature high density plasmas, it is found that the linear wave modes can be unstable, due to the magnetic attraction of individual fluid elements. The significance of our results are discussed.

  6. MU-SPIN Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, James, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Current goals are to: (1) Strengthen the science and engineering capabilities of MU-SPIN institutions in research and education via computer networks; (2) Involve and prepare minority institutions and principal investigators to successfully participate in competitive research and education processes via computer networks; and (3) Develop training and education mechanisms to support, sustain and evolve the institutional network infrastructure, thereby generating a better, prepared pool of candidates to contribute to NASA's missions.

  7. Spin and gravitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental variational principle for a perfect fluid in general relativity is extended so that it applies to the metric-torsion Einstein-Cartan theory. Field equations for a perfect fluid in the Einstein-Cartan theory are deduced. In addition, the equations of motion for a fluid with intrinsic spin in general relativity are deduced from a special relativistic variational principle. The theory is a direct extension of the theory of nonspinning fluids in special relativity.

  8. Recovery of spinning satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coppey, J. M.; Mahaffey, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of a space tug and a spinning satellite in a coupled configuration was simulated and analyzed. A docking concept was developed to investigate the requirements pertaining to the design of a docking interface. Sensing techniques and control requirements for the chase vehicle were studied to assess the feasibility of an automatic docking. The effects of nutation dampers and liquid propellant slosh motion upon the docking transient were investigated.

  9. Quantum Spin Gyroscope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-15

    Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond . The NV center has recently emerged as a powerful quantum system, combining the good coherence properties and...fluorescence collection of the NV centers as well as their magnetic resonance driving and characterization of diamond samples with high defect...state quantum spin gyroscope associated with the Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond . The NV center has recently emerged as a powerful quantum

  10. Spin Glass Patch Planting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Wenlong; Mandra, Salvatore; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a patch planting method for creating arbitrarily large spin glass instances with known ground states. The scaling of the computational complexity of these instances with various block numbers and sizes is investigated and compared with random instances using population annealing Monte Carlo and the quantum annealing DW2X machine. The method can be useful for benchmarking tests for future generation quantum annealing machines, classical and quantum mechanical optimization algorithms.

  11. Spinning yarns for years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, Grzegorz

    1997-05-01

    Applications of rather routine high speed photography techniques for research of some textile technologies invented, developed, improved or investigated by the Technical University of Lodz are presented. The following technologies and processes are mentioned: sewing, knitting, spinning, texturing, weaving (including pneumatic methods employed in some technologies). Rotating prism cameras, microsecond flash guns, stereo photography have been mainly applied. Most HSP applications and examples are illustrated by a video presentation.

  12. One-dimensional spinon spin currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirobe, Daichi; Sato, Masahiro; Kawamata, Takayuki; Shiomi, Yuki; Uchida, Ken-Ichi; Iguchi, Ryo; Koike, Yoji; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Saitoh, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    Quantum spin fluctuation in a low-dimensional or frustrated magnet breaks magnetic ordering while keeping spin correlation. Such fluctuation has been a central topic in magnetism because of its relevance to high-Tc superconductivity and topological states. However, utilizing such spin states has been quite difficult. In a one-dimensional spin-1/2 chain, a particle-like excitation called a spinon is known to be responsible for spin fluctuation in a paramagnetic state. Spinons behave as a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid at low energy, and the spin system is often called a quantum spin chain. Here we show that a quantum spin chain generates and carries spin current, which is attributed to spinon spin current. This is demonstrated by observing an anisotropic negative spin Seebeck effect along the spin chains in Sr2CuO3. The results show that spin current can flow even in an atomic channel owing to long-range spin fluctuation.

  13. Minimal Model of Spin-Transfer Torque and Spin Pumping Caused by the Spin Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Sigrist, Manfred; Sinova, Jairo; Manske, Dirk

    2015-11-20

    In the normal-metal-ferromagnetic-insulator bilayer (such as Pt/Y_{3}Fe_{5}O_{12}) and the normal-metal-ferromagnetic-metal-oxide trilayer (such as Pt/Co/AlO_{x}) where spin injection and ejection are achieved by the spin Hall effect in the normal metal, we propose a minimal model based on quantum tunneling of spins to explain the spin-transfer torque and spin pumping caused by the spin Hall effect. The ratio of their dampinglike to fieldlike component depends on the tunneling wave function that is strongly influenced by generic material properties such as interface s-d coupling, insulating gap, and layer thickness, yet the spin relaxation plays a minor role. The quantified result renders our minimal model an inexpensive tool for searching for appropriate materials.

  14. Dynamic Spin Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirtas, Sezen; Koymen, Ali; Salamon, Myron

    2010-03-01

    In this study we investigate a dynamic extension of well known classic spin valves. Ultra thin films were dc sputtered in a UHV chamber and their dynamic responses were measured by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Two Co layers, separated by a nonmagnetic Ag layer--thick enough to suppress exchange coupling--were deposited, with one of them coupled to a Gd underlayer, forming a Co(1)/Ag/Co(2)/Gd multilayer. At room temperature both Co(1) and Co(2) FMR's are observed for the external magnetic field in the plane of the film. The field for resonance of Co(2) is reduced significantly relative to Co(1), with the paramagnetic moment of the Gd apparently added to the Co magnetization, and the linewidth is broader. Spin pumping effects are minimal since Co(1) and Co(2) do not resonate at the same field.. The Co(2) FMR disappears at the TC of Gd leaving the linewidth of the Co(1) FMR weakly temperature dependent down to the compensation temperature of the Co(2)/Gd bilayer. Below that point, the two Co layers in this dynamic spin valve device are in antiparallel alignment, leading to strong broadening of the Co(1) FMR with decreasing temperature.

  15. Nuclear spin circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Vaara, Juha; Rizzo, Antonio; Kauczor, Joanna; Norman, Patrick; Coriani, Sonia

    2014-04-07

    Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in magneto-optic spectroscopy techniques that use nuclear magnetization as the source of the magnetic field. Here we present a formulation of magnetic circular dichroism (CD) due to magnetically polarized nuclei, nuclear spin-induced CD (NSCD), in molecules. The NSCD ellipticity and nuclear spin-induced optical rotation (NSOR) angle correspond to the real and imaginary parts, respectively, of (complex) quadratic response functions involving the dynamic second-order interaction of the electron system with the linearly polarized light beam, as well as the static magnetic hyperfine interaction. Using the complex polarization propagator framework, NSCD and NSOR signals are obtained at frequencies in the vicinity of optical excitations. Hartree-Fock and density-functional theory calculations on relatively small model systems, ethene, benzene, and 1,4-benzoquinone, demonstrate the feasibility of the method for obtaining relatively strong nuclear spin-induced ellipticity and optical rotation signals. Comparison of the proton and carbon-13 signals of ethanol reveals that these resonant phenomena facilitate chemical resolution between non-equivalent nuclei in magneto-optic spectra.

  16. Anomalous spin Josephson effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mei-Juan; Wang, Jun; Hao, Lei; Liu, Jun-Feng

    2016-10-01

    We report a theoretical study on the spin Josephson effect arising from the exchange coupling of the two ferromagnets (Fs), which are deposited on a two-dimensional (2D) time-reversal-invariant topological insulator. An anomalous spin supercurrent Js z˜sin(α +α0) is found to flow in between the two Fs and the ground state of the system is not limited to the magnetically collinear configuration (α =n π ,n is an integer) but determined by a controllable angle α0, where α is the crossed angle between the two F magnetizations. The angle α0 is the dynamic phase of the electrons traveling in between the two Fs and can be controlled electrically by a gate voltage. This anomalous spin Josephson effect, similar to the conventional φ0 superconductor junction, originates from the definite electron chirality of the helical edge states in the 2D topological insulator. These results indicate that the magnetic coupling in a topological system is different from the usual one in conventional materials.

  17. Optimally Squeezed Spin States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojo, Alberto

    2004-03-01

    We consider optimally spin-squeezed states that maximize the sensitivity of the Ramsey spectroscopy, and for which the signal to noise ratio scales as the number of particles N. Using the variational principle we prove that these states are eigensolutions of the Hamiltonian H(λ)=λ S_z^2-S_x, and that, for large N, the states become equivalent to the quadrature squeezed states of the harmonic oscillator. We present numerical results that illustrate the validity of the equivalence. We also present results of spin squeezing via atom-field interactions within the context of the Tavis-Cummings model. An ensemble of N two-level atoms interacts with a quantized cavity field. For all the atoms initially in their ground states, it is shown that spin squeezing of both the atoms and the field can be achieved provided the initial state of the cavity field has coherence between number states differing by 2. Most of the discussion is restricted to the case of a cavity field initially in a coherent state, but initial squeezed states for the field are also discussed. An analytic solution is found that is valid in the limit that the number of atoms is much greater than unity. References: A. G. Rojo, Phys. Rev A, 68, 013807 (2003); Claudiu Genes, P. R. Berman, and A. G. Rojo Phys. Rev. A 68, 043809 (2003).

  18. Epigenetics and Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Golledge, Jonathan; Biros, Erik; Bingley, John; Iyer, Vikram; Krishna, Smriti M

    2016-04-01

    The term epigenetics is usually used to describe inheritable changes in gene function which do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. These typically include non-coding RNAs, DNA methylation and histone modifications. Smoking and older age are recognised risk factors for peripheral artery diseases, such as occlusive lower limb artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm, and have been implicated in promoting epigenetic changes. This brief review describes studies that have associated epigenetic factors with peripheral artery diseases and investigations which have examined the effect of epigenetic modifications on the outcome of peripheral artery diseases in mouse models. Investigations have largely focused on microRNAs and have identified a number of circulating microRNAs associated with human peripheral artery diseases. Upregulating or antagonising a number of microRNAs has also been reported to limit aortic aneurysm development and hind limb ischemia in mouse models. The importance of DNA methylation and histone modifications in peripheral artery disease has been relatively little studied. Whether circulating microRNAs can be used to assist identification of patients with peripheral artery diseases and be modified in order to improve the outcome of peripheral artery disease will require further investigation.

  19. Computer measurement of arterial disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J.; Selzer, R. H.; Barndt, R.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Brooks, S.

    1980-01-01

    Image processing technique quantifies human atherosclerosis by computer analysis of arterial angiograms. X-ray film images are scanned and digitized, arterial shadow is tracked, and several quantitative measures of lumen irregularity are computed. In other tests, excellent agreement was found between computer evaluation of femoral angiograms on living subjects and evaluation by teams of trained angiographers.

  20. Spin resonance and spin fluctuations in a quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovsky, V. L.

    2017-02-01

    This is a review of theoretical works on spin resonance in a quantum wire associated with the spin-orbit interaction. We demonstrate that the spin-orbit induced internal "magnetic field" leads to a narrow spin-flip resonance at low temperatures in the absence of an applied magnetic field. An applied dc magnetic field perpendicular to and small compared with the spin-orbit field enhances the resonance absorption by several orders of magnitude. The component of applied field parallel to the spin-orbit field separates the resonance frequencies of right and left movers and enables a linearly polarized ac electric field to produce a dynamic magnetization as well as electric and spin currents. We start with a simple model of noninteracting electrons and then consider the interaction that is not weak in 1d electron system. We show that electron spin resonance in the spin-orbit field persists in the Luttinger liquid. The interaction produces an additional singularity (cusp) in the spin-flip channel associated with the plasma oscillation. As it was shown earlier by Starykh and his coworkers, the interacting 1d electron system in the external field with sufficiently large parallel component becomes unstable with respect to the appearance of a spin-density wave. This instability suppresses the spin resonance. The observation of the electron spin resonance in a thin wires requires low temperature and high intensity of electromagnetic field in the terahertz diapason. The experiment satisfying these two requirements is possible but rather difficult. An alternative approach that does not require strong ac field is to study two-time correlations of the total spin of the wire with an optical method developed by Crooker and coworkers. We developed theory of such correlations. We prove that the correlation of the total spin component parallel to the internal magnetic field is dominant in systems with the developed spin-density waves but it vanishes in Luttinger liquid. Thus, the

  1. Adiabatic rotation of effective spin. II. Spin-rotational relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrennikov, Yu. A.; Steiner, U. E.

    1994-05-01

    The theory of electron spin-rotational (SR) relaxation in systems with an effective spin Seff=1/2 is formulated in terms of the adiabatic rotation of effective spin (ARES) approach. It is shown that SR relaxation results from the orientational random walk of the axes of the intramolecular electric field potential (ligand field) to which a spin-bearing atomic center is exposed. The validity of the stochastic treatment presented here is not limited by the Redfield conditions. The general expression obtained for the time constant of electron spin relaxation in liquid phase reproduces the well-known result of Hubbard-Atkins-Kivelson theory if it is specialized to the case of systems with weak spin-orbit coupling.

  2. Charged spinning black holes as accelerators of spinning particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Peng; Gu, Bao-Min; Wei, Shao-Wen; Yang, Jie; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that some black holes can act as accelerators for particles without spin. Recently, some works have considered the collision of two spinning particles in the background of Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes and it has been shown that the center-of-mass energy of the test particles is related to the spin. In this paper we extend the results to some more general cases. We consider Kerr-Newman black holes as accelerators for spinning particles. We derive the center-of-mass energy of the spinning particles and use numerical method to investigate how the center-of-mass energy is affected by the properties of the black holes and spinning particles.

  3. Arterial anatomy of the thumb.

    PubMed

    Ames, E L; Bissonnette, M; Acland, R; Lister, G; Firrell, J

    1993-08-01

    The anatomical literature has indicated that the arterial supply to the thumb comes from the princeps pollicis artery. However, this simplified description does not often correlate with intraoperative findings. The purpose of this study was to investigate and clarify this important area of anatomy by dissection of fresh cadaver hands. 40 dissections were completed on 35 intravascularly injected and five non-injected hands. Five patterns were identified. The most common pattern showed both a superficial and deep vessel to the first web space in 54% of specimens. Dominant vessels included the superficial palmar branch of the radial artery in 8%, first palmar metacarpal artery in 18% and dorsal metacarpal artery in 8%. Only three specimens correlated with the textbook description. We conclude that the term "princeps pollicis" is actually a misnomer.

  4. Arterial Stiffness: Recommendations and Standardization

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Raymond R.

    2017-01-01

    The use of arterial stiffness measurements in longitudinal cohorts of normal populations, hypertensive patients, diabetic patients, healthy elderly, and patients on hemodialysis have confirmed the value of this important measure of arterial health, and established its complementary role to measures of blood pressure. Its contribution to understanding cardiovascular and mortality risk beyond blood pressure measurements has moved measures of arterial stiffness into the ranks of factors such as elevated cholesterol, diabetes, and left ventricular hypertrophy in considering cardiovascular risk. The recent international collaboration's publication of reference ranges for normal people and those with hypertension, along with the American Heart Association's recent scientific statement on standardizing arterial stiffness measurements are important aspects to consider in future studies employing these valuable methods, particularly as interventions that not only lower blood pressure but improve arterial function are tested in the clinical arena. PMID:28275588

  5. Coherent spin mixing dynamics in a spin-1 atomic condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Wenxian; Chang, M.-S.; Chapman, M.S.; Zhou, D.L.; You, L.

    2005-07-15

    We study the coherent off-equilibrium spin mixing inside an atomic condensate. Using mean-field theory and adopting the single-spatial-mode approximation, the condensate spin dynamics is found to be well described by that of a nonrigid pendulum and displays a variety of periodic oscillations in an external magnetic field. Our results illuminate several recent experimental observations and provide critical insights into the observation of coherent interaction-driven oscillations in a spin-1 condensate.

  6. [Progestins and arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, H

    1985-01-01

    The role of estrogens in the etiology of vascular accidents was identified soon after oral contraceptives (OCs) came into use over 2 decades ago, but the role of progestins was only identified on the basis of systematic study. Reduction in the estrogen dose of OCs was accompained by a steady decline in venous accidents, but the rate of arterial accidents changed little. It is important to remember that the actual occurrence of vascular accidents in OC users is rare. Available statistics indicate that age and smoking are important risk factors for vascular accidents. Among nonsmokers and smokers respectively, the annual risk of death due to vascular accidents is 1 in 77,000 and 1 in 10,000 for women under 35, 1 in 67,000 and 1 in 2000 for women 35-44, and 1 in 2500 and 1 in 500 for women 45 and over. Some isolated cases of arterial vascular accidents in users of progestin only OCs have been published. The death rate from vascular accidents is 3 times as high when the levonorgestrel dose increases from 150 to 250 mcg, and twice as high when the norethisterone acetate dose increases from 1 to 4 mg. It is not known precisely how synthetic progestins can induce an arterial accident, but the factors involved may include elevation of blood pressure by potentiation of the modifications in renin-angiotensin system caused by ethinyl estradiol, reducing the level of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, impairing glucose tolerance, altering the vascular walls directly, or modifying certain coagulation factors. Little data is available on progestin-caused modifications in coagulation factors, but a recent study reported that the effects of combined OCs on coagulation factors increased with the progestin dose. 2 groups of 19-norsteroids are currently used in contraception, the estranes including norethisterone and some prohormones that metabolize to norethisterone before becoming active, and the gonanes including norgestrel, levonorgestrel, and desogestrel. Early optimism

  7. Limits on Anomalous Spin-Spin Couplings between Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenday, Alexander G.; Cramer, Claire E.; Phillips, David F.; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2008-12-01

    We report experimental limits on new spin-dependent macroscopic forces between neutrons. We measured the nuclear Zeeman frequencies of a He3/Xe129 maser while modulating the nuclear spin polarization of a nearby He3 ensemble in a separate glass cell. We place limits on the coupling strength of neutron spin-spin interactions mediated by light pseudoscalar particles like the axion [gpgp/(4πℏc)] at the 3×10-7 level for interaction ranges longer than about 40 cm. This limit is about 10-5 the size of the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction between neutrons.

  8. CP observables with spin spin correlations in chargino production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, A.; Hohenwarter-Sodek, K.; Kernreiter, T.; Kittel, O.; Terwort, M.

    2008-10-01

    We study the CP-violating terms of the spin-spin correlations in chargino production ee→χ˜1±χ˜2∓, and their subsequent two-body decays into sneutrinos plus leptons. We propose novel CP-sensitive observables with the help of T-odd products of the spin-spin terms. These terms depend on the polarizations of both charginos, with one polarization perpendicular to the production plane. We identify two classes of CP-sensitive observables; one requires the reconstruction of the production plane, the other not. Our framework is the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with complex parameters.

  9. Chiral spin liquids in arrays of spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorohovsky, Gregory; Pereira, Rodrigo G.; Sela, Eran

    2015-06-01

    We describe a coupled-chain construction for chiral spin liquids in two-dimensional spin systems. Starting from a one-dimensional zigzag spin chain and imposing SU(2) symmetry in the framework of non-Abelian bosonization, we first show that our approach faithfully describes the low-energy physics of an exactly solvable model with a three-spin interaction. Generalizing the construction to the two-dimensional case, we obtain a theory that incorporates the universal properties of the chiral spin liquid predicted by Kalmeyer and Laughlin: charge-neutral edge states, gapped spin-1/2 bulk excitations, and ground-state degeneracy on the torus signaling the topological order of this quantum state. In addition, we show that the chiral spin liquid phase is more easily stabilized in frustrated lattices containing corner-sharing triangles, such as the extended kagome lattice, than in the triangular lattice. Our field-theoretical approach invites generalizations to more exotic chiral spin liquids and may be used to assess the existence of the chiral spin liquid as the ground state of specific lattice systems.

  10. Spin-seebeck effect: a phonon driven spin distribution.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, C M; Yang, J; Mack, S; Awschalom, D D; Myers, R C; Heremans, J P

    2011-05-06

    Here we report on measurements of the spin-Seebeck effect in GaMnAs over an extended temperature range alongside the thermal conductivity, specific heat, magnetization, and thermoelectric power. The amplitude of the spin-Seebeck effect in GaMnAs scales with the thermal conductivity of the GaAs substrate and the phonon-drag contribution to the thermoelectric power of the GaMnAs, demonstrating that phonons drive the spin redistribution. A phenomenological model involving phonon-magnon drag explains the spatial and temperature dependence of the measured spin distribution.

  11. Charge-spin coupling in a quantum Heisenberg spin ladder

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, John; Lee, C; Gunaydin - Sen, O; Tung, L C; Christen, H M; Wang, Y J; Turnbull, M M; Landee, C P; Mcdonald, R D; White, J L; Crooker, S A; Singleton, J; Whangbo, M - H; Musfeldt, J L

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the magnetic and optical properties of (2,3-dmpyH){sub 2}CuBr{sub 4}, an antiferromagnetic quantum spin ladder with strong rail interactions. Because the magnetic energy scales are smail, field drives the system into the fully polarized state with a concomitant change in the optical properties. Spin density distribution calculations reveal that electronic structure is sensitive to the magnetic state because the Br 4s orbital contribution to the empty down-spin band, into which the optical excitations take place, depends on the spin arrangement between adjacent CuBr{sub 4}{sup 2-} chromophores.

  12. Decoupling a hole spin qubit from the nuclear spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prechtel, Jonathan H.; Kuhlmann, Andreas V.; Houel, Julien; Ludwig, Arne; Valentin, Sascha R.; Wieck, Andreas D.; Warburton, Richard J.

    2016-09-01

    A huge effort is underway to develop semiconductor nanostructures as low-noise hosts for qubits. The main source of dephasing of an electron spin qubit in a GaAs-based system is the nuclear spin bath. A hole spin may circumvent the nuclear spin noise. In principle, the nuclear spins can be switched off for a pure heavy-hole spin. In practice, it is unknown to what extent this ideal limit can be achieved. A major hindrance is that p-type devices are often far too noisy. We investigate here a single hole spin in an InGaAs quantum dot embedded in a new generation of low-noise p-type device. We measure the hole Zeeman energy in a transverse magnetic field with 10 neV resolution by dark-state spectroscopy as we create a large transverse nuclear spin polarization. The hole hyperfine interaction is highly anisotropic: the transverse coupling is <1% of the longitudinal coupling. For unpolarized, randomly fluctuating nuclei, the ideal heavy-hole limit is achieved down to nanoelectronvolt energies; equivalently dephasing times up to a microsecond. The combination of large and strong optical dipole makes the single hole spin in a GaAs-based device an attractive quantum platform.

  13. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Giacoppo, Daniele; Capodanno, Davide; Dangas, George; Tamburino, Corrado

    2014-07-15

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a relatively rare and unexplored type of coronary disease. Although atherosclerosis, hormonal changes during pregnancy and connective tissue disorders might represent a sufficiently convincing explanation for some patients with SCAD, the many remaining cases display only a weak relationship with these causes. While on one side the clinical heterogeneity of SCAD masks a full understanding of their underlying pathophysiologic process, on the other side paucity of data and misleading presentations hamper the quick diagnosis and optimal management of this condition. A definite diagnosis of SCAD can be significantly facilitated by endovascular imaging techniques. In fact, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) overcome the limitations of coronary angiography providing detailed endovascular morphologic information. In contrast, optimal treatment strategies for SCAD still represent a burning controversial question. Herein, we review the published data examining possible causes and investigating the best therapy for SCAD in different clinical scenarios.

  14. [Grafting of carotid arteries].

    PubMed

    Belov, Iu V; Stepanenko, A B; Gens, A P; Bazylev, V V; Seleznev, M N; Savichev, D D

    2005-01-01

    Over 5-years, 167 reconstructive surgeries for stenosis of internal carotid arteries (ICA) were performed in 124 patients. Mean age of the patients was 63.5 years. One hundred and twenty-nine carotid endarterectomies (CEAE) in 86 patients and 38 reconstructive operations of ICA in 38 patients were performed. There were no lethal outcomes in short- and long-term postoperative period. In short-term period after prosthesis of ICA restenosis was revealed in 3% patients, after eversion CEAE in 3% patients the embolism was seen, after standard CEAE restenosis were diagnosed in 8% patients and thrombosis -- in 3%. In long-term period after grafting of ICA the strokes were seen in 3%, stenosis -- in 6% patients, after eversion endarterectomy -- in 0 and 3% patients, and after standard CEAE -- in 3 and 24% patients, respectively. It is concluded that grafting of ICA is adequate surgical method of reconstruction and stroke prevention in specific variants of carotid atherosclerosis.

  15. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Giedrius, Bernotavičius; Kęstutis, Saniukas; Irena, Karmonaitė; Rimantas, Zagorskis

    2016-01-01

    Background. An obstruction of the distal part of the duodenum can occur because of the superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) after a surgical correction of scoliosis. It is essential to evaluate the risk factors and diagnose the SMAS in time because complications of this condition are life-threatening and it is associated with a high rate of morbidity. Diagnostics of the SMAS is challenging, because it is rare and its symptoms are non-specific. Therefore, in order to better understand the essence of this pathology and to make diagnosis easier we present a rare clinical case of the superior mesenteric artery syndrome after a surgical correction of neuromuscular scoliosis. The clinical case. A 12-year-old girl with a specific development disorder, sensory neuropathy and progressive kypho-scoliosis was admitted to Vilnius University Children’s Hospital. The patient had right side 50-degree thoracic scoliosis and an 80-degree thoracic kyphosis. She underwent posterior spinal fusion with hooks and screws from Th1 to L2. On the fourth day after the surgery the patient developed nausea and began to vomit each day 1-2 times per day, especially after meals. The SMAS was suspected and a nasogastric tube was inserted, stomach decompression and the correction of electrolytes disbalance were made. After the treatment, the symptoms did not recur and a satisfactory correction and balance of the spine were made in coronal and sagittal planes. Conclusions. It is extremely important to identify the risk factors of the SMAS and begin preoperative diet supplements before surgical correction of scoliosis for patients with a low body mass index. After the first episode of vomiting following the surgery, we recommend to investigate these patients for a gastrointestinal obstruction as soon as possible. Decompression of the stomach, enteral or parenteral nutrition, and fluid therapy are essential in treating the SMAS. PMID:28356803

  16. Inductance due to spin current

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei

    2014-03-21

    The inductance of spintronic devices that transport charge neutral spin currents is discussed. It is known that in a media that contains charge neutral spins, a time-varying electric field induces a spin current. We show that since the spin current itself produces an electric field, this implies existence of inductance and electromotive force when the spin current changes with time. The relations between the electromotive force and the corresponding flux, which is a vector calculated by the cross product of electric field and the trajectory of the device, are clarified. The relativistic origin generally renders an extremely small inductance, which indicates the advantage of spin current in building low inductance devices. The same argument also explains the inductance due to electric dipole current and applies to physical dipoles consist of polarized bound charges.

  17. Semicircular Rashba arc spin polarizer

    SciTech Connect

    Bin Siu, Zhuo; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Ghee Tan, Seng

    2014-05-07

    In this work, we study the generation of spin polarized currents using curved arcs of finite widths, in which the Rashba spin orbit interaction (RSOI) is present. Compared to the 1-dimensional RSOI arcs with zero widths studied previously, the finite width presents charge carriers with another degree of freedom along the transverse width of the arc, in addition to the longitudinal degree of freedom along the circumference of the arc. The asymmetry in the transverse direction due to the difference in the inner and outer radii of the arc breaks the antisymmetry of the longitudinal spin z current in a straight RSOI segment. This property can be exploited to generate spin z polarized current output from the RSOI arc by a spin unpolarized current input. The sign of the spin current can be manipulated by varying the arc dimensions.

  18. Quantum Dot Spins and Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atature, Mete

    2012-02-01

    Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots are interesting and rich physical systems. Their inherently mesoscopic nature leads to a multitude of interesting interaction mechanisms of confined spins with the solid state environment of spins, charges and phonons. In parallel, the relatively clean spin-dependent optical transitions make quantum dots strong candidates for stationary and flying qubits within the context of spin-based quantum information science. The recently observed quantum dot resonance fluorescence has become a key enabler for further progress in this context. I will first discuss the real-time optical detection (or single-shot readout) of quantum dot spins, and then I will discuss how resonance fluorescence allows coherent generation of single photons suitable (and tailored) for linear-optics quantum computation and for establishing a high-efficiency spin-photon quantum interface within a distributed quantum network.

  19. Understanding the proton's spin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Myhrer; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2010-02-01

    We discuss the tremendous progress that has been towards an understanding of how the spin of the proton is distributed on its quark and gluon constituents. This is a problem that began in earnest twenty years ago with the discovery of the proton "spin crisis" by the European Muon Collaboration. The discoveries prompted by that original work have given us unprecedented insight into the amount of spin carried by polarized gluons and the orbital angular momentum of the quarks.

  20. Symplectic integrators for spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLachlan, Robert I.; Modin, Klas; Verdier, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    We present a symplectic integrator, based on the implicit midpoint method, for classical spin systems where each spin is a unit vector in R3. Unlike splitting methods, it is defined for all Hamiltonians and is O (3)-equivariant, i.e., coordinate-independent. It is a rare example of a generating function for symplectic maps of a noncanonical phase space. It yields a new integrable discretization of the spinning top.

  1. Hanle magnetoresistance: The role of edge spin accumulation and interfacial spin current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Zhang, X.; Wan, C. H.; Tao, B. S.; Huang, L.; Kong, W. J.; Han, X. F.

    2016-11-01

    We report the Hanle magnetoresistance (HMR) due to the spin precession of edge spin accumulation and interfacial spin current. Because of spin-orbit coupling (SOC), an electric current is accompanied by a transverse spin current, which builds up the spin accumulation at surfaces of Pt and the spin current across the YIG/Pt interface. Once a magnetic field is applied, the precession of spins will decrease the edge spin accumulation and interfacial spin current, which leads to an increased resistance of Pt via ISHE. Spin relaxation governs the HMR from edge spin accumulation, while spin diffusion and spin conversion play important roles in the HMR from interfacial spin current. This work provides another method to investigate the spin-orbit coupling by electrical measurement.

  2. Arterial injuries during inguinal herniorrhaphy.

    PubMed Central

    Shamberger, R C; Ottinger, L W; Malt, R A

    1984-01-01

    In all common forms of inguinal herniorrhaphy, stitches pass either just superficial to the internal iliac artery and vein or through their sheath. Despite the potential for arterial injury, documented cases seem to exist only in the foreign-language literature. We report four cases of arterial injury following inguinal herniorrhaphy in adults. The artery is placed in jeopardy when the transversalis fascia is incorporated in the stitches used to close the medial aspect of the internal inguinal ring. The depth of penetration of the needle and the proximity of the external iliac artery must be accurately judged. Injury can result from direct puncture of the artery or avulsion of one of its branches. Immediate repair of any arterial injury is paramount, and newly subnormal pulses below the inguinal injury are unacceptable. Exposure must be adequate, and division of the floor of the inguinal canal may be necessary for this purpose. Repair may require a simple hemostatic suture, a patch graft, or an interposition graft. PMID:6732332

  3. Left Main Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Doustkami, Hossein; Maleki, Nasrollah; Tavosi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the left main coronary artery are exceedingly rare clinical entities, encountered incidentally in approximately 0.1% of patients who undergo routine angiography. The most common cause of coronary artery aneurysms is atherosclerosis. Angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the severity of the coexisting coronary stenosis, patients with left main coronary artery aneurysms can be effectively managed either surgically or pharmacologically. We herein report a case of left main coronary artery aneurysm in a 72-year-old man with a prior history of hypertension presenting to our hospital because of unstable angina. The electrocardiogram showed ST-segment depression and T-wave inversion in the precordial leads. All the data of blood chemistry were normal. Echocardiography showed akinetic anterior wall, septum, and apex, mild mitral regurgitation and ejection fraction of 45%. Coronary angiography revealed a saccular aneurysm of the left main coronary artery with significant stenosis in the left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right coronary artery. The patient immediately underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and ligation of the aneurysm. At six months’ follow-up, he remained asymptomatic. PMID:27403190

  4. Spin precession in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raes, B.; Cummings, A. W.; Bonell, F.; Costache, M. V.; Sierra, J. F.; Roche, S.; Valenzuela, S. O.

    2017-02-01

    We generalize the diffusive model for spin injection and detection in nonlocal spin structures to account for spin precession under an applied magnetic field in an anisotropic medium, for which the spin lifetime is not unique and depends on the spin orientation. We demonstrate that the spin precession (Hanle) line shape is strongly dependent on the degree of anisotropy and on the orientation of the magnetic field. In particular, we show that the anisotropy of the spin lifetime can be extracted from the measured spin signal, after dephasing in an oblique magnetic field, by using an analytical formula with a single fitting parameter. Alternatively, after identifying the fingerprints associated with the anisotropy, we propose a simple scaling of the Hanle line shapes at specific magnetic field orientations that results in a universal curve only in the isotropic case. The deviation from the universal curve can be used as a complementary means of quantifying the anisotropy by direct comparison with the solution of our generalized model. Finally, we applied our model to graphene devices and find that the spin relaxation for graphene on silicon oxide is isotropic within our experimental resolution.

  5. Spin manipulation in nanoscale superconductors.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, D

    2016-04-27

    The interplay of superconductivity and magnetism in nanoscale structures has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to the exciting new physics created by the competition of these antagonistic ordering phenomena, and the prospect of exploiting this competition for superconducting spintronics devices. While much of the attention is focused on spin-polarized supercurrents created by the triplet proximity effect, the recent discovery of long range quasiparticle spin transport in high-field superconductors has rekindled interest in spin-dependent nonequilibrium properties of superconductors. In this review, the experimental situation on nonequilibrium spin injection into superconductors is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions of the field are outlined.

  6. The straintronic spin-neuron.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Ayan K; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-07-17

    In artificial neural networks, neurons are usually implemented with highly dissipative CMOS-based operational amplifiers. A more energy-efficient implementation is a 'spin-neuron' realized with a magneto-tunneling junction (MTJ) that is switched with a spin-polarized current (representing weighted sum of input currents) that either delivers a spin transfer torque or induces domain wall motion in the soft layer of the MTJ to mimic neuron firing. Here, we propose and analyze a different type of spin-neuron in which the soft layer of the MTJ is switched with mechanical strain generated by a voltage (representing weighted sum of input voltages) and term it straintronic spin-neuron. It dissipates orders of magnitude less energy in threshold operations than the traditional current-driven spin neuron at 0 K temperature and may even be faster. We have also studied the room-temperature firing behaviors of both types of spin neurons and find that thermal noise degrades the performance of both types, but the current-driven type is degraded much more than the straintronic type if both are optimized for maximum energy-efficiency. On the other hand, if both are designed to have the same level of thermal degradation, then the current-driven version will dissipate orders of magnitude more energy than the straintronic version. Thus, the straintronic spin-neuron is superior to current-driven spin neurons.

  7. Surface spin-valve effect.

    PubMed

    Yanson, I K; Naidyuk, Yu G; Fisun, V V; Konovalenko, A; Balkashin, O P; Triputen, L Yu; Korenivski, V

    2007-04-01

    We report an observation of spin-valve-like hysteresis within a few atomic layers at a ferromagnetic interface. We use phonon spectroscopy of nanometer-sized point contacts as an in situ probe to study the mechanism of the effect. Distinctive energy phonon peaks for contacts with dissimilar nonmagnetic outer electrodes allow localizing the observed spin switching to the top or bottom interfaces for nanometer thin ferromagnetic layers. The mechanism consistent with our data is energetically distinct atomically thin surface spin layers that can form current- or field-driven surface spin-valves within a single ferromagnetic film.

  8. Spin quasi-distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, M. O.; Wódkiewicz, K.

    1994-01-01

    Two-classes of phase-space spin quasi-distribution functions are introduced and discussed. The first class of these distributions is based on the delta function construction. It is shown that such a construction can be carried out for an arbitrary spin s and an arbitrary ordering of the spin operators. The second class of the spin distributions is constructed with the help of the spin coherent states. The connection of the spin coherent states to the Stratonovich formalism is established and discussed. It is shown that the c-number phase-space description of quantum fluctuations provides a simple statistical picture of quantum fluctuations of spinoperators in terms of random directions on a unit sphere. For quantum states of the spin system the statistics of these random orientations is given by non-positive spin quasi-distribution functions. It is shown that the application of these spin quasi-distribution functions to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations provide an insight into the quantum theory of measurement.

  9. RHIC spin program

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, G.

    1995-12-31

    Colliding beams of high energy polarized protons at RHIC is an excellent way to probe the polarization of gluons, u and d quarks in a polarized proton. RHIC is the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider being built now at Brookhaven in the ISABELLE tunnel. It is designed to collide gold ions on gold ions at 100 GeV/nucleon. Its goal is to discover the quark-gluon plasma, and the first collisions are expected in March, 1999. RHIC will also make an ideal polarized proton collider with high luminosity and 250 GeV x 250 GeV collisions. The RHIC spin physics program is: (1) Use well-understood perturbative QCD probes to study non-perturbative confining dynamics in QCD. We will measure - gluon and sea quark polarization in a polarized proton, polarization of quarks in a transversely polarized proton. (2) Look for additional surprises using the first high energy polarized proton collider. We will - look for the expected maximal parity violation in W and Z boson production, - search for parity violation in other processes, - test parton models with spin. This lecture is organized around a few of the key ideas: Siberian Snakes--What are they? High energy proton-proton collisions are scatters of quarks and leptons, at high x, a polarized proton beam is a beam of polarized u quarks, quark and gluon collisions are very sensitive to spin. We will discuss two reactions: how direct photon production measures gluon polarization, and how W{sup +} boson production measures u and d quark polarization.

  10. Unusual spin transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovcharenko, V. I.; Fokin, S. V.; Romanenko, G. V.; Ikorskii, V. N.; Tretyakov, E. V.; Vasilevsky, S. F.; Sagdeev, R. Z.

    New heterospin complexes of Cu(hfac) 2 (hfac, hexafluoroacetylacetonate) with pyrazole-substituted nitronyl nitroxides have been found that in the solid state exhibit thermally induced spin transitions analogous to spin crossover. For the first complex, [Cu(hfac) 2 L i-Pr ], at room temperature, the Cu - O L distances, where O L is the oxygen atom of the nitroxyl group, are very short (2.143 Å). This leads to a strong antiferromagnetic exchange (~-120 cm -1 ) in the > N - •O - Cu 2+ - O •- N< exchange clusters. The CuO 6 coordination units formed by four O atoms of the two hfac anions and by the nitroxyl O atoms of the two bridging nitroxides have a rare form of flattened octahedra, transformed at low temperatures into elongated octahedra with shorter Cu - O L distances (2.143 Å ⇔2.002 Å) and two longer Cu - O hfac distances (2.130 Å ⇔2.293 Å). For the second complex, [Cu(hfac) 2 L Bu ·0.5C 6 H 14 ], unusual low temperature structural dynamics of heterospin systems have been found. It is characterized by the formation of two types of CuO 6 unit. The axial Cu - O L distances are lengthened in one unit (2.250 Å 2.347 Å) and shortened in the other (2.250 Å ⇔2.006 Å). This leads to a sophisticated μeff ( T ) dependence with μeff drastically decreased at 163 K as a result of full coupling of two spins in half of all >N - •O - Cu 2+ - O •- N< exchange clusters and to a shift from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic exchange in the other half.

  11. Anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a heart defect. The left coronary artery (LCA), which carries blood to the heart muscle, begins ... not attach correctly. In the normal heart, the LCA originates from the aorta. It supplies oxygen-rich ...

  12. Spin Resonance Strength Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courant, E. D.

    2009-08-01

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  13. Spin waves in the (

    SciTech Connect

    Lipscombe, O. J.; Chen, G. F.; Fang, Chen; Perring, T. G.; Abernathy, Douglas L; Christianson, Andrew D; Egami, Takeshi; Wang, Nanlin; Hu, Jiangping; Dai, Pengcheng

    2011-01-01

    We use neutron scattering to show that spin waves in the iron chalcogenide Fe{sub 1.05}Te display novel dispersion clearly different from both the first principles density functional calculations and recent observations in the related iron pnictide CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. By fitting to a Heisenberg Hamiltonian, we find that although the nearest-neighbor exchange couplings in the two systems are quite different, their next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) couplings are similar. This suggests that superconductivity in the pnictides and chalcogenides share a common magnetic origin that is intimately associated with the NNN magnetic coupling between the irons.

  14. Middle-colic artery aneurysm associated with segmental arterial mediolysis, successfully managed by transcatheter arterial embolization: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Takahisa; Sawai, Hirozumi; Yamada, Koji; Wakasugi, Takehiro; Takeyama, Hiromitsu; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Arai, Yasuaki

    2009-01-01

    An aneurysm of the middle-colic artery, associated with segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM), is a rare condition. This report describes a case of a middle-colic artery aneurysm that was associated with SAM. A 57-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of severe abdominal pain. A rupture of a middle-colic artery aneurysm was diagnosed by computed tomography, and angiography showed that it may have been associated with SAM. The ruptured aneurysm was successfully treated with transcatheter arterial embolization. Transcatheter arterial embolization might be one of the best treatments for such a complicated aneurysm occurring in a visceral artery.

  15. Determination of the Pt spin diffusion length by spin-pumping and spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Pearson, John E.; Hoffmann, Axel; Vlaminck, Vincent; Divan, Ralu; Bader, Samuel D.

    2013-12-09

    The spin diffusion length of Pt at room temperature and at 8 K is experimentally determined via spin pumping and spin Hall effect in permalloy/Pt bilayers. Voltages generated during excitation of ferromagnetic resonance from the inverse spin Hall effect and anisotropic magnetoresistance effect were investigated with a broadband approach. Varying the Pt layer thickness gives rise to an evolution of the voltage line shape due to the superposition of the above two effects. By studying the ratio of the two voltage components with the Pt layer thickness, the spin diffusion length of Pt can be directly extracted. We obtain a spin diffusion length of ∼1.2 nm at room temperature and ∼1.6 nm at 8 K.

  16. Coherent manipulation of nuclear spins using spin injection from a half-metallic spin source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Tetsuya; Akiho, Takafumi; Ebina, Yuya; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that uses spin injection from a highly polarized spin source. Efficient spin injection into GaAs from a half-metallic spin source of Mn-rich Co2MnSi enabled an efficient dynamic nuclear polarization of Ga and As nuclei in GaAs and a sensitive detection of NMR signals. Moreover, coherent control of nuclear spins, or the Rabi oscillation between two quantum levels formed at Ga nuclei, induced by a pulsed NMR has been demonstrated at a relatively low magnetic field of ˜0.1 T. This provides a novel all-electrical solid-state NMR system with the high spatial resolution and high sensitivity needed to implement scalable nuclear-spin based qubits.

  17. Spin-SILC: CMB polarization component separation with spin wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Keir K.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Leistedt, Boris; McEwen, Jason D.; Pontzen, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    We present Spin-SILC, a new foreground component separation method that accurately extracts the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization E and B modes from raw multifrequency Stokes Q and U measurements of the microwave sky. Spin-SILC is an internal linear combination method that uses spin wavelets to analyse the spin-2 polarization signal P = Q + iU. The wavelets are additionally directional (non-axisymmetric). This allows different morphologies of signals to be separated and therefore the cleaning algorithm is localized using an additional domain of information. The advantage of spin wavelets over standard scalar wavelets is to simultaneously and self-consistently probe scales and directions in the polarization signal P = Q + iU and in the underlying E and B modes, therefore providing the ability to perform component separation and E-B decomposition concurrently for the first time. We test Spin-SILC on full-mission Planck simulations and data and show the capacity to correctly recover the underlying cosmological E and B modes. We also demonstrate a strong consistency of our CMB maps with those derived from existing component separation methods. Spin-SILC can be combined with the pseudo- and pure E-B spin wavelet estimators presented in a companion paper to reliably extract the cosmological signal in the presence of complicated sky cuts and noise. Therefore, it will provide a computationally efficient method to accurately extract the CMB E and B modes for future polarization experiments.

  18. Tensor spin observables and spin stucture at low Q2

    SciTech Connect

    Slifer, Karl J.

    2015-04-01

    We discuss recent spin structure results from Jefferson Lab, and outline an emerging program to study tensor spin observables using solid deuteron targets. These new experiments open the potential to study hidden color, the tensor nature of short range correlations, and to probe for exotic gluonic states.

  19. Electrically-induced Spin Coherence by Ultrafast Electrical Spin Injection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beschoten, B.; Schreiber, L.; Moritz, J.; Schwark, C.; Guentherodt, G.; Lou, X.; Crowell, P.; Adelmann, C.; Palmstrom, C.

    2008-03-01

    Efficient electrical spin injection from a ferromagnet into a semiconductor has been demonstrated for various material systems by steady-state experiments. We introduce a novel time-resolved technique based on electrical pumping and optical probing. As a pump we apply ultrafast current pulses (˜200ps) to electrically inject spin packets from an iron layer through a reverse biased Schottky barrier into a n-GaAs layer. Spin coherence in the semiconductor is probed by subsequent spin precession in a transverse magnetic field using time-resolved Faraday rotation. We observe spin precession for current pulse widths down to 200 ps. The spin polarization of the spin packets is directly measured by Faraday rotation and is found to increase linearly with the current pulse width for pulses shorter than 3 ns at small magnetic fields. This finding together with independent measurements of the samples' high frequency bandwidth indicate that even shorter than 200 ps pulses might be used for generating coherent spin currents in our devices. Work supported by BMBF, DFG and HGF.

  20. Spin-spin and spin-orbit interactions in nanographene fragments: a quantum chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Perumal, S; Minaev, B; Ågren, H

    2012-03-14

    The relativistic behavior of graphene structures, starting from the fundamental building blocks--the poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) along with other PAH nanographenes--is studied to quantify any associated intrinsic magnetism in the triplet (T) state and subsequently in the ground singlet (S) state with account of possible S-T mixture induced by spin-orbit coupling (SOC). We employ a first principle quantum chemical-based approach and density functional theory (DFT) for a systematic treatment of the spin-Hamiltonian by considering both the spin-orbit and spin-spin interactions as dependent on different numbers of benzene rings. We assess these relativistic spin-coupling phenomena in terms of splitting parameters which cause magnetic anisotropy in absence of external perturbations. Possible routes for changes in the couplings in terms of doping and defects are also simulated and discussed. Accounting for the artificial character of the broken-symmetry solutions for strong spin polarization of the so-called "singlet open-shell" ground state in zigzag graphene nanoribbons predicted by spin-unrestricted DFT approaches, we interpolate results from more sophisticated methods for the S-T gaps and spin-orbit coupling (SOC) integrals and find that these spin interactions become weak as function of size and increasing decoupling of electrons at the edges. This leads to reduced electron spin-spin interaction and hence almost negligible intrinsic magnetism in the carbon-based PAHs and carbon nanographene fragments. Our results are in agreement with the fact that direct experimental evidence of edge magnetism in pristine graphene has been reported so far. We support the notion that magnetism in graphene only can be ascribed to structural defects or impurities.

  1. [Spin-spin interaction upon introduction of a spin label into immunoglobulins M and G at the carbohydrate moiety].

    PubMed

    Timofeev, V P; Nikol'skiĭ, D O; Lapuk, V A; Aleshkin, V A

    2002-01-01

    By spin labeling the monoclonal IgM and normal IgG at the carbohydrate moiety with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-aminopiperidine-1-oxyl, preparations were obtained whose ESR spectra indicate rapid exchange spin-spin interactions between two spin labels. It was shown that, in the case of spin-labeled IgM, this spectrum is determined by a glycopeptide noncovalently bound to IgM, which incorporates two spin labels.

  2. Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  3. Pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Günther, Sven; Dorfmüller, Peter; Perros, Frédéric; Girerd, Barbara; Garcia, Gilles; Jaïs, Xavier; Savale, Laurent; Artaud-Macari, Elise; Price, Laura C; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2013-07-06

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  4. Novel itinerant transverse spin waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, John Delaney

    In 1956, Lev Davidovich Landau put forth his theory on systems of interacting fermions, or fermi liquids. A year later, Viktor Pavlovich Silin described spin waves that such a system of fermions would support. The treatment of the contribution of the molecular field to the spin wave dispersion was a novel aspect of these spin waves. Silin predicted that there would exist a hierarchy of spin waves in a fermi liquid, one for each component of the spherical harmonic expansion of the fermi surface. In 1968, Anthony J. Leggett and Michael J. Rice derived from fermi liquid theory how the behavior of the spin diffusion coefficient of a fermi liquid could be directly experimentally observable via the spin echo effect [24]. Their prediction, that the diffusion coefficient of a fermi liquid would not decay exponentially with temperature, but rather would have a maximum at some non-zero temperature, was a direct consequence of the fermi liquid molecular field and spin wave phenomena, and this was corroborated by experiment in 1971 by Corruccini, et al. [13]. A parallel advancement in the theory of fermi liquid spin waves came with the extension of the theory to describe weak ferromagnetic metals. In 1959, Alexei Abrikosov and I. E. Dzyaloshiski put forth a theoretical description of a ferromagnetic fermi liquid [1]. In 2001, Kevin Bedell and Krastan Blagoev showed that a non-trivial contribution to the dispersion of the ferromagnetic current spin wave arises from the necessary consideration of higher harmonic moments in the distortion of the fermi surface from its ground state [8]. In the chapters to follow, the author presents new results for transverse spin waves in a fermi liquid, which arise from a novel ground state of a fermi liquid-one in which an l = 1 harmonic distortion exists in the ground state polarization. It is shown that such an instability can lead to spin waves with dispersions that are characterized by a linear dependence on the wave number at long

  5. A log-linearized arterial viscoelastic model for evaluation of the carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Harutoyo; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Kutluk, Abdugheni; Kurita, Yuichi; Ukawa, Teiji; Nakamura, Ryuji; Saeki, Noboru; Higashi, Yukihito; Kawamoto, Masashi; Yoshizumi, Masao; Tsuji, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for qualitatively estimating the mechanical properties of arterial walls on a beat-to-beat basis through noninvasive measurement of continuous arterial pressure and arterial diameter using an ultrasonic device. First, in order to describe the nonlinear relationships linking arterial pressure waveforms and arterial diameter waveforms as well as the viscoelastic characteristics of arteries, we developed a second-order nonlinear model (called the log-linearized arterial viscoelastic model) to allow estimation of arterial wall viscoelasticity. Next, to verify the validity of the proposed method, the viscoelastic indices of the carotid artery were estimated. The results showed that the proposed model can be used to accurately approximate the mechanical properties of arterial walls. It was therefore deemed suitable for qualitative evaluation of arterial viscoelastic properties based on noninvasive measurement of arterial pressure and arterial diameter.

  6. Single spin relaxometry of spin noise from a ferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casola, Francesco; van der Sar, Toeno; Walsworth, Ronald; Yacoby, Amir

    2015-03-01

    The introduction of new schemes for the measurement of spatially resolved dynamic magnetic properties of strongly correlated electrons is essential for the study of condensed matter magnetism and the development of novel spintronic devices. Here we show the possibility to detect the magnetic spin noise produced by a thin (~ 30 nm) layer of a patterned micro-sized ferromagnet (Ni81Fe19) by optical initialization and read-out of the single spin state of a nearby nitrogen vacancy center (NV) in diamond. For the interpretation of our results, we develop a general framework describing single-spin stray field detection in terms of a filter function sensitive mostly to spin fluctuations with wavevector ~ 1 / d , where d is the NV-ferromagnet distance. Our results pave the way towards quantitative and non-perturbative detection of spectral properties in nanomagnets, establishing NV center magnetometry as an emergent probe of collective spin dynamics in condensed matter.

  7. Disorder-Induced Quantum Spin Liquid in Spin Ice Pyrochlores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savary, Lucile; Balents, Leon

    2017-02-01

    We propose that in a certain class of magnetic materials, known as non-Kramers "spin ice," disorder induces quantum entanglement. Instead of driving glassy behavior, disorder provokes quantum superpositions of spins throughout the system and engenders an associated emergent gauge structure and set of fractional excitations. More precisely, disorder transforms a classical phase governed by a large entropy, classical spin ice, into a quantum spin liquid governed by entanglement. As the degree of disorder is increased, the system transitions between (i) a "regular" Coulombic spin liquid, (ii) a phase known as "Mott glass," which contains rare gapless regions in real space, but whose behavior on long length scales is only modified quantitatively, and (iii) a true glassy phase for random distributions with large width or large mean amplitude.

  8. Unconventional spin texture in a noncentrosymmetric quantum spin Hall insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mera Acosta, C.; Babilonia, O.; Abdalla, L.; Fazzio, A.

    2016-07-01

    We propose that the simultaneous presence of both Rashba and band inversion can lead to a Rashba-like spin splitting formed by two bands with the same in-plane helical spin texture. Because of this unconventional spin texture, the backscattering is forbidden in edge and bulk conductivity channels. We propose a noncentrosymmetric honeycomb-lattice quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulator family formed by the IV, V, and VII elements with this property. The system formed by Bi, Pb, and I atoms is mechanically stable and has both a large Rashba spin splitting of 60 meV and a large nontrivial band gap of 0.14 eV. Since the edge and the bulk states are protected by the time-reversal (TR) symmetry, contrary to what happens in most doped QSH insulators, the bulk states do not contribute to the backscattering in the electronic transport, allowing the construction of a spintronic device with less energy loss.

  9. Spin injection and spin transport in paramagnetic insulators

    DOE PAGES

    Okamoto, Satoshi

    2016-02-22

    We investigate the spin injection and the spin transport in paramagnetic insulators described by simple Heisenberg interactions using auxiliary particle methods. Some of these methods allow access to both paramagnetic states above magnetic transition temperatures and magnetic states at low temperatures. It is predicted that the spin injection at an interface with a normal metal is rather insensitive to temperatures above the magnetic transition temperature. On the other hand below the transition temperature, it decreases monotonically and disappears at zero temperature. We also analyze the bulk spin conductance. We show that the conductance becomes zero at zero temperature as predictedmore » by linear spin wave theory but increases with temperature and is maximized around the magnetic transition temperature. These findings suggest that the compromise between the two effects determines the optimal temperature for spintronics applications utilizing magnetic insulators.« less

  10. Spin injection and spin transport in paramagnetic insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Satoshi

    2016-02-22

    We investigate the spin injection and the spin transport in paramagnetic insulators described by simple Heisenberg interactions using auxiliary particle methods. Some of these methods allow access to both paramagnetic states above magnetic transition temperatures and magnetic states at low temperatures. It is predicted that the spin injection at an interface with a normal metal is rather insensitive to temperatures above the magnetic transition temperature. On the other hand below the transition temperature, it decreases monotonically and disappears at zero temperature. We also analyze the bulk spin conductance. We show that the conductance becomes zero at zero temperature as predicted by linear spin wave theory but increases with temperature and is maximized around the magnetic transition temperature. These findings suggest that the compromise between the two effects determines the optimal temperature for spintronics applications utilizing magnetic insulators.

  11. Spin current draining effect on heat-driven spin transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yadong; Yang, Bowen; Tang, Chi; Jiang, Zilong; Shi, Jing; Schneider, Michael; Whig, Renu

    As a non-magnetic heavy metal is attached to a ferromagnet, a vertically flowing heat-driven spin current is converted to a transverse electric voltage, which is known as the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect. If the ferromagnet is a metal, this voltage is also accompanied by voltages from two other sources, i.e. the anomalous Nernst effect in both the ferromagnet and the proximity-induced ferromagnetic boundary layer. In this work, we have investigated these phenomena in NiFe/Cu/heavy metal multilayer structure. By identifying and carefully separating those effects, we find that in this pure spin current circuit the additional spin current drawn by the heavy metal generates another voltage in the ferromagnetic metal via the inverse spin Hall effect. The research was supported by the DOE BES Award #DE-FG02-07ER46351 and DARPA/DMEA under H94003-10-2-1004.

  12. Spin slush in an extended spin ice model

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Jeffrey G.; Gingras, Michel J. P.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new classical spin liquid on the pyrochlore lattice by extending spin ice with further neighbour interactions. We find that this disorder-free spin model exhibits a form of dynamical heterogeneity with extremely slow relaxation for some spins, while others fluctuate quickly down to zero temperature. We thus call this state spin slush, in analogy to the heterogeneous mixture of solid and liquid water. This behaviour is driven by the structure of the ground-state manifold which extends the celebrated two-in/two-out ice states to include branching structures built from three-in/one-out, three-out/one-in and all-in/all-out tetrahedra defects. Distinctive liquid-like patterns in the magnetic correlations serve as a signature of this intermediate range order. Possible applications to materials as well the effects of quantum tunnelling are discussed. PMID:27470199

  13. Spin dynamics of polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle in multiple spin systems.

    PubMed

    Gan, Z

    2000-03-01

    Polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA) [J. Magn. Reson. A 109, 270 (1994)] is an important experiment in NMR structural characterization of membrane proteins in oriented lipid bilayers. This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study of the spin dynamics in PISEMA to investigate the line-narrowing mechanism. The study focuses on the effect of neighboring protons on the spin exchange of a strongly coupled spin pair. The spin exchange is solved analytically for simple spin systems and is numerically simulated for many-spin systems. The results show that the dipolar couplings from the neighboring protons of a strongly coupled spin pair perturb the spin exchange only in the second order, therefore it has little contribution to the linewidth of PISEMA spectra in comparison to the separated-local-field spectra. The effects from proton resonance offset and the mismatch of the Hartmann-Hahn condition are also discussed along with experimental results using model single-crystal samples.

  14. SAMPEX Spin Stabilized Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Dean C.; Markley, F. Landis; Watson, Todd P.

    2008-01-01

    The Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX), the first of the Small Explorer series of spacecraft, was launched on July 3, 1992 into an 82' inclination orbit with an apogee of 670 km and a perigee of 520 km and a mission lifetime goal of 3 years. After more than 15 years of continuous operation, the reaction wheel began to fail on August 18,2007. With a set of three magnetic torquer bars being the only remaining attitude actuator, the SAMPEX recovery team decided to deviate from its original attitude control system design and put the spacecraft into a spin stabilized mode. The necessary operations had not been used for many years, which posed a challenge. However, on September 25, 2007, the spacecraft was successfully spun up to 1.0 rpm about its pitch axis, which points at the sun. This paper describes the diagnosis of the anomaly, the analysis of flight data, the simulation of the spacecraft dynamics, and the procedures used to recover the spacecraft to spin stabilized mode.

  15. Snakes and spin rotators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    1990-06-18

    The generalized snake configuration offers advantages of either shorter total snake length and smaller orbit displacement in the compact configuration or the multi-functions in the split configuration. We found that the compact configuration can save about 10% of the total length of a snake. On other hand, the spilt snake configuration can be used both as a snake and as a spin rotator for the helicity state. Using the orbit compensation dipoles, the spilt snake configuration can be located at any distance on both sides of the interaction point of a collider provided that there is no net dipole rotation between two halves of the snake. The generalized configuration is then applied to the partial snake excitation. Simple formula have been obtained to understand the behavior of the partial snake. Similar principle can also be applied to the spin rotators. We also estimate the possible snake imperfections are due to various construction errors of the dipole magnets. Accuracy of field error of better than 10{sup {minus}4} will be significant. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Magnetar Spin-Down.

    PubMed

    Harding; Contopoulos; Kazanas

    1999-11-10

    We examine the effects of a relativistic wind on the spin-down of a neutron star and apply our results to the study of soft gamma repeaters (SGRs), which are thought to be neutron stars with magnetic fields greater than 1014 G. We derive a spin-down formula that includes torques from both dipole radiation and episodic or continuous particle winds. We find that if SGR 1806-20 puts out a continuous particle wind of 1037 ergs s-1, then the pulsar age is consistent with that of the supernova remnant, but the derived surface dipole magnetic field is only 3x1013 G, in the range of normal radio pulsars. If instead the particle wind flows are episodic with small duty cycle, then the observed period derivatives imply magnetar-strength fields, while still allowing characteristic ages within a factor of 2 of the estimated supernova remnant age. Close monitoring of the periods of SGRs will allow us to establish or place limits on the wind duty cycle and thus the magnetic field and age of the neutron star.

  17. Spin-noise correlations and spin-noise exchange driven by low-field spin-exchange collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellis, A. T.; Loulakis, M.; Kominis, I. K.

    2014-09-01

    The physics of spin-exchange collisions have fueled several discoveries in fundamental physics and numerous applications in medical imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance. We report on the experimental observation and theoretical justification of spin-noise exchange, the transfer of spin noise from one atomic species to another. The signature of spin-noise exchange is an increase of the total spin-noise power at low magnetic fields, on the order of 1 mG, where the two-species spin-noise resonances overlap. The underlying physical mechanism is the two-species spin-noise correlation induced by spin-exchange collisions.

  18. Enhanced spin polarization in graphene with spin energy gap induced by spin-orbit coupling and strain

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zheng-Fang; Wu, Qing-Ping E-mail: aixichen@ecjtu.jx.cn; Chen, Ai-Xi E-mail: aixichen@ecjtu.jx.cn; Xiao, Xian-Bo; Liu, Nian-Hua

    2014-05-28

    We investigate the possibility of spin polarization in graphene. The result shows that a spin energy gap can be opened in the presence of both spin-orbit coupling and strain. We find that high spin polarization with large spin-polarized current is achieved in the spin energy gap. However, only one of the two modulations is present, no spin polarization can be generated. So the combination of the two modulations provides a way to design tunable spin polarization without need for a magnetic element or an external magnetic field.

  19. Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents ... this depends on which arteries are affected. Coronary Arteries Coronary arteries supply oxygen-rich blood to the ...

  20. Update in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mejía Chew, C R; Alcolea Batres, S; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2016-11-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare and progressive disease that mainly affects the pulmonary arterioles (precapillary), regardless of the triggering aetiology. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension in Spain is estimated at 19.2 and 16 cases per million inhabitants, respectively. The diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension is based on haemodynamic criteria (mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25mmHg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤15mmHg and pulmonary vascular resistance >3 Wood units) and therefore requires the implementation of right cardiac catheterisation. Sequential therapy with a single drug has been used in clinical practice. However, recent European guidelines recommend combined initial therapy in some situations. This review conducts a critical update of our knowledge of this disease according to the latest guidelines and recommendations.

  1. About Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CAD). Both PAD and CAD are caused by atherosclerosis that narrows and blocks arteries in various critical ... can be managed with lifestyle changes and medication . Atherosclerosis and PAD Atherosclerosis is a disease in which ...

  2. Twist buckling behavior of arteries.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Justin R; Lamm, Shawn D; Han, Hai-Chao

    2013-10-01

    Arteries are often subjected to torsion due to body movement and surgical procedures. While it is essential that arteries remain stable and patent under twisting loads, the stability of arteries under torsion is poorly understood. The goal of this work was to experimentally investigate the buckling behavior of arteries under torsion and to determine the critical buckling torque, the critical buckling twist angle, and the buckling shape. Porcine common carotid arteries were slowly twisted in vitro until buckling occurred while subjected to a constant axial stretch ratio (1.1, 1.3, 1.5 (in vivo level) and 1.7) and lumen pressure (20, 40, 70 and 100 mmHg). Upon buckling, the arteries snapped to form a kink. For a group of six arteries, the axial stretch ratio significantly affected the critical buckling torque ([Formula: see text]) and the critical buckling twist angle ([Formula: see text]). Lumen pressure also significantly affected the critical buckling torque ([Formula: see text]) but had no significant effect on the critical twist angle ([Formula: see text]). Convex material constants for a Fung strain energy function were determined and fit well with the axial force, lumen pressure, and torque data measured pre-buckling. The material constants are valid for axial stretch ratios, lumen pressures, and rotation angles of 1.3-1.5, 20-100 mmHg, and 0-270[Formula: see text], respectively. The current study elucidates the buckling behavior of arteries under torsion and provides new insight into mechanical instability of blood vessels.

  3. Twist Buckling Behavior of Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Justin R.; Lamm, Shawn D.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2012-01-01

    Arteries are often subjected to torsion due to body movement and surgical procedures. While it is essential that arteries remain stable and patent under twisting loads, the stability of arteries under torsion is poorly understood. The goal of this work was to experimentally investigate the buckling behavior of arteries under torsion and to determine the critical buckling torque, the critical buckling twist angle, and the buckling shape. Porcine common carotid arteries were slowly twisted in vitro until buckling occurred while subjected to a constant axial stretch ratio (1.1, 1.3, 1.5 (in vivo level), and 1.7) and lumen pressure (20, 40, 70, and 100 mmHg). Upon buckling, the arteries snapped to form a kink. For a group of six arteries, the axial stretch ratio significantly affected the critical buckling torque (p < 0.002) and the critical buckling twist angle (p < 0.001). Lumen pressure also significantly affected the critical buckling torque (p < 0.001) but had no significant effect on the critical twist angle (p = 0.067). Convex material constants for a Fung strain energy function were determined and fit well with the axial force, lumen pressure, and torque data measured pre-buckling. The material constants are valid for axial stretch ratios, lumen pressures, and rotation angles of 1.3 – 1.5, 20 – 100 mmHg, and 0 – 270 degrees, respectively. The current study elucidates the buckling behavior of arteries under torsion and provides new insight into mechanical instability of blood vessels. PMID:23160845

  4. SpinSat Mission Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Nitinol antennae are stowed in a shallow groove along the equator of SpinSat. Each antenna is 7.5” long from the tip to the surface of SpinSat and is...antenna material is made of nitinol , a flexible metal alloy that can maintain a straight shape and can be stowed with tight bends. The antennas will be

  5. Spin Changing Collisions of Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zygelman, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    We discuss spin changing collisions of hydrogen atoms. Employing a fully quantal theory we calculate and present new collision data. We discuss the respective roles of spin exchange and long range magnetic interactions in collisonal redistribution of sub-level populations. The calculated atomic data is needed for accurate modeling of 21 cm line emission/absorption by primordial hydrogen in the early universe.

  6. Electron Spin and Its History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commins, Eugene D.

    2012-11-01

    The history of electron spin is summarized. Topics include the discovery of electron spin, the birth of quantum electrodynamics, the invention of magnetic resonance, the invention of renormalization, the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron in experiment and theory, and searches for the electron electric dipole moment.

  7. Invariant Spin in the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Anthony W.

    2008-10-13

    We discuss recent theoretical progress in understanding the distribution of spin and orbital angular momentum in the proton. Particular attention is devoted to the effect of QCD evolution and to the distinction between 'chiral' and 'invariant' spin. This is particularly significant with respect to the possible presence of polarized strange quarks.

  8. Spin transport in hydrogenated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano, David; Van Tuan, Dinh; M-M Dubois, Simon; Gmitra, Martin; Cummings, Aron W.; Kochan, Denis; Ortmann, Frank; Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Fabian, Jaroslav; Roche, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    In this review we discuss the multifaceted problem of spin transport in hydrogenated graphene from a theoretical perspective. The current experimental findings suggest that hydrogenation can either increase or decrease spin lifetimes, which calls for clarification. We first discuss the spin-orbit coupling induced by local σ -π re-hybridization and {s}{{{p}}3} C-H defect formation together with the formation of a local magnetic moment. First-principles calculations of hydrogenated graphene unravel the strong interplay of spin-orbit and exchange couplings. The concept of magnetic scattering resonances, recently introduced by Kochan et al (2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 112 116602) is revisited by describing the local magnetism through the self-consistent Hubbard model in the mean field approximation in the dilute limit, while spin relaxation lengths and transport times are computed using an efficient real space order N wavepacket propagation method. Typical spin lifetimes on the order of 1 ns are obtained for 1 ppm of hydrogen impurities (corresponding to a transport time of about 50 ps), and the scaling of spin lifetimes with impurity density is described by the Elliott-Yafet mechanism. This reinforces the statement that local defect-induced magnetism can be at the origin of the substantial spin polarization loss in the clean graphene limit.

  9. Quantum Spin Liquids and Fractionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misguich, Grégoire

    This chapter discusses quantum antiferromagnets which do not break any symmetries at zero temperature - also called "spin liquids" - and focuses on lattice spin models with Heisenberg-like (i.e. SU(2)-symmetric) interactions in dimensions larger than one. We begin by discussing the Lieb-Schultz-Mattis theorem and its recent extension to D > 1 by Hastings (2004), which establishes an important distinction between spin liquids with an integer and with a half-integer spin per unit cell. Spin liquids of the first kind, "band insulators", can often be understood by elementary means, whereas the latter, "Mott insulators", are more complex (featuring "topological order") and support spin-1/2 excitations (spinons). The fermionic formalism (Affleck and Marston, 1988) is described and the effect of fluctuations about mean-field solutions, such as the possible creation of instabilities, is discussed in a qualitative way. In particular, we explain the emergence of gauge modes and their relation to fractionalization. The concept of the projective symmetry group (X.-G. Wen, 2002) is introduced, with the aid of some examples. Finally, we present the phenomenology of (gapped) short-ranged resonating-valence-bond spin liquids, and make contact with the fermionic approach by discussing their description in terms of a fluctuating Z 2 gauge field. Some recent references are given to other types of spin liquid, including gapless ones.

  10. Recent Development in Proton Spin Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2008-12-10

    In the naive model of the proton, its 1/2 spin is carried by its quark constituents. However, experiments over the last several decades have shown that the quark spin only contribute a small portion of the proton spin. In this talk, I will present recent developments exploring this proton spin puzzle, and focus on the progress made in the last few years on the longitudinal spin physics, the generalized parton distribution physics, and the transverse spin physics.

  11. [Ageing of the arterial wall].

    PubMed

    Hanon, O

    2006-11-01

    Several mechanisms are implicated in the arterial wall changes due to ageing: ageing, hypertension and atherosclerosis. Although the changes related to ageing (arteriosclerosis) have many factors in common with those induced by hypertension, they differ from those caused by atherosclerosis although commonly associated. Arteriosclerosis causes a diffuse increase of the rigidity of the large arteries by disease of the media, the main clinical manifestation of which is the increase in pulsed pressure. This arterial "hyperpulsability" contributes to a defect in coupling between the heart and the blood vessels which results in an increase in the pulsatile load of the left ventricle and to left ventricular hypertrophy and decreased coronary perfusion. Atherosclerosis seems more of a localised scarring phenomenon of the arterial wall which is exposed to a series of chronic aggressions characterised by deposits of lipids in the intima and whose main complication is thrombosis. Although these two processes may be associated, or interact one with the other, they are clearly different in nature. Therefore, atherosclerosis is a localised disease resulting in a decrease in arterial lumen, quite different from arteriosclerosis which is a diffuse, physiological condition which leads to an increase in the arterial lumen.

  12. Arterial Stiffness and Cardiovascular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Janić, Miodrag; Lunder, Mojca; Šabovič, Mišo

    2014-01-01

    The world population is aging and the number of old people is continuously increasing. Arterial structure and function change with age, progressively leading to arterial stiffening. Arterial stiffness is best characterized by measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV), which is its surrogate marker. It has been shown that PWV could improve cardiovascular event prediction in models that included standard risk factors. Consequently, it might therefore enable better identification of populations at high-risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The present review is focused on a survey of different pharmacological therapeutic options for decreasing arterial stiffness. The influence of several groups of drugs is described: antihypertensive drugs (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, calcium channel blockers, beta-blockers, diuretics, and nitrates), statins, peroral antidiabetics, advanced glycation end-products (AGE) cross-link breakers, anti-inflammatory drugs, endothelin-A receptor antagonists, and vasopeptidase inhibitors. All of these have shown some effect in decreasing arterial stiffness. Nevertheless, further studies are needed which should address the influence of arterial stiffness diminishment on major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE). PMID:25170513

  13. Spin Pumping in Ferromagnetic Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro; Imamura, Hiroshi

    We present a brief review of our recent study on spin pumping in ferromagnetic multilayers. First, we present theoretical models describing spin pumping induced by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Then we apply the spin-pumping theory to FMR in ferromagnetic multilayers and show that the line width of the FMR spectrum depends on the thickness of the ferromagnetic metal layer which is not in resonance. We also show that the penetration depths of transverse spin current in ferromagnetic metals can be determined by analyzing the line width of the FMR spectrum. The obtained penetration depths of the transverse spin current were 3.7 nm for Py, 2.5 nm for CoFe, 12.0 nm for CoFeB, and 1.7 nm for Co, respectively.

  14. Spin-3 topologically massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Long, Jiang; Wu, Jun-bao

    2011-11-01

    In this Letter, we study the spin-3 topologically massive gravity (TMG), paying special attention to its properties at the chiral point. We propose an action describing the higher spin fields coupled to TMG. We discuss the traceless spin-3 fluctuations around the AdS3 vacuum and find that there is an extra local massive mode, besides the left-moving and right-moving boundary massless modes. At the chiral point, such extra mode becomes massless and degenerates with the left-moving mode. We show that at the chiral point the only degrees of freedom in the theory are the boundary right-moving graviton and spin-3 field. We conjecture that spin-3 chiral gravity with generalized Brown-Henneaux boundary condition is holographically dual to 2D chiral CFT with classical W3 algebra and central charge cR = 3 l / G.

  15. Spin Filtering in Storage Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, N. N.; Pavlov, F. F.

    The spin filtering in storage rings is based on a multiple passage of a stored beam through a polarized internal gas target. Apart from the polarization by the spin-dependent transmission, a unique geometrical feature of interaction with the target in such a filtering process, pointed out by H.O. Meyer,1 is a scattering of stored particles within the beam. A rotation of the spin in the scattering process affects the polarization buildup. We derive here a quantum-mechanical evolution equation for the spin-density matrix of a stored beam which incorporates the scattering within the beam. We show how the interplay of the transmission and scattering within the beam changes from polarized electrons to polarized protons in the atomic target. After discussions of the FILTEX results on the filtering of stored protons,2 we comment on the strategy of spin filtering of antiprotons for the PAX experiment at GSI FAIR.3.

  16. Theory of the spin Seebeck effect.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Hiroto; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Saitoh, Eiji; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2013-03-01

    The spin Seebeck effect refers to the generation of a spin voltage caused by a temperature gradient in a ferromagnet, which enables the thermal injection of spin currents from the ferromagnet into an attached nonmagnetic metal over a macroscopic scale of several millimeters. The inverse spin Hall effect converts the injected spin current into a transverse charge voltage, thereby producing electromotive force as in the conventional charge Seebeck device. Recent theoretical and experimental efforts have shown that the magnon and phonon degrees of freedom play crucial roles in the spin Seebeck effect. In this paper, we present the theoretical basis for understanding the spin Seebeck effect and briefly discuss other thermal spin effects.

  17. Spin transport in Au films: An investigation by spin pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Eric; Kardasz, Bartek; Burrowes, Capucine; Huttema, Wendell; Girt, Erol; Heinrich, Bret

    2012-04-01

    The thickness and temperature dependence of spin transport in Au has been investigated in multilayer films via the spin pumping effect. To study spin transport in Au, single layer GaAs/16Fe/(d)Au(001) and double layer GaAs/16Fe/(d)Au/12Fe/20Au(001) were investigated using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), where d = 20, 300, and the numerals preceding Fe and Au indicate the layer thickness in atomic layers (AL). FMR measurements were performed at frequencies ranging from 27.3 to 40.6 GHz and at temperatures ranging from 88 to 295 K. By measuring the total Gilbert damping in the 16Fe layer as a function of d and temperature for both single and double magnetic layer structures and by utilizing the spin diffusion equation, one is able to determine the spin mixing conductance, g↑↓, at the Fe/Au interface, and the spin flip relaxation time, τsf, in Au as a function of temperature. The temperature dependence of the momentum relaxation time, τm, in Au was measured independently by means of electron transport measurements in a van der Pauw configuration. It has been found that the spin flip relaxation time, τsf, in Au is dominated by phonon interactions.

  18. Spin Orbit Interaction Engineering for beyond Spin Transfer Torque memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang L.

    Spin transfer torque memory uses electron current to transfer the spin torque of electrons to switch a magnetic free layer. This talk will address an alternative approach to energy efficient non-volatile spintronics through engineering of spin orbit interaction (SOC) and the use of spin orbit torque (SOT) by the use of electric field to improve further the energy efficiency of switching. I will first discuss the engineering of interface SOC, which results in the electric field control of magnetic moment or magneto-electric (ME) effect. Magnetic memory bits based on this ME effect, referred to as magnetoelectric RAM (MeRAM), is shown to have orders of magnitude lower energy dissipation compared with spin transfer torque memory (STTRAM). Likewise, interests in spin Hall as a result of SOC have led to many advances. Recent demonstrations of magnetization switching induced by in-plane current in heavy metal/ferromagnetic heterostructures have been shown to arise from the large SOC. The large SOC is also shown to give rise to the large SOT. Due to the presence of an intrinsic extraordinarily strong SOC and spin-momentum lock, topological insulators (TIs) are expected to be promising candidates for exploring spin-orbit torque (SOT)-related physics. In particular, we will show the magnetization switching in a chromium-doped magnetic TI bilayer heterostructure by charge current. A giant SOT of more than three orders of magnitude larger than those reported in heavy metals is also obtained. This large SOT is shown to come from the spin-momentum locked surface states of TI, which may further lead to innovative low power applications. I will also describe other related physics of SOC at the interface of anti-ferromagnetism/ferromagnetic structure and show the control exchange bias by electric field for high speed memory switching. The work was in part supported by ERFC-SHINES, NSF, ARO, TANMS, and FAME.

  19. Feasibility of Quantifying Arterial Cerebral Blood Volume Using Multiphase Alternate Ascending/Descending Directional Navigation (ALADDIN)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Hwan; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Sung-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Arterial cerebral blood volume (aCBV) is associated with many physiologic and pathologic conditions. Recently, multiphase balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) readout was introduced to measure labeled blood signals in the arterial compartment, based on the fact that signal difference between labeled and unlabeled blood decreases with the number of RF pulses that is affected by blood velocity. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of a new 2D inter-slice bSSFP-based arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique termed, alternate ascending/descending directional navigation (ALADDIN), to quantify aCBV using multiphase acquisition in six healthy subjects. A new kinetic model considering bSSFP RF perturbations was proposed to describe the multiphase data and thus to quantify aCBV. Since the inter-slice time delay (TD) and gap affected the distribution of labeled blood spins in the arterial and tissue compartments, we performed the experiments with two TDs (0 and 500 ms) and two gaps (300% and 450% of slice thickness) to evaluate their roles in quantifying aCBV. Comparison studies using our technique and an existing method termed arterial volume using arterial spin tagging (AVAST) were also separately performed in five subjects. At 300% gap or 500-ms TD, significant tissue perfusion signals were demonstrated, while tissue perfusion signals were minimized and arterial signals were maximized at 450% gap and 0-ms TD. ALADDIN has an advantage of visualizing bi-directional flow effects (ascending/descending) in a single experiment. Labeling efficiency (α) of inter-slice blood flow effects could be measured in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) (20.8±3.7%.) and was used for aCBV quantification. As a result of fitting to the proposed model, aCBV values in gray matter (1.4–2.3 mL/100 mL) were in good agreement with those from literature. Our technique showed high correlation with AVAST, especially when arterial signals were accentuated (i.e., when TD = 0 ms) (r = 0

  20. Multiferroics of spin origin.

    PubMed

    Tokura, Yoshinori; Seki, Shinichiro; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2014-07-01

    Multiferroics, compounds with both magnetic and ferroelectric orders, are believed to be a key material system to achieve cross-control between magnetism and electricity in a solid with minute energy dissipation. Such a colossal magnetoelectric (ME) effect has been an issue of keen interest for a long time in condensed matter physics as well as a most desired function in the emerging spin-related electronics. Here we begin with the basic mechanisms to realize multiferroicity or spin-driven ferroelectricity in magnetic materials, which have recently been clarified and proved both theoretically and experimentally. According to the proposed mechanisms, many families of multiferroics have been explored, found (re-discovered), and newly developed, realizing a variety of colossal ME controls. We overview versatile multiferroics from the viewpoints of their multiferroicity mechanisms and their fundamental ME characteristics on the basis of the recent advances in exploratory materials. One of the new directions in multiferroic science is the dynamical ME effect, namely the dynamical and/or fast cross-control between electric and magnetic dipoles in a solid. We argue here that the dynamics of multiferroic domain walls significantly contributes to the amplification of ME response, which has been revealed through the dielectric spectroscopy. Another related issue is the electric-dipole-active magnetic resonance, called electromagnons. The electromagnons can provide a new stage of ME optics via resonant coupling with the external electromagnetic wave (light). Finally, we give concluding remarks on multiferroics physics in the light of a broader perspective from the emergent electromagnetism in a solid as well as from the possible application toward future dissipationless electronics.

  1. Spin-Thermodynamics of Ultra-Cold Spin-1 Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. B.; Yao, D. X.; Bao, C. G.

    2015-08-01

    The spin-thermodynamics of a -body spin-1 condensate containing only the spin-degrees of freedom is studied via a theory in which , the total spin and its Z-component are exactly conserved. The magnetic field is considered as zero at first. Then the effect of a residual is evaluated. A temperature is defined as below that all the spatial degrees of freedom can be considered as being frozen and, accordingly, a pure spin-system will emerge. Effort is made to evaluate . When goes up from zero, the internal energy and the entropy experience sharp changes in two narrow domains of surrounding two turning temperatures and , the latter is higher. When or , and remain unchanged. Whereas when , and . It was found that and originate from the gap (the energy difference between the ground state (g.s.) and the first excited state) and the width (the energy difference between the g.s. and the highest state without spatial excitation) of the spectra, respectively. Thus their appearance is a common feature in spin-thermodynamics. In fact, marks the lowest excitation of the spin-modes, while marks the maximization of the entropy in the spin-space. In particular, the T-dependent population density is defined so that the theory can be checked by experimental data. Two kinds of condensates are notable: (i) the strongly trapped systems with a very small , they can work as pure spin-systems at relatively higher temperature; (ii) the systems with a high magnetization (say, ), the dimensions of their spin-spaces are very low. Furthermore, a larger together with a large N (for Rb) or a large (for Na) will lead to a sufficiently large so that a real g.s. can be experimentally created at a higher temperature. The spin-thermodynamics would remain valid whenever the spatial modes decouple from the spin-modes. This can occur at a higher temperature as demonstrated in Pechkis et al. (Phys Rev Lett 111:025301, 2013).

  2. Confined spin wave spectra of Kagome artificial spin ice arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotopoulos, I.

    2017-01-01

    The spin wave modes of elongated magnetic islands arranged in Kagome artificial spin-ice arrays are micromagnetically simulated in the frequency regime between 3 and 16 GHz. The edge modes are more suitable in order to detect the signatures of various types of local order of the spin-ice lattice as they are much more sensitive to the magnetic configurations of neighboring elements. The spectra of arrays consisting up to 30 elements can be decomposed to those originating from local magnetic states of their vertices.

  3. Middle Cerebral Artery Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Liou, Michelle; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Liu, Hua-Shan; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chou, Ming-Chung; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Calcification of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) is uncommon in the healthy elderly. Whether calcification of the MCA is associated with cerebral ischemic stroke remains undetermined. We intended to investigate the association using Agatston calcium scoring of the MCA. This study retrospectively included 354 subjects with ischemic stroke in the MCA territory and 1518 control subjects who underwent computed tomography (CT) of the brain. We recorded major known risk factors for ischemic stroke, including age, gender, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, hyperlipidemia, and obesity, along with the MCA calcium burden, measured with the Agatston calcium scoring method. Univariate and modified logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between the MCA calcification and ischemic stroke. The univariate analyses showed significant associations of ischemic stroke with age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, total MCA Agatston score, and the presence of calcification on both or either side of the MCA. Subjects with the presence of MCA calcification on both or either side of the MCA were 8.46 times (95% confidence interval, 4.93–14.53; P < 0.001) more likely to have a cerebral infarct than subjects without MCA calcification after adjustment for the major known risk factors, including age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and smoking. However, a higher degree of MCA calcification reflected by the Agatston score was not associated with higher risk of MCA ischemic stroke after adjustment for the confounding factors and presence of MCA calcification. These results suggest that MCA calcification is associated with ischemic stroke in the MCA territory. Further prospective studies are required to verify the clinical implications of the MCA calcification. PMID:26683969

  4. Pulmonary artery sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Blackmon, Shanda H; Reardon, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Primary heart tumors are rare, and malignant primary heart tumors are only a small subset of these. Most primary malignant tumors are sarcomas arising from the cells of the structural elements of the heart such as blood vessels, muscle, connective tissue, fat and even bone. Unlike most malignancies, where cell type often dictates treatment choices and prognosis and is used for classification, the histology in primary cardiac sarcoma plays little role in determining therapeutic options or prognosis. We have found that anatomic location within the heart is the major determining factor in clinical presentation, treatment options and prognosis in cardiac sarcoma. Therefore, we accordingly classify primary cardiac sarcomas into right heart sarcomas, left heart sarcomas and pulmonary artery (PA) sarcomas. Since the first autopsy report of a primary PA sarcoma in 1923, there have been fewer than 250 cases reported in the English literature. Most of these reports have been single autopsy or case reports, and patient prognosis has generally been dismal. Since few institutions and even fewer individual physicians acquire much exposure to this disease, the diagnostic and treatment approaches have remained unresolved. Our cardiac sarcoma group working at the Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center and the MD Anderson Cancer Center has undertaken a systematic study of this disease, and operated on 9 patients using a radical resection with curative intent and multimodality approach. Based on this work, we have suggested a diagnostic strategy, treatment approach and staging system for primary PA sarcoma. A substantial improvement in patient survival over historical controls has also been demonstrated and will be discussed in this review.

  5. Turbulent Flow Past Spinning Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Donald; Carlucci, Pasquale; Thangam, Siva

    2009-11-01

    Flow past cylinders aligned along their axis where a base freely spins while attached to a non-spinning forebody is considered from a computational and experimental point of view. The time-averaged equations of motion and energy are solved using the modeled form of transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and the scalar form of turbulence dissipation with an efficient finite-volume algorithm. An anisotropic two-equation Reynolds-stress model that incorporates the effect of rotation-modified energy spectrum and swirl is used to perform computations for the flow past axially rotating cylinders. Both rigid cylinders as well as that of cylinders with free-spinning base are considered from a computational point of view. A subsonic wind tunnel with a forward-sting mounted spinning cylinder is used for experiments. Experiments are performed for a range of spin rates and free stream flow conditions. The experimental results of Carlucci & Thangam (2001) are used to benchmark flow over spinning cylinders. The data is extended to munitions spinning in the wake of other munitions. Applications involving the design of projectiles are discussed.

  6. Quantum spin liquids: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savary, Lucile; Balents, Leon

    2017-01-01

    Quantum spin liquids may be considered ‘quantum disordered’ ground states of spin systems, in which zero-point fluctuations are so strong that they prevent conventional magnetic long-range order. More interestingly, quantum spin liquids are prototypical examples of ground states with massive many-body entanglement, which is of a degree sufficient to render these states distinct phases of matter. Their highly entangled nature imbues quantum spin liquids with unique physical aspects, such as non-local excitations, topological properties, and more. In this review, we discuss the nature of such phases and their properties based on paradigmatic models and general arguments, and introduce theoretical technology such as gauge theory and partons, which are conveniently used in the study of quantum spin liquids. An overview is given of the different types of quantum spin liquids and the models and theories used to describe them. We also provide a guide to the current status of experiments in relation to study quantum spin liquids, and to the diverse probes used therein.

  7. Anomalous superficial ulnar artery based flap

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, C. V.; Kundagulwar, Girish K.; Prabha, Yadav S.; Dushyanth, Jaiswal

    2014-01-01

    Upper limb shows a large number of arterial variations. This case report describes the presence of additional superficial ulnar artery which was used to raise a pedicle flap to cover an arm defect thus avoided using the main vessel of the forearm - radial or ulnar artery. Vascular anomalies occurring in the arm and forearm tend to increase the likelihood of damaging the superficial anomalous arteries during surgery. Superficial ulnar or radial arteries have been described to originate from the upper third of the brachial artery; here we report the origin of the anomalous superficial ulnar artery originating from the brachial artery at the level of elbow with the concomitant presence of normal deep radial and ulnar arteries. PMID:24987217

  8. Ferroelectric control of spin polarization.

    PubMed

    Garcia, V; Bibes, M; Bocher, L; Valencia, S; Kronast, F; Crassous, A; Moya, X; Enouz-Vedrenne, S; Gloter, A; Imhoff, D; Deranlot, C; Mathur, N D; Fusil, S; Bouzehouane, K; Barthélémy, A

    2010-02-26

    A current drawback of spintronics is the large power that is usually required for magnetic writing, in contrast with nanoelectronics, which relies on "zero-current," gate-controlled operations. Efforts have been made to control the spin-relaxation rate, the Curie temperature, or the magnetic anisotropy with a gate voltage, but these effects are usually small and volatile. We used ferroelectric tunnel junctions with ferromagnetic electrodes to demonstrate local, large, and nonvolatile control of carrier spin polarization by electrically switching ferroelectric polarization. Our results represent a giant type of interfacial magnetoelectric coupling and suggest a low-power approach for spin-based information control.

  9. Spin-manipulating polarized deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, V S; Krisch, A D; Leonova, M A; Raymond, R S; Sivers, D W; Wong, V K; Hinterberger, F; Kondratenko, A M; Stephenson, E J

    2011-03-01

    Spin dynamics of polarized deuteron beams near depolarization resonances, including a new polarization preservation concept based on specially-designed multiple resonance crossings, has been tested in a series of experiments in the COSY synchrotron. Intricate spin dynamics with sophisticated pre-programmed patterns as well as effects of multiple crossings of a resonance were studied both theoretically and experimentally with excellent agreement. Possible applications of these results to preserve, manipulate and spin-flip polarized beams in synchrotrons and storage rings are discussed.

  10. Pairing Correlations at High Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hai-Liang; Dong, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yan; Fan, Ping; Yuan, Da-Qing; Zhu, Shen-Yun; Zhang, Huan-Qiao; Petrache, C. M.; Ragnarsson, I.; Carlsson, B. G.

    The pairing correcting energies at high spins in 161Lu and 138Nd are studied by comparing the results of the cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky (CNS) and cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky-Bogoliubov (CNSB) models. It is concluded that the Coriolis effect rather than the rotational alignment effect plays a major role in the reduction of the pairing correlations in the high spin region. Then we proposed an average pairing correction method which not only better reproduces the experimental data comparing with the CNS model but also enables a clean-cut tracing of the configurations thus the full-spin-range discussion on the various rotating bands.

  11. Quantum melting of spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoda, Shigeki; Tanaka, Yoichi

    2010-03-01

    A quantum melting of the spin ice is proposed for pyrochlore-lattice magnets Pr2TM2O7 (TM =Ir, Zr, and Sn). The quantum pseudospin-1/2 model is derived from the strong-coupling perturbation of the f-p electron transfer in the basis of atomic non-Kramers magnetic doublets. The ground states are characterized by a cooperative ferroquadrupole and pseudospin chirality in the cubic unit cell, forming a magnetic analog of smectic liquid crystals. Then, pinch points observed in spin correlations for dipolar spin-ice systems are replaced with the minima. The relevance to experiments is discussed.

  12. Wing design for spin resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stough, H. P., III; Dicarlo, D. J.; Glover, K. E.; Stewart, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    Use of a discontinuous outboard wing leading edge to improve stall/spin characteristics has been evaluated through wind-tunnel and flight tests. Addition of such a discontinuous outboard wing leading-edge droop design to three light airplanes having NACA 6-series airfoil sections produced significant improvements in stall characteristics and spin resistance. The increased spin resistance of the modified airplanes has been related to the difference in angle of attack between the outer wing panel stall and the maximum attainable angle of attack.

  13. Spinning fluids in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, J. R.; Smalley, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    General relativity field equations are employed to examine a continuous medium with internal spin. A variational principle formerly applied in the special relativity case is extended to the general relativity case, using a tetrad to express the spin density and the four-velocity of the fluid. An energy-momentum tensor is subsequently defined for a spinning fluid. The equations of motion of the fluid are suggested to be useful in analytical studies of galaxies, for anisotropic Bianchi universes, and for turbulent eddies.

  14. Engineering of arteries in vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Angela H; Niklason, Laura E

    2014-06-01

    This review will focus on two elements that are essential for functional arterial regeneration in vitro: the mechanical environment and the bioreactors used for tissue growth. The importance of the mechanical environment to embryological development, vascular functionality, and vascular graft regeneration will be discussed. Bioreactors generate mechanical stimuli to simulate biomechanical environment of arterial system. This system has been used to reconstruct arterial grafts with appropriate mechanical strength for implantation by controlling the chemical and mechanical environments in which the grafts are grown. Bioreactors are powerful tools to study the effect of mechanical stimuli on extracellular matrix architecture and mechanical properties of engineered vessels. Hence, biomimetic systems enable us to optimize chemo-biomechanical culture conditions to regenerate engineered vessels with physiological properties similar to those of native arteries. In addition, this article reviews various bioreactors designed especially to apply axial loading to engineered arteries. This review will also introduce and examine different approaches and techniques that have been used to engineer biologically based vascular grafts, including collagen-based grafts, fibrin-gel grafts, cell sheet engineering, biodegradable polymers, and decellularization of native vessels.

  15. Arterial calcification: A new perspective?

    PubMed

    Nicoll, R; Henein, M

    2017-02-01

    Arterial calcification is commonly seen in atherosclerosis, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes and has long been considered a natural progression of atherosclerosis. Yet it is a systemic condition, occurring in a wide and diverse range of disease states and no medical treatment for cardiovascular disease has yet found a way to regress it; on the contrary, lipid-lowering therapy may worsen its progression. Although numerous studies have found associations between calcification and biomarkers, none has yet found a unifying mechanism that explains the calcification found in atherosclerosis, CKD or diabetes and many of the biomarkers are equally associated with atheroma development and cardiovascular events. Furthermore, both presence and absence of coronary artery calcification appear predictive of plaque rupture and cardiovascular events, indicating that the association is not causal. This suggests that we are no further forward in understanding the true nature of arterial calcification or its pathogenesis, other than noting that it is 'multifactorial'. This is because most researchers view arterial calcification as a progressive pathological condition which must be treated. Instead, we hypothesise that calcification develops as an immune response to endothelial injury, such as shear stress or oxidative stress in diabetics, and is consequently part of the body's natural defences. This would explain why it has been found to be protective of plaque rupture and why it is unresponsive to lipid-lowering agents. We propose that instead of attempting to treat arterial calcification, we should instead be attempting to prevent or treat all causes of endothelial injury.

  16. SPIN-UP/SPIN-DOWN MODELS FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Stefano, R. Di; Voss, R.

    2011-09-01

    In the single-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), a white dwarf (WD) must gain a significant amount of matter from a companion star. Because the accreted mass carries angular momentum, the WD is likely to achieve fast spin periods, which can increase the critical mass, M{sub crit}, needed for explosion. When M{sub crit} is higher than the maximum mass achieved by the WD, the central regions of the WD must spin down before it can explode. This introduces super-Chandrasekhar single-degenerate explosions, and a delay between the completion of mass gain and the time of the explosion. Matter ejected from the binary during mass transfer therefore has a chance to become diffuse, and the explosion occurs in a medium with a density similar to that of typical regions of the interstellar medium. Also, either by the end of the WD's mass increase or else by the time of explosion, the donor may exhaust its stellar envelope and become a WD. This alters, generally diminishing, explosion signatures related to the donor star. Nevertheless, the spin-up/spin-down model is highly predictive. Prior to explosion, progenitors can be super-M{sub Ch} WDs in either wide binaries with WD companions or cataclysmic variables. These systems can be discovered and studied through wide-field surveys. Post-explosion, the spin-up/spin-down model predicts a population of fast-moving WDs, low-mass stars, and even brown dwarfs. In addition, the spin-up/spin-down model provides a paradigm which may be able to explain both the similarities and the diversity observed among SNe Ia.

  17. Electrical Spin-Injection into Silicon and Spin FET

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-18

    MgO/silicon tunneling emitter NPN bipolar transistors . Device simulations revealed that the NDTC was the consequence of an inversion layer at...2009. He is now a research engineer at Intel Semiconductor Company. The aim of the project was to explore a tunneling emitter bipolar transistor as a...possible spin injector into silicon, and we have succeeded in that goal. The transistor has a metallic emitter that as a spin-injector will be a 1

  18. Spin filter for arbitrary spins by substrate engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Biplab; Römer, Rudolf A.; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2016-08-01

    We design spin filters for particles with potentially arbitrary spin S≤ft(=1/2,1,3/2,\\ldots \\right) using a one-dimensional periodic chain of magnetic atoms as a quantum device. Describing the system within a tight-binding formalism we present an analytical method to unravel the analogy between a one-dimensional magnetic chain and a multi-strand ladder network. This analogy is crucial, and is subsequently exploited to engineer gaps in the energy spectrum by an appropriate choice of the magnetic substrate. We obtain an exact correlation between the magnitude of the spin of the incoming beam of particles and the magnetic moment of the substrate atoms in the chain desired for opening up of a spectral gap. Results of spin polarized transport, calculated within a transfer matrix formalism, are presented for particles having half-integer as well as higher spin states. We find that the chain can be made to act as a quantum device which opens a transmission window only for selected spin components over certain ranges of the Fermi energy, blocking them in the remaining part of the spectrum. The results appear to be robust even when the choice of the substrate atoms deviates substantially from the ideal situation, as verified by extending the ideas to the case of a ‘spin spiral’. Interestingly, the spin spiral geometry, apart from exhibiting the filtering effect, is also seen to act as a device flipping spins—an effect that can be monitored by an interplay of the system size and the period of the spiral. Our scheme is applicable to ultracold quantum gases, and might inspire future experiments in this direction.

  19. Spin Interactions and Spin Dynamics in Electronic Nanostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of technological importance, and the spectroscopic study of the spin transport properties of nanoscale systems, the demonstration of terahertz spin...dynamics at near- terahertz frequencies in magnetically doped quantum wells,” R. C. Myers. K. C. Ku, X. Li, N. Samarth, and D. D. Awschalom, Phys. Rev. B 72...dynamics at near- terahertz frequencies in magnetically doped quantum wells,” R. C. Myers. K. C. Ku, X. Li, N. Samarth, and D. D. Awschalom, Phys. Rev

  20. Spin-up/Spin-down Models for Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, R.; Voss, R.; Claeys, J. S. W.

    2011-09-01

    In the single-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), a white dwarf (WD) must gain a significant amount of matter from a companion star. Because the accreted mass carries angular momentum, the WD is likely to achieve fast spin periods, which can increase the critical mass, M crit, needed for explosion. When M crit is higher than the maximum mass achieved by the WD, the central regions of the WD must spin down before it can explode. This introduces super-Chandrasekhar single-degenerate explosions, and a delay between the completion of mass gain and the time of the explosion. Matter ejected from the binary during mass transfer therefore has a chance to become diffuse, and the explosion occurs in a medium with a density similar to that of typical regions of the interstellar medium. Also, either by the end of the WD's mass increase or else by the time of explosion, the donor may exhaust its stellar envelope and become a WD. This alters, generally diminishing, explosion signatures related to the donor star. Nevertheless, the spin-up/spin-down model is highly predictive. Prior to explosion, progenitors can be super-M Ch WDs in either wide binaries with WD companions or cataclysmic variables. These systems can be discovered and studied through wide-field surveys. Post-explosion, the spin-up/spin-down model predicts a population of fast-moving WDs, low-mass stars, and even brown dwarfs. In addition, the spin-up/spin-down model provides a paradigm which may be able to explain both the similarities and the diversity observed among SNe Ia.

  1. [Reconstruction of foot arteries after injury in arterial occlusive disease].

    PubMed

    Flis, V; Tomazic, T

    1993-06-01

    At the Maribor Teaching Hospital two elderly with progressive atherosclerotic disease below the knee were treated between 1986-1992 for open fracture of ankle joint and pedal arterial trauma. The only patent atherosclerotic vessel (dorsal artery of the foot) that was disrupted was reconstructed in both cases by interposition of a part of the great and small saphenous vein in one case each. A termino-terminal anastomosis with a long, triangular patch was used, fixed with interrupted sutures. The fractures were stabilized with external fixators. Both extremities were saved.

  2. Coronary revascularization after arterial switch operation.

    PubMed

    Prifti, Edvin; Bonacchi, Massimo; Luisi, Stefano Vincenzo; Vanini, Vittorio

    2002-01-01

    We report two cases presenting bilateral coronary artery obstruction after arterial switch operation. The first patient underwent bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting to the left and right coronary arteries. The other patient, presenting a single coronary ostium, underwent surgical coronary ostial angioplasty in concomitance to proximal arterioplasty of both coronary arteries employing a single "pantaloon" shape autologous pericardial patch. Both patients survived and, at 1 year and 9 months after the coronary revascularization procedures, the coronary angiography demonstrated a good patency of the internal thoracic grafts and excellent ostial plasty results, respectively. A complete literature review of patients undergoing different coronary revascularization procedures after arterial switch operation is reported.

  3. Random SU(2)-symmetric spin-S chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quito, V. L.; Hoyos, José A.; Miranda, E.

    2016-08-01

    We study the low-energy physics of a broad class of time-reversal invariant and SU(2)-symmetric one-dimensional spin-S systems in the presence of quenched disorder via a strong-disorder renormalization-group technique. We show that, in general, there is an antiferromagnetic phase with an emergent SU (2 S +1 ) symmetry. The ground state of this phase is a random singlet state in which the singlets are formed by pairs of spins. For integer spins, there is an additional antiferromagnetic phase which does not exhibit any emergent symmetry (except for S =1 ). The corresponding ground state is a random singlet one but the singlets are formed mostly by trios of spins. In each case the corresponding low-energy dynamics is activated, i.e., with a formally infinite dynamical exponent, and related to distinct infinite-randomness fixed points. The phase diagram has two other phases with ferromagnetic tendencies: a disordered ferromagnetic phase and a large spin phase in which the effective disorder is asymptotically finite. In the latter case, the dynamical scaling is governed by a conventional power law with a finite dynamical exponent.

  4. Spin voltage generation through optical excitation of complementary spin populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottegoni, Federico; Celebrano, Michele; Bollani, Monica; Biagioni, Paolo; Isella, Giovanni; Ciccacci, Franco; Finazzi, Marco

    2014-08-01

    By exploiting the spin degree of freedom of carriers inside electronic devices, spintronics has a huge potential for quantum computation and dissipationless interconnects. Pure spin currents in spintronic devices should be driven by a spin voltage generator, able to drive the spin distribution out of equilibrium without inducing charge currents. Ideally, such a generator should operate at room temperature, be highly integrable with existing semiconductor technology, and not interfere with other spintronic building blocks that make use of ferromagnetic materials. Here we demonstrate a device that matches these requirements by realizing the spintronic equivalent of a photovoltaic generator. Whereas a photovoltaic generator spatially separates photoexcited electrons and holes, our device exploits circularly polarized light to produce two spatially well-defined electron populations with opposite in-plane spin projections. This is achieved by modulating the phase and amplitude of the light wavefronts entering a semiconductor (germanium) with a patterned metal overlayer (platinum). The resulting light diffraction pattern features a spatially modulated chirality inside the semiconductor, which locally excites spin-polarized electrons thanks to electric dipole selection rules.

  5. Spin voltage generation through optical excitation of complementary spin populations.

    PubMed

    Bottegoni, Federico; Celebrano, Michele; Bollani, Monica; Biagioni, Paolo; Isella, Giovanni; Ciccacci, Franco; Finazzi, Marco

    2014-08-01

    By exploiting the spin degree of freedom of carriers inside electronic devices, spintronics has a huge potential for quantum computation and dissipationless interconnects. Pure spin currents in spintronic devices should be driven by a spin voltage generator, able to drive the spin distribution out of equilibrium without inducing charge currents. Ideally, such a generator should operate at room temperature, be highly integrable with existing semiconductor technology, and not interfere with other spintronic building blocks that make use of ferromagnetic materials. Here we demonstrate a device that matches these requirements by realizing the spintronic equivalent of a photovoltaic generator. Whereas a photovoltaic generator spatially separates photoexcited electrons and holes, our device exploits circularly polarized light to produce two spatially well-defined electron populations with opposite in-plane spin projections. This is achieved by modulating the phase and amplitude of the light wavefronts entering a semiconductor (germanium) with a patterned metal overlayer (platinum). The resulting light diffraction pattern features a spatially modulated chirality inside the semiconductor, which locally excites spin-polarized electrons thanks to electric dipole selection rules.

  6. RESEARCH PLAN FOR SPIN PHYSICS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    AIDALA, C.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2005-02-01

    In this report we present the research plan for the RHIC spin program. The report covers (1) the science of the RHIC spin program in a world-wide context; (2) the collider performance requirements for the RHIC spin program; (3) the detector upgrades required, including timelines; (4) time evolution of the spin program.

  7. Spin-pump-induced spin transport in p-type Si at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Shikoh, Eiji; Ando, Kazuya; Kubo, Kazuki; Saitoh, Eiji; Shinjo, Teruya; Shiraishi, Masashi

    2013-03-22

    A spin battery concept is applied for the dynamical generation of pure spin current and spin transport in p-type silicon (p-Si). Ferromagnetic resonance and effective s-d coupling in Ni(80)Fe(20) results in spin accumulation at the Ni(80)Fe(20)/p-Si interface, inducing spin injection and the generation of spin current in the p-Si. The pure spin current is converted to a charge current by the inverse spin Hall effect of Pd evaporated onto the p-Si. This approach demonstrates the generation and transport of pure spin current in p-Si at room temperature.

  8. Spin-Pump-Induced Spin Transport in p-Type Si at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikoh, Eiji; Ando, Kazuya; Kubo, Kazuki; Saitoh, Eiji; Shinjo, Teruya; Shiraishi, Masashi

    2013-03-01

    A spin battery concept is applied for the dynamical generation of pure spin current and spin transport in p-type silicon (p-Si). Ferromagnetic resonance and effective s-d coupling in Ni80Fe20 results in spin accumulation at the Ni80Fe20/p-Si interface, inducing spin injection and the generation of spin current in the p-Si. The pure spin current is converted to a charge current by the inverse spin Hall effect of Pd evaporated onto the p-Si. This approach demonstrates the generation and transport of pure spin current in p-Si at room temperature.

  9. Emerging Techniques for Evaluation of the Hemodynamics of Intracranial Vascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Melissa; Chien, Aichi

    2015-01-01

    Advances in imaging modalities have improved the assessment of intracranial hemodynamics using non-invasive techniques. This review examines new imaging modalities and clinical applications of currently available techniques, describes pathophysiology and future directions in hemodynamic analysis of intracranial stenoses, aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations and explores how hemodynamic analysis may have prognostic value in predicting clinical outcomes and assist in risk stratification. The advent of new technologies such as pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling, accelerated magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) techniques, 4D digital subtraction angiography, and improvements in clinically available techniques such as phase-contrast MRA may change the landscape of vascular imaging and modify current clinical practice guidelines. PMID:25924168

  10. Superficial ulnar artery perforator flap.

    PubMed

    Schonauer, Fabrizio; Marlino, Sergio; Turrà, Francesco; Graziano, Pasquale; Dell'Aversana Orabona, Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    Superficial ulnar artery is a rare finding but shows significant surgical implications. Its thinness and pliability make this flap an excellent solution for soft tissue reconstruction, especially in the head and neck region. We hereby report a successful free superficial ulnar artery perforator forearm flap transfer for tongue reconstruction. A 64-year-old man presenting with a squamous cell carcinoma of the left tongue underwent a wide resection of the tumor, left radical neck dissection, and reconstruction of the tongue and the left tonsillar pillar with the mentioned flap. No complications were observed postoperatively. The flap survived completely; no recurrence at 6 months of follow-up was detected. Superficial ulnar artery perforator flap has shown to be a safe alternative to other free tissue flaps in specific forearm anatomic conditions.

  11. ACUTE RETINAL ARTERIAL OCCLUSIVE DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    The initial section deals with basic sciences; among the various topics briefly discussed are the anatomical features of ophthalmic, central retinal and cilioretinal arteries which may play a role in acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Crucial information required in the management of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is the length of time the retina can survive following that. An experimental study shows that CRAO for 97 minutes produces no detectable permanent retinal damage but there is a progressive ischemic damage thereafter, and by 4 hours the retina has suffered irreversible damage. In the clinical section, I discuss at length various controversies on acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Classification of acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders These are of 4 types: CRAO, branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO), cotton wools spots and amaurosis fugax. Both CRAO and BRAO further comprise multiple clinical entities. Contrary to the universal belief, pathogenetically, clinically and for management, CRAO is not one clinical entity but 4 distinct clinical entities – non-arteritic CRAO, non-arteritic CRAO with cilioretinal artery sparing, arteritic CRAO associated with giant cell arteritis (GCA) and transient non-arteritic CRAO. Similarly, BRAO comprises permanent BRAO, transient BRAO and cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO), and the latter further consists of 3 distinct clinical entities - non-arteritic CLRAO alone, non-arteritic CLRAO associated with central retinal vein occlusion and arteritic CLRAO associated with GCA. Understanding these classifications is essential to comprehend fully various aspects of these disorders. Central retinal artery occlusion The pathogeneses, clinical features and management of the various types of CRAO are discussed in detail. Contrary to the prevalent belief, spontaneous improvement in both visual acuity and visual fields does occur, mainly during the first 7 days. The incidence of spontaneous visual

  12. Spin current source based on a quantum point contact with local spin-orbit interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, M. P.; Szafran, B.

    2013-11-11

    Proposal for construction of a source of spin-polarized current based on quantum point contact (QPC) with local spin-orbit interaction is presented. We show that spin-orbit interaction present within the narrowing acts like a spin filter. The spin polarization of the current is discussed as a function of the Fermi energy and the width of the QPC.

  13. Colloquium: Persistent spin textures in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schliemann, John

    2017-01-01

    Device concepts in semiconductor spintronics make long spin lifetimes desirable, and the requirements put on spin control by proposals for quantum information processing are even more demanding. Unfortunately, due to spin-orbit coupling electron spins in semiconductors are generically subject to rather fast decoherence. In two-dimensional quantum wells made of zinc-blende semiconductors, however, the spin-orbit interaction can be engineered to produce persistent spin structures with extraordinarily long spin lifetimes even in the presence of disorder and imperfections. Experimental and theoretical developments on this subject for both n -doped and p -doped structures are reviewed and possible device applications are discussed.

  14. Spin transport in half-metallic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuma, Y.; Matsuo, M.; Maekawa, S.

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically investigate spin transport in half-metallic ferromagnets at finite temperatures. The side-jump and skew-scattering contributions to spin Hall conductivity are derived using the Kubo formula. The electron-magnon interaction causes a finite density of states in the energy gap of the minority-spin band and induces spin Hall conductivity. We show that spin Hall conductivity is proportional to T3 /2, with T being temperature, and is sensitive to T . We propose that spin Hall conductivity may be a tool to study the minority-spin state.

  15. Experimenting with a Spinning Disk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2015-01-01

    Almost everyone will have observed a spinning coin fall to a shuddering stop. How and why does it do that? Several experiments are described, suitable for a student project, to help motivate an understanding of the rotational dynamics involved.

  16. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Stephen K.; Pratt, II, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning "magic angles" in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the "magic angle" of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning "magic angle" of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position.

  17. Proton spin: A topological invariant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S. C.

    2016-11-01

    Proton spin problem is given a new perspective with the proposition that spin is a topological invariant represented by a de Rham 3-period. The idea is developed generalizing Finkelstein-Rubinstein theory for Skyrmions/kinks to topological defects, and using non-Abelian de Rham theorems. Two kinds of de Rham theorems are discussed applicable to matrix-valued differential forms, and traces. Physical and mathematical interpretations of de Rham periods are presented. It is suggested that Wilson lines and loop operators probe the local properties of the topology, and spin as a topological invariant in pDIS measurements could appear with any value from 0 to ℏ 2, i.e. proton spin decomposition has no meaning in this approach.

  18. Spin caloritronics, origin and outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haiming; Brechet, Sylvain D.; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2017-03-01

    Spin caloritronics refers to research efforts in spintronics when a heat current plays a role. In this review, we start out by reviewing the predictions that can be drawn from the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. This serves as a conceptual framework in which to analyze the interplay of charge, spin and heat transport. This formalism predicts tensorial relations between vectorial quantities such as currents and gradients of chemical potentials or of temperature. Transverse effects such as the Nernst or Hall effects are predicted on the basis that these tensors can include an anti-symmetric contribution, which can be written with a vectorial cross-product. The local symmetry of the system may determine the direction of the vector defining such transverse effects, such as the surface of an isotropic medium. By including magnetization as state field in the thermodynamic description, spin currents appear naturally from the continuity equation for the magnetization, and dissipative spin torques are derived, which are charge-driven or heat-driven. Thermodynamics does not give the strength of these effects, but may provide relationships between them. Based on this framework, the review proceeds by showing how these effects have been observed in various systems. Spintronics has become a vast field of research, and the experiments highlighted in this review pertain only to heat effects on transport and magnetization dynamics, such as magneto-thermoelectric power, or the spin-dependence of the Seebeck effect, the spin-dependence of the Peltier effect, the spin Seebeck effect, the magnetic Seebeck effect, or the Nernst effect. The review concludes by pointing out predicted effects that are yet to be verified experimentally, and in what novel materials the standard thermal spin effects could be investigated.

  19. Muon spin rotation in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stronach, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    The muon spin rotation (MuSR) technique is used to probe the microscopic electron density in materials. High temperature MuSR and magnetization measurements in nickel are in progress to allow an unambiguous determination of the muon impurity interaction and the impurity induced change in local spin density. The first results on uniaxial stress induced frequency shifts in an Fe single crystal are also reported.

  20. Beam normal spin asymmetries: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    M. Vanderhaeghen

    2007-06-01

    The beam normal spin asymmetry in elastic electron-nucleon scattering is discussed. This beam normal spin asymmetry depends on the imaginary part of two-photon exchange processes between electron and nucleon, and measures the non-forward structure functions of the nucleon. After briefly reviewing the theoretical formalism, we discuss calculations in the threshold region, in the resonance region, as well as in the diffractive region, corresponding with high energy and forward angles.