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Sample records for pseudokinase domain target

  1. Pseudokinases: update on their functions and evaluation as new drug targets.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Dominic P; Foulkes, Daniel M; Eyers, Patrick A

    2017-01-01

    The pseudokinase complement of the human kinase superfamily consists of approximately 60 signaling proteins, which lacks one or more of the amino acids typically required to correctly align ATP and metal ions, and phosphorylate protein substrates. Recent studies in the pseudokinase field have begun to expose the biological relevance of pseudokinases, which are now thought to perform a diverse range of physiological roles and are connected to a multitude of human diseases, including cancer. In this review, we discuss how and why members of the 'pseudokinome' represent important new targets for drug discovery, and describe how knowledge of protein structure and function provides informative clues to help guide the rational chemical design or repurposing of inhibitors to target pseudokinases.

  2. Structure of the pseudokinase-kinase domains from protein kinase TYK2 reveals a mechanism for Janus kinase (JAK) autoinhibition.

    PubMed

    Lupardus, Patrick J; Ultsch, Mark; Wallweber, Heidi; Bir Kohli, Pawan; Johnson, Adam R; Eigenbrot, Charles

    2014-06-03

    Janus kinases (JAKs) are receptor-associated multidomain tyrosine kinases that act downstream of many cytokines and interferons. JAK kinase activity is regulated by the adjacent pseudokinase domain via an unknown mechanism. Here, we report the 2.8-Å structure of the two-domain pseudokinase-kinase module from the JAK family member TYK2 in its autoinhibited form. We find that the pseudokinase and kinase interact near the kinase active site and that most reported mutations in cancer-associated JAK alleles cluster in or near this interface. Mutation of residues near the TYK2 interface that are analogous to those in cancer-associated JAK alleles, including the V617F and "exon 12" JAK2 mutations, results in increased kinase activity in vitro. These data indicate that JAK pseudokinases are autoinhibitory domains that hold the kinase domain inactive until receptor dimerization stimulates transition to an active state.

  3. Tyrosine Kinase 2-mediated Signal Transduction in T Lymphocytes Is Blocked by Pharmacological Stabilization of Its Pseudokinase Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Tokarski, John S.; Zupa-Fernandez, Adriana; Tredup, Jeffrey A.; Pike, Kristen; Chang, ChiehYing; Xie, Dianlin; Cheng, Lihong; Pedicord, Donna; Muckelbauer, Jodi; Johnson, Stephen R.; Wu, Sophie; Edavettal, Suzanne C.; Hong, Yang; Witmer, Mark R.; Elkin, Lisa L.; Blat, Yuval; Pitts, William J.; Weinstein, David S.; Burke, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of signal transduction downstream of the IL-23 receptor represents an intriguing approach to the treatment of autoimmunity. Using a chemogenomics approach marrying kinome-wide inhibitory profiles of a compound library with the cellular activity against an IL-23-stimulated transcriptional response in T lymphocytes, a class of inhibitors was identified that bind to and stabilize the pseudokinase domain of the Janus kinase tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2), resulting in blockade of receptor-mediated activation of the adjacent catalytic domain. These Tyk2 pseudokinase domain stabilizers were also shown to inhibit Tyk2-dependent signaling through the Type I interferon receptor but not Tyk2-independent signaling and transcriptional cellular assays, including stimulation through the receptors for IL-2 (JAK1- and JAK3-dependent) and thrombopoietin (JAK2-dependent), demonstrating the high functional selectivity of this approach. A crystal structure of the pseudokinase domain liganded with a representative example showed the compound bound to a site analogous to the ATP-binding site in catalytic kinases with features consistent with high ligand selectivity. The results support a model where the pseudokinase domain regulates activation of the catalytic domain by forming receptor-regulated inhibitory interactions. Tyk2 pseudokinase stabilizers, therefore, represent a novel approach to the design of potent and selective agents for the treatment of autoimmunity. PMID:25762719

  4. Structural and Functional Characterization of the JH2 Pseudokinase Domain of JAK Family Tyrosine Kinase 2 (TYK2).

    PubMed

    Min, Xiaoshan; Ungureanu, Daniela; Maxwell, Sarah; Hammarén, Henrik; Thibault, Steve; Hillert, Ellin-Kristina; Ayres, Merrill; Greenfield, Brad; Eksterowicz, John; Gabel, Chris; Walker, Nigel; Silvennoinen, Olli; Wang, Zhulun

    2015-11-06

    JAK (Janus family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases) family tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2) participates in signaling through cytokine receptors involved in immune responses and inflammation. JAKs are characterized by dual kinase domain: a tyrosine kinase domain (JH1) that is preceded by a pseudokinase domain (JH2). The majority of disease-associated mutations in JAKs map to JH2, demonstrating its central regulatory function. JH2s were considered catalytically inactive, but JAK2 JH2 was found to have low autoregulatory catalytic activity. Whether the other JAK JH2s share ATP binding and enzymatic activity has been unclear. Here we report the crystal structure of TYK2 JH2 in complex with adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) (ATP-γS) and characterize its nucleotide binding by biochemical and biophysical methods. TYK2 JH2 did not show phosphotransfer activity, but it binds ATP and the nucleotide binding stabilizes the protein without inducing major conformational changes. Mutation of the JH2 ATP-binding pocket increased basal TYK2 phosphorylation and downstream signaling. The overall structural characteristics of TYK2 JH2 resemble JAK2 JH2, but distinct stabilizing molecular interactions around helix αAL in the activation loop provide a structural basis for differences in substrate access and catalytic activities among JAK family JH2s. The structural and biochemical data suggest that ATP binding is functionally important for both TYK2 and JAK2 JH2s, whereas the regulatory phosphorylation appears to be a unique property of JAK2. Finally, the co-crystal structure of TYK2 JH2 complexed with a small molecule inhibitor demonstrates that JH2 is accessible to ATP-competitive compounds, which offers novel approaches for targeting cytokine signaling as well as potential therapeutic applications. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Molecular basis for pseudokinase-dependent autoinhibition of JAK2 tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Yibing; Gnanasambandan, Kavitha; Ungureanu, Daniela; Kim, Eric T.; Hammarén, Henrik; Yamashita, Kazuo; Silvennoinen, Olli; Shaw, David E.; Hubbard Shaw, Stevan R.

    2015-01-01

    Janus kinase-2 (JAK2) mediates signaling by various cytokines, including erythropoietin and growth hormone. JAK2 possesses tandem pseudokinase and tyrosine kinase domains. Mutations in the pseudokinase domain are causally linked to myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in humans. The structure of the JAK2 tandem kinase domains is unknown, and therefore the molecular bases for pseudokinase-mediated autoinhibition and pathogenic activation remain obscure. Using unbiased molecular dynamics simulations of protein-protein docking, we produced a structural model for the autoinhibitory interaction between the JAK2 pseudokinase and kinase domains. A striking feature of our model, which is supported by mutagenesis experiments, is that nearly all of the disease mutations map to the domain interface. The simulations indicate that the kinase domain is stabilized in an inactive state by the pseudokinase domain, and they offer a molecular rationale for the hyperactivity of V617F, the predominant JAK2 MPN mutation. PMID:24918548

  6. A robust methodology to subclassify pseudokinases based on their nucleotide-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Murphy, James M; Zhang, Qingwei; Young, Samuel N; Reese, Michael L; Bailey, Fiona P; Eyers, Patrick A; Ungureanu, Daniela; Hammaren, Henrik; Silvennoinen, Olli; Varghese, Leila N; Chen, Kelan; Tripaydonis, Anne; Jura, Natalia; Fukuda, Koichi; Qin, Jun; Nimchuk, Zachary; Mudgett, Mary Beth; Elowe, Sabine; Gee, Christine L; Liu, Ling; Daly, Roger J; Manning, Gerard; Babon, Jeffrey J; Lucet, Isabelle S

    2014-01-15

    Protein kinase-like domains that lack conserved residues known to catalyse phosphoryl transfer, termed pseudokinases, have emerged as important signalling domains across all kingdoms of life. Although predicted to function principally as catalysis-independent protein-interaction modules, several pseudokinase domains have been attributed unexpected catalytic functions, often amid controversy. We established a thermal-shift assay as a benchmark technique to define the nucleotide-binding properties of kinase-like domains. Unlike in vitro kinase assays, this assay is insensitive to the presence of minor quantities of contaminating kinases that may otherwise lead to incorrect attribution of catalytic functions to pseudokinases. We demonstrated the utility of this method by classifying 31 diverse pseudokinase domains into four groups: devoid of detectable nucleotide or cation binding; cation-independent nucleotide binding; cation binding; and nucleotide binding enhanced by cations. Whereas nine pseudokinases bound ATP in a divalent cation-dependent manner, over half of those examined did not detectably bind nucleotides, illustrating that pseudokinase domains predominantly function as non-catalytic protein-interaction modules within signalling networks and that only a small subset is potentially catalytically active. We propose that henceforth the thermal-shift assay be adopted as the standard technique for establishing the nucleotide-binding and catalytic potential of kinase-like domains.

  7. The secret life of kinases: insights into non-catalytic signalling functions from pseudokinases.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Annette V; Murphy, James M

    2017-06-15

    Over the past decade, our understanding of the mechanisms by which pseudokinases, which comprise ∼10% of the human and mouse kinomes, mediate signal transduction has advanced rapidly with increasing structural, biochemical, cellular and genetic studies. Pseudokinases are the catalytically defective counterparts of conventional, active protein kinases and have been attributed functions as protein interaction domains acting variously as allosteric modulators of conventional protein kinases and other enzymes, as regulators of protein trafficking or localisation, as hubs to nucleate assembly of signalling complexes, and as transmembrane effectors of such functions. Here, by categorising mammalian pseudokinases based on their known functions, we illustrate the mechanistic diversity among these proteins, which can be viewed as a window into understanding the non-catalytic functions that can be exerted by conventional protein kinases. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  8. Structural and evolutionary adaptation of rhoptry kinases and pseudokinases, a family of coccidian virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The widespread protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii interferes with host cell functions by exporting the contents of a unique apical organelle, the rhoptry. Among the mix of secreted proteins are an expanded, lineage-specific family of protein kinases termed rhoptry kinases (ROPKs), several of which have been shown to be key virulence factors, including the pseudokinase ROP5. The extent and details of the diversification of this protein family are poorly understood. Results In this study, we comprehensively catalogued the ROPK family in the genomes of Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum and Eimeria tenella, as well as portions of the unfinished genome of Sarcocystis neurona, and classified the identified genes into 42 distinct subfamilies. We systematically compared the rhoptry kinase protein sequences and structures to each other and to the broader superfamily of eukaryotic protein kinases to study the patterns of diversification and neofunctionalization in the ROPK family and its subfamilies. We identified three ROPK sub-clades of particular interest: those bearing a structurally conserved N-terminal extension to the kinase domain (NTE), an E. tenella-specific expansion, and a basal cluster including ROP35 and BPK1 that we term ROPKL. Structural analysis in light of the solved structures ROP2, ROP5, ROP8 and in comparison to typical eukaryotic protein kinases revealed ROPK-specific conservation patterns in two key regions of the kinase domain, surrounding a ROPK-conserved insert in the kinase hinge region and a disulfide bridge in the kinase substrate-binding lobe. We also examined conservation patterns specific to the NTE-bearing clade. We discuss the possible functional consequences of each. Conclusions Our work sheds light on several important but previously unrecognized features shared among rhoptry kinases, as well as the essential differences between active and degenerate protein kinases. We identify the most distinctive ROPK-specific features

  9. The Toxoplasma pseudokinase ROP5 is an allosteric inhibitor of the immunity-related GTPases.

    PubMed

    Reese, Michael L; Shah, Niket; Boothroyd, John C

    2014-10-03

    The Red Queen hypothesis proposes that there is an evolutionary arms race between host and pathogen. One possible example of such a phenomenon could be the recently discovered interaction between host defense proteins known as immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and a family of rhoptry pseudokinases (ROP5) expressed by the protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Mouse IRGs are encoded by an extensive and rapidly evolving family of over 20 genes. Similarly, the ROP5 family is highly polymorphic and consists of 4-10 genes, depending on the strain of Toxoplasma. IRGs are known to be avidly bound and functionally inactivated by ROP5 proteins, but the molecular basis of this interaction/inactivation has not previously been known. Here we show that ROP5 uses a highly polymorphic surface to bind adjacent to the nucleotide-binding domain of an IRG and that this produces a profound allosteric change in the IRG structure. This has two dramatic effects: 1) it prevents oligomerization of the IRG, and 2) it alters the orientation of two threonine residues that are targeted by the Toxoplasma Ser/Thr kinases, ROP17 and ROP18. ROP5s are highly specific in the IRGs that they will bind, and the fact that it is the most highly polymorphic surface of ROP5 that binds the IRG strongly supports the notion that these two protein families are co-evolving in a way predicted by the Red Queen hypothesis.

  10. Dimeric structure of pseudokinase RNase L bound to 2-5A reveals a basis for interferon induced antiviral activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Zeqiraj, Elton; Dong, Beihua; Jha, Babal Kant; Duffy, Nicole; Orlicky, Stephen; Thevakumaran, Neroshan; Talukdar, Manisha; Pillon, Monica C.; Ceccarelli, Derek F.; Wan, Leo; Juang, Yu-Chi; Mao, Daniel Y.L.; Gaughan, Christina; Brinton, Margo A.; Perelygin, Andrey A.; Kourinov, Igor; Guarné, Alba; Silverman, Robert H.; Sicheri, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Summary RNase L is an ankyrin repeat domain containing dual endoribonuclease-pseudokinase that is activated by unusual 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2-5A) second messengers and which impedes viral infections in higher vertebrates. Despite its importance in interferon regulated antiviral innate immunity, relatively little is known about its precise mechanism of action. Here, we present a functional characterization of 2.5 Å and 3.25 Å X-ray crystal and small angle x-ray scattering structures of RNase L bound to a natural 2-5A activator with and without ADP or the non-hydrolysable ATP mimetic AMP-PNP. These studies reveal how recognition of 2-5A through interactions with the ankyrin repeat domain and the pseudokinase domain together with nucleotide binding, impose a rigid intertwined dimer configuration that is essential for RNase catalytic and anti-viral functions. The involvement of the pseudokinase domain of RNase L in 2-5A sensing, nucleotide binding, dimerization, and ribonuclease functions highlights the evolutionary adaptability of the eukaryotic protein kinase fold. PMID:24462203

  11. Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    Agency: DOD-BCRP Grant #: Breakthrough Award L1 BC150621P Title: “Discoidin Domain Receptors: Novel Targets in Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0226 TITLE: Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Rafael Fridman...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0226 Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15

  12. Targeting SH2 domains in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Morlacchi, Pietro; Robertson, Fredika M; Klostergaard, Jim; McMurray, John S

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is among the most commonly diagnosed cancer types in women worldwide and is the second leading cause of cancer-related disease in the USA. SH2 domains recruit signaling proteins to phosphotyrosine residues on aberrantly activated growth factor and cytokine receptors and contribute to cancer cell cycling, metastasis, angiogenesis and so on. Herein we review phosphopeptide mimetic and small-molecule approaches targeting the SH2 domains of Grb2, Grb7 and STAT3 that inhibit their targets and reduce proliferation in in vitro breast cancer models. Only STAT3 inhibitors have been evaluated in in vivo models and have led to tumor reduction. Taken together, these studies suggest that targeting SH2 domains is an important approach to the treatment of breast cancer.

  13. Discoidin Domains as Emerging Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Villoutreix, Bruno O; Miteva, Maria A

    2016-08-01

    Discoidin (DS) domains are found in eukaryotic and prokaryotic extracellular and transmembrane multidomain proteins. These small domains play different functional roles and can interact with phospholipids, glycans, and proteins, including collagens. DS domain-containing proteins are often involved in cellular adhesion, migration, proliferation, and matrix-remodeling events, while some play a major role in blood coagulation. Mutations in DS domains have been associated with various disease conditions. This review provides an update on the structure, function, and modulation of the DS domains, with a special emphasis on two circulating blood coagulation cofactors, factor V and factor VIII, and the transmembrane neuropilin receptors that have been targeted for inhibition by biologics and small chemical compounds.

  14. ATP and MO25α Regulate the Conformational State of the STRADα Pseudokinase and Activation of the LKB1 Tumour Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Zeqiraj, Elton; Filippi, Beatrice Maria; Goldie, Simon; Navratilova, Iva; Boudeau, Jérôme; Deak, Maria; Alessi, Dario R.; van Aalten, Daan M. F.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudokinases lack essential residues for kinase activity, yet are emerging as important regulators of signal transduction networks. The pseudokinase STRAD activates the LKB1 tumour suppressor by forming a heterotrimeric complex with LKB1 and the scaffolding protein MO25. Here, we describe the structure of STRADα in complex with MO25α. The structure reveals an intricate web of interactions between STRADα and MO25α involving the αC-helix of STRADα, reminiscent of the mechanism by which CDK2 interacts with cyclin A. Surprisingly, STRADα binds ATP and displays a closed conformation and an ordered activation loop, typical of active protein kinases. Inactivity is accounted for by nonconservative substitution of almost all essential catalytic residues. We demonstrate that binding of ATP enhances the affinity of STRADα for MO25α, and conversely, binding of MO25α promotes interaction of STRADα with ATP. Mutagenesis studies reveal that association of STRADα with either ATP or MO25α is essential for LKB1 activation. We conclude that ATP and MO25α cooperate to maintain STRADα in an “active” closed conformation required for LKB1 activation. It has recently been demonstrated that a mutation in human STRADα that truncates a C-terminal region of the pseudokinase domain leads to the polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, symptomatic epilepsy (PMSE) syndrome. We demonstrate this mutation destabilizes STRADα and prevents association with LKB1. In summary, our findings describe one of the first structures of a genuinely inactive pseudokinase. The ability of STRADα to activate LKB1 is dependent on a closed “active” conformation, aided by ATP and MO25α binding. Thus, the function of STRADα is mediated through an active kinase conformation rather than kinase activity. It is possible that other pseudokinases exert their function through nucleotide binding and active conformations. PMID:19513107

  15. ATP and MO25alpha regulate the conformational state of the STRADalpha pseudokinase and activation of the LKB1 tumour suppressor.

    PubMed

    Zeqiraj, Elton; Filippi, Beatrice Maria; Goldie, Simon; Navratilova, Iva; Boudeau, Jérôme; Deak, Maria; Alessi, Dario R; van Aalten, Daan M F

    2009-06-09

    Pseudokinases lack essential residues for kinase activity, yet are emerging as important regulators of signal transduction networks. The pseudokinase STRAD activates the LKB1 tumour suppressor by forming a heterotrimeric complex with LKB1 and the scaffolding protein MO25. Here, we describe the structure of STRADalpha in complex with MO25alpha. The structure reveals an intricate web of interactions between STRADalpha and MO25alpha involving the alphaC-helix of STRADalpha, reminiscent of the mechanism by which CDK2 interacts with cyclin A. Surprisingly, STRADalpha binds ATP and displays a closed conformation and an ordered activation loop, typical of active protein kinases. Inactivity is accounted for by nonconservative substitution of almost all essential catalytic residues. We demonstrate that binding of ATP enhances the affinity of STRADalpha for MO25alpha, and conversely, binding of MO25alpha promotes interaction of STRADalpha with ATP. Mutagenesis studies reveal that association of STRADalpha with either ATP or MO25alpha is essential for LKB1 activation. We conclude that ATP and MO25alpha cooperate to maintain STRADalpha in an "active" closed conformation required for LKB1 activation. It has recently been demonstrated that a mutation in human STRADalpha that truncates a C-terminal region of the pseudokinase domain leads to the polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, symptomatic epilepsy (PMSE) syndrome. We demonstrate this mutation destabilizes STRADalpha and prevents association with LKB1. In summary, our findings describe one of the first structures of a genuinely inactive pseudokinase. The ability of STRADalpha to activate LKB1 is dependent on a closed "active" conformation, aided by ATP and MO25alpha binding. Thus, the function of STRADalpha is mediated through an active kinase conformation rather than kinase activity. It is possible that other pseudokinases exert their function through nucleotide binding and active conformations.

  16. An ATP-competitive inhibitor modulates the allosteric function of the HER3 pseudokinase

    PubMed Central

    Littlefield, Peter; Moasser, Mark M.; Jura, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that lacks catalytic activity, but is essential for cellular homeostasis due to its ability to allosterically activate EGFR/HER2. Though catalytically inactive, HER3 binds ATP tightly, hinting at a possible role of the nucleotide-binding pocket in modulating HER3 function. We report a structure of the HER3 pseudokinase bound to the ATP-competitive inhibitor bosutinib. Previously solved structures show that bosutinib can potently interact with multiple kinase domain conformations. In complex with HER3, bosutinib binds to yet another conformation, which is nearly identical to that observed in the HER3/ATP complex. Interestingly, occupation of the ATP-binding site by bosutinib improves the ability of HER3 to act as an allosteric activator of EGFR in vitro by increasing the affinity of the HER3/EGFR heterodimer in a membrane-dependent manner. PMID:24656791

  17. The rise of the undead: pseudokinases as mediators of effector-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer D; Lo, Timothy; Bastedo, Patrick; Guttman, David S; Desveaux, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens use effector proteins to suppress host immunity and promote infection. However, plants can recognize specific effectors and mount an effector-triggered immune response that suppresses pathogen growth. The YopJ/HopZ family of type III secreted effector proteins is broadly distributed in bacterial pathogens of both animals and plants. These effectors can either suppress host immunity or elicit defense responses depending on the host genotype. In a recent report, we identified an Arabidopsis thaliana pseudokinase ZED1 that is required for the recognition of the Pseudomonas syringae HopZ1a effector. Here we discuss the role of ZED1 in HopZ1a recognition, and present models of effector recognition in plants. We draw parallels between HopZ1a and YopJ effector proteins, and between ZED1 and other immunity-related kinases that can be targeted by pathogen effectors.

  18. The structure of the Pan2-Pan3 core complex reveals cross-talk between deadenylase and pseudokinase.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Ingmar B; Rode, Michaela; Bonneau, Fabien; Schüssler, Steffen; Conti, Elena

    2014-07-01

    Pan2-Pan3 is a conserved complex involved in the shortening of mRNA poly(A) tails, the initial step in eukaryotic mRNA turnover. We show that recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pan2-Pan3 can deadenylate RNAs in vitro without needing the poly(A)-binding protein Pab1. The crystal structure of an active ~200-kDa core complex reveals that Pan2 and Pan3 interact with an unusual 1:2 stoichiometry imparted by the asymmetric nature of the Pan3 homodimer. An extended region of Pan2 wraps around Pan3 and provides a major anchoring point for complex assembly. A Pan2 module formed by the pseudoubiquitin-hydrolase and RNase domains latches onto the Pan3 pseudokinase with intertwined interactions that orient the deadenylase active site toward the A-binding site of the interacting Pan3. The molecular architecture of Pan2-Pan3 suggests how the nuclease and its pseudokinase regulator act in synergy to promote deadenylation.

  19. A pseudokinase couples signaling pathways to enable asymmetric cell division in a bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Childers, W. S.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria face complex decisions when initiating developmental events such as sporulation, nodulation, virulence, and asymmetric cell division. These developmental decisions require global changes in genomic readout, and bacteria typically employ intricate (yet poorly understood) signaling networks that enable changes in cell function. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus divides asymmetrically to yield two functionally distinct cells: a motile, chemotactic swarmer cell, and a sessile stalked cell with replication and division capabilities. Work from several Caulobacter labs has revealed that differentiation requires concerted regulation by several two-component system (TCS) signaling pathways that are differentially positioned at the poles of the predivisional cell (Figure 1). The strict unidirectional flow from histidine kinase (HK) to the response regulator (RR), observed in most studied TCS, is difficult to reconcile with the notion that information can be transmitted between two or more TCS signaling pathways. In this study, we uncovered a mechanism by which daughter cell fate, which is specified by the DivJ-DivK-PleC system and effectively encoded in the phosphorylation state of the single-domain RR DivK, is communicated to the CckA-ChpT-CtrA signaling pathway that regulates more than 100 genes for polar differentiation, replication initiation and cell division. Using structural biology and biochemical findings we proposed a mechanistic basis for TCS pathway coupling in which the DivL pseudokinase is repurposed as a sensor rather than participant in phosphotransduction.

  20. The Rhoptry Pseudokinase ROP54 Modulates Toxoplasma gondii Virulence and Host GBP2 Loading.

    PubMed

    Kim, Elliot W; Nadipuram, Santhosh M; Tetlow, Ashley L; Barshop, William D; Liu, Philip T; Wohlschlegel, James A; Bradley, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii uses unique secretory organelles called rhoptries to inject an array of effector proteins into the host cytoplasm that hijack host cell functions. We have discovered a novel rhoptry pseudokinase effector, ROP54, which is injected into the host cell upon invasion and traffics to the cytoplasmic face of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM). Disruption of ROP54 in a type II strain of T. gondii does not affect growth in vitro but results in a 100-fold decrease in virulence in vivo, suggesting that ROP54 modulates some aspect of the host immune response. We show that parasites lacking ROP54 are more susceptible to macrophage-dependent clearance, further suggesting that ROP54 is involved in evasion of innate immunity. To determine how ROP54 modulates parasite virulence, we examined the loading of two known innate immune effectors, immunity-related GTPase b6 (IRGb6) and guanylate binding protein 2 (GBP2), in wild-type and ∆rop54II mutant parasites. While no difference in IRGb6 loading was seen, we observed a substantial increase in GBP2 loading on the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) of ROP54-disrupted parasites. These results demonstrate that ROP54 is a novel rhoptry effector protein that promotes Toxoplasma infections by modulating GBP2 loading onto parasite-containing vacuoles. IMPORTANCE The interactions between intracellular microbes and their host cells can lead to the discovery of novel drug targets. During Toxoplasma infections, host cells express an array of immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) that load onto the parasite-containing vacuole to clear the parasite. To counter this mechanism, the parasite secretes effector proteins that traffic to the vacuole to disarm the immunity-related loading proteins and evade the immune response. While the interplay between host IRGs and Toxoplasma effector proteins is well understood, little is known about how Toxoplasma neutralizes the GBP response. We describe here a T

  1. The Rhoptry Pseudokinase ROP54 Modulates Toxoplasma gondii Virulence and Host GBP2 Loading

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Elliot W.; Nadipuram, Santhosh M.; Tetlow, Ashley L.; Barshop, William D.; Liu, Philip T.; Wohlschlegel, James A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toxoplasma gondii uses unique secretory organelles called rhoptries to inject an array of effector proteins into the host cytoplasm that hijack host cell functions. We have discovered a novel rhoptry pseudokinase effector, ROP54, which is injected into the host cell upon invasion and traffics to the cytoplasmic face of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM). Disruption of ROP54 in a type II strain of T. gondii does not affect growth in vitro but results in a 100-fold decrease in virulence in vivo, suggesting that ROP54 modulates some aspect of the host immune response. We show that parasites lacking ROP54 are more susceptible to macrophage-dependent clearance, further suggesting that ROP54 is involved in evasion of innate immunity. To determine how ROP54 modulates parasite virulence, we examined the loading of two known innate immune effectors, immunity-related GTPase b6 (IRGb6) and guanylate binding protein 2 (GBP2), in wild-type and ∆rop54II mutant parasites. While no difference in IRGb6 loading was seen, we observed a substantial increase in GBP2 loading on the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) of ROP54-disrupted parasites. These results demonstrate that ROP54 is a novel rhoptry effector protein that promotes Toxoplasma infections by modulating GBP2 loading onto parasite-containing vacuoles. IMPORTANCE The interactions between intracellular microbes and their host cells can lead to the discovery of novel drug targets. During Toxoplasma infections, host cells express an array of immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) that load onto the parasite-containing vacuole to clear the parasite. To counter this mechanism, the parasite secretes effector proteins that traffic to the vacuole to disarm the immunity-related loading proteins and evade the immune response. While the interplay between host IRGs and Toxoplasma effector proteins is well understood, little is known about how Toxoplasma neutralizes the GBP response. We describe

  2. Domain definition and target classification for CASP6.

    PubMed

    Tress, Michael; Tai, Chin-Hsien; Wang, Guoli; Ezkurdia, Iakes; López, Gonzalo; Valencia, Alfonso; Lee, Byungkook; Dunbrack, Roland L

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of structure predictions in CASP6 was based on single domains isolated from experimentally determined structures, which were categorized into comparative modeling, fold recognition, and new fold targets. Domain definitions were defined upon visual examination of the structures with the aid of automated domain-parsing programs. Domain categorization was determined by comparison of the target structures with those in the Protein Data Bank at the time each target expired and a variety of sequence and structure-based methods to determine potential homologous relationships. 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Generating target system specifications from a domain model using CLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugumaran, Vijayan; Gomaa, Hassan; Kerschberg, Larry

    1991-01-01

    The quest for reuse in software engineering is still being pursued and researchers are actively investigating the domain modeling approach to software construction. There are several domain modeling efforts reported in the literature and they all agree that the components that are generated from domain modeling are more conducive to reuse. Once a domain model is created, several target systems can be generated by tailoring the domain model or by evolving the domain model and then tailoring it according to the specified requirements. This paper presents the Evolutionary Domain Life Cycle (EDLC) paradigm in which a domain model is created using multiple views, namely, aggregation hierarchy, generalization/specialization hierarchies, object communication diagrams and state transition diagrams. The architecture of the Knowledge Based Requirements Elicitation Tool (KBRET) which is used to generate target system specifications is also presented. The preliminary version of KBRET is implemented in the C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS).

  4. Targeting of passenger protein domains to multiple intracellular membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Janiak, F; Glover, J R; Leber, B; Rachubinski, R A; Andrews, D W

    1994-01-01

    The role of passenger domains in protein targeting was examined by fusing previously characterized targeting motifs to different protein sequences. To compare the targeting requirements for a variety of subcellular compartments, targeting of the fusion proteins was examined for endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and peroxisomes in vitro and in yeast. Although most passenger domains were only partially passive to translocation, motif-dependent targeting via motifs positioned at either end of one passenger domain (gPA) was demonstrated for all of the subcellular compartments tested. The data presented extend earlier suggestions that translocation competence is an intrinsic property of the passenger protein. However, the properties that determine protein targeting are not mutually exclusive for the compartments tested. Therefore, although the primary determinant of specificity is the targeting motif, our results suggest that translocation competence of the targeted protein augments the fidelity of transport. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8198533

  5. The Drosophila melanogaster tribbles pseudokinase is necessary for proper memory formation.

    PubMed

    LaFerriere, Holly; Zars, Troy

    2017-10-01

    The tribbles (trbl) pseudokinases play important roles in signaling and physiology in multiple contexts, ranging from innate immunity to cancer, suggesting fundamental cellular functions for the trbls' gene products. Despite expression of the trbl pseudokinases in the nervous systems of invertebrate and vertebrate animals, and evidence that they have a function within mouse and human dopamine neurons, there is no clear case for a function of a Trbl protein that influences behavior. Indeed, the first and only evidence for this type of function comes from Drosophila melanogaster, where a mutation of the single trbl gene was identified in a genetic screen for short-term memory mutant flies. The current study tested flies containing multiple trbl mutant alleles and potential transgenic rescue in both operant place memory and classical olfactory memory paradigms. Genetic complementation tests and transgenic rescue of memory phenotypes in both paradigms show that the D. melanogaster trbl pseudokinase is essential for proper memory formation. Expression analysis with a polyclonal antiserum against Trbl shows that the protein is expressed widely in the fly brain, with higher expression in the cellular rind than the neuropil. Rescue of the behavioral phenotype with transgenic expression indicates the trbl function can be localized to a subset of the nervous system. Thus, we provide the first compelling case for the function of a trbl pseudokinase in the regulation of behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Exogenous agents that target transmembrane domains of proteins.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang

    2008-01-01

    Although membrane proteins account for approximately one third of all proteins encoded in the human genome, the functions and structures of their transmembrane domains are much less understood than the water-soluble regions. A major hurdle in studying these transmembrane domains is the lack of appropriate exogenous agents that can be used as specific probes. Despite the daunting challenges, major strides have recently been made in targeting the transmembrane domains of a variety of membrane proteins. High affinity and selectivity have been achieved in model biophysical systems, membranes of bacteria, and mammalian cells.

  7. The crystal structure of PknI from Mycobacterium tuberculosis shows an inactive, pseudokinase-like conformation.

    PubMed

    Lisa, María-Natalia; Wagner, Tristan; Alexandre, Matthieu; Barilone, Nathalie; Raynal, Bertrand; Alzari, Pedro M; Bellinzoni, Marco

    2017-02-01

    Eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr protein kinases (ePKs) have been identified in many bacterial species, where they are known to mediate signalling mechanisms that share several features with their eukaryotic counterparts. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, PknI is one of the 11 predicted ePKs and it has been related to bacterial virulence. In order to better understand the molecular basis of its role in mycobacterial signalling, we solved the crystal structure of the PknI cytoplasmic domain. We found that even though PknI possesses most conserved elements characteristic of Hanks-type kinases, it is degraded in several motifs that are essential for the ePKs catalytic activity. Most notably, PknI presents a remarkably short activation segment lacking a peptide-substrate binding site. Consistent with this observation and similar to earlier findings for eukaryotic pseudokinases, no kinase activity was detected for the catalytic domain of PknI, against different substrates and in various experimental conditions. Based on these results, we conclude that PknI may rely on unconventional mechanism(s) for kinase activity and/or it could play alternative role(s) in mycobacterial signalling.

  8. Limited Proteolysis Combined with Stable Isotope Labeling Reveals Conformational Changes in Protein (Pseudo)kinases upon Binding Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Di Michele, Michela; Stes, Elisabeth; Vandermarliere, Elien; Arora, Rohit; Astorga-Wells, Juan; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; van Heerde, Erika; Zubarev, Roman; Bonnet, Pascal; Linders, Joannes T M; Jacoby, Edgar; Brehmer, Dirk; Martens, Lennart; Gevaert, Kris

    2015-10-02

    Likely due to conformational rearrangements, small molecule inhibitors may stabilize the active conformation of protein kinases and paradoxically promote tumorigenesis. We combined limited proteolysis with stable isotope labeling MS to monitor protein conformational changes upon binding of small molecules. Applying this method to the human serine/threonine kinase B-Raf, frequently mutated in cancer, we found that binding of ATP or its nonhydrolyzable analogue AMP-PNP, but not ADP, stabilized the structure of both B-Raf(WT) and B-Raf(V600E). The ATP-competitive type I B-Raf inhibitor vemurafenib and the type II inhibitor sorafenib stabilized the kinase domain (KD) but had distinct effects on the Ras-binding domain. Stabilization of the B-Raf(WT) KD was confirmed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange MS and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results are further supported by cellular assays in which we assessed cell viability and phosphorylation profiles in cells expressing B-Raf(WT) or B-Raf(V600E) in response to vemurafenib or sorafenib. Our data indicate that an overall stabilization of the B-Raf structure by specific inhibitors activates MAPK signaling and increases cell survival, helping to explain clinical treatment failure. We also applied our method to monitor conformational changes upon nucleotide binding of the pseudokinase KSR1, which holds high potential for inhibition in human diseases.

  9. The receptor-like pseudokinase MRH1 interacts with the voltage-gated potassium channel AKT2

    PubMed Central

    Sklodowski, Kamil; Riedelsberger, Janin; Raddatz, Natalia; Riadi, Gonzalo; Caballero, Julio; Chérel, Isabelle; Schulze, Waltraud; Graf, Alexander; Dreyer, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    The potassium channel AKT2 plays important roles in phloem loading and unloading. It can operate as inward-rectifying channel that allows H+-ATPase-energized K+ uptake. Moreover, through reversible post-translational modifications it can also function as an open, K+-selective channel, which taps a ‘potassium battery’, providing additional energy for transmembrane transport processes. Knowledge about proteins involved in the regulation of the operational mode of AKT2 is very limited. Here, we employed a large-scale yeast two-hybrid screen in combination with fluorescence tagging and null-allele mutant phenotype analysis and identified the plasma membrane localized receptor-like kinase MRH1/MDIS2 (AT4G18640) as interaction partner of AKT2. The phenotype of the mrh1-1 knockout plant mirrors that of akt2 knockout plants in energy limiting conditions. Electrophysiological analyses showed that MRH1/MDIS2 failed to exert any functional regulation on AKT2. Using structural protein modeling approaches, we instead gathered evidence that the putative kinase domain of MRH1/MDIS2 lacks essential sites that are indispensable for a functional kinase suggesting that MRH1/MDIS2 is a pseudokinase. We propose that MRH1/MDIS2 and AKT2 are likely parts of a bigger protein complex. MRH1 might help to recruit other, so far unknown partners, which post-translationally regulate AKT2. Additionally, MRH1 might be involved in the recognition of chemical signals. PMID:28300158

  10. The receptor-like pseudokinase MRH1 interacts with the voltage-gated potassium channel AKT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklodowski, Kamil; Riedelsberger, Janin; Raddatz, Natalia; Riadi, Gonzalo; Caballero, Julio; Chérel, Isabelle; Schulze, Waltraud; Graf, Alexander; Dreyer, Ingo

    2017-03-01

    The potassium channel AKT2 plays important roles in phloem loading and unloading. It can operate as inward-rectifying channel that allows H+-ATPase-energized K+ uptake. Moreover, through reversible post-translational modifications it can also function as an open, K+-selective channel, which taps a ‘potassium battery’, providing additional energy for transmembrane transport processes. Knowledge about proteins involved in the regulation of the operational mode of AKT2 is very limited. Here, we employed a large-scale yeast two-hybrid screen in combination with fluorescence tagging and null-allele mutant phenotype analysis and identified the plasma membrane localized receptor-like kinase MRH1/MDIS2 (AT4G18640) as interaction partner of AKT2. The phenotype of the mrh1-1 knockout plant mirrors that of akt2 knockout plants in energy limiting conditions. Electrophysiological analyses showed that MRH1/MDIS2 failed to exert any functional regulation on AKT2. Using structural protein modeling approaches, we instead gathered evidence that the putative kinase domain of MRH1/MDIS2 lacks essential sites that are indispensable for a functional kinase suggesting that MRH1/MDIS2 is a pseudokinase. We propose that MRH1/MDIS2 and AKT2 are likely parts of a bigger protein complex. MRH1 might help to recruit other, so far unknown partners, which post-translationally regulate AKT2. Additionally, MRH1 might be involved in the recognition of chemical signals.

  11. The receptor-like pseudokinase MRH1 interacts with the voltage-gated potassium channel AKT2.

    PubMed

    Sklodowski, Kamil; Riedelsberger, Janin; Raddatz, Natalia; Riadi, Gonzalo; Caballero, Julio; Chérel, Isabelle; Schulze, Waltraud; Graf, Alexander; Dreyer, Ingo

    2017-03-16

    The potassium channel AKT2 plays important roles in phloem loading and unloading. It can operate as inward-rectifying channel that allows H(+)-ATPase-energized K(+) uptake. Moreover, through reversible post-translational modifications it can also function as an open, K(+)-selective channel, which taps a 'potassium battery', providing additional energy for transmembrane transport processes. Knowledge about proteins involved in the regulation of the operational mode of AKT2 is very limited. Here, we employed a large-scale yeast two-hybrid screen in combination with fluorescence tagging and null-allele mutant phenotype analysis and identified the plasma membrane localized receptor-like kinase MRH1/MDIS2 (AT4G18640) as interaction partner of AKT2. The phenotype of the mrh1-1 knockout plant mirrors that of akt2 knockout plants in energy limiting conditions. Electrophysiological analyses showed that MRH1/MDIS2 failed to exert any functional regulation on AKT2. Using structural protein modeling approaches, we instead gathered evidence that the putative kinase domain of MRH1/MDIS2 lacks essential sites that are indispensable for a functional kinase suggesting that MRH1/MDIS2 is a pseudokinase. We propose that MRH1/MDIS2 and AKT2 are likely parts of a bigger protein complex. MRH1 might help to recruit other, so far unknown partners, which post-translationally regulate AKT2. Additionally, MRH1 might be involved in the recognition of chemical signals.

  12. Superdiffusive motion of membrane-targeting C2 domains

    PubMed Central

    Campagnola, Grace; Nepal, Kanti; Schroder, Bryce W.; Peersen, Olve B.; Krapf, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Membrane-targeting domains play crucial roles in the recruitment of signalling molecules to the plasma membrane. For most peripheral proteins, the protein-to-membrane interaction is transient. After proteins dissociate from the membrane they have been observed to rebind following brief excursions in the bulk solution. Such membrane hops can have broad implications for the efficiency of reactions on membranes. We study the diffusion of membrane-targeting C2 domains using single-molecule tracking in supported lipid bilayers. The ensemble-averaged mean square displacement (MSD) exhibits superdiffusive behaviour. However, traditional time-averaged MSD analysis of individual trajectories remains linear and does not reveal superdiffusion. Our observations are explained in terms of bulk excursions that introduce jumps with a heavy-tail distribution. These hopping events allow proteins to explore large areas in a short time. The experimental results are shown to be consistent with analytical models of bulk-mediated diffusion and numerical simulations. PMID:26639944

  13. Superdiffusive motion of membrane-targeting C2 domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagnola, Grace; Nepal, Kanti; Schroder, Bryce W.; Peersen, Olve B.; Krapf, Diego

    2015-12-01

    Membrane-targeting domains play crucial roles in the recruitment of signalling molecules to the plasma membrane. For most peripheral proteins, the protein-to-membrane interaction is transient. After proteins dissociate from the membrane they have been observed to rebind following brief excursions in the bulk solution. Such membrane hops can have broad implications for the efficiency of reactions on membranes. We study the diffusion of membrane-targeting C2 domains using single-molecule tracking in supported lipid bilayers. The ensemble-averaged mean square displacement (MSD) exhibits superdiffusive behaviour. However, traditional time-averaged MSD analysis of individual trajectories remains linear and does not reveal superdiffusion. Our observations are explained in terms of bulk excursions that introduce jumps with a heavy-tail distribution. These hopping events allow proteins to explore large areas in a short time. The experimental results are shown to be consistent with analytical models of bulk-mediated diffusion and numerical simulations.

  14. Radar target imaging by time-domain inverse scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morag, M.

    1981-03-01

    This thesis describes the study and development of a workable inverse scattering method for imaging and identification of radar targets. The space-time integral approach is used for iterative target shape reconstruction. Following an overview of transient electromagnetics, the integral equation is applied for thin-wire transient response computation. The analytical time domain integral equation is derived and solved numerically, for general conducting bodies of revolution. Finally the algorithm for an inverse scattering computer solution is derived and tested under simulation of physical environments.

  15. Improving the targeting of therapeutics with single-domain antibodies.

    PubMed

    Turner, Kendrick B; Alves, Nathan J; Medintz, Igor L; Walper, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    The targeted delivery of therapeutic agents greatly increases their effectiveness while simultaneously reducing negative side effects. In the past, targeting of therapeutics has been accomplished with nucleic acids, peptides/proteins, and conventional antibodies. A promising alternative to the conventional antibodies often used in therapeutic targeting are significantly smaller-sized antibody fragments known as single-domain antibodies (sdAbs). Recent advances in the utility of sdAbs for targeting of therapeutic agents along with relevant examples from the literature are discussed. Their advantages when compared to other targeting strategies as well as their challenges and limitations is also covered. The development of sdAb-based targeted therapeutics will likely continue. The identification of novel protein modification techniques will provide more options for sdAb modification (conjugation, immobilization, functionalization), allowing a wider array of therapeutic agents to be successfully targeted and delivered using sdAbs. This will also spur the selection of sdAbs with specificity for other targets having relevance towards therapeutics.

  16. Coverage Assessment and Target Tracking in 3D Domains

    PubMed Central

    Boudriga, Noureddine; Hamdi, Mohamed; Iyengar, Sitharama

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in integrated electronic devices motivated the use of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) in many applications including domain surveillance and mobile target tracking, where a number of sensors are scattered within a sensitive region to detect the presence of intruders and forward related events to some analysis center(s). Obviously, sensor deployment should guarantee an optimal event detection rate and should reduce coverage holes. Most of the coverage control approaches proposed in the literature deal with two-dimensional zones and do not develop strategies to handle coverage in three-dimensional domains, which is becoming a requirement for many applications including water monitoring, indoor surveillance, and projectile tracking. This paper proposes efficient techniques to detect coverage holes in a 3D domain using a finite set of sensors, repair the holes, and track hostile targets. To this end, we use the concepts of Voronoi tessellation, Vietoris complex, and retract by deformation. We show in particular that, through a set of iterative transformations of the Vietoris complex corresponding to the deployed sensors, the number of coverage holes can be computed with a low complexity. Mobility strategies are also proposed to repair holes by moving appropriately sensors towards the uncovered zones. The tracking objective is to set a non-uniform WSN coverage within the monitored domain to allow detecting the target(s) by the set of sensors. We show, in particular, how the proposed algorithms adapt to cope with obstacles. Simulation experiments are carried out to analyze the efficiency of the proposed models. To our knowledge, repairing and tracking is addressed for the first time in 3D spaces with different sensor coverage schemes. PMID:22163733

  17. Coverage assessment and target tracking in 3D domains.

    PubMed

    Boudriga, Noureddine; Hamdi, Mohamed; Iyengar, Sitharama

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in integrated electronic devices motivated the use of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) in many applications including domain surveillance and mobile target tracking, where a number of sensors are scattered within a sensitive region to detect the presence of intruders and forward related events to some analysis center(s). Obviously, sensor deployment should guarantee an optimal event detection rate and should reduce coverage holes. Most of the coverage control approaches proposed in the literature deal with two-dimensional zones and do not develop strategies to handle coverage in three-dimensional domains, which is becoming a requirement for many applications including water monitoring, indoor surveillance, and projectile tracking. This paper proposes efficient techniques to detect coverage holes in a 3D domain using a finite set of sensors, repair the holes, and track hostile targets. To this end, we use the concepts of Voronoi tessellation, Vietoris complex, and retract by deformation. We show in particular that, through a set of iterative transformations of the Vietoris complex corresponding to the deployed sensors, the number of coverage holes can be computed with a low complexity. Mobility strategies are also proposed to repair holes by moving appropriately sensors towards the uncovered zones. The tracking objective is to set a non-uniform WSN coverage within the monitored domain to allow detecting the target(s) by the set of sensors. We show, in particular, how the proposed algorithms adapt to cope with obstacles. Simulation experiments are carried out to analyze the efficiency of the proposed models. To our knowledge, repairing and tracking is addressed for the first time in 3D spaces with different sensor coverage schemes.

  18. Structural Basis for Endosomal Targeting by the Bro1 Domain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaewon; Sitaraman, Sujatha; Hierro, Aitor; Beach, Bridgette M.; Odorizzi, Greg; Hurley, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Proteins delivered to the lysosome or the yeast vacuole via late endosomes are sorted by the ESCRT complexes and by associated proteins, including Alix and its yeast homolog Bro1. Alix, Bro1, and several other late endosomal proteins share a conserved 160 residue Bro1 domain whose boundaries, structure, and function have not been characterized. The crystal structure of the Bro1 domain of Bro1 reveals a folded core of 367 residues. The extended Bro1 domain is necessary and sufficient for binding to the ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 and for the recruitment of Bro1 to late endosomes. The structure resembles a boomerang with its concave face filled in and contains a triple tetratricopeptide repeat domain as a substructure. Snf7 binds to a conserved hydrophobic patch on Bro1 that is required for protein complex formation and for the protein-sorting function of Bro1. These results define a conserved mechanism whereby Bro1 domain-containing proteins are targeted to endosomes by Snf7 and its orthologs. PMID:15935782

  19. Structural basis for endosomal targeting by the Bro1 domain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaewon; Sitaraman, Sujatha; Hierro, Aitor; Beach, Bridgette M; Odorizzi, Greg; Hurley, James H

    2005-06-01

    Proteins delivered to the lysosome or the yeast vacuole via late endosomes are sorted by the ESCRT complexes and by associated proteins, including Alix and its yeast homolog Bro1. Alix, Bro1, and several other late endosomal proteins share a conserved 160 residue Bro1 domain whose boundaries, structure, and function have not been characterized. The crystal structure of the Bro1 domain of Bro1 reveals a folded core of 367 residues. The extended Bro1 domain is necessary and sufficient for binding to the ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 and for the recruitment of Bro1 to late endosomes. The structure resembles a boomerang with its concave face filled in and contains a triple tetratricopeptide repeat domain as a substructure. Snf7 binds to a conserved hydrophobic patch on Bro1 that is required for protein complex formation and for the protein-sorting function of Bro1. These results define a conserved mechanism whereby Bro1 domain-containing proteins are targeted to endosomes by Snf7 and its orthologs.

  20. Targeting proteins to liquid-ordered domains in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Hayden, Carl C; Sanchez, Mari Angelica A; Wang, Julia; Bunker, Bruce C; Voigt, James A; Sasaki, Darryl Y

    2011-02-15

    We demonstrate the construction of novel protein-lipid assemblies through the design of a lipid-like molecule, DPIDA, endowed with tail-driven affinity for specific lipid membrane phases and head-driven affinity for specific proteins. In studies performed on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) with varying mole fractions of dipalymitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesterol, and diphytanoylphosphatidyl choline (DPhPC), DPIDA selectively partitioned into the more ordered phases, either solid or liquid-ordered (L(o)) depending on membrane composition. Fluorescence imaging established the phase behavior of the resulting quaternary lipid system. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy confirmed the fluidity of the L(o) phase containing DPIDA. In the presence of CuCl(2), the iminodiacetic acid (IDA) headgroup of DPIDA forms the Cu(II)-IDA complex that exhibits a high affinity for histidine residues. His-tagged proteins were bound specifically to domains enriched in DPIDA, demonstrating the capacity to target protein binding selectively to both solid and L(o) phases. Steric pressure from the crowding of surface-bound proteins transformed the domains into tubules with persistence lengths that depended on the phase state of the lipid domains.

  1. Adenoviral targeting using genetically incorporated camelid single variable domains

    PubMed Central

    Kaliberov, Sergey A.; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N.; Buggio, Maurizio; Tremblay, Jacqueline M.; Shoemaker, Charles B.; Curiel, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The unique ability of human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) to accomplish efficient transduction has allowed the use of Ad5-based vectors for a range of gene therapy applications. Several strategies have been developed to alter tropism of Ad vectors to achieve a cell-specific gene delivery by employing fiber modifications via genetic incorporation of targeting motifs. In this study we have explored the utility of novel anti-human carcinoembryonic antigen (hCEA) single variable domains derived from heavy chain (VHH) camelid family of antibodies to achieve targeted gene transfer. To obtain anti-CEA VHHs we produced a VHH-display library from peripheral blood lymphocytes RNA of alpacas at the peak of immune response to the hCEA antigen. We genetically incorporated an anti-hCEA VHH into a de-knobbed Ad5 fiber-fibritin chimera and demonstrated selective targeting to the cognate epitope expressed on the membrane surface of target cells. We report that the anti-hCEA VHH employed in this study retains antigen recognition functionality and provides specificity for gene transfer of capsid-modified Ad5 vectors. These studies clearly demonstrated the feasibility of retargeting of Ad5-based gene transfer using VHHs. PMID:24933423

  2. Adenoviral targeting using genetically incorporated camelid single variable domains.

    PubMed

    Kaliberov, Sergey A; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N; Buggio, Maurizio; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Shoemaker, Charles B; Curiel, David T

    2014-08-01

    The unique ability of human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) to accomplish efficient transduction has allowed the use of Ad5-based vectors for a range of gene therapy applications. Several strategies have been developed to alter tropism of Ad vectors to achieve a cell-specific gene delivery by using fiber modifications via genetic incorporation of targeting motifs. In this study, we have explored the utility of novel anti-human carcinoembryonic antigen (hCEA) single variable domains derived from heavy chain (VHH) camelid family of antibodies to achieve targeted gene transfer. To obtain anti-CEA VHHs, we produced a VHH-display library from peripheral blood lymphocytes RNA of alpacas at the peak of immune response to the hCEA antigen (Ag). We genetically incorporated an anti-hCEA VHH into a de-knobbed Ad5 fiber-fibritin chimera and demonstrated selective targeting to the cognate epitope expressed on the membrane surface of target cells. We report that the anti-hCEA VHH used in this study retains Ag recognition functionality and provides specificity for gene transfer of capsid-modified Ad5 vectors. These studies clearly demonstrated the feasibility of retargeting of Ad5-based gene transfer using VHHs.

  3. Fourier domain target transformation analysis in the thermal infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Remote sensing uses of principal component analysis (PCA) of multispectral images include band selection and optimal color selection for display of information content. PCA has also been used for quantitative determination of mineral types and abundances given end member spectra. The preliminary results of the investigation of target transformation PCA (TTPCA) in the fourier domain to both identify end member spectra in an unknown spectrum, and to then calculate the relative concentrations of these selected end members are presented. Identification of endmember spectra in an unknown sample has previously been performed through bandmatching, expert systems, and binary classifiers. Both bandmatching and expert system techniques require the analyst to select bands or combinations of bands unique to each endmember. Thermal infrared mineral spectra have broad spectral features which vary subtly with composition. This makes identification of unique features difficult. Alternatively, whole spectra can be used in the classification process, in which case there is not need for an expert to identify unique spectra. Use of binary classifiers on whole spectra to identify endmember components has met with some success. These techniques can be used, along with a least squares fit approach on the endmembers identified, to derive compositional information. An alternative to the approach outlined above usese target transformation in conjunction with PCA to both identify and quantify the composition of unknown spectra. Preprocessing of the library and unknown spectra into the fourier domain, and using only a specific number of the components, allows for significant data volume reduction while maintaining a linear relationship in a Beer's Law sense. The approach taken here is to iteratively calculate concentrations, reducing the number of endmember components until only non-negative concentrations remain.

  4. Fourier domain target transformation analysis in the thermal infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Remote sensing uses of principal component analysis (PCA) of multispectral images include band selection and optimal color selection for display of information content. PCA has also been used for quantitative determination of mineral types and abundances given end member spectra. The preliminary results of the investigation of target transformation PCA (TTPCA) in the fourier domain to both identify end member spectra in an unknown spectrum, and to then calculate the relative concentrations of these selected end members are presented. Identification of endmember spectra in an unknown sample has previously been performed through bandmatching, expert systems, and binary classifiers. Both bandmatching and expert system techniques require the analyst to select bands or combinations of bands unique to each endmember. Thermal infrared mineral spectra have broad spectral features which vary subtly with composition. This makes identification of unique features difficult. Alternatively, whole spectra can be used in the classification process, in which case there is not need for an expert to identify unique spectra. Use of binary classifiers on whole spectra to identify endmember components has met with some success. These techniques can be used, along with a least squares fit approach on the endmembers identified, to derive compositional information. An alternative to the approach outlined above usese target transformation in conjunction with PCA to both identify and quantify the composition of unknown spectra. Preprocessing of the library and unknown spectra into the fourier domain, and using only a specific number of the components, allows for significant data volume reduction while maintaining a linear relationship in a Beer's Law sense. The approach taken here is to iteratively calculate concentrations, reducing the number of endmember components until only non-negative concentrations remain.

  5. The pseudokinase CaMKv is required for the activity-dependent maintenance of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhuoyi; Zhan, Yi; Shen, Yang; Wong, Catherine C. L.; Yates, John R.; Plattner, Florian; Lai, Kwok-On; Ip, Nancy Y.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spine stabilization depends on afferent synaptic input and requires changes in actin cytoskeleton dynamics and protein synthesis. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here we report the identification of ‘calmodulin kinase-like vesicle-associated' (CaMKv), a pseudokinase of the CaMK family with unknown function, as a synaptic protein crucial for dendritic spine maintenance. CaMKv mRNA localizes at dendrites, and its protein synthesis is regulated by neuronal activity. CaMKv function is inhibited upon phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) at Thr345. Furthermore, CaMKv knockdown in mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons impairs synaptic transmission and plasticity in vivo, resulting in hyperactivity and spatial memory impairment. These findings collectively indicate that the precise regulation of CaMKv through activity-dependent synthesis and post-translational phosphorylation is critical for dendritic spine maintenance, revealing an unusual signalling pathway in the regulation of synaptic transmission and brain function that involves a pseudokinase. PMID:27796283

  6. Bacterial collagen-binding domain targets undertwisted regions of collagen

    PubMed Central

    Philominathan, Sagaya Theresa Leena; Koide, Takaki; Matsushita, Osamu; Sakon, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium histolyticum collagenase causes extensive degradation of collagen in connective tissue that results in gas gangrene. The C-terminal collagen-binding domain (CBD) of these enzymes is the minimal segment required to bind to a collagen fibril. CBD binds unidirectionally to the undertwisted C-terminus of triple helical collagen. Here, we examine whether CBD could also target undertwisted regions even in the middle of the triple helix. Collageneous peptides with an additional undertwisted region were synthesized by introducing a Gly → Ala substitution [(POG)xPOA(POG)y]3, where x + y = 9 and x > 3). 1H–15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance (HSQC NMR) titration studies with 15N-labeled CBD demonstrated that the minicollagen binds to a 10 Å wide 25 Å long cleft. Six collagenous peptides each labeled with a nitroxide radical were then titrated with 15N-labeled CBD. CBD binds to either the Gly → Ala substitution site or to the C-terminus of each minicollagen. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements revealed that CBD prefers to bind the Gly → Ala site to the C-terminus. The HSQC NMR spectra of 15N-labeled minicollagen and minicollagen with undertwisted regions were unaffected by the titration of unlabeled CBD. The results imply that CBD binds to the undertwisted region of the minicollagen but does not actively unwind the triple helix. PMID:22898990

  7. Mechanism of specific membrane targeting by C2 domains: localized pools of target lipids enhance Ca2+ affinity.

    PubMed

    Corbin, John A; Evans, John H; Landgraf, Kyle E; Falke, Joseph J

    2007-04-10

    The C2 domain is a ubiquitous, conserved protein signaling motif widely found in eukaryotic signaling proteins. Although considerable functional diversity exists, most C2 domains are activated by Ca2+ binding and then dock to a specific cellular membrane. The C2 domains of protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and cytosolic phospholipase A2alpha (cPLA2alpha), for example, are known to dock to different membrane surfaces during an intracellular Ca2+ signal. Ca2+ activation targets the PKCalpha C2 domain to the plasma membrane and the cPLA2alpha C2 domain to the internal membranes, with no detectable spatial overlap. It is crucial to determine how such targeting specificity is achieved at physiological bulk Ca2+ concentrations that during a typical signaling event rarely exceed 1 muM. For the isolated PKCalpha C2 domain in the presence of physiological Ca2+ levels, the target lipids phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) are together sufficient to recruit the PKCalpha C2 domain to a lipid mixture mimicking the plasma membrane inner leaflet. For the cPLA2alpha C2 domain, the target lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) appears to be sufficient to drive membrane targeting to an internal membrane mimic at physiological Ca2+ levels, although the results do not rule out a second, unknown target molecule. Stopped-flow kinetic studies provide additional information about the fundamental molecular events that occur during Ca2+-activated membrane docking. In principle, C2 domain-directed intracellular targeting, which requires coincidence detection of multiple signals (Ca2+ and one or more target lipids), can exhibit two different mechanisms: messenger-activated target affinity (MATA) and target-activated messenger affinity (TAMA). The C2 domains studied here both utilize the TAMA mechanism, in which the C2 domain Ca2+ affinity is too low to be activated by physiological Ca2+ signals in most regions of the cell. Only when the C2 domain nears its target

  8. Discoidin Domain Receptors: Potential Actors and Targets in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rammal, Hassan; Saby, Charles; Magnien, Kevin; Van-Gulick, Laurence; Garnotel, Roselyne; Buache, Emilie; El Btaouri, Hassan; Jeannesson, Pierre; Morjani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix critically controls cancer cell behavior by inducing several signaling pathways through cell membrane receptors. Besides conferring structural properties to tissues around the tumor, the extracellular matrix is able to regulate cell proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion. Among these receptors, the integrins family constitutes a major class of receptors that mediate cell interactions with extracellular matrix components. Twenty years ago, a new class of extracellular matrix receptors has been discovered. These tyrosine kinase receptors are the two discoidin domain receptors DDR1 and DDR2. DDR1 was first identified in the Dictyostelium discoideum and was shown to mediate cell aggregation. DDR2 shares highly conserved sequences with DDR1. Both receptors are activated upon binding to collagen, one of the most abundant proteins in extracellular matrix. While DDR2 can only be activated by fibrillar collagen, particularly types I and III, DDR1 is mostly activated by type I and IV collagens. In contrast with classical growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors which display a rapid and transient activation, DDR1 and DDR2 are unique in that they exhibit delayed and sustained receptor phosphorylation upon binding to collagen. Recent studies have reported differential expression and mutations of DDR1 and DDR2 in several cancer types and indicate clearly that these receptors have to be taken into account as new players in the different aspects of tumor progression, from non-malignant to highly malignant and invasive stages. This review will discuss the current knowledge on the role of DDR1 and DDR2 in malignant transformation, cell proliferation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, migratory, and invasive processes, and finally the modulation of the response to chemotherapy. These new insights suggest that DDR1 and DDR2 are new potential targets in cancer therapy.

  9. Discoidin Domain Receptors: Potential Actors and Targets in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rammal, Hassan; Saby, Charles; Magnien, Kevin; Van-Gulick, Laurence; Garnotel, Roselyne; Buache, Emilie; El Btaouri, Hassan; Jeannesson, Pierre; Morjani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix critically controls cancer cell behavior by inducing several signaling pathways through cell membrane receptors. Besides conferring structural properties to tissues around the tumor, the extracellular matrix is able to regulate cell proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion. Among these receptors, the integrins family constitutes a major class of receptors that mediate cell interactions with extracellular matrix components. Twenty years ago, a new class of extracellular matrix receptors has been discovered. These tyrosine kinase receptors are the two discoidin domain receptors DDR1 and DDR2. DDR1 was first identified in the Dictyostelium discoideum and was shown to mediate cell aggregation. DDR2 shares highly conserved sequences with DDR1. Both receptors are activated upon binding to collagen, one of the most abundant proteins in extracellular matrix. While DDR2 can only be activated by fibrillar collagen, particularly types I and III, DDR1 is mostly activated by type I and IV collagens. In contrast with classical growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors which display a rapid and transient activation, DDR1 and DDR2 are unique in that they exhibit delayed and sustained receptor phosphorylation upon binding to collagen. Recent studies have reported differential expression and mutations of DDR1 and DDR2 in several cancer types and indicate clearly that these receptors have to be taken into account as new players in the different aspects of tumor progression, from non-malignant to highly malignant and invasive stages. This review will discuss the current knowledge on the role of DDR1 and DDR2 in malignant transformation, cell proliferation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, migratory, and invasive processes, and finally the modulation of the response to chemotherapy. These new insights suggest that DDR1 and DDR2 are new potential targets in cancer therapy. PMID:27014069

  10. Knowledge-based approach for generating target system specifications from a domain model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomaa, Hassan; Kerschberg, Larry; Sugumaran, Vijayan

    1992-01-01

    Several institutions in industry and academia are pursuing research efforts in domain modeling to address unresolved issues in software reuse. To demonstrate the concepts of domain modeling and software reuse, a prototype software engineering environment is being developed at George Mason University to support the creation of domain models and the generation of target system specifications. This prototype environment, which is application domain independent, consists of an integrated set of commercial off-the-shelf software tools and custom-developed software tools. This paper describes the knowledge-based tool that was developed as part of the environment to generate target system specifications from a domain model.

  11. Structures and target recognition modes of PDZ domains: recurring themes and emerging pictures.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; Zhang, Mingjie

    2013-10-01

    PDZ domains are highly abundant protein-protein interaction modules and are often found in multidomain scaffold proteins. PDZ-domain-containing scaffold proteins regulate multiple biological processes, including trafficking and clustering receptors and ion channels at defined membrane regions, organizing and targeting signalling complexes at specific cellular compartments, interfacing cytoskeletal structures with membranes, and maintaining various cellular structures. PDZ domains, each with ~90-amino-acid residues folding into a highly similar structure, are best known to bind to short C-terminal tail peptides of their target proteins. A series of recent studies have revealed that, in addition to the canonical target-binding mode, many PDZ-target interactions involve amino acid residues beyond the regular PDZ domain fold, which we refer to as extensions. Such extension sequences often form an integral structural and functional unit with the attached PDZ domain, which is defined as a PDZ supramodule. Correspondingly, PDZ-domain-binding sequences from target proteins are frequently found to require extension sequences beyond canonical short C-terminal tail peptides. Formation of PDZ supramodules not only affords necessary binding specificities and affinities demanded by physiological functions of PDZ domain targets, but also provides regulatory switches to be built in the PDZ-target interactions. At the 20th anniversary of the discovery of PDZ domain proteins, we try to summarize structural features and target-binding properties of such PDZ supramodules emerging from studies in recent years.

  12. Unsupervised Spatial Event Detection in Targeted Domains with Applications to Civil Unrest Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Feng; Dai, Jing; Hua, Ting; Lu, Chang-Tien; Ramakrishnan, Naren

    2014-01-01

    Twitter has become a popular data source as a surrogate for monitoring and detecting events. Targeted domains such as crime, election, and social unrest require the creation of algorithms capable of detecting events pertinent to these domains. Due to the unstructured language, short-length messages, dynamics, and heterogeneity typical of Twitter data streams, it is technically difficult and labor-intensive to develop and maintain supervised learning systems. We present a novel unsupervised approach for detecting spatial events in targeted domains and illustrate this approach using one specific domain, viz. civil unrest modeling. Given a targeted domain, we propose a dynamic query expansion algorithm to iteratively expand domain-related terms, and generate a tweet homogeneous graph. An anomaly identification method is utilized to detect spatial events over this graph by jointly maximizing local modularity and spatial scan statistics. Extensive experiments conducted in 10 Latin American countries demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:25350136

  13. Using llama derived single domain antibodies to target botulinum neurotoxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Marla D.; Anderson, George P.; Bernstein, Rachael D.; Liu, Jinny L.; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2010-04-01

    Llama serum contains both conventional IgG as well as unique forms of antibody that contain only heavy chains where antigen binding is mediated through a single variable domain. These variable domains can be expressed recombinantly and are referred to as single domain antibodies (sdAb). SdAb are among the smallest known naturally derived antigen binding fragments, possess good solubility, thermal stability, and can refold after heat and chemical denaturation. Llamas were immunized with either BoNT A or B toxoid and phage display libraries prepared. Single domain antibodies (sdAb) that were able to detect botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A and B were selected from their respective libraries. Here, the binders obtained by panning the BoNT B library on either BoNT B toxoid or BoNT B complex toxoid coated plates or BoNT B toxin coupled microspheres are described. Using these panning methods, we selected for binders that showed specificity for BoNT B. Phage displayed binders were screened, moved to a protein expression vector and soluble sdAb was produced. Using a Luminex flow cytometer binders were evaluated in direct binding assays. We have exploited the unique properties of sdAb and used them as biological recognition elements in immuno-based sensors that can detect BoNT B.

  14. Differences between lumen targeting domains of chloroplast transit peptides determine pathway specificity for thylakoid transport.

    PubMed

    Henry, R; Kapazoglou, A; McCaffery, M; Cline, K

    1994-04-08

    Nuclear encoded thylakoid lumen proteins are imported into the chloroplast storma and further directed across thylakoid membranes by lumen targeting domains. Recently, we showed that there are two protein-specific pathways for transport into the lumen. This was unexpected in that lumen targeting domains have similar properties, all containing bacterial signal peptide motifs. Nevertheless, sequence homology analysis suggests that pathway specificity is determined by elements in the lumen targeting domain. To test this, we constructed and analyzed chimeric proteins in which transit peptides from proteins transported by one pathway were fused to the mature domains of proteins directed by the other. We also investigated the transport characteristics of a previously unexamined protein whose pathway was predicted by sequence similarity analysis. Our results confirm that lumen targeting domains contain pathway sorting elements and further indicate that distinct energy and stroma requirements for transport are pathway characteristics, unrelated to the passenger protein. These findings suggest the operation of two mechanistically different translocators.

  15. Discovery of cancer drug targets by CRISPR-Cas9 screening of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junwei; Wang, Eric; Milazzo, Joseph P; Wang, Zihua; Kinney, Justin B; Vakoc, Christopher R

    2015-06-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology holds great promise for discovering therapeutic targets in cancer and other diseases. Current screening strategies target CRISPR-Cas9-induced mutations to the 5' exons of candidate genes, but this approach often produces in-frame variants that retain functionality, which can obscure even strong genetic dependencies. Here we overcome this limitation by targeting CRISPR-Cas9 mutagenesis to exons encoding functional protein domains. This generates a higher proportion of null mutations and substantially increases the potency of negative selection. We also show that the magnitude of negative selection can be used to infer the functional importance of individual protein domains of interest. A screen of 192 chromatin regulatory domains in murine acute myeloid leukemia cells identifies six known drug targets and 19 additional dependencies. A broader application of this approach may allow comprehensive identification of protein domains that sustain cancer cells and are suitable for drug targeting.

  16. Discoidin Domain Receptors: Novel Targets in Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-01

    of invasive BrCa cases with different molecular subtypes, and found a significant inverse association between cytoplasmic DDR1 localization and...further examine the association between DDR expression in primary tumors and development of BrCa bone metastasis. In our experimental studies, we have... associated DDRs on the regulation of pro- and anti-osteolytic genes in vitro. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast cancer, bone metastasis, discoidin domain

  17. Suppression of TLR signaling by targeting TIR domain-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Fekonja, Ota; Avbelj, Monika; Jerala, Roman

    2012-12-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize molecules specific to pathogens and endogenous danger signals. Binding of agonists to the ectodomain of the receptor initiates TLR activation and is followed by the association of receptor cytosolic Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains with TIR domains of adapter proteins leading to the assembly of signaling cascade of protein kinases that ultimately trigger the activation of transcription factors and expression of genes involved in the immune response. Excessive activation of TIR-domain mediated signaling has been implicated in inflammatory diseases (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, colitis) as well as in the development of cancer. Targeting receptor-adapter interactions represents a potential strategy for the therapeutic TLR/IL-1R-specific inhibition due to the unique interacting domains involved. Peptide and protein-domain binding TLR inhibitors originating from the interacting surfaces of TIR-domain containing proteins can bind to the site on their target interacting protein thereby preventing the assembly of the functional signaling complex. Here we review protein-domain, peptide and peptidomimetic inhibitors targeting TIR-domain mediated interactions and their application demonstrated on in vitro and in vivo models. Recent structural data and elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of TIR-domain mediated signaling enabled the development of peptide inhibitors from TIR domains of TLRs and adapters, MyD88 intermediary domain as well as improved protein inhibitors based on TIR domain dimerization, mimicking bacterial TIR-domain containing immunosuppressors (TCPs) which we discuss with challenges concerning the delivery and specificity of inhibitors targeting TLR adapters.

  18. Suppression of TLR Signaling by Targeting TIR domain-Containing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fekonja, Ota; Avbelj, Monika; Jerala, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize molecules specific to pathogens and endogenous danger signals. Binding of agonists to the ectodomain of the receptor initiates TLR activation and is followed by the association of receptor cytosolic Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains with TIR domains of adapter proteins leading to the assembly of signaling cascade of protein kinases that ultimately trigger the activation of transcription factors and expression of genes involved in the immune response. Excessive activation of TIR-domain mediated signaling has been implicated in inflammatory diseases (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, colitis) as well as in the development of cancer. Targeting receptor-adapter interactions represents a potential strategy for the therapeutic TLR/IL-1R-specific inhibition due to the unique interacting domains involved. Peptide and protein-domain binding TLR inhibitors originating from the interacting surfaces of TIR-domain containing proteins can bind to the site on their target interacting protein thereby preventing the assembly of the functional signaling complex. Here we review protein-domain, peptide and peptidomimetic inhibitors targeting TIR-domain mediated interactions and their application demonstrated on in vitro and in vivo models. Recent structural data and elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of TIR-domain mediated signaling enabled the development of peptide inhibitors from TIR domains of TLRs and adapters, MyD88 intermediary domain as well as improved protein inhibitors based on TIR domain dimerization, mimicking bacterial TIR-domain containing immunosuppressors (TCPs) which we discuss with challenges concerning the delivery and specificity of inhibitors targeting TLR adapters. PMID:23305364

  19. The Replication Focus Targeting Sequence (RFTS) Domain Is a DNA-competitive Inhibitor of Dnmt1

    SciTech Connect

    Syeda, Farisa; Fagan, Rebecca L.; Wean, Matthew; Avvakumov, George V.; Walker, John R.; Xue, Sheng; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Brenner, Charles

    2015-11-30

    Dnmt1 (DNA methyltransferase 1) is the principal enzyme responsible for maintenance of cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides in the mammalian genome. The N-terminal replication focus targeting sequence (RFTS) domain of Dnmt1 has been implicated in subcellular localization, protein association, and catalytic function. However, progress in understanding its function has been limited by the lack of assays for and a structure of this domain. Here, we show that the naked DNA- and polynucleosome-binding activities of Dnmt1 are inhibited by the RFTS domain, which functions by virtue of binding the catalytic domain to the exclusion of DNA. Kinetic analysis with a fluorogenic DNA substrate established the RFTS domain as a 600-fold inhibitor of Dnmt1 enzymatic activity. The crystal structure of the RFTS domain reveals a novel fold and supports a mechanism in which an RFTS-targeted Dnmt1-binding protein, such as Uhrf1, may activate Dnmt1 for DNA binding.

  20. Positive Regulation of Interleukin-2 Expression by a Pseudokinase, Tribbles 1, in Activated T Cells.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Chiharu; Itoh, Yuka; Inoue, Yasumichi; Hayashi, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    Tribbles 1 (TRB1), a member of the Tribbles family, is a pseudokinase that is conserved among species and implicated in various human diseases including leukemia, cardiovascular diseases, and metabolic disorders. However, the role of TRB1 in the immune response is not understood. To evaluate this role, we examined regulation of TRB1 expression and the function of TRB1 in interleukin-2 (IL-2) induction in Jurkat cells, a human acute T cell leukemia cell line. We found that TRB1 was strongly induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin in these cells. IL-2 expression was induced in Jurkat cells activated by PMA and ionomycin; however, knockdown of TRB1 resulted in decreased induction of IL-2. TRB1 null Jurkat cells established using the CRISPR/Cas9 system also showed reduction of IL-2 expression on PMA/ionomycin stimulation. TRB1 knockdown also markedly inhibited IL-2 promoter activation. To determine the mechanism of the stimulatory effect on IL-2 induction, we focused on histone deacetylases (HDACs), and found that HDAC1 preferentially interacts with TRB1. TRB1 suppressed the interaction of HDAC1 with nuclear factor of activated T cells 2 (NFAT2), which is a crucial transcription factor for IL-2 induction. These results indicate that TRB1 is a positive regulator of IL-2 induction in activated T cells.

  1. The pseudokinase MLKL mediates programmed hepatocellular necrosis independently of RIPK3 during hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Claudia; He, Gui-Wei; Kremer, Andreas E.; Murphy, James M.; Petrie, Emma J.; Amann, Kerstin; Linkermann, Andreas; Poremba, Christopher; Schleicher, Ulrike; Dewitz, Christin; Neurath, Markus F.; Becker, Christoph; Wirtz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Although necrosis and necroinflammation are central features of many liver diseases, the role of programmed necrosis in the context of inflammation-dependent hepatocellular death remains to be fully determined. Here, we have demonstrated that the pseudokinase mixed lineage kinase domain–like protein (MLKL), which plays a key role in the execution of receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinase–dependent necroptosis, is upregulated and activated in human autoimmune hepatitis and in a murine model of inflammation-dependent hepatitis. Using genetic and pharmacologic approaches, we determined that hepatocellular necrosis in experimental hepatitis is driven by an MLKL-dependent pathway that occurs independently of RIPK3. Moreover, we have provided evidence that the cytotoxic activity of the proinflammatory cytokine IFN-γ in hepatic inflammation is strongly connected to induction of MLKL expression via activation of the transcription factor STAT1. In summary, our results reveal a pathway for MLKL-dependent programmed necrosis that is executed in the absence of RIPK3 and potentially drives the pathogenesis of severe liver diseases. PMID:27756058

  2. Expanding the Targeting Process into the Space Domain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instruction, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining...planning and operations. The process is a continuous method by which information is converted into intelligence and made available to users...Targeting personnel and organizations consume intelligence produced by various agencies and organizations. Actionable and predictive intelligence applies to

  3. Preprotein mature domains contain translocase targeting signals that are essential for secretion.

    PubMed

    Chatzi, Katerina E; Sardis, Marios Frantzeskos; Tsirigotaki, Alexandra; Koukaki, Marina; Šoštarić, Nikolina; Konijnenberg, Albert; Sobott, Frank; Kalodimos, Charalampos G; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Economou, Anastassios

    2017-05-01

    Secretory proteins are only temporary cytoplasmic residents. They are typically synthesized as preproteins, carrying signal peptides N-terminally fused to their mature domains. In bacteria secretion largely occurs posttranslationally through the membrane-embedded SecA-SecYEG translocase. Upon crossing the plasma membrane, signal peptides are cleaved off and mature domains reach their destinations and fold. Targeting to the translocase is mediated by signal peptides. The role of mature domains in targeting and secretion is unclear. We now reveal that mature domains harbor their own independent targeting signals (mature domain targeting signals [MTSs]). These are multiple, degenerate, interchangeable, linear or 3D hydrophobic stretches that become available because of the unstructured states of targeting-competent preproteins. Their receptor site on the cytoplasmic face of the SecYEG-bound SecA is also of hydrophobic nature and is located adjacent to the signal peptide cleft. Both the preprotein MTSs and their receptor site on SecA are essential for protein secretion. Evidently, mature domains have their own previously unsuspected distinct roles in preprotein targeting and secretion. © 2017 Chatzi et al.

  4. Defining the Domain Arrangement of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex Component Rictor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Ning; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complexes play a pivotal role in the cell. Raptor and Rictor proteins interact with mTOR to form two distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, respectively. While the domain structure of Raptor is known, current bioinformatics tools failed to classify the domains in Rictor. Here we focus on identifying specific domains in Rictor by searching for conserved regions. We scanned the pdb structural database and constructed three protein domain datasets. Next we carried out multiple pairwise sequence alignments of the proteins in the domain dataset. By analyzing the z-scores of Rictor sequence similarity to protein sequences in the dataset, we assigned the structural and functional domains of Rictor. We found that, like Raptor, Rictor also has HEAT and WD40 domains, which could be the common motif binding to mTORC. Rictor may also have pleckstrin homology domains, which mediate cellular localization and transmit signals to downstream targets, as well as a domain that is homologous to 50S protein L17 and human 39S protein L17. This putative ribosome binding domain could mediate mTORC2–ribosome interaction. PMID:26176550

  5. Ligands located within a cholesterol domain enhance gene delivery to the target tissue

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Long; Betker, Jamie; Yin, Hao; Anchordoquy, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Targeted gene delivery provides enormous potential for clinical treatment of many incurable diseases. Liposomes formulated with targeting ligands have been tested extensively both in vitro and in vivo, and many studies have strived to identify more efficacious ligands. However, the environment of the ligand within the delivery vehicle is generally not considered, and this study assesses the effect of ligand micoenvironment by utilizing a lipoplex possessing a cholesterol domain. Our recent work has shown that the presence of the targeting ligand within the cholesterol domain promotes more productive transfection in cultured cells. In the present study, lipoplexes having the identical lipid composition were formulated with different conjugates of the folate ligand such that the ligand was included in, or excluded from, the cholesterol domain. The effect of locating the ligand within the cholesterol domain was then tested in a xenograft tumor model in mice. Lipoplexes that included the ligand within the cholesterol domain showed significantly higher luciferase expression and plasmid accumulation in tumors as compared to lipoplexes in which the ligand was excluded from the domain. These results demonstrate that the microenvironment of the ligand can affect gene delivery to tumors, and show that ligand-mediated delivery can be enhanced by locating targeting ligands within a cholesterol domain. PMID:22440429

  6. Coupling of tandem Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor (Smurf) WW domains modulates target specificity.

    PubMed

    Chong, P Andrew; Lin, Hong; Wrana, Jeffrey L; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2010-10-26

    Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor 2 (Smurf2) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that participates in degradation of TGF-β receptors and other targets. Smurf2 WW domains recognize PPXY (PY) motifs on ubiquitin ligase target proteins or on adapters, such as Smad7, that bind to E3 target proteins. We previously demonstrated that the isolated WW3 domain of Smurf2, but not the WW2 domain, can directly bind to a Smad7 PY motif. We show here that the WW2 augments this interaction by binding to the WW3 and making auxiliary contacts with the PY motif and a novel E/D-S/T-P motif, which is N-terminal to all Smad PY motifs. The WW2 likely enhances the selectivity of Smurf2 for the Smad proteins. NMR titrations confirm that Smad1 and Smad2 are bound by Smurf2 with the same coupled WW domain arrangement used to bind Smad7. The analogous WW domains in the short isoform of Smurf1 recognize the Smad7 PY peptide using the same coupled mechanism. However, a longer Smurf1 isoform, which has an additional 26 residues in the inter-WW domain linker, is only partially able to use the coupled WW domain binding mechanism. The longer linker results in a decrease in affinity for the Smad7 peptide. Interdomain coupling of WW domains enhances selectivity and enables the tuning of interactions by isoform switching.

  7. A conserved domain targets exported PHISTb family proteins to the periphery of Plasmodium infected erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tarr, Sarah J.; Moon, Robert W.; Hardege, Iris; Osborne, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    During blood-stage infection, malaria parasites export numerous proteins to the host erythrocyte. The Poly-Helical Interspersed Sub-Telomeric (PHIST) proteins are an exported family that share a common ‘PRESAN’ domain, and include numerous members in Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi. In P. falciparum, PHIST proteins have been implicated in protein trafficking and intercellular communication. A number of PHIST proteins are essential for parasite survival. Here, we identify nine members of the PHISTb sub-class of PHIST proteins, including one protein known to be essential for parasite survival, that localise to the erythrocyte periphery. These proteins have solubility characteristics consistent with their association with the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. Together, an extended PRESAN domain, comprising the PRESAN domain and preceding sequence, form a novel targeting-domain that is sufficient to localise a protein to the erythrocyte periphery. We validate the role of this domain in RESA, thus identifying a cytoskeleton-binding domain in RESA that functions independently of its known spectrin-binding domain. Our data suggest that some PHISTb proteins may act as cross-linkers of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. We also show for the first time that peripherally-localised PHISTb proteins are encoded in genomes of P. knowlesi and vivax indicating a conserved role for the extended PRESAN domain of these proteins in targeting to the erythrocyte periphery. PMID:25106850

  8. Versatile TPR domains accommodate different modes of target protein recognition and function.

    PubMed

    Allan, Rudi Kenneth; Ratajczak, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    The tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motif is one of many repeat motifs that form structural domains in proteins that can act as interaction scaffolds in the formation of multi-protein complexes involved in numerous cellular processes such as transcription, the cell cycle, protein translocation, protein degradation and host defence against invading pathogens. The crystal structures of many TPR domain-containing proteins have been determined, showing TPR motifs as two anti-parallel α-helices packed in tandem arrays to form a structure with an amphipathic groove which can bind a target peptide. This is however not the only mode of target recognition by TPR domains, with short amino acid insertions and alternative TPR motif conformations also shown to contribute to protein interactions, highlighting diversity in TPR domains and the versatility of this structure in mediating biological events.

  9. Using compound similarity and functional domain composition for prediction of drug-target interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; He, Zhi-Song; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2010-11-01

    Study of interactions between drugs and target proteins is an essential step in genomic drug discovery. It is very hard to determine the compound-protein interactions or drug-target interactions by experiment alone. As supplementary, effective prediction model using machine learning or data mining methods can provide much help. In this study, a prediction method based on Nearest Neighbor Algorithm and a novel metric, which was obtained by combining compound similarity and functional domain composition, was proposed. The target proteins were divided into the following groups: enzymes, ion channels, G protein-coupled receptors, and nuclear receptors. As a result, four predictors with the optimal parameters were established. The overall prediction accuracies, evaluated by jackknife cross-validation test, for four groups of target proteins are 90.23%, 94.74%, 97.80%, and 97.51%, respectively, indicating that compound similarity and functional domain composition are very effective to predict drug-target interaction networks.

  10. Chloroplast targeting factor AKR2 evolved from an ankyrin repeat domain coincidentally binds two chloroplast lipids

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Heon; Park, Mi-Jeong; Gwon, Gwang Hyeon; Silkov, Antonina; Xu, Zheng-Yi; Yang, Eun Chan; Song, Seohyeon; Song, Kyungyoung; Kim, Younghyun; Yoon, Hwan Su; Honig, Barry; Cho, Wonhwa; Cho, Yunje; Hwang, Inhwan

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In organellogenesis of the chloroplast from endosymbiotic cyanobacterium, the establishment of protein targeting mechanisms to the chloroplast should have been pivotal. However, it is still mysterious how these mechanisms were established and how they work in plant cells. Here, we show that AKR2A, the cytosolic targeting factor for chloroplast outer membrane (COM) proteins, evolved from the ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) of the host cell by stepwise extensions of its N-terminal domain, and two lipids monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) of the endosymbiont were selected to function as the AKR2A receptor. Structural analysis, molecular modeling and mutational analysis of the ARD identified two adjacent sites for coincidental and synergistic binding of MGDG and PG. Based on these findings, we propose that the targeting mechanism of COM proteins was established using components from both the endosymbiont and host cell through a modification of the protein-protein interacting ARD into a lipid binding domain. PMID:25203210

  11. Crystallization of the Focal Adhesion Kinase Targeting (FAT) Domain in a Primitive Orthorhombic Space Group

    SciTech Connect

    Magis,A.; Bailey, K.; Kurenova, E.; Hernandez Prada, J.; Cance, W.; Ostrov, D.

    2008-01-01

    X-ray diffraction data from the targeting (FAT) domain of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were collected from a single crystal that diffracted to 1.99 Angstroms resolution and reduced to the primitive orthorhombic lattice. A single molecule was predicted to be present in the asymmetric unit based on the Matthews coefficient. The data were phased using molecular-replacement methods using an existing model of the FAK FAT domain. All structures of human focal adhesion kinase FAT domains solved to date have been solved in a C-centered orthorhombic space group.

  12. Generation and isolation of target-specific single-domain antibodies from shark immune repertoires.

    PubMed

    Müller, Mischa Roland; O'Dwyer, Ronan; Kovaleva, Marina; Rudkin, Fiona; Dooley, Helen; Barelle, Caroline Jane

    2012-01-01

    The drive to exploit novel targets and biological pathways has lead to the expansion of classical antibody research into innovative fragment adaptations and novel scaffolds. The hope being that alternative or cryptic epitopes may be targeted, tissue inaccessibility may be overcome, and easier engineering options will facilitate multivalent, multi-targeting approaches. To this end, we have been isolating shark single domains to gain a greater understanding of their potential as therapeutic agents. Their unique shape, small size, inherent stability, and simple molecular architecture make them attractive candidates from a drug discovery perspective. Here we describe protocols to capture the immune repertoire of an immunized shark species and to build and select via phage-display target-specific IgNAR variable domains (VNARs).

  13. GRP1 pleckstrin homology domain: activation parameters and novel search mechanism for rare target lipid.

    PubMed

    Corbin, John A; Dirkx, Ronald A; Falke, Joseph J

    2004-12-28

    Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains play a central role in a wide array of signaling pathways by binding second messenger lipids of the phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) lipid family. A given type of PIP lipid is formed in a specific cellular membrane where it is generally a minor component of the bulk lipid mixture. For example, the signaling lipid PI(3,4,5)P(3) (or PIP(3)) is generated primarily in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane where it is believed to never exceed 0.02% of the bulk lipid. The present study focuses on the PH domain of the general receptor for phosphoinositides, isoform 1 (GRP1), which regulates the actin cytoskeleton in response to PIP(3) signals at the plasma membrane surface. The study systematically analyzes both the equilibrium and kinetic features of GRP1-PH domain binding to its PIP lipid target on a bilayer surface. Equilibrium binding measurements utilizing protein-to-membrane fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to detect GRP1-PH domain docking to membrane-bound PIP lipids confirm specific binding to PIP(3). A novel FRET competitive binding measurement developed to quantitate docking affinity yields a K(D) of 50 +/- 10 nM for GRP1-PH domain binding to membrane-bound PIP(3) in a physiological lipid mixture approximating the composition of the plasma membrane inner leaflet. This observed K(D) lies in a suitable range for regulation by physiological PIP(3) signals. Interestingly, the affinity of the interaction decreases at least 12-fold when the background anionic lipids phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) are removed from the lipid mixture. Stopped-flow kinetic studies using protein-to-membrane FRET to monitor association and dissociation time courses reveal that this affinity decrease arises from a corresponding decrease in the on-rate for GRP1-PH domain docking with little or no change in the off-rate for domain dissociation from membrane-bound PIP(3). Overall, these findings indicate that the PH

  14. Characterization of the membrane-targeting C1 domain in Pasteurella multocida toxin.

    PubMed

    Kamitani, Shigeki; Kitadokoro, Kengo; Miyazawa, Masayuki; Toshima, Hirono; Fukui, Aya; Abe, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Masami; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko

    2010-08-13

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) is a virulence factor responsible for the pathogenesis of some forms of pasteurellosis. The toxin activates G(q)- and G(12/13)-dependent pathways through the deamidation of a glutamine residue in the alpha-subunit of heterotrimeric GTPases. We recently reported the crystal structure of the C terminus (residues 575-1285) of PMT (C-PMT), which is composed of three domains (C1, C2, and C3), and that the C1 domain is involved in the localization of C-PMT to the plasma membrane, and the C3 domain possesses a cysteine protease-like catalytic triad. In this study, we analyzed the membrane-targeting function of the C1 domain in detail. The C1 domain consists of seven helices of which the first four (residues 590-670), showing structural similarity to the N terminus of Clostridium difficile toxin B, were found to be involved in the recruitment of C-PMT to the plasma membrane. C-PMT lacking these helices (C-PMT DeltaC1(4H)) neither localized to the plasma membrane nor stimulated the G(q/12/13)-dependent signaling pathways. When the membrane-targeting property was complemented by a peptide tag with an N-myristoylation motif, C-PMT DeltaC1(4H) recovered the PMT activity. Direct binding between the C1 domain and liposomes containing phospholipids was evidenced by surface plasmon resonance analyses. These results indicate that the C1 domain of C-PMT functions as a targeting signal for the plasma membrane.

  15. Novel Inhibitors of AKT: Assessment of a Different Approach Targeting the Pleckstrin Homology Domain

    PubMed Central

    Meuillet, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase B/AKT plays a central role in cancer. The serine/threonine kinase is overexpressed or constitutively active in many cancers and has been validated as a therapeutic target for cancer treatment. However, targeting the kinase activity has revealed itself to be a challenge due to non-selectivity of the compounds towards other kinases. This review summarizes other approaches scientists have developed to inhibit the activity and function of AKT. They consist of targeting the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of AKT. Indeed, upon the generation of 3-phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PI3Ps) by PI3-kinase (PI3K), AKT translocates from the cytosol to the plasma membrane and binds to the PI3Ps via its PH domain. Thus, several analogs of PI3Ps (PI Analogs or PIAs), alkylphospholipids (APLs), such as edelfosine or inositol phosphates (IPs) have been described to inhibit the binding of the PH domain to PI3Ps. Recent allostetic inhibitors and small molecules that do not bind the kinase domain but affect the kinase activity of AKT, presumably by interacting with the PH domain, have been also identified. Finally, several drug screening studies spawned novel chemical scaffolds that bind the PH domain of AKT. Together, these approaches have been more or less sucessful in vitro and to some extent translated in preclinical studies. Several of these new AKT PH domain inhibitors exhibit promising anti-tumor activity in mouse models and some of them show synergy with ionizing radiation and chemotherapy. Early clinical trials have started and results will attest to the validity and efficacy of such approaches in the near future. PMID:21649580

  16. Inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase by small molecules targeting the catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, Jagamya; Kramp, Kristopher; Harris, Michael E; van den Akker, Focco

    2016-10-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) plays a crucial role in cyclic nucleotide signaling that regulates numerous important physiological processes. To identify new sGC inhibitors that may prevent the formation of the active catalytic domain conformation, we carried out an in silico docking screen targeting a 'backside pocket' of the inactive sGC catalytic domain structure. Compounds 1 and 2 were discovered to inhibit sGC even at high/saturating nitric oxide concentrations. Both compounds also inhibit the BAY 58-2667-activated sGC as well as BAY 41-2272-stimulated sGC activity. Additional biochemical analyses showed that compound 2 also inhibits the isolated catalytic domain, thus demonstrating functional binding to this domain. Both compounds have micromolar affinity for sGC and are potential leads to develop more potent sGC inhibitors. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. A conserved polybasic domain mediates plasma membrane targeting of Lgl and its regulation by hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wei; Zhang, Xuejing; Liu, Weijie; Chen, Yi-jiun; Huang, Juan; Austin, Erin; Celotto, Alicia M.; Jiang, Wendy Z.; Palladino, Michael J.; Jiang, Yu; Hammond, Gerald R.V.

    2015-01-01

    Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) plays essential and conserved functions in regulating both cell polarity and tumorigenesis in Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrates. It is well recognized that plasma membrane (PM) or cell cortex localization is crucial for Lgl function in vivo, but its membrane-targeting mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we discovered that hypoxia acutely and reversibly inhibits Lgl PM targeting through a posttranslational mechanism that is independent of the well-characterized atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) or Aurora kinase–mediated phosphorylations. Instead, we identified an evolutionarily conserved polybasic (PB) domain that targets Lgl to the PM via electrostatic binding to membrane phosphatidylinositol phosphates. Such PB domain–mediated PM targeting is inhibited by hypoxia, which reduces inositol phospholipid levels on the PM through adenosine triphosphate depletion. Moreover, Lgl PB domain contains all the identified phosphorylation sites of aPKC and Aurora kinases, providing a molecular mechanism by which phosphorylations neutralize the positive charges on the PB domain to inhibit Lgl PM targeting. PMID:26483556

  18. Extracting sets of chemical substructures and protein domains governing drug-target interactions.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Yoshihiro; Pauwels, Edouard; Saigo, Hiroto; Stoven, Véronique

    2011-05-23

    The identification of rules governing molecular recognition between drug chemical substructures and protein functional sites is a challenging issue at many stages of the drug development process. In this paper we develop a novel method to extract sets of drug chemical substructures and protein domains that govern drug-target interactions on a genome-wide scale. This is made possible using sparse canonical correspondence analysis (SCCA) for analyzing drug substructure profiles and protein domain profiles simultaneously. The method does not depend on the availability of protein 3D structures. From a data set of known drug-target interactions including enzymes, ion channels, G protein-coupled receptors, and nuclear receptors, we extract a set of chemical substructures shared by drugs able to bind to a set of protein domains. These two sets of extracted chemical substructures and protein domains form components that can be further exploited in a drug discovery process. This approach successfully clusters protein domains that may be evolutionary unrelated but that bind a common set of chemical substructures. As shown in several examples, it can also be very helpful for predicting new protein-ligand interactions and addressing the problem of ligand specificity. The proposed method constitutes a contribution to the recent field of chemogenomics that aims to connect the chemical space with the biological space.

  19. Palmitoylation of stathmin family proteins domain A controls Golgi versus mitochondrial subcellular targeting.

    PubMed

    Chauvin, Stéphanie; Poulain, Fabienne E; Ozon, Sylvie; Sobel, André

    2008-10-01

    Precise localization of proteins to specialized subcellular domains is fundamental for proper neuronal development and function. The neural microtubule-regulatory phosphoproteins of the stathmin family are such proteins whose specific functions are controlled by subcellular localization. Whereas stathmin is cytosolic, SCG10, SCLIP and RB3/RB3'/RB3'' are localized to the Golgi and vesicle-like structures along neurites and at growth cones. We examined the molecular determinants involved in the regulation of this specific subcellular localization in hippocampal neurons in culture. We show that their conserved N-terminal domain A carrying two palmitoylation sites is dominant over the others for Golgi and vesicle-like localization. Using palmitoylation-deficient GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion mutants, we demonstrate that domains A of stathmin proteins have the particular ability to control protein targeting to either Golgi or mitochondria, depending on their palmitoylation. This regulation involves the co-operation of two subdomains within domain A, and seems also to be under the control of its SLD (stathmin-like domain) extension. Our results unravel that, in specific biological conditions, palmitoylation of stathmin proteins might be able to control their targeting to express their functional activities at appropriate subcellular sites. They, more generally, open new perspectives regarding the role of palmitoylation as a signalling mechanism orienting proteins to their functional subcellular compartments.

  20. Neutralization of Clostridium difficile Toxin A with Single-domain Antibodies Targeting the Cell Receptor Binding Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Hussack, Greg; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi; van Faassen, Henk; Songer, J. Glenn; Ng, Kenneth K.-S.; MacKenzie, Roger; Tanha, Jamshid

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of nosocomial infection in North America and a considerable challenge to healthcare professionals in hospitals and nursing homes. The Gram-positive bacterium produces two high molecular weight exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), which are the major virulence factors responsible for C. difficile-associated disease and are targets for C. difficile-associated disease therapy. Here, recombinant single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs), which specifically target the cell receptor binding domains of TcdA or TcdB, were isolated from an immune llama phage display library and characterized. Four VHHs (A4.2, A5.1, A20.1, and A26.8), all shown to recognize conformational epitopes, were potent neutralizers of the cytopathic effects of toxin A on fibroblast cells in an in vitro assay. The neutralizing potency was further enhanced when VHHs were administered in paired or triplet combinations at the same overall VHH concentration, suggesting recognition of nonoverlapping TcdA epitopes. Biacore epitope mapping experiments revealed that some synergistic combinations consisted of VHHs recognizing overlapping epitopes, an indication that factors other than mere epitope blocking are responsible for the increased neutralization. Further binding assays revealed TcdA-specific VHHs neutralized toxin A by binding to sites other than the carbohydrate binding pocket of the toxin. With favorable characteristics such as high production yield, potent toxin neutralization, and intrinsic stability, these VHHs are attractive systemic therapeutics but are more so as oral therapeutics in the destabilizing environment of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:21216961

  1. Targeted ablation of the WW domain-containing oxidoreductase tumor suppressor leads to impaired steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Aqeilan, Rami I; Hagan, John P; de Bruin, Alain; Rawahneh, Maysoon; Salah, Zaidoun; Gaudio, Eugenio; Siddiqui, Hasan; Volinia, Stefano; Alder, Hansjuerg; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Gary S; Croce, Carlo M

    2009-03-01

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene encodes a 46-kDa tumor suppressor. The Wwox protein contains two N-terminal WW domains that interact with several transcriptional activators containing proline-tyrosine motifs and a central short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase domain that has been suggested to play a role in steroid metabolism. Recently, we have shown that targeted deletion of the Wwox gene in mice leads to postnatal lethality and defects in bone growth. Here, we report that Wwox-deficient mice display impaired steroidogenesis. Mutant homozygous mice are born with gonadal abnormalities, including failure of Leydig cell development in testis and reduced theca cell proliferation in ovary. Furthermore, Wwox(-/-) mice displayed impaired gene expression of key steroidogenesis enzymes. Affymetrix microarray gene analysis revealed differentially expressed related genes in steroidogenesis in knockout mice testis and ovary as compared with control mice. These results demonstrate the essential requirement for the Wwox tumor suppressor in proper steroidogenesis.

  2. Chemically-Modified Peptides Targeting the PDZ Domain of GIPC as a Therapeutic Approach for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Rupasinghe, Chamila N.; Dutta, Shamit K; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Wang, Enfeng; Spaller, Mark R.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2012-01-01

    GIPC (GAIP-interacting protein, C terminus) represents a new target class for the discovery of chemotherapeutics. While many of the current generation of anticancer agents function by directly binding to intracellular kinases or cell surface receptors, the disruption of cytosolic protein-protein interactions mediated by non-enzymatic domains is an underdeveloped avenue for inhibiting cancer growth. One such example is the PDZ domain of GIPC. Previously we developed a molecular probe, the cell permeable octapeptide CR1023 (N-myristoyl-PSQSSSEA), which diminished proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. We have expanded upon that discovery using a chemical modification approach, and here report a series of cell permeable, side chain-modified lipopeptides that target the GIPC PDZ domain in vitro and in vivo. These peptides exhibit significant activity against pancreatic and breast cancers, both in vitro and in animal models. CR1166 (N-myristoyl-PSQSK(εN-4-bromobenzoyl)SK(εN-4-bromobenzoyl)A), bearing two halogenated aromatic units on alternate side chains, was found to be the most active compound, with pronounced down-regulation of EGFR/1GF-1R expression. We hypothesize that these organic acid-modified residues extend the productive reach of the peptide beyond the canonical binding pocket, which defines the limit of accessibility for the native proteinogenic sequences that the PDZ domain has evolved to recognize. Cell permeability is achieved with N-terminal lipidation using myristate, rather than a larger CPP (cell-penetrating peptide) sequence. This, in conjunction with optimization of targeting through side chain modification, has yielded an approach that will allow the discovery and development of next-generation cellular probes for GIPC PDZ as well as other PDZ domains. PMID:22292614

  3. Chemically modified peptides targeting the PDZ domain of GIPC as a therapeutic approach for cancer.

    PubMed

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Rupasinghe, Chamila N; Dutta, Shamit K; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Wang, Enfeng; Spaller, Mark R; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2012-04-20

    GIPC (GAIP-interacting protein, C terminus) represents a new target class for the discovery of chemotherapeutics. While many of the current generation of anticancer agents function by directly binding to intracellular kinases or cell surface receptors, the disruption of cytosolic protein-protein interactions mediated by non-enzymatic domains is an underdeveloped avenue for inhibiting cancer growth. One such example is the PDZ domain of GIPC. Previously we developed a molecular probe, the cell-permeable octapeptide CR1023 (N-myristoyl-PSQSSSEA), which diminished proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. We have expanded upon that discovery using a chemical modification approach and here report a series of cell-permeable, side chain-modified lipopeptides that target the GIPC PDZ domain in vitro and in vivo. These peptides exhibit significant activity against pancreatic and breast cancers, both in cellular and animal models. CR1166 (N-myristoyl-PSQSK(εN-4-bromobenzoyl)SK(εN-4-bromobenzoyl)A), bearing two halogenated aromatic units on alternate side chains, was found to be the most active compound, with pronounced down-regulation of EGFR/1GF-1R expression. We hypothesize that these organic acid-modified residues extend the productive reach of the peptide beyond the canonical binding pocket, which defines the limit of accessibility for the native proteinogenic sequences that the PDZ domain has evolved to recognize. Cell permeability is achieved with N-terminal lipidation using myristate, rather than a larger CPP (cell-penetrating peptide) sequence. This, in conjunction with optimization of targeting through side chain modification, has yielded an approach that will allow the discovery and development of next-generation cellular probes for GIPC PDZ as well as for other PDZ domains.

  4. Identification of conserved, centrosome-targeting ASH domains in TRAPPII complex subunits and TRAPPC8

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Assembly of primary cilia relies on vesicular trafficking towards the cilium base and intraflagellar transport (IFT) between the base and distal tip of the cilium. Recent studies have identified several key regulators of these processes, including Rab GTPases such as Rab8 and Rab11, the Rab8 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rabin8, and the transport protein particle (TRAPP) components TRAPPC3, -C9, and -C10, which physically interact with each other and function together with Bardet Biedl syndrome (BBS) proteins in ciliary membrane biogenesis. However, despite recent advances, the exact molecular mechanisms by which these proteins interact and target to the basal body to promote ciliogenesis are not fully understood. Results We surveyed the human proteome for novel ASPM, SPD-2, Hydin (ASH) domain-containing proteins. We identified the TRAPP complex subunits TRAPPC8, -9, -10, -11, and -13 as novel ASH domain-containing proteins. In addition to a C-terminal ASH domain region, we predict that the N-terminus of TRAPPC8, -9, -10, and -11, as well as their yeast counterparts, consists of an α-solenoid bearing stretches of multiple tetratricopeptide (TPR) repeats. Immunofluorescence microscopy analysis of cultured mammalian cells revealed that exogenously expressed ASH domains, as well as endogenous TRAPPC8, localize to the centrosome/basal body. Further, depletion of TRAPPC8 impaired ciliogenesis and GFP-Rabin8 centrosome targeting. Conclusions Our results suggest that ASH domains confer targeting to the centrosome and cilia, and that TRAPPC8 has cilia-related functions. Further, we propose that the yeast TRAPPII complex and its mammalian counterpart are evolutionarily related to the bacterial periplasmic trafficking chaperone PapD of the usher pili assembly machinery. PMID:25018876

  5. Analysis of the Protein Domain and Domain Architecture Content in Fungi and Its Application in the Search of New Antifungal Targets

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Alejandro; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Martín, María J.; Cuesta, Isabel; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several years fungal infections have shown an increasing incidence in the susceptible population, and caused high mortality rates. In parallel, multi-resistant fungi are emerging in human infections. Therefore, the identification of new potential antifungal targets is a priority. The first task of this study was to analyse the protein domain and domain architecture content of the 137 fungal proteomes (corresponding to 111 species) available in UniProtKB (UniProt KnowledgeBase) by January 2013. The resulting list of core and exclusive domain and domain architectures is provided in this paper. It delineates the different levels of fungal taxonomic classification: phylum, subphylum, order, genus and species. The analysis highlighted Aspergillus as the most diverse genus in terms of exclusive domain content. In addition, we also investigated which domains could be considered promiscuous in the different organisms. As an application of this analysis, we explored three different ways to detect potential targets for antifungal drugs. First, we compared the domain and domain architecture content of the human and fungal proteomes, and identified those domains and domain architectures only present in fungi. Secondly, we looked for information regarding fungal pathways in public repositories, where proteins containing promiscuous domains could be involved. Three pathways were identified as a result: lovastatin biosynthesis, xylan degradation and biosynthesis of siroheme. Finally, we classified a subset of the studied fungi in five groups depending on their occurrence in clinical samples. We then looked for exclusive domains in the groups that were more relevant clinically and determined which of them had the potential to bind small molecules. Overall, this study provides a comprehensive analysis of the available fungal proteomes and shows three approaches that can be used as a first step in the detection of new antifungal targets. PMID:25033262

  6. Epigenetic and genetic deregulation in cancer target distinct signaling pathway domains

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Teschendorff, Andrew E.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is characterized by both genetic and epigenetic alterations. While cancer driver mutations and copy-number alterations have been studied at a systems-level, relatively little is known about the systems-level patterns exhibited by their epigenetic counterparts. Here we perform a pan-cancer wide systems-level analysis, mapping candidate cancer-driver DNA methylation (DNAm) alterations onto a human interactome. We demonstrate that functional DNAm alterations in cancer tend to map to nodes of lower connectivity and inter-connectivity, compared to the corresponding alterations at the genomic level. We find that epigenetic alterations are relatively over-represented in extracellular and transmembrane signaling domains, whereas cancer genes undergoing amplification or deletion tend to be enriched within the intracellular domain. A pan-cancer wide meta-analysis identifies WNT and chemokine signaling, as two key pathways where epigenetic deregulation preferentially targets extracellular components. We further pinpoint specific chemokine ligands/receptors whose epigenetic deregulation associates with key epigenetic enzymes, representing potential targets for epigenetic therapy. Our results suggest that epigenetic deregulation in cancer not only targets tissue-specific transcription factors, but also modulates signaling within the extra-cellular domain, providing novel system-level insight into the potential distinctive role of genetic and epigenetic alterations in cancer. PMID:27899617

  7. Non-catalytic participation of the Pin1 peptidyl-prolyl isomerase domain in target binding

    PubMed Central

    Innes, Brendan T.; Bailey, Melanie L.; Brandl, Christopher J.; Shilton, Brian H.; Litchfield, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Pin1 is a phosphorylation-dependent peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) that has the potential to add an additional level of regulation within protein kinase mediated signaling pathways. Furthermore, there is a mounting body of evidence implicating Pin1 in the emergence of pathological phenotypes in neurodegeneration and cancer through the isomerization of a wide variety of substrates at peptidyl-prolyl bonds where the residue preceding proline is a phosphorylated serine or threonine residue (i.e., pS/T-P motifs). A key step in this regulatory process is the interaction of Pin-1 with its substrates. This is a complex process since Pin1 is composed of two domains, the catalytic PPIase domain, and a type IV WW domain, both of which recognize pS/T-P motifs. The observation that the WW domain exhibits considerably higher binding affinity for pS/T-P motifs has led to predictions that the two domains may have distinct roles in mediating the actions of Pin1 on its substrates. To evaluate the participation of its individual domains in target binding, we performed GST pulldowns to monitor interactions between various forms of Pin1 and mitotic phospho-proteins that revealed two classes of Pin-1 interacting proteins, differing in their requirement for residues within the PPIase domain. From these observations, we consider models for Pin1-substrate interactions and the potential functions of the different classes of Pin1 interacting proteins. We also compare sequences that are recognized by Pin1 within its individual interaction partners to investigate the underlying basis for its different types of interactions. PMID:23407864

  8. Rotavirus NSP1 mediates degradation of interferon regulatory factors through targeting of the dimerization domain.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Michelle M; Barro, Mario; Patton, John T

    2013-09-01

    Rotavirus nonstructural protein NSP1 can inhibit expression of interferon (IFN) and IFN-stimulated gene products by inducing proteasome-mediated degradation of IFN-regulatory factors (IRFs), including IRF3, IRF5, and IRF7. All IRF proteins share an N-terminal DNA-binding domain (DBD), and IRF3, IRF5, and IRF7 contain a similar C-proximal IRF association domain (IAD) that mediates IRF dimerization. An autoinhibitory domain (ID) at the extreme C terminus interacts with the IAD, burying residues necessary for IRF dimerization. Phosphorylation of serine/threonine residues in the ID induces charge repulsions that unmask the IAD, enabling IRF dimerization and subsequent nuclear translocation. To define the region of IRF proteins targeted for degradation by NSP1, we generated IRF3 and IRF7 truncation mutants and transiently expressed each with simian SA11-4F NSP1. These assays indicated that the IAD represented a necessary and sufficient target for degradation. Because NSP1 did not mediate degradation of truncated forms of the IAD, NSP1 likely requires a structurally intact IAD for recognition and targeting of IRF proteins. IRF9, which contains an IAD-like region that directs interactions with signal inducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins, was also targeted for degradation by NSP1, while IRF1, which lacks an IAD, was not. Analysis of mutant forms of IRF3 unable to undergo dimerization or that were constitutively dimeric showed that both were targeted for degradation by NSP1. These results indicate that SA11-4F NSP1 can induce degradation of inactive and activated forms of IAD-containing IRF proteins (IRF3 to IRF9), allowing a multipronged attack on IFN-based pathways that promote antiviral innate and adaptive immune responses.

  9. Molecular Pathways: The Necrosome-A Target for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Lena; Miller, George

    2017-03-01

    Necroptosis is a caspase-8-independent cell death that requires coactivation of receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) and receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3) kinases. The necrosome is a complex consisting of RIP1, RIP3, and Fas-associated protein with death domain leading to activation of the pseudokinase mixed lineage kinase like followed by a rapid plasma membrane rupture and inflammatory response through the release of damage-associated molecular patterns and cytokines. The necrosome has been shown to be relevant in multiple tumor types, including pancreatic adenocarcinoma, melanoma, and several hematologic malignancies. Preclinical data suggest that targeting this complex can have differential impact on tumor progression and that the effect of necroptosis on oncogenesis is cell-type and context dependent. The emerging data suggest that targeting the necrosome may lead to immunogenic reprogramming in the tumor microenvironment in multiple tumors and that combining therapies targeting the necrosome with either conventional chemotherapy or immunotherapy may have beneficial effects. Thus, understanding the interplay of necroptotic cell death, transformed cells, and the immune system may enable the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Clin Cancer Res; 23(5); 1132-6. ©2016 AACR.

  10. Evaluation of Waveform Structure Features on Time Domain Target Recognition under Cross Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selver, M. A.; Seçmen, M.; Zoral, E. Y.

    2016-08-01

    Classification of aircraft targets from scattered electromagnetic waves is a challenging application, which suffers from aspect angle dependency. In order to eliminate the adverse effects of aspect angle, various strategies were developed including the techniques that rely on extraction of several features and design of suitable classification systems to process them. Recently, a hierarchical method, which uses features that take advantage of waveform structure of the scattered signals, is introduced and shown to have effective results. However, this approach has been applied to the special cases that consider only a single planar component of electric field that cause no-cross polarization at the observation point. In this study, two small scale aircraft models, Boeing-747 and DC-10, are selected as the targets and various polarizations are used to analyse the cross-polarization effects on system performance of the aforementioned method. The results reveal the advantages and the shortcomings of using waveform structures in time-domain target identification.

  11. The TCF C-clamp DNA binding domain expands the Wnt transcriptome via alternative target recognition

    PubMed Central

    Hoverter, Nate P.; Zeller, Michael D.; McQuade, Miriam M.; Garibaldi, Angela; Busch, Anke; Selwan, Elizabeth M.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Baldi, Pierre; Waterman, Marian L.

    2014-01-01

    LEF/TCFs direct the final step in Wnt/β-catenin signalling by recruiting β-catenin to genes for activation of transcription. Ancient, non-vertebrate TCFs contain two DNA binding domains, a High Mobility Group box for recognition of the Wnt Response Element (WRE; 5′-CTTTGWWS-3′) and the C-clamp domain for recognition of the GC-rich Helper motif (5′-RCCGCC-3′). Two vertebrate TCFs (TCF-1/TCF7 and TCF-4/TCF7L2) use the C-clamp as an alternatively spliced domain to regulate cell-cycle progression, but how the C-clamp influences TCF binding and activity genome-wide is not known. Here, we used a doxycycline inducible system with ChIP-seq to assess how the C-clamp influences human TCF1 binding genome-wide. Metabolic pulse-labeling of nascent RNA with 4′Thiouridine was used with RNA-seq to connect binding to the Wnt transcriptome. We find that the C-clamp enables targeting to a greater number of gene loci for stronger occupancy and transcription regulation. The C-clamp uses Helper sites concurrently with WREs for gene targeting, but it also targets TCF1 to sites that do not have readily identifiable canonical WREs. The coupled ChIP-seq/4′Thiouridine-seq analysis identified new Wnt target genes, including additional regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, C-clamp containing isoforms of TCFs are potent transcriptional regulators with an expanded transcriptome directed by C-clamp-Helper site interactions. PMID:25414359

  12. The TCF C-clamp DNA binding domain expands the Wnt transcriptome via alternative target recognition.

    PubMed

    Hoverter, Nate P; Zeller, Michael D; McQuade, Miriam M; Garibaldi, Angela; Busch, Anke; Selwan, Elizabeth M; Hertel, Klemens J; Baldi, Pierre; Waterman, Marian L

    2014-12-16

    LEF/TCFs direct the final step in Wnt/β-catenin signalling by recruiting β-catenin to genes for activation of transcription. Ancient, non-vertebrate TCFs contain two DNA binding domains, a High Mobility Group box for recognition of the Wnt Response Element (WRE; 5'-CTTTGWWS-3') and the C-clamp domain for recognition of the GC-rich Helper motif (5'-RCCGCC-3'). Two vertebrate TCFs (TCF-1/TCF7 and TCF-4/TCF7L2) use the C-clamp as an alternatively spliced domain to regulate cell-cycle progression, but how the C-clamp influences TCF binding and activity genome-wide is not known. Here, we used a doxycycline inducible system with ChIP-seq to assess how the C-clamp influences human TCF1 binding genome-wide. Metabolic pulse-labeling of nascent RNA with 4'Thiouridine was used with RNA-seq to connect binding to the Wnt transcriptome. We find that the C-clamp enables targeting to a greater number of gene loci for stronger occupancy and transcription regulation. The C-clamp uses Helper sites concurrently with WREs for gene targeting, but it also targets TCF1 to sites that do not have readily identifiable canonical WREs. The coupled ChIP-seq/4'Thiouridine-seq analysis identified new Wnt target genes, including additional regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, C-clamp containing isoforms of TCFs are potent transcriptional regulators with an expanded transcriptome directed by C-clamp-Helper site interactions. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Crystal Structures of Free and Ligand-Bound Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain of Pyk2

    SciTech Connect

    Lulo, J.; Yuzawa, S; Schlessinger, J

    2009-01-01

    Focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domains target the non-receptor tyrosine kinases FAK and Pyk2 to cellular focal adhesion areas, where the signaling molecule paxillin is also located. Here, we report the crystal structures of the Pyk2 FAT domain alone or in complex with paxillin LD4 peptides. The overall structure of Pyk2-FAT is an antiparallel four-helix bundle with an up-down, up-down, right-handed topology. In the LD4-bound FAT complex, two paxillin LD4 peptides interact with two opposite sides of Pyk2-FAT, at the surfaces of the a1a4 and a2a3 helices of each FAT molecule. We also demonstrate that, while paxillin is phosphorylated by Pyk2, complex formation between Pyk2 and paxillin does not depend on Pyk2 tyrosine kinase activity. These experiments reveal the structural basis underlying the selectivity of paxillin LD4 binding to the Pyk2 FAT domain and provide insights about the molecular details which influence the different behavior of these two closely-related kinases.

  14. Chemically modified peptide scaffolds target the CFTR-associated ligand PDZ domain.

    PubMed

    Amacher, Jeanine F; Zhao, Ruizhi; Spaller, Mark R; Madden, Dean R

    2014-01-01

    PDZ domains are protein-protein interaction modules that coordinate multiple signaling and trafficking pathways in the cell and that include active therapeutic targets for diseases such as cancer, cystic fibrosis, and addiction. Our previous work characterized a PDZ interaction that restricts the apical membrane half-life of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Using iterative cycles of peptide-array and solution-binding analysis, we targeted the PDZ domain of the CFTR-Associated Ligand (CAL), and showed that an engineered peptide inhibitor rescues cell-surface expression of the most common CFTR disease mutation ΔF508. Here, we present a series of scaffolds containing chemically modifiable side chains at all non-motif positions along the CAL PDZ domain binding cleft. Concordant equilibrium dissociation constants were determined in parallel by fluorescence polarization, isothermal titration calorimetry, and surface plasmon resonance techniques, confirming robust affinity for each scaffold and revealing an enthalpically driven mode of inhibitor binding. Structural studies demonstrate a conserved binding mode for each peptide, opening the possibility of combinatorial modification. Finally, we diversified one of our peptide scaffolds with halogenated substituents that yielded modest increases in binding affinity. Overall, this work validates our approach and provides a stereochemical foundation for further CAL inhibitor design and screening.

  15. Proposed docking interface between peptidoglycan and the target recognition domain of zoocin A.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinghua; Simmonds, Robin S; Timkovich, Russell

    2013-11-15

    A docking model is proposed for the target recognition domain of the lytic exoenzyme zoocin A with the peptidoglycan on the outer cell surface of sensitive bacterial strains. Solubilized fragments from such peptidoglycans perturb specific backbone and side chain amide resonances in the recombinant form of the domain designated rTRD as detected in two-dimensional (1)H-(15)N correlation NMR spectra. The affected residues comprise a shallow surface cleft on the protein surface near W115, N53, N117, and Q105 among others, which interacts with the peptide portion of the peptidoglycan. Calculations with AutoDock Vina provide models of the docking interface. There is approximate homology between the rTDR-peptidoglycan docking site and the antigen binding site of Fab antibodies with the immunoglobin fold. EDTA was also found to bind to rTRD, but at a site distinct from the proposed peptidoglycan docking site.

  16. Dual streams of auditory afferents target multiple domains in the primate prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Romanski, L. M.; Tian, B.; Fritz, J.; Mishkin, M.; Goldman-Rakic, P. S.; Rauschecker, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    ‘What’ and ‘where’ visual streams define ventrolateral object and dorsolateral spatial processing domains in the prefrontal cortex of nonhuman primates. We looked for similar streams for auditory–prefrontal connections in rhesus macaques by combining microelectrode recording with anatomical tract-tracing. Injection of multiple tracers into physiologically mapped regions AL, ML and CL of the auditory belt cortex revealed that anterior belt cortex was reciprocally connected with the frontal pole (area 10), rostral principal sulcus (area 46) and ventral prefrontal regions (areas 12 and 45), whereas the caudal belt was mainly connected with the caudal principal sulcus (area 46) and frontal eye fields (area 8a). Thus separate auditory streams originate in caudal and rostral auditory cortex and target spatial and non-spatial domains of the frontal lobe, respectively. PMID:10570492

  17. Membrane domain formation—a key factor for targeted intracellular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Popov-Čeleketić, Dušan; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M. P.

    2014-01-01

    Protein molecules, toxins and viruses internalize into the cell via receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) using specific proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane. The plasma membrane is a barrier for many pharmaceutical agents to enter into the cytoplasm of target cells. In the case of cancer cells, tissue-specific biomarkers in the plasma membrane, like cancer-specific growth factor receptors, could be excellent candidates for RME-dependent drug delivery. Recent data suggest that agent binding to these receptors at the cell surface, resulting in membrane domain formation by receptor clustering, can be used for the initiation of RME. As a result, these pharmaceutical agents are internalized into the cells and follow different routes until they reach their final intracellular targets like lysosomes or Golgi. We propose that clustering induced formation of plasma membrane microdomains enriched in receptors, sphingolipids, and inositol lipids, leads to membrane bending which functions as the onset of RME. In this review we will focus on the role of domain formation in RME and discuss potential applications for targeted intracellular drug delivery. PMID:25520666

  18. C2 domain is responsible for targeting rice phosphoinositide specific phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Rupwate, Sunny D; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2012-02-01

    Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) is involved in Ca²⁺ mediated signalling events that lead to altered cellular status. Using various sequence-analysis methods, we identified two conserved motifs in known PLC sequences. The identified motifs are located in the C2 domain of plant PLCs and are not found in any other protein. These motifs are specifically found in the Ca²⁺ binding loops and form adjoining beta strands. Further, we identified certain conserved residues that are highly distinct from corresponding residues of animal PLCs. The motifs reported here could be used to annotate plant-specific phospholipase C sequences. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the C2 domain alone is capable of targeting PLC to the membrane in response to a Ca²⁺ signal. We also showed that the binding event results from a change in the hydrophobicity of the C2 domain upon Ca²⁺ binding. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that all PLCs from Arabidopsis and rice lack a transmembrane domain, myristoylation and GPI-anchor protein modifications. Our bioinformatic study indicates that plant PLCs are located in the cytoplasm, the nucleus and the mitochondria. Our results suggest that there are no distinct isoforms of plant PLCs, as have been proposed to exist in the soluble and membrane associated fractions. The same isoform could potentially be present in both subcellular fractions, depending on the calcium level of the cytosol. Overall, these data suggest that the C2 domain of PLC plays a vital role in calcium signalling.

  19. Proposal of Dual Inhibitor Targeting ATPase Domains of Topoisomerase II and Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    There is a conserved ATPase domain in topoisomerase II (topo II) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) which belong to the GHKL (gyrase, Hsp90, histidine kinase, and MutL) family. The inhibitors that target each of topo II and Hsp90 are intensively studied as anti-cancer drugs since they play very important roles in cell proliferation and survival. Therefore the development of dual targeting anti-cancer drugs for topo II and Hsp90 is suggested to be a promising area. The topo II and Hsp90 inhibitors, known to bind to their ATP binding site, were searched. All the inhibitors investigated were docked to both topo II and Hsp90. Four candidate compounds as possible dual inhibitors were selected by analyzing the molecular docking study. The pharmacophore model of dual inhibitors for topo II and Hsp90 were generated and the design of novel dual inhibitor was proposed. PMID:27582553

  20. Novel Kinase Inhibitors Targeting the PH Domain of AKT for Preventing and Treating Cancer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Medical Oncology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in licensing and co-development collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize novel kinase inhibitors targeting the PH domain of AKT.

  1. Time domain investigation of transceiver functions using a known reference target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuillade, C.; Meredith, R. W.; Chotiros, N. P.; Clay, C. S.

    2002-12-01

    During August 1998, a bottom scattering tank experiment was performed at the Applied Research Laboratory, University of Texas to measure wideband acoustic reverberation from multiple objects (e.g., cobbles and pebbles) placed on a sediment simulation of the sea floor. In preparation for processing and analyzing the experimental data, time domain scattering measurements made with stainless steel and glass balls suspended in the water column were used to calibrate the sonar transceiver system by deconvolving the theoretical impulse response for steel and glass spheres, obtained via the Faran elastic sphere scattering model, from the scattered time signals. It is the analysis of these calibration measurements which forms the subject of this paper. Results show the critical importance of accurate input-output system calibrations for time domain sound scattering research, and successfully demonstrate a time domain method for accurately calibrating the complete sonar transceiver function, i.e., both the amplitude and time dependence, using a known reference target. The work has implications for boundary and volume scattering applications.

  2. DNA damage targets PKC{eta} to the nuclear membrane via its C1b domain

    SciTech Connect

    Tamarkin, Ana; Zurgil, Udi; Braiman, Alex; Hai, Naama; Krasnitsky, Ella; Maissel, Adva; Ben-Ari, Assaf; Yankelovich, Liat; Livneh, Etta

    2011-06-10

    Translocation to cellular membranes is one of the hallmarks of PKC activation, occurring as a result of the generation of lipid secondary messengers in target membrane compartments. The activation-induced translocation of PKCs and binding to membranes is largely directed by their regulatory domains. We have previously reported that PKC{eta}, a member of the novel subfamily and an epithelial specific isoform, is localized at the cytoplasm and ER/Golgi and is translocated to the plasma membrane and the nuclear envelope upon short-term activation by PMA. Here we show that PKC{eta} is shuttling between the cytoplasm and the nucleus and that upon etoposide induced DNA damage is tethered at the nuclear envelope. Although PKC{eta} expression and its phosphorylation on the hydrophobic motif (Ser675) are increased by etoposide, this phosphorylation is not required for its accumulation at the nuclear envelope. Moreover, we demonstrate that the C1b domain is sufficient for translocation to the nuclear envelope. We further show that, similar to full-length PKC{eta}, the C1b domain could also confer protection against etoposide-induced cell death. Our studies demonstrate translocation of PKC{eta} to the nuclear envelope, and suggest that its spatial regulation could be important for its cellular functions including effects on cell death.

  3. GRP1 PH Domain, Like AKT1 PH Domain, Possesses a Sentry Glutamate Residue Essential for Specific Targeting to Plasma Membrane PI(3,4,5)P3

    PubMed Central

    Pilling, Carissa; Landgraf, Kyle E.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    During the appearance of the signaling lipid PI(3,4,5)P3, an important subset of pleckstrin homology (PH) domains target signaling proteins to the plasma membrane. To ensure proper pathway regulation, such PI(3,4,5)P3-specific PH domains must exclude the more prevalant, constitutive plasma membrane lipid PI(4,5)P2 and bind the rare PI(3,4,5)P3 target lipid with sufficiently high affinity. Our previous study of the E17K mutant of protein kinase B (AKT1) PH domain, together with evidence from Carpten et al (1), revealed that the native AKT1 E17 residue serves as a sentry glutamate that excludes PI(4,5)P2, thereby playing an essential role in specific PI(3,4,5)P3 targeting (2). The sentry glutamate hypothesis proposes that an analogous sentry glutamate residue is a widespread feature of PI(3,4,5)P3-specific PH domains, and that charge reversal mutation at the sentry glutamate position will yield both increased PI(4,5)P2 affinity and constitutive plasma membrane targeting. To test this hypothesis the present study investigates the E345 residue, a putative sentry glutamate, of General Receptor for Phosphoinositides 1 (GRP1) PH domain. The results show that incorporation of the E345K charge reversal mutation into GRP1 PH domain enhances PI(4,5)P2 affinity 8-fold and yields constitutive plasma membrane targeting in cells, reminiscent of the effects of the E17K mutation in AKT1 PH domain. Hydrolysis of plasma membrane PI(4,5)P2 releases E345K GRP1 PH domain into the cytoplasm and the efficiency of this release increases when target Arf6 binding is disrupted. Overall, the findings provide strong support for the sentry glutamate hypothesis and suggest that the GRP1 E345K mutation will be linked to changes in cell physiology and human pathologies, as demonstrated for AKT1 E17K (1, 3). Analysis of available PH domain structures suggests that a lone glutamate residue (or, in some cases an aspartate) is a common, perhaps ubiquitous, feature of PI(3,4,5)P3-specific binding

  4. CdiA Effectors Use Modular Receptor-Binding Domains To Recognize Target Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ruhe, Zachary C.; Nguyen, Josephine Y.; Xiong, Jing; Koskiniemi, Sanna; Beck, Christina M.; Perkins, Basil R.; Low, David A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) systems encode CdiA effectors, which bind to specific receptors on neighboring bacteria and deliver C-terminal toxin domains to suppress target cell growth. Two classes of CdiA effectors that bind distinct cell surface receptors have been identified, but the molecular basis of receptor specificity is not understood. Alignment of BamA-specific CdiAEC93 from Escherichia coli EC93 and OmpC-specific CdiAEC536 from E. coli 536 suggests that the receptor-binding domain resides within a central region that varies between the two effectors. In support of this hypothesis, we find that CdiAEC93 fragments containing residues Arg1358 to Phe1646 bind specifically to purified BamA. Moreover, chimeric CdiAEC93 that carries the corresponding sequence from CdiAEC536 is endowed with OmpC-binding activity, demonstrating that this region dictates receptor specificity. A survey of E. coli CdiA proteins reveals two additional effector classes, which presumably recognize distinct receptors. Using a genetic approach, we identify the outer membrane nucleoside transporter Tsx as the receptor for a third class of CdiA effectors. Thus, CDI systems exploit multiple outer membrane proteins to identify and engage target cells. These results underscore the modularity of CdiA proteins and suggest that novel effectors can be constructed through genetic recombination to interchange different receptor-binding domains and toxic payloads. PMID:28351921

  5. Mammalian Pseudokinase TRIB3 in Normal Physiology and Disease: Charting the Progress in Old and New Avenues.

    PubMed

    Örd, Tiit; Örd, Tõnis

    2017-04-06

    Tribbles homolog 3 (TRIB3) is a mammalian gene that is upregulated in response to several types of cell death-inducing cellular stress. The TRIB3 protein is a pseudokinase, a protein kinase-like scaffold with impaired catalytic activity. However, research has revealed it to be prolific at forming protein-protein interactions. By binding to and regulating the activity of several key proteins, including the protein kinase Akt and transcription factors ATF4, CHOP and NF-κB, TRIB3 is at a junction of several signaling pathways. This review begins by providing insights into the characteristic protein structure and gene expression regulation mechanisms of TRIB3. Further, the diverse reported molecular roles of TRIB3 as a regulator of cell death, stress responses, inflammation, cell differentiation, protein degradation and other processes are discussed. Special attention is devoted to the involvement of TRIB3 in the pathogenesis of cancer and type 2 diabetes, two fields where TRIB3 has generated particular interest, as well as considerable debate, from a biomedical standpoint. Throughout, emphasis is placed on results obtained from animal models with altered TRIB3 expression (Trib3 knockout or overexpression mice), in order to provide insight into the contributions of TRIB3 to physiology and disease at the organism level.

  6. The axon-dendrite targeting of Kv3 (Shaw) channels is determined by a targeting motif that associates with the T1 domain and ankyrin G.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingxuan; Cao, Ruifeng; Xiao, Rui; Zhu, Michael X; Gu, Chen

    2007-12-19

    Kv3 (Shaw) channels regulate rapid spiking, transmitter release and dendritic integration of many central neurons. Crucial to functional diversity are the complex targeting patterns of channel proteins. However, the targeting mechanisms are not known. Here we report that the axon-dendrite targeting of Kv3.1 is controlled by a conditional interaction of a C-terminal axonal targeting motif (ATM) with the N-terminal T1 domain and adaptor protein ankyrin G. In cultured hippocampal neurons, although the two splice variants of Kv3.1, Kv3.1a and Kv3.1b, are differentially targeted to the somatodendritic and axonal membrane, respectively, the lysine-rich ATM is surprisingly common for both splice variants. The ATM not only directly binds to the T1 domain in a Zn2+-dependent manner, but also associates with the ankyrin-repeat domain of ankyrin G. However, the full-length channel proteins of Kv3.1b display stronger association to ankyrin G than those of Kv3.1a, suggesting that the unique splice domain at Kv3.1b C terminus influences ATM binding to T1 and ankyrin G. Because ankyrin G mainly resides at the axon initial segment, we propose that it may function as a barrier for axon-dendrite targeting of Kv3.1 channels. In support of this idea, disrupting ankyrin G function either by over-expressing a dominant-negative mutant or by siRNA knockdown decreases polarized axon-dendrite targeting of both Kv3.1a and Kv3.1b. We conclude that the conditional ATM masked by the T1 domain in Kv3.1a is exposed by the splice domain in Kv3.1b, and is subsequently recognized by ankyrin G to target Kv3.1b into the axon.

  7. Affibody molecules: new protein domains for molecular imaging and targeted tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Fredrik Y; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2007-03-01

    Molecular imaging shows promise as a useful tool to aid drug discovery and development and also to provide important prognostic and predictive diagnostic information affecting patient management in the clinic. However, the use of molecular imaging diagnostically is not widely adopted, in part due to the lack of suitable targeting agents. Affibody molecules are a class of small and very stable protein domains, which can be used to selectively address a wide range of protein targets. Their small size enables high contrast radionuclide imaging and they can be produced by conventional peptide synthesis methods. Their potential utility in molecular imaging is highlighted in a large number of animal studies using anti-HER2 Affibody tracers and has recently been validated in breast cancer patients with HER2-expressing metastases. The therapeutic efficacy of the Affibody molecules in this indication was demonstrated in preclinical models using a targeted radionuclide as the effector function. This review will focus on the recent use of Affibody molecules for molecular imaging and their application for radioimmunotherapy.

  8. DNA-binding domain fusions enhance the targeting range and precision of Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Bolukbasi, Mehmet Fatih; Gupta, Ankit; Oikemus, Sarah; Derr, Alan G.; Garber, Manuel; Brodsky, Michael H.; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Wolfe, Scot A.

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas9 system is commonly employed in biomedical research; however, the precision of Cas9 is sub-optimal for gene therapy applications that involve editing a large population of cells. Variations on the standard Cas9 system have yielded improvements in the precision of targeted DNA cleavage, but often restrict the range of targetable sequences. It remains unclear whether these variants can limit lesions to a single site within the human genome over a large cohort of treated cells. Here, we demonstrate that fusing a programmable DNA-binding domain (pDBD) to Cas9 combined with the attenuation of Cas9’s inherent DNA binding affinity produces a Cas9-pDBD chimera with dramatically improved precision and increased targeting range. Because the specificity and affinity of this framework is easily tuned, Cas9-pDBDs provide a flexible system that can be tailored to achieve extremely precise genome editing at nearly any genomic locus – characteristics that are ideal for gene therapy applications. PMID:26480473

  9. Single-Domain Antibodies Targeting Neuraminidase Protect against an H5N1 Influenza Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Francisco Miguel; Ibañez, Lorena Itatí; Van den Hoecke, Silvie; De Baets, Sarah; Smet, Anouk; Roose, Kenny; Schepens, Bert; Descamps, Francis J.; Fiers, Walter; Muyldermans, Serge

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) is an interesting target of small-molecule antiviral drugs. We isolated a set of H5N1 NA-specific single-domain antibodies (N1-VHHm) and evaluated their in vitro and in vivo antiviral potential. Two of them inhibited the NA activity and in vitro replication of clade 1 and 2 H5N1 viruses. We then generated bivalent derivatives of N1-VHHm by two methods. First, we made N1-VHHb by genetically joining two N1-VHHm moieties with a flexible linker. Second, bivalent N1-VHH-Fc proteins were obtained by genetic fusion of the N1-VHHm moiety with the crystallizable region of mouse IgG2a (Fc). The in vitro antiviral potency against H5N1 of both bivalent N1-VHHb formats was 30- to 240-fold higher than that of their monovalent counterparts, with 50% inhibitory concentrations in the low nanomolar range. Moreover, single-dose prophylactic treatment with bivalent N1-VHHb or N1-VHH-Fc protected BALB/c mice against a lethal challenge with H5N1 virus, including an oseltamivir-resistant H5N1 variant. Surprisingly, an N1-VHH-Fc fusion without in vitro NA-inhibitory or antiviral activity also protected mice against an H5N1 challenge. Virus escape selection experiments indicated that one amino acid residue close to the catalytic site is required for N1-VHHm binding. We conclude that single-domain antibodies directed against influenza virus NA protect against H5N1 virus infection, and when engineered with a conventional Fc domain, they can do so in the absence of detectable NA-inhibitory activity. IMPORTANCE Highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses are a zoonotic threat. Outbreaks of avian influenza caused by these viruses occur in many parts of the world and are associated with tremendous economic loss, and these viruses can cause very severe disease in humans. In such cases, small-molecule inhibitors of the viral NA are among the few treatment options for patients. However, treatment with such drugs often results in the emergence of resistant viruses

  10. Effects of gender-related domain violations and sexual orientation on perceptions of male and female targets: an analogue study.

    PubMed

    Blashill, Aaron J; Powlishta, Kimberly K

    2012-10-01

    The current study examined factors that influenced heterosexual male and female raters' evaluations of male and female targets who were gay or heterosexual, and who displayed varying gender roles (i.e., typical vs. atypical) in multiple domains (i.e., activities, traits, and appearance). Participants were 305 undergraduate students from a private, midwestern Jesuit institution who read vignettes describing one of 24 target types and then rated the target on possession of positive and negative characteristics, psychological adjustment, and on measures reflecting the participants' anticipated behavior toward or comfort with the target. Results showed that gender atypical appearance and activity attributes (but not traits) were viewed more negatively than their gender typical counterparts. It was also found that male participants in particular viewed gay male targets as less desirable than lesbian and heterosexual male targets. These findings suggest a nuanced approach for understanding sexual prejudice, which incorporates a complex relationship among sex, gender, sexual orientation, and domain of gendered attributes.

  11. Selection and affinity maturation of IgNAR variable domains targeting Plasmodium falciparum AMA1.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, Stewart D; Humberstone, Karen S; Krishnan, Usha V; Carmichael, Jennifer A; Doughty, Larissa; Hattarki, Meghan; Coley, Andrew M; Casey, Joanne L; Anders, Robin F; Foley, Michael; Irving, Robert A; Hudson, Peter J

    2004-04-01

    The new antigen receptor (IgNAR) is an antibody unique to sharks and consists of a disulphide-bonded dimer of two protein chains, each containing a single variable and five constant domains. The individual variable (V(NAR)) domains bind antigen independently, and are candidates for the smallest antibody-based immune recognition units. We have previously produced a library of V(NAR) domains with extensive variability in the CDR1 and CDR3 loops displayed on the surface of bacteriophage. Now, to test the efficacy of this library, and further explore the dynamics of V(NAR) antigen binding we have performed selection experiments against an infectious disease target, the malarial Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA1) from Plasmodium falciparum. Two related V(NAR) clones were selected, characterized by long (16- and 18-residue) CDR3 loops. These recombinant V(NAR)s could be harvested at yields approaching 5mg/L of monomeric protein from the E. coli periplasm, and bound AMA1 with nanomolar affinities (K(D)= approximately 2 x 10(-7) M). One clone, designated 12Y-2, was affinity-matured by error prone PCR, resulting in several variants with mutations mapping to the CDR1 and CDR3 loops. The best of these variants showed approximately 10-fold enhanced affinity over 12Y-2 and was Plasmodium falciparum strain-specific. Importantly, we demonstrated that this monovalent V(NAR) co-localized with rabbit anti-AMA1 antisera on the surface of malarial parasites and thus may have utility in diagnostic applications.

  12. Proposed docking interface between peptidoglycan and the target recognition domain of zoocin A

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yinghua; Simmonds, Robin S.; Timkovich, Russell

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Peptidoglycan added to zoocin rTRD perturbs NMR resonances around W115. •Simulations predict docking to a shallow surface groove near W115. •The docking interface is similar to mammalian antibody–antigen sites. •EDTA binds to a distinct surface site. -- Abstract: A docking model is proposed for the target recognition domain of the lytic exoenzyme zoocin A with the peptidoglycan on the outer cell surface of sensitive bacterial strains. Solubilized fragments from such peptidoglycans perturb specific backbone and side chain amide resonances in the recombinant form of the domain designated rTRD as detected in two-dimensional {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N correlation NMR spectra. The affected residues comprise a shallow surface cleft on the protein surface near W115, N53, N117, and Q105 among others, which interacts with the peptide portion of the peptidoglycan. Calculations with AutoDock Vina provide models of the docking interface. There is approximate homology between the rTDR-peptidoglycan docking site and the antigen binding site of Fab antibodies with the immunoglobin fold. EDTA was also found to bind to rTRD, but at a site distinct from the proposed peptidoglycan docking site.

  13. Receptor-binding domain as a target for developing SARS vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaojie; Liu, Qi; Du, Lanying; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo

    2013-08-01

    A decade ago, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SARS-CoV) caused a global pandemic with a mortality rate of 10%. Reports of recent outbreaks of a SARS-like disease caused by Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) have raised serious concerns of a possible reemergence of SARS-CoV, either by laboratory escape or the presence of a natural reservoir. Therefore, the development of effective and safe SARS vaccines is still needed. Based on our previous studies, we believe that the receptor-binding domain (RBD) in the S1 subunit of the SARS-CoV spike (S) protein is the most important target for developing a SARS vaccine. In particular, RBD of S protein contains the critical neutralizing domain (CND), which is able to induce highly potent neutralizing antibody response and cross-protection against divergent SARS-CoV strains. Furthermore, a RBD-based subunit vaccine is expected to be safer than other vaccines that may induce Th2-type immunopathology. This review will discuss key advances in the development of RBD-based SARS vaccines and the possibility of using a similar strategy to develop vaccines against MERS-CoV.

  14. Polycomb Group Targeting through Different Binding Partners of RING1B C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Renjing; Taylor, Alexander B.; Leal, Belinda Z.; Chadwell, Linda V.; Ilangovan, Udayar; Robinson, Angela K.; Schirf, Virgil; Hart, P. John; Lafer, Eileen M.; Demeler, Borries; Hinck, Andrew P.; McEwen, Donald G.; Kim, Chongwoo A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY RING1B, a Polycomb Group (PcG) protein, binds methylated chromatin through its association with another PcG protein called Polycomb (Pc). However, RING1B can associate with nonmethylated chromatin suggesting an alternate mechanism for RING1B interaction with chromatin. Here, we demonstrate that two proteins with little sequence identity between them, the Pc cbox domain and RYBP, bind the same surface on the C-terminal domain of RING1B (C-RING1B). Pc cbox and RYBP each fold into a nearly identical, intermolecular beta sheet with C-RING1B and a loop structure which are completely different in the two proteins. Both the beta sheet and loop are required for stable binding and transcription repression. Further, a mutation engineered to disrupt binding on the Drosophila dRING1 protein prevents chromatin association and PcG function in vivo. These results suggest that PcG targeting to different chromatin locations relies, in part, on binding partners of C-RING1B that are diverse in sequence and structure. PMID:20696397

  15. Molecular functions of the TLE tetramerization domain in Wnt target gene repression

    PubMed Central

    Chodaparambil, Jayanth V; Pate, Kira T; Hepler, Margretta R D; Tsai, Becky P; Muthurajan, Uma M; Luger, Karolin; Waterman, Marian L; Weis, William I

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling activates target genes by promoting association of the co-activator β-catenin with TCF/LEF transcription factors. In the absence of β-catenin, target genes are silenced by TCF-mediated recruitment of TLE/Groucho proteins, but the molecular basis for TLE/TCF-dependent repression is unclear. We describe the unusual three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal Q domain of TLE1 that mediates tetramerization and binds to TCFs. We find that differences in repression potential of TCF/LEFs correlates with their affinities for TLE-Q, rather than direct competition between β-catenin and TLE for TCFs as part of an activation–repression switch. Structure-based mutation of the TLE tetramer interface shows that dimers cannot mediate repression, even though they bind to TCFs with the same affinity as tetramers. Furthermore, the TLE Q tetramer, not the dimer, binds to chromatin, specifically to K20 methylated histone H4 tails, suggesting that the TCF/TLE tetramer complex promotes structural transitions of chromatin to mediate repression. PMID:24596249

  16. Design and implementation of random noise radar with spectral-domain correlation for moving target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Phill; Jeong, Chi Hyun; Kim, Cheol Hoo

    2011-06-01

    A correlation processing algorithm in the spectral domain is proposed for detecting moving targets with random noise radar. AD converted reference and Rx signals are passed through FFT block, and they are multiplied after the reference signal is complex conjugated. Now inverse FFT yields the sub-correlation results, and range and velocity information can be accurately extracted by an additional FFT processing. In this design procedure, specific considerations have to be made for correlation length, averaging number, and number of sub-correlation data for Doppler processing. The proposed algorithm was verified by Simulink (Mathworks) simulation, and its logic was implemented with Xilinx FPGA device (Vertex5 series) by System Generator block sets (Xilinx) in the Simulink environment. A CW X-band random-FM noise radar prototype with an instantaneous bandwidth of 100 MHz was designed and implemented, and laboratory and field tests were conducted to detect moving targets, and the observed results showed the validity of the proposed algorithm and the operation of implemented FPGA logics.

  17. Target of Rapamycin Regulates Development and Ribosomal RNA Expression through Kinase Domain in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Maozhi; Qiu, Shuqing; Venglat, Prakash; Xiang, Daoquan; Feng, Li; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Datla, Raju

    2011-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) is a central regulator of cell growth, cell death, nutrition, starvation, hormone, and stress responses in diverse eukaryotes. However, very little is known about TOR signaling and the associated functional domains in plants. We have taken a genetic approach to dissect TOR functions in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and report here that the kinase domain is essential for the role of TOR in embryogenesis and 45S rRNA expression. Twelve new T-DNA insertion mutants, spanning 14.2 kb of TOR-encoding genomic region, have been characterized. Nine of these share expression of defective kinase domain and embryo arrest at 16 to 32 cell stage. However, three T-DNA insertion lines affecting FATC domain displayed normal embryo development, indicating that FATC domain was dispensable in Arabidopsis. Genetic complementation showed that the TOR kinase domain alone in tor-10/tor-10 mutant background can rescue early embryo lethality and restore normal development. Overexpression of full-length TOR or kinase domain in Arabidopsis displayed developmental abnormalities in meristem, leaf, root, stem, flowering time, and senescence. We further show that TOR, especially the kinase domain, plays a role in ribosome biogenesis by activating 45S rRNA production. Of the six putative nuclear localization sequences in the kinase domain, nuclear localization sequence 6 was identified to confer TOR nuclear targeting in transient expression assays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies revealed that the HEAT repeat domain binds to 45S rRNA promoter and the 5′ external transcribed spacer elements motif. Together, these results show that TOR controls the embryogenesis, postembryonic development, and 45S rRNA production through its kinase domain in Arabidopsis. PMID:21266656

  18. Modulators of Hepatic Lipoprotein Metabolism Identified in a Search for Small-Molecule Inducers of Tribbles Pseudokinase 1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nagiec, Marek M.; Skepner, Adam P.; Negri, Joseph; Eichhorn, Michelle; Kuperwasser, Nicolas; Comer, Eamon; Muncipinto, Giovanni; Subramanian, Aravind; Clish, Clary; Musunuru, Kiran; Duvall, Jeremy R.; Foley, Michael; Perez, Jose R.; Palmer, Michelle A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome wide association studies have linked tribbles pseudokinase 1 (TRIB1) to the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). Based on the observations that increased expression of TRIB1 reduces secretion of VLDL and is associated with lower plasma levels of LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, higher plasma levels of HDL cholesterol and reduced risk for myocardial infarction, we carried out a high throughput phenotypic screen based on quantitative RT-PCR assay to identify compounds that induce TRIB1 expression in human HepG2 hepatoma cells. In a screen of a collection of diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS)-derived compounds, we identified a series of benzofuran-based compounds that upregulate TRIB1 expression and phenocopy the effects of TRIB1 cDNA overexpression, as they inhibit triglyceride synthesis and apoB secretion in cells. In addition, the compounds downregulate expression of MTTP and APOC3, key components of the lipoprotein assembly pathway. However, CRISPR-Cas9 induced chromosomal disruption of the TRIB1 locus in HepG2 cells, while confirming its regulatory role in lipoprotein metabolism, demonstrated that the effects of benzofurans persist in TRIB1-null cells indicating that TRIB1 is sufficient but not necessary to transmit the effects of the drug. Remarkably, active benzofurans, as well as natural products capable of TRIB1 upregulation, also modulate hepatic cell cholesterol metabolism by elevating the expression of LDLR transcript and LDL receptor protein, while reducing the levels of PCSK9 transcript and secreted PCSK9 protein and stimulating LDL uptake. The effects of benzofurans are not masked by cholesterol depletion and are independent of the SREBP-2 regulatory circuit, indicating that these compounds represent a novel class of chemically tractable small-molecule modulators that shift cellular lipoprotein metabolism in HepG2 cells from lipogenesis to scavenging. PMID:25811180

  19. Liver-Targeting of Interferon-Alpha with Tissue-Specific Domain Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Coulstock, Edward; Sosabowski, Jane; Ovečka, Milan; Prince, Rob; Goodall, Laura; Mudd, Clare; Sepp, Armin; Davies, Marie; Foster, Julie; Burnet, Jerome; Dunlevy, Gráinne; Walker, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Interferon alpha (IFNα) is used for the treatment of hepatitis C infection and whilst efficacious it is associated with multiple adverse events including reduced leukocyte, erythrocyte, and platelet counts, fatigue, and depression. These events are most likely caused by systemic exposure to interferon. We therefore hypothesise that targeting the therapeutic directly to the intended site of action in the liver would reduce exposure in blood and peripheral tissue and hence improve the safety and tolerability of IFNα therapy. We genetically fused IFN to a domain antibody (dAb) specific to a hepatocyte restricted antigen, asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR). Our results show that the murine IFNα2 homolog (mIFNα2) fused to an ASGPR specific dAb, termed DOM26h-196-61, could be expressed in mammalian tissue culture systems and retains the desirable biophysical properties and activity of both fusion partners when measured in vitro. Furthermore a clear increase in in vivo targeting of the liver by mIFNα2-ASGPR dAb fusion protein, compared to that observed with either unfused mIFNα2 or mIFNα2 fused to an isotype control dAb VHD2 (which does not bind ASGPR) was demonstrated using microSPECT imaging. We suggest that these findings may be applicable in the development of a liver-targeted human IFN molecule with improved safety and patient compliance in comparison to the current standard of care, which could ultimately be used as a treatment for human hepatitis virus infections. PMID:23451195

  20. ETS-domain transcription factor Elk-1 mediates neuronal survival: SMN as a potential target.

    PubMed

    Demir, Ozlem; Aysit, Nese; Onder, Zeynep; Turkel, Nezaket; Ozturk, Gurkan; Sharrocks, Andrew D; Kurnaz, Isil Aksan

    2011-06-01

    Elk-1 belongs to the ternary complex factors (TCFs) subfamily of the ETS domain proteins, and plays a critical role in the expression of immediate-early genes (IEGs) upon mitogen stimulation and activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. The association of TCFs with serum response elements (SREs) on IEG promoters has been widely studied and a role for Elk-1 in promoting cell cycle entry has been determined. However, the presence of the ETS domain transcription factor Elk-1 in axons and dendrites of post-mitotic adult brain neurons has implications for an alternative function for Elk-1 in neurons other than controlling proliferation. In this study, possible alternative roles for Elk-1 in neurons were investigated, and it was demonstrated that blocking TCF-mediated transactivation in neuronal cells leads to apoptosis through a caspase-dependent mechanism. Indeed RNAi-mediated depletion of endogenous Elk-1 results in increased caspase activity. Conversely, overexpression of either Elk-1 or Elk-VP16 fusion proteins was shown to rescue PC12 cells from chemically-induced apoptosis, and that higher levels of endogenous Elk-1 correlated with longer survival of DRGs in culture. It was shown that Elk-1 regulated the Mcl-1 gene expression required for survival, and that RNAi-mediated degradation of endogenous Elk-1 resulted in elimination of the mcl-1 message. We have further identified the survival-of-motor neuron-1 (SMN1) gene as a novel target of Elk-1, and show that the ets motifs in the SMN1 promoter are involved in this regulation.

  1. Antiviral activity of recombinant ankyrin targeted to the capsid domain of HIV-1 Gag polyprotein.

    PubMed

    Nangola, Sawitree; Urvoas, Agathe; Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie; Khamaikawin, Wannisa; Sakkhachornphop, Supachai; Hong, Saw-See; Boulanger, Pierre; Minard, Philippe; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai

    2012-02-20

    Ankyrins are cellular mediators of a number of essential protein-protein interactions. Unlike intrabodies, ankyrins are composed of highly structured repeat modules characterized by disulfide bridge-independent folding. Artificial ankyrin molecules, designed to target viral components, might act as intracellular antiviral agents and contribute to the cellular immunity against viral pathogens such as HIV-1. A phage-displayed library of artificial ankyrins was constructed, and screened on a polyprotein made of the fused matrix and capsid domains (MA-CA) of the HIV-1 Gag precursor. An ankyrin with three modules named Ank(GAG)1D4 (16.5 kDa) was isolated. Ank(GAG)1D4 and MA-CA formed a protein complex with a stoichiometry of 1:1 and a dissociation constant of K(d) ~ 1 μM, and the Ank(GAG)1D4 binding site was mapped to the N-terminal domain of the CA, within residues 1-110. HIV-1 production in SupT1 cells stably expressing Ank(GAG)1D4 in both N-myristoylated and non-N-myristoylated versions was significantly reduced compared to control cells. Ank(GAG)1D4 expression also reduced the production of MLV, a phylogenetically distant retrovirus. The Ank(GAG)1D4-mediated antiviral effect on HIV-1 was found to occur at post-integration steps, but did not involve the Gag precursor processing or cellular trafficking. Our data suggested that the lower HIV-1 progeny yields resulted from the negative interference of Ank(GAG)1D4-CA with the Gag assembly and budding pathway. The resistance of Ank(GAG)1D4-expressing cells to HIV-1 suggested that the CA-targeted ankyrin Ank(GAG)1D4 could serve as a protein platform for the design of a novel class of intracellular inhibitors of HIV-1 assembly based on ankyrin-repeat modules.

  2. ErbB3/HER3 intracellular domain is competent to bind ATP and catalyze autophosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Fumin; Telesco, Shannon E.; Liu, Yingting; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2010-06-21

    ErbB3/HER3 is one of four members of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER) or ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase family. ErbB3 binds neuregulins via its extracellular region and signals primarily by heterodimerizing with ErbB2/HER2/Neu. A recently appreciated role for ErbB3 in resistance of tumor cells to EGFR/ErbB2-targeted therapeutics has made it a focus of attention. However, efforts to inactivate ErbB3 therapeutically in parallel with other ErbB receptors are challenging because its intracellular kinase domain is thought to be an inactive pseudokinase that lacks several key conserved (and catalytically important) residues - including the catalytic base aspartate. We report here that, despite these sequence alterations, ErbB3 retains sufficient kinase activity to robustly trans-autophosphorylate its intracellular region - although it is substantially less active than EGFR and does not phosphorylate exogenous peptides. The ErbB3 kinase domain binds ATP with a K{sub d} of approximately 1.1 {micro}M. We describe a crystal structure of ErbB3 kinase bound to an ATP analogue, which resembles the inactive EGFR and ErbB4 kinase domains (but with a shortened {alpha}C-helix). Whereas mutations that destabilize this configuration activate EGFR and ErbB4 (and promote EGFR-dependent lung cancers), a similar mutation conversely inactivates ErbB3. Using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we delineate a reaction pathway for ErbB3-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer that does not require the conserved catalytic base and can be catalyzed by the 'inactive-like'configuration observed crystallographically. These findings suggest that ErbB3 kinase activity within receptor dimers may be crucial for signaling and could represent an important therapeutic target.

  3. ErbB3/HER3 intracellular domain is competent to bind ATP and catalyze autophosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fumin; Telesco, Shannon E; Liu, Yingting; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Lemmon, Mark A

    2010-04-27

    ErbB3/HER3 is one of four members of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER) or ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase family. ErbB3 binds neuregulins via its extracellular region and signals primarily by heterodimerizing with ErbB2/HER2/Neu. A recently appreciated role for ErbB3 in resistance of tumor cells to EGFR/ErbB2-targeted therapeutics has made it a focus of attention. However, efforts to inactivate ErbB3 therapeutically in parallel with other ErbB receptors are challenging because its intracellular kinase domain is thought to be an inactive pseudokinase that lacks several key conserved (and catalytically important) residues-including the catalytic base aspartate. We report here that, despite these sequence alterations, ErbB3 retains sufficient kinase activity to robustly trans-autophosphorylate its intracellular region--although it is substantially less active than EGFR and does not phosphorylate exogenous peptides. The ErbB3 kinase domain binds ATP with a K(d) of approximately 1.1 microM. We describe a crystal structure of ErbB3 kinase bound to an ATP analogue, which resembles the inactive EGFR and ErbB4 kinase domains (but with a shortened alphaC-helix). Whereas mutations that destabilize this configuration activate EGFR and ErbB4 (and promote EGFR-dependent lung cancers), a similar mutation conversely inactivates ErbB3. Using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we delineate a reaction pathway for ErbB3-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer that does not require the conserved catalytic base and can be catalyzed by the "inactive-like" configuration observed crystallographically. These findings suggest that ErbB3 kinase activity within receptor dimers may be crucial for signaling and could represent an important therapeutic target.

  4. Mutations in the linker domain affect phospho-STAT3 function and suggest targets for interrupting STAT3 activity.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Claudia; Haripal, Bhagwattie; Klinge, Sebastian; Darnell, James E

    2015-12-01

    Crystallography of the cores of phosphotyrosine-activated dimers of STAT1 (132-713) and STAT3 (127-722) bound to a similar double-stranded deoxyoligonucleotide established the domain structure of the STATs and the structural basis for activation through tyrosine phosphorylation and dimerization. We reported earlier that mutants in the linker domain of STAT1 that connect the DNA-binding domain and SH2 domain can prevent transcriptional activation. Because of the pervasive importance of persistently activated STAT3 in many human cancers and the difficulty of finding useful drug candidates aimed at disrupting the pY interchange in active STAT3 dimers, we have examined effects of an array of mutants in the STAT3 linker domain. We have found several STAT3 linker domain mutants to have profound effects of inhibiting STAT3 transcriptional activation. From these results, we propose (i) there is definite functional interaction of the linker both with the DNA binding domain and with the SH2 domain, and (ii) these putative contacts provide potential new targets for small molecule-induced pSTAT3 inhibition.

  5. Mutations in the linker domain affect phospho-STAT3 function and suggest targets for interrupting STAT3 activity

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Claudia; Haripal, Bhagwattie; Klinge, Sebastian; Darnell, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Crystallography of the cores of phosphotyrosine-activated dimers of STAT1 (132–713) and STAT3 (127–722) bound to a similar double-stranded deoxyoligonucleotide established the domain structure of the STATs and the structural basis for activation through tyrosine phosphorylation and dimerization. We reported earlier that mutants in the linker domain of STAT1 that connect the DNA-binding domain and SH2 domain can prevent transcriptional activation. Because of the pervasive importance of persistently activated STAT3 in many human cancers and the difficulty of finding useful drug candidates aimed at disrupting the pY interchange in active STAT3 dimers, we have examined effects of an array of mutants in the STAT3 linker domain. We have found several STAT3 linker domain mutants to have profound effects of inhibiting STAT3 transcriptional activation. From these results, we propose (i) there is definite functional interaction of the linker both with the DNA binding domain and with the SH2 domain, and (ii) these putative contacts provide potential new targets for small molecule-induced pSTAT3 inhibition. PMID:26553978

  6. Structural basis of focal adhesion targeting domain-mediated signaling in cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Pallavi; Bhatnagar, Sonika

    2017-02-01

    The focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domain of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) exists in monomeric closed (c) or arm exchanged (ae) dimeric state. FAT interaction with Grb2 necessitates an intermediate open (o) state that interacts with Grb2 and activates signaling pathways leading to pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Targeted molecular dynamics (TMD) simulation was carried out in order to capture the structure of the intermediate formed by opening of Helix1 (H1) from monomeric cFAT leading to the formation of monomeric aeFAT. During TMD, H1 separated from the four helices bundle of cFAT, completely unfolded and performed a full turn before folding back to a helix inclined at an acute angle to the helical bundle in aeFAT. The entire transition can be described in six distinct intermediate structural stages. The most significant correlation of H1 motion was observed with Loop3 (L3) and is the likely reason for the complete disruption of the FAT interaction with paxillin during the transition. High-affinity analogs of the paxillin LD4 region can be a promising strategy to drive the equilibrium towards cFAT, thus antagonizing FAT-Grb2 association. During transition, the overall shift in orientation of all the four helices rejects paxillin binding and approves Grb2 association. Exposure and β-turn conformation of the YENV motif (residues 925-928) in oFAT-facilitated phosphorylation and Grb2 binding. Docking, MD simulation and conservation analysis of oFAT-Grb2 complex provided insight into the structural determinants of binding and specificity. Our work provides a structural basis for pharmacological modulation of dynamic conformational changes and interactions of FAT.

  7. Targeted Degradation of CTCF Decouples Local Insulation of Chromosome Domains from Genomic Compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Nora, Elphège P; Goloborodko, Anton; Valton, Anne-Laure; Gibcus, Johan H; Uebersohn, Alec; Abdennur, Nezar; Dekker, Job; Mirny, Leonid A; Bruneau, Benoit G

    2017-05-18

    The molecular mechanisms underlying folding of mammalian chromosomes remain poorly understood. The transcription factor CTCF is a candidate regulator of chromosomal structure. Using the auxin-inducible degron system in mouse embryonic stem cells, we show that CTCF is absolutely and dose-dependently required for looping between CTCF target sites and insulation of topologically associating domains (TADs). Restoring CTCF reinstates proper architecture on altered chromosomes, indicating a powerful instructive function for CTCF in chromatin folding. CTCF remains essential for TAD organization in non-dividing cells. Surprisingly, active and inactive genome compartments remain properly segregated upon CTCF depletion, revealing that compartmentalization of mammalian chromosomes emerges independently of proper insulation of TADs. Furthermore, our data support that CTCF mediates transcriptional insulator function through enhancer blocking but not as a direct barrier to heterochromatin spreading. Beyond defining the functions of CTCF in chromosome folding, these results provide new fundamental insights into the rules governing mammalian genome organization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Antibacterial small molecules targeting the conserved TOPRIM domain of DNA gyrase

    PubMed Central

    Labroli, Marc; Painter, Ronald E.; Wiltsie, Judyann; Sherborne, Brad; Murgolo, Nicholas; Sher, Xinwei; Mann, Paul; Zuck, Paul; Garlisi, Charles G.; Su, Jing; Kargman, Stacia; Xiao, Li; Scapin, Giovanna; Salowe, Scott; Devito, Kristine; Sheth, Payal; Buist, Nichole; Tan, Christopher M.; Black, Todd A.; Roemer, Terry

    2017-01-01

    To combat the threat of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, novel agents that circumvent established resistance mechanisms are urgently needed. Our approach was to focus first on identifying bioactive small molecules followed by chemical lead prioritization and target identification. Within this annotated library of bioactives, we identified a small molecule with activity against efflux-deficient Escherichia coli and other sensitized Gram-negatives. Further studies suggested that this compound inhibited DNA replication and selection for resistance identified mutations in a subunit of E. coli DNA gyrase, a type II topoisomerase. Our initial compound demonstrated weak inhibition of DNA gyrase activity while optimized compounds demonstrated significantly improved inhibition of E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA gyrase and caused cleaved complex stabilization, a hallmark of certain bactericidal DNA gyrase inhibitors. Amino acid substitutions conferring resistance to this new class of DNA gyrase inhibitors reside exclusively in the TOPRIM domain of GyrB and are not associated with resistance to the fluoroquinolones, suggesting a novel binding site for a gyrase inhibitor. PMID:28700746

  9. Antibacterial small molecules targeting the conserved TOPRIM domain of DNA gyrase.

    PubMed

    Walker, Scott S; Labroli, Marc; Painter, Ronald E; Wiltsie, Judyann; Sherborne, Brad; Murgolo, Nicholas; Sher, Xinwei; Mann, Paul; Zuck, Paul; Garlisi, Charles G; Su, Jing; Kargman, Stacia; Xiao, Li; Scapin, Giovanna; Salowe, Scott; Devito, Kristine; Sheth, Payal; Buist, Nichole; Tan, Christopher M; Black, Todd A; Roemer, Terry

    2017-01-01

    To combat the threat of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, novel agents that circumvent established resistance mechanisms are urgently needed. Our approach was to focus first on identifying bioactive small molecules followed by chemical lead prioritization and target identification. Within this annotated library of bioactives, we identified a small molecule with activity against efflux-deficient Escherichia coli and other sensitized Gram-negatives. Further studies suggested that this compound inhibited DNA replication and selection for resistance identified mutations in a subunit of E. coli DNA gyrase, a type II topoisomerase. Our initial compound demonstrated weak inhibition of DNA gyrase activity while optimized compounds demonstrated significantly improved inhibition of E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA gyrase and caused cleaved complex stabilization, a hallmark of certain bactericidal DNA gyrase inhibitors. Amino acid substitutions conferring resistance to this new class of DNA gyrase inhibitors reside exclusively in the TOPRIM domain of GyrB and are not associated with resistance to the fluoroquinolones, suggesting a novel binding site for a gyrase inhibitor.

  10. Discovery of novel potent ΔF508-CFTR correctors that target the nucleotide binding domain.

    PubMed

    Odolczyk, Norbert; Fritsch, Janine; Norez, Caroline; Servel, Nathalie; da Cunha, Melanie Faria; Bitam, Sara; Kupniewska, Anna; Wiszniewski, Ludovic; Colas, Julien; Tarnowski, Krzysztof; Tondelier, Danielle; Roldan, Ariel; Saussereau, Emilie L; Melin-Heschel, Patricia; Wieczorek, Grzegorz; Lukacs, Gergely L; Dadlez, Michal; Faure, Grazyna; Herrmann, Harald; Ollero, Mario; Becq, Frédéric; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Edelman, Aleksander

    2013-10-01

    The deletion of Phe508 (ΔF508) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of CFTR is the most common mutation associated with cystic fibrosis. The ΔF508-CFTR mutant is recognized as improperly folded and targeted for proteasomal degradation. Based on molecular dynamics simulation results, we hypothesized that interaction between ΔF508-NBD1 and housekeeping proteins prevents ΔF508-CFTR delivery to the plasma membrane. Based on this assumption we applied structure-based virtual screening to identify new low-molecular-weight compounds that should bind to ΔF508-NBD1 and act as protein-protein interaction inhibitors. Using different functional assays for CFTR activity, we demonstrated that in silico-selected compounds induced functional expression of ΔF508-CFTR in transfected HeLa cells, human bronchial CF cells in primary culture, and in the nasal epithelium of homozygous ΔF508-CFTR mice. The proposed compounds disrupt keratin8-ΔF508-CFTR interaction in ΔF508-CFTR HeLa cells. Structural analysis of ΔF508-NBD1 in the presence of these compounds suggests their binding to NBD1. We conclude that our strategy leads to the discovery of new compounds that are among the most potent correctors of ΔF508-CFTR trafficking defect known to date. © 2013 The Authors. Published by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd on behalf of EMBO.

  11. DEDD, a novel death effector domain-containing protein, targeted to the nucleolus.

    PubMed Central

    Stegh, A H; Schickling, O; Ehret, A; Scaffidi, C; Peterhänsel, C; Hofmann, T G; Grummt, I; Krammer, P H; Peter, M E

    1998-01-01

    The CD95 signaling pathway comprises proteins that contain one or two death effector domains (DED), such as FADD/Mort1 or caspase-8. Here we describe a novel 37 kDa protein, DEDD, that contains an N-terminal DED. DEDD is highly conserved between human and mouse (98. 7% identity) and is ubiquitously expressed. Overexpression of DEDD in 293T cells induced weak apoptosis, mainly through its DED by which it interacts with FADD and caspase-8. Endogenous DEDD was found in the cytoplasm and translocated into the nucleus upon stimulation of CD95. Immunocytological studies revealed that overexpressed DEDD directly translocated into the nucleus, where it co-localizes in the nucleolus with UBF, a basal factor required for RNA polymerase I transcription. Consistent with its nuclear localization, DEDD contains two nuclear localization signals and the C-terminal part shares sequence homology with histones. Recombinant DEDD binds to both DNA and reconstituted mononucleosomes and inhibits transcription in a reconstituted in vitro system. The results suggest that DEDD is a final target of a chain of events by which the CD95-induced apoptotic signal is transferred into the nucleolus to shut off cellular biosynthetic activities. PMID:9774341

  12. Evidence that ethanol acts on a target in Loop 2 of the extracellular domain of alpha1 glycine receptors.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Daniel K; Trudell, James R; Bertaccini, Edward J; Li, Kaixun; Davies, Daryl L; Alkana, Ronald L

    2007-09-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that ethanol acts on specific residues in the transmembrane domains of glycine receptors (GlyRs). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the extracellular domain is also a target for ethanol action by investigating the effect of cysteine substitutions at positions 52 (extracellular domain) and 267 (transmembrane domain) on responses to n-alcohols and propyl methanethiosulfonate (PMTS) in alpha1GlyRs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In support of the hypothesis: (i) The A52C mutation changed ethanol sensitivity compared to WT GlyRs; (ii) PMTS produced irreversible alcohol-like potentiation in A52C GlyRs; and (iii) PMTS binding reduced the n-chain alcohol cutoff in A52C GlyRs. Further studies used PMTS binding to cysteines at positions 52 or 267 to block ethanol action at one site in order to determine its effect at other site(s). In these situations, ethanol caused negative modulation when acting at position 52 and positive modulation when acting at position 267. Collectively, these findings parallel the evidence that established the TM domain as a target for ethanol, suggest that positions 52 and 267 are part of the same alcohol pocket and indicate that the net effect of ethanol on GlyR function reflects the summation of its positive and negative modulatory effects on different targets.

  13. Structure-based Discovery of Novel Small Molecule Wnt Signaling Inhibitors by Targeting the Cysteine-rich Domain of Frizzled*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Jin; Bao, Ju; Miller, Ami; Zhang, Chi; Wu, Jibo; Baday, Yiressy C.; Guibao, Cristina; Li, Lin; Wu, Dianqing; Zheng, Jie J.

    2015-01-01

    Frizzled is the earliest discovered glycosylated Wnt protein receptor and is critical for the initiation of Wnt signaling. Antagonizing Frizzled is effective in inhibiting the growth of multiple tumor types. The extracellular N terminus of Frizzled contains a conserved cysteine-rich domain that directly interacts with Wnt ligands. Structure-based virtual screening and cell-based assays were used to identify five small molecules that can inhibit canonical Wnt signaling and have low IC50 values in the micromolar range. NMR experiments confirmed that these compounds specifically bind to the Wnt binding site on the Frizzled8 cysteine-rich domain with submicromolar dissociation constants. Our study confirms the feasibility of targeting the Frizzled cysteine-rich domain as an effective way of regulating canonical Wnt signaling. These small molecules can be further optimized into more potent therapeutic agents for regulating abnormal Wnt signaling by targeting Frizzled. PMID:26504084

  14. A sting in the tail: the N-terminal domain of the androgen receptor as a drug target

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Amy E; McEwan, Iain J

    2016-01-01

    The role of androgen receptor (AR) in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer (PCa) is well established. Competitive inhibition of the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) has been the staple of antiandrogen therapies employed to combat the disease in recent years. However, their efficacy has often been limited by the emergence of resistance, mediated through point mutations, and receptor truncations. As a result, the prognosis for patients with malignant castrate resistant disease remains poor. The amino-terminal domain (NTD) of the AR has been shown to be critical for AR function. Its modular activation function (AF-1) is important for both gene regulation and participation in protein-protein interactions. However, due to the intrinsically disordered structure of the domain, its potential as a candidate for therapeutic intervention has been dismissed in the past. The recent emergence of the small molecule EPI-001 has provided evidence that AR-NTD can be targeted therapeutically, independent of the LBD. Targeting of AR-NTD has the potential to disrupt multiple intermolecular interactions between AR and its coregulatory binding partners, in addition to intramolecular cross-talk between the domains of the AR. Therapeutics targeting these protein-protein interactions or NTD directly should also have efficacy against emerging AR splice variants which may play a role in PCa progression. This review will discuss the role of intrinsic disorder in AR function and illustrate how emerging therapies might target NTD in PCa. PMID:27212126

  15. Design and biological testing of peptidic dimerization inhibitors of human Hsp90 that target the C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Bertan; Ciglia, Emanuele; Ouald-Chaib, Anissa; Groth, Georg; Gohlke, Holger; Jose, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Small molecules targeting the dimerization interface of the C-terminal domain of Hsp90, a validated target for cancer treatment, have yet to be identified. Three peptides were designed with the aim to inhibit the dimerization of Hsp90. Computational and biophysical methods examined the α-helical structure for the three peptides. Based on the Autodisplay technology, a novel flow cytometer dimerization assay was developed to test inhibition of Hsp90 dimerization. Microscale thermophoresis was used to determine the K(D) of the peptides towards the C-terminal domain of Hsp90. MD simulations and CD spectroscopy indicated an α-helical structure for two of the three peptides. By flow cytometer analysis, IC(50) values of 2.08 μM for peptide H2 and 8.96 μM for peptide H3 were determined. Dimer formation of the C-terminal dimerization domain was analyzed by microscale thermophoresis, and a K(D) of 1.29 nM was determined. Furthermore, microscale thermophoresis studies demonstrated a high affinity binding of H2 and H3 to the C-terminal domain, with a K(D) of 1.02 μM and 1.46 μM, respectively. These results revealed the first peptidic inhibitors of Hsp90 dimerization targeting the C-terminal domain. Furthermore, it has been shown that these peptides bind to the C-terminal domain with a low micromolar affinity. These results can be used to design and screen for small molecules that inhibit the dimerization of the C-terminal domain of Hsp90, which could open a new route for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Protein-tyrosine Pseudokinase 7 (PTK7) Directs Cancer Cell Motility and Metastasis*

    PubMed Central

    Golubkov, Vladislav S.; Prigozhina, Natalie L.; Zhang, Yong; Stoletov, Konstantin; Lewis, John D.; Schwartz, Phillip E.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Strongin, Alex Y.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that widely expressed PTK7 is essential for vertebrate tissue morphogenesis. In cancer, the functionality of PTK7 is selectively regulated by membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), ADAMs (a disintegrin domain and metalloproteinases), and γ-secretase proteolysis. Here, we established that the full-length membrane PTK7, its Chuzhoi mutant with the two functional MT1-MMP cleavage sites, and its L622D mutant with the single inactivated MT1-MMP cleavage site differentially regulate cell motility in a two-dimensional versus three-dimensional environment. We also demonstrated that in polarized cancer cells, the levels of PTK7 expression and proteolysis were directly linked to the structure and kinetics of cell protrusions, including lamellipodia and invadopodia. In the functionally relevant and widely accepted animal models of metastasis, mouse and chick embryo models, both the overexpression and knock-out of PTK7 in HT1080 cells abrogated metastatic dissemination. Our analysis of human tissue specimens confirmed intensive proteolysis of PTK7 in colorectal cancer tumors, but not in matching normal tissue. Our results provide convincing evidence that both PTK7 expression and proteolysis, rather than the level of the cellular full-length PTK7 alone, contribute to efficient directional cell motility and metastasis in cancer. PMID:25006253

  17. PTB domain-directed substrate targeting in a tyrosine kinase from the unicellular choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Echagüe, Victoria; Chan, Perry M; Craddock, Barbara P; Manser, Edward; Miller, W Todd

    2011-04-26

    Choanoflagellates are considered to be the closest living unicellular relatives of metazoans. The genome of the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis contains a surprisingly high number and diversity of tyrosine kinases, tyrosine phosphatases, and phosphotyrosine-binding domains. Many of the tyrosine kinases possess combinations of domains that have not been observed in any multicellular organism. The role of these protein interaction domains in M. brevicollis kinase signaling is not clear. Here, we have carried out a biochemical characterization of Monosiga HMTK1, a protein containing a putative PTB domain linked to a tyrosine kinase catalytic domain. We cloned, expressed, and purified HMTK1, and we demonstrated that it possesses tyrosine kinase activity. We used immobilized peptide arrays to define a preferred ligand for the third PTB domain of HMTK1. Peptide sequences containing this ligand sequence are phosphorylated efficiently by recombinant HMTK1, suggesting that the PTB domain of HMTK1 has a role in substrate recognition analogous to the SH2 and SH3 domains of mammalian Src family kinases. We suggest that the substrate recruitment function of the noncatalytic domains of tyrosine kinases arose before their roles in autoinhibition.

  18. DDR2 (discoidin domain receptor 2) suppresses osteoclastogenesis and is a potential therapeutic target in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Su, Jin; Wu, Shufang; Teng, Yue; Yin, Zhanhai; Guo, Yan; Li, Jing; Li, Kun; Yao, Libo; Li, Xu

    2015-03-24

    Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by abnormal skeletal fragility due to an imbalance in bone homeostasis. Finding therapeutic targets that promote bone formation is valuable for treating osteoporosis. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that promotes the differentiation of bone-depositing cells, osteoblasts, and bone formation. We investigated the role of DDR2 in osteoclastogenesis, the formation of cells responsible for bone resorption. We found that, although differentiated osteoclasts had catalytically active DDR2, its abundance was decreased. Overexpression of DDR2 inhibited the expression of osteoclastic markers, osteoclast maturation, and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in a culture model of bone matrix. Conversely, knocking down Ddr2 through RNA interference accelerated osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in mice. Further, we identified the co-receptor Neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) as a DDR2-interacting protein. DDR2 facilitated the binding of Nrp1 and the co-receptor PlexinA1 by forming a DDR2-Nrp1-PlexinA1 complex, which blocked PlexinA1-mediated stimulation of osteoclastogenesis. DDR2 prevented PlexinA1 from interacting with the receptor TREM2 and the adaptor DAP12. Moreover, knocking down Nrp1 rescued the expression of osteoclastic markers observed in DDR2-overexpressing cells, whereas ectopic expression of Nrp1 in DDR2-silenced cells inhibited the induction of osteoclastogenesis. Nrp1 enhanced the function of DDR2 in promoting osteoblast differentiation and bone formation in mice. In an ovariectomized mouse model of osteoporosis, adenovirus-mediated delivery of DDR2 to the femur bone alleviated osteopenic phenotypes. Our results revealed that DDR2 functions as an inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis, as well as a promoter of osteoblastogenesis, suggesting that enhancing DDR2 may be therapeutic for patients with osteoporosis.

  19. Functional analysis of TMLH variants and definition of domains required for catalytic activity and mitochondrial targeting.

    PubMed

    Monfregola, Jlenia; Cevenini, Armando; Terracciano, Antonio; van Vlies, Naomi; Arbucci, Salvatore; Wanders, Ronald J A; D'Urso, Michele; Vaz, Frédéric M; Ursini, Matilde Valeria

    2005-09-01

    epsilon-N-Trimethyllysine hydroxylase (TMLH) (EC 1.14.11.8) is a non-heme-ferrous iron hydroxylase, Fe(++) and 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) dependent, catalyzing the first of four enzymatic reactions of the highly conserved carnitine biosynthetic pathway. Otherwise from all the other enzymes of carnitine biosynthesis, TMLH was found to be associated to the mitochondrial fraction. We here report molecular cloning of two alternative spliced forms of TMLH, which appear ubiquitously expressed in human adult and fetal tissues. The deduced proteins are designated TMLH-a and TMLH-b, and contain 421 and 399 amino acids, respectively. They share the first N-terminal 332 amino acids, including a mitochondrial targeting signal, but diverge at the C-terminal end. TMLH-a and TMLH-b exogenous expression in COS-1 cells shows that the first 15 amino acids are necessary and sufficient for mitochondrial import. Furthermore, comparative evolutionary analysis of the C-terminal portion of TMLH-a identifies a conserved domain characterized by a key triad of residues, His242-Glu244-His389 predicted to bind 2OG end. This sequence is conserved in the TMLH enzyme from all species but is partially substituted by a unique sequence in the TMLH-b variant. Indeed, TMLH-b is not functional by itself as well as a TMLH-H389L mutant produced by site directed mutagenesis. As great interest, we found that TMLH-b and TMLH-H389L, individually co-expressed with TMLH-a in COS-1 cells, negatively affect TMLH activity. Therefore, our studies on the TMLH alternative form provide relevant novel information, first that the C-terminal region of TMLH contains the main determinants for its enzymatic activity including a key H389 residue, and second that TMLH-b could act as a crucial physiological negative regulator of TMLH. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Targeting domain-III hinging of dengue envelope (DENV-2) protein by MD simulations, docking and free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Kshatresh Dutta; Tiwari, Gargi; Ojha, Rajendra Prasad

    2017-04-01

    The entry of the dengue virus is mediated by the conformational change in the envelope protein due to change in the endosomal pH. The structural study reveals that domain-III of the dengue envelope protein (DENV) shows the largest shift in its position during the entry of the virus. Therefore, targeting the hinge region of the domain-III may block the conformational changes in the DENV. In the present work, we have targeted the domain I/III hinge region using four known ligands used for the dengue envelope protein (serotype-2) and have intended to explore the specificity of one ligand R1 (5-(3-chlorophenyl)-N-(2-phenyl-2H-benzo[d][1,2,3]triazol-6-yl)furan-2-carboxamide) that succeeded the dengue inhibition by the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in conjunction of the molecular docking and the binding free energy calculations. The residue interactions map shows Lys 296 of domain-III of the DENV-2, which might be responsible for binding small molecules between domain I/III interface, as an important residue conserved in all the dengue serotypes.

  1. miRNA863-3p sequentially targets negative immune regulator ARLPKs and positive regulator SERRATE upon bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Dongdong; Lii, Yifan E.; Chellappan, Padmanabhan; Lei, Lei; Peralta, Karl; Jiang, Chunhao; Guo, Jianhua; Coaker, Gitta; Jin, Hailing

    2016-01-01

    Plant small RNAs play important roles in gene regulation during pathogen infection. Here we show that miR863-3p is induced by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae carrying various effectors. Early during infection, miR863-3p silences two negative regulators of plant defence, atypical receptor-like pseudokinase1 (ARLPK1) and ARLPK2, both lacking extracellular domains and kinase activity, through mRNA degradation to promote immunity. ARLPK1 associates with, and may function through another negative immune regulator ARLPK1-interacting receptor-like kinase 1 (AKIK1), an active kinase with an extracellular domain. Later during infection, miR863-3p silences SERRATE, which is essential for miRNA accumulation and positively regulates defence, through translational inhibition. This results in decreased miR863-3p levels, thus forming a negative feedback loop to attenuate immune responses after successful defence. This is an example of a miRNA that sequentially targets both negative and positive regulators of immunity through two modes of action to fine-tune the timing and amplitude of defence responses. PMID:27108563

  2. Real-Time Investigation of Referential Domains in Unscripted Conversation: A Targeted Language Game Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown-Schmidt, Sarah; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments examined the restriction of referential domains during unscripted conversation by analyzing the modification and online interpretation of referring expressions. Experiment 1 demonstrated that from the earliest moments of processing, addressees interpreted referring expressions with respect to referential domains constrained by the…

  3. Real-Time Investigation of Referential Domains in Unscripted Conversation: A Targeted Language Game Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown-Schmidt, Sarah; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments examined the restriction of referential domains during unscripted conversation by analyzing the modification and online interpretation of referring expressions. Experiment 1 demonstrated that from the earliest moments of processing, addressees interpreted referring expressions with respect to referential domains constrained by the…

  4. A domain unique to plant RanGAP is responsible for its targeting to the plant nuclear rim

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Annkatrin; Meier, Iris

    2001-01-01

    Ran is a small signaling GTPase that is involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Two additional functions of animal Ran in the formation of spindle asters and the reassembly of the nuclear envelope in mitotic cells have been recently reported. In contrast to Ras or Rho, Ran is not associated with membranes. Instead, the spatial sequestering of its accessory proteins, the Ran GTPase-activating protein RanGAP and the nucleotide exchange factor RCC1, appears to define the local concentration of RanGTP vs. RanGDP involved in signaling. Mammalian RanGAP is bound to the nuclear pore by a mechanism involving the attachment of small ubiquitin-related modifier protein (SUMO) to its C terminus and the subsequent binding of the SUMOylated domain to the nucleoporin Nup358. Here we show that plant RanGAP utilizes a different mechanism for nuclear envelope association, involving a novel targeting domain that appears to be unique to plants. The N-terminal WPP domain is highly conserved among plant RanGAPs and the small, plant-specific nuclear envelope-associated protein MAF1, but not present in yeast or animal RanGAP. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins showed that it is necessary for RanGAP targeting and sufficient to target the heterologous protein GFP to the plant nuclear rim. The highly conserved tryptophan and proline residues of the WPP motif are necessary for its function. The 110-aa WPP domain is the first nuclear-envelope targeting domain identified in plants. Its fundamental difference to its mammalian counterpart implies that different mechanisms have evolved in plants and animals to anchor RanGAP at the nuclear surface. PMID:11752475

  5. A domain unique to plant RanGAP is responsible for its targeting to the plant nuclear rim.

    PubMed

    Rose, A; Meier, I

    2001-12-18

    Ran is a small signaling GTPase that is involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Two additional functions of animal Ran in the formation of spindle asters and the reassembly of the nuclear envelope in mitotic cells have been recently reported. In contrast to Ras or Rho, Ran is not associated with membranes. Instead, the spatial sequestering of its accessory proteins, the Ran GTPase-activating protein RanGAP and the nucleotide exchange factor RCC1, appears to define the local concentration of RanGTP vs. RanGDP involved in signaling. Mammalian RanGAP is bound to the nuclear pore by a mechanism involving the attachment of small ubiquitin-related modifier protein (SUMO) to its C terminus and the subsequent binding of the SUMOylated domain to the nucleoporin Nup358. Here we show that plant RanGAP utilizes a different mechanism for nuclear envelope association, involving a novel targeting domain that appears to be unique to plants. The N-terminal WPP domain is highly conserved among plant RanGAPs and the small, plant-specific nuclear envelope-associated protein MAF1, but not present in yeast or animal RanGAP. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins showed that it is necessary for RanGAP targeting and sufficient to target the heterologous protein GFP to the plant nuclear rim. The highly conserved tryptophan and proline residues of the WPP motif are necessary for its function. The 110-aa WPP domain is the first nuclear-envelope targeting domain identified in plants. Its fundamental difference to its mammalian counterpart implies that different mechanisms have evolved in plants and animals to anchor RanGAP at the nuclear surface.

  6. Targeting Extracellular Domains D4 and D7 of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 Reveals Allosteric Receptor Regulatory Sites

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Caroline A. C.; Giese, Alexandra; Stuttfeld, Edward; Abram Saliba, Johan; Villemagne, Denis; Schleier, Thomas; Binz, H. Kaspar

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) activate three receptor tyrosine kinases, VEGFR-1, -2, and -3, which regulate angiogenic and lymphangiogenic signaling. VEGFR-2 is the most prominent receptor in angiogenic signaling by VEGF ligands. The extracellular part of VEGF receptors consists of seven immunoglobulin homology domains (Ig domains). Earlier studies showed that domains 2 and 3 (D23) mediate ligand binding, while structural analysis of dimeric ligand/receptor complexes by electron microscopy and small-angle solution scattering revealed additional homotypic contacts in membrane-proximal Ig domains D4 and D7. Here we show that D4 and D7 are indispensable for receptor signaling. To confirm the essential role of these domains in signaling, we isolated VEGFR-2-inhibitory “designed ankyrin repeat proteins” (DARPins) that interact with D23, D4, or D7. DARPins that interact with D23 inhibited ligand binding, receptor dimerization, and receptor kinase activation, while DARPins specific for D4 or D7 did not prevent ligand binding or receptor dimerization but effectively blocked receptor signaling and functional output. These data show that D4 and D7 allosterically regulate VEGFR-2 activity. We propose that these extracellular-domain-specific DARPins represent a novel generation of receptor-inhibitory drugs for in vivo applications such as targeting of VEGFRs in medical diagnostics and for treating vascular pathologies. PMID:22801374

  7. Targeting extracellular domains D4 and D7 of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 reveals allosteric receptor regulatory sites.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Caroline A C; Giese, Alexandra; Stuttfeld, Edward; Abram Saliba, Johan; Villemagne, Denis; Schleier, Thomas; Binz, H Kaspar; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt

    2012-10-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) activate three receptor tyrosine kinases, VEGFR-1, -2, and -3, which regulate angiogenic and lymphangiogenic signaling. VEGFR-2 is the most prominent receptor in angiogenic signaling by VEGF ligands. The extracellular part of VEGF receptors consists of seven immunoglobulin homology domains (Ig domains). Earlier studies showed that domains 2 and 3 (D23) mediate ligand binding, while structural analysis of dimeric ligand/receptor complexes by electron microscopy and small-angle solution scattering revealed additional homotypic contacts in membrane-proximal Ig domains D4 and D7. Here we show that D4 and D7 are indispensable for receptor signaling. To confirm the essential role of these domains in signaling, we isolated VEGFR-2-inhibitory "designed ankyrin repeat proteins" (DARPins) that interact with D23, D4, or D7. DARPins that interact with D23 inhibited ligand binding, receptor dimerization, and receptor kinase activation, while DARPins specific for D4 or D7 did not prevent ligand binding or receptor dimerization but effectively blocked receptor signaling and functional output. These data show that D4 and D7 allosterically regulate VEGFR-2 activity. We propose that these extracellular-domain-specific DARPins represent a novel generation of receptor-inhibitory drugs for in vivo applications such as targeting of VEGFRs in medical diagnostics and for treating vascular pathologies.

  8. Anti-HIV Double Variable Domain Immunoglobulins Binding Both gp41 and gp120 for Targeted Delivery of Immunoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Ryan B.; Summa, Christopher M.; Corti, Miriam; Pincus, Seth H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Anti-HIV immunoconjugates targeted to the HIV envelope protein may be used to eradicate the latent reservoir of HIV infection using activate-and-purge protocols. Previous studies have identified the two target epitopes most effective for the delivery of cytotoxic immunoconjugates the CD4-binding site of gp120, and the hairpin loop of gp41. Here we construct and test tetravalent double variable domain immunoglobulin molecules (DVD-Igs) that bind to both epitopes. Methods Synthetic genes that encode DVD-Igs utilizing V-domains derived from human anti-gp120 and anti-gp41 Abs were designed and expressed in 293F cells. A series of constructs tested different inter-V-linker domains and orientations of the two V domains. Antibodies were tested for binding to recombinant Ag and native Env expressed on infected cells, for neutralization of infectious HIV, and for their ability to deliver cytotoxic immunoconjugates to infected cells. Findings The outer V-domain was the major determinant of binding and functional activity of the DVD-Ig. Function of the inner V-domain and bifunctional binding required at least 15 AA in the inter-V-domain linker. A molecular model showing the spatial orientation of the two epitopes is consistent with this observation. Linkers that incorporated helical domains (A[EAAAK]nA) resulted in more effective DVD-Igs than those based solely on flexible domains ([GGGGS]n). In general, the DVD-Igs outperformed the less effective parental antibody and equaled the activity of the more effective. The ability of the DVD-Igs to deliver cytotoxic immunoconjugates in the absence of soluble CD4 was improved over that of either parent. Conclusions DVD-Igs can be designed that bind to both gp120 and gp41 on the HIV envelope. DVD-Igs are effective in delivering cytotoxic immunoconjugates. The optimal design of these DVD-Igs, in which both domains are fully functional, has not yet been achieved. PMID:23056448

  9. Real-time investigation of referential domains in unscripted conversation: a targeted language game approach

    PubMed Central

    Brown-Schmidt, Sarah; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments examined the restriction of referential domains during unscripted conversation by analyzing the modification and on-line interpretation of referring expressions. Experiment 1 demonstrated that from the earliest moments of processing, addressees interpreted referring expressions with respect to referential domains constrained by the conversation. Analysis of eye movements during the conversation showed elimination of standard competition effects seen with scripted language. Results from Experiment 2 pinpointed two pragmatic factors responsible for restriction of the referential domains used by speakers to design referential expressions and demonstrated that the same factors predict whether addressees consider local competitors to be potential referents during on-line interpretation of the same expressions. These experiments demonstrate for the first time that on-line interpretation of referring expressions in conversation is facilitated by referential domains constrained by pragmatic factors which predict when addressees are likely to encounter temporary ambiguity in language processing. PMID:19890480

  10. Targeting Adenoviral Vectors by Using the Extracellular Domain of the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor: Improved Potency via Trimerization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin; Smith,*, Theodore; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Mulgrew, Kathy; Kaloss, Michele; Kylefjord, Helen; Ryan, Patricia C.; Kaleko, Michael; Stevenson, Susan C.

    2002-01-01

    Adenovirus binds to mammalian cells via interaction of fiber with the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR). Redirecting adenoviral vectors to enter target cells via new receptors has the advantage of increasing the efficiency of gene delivery and reducing nonspecific transduction of untargeted tissues. In an attempt to reach this goal, we have produced bifunctional molecules with soluble CAR (sCAR), which is the extracellular domain of CAR fused to peptide-targeting ligands. Two peptide-targeting ligands have been evaluated: a cyclic RGD peptide (cRGD) and the receptor-binding domain of apolipoprotein E (ApoE). Human diploid fibroblasts (HDF) are poorly transduced by adenovirus due to a lack of CAR on the surface. Addition of the sCAR-cRGD or sCAR-ApoE targeting protein to adenovirus redirected binding to the appropriate receptor on HDF. However, a large excess of the monomeric protein was needed for maximal transduction, indicating a suboptimal interaction. To improve interaction of sCAR with the fiber knob, an isoleucine GCN4 trimerization domain was introduced, and trimerization was verified by cross-linking analysis. Trimerized sCAR proteins were significantly better at interacting with fiber and inhibiting binding to HeLa cells. Trimeric sCAR proteins containing cRGD and ApoE were more efficient at transducing HDF in vitro than the monomeric proteins. In addition, the trimerized sCAR protein without targeting ligands efficiently blocked liver gene transfer in normal C57BL/6 mice. However, addition of either ligand failed to retarget the liver in vivo. One explanation may be the large complex size, which serves to decrease the bioavailability of the trimeric sCAR-adenovirus complexes. In summary, we have demonstrated that trimerization of sCAR proteins can significantly improve the potency of this targeting approach in altering vector tropism in vitro and allow the efficient blocking of liver gene transfer in vivo. PMID:11799184

  11. Analysis of Organelle Targeting by DIL Domains of the Arabidopsis Myosin XI Family.

    PubMed

    Sattarzadeh, Amirali; Schmelzer, Elmon; Hanson, Maureen R

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes 13 myosin XI motor proteins. Previous insertional mutant analysis has implicated substantial redundancy of function of plant myosin XIs in transport of intracellular organelles. Considerable information is available about the interaction of cargo with the myosin XI-homologous yeast myosin V protein myo2p. We identified a region in each of 12 myosin XI sequences that correspond to the yeast myo2p secretory-vesicle binding domain (the "DIL" domain). Structural modeling of the myosin DIL domain region of plant myosin XIs revealed significant similarity to the yeast myo2p and myo4p DIL domains. Transient expression of YFP fusions with the Arabidopsis myosin XI DIL domain resulted in fluorescent labeling of a variety of organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisomes, Golgi, and nuclear envelope. With the exception of the YFP::MYA1 DIL fusion, expression of the DIL-YFP fusions resulted in loss of motility of labeled organelles, consistent with a dominant-negative effect. Certain fusions resulted in localization to the cytoplasm, plasma membrane, or to unidentified vesicles. The same YFP-domain fusion sometimes labeled more than one organelle. Expression of a YFP fusion to a yeast myo2p DIL domain resulted in labeling of plant peroxisomes. Fusions with some of the myosin XI domains resulted in labeling of known cargoes of the particular myosin XI; however, certain myosin XI YFP fusions labeled organelles that had not previously been found to be detectably affected by mutations nor by expression of dominant-negative constructs.

  12. A Proteomic Approach to Identify Phosphorylation-Dependent Targets of BRCT Domains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    ES) 10 . SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S...Recently, our lab and others have discovered that BRCT domains are novel phosphopeptide binding modules ( 10 , 14, 19). BRCA1 BRCT domains associate with...to give rise to higher YFP fluorescence intensity, and are therefore disproportionately enriched in subsequent steps . In addition, the reduction

  13. Analysis of Organelle Targeting by DIL Domains of the Arabidopsis Myosin XI Family

    PubMed Central

    Sattarzadeh, Amirali; Schmelzer, Elmon; Hanson, Maureen R.

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes 13 myosin XI motor proteins. Previous insertional mutant analysis has implicated substantial redundancy of function of plant myosin XIs in transport of intracellular organelles. Considerable information is available about the interaction of cargo with the myosin XI-homologous yeast myosin V protein myo2p. We identified a region in each of 12 myosin XI sequences that correspond to the yeast myo2p secretory-vesicle binding domain (the “DIL” domain). Structural modeling of the myosin DIL domain region of plant myosin XIs revealed significant similarity to the yeast myo2p and myo4p DIL domains. Transient expression of YFP fusions with the Arabidopsis myosin XI DIL domain resulted in fluorescent labeling of a variety of organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisomes, Golgi, and nuclear envelope. With the exception of the YFP::MYA1 DIL fusion, expression of the DIL–YFP fusions resulted in loss of motility of labeled organelles, consistent with a dominant-negative effect. Certain fusions resulted in localization to the cytoplasm, plasma membrane, or to unidentified vesicles. The same YFP-domain fusion sometimes labeled more than one organelle. Expression of a YFP fusion to a yeast myo2p DIL domain resulted in labeling of plant peroxisomes. Fusions with some of the myosin XI domains resulted in labeling of known cargoes of the particular myosin XI; however, certain myosin XI YFP fusions labeled organelles that had not previously been found to be detectably affected by mutations nor by expression of dominant-negative constructs. PMID:22645548

  14. The C1 and C2 domains target human type 6 adenylyl cyclase to lipid rafts and caveolae.

    PubMed

    Thangavel, Muthusamy; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Sun, Shu Qiang; Kaminsky, Joseph; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2009-02-01

    Previous data has shown that adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6) is expressed principally in lipid rafts or caveolae of cardiac myocytes and other cell types while certain other isoforms of AC are excluded from these microdomains. The mechanism by which AC6 is localized to lipid rafts or caveolae is unknown. In this study, we show AC6 is localized in lipid rafts of COS-7 cells (expressing caveolin-1) and in HEK-293 cells or cardiac fibroblasts isolated from caveolin-1 knock-out mice (both of which lack prototypical caveolins). To determine the region of AC6 that confers raft localization, we independently expressed each of the major intracellular domains, the N-terminus, C1 and C2 domains, and examined their localization with various approaches. The N-terminus did not associate with lipid rafts or caveolae of either COS-7 or HEK-293 cells nor did it immunoprecipitate with caveolin-1 when expressed in COS-7 cells. By contrast, the C1 and C2 domains each associated with lipid rafts to varying degrees and were present in caveolin-1 immunoprecipitates. There were no differences in the pattern of localization of either the C1 or C2 domains between COS-7 and HEK-293 cells. Further dissection of the C1 domain into four individual proteins indicated that the N-terminal half of this domain is responsible for its raft localization. To probe for a role of a putative palmitoylation motif in the C-terminal portion of the C2 domain, we expressed various truncated forms of AC6 lacking most or all of the C-terminal 41 amino acids. These truncated AC6 proteins were not altered in terms of their localization in lipid rafts or their catalytic activity, implying that this C-terminal region is not required for lipid raft targeting of AC6. We conclude that while the C1 domain may be most important, both the C1 and C2 domains of AC6 play a role in targeting AC6 to lipid rafts.

  15. Structures of YAP protein domains reveal promising targets for development of new cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sudol, Marius; Shields, Denis C.; Farooq, Amjad

    2012-01-01

    YAP (Yes-associated protein) is a potent oncogene and a major effector of the mammalian Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. In this review, our emphasis is on the structural basis of how YAP recognizes its various cellular partners. In particular, we discuss the role of LATS kinase and AMOTL1 junction protein, two key cellular partners of YAP that bind to its WW domain, in mediating cytoplasmic localization of YAP and thereby playing a key role in the regulation of its transcriptional activity. Importantly, the crystal structure of an amino-terminal domain of YAP in complex with the carboxy-terminal domain of TEAD transcription factor was only recently solved at atomic resolution, while the structure of WW domain of YAP in complex with a peptide containing the PPxY motif has been available for more than a decade. We discuss how such structural information may be exploited for the rational development of novel anti-cancer therapeutics harboring greater efficacy coupled with low toxicity. We also embark on a brief discussion of how recent in silico studies led to identification of the cardiac glycoside digitoxin as a potential modulator of WW domain-ligand interactions. Conversely, dobutamine was identified in a screen of known drugs as a compound that promotes cytoplasmic localization of YAP, thereby resulting in growth suppressing activity. Finally, we discuss how a recent study on the dynamics of WW domain folding on a biologically critical time scale may provide a tool to generate repertoires of WW domain variants for regulation of the Hippo pathway toward desired, non-oncogenic outputs. PMID:22609812

  16. Engineered domain based assays to identify individual antibodies in oligoclonal combinations targeting the same protein

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Q.; Garcia-Rodriguez, C.; Manzanarez, G.; Silberg, M.A.; Conrad, F.; Bettencourt, J.; Pan, X.; Breece, T.; To, R.; Li, M.; Lee, D.; Thorner, L.; Tomic, M.T.; Marks, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitation of individual mAbs within a combined antibody drug product is required for preclinical and clinical drug development. We have developed two antitoxins (XOMA 3B and XOMA 3E) each consisting of three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralize type B and type E botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT/B and BoNT/E) to treat serotype B and E botulism. To develop mAb-specific binding assays for each antitoxin, we mapped the epitopes of the six mAbs. Each mAb bound an epitope on either the BoNT light chain (LC) or translocation domain (HN). Epitope mapping data was used to design LC-HN domains with orthogonal mutations to make them specific for only one mAb in either XOMA 3B or 3E. Mutant LC-HN domains were cloned, expressed, and purified from E. coli. Each mAb bound only to its specific domain with affinity comparable to the binding to holotoxin. Further engineering of domains allowed construction of ELISAs that could characterize the integrity, binding affinity, and identity of each of the six mAbs in XOMA 3B, and 3E without interference from the three BoNT/A mAbs in XOMA 3AB. Such antigen engineering is a general method allowing quantitation and characterization of individual mAbs in a mAb cocktail that bind the same protein. PMID:22922799

  17. Time-domain response of a metal detector to a target buried in soil with frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Y.

    2006-05-01

    The work reported in this paper is a part of on-going studies to clarify how and to what extent soil electromagnetic properties affect the performance of induction metal detectors widely used in humanitarian demining. This paper studies the specific case of the time-domain response of a small metallic sphere buried in a non-conducting soil half-space with frequency-dependent complex magnetic susceptibility. The sphere is chosen as a simple prototype for the small metal parts in low-metal landmines, while soil with dispersive magnetic susceptibility is a good model for some soils that are known to adversely affect the performance of metal detectors. The included analysis and computations extend previous work which has been done mostly in the frequency domain. Approximate theoretical expressions for weakly magnetic soils are found to fit the experimental data very well, which allowed the estimation of soil model parameters, albeit in an ad hoc manner. Soil signal is found to exceed target signal (due to an aluminum sphere of radius 0.0127 m) in many cases, even for the weakly magnetic Cambodian laterite used in the experiments. How deep a buried target is detected depends on many other factors in addition to the relative strength of soil and target signals. A general statement cannot thus be made regarding detectability of a target in soil based on the presented results. However, computational results complemented with experimental data extend the understanding of the effect that soil has on metal detectors.

  18. Domain based assays of individual antibody concentrations in an oligoclonal combination targeting a single protein

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Q.; Li, M.; Silberg, M.A.; Conrad, F.; Bettencourt, J.; To, R.; Huang, C.; Ma, J.; Meyer, K.; Shimizu, R.; Cao, L.; Tomic, M.T.; Marks, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitation of individual mAbs within a combined antibody drug product is required for preclinical and clinical drug development including pharmacokinetics (PK), toxicology, stability and biochemical characterization studies of such drugs. We have developed an antitoxin (XOMA 3AB) consisting of three recombinant monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that potently neutralizes the known subtypes of type A botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT/A). The three mAbs bind non-overlapping BoNT/A epitopes with high affinity. XOMA3AB is being developed as a treatment for botulism resulting from BoNT/A. To develop antibody-specific assays, we cloned, expressed, and purified BoNT/A domains from E. coli. Each mAb bound only to its specific domain with affinity comparable to the binding to holotoxin. MAb specific domains were used to develop an ELISA for characterization of the integrity and binding activity of the three mAbs in the drug product. An electrochemiluminescence bridging assay was also developed that is robust to interference from components in serum and we demonstrate that it can be used for PK assays. This type of antigen engineering to generate mAb-specific domains is a general method allowing quantitation and characterization of individual mAbs in a mAb cocktail that bind the same protein and is superior to anti-idiotype approaches. PMID:22037290

  19. Toxic PR Poly-Dipeptides Encoded by the C9orf72 Repeat Expansion Target LC Domain Polymers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi; Mori, Eiichiro; Kato, Masato; Xiang, Siheng; Wu, Leeju; Kwon, Ilmin; McKnight, Steven L

    2016-10-20

    Two complementary approaches were used in search of the intracellular targets of the toxic PR poly-dipeptide encoded by the repeat sequences expanded in the C9orf72 form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The top categories of PRn-bound proteins include constituents of non-membrane invested cellular organelles and intermediate filaments. PRn targets are enriched for the inclusion of low complexity (LC) sequences. Evidence is presented indicating that LC sequences represent the direct target of PRn binding and that interaction between the PRn poly-dipeptide and LC domains is polymer-dependent. These studies indicate that PRn-mediated toxicity may result from broad impediments to the dynamics of cell structure and information flow from gene to message to protein.

  20. Toxic PR poly-dipeptides encoded by the C9orf72 repeat expansion target LC domain polymers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi; Mori, Eiichiro; Kato, Masato; Xiang, Siheng; Wu, Leeju; Kwon, Ilmin; McKnight, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Two complementary approaches were used in search of the intracellular targets of the toxic PR poly-dipeptide encoded by the repeat sequences expanded in the C9orf72 form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The top categories of PRn-bound proteins include constituents of non-membrane invested cellular organelles and intermediate filaments. PRn targets are enriched for the inclusion of low complexity (LC) sequences. Evidence is presented indicating that LC sequences represent the direct target of PRn binding, and that interaction between the PRn poly-dipeptide and LC domains is polymer-dependent. These studies indicate that PRn-mediated toxicity may result from broad impediments to the dynamics of cell structure and information flow from gene to message to protein. PMID:27768897

  1. Infrared small target tracking by discriminative classification based on Gaussian mixture model in compressive sensing domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuanyun; Song, Fei; Qin, Shiyin

    2017-02-01

    Addressing the problems of infrared small target tracking in forward looking infrared (FLIR) system, a new infrared small target tracking method is presented, in which features binding of both target gray intensity and spatial relationship is implemented by compressive sensing so as to construct the Gaussian mixture model of compressive appearance distribution. Subsequently, naive Bayesian classification is carried out over testing samples acquired with non-uniform sampling probability to identify the most credible location of targets from background scene. A series of experiments are carried out over four infrared small target image sequences with more than 200 images for each sequence, the results demonstrate the effectiveness and advantages of the proposed method in both success rate and precision rate.

  2. GT-2: in vivo transcriptional activation activity and definition of novel twin DNA binding domains with reciprocal target sequence selectivity.

    PubMed

    Ni, M; Dehesh, K; Tepperman, J M; Quail, P H

    1996-06-01

    GT-2 is a novel DNA binding protein that interacts with a triplet functionally defined, positively acting GT-box motifs (GT1-bx, GT2-bx, and GT3-bx) in the rice phytochrome A gene (PHYA) promoter. Data from a transient transfection assay used here show that recombinant GT-2 enhanced transcription from both homologous and heterologous GT-box-containing promoters, thereby indicating that this protein can function as a transcriptional activator in vivo. Previously, we have shown that GT-2 contains separate DNA binding determinants in its N- and C-terminal halves, with binding site preferences for the GT3-bx and GT2-bx promoter motifs, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that the minimal DNA binding domains reside within dual 90-amino acid polypeptide segments encompassing duplicated sequences, termed trihelix regions, in each half of the molecule, plus 15 additional immediately adjacent amino acids downstream. These minimal binding domains retained considerable target sequence selectivity for the different GT-box motifs, but this selectivity was enhanced by a separate polypeptide segment farther downstream on the C-terminal side of each trihelix region. Therefore, the data indicate that the twin DNA binding domains of GT-2 each consist of a general GT-box recognition core with intrinsic differential binding activity toward closely related target motifs and a modified sequence conferring higher resolution reciprocal selectivity between these motifs.

  3. Conformational Dynamics of the Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain Control Specific Functions of Focal Adhesion Kinase in Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kadaré, Gress; Gervasi, Nicolas; Brami-Cherrier, Karen; Blockus, Heike; El Messari, Said; Arold, Stefan T.; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion (FA) kinase (FAK) regulates cell survival and motility by transducing signals from membrane receptors. The C-terminal FA targeting (FAT) domain of FAK fulfils multiple functions, including recruitment to FAs through paxillin binding. Phosphorylation of FAT on Tyr925 facilitates FA disassembly and connects to the MAPK pathway through Grb2 association, but requires dissociation of the first helix (H1) of the four-helix bundle of FAT. We investigated the importance of H1 opening in cells by comparing the properties of FAK molecules containing wild-type or mutated FAT with impaired or facilitated H1 openings. These mutations did not alter the activation of FAK, but selectively affected its cellular functions, including self-association, Tyr925 phosphorylation, paxillin binding, and FA targeting and turnover. Phosphorylation of Tyr861, located between the kinase and FAT domains, was also enhanced by the mutation that opened the FAT bundle. Similarly phosphorylation of Ser910 by ERK in response to bombesin was increased by FAT opening. Although FAK molecules with the mutation favoring FAT opening were poorly recruited at FAs, they efficiently restored FA turnover and cell shape in FAK-deficient cells. In contrast, the mutation preventing H1 opening markedly impaired FAK function. Our data support the biological importance of conformational dynamics of the FAT domain and its functional interactions with other parts of the molecule. PMID:25391654

  4. Atomic structure of the nuclear pore complex targeting domain of a Nup116 homologue from the yeast, Candida glabrata

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Kim, Seung Joong; Manglicmot, Danalyn; Bain, Kevin T.; Gilmore, Jeremiah; Gheyi, Tarun; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej; Sauder, J. Michael; Almo, Steven C.; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-10-23

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), embedded in the nuclear envelope, is a large, dynamic molecular assembly that facilitates exchange of macromolecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The yeast NPC is an eightfold symmetric annular structure composed of {approx}456 polypeptide chains contributed by {approx}30 distinct proteins termed nucleoporins. Nup116, identified only in fungi, plays a central role in both protein import and mRNA export through the NPC. Nup116 is a modular protein with N-terminal 'FG' repeats containing a Gle2p-binding sequence motif and a NPC targeting domain at its C-terminus. We report the crystal structure of the NPC targeting domain of Candida glabrata Nup116, consisting of residues 882-1034 [CgNup116(882-1034)], at 1.94 {angstrom} resolution. The X-ray structure of CgNup116(882-1034) is consistent with the molecular envelope determined in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering. Structural similarities of CgNup116(882-1034) with homologous domains from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup116, S. cerevisiae Nup145N, and human Nup98 are discussed.

  5. Time-Domain Modeling of Electromagnetic Pulses Returned from Targets in Dispersive and Dissipative Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunaurd, G. C.; Strifors, H. C.; Sullivan, A.

    2008-06-01

    Using a Method-of-Moments (MoM) code, we earlier simulated ultra-wideband (UWB) returned echoes from two targets, one penetrable and one impenetrable, buried in a soil with known electric properties. The simple shape of mines, coupled with their predictable deployment in the ground, has also provided a fundamental understanding of the underlying backscatter phenomenology. In particular, the backscattered waveform from a mine can be decomposed into a collection of closely spaced copies of an elemental wave object with different amplitudes and time delays. This wave object is here defined as the derivative of the waveform incident on the target. The spacing of the copies or replicas of the wave object could be determined by the round trip time delay between scattering centers. This methodology was previously applied to impenetrable targets and is now applied also to a penetrable target. The previously computed returns from each target for a given incident pulse are modeled by a few copies of the elemental wave object with the time delay and amplitude of each copy taken as unknown parameters. These parameters are then determined by minimizing in the least square sense the difference between the MoM computed signal and the model signal using the differential evolution method (DEM). The methodology is extended by way of our previously developed target translated method (TTM) to approximate the computation of the backscattered model signal when the target is buried at a different depth in the soil with a different moisture content.

  6. The rotaviral NSP3 protein stimulates translation of polyadenylated target mRNAs independently of its RNA-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Keryer-Bibens, Cecile; Legagneux, Vincent; Namanda-Vanderbeken, Allen; Cosson, Bertrand; Paillard, Luc; Poncet, Didier; Osborne, H. Beverley

    2009-12-11

    The non-structural protein 3 (NSP3) of rotaviruses is an RNA-binding protein that specifically recognises a 4 nucleotide sequence at the 3' extremity of the non-polyadenylated viral mRNAs. NSP3 also has a high affinity for eIF4G. These two functions are clearly delimited in separate domains the structures of which have been determined. They are joined by a central domain implicated in the dimerisation of the full length protein. The bridging function of NSP3 between the 3' end of the viral mRNA and eIF4G has been proposed to enhance the synthesis of viral proteins. However, this role has been questioned as knock-down of NSP3 did not impair viral protein synthesis. We show here using a MS2/MS2-CP tethering assay that a C-terminal fragment of NSP3 containing the eIF4G binding domain and the dimerisation domain can increase the expression of a protein encoded by a target reporter mRNA in HEK 293 cells. The amount of reporter mRNA in the cells is not significantly affected by the presence of the NSP3 derived fusion protein showing that the enhanced protein expression is due to increased translation. These results show that NSP3 can act as a translational enhancer even on a polyadenylated mRNA that should be a substrate for PABP1.

  7. Fast analysis of wide-band scattering from electrically large targets with time-domain parabolic equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zi; Chen, Ru-Shan

    2016-03-01

    An efficient three-dimensional time domain parabolic equation (TDPE) method is proposed to fast analyze the narrow-angle wideband EM scattering properties of electrically large targets. The finite difference (FD) of Crank-Nicolson (CN) scheme is used as the traditional tool to solve the time-domain parabolic equation. However, a huge computational resource is required when the meshes become dense. Therefore, the alternating direction implicit (ADI) scheme is introduced to discretize the time-domain parabolic equation. In this way, the reduced transient scattered fields can be calculated line by line in each transverse plane for any time step with unconditional stability. As a result, less computational resources are required for the proposed ADI-based TDPE method when compared with both the traditional CN-based TDPE method and the finite-different time-domain (FDTD) method. By employing the rotating TDPE method, the complete bistatic RCS can be obtained with encouraging accuracy for any observed angle. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method.

  8. Targeted molecular dynamics reveals overall common conformational changes upon hybrid domain swing-out in beta3 integrins.

    PubMed

    Provasi, Davide; Murcia, Marta; Coller, Barry S; Filizola, Marta

    2009-11-01

    The beta3 integrin family members alphaIIbeta3 and alphaVbeta3 signal bidirectionally through long-range allosteric changes, including a transition from a bent unliganded-closed low-affinity state to an extended liganded-open high-affinity state. To obtain an atomic-level description of this transition in an explicit solvent, we carried out targeted molecular dynamics simulations of the headpieces of alphaIIbeta3 and alphaVbeta3 integrins. Although minor differences were observed between these receptors, our results suggest a common transition pathway in which the hybrid domain swing-out is accompanied by conformational changes within the beta3 betaA (I-like) domain that propagate through the alpha7 helix C-terminus, and are followed by the alpha7 helix downward motion and the opening of the beta6-alpha7 loop. Breaking of contact interactions between the beta6-alpha7 loop and the alpha1 helix N-terminus results in helix straightening, internal rearrangements of the specificity determining loop (SDL), movement of the beta1-alpha1 loop toward the metal ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS), and final changes at the interfaces between the beta3 betaA (I-like) domain and either the hybrid or the alpha beta-propeller domains. Taken together, our results suggest novel testable hypotheses of intradomain and interdomain interactions responsible for beta3 integrin activation.

  9. Mechanism of intermediate filament recognition by plakin repeat domains revealed by envoplakin targeting of vimentin

    PubMed Central

    Fogl, Claudia; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Al-Jassar, Caezar; Jeeves, Mark; Knowles, Timothy J.; Rodriguez-Zamora, Penelope; White, Scott A.; Odintsova, Elena; Overduin, Michael; Chidgey, Martyn

    2016-01-01

    Plakin proteins form critical connections between cell junctions and the cytoskeleton; their disruption within epithelial and cardiac muscle cells cause skin-blistering diseases and cardiomyopathies. Envoplakin has a single plakin repeat domain (PRD) which recognizes intermediate filaments through an unresolved mechanism. Herein we report the crystal structure of envoplakin's complete PRD fold, revealing binding determinants within its electropositive binding groove. Four of its five internal repeats recognize negatively charged patches within vimentin via five basic determinants that are identified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mutations of the Lys1901 or Arg1914 binding determinants delocalize heterodimeric envoplakin from intracellular vimentin and keratin filaments in cultured cells. Recognition of vimentin is abolished when its residues Asp112 or Asp119 are mutated. The latter slot intermediate filament rods into basic PRD domain grooves through electrosteric complementarity in a widely applicable mechanism. Together this reveals how plakin family members form dynamic linkages with cytoskeletal frameworks. PMID:26935805

  10. PERIPARTUM DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY AS AN INTEGRATIVE CROSS DOMAIN TARGET FOR PSYCHIATRIC PREVENTATIVE MEASURES

    PubMed Central

    Babb, Jessica A.; Deligiannidis, Kristina M.; Murgatroyd, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of early life stress has been identified as a potent risk factor for neurodevelopmental delays in infants, behavioral problems and autism in children, but also for several psychiatric illnesses in adulthood, such as depression, anxiety, autism, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Despite having robust adverse effects on both mother and infant, the pathophysiology of peripartum depression and anxiety are poorly understood. The objective of this review is to highlight the advantages of using an integrated approach addressing several behavioral domains in both animal and clinical studies of peripartum depression and anxiety. It is postulated that a greater focus on integrated cross domain studies will lead to advances in treatments and preventative measures for several disorders associated with peripartum depression and anxiety. PMID:24709228

  11. Mechanism of intermediate filament recognition by plakin repeat domains revealed by envoplakin targeting of vimentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogl, Claudia; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Al-Jassar, Caezar; Jeeves, Mark; Knowles, Timothy J.; Rodriguez-Zamora, Penelope; White, Scott A.; Odintsova, Elena; Overduin, Michael; Chidgey, Martyn

    2016-03-01

    Plakin proteins form critical connections between cell junctions and the cytoskeleton; their disruption within epithelial and cardiac muscle cells cause skin-blistering diseases and cardiomyopathies. Envoplakin has a single plakin repeat domain (PRD) which recognizes intermediate filaments through an unresolved mechanism. Herein we report the crystal structure of envoplakin's complete PRD fold, revealing binding determinants within its electropositive binding groove. Four of its five internal repeats recognize negatively charged patches within vimentin via five basic determinants that are identified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mutations of the Lys1901 or Arg1914 binding determinants delocalize heterodimeric envoplakin from intracellular vimentin and keratin filaments in cultured cells. Recognition of vimentin is abolished when its residues Asp112 or Asp119 are mutated. The latter slot intermediate filament rods into basic PRD domain grooves through electrosteric complementarity in a widely applicable mechanism. Together this reveals how plakin family members form dynamic linkages with cytoskeletal frameworks.

  12. The Hippo pathway target, YAP, promotes metastasis through its TEAD-interaction domain.

    PubMed

    Lamar, John M; Stern, Patrick; Liu, Hui; Schindler, Jeffrey W; Jiang, Zhi-Gang; Hynes, Richard O

    2012-09-11

    The transcriptional coactivator Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a major regulator of organ size and proliferation in vertebrates. As such, YAP can act as an oncogene in several tissue types if its activity is increased aberrantly. Although no activating mutations in the yap1 gene have been identified in human cancer, yap1 is located on the 11q22 amplicon, which is amplified in several human tumors. In addition, mutations or epigenetic silencing of members of the Hippo pathway, which represses YAP function, have been identified in human cancers. Here we demonstrate that, in addition to increasing tumor growth, increased YAP activity is potently prometastatic in breast cancer and melanoma cells. Using a Luminex-based approach to multiplex in vivo assays, we determined that the domain of YAP that interacts with the TEAD/TEF family of transcription factors but not the WW domains or PDZ-binding motif, is essential for YAP-mediated tumor growth and metastasis. We further demonstrate that, through its TEAD-interaction domain, YAP enhances multiple processes known to be important for tumor progression and metastasis, including cellular proliferation, transformation, migration, and invasion. Finally, we found that the metastatic potential of breast cancer and melanoma cells is strongly correlated with increased TEAD transcriptional activity. Together, our results suggest that increased YAP/TEAD activity plays a causal role in cancer progression and metastasis.

  13. Analysis of Bovine Leukemia Virus Gag Membrane Targeting and Late Domain Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huating; Norris, Kendra M.; Mansky, Louis M.

    2002-01-01

    Assembly of retrovirus-like particles only requires the expression of the Gag polyprotein precursor. We have exploited this in the development of a model system for studying the virus particle assembly pathway for bovine leukemia virus (BLV). BLV is closely related to the human T-cell leukemia viruses (HTLVs), and all are members of the Deltaretrovirus genus of the Retroviridae family. Overexpression of a BLV Gag polyprotein containing a carboxy-terminal influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) epitope tag in mammalian cells led to the robust production of virus-like particles (VLPs). Site-directed mutations were introduced into HA-tagged Gag to test the usefulness of this model system for studying certain aspects of the virus assembly pathway. First, mutations that disrupted the amino-terminal glycine residue that is important for Gag myristylation led to a drastic reduction in VLP production. Predictably, the nature of the VLP production defect was correlated to Gag membrane localization. Second, mutation of the PPPY motif (located in the MA domain) greatly reduced VLP production in the absence of the viral protease. This reduction in VLP production was more severe in the presence of an active viral protease. Examination of particles by electron microscopy revealed an abundance of particles that began to pinch off from the plasma membrane but were not completely released from the cell surface, indicating that the PPPY motif functions as a late domain (L domain). PMID:12134053

  14. A TOGL domain specifically targets yeast CLASP to kinetochores to stabilize kinetochore microtubules.

    PubMed

    Funk, Caroline; Schmeiser, Verena; Ortiz, Jennifer; Lechner, Johannes

    2014-05-26

    Cytoplasmic linker-associated proteins (CLASPs) are proposed to function in cell division based on their ability to bind tubulin via arrayed tumor overexpressed gene (TOG)-like (TOGL) domains. Structure predictions suggest that CLASPs have at least two TOGL domains. We show that only TOGL2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CLASP Stu1 binds to tubulin and is required for polymerization of spindle microtubules (MTs) in vivo. In contrast, TOGL1 recruits Stu1 to kinetochores (KTs), where it is essential for the stability and tension-dependent regulation of KT MTs. Stu1 is also recruited to spindle MTs by different mechanisms depending on the mitotic phase: in metaphase, Stu1 binds directly to the MT lattice, whereas in anaphase, it is localized indirectly to the spindle midzone. In both phases, the activity of TOGL2 is essential for interpolar MT stability, whereas TOGL1 is not involved. Thus, the two TOGL domains of yeast CLASP have different activities and execute distinct mitotic functions. © 2014 Funk et al.

  15. A TOGL domain specifically targets yeast CLASP to kinetochores to stabilize kinetochore microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Caroline; Schmeiser, Verena; Ortiz, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasmic linker–associated proteins (CLASPs) are proposed to function in cell division based on their ability to bind tubulin via arrayed tumor overexpressed gene (TOG)–like (TOGL) domains. Structure predictions suggest that CLASPs have at least two TOGL domains. We show that only TOGL2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CLASP Stu1 binds to tubulin and is required for polymerization of spindle microtubules (MTs) in vivo. In contrast, TOGL1 recruits Stu1 to kinetochores (KTs), where it is essential for the stability and tension-dependent regulation of KT MTs. Stu1 is also recruited to spindle MTs by different mechanisms depending on the mitotic phase: in metaphase, Stu1 binds directly to the MT lattice, whereas in anaphase, it is localized indirectly to the spindle midzone. In both phases, the activity of TOGL2 is essential for interpolar MT stability, whereas TOGL1 is not involved. Thus, the two TOGL domains of yeast CLASP have different activities and execute distinct mitotic functions. PMID:24862575

  16. Target selectivity of vertebrate notch proteins. Collaboration between discrete domains and CSL-binding site architecture determines activation probability.

    PubMed

    Ong, Chin-Tong; Cheng, Hui-Teng; Chang, Li-Wei; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Stormo, Gary D; Kopan, Raphael

    2006-02-24

    All four mammalian Notch proteins interact with a single DNA-binding protein (RBP-jkappa), yet they are not equivalent in activating target genes. Parallel assays of three Notch-responsive promoters in several cell lines revealed that relative activation strength is dependent on protein module and promoter context more than the cellular context. Each Notch protein reads binding site orientation and distribution on the promoter differently; Notch1 performs extremely well on paired sites, and Notch3 prefers single sites in conjunction with a proximal zinc finger transcription factor. Although head-head sites can elicit a Notch response on their own, use of CBS (CSL binding site) in tail-tail orientation is context-dependent. Bias for specific DNA elements is achieved by interplay between the N-terminal RAM (RBP-jkappa-associated molecule/ankyrin region), which interprets CBS proximity and orientation, and the C-terminal transactivation domain that interacts specifically with the transcription machinery or nearby factors. To confirm the prediction that modular design underscores the evolution of functional divergence between Notch proteins, we generated a synthetic Notch protein (Notch1 ankyrin with Notch3 transactivation domain) that displayed superior signaling strength on the hes5 promoter. Consistent with the prediction that "preferred" targets (Hes1) should respond faster and at lower Notch concentration than other targets, we showed that Hes5-GFP was extinguished fast and recovered slowly, whereas Hes1-GFP was inhibited late and recovered quickly after a pulse of DAPT in metanephroi cultures.

  17. Comprehensive optimization of a single-chain variable domain antibody fragment as a targeting ligand for a cytotoxic nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kathy; Geddie, Melissa L; Kohli, Neeraj; Kornaga, Tad; Kirpotin, Dmitri B; Jiao, Yang; Rennard, Rachel; Drummond, Daryl C; Nielsen, Ulrik B; Xu, Lihui; Lugovskoy, Alexey A

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-targeted nanoparticles have the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of cytotoxic anti-cancer therapies by directing them to tumor cells. Using antibodies or their fragments requires careful engineering because multiple parameters, including affinity, internalization rate and stability, all need to be optimized. Here, we present a case study of the iterative engineering of a single chain variable fragment (scFv) for use as a targeting arm of a liposomal cytotoxic nanoparticle. We describe the effect of the orientation of variable domains, the length and composition of the interdomain protein linker that connects VH and VL, and stabilizing mutations in both the framework and complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) on the molecular properties of the scFv. We show that variable domain orientation can alter cross-reactivity to murine antigen while maintaining affinity to the human antigen. We demonstrate that tyrosine residues in the CDRs make diverse contributions to the binding affinity and biophysical properties, and that replacement of non-essential tyrosines can improve the stability and bioactivity of the scFv. Our studies demonstrate that a comprehensive engineering strategy may be required to identify a scFv with optimal characteristics for nanoparticle targeting.

  18. Target detection from MPEG video based on low-rank filtering in the compressed domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viangteeravat, Teeradache; Krootjohn, Soradech; Wilkes, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    There are advantages of using the motion vector obtained from the MPEG video coding to perform target of interest identification in the field. In practice, however, environment noise, time-varying, and uncertainty factors affect their performance reliably and accurately detecting targets of interest. In this paper, we proposed a novel low rank filtering based on L1 norm in order to straighten up single rogue or outliers that might show up fairly often. Finally, a simple average smoothing filter was applied to reduce vector quantization noise. By using the low rank filtering based on L1 norm, the dominant motion vectors from the MPEG video coding can be extracted appropriately with respect to target operational responses and can be used for robust identification of moving target. The performance of the proposed approach was evaluated based on a set of experimental camera motion. The motions, including pan, tilt, and zoom, was computed from the motion vectors, and the residual vectors which are not described by the camera motion are regarded as generated by moving blobs. Events, as a result, can be detected from these moving blobs. It is demonstrated that the approach yields very promising results where motion vectors obtained from the MPEG video coding can be used efficiently to detect and identify moving target in the field.

  19. Nephrocystin-conserved domains involved in targeting to epithelial cell-cell junctions, interaction with filamins, and establishing cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, John C; Dise, Rebecca S; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Hanks, Steven K

    2002-08-09

    Nephrocystin is the protein product of the gene mutated in juvenile nephronophthisis, an autosomal recessive cystic kidney disease afflicting children and young adults. Because the normal cellular function of nephrocystin is largely unknown, the molecular defects underlying disease pathogenesis remain obscure. Analysis of nephrocystin amino acid sequences from human and other species revealed three distinct conserved domains including Src homology 3 and coil-coil domains in the N-terminal region, as well as a large highly conserved C-terminal region bearing no obvious homology to other proteins and hence referred to as the "nephrocystin homology domain" (NHD). The objective of this study was to gain insight into nephrocystin function by defining functional properties of the conserved domains. We analyzed a series of nephrocystin deletion mutants expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney and COS-7 cells. This analysis revealed previously unrecognized functional attributes of the NHD, including abilities to promote both self-association and epithelial cell-cell junctional targeting. We further observed that Madin-Darby canine kidney cell lines stably expressing a nephrocystin mutant with a deletion of the Src homology 3 domain have reduced ability to establish tight junctions as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. Finally, from a two-hybrid screen and coimmunoprecipitation studies we identified members of the filamin family of actin-binding proteins as having the capacity to interact with the NHD. These findings support a functional role for nephrocystin as a docking protein involved in organizing a protein complex to regulate the actin cytoskeleton at sites of epithelial cell-cell adhesion and further suggest that these properties are important for establishing epithelial cell polarity.

  20. Targeting PDE10A GAF Domain with Small Molecules: A Way for Allosteric Modulation with Anti-Inflammatory Effects.

    PubMed

    García, Ana M; Brea, José; González-García, Alejandro; Pérez, Concepción; Cadavid, María Isabel; Loza, María Isabel; Martinez, Ana; Gil, Carmen

    2017-09-04

    Phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes regulate the levels of cyclic nucleotides, cAMP, and/or cGMP, being attractive therapeutic targets. In order to modulate PDE activity in a selective way, we focused our efforts on the search of allosteric modulators. Based on the crystal structure of the PDE10A GAF-B domain, a virtual screening study allowed the discovery of new hits that were also tested experimentally, showing inhibitory activities in the micromolar range. Moreover, these new PDE10A inhibitors were able to decrease the nitrite production in LPS-stimulated cells, thus demonstrating their potential as anti-inflammatory agents.

  1. Diagnostic nanoparticle targeting of the EGF-receptor in complex biological conditions using single-domain antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarschler, K.; Prapainop, K.; Mahon, E.; Rocks, L.; Bramini, M.; Kelly, P. M.; Stephan, H.; Dawson, K. A.

    2014-05-01

    For effective localization of functionalized nanoparticles at diseased tissues such as solid tumours or metastases through biorecognition, appropriate targeting vectors directed against selected tumour biomarkers are a key prerequisite. The diversity of such vector molecules ranges from proteins, including antibodies and fragments thereof, through aptamers and glycans to short peptides and small molecules. Here, we analyse the specific nanoparticle targeting capabilities of two previously suggested peptides (D4 and GE11) and a small camelid single-domain antibody (sdAb), representing potential recognition agents for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We investigate specificity by way of receptor RNA silencing techniques and look at increasing complexity in vitro by introducing increasing concentrations of human or bovine serum. Peptides D4 and GE11 proved problematic to employ and conjugation resulted in non-receptor specific uptake into cells. Our results show that sdAb-functionalized particles can effectively target the EGFR, even in more complex bovine and human serum conditions where targeting specificity is largely conserved for increasing serum concentration. In human serum however, an inhibition of overall nanoparticle uptake is observed with increasing protein concentration. For highly affine targeting ligands such as sdAbs, targeting a receptor such as EGFR with low serum competitor abundance, receptor recognition function can still be partially realised in complex conditions. Here, we stress the value of evaluating the targeting efficiency of nanoparticle constructs in realistic biological milieu, prior to more extensive in vivo studies.For effective localization of functionalized nanoparticles at diseased tissues such as solid tumours or metastases through biorecognition, appropriate targeting vectors directed against selected tumour biomarkers are a key prerequisite. The diversity of such vector molecules ranges from proteins, including

  2. Protein superfamily members as targets for computer modeling: The carbohydrate recognition domain of a macrophage lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Stenkamp, R.E.; Aruffo, A.; Bajorath, J. |

    1996-12-31

    Members of protein superfamilies display similar folds, but share only limited sequence identity, often 25% or less. Thus, it is not straightforward to apply standard homology modeling methods to construct reliable three-dimensional models of such proteins. A three-dimensional model of the carbohydrate recognition domain of the rat macrophage lectin, a member of the calcium-dependent (C-type) lectin superfamily, has been generated to illustrate how information provided by comparison of X-ray structures and sequence-structure alignments can aid in comparative modeling when primary sequence similarities are low. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  3. A DNA vaccine targeting the receptor-binding domain of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, David F.; Rosenberg, Talia; Zaharatos, Jerry; Franco, David; Ho, David D

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a pathogen with increasing severity for which host antibody responses provide protection from disease. DNA vaccination has several advantages compared to traditional vaccine methods, however no study has examined this platform against C. difficile toxins. A synthetic gene was created encoding the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of C. difficile toxin A, optimized for expression in human cells. Gene expression was examined in vitro. Mice were inoculated then challenged with parenteral toxin A. Vaccination provided high titer antibodies and protected mice from death. This represents the first report of DNA vaccine inducing neutralizing antibodies to Clostridium difficile toxin A. PMID:19464540

  4. A DNA vaccine targeting the receptor-binding domain of Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, David F; Rosenberg, Talia; Zaharatos, Jerry; Franco, David; Ho, David D

    2009-06-02

    Clostridium difficile is a pathogen with increasing severity for which host antibody responses provide protection from disease. DNA vaccination has several advantages compared to traditional vaccine methods, however no study has examined this platform against C. difficile toxins. A synthetic gene was created encoding the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of C. difficile toxin A, optimized for expression in human cells. Gene expression was examined in vitro. Mice were inoculated and then challenged with parenteral toxin A. Vaccination provided high titer antibodies and protected mice from death. This represents the first report of DNA vaccine inducing neutralizing antibodies to C. difficile toxin A.

  5. Identifying members of the domain Archaea with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Burggraf, S; Mayer, T; Amann, R; Schadhauser, S; Woese, C R; Stetter, K O

    1994-09-01

    Two 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for the archaeal kingdoms Euryachaeota and Crenarchaeota. Probe specificities were evaluated by nonradioactive dot blot hybridization against selected reference organisms. The successful application of fluorescent-probe derivatives for whole-cell hybridization required organism-specific optimizations of fixation and hybridization conditions to assure probe penetration and morphological integrity of the cells. The probes allowed preliminary grouping of three new hyperthermophilic isolates. Together with other group-specific rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes, these probes will facilitate rapid in situ monitoring of the populations present in hydrothermal systems and support cultivation attempts.

  6. The role of symptom induction in the treatment of panic and anxiety. Identifiable domains, conditional properties, and treatment targets.

    PubMed

    Rudd, M D; Joiner, T

    1998-01-01

    Although the importance of affectively charged material in the treatment of panic and anxiety has been emphasized and implicitly viewed as essential for effective therapeutic change, a general framework for organizing, understanding, implementing, and evaluating symptom induction techniques has yet to be offered. This article offers a framework for organizing symptoms induction techniques, categorizing treatment targets, and, accordingly, assessing therapeutic change in the treatment of panic and anxiety. Symptom induction techniques are examined in three exposure domains: physiological, cognitive, and situational/circumstantial; treatment targets fall into five categories: (a) poor symptom tolerance and resultant hypersensitivity and hypervigilance, (b) avoidance of internal and external triggers, (c) the emergence of specific catastrophic thoughts and related misinterpretations, (d) diminished adaptive coping skills, and (e) a reduction in general self-efficacy. Additionally, a distinction is proposed between conditional and unconditional properties of symptom induction, with an emphasis on the potential deleterious role conditional properties play during the course of treatment.

  7. Experimental Study of High-Range-Resolution Medical Acoustic Imaging for Multiple Target Detection by Frequency Domain Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Tomoki; Taki, Hirofumi; Sakamoto, Takuya; Sato, Toru

    2009-07-01

    We employed frequency domain interferometry (FDI) for use as a medical acoustic imager to detect multiple targets with high range resolution. The phase of each frequency component of an echo varies with the frequency, and target intervals can be estimated from the phase variance. This processing technique is generally used in radar imaging. When the interference within a range gate is coherent, the cross correlation between the desired signal and the coherent interference signal is nonzero. The Capon method works under the guiding principle that output power minimization cancels the desired signal with a coherent interference signal. Therefore, we utilize frequency averaging to suppress the correlation of the coherent interference. The results of computational simulations using a pseudoecho signal show that the Capon method with adaptive frequency averaging (AFA) provides a higher range resolution than a conventional method. These techniques were experimentally investigated and we confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed method of processing by FDI.

  8. Therapeutic targeting of two-pore-domain potassium (K(2P)) channels in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Wiedmann, Felix; Schmidt, Constanze; Lugenbiel, Patrick; Staudacher, Ingo; Rahm, Ann-Kathrin; Seyler, Claudia; Schweizer, Patrick A; Katus, Hugo A; Thomas, Dierk

    2016-05-01

    The improvement of treatment strategies in cardiovascular medicine is an ongoing process that requires constant optimization. The ability of a therapeutic intervention to prevent cardiovascular pathology largely depends on its capacity to suppress the underlying mechanisms. Attenuation or reversal of disease-specific pathways has emerged as a promising paradigm, providing a mechanistic rationale for patient-tailored therapy. Two-pore-domain K(+) (K(2P)) channels conduct outward K(+) currents that stabilize the resting membrane potential and facilitate action potential repolarization. K(2P) expression in the cardiovascular system and polymodal K2P current regulation suggest functional significance and potential therapeutic roles of the channels. Recent work has focused primarily on K(2P)1.1 [tandem of pore domains in a weak inwardly rectifying K(+) channel (TWIK)-1], K(2P)2.1 [TWIK-related K(+) channel (TREK)-1], and K(2P)3.1 [TWIK-related acid-sensitive K(+) channel (TASK)-1] channels and their role in heart and vessels. K(2P) currents have been implicated in atrial and ventricular arrhythmogenesis and in setting the vascular tone. Furthermore, the association of genetic alterations in K(2P)3.1 channels with atrial fibrillation, cardiac conduction disorders and pulmonary arterial hypertension demonstrates the relevance of the channels in cardiovascular disease. The function, regulation and clinical significance of cardiovascular K(2P) channels are summarized in the present review, and therapeutic options are emphasized. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  9. Targeting the Transposase Domain of the DNA Repair Component Metnase to Enhance Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Elizabeth A.; Damiani, Leah; Leitao, Andrei; Hu, Chelin; Hathaway, Helen; Oprea, Tudor; Sklar, Larry; Shaheen, Montaser; Bauman, Julie; Wang, Wei; Nickoloff, Jac A.; Lee, Suk-Hee; Hromas, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the DNA repair component Metnase (SETMAR) mediates resistance to DNA damaging cancer chemotherapy. Metnase has a nuclease domain that shares homology with the Transposase family. We therefore virtually screened the tertiary Metnase structure against the 550,000 compound ChemDiv library to identify small molecules that might dock in the active site of the transposase nuclease domain of Metnase. We identified eight compounds as possible Metnase inhibitors. Interestingly, among these candidate inhibitors were quinolone antibiotics and HIV integrase inhibitors, which share common structural features. Previous reports have described possible activity of quinolones as antineoplastic agents. Therefore, we chose the quinolone ciprofloxacin for further study, based on its wide clinical availability and low toxicity. We found that ciprofloxacin inhibits the ability of Metnase to cleave DNA and inhibits Metnase-dependent DNA repair. Ciprofloxacin on its own did not induce DNA damage, but it did reduce repair of chemotherapy-induced DNA damage. Ciprofloxacin increased the sensitivity of cancer cell lines and a xenograft tumor model to clinically relevant chemotherapy. These studies provide a mechanism for the previously postulated antineoplastic activity of quinolones, and suggest that ciprofloxacin might be a simple yet effective adjunct to cancer chemotherapy. PMID:23090115

  10. Encounter dynamics of a small target by a polymer diffusing in a confined domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitai, A.; Amoruso, C.; Ziskind, A.; Holcman, D.

    2012-12-01

    We study the first passage time for a polymer, that we call the narrow encounter time (NETP), to reach a small target located on the surface of a microdomain. The polymer is modeled as a freely joint chain (beads connected by springs with a resting non zero length) and we use Brownian simulations to study two cases: when (i) any of the monomer or (ii) only one can be absorbed at the target window. Interestingly, we find that in the first case, the NETP is an increasing function of the polymer length until a critical length, after which it decreases. Moreover, in the long polymer regime, we identified an exponential scaling law for the NETP as a function of the polymer length. In the second case, the position of the absorbed monomer along the polymer chain strongly influences the NETP. Our analysis can be applied to estimate the mean first time of a DNA fragment to a small target in the chromatin structure or for mRNA to find a small target.

  11. Therapeutically targeting glypican-2 via single-domain antibody-based chimeric antigen receptors and immunotoxins in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Fu, Haiying; Hewitt, Stephen M; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Ho, Mitchell

    2017-08-08

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer that is fatal in almost half of patients despite intense multimodality treatment. This cancer is derived from neuroendocrine tissue located in the sympathetic nervous system. Glypican-2 (GPC2) is a cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is important for neuronal cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth. In this study, we find that GPC2 protein is highly expressed in about half of neuroblastoma cases and that high GPC2 expression correlates with poor overall survival compared with patients with low GPC2 expression. We demonstrate that silencing of GPC2 by CRISPR-Cas9 or siRNA results in the inhibition of neuroblastoma tumor cell growth. GPC2 silencing inactivates Wnt/β-catenin signaling and reduces the expression of the target gene N-Myc, an oncogenic driver of neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. We have isolated human single-domain antibodies specific for GPC2 by phage display technology and found that the single-domain antibodies can inhibit active β-catenin signaling by disrupting the interaction of GPC2 and Wnt3a. To explore GPC2 as a potential target in neuroblastoma, we have developed two forms of antibody therapeutics, immunotoxins and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells. Immunotoxin treatment was demonstrated to inhibit neuroblastoma growth in mice. CAR T cells targeting GPC2 eliminated tumors in a disseminated neuroblastoma mouse model where tumor metastasis had spread to multiple clinically relevant sites, including spine, skull, legs, and pelvis. This study suggests GPC2 as a promising therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

  12. HSV-2 glycoprotein gD targets the CC domain of tetherin and promotes tetherin degradation via lysosomal pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yalan; Li, Mei; Zhang, Di; Zhang, Mudan; Hu, Qinxue

    2016-09-15

    HSV-2 is the major cause of genital herpes. We previously demonstrated that the host viral restriction factor tetherin restricts HSV-2 release and is antagonized by several HSV-2 glycoproteins. However, the mechanisms underlying HSV-2 glycoproteins mediated counteraction of tetherin remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether tetherin restricts the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-2 and the mechanisms underlying HSV-2 gD mediated antagonism of tetherin. Infectious center assays were used to test whether tetherin could affect cell-to-cell spread of HSV-2. Coimmunoprecipitation assays were performed to map the tetherin domains required for HSV-2 gD-mediated downregulation. Immunoflurence assays were performed to detect the accumulation of tetherin in lysosomes or proteasomes. All experiments were repeated for at least three times and the data were performed statistical analysis. 1) Tetherin restricts cell-to-cell spread of HSV-2; 2) HSV-2 gD specifically interacts with the CC domain of tetherin; 3) HSV-2 gD promotes tetherin to the lysosomal degradation pathway. Tetherin not only restricts HSV-2 release but also its cell-to-cell spread. In turn, HSV-2 gD targets the CC domain of tetherin and promotes its degradation in the lysosome. Findings in this study have increased our understanding of tetherin restriction and viral countermeasures.

  13. Distinct domains of the spinal muscular atrophy protein SMN are required for targeting to Cajal bodies in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Renvoisé, Benoît; Khoobarry, Kevinee; Gendron, Marie-Claude; Cibert, Christian; Viollet, Louis; Lefebvre, Suzie

    2006-02-15

    Mutations of the survival motor neuron gene SMN1 cause the inherited disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The ubiquitous SMN protein facilitates the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). The protein is detected in the cytoplasm, nucleoplasm and enriched with snRNPs in nuclear Cajal bodies. It is structurally divided into at least an amino-terminal region rich in basic amino acid residues, a central Tudor domain, a self-association tyrosine-glycine-box and an exon7-encoded C-terminus. To examine the domains required for the intranuclear localization of SMN, we have used fluorescently tagged protein mutants transiently overexpressed in mammalian cells. The basic amino acid residues direct nucleolar localization of SMN mutants. The Tudor domain promotes localization of proteins in the nucleus and it cooperates with the basic amino acid residues and the tyrosine-glycine-box for protein localization in Cajal bodies. Moreover, the most frequent disease-linked mutant SMNDeltaex7 reduces accumulation of snRNPs in Cajal bodies, suggesting that the C-terminus of SMN participates in targeting to Cajal bodies. A reduced number of Cajal bodies in patient fibroblasts associates with the absence of snRNPs in Cajal bodies, revealing that intranuclear snRNA organization is modified in disease. These results indicate that direct and indirect mechanisms regulate localization of SMN in Cajal bodies.

  14. Targeting the hepatitis B virus precore antigen with a novel IgNAR single variable domain intrabody.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Renae; Nuttall, Stewart; Revill, Peter; Colledge, Danni; Cabuang, Liza; Soppe, Sally; Dolezal, Olan; Griffiths, Kate; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Locarnini, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    The Hepatitis B virus precore protein is processed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) into secreted hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), which acts as an immune tolerogen to establish chronic infection. Downregulation of secreted HBeAg should improve clinical outcome, as patients who effectively respond to current treatments (IFN-α) have significantly lower serum HBeAg levels. Here, we describe a novel reagent, a single variable domain (V(NAR)) of the shark immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (IgNAR) antibodies. V(NAR)s possess advantages in stability, size (~14 kDa) and cryptic epitope recognition compared to conventional antibodies. The V(NAR) domain displayed biologically useful affinity for recombinant and native HBeAg, and recognised a unique conformational epitope. To assess therapeutic potential in targeting intracellular precore protein to reduce secreted HBeAg, the V(NAR) was engineered for ER-targeted in vitro delivery to function as an intracellular antibody (intrabody). In vitro data from HBV/precore hepatocyte cell lines demonstrated effective intrabody regulation of precore/HBeAg.

  15. Acquisition of a single EZH2 D1 domain mutation confers acquired resistance to EZH2-targeted inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Theresa; Nerle, Sujata; Pritchard, Justin; Zhao, Boyang; Rivera, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    Although targeted therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment, overcoming acquired resistance remains a major clinical challenge. EZH2 inhibitors (EZH2i), EPZ-6438 and GSK126, are currently in the early stages of clinical evaluation and the first encouraging signs of efficacy have recently emerged in the clinic. To anticipate mechanisms of resistance to EZH2i, we used a forward genetic platform combining a mutagenesis screen with next generation sequencing technology and identified a hotspot of secondary mutations in the EZH2 D1 domain (Y111 and I109). Y111D mutation within the WT or A677G EZH2 allele conferred robust resistance to both EPZ-6438 and GSK126, but it only drove a partial resistance within the Y641F allele. EZH2 mutants required histone methyltransferase (HMT) catalytic activity and the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) components, SUZ12 and EED, to drive drug resistance. Furthermore, D1 domain mutations not only blocked the ability of EZH2i to bind to WT and A677G mutant, but also abrogated drug binding to the Y641F mutant. These data provide the first cellular validation of the mechanistic model underpinning the oncogenic function of WT and mutant EZH2. Importantly, our findings suggest that acquired-resistance to EZH2i may arise in WT and mutant EZH2 patients through a single mutation that remains targetable by second generation EZH2i. PMID:26360609

  16. An E3 ubiquitin ligase prevents ectopic localization of the centromeric histone H3 variant via the centromere targeting domain

    PubMed Central

    Ranjitkar, Prerana; Press, Maximilian O.; Yi, Xianhua; Baker, Richard; MacCoss, Michael J.; Biggins, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Summary Proper centromere function is critical to maintain genomic stability and to prevent aneuploidy, a hallmark of tumors and birth defects. A conserved feature of all eukaryotic centromeres is an essential histone H3 variant called CENP-A that requires a centromere targeting domain (CATD) for its localization. Although proteolysis prevents CENP-A from mislocalizing to euchromatin, regulatory factors have not been identified. Here, we identify an E3 ubiquitin ligase called Psh1 that leads to the degradation of Cse4, the budding yeast CENP-A homolog. Cse4 overexpression is toxic to psh1Δ cells and results in euchromatic localization. Strikingly, the Cse4 centromere targeting domain is a key regulator of its stability and helps Psh1 discriminate Cse4 from histone H3. Taken together, we propose that the CATD has a previously unknown role in maintaining the exclusive localization of Cse4 by preventing its mislocalization to euchromatin via Psh1-mediated degradation. PMID:21070971

  17. Targeting diverse protein–protein interaction interfaces with α/β-peptides derived from the Z-domain scaffold

    DOE PAGES

    Checco, James W.; Kreitler, Dale F.; Thomas, Nicole C.; ...

    2015-03-30

    Peptide-based agents derived from well-defined scaffolds offer an alternative to antibodies for selective and high-affinity recognition of large and topologically complex protein surfaces. In this paper, we describe a strategy for designing oligomers containing both α- and β-amino acid residues (“α/β-peptides”) that mimic several peptides derived from the three-helix bundle “Z-domain” scaffold. We show that α/β-peptides derived from a Z-domain peptide targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can structurally and functionally mimic the binding surface of the parent peptide while exhibiting significantly decreased susceptibility to proteolysis. The tightest VEGF-binding α/β-peptide inhibits the VEGF165-induced proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells.more » We demonstrate the versatility of this strategy by showing how principles underlying VEGF signaling inhibitors can be rapidly extended to produce Z-domain–mimetic α/β-peptides that bind to two other protein partners, IgG and tumor necrosis factor-α. Because well-established selection techniques can identify high-affinity Z-domain derivatives from large DNA-encoded libraries, our findings should enable the design of biostable α/β-peptides that bind tightly and specifically to diverse targets of biomedical interest. Finally, such reagents would be useful for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.« less

  18. Targeting diverse protein–protein interaction interfaces with α/β-peptides derived from the Z-domain scaffold

    SciTech Connect

    Checco, James W.; Kreitler, Dale F.; Thomas, Nicole C.; Belair, David G.; Rettko, Nicholas J.; Murphy, William L.; Forest, Katrina T.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2015-03-30

    Peptide-based agents derived from well-defined scaffolds offer an alternative to antibodies for selective and high-affinity recognition of large and topologically complex protein surfaces. In this paper, we describe a strategy for designing oligomers containing both α- and β-amino acid residues (“α/β-peptides”) that mimic several peptides derived from the three-helix bundle “Z-domain” scaffold. We show that α/β-peptides derived from a Z-domain peptide targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can structurally and functionally mimic the binding surface of the parent peptide while exhibiting significantly decreased susceptibility to proteolysis. The tightest VEGF-binding α/β-peptide inhibits the VEGF165-induced proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We demonstrate the versatility of this strategy by showing how principles underlying VEGF signaling inhibitors can be rapidly extended to produce Z-domain–mimetic α/β-peptides that bind to two other protein partners, IgG and tumor necrosis factor-α. Because well-established selection techniques can identify high-affinity Z-domain derivatives from large DNA-encoded libraries, our findings should enable the design of biostable α/β-peptides that bind tightly and specifically to diverse targets of biomedical interest. Finally, such reagents would be useful for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  19. Extra domain B fibronectin as a target for near-infrared fluorescence imaging of rheumatoid arthritis affected joints in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Sonja; Vater, Axel; Licha, Kai; Gemeinhardt, Ines; Gemeinhardt, Ole; Voigt, Jan; Ebert, Bernd; Schnorr, Jörg; Taupitz, Matthias; Macdonald, Rainer; Schirner, Michael

    2009-12-01

    Abstract We investigated a molecular imaging approach for the detection of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by targeting the extra domain B (ED-B) of the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. ED-B is a highly conserved domain (identical in human and rats) that is produced by alternative splicing during embryonic development and during vascular remodeling such as angiogenesis. The hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis is synovitis leading to both angiogenesis in the synovium and the promotion of cartilage and bone disruption. For in vivo diagnostics, the ED-B-binding single-chain antibody fragment AP39 was used as a targeting probe. It was covalently linked to the near-infrared dye tetrasulfocyanine (TSC) to be visualized by near-infrared fluorescence imaging. The resulting AP39-TSC conjugate was intravenously administered to rats with collagen-induced arthritis and the respective controls. Ovalbumin-TSC was used as control conjugate. Optical imaging over a time period of 24 hours using a planar imaging setup resulted in a clear enhancement of fluorescence intensity in joints with moderate to severe arthritis compared with control joints between 3 and 8 hours postinjection. Given that AP39 is a fully human antibody fragment, this molecular imaging approach for arthritis detection might be translated to humans.

  20. Dominant repression of target genes by chimeric repressors that include the EAR motif, a repression domain, in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hiratsu, Keiichiro; Matsui, Kyoko; Koyama, Tomotsugu; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2003-06-01

    The redundancy of genes for plant transcription factors often interferes with efforts to identify the biologic functions of such factors. We show here that four different transcription factors fused to the EAR motif, a repression domain of only 12 amino acids, act as dominant repressors in transgenic Arabidopsis and suppress the expression of specific target genes, even in the presence of the redundant transcription factors, with resultant dominant loss-of-function phenotypes. Chimeric EIN3, CUC1, PAP1, and AtMYB23 repressors that included the EAR motif dominantly suppressed the expression of their target genes and caused insensitivity to ethylene, cup-shaped cotyledons, reduction in the accumulation of anthocyanin, and absence of trichomes, respectively. This chimeric repressor silencing technology (CRES-T), exploiting the EAR-motif repression domain, is simple and effective and can overcome genetic redundancy. Thus, it should be useful not only for the rapid analysis of the functions of redundant plant transcription factors but also for the manipulation of plant traits via the suppression of gene expression that is regulated by specific transcription factors.

  1. Computational modeling of novel inhibitors targeting the Akt pleckstrin homology domain.

    PubMed

    Du-Cuny, Lei; Song, Zuohe; Moses, Sylvestor; Powis, Garth; Mash, Eugene A; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J; Zhang, Shuxing

    2009-10-01

    Computational modeling continues to play an important role in novel therapeutics discovery and development. In this study, we have investigated the use of in silico approaches to develop inhibitors of the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of AKT (protein kinase B). Various docking/scoring schemes have been evaluated, and the best combination was selected to study the system. Using this strategy, two hits were identified and their binding behaviors were investigated. Robust and predictive QSAR models were built using the k nearest neighbor (kNN) method to study their cellular permeability. Based on our in silico results, long flexible aliphatic tails were proposed to improve the Caco-2 penetration without affecting the binding mode. The modifications enhanced the AKT inhibitory activity of the compounds in cell-based assays, and increased their activity as in vivo antitumor testing.

  2. Targeted yield concept and a framework of fertilizer recommendation in irrigated rice domains of subtropical India*

    PubMed Central

    Bera, R.; Seal, A.; Bhattacharyya, P.; Das, T.H.; Sarkar, D.; Kangjoo, K.

    2006-01-01

    Soil test crop response (STCR) correlation studies were carried out in Vindhyan alluvial plain during 2001 to 2004 taking IR-36 as test crop to quantify rice production in the context of the variability of soil properties and use of balanced fertilizers based on targeted yield concept. The soils were developed on gently sloping alluvial plain with different physiographic settings and notable variation in drainage condition. Soil properties show moderate variation in texture (loamy to clay), organic carbon content (4.4 to 9.8 g/kg), cation exchange capacity (10.2 to 22.4 cmol (p+)/kg) and pH (5.3 to 6.4). Soil fertility status for N is low to medium (224 to 348 kg/ha), P is medium to high (87 to 320 kg/ha) and K ranges from medium to high (158 to 678 kg/ha). Database regarding nutrient requirement in kg/t of grain produce (NR), the percent contribution from the soil available nutrients [CS (%)] and the percent contribution from the applied fertilizer nutrients [CF (%)] were computed for calibrating and formulating fertilizer recommendations. Validity of the yield target for 7 and 8 t/ha was tested in farmers’ fields and yields targets varied at less than 10%. The percent achievement of targets aimed at different level was more than 90%, indicating soil test based fertilizer recommendation approach was economically viable within the agro-ecological zone with relatively uniform cropping practices and socio-economic conditions. PMID:17111464

  3. Probing Dense Plasmas Created from Intense Irradiation of Solid Target in the XUV Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Dobosz, S.; Doumy, G.; Stabile, H.; Monot, P.; Bougeard, M.; Reau, F.; Martin, Ph.

    2006-04-07

    In this paper, electronic density and temperature have been inferred from XUV transmission through hot solid-density plasma created by high temporal contrast femtosecond irradiation of thin plastic foil target in the 1018W/cm2 intensity range. High order harmonics generated in pulsed gas jet are used as a probe beam. The initial plasma parameters are determined with an accuracy better than 15% on the 100fs time scale, by comparison of the transmission of two consecutive harmonics.

  4. Light Curves as Predictors of Good Radial Velocity Planet Search Targets in New Stellar Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Wright, Jason; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Dumusque, Xavier; Luhn, Jacob K.; Howard, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    As Kepler and K2 have collectively found thousands of exoplanet candidates, their discoveries have strained ground-based radial velocity (RV) follow-up resources, which are unable to simultaneously keep up with the pace of transit discoveries by measuring masses for all of the candidates and maintain vigorous RV searches for planets that do not transit their parent star. The burden to the RV community is expected to worsen with the upcoming TESS mission, even as new RV instruments are slated to come online in the coming years. Observations that can enable the RV community to prioritize targets on the basis of their stellar RV variability in advance and, ideally, independently of the RV instruments themselves, can therefore permit us to reserve our RV resources for the stars most likely to yield the highest payoff. We show that the light curves from space-based transit surveys may not only be used as predictors of good RV search targets for the stars predominantly targeted by the exoplanet community but also for stars usually avoided by both RV and transit surveys due to their high intrinsic levels of stellar variability. We also briefly present recommendations to the RV planet search community on how to improve prospects for finding Earth analogs from the recent workshop at the Aspen Center for Physics, “Approaching the Stellar Astrophysical Limits of Exoplanet Detection: Getting to 10cm/s.”

  5. The targeting of starch binding domains from starch synthase III to the cell wall alters cell wall composition and properties.

    PubMed

    Grisolia, Mauricio J; Peralta, Diego A; Valdez, Hugo A; Barchiesi, Julieta; Gomez-Casati, Diego F; Busi, María V

    2017-01-01

    Starch binding domains of starch synthase III from Arabidopsis thaliana (SBD123) binds preferentially to cell wall polysaccharides rather than to starch in vitro. Transgenic plants overexpressing SBD123 in the cell wall are larger than wild type. Cell wall components are altered in transgenic plants. Transgenic plants are more susceptible to digestion than wild type and present higher released glucose content. Our results suggest that the transgenic plants have an advantage for the production of bioethanol in terms of saccharification of essential substrates. The plant cell wall, which represents a major source of biomass for biofuel production, is composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins and lignin. A potential biotechnological target for improving the production of biofuels is the modification of plant cell walls. This modification is achieved via several strategies, including, among others, altering biosynthetic pathways and modifying the associations and structures of various cell wall components. In this study, we modified the cell wall of A. thaliana by targeting the starch-binding domains of A. thaliana starch synthase III to this structure. The resulting transgenic plants (E8-SDB123) showed an increased biomass, higher levels of both fermentable sugars and hydrolyzed cellulose and altered cell wall properties such as higher laxity and degradability, which are valuable characteristics for the second-generation biofuels industry. The increased biomass and degradability phenotype of E8-SBD123 plants could be explained by the putative cell-wall loosening effect of the in tandem starch binding domains. Based on these results, our approach represents a promising biotechnological tool for reducing of biomass recalcitrance and therefore, the need for pretreatments.

  6. An archaeal sRNA targeting cis- and trans-encoded mRNAs via two distinct domains

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Dominik; Pernitzsch, Sandy R.; Richter, Andreas S.; Backofen, Rolf; Sharma, Cynthia M.; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the characterization and target analysis of the small (s)RNA162 in the methanoarchaeon Methanosarcina mazei. Using a combination of genetic approaches, transcriptome analysis and computational predictions, the bicistronic MM2441-MM2440 mRNA encoding the transcription factor MM2441 and a protein of unknown function was identified as a potential target of this sRNA, which due to processing accumulates as three stabile 5′ fragments in late exponential growth. Mobility shift assays using various mutants verified that the non-structured single-stranded linker region of sRNA162 (SLR) base-pairs with the MM2440-MM2441 mRNA internally, thereby masking the predicted ribosome binding site of MM2441. This most likely leads to translational repression of the second cistron resulting in dis-coordinated operon expression. Analysis of mutant RNAs in vivo confirmed that the SLR of sRNA162 is crucial for target interactions. Furthermore, our results indicate that sRNA162-controlled MM2441 is involved in regulating the metabolic switch between the carbon sources methanol and methylamine. Moreover, biochemical studies demonstrated that the 5′ end of sRNA162 targets the 5′-untranslated region of the cis-encoded MM2442 mRNA. Overall, this first study of archaeal sRNA/mRNA-target interactions unraveled that sRNA162 acts as an antisense (as)RNA on cis- and trans-encoded mRNAs via two distinct domains, indicating that cis-encoded asRNAs can have larger target regulons than previously anticipated. PMID:22965121

  7. Isolation and characterization of signermycin B, an antibiotic that targets the dimerization domain of histidine kinase WalK.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takafumi; Igarashi, Masayuki; Okajima, Toshihide; Ishii, Eiji; Kino, Hirokazu; Hatano, Masaki; Sawa, Ryuichi; Umekita, Maya; Kimura, Tomoyuki; Okamoto, Sho; Eguchi, Yoko; Akamatsu, Yuzuru; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2012-07-01

    The WalK (histidine kinase)/WalR (response regulator) two-component signal transduction system is a master regulatory system for cell wall metabolism and growth. This system is conserved in low G+C Gram-positive bacteria, including Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus mutans. In this study, we found the first antibiotic that functions as a WalK inhibitor (signermycin B) by screening 10,000 Streptomyces extracts. The chemical structure (C(23)H(35)NO(4); molecular weight, 389.5) comprises a tetramic acid moiety and a decalin ring. Signermycin B exhibited antimicrobial activity, with MIC values ranging from 3.13 μg/ml (8 μM) to 6.25 μg/ml (16 μM) against Gram-positive bacteria that possess the WalK/WalR two-component signal transduction system, including the drug-resistant bacteria methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of signermycin B against WalK in these organisms ranged from 37 to 61 μM. To determine the mechanism of action of signermycin B, surface plasmon resonance response analysis with the two WalK domains of Bacillus subtilis and competition assay with ATP were performed. The results showed that signermycin B binds to the dimerization domain but not the ATP-binding domain of WalK. In the presence of the cross-linker glutaraldehyde, signermycin B did not cause protein aggregation but interfered with the cross-linking of WalK dimers. These results suggest that signermycin B targets the conserved dimerization domain of WalK to inhibit autophosphorylation. In Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, signermycin B preferentially controlled the WalR regulon, thereby inhibiting cell division. These phenotypes are consistent with those of cells starved for the WalK/WalR system.

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Signermycin B, an Antibiotic That Targets the Dimerization Domain of Histidine Kinase WalK

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Takafumi; Igarashi, Masayuki; Okajima, Toshihide; Ishii, Eiji; Kino, Hirokazu; Hatano, Masaki; Sawa, Ryuichi; Umekita, Maya; Kimura, Tomoyuki; Okamoto, Sho; Eguchi, Yoko; Akamatsu, Yuzuru

    2012-01-01

    The WalK (histidine kinase)/WalR (response regulator) two-component signal transduction system is a master regulatory system for cell wall metabolism and growth. This system is conserved in low G+C Gram-positive bacteria, including Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus mutans. In this study, we found the first antibiotic that functions as a WalK inhibitor (signermycin B) by screening 10,000 Streptomyces extracts. The chemical structure (C23H35NO4; molecular weight, 389.5) comprises a tetramic acid moiety and a decalin ring. Signermycin B exhibited antimicrobial activity, with MIC values ranging from 3.13 μg/ml (8 μM) to 6.25 μg/ml (16 μM) against Gram-positive bacteria that possess the WalK/WalR two-component signal transduction system, including the drug-resistant bacteria methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of signermycin B against WalK in these organisms ranged from 37 to 61 μM. To determine the mechanism of action of signermycin B, surface plasmon resonance response analysis with the two WalK domains of Bacillus subtilis and competition assay with ATP were performed. The results showed that signermycin B binds to the dimerization domain but not the ATP-binding domain of WalK. In the presence of the cross-linker glutaraldehyde, signermycin B did not cause protein aggregation but interfered with the cross-linking of WalK dimers. These results suggest that signermycin B targets the conserved dimerization domain of WalK to inhibit autophosphorylation. In Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, signermycin B preferentially controlled the WalR regulon, thereby inhibiting cell division. These phenotypes are consistent with those of cells starved for the WalK/WalR system. PMID:22526318

  9. Inhibition of TLR2 signaling by small molecule inhibitors targeting a pocket within the TLR2 TIR domain.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Pragnesh; Laird, Michelle H W; Schwarz, Ryan S; Greene, Shannon; Dyson, Tristan; Snyder, Greg A; Xiao, Tsan Sam; Chauhan, Jay; Fletcher, Steven; Toshchakov, Vladimir Y; MacKerell, Alexander D; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2015-04-28

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is initiated by dimerization of intracellular Toll/IL-1 receptor resistance (TIR) domains. For all TLRs except TLR3, recruitment of the adapter, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), to TLR TIR domains results in downstream signaling culminating in proinflammatory cytokine production. Therefore, blocking TLR TIR dimerization may ameliorate TLR2-mediated hyperinflammatory states. The BB loop within the TLR TIR domain is critical for mediating certain protein-protein interactions. Examination of the human TLR2 TIR domain crystal structure revealed a pocket adjacent to the highly conserved P681 and G682 BB loop residues. Using computer-aided drug design (CADD), we sought to identify a small molecule inhibitor(s) that would fit within this pocket and potentially disrupt TLR2 signaling. In silico screening identified 149 compounds and 20 US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs based on their predicted ability to bind in the BB loop pocket. These compounds were screened in HEK293T-TLR2 transfectants for the ability to inhibit TLR2-mediated IL-8 mRNA. C16H15NO4 (C29) was identified as a potential TLR2 inhibitor. C29, and its derivative, ortho-vanillin (o-vanillin), inhibited TLR2/1 and TLR2/6 signaling induced by synthetic and bacterial TLR2 agonists in human HEK-TLR2 and THP-1 cells, but only TLR2/1 signaling in murine macrophages. C29 failed to inhibit signaling induced by other TLR agonists and TNF-α. Mutagenesis of BB loop pocket residues revealed an indispensable role for TLR2/1, but not TLR2/6, signaling, suggesting divergent roles. Mice treated with o-vanillin exhibited reduced TLR2-induced inflammation. Our data provide proof of principle that targeting the BB loop pocket is an effective approach for identification of TLR2 signaling inhibitors.

  10. Structure-Function Analysis of Rgs1 in Magnaporthe oryzae: Role of DEP Domains in Subcellular Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Ramanujam, Ravikrishna; Yishi, Xu; Liu, Hao; Naqvi, Naweed I.

    2012-01-01

    assign a specific vesicular/membrane targeting function for the N-terminal DEP domains of Rgs1 in the rice-blast fungus. PMID:22927898

  11. A bi-functional antibody-receptor domain fusion protein simultaneously targeting IGF-IR and VEGF for degradation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Zeng, Lin; Novosyadlyy, Ruslan; Forest, Amelie; Zhu, Aiping; Korytko, Andrew; Zhang, Haifan; Eastman, Scott W; Topper, Michael; Hindi, Sagit; Covino, Nicole; Persaud, Kris; Kang, Yun; Burtrum, Douglas; Surguladze, David; Prewett, Marie; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Wroblewski, Victor J; Shen, Juqun; Balderes, Paul; Zhu, Zhenping; Snavely, Marshall; Ludwig, Dale L

    2015-01-01

    Bi-specific antibodies (BsAbs), which can simultaneously block 2 tumor targets, have emerged as promising therapeutic alternatives to combinations of individual monoclonal antibodies. Here, we describe the engineering and development of a novel, human bi-functional antibody-receptor domain fusion molecule with ligand capture (bi-AbCap) through the fusion of the domain 2 of human vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) to an antibody directed against insulin-like growth factor – type I receptor (IGF-IR). The bi-AbCap possesses excellent stability and developability, and is the result of minimal engineering. Beyond potent neutralizing activities against IGF-IR and VEGF, the bi-AbCap is capable of cross-linking VEGF to IGF-IR, leading to co-internalization and degradation of both targets by tumor cells. In multiple mouse xenograft tumor models, the bi-AbCap improves anti-tumor activity over individual monotherapies. More importantly, it exhibits superior inhibition of tumor growth, compared with the combination of anti-IGF-IR and anti-VEGF therapies, via powerful blockade of both direct tumor cell growth and tumor angiogenesis. The unique “capture-for-degradation” mechanism of the bi-AbCap is informative for the design of next-generation bi-functional anti-cancer therapies directed against independent signaling pathways. The bi-AbCap design represents an alternative approach to the creation of dual-targeting antibody fusion molecules by taking advantage of natural receptor-ligand interactions. PMID:26073904

  12. A bi-functional antibody-receptor domain fusion protein simultaneously targeting IGF-IR and VEGF for degradation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Zeng, Lin; Novosyadlyy, Ruslan; Forest, Amelie; Zhu, Aiping; Korytko, Andrew; Zhang, Haifan; Eastman, Scott W; Topper, Michael; Hindi, Sagit; Covino, Nicole; Persaud, Kris; Kang, Yun; Burtrum, Douglas; Surguladze, David; Prewett, Marie; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Wroblewski, Victor J; Shen, Juqun; Balderes, Paul; Zhu, Zhenping; Snavely, Marshall; Ludwig, Dale L

    2015-01-01

    Bi-specific antibodies (BsAbs), which can simultaneously block 2 tumor targets, have emerged as promising therapeutic alternatives to combinations of individual monoclonal antibodies. Here, we describe the engineering and development of a novel, human bi-functional antibody-receptor domain fusion molecule with ligand capture (bi-AbCap) through the fusion of the domain 2 of human vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) to an antibody directed against insulin-like growth factor - type I receptor (IGF-IR). The bi-AbCap possesses excellent stability and developability, and is the result of minimal engineering. Beyond potent neutralizing activities against IGF-IR and VEGF, the bi-AbCap is capable of cross-linking VEGF to IGF-IR, leading to co-internalization and degradation of both targets by tumor cells. In multiple mouse xenograft tumor models, the bi-AbCap improves anti-tumor activity over individual monotherapies. More importantly, it exhibits superior inhibition of tumor growth, compared with the combination of anti-IGF-IR and anti-VEGF therapies, via powerful blockade of both direct tumor cell growth and tumor angiogenesis. The unique "capture-for-degradation" mechanism of the bi-AbCap is informative for the design of next-generation bi-functional anti-cancer therapies directed against independent signaling pathways. The bi-AbCap design represents an alternative approach to the creation of dual-targeting antibody fusion molecules by taking advantage of natural receptor-ligand interactions.

  13. Targeted inhibition of disheveled PDZ domain via NSC668036 depresses fibrotic process

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cong; Dai, Jinghong; Sun, Zhaorui; Shi, Chaowen; Cao, Honghui; and others

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we determined the effects of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and Wnt/β-catenin signaling on myofibroblast differentiation of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts in vitro and evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of NSC668036 in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis murine model. In vitro study, NSC668036, a small organic inhibitor of the PDZ domain in Dvl, suppressed β-catenin-driven gene transcription and abolished TGF-β1-induced migration, expression of collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in fibroblasts. In vivo study, we found that NSC668036 significantly suppressed accumulation of collagen I, α-SMA, and TGF-β1 but increased the expression of CK19, Occludin and E-cadherin that can inhibit pulmonary fibrogenesis. Because fibrotic lung exhibit aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, these data collectively suggest that inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling at the Dvl level may be an effective approach to the treatment of fibrotic lung diseases. - Highlights: • NSC668036 inhibited the proliferation and migration of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. • NSC668036 suppressed the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. • TGF-β-induced stimulation of profibrotic responses were inhibited by NSC668036. • NSC668036 can inhibit the development of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  14. High-Throughput, Protein-Targeted Biomolecular Detection Using Frequency-Domain Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Murdock, Richard J; Putnam, Shawn A; Das, Soumen; Gupta, Ankur; Chase, Elyse D Z; Seal, Sudipta

    2017-01-16

    A clinically relevant magneto-optical technique (fd-FRS, frequency-domain Faraday rotation spectroscopy) for characterizing proteins using antibody-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is demonstrated. This technique distinguishes between the Faraday rotation of the solvent, iron oxide core, and functionalization layers of polyethylene glycol polymers (spacer) and model antibody-antigen complexes (anti-BSA/BSA, bovine serum albumin). A detection sensitivity of ≈10 pg mL(-1) and broad detection range of 10 pg mL(-1) ≲ cBSA ≲ 100 µg mL(-1) are observed. Combining this technique with predictive analyte binding models quantifies (within an order of magnitude) the number of active binding sites on functionalized MNPs. Comparative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) studies are conducted, reproducing the manufacturer advertised BSA ELISA detection limits from 1 ng mL(-1) ≲ cBSA ≲ 500 ng mL(-1) . In addition to the increased sensitivity, broader detection range, and similar specificity, fd-FRS can be conducted in less than ≈30 min, compared to ≈4 h with ELISA. Thus, fd-FRS is shown to be a sensitive optical technique with potential to become an efficient diagnostic in the chemical and biomolecular sciences.

  15. Targeting a novel domain in podoplanin for inhibiting platelet-mediated tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Takaya; Takemoto, Ai; Takagi, Satoshi; Takatori, Kazuki; Sato, Shigeo; Takami, Miho; Fujita, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Podoplanin/Aggrus is a sialoglycoprotein expressed in various cancers. We previously identified podoplanin as a key factor in tumor-induced platelet aggregation. Podoplanin-mediated platelet aggregation enhances tumor growth and metastasis by secreting growth factors and by forming tumor emboli in the microvasculature. Thus, precise analysis of the mechanisms of podoplanin-mediated platelet aggregation is critical for developing anti-tumor therapies. Here we report the discovery of a novel platelet aggregation-inducing domain, PLAG4 (81-EDLPT-85). PLAG4 has high homology to the previously reported PLAG3 and contributes to the binding of its platelet receptor CLEC-2. Mutant analyses indicated that PLAG4 exhibits a predominant platelet-aggregating function relative to PLAG3 and that conserved Glu81/Asp82/Thr85 residues in PLAG4 are indispensable for CLEC-2 binding. By establishing anti-PLAG4-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, we confirmed its role in CLEC-2 binding, platelet aggregation, and tumor emboli formation. Our results suggest the requirement of simultaneous inhibition of PLAG3/4 for complete suppression of podoplanin-mediated tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:26684030

  16. Human CENP-A contains a histone H3 related histone fold domain that is required for targeting to the centromere

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Centromeres are the differentiated chromosomal domains that specify the mitotic behavior of chromosomes. To examine the molecular basis for the specification of centromeric chromatin, we have cloned a human cDNA that encodes the 17-kD histone-like centromere antigen, CENP-A. Two domains are evident in the 140 aa CENP-A polypeptide: a unique NH2- terminal domain and a 93-amino acid COOH-terminal domain that shares 62% identity with nucleosomal core protein, histone H3. An epitope tagged derivative of CENP-A was faithfully targeted to centromeres when expressed in a variety of animal cells and this targeting activity was shown to reside in the histone-like COOH-terminal domain of CENP-A. These data clearly indicate that the assembly of centromeres is driven, at least in part, by the incorporation of a novel core histone into centromeric chromatin. PMID:7962047

  17. Analysis in the joint time-frequency domain of the identifying signatures of submerged targets insonified by dolphin clicks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strifors, Hans C.; Gaunaurd, Guillermo C.; Moore, Patrick W.

    1997-06-01

    We study the scattering interaction of dolphin-emitted acoustic pulses ('clicks') with various elastic shells located, underwater, in front of the animal in a large test site in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. A carefully instrumented analog- to-digital system continuously captured the emitted clicks and also the returned, backscattered echoes. Using standard conditioning techniques and food reinforcers, the dolphin is taught to push an underwater paddle when the 'correct' target -- the one he has been trained to identify -- is presented to him. He communicates to us his consistently correct identifying choices in this manner. By means of several time- frequency distributions (TFD) of the Wigner-type, or Cohen class, we examine echoes returned by three types of cylindrical shells. The time-frequency distributions we compare in this survey are the pseudo-Wigner distribution (PWD), the Choi-Williams distribution (CWD), the adaptive spectrogram (AS), the cone-shaped distribution (CSD), the Gabor spectrogram (GS), and the spectrogram (SPEC). To be satisfactory for target identification purposes, a time- frequency representation of the echoes should display a sufficient amount of distinguishing features, and still be robust enough to suppress the interference of noise contained in the received signals. Both these properties in a time- frequency distribution depend on the distribution's capability of concentrating the featuers in time and frequency and of handling cross-term interference. With some time-frequency distributions there is a trade-off between the concentration of features and the suppression of cross-term interference. The results of our investigation serve the twofold purposes of (1) advancing the understanding of the amazing target identification capability of dolphins, and (2) to assist in assessing the possibility of identifying submerged targets using active sonar and a classifier based on target signatures in the combined time-frequency domain.

  18. AlzPlatform: An Alzheimer’s Disease Domain-Specific Chemogenomics Knowledgebase for Polypharmacology and Target Identification Research

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is one of the most complicated progressive neurodegeneration diseases that involve many genes, proteins, and their complex interactions. No effective medicines or treatments are available yet to stop or reverse the progression of the disease due to its polygenic nature. To facilitate discovery of new AD drugs and better understand the AD neurosignaling pathways involved, we have constructed an Alzheimer’s disease domain-specific chemogenomics knowledgebase, AlzPlatform (www.cbligand.org/AD/) with cloud computing and sourcing functions. AlzPlatform is implemented with powerful computational algorithms, including our established TargetHunter, HTDocking, and BBB Predictor for target identification and polypharmacology analysis for AD research. The platform has assembled various AD-related chemogenomics data records, including 928 genes and 320 proteins related to AD, 194 AD drugs approved or in clinical trials, and 405 188 chemicals associated with 1 023 137 records of reported bioactivities from 38 284 corresponding bioassays and 10 050 references. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the application of the AlzPlatform in three case studies for identification of multitargets and polypharmacology analysis of FDA-approved drugs and also for screening and prediction of new AD active small chemical molecules and potential novel AD drug targets by our established TargetHunter and/or HTDocking programs. The predictions were confirmed by reported bioactivity data and our in vitro experimental validation. Overall, AlzPlatform will enrich our knowledge for AD target identification, drug discovery, and polypharmacology analyses and, also, facilitate the chemogenomics data sharing and information exchange/communications in aid of new anti-AD drug discovery and development. PMID:24597646

  19. A bivalent tarantula toxin activates the capsaicin receptor, TRPV1, by targeting the outer pore domain.

    PubMed

    Bohlen, Christopher J; Priel, Avi; Zhou, Sharleen; King, David; Siemens, Jan; Julius, David

    2010-05-28

    Toxins have evolved to target regions of membrane ion channels that underlie ligand binding, gating, or ion permeation, and have thus served as invaluable tools for probing channel structure and function. Here, we describe a peptide toxin from the Earth Tiger tarantula that selectively and irreversibly activates the capsaicin- and heat-sensitive channel, TRPV1. This high-avidity interaction derives from a unique tandem repeat structure of the toxin that endows it with an antibody-like bivalency. The "double-knot" toxin traps TRPV1 in the open state by interacting with residues in the presumptive pore-forming region of the channel, highlighting the importance of conformational changes in the outer pore region of TRP channels during activation.

  20. A Bivalent Tarantula Toxin Activates the Capsaicin Receptor, TRPV1, by Targeting the Outer Pore Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bohlen, Christopher J.; Priel, Avi; Zhou, Sharleen; King, David; Siemens, Jan; Julius, David

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Toxins have evolved to target regions of membrane ion channels that underlie ligand binding, gating, or ion permeation, and have thus served as invaluable tools for probing channel structure and function. Here we describe a peptide toxin from the Earth Tiger tarantula that selectively and irreversibly activates the capsaicin- and heat-sensitive channel, TRPV1. This high avidity interaction derives from a unique tandem repeat structure of the toxin that endows it with an antibody-like bivalency, illustrating a new paradigm in toxin structure and evolution. The ‘double-knot’ toxin traps TRPV1 in the open state by interacting with residues in the presumptive pore-forming region of the channel, highlighting the importance of conformational changes in the outer pore region of TRP channels during activation. PMID:20510930

  1. Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Development of Disease-Modifying Osteoarthritis Drugs.

    PubMed

    Manning, Lauren B; Li, Yefu; Chickmagalur, Nithya S; Li, Xiaolong; Xu, Lin

    2016-11-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis disorders, but the identification of therapeutic targets to effectively prevent OA has been increasingly difficult. The goal of this investigation is to provide experimental evidence that discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) may be an ideal target for the development of disease-modifying OA drugs. Ddr2 was conditionally deleted from articular cartilage of adult mouse knee joints. Aggrecan-CreERT2;floxed Ddr2 mice, which were generated by crossing Aggrecan-CreERT2 mice with floxed Ddr2 mice, then received tamoxifen injections at the age of 8 weeks. The mice were then subjected to destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. At 8 and 16 weeks after DMM, mice were euthanized for the collection of knee joints. In a separate experiment, Aggrecan-CreERT2;floxed Ddr2 mice were subjected to DMM at the age of 10 weeks. The mice then received tamoxifen injections at 8 weeks after DMM. The mice were euthanized for the collection of knee joints at 16 weeks after DMM. The progressive process of articular cartilage degeneration was significantly delayed in the knee joints of Ddr2-deficient mice in comparison to their control littermates. Articular cartilage damage in the knee joints of the mice was associated with increased expression profiles of both Ddr2 and matrix metalloproteinase 13. These findings suggest that DDR2 may be an ideal target for the development of disease-modifying OA drugs.

  2. Human lysozyme possesses novel antimicrobial peptides within its N-terminal domain that target bacterial respiration.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hisham R; Imazato, Kenta; Ono, Hajime

    2011-09-28

    Human milk lysozyme is thought to be a key defense factor in protecting the gastrointestinal tract of newborns against bacterial infection. Recently, evidence was found that pepsin, under conditions relevant to the newborn stomach, cleaves chicken lysozyme (cLZ) at specific loops to generate five antimicrobial peptide motifs. This study explores the antimicrobial role of the corresponding peptides of human lysozyme (hLZ), the actual protein in breast milk. Five peptide motifs of hLZ, one helix-loop-helix (HLH), its two helices (H1 and H2), and two helix-sheet motifs, H2-β-strands 1-2 (H2-S12) or H2-β-strands 1-3 (H2-S13), were synthesized and examined for antimicrobial action. The five peptides of hLZ exhibit microbicidal activity to various degrees against several bacterial strains. The HLH peptide and its N-terminal helix (H1) were significantly the most potent bactericidal to Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and the fungus Candida albicans . Outer and inner membrane permeabilization studies, as well as measurements of transmembrane electrochemical potentials, provided evidence that HLH peptide and its N-terminal helix (H1) kill bacteria by crossing the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria via self-promoted uptake and are able to dissipate the membrane potential-dependent respiration of Gram-positive bacteria. This finding is the first to describe that hLZ possesses multiple antimicrobial peptide motifs within its N-terminal domain, providing insight into new classes of antibiotic peptides with potential use in the treatment of infectious diseases.

  3. Targeted induction of meiotic double-strand breaks reveals chromosomal domain-dependent regulation of Spo11 and interactions among potential sites of meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tomoyuki; Kugou, Kazuto; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Takehiko; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2008-02-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation mediated by Spo11. DSBs occur with frequency in chromosomal regions called hot domains but are seldom seen in cold domains. To obtain insights into the determinants of the distribution of meiotic DSBs, we examined the effects of inducing targeted DSBs during yeast meiosis using a UAS-directed form of Spo11 (Gal4BD-Spo11) and a meiosis-specific endonuclease, VDE (PI-SceI). Gal4BD-Spo11 cleaved its target sequence (UAS) integrated in hot domains but rarely in cold domains. However, Gal4BD-Spo11 did bind to UAS and VDE efficiently cleaved its recognition sequence in either context, suggesting that a cold domain is not a region of inaccessible or uncleavable chromosome structure. Importantly, self-association of Spo11 occurred at UAS in a hot domain but not in a cold domain, raising the possibility that Spo11 remains in an inactive intermediate state in cold domains. Integration of UAS adjacent to known DSB hotspots allowed us to detect competitive interactions among hotspots for activation. Moreover, the presence of VDE-introduced DSB repressed proximal hotspot activity, implicating DSBs themselves in interactions among hotspots. Thus, potential sites for Spo11-mediated DSB are subject to domain-specific and local competitive regulations during and after DSB formation.

  4. Rescue of HIV-1 Release by Targeting Widely Divergent NEDD4-Type Ubiquitin Ligases and Isolated Catalytic HECT Domains to Gag

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Eric R.; Popova, Elena; Yamanaka, Hikaru; Kim, Hyung Cheol; Huibregtse, Jon M.; Göttlinger, Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    Retroviruses engage the ESCRT pathway through late assembly (L) domains in Gag to promote virus release. HIV-1 uses a PTAP motif as its primary L domain, which interacts with the ESCRT-I component Tsg101. In contrast, certain other retroviruses primarily use PPxY-type L domains, which constitute ligands for NEDD4-type ubiquitin ligases. Surprisingly, although HIV-1 Gag lacks PPxY motifs, the release of HIV-1 L domain mutants is potently enhanced by ectopic NEDD4-2s, a native isoform with a naturally truncated C2 domain that appears to account for the residual titer of L domain-defective HIV-1. The reason for the unique potency of the NEDD4-2s isoform has remained unclear. We now show that the naturally truncated C2 domain of NEDD4-2s functions as an autonomous Gag-targeting module that can be functionally replaced by the unrelated Gag-binding protein cyclophilin A (CypA). The residual C2 domain of NEDD4-2s was sufficient to transfer the ability to stimulate HIV-1 budding to other NEDD4 family members, including the yeast homologue Rsp5, and even to isolated catalytic HECT domains. The isolated catalytic domain of NEDD4-2s also efficiently promoted HIV-1 budding when targeted to Gag via CypA. We conclude that the regions typically required for substrate recognition by HECT ubiquitin ligases are all dispensable to stimulate HIV-1 release, implying that the relevant target for ubiquitination is Gag itself or can be recognized by divergent isolated HECT domains. However, the mere ability to ubiquitinate Gag was not sufficient to stimulate HIV-1 budding. Rather, our results indicate that the synthesis of K63-linked ubiquitin chains is critical for ubiquitin ligase-mediated virus release. PMID:20862313

  5. Rescue of HIV-1 release by targeting widely divergent NEDD4-type ubiquitin ligases and isolated catalytic HECT domains to Gag.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Eric R; Popova, Elena; Yamanaka, Hikaru; Kim, Hyung Cheol; Huibregtse, Jon M; Göttlinger, Heinrich

    2010-09-16

    Retroviruses engage the ESCRT pathway through late assembly (L) domains in Gag to promote virus release. HIV-1 uses a PTAP motif as its primary L domain, which interacts with the ESCRT-I component Tsg101. In contrast, certain other retroviruses primarily use PPxY-type L domains, which constitute ligands for NEDD4-type ubiquitin ligases. Surprisingly, although HIV-1 Gag lacks PPxY motifs, the release of HIV-1 L domain mutants is potently enhanced by ectopic NEDD4-2s, a native isoform with a naturally truncated C2 domain that appears to account for the residual titer of L domain-defective HIV-1. The reason for the unique potency of the NEDD4-2s isoform has remained unclear. We now show that the naturally truncated C2 domain of NEDD4-2s functions as an autonomous Gag-targeting module that can be functionally replaced by the unrelated Gag-binding protein cyclophilin A (CypA). The residual C2 domain of NEDD4-2s was sufficient to transfer the ability to stimulate HIV-1 budding to other NEDD4 family members, including the yeast homologue Rsp5, and even to isolated catalytic HECT domains. The isolated catalytic domain of NEDD4-2s also efficiently promoted HIV-1 budding when targeted to Gag via CypA. We conclude that the regions typically required for substrate recognition by HECT ubiquitin ligases are all dispensable to stimulate HIV-1 release, implying that the relevant target for ubiquitination is Gag itself or can be recognized by divergent isolated HECT domains. However, the mere ability to ubiquitinate Gag was not sufficient to stimulate HIV-1 budding. Rather, our results indicate that the synthesis of K63-linked ubiquitin chains is critical for ubiquitin ligase-mediated virus release.

  6. Targeting of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) Prevents Myofibroblast Activation and Neovessel Formation During Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hu; Bian, Huan; Bu, Xin; Zhang, Shuya; Zhang, Pan; Yu, Jiangtian; Lai, Xiaofeng; Li, Di; Zhu, Chuchao; Yao, Libo; Su, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a lethal human disease with short survival time and few treatment options. Herein, we demonstrated that discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), a receptor tyrosine kinase that predominantly transduces signals from fibrillar collagens, plays a critical role in the induction of fibrosis and angiogenesis in the lung. In vitro cell studies showed that DDR2 can synergize the actions of both transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and fibrillar collagen to stimulate lung fibroblasts to undergo myofibroblastic changes and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. In addition, we confirmed that late treatment of the injured mice with specific siRNA against DDR2 or its kinase inhibitor exhibited therapeutic efficacy against lung fibrosis. Thus, this study not only elucidated novel mechanisms by which DDR2 controls the development of pulmonary fibrosis, but also provided candidate target for the intervention of this stubborn disease.

  7. Clustering of mammalian Hox genes with other H3K27me3 targets within an active nuclear domain.

    PubMed

    Vieux-Rochas, Maxence; Fabre, Pierre J; Leleu, Marion; Duboule, Denis; Noordermeer, Daan

    2015-04-14

    Embryogenesis requires the precise activation and repression of many transcriptional regulators. The Polycomb group proteins and the associated H3K27me3 histone mark are essential to maintain the inactive state of many of these genes. Mammalian Hox genes are targets of Polycomb proteins and form local 3D clusters centered on the H3K27me3 mark. More distal contacts have also been described, yet their selectivity, dynamics, and relation to other layers of chromatin organization remained elusive. We report that repressed Hox genes form mutual intra- and interchromosomal interactions with other genes located in strong domains labeled by H3K27me3. These interactions occur in a central and active nuclear environment that consists of the HiC compartment A, away from peripheral lamina-associated domains. Interactions are independent of nearby H3K27me3-marked loci and determined by chromosomal distance and cell-type-specific scaling factors, thus inducing a moderate reorganization during embryogenesis. These results provide a simplified view of nuclear organization whereby Polycomb proteins may have evolved to repress genes located in gene-dense regions whose position is restricted to central, active, nuclear environments.

  8. Effect of single-chain antibody targeting of the ligand-binding domain in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase receptor

    PubMed Central

    Stylianou, DC; Auf der Maur, A; Kodack, DP; Henke, RT; Hohn, S; Toretsky, JA; Riegel, AT; Wellstein, A

    2013-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase receptor anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and its ligand, the growth factor pleiotrophin (PTN), are highly expressed during the development of the nervous system and have been implicated in the malignant progression of different tumor types. Here, we describe human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies that target the ligand-binding domain (LBD) in ALK and show the effect in vitro and in vivo. The ALK LBD was used as a bait in a yeast two-hybdrid system to select human scFv from a library with randomized complementarity-determining region 3 domains. Surface plasmon resonance showed high-affinity binding of the selected scFv. The anti-ALK scFv competed for binding of PTN to ALK in intact cells and inhibited PTN-dependent signal transduction through endogenous ALK. Invasion of an intact endothelial cell monolayer by U87MG human glioblastoma cells was inhibited by the anti-ALK scFv. In addition, the growth of established tumor xenografts in mice was reversed after the induction of the conditional expression of the anti-ALK scFv. In archival malignant brain tumors expression levels of ALK and PTN were found elevated and appear correlated with poor patient survival. This suggests a rate-limiting function of the PTN/ALK interaction that may be exploited therapeutically. PMID:19633684

  9. Constructs of human neuropathy target esterase catalytic domain containing mutations related to motor neuron disease have altered enzymatic properties.

    PubMed

    Hein, Nichole D; Stuckey, Jeanne A; Rainier, Shirley R; Fink, John K; Richardson, Rudy J

    2010-07-01

    Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) is a phospholipase/lysophospholipase associated with organophosphorus (OP) compound-induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN). Distal degeneration of motor axons occurs in both OPIDN and the hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs). Recently, mutations within the esterase domain of NTE were identified in patients with a novel type of HSP (SPG39) designated NTE-related motor neuron disease (NTE-MND). Two of these mutations, arginine 890 to histidine (R890H) and methionine 1012 to valine (M1012V), were created in human recombinant NTE catalytic domain (NEST) to measure possible changes in catalytic properties. These mutated enzymes had decreased specific activities for hydrolysis of the artificial substrate, phenyl valerate. In addition, the M1012V mutant exhibited a reduced bimolecular rate constant of inhibition (k(i)) for all three inhibitors tested: mipafox, diisopropylphosphorofluoridate, and chlorpyrifos oxon. Finally, while both mutated enzymes inhibited by OP compounds exhibited altered time-dependent loss of their ability to be reactivated by nucleophiles (aging), more pronounced effects were seen with the M1012V mutant. Taken together, the results from specific activity, inhibition, and aging experiments suggest that the mutations found in association with NTE-MND have functional correlates in altered enzymological properties of NTE.

  10. Ig-like domain 6 of VCAM-1 is a potential therapeutic target in TNFα-induced angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taek-Keun; Park, Chang Sik; Na, Hee-Jun; Lee, Kangseung; Yoon, Aerin; Chung, Junho; Lee, Sukmook

    2017-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)-induced angiogenesis plays important roles in the progression of various diseases, including cancer, wet age-related macular degeneration, and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the relevance and role of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in angiogenesis have not yet been clearly elucidated. In this study, VCAM-1 knockdown shows VCAM-1 involvement in TNFα-induced angiogenesis. Through competitive blocking experiments with VCAM-1 Ig-like domain 6 (VCAM-1-D6) protein, we identified VCAM-1-D6 as a key domain regulating TNFα-induced vascular tube formation. We demonstrated that a monoclonal antibody specific to VCAM-1-D6 suppressed TNFα-induced endothelial cell migration and tube formation and TNFα-induced vessel sprouting in rat aortas. We also found that the antibody insignificantly affected endothelial cell viability, morphology and activation. Finally, the antibody specifically blocked VCAM-1-mediated cell–cell contacts by directly inhibiting VCAM-1-D6-mediated interaction between VCAM-1 molecules. These findings suggest that VCAM-1-D6 may be a potential novel therapeutic target in TNFα-induced angiogenesis and that antibody-based modulation of VCAM-1-D6 may be an effective strategy to suppress TNFα-induced angiogenesis. PMID:28209985

  11. Ig-like domain 6 of VCAM-1 is a potential therapeutic target in TNFα-induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taek-Keun; Park, Chang Sik; Na, Hee-Jun; Lee, Kangseung; Yoon, Aerin; Chung, Junho; Lee, Sukmook

    2017-02-17

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)-induced angiogenesis plays important roles in the progression of various diseases, including cancer, wet age-related macular degeneration, and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the relevance and role of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in angiogenesis have not yet been clearly elucidated. In this study, VCAM-1 knockdown shows VCAM-1 involvement in TNFα-induced angiogenesis. Through competitive blocking experiments with VCAM-1 Ig-like domain 6 (VCAM-1-D6) protein, we identified VCAM-1-D6 as a key domain regulating TNFα-induced vascular tube formation. We demonstrated that a monoclonal antibody specific to VCAM-1-D6 suppressed TNFα-induced endothelial cell migration and tube formation and TNFα-induced vessel sprouting in rat aortas. We also found that the antibody insignificantly affected endothelial cell viability, morphology and activation. Finally, the antibody specifically blocked VCAM-1-mediated cell-cell contacts by directly inhibiting VCAM-1-D6-mediated interaction between VCAM-1 molecules. These findings suggest that VCAM-1-D6 may be a potential novel therapeutic target in TNFα-induced angiogenesis and that antibody-based modulation of VCAM-1-D6 may be an effective strategy to suppress TNFα-induced angiogenesis.

  12. The Myosin IXb Motor Activity Targets the Myosin IXb RhoGAP Domain as Cargo to Sites of Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    van den Boom, Frank; Düssmann, Heiko; Uhlenbrock, Katharina; Abouhamed, Marouan

    2007-01-01

    Myosin IXb (Myo9b) is a single-headed processive myosin that exhibits Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP) activity in its tail region. Using live cell imaging, we determined that Myo9b is recruited to extending lamellipodia, ruffles, and filopodia, the regions of active actin polymerization. A functional motor domain was both necessary and sufficient for targeting Myo9b to these regions. The head domains of class IX myosins comprise a large insertion in loop2. Deletion of the large Myo9b head loop 2 insertion abrogated the enrichment in extending lamellipodia and ruffles, but enhanced significantly the enrichment at the tips of filopodia and retraction fibers. The enrichment in the tips of filopodia and retraction fibers depended on four lysine residues C-terminal to the loop 2 insertion and the tail region. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and photoactivation experiments in lamellipodia revealed that the dynamics of Myo9b was comparable to that of actin. The exchange rates depended on the Myo9b motor region and motor activity, and they were also dependent on the turnover of F-actin. These results demonstrate that Myo9b functions as a motorized RhoGAP molecule in regions of actin polymerization and identify Myo9b head sequences important for in vivo motor properties. PMID:17314409

  13. Clustering of mammalian Hox genes with other H3K27me3 targets within an active nuclear domain

    PubMed Central

    Vieux-Rochas, Maxence; Fabre, Pierre J.; Leleu, Marion; Duboule, Denis; Noordermeer, Daan

    2015-01-01

    Embryogenesis requires the precise activation and repression of many transcriptional regulators. The Polycomb group proteins and the associated H3K27me3 histone mark are essential to maintain the inactive state of many of these genes. Mammalian Hox genes are targets of Polycomb proteins and form local 3D clusters centered on the H3K27me3 mark. More distal contacts have also been described, yet their selectivity, dynamics, and relation to other layers of chromatin organization remained elusive. We report that repressed Hox genes form mutual intra- and interchromosomal interactions with other genes located in strong domains labeled by H3K27me3. These interactions occur in a central and active nuclear environment that consists of the HiC compartment A, away from peripheral lamina-associated domains. Interactions are independent of nearby H3K27me3-marked loci and determined by chromosomal distance and cell-type–specific scaling factors, thus inducing a moderate reorganization during embryogenesis. These results provide a simplified view of nuclear organization whereby Polycomb proteins may have evolved to repress genes located in gene-dense regions whose position is restricted to central, active, nuclear environments. PMID:25825760

  14. Direct inhibition of NF-κB activation by peptide targeting the NOA ubiquitin binding domain of NEMO.

    PubMed

    Chiaravalli, Jeanne; Fontan, Elisabeth; Fsihi, Hafida; Coic, Yves-Marie; Baleux, Françoise; Véron, Michel; Agou, Fabrice

    2011-11-01

    Aberrant and constitutive NF-κB activation are frequently reported in numerous tumor types, making its inhibition an attractive target for the treatment of certain cancers. NEMO (NF-κB essential modulator) is the crucial component of the canonical NF-κB pathway that mediates IκB kinase (IKK) complex activation. IKK activation resides in the ability of the C-terminal domain of NEMO to properly dimerize and interact with linear and K63-linked polyubiquitin chains. Here, we have identified a new NEMO peptide inhibitor, termed UBI (ubiquitin binding inhibitor) that derives from the NOA/NUB/UBAN ubiquitin binding site located in the CC2-LZ domain of NEMO. UBI specifically inhibits the NF-κB pathway at the IKK level in different cell types stimulated by a variety of NF-κB signals. Circular dichroïsm and fluorescence studies showed that UBI exhibits an increased α-helix character and direct, good-affinity binding to the NOA-LZ region of NEMO. We also showed that UBI targets NEMO in cells but its mode of inhibition is completely different from the previously reported LZ peptide (herein denoted NOA-LZ). UBI does not promote dissociation of NEMO subunits in cells but impairs the interaction between the NOA UBD of NEMO and polyubiquitin chains. Importantly, we showed that UBI efficiently competes with the in vitro binding of K63-linked chains, but not with linear chains. The identification of this new NEMO inhibitor emphasizes the important contribution of K63-linked chains for IKK activation in NF-κB signaling and would provide a new tool for studying the complex role of NF-κB in inflammation and cancer.

  15. The Biologically Relevant Targets and Binding Affinity Requirements for the Function of the Yeast Actin-Binding Protein 1 Src-Homology 3 Domain Vary With Genetic Context

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Jennifer; Garcia, Bianca; Stollar, Elliott J.; Rath, Arianna; Andrews, Brenda J.; Davidson, Alan R.

    2007-01-01

    Many protein–protein interaction domains bind to multiple targets. However, little is known about how the interactions of a single domain with many proteins are controlled and modulated under varying cellular conditions. In this study, we investigated the in vivo effects of Abp1p SH3 domain mutants that incrementally reduce target-binding affinity in four different yeast mutant backgrounds in which Abp1p activity is essential for growth. Although the severity of the phenotypic defects observed generally increased as binding affinity was reduced, some genetic backgrounds (prk1Δ and sla1Δ) tolerated large affinity reductions while others (sac6Δ and sla2Δ) were much more sensitive to these reductions. To elucidate the mechanisms behind these observations, we determined that Ark1p is the most important Abp1p SH3 domain interactor in prk1Δ cells, but that interactions with multiple targets, including Ark1p and Scp1p, are required in the sac6Δ background. We establish that the Abp1p SH3 domain makes different, functionally important interactions under different genetic conditions, and these changes in function are reflected by changes in the binding affinity requirement of the domain. These data provide the first evidence of biological relevance for any Abp1p SH3 domain-mediated interaction. We also find that considerable reductions in binding affinity are tolerated by the cell with little effect on growth rate, even when the actin cytoskeletal morphology is significantly perturbed. PMID:17409071

  16. A CC-SAM, for coiled coil-sterile α motif, domain targets the scaffold KSR-1 to specific sites in the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Koveal, Dorothy; Schuh-Nuhfer, Natasha; Ritt, Daniel; Page, Rebecca; Morrison, Deborah K; Peti, Wolfgang

    2012-12-18

    Kinase suppressor of Ras-1 (KSR-1) is an essential scaffolding protein that coordinates the assembly of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) module, consisting of the MAPK kinase kinase Raf, the MAPK kinase MEK (mitogen-activated or extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase kinase), and the MAPK ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) to facilitate activation of MEK and thus ERK. Although KSR-1 is targeted to the cell membrane in part by its atypical C1 domain, which binds to phospholipids, other domains may be involved. We identified another domain in KSR-1 that we termed CC-SAM, which is composed of a coiled coil (CC) and a sterile α motif (SAM). The CC-SAM domain targeted KSR-1 to specific signaling sites at the plasma membrane in growth factor-treated cells, and it bound directly to various micelles and bicelles in vitro, indicating that the CC-SAM functioned as a membrane-binding module. By combining nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and experiments in cultured cells, we found that membrane binding was mediated by helix α3 of the CC motif and that mutating residues in α3 abolished targeting of KSR-1 to the plasma membrane. Thus, in addition to the atypical C1 domain, the CC-SAM domain is required to target KSR-1 to the plasma membrane.

  17. C-terminal domain of the RNA chaperone Hfq drives sRNA competition and release of target RNA

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Frangos, Andrew; Kavita, Kumari; Schu, Daniel J.; Gottesman, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial Sm protein and RNA chaperone Hfq stabilizes small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) and facilitates their annealing to mRNA targets involved in stress tolerance and virulence. Although an arginine patch on the Sm core is needed for Hfq’s RNA chaperone activity, the function of Hfq’s intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain (CTD) has remained unclear. Here, we use stopped flow spectroscopy to show that the CTD of Escherichia coli Hfq is not needed to accelerate RNA base pairing but is required for the release of dsRNA. The Hfq CTD also mediates competition between sRNAs, offering a kinetic advantage to sRNAs that contact both the proximal and distal faces of the Hfq hexamer. The change in sRNA hierarchy caused by deletion of the Hfq CTD in E. coli alters the sRNA accumulation and the kinetics of sRNA regulation in vivo. We propose that the Hfq CTD displaces sRNAs and annealed sRNA⋅mRNA complexes from the Sm core, enabling Hfq to chaperone sRNA–mRNA interactions and rapidly cycle between competing targets in the cell. PMID:27681631

  18. PCR-targeted Streptomyces gene replacement identifies a protein domain needed for biosynthesis of the sesquiterpene soil odor geosmin.

    PubMed

    Gust, Bertolt; Challis, Greg L; Fowler, Kay; Kieser, Tobias; Chater, Keith F

    2003-02-18

    Streptomycetes are high G+C Gram-positive, antibiotic-producing, mycelial soil bacteria. The 8.7-Mb Streptomyces coelicolor genome was previously sequenced by using an ordered library of Supercos-1 clones. Here, we describe an efficient procedure for creating precise gene replacements in the cosmid clones by using PCR targeting and lambda-Red-mediated recombination. The cloned Streptomyces genes are replaced with a cassette containing a selectable antibiotic resistance and oriT(RK2) for efficient transfer to Streptomyces by RP4-mediated intergeneric conjugation. Supercos-1 does not replicate in Streptomyces, but the clones readily undergo double-crossover recombination, thus creating gene replacements. The antibiotic resistance cassettes are flanked by yeast FLP recombinase target sequences for removal of the antibiotic resistance and oriT(RK2) to generate unmarked, nonpolar mutations. The technique has been used successfully by >20 researchers to mutate around 100 Streptomyces genes. As an example, we describe its application to the discovery of a gene involved in the production of geosmin, the ubiquitous odor of soil. The gene, Sco6073 (cyc2), codes for a protein with two sesquiterpene synthase domains, only one of which is required for geosmin biosynthesis, probably via a germacra-1 (10) E,5E-dien-11-ol intermediate generated by the sesquiterpene synthase from farnesyl pyrophosphate.

  19. Structural and functional analyses of minimal phosphopeptides targeting the polo-box domain of polo-like kinase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Sang-Moon; Moulaei, Tinoush; Lim, Dan; Bang, Jeong K.; Park, Jung-Eun; Shenoy, Shilpa R.; Liu, Fa; Kang, Young H.; Liao, Chenzhong; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Lee, Sunhee; Yoon, Do-Young; Lim, Yoongho; Lee, Dong-Hee; Otaka, Akira; Appella, Ettore; McMahon, James B.; Nicklaus, Marc C.; Burke, Jr., Terrence R.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Lee, Kyung S.

    2009-09-14

    Polo-like kinase-1 (Plk1) has a pivotal role in cell proliferation and is considered a potential target for anticancer therapy. The noncatalytic polo-box domain (PBD) of Plk1 forms a phosphoepitope binding module for protein-protein interaction. Here, we report the identification of minimal phosphopeptides that specifically interact with the PBD of human PLK1, but not those of the closely related PLK2 and PLK3. Comparative binding studies and analyses of crystal structures of the PLK1 PBD in complex with the minimal phosphopeptides revealed that the C-terminal SpT dipeptide functions as a high-affinity anchor, whereas the N-terminal residues are crucial for providing specificity and affinity to the interaction. Inhibition of the PLK1 PBD by phosphothreonine mimetic peptides was sufficient to induce mitotic arrest and apoptotic cell death. The mode of interaction between the minimal peptide and PBD may provide a template for designing therapeutic agents that target PLK1.

  20. Discovery of small-molecule inhibitors selectively targeting the DNA-binding domain of the human androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Li, Huifang; Ban, Fuqiang; Dalal, Kush; Leblanc, Eric; Frewin, Kate; Ma, Dennis; Adomat, Hans; Rennie, Paul S; Cherkasov, Artem

    2014-08-14

    The human androgen receptor (AR) is considered as a master regulator in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). As resistance to clinically used anti-AR drugs remains a major challenge for the treatment of advanced PCa, there is a pressing need for new anti-AR therapeutic avenues. In this study, we identified a binding site on the DNA binding domain (DBD) of the receptor and utilized virtual screening to discover a set of micromolar hits for the target. Through further exploration of the most potent hit (1), a structural analogue (6) was identified demonstrating 10-fold improved anti-AR potency. Further optimization resulted in a more potent synthetic analogue (25) with anti-AR potency comparable to a newly FDA-approved drug Enzalutamide. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the developed inhibitors do interact with the intended target site. Importantly, the AR DBD inhibitors could effectively inhibit the growth of Enzalutamide-resistant cells as well as block the transcriptional activity of constitutively active AR splice variants, such as V7.

  1. PCR-targeted Streptomyces gene replacement identifies a protein domain needed for biosynthesis of the sesquiterpene soil odor geosmin

    PubMed Central

    Gust, Bertolt; Challis, Greg L.; Fowler, Kay; Kieser, Tobias; Chater, Keith F.

    2003-01-01

    Streptomycetes are high G+C Gram-positive, antibiotic-producing, mycelial soil bacteria. The 8.7-Mb Streptomyces coelicolor genome was previously sequenced by using an ordered library of Supercos-1 clones. Here, we describe an efficient procedure for creating precise gene replacements in the cosmid clones by using PCR targeting and λ-Red-mediated recombination. The cloned Streptomyces genes are replaced with a cassette containing a selectable antibiotic resistance and oriTRK2 for efficient transfer to Streptomyces by RP4-mediated intergeneric conjugation. Supercos-1 does not replicate in Streptomyces, but the clones readily undergo double-crossover recombination, thus creating gene replacements. The antibiotic resistance cassettes are flanked by yeast FLP recombinase target sequences for removal of the antibiotic resistance and oriTRK2 to generate unmarked, nonpolar mutations. The technique has been used successfully by >20 researchers to mutate around 100 Streptomyces genes. As an example, we describe its application to the discovery of a gene involved in the production of geosmin, the ubiquitous odor of soil. The gene, Sco6073 (cyc2), codes for a protein with two sesquiterpene synthase domains, only one of which is required for geosmin biosynthesis, probably via a germacra-1 (10) E,5E-dien-11-ol intermediate generated by the sesquiterpene synthase from farnesyl pyrophosphate. PMID:12563033

  2. Imaging site-specific peptide-targeting in tumor tissues using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lixin; Zhang, Miao; Yu, Ping

    2011-03-01

    We report imaging studies on site-specific peptide-targeting in tumor tissues using newly developed optical peptide probes and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The system used two broadband superluminescent light emission diodes with different central wavelengths. An electro-optic modulation in the reference beam was used to get full-range deep imaging inside tumor tissues. The optical probes were based on Bombesin (BBN) that is a fourteen amino acid peptide. BBN has high binding affinity to gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors overexpressed on several human cancer cell lines. Fluorescence BBN probes were developed by conjugating the last eight residues of BBN, -Q-W-A-V-G-H-L-M-(NH2), with Alexa Flour 680 or Alexa Fluor 750 dye molecules via amino acid linker -G-G-G. The SD-OCT imaging can identify normal tissue and tumor tissue through the difference in scattering coefficient, and trace the BBN conjugate probes through the absorption of the dye molecules using the twowavelength algorithm. We performed the specific uptake and receptor-blocking experiments of the optical BBN probes in severely compromised immunodeficient mouse model bearing human PC-3 prostate tumor xenografts. Tumor and muscle tissues were collected and used for SD-OCT imaging. The SD-OCT images showed fluorescence traces of the BBN probes in the peptide-targeted tumor tissues. Our results demonstrated that SD-OCT is a potential tool for preclinical and clinical early cancer detection.

  3. Tumor Inhibitory Effect of IRCR201, a Novel Cross-Reactive c-Met Antibody Targeting the PSI Domain.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunkyu; Kim, Donggeon; Kim, Eunmi; Sa, Jason K; Lee, Hee Won; Yu, Suji; Oh, Jiwon; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Yoon, Yeup; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2017-09-13

    Hepatocyte growth factor receptor (HGFR, c-Met) is an essential member of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family that is often dysregulated during tumor progression, driving a malignant phenotypic state and modulating important cellular functions including tumor growth, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis, providing a strong rationale for targeting HGF/c-Met signaling axis in cancer therapy. Based on its protumorigenic potentials, we developed IRCR201, a potent antagonistic antibody targeting the plexin-semaphorin-integrin (PSI) domain of c-Met, using synthetic human antibody phage libraries. We characterized and evaluated the biochemical properties and tumor inhibitory effect of IRCR201 in vitro and in vivo. IRCR201 is a novel fully-human bivalent therapeutic antibody that exhibits cross-reactivity against both human and mouse c-Met proteins with high affinity and specificity. IRCR201 displayed low agonist activity and rapidly depleted total c-Met protein via the lysosomal degradation pathway, inhibiting c-Met-dependent downstream activation and attenuating cellular proliferation in various c-Met-expressing cancer cells. In vivo tumor xenograft models also demonstrated the superior tumor inhibitory responsiveness of IRCR201. Taken together, IRCR201 provides a promising therapeutic agent for c-Met-positive cancer patients through suppressing the c-Met signaling pathway and tumor growth.

  4. Structural and functional analyses of minimal phosphopeptides targeting the polo-box domain of polo-like kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sang-Moon; Moulaei, Tinoush; Lim, Dan; Bang, Jeong K; Park, Jung-Eun; Shenoy, Shilpa R; Liu, Fa; Kang, Young H; Liao, Chenzhong; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Lee, Sunhee; Yoon, Do-Young; Lim, Yoongho; Lee, Dong-Hee; Otaka, Akira; Appella, Ettore; McMahon, James B; Nicklaus, Marc C; Burke, Terrence R; Yaffe, Michael B; Wlodawer, Alexander; Lee, Kyung S

    2009-08-01

    Polo-like kinase-1 (Plk1) has a pivotal role in cell proliferation and is considered a potential target for anticancer therapy. The noncatalytic polo-box domain (PBD) of Plk1 forms a phosphoepitope binding module for protein-protein interaction. Here, we report the identification of minimal phosphopeptides that specifically interact with the PBD of human PLK1, but not those of the closely related PLK2 and PLK3. Comparative binding studies and analyses of crystal structures of the PLK1 PBD in complex with the minimal phosphopeptides revealed that the C-terminal SpT dipeptide functions as a high-affinity anchor, whereas the N-terminal residues are crucial for providing specificity and affinity to the interaction. Inhibition of the PLK1 PBD by phosphothreonine mimetic peptides was sufficient to induce mitotic arrest and apoptotic cell death. The mode of interaction between the minimal peptide and PBD may provide a template for designing therapeutic agents that target PLK1.

  5. Compaction of a prokaryotic signal-anchor transmembrane domain begins within the ribosome tunnel and is stabilized by SRP during targeting.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Philip J; Findlay, Jane E; Woolhead, Cheryl A

    2012-11-02

    Cotranslational targeting of membrane proteins is mediated by the universally conserved signal recognition particle (SRP). In eukaryotes, SRP attenuates translation during targeting; however, in prokaryotes, a simplified SRP is believed to carry out targeting during continuing translation. Here, we show a detailed stepwise analysis of the targeting of subunit c of the F(0) component of the bacterial ATP synthase (F(0)c) to the inner membrane. We show that the first transmembrane (TM) signal-anchor domain of F(0)c forms a compacted structure within the distal portion of the ribosome tunnel. This structure is formed just prior to the interaction with SRP. In the absence of SRP this structure is lost as the TM domain exits the tunnel; however in the presence of SRP it is stabilized. Our results suggest differences in early protein folding of substrates for prokaryotic SRP-dependent membrane protein targeting pathways, from that of eukaryotic SRP targeting. These results imply that early TM domain recognition by targeting factors acts to ensure that the efficiency of membrane targeting is maintained. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The GRP1 PH domain, like the AKT1 PH domain, possesses a sentry glutamate residue essential for specific targeting to plasma membrane PI(3,4,5)P(3).

    PubMed

    Pilling, Carissa; Landgraf, Kyle E; Falke, Joseph J

    2011-11-15

    During the appearance of the signaling lipid PI(3,4,5)P(3), an important subset of pleckstrin homology (PH) domains target signaling proteins to the plasma membrane. To ensure proper pathway regulation, such PI(3,4,5)P(3)-specific PH domains must exclude the more prevalant, constitutive plasma membrane lipid PI(4,5)P(2) and bind the rare PI(3,4,5)P(3) target lipid with sufficiently high affinity. Our previous study of the E17K mutant of the protein kinase B (AKT1) PH domain, together with evidence from Carpten et al. [Carpten, J. D., et al. (2007) Nature 448, 439-444], revealed that the native AKT1 E17 residue serves as a sentry glutamate that excludes PI(4,5)P(2), thereby playing an essential role in specific PI(3,4,5)P(3) targeting [Landgraf, K. E., et al. (2008) Biochemistry 47, 12260-12269]. The sentry glutamate hypothesis proposes that an analogous sentry glutamate residue is a widespread feature of PI(3,4,5)P(3)-specific PH domains, and that charge reversal mutation at the sentry glutamate position will yield both increased PI(4,5)P(2) affinity and constitutive plasma membrane targeting. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the E345 residue, a putative sentry glutamate, of the general receptor for phosphoinositides 1 (GRP1) PH domain. The results show that incorporation of the E345K charge reversal mutation into the GRP1 PH domain enhances PI(4,5)P(2) affinity 8-fold and yields constitutive plasma membrane targeting in cells, reminiscent of the effects of the E17K mutation in the AKT1 PH domain. Hydrolysis of plasma membrane PI(4,5)P(2) releases the E345K GRP1 PH domain into the cytoplasm, and the efficiency of this release increases when Arf6 binding is disrupted. Overall, the findings provide strong support for the sentry glutamate hypothesis and suggest that the GRP1 E345K mutation will be linked to changes in cell physiology and human pathologies, as demonstrated for AKT1 E17K [Carpten, J. D., et al. (2007) Nature 448, 439-444; Lindhurst, M. J., et al

  7. Structure of the PSD-95/MAP1A complex reveals a unique target recognition mode of the MAGUK GK domain.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yitian; Shang, Yuan; Zhang, Rongguang; Zhu, Jinwei

    2017-08-10

    The PSD-95 family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) are major synaptic scaffold proteins and play crucial roles in the dynamic regulation of dendritic remodelling, which is understood to be the foundation of synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity. The guanylate kinase (GK) domain of MAGUK family proteins functions as a phosphor-peptide binding module. However, the GK domain of PSD-95 has been found to directly bind to a peptide sequence within the C-terminal region of neuronal-specific microtubule-associated protein 1A (MAP1A), although the detailed molecular mechanism governing this phosphorylation-independent interaction at the atomic level is missing. In the present study, we determine the crystal structure of PSD-95 GK in complex with the MAP1A peptide at 2.6-Å resolution. The complex structure reveals that, unlike a linear and elongated conformation in the phosphor-peptide/GK complexes, the MAP1A peptide adopts a unique conformation with a stretch of hydrophobic residues far from each other in the primary sequence clustering and interacting with the 'hydrophobic site' of PSD-95 GK and a highly conserved aspartic acid of MAP1A (D2117) mimicking the phosphor-serine/threonine in binding to the 'phosphor-site' of PSD-95 GK. We demonstrate that the MAP1A peptide may undergo a conformational transition upon binding to PSD-95 GK. Further structural comparison of known DLG GK-mediated complexes reveals the target recognition specificity and versatility of DLG GKs. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  8. Arabidopsis myosin XI sub-domains homologous to the yeast myo2p organelle inheritance sub-domain target subcellular structures in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Sattarzadeh, Amirali; Schmelzer, Elmon; Hanson, Maureen R.

    2013-01-01

    Myosin XI motor proteins transport plant organelles on the actin cytoskeleton. The Arabidopsis gene family that encodes myosin XI has 13 members, 12 of which have sub-domains within the tail region that are homologous to well-characterized cargo-binding domains in the yeast myosin V myo2p. Little is presently known about the cargo-binding domains of plant myosin XIs. Prior experiments in which most or all of the tail regions of myosin XIs have been fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and transiently expressed have often not resulted in fluorescent labeling of plant organelles. We identified 42 amino-acid regions within 12 Arabidopsis myosin XIs that are homologous to the yeast myo2p tail region known to be essential for vacuole and mitochondrial inheritance. A YFP fusion of the yeast region expressed in plants did not label tonoplasts or mitochondria. We investigated whether the homologous Arabidopsis regions, termed by us the “PAL” sub-domain, could associate with subcellular structures following transient expression of fusions with YFP in Nicotiana benthamiana. Seven YFP::PAL sub-domain fusions decorated Golgi and six were localized to mitochondria. In general, the myosin XI PAL sub-domains labeled organelles whose motility had previously been observed to be affected by mutagenesis or dominant negative assays with the respective myosins. Simultaneous transient expression of the PAL sub-domains of myosin XI-H, XI-I, and XI-K resulted in inhibition of movement of mitochondria and Golgi. PMID:24187546

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExoT Induces Mitochondrial Apoptosis in Target Host Cells in a Manner That Depends on Its GTPase-activating Protein (GAP) Domain Activity.

    PubMed

    Wood, Stephen J; Goldufsky, Josef W; Bello, Daniella; Masood, Sara; Shafikhani, Sasha H

    2015-11-27

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia and a killer of immunocompromised patients. We and others have demonstrated that the type III secretion system (T3SS) effector protein ExoT plays a pivotal role in facilitating P. aeruginosa pathogenesis. ExoT possesses an N-terminal GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain and a C-terminal ADP-ribosyltransferase (ADPRT) domain. Because it targets multiple non-overlapping cellular targets, ExoT performs several distinct virulence functions for P. aeruginosa, including induction of apoptosis in a variety of target host cells. Both the ADPRT and the GAP domain activities contribute to ExoT-induced apoptosis. The ADPRT domain of ExoT induces atypical anoikis by transforming an innocuous cellular protein, Crk, into a cytotoxin, which interferes with integrin survival signaling. However, the mechanism underlying the GAP-induced apoptosis remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the GAP domain activity is both necessary and sufficient to induce mitochondrial (intrinsic) apoptosis. We show that intoxication with GAP domain results in: (i) JNK1/2 activation; (ii) substantial increases in the mitochondrial levels of activated pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bid, and to a lesser extent Bim; (iii) loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release; and (iv) activation of initiator caspase-9 and executioner caspase-3. Further, GAP-induced apoptosis is partially mediated by JNK1/2, but it is completely dependent on caspase-9 activity. Together, the ADPRT and the GAP domains make ExoT into a highly versatile and potent cytotoxin, capable of inducing multiple forms of apoptosis in target host cells. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Arsenite Targets the Zinc Finger Domains of Tet Proteins and Inhibits Tet-Mediated Oxidation of 5-Methylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuo; Jiang, Ji; Li, Lin; Amato, Nicholas J; Wang, Zi; Wang, Yinsheng

    2015-10-06

    Arsenic toxicity is a serious public health problem worldwide that brings more than 100 million people into the risk of arsenic exposure from groundwater and food contamination. Although there is accumulating evidence linking arsenic exposure with aberrant cytosine methylation in the global genome or at specific genomic loci, very few have investigated the impact of arsenic on the oxidation of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) mediated by the Ten-eleven translocation (Tet) family of proteins. Owing to the high binding affinity of As(III) toward cysteine residues, we reasoned that the highly conserved C3H-type zinc fingers situated in Tet proteins may constitute potential targets for arsenic binding. Herein, we found that arsenite could bind directly to the zinc fingers of Tet proteins in vitro and in cells, and this interaction substantially impaired the catalytic efficiency of Tet proteins in oxidizing 5-mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-foC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). Treatments with arsenite also led to a dose-dependent decrease in the level of 5-hmC, but not 5-mC, in DNA isolated from HEK293T cells overexpressing the catalytic domain of any of the three Tet proteins and from mouse embryonic stem cells. Together, our study unveiled, for the first time, that arsenite could alter epigenetic signaling by targeting the zinc fingers of Tet proteins and perturbing the Tet-mediated oxidation of 5-mC in vitro and in cells. Our results offer important mechanistic understanding of arsenic epigenotoxicity and carcinogenesis in mammalian systems and may lead to novel approaches for the chemoprevention of arsenic toxicity.

  11. Adaptive evolution has targeted the C-terminal domain of the RXLR effectors of plant pathogenic oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Win, Joe; Morgan, William; Bos, Jorunn; Krasileva, Ksenia V; Cano, Liliana M; Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Ammar, Randa; Staskawicz, Brian J; Kamoun, Sophien

    2007-08-01

    Oomycete plant pathogens deliver effector proteins inside host cells to modulate plant defense circuitry and to enable parasitic colonization. These effectors are defined by a conserved motif, termed RXLR (for Arg, any amino acid, Leu, Arg), that is located downstream of the signal peptide and that has been implicated in host translocation. Because the phenotypes of RXLR effectors extend to plant cells, their genes are expected to be the direct target of the evolutionary forces that drive the antagonistic interplay between pathogen and host. We used the draft genome sequences of three oomycete plant pathogens, Phytophthora sojae, Phytophthora ramorum, and Hyaloperonospora parasitica, to generate genome-wide catalogs of RXLR effector genes and determine the extent to which these genes are under positive selection. These analyses revealed that the RXLR sequence is overrepresented and positionally constrained in the secretome of Phytophthora relative to other eukaryotes. The three examined plant pathogenic oomycetes carry complex and diverse sets of RXLR effector genes that have undergone relatively rapid birth and death evolution. We obtained robust evidence of positive selection in more than two-thirds of the examined paralog families of RXLR effectors. Positive selection has acted for the most part on the C-terminal region, consistent with the view that RXLR effectors are modular, with the N terminus involved in secretion and host translocation and the C-terminal domain dedicated to modulating host defenses inside plant cells.

  12. Structural and functional analyses of minimal phosphopeptides targeting the polo-box domain of polo-like kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sang-Moon; Moulaei, Tinoush; Lim, Dan; Bang, Jeong K.; Park, Jung-Eun; Shenoy, Shilpa R.; Liu, Fa; Kang, Young Hwi; Liao, Chenzhong; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Lee, Sunhee; Yoon, Do-Young; Lim, Yoongho; Lee, Dong-Hee; Otaka, Akira; Appella, Ettore; McMahon, James B.; Nicklaus, Marc C.; Burke, Terrence R.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Lee, Kyung S.

    2009-01-01

    Plk1 plays a pivotal role in cell proliferation and is considered an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy. The noncatalytic polo-box domain (PBD) of Plk1 forms a phosphoepitope-binding module for protein-protein interaction. Here, we report the identification of minimal phosphopeptides that specifically interacted with the PBD of Plk1, but not the two closely-related Plk2 and Plk3. Comparative binding studies and analyses of crystal structures of the Plk1 PBD in complex with the minimal phosphopeptides revealed that the C-terminal SpT dipeptide functions as a high affinity anchor, whereas the N-terminal residues are critical for providing both specificity and affinity to the interaction. Inhibition of the Plk1 PBD by phospho-Thr mimetic peptides was sufficient to induce mitotic arrest and apoptotic cell death. Thus, the mode of the minimal peptide and PBD interaction may provide a template for designing anti-Plk1 therapeutic agents. PMID:19597481

  13. Effects of targeted phosphorylation site mutations in the DNA-PKcs phosphorylation domain on low and high LET radiation sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Ian M; Bell, Justin J; Maeda, Junko; Genet, Matthew D; Romero, Ashley; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Fujimori, Akira; Kitamuta, Hisashi; Kamada, Tadashi; Chen, David J; Kato, Takamitsu A

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigated the effect of targeted mutations in the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit and phosphorylation domains on the survival of cells in response to different qualities of ionizing radiation. Mutated Chinese hamster ovary V3 cells were exposed to 500 MeV/nucleon initial energy and 200 keV/μm monoenergetic Fe ions; 290 MeV/nucleon initial energy and average 50 keV/μm spread-out Bragg peak C ions; 70 MeV/nucleon initial energy and 1 keV/μm monoenergetic protons; and 0.663 MeV initial energy and 0.3 keV/μm Cs(137) γ radiation. The results demonstrated that sensitivity to high linear energy transfer radiation is increased when both S2056 and T2609 clusters each contain a point mutation or multiple mutations are present in either cluster, whereas the phosphoinositide 3 kinase cluster only requires a single mutation to induce the sensitized phenotype of V3 cells. Additionally, the present study demonstrated that sensitivity to DNA cross-linking damage by cisplatin only requires a single mutation in one of the three clusters and that additional point mutations do not increase cell sensitivity.

  14. Transcription factor TFIID is a direct functional target of the adenovirus E1A transcription-repression domain.

    PubMed Central

    Song, C Z; Loewenstein, P M; Toth, K; Green, M

    1995-01-01

    The 243-amino acid adenovirus E1A oncoprotein both positively and negatively modulates the expression of cellular genes involved in the regulation of cell growth. The E1A transcription repression function appears to be linked with its ability to induce cellular DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and cell transformation, as well as to inhibit cell differentiation. The mechanism by which E1A represses the transcription of various promoters has proven enigmatic. Here we provide several lines of evidence that the "TATA-box" binding protein (TBP) component of transcription factor TFIID is a cellular target of the E1A repression function encoded within the E1A N-terminal 80 amino acids. (i) The E1A N-terminal 80 amino acids [E1A-(1-80)protein] efficiently represses basal transcription from TATA-containing core promoters in vitro. (ii) TBP reverses completely E1A repression in vitro. (iii) TBP restores transcriptional activity to E1A-(1-80) protein affinity-depleted nuclear extracts. (iv) The N-terminal repression domain of E1A interacts directly and specifically with TBP in vitro. These results may help explain how E1A represses a set of genes that lack common upstream promoter elements. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7479778

  15. Incorporation of Peptides Targeting EGFR and FGFR1 into the Adenoviral Fiber Knob Domain and Their Evaluation as Targeted Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Uusi-Kerttula, Hanni; Legut, Mateusz; Davies, James; Jones, Rachel; Hudson, Emma; Hanna, Louise; Stanton, Richard J.; Chester, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Oncolytic virotherapies based on adenovirus 5 (Ad5) hold promise as adjunctive cancer therapies; however, their efficacy when delivered systemically is hampered by poor target cell specificity and preexisting anti-Ad5 immunity. Ovarian cancer represents a promising target for virotherapy, since the virus can be delivered locally into the peritoneal cavity. Both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) are overexpressed in the majority of human tumors, including ovarian cancer. To generate adenoviral vectors with improved tumor specificity, we generated a panel of Ad5 vectors with altered tropism for EGFR and FGFR, rather than the natural Ad5 receptor, hCAR. We have included mutations within AB loop of the viral fiber knob (KO1 mutation) to preclude interaction with hCAR, combined with insertions in the HI loop to incorporate peptides that bind either EGFR (peptide YHWYGYTPQNVI, GE11) or FGFR1 (peptides MQLPLAT, M*, and LSPPRYP, LS). Viruses were produced to high titers, and the integrity of the fiber protein was validated by Western blotting. The KO1 mutation efficiently ablated hCAR interactions, and significantly increased transduction was observed in hCARlow/EGFRhigh cell lines using Ad5.GE11, while transduction levels using Ad5.M* or Ad5.LS were not increased. In the presence of physiological concentrations of human blood clotting factor X (hFX), significantly increased levels of transduction via the hFX-mediated pathway were observed in cell lines, but not in primary tumor cells derived from epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) ascites samples. Ad5-mediated transduction of EOC cells was completely abolished by the presence of 2.5% serum from patients, while, surprisingly, incorporation of the GE11 peptide resulted in significant evasion of neutralization in the same samples. We thus speculate that incorporation of the YHWYGYTPQNVI dodecapeptide within the fiber knob domain may provide a novel means of

  16. Incorporation of Peptides Targeting EGFR and FGFR1 into the Adenoviral Fiber Knob Domain and Their Evaluation as Targeted Cancer Therapies.

    PubMed

    Uusi-Kerttula, Hanni; Legut, Mateusz; Davies, James; Jones, Rachel; Hudson, Emma; Hanna, Louise; Stanton, Richard J; Chester, John D; Parker, Alan L

    2015-05-01

    Oncolytic virotherapies based on adenovirus 5 (Ad5) hold promise as adjunctive cancer therapies; however, their efficacy when delivered systemically is hampered by poor target cell specificity and preexisting anti-Ad5 immunity. Ovarian cancer represents a promising target for virotherapy, since the virus can be delivered locally into the peritoneal cavity. Both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) are overexpressed in the majority of human tumors, including ovarian cancer. To generate adenoviral vectors with improved tumor specificity, we generated a panel of Ad5 vectors with altered tropism for EGFR and FGFR, rather than the natural Ad5 receptor, hCAR. We have included mutations within AB loop of the viral fiber knob (KO1 mutation) to preclude interaction with hCAR, combined with insertions in the HI loop to incorporate peptides that bind either EGFR (peptide YHWYGYTPQNVI, GE11) or FGFR1 (peptides MQLPLAT, M*, and LSPPRYP, LS). Viruses were produced to high titers, and the integrity of the fiber protein was validated by Western blotting. The KO1 mutation efficiently ablated hCAR interactions, and significantly increased transduction was observed in hCAR(low)/EGFR(high) cell lines using Ad5.GE11, while transduction levels using Ad5.M* or Ad5.LS were not increased. In the presence of physiological concentrations of human blood clotting factor X (hFX), significantly increased levels of transduction via the hFX-mediated pathway were observed in cell lines, but not in primary tumor cells derived from epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) ascites samples. Ad5-mediated transduction of EOC cells was completely abolished by the presence of 2.5% serum from patients, while, surprisingly, incorporation of the GE11 peptide resulted in significant evasion of neutralization in the same samples. We thus speculate that incorporation of the YHWYGYTPQNVI dodecapeptide within the fiber knob domain may provide a novel means of circumventing

  17. In vitro and in vivo activity of novel small-molecule inhibitors targeting the pleckstrin homology domain of protein kinase B/AKT.

    PubMed

    Moses, Sylvestor A; Ali, M Ahad; Zuohe, Song; Du-Cuny, Lei; Zhou, Li Li; Lemos, Robert; Ihle, Nathan; Skillman, A Geoffrey; Zhang, Shuxing; Mash, Eugene A; Powis, Garth; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J

    2009-06-15

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway plays a critical role in activating survival and antiapoptotic pathways within cancer cells. Several studies have shown that this pathway is constitutively activated in many different cancer types. The goal of this study was to discover novel compounds that bind to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of AKT, thereby inhibiting AKT activation. Using proprietary docking software, 22 potential PH domain inhibitors were identified. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy was used to measure the binding of the compounds to the expressed PH domain of AKT followed by an in vitro activity screen in Panc-1 and MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cell lines. We identified a novel chemical scaffold in several of the compounds that binds selectively to the PH domain of AKT, inducing a decrease in AKT activation and causing apoptosis at low micromolar concentrations. Structural modifications of the scaffold led to compounds with enhanced inhibitory activity in cells. One compound, 4-dodecyl-N-(1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)benzenesulfonamide, inhibited AKT and its downstream targets in cells as well as in pancreatic cancer cell xenografts in immunocompromised mice; it also exhibited good antitumor activity. In summary, a pharmacophore for PH domain inhibitors targeting AKT function was developed. Computer-aided modeling, synthesis, and testing produced novel AKT PH domain inhibitors that exhibit promising preclinical properties.

  18. Cooperation of two-domain Ca2+ channel fragments in triad targeting and restoration of excitation– contraction coupling in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Flucher, Bernhard E.; Weiss, Regina G.; Grabner, Manfred

    2002-01-01

    The specific incorporation of the skeletal muscle voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel in the triad is a prerequisite of normal excitation–contraction (EC) coupling. Sequences involved in membrane expression and in targeting of Ca2+ channels into skeletal muscle triads have been described in different regions of the α1S subunit. Here we studied the targeting properties of two-domain α1S fragments, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-I⋅II (1–670) and III⋅IV (691–1873) expressed alone or in combination in dysgenic (α1S-null) myotubes. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that GFP-I⋅II or III⋅IV expressed separately were not targeted into triads. In contrast, on coexpression the two α1S fragments were colocalized with one another and with the ryanodine receptor in the triads. Coexpression of GFP-I⋅II and III⋅IV also fully restored Ca2+ currents and depolarization-induced Ca2+ transients, despite the severed connection between the two channel halves and the absence of amino acids 671–690 from either α1S fragment. Thus, triad targeting, like the rescue of function, requires the cooperation and coassembly of the two complementary channel fragments. Transferring the C terminus of α1S to the N-terminal two-domain fragment (GFP-I⋅II⋅tail), or transferring the I–II connecting loop containing the β interaction domain to the C-terminal fragment (III⋅IV⋅βin) did not improve the targeting properties of the individually expressed two-domain channel fragments. Thus, the cooperation of GFP-I⋅II and III⋅IV in targeting cannot be explained solely by a sequential action of the β subunit by means of the I–II loop in releasing the channel from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and of the C terminus in triad targeting. PMID:12119388

  19. The PGRS Domain from PE_PGRS33 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is Target of Humoral Immune Response in Mice and Humans.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ingrid; Parada, Cristina; Acosta-Gío, Enrique; Espitia, Clara

    2014-01-01

    The PE_PGRS33 protein is a member of the PE family, which encompasses the PE and the PE_PGRS subfamilies. Among PE_PGRS's, this protein is one of the most studied antigens and its immunomodulatory properties are influence by both PE and PGRS domains. However, the contribution of these domains to the host immune recognition of the PE_PGRS33 protein and their potential role in latent tuberculosis infection in humans is still unknown. In this study, the immunogenic properties of the complete PE_PGRS33 protein and each domain separately were evaluated in BALB/c mice and latent tuberculosis infected (LTBI) humans. In mice, PE_PGRS33 and its domains induced similar antibody production and secretion of IFN-γ. PE_PGRS33 and the PE domain stimulated higher CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation compared to the PGRS domain. This demonstrated that the principal difference in the immune recognition of the domains is the higher activation of T-cell subpopulations involved in the control of tuberculosis. In humans, the secretion of IFN-γ in response to PE_PGRS33 was detected in both LTBI and in non-infected vaccinated individuals. The same was observed for antibody response, which targets epitopes located in the PGRS domain but not in the PE domain. These observations suggest that T and B cell responses to PE_PGRS33 are induced by BCG vaccination and can be maintained for many years in non-infected individuals. This also indicates that the IFN-γ response detected might not be associated with latent tuberculosis infection. These results contribute to the elucidation of the role of the PE_PGRS33 protein and its PE and PGRS domains in the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  20. The PGRS Domain from PE_PGRS33 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is Target of Humoral Immune Response in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ingrid; Parada, Cristina; Acosta-Gío, Enrique; Espitia, Clara

    2014-01-01

    The PE_PGRS33 protein is a member of the PE family, which encompasses the PE and the PE_PGRS subfamilies. Among PE_PGRS’s, this protein is one of the most studied antigens and its immunomodulatory properties are influence by both PE and PGRS domains. However, the contribution of these domains to the host immune recognition of the PE_PGRS33 protein and their potential role in latent tuberculosis infection in humans is still unknown. In this study, the immunogenic properties of the complete PE_PGRS33 protein and each domain separately were evaluated in BALB/c mice and latent tuberculosis infected (LTBI) humans. In mice, PE_PGRS33 and its domains induced similar antibody production and secretion of IFN-γ. PE_PGRS33 and the PE domain stimulated higher CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell proliferation compared to the PGRS domain. This demonstrated that the principal difference in the immune recognition of the domains is the higher activation of T-cell subpopulations involved in the control of tuberculosis. In humans, the secretion of IFN-γ in response to PE_PGRS33 was detected in both LTBI and in non-infected vaccinated individuals. The same was observed for antibody response, which targets epitopes located in the PGRS domain but not in the PE domain. These observations suggest that T and B cell responses to PE_PGRS33 are induced by BCG vaccination and can be maintained for many years in non-infected individuals. This also indicates that the IFN-γ response detected might not be associated with latent tuberculosis infection. These results contribute to the elucidation of the role of the PE_PGRS33 protein and its PE and PGRS domains in the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:24904584

  1. The interaction between the pleckstrin homology domain of ceramide kinase and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate regulates the plasma membrane targeting and ceramide 1-phosphate levels

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tack-Joong; Mitsutake, Susumu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki . E-mail: yigarash@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp

    2006-04-07

    Ceramide kinase (CERK) converts ceramide to ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P), which has recently emerged as a new bioactive molecule capable of regulating diverse cellular functions. The N-terminus of the CERK protein encompasses a sequence motif known as a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. Although the PH domain was previously demonstrated to be an important domain for the subcellular localization of CERK, the precise properties of this domain remained unclear. In this study, we reveal that the PH domain of CERK exhibits high affinity for phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P{sub 2}), among other lipids. Furthermore, in COS7 cells, GFP-fused CERK translocated rapidly from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane in response to hyper-osmotic stress, which is known to increase the intracellular PI(4,5)P{sub 2} levels, whereas a PH domain deletion mutant did not. Additionally, in [{sup 32}P]orthophosphate-labeled COS7 cells, the translocation of CERK to the plasma membrane induced a 2.8-fold increase in C1P levels. The study presented here provides insight into the crucial role of the CERK-PH domain in plasma membrane targeting, through its binding to PI(4,5)P{sub 2}, and subsequent induction of C1P production in the vicinity of the membrane.

  2. Baculovirus protein PK2 subverts eIF2α kinase function by mimicry of its kinase domain C-lobe

    PubMed Central

    Li, John J.; Cao, Chune; Fixsen, Sarah M.; Young, Janet M.; Bando, Hisanori; Elde, Nels C.; Katsuma, Susumu; Dever, Thomas E.; Sicheri, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) by eIF2α family kinases is a conserved mechanism to limit protein synthesis under specific stress conditions. The baculovirus-encoded protein PK2 inhibits eIF2α family kinases in vivo, thereby increasing viral fitness. However, the precise mechanism by which PK2 inhibits eIF2α kinase function remains an enigma. Here, we probed the mechanism by which PK2 inhibits the model eIF2α kinase human RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) as well as native insect eIF2α kinases. Although PK2 structurally mimics the C-lobe of a protein kinase domain and possesses the required docking infrastructure to bind eIF2α, we show that PK2 directly binds the kinase domain of PKR (PKRKD) but not eIF2α. The PKRKD–PK2 interaction requires a 22-residue N-terminal extension preceding the globular PK2 body that we term the “eIF2α kinase C-lobe mimic” (EKCM) domain. The functional insufficiency of the N-terminal extension of PK2 implicates a role for the adjacent EKCM domain in binding and inhibiting PKR. Using a genetic screen in yeast, we isolated PK2-activating mutations that cluster to a surface of the EKCM domain that in bona fide protein kinases forms the catalytic cleft through sandwiching interactions with a kinase N-lobe. Interaction assays revealed that PK2 associates with the N- but not the C-lobe of PKRKD. We propose an inhibitory model whereby PK2 engages the N-lobe of an eIF2α kinase domain to create a nonfunctional pseudokinase domain complex, possibly through a lobe-swapping mechanism. Finally, we show that PK2 enhances baculovirus fitness in insect hosts by targeting the endogenous insect heme-regulated inhibitor (HRI)–like eIF2α kinase. PMID:26216977

  3. Influence of lysophospholipid hydrolysis by the catalytic domain of neuropathy target esterase on the fluidity of bilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Aaron J; Richardson, Rudy J; Worden, R Mark; Ofoli, Robert Y

    2010-08-01

    Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) is an integral membrane protein localized in the endoplasmic reticulum in neurons. Irreversible inhibition of NTE by certain organophosphorus compounds produces a paralysis known as organophosphorus compound-induced delayed neuropathy. In vitro, NTE has phospholipase/lysophospholipase activity that hydrolyses exogenously added single-chain lysophospholipids in preference to dual-chain phospholipids, and NTE mutations have been associated with motor neuron disease. NTE's physiological role is not well understood, although recent studies suggest that it may control the cytotoxic accumulation of lysophospholipids in membranes. We used the NTE catalytic domain (NEST) to hydrolyze palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (p-lysoPC) to palmitic acid in bilayer membranes comprising 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and the fluorophore 1-oleoyl-2-[12-[(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]dodecanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (NBD-PC). Translational diffusion coefficients (D(L)) in supported bilayer membranes were measured by fluorescence recovery after pattern photobleaching (FRAPP). The average D(L) for DOPC/p-lysoPC membranes without NEST was 2.44 microm(2)s(-1)+/-0.09; the D(L) for DOPC/p-lysoPC membranes containing NEST and diisopropylphosphorofluoridate, an inhibitor, was nearly identical at 2.45+/-0.08. By contrast, the D(L) for membranes comprising NEST, DOPC, and p-lysoPC was 2.28+/-0.07, significantly different from the system with inhibited NEST, due to NEST hydrolysis. Likewise, a system without NEST containing the amount of palmitic acid that would have been produced by NEST hydrolysis of p-lysoPC was identical at 2.26+/-0.06. These results indicate that NTE's catalytic activity can alter membrane fluidity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The matricellular protein CCN1 controls retinal angiogenesis by targeting VEGF, Src homology 2 domain phosphatase-1 and Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Chintala, Hemabindu; Krupska, Izabela; Yan, Lulu; Lau, Lester; Grant, Maria; Chaqour, Brahim

    2015-07-01

    Physiological angiogenesis depends on the highly coordinated actions of multiple angiogenic regulators. CCN1 is a secreted cysteine-rich and integrin-binding matricellular protein required for proper cardiovascular development. However, our understanding of the cellular origins and activities of this molecule is incomplete. Here, we show that CCN1 is predominantly expressed in angiogenic endothelial cells (ECs) at the leading front of actively growing vessels in the mouse retina. Endothelial deletion of CCN1 in mice using a Cre-Lox system is associated with EC hyperplasia, loss of pericyte coverage and formation of dense retinal vascular networks lacking the normal hierarchical arrangement of arterioles, capillaries and venules. CCN1 is a product of an immediate-early gene that is transcriptionally induced in ECs in response to stimulation by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We found that CCN1 activity is integrated with VEGF receptor 2 (VEGF-R2) activation and downstream signaling pathways required for tubular network formation. CCN1-integrin binding increased the expression of and association between Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) and VEGF-R2, which leads to rapid dephosphorylation of VEGF-R2 tyrosine, thus preventing EC hyperproliferation. Predictably, CCN1 further brings receptors/signaling molecules into proximity that are otherwise spatially separated. Furthermore, CCN1 induces integrin-dependent Notch activation in cultured ECs, and its targeted gene inactivation in vivo alters Notch-dependent vascular specification and remodeling, suggesting that functional levels of Notch signaling requires CCN1 activity. These data highlight novel functions of CCN1 as a naturally optimized molecule, fine-controlling key processes in physiological angiogenesis and safeguarding against aberrant angiogenic responses.

  5. Targeting nitrative stress for attenuating cisplatin-induced downregulation of cochlear LIM domain only 4 and ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jamesdaniel, Samson; Rathinam, Rajamani; Neumann, William L

    2016-12-01

    Cisplatin-induced ototoxicity remains a primary dose-limiting adverse effect of this highly effective anticancer drug. The clinical utility of cisplatin could be enhanced if the signaling pathways that regulate the toxic side-effects are delineated. In previous studies, we reported cisplatin-induced nitration of cochlear proteins and provided the first evidence for nitration and downregulation of cochlear LIM domain only 4 (LMO4) in cisplatin ototoxicity. Here, we extend these findings to define the critical role of nitrative stress in cisplatin-induced downregulation of LMO4 and its consequent ototoxic effects in UBOC1 cell cultures derived from sensory epithelial cells of the inner ear and in CBA/J mice. Cisplatin treatment increased the levels of nitrotyrosine and active caspase 3 in UBOC1 cells, which was detected by immunocytochemical and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. The cisplatin-induced nitrative stress and apoptosis were attenuated by co-treatment with SRI110, a peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst (PNDC), which also attenuated the cisplatin-induced downregulation of LMO4 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, transient overexpression of LMO4 in UBOC1 cells prevented cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity while repression of LMO4 exacerbated cisplatin-induced cell death, indicating a direct link between LMO4 protein levels and cisplatin ototoxicity. Finally, auditory brainstem responses (ABR) recorded from CBA/J mice indicated that co-treatment with SRI110 mitigated cisplatin-induced hearing loss. Together, these results suggest that cisplatin-induced nitrative stress leads to a decrease in the levels of LMO4, downregulation of LMO4 is a critical determinant in cisplatin-induced ototoxicity, and targeting peroxynitrite could be a promising strategy for mitigating cisplatin-induced hearing loss. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The matricellular protein CCN1 controls retinal angiogenesis by targeting VEGF, Src homology 2 domain phosphatase-1 and Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chintala, Hemabindu; Krupska, Izabela; Yan, Lulu; Lau, Lester; Grant, Maria; Chaqour, Brahim

    2015-01-01

    Physiological angiogenesis depends on the highly coordinated actions of multiple angiogenic regulators. CCN1 is a secreted cysteine-rich and integrin-binding matricellular protein required for proper cardiovascular development. However, our understanding of the cellular origins and activities of this molecule is incomplete. Here, we show that CCN1 is predominantly expressed in angiogenic endothelial cells (ECs) at the leading front of actively growing vessels in the mouse retina. Endothelial deletion of CCN1 in mice using a Cre-Lox system is associated with EC hyperplasia, loss of pericyte coverage and formation of dense retinal vascular networks lacking the normal hierarchical arrangement of arterioles, capillaries and venules. CCN1 is a product of an immediate-early gene that is transcriptionally induced in ECs in response to stimulation by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We found that CCN1 activity is integrated with VEGF receptor 2 (VEGF-R2) activation and downstream signaling pathways required for tubular network formation. CCN1-integrin binding increased the expression of and association between Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) and VEGF-R2, which leads to rapid dephosphorylation of VEGF-R2 tyrosine, thus preventing EC hyperproliferation. Predictably, CCN1 further brings receptors/signaling molecules into proximity that are otherwise spatially separated. Furthermore, CCN1 induces integrin-dependent Notch activation in cultured ECs, and its targeted gene inactivation in vivo alters Notch-dependent vascular specification and remodeling, suggesting that functional levels of Notch signaling requires CCN1 activity. These data highlight novel functions of CCN1 as a naturally optimized molecule, fine-controlling key processes in physiological angiogenesis and safeguarding against aberrant angiogenic responses. PMID:26002917

  7. The auto-inhibitory state of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF5/TIM can be relieved by targeting its SH3 domain with rationally designed peptide aptamers.

    PubMed

    He, Ping; Tan, De-Li; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Lv, Feng-Lin; Wu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The short isoform of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF5 is known as TIM, which plays diverse roles in, for example, tumorigenesis, neuronal development and Src-induced podosome formation through the activation of its substrates, the Rho family of GTPases. The activation is auto-inhibited by a putative helix N-terminal to the DH domain of TIM, which is stabilized by the intramolecular interaction of C-terminal SH3 domain with a poly-proline sequence between the putative helix and the DH domain. In this study, we systematically investigated the structural basis, energetic landscape and biological implication underlying TIM auto-inhibition by using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy analysis. The computational study revealed that the binding of SH3 domain to poly-proline sequence is the prerequisite for the stabilization of TIM auto-inhibition. Thus, it is suggested that targeting SH3 domain with competitors of the poly-proline sequence would be a promising strategy to relieve the auto-inhibitory state of TIM. In this consideration, we rationally designed a number of peptide aptamers for competitively inhibiting the SH3 domain based on modeled TIM structure and computationally generated data. Peptide binding test and guanine nucleotide exchange analysis solidified that these designed peptides can both bind to the SH3 domain potently and activate TIM-catalyzed RhoA exchange reaction effectively. Interestingly, a positive correlation between the peptide affinity and induced exchange activity was observed. In addition, separate mutation of three conserved residues Pro49, Pro52 and Lys54 - they are required for peptide recognition by SH3 domain -- in a designed peptide to Ala would completely abolish the capability of this peptide activating TIM. All these come together to suggest an intrinsic relationship between peptide binding to SH3 domain and the activation of TIM.

  8. Enhancement of hERG channel activity by scFv antibody fragments targeted to the PAS domain

    PubMed Central

    Harley, Carol A.; Starek, Greg; Jones, David K.; Fernandes, Andreia S.; Robertson, Gail A.; Morais-Cabral, João H.

    2016-01-01

    The human human ether-à-go-go–related gene (hERG) potassium channel plays a critical role in the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. Changes in hERG channel function underlie long QT syndrome (LQTS) and are associated with cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death. A striking feature of this channel and KCNH channels in general is the presence of an N-terminal Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain. In other proteins, PAS domains bind ligands and modulate effector domains. However, the PAS domains of KCNH channels are orphan receptors. We have uncovered a family of positive modulators of hERG that specifically bind to the PAS domain. We generated two single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) that recognize different epitopes on the PAS domain. Both antibodies increase the rate of deactivation but have different effects on channel activation and inactivation. Importantly, we show that both antibodies, on binding to the PAS domain, increase the total amount of current that permeates the channel during a ventricular action potential and significantly reduce the action potential duration recorded in human cardiomyocytes. Overall, these molecules constitute a previously unidentified class of positive modulators and establish that allosteric modulation of hERG channel function through ligand binding to the PAS domain can be attained. PMID:27516548

  9. Kinase Associated-1 Domains Drive MARK/PAR1 Kinases to Membrane Targets by Binding Acidic Phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Slochower, David; Janmey, Paul A.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2011-09-28

    Phospholipid-binding modules such as PH, C1, and C2 domains play crucial roles in location-dependent regulation of many protein kinases. Here, we identify the KA1 domain (kinase associated-1 domain), found at the C terminus of yeast septin-associated kinases (Kcc4p, Gin4p, and Hsl1p) and human MARK/PAR1 kinases, as a membrane association domain that binds acidic phospholipids. Membrane localization of isolated KA1 domains depends on phosphatidylserine. Using X-ray crystallography, we identified a structurally conserved binding site for anionic phospholipids in KA1 domains from Kcc4p and MARK1. Mutating this site impairs membrane association of both KA1 domains and intact proteins and reveals the importance of phosphatidylserine for bud neck localization of yeast Kcc4p. Our data suggest that KA1 domains contribute to coincidence detection, allowing kinases to bind other regulators (such as septins) only at the membrane surface. These findings have important implications for understanding MARK/PAR1 kinases, which are implicated in Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and autism.

  10. The C-terminal cytidine deaminase domain of APOBEC3G itself undergoes intersegmental transfer for a target search, as revealed by real-time NMR monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kamba, Keisuke; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2017-09-14

    APOBEC3G (A3G), an anti-human immunodeficiency virus 1 factor, deaminates cytidines. We examined deamination of two cytidines located separately on substrate ssDNA by the C-terminal domain (CTD) of A3G using real-time NMR monitoring. The deamination preference between the two cytidines was lost when either the substrate or non-substrate ssDNA concentration increased. When the non-substrate ssDNA concentration increased, the deamination activity first increased, but then decreased. This indicates that even a single domain, A3G-CTD, undergoes intersegmental transfer for a target search.

  11. A synthetic peptide targeting the BH4 domain of Bcl-2 induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma and follicular lymphoma cells alone or in combination with agents targeting the BH3-binding pocket of Bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Lavik, Andrew R; Zhong, Fei; Chang, Ming-Jin; Greenberg, Edward; Choudhary, Yuvraj; Smith, Mitchell R; McColl, Karen S; Pink, John; Reu, Frederic J; Matsuyama, Shigemi; Distelhorst, Clark W

    2015-09-29

    Bcl-2 inhibits apoptosis by two distinct mechanisms but only one is targeted to treat Bcl-2-positive malignancies. In this mechanism, the BH1-3 domains of Bcl-2 form a hydrophobic pocket, binding and inhibiting pro-apoptotic proteins, including Bim. In the other mechanism, the BH4 domain mediates interaction of Bcl-2 with inositol 1,4, 5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs), inhibiting pro-apoptotic Ca2+ signals. The current anti-Bcl-2 agents, ABT-263 (Navitoclax) and ABT-199 (Venetoclax), induce apoptosis by displacing pro-apoptotic proteins from the hydrophobic pocket, but do not inhibit Bcl-2-IP3R interaction. Therefore, to target this interaction we developed BIRD-2 (Bcl-2 IP3 Receptor Disruptor-2), a decoy peptide that binds to the BH4 domain, blocking Bcl-2-IP3R interaction and thus inducing Ca2+-mediated apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, multiple myeloma, and follicular lymphoma cells, including cells resistant to ABT-263, ABT-199, or the Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor Ibrutinib. Moreover, combining BIRD-2 with ABT-263 or ABT-199 enhances apoptosis induction compared to single agent treatment. Overall, these findings provide strong rationale for developing novel therapeutic agents that mimic the action of BIRD-2 in targeting the BH4 domain of Bcl-2 and disrupting Bcl-2-IP3R interaction.

  12. Pleckstrin Homology Domain of Akt Kinase: A Proof of Principle for Highly Specific and Effective Non-Enzymatic Anti-Cancer Target

    PubMed Central

    Joh, Eun-Ha; Hollenbaugh, Joseph A.; Kim, Baek; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    While pharmacological inhibition of Akt kinase has been regarded as a promising anti-cancer strategy, most of the Akt inhibitors that have been developed are enzymatic inhibitors that target the kinase active site of Akt. Another key cellular regulatory event for Akt activation is the translocation of Akt kinase to the cell membrane from the cytoplasm, which is accomplished through the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of Akt. However, compounds specifically interacting with the PH domain of Akt to inhibit Akt activation are currently limited. Here we identified a compound, lancemaside A (LAN-A), which specifically binds to the PH domain of Akt kinase. First, our mass spectra analysis of cellular Akt kinase isolated from cells treated with LAN-A revealed that LAN-A specifically binds to the PH domain of cellular Akt kinase. Second, we observed that LAN-A inhibits the translocation of Akt kinase to the membrane and thus Akt activation, as examined by the phosphorylation of various downstream targets of Akt such as GSK3β, mTOR and BAD. Third, in a co-cultured cell model containing human lung epithelial cancer cells (A549) and normal human primary lung fibroblasts, LAN-A specifically restricts the growth of the A549 cells. LAN-A also displayed anti-proliferative effects on various human cancer cell lines. Finally, in the A549-luciferase mouse transplant model, LAN-A effectively inhibited A549 cell growth with little evident cytotoxicity. Indeed, the therapeutic index of LAN-A in this mouse model was >250, supporting that LAN-A is a potential lead compound for PH domain targeting as a safe anti-cancer Akt inhibitor. PMID:23189201

  13. Identification of Novel Molecular Targets for Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domains Found in Oncogenes Implicated in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    simply two free phosphate groups of unliganded DAPP1 PH (DiNitto et al, 2003)). As phosphate groups on the inositol head group are the major PH domain...weakly (ə µM). To identify which phosphoinositide determinants (i.e. inositol phosphates ring moieties, the glycerol moiety or nearby acyl chains...are involved in PH domain binding, I performed SPR lipid competition studies, preincubating inositol headgroups/phosphoinositide constructs of

  14. An antigenic domain within a catalytically active Leishmania infantum nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase 1) is a target of inhibitory antibodies.

    PubMed

    Maia, Ana Carolina Ribeiro Gomes; Porcino, Gabriane Nascimento; Detoni, Michelle de Lima; Emídio, Nayara Braga; Marconato, Danielle Gomes; Faria-Pinto, Priscila; Fessel, Melissa Regina; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Juliano, Luiz; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Marques, Marcos José; Vasconcelos, Eveline Gomes

    2013-02-01

    We identified a shared B domain within nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases) of plants and parasites. Now, an NTPDase activity not affected by inhibitors of adenylate kinase and ATPases was detected in Leishmania infantum promastigotes. By non-denaturing gel electrophoresis of detergent-homogenized promastigote preparation, an active band hydrolyzing nucleosides di- and triphosphate was visualized and, following SDS-PAGE and silver staining was identified as a single polypeptide of 50kDa. By Western blots, it was recognized by immune sera raised against potato apyrase (SA), r-pot B domain (SB), a recombinant polypeptide derived from the potato apyrase, and LbB1LJ (SC) or LbB2LJ (SD), synthetic peptides derived from the Leishmania NTPDase 1, and by serum samples from dogs with visceral leishmaniasis, identifying the antigenic L. infantum NTPDase 1 and, also, its conserved B domain (r83-122). By immunoprecipitation assays and Western blots, immune sera SA and SB identified the catalytically active NTPDase 1 in promastigote preparation. In addition, the immune sera SB (44%) and SC or SD (87-99%) inhibited its activity, suggesting a direct effect on the B domain. By ELISA, 37%, 45% or 50% of 38 infected dogs were seropositive for r-pot B domain, LbB1LJ and LbB2LJ, respectively, confirming the B domain antigenicity.

  15. A novel bispecific peptide HIV-1 fusion inhibitor targeting the N-terminal heptad repeat and fusion peptide domains in gp41.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xifeng; Jia, Qiyan; Lu, Lu; Yu, Fei; Zheng, Jishen; Shi, Weiguo; Cai, Lifeng; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Keliang

    2016-12-01

    HIV-1 fusion with the target cell is initiated by the insertion of the gp41 fusion peptide (FP) into the target cell membrane and the interaction between the gp41 N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR), followed by the formation of the six-helix bundle (6-HB) fusion core. Therefore, both FP and NHR are important targets for HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Here, we designed and synthesized a dual-target peptidic HIV-1 fusion inhibitor, 4HR-LBD-VIRIP, in which 4HR-LBD is able to bind to the gp41 NHR domain, while VIRIP is able to interact with gp41 FP. We found that 4HR-LBD-VIRIP is about tenfold more potent than 4HR-LBD and VIRIP in inhibiting HIV-1IIIB infection and HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env)-mediated cell-cell fusion, suggesting that this dual-target HIV-1 fusion inhibitor possesses a strong synergistic antiviral effect. A biophysical analysis indicates that 4HR-LBD-VIRIP can interact with N70 peptide that contains the gp41 NHR and FP domains and binds with lipid membrane. This study provides a new approach for designing novel viral fusion inhibitors against HIV and other enveloped viruses with class I membrane fusion proteins.

  16. Conserved themes in target recognition by the PAH1 and PAH2 domains of the Sin3 transcriptional corepressor.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Sarata C; Swanson, Kurt A; Kang, Richard S; Huang, Kai; Brubaker, Kurt; Ratcliff, Kathleen; Radhakrishnan, Ishwar

    2008-02-01

    The recruitment of chromatin-modifying coregulator complexes by transcription factors to specific sites of the genome constitutes an important step in many eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory pathways. The histone deacetylase-associated Sin3 corepressor complex is recruited by a large and diverse array of transcription factors through direct interactions with the N-terminal PAH domains of Sin3. Here, we describe the solution structures of the mSin3A PAH1 domain in the apo form and when bound to SAP25, a component of the corepressor complex. Unlike the apo-mSin3A PAH2 domain, the apo-PAH1 domain is conformationally pure and is largely, but not completely, folded. Portions of the interacting segments of both mSin3A PAH1 and SAP25 undergo folding upon complex formation. SAP25 binds through an amphipathic helix to a predominantly hydrophobic cleft on the surface of PAH1. Remarkably, the orientation of the helix is reversed compared to that adopted by NRSF, a transcription factor unrelated to SAP25, upon binding to the mSin3B PAH1 domain. The reversal in helical orientations is correlated with a reversal in the underlying PAH1-interaction motifs, echoing a theme previously described for the mSin3A PAH2 domain. The definition of these so-called type I and type II PAH1-interaction motifs has allowed us to predict the precise location of these motifs within previously experimentally characterized PAH1 binders. Finally, we explore the specificity determinants of protein-protein interactions involving the PAH1 and PAH2 domains. These studies reveal that even conservative replacements of PAH2 residues with equivalent PAH1 residues are sufficient to alter the affinity and specificity of these protein-protein interactions dramatically.

  17. FERM Domain Phosphoinositide Binding Targets Merlin to the Membrane and Is Essential for Its Growth-Suppressive Function ▿

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Timmy; Hennigan, Robert F.; Foster, Lauren A.; Conrady, Deborah G.; Herr, Andrew B.; Ip, Wallace

    2011-01-01

    The neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor suppressor protein, merlin, is related to the ERM (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) family of plasma membrane-actin cytoskeleton linkers. For ezrin, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) binding to the amino-terminal FERM domain is required for its conformational activation, proper subcellular localization, and function, but less is known about the role of phosphoinositide binding for merlin. Current evidence indicates that association with the membrane is important for merlin to function as a growth regulator; however, the mechanisms by which merlin localizes to the membrane are less clear. Here, we report that merlin binds phosphoinositides, including PIP2, via a conserved binding motif in its FERM domain. Abolition of FERM domain-mediated phosphoinositide binding of merlin displaces merlin from the membrane and releases it into the cytosol without altering the folding of merlin. Importantly, a merlin protein whose FERM domain cannot bind phosphoinositide is defective in growth suppression. Retargeting the mutant merlin into the membrane using a dual-acylated amino-terminal decapeptide from Fyn is sufficient to restore the growth-suppressive properties to the mutant merlin. Thus, FERM domain-mediated phosphoinositide binding and membrane association are critical for the growth-regulatory function of merlin. PMID:21402777

  18. Structure-based identification of CaMKIIα-interacting MUPP1 PDZ domains and rational design of peptide ligands to target such interaction in human fertilization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Le; Han, Zhao-Feng; Sun, Ying-Pu

    2016-06-01

    The recognition and association between Ca(2+)/calmodulin-activated protein kinase II-α (CaMKIIα) and multi-PDZ domain protein 1 (MUPP1) plays an important role in sperm acrosome reaction and human fertilization, which is mediated by the binding of CaMKIIα's C-terminal tail to one or more PDZ domains of the scaffolding protein MUPP1. In this study, we attempt to identify the CaMKIIα-interacting MUPP1 PDZ domains and to design peptide ligands that can potently target and then competitively disrupt such interaction. Here, a synthetic biology approach was proposed to systematically characterize the structural basis, energetic property, dynamic behavior and biological implication underlying the intermolecular interactions between the C-terminal peptide of CaMKIIα and all the 13 PDZ domains of MUPP1. These domains can be grouped into four clusters in terms of their sequence, structure and physiochemical profile; different clusters appear to recognize different classes of PDZ-binding motifs. The cluster 3 includes two members, i.e. MUPP1 PDZ 5 and 11 domains, which were suggested to bind class II motif Φ-X-Φ(-COOH) of the C-terminal peptide SGAPSV(-COOH) of CaMKIIα. Subsequently, the two domains were experimentally measured as the moderate- and high-affinity binders of the peptide by using fluorescence titration (dissociation constants K d = 25.2 ± 4.6 and 0.47 ± 0.08 µM for peptide binding to PDZ 5 and 11, respectively), which was in line with theoretical prediction (binding free energies ΔG total = -7.6 and -9.2 kcal/mol for peptide binding to PDZ 5 and 11, respectively). A systematic mutation of SGAPSV(-COOH) residues suggested few favorable amino acids at different residue positions of the peptide, which were then combined to generate a number of potent peptide mutants for PDZ 11 domain. Consequently, two peptides (SIAPNV(-COOH) and SIVMNV(-COOH)) were identified to have considerably improved affinity with K d increase by ~tenfold relative to

  19. Finding a Needle in a Haystack: The Role of Electrostatics in Target Lipid Recognition by PH Domains

    PubMed Central

    Lumb, Craig N.; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between protein domains and lipid molecules play key roles in controlling cell membrane signalling and trafficking. The pleckstrin homology (PH) domain is one of the most widespread, binding specifically to phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs) in cell membranes. PH domains must locate specific PIPs in the presence of a background of approximately 20% anionic lipids within the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. We investigate the mechanism of such recognition via a multiscale procedure combining Brownian dynamics (BD) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the GRP1 PH domain interacting with phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5)P3). The interaction of GRP1-PH with PI(3,4,5)P3 in a zwitterionic bilayer is compared with the interaction in bilayers containing different levels of anionic ‘decoy’ lipids. BD simulations reveal both translational and orientational electrostatic steering of the PH domain towards the PI(3,4,5)P3-containing anionic bilayer surface. There is a payoff between non-PIP anionic lipids attracting the PH domain to the bilayer surface in a favourable orientation and their role as ‘decoys’, disrupting the interaction of GRP1-PH with the PI(3,4,5)P3 molecule. Significantly, approximately 20% anionic lipid in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the bilayer is nearly optimal to both enhance orientational steering and to localise GRP1-PH proximal to the surface of the membrane without sacrificing its ability to locate PI(3,4,5)P3 within the bilayer plane. Subsequent MD simulations reveal binding to PI(3,4,5)P3, forming protein-phosphate contacts comparable to those in X-ray structures. These studies demonstrate a computational framework which addresses lipid recognition within a cell membrane environment, offering a link between structural and cell biological characterisation. PMID:22844242

  20. Protein Kinase Activity and Identification of a Toxic Effector Domain of the Target of Rapamycin TOR Proteins in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Alarcon, Clara M.; Heitman, Joseph; Cardenas, Maria E.

    1999-01-01

    In complex with FKBP12, the immunosuppressant rapamycin binds to and inhibits the yeast TOR1 and TOR2 proteins and the mammalian homologue mTOR/FRAP/RAFT1. The TOR proteins promote cell cycle progression in yeast and human cells by regulating translation and polarization of the actin cytoskeleton. A C-terminal domain of the TOR proteins shares identity with protein and lipid kinases, but only one substrate (PHAS-I), and no regulators of the TOR-signaling cascade have been identified. We report here that yeast TOR1 has an intrinsic protein kinase activity capable of phosphorylating PHAS-1, and this activity is abolished by an active site mutation and inhibited by FKBP12-rapamycin or wortmannin. We find that an intact TOR1 kinase domain is essential for TOR1 functions in yeast. Overexpression of a TOR1 kinase-inactive mutant, or of a central region of the TOR proteins distinct from the FRB and kinase domains, was toxic in yeast, and overexpression of wild-type TOR1 suppressed this toxic effect. Expression of the TOR-toxic domain leads to a G1 cell cycle arrest, consistent with an inhibition of TOR function in translation. Overexpression of the PLC1 gene, which encodes the yeast phospholipase C homologue, suppressed growth inhibition by the TOR-toxic domains. In conclusion, our findings identify a toxic effector domain of the TOR proteins that may interact with substrates or regulators of the TOR kinase cascade and that shares sequence identity with other PIK family members, including ATR, Rad3, Mei-41, and ATM. PMID:10436010

  1. Essential Role of the EF-hand Domain in Targeting Sperm Phospholipase Cζ to Membrane Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate (PIP2)*

    PubMed Central

    Nomikos, Michail; Sanders, Jessica R.; Parthimos, Dimitris; Buntwal, Luke; Calver, Brian L.; Stamatiadis, Panagiotis; Smith, Adrian; Clue, Matthew; Sideratou, Zili; Swann, Karl; Lai, F. Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Sperm-specific phospholipase C-ζ (PLCζ) is widely considered to be the physiological stimulus that triggers intracellular Ca2+ oscillations and egg activation during mammalian fertilization. Although PLCζ is structurally similar to PLCδ1, it lacks a pleckstrin homology domain, and it remains unclear how PLCζ targets its phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) membrane substrate. Recently, the PLCδ1 EF-hand domain was shown to bind to anionic phospholipids through a number of cationic residues, suggesting a potential mechanism for how PLCs might interact with their target membranes. Those critical cationic EF-hand residues in PLCδ1 are notably conserved in PLCζ. We investigated the potential role of these conserved cationic residues in PLCζ by generating a series of mutants that sequentially neutralized three positively charged residues (Lys-49, Lys-53, and Arg-57) within the mouse PLCζ EF-hand domain. Microinjection of the PLCζ EF-hand mutants into mouse eggs enabled their Ca2+ oscillation inducing activities to be compared with wild-type PLCζ. Furthermore, the mutant proteins were purified, and the in vitro PIP2 hydrolysis and binding properties were monitored. Our analysis suggests that PLCζ binds significantly to PIP2, but not to phosphatidic acid or phosphatidylserine, and that sequential reduction of the net positive charge within the first EF-hand domain of PLCζ significantly alters in vivo Ca2+ oscillation inducing activity and in vitro interaction with PIP2 without affecting its Ca2+ sensitivity. Our findings are consistent with theoretical predictions provided by a mathematical model that links oocyte Ca2+ frequency and the binding ability of different PLCζ mutants to PIP2. Moreover, a PLCζ mutant with mutations in the cationic residues within the first EF-hand domain and the XY linker region dramatically reduces the binding of PLCζ to PIP2, leading to complete abolishment of its Ca2+ oscillation inducing activity. PMID:26429913

  2. Long-range repression by multiple polycomb group (PcG) proteins targeted by fusion to a defined DNA-binding domain in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Roseman, R R; Morgan, K; Mallin, D R; Roberson, R; Parnell, T J; Bornemann, D J; Simon, J A; Geyer, P K

    2001-01-01

    A tethering assay was developed to study the effects of Polycomb group (PcG) proteins on gene expression in vivo. This system employed the Su(Hw) DNA-binding domain (ZnF) to direct PcG proteins to transposons that carried the white and yellow reporter genes. These reporters constituted naive sensors of PcG effects, as bona fide PcG response elements (PREs) were absent from the constructs. To assess the effects of different genomic environments, reporter transposons integrated at nearly 40 chromosomal sites were analyzed. Three PcG fusion proteins, ZnF-PC, ZnF-SCM, and ZnF-ESC, were studied, since biochemical analyses place these PcG proteins in distinct complexes. Tethered ZnF-PcG proteins repressed white and yellow expression at the majority of sites tested, with each fusion protein displaying a characteristic degree of silencing. Repression by ZnF-PC was stronger than ZnF-SCM, which was stronger than ZnF-ESC, as judged by the percentage of insertion lines affected and the magnitude of the conferred repression. ZnF-PcG repression was more effective at centric and telomeric reporter insertion sites, as compared to euchromatic sites. ZnF-PcG proteins tethered as far as 3.0 kb away from the target promoter produced silencing, indicating that these effects were long range. Repression by ZnF-SCM required a protein interaction domain, the SPM domain, which suggests that this domain is not primarily used to direct SCM to chromosomal loci. This targeting system is useful for studying protein domains and mechanisms involved in PcG repression in vivo. PMID:11333237

  3. Two independent targeting signals in the cytoplasmic domain determine trans-Golgi network localization and endosomal trafficking of the proprotein convertase furin.

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, W; Stroh, A; Berghöfer, S; Seiler, J; Vey, M; Kruse, M L; Kern, H F; Klenk, H D; Garten, W

    1995-01-01

    Furin, a subtilisin-like eukaryotic endoprotease, is responsible for proteolytic cleavage of cellular and viral proteins transported via the constitutive secretory pathway. Cleavage occurs at the C-terminus of basic amino acid sequences, such as R-X-K/R-R and R-X-X-R. Furin was found predominantly in the trans-Golgi network (TGN), but also in clathrin-coated vesicles dispatched from the TGN, on the plasma membrane as an integral membrane protein and in the medium as an anchorless enzyme. When furin was vectorially expressed in normal rat kidney (NRK) cells it accumulated in the TGN similarly to the endogenous glycoprotein TGN38, often used as a TGN marker protein. The signals determining TGN targeting of furin were investigated by mutational analysis of the cytoplasmic tail of furin and by using the hemagglutinin (HA) of fowl plague virus, a protein with cell surface destination, as a reporter molecule, in which membrane anchor and cytoplasmic tail were replaced by the respective domains of furin. The membrane-spanning domain of furin grafted to HA does not localize the chimeric molecule to the TGN, whereas the cytoplasmic domain does. Results obtained on furin mutants with substitutions and deletions of amino acids in the cytoplasmic tail indicate that wild-type furin is concentrated in the TGN by a mechanism involving two independent targeting signals, which consist of the acidic peptide CPSDSEEDEG783 and the tetrapeptide YKGL765. The acidic signal in the cytoplasmic domain of a HA-furin chimera is necessary and sufficient to localize the reporter molecule to the TGN, whereas YKGL is a determinant for targeting to the endosomes. The data support the concept that the acidic signal, which is the dominant one, retains furin in the TGN, whereas the YKGL motif acts as a retrieval signal for furin that has escaped to the cell surface. Images PMID:7781597

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Assessment of Targeting Lipid-based Nanoparticles to the Epidermal Growth Factor-Receptor (EGFR) Using a Novel Heptameric ZEGFR Domain

    PubMed Central

    Benhabbour, S. Rahima; Luft, J. Christopher; Kim, Dongwook; Jain, Anekant; Wadhwa, Saurabh; Parrott, Matthew C.; Liu, Rihe; DeSimone, Joseph; Mumper, Russell J.

    2011-01-01

    Lipid-based oil-filled nanoparticles (NPs) with a high concentration of surface-chelated nickel (Ni-NPs) were successfully prepared using a Brij78-NTA-Ni conjugate synthesized with Brij 78 (Polyoxyethylene (20) stearyl ether) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA). The facile incorporation of the Brij 78-NTA-Ni conjugate into the NP formulation allowed up to 90% Ni incorporation, which was a significant improvement over the previously used standard agent DOGS-NTA-Ni which led to ~6% Ni incorporation. The Ni-NPs were targeted to the highly epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-overexpressing epidermoid carcinoma cells A431. This was accomplished using a novel high affinity histidine×6-tagged EGFR-binding Z domain (heptameric ZEGFR domain). In vitro cell uptake studies showed enhanced internalization (up to 90%) of the targeted Ni-NPs in A431 cells with only ≤10% internalization of the of untargeted Ni-NPs. ICP-MS analysis used to quantify the amount of Ni in the cells were in close agreement with flow cytometry studies, which showed a dose dependent increase in the amount of Ni with the targeted Ni-NPs. Cell uptake competition studies showed that internalization of the targeted Ni-NPs within the cells was competed off with free heptameric ZEGFR domain at concentrations of 8.75 ng/mL or higher. In vivo studies were carried out in nude mice bearing A431 tumors to determine the biodistribution and intracellular delivery. Near Infrared (NIR) optical imaging studies using Alexa750-labeled heptameric ZEGFR domain showed localization of 19% of the total detected fluorescence intensity in the tumor tissue, 28% in the liver and 42% in the kidneys 16 h post i.v. injection. ICP-MS analysis showed almost a two-fold increase in the amount of intracellular Ni with the targeted Ni-NPs. These new Ni-NPs could be a very useful tool for targeting and drug delivery to a wide range of EGFR positive cancers. PMID:22037106

  5. Crystal Structure of Human Profilaggrin S100 Domain and Identification of Target Proteins Annexin II, Stratifin, and HSP27.

    PubMed

    Bunick, Christopher G; Presland, Richard B; Lawrence, Owen T; Pearton, David J; Milstone, Leonard M; Steitz, Thomas A

    2015-07-01

    The fused-type S100 protein profilaggrin and its proteolytic products including filaggrin are important in the formation of a normal epidermal barrier; however, the specific function of the S100 calcium-binding domain in profilaggrin biology is poorly understood. To explore its molecular function, we determined a 2.2 Å-resolution crystal structure of the N-terminal fused-type S100 domain of human profilaggrin with bound calcium ions. The profilaggrin S100 domain formed a stable dimer, which contained two hydrophobic pockets that provide a molecular interface for protein interactions. Biochemical and molecular approaches demonstrated that three proteins, annexin II/p36, stratifin/14-3-3 sigma, and heat shock protein 27, bind to the N-terminal domain of human profilaggrin; one protein (stratifin) co-localized with profilaggrin in the differentiating granular cell layer of human skin. Together, these findings suggest a model where the profilaggrin N-terminus uses calcium-dependent and calcium-independent protein-protein interactions to regulate its involvement in keratinocyte terminal differentiation and incorporation into the cornified cell envelope.

  6. Binding specificity and in vivo targets of the EH domain, a novel protein–protein interaction module

    PubMed Central

    Salcini, Anna Elisabetta; Confalonieri, Stefano; Doria, Margherita; Santolini, Elisa; Tassi, Elena; Minenkova, Olga; Cesareni, Gianni; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo

    1997-01-01

    EH is a recently identified protein–protein interaction domain found in the signal transducers Eps15 and Eps15R and several other proteins of yeast nematode. We show that EH domains from Eps15 and Eps15R bind in vitro to peptides containing an asparagine–proline–phenylalanine (NPF) motif. Direct screening of expression libraries with EH domains yielded a number of putative EH interactors, all of which possessed NPF motifs that were shown to be responsible for the interaction. Among these interactors were the human homolog of NUMB, a developmentally reguated gene of Drosophila, and RAB, the cellular cofactor of the HIV REV protein. We demonstrated coimmunoprecipitation of Eps15 with NUMB and RAB. Finally, in vitro binding of NPF-containing peptides to cellular proteins and EST database screening established the existence of a family of EH-containing proteins in mammals. Based on the characteristics of EH-containing and EH-binding proteins, we propose that EH domains are involved in processes connected with the transport and sorting of molecules within the cell. PMID:9303539

  7. A parallel panning scheme used for selection of a GluA4-specific Fab targeting the ligand-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Rasmus P; Mohr, Andreas Ø; Riise, Erik; Jensen, Anders A; Gill, Avinash; Madden, Dean R; Kastrup, Jette S; Skottrup, Peter D

    2016-11-01

    A method for development of murine Fab fragments towards extracellular domains of a surface receptor is presented. The GluA4 ionotropic glutamate receptor is used as a model system. Recombinant GluA4 ectodomain comprising both the N-terminal domain (NTD) and the ligand-binding domain (LBD) in one molecule was used for immunization. A Fab-phage library was constructed and a parallel panning approach enabled selection of murine Fab fragments towards either intact ectodomain or the isolated LBD of the GluA4 receptor. One LBD-Fab (FabL9) showed exclusive selectivity for the GluA4 LBD, over a panel of LBDs from GluA2, GluK1, GluK2 and GluD2. Soluble FabL9 was produced in amounts suitable for characterization. Competitive ELISA and rat-brain immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that the FabL9 epitope is conserved in the LBD and in the intact native receptor. By an alignment of GluA2 and GluA4, the likely binding epitope for FabL9 was predicted. This study demonstrates a simple approach for development of antibody fragments towards specific sub-domains of a large ligand-gated ion channel, and this method could be utilized for all multi-domain surface receptors where antibody domain-selectivity may be desirable. Furthermore, we present for the first time a GluA4 subtype-specific murine Fab fragment targeting the LBD of the receptor.

  8. Adenovirus E4-ORF3 Targets PIAS3 and Together with E1B-55K Remodels SUMO Interactions in the Nucleus and at Virus Genome Replication Domains.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Jennifer M; O'Shea, Clodagh C

    2015-10-01

    Adenovirus E4-ORF3 and E1B-55K converge in subverting critical overlapping cellular pathways to facilitate virus replication. Here, we show that E1B-55K and E4-ORF3 induce sumoylation and the assembly of SUMO2/3 viral genome replication domains. Using a conjugation-deficient SUMO2 construct, we demonstrate that SUMO2/3 is recruited to E2A viral genome replication domains through noncovalent interactions. E1B-55K and E4-ORF3 have critical functions in inactivating MRN and ATM to facilitate viral genome replication. We show that ATM kinase inhibitors rescue ΔE1B-55K/ΔE4-ORF3 viral genome replication and that the assembly of E2A domains recruits SUMO2/3 independently of E1B-55K and E4-ORF3. However, the morphology and organization of SUMO2/3-associated E2A domains is strikingly different from that in wild-type Ad5-infected cells. These data reveal that E1B-55K and E4-ORF3 specify the nuclear compartmentalization and structure of SUMO2/3-associated E2A domains, which could have important functions in viral replication. We show that E4-ORF3 specifically targets and sequesters the cellular E3 SUMO ligase PIAS3 but not PIAS1, PIAS2, or PIAS4. The assembly of E4-ORF3 into a multivalent nuclear matrix is required to target PIAS3. In contrast to MRN, PIAS3 is targeted by E4-ORF3 proteins from disparate adenovirus subgroups. Our studies reveal that PIAS3 is a novel and evolutionarily conserved target of E4-ORF3 in human adenovirus infections. Furthermore, we reveal that viral proteins not only disrupt but also usurp SUMO2/3 to transform the nucleus and assemble novel genomic domains that could facilitate pathological viral replication. SUMO is a key posttranslational modification that modulates the function, localization, and assembly of protein complexes. In the ever-escalating host-pathogen arms race, viruses have evolved strategies to subvert sumoylation. Adenovirus is a small DNA tumor virus that is a global human pathogen and key biomedical agent in basic research and

  9. Adenovirus E4-ORF3 Targets PIAS3 and Together with E1B-55K Remodels SUMO Interactions in the Nucleus and at Virus Genome Replication Domains

    PubMed Central

    Higginbotham, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenovirus E4-ORF3 and E1B-55K converge in subverting critical overlapping cellular pathways to facilitate virus replication. Here, we show that E1B-55K and E4-ORF3 induce sumoylation and the assembly of SUMO2/3 viral genome replication domains. Using a conjugation-deficient SUMO2 construct, we demonstrate that SUMO2/3 is recruited to E2A viral genome replication domains through noncovalent interactions. E1B-55K and E4-ORF3 have critical functions in inactivating MRN and ATM to facilitate viral genome replication. We show that ATM kinase inhibitors rescue ΔE1B-55K/ΔE4-ORF3 viral genome replication and that the assembly of E2A domains recruits SUMO2/3 independently of E1B-55K and E4-ORF3. However, the morphology and organization of SUMO2/3-associated E2A domains is strikingly different from that in wild-type Ad5-infected cells. These data reveal that E1B-55K and E4-ORF3 specify the nuclear compartmentalization and structure of SUMO2/3-associated E2A domains, which could have important functions in viral replication. We show that E4-ORF3 specifically targets and sequesters the cellular E3 SUMO ligase PIAS3 but not PIAS1, PIAS2, or PIAS4. The assembly of E4-ORF3 into a multivalent nuclear matrix is required to target PIAS3. In contrast to MRN, PIAS3 is targeted by E4-ORF3 proteins from disparate adenovirus subgroups. Our studies reveal that PIAS3 is a novel and evolutionarily conserved target of E4-ORF3 in human adenovirus infections. Furthermore, we reveal that viral proteins not only disrupt but also usurp SUMO2/3 to transform the nucleus and assemble novel genomic domains that could facilitate pathological viral replication. IMPORTANCE SUMO is a key posttranslational modification that modulates the function, localization, and assembly of protein complexes. In the ever-escalating host-pathogen arms race, viruses have evolved strategies to subvert sumoylation. Adenovirus is a small DNA tumor virus that is a global human pathogen and key biomedical agent in

  10. Passive immunization targeting the N-terminal projection domain of tau decreases tau pathology and improves cognition in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease and tauopathies.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chun-ling; Chen, Xia; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2015-04-01

    Intraneuronal accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain is a histopathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and a family of related neurodegenerative disorders collectively called tauopathies. At present there is no effective treatment available for these progressive neurodegenerative diseases which are clinically characterized by dementia in mid to old-age. Here we report the treatment of 14-17-months-old 3xTg-AD mice with tau antibodies 43D (tau 6-18) and 77E9 (tau 184-195) to the N-terminal projection domain of tau or mouse IgG as a control by intraperitoneal injection once a week for 4 weeks, and the effects of the passive immunization on reduction of hyperphosphorylated tau, Aβ accumulation and cognitive performance in these animals. We found that treatment with tau antibodies 43D and 77E9 reduced total tau level, decreased tau hyperphosphorylated at Ser199, Ser202/Thr205 (AT8), Thr205, Ser262/356 (12E8), and Ser396/404 (PHF-1) sites, and a trend to reduce Aβ pathology. Most importantly, targeting N-terminal tau especially by 43D (tau 6-18) improved reference memory in the Morris water maze task in 3xTg-AD mice. We did not observe any abnormality in general physical characteristics of the treated animals with either of the two antibodies during the course of this study. Taken together, our studies demonstrate for the first time (1) that passive immunization targeting normal tau can effectively clear the hyperphosphorylated protein and possibly reduce Aβ pathology from the brain and (2) that targeting N-terminal projection domain of tau containing amino acid 6-18 is especially beneficial. Thus, targeting selective epitopes of N-terminal domain of tau may present a novel effective therapeutic opportunity for Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies.

  11. MZF-1/Elk-1 interaction domain as therapeutic target for protein kinase Cα-based triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Jen; Hsu, Li-Sung; Yue, Chia-Herng; Lin, Ho; Chiu, Yung-Wei; Lin, Yu-Yu; Huang, Chih-Yang; Hung, Mien-Chie; Liu, Jer-Yuh

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports demonstrate that the expression of protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) correlates with decreased survival outcomes. However, off-target effects of targeting PKCα and limited understanding of the signaling mechanisms upstream of PKCα have hampered previous efforts to manipulate this ubiquitous gene. This study shows that the expression of both myeloid zinc finger 1 (MZF-1) and Ets-like protein-1 (Elk-1) correlates with PKCα expression in TNBC. We found that the acidic domain of MZF-1 and the heparin-binding domain of Elk-1 facilitate the heterodimeric interaction between the two genes before the complex formation binds to the PKCα promoter. Blocking the formation of the heterodimer by transfection of MZF-160–72 or Elk-1145–157 peptide fragments at the MZF-1 / Elk-1 interface decreases DNA-binding activity of the MZF-1 / Elk-1 complex at the PKCα promoter. Subsequently, PKCα expression, migration, tumorigenicity, and the epithelial–mesenchymal transition potential of TNBC cells decrease. These subsequent effects are reversed by transfection with full-length PKCα, confirming that the MZF-1/Elk-1 heterodimer is a mediator of PKCα in TNBC cells. These data suggest that the next therapeutic strategy in treating PKCα-related cancer will be developed from blocking MZF-1/Elk-1 interaction through their binding domain. PMID:27542222

  12. MZF-1/Elk-1 interaction domain as therapeutic target for protein kinase Cα-based triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Jen; Hsu, Li-Sung; Yue, Chia-Herng; Lin, Ho; Chiu, Yung-Wei; Lin, Yu-Yu; Huang, Chih-Yang; Hung, Mien-Chie; Liu, Jer-Yuh

    2016-09-13

    Recent reports demonstrate that the expression of protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) correlates with decreased survival outcomes. However, off-target effects of targeting PKCα and limited understanding of the signaling mechanisms upstream of PKCα have hampered previous efforts to manipulate this ubiquitous gene. This study shows that the expression of both myeloid zinc finger 1 (MZF-1) and Ets-like protein-1 (Elk-1) correlates with PKCα expression in TNBC. We found that the acidic domain of MZF-1 and the heparin-binding domain of Elk-1 facilitate the heterodimeric interaction between the two genes before the complex formation binds to the PKCα promoter. Blocking the formation of the heterodimer by transfection of MZF-160-72 or Elk-1145-157 peptide fragments at the MZF-1 / Elk-1 interface decreases DNA-binding activity of the MZF-1 / Elk-1 complex at the PKCα promoter. Subsequently, PKCα expression, migration, tumorigenicity, and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition potential of TNBC cells decrease. These subsequent effects are reversed by transfection with full-length PKCα, confirming that the MZF-1/Elk-1 heterodimer is a mediator of PKCα in TNBC cells. These data suggest that the next therapeutic strategy in treating PKCα-related cancer will be developed from blocking MZF-1/Elk-1 interaction through their binding domain.

  13. Transcription factor Nrf1 is topologically repartitioned across membranes to enable target gene transactivation through its acidic glucose-responsive domains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiguo; Ren, Yonggang; Li, Shaojun; Hayes, John D

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-bound Nrf1 transcription factor regulates critical homeostatic and developmental genes. The conserved N-terminal homology box 1 (NHB1) sequence in Nrf1 targets the cap'n'collar (CNC) basic basic-region leucine zipper (bZIP) factor to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but it is unknown how its activity is controlled topologically within membranes. Herein, we report a hitherto unknown mechanism by which the transactivation activity of Nrf1 is controlled through its membrane-topology. Thus after Nrf1 is anchored within ER membranes, its acidic transactivation domains (TADs), including the Asn/Ser/Thr-rich (NST) glycodomain situated between acidic domain 1 (AD1) and AD2, are transiently translocated into the lumen of the ER, where NST is glycosylated in the presence of glucose to yield an inactive 120-kDa Nrf1 glycoprotein. Subsequently, portions of the TADs partially repartition across membranes into the cyto/nucleoplasmic compartments, whereupon an active 95-kDa form of Nrf1 accumulates, a process that is more obvious in glucose-deprived cells and may involve deglycosylation. The repartitioning of Nrf1 out of membranes is monitored within this protein by its acidic-hydrophobic amphipathic glucose-responsive domains, particularly the Neh5L subdomain within AD1. Therefore, the membrane-topological organization of Nrf1 dictates its post-translational modifications (i.e. glycosylation, the putative deglycosylation and selective proteolysis), which together control its ability to transactivate target genes.

  14. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the DNA-binding domain of the Ets transcription factor in complex with target DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Suwa, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Teruya; Toma, Sachiko; Ikemizu, Shinji; Kai, Hirofumi; Yamagata, Yuriko

    2008-03-01

    The complex between the Ets domain of Ets2 and its target DNA has been crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 3.0 Å resolution. The Ets2 transcription factor is a member of the Ets transcription-factor family. Ets2 plays a role in the malignancy of cancer and in Down’s syndrome by regulating the transcription of various genes. The DNA-binding domain of Ets2 (Ets domain; ETSD), which contains residues that are highly conserved among Ets transcription-factor family members, was expressed as a GST-fusion protein. The aggregation of ETSD produced after thrombin cleavage could be prevented by treatment with NDSB-195 (nondetergent sulfobetaine 195). ETSD was crystallized in complex with DNA containing the Ets2 target sequence (GGAA) by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The best crystals were grown using 25% PEG 3350, 80 mM magnesium acetate, 50 mM sodium cacodylate pH 5.0/5.5 as the reservoir at 293 K. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 85.89, b = 95.52, c = 71.89 Å, β = 101.7° and a V{sub M} value of 3.56 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 3.0 Å.

  15. Role of the N-terminal transmembrane domain in the endo-lysosomal targeting and function of the human ABCB6 protein

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Katalin; Kucsma, Nora; Brozik, Anna; Tusnady, Gabor E.; Bergam, Ptissam; vanNiel, Guillaume; Szakacs, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette, subfamily B (ABCB) 6 is a homodimeric ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter present in the plasma membrane and in the intracellular organelles. The intracellular localization of ABCB6 has been a matter of debate, as it has been suggested to reside in the mitochondria and the endo-lysosomal system. Using a variety of imaging modalities, including confocal microscopy and EM, we confirm the endo-lysosomal localization of ABCB6 and show that the protein is internalized from the plasma membrane through endocytosis, to be distributed to multivesicular bodies and lysosomes. In addition to the canonical nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) and transmembrane domain (TMD), ABCB6 contains a unique N-terminal TMD (TMD0), which does not show sequence homology to known proteins. We investigated the functional role of these domains through the molecular dissection of ABCB6. We find that the folding, dimerization, membrane insertion and ATP binding/hydrolysis of the core–ABCB6 complex devoid of TMD0 are preserved. However, in contrast with the full-length transporter, the core–ABCB6 construct is retained at the plasma membrane and does not appear in Rab5-positive endosomes. TMD0 is directly targeted to the lysosomes, without passage to the plasma membrane. Collectively, our results reveal that TMD0 represents an independently folding unit, which is dispensable for catalysis, but has a crucial role in the lysosomal targeting of ABCB6. PMID:25627919

  16. Time-domain Response of a Metal Detector to a Target Buried in Soil with Frequency-dependent Magnetic Susceptibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-06

    metallic sphere buried in a non-conducting soil half-space with frequency-dependent complex magnetic susceptibility. The sphere is chosen as a simple...prototype for the small metal parts in low-metal landmines, while soil with dispersive magnetic susceptibility is a good model for some soils that are...the frequency domain. Approximate theoretical expressions for weakly magnetic soils are found to fit the experimental data very well, which allowed the

  17. VERDANDI Is a Direct Target of the MADS Domain Ovule Identity Complex and Affects Embryo Sac Differentiation in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Matias-Hernandez, Luis; Battaglia, Raffaella; Galbiati, Francesca; Rubes, Marco; Eichenberger, Christof; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Kater, Martin M.; Colombo, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the three MADS box genes SEEDSTICK (STK), SHATTERPROOF1 (SHP1), and SHP2 redundantly regulate ovule development. Protein interaction studies have shown that a multimeric complex composed of the ovule identity proteins together with the SEPALLATA MADS domain proteins is necessary to determine ovule identity. Despite the extensive knowledge that has become available about these MADS domain transcription factors, little is known regarding the genes that they regulate. Here, we show that STK, SHP1, and SHP2 redundantly regulate VERDANDI (VDD), a putative transcription factor that belongs to the plant-specific B3 superfamily. The vdd mutant shows defects during the fertilization process resulting in semisterility. Analysis of the vdd mutant female gametophytes indicates that antipodal and synergid cell identity and/or differentiation are affected. Our results provide insights into the pathways regulated by the ovule identity factors and the role of the downstream target gene VDD in female gametophyte development. PMID:20581305

  18. The targeting of the atToc159 preprotein receptor to the chloroplast outer membrane is mediated by its GTPase domain and is regulated by GTP

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew D.; Hiltbrunner, Andreas; Kessler, Felix; Schnell, Danny J.

    2002-01-01

    The multimeric translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts (Toc) initiates the recognition and import of nuclear-encoded preproteins into chloroplasts. Two Toc GTPases, Toc159 and Toc33/34, mediate preprotein recognition and regulate preprotein translocation. Although these two proteins account for the requirement of GTP hydrolysis for import, the functional significance of GTP binding and hydrolysis by either GTPase has not been defined. A recent study indicates that Toc159 is equally distributed between a soluble cytoplasmic form and a membrane-inserted form, raising the possibility that it might cycle between the cytoplasm and chloroplast as a soluble preprotein receptor. In the present study, we examined the mechanism of targeting and insertion of the Arabidopsis thaliana orthologue of Toc159, atToc159, to chloroplasts. Targeting of atToc159 to the outer envelope membrane is strictly dependent only on guanine nucleotides. Although GTP is not required for initial binding, the productive insertion and assembly of atToc159 into the Toc complex requires its intrinsic GTPase activity. Targeting is mediated by direct binding between the GTPase domain of atToc159 and the homologous GTPase domain of atToc33, the Arabidopsis Toc33/34 orthologue. Our findings demonstrate a role for the coordinate action of the Toc GTPases in assembly of the functional Toc complex at the chloroplast outer envelope membrane. PMID:12473690

  19. Protein phosphatase PP1/GLC7 interaction domain in yeast eIF2γ bypasses targeting subunit requirement for eIF2α dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Margarito; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Dever, Thomas E

    2014-04-08

    Whereas the protein kinases GCN2, HRI, PKR, and PERK specifically phosphorylate eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) on Ser51 to regulate global and gene-specific mRNA translation, eIF2α is dephosphorylated by the broadly acting serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). In mammalian cells, the regulatory subunits GADD34 and CReP target PP1 to dephosphorylate eIF2α; however, as there are no homologs of these targeting subunits in yeast, it is unclear how GLC7, the functional homolog of PP1 in yeast, is recruited to dephosphorylate eIF2α. Here, we show that a novel N-terminal extension on yeast eIF2γ contains a PP1-binding motif (KKVAF) that enables eIF2γ to pull down GLC7 and target it to dephosphorylate eIF2α. Truncation or point mutations designed to eliminate the KKVAF motif in eIF2γ impair eIF2α dephosphorylation in vivo and in vitro and enhance expression of GCN4. Replacement of the N terminus of eIF2γ with the GLC7-binding domain from GAC1 or fusion of heterologous dimerization domains to eIF2γ and GLC7, respectively, maintained eIF2α phosphorylation at basal levels. Taken together, these results indicate that, in contrast to the paradigm of distinct PP1-targeting or regulatory subunits, the unique N terminus of yeast eIF2γ functions in cis to target GLC7 to dephosphorylate eIF2α.

  20. Modular elements of the TPR domain in the Mps1 N terminus differentially target Mps1 to the centrosome and kinetochore

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Joseph R.; Perkins, Jennifer L.; Beuoy, Kyle J.; Fisk, Harold A.

    2016-01-01

    Faithful segregation of chromosomes to two daughter cells is regulated by the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and the spindle assembly checkpoint, ensuring proper spindle function. Here we show that the proper localization of the kinase Mps1 (monopolar spindle 1) is critical to both these processes. Separate elements in the Mps1 N-terminal extension (NTE) and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains govern localization to either the kinetochore or the centrosome. The third TPR (TPR3) and the TPR-capping helix (C-helix) are each sufficient to target Mps1 to the centrosome. TPR3 binds to voltage-dependent anion channel 3, but although this is sufficient for centrosome targeting of Mps1, it is not necessary because of the presence of the C-helix. A version of Mps1 lacking both elements cannot localize to or function at the centrosome, but maintains kinetochore localization and spindle assembly checkpoint function, indicating that TPR3 and the C-helix define a bipartite localization determinant that is both necessary and sufficient to target Mps1 to the centrosome but dispensable for kinetochore targeting. In contrast, elements required for kinetochore targeting (the NTE and first two TPRs) are dispensable for centrosomal localization and function. These data are consistent with a separation of Mps1 function based on localization determinants within the N terminus. PMID:27339139

  1. Molecular cloning and cold shock induced overexpression of the DNA encoding phor sensor domain from Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a target molecule for novel anti-tubercular drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langi, Gladys Emmanuella Putri; Moeis, Maelita R.; Ihsanawati, Giri-Rachman, Ernawati Arifin

    2014-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the sole cause of Tuberculosis (TB), is still a major global problem. The discovery of new anti-tubercular drugs is needed to face the increasing TB cases, especially to prevent the increase of cases with resistant Mtb. A potential novel drug target is the Mtb PhoR sensor domain protein which is the histidine kinase extracellular domain for receiving environmental signals. This protein is the initial part of the two-component system PhoR-PhoP regulating 114 genes related to the virulence of Mtb. In this study, the gene encoding PhoR sensor domain (SensPhoR) was subcloned from pGEM-T SensPhoR from the previous study (Suwanto, 2012) to pColdII. The construct pColdII SensPhoR was confirmed through restriction analysis and sequencing. Using the construct, SensPhoR was overexpressed at 15°C using Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Low temperature was chosen because according to the solubility prediction program of recombinant proteins from The University of Oklahama, the PhoR sensor domain has a chance of 79.8% to be expressed as insoluble proteins in Escherichia coli's (E. coli) cytoplasm. This prediction is also supported by other similar programs: PROSO and PROSO II. The SDS PAGE result indicated that the PhoR sensor domain recombinant protein was overexpressed. For future studies, this protein will be purified and used for structure analysis which can be used to find potential drugs through rational drug design.

  2. Applying the Theoretical Domains Framework to identify barriers and targeted interventions to enhance nurses' use of electronic medication management systems in two Australian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Debono, Deborah; Taylor, Natalie; Lipworth, Wendy; Greenfield, David; Travaglia, Joanne; Black, Deborah; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2017-03-27

    Medication errors harm hospitalised patients and increase health care costs. Electronic Medication Management Systems (EMMS) have been shown to reduce medication errors. However, nurses do not always use EMMS as intended, largely because implementation of such patient safety strategies requires clinicians to change their existing practices, routines and behaviour. This study uses the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) to identify barriers and targeted interventions to enhance nurses' appropriate use of EMMS in two Australian hospitals. This qualitative study draws on in-depth interviews with 19 acute care nurses who used EMMS. A convenience sampling approach was used. Nurses working on the study units (N = 6) in two hospitals were invited to participate if available during the data collection period. Interviews inductively explored nurses' experiences of using EMMS (step 1). Data were analysed using the TDF to identify theory-derived barriers to nurses' appropriate use of EMMS (step 2). Relevant behaviour change techniques (BCTs) were identified to overcome key barriers to using EMMS (step 3) followed by the identification of potential literature-informed targeted intervention strategies to operationalise the identified BCTs (step 4). Barriers to nurses' use of EMMS in acute care were represented by nine domains of the TDF. Two closely linked domains emerged as major barriers to EMMS use: Environmental Context and Resources (availability and properties of computers on wheels (COWs); technology characteristics; specific contexts; competing demands and time pressure) and Social/Professional Role and Identity (conflict between using EMMS appropriately and executing behaviours critical to nurses' professional role and identity). The study identified three potential BCTs to address the Environmental Context and Resources domain barrier: adding objects to the environment; restructuring the physical environment; and prompts and cues. Seven BCTs to address Social

  3. Investigation of Novel Molecular Targets for Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domains Found in Oncogenes Implicated in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    two free phosphate groups of unliganded DAPP1 PH (DiNitto et al, 2003)). As phosphate groups on the inositol head group are the major PH domain... inositol headgroups / phosphoinositides of different lengths with the OSBP PH before applying it to lipid (3% PtdIns(4)P and PtdIns(4,5)P2 in PC...4)P and PtdIns(4,5)P2 surfaces, suggesting the importance of nonspecific electrostatic interactions; 3) all inositol phosphates and

  4. Fabrication of a Dual Substrate Display to Test Roles of Cell Adhesion Proteins in Vesicle Targeting to Plasma Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Stephen J.; Nelson, W. James

    2009-01-01

    While much is known of the molecular machinery involved in protein sorting during exocytosis, less is known about the spatial regulation of exocytosis at the plasma membrane (PM). This study outlines a novel method, Dual Substrate Display, used to formally test the hypothesis that E-cadherin-mediated adhesion directs basolateral vesicle exocytosis to specific sites at the PM. We show that vesicles containing the basolateral marker protein VSV-G preferentially target to sites of adhesion to E-cadherin rather than collagen VI or a control peptide. These results support the hypothesis that E-cadherin adhesion initiates signaling at the PM resulting in targeted sites for exocytosis. PMID:17803993

  5. Receptor-binding domains of spike proteins of emerging or re-emerging viruses as targets for development of antiviral vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu; Liu, Qi; Xu, Wei; Du, Lanying

    2012-01-01

    A number of emerging and re-emerging viruses have caused epidemics or pandemics of infectious diseases leading to major devastations throughout human history. Therefore, developing effective and safe vaccines against these viruses is clearly important for the protection of at-risk populations. Our previous studies have shown that the receptor-binding domain (RBD) in the spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is a key target for the development of SARS vaccines. In this review, we highlight some key advances in the development of antiviral vaccines targeting the RBDs of spike proteins of emerging and re-emerging viruses, using SARS-CoV, influenza virus, Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) as examples. PMID:26038424

  6. Interference with RUNX1/ETO Leukemogenic Function by Cell-Penetrating Peptides Targeting the NHR2 Oligomerization Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, Yvonne; Grez, Manuel; Wichmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The leukemia-associated fusion protein RUNX1/ETO is generated by the chromosomal translocation t(8;21) which appears in about 12% of all de novo acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs). Essential for the oncogenic potential of RUNX1/ETO is the oligomerization of the chimeric fusion protein through the nervy homology region 2 (NHR2) within ETO. In previous studies, we have shown that the intracellular expression of peptides containing the NHR2 domain inhibits RUNX1/ETO oligomerization, thereby preventing cell proliferation and inducing differentiation of RUNX1/ETO transformed cells. Here, we show that introduction of a recombinant TAT-NHR2 fusion polypeptide into the RUNX1/ETO growth-dependent myeloid cell line Kasumi-1 results in decreased cell proliferation and increased numbers of apoptotic cells. This effect was highly specific and mediated by binding the TAT-NHR2 peptide to ETO sequences, as TAT-polypeptides containing the oligomerization domain of BCR did not affect cell proliferation or apoptosis in Kasumi-1 cells. Thus, the selective interference with NHR2-mediated oligomerization by peptides represents a challenging but promising strategy for the inhibition of the leukemogenic potential of RUNX1/ETO in t(8;21)-positive leukemia. PMID:23865046

  7. Blue light-induced LOV domain dimerization enhances the affinity of Aureochrome 1a for its target DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Heintz, Udo; Schlichting, Ilme

    2016-01-01

    The design of synthetic optogenetic tools that allow precise spatiotemporal control of biological processes previously inaccessible to optogenetic control has developed rapidly over the last years. Rational design of such tools requires detailed knowledge of allosteric light signaling in natural photoreceptors. To understand allosteric communication between sensor and effector domains, characterization of all relevant signaling states is required. Here, we describe the mechanism of light-dependent DNA binding of the light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) transcription factor Aureochrome 1a from Phaeodactylum tricornutum (PtAu1a) and present crystal structures of a dark state LOV monomer and a fully light-adapted LOV dimer. In combination with hydrogen/deuterium-exchange, solution scattering data and DNA-binding experiments, our studies reveal a light-sensitive interaction between the LOV and basic region leucine zipper DNA-binding domain that together with LOV dimerization results in modulation of the DNA affinity of PtAu1a. We discuss the implications of these results for the design of synthetic LOV-based photosensors with application in optogenetics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11860.001 PMID:26754770

  8. Porcine bocavirus NP1 negatively regulates interferon signaling pathway by targeting the DNA-binding domain of IRF9

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ruoxi; Fang, Liurong; Wang, Dang; Cai, Kaimei; Zhang, Huan; Xie, Lilan; Li, Yi; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2015-11-15

    To subvert host antiviral immune responses, many viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit IFN signaling pathway. Porcine bocavirus (PBoV), a newly identified porcine parvovirus, has received attention because it shows clinically high co-infection prevalence with other pathogens in post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PWMS) and diarrheic piglets. In this study, we screened the structural and non-structural proteins encoded by PBoV and found that the non-structural protein NP1 significantly suppressed IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) activity and subsequent IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. However, NP1 affected neither the activation and translocation of STAT1/STAT2, nor the formation of the heterotrimeric transcription factor complex ISGF3 (STAT1/STAT2/IRF9). Detailed analysis demonstrated that PBoV NP1 blocked the ISGF3 DNA-binding activity by combining with the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of IRF9. In summary, these results indicate that PBoV NP1 interferes with type I IFN signaling pathway by blocking DNA binding of ISGF3 to attenuate innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Porcine bocavirus (PBoV) NP1 interferes with the IFN α/β signaling pathway. • PBoV NP1 does not prevent STAT1/STAT2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. • PBoV NP1 inhibits the DNA-binding activity of ISGF3. • PBoV NP1 interacts with the DNA-binding domain of IRF9.

  9. CIGB-300, a synthetic peptide-based drug that targets the CK2 phosphoaceptor domain. Translational and clinical research.

    PubMed

    Perea, Silvio E; Baladron, Idania; Garcia, Yanelda; Perera, Yasser; Lopez, Adlin; Soriano, Jorge L; Batista, Noyde; Palau, Aley; Hernández, Ignacio; Farina, Hernán; Garcia, Idrian; Gonzalez, Lidia; Gil, Jeovanis; Rodriguez, Arielis; Solares, Margarita; Santana, Agueda; Cruz, Marisol; Lopez, Matilde; Valenzuela, Carmen; Reyes, Osvaldo; López-Saura, Pedro A; González, Carlos A; Diaz, Alina; Castellanos, Lila; Sanchez, Aniel; Betancourt, Lazaro; Besada, Vladimir; González, Luis J; Garay, Hilda; Gómez, Roberto; Gómez, Daniel E; Alonso, Daniel F; Perrin, Phillipe; Renualt, Jean-Yves; Sigman, Hugo; Herrera, Luis; Acevedo, Boris

    2011-10-01

    CK2 represents an oncology target scientifically validated. However, clinical research with inhibitors of the CK2-mediated phosphorylation event is still insufficient to recognize it as a clinically validated target. CIGB-300, an investigational peptide-based drug that targets the phosphoaceptor site, binds to a CK2 substrate array in vitro but mainly to B23/nucleophosmin in vivo. The CIGB-300 proapoptotic effect is preceded by its nucleolar localization, inhibition of the CK2-mediated phosphorylation on B23/nucleophosmin and nucleolar disassembly. Importantly, CIGB-300 shifted a protein array linked to apoptosis, ribosome biogenesis, cell proliferation, glycolisis, and cell motility in proteomic studies which helped to understand its mechanism of action. In the clinical ground, CIGB-300 has proved to be safe and well tolerated in a First-in-Human trial in women with cervical malignancies who also experienced signs of clinical benefit. In a second Phase 1 clinical trial in women with cervical cancer stage IB2/II, the MTD and DLT have been also identified in the clinical setting. Interestingly, in cervical tumors the B23/nucleophosmin protein levels were significantly reduced after CIGB-300 treatment at the nucleus compartment. In addition, expanded use of CIGB-300 in case studies has evidenced antitumor activity when administered as compassional option. Collectively, our data outline important clues on translational and clinical research from this novel peptide-based drug reinforcing its perspectives to treat cancer and paving the way to validate CK2 as a promising target in oncology.

  10. DT-Web: a web-based application for drug-target interaction and drug combination prediction through domain-tuned network-based inference

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The identification of drug-target interactions (DTI) is a costly and time-consuming step in drug discovery and design. Computational methods capable of predicting reliable DTI play an important role in the field. Algorithms may aim to design new therapies based on a single approved drug or a combination of them. Recently, recommendation methods relying on network-based inference in connection with knowledge coming from the specific domain have been proposed. Description Here we propose a web-based interface to the DT-Hybrid algorithm, which applies a recommendation technique based on bipartite network projection implementing resources transfer within the network. This technique combined with domain-specific knowledge expressing drugs and targets similarity is used to compute recommendations for each drug. Our web interface allows the users: (i) to browse all the predictions inferred by the algorithm; (ii) to upload their custom data on which they wish to obtain a prediction through a DT-Hybrid based pipeline; (iii) to help in the early stages of drug combinations, repositioning, substitution, or resistance studies by finding drugs that can act simultaneously on multiple targets in a multi-pathway environment. Our system is periodically synchronized with DrugBank and updated accordingly. The website is free, open to all users, and available at http://alpha.dmi.unict.it/dtweb/. Conclusions Our web interface allows users to search and visualize information on drugs and targets eventually providing their own data to compute a list of predictions. The user can visualize information about the characteristics of each drug, a list of predicted and validated targets, associated enzymes and transporters. A table containing key information and GO classification allows the users to perform their own analysis on our data. A special interface for data submission allows the execution of a pipeline, based on DT-Hybrid, predicting new targets with the corresponding p

  11. DT-Web: a web-based application for drug-target interaction and drug combination prediction through domain-tuned network-based inference.

    PubMed

    Alaimo, Salvatore; Bonnici, Vincenzo; Cancemi, Damiano; Ferro, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba; Pulvirenti, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The identification of drug-target interactions (DTI) is a costly and time-consuming step in drug discovery and design. Computational methods capable of predicting reliable DTI play an important role in the field. Algorithms may aim to design new therapies based on a single approved drug or a combination of them. Recently, recommendation methods relying on network-based inference in connection with knowledge coming from the specific domain have been proposed. Here we propose a web-based interface to the DT-Hybrid algorithm, which applies a recommendation technique based on bipartite network projection implementing resources transfer within the network. This technique combined with domain-specific knowledge expressing drugs and targets similarity is used to compute recommendations for each drug. Our web interface allows the users: (i) to browse all the predictions inferred by the algorithm; (ii) to upload their custom data on which they wish to obtain a prediction through a DT-Hybrid based pipeline; (iii) to help in the early stages of drug combinations, repositioning, substitution, or resistance studies by finding drugs that can act simultaneously on multiple targets in a multi-pathway environment. Our system is periodically synchronized with DrugBank and updated accordingly. The website is free, open to all users, and available at http://alpha.dmi.unict.it/dtweb/. Our web interface allows users to search and visualize information on drugs and targets eventually providing their own data to compute a list of predictions. The user can visualize information about the characteristics of each drug, a list of predicted and validated targets, associated enzymes and transporters. A table containing key information and GO classification allows the users to perform their own analysis on our data. A special interface for data submission allows the execution of a pipeline, based on DT-Hybrid, predicting new targets with the corresponding p-values expressing the reliability of

  12. A novel domain cassette identifies Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 proteins binding ICAM-1 and is a target of cross-reactive, adhesion-inhibitory antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Anja; Joergensen, Louise; Rask, Thomas S; Olsen, Rebecca W; Andersen, Marianne A; Turner, Louise; Theander, Thor G; Hviid, Lars; Higgins, Matthew K; Craig, Alister; Brown, Alan; Jensen, Anja T R

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral Plasmodium falciparum malaria is characterized by adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs) to the cerebral microvasculature. This has been linked to parasites expressing the structurally related group A subset of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family of IE adhesion ligands and to IEs with affinity for ICAM-1. However, recent evidence has cast doubt on both these associations, tempering hopes of the feasibility of developing a vaccine based on ICAM-1-binding PfEMP1. In this study, we report the identification of a domain cassette (DC) present in group A var genes from six genetically distinct P. falciparum parasites. The three domains in the cassette, which we call DC4, had a high level of sequence identity and cluster together phylogenetically. Erythrocytes infected by these parasites and selected in vitro for expression of DC4 adhered specifically to ICAM-1. The ICAM-1-binding capacity of DC4 was mapped to the C-terminal third of its Duffy-binding-like β3 domain. DC4 was the target of broadly cross-reactive and adhesion-inhibitory IgG Abs, and levels of DC4-specific and adhesion-inhibitory IgG increased with age among P. falciparum-exposed children. Our study challenges earlier conclusions that group A PfEMP1 proteins are not central to ICAM-1-specific IE adhesion and support the feasibility of developing a vaccine preventing cerebral malaria by inhibiting cerebral IE sequestration.

  13. A stably expressed llama single-domain intrabody targeting Rev displays broad-spectrum anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Boons, Eline; Li, Guangdi; Vanstreels, Els; Vercruysse, Thomas; Pannecouque, Christophe; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Daelemans, Dirk

    2014-12-01

    The HIV Rev protein mediates the transport of partially and unspliced HIV mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Rev multimerizes on a secondary stem-loop structure present in the viral intron-containing mRNA species and recruits the cellular karyopherin CRM1 to export viral mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Previously we have identified a single-domain intrabody (Nb(190)), derived from a llama heavy-chain antibody, which efficiently inhibits Rev multimerization and suppresses the production of infectious virus. We recently mapped the epitope of this nanobody and demonstrated that Rev residues K20 and Y23 are crucial for interaction while residues V16, H53 and L60 are important to a lesser extent. Here, we generated cell lines stably expressing Nb(190) and assessed the capacity of these cell lines to suppress the replication of different HIV-1 subtypes. These cells stably expressing the single-domain antibody are protected from virus-induced cytopathogenic effect even in the context of high multiplicity of infection. In addition, the replication of different subtypes of group M and one strain of group O is significantly suppressed in these cell lines. Next, we analysed the natural variations of Rev amino acids in sequence samples from HIV-1 infected patients worldwide and assessed the effect of Nb(190) on the most prevalent polymorphisms occurring at the key epitope positions (K20 and Y23) in Rev. We found that Nb(190) was able to suppress the function of these Rev variants except for the K20N mutant, which was present in only 0.7% of HIV-1 sequence populations (n = 4632). Cells stably expressing the single-domain intrabody Nb(190) are protected against virus-induced cytopathogenic effect and display a selective survival advantage upon infection. In addition, Nb(190) suppresses the replication of a wide range of different HIV-1 subtypes. Large-scale sequence analysis reveals that the Nb(190) epitope positions in Rev are well conserved across major HIV-1

  14. Endocytotic routes of cobra cardiotoxins depend on spatial distribution of positively charged and hydrophobic domains to target distinct types of sulfated glycoconjugates on cell surface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shao-Chen; Lin, Chien-Chu; Wang, Chia-Hui; Wu, Po-Long; Huang, Hsuan-Wei; Chang, Chung-I; Wu, Wen-guey

    2014-07-18

    Cobra cardiotoxins (CTX) are a family of three-fingered basic polypeptides known to interact with diverse targets such as heparan sulfates, sulfatides, and integrins on cell surfaces. After CTX bind to the membrane surface, they are internalized to intracellular space and exert their cytotoxicity via an unknown mechanism. By the combined in vitro kinetic binding, three-dimensional x-ray structure determination, and cell biology studies on the naturally abundant CTX homologues from the Taiwanese cobra, we showed that slight variations on the spatial distribution of positively charged or hydrophobic domains among CTX A2, A3, and A4 could lead to significant changes in their endocytotic pathways and action mechanisms via distinct sulfated glycoconjugate-mediated processes. The intracellular locations of these structurally similar CTX after internalization are shown to vary between the mitochondria and lysosomes via either dynamin2-dependent or -independent processes with distinct membrane cholesterol sensitivity. Evidence is presented to suggest that the shifting between the sulfated glycoconjugates as distinct targets of CTX A2, A3, and A4 might play roles in the co-evolutionary arms race between venomous snake toxins to cope with different membrane repair mechanisms at the cellular levels. The sensitivity of endocytotic routes to the spatial distribution of positively charged or hydrophobic domains may provide an explanation for the diverse endocytosis pathways of other cell-penetrating basic polypeptides.

  15. The α2 helix in the DNA ligase IV BRCT-1 domain is required for targeted degradation of ligase IV during adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Timra; Greer, Amy E; Vindigni, Alessandro; Ketner, Gary; Hanakahi, Leslyn A

    2012-07-05

    In adenovirus E4 mutant infections, viral DNAs form concatemers through a process that requires host Non-homologous End Joining (NHEJ) proteins including DNA Ligase IV (LigIV). Adenovirus proteins E4 34k and E1b 55k form the substrate-selection component of an E3 ubiquitin ligase and prevent concatenation by targeting LigIV for proteasomal degradation. The mechanisms and sites involved in targeting this and other E3 ligase substrates generally are poorly-understood. Through genetic analysis, we identified the α2 helix of one LigIV BRCT domain (BRCT-1) as essential for adenovirus-mediated degradation. Replacement of the BRCT domain of DNA ligase III (LigIII), which is resistant to degradation, with LigIV BRCT-1 does not promote degradation. A humanized mouse LigIV that possesses a BRCT-1 α2 helix identical to the human protein, like its parent, is also resistant to adenovirus-mediated degradation. Thus, both the BRCT-1 α2 helix and an element outside BRCT-1 are required for adenovirus-mediated degradation of LigIV.

  16. An amphiphilic region in the cytoplasmic domain of KdpD is recognized by the signal recognition particle and targeted to the Escherichia coli membrane

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Katja S; Hubich, Stefanie; Liebhart, Helga; Krauss, Susanne; Kuhn, Andreas; Facey, Sandra J

    2008-01-01

    The sensor protein KdpD of Escherichia coli is composed of a large N-terminal hydrophilic region (aa 1–400), four transmembrane regions (aa 401–498) and a large hydrophilic region (aa 499–894) at the C-terminus. KdpD requires the signal recognition particle (SRP) for its targeting to the membrane. Deletions within KdpD show that the first 50 residues are required for SRP-driven membrane insertion. A fusion protein of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) with KdpD is found localized at the membrane only when SRP is present. The membrane targeting of GFP was not observed when the first 50 KdpD residues were deleted. A truncated mutant of KdpD containing only the first 25 amino acids fused to GFP lost its ability to specifically interact with SRP, whereas a specific interaction between SRP and the first 48 amino acids of KdpD fused to GFP was confirmed by pull-down experiments. Conclusively, a small amphiphilic region of 27 residues within the amino-terminal domain of KdpD (aa 22–48) is recognized by SRP and targets the protein to the membrane. This shows that membrane proteins with a large N-terminal region in the cytoplasm can be membrane-targeted early on to allow co-translational membrane insertion of their distant transmembrane regions. PMID:18433452

  17. Preferential Entry of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Hc Domain through Intestinal Crypt Cells and Targeting to Cholinergic Neurons of the Mouse Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Couesnon, Aurélie; Molgó, Jordi; Connan, Chloé; Popoff, Michel R.

    2012-01-01

    Botulism, characterized by flaccid paralysis, commonly results from botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) absorption across the epithelial barrier from the digestive tract and then dissemination through the blood circulation to target autonomic and motor nerve terminals. The trafficking pathway of BoNT/A passage through the intestinal barrier is not yet fully understood. We report that intralumenal administration of purified BoNT/A into mouse ileum segment impaired spontaneous muscle contractions and abolished the smooth muscle contractions evoked by electric field stimulation. Entry of BoNT/A into the mouse upper small intestine was monitored with fluorescent HcA (half C-terminal domain of heavy chain) which interacts with cell surface receptor(s). We show that HcA preferentially recognizes a subset of neuroendocrine intestinal crypt cells, which probably represent the entry site of the toxin through the intestinal barrier, then targets specific neurons in the submucosa and later (90–120 min) in the musculosa. HcA mainly binds to certain cholinergic neurons of both submucosal and myenteric plexuses, but also recognizes, although to a lower extent, other neuronal cells including glutamatergic and serotoninergic neurons in the submucosa. Intestinal cholinergic neuron targeting by HcA could account for the inhibition of intestinal peristaltism and secretion observed in botulism, but the consequences of the targeting to non-cholinergic neurons remains to be determined. PMID:22438808

  18. Non-neutralizing Antibodies Targeting the V1V2 Domain of HIV Exhibit Strong Antibody-Dependent Cell-mediated Cytotoxic Activity.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Luzia M; Decoville, Thomas; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Géraldine; Klingler, Jéromine; Ducloy, Camille; Bahram, Seiamak; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Moog, Christiane

    2017-10-04

    The development of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 has proven to be challenging. Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), whilst exhibiting neutralization breadth and potency, are elicited only in a small subset of infected individuals and have yet to be induced by vaccination. Case-control studies of RV144 identified an inverse correlation of HIV-1 infection risk with antibodies (Abs) to the V1V2 region of gp120 with high antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. The neutralizing activity of Abs was not found to contribute to this protective outcome. Using primary effector and target cells and primary virus isolates, we studied the ADCC profile of different monoclonal Abs targeting the V1V2 loop of gp120 that had low or no neutralizing activity. We compared their ADCC activity to some bNAbs targeting different regions of gp120. We found that mAbs targeting the V1V2 domain induce up to 60% NK cell mediated lysis of HIV-1 infected PBMCs in a physiologically relevant ADCC model, highlighting the interest in inducing such Abs in future HIV vaccine trials. Our data also suggest that in addition to neutralization, lysis of infected cells by Abs can effectively participate in HIV protection, as suggested by the RV144 immune correlate analysis.

  19. Resveratrol induces apoptosis by directly targeting Ras-GTPase activating protein SH3 domain binding protein 1 (G3BP1)

    PubMed Central

    Oi, Naomi; Yuan, Jian; Malakhova, Margarita; Luo, Kuntian; Li, Yunhui; Ryu, Joohyun; Zhang, Lei; Bode, Ann M.; Xu, Zengguang; Li, Yan; Lou, Zhenkun; Dong, Zigang

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol possesses a strong anticancer activity exhibited as the induction of apoptosis through p53 activation. However, the molecular mechanism and direct target(s) of resveratrol-induced p53 activation remain elusive. Here, the Ras-GTPase activating protein SH3 domain binding protein 1 (G3BP1) was identified as a potential target of resveratrol, and in vitro binding assay results using resveratrol (RSVL)-conjugated Sepharose 4B beads confirmed their direct binding. Depletion of G3BP1 significantly diminishes resveratrol-induced p53 expression and apoptosis. We also found that G3BP1 negatively regulates p53 expression by interacting with ubiquitin-specific protease 10 (USP10), a deubiquitinating enzyme of p53. Disruption of the interaction of p53 with USP10 by G3BP1 interference leads to suppression of p53 deubiquitination. Resveratrol, on the other hand, directly binds to G3BP1 and prevents the G3BP1/USP10 interaction, resulting in enhanced USP10-mediated deubiquitination of p53 and consequently increased p53 expression. These findings disclose a novel mechanism of resveratrol-induced p53 activation and resveratrol-induced apoptosis by direct targeting of G3BP1. PMID:24998844

  20. Induction of necrosis via mitochondrial targeting of Melon necrotic spot virus replication protein p29 by its second transmembrane domain

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Hirai, Katsuyuki; Kanda, Ayami; Ohnishi, Jun; Ohki, Takehiro; Tsuda, Shinya

    2009-08-01

    The virulence factor of Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV), a virus that induces systemic necrotic spot disease on melon plants, was investigated. When the replication protein p29 was expressed in N. benthamiana using a Cucumber mosaic virus vector, necrotic spots appeared on the leaf tissue. Transmission electron microscopy revealed abnormal mitochondrial aggregation in these tissues. Fractionation of tissues expressing p29 and confocal imaging using GFP-tagged p29 revealed that p29 associated with the mitochondrial membrane as an integral membrane protein. Expression analysis of p29 deletion fragments and prediction of hydrophobic transmembrane domains (TMDs) in p29 showed that deletion of the second putative TMD from p29 led to deficiencies in both the mitochondrial localization and virulence of p29. Taken together, these results indicated that MNSV p29 interacts with the mitochondrial membrane and that p29 may be a virulence factor causing the observed necrosis.

  1. Caspase recruitment domain of procaspase-2 could be a target for SUMO-1 modification through Ubc9

    SciTech Connect

    Shirakura, Hiromi; Hayashi, Naoko; Ogino, Shin-ichi; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Uehara, Takashi; Nomura, Yasuyuki . E-mail: nomura@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp

    2005-06-17

    To identify the binding proteins that regulate the function of procaspase-2, we screened for proteins using the yeast two-hybrid method and isolated human Ubc9 and SUMO-1 as the candidates. Ubc9 and SUMO-1 interacted with the caspase recruitment domain of procaspase-2 in its N-terminal. We elucidated the covalent modification of procaspase-2 by SUMO-1 in mammalian cells by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis. Procaspase-2 and SUMO-1 were co-localized by dot-like structures in the nucleus that are related to promyelocytic leukemia bodies. Interestingly, a conjugation-deficient mutant (K60R) procaspase-2 resulted in a delay of its enzyme maturation (appearance of p12 subunit) compared to that of wild-type. Thus, the modification with SUMO-1 may play a critical role in the nuclear localization and the activation (maturation) of procaspase-2.

  2. Identification of Novel Molecular Targets for Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domains Found in Oncogenes Implicated in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    each family (FAPP2 and OSBP2) have been associated with brest cancer development or progression (Foumier et al, 1999; Scanlan et al, 2001). This family...A, Singh, S, Keleti, D, DeWald, DB, Murray, D, Emr , SD, and Lemmon, MA. (2004) Genome-wide Analysis of Membrane Targeting by S. cerivisiae Pleckstrin... Emr ,2 and Mark A. Lemmonl,* humans, with -252 examples (International Human Ge- 1Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics nome Consortium, 2001

  3. Discovery of Small-Molecule Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Entry Inhibitors That Target the gp120-Binding Domain of CD4†

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Quan-en; Stephen, Andrew G.; Adelsberger, Joseph W.; Roberts, Paula E.; Zhu, Weimin; Currens, Michael J.; Feng, Yaxiong; Crise, Bruce J.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rein, Alan R.; Fisher, Robert J.; Shoemaker, Robert H.; Sei, Shizuko

    2005-01-01

    The interaction between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 and the CD4 receptor is highly specific and involves relatively small contact surfaces on both proteins according to crystal structure analysis. This molecularly conserved interaction presents an excellent opportunity for antiviral targeting. Here we report a group of pentavalent antimony-containing small molecule compounds, NSC 13778 (molecular weight, 319) and its analogs, which exert a potent anti-HIV activity. These compounds block the entry of X4-, R5-, and X4/R5-tropic HIV-1 strains into CD4+ cells but show little or no activity in CD4-negative cells or against vesicular stomatitis virus-G pseudotyped virions. The compounds compete with gp120 for binding to CD4: either immobilized on a solid phase (soluble CD4) or on the T-cell surface (native CD4 receptor) as determined by a competitive gp120 capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or flow cytometry. NSC 13778 binds to an N-terminal two-domain CD4 protein, D1/D2 CD4, immobilized on a surface plasmon resonance sensor chip, and dose dependently reduces the emission intensity of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of D1/D2 CD4, which contains two of the three tryptophan residues in the gp120-binding domain. Furthermore, T cells incubated with the compounds alone show decreased reactivity to anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies known to recognize the gp120-binding site. In contrast to gp120-binders that inhibit gp120-CD4 interaction by binding to gp120, these compounds appear to disrupt gp120-CD4 contact by targeting the specific gp120-binding domain of CD4. NSC 13778 may represent a prototype of a new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors that can break into the gp120-CD4 interface and mask the gp120-binding site on the CD4 molecules, effectively repelling incoming virions. PMID:15857997

  4. Targeting of promoters for trans activation by a carboxy-terminal domain of the NS-1 protein of the parvovirus minute virus of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Legendre, D; Rommelaere, J

    1994-01-01

    The NS-1 gene of the parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM) (prototype strain, MVMp) was fused in phase with the sequence coding for the DNA-binding domain of the bacterial LexA repressor. The resulting chimeric protein, LexNS-1, was tested for its transcriptional activity by using various target promoters in which multiple LexA operator sequences had been introduced. Under these conditions, NS-1 was shown to stimulate gene expression driven by the modified long terminal repeat promoters (from the retroviruses mouse mammary tumor virus and Rous sarcoma virus) and P38 promoter (from MVMp), indicating that the NS-1 protein is a potent transcriptional activator. It is noteworthy that in the absence of LexA operator-mediated targeting, the genuine mouse mammary tumor virus and Rous sarcoma virus promoters were inhibited by NS-1. Together these data strongly suggest that NS-1 contains an activating region able to induce promoters with which this protein interacts but also to repress transcription from nonrecognized promoters by a squelching mechanism similar to that described for other activators. Deletion mutant analysis led to the identification of an NS-1 domain that exhibited an activating potential comparable to that of the whole polypeptide when fused to the DNA-binding region of LexA. This domain is localized in the carboxy-terminal part of NS-1 and corresponds to one of the two regions previously found to be responsible for toxicity. These results argue for the involvement of the regulatory functions of NS-1 in the cytopathic effect of this parvovirus product. Images PMID:7966588

  5. MicroRNA-181b inhibits thrombin-mediated endothelial activation and arterial thrombosis by targeting caspase recruitment domain family member 10.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jibin; He, Shaolin; Sun, Xinghui; Franck, Gregory; Deng, Yihuan; Yang, Dafeng; Haemmig, Stefan; Wara, A K M; Icli, Basak; Li, Dazhu; Feinberg, Mark W

    2016-09-01

    Thrombogenic and inflammatory mediators, such as thrombin, induce NF-κB-mediated endothelial cell (EC) activation and dysfunction, which contribute to pathogenesis of arterial thrombosis. The role of anti-inflammatory microRNA-181b (miR-181b) on thrombosis remains unknown. Our previous study demonstrated that miR-181b inhibits downstream NF-κB signaling in response to TNF-α. Here, we demonstrate that miR-181b uniquely inhibits upstream NF-κB signaling in response to thrombin. Overexpression of miR-181b inhibited thrombin-induced activation of NF-κB signaling, demonstrated by reduction of phospho-IKK-β, -IκB-α, and p65 nuclear translocation in ECs. MiR-181b also reduced expression of NF-κB target genes VCAM-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, E-selectin, and tissue factor. Mechanistically, miR-181b targets caspase recruitment domain family member 10 (Card10), an adaptor protein that participates in activation of the IKK complex in response to signals transduced from protease-activated receptor-1. miR-181b reduced expression of Card10 mRNA and protein, but not protease-activated receptor-1. 3'-Untranslated region reporter assays, argonaute-2 microribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation studies, and Card10 rescue studies revealed that Card10 is a bona fide direct miR-181b target. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Card10 expression phenocopied effects of miR-181b on NF-κB signaling and targets. Card10 deficiency did not affect TNF-α-induced activation of NF-κB signaling, which suggested stimulus-specific regulation of NF-κB signaling and endothelial responses by miR-181b in ECs. Finally, in response to photochemical injury-induced arterial thrombosis, systemic delivery of miR-181b reduced thrombus formation by 73% in carotid arteries and prolonged time to occlusion by 1.6-fold, effects recapitulated by Card10 small interfering RNA. These data demonstrate that miR-181b and Card10 are important regulators of thrombin-induced EC activation and

  6. Discovery of a novel azaindole class of antibacterial agents targeting the ATPase domains of DNA gyrase and Topoisomerase IV.

    PubMed

    Manchester, John I; Dussault, Daemian D; Rose, Jonathan A; Boriack-Sjodin, P Ann; Uria-Nickelsen, Maria; Ioannidis, Georgine; Bist, Shanta; Fleming, Paul; Hull, Kenneth G

    2012-08-01

    We present the discovery and optimization of a novel series of bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors. Starting from a virtual screening hit, activity was optimized through a combination of structure-based design and physical property optimization. Synthesis of fewer than a dozen compounds was required to achieve inhibition of the growth of methicillin-resistant Staphyloccus aureus (MRSA) at compound concentrations of 1.56 μM. These compounds simultaneously inhibit DNA gyrase and Topoisomerase IV at similar nanomolar concentrations, reducing the likelihood of the spontaneous occurrence of target-based mutations resulting in antibiotic resistance, an increasing threat in the treatment of serious infections.

  7. Monoclonal And Single Domain Antibodies Targeting β-Integrin Subunits Block Sexual Transmission of HIV-1 in in vitro and in vivo Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Guedon, Janet Tai; Luo, Kun; Zhang, Hong; Markham, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to prevention regimens for gel-based anti-HIV-1 microbicides has been a major obstacle to more effective pre-exposure prophylaxis. Concern persists that the antiretroviral drug containing microbicides might promote development of antiretroviral resistance. Methods Using in vitro transwell systems and a humanized mouse model of HIV-1 sexual transmission, we examined, as candidate microbicides, antibodies targeting the heterodimeric leukocyte function associated antigen 1 (LFA-1), a non-virally encoded protein acquired by the virus that also plays a critical role cell movement across endothelial and epithelial barriers. LFA-1 specific single domain variable regions from alpaca heavy-chain only antibodies (VHH) were identified and evaluated for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 transmission in the in vitro transwell system. Results Monoclonal antibodies targeting the CD11a and CD18 components of LFA-1 significantly reduced cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 transmission in the in vitro transwell culture system and prevented virus transmission in the humanized mouse model of vaginal transmission. The broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody b12 was unable to block transmission of cell-free virus. CD11a-specific VHH were isolated and expressed and the purified variable region protein domains reduced in vitro transepithelial transmission with an efficacy comparable to that of the CD11a monoclonal antibody. Conclusions Targeting integrins acquired by HIV-1 during budding and which are critical to interactions between epithelial cells and lymphocytes can reduce viral movement across epithelial barriers and prevent transmission in a humanized mouse model of sexual transmission. VHH capable of being produced by transformed bacteria can significantly reduce transepithelial virus transmission in in vitro model systems. PMID:25828964

  8. PBK/TOPK interacts with the DBD domain of tumor suppressor p53 and modulates expression of transcriptional targets including p21.

    PubMed

    Hu, F; Gartenhaus, R B; Eichberg, D; Liu, Z; Fang, H-B; Rapoport, A P

    2010-10-07

    PBK/TOPK (PDZ-binding kinase, T-LAK-cell-originated protein kinase) is a serine-threonine kinase that is overexpressed in a variety of tumor cells but its role in oncogenesis remains unclear. Here we show, by co-immunoprecipitation experiments and yeast two-hybrid analysis, that PBK/TOPK physically interacts with the tumor suppressor p53 through its DNA-binding (DBD) domain in HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells that express wild-type p53. PBK also binds to p53 mutants carrying five common point mutations in the DBD domain. The PBK-p53 interaction appears to downmodulate p53 transactivation function as indicated by PBK/TOPK knockdown experiments, which show upregulated expression of the key p53 target gene and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 in HCT116 cells, particularly after genotoxic damage from doxorubicin. Furthermore, stable PBK/TOPK knockdown cell lines (derived from HCT116 and MCF-7 cells) showed increased apoptosis, G(2)/M arrest and slower growth as compared to stable empty vector-transfected control cell lines. Gene microarray studies identified additional p53 target genes involved in apoptosis or cell cycling, which were differentially regulated by PBK knockdown. Together, these data suggest that increased levels of PBK/TOPK may contribute to tumor cell development and progression through suppression of p53 function and consequent reductions in the cell-cycle regulatory proteins such as p21. PBK/TOPK may therefore be a valid target for antineoplastic kinase inhibitors to sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis and growth suppression.

  9. The mammalian heterochromatin protein 1 binds diverse nuclear proteins through a common motif that targets the chromoshadow domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, Mark S. . E-mail: msl27@drexel.edu; Schultz, David C.; Negorev, Dmitri; Maul, Gerd G.; Rauscher, Frank J.

    2005-06-17

    The HP1 proteins regulate epigenetic gene silencing by promoting and maintaining chromatin condensation. The HP1 chromodomain binds to methylated histone H3. More enigmatic is the chromoshadow domain (CSD), which mediates dimerization, transcription repression, and interaction with multiple nuclear proteins. Here we show that KAP-1, CAF-1 p150, and NIPBL carry a canonical amino acid motif, PxVxL, which binds directly to the CSD with high affinity. We also define a new class of variant PxVxL CSD-binding motifs in Sp100A, LBR, and ATRX. Both canonical and variant motifs recognize a similar surface of the CSD dimer as demonstrated by a panel of CSD mutants. These in vitro binding results were confirmed by the analysis of polypeptides found associated with nuclear HP1 complexes and we provide the first evidence of the NIPBL/delangin protein in human cells, a protein recently implicated in the developmental disorder, Cornelia de Lange syndrome. NIPBL is related to Nipped-B, a factor participating in gene activation by remote enhancers in Drosophila melanogaster. Thus, this spectrum of direct binding partners suggests an expanded role for HP1 as factor participating in promoter-enhancer communication, chromatin remodeling/assembly, and sub-nuclear compartmentalization.

  10. Cyclic di-AMP targets the cystathionine beta-synthase domain of the osmolyte transporter OpuC.

    PubMed

    Huynh, TuAnh Ngoc; Choi, Philip H; Sureka, Kamakshi; Ledvina, Hannah E; Campillo, Julian; Tong, Liang; Woodward, Joshua J

    2016-10-01

    Cellular turgor is of fundamental importance to bacterial growth and survival. Changes in external osmolarity as a consequence of fluctuating environmental conditions and colonization of diverse environments can significantly impact cytoplasmic water content, resulting in cellular lysis or plasmolysis. To ensure maintenance of appropriate cellular turgor, bacteria import ions and small organic osmolytes, deemed compatible solutes, to equilibrate cytoplasmic osmolarity with the extracellular environment. Here, we show that elevated levels of c-di-AMP, a ubiquitous second messenger among bacteria, result in significant susceptibility to elevated osmotic stress in the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. We found that levels of import of the compatible solute carnitine show an inverse correlation with intracellular c-di-AMP content and that c-di-AMP directly binds to the CBS domain of the ATPase subunit of the carnitine importer OpuC. Biochemical and structural studies identify conserved residues required for this interaction and transport activity in bacterial cells. Overall, these studies reveal a role for c-di-AMP mediated regulation of compatible solute import and provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms by which this essential second messenger impacts bacterial physiology and adaptation to changing environmental conditions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Characterization and target genes of nine human PRD-like homeobox domain genes expressed exclusively in early embryos

    PubMed Central

    Madissoon, Elo; Jouhilahti, Eeva-Mari; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Töhönen, Virpi; Krjutškov, Kaarel; Petropoulous, Sophie; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Linnarsson, Sten; Lanner, Fredrik; Månsson, Robert; Hovatta, Outi; Bürglin, Thomas R.; Katayama, Shintaro; Kere, Juha

    2016-01-01

    PAIRED (PRD)-like homeobox genes belong to a class of predicted transcription factor genes. Several of these PRD-like homeobox genes have been predicted in silico from genomic sequence but until recently had no evidence of transcript expression. We found recently that nine PRD-like homeobox genes, ARGFX, CPHX1, CPHX2, DPRX, DUXA, DUXB, NOBOX, TPRX1 and TPRX2, were expressed in human preimplantation embryos. In the current study we characterized these PRD-like homeobox genes in depth and studied their functions as transcription factors. We cloned multiple transcript variants from human embryos and showed that the expression of these genes is specific to embryos and pluripotent stem cells. Overexpression of the genes in human embryonic stem cells confirmed their roles as transcription factors as either activators (CPHX1, CPHX2, ARGFX) or repressors (DPRX, DUXA, TPRX2) with distinct targets that could be explained by the amino acid sequence in homeodomain. Some PRD-like homeodomain transcription factors had high concordance of target genes and showed enrichment for both developmentally important gene sets and a 36 bp DNA recognition motif implicated in Embryo Genome Activation (EGA). Our data implicate a role for these previously uncharacterized PRD-like homeodomain proteins in the regulation of human embryo genome activation and preimplantation embryo development. PMID:27412763

  12. The N1 domain of human lactoferrin is required for internalization by caco-2 cells and targeting to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasushi A; Wong, Henry; Ashida, Kin-Ya; Schryvers, Anthony B; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2008-10-14

    Human lactoferrin (hLf) has been shown to interact with cells from the Caco-2 human small intestinal cell line. There currently is little information about the molecular details of its interaction. As a first step toward detailed characterization of this interaction, we used a series of Lf chimeras to analyze which part of Lf is responsible for the interaction with Caco-2 cells. Recombinant chimeric proteins consisting of segments of hLf and bovine transferrin (bTf) were produced in a baculovirus-insect cell system and purified by a combination of cation exchange chromatography and immobilized bTf antibody affinity chromatography. Each chimera was labeled with a green fluorescent dye to monitor its interaction with Caco-2 cells. Similarly, the intestinal Lf receptor (LfR), also known as intelectin, was probed with an anti-LfR antibody that was detected with a secondary antibody conjugated with a red-color fluorescent dye. The results demonstrated that chimeric proteins containing the N-lobe or the N1.1 subdomain of Lf bound as well as intact Lf to Caco-2 cells. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that these proteins, along with the LfR, were internalized and targeted to the nucleus. These results indicate that the N1.1 subdomain of hLf is sufficient for binding, internalization, and targeting to the nucleus of Caco-2 cells.

  13. MicroRNA-383 is a tumor suppressor in human lung cancer by targeting endothelial PAS domain-containing protein 1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongjing; Liu, Bin; Wang, Shuoying; Liu, Jing

    2016-12-01

    Lung cancer is the deadliest of all human cancers worldwide. The role of microRNA (miR)-383 has been controversial in the initiation and progression of different cancers. We aimed to investigate the function of miR-383 in human lung cancer both in vitro and in vivo. MicroRNA-383 levels were analyzed in noncancerous versus cancerous human lung tissues and in normal versus lung cancer cell lines. Effect of miR-383 on cell migration and invasion was examined in vitro and on tumor growth by using a xenograft mouse model in vivo. Potential mRNA target of miR-383 was predicted, and underlying mechanism was explored as well. MicroRNA-383 was downregulated in lung cancer tissue and cell lines. Expression of miR-383 inhibited migration and invasion of human lung cancer cell lines in vitro and tumorigenesis of lung cancer xenografts in vivo. MicroRNA-383 directly targeted 3' untranslated region of endothelial PAS domain-containing protein 1 (EPAS1) messenger RNA and inhibited both its mRNA and protein expressions. Reintroduction of EPAS1 could bypass the inhibition by miR-383 on tumorigenesis of human lung cancer cell lines. MicroRNA-383 is a tumor suppressor in human lung cancer by inhibiting EPAS1, both of which could serve as potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of lung cancer. MicroRNA-383 is a tumor suppressor in human lung cancer, which functions to inhibit tumorigenesis of lung cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. This inhibitory effect is mediated by direct targeting of EPAS1 mRNA and subsequent repressing of its expression. Both microRNA-383 and EPAS1 could serve as potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of lung cancer. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Hepatitis B Virus Polymerase Localizes to the Mitochondria, and Its Terminal Protein Domain Contains the Mitochondrial Targeting Signal

    PubMed Central

    Unchwaniwala, Nuruddin; Sherer, Nathan M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To understand subcellular sites of hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication, we visualized core (Cp), polymerase (Pol), and pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) in infected cells. Interestingly, we found that the majority of Pol localized to the mitochondria in cells undergoing viral replication. The mitochondrial localization of Pol was independent of both the cell type and other viral components, indicating that Pol contains an intrinsic mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS). Neither Cp nor pgRNA localized to the mitochondria during active replication, suggesting a role other than DNA synthesis for Pol at the mitochondria. The Pol of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) also localized to the mitochondria. This result indicates that localization of Pol to mitochondria is likely a feature of all hepadnaviruses. To map the MTS within HBV Pol, we generated a series of Pol-green fluorescent protein (Pol-GFP) fusions and found that a stretch spanning amino acids (aa) 141 to 160 of Pol was sufficient to target GFP to the mitochondria. Surprisingly, deleting aa 141 to 160 in full-length Pol did not fully ablate Pol's mitochondrial localization, suggesting that additional sequences are involved in mitochondrial targeting. Only by deleting the N-terminal 160 amino acids in full-length Pol was mitochondrial localization ablated. Crucial residues for pgRNA packaging are contained within aa 141 to 160, indicating a multifunctional role of this region of Pol in the viral life cycle. Our studies show an unexpected Pol trafficking behavior that is uncoupled from its role in viral DNA synthesis. IMPORTANCE Chronic infection by HBV is a serious health concern. Existing therapies for chronically infected individuals are not curative, underscoring the need for a better understanding of the viral life cycle to develop better antiviral therapies. To date, the most thoroughly studied function of Pol is to package the pgRNA and reverse transcribe it to double-stranded DNA within capsids. This study

  15. Hepatitis B Virus Polymerase Localizes to the Mitochondria, and Its Terminal Protein Domain Contains the Mitochondrial Targeting Signal.

    PubMed

    Unchwaniwala, Nuruddin; Sherer, Nathan M; Loeb, Daniel D

    2016-10-01

    To understand subcellular sites of hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication, we visualized core (Cp), polymerase (Pol), and pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) in infected cells. Interestingly, we found that the majority of Pol localized to the mitochondria in cells undergoing viral replication. The mitochondrial localization of Pol was independent of both the cell type and other viral components, indicating that Pol contains an intrinsic mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS). Neither Cp nor pgRNA localized to the mitochondria during active replication, suggesting a role other than DNA synthesis for Pol at the mitochondria. The Pol of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) also localized to the mitochondria. This result indicates that localization of Pol to mitochondria is likely a feature of all hepadnaviruses. To map the MTS within HBV Pol, we generated a series of Pol-green fluorescent protein (Pol-GFP) fusions and found that a stretch spanning amino acids (aa) 141 to 160 of Pol was sufficient to target GFP to the mitochondria. Surprisingly, deleting aa 141 to 160 in full-length Pol did not fully ablate Pol's mitochondrial localization, suggesting that additional sequences are involved in mitochondrial targeting. Only by deleting the N-terminal 160 amino acids in full-length Pol was mitochondrial localization ablated. Crucial residues for pgRNA packaging are contained within aa 141 to 160, indicating a multifunctional role of this region of Pol in the viral life cycle. Our studies show an unexpected Pol trafficking behavior that is uncoupled from its role in viral DNA synthesis. Chronic infection by HBV is a serious health concern. Existing therapies for chronically infected individuals are not curative, underscoring the need for a better understanding of the viral life cycle to develop better antiviral therapies. To date, the most thoroughly studied function of Pol is to package the pgRNA and reverse transcribe it to double-stranded DNA within capsids. This study provides evidence for

  16. Chimeric Flock House virus protein A with endoplasmic reticulum-targeting domain enhances viral replication and virus-like particle trans-encapsidation in plants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yiyang; Kearney, Christopher M

    2017-07-01

    Flock House virus (FHV) RNA can be trans-encapsidated, entirely in planta, by tobacco mosaic virus coat protein to form virus-like particles (VLPs). Vaccination with these VLPs leads to strong antigen expression in mice and immune-activation. We hypothesize that creating an additional cellular site for replication and/or trans-encapsidation might significantly improve the final output of trans-encapsidated product. FHV protein A was engineered to target the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via a heterologous tobacco etch virus ER-targeting domain, and was expressed in cis or in trans relative to the replicating FHV RNA1. A strong increase in marker gene expression in plants was noted when ER-targeted protein A was supplied in trans. RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed RNA1 replication in both the mitochondria and ER, and total RNA1 accumulation was increased. In support of our hypothesis, VLP yield was increased significantly by the addition of this single genetic component to the inoculum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The HP1a Disordered C-terminus and Chromo Shadow Domain Cooperate to Select Target Peptide Partners

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Deanna L.; Kim, Daesung; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Stephens, Gena E.; Minor, Wladek

    2011-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster Heterochromatin Protein 1a (HP1a) is essential for compacted heterochromatin structure and associated gene silencing. Its chromo shadow domain (CSD) is well-known for binding to peptides that contain a PXVXL motif. Heterochromatin protein 2 (HP2) is a nonhistone chromosomal protein that associates with HP1a in the pericentric heterochromatin, telomeres and the fourth chromosome. Using NMR spectroscopy, fluorescence polarization and site-directed mutagenesis, we identified an LCVKI motif in HP2 that binds to the HP1a CSD. The binding affinity of the HP2 fragment is approximately two orders of magnitude higher than that of peptides from PIWI (with a PRVKV motif), AF10 (with a PLVVL motif), or CG15356 (with LYPLL and LSIVA motifs). To delineate differential interactions of the HP1a CSD, we characterized its structure, backbone dynamics and dimerization constant. We find that the dimerization constant is bracketed by the affinities of HP2 and PIWI, which dock to the same HP1a homodimer surface. This suggests that HP2, but not PIWI, interaction can drive homodimerization of HP1a. Interestingly, the integrity of the disordered C-terminal extension (CTE) of HP1a is essential for discriminatory binding, whereas swapping the PXVXL motifs does not confer specificity. Serine phosphorylation at the peptide binding surface of the CSD is thought to regulate heterochromatin assembly. Glutamic acid substitution at these sites destabilizes HP1a dimers, but improves the interaction with both binding partners. Our studies underscore the importance of CSD dimerization and cooperation with the CTE in forming distinct complexes of HP1a. PMID:21472955

  18. A humanized neutralizing antibody against MERS-CoV targeting the receptor-binding domain of the spike protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wan, Yuhua; Liu, Peipei; Zhao, Jincun; Lu, Guangwen; Qi, Jianxun; Wang, Qihui; Lu, Xuancheng; Wu, Ying; Liu, Wenjun; Zhang, Buchang; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Perlman, Stanley; Gao, George F; Yan, Jinghua

    2015-11-01

    The newly-emerging Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) can cause severe and fatal acute respiratory disease in humans. Despite global efforts, the potential for an associated pandemic in the future cannot be excluded. The development of effective counter-measures is urgent. MERS-CoV-specific anti-viral drugs or vaccines are not yet available. Using the spike receptor-binding domain of MERS-CoV (MERS-RBD) to immunize mice, we identified two neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 4C2 and 2E6. Both mAbs potently bind to MERS-RBD and block virus entry in vitro with high efficacy. We further investigated their mechanisms of neutralization by crystallizing the complex between the Fab fragments and the RBD, and solved the structure of the 4C2 Fab/MERS-RBD complex. The structure showed that 4C2 recognizes an epitope that partially overlaps the receptor-binding footprint in MERS-RBD, thereby interfering with the virus/receptor interactions by both steric hindrance and interface-residue competition. 2E6 also blocks receptor binding, and competes with 4C2 for binding to MERS-RBD. Based on the structure, we further humanized 4C2 by preserving only the paratope residues and substituting the remaining amino acids with the counterparts from human immunoglobulins. The humanized 4C2 (4C2h) antibody sustained similar neutralizing activity and biochemical characteristics to the parental mouse antibody. Finally, we showed that 4C2h can significantly abate the virus titers in lungs of Ad5-hCD26-transduced mice infected with MERS-CoV, therefore representing a promising agent for prophylaxis and therapy in clinical settings.

  19. Targeting the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) assembly domain attenuates inflammation-induced hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Robyn; Chapman, Kevin; Iftinca, Mircea; Aboushousha, Reem; Varela, Diego; Altier, Christophe

    2014-06-13

    The transient receptor potential channel vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed in sensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. TRPV1 is a polymodal channel activated by noxious heat, capsaicin, and protons. As a sensor for noxious stimuli, TRPV1 channel has been described as a key contributor to pain signaling. To form a functional channel, TRPV1 subunits must assemble into tetramers, and several studies have identified the TRPV1 C terminus as an essential element in subunit association. Here we combined biochemical assays with electrophysiology and imaging-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in live cells to identify a short motif in the C-terminal tail of the TRPV1 subunit that governs channel assembly. Removing this region through early truncation or targeted deletion results in loss of subunit association and channel function. Importantly, we found that interfering with TRPV1 subunit association using a plasma membrane-tethered peptide attenuated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in two mouse models of inflammatory hyperalgesia. This represents a novel mechanism to disrupt TRPV1 subunit assembly and hence may offer a new analgesic tool for pain relief. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Targeting the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 1 (TRPV1) Assembly Domain Attenuates Inflammation-induced Hypersensitivity*

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Robyn; Chapman, Kevin; Iftinca, Mircea; Aboushousha, Reem; Varela, Diego; Altier, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential channel vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed in sensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. TRPV1 is a polymodal channel activated by noxious heat, capsaicin, and protons. As a sensor for noxious stimuli, TRPV1 channel has been described as a key contributor to pain signaling. To form a functional channel, TRPV1 subunits must assemble into tetramers, and several studies have identified the TRPV1 C terminus as an essential element in subunit association. Here we combined biochemical assays with electrophysiology and imaging-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in live cells to identify a short motif in the C-terminal tail of the TRPV1 subunit that governs channel assembly. Removing this region through early truncation or targeted deletion results in loss of subunit association and channel function. Importantly, we found that interfering with TRPV1 subunit association using a plasma membrane-tethered peptide attenuated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in two mouse models of inflammatory hyperalgesia. This represents a novel mechanism to disrupt TRPV1 subunit assembly and hence may offer a new analgesic tool for pain relief. PMID:24808184

  1. Interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with the Estrogen Receptor Alpha F domain provides a drug target interface

    PubMed Central

    De Vries-van Leeuwen, Ingrid J.; da Costa Pereira, Daniel; Flach, Koen D.; Piersma, Sander R.; Haase, Christian; Bier, David; Yalcin, Zeliha; Michalides, Rob; Feenstra, K. Anton; Jiménez, Connie R.; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian; Zwart, Wilbert; de Boer, Albertus H.

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes, including breast cancer. Breast cancer therapy is therefore currently directed at inhibiting the transcriptional potency of ERα, either by blocking estrogen production through aromatase inhibitors or antiestrogens that compete for hormone binding. Due to resistance, new treatment modalities are needed and as ERα dimerization is essential for its activity, interference with receptor dimerization offers a new opportunity to exploit in drug design. Here we describe a unique mechanism of how ERα dimerization is negatively controlled by interaction with 14-3-3 proteins at the extreme C terminus of the receptor. Moreover, the small-molecule fusicoccin (FC) stabilizes this ERα/14-3-3 interaction. Cocrystallization of the trimeric ERα/14-3-3/FC complex provides the structural basis for this stabilization and shows the importance of phosphorylation of the penultimate Threonine (ERα-T594) for high-affinity interaction. We confirm that T594 is a distinct ERα phosphorylation site in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 using a phospho-T594–specific antibody and by mass spectrometry. In line with its ERα/14-3-3 interaction stabilizing effect, fusicoccin reduces the estradiol-stimulated ERα dimerization, inhibits ERα/chromatin interactions and downstream gene expression, resulting in decreased cell proliferation. Herewith, a unique functional phosphosite and an alternative regulation mechanism of ERα are provided, together with a small molecule that selectively targets this ERα/14-3-3 interface. PMID:23676274

  2. Interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with the estrogen receptor alpha F domain provides a drug target interface.

    PubMed

    De Vries-van Leeuwen, Ingrid J; da Costa Pereira, Daniel; Flach, Koen D; Piersma, Sander R; Haase, Christian; Bier, David; Yalcin, Zeliha; Michalides, Rob; Feenstra, K Anton; Jiménez, Connie R; de Greef, Tom F A; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian; Zwart, Wilbert; de Boer, Albertus H

    2013-05-28

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes, including breast cancer. Breast cancer therapy is therefore currently directed at inhibiting the transcriptional potency of ERα, either by blocking estrogen production through aromatase inhibitors or antiestrogens that compete for hormone binding. Due to resistance, new treatment modalities are needed and as ERα dimerization is essential for its activity, interference with receptor dimerization offers a new opportunity to exploit in drug design. Here we describe a unique mechanism of how ERα dimerization is negatively controlled by interaction with 14-3-3 proteins at the extreme C terminus of the receptor. Moreover, the small-molecule fusicoccin (FC) stabilizes this ERα/14-3-3 interaction. Cocrystallization of the trimeric ERα/14-3-3/FC complex provides the structural basis for this stabilization and shows the importance of phosphorylation of the penultimate Threonine (ERα-T(594)) for high-affinity interaction. We confirm that T(594) is a distinct ERα phosphorylation site in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 using a phospho-T(594)-specific antibody and by mass spectrometry. In line with its ERα/14-3-3 interaction stabilizing effect, fusicoccin reduces the estradiol-stimulated ERα dimerization, inhibits ERα/chromatin interactions and downstream gene expression, resulting in decreased cell proliferation. Herewith, a unique functional phosphosite and an alternative regulation mechanism of ERα are provided, together with a small molecule that selectively targets this ERα/14-3-3 interface.

  3. A Targeted Mutation within the Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) Envelope Protein Immunosuppressive Domain To Improve a Canarypox Virus-Vectored FeLV Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht-Louf, Géraldine; Mangeney, Marianne; El-Garch, Hanane; Lacombe, Valérie; Poulet, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    We previously delineated a highly conserved immunosuppressive (IS) domain within murine and primate retroviral envelope proteins that is critical for virus propagation in vivo. The envelope-mediated immunosuppression was assessed by the ability of the proteins, when expressed by allogeneic tumor cells normally rejected by engrafted mice, to allow these cells to escape, at least transiently, immune rejection. Using this approach, we identified key residues whose mutation (i) specifically abolishes immunosuppressive activity without affecting the “mechanical” function of the envelope protein and (ii) significantly enhances humoral and cellular immune responses elicited against the virus. The objective of this work was to study the immunosuppressive activity of the envelope protein (p15E) of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and evaluate the effect of its abolition on the efficacy of a vaccine against FeLV. Here we demonstrate that the FeLV envelope protein is immunosuppressive in vivo and that this immunosuppressive activity can be “switched off” by targeted mutation of a specific amino acid. As a result of the introduction of the mutated envelope sequence into a previously well characterized canarypox virus-vectored vaccine (ALVAC-FeLV), the frequency of vaccine-induced FeLV-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells was increased, whereas conversely, the frequency of vaccine-induced FeLV-specific interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing cells was reduced. This shift in the IFN-γ/IL-10 response was associated with a higher efficacy of ALVAC-FeLV against FeLV infection. This study demonstrates that FeLV p15E is immunosuppressive in vivo, that the immunosuppressive domain of p15E can modulate the FeLV-specific immune response, and that the efficacy of FeLV vaccines can be enhanced by inhibiting the immunosuppressive activity of the IS domain through an appropriate mutation. PMID:24198407

  4. A Novel Domain Cassette Identifies Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 Proteins Binding ICAM-1 and Is a Target of Cross-Reactive, Adhesion-Inhibitory Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Anja; Joergensen, Louise; Rask, Thomas S.; Olsen, Rebecca W.; Andersen, Marianne A.; Turner, Louise; Theander, Thor G.; Higgins, Matthew K.; Craig, Alister; Brown, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral Plasmodium falciparum malaria is characterized by adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs) to the cerebral microvasculature. This has been linked to parasites expressing the structurally related group A subset of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family of IE adhesion ligands and to IEs with affinity for ICAM-1. However, recent evidence has cast doubt on both these associations, tempering hopes of the feasibility of developing a vaccine based on ICAM-1–binding PfEMP1. In this study, we report the identification of a domain cassette (DC) present in group A var genes from six genetically distinct P. falciparum parasites. The three domains in the cassette, which we call DC4, had a high level of sequence identity and cluster together phylogenetically. Erythrocytes infected by these parasites and selected in vitro for expression of DC4 adhered specifically to ICAM-1. The ICAM-1–binding capacity of DC4 was mapped to the C-terminal third of its Duffy-binding–like β3 domain. DC4 was the target of broadly cross-reactive and adhesion-inhibitory IgG Abs, and levels of DC4-specific and adhesion-inhibitory IgG increased with age among P. falciparum–exposed children. Our study challenges earlier conclusions that group A PfEMP1 proteins are not central to ICAM-1–specific IE adhesion and support the feasibility of developing a vaccine preventing cerebral malaria by inhibiting cerebral IE sequestration. PMID:23209327

  5. A targeted mutation within the feline leukemia virus (FeLV) envelope protein immunosuppressive domain to improve a canarypox virus-vectored FeLV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Schlecht-Louf, Géraldine; Mangeney, Marianne; El-Garch, Hanane; Lacombe, Valérie; Poulet, Hervé; Heidmann, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    We previously delineated a highly conserved immunosuppressive (IS) domain within murine and primate retroviral envelope proteins that is critical for virus propagation in vivo. The envelope-mediated immunosuppression was assessed by the ability of the proteins, when expressed by allogeneic tumor cells normally rejected by engrafted mice, to allow these cells to escape, at least transiently, immune rejection. Using this approach, we identified key residues whose mutation (i) specifically abolishes immunosuppressive activity without affecting the "mechanical" function of the envelope protein and (ii) significantly enhances humoral and cellular immune responses elicited against the virus. The objective of this work was to study the immunosuppressive activity of the envelope protein (p15E) of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and evaluate the effect of its abolition on the efficacy of a vaccine against FeLV. Here we demonstrate that the FeLV envelope protein is immunosuppressive in vivo and that this immunosuppressive activity can be "switched off" by targeted mutation of a specific amino acid. As a result of the introduction of the mutated envelope sequence into a previously well characterized canarypox virus-vectored vaccine (ALVAC-FeLV), the frequency of vaccine-induced FeLV-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells was increased, whereas conversely, the frequency of vaccine-induced FeLV-specific interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing cells was reduced. This shift in the IFN-γ/IL-10 response was associated with a higher efficacy of ALVAC-FeLV against FeLV infection. This study demonstrates that FeLV p15E is immunosuppressive in vivo, that the immunosuppressive domain of p15E can modulate the FeLV-specific immune response, and that the efficacy of FeLV vaccines can be enhanced by inhibiting the immunosuppressive activity of the IS domain through an appropriate mutation.

  6. Site-Selective Monitoring of the Interaction of the SRA Domain of UHRF1 with Target DNA Sequences Labeled with 2-Aminopurine.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Vanille J; Kovalenko, Lesia; Humbert, Nicolas; Richert, Ludovic; Birck, Catherine; Ruff, Marc; Zaporozhets, Olga A; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Bronner, Christian; Mély, Yves

    2015-10-06

    UHRF1 plays a central role in the maintenance and transmission of epigenetic modifications by recruiting DNMT1 to hemimethylated CpG sites via its SET and RING-associated (SRA) domain, ensuring error-free duplication of methylation profiles. To characterize SRA-induced changes in the conformation and dynamics of a target 12 bp DNA duplex as a function of the methylation status, we labeled duplexes by the environment-sensitive probe 2-aminopurine (2-Ap) at various positions near or far from the central CpG recognition site containing either a nonmodified cytosine (NM duplex), a methylated cytosine (HM duplex), or methylated cytosines on both strands (BM duplex). Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence indicated that binding of SRA induced modest conformational and dynamical changes in NM, HM, and BM duplexes, with only slight destabilization of base pairs, restriction of global duplex flexibility, and diminution of local nucleobase mobility. Moreover, significant restriction of the local motion of residues flanking the methylcytosine in the HM duplex suggested that these residues are more rigidly bound to SRA, in line with a slightly higher affinity of the HM duplex as compared to that of the NM or BM duplex. Our results are consistent with a "reader" role, in which the SRA domain scans DNA sequences for hemimethylated CpG sites without perturbation of the structure of contacted nucleotides.

  7. Structure of the Brachydanio Rerio Polo-Like Kinase 1 (Plk1) Catalytic Domain in Complex With An Extended Inhibitor Targeting the Adaptive Pocket of the Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Elling, R.A.; Fucini, R.V.; Hanan, E.J.; Barr, K.J.; Zhu, J.; Paulvannan, K.; Yang, W.; Romanowski, M.J.

    2009-05-18

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a member of the Polo-like kinase family of serine/threonine kinases involved in the regulation of cell-cycle progression and cytokinesis and is an attractive target for the development of anticancer therapeutics. The catalytic domain of this enzyme shares significant primary amino-acid homology and structural similarity with another mitotic kinase, Aurora A. While screening an Aurora A library of ATP-competitive compounds, a urea-containing inhibitor with low affinity for mouse Aurora A but with submicromolar potency for human and zebrafish Plk1 (hPlk1 and zPlk1, respectively) was identified. A crystal structure of the zebrafish Plk1 kinase domain-inhibitor complex reveals that the small molecule occupies the purine pocket and extends past the catalytic lysine into the adaptive region of the active site. Analysis of the structures of this protein-inhibitor complex and of similar small molecules cocrystallized with other kinases facilitates understanding of the specificity of the inhibitor for Plk1 and documents for the first time that Plk1 can accommodate extended ATP-competitive compounds that project toward the adaptive pocket and help the enzyme order its activation segment.

  8. Large-Scale Screening of Preferred Interactions of Human Src Homology-3 (SH3) Domains Using Native Target Proteins as Affinity Ligands.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskas, Arunas; Schmotz, Constanze; Kesti, Tapio; Hepojoki, Jussi; Kleino, Iivari; Kaneko, Tomonori; Li, Shawn S C; Saksela, Kalle

    2016-10-01

    The Src Homology-3 (SH3) domains are ubiquitous protein modules that mediate important intracellular protein interactions via binding to short proline-rich consensus motifs in their target proteins. The affinity and specificity of such core SH3 - ligand contacts are typically modest, but additional binding interfaces can give rise to stronger and more specific SH3-mediated interactions. To understand how commonly such robust SH3 interactions occur in the human protein interactome, and to identify these in an unbiased manner we have expressed 324 predicted human SH3 ligands as full-length proteins in mammalian cells, and screened for their preferred SH3 partners using a phage display-based approach. This discovery platform contains an essentially complete repertoire of the ∼300 human SH3 domains, and involves an inherent binding threshold that ensures selective identification of only SH3 interactions with relatively high affinity. Such strong and selective SH3 partners could be identified for only 19 of these 324 predicted ligand proteins, suggesting that the majority of human SH3 interactions are relatively weak, and thereby have capacity for only modest inherent selectivity. The panel of exceptionally robust SH3 interactions identified here provides a rich source of leads and hypotheses for further studies. However, a truly comprehensive characterization of the human SH3 interactome will require novel high-throughput methods based on function instead of absolute binding affinity. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. M.(phi)BssHII, a novel cytosine-C5-DNA-methyltransferase with target-recognizing domains at separated locations of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Sethmann, S; Ceglowski, P; Willert, J; Iwanicka-Nowicka, R; Trautner, T A; Walter, J

    1999-01-01

    In all cytosine-C5-DNA-methyltransferases (MTases) from prokaryotes and eukaryotes, remarkably conserved amino acid sequence elements responsible for general enzymatic functions are arranged in the same canonical order. In addition, one variable region, which includes the target-recognizing domain(s) (TRDs) characteristic for each enzyme, has been localized in one region between the same blocks of these conserved elements. This conservation in the order of conserved and variable sequences suggests stringent structural constraints in the primary structure to obtain the correct folding of the enzymes. Here we report the characterization of a new type of a multispecific MTase, M.(phiphi)BssHII, which is expressed as two isoforms. Isoform I is an entirely novel type of MTase which has, in addition to the TRDs at the conventional location, one TRD located at a non-canonical position at its N-terminus. Isoform II is represented by the same MTase, but without the N-terminal TRD. The N-terminal TRD provides HaeII methylation specificity to isoform I. The TRD is fully functional when engineered into either the conventional variable region of M.(phiphi)BssHII or the related monospecific M.phi3TII MTase. The implications of this structural plasticity with respect to the evolution of MTases are discussed. PMID:10369689

  10. Targeting two-pore domain K+ channels TREK-1 and TASK-3 for the treatment of depression: a new therapeutic concept

    PubMed Central

    Borsotto, M; Veyssiere, J; Moha ou Maati, H; Devader, C; Mazella, J; Heurteaux, C

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a disease that is particularly frequent, affecting up to 20% of the population in Western countries. The origins of this pathology involve multiple genes as well as environmental and developmental factors leading to a disorder that remains difficult to treat. Several therapies for depression have been developed and these mainly target monoamine neurotransmitters. However, these treatments are not only associated with numerous adverse effects, but they are also ineffective for more than one-third of patients. Therefore, the need to develop new concepts to treat depression is crucial. Recently, studies using knockout mouse models have provided evidence for a crucial role of two members of the two-pore domain potassium channel (K2P) family, tandem P-domain weak inward rectifying K+ (TWIK)-related K+ channel 1 (TREK-1) and TWIK-related acid-sensitive K+ channel 3 (TASK-3) in the pathophysiology of depression. It is believed that TREK-1 and TASK-3 antagonists could lead to the development of new antidepressants. Herein, we describe the discovery of spadin, a natural peptide released from the maturation of the neurotensin receptor-3 (also known as sortilin), which specifically blocks the activity of the TREK-1 channel and displays particular antidepressant properties, with a rapid onset of action and the absence of adverse effects. The development of such molecules may open a new era in the field of psychiatry. PMID:25263033

  11. The extra domain A from fibronectin targets antigens to TLR4-expressing cells and induces cytotoxic T cell responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lasarte, Juan J; Casares, Noelia; Gorraiz, Marta; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Arribillaga, Laura; Mansilla, Cristina; Durantez, Maika; Llopiz, Diana; Sarobe, Pablo; Borrás-Cuesta, Francisco; Prieto, Jesús; Leclerc, Claude

    2007-01-15

    Vaccination strategies based on the in vivo targeting of Ags to dendritic cells (DCs) are needed to improve the induction of specific T cell immunity against tumors and infectious agents. In this study, we have used a recombinant protein encompassing the extra domain A from fibronectin (EDA), an endogenous ligand for TLR4, to deliver Ags to TLR4-expressing DC. The purified EDA protein was shown to bind to TLR4-expressing HEK293 cells and to activate the TLR4 signaling pathway. EDA also stimulated the production by DC of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-12 or TNF-alpha and induced their maturation in vitro and in vivo. A fusion protein between EDA and a cytotoxic T cell epitope from OVA efficiently presented this epitope to specific T cells and induced the in vivo activation of a strong and specific CTL response. Moreover, a fusion protein containing EDA and the full OVA also improved OVA presentation by DC and induced CTL responses in vivo. These EDA recombinant proteins protected mice from a challenge with tumor cells expressing OVA. These results strongly suggest that the fibronectin extra domain A may serve as a suitable Ag carrier for the development of antiviral or antitumoral vaccines.

  12. Crystal Structure of USP7 Ubiquitin-like Domains with an ICP0 Peptide Reveals a Novel Mechanism Used by Viral and Cellular Proteins to Target USP7.

    PubMed

    Pfoh, Roland; Lacdao, Ira Kay; Georges, Anna A; Capar, Adam; Zheng, Hong; Frappier, Lori; Saridakis, Vivian

    2015-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 immediate-early protein ICP0 activates viral genes during early stages of infection, affects cellular levels of multiple host proteins and is crucial for effective lytic infection. Being a RING-type E3 ligase prone to auto-ubiquitination, ICP0 relies on human deubiquitinating enzyme USP7 for protection against 26S proteasomal mediated degradation. USP7 is involved in apoptosis, epigenetics, cell proliferation and is targeted by several herpesviruses. Several USP7 partners, including ICP0, GMPS, and UHRF1, interact through its C-terminal domain (CTD), which contains five ubiquitin-like (Ubl) structures. Despite the fact that USP7 has emerged as a drug target for cancer therapy, structural details of USP7 regulation and the molecular mechanism of interaction at its CTD have remained elusive. Here, we mapped the binding site between an ICP0 peptide and USP7 and determined the crystal structure of the first three Ubl domains bound to the ICP0 peptide, which showed that ICP0 binds to a loop on Ubl2. Sequences similar to the USP7-binding site in ICP0 were identified in GMPS and UHRF1 and shown to bind USP7-CTD through Ubl2. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation assays in human cells comparing binding to USP7 with and without a Ubl2 mutation, confirmed the importance of the Ubl2 binding pocket for binding ICP0, GMPS and UHRF1. Therefore we have identified a novel mechanism of USP7 recognition that is used by both viral and cellular proteins. Our structural information was used to generate a model of near full-length USP7, showing the relative position of the ICP0/GMPS/UHRF1 binding pocket and the structural basis by which it could regulate enzymatic activity.

  13. Crystal Structure of USP7 Ubiquitin-like Domains with an ICP0 Peptide Reveals a Novel Mechanism Used by Viral and Cellular Proteins to Target USP7

    PubMed Central

    Capar, Adam; Zheng, Hong; Frappier, Lori; Saridakis, Vivian

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 immediate-early protein ICP0 activates viral genes during early stages of infection, affects cellular levels of multiple host proteins and is crucial for effective lytic infection. Being a RING-type E3 ligase prone to auto-ubiquitination, ICP0 relies on human deubiquitinating enzyme USP7 for protection against 26S proteasomal mediated degradation. USP7 is involved in apoptosis, epigenetics, cell proliferation and is targeted by several herpesviruses. Several USP7 partners, including ICP0, GMPS, and UHRF1, interact through its C-terminal domain (CTD), which contains five ubiquitin-like (Ubl) structures. Despite the fact that USP7 has emerged as a drug target for cancer therapy, structural details of USP7 regulation and the molecular mechanism of interaction at its CTD have remained elusive. Here, we mapped the binding site between an ICP0 peptide and USP7 and determined the crystal structure of the first three Ubl domains bound to the ICP0 peptide, which showed that ICP0 binds to a loop on Ubl2. Sequences similar to the USP7-binding site in ICP0 were identified in GMPS and UHRF1 and shown to bind USP7-CTD through Ubl2. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation assays in human cells comparing binding to USP7 with and without a Ubl2 mutation, confirmed the importance of the Ubl2 binding pocket for binding ICP0, GMPS and UHRF1. Therefore we have identified a novel mechanism of USP7 recognition that is used by both viral and cellular proteins. Our structural information was used to generate a model of near full-length USP7, showing the relative position of the ICP0/GMPS/UHRF1 binding pocket and the structural basis by which it could regulate enzymatic activity. PMID:26046769

  14. Targeting RING domains of Mdm2-MdmX E3 complex activates apoptotic arm of the p53 pathway in leukemia/lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Xu, C; Ling, X; Fan, C; Buckley, B P; Chernov, M V; Ellis, L; Li, F; Muñoz, I G; Wang, X

    2015-12-31

    Reactivation of tumor-suppressor p53 for targeted cancer therapy is an attractive strategy for cancers bearing wild-type (WT) p53. Targeting the Mdm2-p53 interface or MdmX ((MDM4), mouse double minute 4)-p53 interface or both has been a focus in the field. However, targeting the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2-MdmX really interesting new gene (RING)-RING interaction as a novel anticancer strategy has never been explored. In this report, we describe the identification and characterization of small molecule inhibitors targeting Mdm2-MdmX RING-RING interaction as a new class of E3 ligase inhibitors. With a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based E3 activity assay in high-throughput screening of a chemical library, we identified inhibitors (designated as MMRis (Mdm2-MdmX RING domain inhibitors)) that specifically inhibit Mdm2-MdmX E3 ligase activity toward Mdm2 and p53 substrates. MMRi6 and its analog MMRi64 are capable of disrupting Mdm2-MdmX interactions in vitro and activating p53 in cells. In leukemia cells, MMRi64 potently induces downregulation of Mdm2 and MdmX. In contrast to Nutlin3a, MMRi64 only induces the expression of pro-apoptotic gene PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) with minimal induction of growth-arresting gene p21. Consequently, MMRi64 selectively induces the apoptotic arm of the p53 pathway in leukemia/lymphoma cells. Owing to the distinct mechanisms of action of MMRi64 and Nutlin3a, their combination synergistically induces p53 and apoptosis. Taken together, this study reveals that Mdm2-MdmX has a critical role in apoptotic response of the p53 pathway and MMRi64 may serve as a new pharmacological tool for p53 studies and a platform for cancer drug development.

  15. Nuclear localization domains of GATA activator Gln3 are required for transcription of target genes through dephosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Numamoto, Minori; Tagami, Shota; Ueda, Yusuke; Imabeppu, Yusuke; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Maekawa, Hiromi; Harashima, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    The GATA transcription activator Gln3 in the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) activates transcription of nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR)-sensitive genes. In cells grown in the presence of preferred nitrogen sources, Gln3 is phosphorylated in a TOR-dependent manner and localizes in the cytoplasm. In cells grown in non-preferred nitrogen medium or treated with rapamycin, Gln3 is dephosphorylated and is transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, thereby activating the transcription of NCR-sensitive genes. Caffeine treatment also induces dephosphorylation of Gln3 and its translocation to the nucleus and transcription of NCR-sensitive genes. However, the details of the mechanism by which phosphorylation controls Gln3 localization and transcriptional activity are unknown. Here, we focused on two regions of Gln3 with nuclear localization signal properties (NLS-K, and NLS-C) and one with nuclear export signal (NES). We constructed various mutants for our analyses: gln3 containing point mutations in all potential phosphoacceptor sites (Thr-339, Ser-344, Ser-347, Ser-355, Ser-391) in the NLS and NES regions to produce non-phosphorylatable (alanine) or mimic-phosphorylatable (aspartic acid) residues; and deletion mutants. We found that phosphorylation of Gln3 was impaired in all of these mutations and that the aspartic acid substitution mutants showed drastic reduction of Gln3-mediated transcriptional activity despite the fact that the mutations had no effect on nuclear localization of Gln3. Our observations suggest that these regions are required for transcription of target genes presumably through dephosphorylation. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Targeted Labeling of Neurons in a Specific Functional Micro-domain of the Neocortex by Combining Intrinsic Signal and Two-photon Imaging

    PubMed Central

    O'Herron, Philip; Shen, Zhiming; Lu, Zhongyang; Schramm, Adrien E.; Levy, Manuel; Kara, Prakash

    2012-01-01

    In the primary visual cortex of non-rodent mammals, neurons are clustered according to their preference for stimulus features such as orientation1-4, direction5-7, ocular dominance8,9 and binocular disparity9. Orientation selectivity is the most widely studied feature and a continuous map with a quasi-periodic layout for preferred orientation is present across the entire primary visual cortex10,11. Integrating the synaptic, cellular and network contributions that lead to stimulus selective responses in these functional maps requires the hybridization of imaging techniques that span sub-micron to millimeter spatial scales. With conventional intrinsic signal optical imaging, the overall layout of functional maps across the entire surface of the visual cortex can be determined12. The development of in vivo two-photon microscopy using calcium sensitive dyes enables one to determine the synaptic input arriving at individual dendritic spines13 or record activity simultaneously from hundreds of individual neuronal cell bodies6,14. Consequently, combining intrinsic signal imaging with the sub-micron spatial resolution of two-photon microscopy offers the possibility of determining exactly which dendritic segments and cells contribute to the micro-domain of any functional map in the neocortex. Here we demonstrate a high-yield method for rapidly obtaining a cortical orientation map and targeting a specific micro-domain in this functional map for labeling neurons with fluorescent dyes in a non-rodent mammal. With the same microscope used for two-photon imaging, we first generate an orientation map using intrinsic signal optical imaging. Then we show how to target a micro-domain of interest using a micropipette loaded with dye to either label a population of neuronal cell bodies or label a single neuron such that dendrites, spines and axons are visible in vivo. Our refinements over previous methods facilitate an examination of neuronal structure-function relationships with sub

  17. Inhibition of HIV-1 Maturation via Small-Molecule Targeting of the Amino-Terminal Domain in the Viral Capsid Protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weifeng; Zhou, Jing; Halambage, Upul D; Jurado, Kellie A; Jamin, Augusta V; Wang, Yujie; Engelman, Alan N; Aiken, Christopher

    2017-05-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid protein is an attractive therapeutic target, owing to its multifunctionality in virus replication and the high fitness cost of amino acid substitutions in capsids to HIV-1 infectivity. To date, small-molecule inhibitors have been identified that inhibit HIV-1 capsid assembly and/or impair its function in target cells. Here, we describe the mechanism of action of the previously reported capsid-targeting HIV-1 inhibitor, Boehringer-Ingelheim compound 1 (C1). We show that C1 acts during HIV-1 maturation to prevent assembly of a mature viral capsid. However, unlike the maturation inhibitor bevirimat, C1 did not significantly affect the kinetics or fidelity of Gag processing. HIV-1 particles produced in the presence of C1 contained unstable capsids that lacked associated electron density and exhibited impairments in early postentry stages of infection, most notably reverse transcription. C1 inhibited assembly of recombinant HIV-1 CA in vitro and induced aberrant cross-links in mutant HIV-1 particles capable of spontaneous intersubunit disulfide bonds at the interhexamer interface in the capsid lattice. Resistance to C1 was conferred by a single amino acid substitution within the compound-binding site in the N-terminal domain of the CA protein. Our results demonstrate that the binding site for C1 represents a new pharmacological vulnerability in the capsid assembly stage of the HIV-1 life cycle.IMPORTANCE The HIV-1 capsid protein is an attractive but unexploited target for clinical drug development. Prior studies have identified HIV-1 capsid-targeting compounds that display different mechanisms of action, which in part reflects the requirement for capsid function at both the efferent and afferent phases of viral replication. Here, we show that one such compound, compound 1, interferes with assembly of the conical viral capsid during virion maturation and results in perturbations at a specific protein

  18. Chromatin remodeling gene AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 1A suppresses gastric cancer cell proliferation by targeting PIK3CA and PDK1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Cui, Shu-Jian; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Feng, Li; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor gene AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 1A (ARID1A) was frequently mutated in cancers. The modulation mechanism of ARID1A for PI3K/AKT signaling in gastric cancer (GC) remains elusive. Here, we found that depletion of endogenous ARID1A enhanced the in vitro proliferation, colony formation, cellular growth, nutrient uptake and in vivo xenograft tumor growth of GC cells. PI3K/AKT activation by ARID1A-silencing was profiled using a phospho-protein antibody array. The phosphorylation of PDK1, AKT, GSK3β and 70S6K, and the protein and mRNA expressions of PI3K and PDK1, were upregulated by ARID1A-silencing. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assay revealed that ARID1A-involved SWI/SNF complex inhibited PIK3CA and PDK1 transcription by direct binding to their promoters. Serial deletion mutation analyses revealed that the ARID1A central region containing the HIC1-binding domain, but not the ARID DNA-binding domain and the C-terminal domain, was essential for the inhibition of GC cell growth, PI3K/AKT pathway phosphorylation and its transcriptional modulation activity of PIK3CA and PDK1. The proliferation, cellular growth and glucose consumption of ARID1A-deficient GC cells were efficiently prohibited by allosteric inhibitors mk2206 and LY294002, which targeting AKT and PI3K, respectively. Both inhibitors also downregulated the phosphorylation of PI3K/AKT pathway in ARID1A-deficient GC cells. Such cells were sensitized to the treatment of LY294002, and AT7867, another inhibitor of AKT and p70S6K. The administration of LY294002 alone inhibited the in vivo growth of ARID1A- deficient GC cells in mouse xenograft model. Our study provides a novel insight into the modulatory function and mechanism of ARID1A in PI3K/AKT signaling in GC. PMID:27323812

  19. Adaptive Immunity against Leishmania Nucleoside Hydrolase Maps Its C-Terminal Domain as the Target of the CD4+ T Cell–Driven Protective Response

    PubMed Central

    Nico, Dirlei; Claser, Carla; Borja-Cabrera, Gulnara P.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Palatnik, Marcos; da Silva Soares, Irene; Rodrigues, Mauricio Martins; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2010-01-01

    Nucleoside hydrolases (NHs) show homology among parasite protozoa, fungi and bacteria. They are vital protagonists in the establishment of early infection and, therefore, are excellent candidates for the pathogen recognition by adaptive immune responses. Immune protection against NHs would prevent disease at the early infection of several pathogens. We have identified the domain of the NH of L. donovani (NH36) responsible for its immunogenicity and protective efficacy against murine visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Using recombinant generated peptides covering the whole NH36 sequence and saponin we demonstrate that protection against L. chagasi is related to its C-terminal domain (amino-acids 199–314) and is mediated mainly by a CD4+ T cell driven response with a lower contribution of CD8+ T cells. Immunization with this peptide exceeds in 36.73±12.33% the protective response induced by the cognate NH36 protein. Increases in IgM, IgG2a, IgG1 and IgG2b antibodies, CD4+ T cell proportions, IFN-γ secretion, ratios of IFN-γ/IL-10 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and percents of antibody binding inhibition by synthetic predicted epitopes were detected in F3 vaccinated mice. The increases in DTH and in ratios of TNFα/IL-10 CD4+ producing cells were however the strong correlates of protection which was confirmed by in vivo depletion with monoclonal antibodies, algorithm predicted CD4 and CD8 epitopes and a pronounced decrease in parasite load (90.5–88.23%; p = 0.011) that was long-lasting. No decrease in parasite load was detected after vaccination with the N-domain of NH36, in spite of the induction of IFN-γ/IL-10 expression by CD4+ T cells after challenge. Both peptides reduced the size of footpad lesions, but only the C-domain reduced the parasite load of mice challenged with L. amazonensis. The identification of the target of the immune response to NH36 represents a basis for the rationale development of a bivalent vaccine against leishmaniasis and for

  20. Antibodies targeting dengue virus envelope domain III are not required for serotype-specific protection or prevention of enhancement in vivo.

    PubMed

    Williams, Katherine L; Wahala, Wahala M P B; Orozco, Susana; de Silva, Aravinda M; Harris, Eva

    2012-07-20

    The envelope (E) protein of dengue virus (DENV) is composed of three domains (EDI, EDII, EDIII) and is the main target of neutralizing antibodies. Many monoclonal antibodies that bind EDIII strongly neutralize DENV. However in vitro studies indicate that anti-EDIII antibodies contribute little to the neutralizing potency of human DENV-immune serum. In this study, we assess the role of anti-EDIII antibodies in mouse and human DENV-immune serum in neutralizing or enhancing DENV infection in mice. We demonstrate that EDIII-depleted human DENV-immune serum was protective against homologous DENV infection in vivo. Although EDIII-depleted DENV-immune mouse serum demonstrated decreased neutralization potency in vitro, reduced protection in some organs, and enhanced disease in vivo, administration of increased volumes of EDIII-depleted serum abrogated these effects. These data indicate that anti-EDIII antibodies contribute to protection and minimize enhancement when present, but can be replaced by neutralizing antibodies targeting other epitopes on the dengue virion.

  1. Distinct functional and conformational states of the human lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase catalytic domain can be targeted by choice of the inhibitor chemotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidović, Dušica; Xie, Yuli; Rinderspacher, Alison; Deng, Shi-Xian; Landry, Donald W.; Chung, Caty; Smith, Deborah H.; Tautz, Lutz; Schürer, Stephan C.

    2011-09-01

    The lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase (LYP), encoded by the PTPN22 gene, has recently been identified as a promising drug target for human autoimmunity diseases. Like the majority of protein-tyrosine phosphatases LYP can adopt two functionally distinct forms determined by the conformation of the WPD-loop. The WPD-loop plays an important role in the catalytic dephosphorylation by protein-tyrosine phosphatases. Here we investigate the binding modes of two chemotypes of small molecule LYP inhibitors with respect to both protein conformations using computational modeling. To evaluate binding in the active form, we built a LYP protein structure model of high quality. Our results suggest that the two different compound classes investigated, bind to different conformations of the LYP phosphatase domain. Binding to the closed form is facilitated by an interaction with Asp195 in the WPD-loop, presumably stabilizing the active conformation. The analysis presented here is relevant for the design of inhibitors that specifically target either the closed or the open conformation of LYP in order to achieve better selectivity over phosphatases with similar binding sites.

  2. Inhibition of PlexA1-mediated brain tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis using a transmembrane domain targeting peptide

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Laurent; Goetz, Jacky; Vermot, Julien; Fernandez, Aurore; Baumlin, Nadège; Aci-Sèche, Samia; Orend, Gertraud; Roussel, Guy; Crémel, Gérard; Genest, Monique; Hubert, Pierre; Bagnard, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The neuropilin-plexin receptor complex regulates tumor cell migration and proliferation and thus is an interesting therapeutic target. High expression of neuropilin-1 is indeed associated with a bad prognosis in glioma patients. Q-RTPCR and tissue-array analyses showed here that Plexin-A1 is highly expressed in glioblastoma and that the highest level of expression correlates with the worse survival of patients. We next identified a developmental and tumor-associated pro-angiogenic role of Plexin-A1. Hence, by using molecular simulations and a two-hybrid like assay in parallel with biochemical and cellular assays we developed a specific Plexin-A1 peptidic antagonist disrupting transmembrane domain-mediated oligomerization of the receptor and subsequent signaling and functional activity. We found that this peptide exhibits anti-tumor activity in vivo on different human glioblastoma models including glioma cancer stem cells. Thus, screening Plexin-A1 expression and targeting Plexin-A1 in glioblastoma patients exhibit diagnostic and therapeutic value. PMID:27506939

  3. Targeting polyIC to EGFR over-expressing cells using a dsRNA binding protein domain tethered to EGF

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, Nufar; Lebendiker, Mario; Klein, Shoshana; Zigler, Maya; Langut, Yael; Levitzki, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Selective delivery of drugs to tumor cells can increase potency and reduce toxicity. In this study, we describe a novel recombinant chimeric protein, dsRBEC, which can bind polyIC and deliver it selectively into EGFR over-expressing tumor cells. dsRBEC, comprises the dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) of human PKR (hPKR), which serves as the polyIC binding moiety, fused to human EGF (hEGF), the targeting moiety. dsRBEC shows high affinity towards EGFR and triggers ligand-induced endocytosis of the receptor, thus leading to the selective internalization of polyIC into EGFR over-expressing tumor cells. The targeted delivery of polyIC by dsRBEC induced cellular apoptosis and the secretion of IFN-β and other pro-inflammatory cytokines. dsRBEC-delivered polyIC is much more potent than naked polyIC and is expected to reduce the toxicity caused by systemic delivery of polyIC. PMID:27598772

  4. Inhibition of PlexA1-mediated brain tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis using a transmembrane domain targeting peptide.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Laurent; Sawma, Paul; Garnier, Norbert; Meyer, Lionel A T; Fritz, Justine; Hussenet, Thomas; Spenlé, Caroline; Goetz, Jacky; Vermot, Julien; Fernandez, Aurore; Baumlin, Nadège; Aci-Sèche, Samia; Orend, Gertraud; Roussel, Guy; Crémel, Gérard; Genest, Monique; Hubert, Pierre; Bagnard, Dominique

    2016-09-06

    The neuropilin-plexin receptor complex regulates tumor cell migration and proliferation and thus is an interesting therapeutic target. High expression of neuropilin-1 is indeed associated with a bad prognosis in glioma patients. Q-RTPCR and tissue-array analyses showed here that Plexin-A1 is highly expressed in glioblastoma and that the highest level of expression correlates with the worse survival of patients. We next identified a developmental and tumor-associated pro-angiogenic role of Plexin-A1. Hence, by using molecular simulations and a two-hybrid like assay in parallel with biochemical and cellular assays we developed a specific Plexin-A1 peptidic antagonist disrupting transmembrane domain-mediated oligomerization of the receptor and subsequent signaling and functional activity. We found that this peptide exhibits anti-tumor activity in vivo on different human glioblastoma models including glioma cancer stem cells. Thus, screening Plexin-A1 expression and targeting Plexin-A1 in glioblastoma patients exhibit diagnostic and therapeutic value.

  5. Structure-based discovery of an inhibitor of Arf activation by Sec7 domains through targeting of protein–protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Viaud, Julien; Zeghouf, Mahel; Barelli, Hélène; Zeeh, Jean-Christophe; Padilla, André; Guibert, Bernard; Chardin, Pierre; Royer, Catherine A.; Cherfils, Jacqueline; Chavanieu, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Small molecules that produce nonfunctional protein–protein complexes are an alternative to competitive inhibitors for the inhibition of protein functions. Here we target the activation of the small GTP-binding protein Arf1, a major regulator of membrane traffic, by the Sec7 catalytic domain of its guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARNO. The crystal structure of the Arf1-GDP/ARNO complex, which initiates the exchange reaction, was used to discover an inhibitor, LM11, using in silico screening of a flexible pocket near the Arf1/ARNO interface. Using fluorescence kinetics and anisotropy, NMR spectroscopy and mutagenesis, we show that LM11 acts following a noncompetitive mechanism in which the inhibitor targets both Arf1-GDP and the Arf1-GDP/ARNO complex and produces a nonfunctional Arf-GDP/ARNO complex whose affinity is similar to that of the native complex. In addition, LM11 recognizes features of both Arf and ARNO near the Arf/Sec7 interface, a characteristic reminiscent of the paradigm interfacial inhibitor Brefeldin A. We then show that LM11 is a cell-active inhibitor that impairs Arf-dependent trafficking structures at the Golgi. Furthermore, LM11 inhibits ARNO-dependent migration of Madin–Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, demonstrating that ARNO is a target of LM11 in cells. Remarkably, LM11 inhibits the activation of Arf1 but not Arf6 in vitro, pointing to a possible synergy between Arf1 and Arf6 activation by ARNO in cell migration. Our design method shows that flexible regions in protein–protein complexes provide drugable sites with the potential to develop novel tools for investigating and inhibiting signaling pathways. PMID:17563369

  6. Structure-based discovery of an inhibitor of Arf activation by Sec7 domains through targeting of protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Viaud, Julien; Zeghouf, Mahel; Barelli, Hélène; Zeeh, Jean-Christophe; Padilla, André; Guibert, Bernard; Chardin, Pierre; Royer, Catherine A; Cherfils, Jacqueline; Chavanieu, Alain

    2007-06-19

    Small molecules that produce nonfunctional protein-protein complexes are an alternative to competitive inhibitors for the inhibition of protein functions. Here we target the activation of the small GTP-binding protein Arf1, a major regulator of membrane traffic, by the Sec7 catalytic domain of its guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARNO. The crystal structure of the Arf1-GDP/ARNO complex, which initiates the exchange reaction, was used to discover an inhibitor, LM11, using in silico screening of a flexible pocket near the Arf1/ARNO interface. Using fluorescence kinetics and anisotropy, NMR spectroscopy and mutagenesis, we show that LM11 acts following a noncompetitive mechanism in which the inhibitor targets both Arf1-GDP and the Arf1-GDP/ARNO complex and produces a nonfunctional Arf-GDP/ARNO complex whose affinity is similar to that of the native complex. In addition, LM11 recognizes features of both Arf and ARNO near the Arf/Sec7 interface, a characteristic reminiscent of the paradigm interfacial inhibitor Brefeldin A. We then show that LM11 is a cell-active inhibitor that impairs Arf-dependent trafficking structures at the Golgi. Furthermore, LM11 inhibits ARNO-dependent migration of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, demonstrating that ARNO is a target of LM11 in cells. Remarkably, LM11 inhibits the activation of Arf1 but not Arf6 in vitro, pointing to a possible synergy between Arf1 and Arf6 activation by ARNO in cell migration. Our design method shows that flexible regions in protein-protein complexes provide drugable sites with the potential to develop novel tools for investigating and inhibiting signaling pathways.

  7. Target-mediated clearance and bio-distribution of a monoclonal antibody against the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor 2 domain of Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lene; Petersen, Lars Christian; Lauritzen, Brian; Clausen, Jes Thorn; Grell, Susanne Nedergaard; Agersø, Henrik; Sørensen, Brit Binow; Hilden, Ida; Almholt, Kasper

    2014-03-01

    A humanised monoclonal antibody, concizumab, that binds with high affinity to the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor (KPI) 2 domain of human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is in clinical development. It promotes coagulation by neutralising the inhibitory function of TFPI and may provide a subcutaneous prophylaxis option for patients with haemophilia. We aimed to study biodistribution and pharmacokinetics (PK) of concizumab. Blockage of cellular TFPI by concizumab was measured by tissue factor/Factor VIIa-mediated Factor X activation on human EA.hy926 cells. Biodistribution of concizumab was analysed in rabbits by immunohistology, and the PK was measured in rabbits and rats. Concizumab bound to cell surface TFPI on EA.hy926 cells and neutralised TFPI inhibition of Factor X activation. The antibody cross-reacted with rabbit TFPI, but not with rat TFPI, allowing for comparative PK studies. PK data in rats described a log-linear profile typical for a non-binding antibody, whereas PK data in rabbits revealed a non-linear, dose-dependent profile, consistent with a target-mediated clearance mechanism. Immunohistology in rabbits during target-saturation showed localisation of the antibody on the endothelium of the microvasculature in several organs. We observed a marked co-localisation with endogenous rabbit TFPI, but a negligible sub-endothelial build-up. Concizumab binds and neutralises the inhibitory effect of cell surface-bound TFPI. The PK profile observed in rabbits is consistent with a TFPI-mediated drug disposition. Double immunofluorescence shows co-localisation of the antibody with TFPI on the endothelium of the microvasculature and points to this TFPI as a putative target involved in the clearance mechanism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Time-domain in vivo near infrared fluorescence imaging for evaluation of matriptase as a potential target for the development of novel, inhibitor-based tumor therapies.

    PubMed

    Napp, Joanna; Dullin, Christian; Müller, Friedemann; Uhland, Kerstin; Petri, Jean Bernhard; van de Locht, Andreas; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Alves, Frauke

    2010-10-15

    Proteolytic enzymes expressed on the surface of tumor cells, and thus easily accessible to external interventions, represent useful targets for anticancer and antimetastatic therapies. In our study, we thoroughly evaluated matriptase, a trypsin-like transmembrane serine protease, as potential target for novel inhibitor-based tumor therapies. We applied time-domain near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging to characterize expression and activity of matriptase in vivo in an orthotopic AsPC-1 pancreatic tumor model in nude mice. We show strong and tumor-specific binding of intravenously injected Cy5.5 labeled antimatriptase antibody (MT-Ab*Cy5.5) only to primary AsPC-1 tumors and their metastases over time within living mice, taking into account fluorescence intensities and fluorescence lifetimes of the applied probes. Specific binding of MT-Ab*Cy5.5 to tumor sites was confirmed by ex vivo NIRF imaging of tumor tissue, NIRF microscopy and by coregistration of the in vivo acquired NIRF intensity maps to anatomical structures visualized by flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT) in living mice. Moreover, using an activatable synthetic substrate S*DY-681 we could clearly demonstrate that matriptase is proteolytically active in vitro as well as in vivo in tumor-bearing mice, and that application of synthetic active-site inhibitors having high affinity and selectivity toward matriptase can efficiently inhibit its proteolytic activity for at least 24 hr. We thus successfully applied NIRF imaging in combination with fpVCT to characterize matriptase as a promising molecular target for inhibitor-based cancer therapies.

  9. BTB-BACK Domain Protein POB1 Suppresses Immune Cell Death by Targeting Ubiquitin E3 ligase PUB17 for Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Mesmar, Joelle; McLellan, Hazel; Yang, Chengwei; Craig, Adam; Zhang, Cunjin; Moore, Jonathan David; Tian, Zhendong; Birch, Paul R. J.; Sadanandom, Ari

    2017-01-01

    Hypersensitive response programmed cell death (HR-PCD) is a critical feature in plant immunity required for pathogen restriction and prevention of disease development. The precise control of this process is paramount to cell survival and an effective immune response. The discovery of new components that function to suppress HR-PCD will be instrumental in understanding the regulation of this fundamental mechanism. Here we report the identification and characterisation of a BTB domain E3 ligase protein, POB1, that functions to suppress HR-PCD triggered by evolutionarily diverse pathogens. Nicotiana benthamiana and tobacco plants with reduced POB1 activity show accelerated HR-PCD whilst those with increased POB1 levels show attenuated HR-PCD. We demonstrate that POB1 dimerization and nuclear localization are vital for its function in HR-PCD suppression. Using protein-protein interaction assays, we identify the Plant U-Box E3 ligase PUB17, a well established positive regulator of plant innate immunity, as a target for POB1-mediated proteasomal degradation. Using confocal imaging and in planta immunoprecipitation assays we show that POB1 interacts with PUB17 in the nucleus and stimulates its degradation. Mutated versions of POB1 that show reduced interaction with PUB17 fail to suppress HR-PCD, indicating that POB1-mediated degradation of PUB17 U-box E3 ligase is an important step for negative regulation of specific immune pathways in plants. Our data reveals a new mechanism for BTB domain proteins in suppressing HR-PCD in plant innate immune responses. PMID:28056034

  10. Identification of a Chromogranin A Domain That Mediates Binding to Secretogranin III and Targeting to Secretory Granules in Pituitary Cells and Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hosaka, Masahiro; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Sakai, Yuko; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Takeuchi, Toshiyuki

    2002-01-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA) is transported restrictedly to secretory granules in neuroendocrine cells. In addition to pH- and Ca2+-dependent aggregation, CgA is known to bind to a number of vesicle matrix proteins. Because the binding-prone property of CgA with secretory proteins may be essential for its targeting to secretory granules, we screened its binding partner proteins using a yeast two-hybrid system. We found that CgA bound to secretogranin III (SgIII) by specific interaction both in vitro and in endocrine cells. Localization analysis showed that CgA and SgIII were coexpressed in pituitary and pancreatic endocrine cell lines, whereas SgIII was not expressed in the adrenal glands and PC12 cells. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that CgA and SgIII were specifically colocalized in large secretory granules in male rat gonadotropes, which possess large-type and small-type granules. An immunocytochemical analysis revealed that deletion of the binding domain (CgA 48–111) for SgIII missorted CgA to the constitutive pathway, whereas deletion of the binding domain (SgIII 214–373) for CgA did not affect the sorting of SgIII to the secretory granules in AtT-20 cells. These findings suggest that CgA localizes with SgIII by specific binding in secretory granules in SgIII-expressing pituitary and pancreatic endocrine cells, whereas other mechanisms are likely to be responsible for CgA localization in secretory granules of SgIII-lacking adrenal chromaffin cells and PC12 cells. PMID:12388744

  11. Rationally Targeted Mutations at the V1V2 Domain of the HIV-1 Envelope to Augment Virus Neutralization by Anti-V1V2 Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guomiao; Upadhyay, Chitra; Zhang, Jing; Pan, Ruimin; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Hioe, Catarina E.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env) are the only viral antigens present on the virus surface and serve as the key targets for virus-neutralizing antibodies. However, HIV-1 deploys multiple strategies to shield the vulnerable sites on its Env from neutralizing antibodies. The V1V2 domain located at the apex of the HIV-1 Env spike is known to encompass highly variable loops, but V1V2 also contains immunogenic conserved elements recognized by cross-reactive antibodies. This study evaluates human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against V2 epitopes which overlap with the conserved integrin α4β7-binding LDV/I motif, designated as the V2i (integrin) epitopes. We postulate that the V2i Abs have weak or no neutralizing activities because the V2i epitopes are often occluded from antibody recognition. To gain insights into the mechanisms of the V2i occlusion, we evaluated three elements at the distal end of the V1V2 domain shown in the structure of V2i epitope complexed with mAb 830A to be important for antibody recognition of the V2i epitope. Amino-acid substitutions at position 179 that restore the LDV/I motif had minimal effects on virus sensitivity to neutralization by most V2i mAbs. However, a charge change at position 153 in the V1 region significantly increased sensitivity of subtype C virus ZM109 to most V2i mAbs. Separately, a disulfide bond introduced to stabilize the hypervariable region of V2 loop also enhanced virus neutralization by some V2i mAbs, but the effects varied depending on the virus. These data demonstrate that multiple elements within the V1V2 domain act independently and in a virus-dependent fashion to govern the antibody recognition and accessibility of V2i epitopes, suggesting the need for multi-pronged strategies to counter the escape and the shielding mechanisms obstructing the V2i Abs from neutralizing HIV-1. PMID:26491873

  12. The N-terminal Zinc Finger and Flanking Basic Domains Represent the Minimal Region of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein for Targeting Chaperone Function

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Mithun; Wang, Wei; Vo, My-Nuong; Rouzina, Ioulia; Barany, George; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid (NC) protein is a chaperone that facilitates nucleic acid conformational changes to form the most thermodynamically stable arrangement. The critical role of NC in many steps of the viral life cycle makes it an attractive therapeutic target. The chaperone activity of NC depends on its nucleic acid aggregating ability, duplex destabilizing activity and rapid on/off binding kinetics. During the minus-strand transfer step of reverse transcription, NC chaperones the annealing of highly structured transactivation response region (TAR) RNA to the complementary TAR DNA. In this work, the role of different functional domains of NC in facilitating 59-nucleotide TAR RNA/DNA annealing was probed by using chemically-synthesized peptides derived from full-length (55 amino acids) HIV-1 NC: NC(1-14), NC(15-35), NC(1-28), NC(1-35), NC(29-55), NC(36-55) and NC(11-55). Most of these peptides displayed significantly reduced annealing kinetics, even when present at much higher concentrations than wild-type (WT) NC. In addition, these truncated NC constructs generally bind more weakly to single-stranded DNA and are less effective nucleic acid aggregating agents than full-length NC, consistent with the loss of both electrostatic and hydrophobic contacts. However, NC(1-35) displayed annealing kinetics, nucleic acid binding, and aggregation activity that were very similar to that of WT NC. Thus, we conclude that the N-terminal zinc finger, flanked by the N-terminus and linker domains, represents the minimal sequence that is necessary and sufficient for chaperone function in vitro. In addition, covalent continuity of the N-terminal 35 amino acids of NC is critical for full activity. Thus, although the hydrophobic pocket formed by residues proximal to the C-terminal zinc finger has been a major focus of recent anti-NC therapeutic strategies, NC(1-35) represents an alternative target for therapeutics aimed at disrupting NC

  13. Post-translational processing of surfactant protein-C proprotein: targeting motifs in the NH(2)-terminal flanking domain are cleaved in late compartments.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A L; Braidotti, P; Pietra, G G; Russo, S J; Kabore, A; Wang, W J; Beers, M F

    2001-03-01

    Rat surfactant protein (SP)-C is a 3.7-kD hydrophobic lung-specific protein generated from proteolytic processing of a 21-kD propeptide (SP-C(21)). We have demonstrated that initial post-translational processing of SP-C(21) involves two cleavages of the COOH-terminus (Beers and colleagues, J. Biol. Chem. 1994;269:20,318--20,328). The goal of the current study was to define processing and function of the NH(2)-terminal flanking domain. Epitope-specific antisera directed against spatially distinct regions of the NH(2) terminus, NPROSP-C(2-9) (epitope = D(2)-L(9)) and NPROSP-C(11-23) (= E(11)-Q(23)) were produced. By Western blotting, both antisera identified SP-C(21) in microsomes. A 6-kD form (SP-C(6)), enriched in lamellar bodies (LBs), was detected only by NPROSP-C(11-23) and not extractable with NaCO(3) treatment. Immunogold staining of ultrathin lung sections with NPROSP-C(11-23) identified proSP-C in both multivesicular bodies (mvb) and LBs whereas NPROSP-C(2-9) labeled only mvb. (35)S-pulse chase analysis demonstrated synthesis of SP-C(21) and three intermediate forms (SP-C(16), SP-C(7), and SP-C(6)). Complete processing involved four separate cleavages with a precursor- product relationship between the low molecular weight forms SP-C(7) and SP-C(6). Fluorescence microscopy of A549 cells expressing fusion proteins of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and proSP-C NH(2)-terminal deletion mutants showed targeting of EGFP/SP-C(1-194) and EGFP/SP-C(10-194) to early endosomal antigen-1-negative, CD-63-positive cytoplasmic vesicles whereas EGFP/SP-C(19-194), EGFP/SP-C(Delta 10-18), and EGFP/SP-C(24-194) were restricted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We conclude that synthetic processing includes a previously unrecognized cleavage of the proximal NH(2) terminus (M(1)-L(9)), which occurs after removal of COOH-flanking domains (H(59)-I(194)) but before packaging in LBs, and that the region M(10)-T(18) is required for targeting of proSP-C to post-ER vesicular

  14. Structures of the Karyopherins Kap121p and Kap60p Bound to the Nuclear Pore-Targeting Domain of the SUMO Protease Ulp1p.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Hidemi; Kobayashi, Junya; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2017-01-20

    The budding yeast small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protease Ulp1p catalyzes both the processing of newly synthesized SUMO to its mature form and the deconjugation of SUMO from target proteins, thereby regulating a wide range of cellular processes including cell division, DNA repair, DNA replication, transcription, and mRNA quality control. Ulp1p is localized primarily at the nuclear pore complex (NPC) through interactions involving the karyopherins Kap121p and Kap95p-Kap60p heterodimer and a subset of nuclear pore-associated proteins. The sequestration of Ulp1p at the nuclear periphery is crucial for the proper control of protein desumoylation. To gain insights into the role of the karyopherins in regulating the localization of Ulp1p, we have determined the crystal structures of Kap121p and Kap60p bound to the N-terminal non-catalytic domain of Ulp1p that is necessary and sufficient for NPC targeting. Contrary to a previous proposal that Ulp1p is tethered to the transport channel of the NPC through unconventional interactions with the karyopherins, our structures reveal that Ulp1p has canonical nuclear localization signals (NLSs): (1) an isoleucine-lysine-NLS (residues 51-55) that binds to the NLS-binding site of Kap121p, and (2) a classical bipartite NLS (residues 154-172) that binds to the major and minor NLS-binding sites of Kap60p. Ulp1p also binds Kap95p directly, and the Ulp1p-Kap95p binding is enhanced by the importin-β-binding domain of Kap60p. GTP-bound Gsp1p (the yeast Ran ortholog) and the exportin Cse1p cooperate to release Ulp1p from the karyopherins, indicating that the stable sequestration of Ulp1p to the NPC would require a karyopherin-independent mechanism to anchor Ulp1p at the NPC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Targeted deletion of the mouse POU domain gene Brn-3a causes selective loss of neurons in the brainstem and trigeminal ganglion, uncoordinated limb movement, and impaired suckling.

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, M; Gan, L; Zhou, L; Klein, W H; Nathans, J

    1996-01-01

    The Brn-3 subfamily of POU domain genes are expressed in sensory neurons and in select brainstem nuclei. Earlier work has shown that targeted deletion of the Brn-3b and Brn-3c genes produce, respectively, defects in the retina and in the inner ear. We show herein that targeted deletion of the Brn-3a gene results in defective suckling and in uncoordinated limb and trunk movements, leading to early postnatal death. Brn-3a (-/-) mice show a loss of neurons in the trigeminal ganglia, the medial habenula, the red nucleus, and the caudal region of the inferior olivary nucleus but not in the retina and dorsal root ganglia. In the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia, but not in the retina, there is a marked decrease in the frequency of neurons expressing Brn-3b and Brn-3c, suggesting that Brn-3a positively regulates Brn-3b and Brn-3c expression in somatosensory neurons. Thus, Brn-3a exerts its major developmental effects in somatosensory neurons and in brainstem nuclei involved in motor control. The pheno-types of Brn-3a, Brn-3b, and Brn-3c mutant mice indicate that individual Brn-3 genes have evolved to control development in the auditory, visual, or somatosensory systems and that despite differences between these systems in transduction mechanisms, sensory organ structures, and central information processing, there may be fundamental homologies in the genetic regulatory events that control their development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:8876243

  16. The Transmembrane Domain of HIV-1 gp41 Inhibits T-Cell Activation by Targeting Multiple T-Cell Receptor Complex Components through Its GxxxG Motif.

    PubMed

    Rotem, Etai; Reuven, Eliran Moshe; Klug, Yoel A; Shai, Yechiel

    2016-02-23

    To successfully infect and persist within its host, HIV-1 utilizes several immunosuppressive motifs within its gp41 envelope glycoprotein to manipulate and evade the immune system. The transmembrane domain (TMD) of gp41 downregulates T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling through a hitherto unknown mechanism. Interactions between TMDs within the membrane milieu have been shown to be typically mediated by particular amino acids, such as interactions between basic and acidic residues and dimerization motifs as GxxxG. The HIV-1 TMD exhibits both a polar arginine (Arg(696)) residue and a GxxxG motif, making them ideal candidates for mediators of TMD-TCR interaction. Using a primary T-cell activation assay and biochemical and biophysical methods, we demonstrate that the gp41 TMD directly interacts with TMDs of the TCR and the CD3 coreceptors (δ, γ, and ε) within the membrane, presumably leading to impairment of complex assembly. Additionally, we reveal that although Arg(696) does not affect TMD immunosuppression, the GxxxG motif is crucial in mediating gp41's TMD interaction with the CD3 coreceptors of the TCR. These findings suggest that compared with other gp41 immunosuppressive motifs, the gp41 TMD has multiple targets within the TCR complex, suggesting less susceptibility to evolutionary pressure and consequently being advantageous for the virus over the host immune response. Furthermore, as the GxxxG motif mediates interactions of the gp41 TMD with multiple receptors, it emerges as an attractive drug target. This multitarget inhibitory mechanism might be a strategy utilized by HIV to interfere with the function of additional host receptors.

  17. A hybrid protein comprising ATF domain of pro-UK and VAS, an angiogenesis inhibitor, is a potent candidate for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiming; Xu, Qian; Dong, Xiangbai; Cao, Lin; Huang, Xiaofeng; Hu, Qingang; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2008-08-15

    Directional and controllable degradation of extracellular matrix mediated by the uPA-uPA receptor (uPAR) system is ubiquitously implicated in tumor establishment, invasion and metastasis. Targeting the excessive activation of this system as well as the proliferation of the tumor vascular endothelial cell would be expected to prevent tumor neovasculature and halt the tumor development. In this study, we created a fusion protein (ALV), comprising the aminoterminal fragment (ATF) of urokinase and VAS, the antiangiogenic functional domain of vasostatin. The antitumor activity of this hybrid molecule was evaluated with both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Cell adhesion and motility assays demonstrated that ALV, owing to its ATF moiety, could interact with uPAR on the tumor cell surface with high affinity and specificity, and thereby might competitively inhibit the plasmin activation by localized urokinase and contribute to the suppression of tumor invasion. These results and speculations were validated by zymography assay and Matrigel invasion assay. In addition, ALV exhibited an improved inhibitory efficacy against endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and capillary vessel formation in a 3D angiogenesis model, proving that ATF and VAS, when fused into a chimeric molecule, cooperatively inhibited angiogenesis by targeting both the interaction of uPA and uPAR on cell surface (by ATF) and EC proliferation (mainly by VAS). Animal model confirmed that, at the same molar dose, ALV produced significantly higher therapeutic benefit than VAS and ATF in terms of tumor growth delay and mice survival prolongation. Conclusively coupling VAS with the uPAR ligand ATF resulted in an improved antineoplastic activity, which may show a novel avenue for the design of tumor therapeutic drugs. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Eps15 Homology Domain-containing Protein 3 Regulates Cardiac T-type Ca2+ Channel Targeting and Function in the Atria*

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Jerry; Musa, Hassan; Kline, Crystal F.; Makara, Michael A.; Little, Sean C.; Higgins, John D.; Hund, Thomas J.; Band, Hamid; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Proper trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters is requisite for normal cardiac function. Endosome-based protein trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters in the heart is poorly understood, particularly in vivo. In fact, for select cardiac cell types such as atrial myocytes, virtually nothing is known regarding endosomal transport. We previously linked the C-terminal Eps15 homology domain-containing protein 3 (EHD3) with endosome-based protein trafficking in ventricular cardiomyocytes. Here we sought to define the roles and membrane protein targets for EHD3 in atria. We identify the voltage-gated T-type Ca2+ channels (CaV3.1, CaV3.2) as substrates for EHD3-dependent trafficking in atria. Mice selectively lacking EHD3 in heart display reduced expression and targeting of both Cav3.1 and CaV3.2 in the atria. Furthermore, functional experiments identify a significant loss of T-type-mediated Ca2+ current in EHD3-deficient atrial myocytes. Moreover, EHD3 associates with both CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. T-type Ca2+ channel function is critical for proper electrical conduction through the atria. Consistent with these roles, EHD3-deficient mice demonstrate heart rate variability, sinus pause, and atrioventricular conduction block. In summary, our findings identify CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 as substrates for EHD3-dependent protein trafficking in heart, provide in vivo data on endosome-based trafficking pathways in atria, and implicate EHD3 as a key player in the regulation of atrial myocyte excitability and cardiac conduction. PMID:25825486

  19. Release of Nonmuscle Myosin II from the Cytosolic Domain of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2 Is Required for Target Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Unni M.; Dechert, Lisa; Davidson, Uchechukwu I.; Waitkus, Matthew; Mavrakis, Lori; Lyons, Katherine; Beach, Jordan R.; Li, Xiaoxia; Egelhoff, Thomas T.; Fox, Paul L.; DiCorleto, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) elicits its biological activities through activation of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1, also known as p55) and TNFR2 (also known as p75). The activities of both receptors are required for the TNF-α–induced proinflammatory response. The adaptor protein TNFR-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) is critical for either p55- or p75-mediated activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, as well as for target gene expression. Here, we identified nonmuscle myosin II (myosin) as a binding partner of p75. TNF-α–dependent signaling by p75 and induction of target gene expression persisted for substantially longer in cells deficient in myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC, a component of myosin) than in cells replete in myosin. In resting endothelial cells, myosin was bound constitutively to the intracellular region of p75, a region that overlaps with the TRAF2-binding domain, and TNF-α caused the rapid dissociation of myosin from p75. At early time points after exposure to TNF-α, p75 activated Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1). Inhibition of ROCK1 activity blocked TNF-α–dependent phosphorylation of MRLC and the dissociation of myosin from p75. ROCK1-dependent release of myosin was necessary for the TNF-α–dependent recruitment of TRAF2 to p75 and for p75-specific activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling. Thus, our findings have revealed a previously uncharacterized, noncanonical regulatory function of myosin in cytokine signaling. PMID:23861542

  20. Design and Synthesis of a Cell-Permeable, Drug-Like Small Molecule Inhibitor Targeting the Polo-Box Domain of Polo-Like Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Mija; Cheong, Chaejoon; Nam, Ky-Youb; Gunasekaran, Pethaiah; Hwang, Eunha; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Shin, Song Yub; Lee, Kyung S.; Ryu, Eunkyung; Bang, Jeong Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Background Polo-like kinase-1 (Plk1) plays a crucial role in cell proliferation and the inhibition of Plk1 has been considered as a potential target for specific inhibitory drugs in anti-cancer therapy. Several research groups have identified peptide-based inhibitors that target the polo-box domain (PBD) of Plk1 and bind to the protein with high affinity in in vitro assays. However, inadequate proteolytic resistance and cell permeability of the peptides hinder the development of these peptide-based inhibitors into novel therapeutic compounds. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to overcome the shortcomings of peptide-based inhibitors, we designed and synthesized small molecule inhibitors. Among these molecules, bg-34 exhibited a high binding affinity for Plk1-PBD and it could cross the cell membrane in its unmodified form. Furthermore, bg-34-dependent inhibition of Plk1-PBD was sufficient for inducing apoptosis in HeLa cells. Moreover, modeling studies performed on Plk1-PBD in complex with bg-34 revealed that bg-34 can interact effectively with Plk1-PBD. Conclusion/Significance We demonstrated that the molecule bg-34 is a potential drug candidate that exhibits anti-Plk1-PBD activity and possesses the favorable characteristics of high cell permeability and stability. We also determined that bg-34 induced apoptotic cell death by inhibiting Plk1-PBD in HeLa cells at the same concentration as PEGylated 4j peptide, which can inhibit Plk1-PBD activity 1000 times more effectively than bg-34 can in in vitro assays. This study may help to design and develop drug-like small molecule as Plk1-PBD inhibitor for better therapeutic activity. PMID:25211362

  1. Eps15 Homology Domain-containing Protein 3 Regulates Cardiac T-type Ca2+ Channel Targeting and Function in the Atria.

    PubMed

    Curran, Jerry; Musa, Hassan; Kline, Crystal F; Makara, Michael A; Little, Sean C; Higgins, John D; Hund, Thomas J; Band, Hamid; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-05-08

    Proper trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters is requisite for normal cardiac function. Endosome-based protein trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters in the heart is poorly understood, particularly in vivo. In fact, for select cardiac cell types such as atrial myocytes, virtually nothing is known regarding endosomal transport. We previously linked the C-terminal Eps15 homology domain-containing protein 3 (EHD3) with endosome-based protein trafficking in ventricular cardiomyocytes. Here we sought to define the roles and membrane protein targets for EHD3 in atria. We identify the voltage-gated T-type Ca(2+) channels (CaV3.1, CaV3.2) as substrates for EHD3-dependent trafficking in atria. Mice selectively lacking EHD3 in heart display reduced expression and targeting of both Cav3.1 and CaV3.2 in the atria. Furthermore, functional experiments identify a significant loss of T-type-mediated Ca(2+) current in EHD3-deficient atrial myocytes. Moreover, EHD3 associates with both CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. T-type Ca(2+) channel function is critical for proper electrical conduction through the atria. Consistent with these roles, EHD3-deficient mice demonstrate heart rate variability, sinus pause, and atrioventricular conduction block. In summary, our findings identify CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 as substrates for EHD3-dependent protein trafficking in heart, provide in vivo data on endosome-based trafficking pathways in atria, and implicate EHD3 as a key player in the regulation of atrial myocyte excitability and cardiac conduction.

  2. A protein-targeting strategy used to develop a selective inhibitor of the E17K point mutation in the PH domain of Akt1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyle, Kaycie M.; Farrow, Blake; Qiao Hee, Ying; Work, Jeremy; Wong, Michelle; Lai, Bert; Umeda, Aiko; Millward, Steven W.; Nag, Arundhati; Das, Samir; Heath, James R.

    2015-05-01

    Ligands that can bind selectively to proteins with single amino-acid point mutations offer the potential to detect or treat an abnormal protein in the presence of the wild type (WT). However, it is difficult to develop a selective ligand if the point mutation is not associated with an addressable location, such as a binding pocket. Here we report an all-chemical synthetic epitope-targeting strategy that we used to discover a 5-mer peptide with selectivity for the E17K-transforming point mutation in the pleckstrin homology domain of the Akt1 oncoprotein. A fragment of Akt1 that contained the E17K mutation and an I19[propargylglycine] substitution was synthesized to form an addressable synthetic epitope. Azide-presenting peptides that clicked covalently onto this alkyne-presenting epitope were selected from a library using in situ screening. One peptide exhibits a 10:1 in vitro selectivity for the oncoprotein relative to the WT, with a similar selectivity in cells. This 5-mer peptide was expanded into a larger ligand that selectively blocks the E17K Akt1 interaction with its PIP3 (phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate) substrate.

  3. Inclusive fitness affects both prosocial and antisocial behavior: target gender and insult domain moderate the link between genetic relatedness and aggression.

    PubMed

    Gesselman, Amanda N; Webster, Gregory D

    2012-11-26

    Although prior research has examined the relationship between genetic relatedness and helping behavior (Burnstein, Crandall, and Kitayama, 1994), less is known about its role in aggressive responses to insults (Fitzgerald and Ketterer, 2011). Drawing on inclusive fitness theory (Hamilton, 1964) and the Kinship, Acceptance, and Rejection Model of Altruism and Aggression (KARMAA; Webster, 2008; Webster et al., 2012), we designed a 2 (participant gender) × 2 (target gender) × 2 (insult: status vs. reproductive) × 3 (relatedness: stranger vs. cousin vs. sibling) between-person experiment in which 489 participants (a) read vignettes in which a stranger, cousin, or sibling was insulted and (b) reported their emotional reaction and retaliation likelihood (six-item α = .91) in response to the insult. Consistent with theory and prior research, men were significantly more aggressive than women, and people were significantly more aggressive responding to insults against kin than non-kin. These findings support theoretically-derived, dynamic, and domain-specific links among insults, gender, relatedness, and aggression.

  4. A Novel Multivalent, Single-Domain Antibody Targeting TcdA and TcdB Prevents Fulminant Clostridium difficile Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiyong; Schmidt, Diane; Liu, Weilong; Li, Shan; Shi, Lianfa; Sheng, Jinliang; Chen, Kevin; Yu, Hua; Tremblay, Jacqueline M.; Chen, Xinhua; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Sundberg, Eric J.; Kelly, Ciaran P.; Bai, Guang; Shoemaker, Charles B.; Feng, Hanping

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and associated mortality have increased rapidly worldwide in recent years. Therefore, it is critical to develop new therapies for CDI. In this study, we generated a novel, potently neutralizing, tetravalent, and bispecific antibody composed of 2 heavy-chain-only VH (VHH) binding domains against both TcdA and TcdB (designated “ABA”) that reverses fulminant CDI in mice infected with an epidemic 027 strain after a single injection of the antibody. We demonstrated that ABA bound to both toxins simultaneously and displayed a significantly enhanced neutralizing activity both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, ABA was able to broadly neutralize toxins from clinical C. difficile isolates that express both TcdA and TcdB but failed to neutralize the toxin from TcdA−TcdB+ C. difficile strains. This study thus provides a rationale for the development of multivalent VHHs that target both toxins and are broadly neutralizing for treating severe CDI. PMID:24683195

  5. Characterization of an entomopathogenic fungi target integument protein, Bombyx mori single domain von Willebrand factor type C, in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Han, F; Lu, A; Yuan, Y; Huang, W; Beerntsen, B T; Huang, J; Ling, E

    2017-06-01

    The insect cuticle works as the first line of defence to protect insects from pathogenic infections and water evaporation. However, the old cuticle must be shed in order to enter the next developmental stage. During each ecdysis, moulting fluids are produced and secreted into the area among the old and new cuticles. In a previous study, the protein Bombyx mori single domain von Willebrand factor type C (BmSVWC; BGIBMGA011399) was identified in the moulting fluids of Bo. mori and demonstrated to regulate ecdysis. In this study we show that in Bo. mori larvae, BmSVWC primarily locates to the integument (epidermal cells and cuticle), wing discs and head. During the moulting stage, BmSVWC is released into the moulting fluids, and is then produced again by epidermal cells after ecdysis. Fungal infection was shown to decrease the amount of BmSVWC in the cuticle, which indicates that BmSVWC is a target protein of entomopathogenic fungi. Thus, BmSVWC is mainly involved in maintaining the integrity of the integument structure, which serves to protect insects from physical damage and pathogenic infection. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  6. Straightforward selection of broadly neutralizing single-domain antibodies targeting the conserved CD4 and coreceptor binding sites of HIV-1 gp120.

    PubMed

    Matz, Julie; Kessler, Pascal; Bouchet, Jérôme; Combes, Olivier; Ramos, Oscar Henrique Pereira; Barin, Francis; Baty, Daniel; Martin, Loïc; Benichou, Serge; Chames, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Few broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting determinants of the HIV-1 surface envelope glycoprotein (gp120) involved in sequential binding to host CD4 and chemokine receptors have been characterized. While these epitopes show low diversity among various isolates, HIV-1 employs many strategies to evade humoral immune response toward these sensitive sites, including a carbohydrate shield, low accessibility to these buried cavities, and conformational masking. Using trimeric gp140, free or bound to a CD4 mimic, as immunogens in llamas, we selected a panel of broadly neutralizing single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) that bind to either the CD4 or the coreceptor binding site (CD4BS and CoRBS, respectively). When analyzed as monomers or as homo- or heteromultimers, the best sdAb candidates could not only neutralize viruses carrying subtype B envelopes, corresponding to the Env molecule used for immunization and selection, but were also efficient in neutralizing a broad panel of envelopes from subtypes A, C, G, CRF01_AE, and CRF02_AG, including tier 3 viruses. Interestingly, sdAb multimers exhibited a broader neutralizing activity spectrum than the parental sdAb monomers. The extreme stability and high recombinant production yield combined with their broad neutralization capacity make these sdAbs new potential microbicide candidates for HIV-1 transmission prevention.

  7. Animal Protection and Structural Studies of a Consensus Sequence Vaccine Targeting the Receptor Binding Domain of the Type IV Pilus of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Daniel J.; Churchill, Mair E.A.; Irvin, Randall T.; Hodges, Robert S.

    2008-09-23

    One of the main obstacles in the development of a vaccine against Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the requirement that it is protective against a wide range of virulent strains. We have developed a synthetic-peptide consensus-sequence vaccine (Cs1) that targets the host receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the type IV pilus of P. aeruginosa. Here, we show that this vaccine provides increased protection against challenge by the four piliated strains that we have examined (PAK, PAO, KB7 and P1) in the A.BY/SnJ mouse model of acute P. aeruginosa infection. To further characterize the consensus sequence, we engineered Cs1 into the PAK monomeric pilin protein and determined the crystal structure of the chimeric Cs1 pilin to 1.35 {angstrom} resolution. The substitutions (T130K and E135P) used to create Cs1 do not disrupt the conserved backbone conformation of the pilin RBD. In fact, based on the Cs1 pilin structure, we hypothesize that the E135P substitution bolsters the conserved backbone conformation and may partially explain the immunological activity of Cs1. Structural analysis of Cs1, PAK and K122-4 pilins reveal substitutions of non-conserved residues in the RBD are compensated for by complementary changes in the rest of the pilin monomer. Thus, the interactions between the RBD and the rest of the pilin can either be mediated by polar interactions of a hydrogen bond network in some strains or by hydrophobic interactions in others. Both configurations maintain a conserved backbone conformation of the RBD. Thus, the backbone conformation is critical in our consensus-sequence vaccine design and that cross-reactivity of the antibody response may be modulated by the composition of exposed side-chains on the surface of the RBD. This structure will guide our future vaccine design by focusing our investigation on the four variable residue positions that are exposed on the RBD surface.

  8. Oral Streptococci Utilize a Siglec-Like Domain of Serine-Rich Repeat Adhesins to Preferentially Target Platelet Sialoglycans in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lingquan; Bensing, Barbara A.; Thamadilok, Supaporn; Yu, Hai; Lau, Kam; Chen, Xi; Ruhl, Stefan; Sullam, Paul M.; Varki, Ajit

    2014-01-01

    Damaged cardiac valves attract blood-borne bacteria, and infective endocarditis is often caused by viridans group streptococci. While such bacteria use multiple adhesins to maintain their normal oral commensal state, recognition of platelet sialoglycans provides an intermediary for binding to damaged valvular endocardium. We use a customized sialoglycan microarray to explore the varied binding properties of phylogenetically related serine-rich repeat adhesins, the GspB, Hsa, and SrpA homologs from Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis species, which belong to a highly conserved family of glycoproteins that contribute to virulence for a broad range of Gram-positive pathogens. Binding profiles of recombinant soluble homologs containing novel sialic acid-recognizing Siglec-like domains correlate well with binding of corresponding whole bacteria to arrays. These bacteria show multiple modes of glycan, protein, or divalent cation-dependent binding to synthetic glycoconjugates and isolated glycoproteins in vitro. However, endogenous asialoglycan-recognizing clearance receptors are known to ensure that only fully sialylated glycans dominate in the endovascular system, wherein we find these particular streptococci become primarily dependent on their Siglec-like adhesins for glycan-mediated recognition events. Remarkably, despite an excess of alternate sialoglycan ligands in cellular and soluble blood components, these adhesins selectively target intact bacteria to sialylated ligands on platelets, within human whole blood. These preferred interactions are inhibited by corresponding recombinant soluble adhesins, which also preferentially recognize platelets. Our data indicate that circulating platelets may act as inadvertent Trojan horse carriers of oral streptococci to the site of damaged endocardium, and provide an explanation why it is that among innumerable microbes that gain occasional access to the bloodstream, certain viridans group streptococci have a

  9. Epitope mapping of inhibitory antibodies targeting the C2 domain of coagulation factor VIII by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sevy, Alexander M.; Healey, John F.; Deng, Wei; Spiegel, P. Clint; Meeks, Shannon L.; Li, Renhao

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The development of anti-factor VIII (fVIII) antibodies (inhibitors) is a significant complication in the management of patients with hemophilia A, leading to significant increases in morbidity and treatment cost. Using a panel of anti-fVIII monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to different epitopes on fVIII, we recently have shown that epitope specificity, inhibitor kinetics, and time to maximum inhibition are more important than inhibitor titer in predicting response to fVIII and the combination of fVIII and recombinant factor VIIa. In particular, a subset of high-titer inhibitors responded to high dose fVIII, which would not be predicted based on their inhibitor titer alone. Thus the ability to quickly map the epitope spectrum of patient plasma using a clinically feasible assay may fundamentally change how clinicians approach the treatment of high-titer inhibitor patients. Objectives To map the epitopes of anti-fVIII MAbs, of which 3 are classical inhibitors and one non-classical, using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Methods Binding epitopes of 4 MAbs targeting fVIII C2 domain were mapped using HDX-MS. Results The epitopes determined by HDX-MS are consistent with those obtained earlier through structural characterization and antibody competition assays. In addition classical and non-classical inhibitor epitopes could be distinguished using a limited subset of C2-derived peptic fragments. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the HDX-MS method for epitope mapping and suggest a potential role of rapid mapping of fVIII inhibitor epitopes in facilitating individualized treatment of inhibitor patients. PMID:24152306

  10. Chemoproteomic, biochemical and pharmacological approaches in the discovery of inhibitors targeting human α/β-hydrolase domain containing 11 (ABHD11).

    PubMed

    Navia-Paldanius, Dina; Patel, Jayendra Z; López Navarro, Miriam; Jakupović, Hermina; Goffart, Steffi; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna; Nevalainen, Tapio J; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Laitinen, Tuomo; Laitinen, Jarmo T; Savinainen, Juha R

    2016-10-10

    ABHD11 (α/β-hydrolase domain containing 11) is a non-annotated enzyme belonging to the family of metabolic serine hydrolases (mSHs). Its natural substrates and products are unknown. Using competitive activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) to identify novel inhibitors of human (h)ABHD11, three compounds from our chemical library exhibited low nanomolar potency towards hABHD11. Competitive ABPP of various proteomes revealed fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) as the sole off-target among the mSHs. Our fluorescent activity assays designed for natural lipase substrates revealed no activity of hABHD11 towards mono- or diacylglycerols. A broader profiling using para-nitrophenyl (pNP)-linked substrates indicated no amidase/protease, phosphatase, sulfatase, phospholipase C or phosphodiesterase activity. Instead, hABHD11 readily utilized para-nitrophenyl butyrate (pNPC4), indicating lipase/esterase-type activity that could be exploited in inhibitor discovery. Additionally, a homology model was created based on the crystal structure of bacterial esterase YbfF. In contrast to YbfF, which reportedly hydrolyze long-chain acyl-CoA, hABHD11 did not utilize oleoyl-CoA or arachidonoyl-CoA. In conclusion, the present study reports the discovery of potent hABHD11 inhibitors with good selectivity among mSHs. We developed substrate-based activity assays for hABHD11 that could be further exploited in inhibitor discovery and created the first homology-based hABHD11 model, offering initial insights into the active site of this poorly characterized enzyme. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. TAL Effectors Target the C-Terminal Domain of RNA Polymerase II (CTD) by Inhibiting the Prolyl-Isomerase Activity of a CTD-Associated Cyclophilin

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Maria Luiza Peixoto; de Mello, Uli Quirino; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors of plant pathogenic bacteria function as transcription factors in plant cells. However, how TAL effectors control transcription in the host is presently unknown. Previously, we showed that TAL effectors of the citrus canker pathogen Xanthomonas citri, named PthAs, targeted the citrus protein complex comprising the thioredoxin CsTdx, ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes CsUev/Ubc13 and cyclophilin CsCyp. Here we show that CsCyp complements the function of Cpr1 and Ess1, two yeast cyclophilins that regulate transcription by the isomerization of proline residues of the regulatory C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II. We also demonstrate that CsCyp, CsTdx, CsUev and four PthA variants interact with the citrus CTD and that CsCyp co-immunoprecipitate with the CTD in citrus cell extracts and with PthA2 transiently expressed in sweet orange epicotyls. The interactions of CsCyp with the CTD and PthA2 were inhibited by cyclosporin A (CsA), a cyclophilin inhibitor. Moreover, we present evidence that PthA2 inhibits the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) activity of CsCyp in a similar fashion as CsA, and that silencing of CsCyp, as well as treatments with CsA, enhance canker lesions in X. citri-infected leaves. Given that CsCyp appears to function as a negative regulator of cell growth and that Ess1 negatively regulates transcription elongation in yeast, we propose that PthAs activate host transcription by inhibiting the PPIase activity of CsCyp on the CTD. PMID:22911812

  12. Design, Synthesis and Characterization of A Potent, Non-Peptide, Cell-Permeable, Bivalent Smac Mimetic that Concurrently Targets both the BIR2 and BIR3 Domains in XIAP

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Haiying; Nikolovska-Coleska, Zaneta; Lu, Jianfeng; Meagher, Jennifer L.; Yang, Chao-Yie; Qiu, Su; Tomita, York; Ueda, Yumi; Jiang, Sheng; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Roller, Peter P.; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Wang, Shaomeng

    2008-01-01

    XIAP is a central apoptosis regulator that inhibits apoptosis by binding to and inhibiting the effectors caspase-3/-7 and an initiator caspase-9 through its BIR2 and BIR3 domains, respectively. Smac protein in its dimeric form effectively antagonizes XIAP by concurrently targeting both its BIR2 and BIR3 domains. We report the design, synthesis and characterization of a non-peptide, cell-permeable, bivalent small-molecule (SM-164) which mimics Smac protein for targeting XIAP. Our study shows that SM-164 binds to XIAP containing both BIR domains with an IC50 value of 1.39 nM, being 300 and 7000-times more potent than its monovalent counterparts and the natural Smac AVPI peptide, respectively. SM-164 concurrently interacts with both BIR domains in XIAP and functions as an ultra-potent antagonist of XIAP in both cell-free functional and cell-based assays. SM-164 targets cellular XIAP and effectively induces apoptosis at concentrations as low as 1 nM in leukemia cancer cells, while having a minimal toxicity to normal human primary cells at 10,000 nM. The potency of bivalent SM-164 in binding, functional and cellular assays is 2–3 orders of magnitude higher than its corresponding monovalent Smac mimetics. PMID:17999504

  13. Identification of Novel Families and Classification of the C2 domain Superfamily Elucidate the Origin and Evolution of Membrane Targeting Activities in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dapeng; Aravind, L.

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotes contain an elaborate membrane system, which bounds the cell itself, nuclei, organelles and transient intracellular structures, such as vesicles. The emergence of this system was marked by an expansion of number of structurally distinct classes of lipid-binding domains that could throw light on the early evolution of eukaryotic membranes. The C2 domain is a useful model to understand these events because it is one of the most prevalent eukaryotic lipid-binding domains deployed in diverse functional contexts. Most studies have concentrated on C2 domains prototyped by those in protein kinase C (PKC-C2) isoforms that bind lipid in a calcium-dependent manner. While two other distinct families of C2 domains, namely those in PI3K-C2 and PTEN-C2 are also recognized, a complete picture of evolutionary relationships within the C2 domain superfamily is lacking. We systematically studied this superfamily using sequence-profile searches, phylogenetic and phyletic-pattern analysis and structure-prediction. Consequently, we identified several distinct families of C2 domains including those respectively typified by C2 domains in the Aida (axin interactor, dorsalization associated) proteins, B9 proteins (e.g. Mks1 (Xbx-7), Stumpy (Tza-1) and Tza-2) involved in centrosome migration and ciliogenesis, Dock180/Zizimin proteins which are Rac/CDC42 GDP exchange factors, the EEIG1/Sym-3, EHBP1 and plant RPG/PMI1 proteins involved in endocytotic recycling and organellar positioning and an apicomplexan family. We present evidence that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) contained at least 10 C2 domains belonging to 6 well-defined families. Further, we suggest that this pre-LECA diversification was linked to emergence of several quintessentially eukaryotic structures, such as membrane repair and vesicular trafficking system, anchoring of the actin and tubulin cytoskeleton to the plasma and vesicular membranes, localization of small GTPases to membranes and lipid

  14. Target recognition by EcoKI: the recognition domain is robust and restriction-deficiency commonly results from the proteolytic control of enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, M; Powell, L M; Murray, N E

    2001-03-30

    We report a genetic and biochemical analysis of a target recognition domain (TRD) of EcoKI, a type I restriction and modification enzyme. The TRDs of type I R-M systems are within the specificity subunit (HsdS) and HsdS confers sequence specificity to a complex endowed with both restriction and modification activities. Random mutagenesis has revealed that most substitutions within the amino TRD of EcoKI, a region comprising 157 amino acid residues, have no detectable effect on the phenotype of the bacterium, even when the substitutions are non- conservative. The structure of the TRD appears to be robust. All but one of the six substitutions that confer a restriction-deficient, modification-deficient (r(-)m(-)) phenotype were found to be in the interval between residues 80 and 110, a region predicted by sequence comparisons to form part of the protein-DNA interface. Additional site-directed mutations affecting this interval commonly impair both restriction and modification. However, we show that an r(-) phenotype cannot be taken as evidence that the EcoKI complex lacks endonuclease activity; in response to even a slightly impaired modification efficiency, the endonuclease activity of EcoKI is destroyed by a process dependent upon the ClpXP protease. Enzymes from mutants with an r(-)m(-) phenotype commonly retain some sequence-specific activity; methylase activity can be detected on hemimethylated DNA substrates and residual endonuclease activity is implied whenever the viability of the r(-)m(-) bacterium is dependent on ClpXP. Conversely, the viability of ClpX(-) r(-)m(-) bacteria can be used as evidence for little, or no, endonuclease activity. Of 14 mutants with an r(-)m(-) phenotype, only six are viable in the absence of ClpXP. The significance of four of the six residues (G91, G105, F107 and G141) is enhanced by the finding that even conservative substitutions for these residues impair modification, thereby conferring an r(-)m(-) phenotype. Copyright 2001

  15. Human Fibronectin Extra-Domain B (EDB)-Specific Aptide (APTEDB) Radiolabelling with Technetium-99m as a Potent Targeted Tumour-Imaging Agent.

    PubMed

    Mohammadgholi, Mohsen; Sadeghzadeh, Nourollah; Erfani, Mostafa; Abediankenari, Saeid; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Emrarian, Iman; Jafari, Narjes; Behzadi, Ramezan

    2017-09-18

    Human fibronectin extra-domain B (EDB) is particularly expressed during angiogenesis progression. It is, thus, a promising marker of tumour growth. Aptides are a novel class of peptides with high-affinity binding to specific protein targets. APTEDB is an antagonist-like ligand that especially interacts with human fibronectin EDB. This study was the first attempt in which the hydrazinonicotinamide (HYNIC)-conjugated APTEDB was labelled with technetium-99m (99mTc) as an appropriate radiotracer and tricine/EDDA exchange labeling .

    Method: Radiochemical purity, normal saline, and serum stability were evaluated by HPLC and radio-isotope TLC scanner. Other examinations, such as protein-binding calculation, dissociation radioligand binding assay, and partition coefficient constant determination, were also carried out. The cellular-specific binding of 99mTc-HYNIC-conjugated APTEDB was assessed in two EDB-positive (U87MG) and EDB-negative (U373MG) cell lines. Bio-distribution was investigated in normal mice as well as in U87MG and U373MG tumour-bearing mice. Eventually, the radiolabelled APTEDB was used for tumour imaging using planar SPECT.

    Results: Radiolabelling was achieved with high purity (up to 97%) and accompanied by high solution (Over 90% after overnight) and serum (80% after 2 hours) stability. The obtained cellular-specific binding ratio was greater than nine-fold. In-vivo experiments showed rapid blood clearance with mainly renal excretion and tumour uptake specificity (0.48±0.03% ID/g after 1h ). The results of the imaging also confirmed considerable tumour uptake for EDB-positive cell lines compared with the EDB-negative ones.

    Conclusion: Aptides are considered to be a potent candidate for biopharmaceutical applications. They can be modified with imaging or therapeutic agents. This report shows the capability of 99mTc-HYNIC-APTEDB for human EDB-expressing tumour detection. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries

  16. A monoclonal antibody targeting ErbB2 domain III inhibits ErbB2 signaling and suppresses the growth of ErbB2-overexpressing breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Y; Zheng, L; Yang, Y; Wang, H; Dong, J; Wang, C; Zhang, Y; Yu, X; Wang, L; Xia, T; Zhang, D; Guo, Y; Li, B

    2016-01-01

    The anti-ErbB2 antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab in combination have recently been approved for the treatment of patients with ErbB2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Pertuzumab, which binds to ErbB2 near the center of domain II, and trastuzumab, which binds to the juxtamembrane region of ErbB2 domain IV, directly interfere with domain II- and domain IV-mediated heterodimerization contacts, respectively. In this study, we report a novel anti-ErbB2 antibody, 3E10, which binds to an epitope in domain III that appears to be located opposite to the dimerization interfaces in domain II and domain IV of ErbB2. Our data show that the 3E10 antibody inhibits ErbB2 heterodimerization via a mechanism that strikingly differs from trastuzumab and pertuzumab. It could be speculated that the 3E10 antibody may affect ErbB2 heterodimerization by causing major conformational changes of ErbB2. Furthermore, 3E10 provides synergistic inhibition of ErbB2 heterodimerization and signaling in combination with either trastuzumab or pertuzumab. The combination of these three anti-ErbB2 antibodies that have complementary mechanisms of action appears to be an extremely potent ErbB2 heterodimerization blocker. Compared with trastuzumab plus pertuzumab, the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab and 3E10 provides a more potent blockade of ErbB2 signaling. Consistent with this, trastuzumab plus pertuzumab plus 3E10 results in greater in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity in ErbB2-overexpressing breast tumor models, suggesting its potential use for treating ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer. PMID:26999718

  17. A monoclonal antibody targeting ErbB2 domain III inhibits ErbB2 signaling and suppresses the growth of ErbB2-overexpressing breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Meng, Y; Zheng, L; Yang, Y; Wang, H; Dong, J; Wang, C; Zhang, Y; Yu, X; Wang, L; Xia, T; Zhang, D; Guo, Y; Li, B

    2016-03-21

    The anti-ErbB2 antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab in combination have recently been approved for the treatment of patients with ErbB2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Pertuzumab, which binds to ErbB2 near the center of domain II, and trastuzumab, which binds to the juxtamembrane region of ErbB2 domain IV, directly interfere with domain II- and domain IV-mediated heterodimerization contacts, respectively. In this study, we report a novel anti-ErbB2 antibody, 3E10, which binds to an epitope in domain III that appears to be located opposite to the dimerization interfaces in domain II and domain IV of ErbB2. Our data show that the 3E10 antibody inhibits ErbB2 heterodimerization via a mechanism that strikingly differs from trastuzumab and pertuzumab. It could be speculated that the 3E10 antibody may affect ErbB2 heterodimerization by causing major conformational changes of ErbB2. Furthermore, 3E10 provides synergistic inhibition of ErbB2 heterodimerization and signaling in combination with either trastuzumab or pertuzumab. The combination of these three anti-ErbB2 antibodies that have complementary mechanisms of action appears to be an extremely potent ErbB2 heterodimerization blocker. Compared with trastuzumab plus pertuzumab, the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab and 3E10 provides a more potent blockade of ErbB2 signaling. Consistent with this, trastuzumab plus pertuzumab plus 3E10 results in greater in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity in ErbB2-overexpressing breast tumor models, suggesting its potential use for treating ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer.

  18. A conserved acidic patch in the Myb domain is required for activation of an endogenous target gene and for chromatin binding

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Emily Ray; Ko, Dennis; Chen, Carolyn; Lipsick, Joseph S

    2008-01-01

    The c-Myb protein is a transcriptional regulator initially identified by homology to the v-Myb oncoprotein, and has since been implicated in human cancer. The most highly conserved portion of the c-Myb protein is the DNA-binding domain which consists of three imperfect repeats. Many other proteins contain one or more Myb-related domains, including a number of proteins that do not bind directly to DNA. We performed a phylogenetic analysis of diverse classes of Myb-related domains and discovered a highly conserved patch of acidic residues common to all Myb-related domains. These acidic residues are positioned in the first of three alpha-helices within each of the three repeats that comprise the c-Myb DNA-binding domain. Interestingly, these conserved acidic residues are present on a surface of the protein which is distinct from that which binds to DNA. Alanine mutagenesis revealed that the acidic patch of the third c-Myb repeat is essential for transcriptional activity, but neither for nuclear localization nor DNA-binding. Instead, these acidic residues are required for efficient chromatin binding and interaction with the histone H4 N-terminal tail. PMID:18840288

  19. Fluorine-18 Labeling of the HER2-Targeting Single-Domain Antibody 2Rs15d Using a Residualizing Label and Preclinical Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhengyuan; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; McDougald, Darryl; Kang, Choong Mo; Balyasnikova, Irina; Devoogdt, Nick; Ta, Angeline N; McNaughton, Brian R; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2017-04-13

    Our previous studies with F-18-labeled anti-HER2 single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) utilized 5F7, which binds to the same epitope on HER2 as trastuzumab, complicating its use for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of patients undergoing trastuzumab therapy. On the other hand, sdAb 2Rs15d binds to a different epitope on HER2 and thus might be a preferable vector for imaging in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tumor targeting of F-18 -labeled 2Rs15d in HER2-expressing breast carcinoma cells and xenografts. sdAb 2Rs15d was labeled with the residualizing labels N-succinimidyl 3-((4-(4-[(18)F]fluorobutyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)methyl)-5-(guanidinomethyl)benzoate ([(18)F]RL-I) and N-succinimidyl 4-guanidinomethyl-3-[(125)I]iodobenzoate ([(125)I]SGMIB), and the purity and HER2-specific binding affinity and immunoreactivity were assessed after labeling. The biodistribution of I-125- and F-18-labeled 2Rs15d was determined in SCID mice bearing subcutaneous BT474M1 xenografts. MicroPET/x-ray computed tomograph (CT) imaging of [(18)F]RL-I-2Rs15d was performed in this model and compared to that of nonspecific sdAb [(18)F]RL-I-R3B23. MicroPET/CT imaging was also done in an intracranial HER2-positive breast cancer brain metastasis model after administration of 2Rs15d-, 5F7-, and R3B23-[(18)F]RL-I conjugates. [(18)F]RL-I was conjugated to 2Rs15d in 40.8 ± 9.1 % yield and with a radiochemical purity of 97-100 %. Its immunoreactive fraction (IRF) and affinity for HER2-specific binding were 79.2 ± 5.4 % and 7.1 ± 0.4 nM, respectively. [(125)I]SGMIB was conjugated to 2Rs15d in 58.4 ± 8.2 % yield and with a radiochemical purity of 95-99 %; its IRF and affinity for HER2-specific binding were 79.0 ± 12.9 % and 4.5 ± 0.8 nM, respectively. Internalized radioactivity in BT474M1 cells in vitro for [(18)F]RL-I-2Rs15d was 43.7 ± 3.6, 36.5 ± 2.6, and 21.7 ± 1.2 % of initially bound radioactivity at 1, 2, and 4 h, respectively

  20. Disruption of TWIST1-RELA binding by mutation and competitive inhibition to validate the TWIST1 WR domain as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Cai M; Shahin, Sophia A; Loeza, Joana; Dellinger, Thanh H; Williams, John C; Glackin, Carlotta A

    2017-03-10

    Most cancer deaths result from tumor cells that have metastasized beyond their tissue of origin, or have developed drug resistance. Across many cancer types, patients with advanced stage disease would benefit from a novel therapy preventing or reversing these changes. To this end, we have investigated the unique WR domain of the transcription factor TWIST1, which has been shown to play a role in driving metastasis and drug resistance. In this study, we identified evolutionarily well-conserved residues within the TWIST1 WR domain and used alanine substitution to determine their role in WR domain-mediated protein binding. Co-immunoprecipitation was used to assay binding affinity between TWIST1 and the NFκB subunit p65 (RELA). Biological activity of this complex was assayed using a dual luciferase assay system in which firefly luciferase was driven by the interleukin-8 (IL-8) promoter, which is upregulated by the TWIST1-RELA complex. Finally, in order to inhibit the TWIST1-RELA interaction, we created a fusion protein comprising GFP and the WR domain. Cell fractionation and proteasome inhibition experiments were utilized to elucidate the mechanism of action of the GFP-WR fusion. We found that the central residues of the WR domain (W190, R191, E193) were important for TWIST1 binding to RELA, and for increased activation of the IL-8 promoter. We also found that the C-terminal 245 residues of RELA are important for TWIST1 binding and IL-8 promoter activation. Finally, we found the GFP-WR fusion protein antagonized TWIST1-RELA binding and downstream signaling. Co-expression of GFP-WR with TWIST1 and RELA led to proteasomal degradation of TWIST1, which could be inhibited by MG132 treatment. These data provide evidence that mutation or inhibition of the WR domain reduces TWIST1 activity, and may represent a potential therapeutic modality.

  1. β2-Chimaerin is a novel target for diacylglycerol: Binding properties and changes in subcellular localization mediated by ligand binding to its C1 domain

    PubMed Central

    Caloca, Maria José; Garcia-Bermejo, Maria Laura; Blumberg, Peter M.; Lewin, Nancy E.; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Mischak, Harald; Wang, Shaomeng; Nacro, Kassoum; Bienfait, Bruno; Marquez, Victor E.; Kazanietz, Marcelo G.

    1999-01-01

    The members of the chimaerin family of Rac-GTPase-activating proteins possess a single C1 domain with high homology to those present in protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes. This domain in PKCs is involved in phorbol ester and diacylglycerol (DAG) binding. We previously have demonstrated that one of the chimaerin isoforms, β2-chimaerin, binds phorbol esters with high affinity. In this study we analyzed the properties of β2-chimaerin as a DAG receptor by using a series of conformationally constrained cyclic DAG analogues (DAG lactones) as probes. We identified analogs that bind to β2-chimaerin with more than 100-fold higher affinity than 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol. The potencies of these analogs approach those of the potent phorbol ester tumor promoters. The different DAG lactones show some selectivity for this novel receptor compared with PKCα. Cellular studies revealed that these DAG analogs induce translocation of β2-chimaerin from cytosolic (soluble) to particulate fractions. Using green fluorescent protein-fusion proteins for β2-chimaerin we determined that this novel receptor translocates to the perinuclear region after treatment with DAG lactones. Binding and translocation were prevented by mutation of the conserved Cys-246 in the C1 domain. The structural homology between the C1 domain of β2-chimaerin and the C1b domain of PKCδ also was confirmed by modeling analysis. Our results demonstrate that β2-chimaerin is a high affinity receptor for DAG through binding to its C1 domain and supports the emerging concept that multiple pathways transduce signaling through DAG and the phorbol esters. PMID:10518540

  2. beta2-chimaerin is a novel target for diacylglycerol: binding properties and changes in subcellular localization mediated by ligand binding to its C1 domain.

    PubMed

    Caloca, M J; Garcia-Bermejo, M L; Blumberg, P M; Lewin, N E; Kremmer, E; Mischak, H; Wang, S; Nacro, K; Bienfait, B; Marquez, V E; Kazanietz, M G

    1999-10-12

    The members of the chimaerin family of Rac-GTPase-activating proteins possess a single C1 domain with high homology to those present in protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes. This domain in PKCs is involved in phorbol ester and diacylglycerol (DAG) binding. We previously have demonstrated that one of the chimaerin isoforms, beta2-chimaerin, binds phorbol esters with high affinity. In this study we analyzed the properties of beta2-chimaerin as a DAG receptor by using a series of conformationally constrained cyclic DAG analogues (DAG lactones) as probes. We identified analogs that bind to beta2-chimaerin with more than 100-fold higher affinity than 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol. The potencies of these analogs approach those of the potent phorbol ester tumor promoters. The different DAG lactones show some selectivity for this novel receptor compared with PKCalpha. Cellular studies revealed that these DAG analogs induce translocation of beta2-chimaerin from cytosolic (soluble) to particulate fractions. Using green fluorescent protein-fusion proteins for beta2-chimaerin we determined that this novel receptor translocates to the perinuclear region after treatment with DAG lactones. Binding and translocation were prevented by mutation of the conserved Cys-246 in the C1 domain. The structural homology between the C1 domain of beta2-chimaerin and the C1b domain of PKCdelta also was confirmed by modeling analysis. Our results demonstrate that beta2-chimaerin is a high affinity receptor for DAG through binding to its C1 domain and supports the emerging concept that multiple pathways transduce signaling through DAG and the phorbol esters.

  3. Perspectives for the use of structural information and chemical genetics to develop inhibitors of Janus kinases

    PubMed Central

    Haan, Claude; Behrmann, Iris; Haan, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Gain-of-function mutations in the genes encoding Janus kinases have been discovered in various haematologic diseases. Jaks are composed of a FERM domain, an SH2 domain, a pseudokinase domain and a kinase domain, and a complex interplay of the Jak domains is involved in regulation of catalytic activity and association to cytokine receptors. Most activating mutations are found in the pseudokinase domain. Here we present recently discovered mutations in the context of our structural models of the respective domains. We describe two structural hotspots in the pseudokinase domain of Jak2 that seem to be associated either to myeloproliferation or to lymphoblastic leukaemia, pointing at the involvement of distinct signalling complexes in these disease settings. The different domains of Jaks are discussed as potential drug targets. We present currently available inhibitors targeting Jaks and indicate structural differences in the kinase domains of the different Jaks that may be exploited in the development of specific inhibitors. Moreover, we discuss recent chemical genetic approaches which can be applied to Jaks to better understand the role of these kinases in their biological settings and as drug targets. PMID:20132407

  4. Interaction domains and nuclear targeting signals in subunits of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle-associated splicing factor SF3a.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Jung; Ferfoglia, Fabio; Raleff, Flore; Krämer, Angela

    2011-04-15

    Human splicing factor SF3a is a component of the mature U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) and its three subunits of 60, 66, and 120 kDa are essential for splicing in vitro and in vivo. The SF3a heterotrimer forms in the cytoplasm and enters the nucleus independently of the U2 snRNP. Here, we have analyzed domains required for in vitro interactions between the SF3a subunits. Our results indicate that the SF3a66-SF3a120 interaction is mediated by a 27-amino acid region in SF3a120 C-terminal to the second suppressor-of-white-apricot and prp21/spp91 domain and amino acids 108-210 of SF3a66. Neither of these sequences contains known structural motifs, suggesting that the interaction domains are novel. Moreover, an ∼100-amino acid region, including the SURP2 domain of SF3a120 but extending into neighboring regions, is sufficient for binding to SF3a60. Analysis of determinants for nuclear import of SF3a demonstrates that SF3a120 provides the major nuclear localization signal and SF3a60 contributes to nuclear import.

  5. Structural basis for membrane targeting by the MVB12-associated [beta]-prism domain of the human ESCRT-I MVB12 subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Boura, Evzen; Hurley, James H.

    2012-03-15

    MVB12-associated {beta}-prism (MABP) domains are predicted to occur in a diverse set of membrane-associated bacterial and eukaryotic proteins, but their existence, structure, and biochemical properties have not been characterized experimentally. Here, we find that the MABP domains of the MVB12A and B subunits of ESCRT-I are functional modules that bind in vitro to liposomes containing acidic lipids depending on negative charge density. The MABP domain is capable of autonomously localizing to subcellular puncta and to the plasma membrane. The 1.3-{angstrom} atomic resolution crystal structure of the MVB12B MABP domain reveals a {beta}-prism fold, a hydrophobic membrane-anchoring loop, and an electropositive phosphoinositide-binding patch. The basic patch is open, which explains how it senses negative charge density but lacks stereoselectivity. These observations show how ESCRT-I could act as a coincidence detector for acidic phospholipids and protein ligands, enabling it to function both in protein transport at endosomes and in cytokinesis and viral budding at the plasma membrane.

  6. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei; Satoh, Ryosuke; Fujiwara, Toshinobu; Ito, Yutaka; Sugiura, Reiko; Mishima, Masaki

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed.

  7. FBI-1 can stimulate HIV-1 Tat activity and is targeted to a novel subnuclear domain that includes the Tat-P-TEFb-containing nuclear speckles.

    PubMed

    Pendergrast, P Shannon; Wang, Chen; Hernandez, Nouria; Huang, Sui

    2002-03-01

    FBI-1 is a cellular POZ-domain-containing protein that binds to the HIV-1 LTR and associates with the HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat. Here we show that elevated levels of FBI-1 specifically stimulate Tat activity and that this effect is dependent on the same domain of FBI-1 that mediates Tat-FBI-1 association in vivo. FBI-1 also partially colocalizes with Tat and Tat's cellular cofactor, P-TEFb (Cdk9 and cyclin T1), at the splicing-factor-rich nuclear speckle domain. Further, a less-soluble population of FBI-1 distributes in a novel peripheral-speckle pattern of localization as well as in other nuclear regions. This distribution pattern is dependent on the FBI-1 DNA binding domain, on the presence of cellular DNA, and on active transcription. Taken together, these results suggest that FBI-1 is a cellular factor that preferentially associates with active chromatin and that can specifically stimulate Tat-activated HIV-1 transcription.

  8. A plasma membrane-targeted cytosolic domain of STIM1 selectively activates ARC channels, an arachidonate-regulated store-independent Orai channel.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jill L; Shuttleworth, Trevor J

    2012-01-01

    The Orai family of calcium channels includes the store-operated CRAC channels and store-independent, arachidonic acid (AA)-regulated ARC channels. Both depend on STIM1 for their activation but, whereas CRAC channel activation involves sensing the depletion of intracellular calcium stores via a luminal N terminal EF-hand of STIM1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, ARC channels are exclusively activated by the pool of STIM1 that constitutively resides in the plasma membrane (PM). Here, the EF-hand is extracellular and unlikely to ever lose its bound calcium, suggesting that STIM1-dependent activation of ARC channels is very different from that of CRAC channels. We now show that attachment of the cytosolic portion of STIM1 to the inner face of the PM via an N terminal Lck-domain sequence is sufficient to enable normal AA-dependent activation of ARC channels, while failing to allow activation of store-operated CRAC channels. Introduction of a point mutation within the Lck-domain resulted in the loss of both PM localization and ARC channel activation. Reversing the orientation of the PM-anchored STIM1 C terminus via a C-terminal CAAX-box fails to support either CRAC or ARC channel activation. Finally, the Lck-anchored STIM1 C-terminal domain also enabled the exclusive activation of the ARC channels following physiological agonist addition. These data demonstrate that simple tethering of the cytosolic C-terminal domain of STIM1 to the inner face of the PM is sufficient to allow the full, normal and exclusive activation of ARC channels, and that the N-terminal regions of STIM1 (including the EF-hand domain) play no significant role in this activation.

  9. Rice Stripe Tenuivirus NSvc2 Glycoproteins Targeted to the Golgi Body by the N-Terminal Transmembrane Domain and Adjacent Cytosolic 24 Amino Acids via the COP I- and COP II-Dependent Secretion Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Min; Liu, Xiaofan; Li, Shuo; Xu, Yi; Zhou, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The NSvc2 glycoproteins encoded by Rice stripe tenuivirus (RSV) share many characteristics common to the glycoproteins found among Bunyaviridae. Within this viral family, glycoproteins targeting to the Golgi apparatus play a pivotal role in the maturation of the enveloped spherical particles. RSV particles, however, adopt a long filamentous morphology. Recently, RSV NSvc2 glycoproteins were shown to localize exclusively to the ER in Sf9 insect cells. Here, we demonstrate that the amino-terminal NSvc2 (NSvc2-N) targets to the Golgi apparatus in Nicotiana benthamiana cells, whereas the carboxyl-terminal NSvc2 (NSvc2-C) accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Upon coexpression, NSvc2-N redirects NSvc2-C from the ER to the Golgi bodies. The NSvc2 glycoproteins move together with the Golgi stacks along the ER/actin network. The targeting of the NSvc2 glycoproteins to the Golgi bodies was strictly dependent on functional anterograde traffic out of the ER to the Golgi bodies or on a retrograde transport route from the Golgi apparatus. The analysis of truncated and chimeric NSvc2 proteins demonstrates that the Golgi targeting signal comprises amino acids 269 to 315 of NSvc2-N, encompassing the transmembrane domain and 24 adjacent amino acids in the cytosolic tail. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that the glycoproteins from an unenveloped Tenuivirus could target Golgi bodies in plant cells. IMPORTANCE NSvc2 glycoprotein encoded by unenveloped Rice stripe tenuivirus (RSV) share many characteristics in common with glycoprotein found among Bunyaviridae in which all members have membrane-enveloped sphere particle. Recently, RSV NSvc2 glycoproteins were shown to localize exclusively to the ER in Sf9 insect cells. In this study, we demonstrated that the RSV glycoproteins could target Golgi bodies in plant cells. The targeting of NSvc2 glycoproteins to the Golgi bodies was dependent on active COP II or COP I. The Golgi targeting signal was mapped to the

  10. D120 and K152 within the PH Domain of T Cell Adapter SKAP55 Regulate Plasma Membrane Targeting of SKAP55 and LFA-1 Affinity Modulation in Human T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Witte, Amelie; Meineke, Bernhard; Sticht, Jana; Philipsen, Lars; Kuropka, Benno; Müller, Andreas J; Freund, Christian; Schraven, Burkhart; Kliche, Stefanie

    2017-04-01

    The β2-integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) is needed for the T cell receptor (TCR)-induced activation of LFA-1 to promote T cell adhesion and interaction with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). LFA-1-mediated cell-cell interactions are critical for proper T cell differentiation and proliferation. The Src kinase-associated phosphoprotein of 55 kDa (SKAP55) is a key regulator of TCR-mediated LFA-1 signaling (inside-out/outside-in signaling). To gain an understanding of how SKAP55 controls TCR-mediated LFA-1 activation, we assessed the functional role of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. We identified two critical amino acid residues within the PH domain of SKAP55, aspartic acid 120 (D120) and lysine 152 (K152). D120 facilitates the retention of SKAP55 in the cytoplasm of nonstimulated T cells, while K152 promotes SKAP55 membrane recruitment via actin binding upon TCR triggering. Importantly, the K152-dependent interaction of the PH domain with actin promotes the binding of talin to LFA-1, thus facilitating LFA-1 activation. These data suggest that K152 and D120 within the PH domain of SKAP55 regulate plasma membrane targeting and TCR-mediated activation of LFA-1.

  11. Peptoid–Peptide Hybrid Ligands Targeting the Polo Box Domain of Polo-Like Kinase 1k | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The cover picture shows the binding of a PLHSpT derivative, 6q, to the polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) polo-box domain (PBD), thereby uncovering a new hydrophobic channel (magnified upper right), which is absent in the unliganded protein (magnified lower left). The authors explain how, as a consequence of the additional interaction with the channel, the peptide binds to the Plk1 PBD with a binding affinity more than two orders of magnitude higher.

  12. TRIM14 inhibits hepatitis C virus infection by SPRY domain-dependent targeted degradation of the viral NS5A protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanshan; Chen, Yongzhi; Li, Chunfeng; Wu, Yaoxing; Guo, Lei; Peng, Changwei; Huang, Yueping; Cheng, Genhong; Qin, F. Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Tripartite motif 14 (TRIM14) was reported to function as a mitochondrial signaling adaptor in mediating innate immune responses. However, the involvement of TRIM14 in host defense against viral infection and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that enforced expression of TRIM14 could potently inhibit the infection and replication of HCV in hepatocytes, whereas TRIM14 knockout cells became more susceptible to HCV infection. Interestingly, further experiments revealed that such anti-HCV activity was independent of activating the NF-κB or interferon pathways but required the C-terminal SPRY domain of no signaling capacity. In searching for mechanisms how TRIM14 exerts its antiviral function we found that TRIM14 interacted with HCV encoded non-structural protein NS5A and could strongly induce its degradation dependent on the NS5A1 subdomain. Interestingly extensive domain mapping analyses revealed that NS5A degradation was mediated by the highly conserved SPRY domain of TRIM14, which might involve the K48 ubiquitination pathway. Collectively, our work uncovered a new mechanism responsible for host defense against HCV infection, and could potentially aid the development of novel anti-HCV therapeutics. PMID:27578425

  13. Novel Strategy Utilizing Extracellular Cysteine-Rich Domain of Membrane Receptor for Constructing d-Peptide Mediated Targeted Drug Delivery Systems: A Case Study on Fn14.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuoxuan; Xie, Jing; Peng, Shan; Liu, Sha; Wang, Ying; Lu, Weiyue; Shen, Jie; Li, Chong

    2017-08-16

    The development of proteolysis-resistant d-peptide ligands for targeted drug/gene delivery has been greatly limited, due to the challenge that lies in the chemical synthesis of membrane receptors without altering their structures. In the present research, a novel strategy utilizing self-stabilized extracellular CRD of the membrane receptor was developed to construct d-peptide ligands and their mediated targeted drug delivery systems. Fn14, a cell surface receptor overexpressed in many cancers including pancreatic and triple-negative breast cancers, was selected as the model receptor. Fn14 CRD was synthesized and folded, and used to screen Fn14 binding peptides using phage display (l-peptide) and mirror-image phage display (d-peptide) techniques, respectively. The d-peptide ligand successfully mediated targeted drug delivery to Fn14 positive tumor cells. In addition, the d-peptide possessed better target-binding affinity, stromal barrier permeability, and tumor targeting ability in vivo when conjugated with liposomes. More importantly, d-peptide mediated liposomal paclitaxel delivery significantly inhibited pancreatic tumor growth in a subcutaneous xenograft model and drastically prolonged survival in a lung metastasis of breast cancer mouse model. This study demonstrated that mirror-image phage display based on the CRD of membrane receptor can be a promising strategy to advance active targeted drug delivery via biostable d-peptides.

  14. The specificities of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded E3 ubiquitin ligases are determined by the positions of lysine or cysteine residues within the intracytoplasmic domains of their targets.

    PubMed

    Cadwell, Ken; Coscoy, Laurent

    2008-04-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus encodes two homologous E3 ligases, MIR1 and MIR2, that mediate the ubiquitination and subsequent downregulation of several cell surface proteins, and in particular major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules. We have previously shown that, in addition to lysine ubiquitination, MIR1 has the unique ability of transferring ubiquitin onto MHC-I molecules lacking available lysine residues, in a cysteine-dependent manner. Here we report that MIR1 activity is maximal when either a lysine or cysteine residue is placed approximately 15 amino acids away from the transmembrane domain, whereas MIR2 preferentially targets residues, including cysteines, that are closer to the transmembrane domain. Thus MIR1 and -2 can distinguish their substrates based on the position of the lysine or cysteine residues, suggesting that these proteins have evolved to target different sets of surface molecules. These results indicate that the position of target residues within a substrate is an essential determinant of E3 ubiquitin ligase specificity.

  15. Single-domain antibody-based and linker-free bispecific antibodies targeting FcγRIII induce potent antitumor activity without recruiting regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Rozan, Caroline; Cornillon, Amélie; Pétiard, Corinne; Chartier, Martine; Behar, Ghislaine; Boix, Charlotte; Kerfelec, Brigitte; Robert, Bruno; Pèlegrin, André; Chames, Patrick; Teillaud, Jean-Luc; Baty, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, one of the most prominent modes of action of antitumor antibodies, suffers from important limitations due to the need for optimal interactions with Fcγ receptors. In this work, we report the design of a new bispecific antibody format, compact and linker-free, based on the use of llama single-domain antibodies that are capable of circumventing most of these limitations. This bispecific antibody format was created by fusing single-domain antibodies directed against the carcinoembryonic antigen and the activating FcγRIIIa receptor to human Cκ and CH1 immunoglobulin G1 domains, acting as a natural dimerization motif. In vitro and in vivo characterization of these Fab-like bispecific molecules revealed favorable features for further development as a therapeutic molecule. They are easy to produce in Escherichia coli, very stable, and elicit potent lysis of tumor cells by human natural killer cells at picomolar concentrations. Unlike conventional antibodies, they do not engage inhibitory FcγRIIb receptor, do not compete with serum immunoglobulins G for receptor binding, and their cytotoxic activity is independent of Fc glycosylation and FcγRIIIa polymorphism. As opposed to anti-CD3 bispecific antitumor antibodies, they do not engage regulatory T cells as these latter cells do not express FcγRIII. Studies in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient gamma mice xenografted with carcinoembryonic antigen-positive tumor cells showed that Fab-like bispecific molecules in the presence of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells significantly slow down tumor growth. This new compact, linker-free bispecific antibody format offers a promising approach for optimizing antibody-based therapies.

  16. Paring Down HIV Env: Design and Crystal Structure of a Stabilized Inner Domain of HIV-1 gp120 Displaying a Major ADCC Target of the A32 Region.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, William D; Gohain, Neelakshi; Veillette, Maxime; Chapleau, Jean-Philippe; Orlandi, Chiara; Visciano, Maria L; Ebadi, Maryam; DeVico, Anthony L; Fouts, Timothy R; Finzi, Andrés; Lewis, George K; Pazgier, Marzena

    2016-05-03

    Evidence supports a role of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) toward transitional epitopes in the first and second constant (C1-C2) regions of gp120 (A32-like epitopes) in preventing HIV-1 infection and in vaccine-induced protection. Here, we describe the first successful attempt at isolating the inner domain (ID) of gp120 as an independent molecule that encapsulates the A32-like region within a minimal structural unit of the HIV-1 Env. Through structure-based design, we developed ID2, which consists of the ID expressed independently of the outer domain and stabilized in the CD4-bound conformation by an inter-layer disulfide bond. ID2 expresses C1-C2 epitopes in the context of CD4-triggered full-length gp120 but without any known neutralizing epitope present. Thus, ID2 represents a novel probe for the analysis and/or selective induction of antibody responses to the A32 epitope region. We also present the crystal structure of ID2 complexed with mAb A32, which defines its epitope.

  17. H3K4/H3K9me3 Bivalent Chromatin Domains Targeted by Lineage-Specific DNA Methylation Pauses Adipocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Yoshihiro; Nakaki, Ryo; Inagaki, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ayano; Kano, Yuka; Kimura, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshiya; Tsutsumi, Shuichi; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Doi, Takefumi; Fukami, Kiyoko; Osborne, Timothy F; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Juro

    2015-11-19

    Bivalent H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 chromatin domains in embryonic stem cells keep active developmental regulatory genes expressed at very low levels and poised for activation. Here, we show an alternative and previously unknown bivalent modified histone signature in lineage-committed mesenchymal stem cells and preadipocytes that pairs H3K4me3 with H3K9me3 to maintain adipogenic master regulatory genes (Cebpa and Pparg) expressed at low levels yet poised for activation when differentiation is required. We show lineage-specific gene-body DNA methylation recruits H3K9 methyltransferase SETDB1, which methylates H3K9 immediately downstream of transcription start sites marked with H3K4me3 to establish the bivalent domain. At the Cebpa locus, this prevents transcription factor C/EBPβ binding, histone acetylation, and further H3K4me3 deposition and is associated with pausing of RNA polymerase II, which limits Cebpa gene expression and adipogenesis.

  18. Alternative splicing targeting the hTAF4-TAFH domain of TAF4 represses proliferation and accelerates chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kazantseva, Jekaterina; Kivil, Anri; Tints, Kairit; Kazantseva, Anna; Neuman, Toomas; Palm, Kaia

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factor IID (TFIID) activity can be regulated by cellular signals to specifically alter transcription of particular subsets of genes. Alternative splicing of TFIID subunits is often the result of external stimulation of upstream signaling pathways. We studied tissue distribution and cellular expression of different splice variants of TFIID subunit TAF4 mRNA and biochemical properties of its isoforms in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to reveal the role of different isoforms of TAF4 in the regulation of proliferation and differentiation. Expression of TAF4 transcripts with exons VI or VII deleted, which results in a structurally modified hTAF4-TAFH domain, increases during early differentiation of hMSCs into osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Functional analysis data reveals that TAF4 isoforms with the deleted hTAF4-TAFH domain repress proliferation of hMSCs and preferentially promote chondrogenic differentiation at the expense of other developmental pathways. This study also provides initial data showing possible cross-talks between TAF4 and TP53 activity and switching between canonical and non-canonical WNT signaling in the processes of proliferation and differentiation of hMSCs. We propose that TAF4 isoforms generated by the alternative splicing participate in the conversion of the cellular transcriptional programs from the maintenance of stem cell state to differentiation, particularly differentiation along the chondrogenic pathway.

  19. Tetratricopeptide repeat domain of Yarrowia lipolytica Pex5p is essential for recognition of the type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal but does not confer full biological activity on Pex5p.

    PubMed

    Szilard, R K; Rachubinski, R A

    2000-02-15

    Peroxins are proteins required for peroxisome assembly and are encoded by the PEX genes. The Yarrowia lipolytica pex5-1 mutant fails to import a subset of peroxisomal matrix proteins, including those with a type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1). Pex5p family members interact with a PTS1 through their characteristic tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. We used binding assays in vitro to investigate the nature of the association of Y. lipolytica Pex5p (YlPex5p) with the PTS1 signal. A purified recombinant YlPex5p fusion protein interacted specifically, directly and autonomously with a protein terminating in a PTS1. Wild-type YlPex5p translated in vitro recognized functional PTS1s specifically. This activity is abrogated by the substitution of an aspartic residue for a conserved glycine residue in the TPR domain (G455D) of YlPex5p encoded by the pex5-1 allele. Deletion analysis demonstrated that an intact TPR domain of YlPex5p is necessary but not sufficient for both interaction with a PTS1 and functional complementation of a strain lacking YlPex5p.

  20. A PWWP Domain-Containing Protein Targets the NuA3 Acetyltransferase Complex via Histone H3 Lysine 36 trimethylation to Coordinate Transcriptional Elongation at Coding Regions*

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Tonya M.; McDaniel, Stephen L.; Byrum, Stephanie D.; Cades, Jessica A.; Dancy, Blair C. R.; Wade, Herschel; Tackett, Alan J.; Strahl, Brian D.; Taverna, Sean D.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of histones, such as acetylation and methylation, are differentially positioned in chromatin with respect to gene organization. For example, although histone H3 is often trimethylated on lysine 4 (H3K4me3) and acetylated on lysine 14 (H3K14ac) at active promoter regions, histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) occurs throughout the open reading frames of transcriptionally active genes. The conserved yeast histone acetyltransferase complex, NuA3, specifically binds H3K4me3 through a plant homeodomain (PHD) finger in the Yng1 subunit, and subsequently catalyzes the acetylation of H3K14 through the histone acetyltransferase domain of Sas3, leading to transcription initiation at a subset of genes. We previously found that Ylr455w (Pdp3), an uncharacterized proline-tryptophan-tryptophan-proline (PWWP) domain-containing protein, copurifies with stable members of NuA3. Here, we employ mass-spectrometric analysis of affinity purified Pdp3, biophysical binding assays, and genetic analyses to classify NuA3 into two functionally distinct forms: NuA3a and NuA3b. Although NuA3a uses the PHD finger of Yng1 to interact with H3K4me3 at the 5′-end of open reading frames, NuA3b contains the unique member, Pdp3, which regulates an interaction between NuA3b and H3K36me3 at the transcribed regions of genes through its PWWP domain. We find that deletion of PDP3 decreases NuA3-directed transcription and results in growth defects when combined with transcription elongation mutants, suggesting NuA3b acts as a positive elongation factor. Finally, we determine that NuA3a, but not NuA3b, is synthetically lethal in combination with a deletion of the histone acetyltransferase GCN5, indicating NuA3b has a specialized role at coding regions that is independent of Gcn5 activity. Collectively, these studies define a new form of the NuA3 complex that associates with H3K36me3 to effect transcriptional elongation. MS data are available via ProteomeXchange with

  1. Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth by the DSL domain of human Delta-like 1 targeted to vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xing-Cheng; Dou, Guo-Rui; Wang, Li; Liang, Liang; Tian, Deng-Mei; Cao, Xiu-Li; Qin, Hong-Yan; Wang, Chun-Mei; Zhang, Ping; Han, Hua

    2013-07-01

    The growth of solid tumors depends on neovascularization. Several therapies targeting tumor angiogenesis have been developed. However, poor response in some tumors and emerging resistance necessitate further investigations of new drug targets. Notch signal pathway plays a pivotal role in vascular development and tumor angiogenesis. Either blockade or forced activation of this pathway can inhibit angiogenesis. As blocking Notch pathway results in the formation of vascular neoplasm, activation of Notch pathway to prevent tumor angiogenesis might be an alternative choice. However, an in vivo deliverable reagent with highly efficient Notch-activating capacity has not been developed. Here, we generated a polypeptide, hD1R, which consists of the Delta-Serrate-Lag-2 fragment of the human Notch ligand Delta-like 1 and an arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) motif targeting endothelial cells (ECs). We showed that hD1R could bind to ECs specifically through its RGD motif and effectively triggered Notch signaling in ECs. We demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo that hD1R inhibited angiogenic sprouting and EC proliferation. In tumor-bearing mice, the injection of hD1R effectively repressed tumor growth, most likely through increasing tumor hypoxia and tissue necrosis. The amount and width of vessels reduced remarkably in tumors of mice treated with hD1R. Moreover, vessels in tumors of mice treated with hD1R recruited more NG2(+) perivascular cells and were better perfused. Combined application of hD1R and chemotherapy with cisplatin and teniposide revealed that these two treatments had additive antitumor effects. Our study provided a new strategy for antiangiogenic tumor therapy.

  2. p53 down-regulates SARS coronavirus replication and is targeted by the SARS-unique domain and PLpro via E3 ubiquitin ligase RCHY1

    PubMed Central

    Ma-Lauer, Yue; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Müller, Marcel A.; Deng, Wen; Lei, Jian; Meyer, Benjamin; Kusov, Yuri; von Brunn, Brigitte; Bairad, Dev Raj; Hünten, Sabine; Drosten, Christian; Hermeking, Heiko; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Mann, Matthias; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; von Brunn, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has developed strategies to inhibit host immune recognition. We identify cellular E3 ubiquitin ligase ring-finger and CHY zinc-finger domain-containing 1 (RCHY1) as an interacting partner of the viral SARS-unique domain (SUD) and papain-like protease (PLpro), and, as a consequence, the involvement of cellular p53 as antagonist of coronaviral replication. Residues 95–144 of RCHY1 and 389–652 of SUD (SUD-NM) subdomains are crucial for interaction. Association with SUD increases the stability of RCHY1 and augments RCHY1-mediated ubiquitination as well as degradation of p53. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (CAMK2D), which normally influences RCHY1 stability by phosphorylation, also binds to SUD. In vivo phosphorylation shows that SUD does not regulate phosphorylation of RCHY1 via CAMK2D. Similarly to SUD, the PLpros from SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and HCoV-NL63 physically interact with and stabilize RCHY1, and thus trigger degradation of endogenous p53. The SARS-CoV papain-like protease is encoded next to SUD within nonstructural protein 3. A SUD–PLpro fusion interacts with RCHY1 more intensively and causes stronger p53 degradation than SARS-CoV PLpro alone. We show that p53 inhibits replication of infectious SARS-CoV as well as of replicons and human coronavirus NL63. Hence, human coronaviruses antagonize the viral inhibitor p53 via stabilizing RCHY1 and promoting RCHY1-mediated p53 degradation. SUD functions as an enhancer to strengthen interaction between RCHY1 and nonstructural protein 3, leading to a further increase in in p53 degradation. The significance of these findings is that down-regulation of p53 as a major player in antiviral innate immunity provides a long-sought explanation for delayed activities of respective genes. PMID:27519799

  3. p53 down-regulates SARS coronavirus replication and is targeted by the SARS-unique domain and PLpro via E3 ubiquitin ligase RCHY1.

    PubMed

    Ma-Lauer, Yue; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Hein, Marco Y; Müller, Marcel A; Deng, Wen; Lei, Jian; Meyer, Benjamin; Kusov, Yuri; von Brunn, Brigitte; Bairad, Dev Raj; Hünten, Sabine; Drosten, Christian; Hermeking, Heiko; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Mann, Matthias; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; von Brunn, Albrecht

    2016-08-30

    Highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has developed strategies to inhibit host immune recognition. We identify cellular E3 ubiquitin ligase ring-finger and CHY zinc-finger domain-containing 1 (RCHY1) as an interacting partner of the viral SARS-unique domain (SUD) and papain-like protease (PL(pro)), and, as a consequence, the involvement of cellular p53 as antagonist of coronaviral replication. Residues 95-144 of RCHY1 and 389-652 of SUD (SUD-NM) subdomains are crucial for interaction. Association with SUD increases the stability of RCHY1 and augments RCHY1-mediated ubiquitination as well as degradation of p53. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (CAMK2D), which normally influences RCHY1 stability by phosphorylation, also binds to SUD. In vivo phosphorylation shows that SUD does not regulate phosphorylation of RCHY1 via CAMK2D. Similarly to SUD, the PL(pro)s from SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and HCoV-NL63 physically interact with and stabilize RCHY1, and thus trigger degradation of endogenous p53. The SARS-CoV papain-like protease is encoded next to SUD within nonstructural protein 3. A SUD-PL(pro) fusion interacts with RCHY1 more intensively and causes stronger p53 degradation than SARS-CoV PL(pro) alone. We show that p53 inhibits replication of infectious SARS-CoV as well as of replicons and human coronavirus NL63. Hence, human coronaviruses antagonize the viral inhibitor p53 via stabilizing RCHY1 and promoting RCHY1-mediated p53 degradation. SUD functions as an enhancer to strengthen interaction between RCHY1 and nonstructural protein 3, leading to a further increase in in p53 degradation. The significance of these findings is that down-regulation of p53 as a major player in antiviral innate immunity provides a long-sought explanation for delayed activities of respective genes.

  4. Novel Injury Site Targeted Fusion Protein Comprising Annexin V and Kunitz Inhibitor Domains Ameliorates Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury and Promotes Survival of Ischemic Rat Abdominal Skin Flaps.

    PubMed

    Shyu, Victor Bong-Hang; Hsu, Chung En; Wen, Chih-Jen; Wun, Tze-Chein; Tang, Rui; Achilefu, Samuel; Wei, Fu-Chan; Cheng, Hui-Yun

    2017-03-01

    Appropriate antithrombotic therapy is critical for successful outcomes in reconstructive microsurgical procedures involving free tissue transfer. The annexin V-6L15 (ANV-6L15) fusion protein was developed as a targeted antithrombotic reagent. Annexin V specifically binds to exposed phosphatidylserine on apoptotic or injured cells, and prevents coagulation and cell adhesion, whereas 6L15 inhibits tissue factor-VIIa pathway within the coagulation cascade. The treatment efficacy of ANV-6L15 on rat island muscle and pedicled abdominal fasciocutaneous flaps following ischemic injury and ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) was evaluated.

  5. Molecular evolution of pentatricopeptide repeat genes reveals truncation in species lacking an editing target and structural domains under distinct selective pressures.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Michael L; Giang, Karolyn; Mulligan, R Michael

    2012-05-14

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are required for numerous RNA processing events in plant organelles including C-to-U editing, splicing, stabilization, and cleavage. Fifteen PPR proteins are known to be required for RNA editing at 21 sites in Arabidopsis chloroplasts, and belong to the PLS class of PPR proteins. In this study, we investigate the co-evolution of four PPR genes (CRR4, CRR21, CLB19, and OTP82) and their six editing targets in Brassicaceae species. PPR genes are composed of approximately 10 to 20 tandem repeats and each repeat has two α-helical regions, helix A and helix B, that are separated by short coil regions. Each repeat and structural feature was examined to determine the selective pressures on these regions. All of the PPR genes examined are under strong negative selection. Multiple independent losses of editing site targets are observed for both CRR21 and OTP82. In several species lacking the known editing target for CRR21, PPR genes are truncated near the 17th PPR repeat. The coding sequences of the truncated CRR21 genes are maintained under strong negative selection; however, the 3' UTR sequences beyond the truncation site have substantially diverged. Phylogenetic analyses of four PPR genes show that sequences corresponding to helix A are high compared to helix B sequences. Differential evolutionary selection of helix A versus helix B is observed in both plant and mammalian PPR genes. PPR genes and their cognate editing sites are mutually constrained in evolution. Editing sites are frequently lost by replacement of an edited C with a genomic T. After the loss of an editing site, the PPR genes are observed with three outcomes: first, few changes are detected in some cases; second, the PPR gene is present as a pseudogene; and third, the PPR gene is present but truncated in the C-terminal region. The retention of truncated forms of CRR21 that are maintained under strong negative selection even in the absence of an editing site target

  6. Molecular evolution of pentatricopeptide repeat genes reveals truncation in species lacking an editing target and structural domains under distinct selective pressures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are required for numerous RNA processing events in plant organelles including C-to-U editing, splicing, stabilization, and cleavage. Fifteen PPR proteins are known to be required for RNA editing at 21 sites in Arabidopsis chloroplasts, and belong to the PLS class of PPR proteins. In this study, we investigate the co-evolution of four PPR genes (CRR4, CRR21, CLB19, and OTP82) and their six editing targets in Brassicaceae species. PPR genes are composed of approximately 10 to 20 tandem repeats and each repeat has two α-helical regions, helix A and helix B, that are separated by short coil regions. Each repeat and structural feature was examined to determine the selective pressures on these regions. Results All of the PPR genes examined are under strong negative selection. Multiple independent losses of editing site targets are observed for both CRR21 and OTP82. In several species lacking the known editing target for CRR21, PPR genes are truncated near the 17th PPR repeat. The coding sequences of the truncated CRR21 genes are maintained under strong negative selection; however, the 3’ UTR sequences beyond the truncation site have substantially diverged. Phylogenetic analyses of four PPR genes show that sequences corresponding to helix A are high compared to helix B sequences. Differential evolutionary selection of helix A versus helix B is observed in both plant and mammalian PPR genes. Conclusion PPR genes and their cognate editing sites are mutually constrained in evolution. Editing sites are frequently lost by replacement of an edited C with a genomic T. After the loss of an editing site, the PPR genes are observed with three outcomes: first, few changes are detected in some cases; second, the PPR gene is present as a pseudogene; and third, the PPR gene is present but truncated in the C-terminal region. The retention of truncated forms of CRR21 that are maintained under strong negative selection even in the

  7. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by a SH2 domain-targeting STAT3 inhibitor leads to metabolic synthetic lethality in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Genini, Davide; Brambilla, Lara; Laurini, Erik; Merulla, Jessica; Civenni, Gianluca; Pandit, Shusil; D'Antuono, Rocco; Perez, Laurent; Levy, David E; Pricl, Sabrina; Carbone, Giuseppina M; Catapano, Carlo V

    2017-06-20

    In addition to its canonical role in nuclear transcription, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is emerging as an important regulator of mitochondrial function. Here, we demonstrate that a novel inhibitor that binds with high affinity to the STAT3 SH2 domain triggers a complex cascade of events initiated by interference with mitochondrial STAT3 (mSTAT3). The mSTAT3-drug interaction leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of proteotoxic STAT3 aggregates, and cell death. The cytotoxic effects depend directly on the drug's ability to interfere with mSTAT3 and mitochondrial function, as demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis and use of STAT3 knockout and mitochondria-depleted cells. Importantly, the lethal consequences of mSTAT3 inhibition are enhanced by glucose starvation and by increased reliance of cancer cells and tumor-initiating cells on mitochondria, resulting in potent activity in cell cultures and tumor xenografts in mice. These findings can be exploited for eliciting synthetic lethality in metabolically stressed cancer cells using high-affinity STAT3 inhibitors. Thus, this study provides insights on the role of mSTAT3 in cancer cells and a conceptual framework for developing more effective cancer therapies.

  8. TRAP150 interacts with the RNA-binding domain of PSF and antagonizes splicing of numerous PSF-target genes in T cells.

    PubMed

    Yarosh, Christopher A; Tapescu, Iulia; Thompson, Matthew G; Qiu, Jinsong; Mallory, Michael J; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Lynch, Kristen W

    2015-10-15

    PSF (a.k.a. SFPQ) is a ubiquitously expressed, essential nuclear protein with important roles in DNA damage repair and RNA biogenesis. In stimulated T cells, PSF binds to and suppresses the inclusion of CD45 exon 4 in the final mRNA; however, in resting cells, TRAP150 binds PSF and prevents access to the CD45 RNA, though the mechanism for this inhibition has remained unclear. Here, we show that TRAP150 binds a region encompassing the RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) of PSF using a previously uncharacterized, 70 residue region we have termed the PSF-interacting domain (PID). TRAP150's PID directly inhibits the interaction of PSF RRMs with RNA, which is mediated through RRM2. However, interaction of PSF with TRAP150 does not appear to inhibit the dimerization of PSF with other Drosophila Behavior, Human Splicing (DBHS) proteins, which is also dependent on RRM2. Finally, we use RASL-Seq to identify ∼40 T cell splicing events sensitive to PSF knockdown, and show that for the majority of these, PSF's effect is antagonized by TRAP150. Together these data suggest a model in which TRAP150 interacts with dimeric PSF to block access of RNA to RRM2, thereby regulating the activity of PSF toward a broad set of splicing events in T cells.

  9. Identification of a Key Target Sequence To Block Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication within the gag-pol Transframe Domain

    PubMed Central

    Sei, Shizuko; Yang, Quan-en; O'Neill, Dennis; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa; Nagashima, Kunio; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2000-01-01

    Although the full sequence of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome has been known for more than a decade, effective genetic antivirals have yet to be developed. Here we show that, of 22 regions examined, one highly conserved sequence (ACTCTTTGGCAACGA) near the 3′ end of the HIV-1 gag-pol transframe region, encoding viral protease residues 4 to 8 and a C-terminal Vpr-binding motif of p6Gag protein in two different reading frames, can be successfully targeted by an antisense peptide nucleic acid oligomer named PNAPR2. A disrupted translation of gag-pol mRNA induced at the PNAPR2-annealing site resulted in a decreased synthesis of Pr160Gag-Pol polyprotein, hence the viral protease, a predominant expression of Pr55Gag devoid of a fully functional p6Gag protein, and the excessive intracellular cleavage of Gag precursor proteins, hindering the processes of virion assembly. Treatment with PNAPR2 abolished virion production by up to 99% in chronically HIV-1-infected H9 cells and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected with clinical HIV-1 isolates with the multidrug-resistant phenotype. This particular segment of the gag-pol transframe gene appears to offer a distinctive advantage over other regions in invading viral structural genes and restraining HIV-1 replication in infected cells and may potentially be exploited as a novel antiviral genetic target. PMID:10775598

  10. Targeted DNA demethylation in vivo using dCas9-peptide repeat and scFv-TET1 catalytic domain fusions.

    PubMed

    Morita, Sumiyo; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Horii, Takuro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Mika; Okamura, Kohji; Sakai, Atsuhiko; Nakashima, Hideyuki; Hata, Kenichiro; Nakashima, Kinichi; Hatada, Izuho

    2016-10-01

    Despite the importance of DNA methylation in health and disease, technologies to readily manipulate methylation of specific sequences for functional analysis and therapeutic purposes are lacking. Here we adapt the previously described dCas9-SunTag for efficient, targeted demethylation of specific DNA loci. The original SunTag consists of ten copies of the GCN4 peptide separated by 5-amino-acid linkers. To achieve efficient recruitment of an anti-GCN4 scFv fused to the ten-eleven (TET) 1 hydroxylase, which induces demethylation, we changed the linker length to 22 amino acids. The system attains demethylation efficiencies >50% in seven out of nine loci tested. Four of these seven loci showed demethylation of >90%. We demonstrate targeted demethylation of CpGs in regulatory regions and demethylation-dependent 1.7- to 50-fold upregulation of associated genes both in cell culture (embryonic stem cells, cancer cell lines, primary neural precursor cells) and in vivo in mouse fetuses.

  11. Single-domain protein A-engineered magnetic nanoparticles: toward a universal strategy to site-specific labeling of antibodies for targeted detection of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mazzucchelli, Serena; Colombo, Miriam; De Palma, Clara; Salvadè, Agnese; Verderio, Paolo; Coghi, Maria D; Clementi, Emilio; Tortora, Paolo; Corsi, Fabio; Prosperi, Davide

    2010-10-26

    Highly monodisperse magnetite nanocrystals (MNC) were synthesized in organic media and transferred to the water phase by ultrasound-assisted ligand exchange with an iminodiacetic phosphonate. The resulting biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and magnetorelaxometry, indicating that this method allowed us to obtain stable particle dispersions with narrow size distribution and unusually high magnetic resonance T(2) contrast power. These nanoparticles were conjugated to a newly designed recombinant monodomain protein A variant, which exhibited a convincingly strong affinity for human and rabbit IgG molecules. Owing to the nature of antibody-protein A binding, tight antibody immobilization occurred through the Fc fragment thus taking full advantage of the targeting potential of bound IgGs. If necessary, monoclonal antibodies could be removed under controlled conditions regenerating the original IgG-conjugatable MNC. As a proof of concept of the utility of our paramagnetic labeling system of human IgGs for biomedical applications, anti-HER-2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab was immobilized on hybrid MNC (TMNC). TMNC were assessed by immunoprecipitation assay and confocal microscopy effected on HER-2-overexpressing MCF-7 breast cancer cells, demonstrating excellent recognition capability and selectivity for the target membrane receptor.

  12. Targeting the BH3 domain of Bcl-2 family proteins. A brief history from natural products to foldamers as promising cancer therapeutic avenues.

    PubMed

    De Giorgi, M; Voisin-Chiret, A S; Rault, S

    2013-01-01

    For many years the spotlight in drug discovery has been on a relatively small number of validated therapeutic target classes, such as G-protein coupled receptors and enzymes such as protein kinases, with well characterized enzymatic and cellular activities. However, with recent progress in genomics and proteomics, protein-protein interactions (PPIs) provide new way of finding novel bioactive molecules acting on their interfaces. This review addresses the current case studies and state of the art in the development of small chemical modulators controlling interactions of proteins that have pathological implications in various human diseases and in particular in cancer. The attention is focused on Bcl-2 family protein modulators ranging from natural products to synthetic ones with particular interest in foldamers as BH3 alpha helix mimetics.

  13. The GAP-related domain of tuberin, the product of the TSC2 gene, is a target for missense mutations in tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Maheshwar, M M; Cheadle, J P; Jones, A C; Myring, J; Fryer, A E; Harris, P C; Sampson, J R

    1997-10-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is an autosomal dominant trait in which the dysregulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation results in the development of hamartomatous growths in many organs. The TSC2 gene is one of two genes determining tuberous sclerosis. Inactivating germline mutations of TSC2 in patients with tuberous sclerosis and somatic loss of heterozygosity at the TSC2 locus in the associated hamartomas indicate that TSC2 functions as a tumour suppressor gene and that loss of function is critical to expression of the tuberous sclerosis phenotype. The TSC2 product, tuberin, has a region of homology with the GTPase activating protein rap1GAP and stimulates the GTPase activity of rap1a and rab5a in vitro. Here we show that the region of homology between tuberin and human rap1GAP and the murine GAP mSpa1 is more extensive than previously reported and spans approximately 160 amino acid residues encoded within exons 34-38 of the TSC2 gene. Single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of these exons in 173 unrelated patients with tuberous sclerosis and direct sequencing of variant conformers together with study of additional family members enabled characterisation of disease associated mutations in 14 cases. Missense mutations, which occurred in exons 36, 37 and 38 were identified in eight cases, four of whom shared the same recurrent change P1675L. Each of the five different missense mutations identified was shown to occur de novo in at least one sporadic case of tuberous sclerosis. The high proportion of missense mutations detected in the region of the TSC2 gene encoding the GAP-related domain supports its key role in the regulation of cellular growth.

  14. WW domain containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 targets the full-length ErbB4 for ubiquitin-mediated degradation in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Zhou, Z; Alimandi, M; Chen, C

    2009-08-20

    ErbB4, a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, plays a role in normal breast and breast cancer development by regulating mammary epithelial cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. In this study, we show that WWP1, a C2-WW-HECT type E3 ubiquitin ligase, binds, ubiquitinates and destructs ErbB4-CYT1, but much less efficiently for CYT2, isoforms (both JMa and JMb). The protein-protein interaction occurs primarily between the first and third WW domains of WWP1 and the second PY motif of ErbB4. Knockdown of WWP1 by two different small interfering RNAs increases the endogenous ErbB4 protein levels in both MCF7 and T47D breast cancer cell lines. In addition, overexpression of the wild type, but not the catalytic inactive WWP1, dramatically decreases the endogenous ErbB4 protein levels in MCF7. Importantly, we found that WWP1 negatively regulates the heregulin-beta1-stimulated ErbB4 activity as measured by the serum response element report assay and the BRCA1 mRNA expression. After a systematic screening of all WWP1 family members by small interfering RNA, we found that AIP4/Itch and HECW1/NEDL1 also negatively regulate the ErbB4 protein expression in T47D. Interestingly, the protein expression levels of both WWP1 and ErbB4 are higher in estrogen receptor-alpha-positive than in estrogen receptor-alpha-negative breast cancer cell lines. These data suggest that WWP1 and its family members suppress the ErbB4 expression and function in breast cancer.

  15. Tandem Mass Spectrometry identifies many mouse brain O-GlcNAcylated proteins including EGF domain-specific O-GlcNAc transferase targets

    SciTech Connect

    Alfaro, Joshua F.; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Monroe, Matthew E.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Purvine, Samuel O.; Wang, Zihao; Camp, David G.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Stanley, Pamela; Hart, Gerald W.; Hunt, Donald F.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-05-08

    O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is a reversible post-translational modification of Ser and Thr residues on cytosolic and nuclear proteins found in all higher eukaryotes. Aberrant O-GlcNAc modification of brain proteins has been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, understanding specific functions of O-GlcNAcylation in AD has been impeded by the difficulty in characterization of O-GlcNAc sites on proteins. In this study, we modified a chemical/enzymatic photochemical cleavage approach for enriching O-GlcNAcylated peptides in samples containing {approx}100 {micro}g of tryptic peptides from mouse cerebrocortical brain tissue. A total of 274 O-GlcNAcylated proteins were identified. Of these 168 were not previously known to be modified by O-GlcNAc. Overall, 458 O-GlcNAc sites on Ser and Thr residues in 195 proteins were identified. Many of the modified residues are either known phosphorylation sites or located in close proximity to known phosphorylation sites. These findings support the proposed regulatory crosstalk between O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation. This study produced the most comprehensive O-GlcNAc proteome of mammalian brain tissue with both protein identification and O-GlcNAc site assignment. Interestingly, we observed O-{beta}-GlcNAc on EGF-like repeats in the extracellular domains of five membrane proteins, thus representing the first evidence for extracellular O-GlcNAcylation in mammalian systems by the ER-resident O-GlcNAc transferase (EOGT). We also report a GlcNAc-{beta}-1,3-Fuc-{alpha}-1-O-Thr modification on the EGF-like repeat of the Versican core protein, a novel substrate of Fringe {beta}1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases.

  16. Review of the Third Domain Receptor Binding Fragment of Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP): Plausible Binding of AFP to Lysophospholipid Receptor Targets.

    PubMed

    Mizejewski, G J

    2016-01-31

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a 69 kD fetal- and tumor-associated single-chain glycoprotein belonging to the albuminoid gene family. AFP functions as a carrier/transport molecule as well as a growth regulator and has been utilized as a clinical biomarker for both fetal defects and cancer growth. Lysophospholipids (LPLs) are plasma membrane-derived bioactive lipid signaling mediators composed of a small molecular weight single acyl carbon chain (palmitic, oleic acid) attached to a polar headgroup; they range in molecular mass from 250-750 daltons. The LPLs consist of either sphingosine-1-phosphate or lysophosphatidic acid, and mostly their choline, ethanolamine, serine or inositol derivatives. They are present only in vertebrates. These bioactive paracrine lipid mediators are ubiquitously distributed in tissues and are released from many different cell types (platelets, macrophages, monocytes, etc.) involved in developmental, physiological, and pathological processes. The LPLs bind to four different classes of G-protein coupled receptors described herein which transduce a multiple of cell effects encompassing activities such as morphogenesis, neural development, angiogenesis, and carcinogenesis. The identification of potential binding sites of LPL receptors on the AFP third domain receptor binding fragment were derived by computer modeling analysis. It is conceivable, but not proven, that AFP might bind not only to the LPL receptors, but also to LPLs themselves since AFP binds medium and long chain fatty acids. It is proposed that some of the activities ascribed to AFP in the past might be due in part to the presence of bound LPLs and/or their receptors.

  17. The cytoplasmic domain of the gamete membrane fusion protein HAP2 targets the protein to the fusion site in Chlamydomonas and regulates the fusion reaction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanjie; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick; Snell, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-cell fusion between gametes is a defining step during development of eukaryotes, yet we know little about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the gamete membrane fusion reaction. HAP2 is the sole gamete-specific protein in any system that is broadly conserved and shown by gene disruption to be essential for gamete fusion. The wide evolutionary distribution of HAP2 (also known as GCS1) indicates it was present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor and, therefore, dissecting its molecular properties should provide new insights into fundamental features of fertilization. HAP2 acts at a step after membrane adhesion, presumably directly in the merger of the lipid bilayers. Here, we use the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas to characterize contributions of key regions of HAP2 to protein location and function. We report that mutation of three strongly conserved residues in the ectodomain has no effect on targeting or fusion, although short deletions that include those residues block surface expression and fusion. Furthermore, HAP2 lacking a 237-residue segment of the cytoplasmic region is expressed at the cell surface, but fails to localize at the apical membrane patch specialized for fusion and fails to rescue fusion. Finally, we provide evidence that the ancient HAP2 contained a juxta-membrane, multi-cysteine motif in its cytoplasmic region, and that mutation of a cysteine dyad in this motif preserves protein localization, but substantially impairs HAP2 fusion activity. Thus, the ectodomain of HAP2 is essential for its surface expression, and the cytoplasmic region targets HAP2 to the site of fusion and regulates the fusion reaction. PMID:25655701

  18. Targeted delivery of interleukin-10 to chronic cardiac allograft rejection using a human antibody specific to the extra domain A of fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Franz, Marcus; Doll, Fabia; Grün, Katja; Richter, Petra; Köse, Nilay; Ziffels, Barbara; Schubert, Haral