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Sample records for pseudomonas putida uw4

  1. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jin; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Zhenyu; Heikkila, John J.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs) were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated “housekeeping” genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup. PMID:23516524

  2. Genome features of Pseudomonas putida LS46, a novel polyhydroxyalkanoate producer and its comparison with other P. putida strains

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A novel strain of Pseudomonas putida LS46 was isolated from wastewater on the basis of its ability to synthesize medium chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHAs). P.putida LS46 was differentiated from other P.putida strains on the basis of cpn60 (UT). The complete genome of P.putida LS46 was sequenced and annotated. Its chromosome is 5,86,2556 bp in size with GC ratio of 61.69. It is encoding 5316 genes, including 7 rRNA genes and 76 tRNA genes. Nucleotide sequence data of the complete P. putida LS46 genome was compared with nine other P. putida strains (KT2440, F1, BIRD-1, S16, ND6, DOT-T1E, UW4, W619 and GB-1) identified either as biocontrol agents or as bioremediation agents and isolated from different geographical region and different environment. BLASTn analysis of whole genome sequences of the ten P. putida strains revealed nucleotide sequence identities of 86.54 to 97.52%. P.putida genome arrangement was LS46 highly similar to P.putida BIRD1 and P.putida ND6 but was markedly different than P.putida DOT-T1E, P.putida UW4 and P.putida W619. Fatty acid biosynthesis (fab), fatty acid degradation (fad) and PHA synthesis genes were highly conserved among biocontrol and bioremediation P.putida strains. Six genes in pha operon of P. putida LS46 showed >98% homology at gene and proteins level. It appears that polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthesis is an intrinsic property of P. putida and was not affected by its geographic origin. However, all strains, including P. putida LS46, were different from one another on the basis of house keeping genes, and presence of plasmid, prophages, insertion sequence elements and genomic islands. While P. putida LS46 was not selected for plant growth promotion or bioremediation capacity, its genome also encoded genes for root colonization, pyoverdine synthesis, oxidative stress (present in other soil isolates), degradation of aromatic compounds, heavy metal resistance and nicotinic acid degradation, manganese (Mn II) oxidation

  3. Investigating the ability of Pseudomonas fluorescens UW4 to reduce cadmium stress in Lactuca sativa via an intervention in the ethylene biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Albano, Lucas J; Macfie, Sheila M

    2016-12-01

    A typical plant response to any biotic or abiotic stress, including cadmium (Cd), involves increased ethylene synthesis, which causes senescence of the affected plant part. Stressed plants can experience reduced ethylene and improved growth if they are inoculated with bacteria that have the enzyme ACC deaminase, which metabolizes the ethylene precursor ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate). We investigated whether one such bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens UW4, reduces the production of ethylene and improves the growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) sown in Cd-contaminated potting material (PRO-MIX® BX). Plants were inoculated with the wild-type P. fluorescens UW4 or a mutant strain that cannot produce ACC deaminase. Cadmium-treated plants contained up to 50 times more Cd than did control plants. In noninoculated plants, Cd induced a 5-fold increase in ethylene concentration. The wild-type bacterium prevented Cd-induced reductions in root biomass but there was no relationship between Cd treatment and ethylene production in inoculated plants. In contrast, when the concentration of ethylene was plotted against the extent of bacterial colonization of the roots, increased colonization with wild-type P. fluorescens UW4 was associated with 20% less ethylene production. Ours is the first study to show that the protective effect of this bacterium is proportional to the quantity of bacteria on the root surface.

  4. Methylmercury degradation by Pseudomonas putida V1.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Lucélia; Yu, Ri-Qing; Crane, Sharron; Giovanella, Patricia; Barkay, Tamar; Camargo, Flávio A O

    2016-08-01

    Environmental contamination of mercury (Hg) has caused public health concerns with focuses on the neurotoxic substance methylmercury, due to its bioaccumulation and biomagnification in food chains. The goals of the present study were to examine: (i) the transformation of methylmercury, thimerosal, phenylmercuric acetate and mercuric chloride by cultures of Pseudomonas putida V1, (ii) the presence of the genes merA and merB in P. putida V1, and (iii) the degradation pathways of methylmercury by P. putida V1. Strain V1 cultures readily degraded methylmercury, thimerosal, phenylmercury acetate, and reduced mercuric chloride into gaseous Hg(0). However, the Hg transformation in LB broth by P. putida V1 was influenced by the type of Hg compounds. The merA gene was detected in P. putida V1, on the other hand, the merB gene was not detected. The sequencing of this gene, showed high similarity (100%) to the mercuric reductase gene of other Pseudomonas spp. Furthermore, tests using radioactive (14)C-methylmercury indicated an uncommon release of (14)CO2 concomitant with the production of Hg(0). The results of the present work suggest that P. putida V1 has the potential to remove methylmercury from contaminated sites. More studies are warranted to determine the mechanism of removal of methylmercury by P. putida V1.

  5. Chemotaxis of Pseudomonas putida toward chlorinated benzoates

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, C.S.; Parales, R.E.; Dispensa, M. )

    1990-05-01

    The chlorinated aromatic acids 3-chlorobenzoate and 4-chlorobenzoate are chemoattractants for Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. These compounds are detected by a chromosomally encoded chemotactic response to benzoate which is inducible by {beta}-ketoadipate, and intermediate of benzoate catabolism. Plasmid pAC27, encoding enzymes for 3-chlorobenzoate degradation, does not appear to carry genes for chemotaxis toward chlorinated compounds.

  6. Characterization of a Nitrilase and a Nitrile Hydratase from Pseudomonas sp. Strain UW4 That Converts Indole-3-Acetonitrile to Indole-3-Acetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is a fundamental phytohormone with the ability to control many aspects of plant growth and development. Pseudomonas sp. strain UW4 is a rhizospheric plant growth-promoting bacterium that produces and secretes IAA. While several putative IAA biosynthetic genes have been reported in this bacterium, the pathways leading to the production of IAA in strain UW4 are unclear. Here, the presence of the indole-3-acetamide (IAM) and indole-3-acetaldoxime/indole-3-acetonitrile (IAOx/IAN) pathways of IAA biosynthesis is described, and the specific role of two of the enzymes (nitrilase and nitrile hydratase) that mediate these pathways is assessed. The genes encoding these two enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the enzymes were isolated and characterized. Substrate-feeding assays indicate that the nitrilase produces both IAM and IAA from the IAN substrate, while the nitrile hydratase only produces IAM. The two nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes have very different temperature and pH optimums. Nitrilase prefers a temperature of 50°C and a pH of 6, while nitrile hydratase prefers 4°C and a pH of 7.5. Based on multiple sequence alignments and motif analyses, physicochemical properties and enzyme assays, it is concluded that the UW4 nitrilase has an aromatic substrate specificity. The nitrile hydratase is identified as an iron-type metalloenzyme that does not require the help of a P47K activator protein to be active. These data are interpreted in terms of a preliminary model for the biosynthesis of IAA in this bacterium. PMID:24837382

  7. Ethylene Glycol Metabolism by Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Mückschel, Björn; Simon, Oliver; Klebensberger, Janosch; Graf, Nadja; Rosche, Bettina; Altenbuchner, Josef; Pfannstiel, Jens; Huber, Armin

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the metabolism of ethylene glycol in the Pseudomonas putida strains KT2440 and JM37 by employing growth and bioconversion experiments, directed mutagenesis, and proteome analysis. We found that strain JM37 grew rapidly with ethylene glycol as a sole source of carbon and energy, while strain KT2440 did not grow within 2 days of incubation under the same conditions. However, bioconversion experiments revealed metabolism of ethylene glycol by both strains, with the temporal accumulation of glycolic acid and glyoxylic acid for strain KT2440. This accumulation was further increased by targeted mutagenesis. The key enzymes and specific differences between the two strains were identified by comparative proteomics. In P. putida JM37, tartronate semialdehyde synthase (Gcl), malate synthase (GlcB), and isocitrate lyase (AceA) were found to be induced in the presence of ethylene glycol or glyoxylic acid. Under the same conditions, strain KT2440 showed induction of AceA only. Despite this difference, the two strains were found to use similar periplasmic dehydrogenases for the initial oxidation step of ethylene glycol, namely, the two redundant pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent enzymes PedE and PedH. From these results we constructed a new pathway for the metabolism of ethylene glycol in P. putida. Furthermore, we conclude that Pseudomonas putida might serve as a useful platform from which to establish a whole-cell biocatalyst for the production of glyoxylic acid from ethylene glycol. PMID:23023748

  8. Binding of germanium of Pseudomonas putida cells

    SciTech Connect

    Klapcinska, B.; Chmielowski, J.

    1986-05-01

    The binding of germanium to Pseudomonas putida ATCC 33015 was investigated by using whole intact cells grown in a medium supplemented with GeO/sub 2/ and catechol or acetate. Electron-microscopic examination of the control and metal-loaded samples revealed that germanium was bound within the cell envelope. A certain number of small electron-dense deposits of the bound element were found in the cytoplasm when the cells were grown in the presence of GeO/sub 2/ and catechol. The study of germanium distribution in cellular fractions revealed that catechol facilitated the intracellular accumulation of this element.

  9. Regulation of alkane oxidation in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Grund, A; Shapiro, J; Fennewald, M; Bacha, P; Leahy, J; Markbreiter, K; Nieder, M; Toepfer, M

    1975-01-01

    We have studied the appearance of whole-cell oxidizing activity for n-alkanes and their oxidation products in strains of Pseudomonas putida carrying the OCT plasmid. Our results indicate that the OCT plasmid codes for inducible alkane-hydroxylating and primary alcohol-dehydrogenating activities and that the chromosome codes for constitutive oxidizing activities for primary alcohols, aliphatic aldehydes, and fatty acids. Mutant isolation confirms the presence of an alcohol dehydrogenase locus on the OCT plasmid and indicated the presence of multiple alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase loci on the P. putida chromosome. Induction tests with various compounds indicate that inducer recognition has specificity for chain length and can be affected by the degree of oxidation of the carbon chain. Some inducers are neither growth nor respiration substrates. Growth tests with and without a gratuitous inducer indicate that undecane is not a growth substrate because it does not induce alkane hydroxylase activity. Using a growth test for determining induction of the plasmid alcohol dehydrogenase it is possible to show that heptane induces this activity in hydroxylase-negative mutants. This suggests that unoxidized alkane molecules are the physiological inducers of both plasmid activities. PMID:1150626

  10. Regulation of Leucine Catabolism in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Linda K.; Conrad, Robert S.; Sokatch, John R.

    1974-01-01

    The generation time of Pseudomonas putida with l-leucine was 20 h in synthetic media but only 3 h with d-leucine. Slow growth in the presence of l-leucine was partially overcome by addition of 0.1 mM amounts of either d-valine, l-valine, or 2-ketoisovalerate. The activities of five enzymes which take part in the oxidation of leucine by P. putida were measured under various conditions of growth. Four enzymes were induced by growth with dl-leucine as sole source of carbon: d-amino acid dehydrogenase, branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase, 3-methylcrotonyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A lyase. The segment of the pathway required for oxidation of 3-methylcrotonate was induced by growth on isovalerate or 3-methylcrotonate without formation of the preceding enzymes. The synthesis of carboxylase and lyase appeared to have been repressed by the addition of l-glutamate or glucose to cells growing on dl-leucine as the sole carbon source. Mutants unable to grow at the expense of isovalerate had reduced levels of carboxylase and lyase, whereas the levels of three enzymes common to the catabolism of all three branched-chain amino acids and those of two isoleucine catabolic enzymes were normal. PMID:4150714

  11. Phospholipid biosynthesis and solvent tolerance in Pseudomonas putida strains.

    PubMed Central

    Pinkart, H C; White, D C

    1997-01-01

    The role of the cell envelope in the solvent tolerance mechanisms of Pseudomonas putida was investigated. The responses of a solvent-tolerant strain, P. putida Idaho, and a solvent-sensitive strain, P. putida MW1200, were examined in terms of phospholipid content and composition and of phospholipid biosynthetic rate following exposure to a nonmetabolizable solvent, o-xylene. Following o-xylene exposure, P. putida MW1200 exhibited a decrease in total phospholipid content. In contrast, P. putida Idaho demonstrated an increase in phospholipid content 1 to 6 h after exposure. Analysis of phospholipid biosynthesis showed P. putida Idaho to have a higher basal rate of phospholipid synthesis than MW1200. This rate increased significantly following exposure to xylene. Both strains showed little significant turnover of phospholipid in the absence of xylene. In the presence of xylene, both strains showed increased phospholipid turnover. The rate of turnover was significantly greater in P. putida Idaho than in P. putida MW1200. These results suggest that P. putida Idaho has a greater ability than the solvent-sensitive strain MW1200 to repair damaged membranes through efficient turnover and increased phospholipid biosynthesis. PMID:9209036

  12. Biological manganese oxidation by Pseudomonas putida in trickling filters.

    PubMed

    McKee, Kyle P; Vance, Cherish C; Karthikeyan, Raghupathy

    2016-01-01

    Biological oxidation has been researched as a viable alternative for treating waters with high manganese (Mn) concentrations, typically found in mine drainage or in some geological formations. In this study, laboratory-scale trickling filters were constructed to compare the Mn removal efficiency between filters inoculated with the Mn oxidizing bacteria, Pseudomonas putida, and filters without inoculation. Manganese oxidation and removal was found to be significantly greater in trickling filters with Pseudomonas putida after startup times of only 48 h. Mn oxidation in Pseudomonas putida inoculated trickling filters was up to 75% greater than non-inoculated filters. One-dimensional advective-dispersive models were formulated to describe the transport of Mn in trickling filter porous media. Based on the experimental transport parameters obtained, the model predicted that a filter depth of only 16 cm is needed to reduce influent concentration of 10 mg L(-1) to 0.05 mg L(-1).

  13. Analysis of the core genome and pangenome of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Udaondo, Zulema; Molina, Lázaro; Segura, Ana; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan L

    2016-10-01

    Pseudomonas putida are strict aerobes that proliferate in a range of temperate niches and are of interest for environmental applications due to their capacity to degrade pollutants and ability to promote plant growth. Furthermore solvent-tolerant strains are useful for biosynthesis of added-value chemicals. We present a comprehensive comparative analysis of nine strains and the first characterization of the Pseudomonas putida pangenome. The core genome of P. putida comprises approximately 3386 genes. The most abundant genes within the core genome are those that encode nutrient transporters. Other conserved genes include those for central carbon metabolism through the Entner-Doudoroff pathway, the pentose phosphate cycle, arginine and proline metabolism, and pathways for degradation of aromatic chemicals. Genes that encode transporters, enzymes and regulators for amino acid metabolism (synthesis and degradation) are all part of the core genome, as well as various electron transporters, which enable aerobic metabolism under different oxygen regimes. Within the core genome are 30 genes for flagella biosynthesis and 12 key genes for biofilm formation. Pseudomonas putida strains share 85% of the coding regions with Pseudomonas aeruginosa; however, in P. putida, virulence factors such as exotoxins and type III secretion systems are absent.

  14. Decolorization of anaerobically digested molasses spent wash by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, M; Ganguli, A; Tripathi, A K

    2009-01-01

    The distillery wastewater (spent wash) contains dark-brown colored recalcitrant organic compounds that are not amenable to conventional biological treatment. The characteristic recalcitrance to decolorization is due to the presence of brown melanoidin polymers. In the present study, feasibility of using Pseudomonas putida strain U for decolorization of spent wash was demonstrated. Batch cultures of P. putida decolourized spent wash by 24%, 2- fold higher decolorization was achieved following immobilization in calcium alginate beads. Glucose concentration was critical for decolourization and improved color removal efficiency was obtained by periodic replenishment of glucose. Decolourization was also observed with lactose or whey as alternative carbon sources. The results of our study suggest that P. putida could be used for biological decolorization of molasses spent washes and that supplementation with whey (a by-product from cheese industry) can offer economical viability to the process.

  15. Bioremediation of p-Nitrophenol by Pseudomonas putida 1274 strain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background p-Nitrophenol (PNP) occurs as contaminants of industrial effluents and it is the most important environmental pollutant and causes significant health and environmental risks, because it is toxic to many living organisms. Nevertheless, the information regarding PNP degradation pathways and their enzymes remain limited. Objective To evaluate the efficacy of the Pseudomonas Putida 1274 for removal of PNP. Methods P. putida MTCC 1274 was obtained from MTCC Chandigarh, India and cultured in the minimal medium in the presence of PNP. PNP degradation efficiency was compared under different pH and temperature ranges. The degraded product was isolated and analyzed with different chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. Results P. putida 1274 shows good growth and PNP degradation at 37°C in neutral pH. Acidic and alkali pH retarded the growth of P. putida as well as the PNP degradation. On the basis of specialized techniques, hydroquinone was identified as major degraded product. The pathway was identified for the biodegradation of PNP. It involved initial removal of the nitrate group and formation of hydroquinone as one of the intermediates. Conclusion Our results suggested that P. putida 1274 strain would be a suitable aspirant for bioremediation of nitro-aromatic compounds contaminated sites in the environment. PMID:24581307

  16. Production of selenium nanoparticles in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Avendaño, Roberto; Chaves, Nefertiti; Fuentes, Paola; Sánchez, Ethel; Jiménez, Jose I; Chavarría, Max

    2016-11-15

    Selenium (Se) is an essential element for the cell that has multiple applications in medicine and technology; microorganisms play an important role in Se transformations in the environment. Here we report the previously unidentified ability of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 to synthesize nanoparticles of elemental selenium (nano-Se) from selenite. Our results show that P. putida is able to reduce selenite aerobically, but not selenate, to nano-Se. Kinetic analysis indicates that, in LB medium supplemented with selenite (1 mM), reduction to nano-Se occurs at a rate of 0.444 mmol L(-1) h(-1) beginning in the middle-exponential phase and with a final conversion yield of 89%. Measurements with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) show that nano-Se particles synthesized by P. putida have a size range of 100 to 500 nm and that they are located in the surrounding medium or bound to the cell membrane. Experiments involving dynamic light scattering (DLS) show that, in aqueous solution, recovered nano-Se particles have a size range of 70 to 360 nm. The rapid kinetics of conversion, easy retrieval of nano-Se and the metabolic versatility of P. putida offer the opportunity to use this model organism as a microbial factory for production of selenium nanoparticles.

  17. Production of selenium nanoparticles in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    Avendaño, Roberto; Chaves, Nefertiti; Fuentes, Paola; Sánchez, Ethel; Jiménez, Jose I.; Chavarría, Max

    2016-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential element for the cell that has multiple applications in medicine and technology; microorganisms play an important role in Se transformations in the environment. Here we report the previously unidentified ability of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 to synthesize nanoparticles of elemental selenium (nano-Se) from selenite. Our results show that P. putida is able to reduce selenite aerobically, but not selenate, to nano-Se. Kinetic analysis indicates that, in LB medium supplemented with selenite (1 mM), reduction to nano-Se occurs at a rate of 0.444 mmol L−1 h−1 beginning in the middle-exponential phase and with a final conversion yield of 89%. Measurements with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) show that nano-Se particles synthesized by P. putida have a size range of 100 to 500 nm and that they are located in the surrounding medium or bound to the cell membrane. Experiments involving dynamic light scattering (DLS) show that, in aqueous solution, recovered nano-Se particles have a size range of 70 to 360 nm. The rapid kinetics of conversion, easy retrieval of nano-Se and the metabolic versatility of P. putida offer the opportunity to use this model organism as a microbial factory for production of selenium nanoparticles. PMID:27845437

  18. Specific Gene Loci of Clinical Pseudomonas putida Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Lázaro; Udaondo, Zulema; Duque, Estrella; Fernández, Matilde; Bernal, Patricia; Roca, Amalia; de la Torre, Jesús; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida are ubiquitous inhabitants of soils and clinical isolates of this species have been seldom described. Clinical isolates show significant variability in their ability to cause damage to hosts because some of them are able to modulate the host’s immune response. In the current study, comparisons between the genomes of different clinical and environmental strains of P. putida were done to identify genetic clusters shared by clinical isolates that are not present in environmental isolates. We show that in clinical strains specific genes are mostly present on transposons, and that this set of genes exhibit high identity with genes found in pathogens and opportunistic pathogens. The set of genes prevalent in P. putida clinical isolates, and absent in environmental isolates, are related with survival under oxidative stress conditions, resistance against biocides, amino acid metabolism and toxin/antitoxin (TA) systems. This set of functions have influence in colonization and survival within human tissues, since they avoid host immune response or enhance stress resistance. An in depth bioinformatic analysis was also carried out to identify genetic clusters that are exclusive to each of the clinical isolates and that correlate with phenotypical differences between them, a secretion system type III-like was found in one of these clinical strains, a determinant of pathogenicity in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26820467

  19. Repeated batch and continuous degradation of chlorpyrifos by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Vijayalakshmi; Subbaiah, Usha Malavalli

    2015-01-01

    The present study was undertaken with the objective of studying repeated batch and continuous degradation of chlorpyrifos (O,O-diethyl O-3,5,6-trichloropyridin-2-yl phosphorothioate) using Ca-alginate immobilized cells of Pseudomonas putida isolated from an agricultural soil, and to study the genes and enzymes involved in degradation. The study was carried out to reduce the toxicity of chlorpyrifos by degrading it to less toxic metabolites. Long-term stability of pesticide degradation was studied during repeated batch degradation of chlorpyrifos, which was carried out over a period of 50 days. Immobilized cells were able to show 65% degradation of chlorpyrifos at the end of the 50th cycle with a cell leakage of 112 × 10(3) cfu mL(-1). During continuous treatment, 100% degradation was observed at 100 mL h(-1) flow rate with 2% chlorpyrifos, and with 10% concentration of chlorpyrifos 98% and 80% degradation was recorded at 20 mL h(-1) and 100 mL h(-1) flow rate respectively. The products of degradation detected by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis were 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol and chlorpyrifos oxon. Plasmid curing experiments with ethidium bromide indicated that genes responsible for the degradation of chlorpyrifos are present on the chromosome and not on the plasmid. The results of Polymerase chain reaction indicate that a ~890-bp product expected for mpd gene was present in Ps. putida. Enzymatic degradation studies indicated that the enzymes involved in the degradation of chlorpyrifos are membrane-bound. The study indicates that immobilized cells of Ps. putida have the potential to be used in bioremediation of water contaminated with chlorpyrifos.

  20. Toluene Diffusion and Reaction in Unsaturated Pseudomonas putida Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Patricia A.; Hunt, James R.; Firestone, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Biofilms are frequently studied in the context of submerged or aquatic systems. However, much less is known about biofilms in unsaturated systems, despite their importance to such processes as food spoilage, terrestrial nutrient cycling, and biodegradation of environmental pollutants in soils. Using modeling and experimentation, we have described the biodegradation of toluene in unsaturated media by bacterial biofilms as a function of matric water potential, a dominant variable in unsaturated systems. We experimentally determined diffusion and kinetic parameters for Pseudomonas putida biofilms, then predicted biodegradation rates over a range of matric water potentials. For validation, we measured the rate of toluene depletion by intact biofilms and found the results to reasonably follow the model predictions. The diffusion coefficient for toluene through unsaturated P. putida biofilm averaged 1.3 × 10−7 cm2/s, which is approximately two orders of magnitude lower than toluene diffusivity in water. Our studies show that, at the scale of the microbial biofilm, the diffusion of toluene to biodegrading bacteria can limit the overall rate of biological toluene depletion in unsaturated systems. PMID:18642338

  1. Biofilm formation-defective mutants in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, Aroa; Leal-Morales, Antonio; Jiménez-Díaz, Lorena; Platero, Ana I; Bardallo-Pérez, Juan; Díaz-Romero, Alberto; Acemel, Rafael D; Illán, Juan M; Jiménez-López, Julia; Govantes, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Out of 8000 candidates from a genetic screening for Pseudomonas putida KT2442 mutants showing defects in biofilm formation, 40 independent mutants with diminished levels of biofilm were analyzed. Most of these mutants carried insertions in genes of the lap cluster, whose products are responsible for synthesis, export and degradation of the adhesin LapA. All mutants in this class were strongly defective in biofilm formation. Mutants in the flagellar regulatory genes fleQ and flhF showed similar defects to that of the lap mutants. On the contrary, transposon insertions in the flagellar structural genes fliP and flgG, that also impair flagellar motility, had a modest defect in biofilm formation. A mutation in gacS, encoding the sensor element of the GacS/GacA two-component system, also had a moderate effect on biofilm formation. Additional insertions targeted genes involved in cell envelope function: PP3222, encoding the permease element of an ABC-type transporter and tolB, encoding the periplasmic component of the Tol-OprL system required for outer membrane stability. Our results underscore the central role of LapA, suggest cross-regulation between motility and adhesion functions and provide insights on the role of cell envelope trafficking and maintenance for biofilm development in P. putida.

  2. Conversion of levoglucosan and cellobiosan by Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    DOE PAGES

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Hobdey, Sarah E.; Franden, Mary Ann; ...

    2016-02-02

    Pyrolysis offers a straightforward approach for the deconstruction of plant cell wall polymers into bio-oil. Recently, there has been substantial interest in bio-oil fractionation and subsequent use of biological approaches to selectively upgrade some of the resulting fractions. A fraction of particular interest for biological upgrading consists of polysaccharide-derived substrates including sugars and sugar dehydration products such as levoglucosan and cellobiosan, which are two of the most abundant pyrolysis products of cellulose. Levoglucosan can be converted to glucose-6-phosphate through the use of a levoglucosan kinase (LGK), but to date, the mechanism for cellobiosan utilization has not been demonstrated. Here, wemore » engineer the microbe Pseudomonas putida KT2440 to use levoglucosan as a sole carbon and energy source through LGK integration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cellobiosan can be enzymatically converted to levoglucosan and glucose with β-glucosidase enzymes from both Glycoside Hydrolase Family 1 and Family 3. β-glucosidases are commonly used in both natural and industrial cellulase cocktails to convert cellobiose to glucose to relieve cellulase product inhibition and to facilitate microbial uptake of glucose. Using an exogenous β-glucosidase, we demonstrate that the engineered strain of P. putida can grow on levoglucosan up to 60 g/L and can also utilize cellobiosan. Overall, this study elucidates the biological pathway to co-utilize levoglucosan and cellobiosan, which will be a key transformation for the biological upgrading of pyrolysis-derived substrates.« less

  3. Identification and transcriptional profiling of Pseudomonas putida genes involved in furoic acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furfural (2-furaldehyde) is a furan formed by dehydration of pentose sugars. Pseudomonas putida Fu1 metabolizes furfural through a pathway involving conversion to 2-oxoglutarate, via 2-furoic acid and Coenzyme A intermediates. To identify genes involved in furan metabolism, two P. putida transposo...

  4. Responses of Pseudomonas putida to toxic aromatic carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Krell, Tino; Lacal, Jesús; Guazzaroni, M Eugenia; Busch, Andreas; Silva-Jiménez, Hortencia; Fillet, Sandy; Reyes-Darías, José A; Muñoz-Martínez, Francisco; Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; García-Fontana, Cristina; Duque, Estrella; Segura, Ana; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2012-07-31

    A number of bacteria can use toxic compounds as carbon sources and have developed complex regulatory networks to protect themselves from the toxic effects of these compounds as well as to benefit from their nutritious properties. As a model system we have studied the responses of Pseudomonas putida strains to toluene. Although this compound is highly toxic, several strains are able to use it for growth. Particular emphasis was given to the responses in the context of taxis, resistance and toluene catabolism. P. putida strains analysed showed chemotactic movements towards toluene. Strain DOT-T1E was characterised by an extreme form of chemotaxis, termed hyperchemotaxis, which is mediated by the McpT chemoreceptor encoded by plasmid pGRT1. Close McpT homologs are found in a number of other plasmids encoding degradation pathways of toxic compounds. The pGRT1 plasmid harbours also the genes for the TtgGHI efflux pump which was identified as the primary determinant for the resistance of strain DOT-T1E towards toluene. Pump expression is controlled by the TtgV repressor in response to a wide range of different mono- and biaromatic compounds. Strain DOT-T1E is able to degrade toluene, benzene and ethylbenzene via the toluene dioxygenase (TOD) pathway. The expression of the pathway operon is controlled by the TodS/T two component system. The sensor kinase TodS recognizes toluene with nanomolar affinity, which in turn triggers an increase in its autophosphorylation and consequently transcriptional activation. Data suggest that transcriptional activation of the TOD pathway occurs at very low toluene concentrations whereas TtgV mediated induction of pump expression sets in as the toluene concentration further increases.

  5. Isolation and characterization of group II introns from Pseudomonas alcaligenes and Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Yeo, C C; Yiin, S; Tan, B H; Poh, C L

    2001-05-01

    Group II introns isolated from Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIB 9867, Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9869, and P. putida KT2440 were closely related with nucleotide sequence identities of between 87 and 96%. The genome of P. alcaligenes also harbored a truncated group II intron of 682 bp that lacks the gene for the intron-encoded protein (IEP). Unlike most bacterial group II introns, the Pseudomonas introns were found to lack the Zn domains in their IEPs, did not appear to interrupt any genes, and were located downstream of open reading frames which were adjacent to hairpin loop structures that resemble rho-independent terminators. These structures also contain the intron binding sites 1 and 2 (IBS1 and IBS2 sequences) that were required for intron target site recognition in transposition. One of the group II introns found in P. alcaligenes, Xln3, was shown to have transposed from the chromosome to the endogenous pRA2 plasmid at a site adjacent to IBS1- and IBS2-like sequences.

  6. A holistic view of polyhydroxyalkanoate metabolism in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Auxiliadora; Escapa, Isabel F; Martínez, Virginia; Dinjaski, Nina; Herencias, Cristina; de la Peña, Fernando; Tarazona, Natalia; Revelles, Olga

    2016-02-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) metabolism has been traditionally considered as a futile cycle involved in carbon and energy storage. The use of cutting-edge technologies linked to systems biology has improved our understanding of the interaction between bacterial physiology, PHA metabolism and other cell functions in model bacteria such as Pseudomonas putida KT2440. PHA granules or carbonosomes are supramolecular complexes of biopolyester and proteins that are essential for granule segregation during cell division, and for the functioning of the PHA metabolic route as a continuous cycle. The simultaneous activities of PHA synthase and depolymerase ensure the carbon flow to the transient demand for metabolic intermediates to balance the storage and use of carbon and energy. PHA cycle also determines the number and size of bacterial cells. The importance of PHAs as nutrients for members of the microbial community different to those that produce them is illustrated here via examples of bacterial predators such as Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus that prey on PHA producers and produces specific extra-cellular depolymerases. PHA hydrolysis confers Bdellovibrio ecological advantages in terms of motility and predation efficiency, demonstrating the importance of PHA producers predation in population dynamics. Metabolic modulation strategies for broadening the portfolio of PHAs are summarized and their properties are compiled.

  7. Characterization of Pseudomonas putida Genes Responsive to Nutrient Limitation

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, Chris K.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Kingsley, Mark T.; Swarup, Sanjay

    2004-06-01

    The low bioavailability of nutrients and oxygen in the soil environment has hampered successful expression of biodegradation/biocontrol genes that are driven by promoters highly active during routine laboratory conditions of high nutrient- and oxygen-availability. Hence, in the present study, expression of the gus-tagged genes in 12 Tn5-gus mutants of the soil microbe Pseudomonas putida PNL-MK25 was examined under various conditions chosen to mimic the soil environment: low carbon, phosphate, nitrate, or oxygen, and in the rhizosphere. Based on their expression profiles, three nutrient-responsive mutant (NRM) strains, NRM5, NRM7, and NRM17, were selected for identification of the tagged genes. In the mutant strain NRM5, expression of the glutamate dehydrogenase (gdhA) gene was increased between 4.9- to 26.4-fold under various low nutrient conditions. In NRM7, expression of the novel NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase-like (nql) gene was consistently amongst the highest and was synergistically upregulated by low nutrient and anoxic conditions. The cyoD gene in NRM17, which encodes the fourth subunit of the cytochrome o ubiquinol oxidase complex, had decreased expression in low nutrient conditions but its absolute expression levels was still amongst the highest. Additionally, it was independent of oxygen availability, in contrast to that in E. coli.

  8. Physical Morphology and Surface Properties of Unsaturated Pseudomonas putida Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Ilene D.; Sorensen, Cody; Hansma, Helen G.; Holden, Patricia A.

    2000-01-01

    Unsaturated biofilms of Pseudomonas putida, i.e., biofilms grown in humid air, were analyzed by atomic force microscopy to determine surface morphology, roughness, and adhesion forces in the outer and basal cell layers of fresh and desiccated biofilms. Desiccated biofilms were equilibrated with a 75.5% relative humidity atmosphere, which is far below the relative humidity of 98 to 99% at which these biofilms were cultured. In sharp contrast to the effects of drying on biofilms grown in fluid, we observed that drying caused little change in morphology, roughness, or adhesion forces in these unsaturated biofilms. Surface roughness for moist and dry biofilms increased approximately linearly with increasing scan sizes. This indicated that the divides between bacteria contributed more to overall roughness than did extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on individual bacteria. The EPS formed higher-order structures we termed mesostructures. These mesostructures are much larger than the discrete polymers of glycolipids and proteins that have been previously characterized on the outer surface of these gram-negative bacteria. PMID:10850998

  9. Comparative genomics and functional analysis of niche-specific adaptation in Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Wu X.; van der Lelie D.; Monchy, S.; Taghavi, S.; Zhu, W.; Ramos, J.

    2011-03-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a gram-negative rod-shaped gammaproteobacterium that is found throughout various environments. Members of the species P. putida show a diverse spectrum of metabolic activities, which is indicative of their adaptation to various niches, which includes the ability to live in soils and sediments contaminated with high concentrations of heavy metals and organic contaminants. Pseudomonas putida strains are also found as plant growth-promoting rhizospheric and endophytic bacteria. The genome sequences of several P. putida species have become available and provide a unique tool to study the specific niche adaptation of the various P. putida strains. In this review, we compare the genomes of four P. putida strains: the rhizospheric strain KT2440, the endophytic strain W619, the aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading strain F1 and the manganese-oxidizing strain GB-1. Comparative genomics provided a powerful tool to gain new insights into the adaptation of P. putida to specific lifestyles and environmental niches, and clearly demonstrated that horizontal gene transfer played a key role in this adaptation process, as many of the niche-specific functions were found to be encoded on clearly defined genomic islands.

  10. Survival of rifampin-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida in soil systems.

    PubMed Central

    Compeau, G; Al-Achi, B J; Platsouka, E; Levy, S B

    1988-01-01

    The fate of spontaneous chromosomal rifampin-resistant (Rifr) mutants of Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens in sterile and live organic soil from which they were isolated was studied. In sterile native-soil assays, a Rifr mutant of P. putida showed no decrease in competitive fitness when compared with the wild-type parent. However, mutants of P. fluorescens were of two general categories. Group 1 showed no difference from the wild type in terms of growth rate, competitive fitness, and membrane protein composition. Group 2 showed a slower growth rate in both minimal and enriched media and an altered membrane protein profile. These mutants also demonstrated decreased competitive fitness compared with the wild-type strain. In live soil, the Rifr P. putida strain persisted throughout the 38-day test period with a decay rate of 0.7 log10 CFU/g of soil per 10 days. A group 1 Rifr P. fluorescens mutant maintained its inoculated titer for 7 to 10 days and then decayed at a rate of 0.2 to 0.4 log10 CFU/g of soil per 10 days. A group 2 Rifr P. fluorescens mutant remained at its titer for 1 to 5 days before decaying at a two- to threefold-faster rate. These findings indicate that rifampin resistance may not be an innocuous mutation in some pseudomonads and that marked strains should be compared with wild-type parents before being used as monitors of parental strain survival. Colonization of sterile soil with either the wild-type or mutant strain precluded normal colonization of the second added strain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:3144244

  11. Physical Forces Shape Group Identity of Swimming Pseudomonas putida Cells

    PubMed Central

    Espeso, David R.; Martínez-García, Esteban; de Lorenzo, Víctor; Goñi-Moreno, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The often striking macroscopic patterns developed by motile bacterial populations on agar plates are a consequence of the environmental conditions where the cells grow and spread. Parameters such as medium stiffness and nutrient concentration have been reported to alter cell swimming behavior, while mutual interactions among populations shape collective patterns. One commonly observed occurrence is the mutual inhibition of clonal bacteria when moving toward each other, which results in a distinct halt at a finite distance on the agar matrix before having direct contact. The dynamics behind this phenomenon (i.e., intolerance to mix in time and space with otherwise identical others) has been traditionally explained in terms of cell-to-cell competition/cooperation regarding nutrient availability. In this work, the same scenario has been revisited from an alternative perspective: the effect of the physical mechanics that frame the process, in particular the consequences of collisions between moving bacteria and the semi-solid matrix of the swimming medium. To this end, we set up a simple experimental system in which the swimming patterns of Pseudomonas putida were tested with different geometries and agar concentrations. A computational analysis framework that highlights cell-to-medium interactions was developed to fit experimental observations. Simulated outputs suggested that the medium is compressed in the direction of the bacterial front motion. This phenomenon generates what was termed a compression wave that goes through the medium preceding the swimming population and that determines the visible high-level pattern. Taken together, the data suggested that the mechanical effects of the bacteria moving through the medium created a factual barrier that impedes to merge with neighboring cells swimming from a different site. The resulting divide between otherwise clonal bacteria is thus brought about by physical forces—not genetic or metabolic programs. PMID

  12. Siderotyping of fluorescent pseudomonads: characterization of pyoverdines of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida strains from Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J M; Stintzi, A; Coulanges, V; Shivaji, S; Voss, J A; Taraz, K; Budzikiewicz, H

    1998-11-01

    Five independent fluorescent pseudomonad isolates originating from Antarctica were analysed for their pyoverdine systems. A pyoverdine-related siderotyping, which involved pyoverdine-induced growth stimulation, pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake, pyoverdine analysis by electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing, revealed three different pyoverdine-related siderotypes among the five isolates. One siderotype, including Pseudomonas fluorescens 1W and P. fluorescens 10CW, was identical to that of P. fluorescens ATCC 13525. Two other strains, P. fluorescens 9AW and Pseudomonas putida 9BW, showed identical pyoverdine-related behaviour to each other, whereas the fifth strain, P. fluorescens 51W, had unique features compared to the other strains or to a set of 12 fluorescent Pseudomonas strains used as comparison material. Elucidation of the structure of the pyoverdines produced by the Antarctic strains supported the accuracy of the siderotyping methodology by confirming that pyoverdines from strains 1W and 10CW had the same structures as the P. fluorescens ATCC 13525 pyoverdine, whereas the 9AW and 9BW pyoverdines are probably identical with the pyoverdine of P. fluorescens strain 244. Pyoverdine from strain 51W appeared to be a novel pyoverdine since its structure was different from all previously established pyoverdine structures. Together with the conclusion that the Antarctic Pseudomonas strains have no special features at the level of their pyoverdines and pyoverdine-mediated iron metabolism compared to worldwide strains, the present work demonstrates that siderotyping provides a rapid means of screening for novel pyoverdines.

  13. Comparative genomics of an endophytic Pseudomonas putida isolated from mango orchard.

    PubMed

    Asif, Huma; Studholme, David J; Khan, Asifullah; Aurongzeb, M; Khan, Ishtiaq A; Azim, M Kamran

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the genome sequence of an endophytic bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida TJI51 isolated from mango bark tissues. Next generation DNA sequencing and short read de novo assembly generated the 5,805,096 bp draft genome of P. putida TJI51. Out of 6,036 protein coding genes in P. putida TJI51 sequences, 4,367 (72%) were annotated with functional specifications, while the remaining encoded hypothetical proteins. Comparative genome sequence analysis revealed that the P. putida TJI51genome contains several regions, not identified in so far sequenced P. putida genomes. Some of these regions were predicted to encode enzymes, including acetylornithine deacetylase, betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, benzoylformate decarboxylase, hydroxyacylglutathione hydrolase, and uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase. The genome of P. putida TJI51 contained three nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene clusters. Genome sequence analysis of P. putidaTJI51 identified this bacterium as an endophytic resident. The endophytic fitness might be linked with alginate, which facilitates bacterial colonization in plant tissues. Genome sequence analysis shed light on the presence of a diverse spectrum of metabolic activities and adaptation of this isolate to various niches.

  14. Comparative genomics of an endophytic Pseudomonas putida isolated from mango orchard

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Huma; Studholme, David J.; Khan, Asifullah; Aurongzeb, M.; Khan, Ishtiaq A.; Azim, M. Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We analyzed the genome sequence of an endophytic bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida TJI51 isolated from mango bark tissues. Next generation DNA sequencing and short read de novo assembly generated the 5,805,096 bp draft genome of P. putida TJI51. Out of 6,036 protein coding genes in P. putida TJI51 sequences, 4,367 (72%) were annotated with functional specifications, while the remaining encoded hypothetical proteins. Comparative genome sequence analysis revealed that the P. putida TJI51genome contains several regions, not identified in so far sequenced P. putida genomes. Some of these regions were predicted to encode enzymes, including acetylornithine deacetylase, betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, benzoylformate decarboxylase, hydroxyacylglutathione hydrolase, and uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase. The genome of P. putida TJI51 contained three nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene clusters. Genome sequence analysis of P. putidaTJI51 identified this bacterium as an endophytic resident. The endophytic fitness might be linked with alginate, which facilitates bacterial colonization in plant tissues. Genome sequence analysis shed light on the presence of a diverse spectrum of metabolic activities and adaptation of this isolate to various niches. PMID:27560648

  15. Iron Uptake Analysis in a Set of Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Lázaro; Geoffroy, Valérie A.; Segura, Ana; Udaondo, Zulema; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strains are frequent inhabitants of soil and aquatic niches and they are occasionally isolated from hospital environments. As the available iron sources in human tissues, edaphic, and aquatic niches are different, we have analyzed iron-uptake related genes in different P. putida strains that were isolated from all these environments. We found that these isolates can be grouped into different clades according to the genetics of siderophore biosynthesis and recycling. The pyoverdine locus of the six P. putida clinical isolates that have so far been completely sequenced, are not closely related; three strains (P. putida HB13667, HB3267, and NBRC14164T) are grouped in Clade I and the other three in Clade II, suggesting possible different origins and evolution. In one clinical strain, P. putida HB4184, the production of siderophores is induced under high osmolarity conditions. The pyoverdine locus in this strain is closely related to that of strain P. putida HB001 which was isolated from sandy shore soil of the Yellow Sea in Korean marine sand, suggesting their possible origin, and evolution. The acquisition of two unique TonB-dependent transporters for xenosiderophore acquisition, similar to those existing in the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa PAO, is an interesting adaptation trait of the clinical strain P. putida H8234 that may confer adaptive advantages under low iron availability conditions. PMID:28082966

  16. Acute toxic effects of three pesticides on Pseudomonas putida monitored by microcalorimeter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Lun; Yao, Jun; Wang, Fei; Bramanti, Emilia; Maskow, Thomas; Zaray, Gyula

    2009-02-01

    A series of calorimetric experiments were performed to investigate the toxic effects of beta-cypermethrin (BCP), bensulfuron-methyl (BSM) and prometryne (PM) on Pseudomonas putida (P. putida). The metabolic action of P. putida on the three pesticides was studied by obtaining power-time curves. The growth of P. putida was inhibited completely in each case when the concentrations of pesticides were up to 80 micro g mL(- 1). The relationships between the inhibitory ratio (k) and doses of contaminants were approximately linear for the three pesticides. The total heat dissipated per milliliter (Q(total)) for the pesticides decreased during the course of the experiment. The OD(600) of P. putida growth in the absence and presence of pesticides was also obtained. The power-time curves of P. putida growth coincided with its turbidity curves. This elucidates that microcalorimetric method agrees well with the routine microbiological method. Among these three pesticides, BSM was found to be the most toxic with an IC(50) of 19.24 micro g mL(- 1) against P. putida. PM exhibited moderate virulence with an IC(50) of 27.86 micro g mL(- 1) and BCP had the lowest toxicity with an IC(50) of 39.64 micro g mL(- 1).

  17. Engineering mediator-based electroactivity in the obligate aerobic bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Simone; Nies, Salome; Wierckx, Nick; Blank, Lars M.; Rosenbaum, Miriam A.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strains are being developed as microbial production hosts for production of a range of amphiphilic and hydrophobic biochemicals. P. putida's obligate aerobic growth thereby can be an economical and technical challenge because it requires constant rigorous aeration and often causes reactor foaming. Here, we engineered a strain of P. putida KT2440 that can produce phenazine redox-mediators from Pseudomonas aeruginosa to allow partial redox balancing with an electrode under oxygen-limited conditions. P. aeruginosa is known to employ its phenazine-type redox mediators for electron exchange with an anode in bioelectrochemical systems (BES). We transferred the seven core phenazine biosynthesis genes phzA-G and the two specific genes phzM and phzS required for pyocyanin synthesis from P. aeruginosa on two inducible plasmids into P. putida KT2440. The best clone, P. putida pPhz, produced 45 mg/L pyocyanin over 25 h of growth, which was visible as blue color formation and is comparable to the pyocyanin production of P. aeruginosa. This new strain was then characterized under different oxygen-limited conditions with electrochemical redox control and changes in central energy metabolism were evaluated in comparison to the unmodified P. putida KT2440. In the new strain, phenazine synthesis with supernatant concentrations up to 33 μg/mL correlated linearly with the ability to discharge electrons to an anode, whereby phenazine-1-carboxylic acid served as the dominating redox mediator. P. putida pPhz sustained strongly oxygen-limited metabolism for up to 2 weeks at up to 12 μA/cm2 anodic current density. Together, this work lays a foundation for future oxygen-limited biocatalysis with P. putida strains. PMID:25914687

  18. Comparative genomic and functional analyses: unearthing the diversity and specificity of nematicidal factors in Pseudomonas putida strain 1A00316

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; Jing, Xueping; Peng, Wen-Lei; Nie, Qiyu; Zhai, Yile; Shao, Zongze; Zheng, Longyu; Cai, Minmin; Li, Guangyu; Zuo, Huaiyu; Zhang, Zhitao; Wang, Rui-Ru; Huang, Dian; Cheng, Wanli; Yu, Ziniu; Chen, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Jibin

    2016-01-01

    We isolated Pseudomonas putida (P. putida) strain 1A00316 from Antarctica. This bacterium has a high efficiency against Meloidogyne incognita (M. incognita) in vitro and under greenhouse conditions. The complete genome of P. putida 1A00316 was sequenced using PacBio single molecule real-time (SMRT) technology. A comparative genomic analysis of 16 Pseudomonas strains revealed that although P. putida 1A00316 belonged to P. putida, it was phenotypically more similar to nematicidal Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens) strains. We characterized the diversity and specificity of nematicidal factors in P. putida 1A00316 with comparative genomics and functional analysis, and found that P. putida 1A00316 has diverse nematicidal factors including protein alkaline metalloproteinase AprA and two secondary metabolites, hydrogen cyanide and cyclo-(l-isoleucyl-l-proline). We show for the first time that cyclo-(l-isoleucyl-l-proline) exhibit nematicidal activity in P. putida. Interestingly, our study had not detected common nematicidal factors such as 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) and pyrrolnitrin in P. putida 1A00316. The results of the present study reveal the diversity and specificity of nematicidal factors in P. putida strain 1A00316. PMID:27384076

  19. Effect of culture medium on biocalcification by Pseudomonas Putida, Lysinibacillus Sphaericus and Bacillus Subtilis.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Márcia Aiko; Cincotto, Maria Alba; Atencio, Daniel; Gaylarde, Christine C; John, Vanderley M

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the efficiency of calcium carbonate bioprecipitation by Lysinibacillus sphaericus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida, obtained from the Coleção de Culturas do Instituto Nacional de Controle de Qualidade em Saúde (INCQS), as a first step in determining their potential to protect building materials against water uptake. Two culture media were studied: modified B4 containing calcium acetate and 295 with calcium chloride. Calcium consumption in the two media after incubation with and without the bacterial inoculum was determined by atomic absorption analysis. Modified B4 gave the best results and in this medium Pseudomonas putida INQCS 113 produced the highest calcium carbonate precipitation, followed by Lysinibacillus sphaericus INQCS 414; the lowest precipitation was produced by Bacillus subtilis INQCS 328. In this culture medium XRD analysis showed that Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis precipitated calcite and vaterite polymorphs while Lysinibacillus sphaericus produced only vaterite. The shape and size of the crystals were affected by culture medium, bacterial strain and culture conditions, static or shaken. In conclusion, of the three strains Pseudomonas putida INQCS 113 in modified B4 medium gave the best results precipitating 96% of the calcium, this strain thus has good potential for use on building materials.

  20. ACTIVE EFFLUX OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS BY PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA S12 IS INDUCED BY SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of the membrane-associated organic solvent efflux system SrpABC of Pseudomonas putida S12 was examined by cloning a 312-bp DNA fragment, containing the srp promoter, in the broad-host-range reporter vector pKRZ-1. Compounds that are capable of inducing expression of the...

  1. Effect of culture medium on biocalcification by Pseudomonas Putida, Lysinibacillus Sphaericus and Bacillus Subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Shirakawa, Márcia Aiko; Cincotto, Maria Alba; Atencio, Daniel; Gaylarde, Christine C.; John, Vanderley M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the efficiency of calcium carbonate bioprecipitation by Lysinibacillus sphaericus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida, obtained from the Coleção de Culturas do Instituto Nacional de Controle de Qualidade em Saúde (INCQS), as a first step in determining their potential to protect building materials against water uptake. Two culture media were studied: modified B4 containing calcium acetate and 295 with calcium chloride. Calcium consumption in the two media after incubation with and without the bacterial inoculum was determined by atomic absorption analysis. Modified B4 gave the best results and in this medium Pseudomonas putida INQCS 113 produced the highest calcium carbonate precipitation, followed by Lysinibacillus sphaericus INQCS 414; the lowest precipitation was produced by Bacillus subtilis INQCS 328. In this culture medium XRD analysis showed that Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis precipitated calcite and vaterite polymorphs while Lysinibacillus sphaericus produced only vaterite. The shape and size of the crystals were affected by culture medium, bacterial strain and culture conditions, static or shaken. In conclusion, of the three strains Pseudomonas putida INQCS 113 in modified B4 medium gave the best results precipitating 96% of the calcium, this strain thus has good potential for use on building materials. PMID:24031661

  2. Complete Genome of the Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1

    SciTech Connect

    Matilla, M.A.; van der Lelie, D.; Pizarro-Tobias, P.; Roca, A.; Fernandez, M.; Duque, E.; Molina, L.; Wu, X.; Gomez, M. J.; Segura, A.; Ramos, J.-L.

    2011-03-01

    We report the complete sequence of the 5.7-Mbp genome of Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1, a metabolically versatile plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that is highly tolerant to desiccation and capable of solubilizing inorganic phosphate and iron and of synthesizing phytohormones that stimulate seed germination and plant growth.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of a Pseudomonas putida Clinical Isolate, Strain H8234

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Patricia; Udaondo, Zulema; Segura, Ana; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2013-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas putida strain H8234, which was isolated from a hospital patient presenting with bacteremia. This strain has a single chromosome (6,870,827 bp) that contains 6,305 open reading frames. The strain is not a pathogen but exhibits multidrug resistance associated with 40 genomic islands. PMID:23868128

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of a Pseudomonas putida Clinical Isolate, Strain H8234.

    PubMed

    Molina, Lázaro; Bernal, Patricia; Udaondo, Zulema; Segura, Ana; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2013-07-18

    We report the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas putida strain H8234, which was isolated from a hospital patient presenting with bacteremia. This strain has a single chromosome (6,870,827 bp) that contains 6,305 open reading frames. The strain is not a pathogen but exhibits multidrug resistance associated with 40 genomic islands.

  5. Using "Pseudomonas Putida xylE" Gene to Teach Molecular Cloning Techniques for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Xu; Xin, Yi; Ye, Li; Ma, Yufang

    2009-01-01

    We have developed and implemented a serial experiment in molecular cloning laboratory course for undergraduate students majored in biotechnology. "Pseudomonas putida xylE" gene, encoding catechol 2, 3-dioxygenase, was manipulated to learn molecular biology techniques. The integration of cloning, expression, and enzyme assay gave students…

  6. Manganese (Mn) Oxidation Increases Intracellular Mn in Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    PubMed Central

    Banh, Andy; Chavez, Valarie; Doi, Julia; Nguyen, Allison; Hernandez, Sophia; Ha, Vu; Jimenez, Peter; Espinoza, Fernanda; Johnson, Hope A.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial manganese (Mn) oxidation plays an important role in the global biogeochemical cycling of Mn and other compounds, and the diversity and prevalence of Mn oxidizers have been well established. Despite many hypotheses of why these bacteria may oxidize Mn, the physiological reasons remain elusive. Intracellular Mn levels were determined for Pseudomonas putida GB-1 grown in the presence or absence of Mn by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Mn oxidizing wild type P. putida GB-1 had higher intracellular Mn than non Mn oxidizing mutants grown under the same conditions. P. putida GB-1 had a 5 fold increase in intracellular Mn compared to the non Mn oxidizing mutant P. putida GB-1-007 and a 59 fold increase in intracellular Mn compared to P. putida GB-1 ∆2665 ∆2447. The intracellular Mn is primarily associated with the less than 3 kDa fraction, suggesting it is not bound to protein. Protein oxidation levels in Mn oxidizing and non oxidizing cultures were relatively similar, yet Mn oxidation did increase survival of P. putida GB-1 when oxidatively stressed. This study is the first to link Mn oxidation to Mn homeostasis and oxidative stress protection. PMID:24147089

  7. Characterization of type IV pilus genes in plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida WCS358.

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, A; Heijnen, I; de Cock, H; Filloux, A; Tommassen, J

    1994-01-01

    In a search for factors that could contribute to the ability of the plant growth-stimulating Pseudomonas putida WCS358 to colonize plant roots, the organism was analyzed for the presence of genes required for pilus biosynthesis. The pilD gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which has also been designated xcpA, is involved in protein secretion and in the biogenesis of type IV pili. It encodes a peptidase that processes the precursors of the pilin subunits and of several components of the secretion apparatus. Prepilin processing activity could be demonstrated in P. putida WCS358, suggesting that this nonpathogenic strain may contain type IV pili as well. A DNA fragment containing the pilD (xcpA) gene of P. putida was cloned and found to complement a pilD (xcpA) mutation in P. aeruginosa. Nucleotide sequencing revealed, next to the pilD (xcpA) gene, the presence of two additional genes, pilA and pilC, that are highly homologous to genes involved in the biogenesis of type IV pili. The pilA gene encodes the pilin subunit, and pilC is an accessory gene, required for the assembly of the subunits into pili. In comparison with the pil gene cluster in P. aeruginosa, a gene homologous to pilB is lacking in the P. putida gene cluster. Pili were not detected on the cell surface of P. putida itself, not even when pilA was expressed from the tac promoter on a plasmid, indicating that not all the genes required for pilus biogenesis were expressed under the conditions tested. Expression of pilA of P. putida in P. aeruginosa resulted in the production of pili containing P. putida PilA subunits. Images PMID:7905475

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida Strain GM4FR, an Endophytic Bacterium Isolated from Festuca rubra L.

    PubMed Central

    Hollensteiner, Jacqueline; Granzow, Sandra; Daniel, Rolf; Vidal, Stefan; Wemheuer, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas putida GM4FR is an endophytic bacterium isolated from aerial plant tissues of Festuca rubra L. Functional annotation of the draft genome (7.1 Mb) revealed 6,272 predicted protein-encoding genes. The genome provides insights into the biocontrol and plant growth-promoting potential of P. putida GM4FR. PMID:28360162

  9. Trichloroethylene degradation by Escherichia coli containing the cloned Pseudomonas putida F1 toluene dioxygenase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, G.J.; Gibson, D.T. ); Wackett, L.P. )

    1989-12-01

    Toluene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida F1 has been implicated as an enzyme capable of degrading trichloroethylene. This has now been confirmed with Escherichia coli JM109(pDTG601) that contains the structural genes (todC1C2BA) of toluene dioxygenase under the control of the tac promoter. The extent of trichloroethylene degradation by the recombinant organism depended on the cell concentration and the concentration of trichloroethylene. A linear rate of trichloroethylene degradation was observed with the E. coli recombinant strain. In contrast, P. putida F39/D, a mutant strain of P. putida F1 that does not contain cis-toluene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, showed a much faster initial rate of trichloroethylene degradation which decreased over time.

  10. Expression analysis of the fpr (ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase) gene in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yunho; Pena-Llopis, Samuel; Kang, Yoon-Suk; Shin, Hyeon-Dong; Demple, Bruce; Madsen, Eugene L.; Jeon, Che Ok; Park, Woojun . E-mail: wpark@korea.ac.kr

    2006-01-27

    The ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase (fpr) participates in cellular defense against oxidative damage. The fpr expression in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is induced by oxidative and osmotic stresses. FinR, a LysR-type transcriptional factor near the fpr gene in the P. putida KT2440 genome, is required for induction of the fpr under both conditions. We have shown that the fpr and finR gene products can counteract the effects of oxidative and osmotic stresses. Interestingly, FinR-independent expression occurs either during a long period of incubation with paraquat or with high concentrations of oxidative stress agent. This result indicates that there may be additional regulators present in the P. putida KT2440 genome. In contrast to in vivo expression kinetics of fpr from the plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, the fpr gene from P. putida KT2440 exhibited unusually prolonged expression after oxidative stress. Transcriptional fusion and Northern blot analysis studies indicated that the FinR is negatively autoregulated. Expression of the fpr promoter was higher in minimal media than in rich media during exponential phase growth. Consistent with this result, the fpr and finR mutants had a long lag phase in minimal media in contrast to wild-type growth characteristics. Antioxidants such as ascorbate could increase the growth rate of all tested strains in minimal media. This result confirmed that P. putida KT2440 experienced more oxidative stress during exponential growth in minimal media than in rich media. Endogenous promoter activity of the fpr gene is much higher during exponential growth than during stationary growth. These findings demonstrate new relationships between fpr, finR, and the physiology of oxidative stress in P. putida KT2440.

  11. Redundancy in putrescine catabolism in solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12.

    PubMed

    Bandounas, Luaine; Ballerstedt, Hendrik; de Winde, Johannes H; Ruijssenaars, Harald J

    2011-06-10

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is a promising platform organism for the biological production of substituted aromatic compounds due to its extreme tolerance towards toxic chemicals. Solvent or aromatic stress tolerance may be due to membrane modifications and efflux pumps; however in general, polyamines have also been implicated in stressed cells. Previous transcriptomics results of P. putida strains producing an aromatic compound, or being exposed to the solvent toluene, indicated differentially expressed genes involved in polyamine transport and metabolism. Therefore, the metabolism of the polyamine, putrescine was investigated in P. putida S12, as no putrescine degradation pathways have been described for this strain. Via transcriptome analysis various, often redundant, putrescine-induced genes were identified as being potentially involved in putrescine catabolism via oxidative deamination and transamination. A series of knockout mutants were constructed in which up to six of these genes were sequentially deleted, and although putrescine degradation was affected in some of these mutants, complete elimination of putrescine degradation in P. putida S12 was not achieved. Evidence was found for the presence of an alternative pathway for putrescine degradation involving γ-glutamylation. The occurrence of multiple putrescine degradation routes in the solvent-tolerant P. putida S12 is indicative of the importance of controlling polyamine homeostasis, as well as of the high metabolic flexibility exhibited by this microorganism.

  12. The Pseudomonas putida T6SS is a plant warden against phytopathogens.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Patricia; Allsopp, Luke P; Filloux, Alain; Llamas, María A

    2017-04-01

    Bacterial type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) are molecular weapons designed to deliver toxic effectors into prey cells. These nanomachines have an important role in inter-bacterial competition and provide advantages to T6SS active strains in polymicrobial environments. Here we analyze the genome of the biocontrol agent Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and identify three T6SS gene clusters (K1-, K2- and K3-T6SS). Besides, 10 T6SS effector-immunity pairs were found, including putative nucleases and pore-forming colicins. We show that the K1-T6SS is a potent antibacterial device, which secretes a toxic Rhs-type effector Tke2. Remarkably, P. putida eradicates a broad range of bacteria in a K1-T6SS-dependent manner, including resilient phytopathogens, which demonstrates that the T6SS is instrumental to empower P. putida to fight against competitors. Furthermore, we observed a drastically reduced necrosis on the leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana during co-infection with P. putida and Xanthomonas campestris. Such protection is dependent on the activity of the P. putida T6SS. Many routes have been explored to develop biocontrol agents capable of manipulating the microbial composition of the rhizosphere and phyllosphere. Here we unveil a novel mechanism for plant biocontrol, which needs to be considered for the selection of plant wardens whose mission is to prevent phytopathogen infections.

  13. Toxicity of graphene oxide on growth and metabolism of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Combarros, R G; Collado, S; Díaz, M

    2016-06-05

    The increasing consumption of graphene derivatives leads to greater presence of these materials in wastewater treatment plants and ecological systems. The toxicity effect of graphene oxide (GO) on the microbial functions involved in the biological wastewater treatment process is studied, using Pseudomonas putida and salicylic acid (SA) as bacterial and pollutant models. A multiparametric flow cytometry (FC) method has been developed to measure the metabolic activity and viability of P. putida in contact with GO. A continuous reduction in the percentages of viable cells and a slight increase, lower than 5%, in the percentages of damaged and dead cells, suggest that P. putida in contact with GO loses the membrane integrity but preserves metabolic activity. The growth of P. putida was strongly inhibited by GO, since 0.05mgmL(-1) of GO reduced the maximum growth by a third, and the inhibition was considerably greater for GO concentrations higher than 0.1mgmL(-1). The specific SA removal rate decreased with GO concentration up to 0.1mgmL(-1) indicating that while GO always reduces the growth of P. putida, for concentrations higher than 0.1mgmL(-1), it also reduces its activity. Similar behaviour is observed using simulated urban and industrial wastewaters, the observed effects being more acute in the industrial wastewaters.

  14. Identification of nah-1 genes of the Pseudomonas putida naphthalene-degrading NPL-41 plasmid operon.

    PubMed

    Serebriiskaya, T S; Lenets, A A; Goldenkova, I V; Kobets, N S; Piruzian, E S

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida BS202 degrades naphthalene via a plasmid-encoded catabolic pathway. The nucleotide sequence of the nahC gene encoding one of this pathway enzymes, 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene dioxygenase, has been determined. Analysis of nucleotide sequence of its flanking regions identified partially the nahF and putative nahQ genes. Comparison of these three genes with corresponding ones in the NAH7 plasmid and DOX operon showed a high degree of homology.

  15. Properties of the iron--sulphur proteins of the benzene dioxygenase system from Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Crutcher, S E; Geary, P J

    1979-01-01

    A purification procedure was developed to stabilize the iron-sulphur proteins of the benzene dioxygenase system from Pseudomonas putida. The intermediate electron-carrying protein has a mol. wt. of 12300 and possesses one (2Fe--2S) cluster, whereas the terminal dioxygenase has a mol.wt. of 215300 and possesses two (2Fe--2S) clusters. The order and stoicheiometry of electron transfer and of the whole system are described. Images Fig. 2. PMID:435241

  16. Enhanced Tolerance to Naphthalene and Enhanced Rhizoremediation Performance for Pseudomonas putida KT2440 via the NAH7 Catabolic Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Matilde; Niqui-Arroyo, José Luis; Conde, Susana; Duque, Estrella

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we explore the potential use of the Pseudomonas putida KT2440 strain for bioremediation of naphthalene-polluted soils. Pseudomonas putida strain KT2440 thrives in naphthalene-saturated medium, establishing a complex response that activates genes coding for extrusion pumps and cellular damage repair enzymes, as well as genes involved in the oxidative stress response. The transfer of the NAH7 plasmid enables naphthalene degradation by P. putida KT2440 while alleviating the cellular stress brought about by this toxic compound, without affecting key functions necessary for survival and colonization of the rhizosphere. Pseudomonas putida KT2440(NAH7) efficiently expresses the Nah catabolic pathway in vitro and in situ, leading to the complete mineralization of [14C]naphthalene, measured as the evolution of 14CO2, while the rate of mineralization was at least 2-fold higher in the rhizosphere than in bulk soil. PMID:22582075

  17. The Ssr protein (T1E_1405) from Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E enables oligonucleotide-based recombineering in platform strain P. putida EM42.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Tomás; Jensen, Sheila I; Nielsen, Alex T; de Lorenzo, Victor; Martínez-García, Esteban

    2016-10-01

    Some strains of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida have become in recent years platforms of choice for hosting biotransformations of industrial interest. Despite availability of many genetic tools for this microorganism, genomic editing of the cell factory P. putida EM42 (a derivative of reference strain KT2440) is still a time-consuming endeavor. In this work we have investigated the in vivo activity of the Ssr protein encoded by the open reading frame T1E_1405 from Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E, a plausible functional homologue of the β protein of the Red recombination system of λ phage of Escherichia coli. A test based on the phenotypes of pyrF mutants of P. putida (the yeast's URA3 ortholog) was developed for quantifying the ability of Ssr to promote invasion of the genomic DNA replication fork by synthetic oligonucleotides. The efficiency of the process was measured by monitoring the inheritance of the changes entered into pyrF by oligonucleotides bearing mutated sequences. Ssr fostered short and long genomic deletions/insertions at considerable frequencies as well as single-base swaps not affected by mismatch repair. These results not only demonstrate the feasibility of recombineering in P. putida, but they also enable a suite of multiplexed genomic manipulations in this biotechnologically important bacterium.

  18. Identification of a Third Mn(II) Oxidase Enzyme in Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    PubMed Central

    Smesrud, Logan; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The oxidation of soluble Mn(II) to insoluble Mn(IV) is a widespread bacterial activity found in a diverse array of microbes. In the Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida GB-1, two Mn(II) oxidase genes, named mnxG and mcoA, were previously identified; each encodes a multicopper oxidase (MCO)-type enzyme. Expression of these two genes is positively regulated by the response regulator MnxR. Preliminary investigation into putative additional regulatory pathways suggested that the flagellar regulators FleN and FleQ also regulate Mn(II) oxidase activity; however, it also revealed the presence of a third, previously uncharacterized Mn(II) oxidase activity in P. putida GB-1. A strain from which both of the Mn(II) oxidase genes and fleQ were deleted exhibited low levels of Mn(II) oxidase activity. The enzyme responsible was genetically and biochemically identified as an animal heme peroxidase (AHP) with domain and sequence similarity to the previously identified Mn(II) oxidase MopA. In the ΔfleQ strain, P. putida GB-1 MopA is overexpressed and secreted from the cell, where it actively oxidizes Mn. Thus, deletion of fleQ unmasked a third Mn(II) oxidase activity in this strain. These results provide an example of an Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium utilizing both MCO and AHP enzymes. IMPORTANCE The identity of the Mn(II) oxidase enzyme in Pseudomonas putida GB-1 has been a long-standing question in the field of bacterial Mn(II) oxidation. In the current work, we demonstrate that P. putida GB-1 employs both the multicopper oxidase- and animal heme peroxidase-mediated pathways for the oxidation of Mn(II), rendering this model organism relevant to the study of both types of Mn(II) oxidase enzymes. The presence of three oxidase enzymes in P. putida GB-1 deepens the mystery of why microorganisms oxidize Mn(II) while providing the field with the tools necessary to address this question. The initial identification of MopA as a Mn(II) oxidase in this strain required the

  19. [Influence of microcystin-LR on cell viability and surface characteristics of Pseudomonas putida].

    PubMed

    Deng, Ting-jin; Ye, Jin-shao; Peng, Hui; Liu, Zhi-chen; Liu, Ze-hua; Yin, Hua; Chen, Shuo-na

    2015-01-01

    In microcystin-LR (MC-LR) degradation system, the change in surface characteristics and cell viability of Pseudomonas putida was studied. The purpose of this study was to reveal the influence of MC-LR on P. putida and elucidate the toxicity of MC-LR on microorganisms. The result demonstrated that MC-LR enhanced the cytoplasmic membrane permeability, as well as affected the ion metabolism and protein release of P. putida. The soluble sugar and Na+, Cl-release increased with the rising concentration of MC-LR ranging from 0 mg x L(-1) to 2.0 mg x L(-1). Flow Cytometry Method(FCM) analysis revealed that MC-LR accelerated the death of P. putida, and the death rate increased with the ascending concentration of MC-LR. Compared with the control, the death rate on day 5 increased by nearly 30% when 2.5 mg x L(-1) MC-LR was added. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that the cells were deformed under the toxicity of MC-LR. After 5-day exposure to 2.5 mg x L(-1) MC-LR, the majority of the cells were ruptured and the intracellular materials flew out. The cellular structure was severely damaged under this condition.

  20. Biosorption of aluminum through the use of non-viable biomass of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Boeris, Paola Sabrina; Agustín, María Del Rosario; Acevedo, Diego Fernando; Lucchesi, Gloria Inés

    2016-10-20

    Living and non-living biomass of Pseudomonas putida A (ATCC 12633) was used as biosorbent for the removing of Al(3+) from aqueous solutions. The process was stable with time, efficient at pH 4.3 and between 15°C and 42°C. Two isotherms models were applied to describe the interaction between the biosorbent and Al(3+). Non-living biomass of P. putida A (ATCC 12633) was found to be the most efficient at adsorbing Al(3+) with a maximum sorption capacity of 0.55mg Al(3+)/gr adsorbent and with 36×10(5) binding sites of Al(3+)/microorganisms. Infrared spectroscopy analysis shows that the biosorbent present some vibrational band of functional groups that change in presence of Al(3+): hydroxyl, carboxyl and phosphate. Considering that Al(3+) binds to the phosphate group of phosphatidylcholine, non-viable biomass of P. putida PB01 (mutant lacking phosphatidylcholine) was used. Aluminum adsorption of the parental strain was 30 times higher than values registered in P. putida PB01 (36×10(5) sites/microorganism vs 1.2×10(5) sites/microorganism, respectively). This result evidenced that the absence of phosphatidylcholine significantly affected the availability of the binding sites and consequently the efficiency of the biomass to adsorb Al(3+).

  1. Effect of Pseudomonas putida on Growth and Anthocyanin Pigment in Two Poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Zulueta-Rodriguez, Ramon; Cordoba-Matson, Miguel Victor; Hernandez-Montiel, Luis Guillermo; Murillo-Amador, Bernardo; Rueda-Puente, Edgar; Lara, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida is plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) that have the capacity to improve growth in plants. The purpose of this study was to determine growth and anthocyanin pigmentation of the bracts in two poinsettia Euphorbia pulcherrima cultivars (Prestige and Sonora Marble) using three strains of P. putida, as well as a mixture of the three (MIX). Comparison with the control group indicated for the most part that Prestige grew better than the Sonora Marble cultivars with the PGPR strains. Prestige with the MIX strain grew better compared to control for the number of cyathia (83 versus 70.4), volume of roots (45 versus 35 cm3), number of leaves (78 versus 58), and area of leaf (1,788 versus 1,331 cm2), except for the number of flowers (8.8 versus 11.6). To the naked eye, coloration of plants appeared identical in color compared to the control group. For all plants with P. putida strains, there was less anthocyanin pigment, but biomass was always greater with PGPR strains. Nevertheless, to the naked eye, the coloration of the plants appeared identical in color compared to the control group. This is the first study reporting the positive effects of P. putida rhizobacteria treatments on growth of poinsettia cultivars. PMID:25097888

  2. Metal Inhibition of Growth and Manganese Oxidation in Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, J.; Sposito, G.

    2009-12-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides (MnO2) are ubiquitous nanoparticulate minerals that contribute to the adsorption of nutrient and toxicant metals, the oxidative degradation of various organic compounds, and the respiration of metal-reducing bacteria in aquatic and terrestrial environments. The formation of these minerals is catalyzed by a diverse and widely-distributed group of bacteria and fungi, often through the enzymatic oxidation of aqueous Mn(II) to Mn(IV). In metal-impacted ecosystems, toxicant metals may alter the viability and metabolic activity of Mn-oxidizing organisms, thereby limiting the conditions under which biogenic MnO2 can form and diminishing their potential as adsorbent materials. Pseudomonas putida GB-1 (P. putida GB-1) is a model Mn-oxidizing laboratory culture representative of freshwater and soil biofilm-forming bacteria. Manganese oxidation in P. putida GB-1 occurs via two single-electron-transfer reactions, involving a multicopper oxidase enzyme found on the bacterial outer membrane surface. Near the onset of the stationary phase of growth, dark brown MnO2 particles are deposited in a matrix of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substances, thus forming heterogeneous biomineral assemblages. In this study, we assessed the influence of various transition metals on microbial growth and manganese oxidation capacity in a P. putida GB-1 culture propagated in a nutrient-rich growth medium. The concentration-response behavior of actively growing P. putida GB-1 cells was investigated for Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn at pH ≈ 6 in the presence and absence of 1 mM Mn. Toxicity parameters such as EC0, EC50 and Hillslope, and EC100 were obtained from the sigmoidal concentration-response curves. The extent of MnO2 formation in the presence of the various metal cations was documented 24, 50, 74 and 104 h after the metal-amended medium was inoculated. Toxicity values were compared to twelve physicochemical properties of the metals tested. Significant

  3. Response of plant-colonizing pseudomonads to hydrogen peroxide. [Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuwon, J.; Anderson, A.J. )

    1989-11-01

    Colonization of plant root surfaces by Pseudomonas putida may require mechanisms that protect this bacterium against superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide produced by the root. Catalase and superoxide dismutase may be important in this bacterial defense system. Stationary-phase cells of P. putida were not killed by hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) at concentrations up to 10 mM, and extracts from these cells possessed three isozymic bands (A, B, and C) of catalase activity in native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Logarithmic-phase cells exposed directly to hydrogen peroxide concentrations above 1 mM were killed. Extracts of logarithmic-phase cells displayed only band A catalase activity. Protection against 5 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was apparent after previous exposure of the logarithmic-phase cells to nonlethal concentrations (30 to 300 {mu}M) of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Extracts of these protected cells possessed enhanced catalase activity of band A and small amounts of bands B and C. A single form of superoxide dismutase and isoforms of catalase were apparent in extracts from a foliar intercellular pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola. The mobilities of these P. syringae enzymes were distinct from those of enzymes in P. putida extracts.

  4. Mannitol, a novel bacterial compatible solute in Pseudomonas putida S12.

    PubMed Central

    Kets, E P; Galinski, E A; de Wit, M; de Bont, J A; Heipieper, H J

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the compatible solutes accumulated by Pseudomonas putida S12 subjected to osmotic stress. In response to reduced water activity, P. putida S12 accumulated Nalpha-acetylglutaminylglutamine amide (NAGGN) simultaneously with a novel compatible solute identified as mannitol (using 13C- and 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance, liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography methods) to maximum concentrations of 74 and 258 micromol g (dry weight) of cells(-1), respectively. The intracellular amounts of each solute varied with both the type and amount of osmolyte applied to induce osmotic stress in the medium. Both solutes were synthesized de novo. Addition of betaine to the medium resulted in accumulation of this compound and depletion of both NAGGN and mannitol. Mannitol and NAGGN were accumulated when sucrose instead of salts was used to reduce the medium water activity. Furthermore, both compatible solutes were accumulated when glucose was substituted by other carbon sources. However, the intracellular quantities of mannitol decreased when fructose, succinate, or lactate were applied as a carbon source. Mannitol was also raised to high intracellular concentrations by other salt-stressed Pseudomonas putida strains. This is the first study demonstrating a principal role for the de novo-synthesized polyol mannitol in osmoadaptation of a heterotrophic eubacterium. PMID:8955280

  5. High-titer production of monomeric hydroxyvalerates from levulinic acid in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Martin, Collin H; Prather, Kristala L Jones

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyacids represent an important class of compounds that see application in the production of polyesters, biodegradable plastics and antibiotics, and that serve as useful chiral synthetic building blocks for other fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals. An economical, high-titer method for the production of 4-hydroxyvalerate (4HV) and 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) from the inexpensive and renewable carbon source levulinic acid was developed. These hydroxyvalerates were produced by periodically feeding levulinate to Pseudomonas putida KT2440 expressing a recombinant thioesterase II (tesB) gene from Escherichia coli K12. The titer of 4HV in shake flask culture reached 13.9+/-1.2 g L(-1) from P. putida tesB(+) cultured at 32 degrees C in LB medium periodically supplemented with glucose and levulinate. The highest 3HV titer obtained was 5.3+/-0.1 g L(-1) in M9 minimal medium supplemented with glucose and levulinate.

  6. LapF and Its Regulation by Fis Affect the Cell Surface Hydrophobicity of Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Lahesaare, Andrio; Ainelo, Hanna; Teppo, Annika; Kivisaar, Maia; Heipieper, Hermann J.; Teras, Riho

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to regulate cell surface hydrophobicity is important for the adaptation to different environmental conditions. The hydrophobicity of cell surface can be determined by several factors, including outer membrane and surface proteins. In this study, we report that an adhesin LapF influences cell surface hydrophobicity of Pseudomonas putida. Cells lacking LapF are less hydrophobic than wild-type cells in stationary growth phase. Moreover, the overexpression of the global regulator Fis decreases surface hydrophobicity by repressing the expression of lapF. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that bacteria producing LapF are more viable when confronted with methanol (a hydrophilic compound) but are more susceptible to 1-octanol (a hydrophobic compound). Thus, these results revealed that LapF is the hydrophobicity factor for the cell surface of P. putida. PMID:27812186

  7. Induction of the tod Operon by Trichloroethylene in Pseudomonas putida TVA8

    PubMed Central

    Shingleton, Justin T.; Applegate, Bruce M.; Nagel, Aaron C.; Bienkowski, Paul R.; Sayler, Gary S.

    1998-01-01

    Bioluminescence, mRNA levels, and toluene degradation rates in Pseudomonas putida TVA8 were measured as a function of various concentrations of toluene and trichloroethylene (TCE). TVA8 showed an increasing bioluminescence response to increasing TCE and toluene concentrations. Compared to uninduced TVA8 cultures, todC1 mRNA levels increased 11-fold for TCE-treated cultures and 13-fold for toluene-treated cultures. Compared to uninduced P. putida F1 cultures, todC1 mRNA levels increased 4.4-fold for TCE-induced cultures and 4.9-fold for toluene-induced cultures. Initial toluene degradation rates were linearly correlated with specific bioluminescence in TVA8 cultures. PMID:9835608

  8. Induction of the tod operon by trichloroethylene in Pseudomonas putida TVA8

    SciTech Connect

    Shingleton, J.T.; Applegate, B.M.; Nagel, A.C.; Bienkowski, P.R.; Sayler, G.S.

    1998-12-01

    Bioluminescence, mRNA levels, and toluene degradation rates in Pseudomonas putida TVA8 were measured as a function of various concentrations of toluene and trichloroethylene (TCE). TVA8 showed an increasing bioluminescence response to increasing TCE and toluene concentrations. Compared to uninduced TVA8 cultures, todC1 mRNA levels increased 11-fold for TCE-treated cultures and 13-fold for toluene-treated cultures. Compared to uninduced P. putida F1 cultures, todC1 mRNA levels increased 4,4-fold for TCE-induced cultures and 4.9-fold for toluene-induced cultures. Initial toluene degradation rates were linearly correlated with specific bioluminescence in TVA8 cultures.

  9. Stereospecific hydroxylation of indan by Escherichia coli containing the cloned toluene dioxygenase genes from Pseudomonas putida F1

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, J.M.; Cruden, D.L.; Zylstra, G.J.; Gibson, D.T. )

    1992-10-01

    Escheria coli JM109(pDTG601), containing the todC1C2BA genes encoding toluene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida F1, oxides indan to (-)-(1R)-indanol (83{percent} R) and trans-1,3-indandiol. Under similar conditions, P.putida F39/D oxidizes indan to (-)-(1R)-indanol (96{percent}R), 1-indanone, and trans-1,3-indandiol. The differences in the enantiomeric composition of the 1-indanols formed by the two organisms are due to the presence of a 1-indanol dehydrogenase in P.putida F39/D that preferentially oxidizes (+)-(1S)-indanol.

  10. Cytosine chemoreceptor McpC in Pseudomonas putida F1 also detects nicotinic acid.

    PubMed

    Parales, Rebecca E; Nesteryuk, Vasyl; Hughes, Jonathan G; Luu, Rita A; Ditty, Jayna L

    2014-12-01

    Soil bacteria are generally capable of growth on a wide range of organic chemicals, and pseudomonads are particularly adept at utilizing aromatic compounds. Pseudomonads are motile bacteria that are capable of sensing a wide range of chemicals, using both energy taxis and chemotaxis. Whilst the identification of specific chemicals detected by the ≥26 chemoreceptors encoded in Pseudomonas genomes is ongoing, the functions of only a limited number of Pseudomonas chemoreceptors have been revealed to date. We report here that McpC, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein in Pseudomonas putida F1 that was previously shown to function as a receptor for cytosine, was also responsible for the chemotactic response to the carboxylated pyridine nicotinic acid.

  11. Trichloroethylene removal and oxidation toxicity mediated by toluene dioxygenase of Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, S.; Jenkins, R.O.

    1994-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a major ground water contaminant and potential health hazard in drinking water. This paper reports on the cometabolism of TCE by a wild-type strain of Pseudomonas putida containing an inducible toluene dioxygenase enzyme. The results show rapid TCE removal by the strain but severe oxidation toxicity and rapid cell death. This is also the first report of enhanced capacity of bacterial cells to remove TCE in the presence of dithiothreitol. Presented also is evidence for induction of toluene degradation by TCE. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Biodegradation of BTEX mixture by Pseudomonas putida YNS1 isolated from oil-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    You, Youngnam; Shim, Jaehong; Cho, Choa-Hyoung; Ryu, Moon-Hee; Shea, Patrick J; Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan; Chae, Jong-Chan; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2013-05-01

    The presence of mixed contaminants, such as BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene isomers) can affect the biodegradation, fate and environmental impacts of each compound. To understand the influence of interactions among BTEX compounds on their biodegradation, four bacteria were isolated from oil-contaminated soil and assayed for BTEX biodegradation in vitro. The isolate exhibiting maximum biodegradation was identified as Pseudomonas putida based on the 16S rDNA sequence. The biodegradation of the BTEX compounds was greatly influenced by pH, temperature, and salinity. Substrate mixture studies (binary, tertiary and quaternary) revealed that the presence of toluene increased the biodegradation rate of benzene, ethylbenzene, and xylene.

  13. Nucleotide sequencing and characterization of the genes encoding benzene oxidation enzymes of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Irie, S; Doi, S; Yorifuji, T; Takagi, M; Yano, K

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the genes from Pseudomonas putida encoding oxidation of benzene to catechol was determined. Five open reading frames were found in the sequence. Four corresponding protein molecules were detected by a DNA-directed in vitro translation system. Escherichia coli cells containing the fragment with the four open reading frames transformed benzene to cis-benzene glycol, which is an intermediate of the oxidation of benzene to catechol. The relation between the product of each cistron and the components of the benzene oxidation enzyme system is discussed. Images PMID:3667527

  14. Cloning of a creatinase gene from Pseudomonas putida in Escherichia coli by using an indicator plate.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, M C; Chang, C C; Chang, J C

    1992-01-01

    A genomic library of Pseudomonas putida DNA was constructed by using plasmid pBR322. Transformants of Escherichia coli in combination with Proteus mirabilis cells grown on creatinase test plates were screened for creatinase activity; transformants were considered positive for creatinase activity if a red-pink zone appeared around the colonies. One creatinase-positive clone was further analyzed, and the gene was reduced to a 2.7-kb DNA fragment. A unique protein band (with a molecular weight of approximately 50,000) was observed in recombinant E. coli by minicell analysis. Images PMID:1444379

  15. Degradation of chloronitrobenzenes by a coculture of Pseudomonas putida and a Rhodococcus sp.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.S.; Lim, S.J.; Chang, Y.K.; Kim, H.S.; Livingston, A.G.

    1999-03-01

    A single microorganism able to mineralize chloronitrobenzenes (CNBs) has not been reported, and degradation of CNBs of coculture of two microbial strains was attempted. Pseudomonas putida HS12 was first isolated by analogue enrichment culture using nitrobenzene (NB) as the substrate, and this strain was observed to possess a partial reductive pathway for the degradation of NB. From high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance analyses, NB-grown cells of P. putida HS12 were found to convert 3- and 4-CNBs to the corresponding 5- and 4-chloro-2-hydroxyacetanilides, respectively, by partial reduction and subsequent acetylation. For the degradation of CNBs, Rhodococcus sp. strain HS51, which degrades 4- and 5-chloro-2-hydroxyacetanilides, was isolated and combined with P. putida HS12 to give a coculture. This coculture was confirmed to mineralize 3- and 4-CNBs in the presence of an additional carbon source. A degradation pathway for 3- and 4-CNBs by the two isolated strains was also proposed.

  16. Three Pseudomonas putida FNR Family Proteins with Different Sensitivities to O2.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Susan A; Crack, Jason C; Rolfe, Matthew D; Borrero-de Acuña, José Manuel; Thomson, Andrew J; Le Brun, Nick E; Schobert, Max; Stapleton, Melanie R; Green, Jeffrey

    2015-07-03

    The Escherichia coli fumarate-nitrate reduction regulator (FNR) protein is the paradigm for bacterial O2-sensing transcription factors. However, unlike E. coli, some bacterial species possess multiple FNR proteins that presumably have evolved to fulfill distinct roles. Here, three FNR proteins (ANR, PP_3233, and PP_3287) from a single bacterial species, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, have been analyzed. Under anaerobic conditions, all three proteins had spectral properties resembling those of [4Fe-4S] proteins. The reactivity of the ANR [4Fe-4S] cluster with O2 was similar to that of E. coli FNR, and during conversion to the apo-protein, via a [2Fe-2S] intermediate, cluster sulfur was retained. Like ANR, reconstituted PP_3233 and PP_3287 were converted to [2Fe-2S] forms when exposed to O2, but their [4Fe-4S] clusters reacted more slowly. Transcription from an FNR-dependent promoter with a consensus FNR-binding site in P. putida and E. coli strains expressing only one FNR protein was consistent with the in vitro responses to O2. Taken together, the experimental results suggest that the local environments of the iron-sulfur clusters in the different P. putida FNR proteins influence their reactivity with O2, such that ANR resembles E. coli FNR and is highly responsive to low concentrations of O2, whereas PP_3233 and PP_3287 have evolved to be less sensitive to O2.

  17. Metabolic Engineering of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 to Produce Anthranilate from Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Kuepper, Jannis; Dickler, Jasmin; Biggel, Michael; Behnken, Swantje; Jäger, Gernot; Wierckx, Nick; Blank, Lars M.

    2015-01-01

    The Pseudomonas putida KT2440 strain was engineered in order to produce anthranilate (oAB, ortho-aminobenzoate), a precursor of the aromatic amino acid tryptophan, from glucose as sole carbon source. To enable the production of the metabolic intermediate oAB, the trpDC operon encoding an anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase (TrpD) and an indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase (TrpC), were deleted. In addition, the chorismate mutase (pheA) responsible for the conversion of chorismate over prephenate to phenylpyruvate was deleted in the background of the deletion of trpDC to circumvent a potential drain of precursor. To further increase the oAB production, a feedback insensitive version of 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase encoded by the aroGD146N gene and an anthranilate synthase (trpES40FG) were overexpressed separately and simultaneously in the deletion mutants. With optimized production conditions in a tryptophan-limited fed-batch process a maximum of 1.54 ± 0.3 g L-1 (11.23 mM) oAB was obtained with the best performing engineered P. putida KT2440 strain (P. putida ΔtrpDC pSEVA234_aroGD146N_trpES40FG). PMID:26635771

  18. Degradation of Chloronitrobenzenes by a Coculture of Pseudomonas putida and a Rhodococcus sp.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee-Sung; Lim, Sung-Jin; Chang, Young Keun; Livingston, Andrew G.; Kim, Hak-Sung

    1999-01-01

    A single microorganism able to mineralize chloronitrobenzenes (CNBs) has not been reported, and degradation of CNBs by coculture of two microbial strains was attempted. Pseudomonas putida HS12 was first isolated by analogue enrichment culture using nitrobenzene (NB) as the substrate, and this strain was observed to possess a partial reductive pathway for the degradation of NB. From high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance analyses, NB-grown cells of P. putida HS12 were found to convert 3- and 4-CNBs to the corresponding 5- and 4-chloro-2-hydroxyacetanilides, respectively, by partial reduction and subsequent acetylation. For the degradation of CNBs, Rhodococcus sp. strain HS51, which degrades 4- and 5-chloro-2-hydroxyacetanilides, was isolated and combined with P. putida HS12 to give a coculture. This coculture was confirmed to mineralize 3- and 4-CNBs in the presence of an additional carbon source. A degradation pathway for 3- and 4-CNBs by the two isolated strains was also proposed. PMID:10049867

  19. Entner–Doudoroff pathway for sulfoquinovose degradation in Pseudomonas putida SQ1

    PubMed Central

    Felux, Ann-Katrin; Spiteller, Dieter; Klebensberger, Janosch; Schleheck, David

    2015-01-01

    Sulfoquinovose (SQ; 6-deoxy-6-sulfoglucose) is the polar head group of the plant sulfolipid SQ-diacylglycerol, and SQ comprises a major proportion of the organosulfur in nature, where it is degraded by bacteria. A first degradation pathway for SQ has been demonstrated recently, a “sulfoglycolytic” pathway, in addition to the classical glycolytic (Embden–Meyerhof) pathway in Escherichia coli K-12; half of the carbon of SQ is abstracted as dihydroxyacetonephosphate (DHAP) and used for growth, whereas a C3-organosulfonate, 2,3-dihydroxypropane sulfonate (DHPS), is excreted. The environmental isolate Pseudomonas putida SQ1 is also able to use SQ for growth, and excretes a different C3-organosulfonate, 3-sulfolactate (SL). In this study, we revealed the catabolic pathway for SQ in P. putida SQ1 through differential proteomics and transcriptional analyses, by in vitro reconstitution of the complete pathway by five heterologously produced enzymes, and by identification of all four organosulfonate intermediates. The pathway follows a reaction sequence analogous to the Entner–Doudoroff pathway for glucose-6-phosphate: It involves an NAD+-dependent SQ dehydrogenase, 6-deoxy-6-sulfogluconolactone (SGL) lactonase, 6-deoxy-6-sulfogluconate (SG) dehydratase, and 2-keto-3,6-dideoxy-6-sulfogluconate (KDSG) aldolase. The aldolase reaction yields pyruvate, which supports growth of P. putida, and 3-sulfolactaldehyde (SLA), which is oxidized to SL by an NAD(P)+-dependent SLA dehydrogenase. All five enzymes are encoded in a single gene cluster that includes, for example, genes for transport and regulation. Homologous gene clusters were found in genomes of other P. putida strains, in other gamma-Proteobacteria, and in beta- and alpha-Proteobacteria, for example, in genomes of Enterobacteria, Vibrio, and Halomonas species, and in typical soil bacteria, such as Burkholderia, Herbaspirillum, and Rhizobium. PMID:26195800

  20. Effect of gravity on Pseudomonas putida and kaolinite cotransport in water saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliadou, Ioanna A.; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2013-04-01

    Bacterial transport in porous media can be affected by several factors, such as cell concentration, water velocity, and attachment onto the solid matrix or suspended in the aqueous phase soil particles (e.g. clays). Gravity, also may significantly influence bacterial transport behavior in the subsurface. The present study aims to determine the gravity effect on transport and cotransport of bacteria species Pseudomonas (P.) putida and kaolinite colloid particles in porous media. Transport experiments were conducted under horizontal-, up- and down-flow conditions in water saturated columns packed with glass beads. These different flow modes represent different gravity effects, namely: no-, negative- and positive-gravity effect. Initial experiments were performed with bacteria and kaolinite alone in order to evaluate the effect of gravity on their individual transport characteristics. No significant gravity effect was observed on the transport of individual bacterial cells. In contrary, each different flow mode was found to differently affect kaolinite transport. Compared to the horizontal-flow mode, the kaolinite mass recovery was decreased during the up-flow mode, and increased during the down-flow mode. Finally, P. putida and kaolinite particles were injected simultaneously into the packed column in order to investigate their cotransport behavior under different flow modes. The experimental data indicated that the kaolinite-P. putida cotransport behavior was similar to that observed for the transport of individual kaolinite particles. It was observed that the P. putida mass recovery decreased during down-flow conditions. This phenomenon may be caused by the attachment of bacteria onto kaolinite particles, which were adsorbed onto the solid matrix.

  1. Entner-Doudoroff pathway for sulfoquinovose degradation in Pseudomonas putida SQ1.

    PubMed

    Felux, Ann-Katrin; Spiteller, Dieter; Klebensberger, Janosch; Schleheck, David

    2015-08-04

    Sulfoquinovose (SQ; 6-deoxy-6-sulfoglucose) is the polar head group of the plant sulfolipid SQ-diacylglycerol, and SQ comprises a major proportion of the organosulfur in nature, where it is degraded by bacteria. A first degradation pathway for SQ has been demonstrated recently, a "sulfoglycolytic" pathway, in addition to the classical glycolytic (Embden-Meyerhof) pathway in Escherichia coli K-12; half of the carbon of SQ is abstracted as dihydroxyacetonephosphate (DHAP) and used for growth, whereas a C3-organosulfonate, 2,3-dihydroxypropane sulfonate (DHPS), is excreted. The environmental isolate Pseudomonas putida SQ1 is also able to use SQ for growth, and excretes a different C3-organosulfonate, 3-sulfolactate (SL). In this study, we revealed the catabolic pathway for SQ in P. putida SQ1 through differential proteomics and transcriptional analyses, by in vitro reconstitution of the complete pathway by five heterologously produced enzymes, and by identification of all four organosulfonate intermediates. The pathway follows a reaction sequence analogous to the Entner-Doudoroff pathway for glucose-6-phosphate: It involves an NAD(+)-dependent SQ dehydrogenase, 6-deoxy-6-sulfogluconolactone (SGL) lactonase, 6-deoxy-6-sulfogluconate (SG) dehydratase, and 2-keto-3,6-dideoxy-6-sulfogluconate (KDSG) aldolase. The aldolase reaction yields pyruvate, which supports growth of P. putida, and 3-sulfolactaldehyde (SLA), which is oxidized to SL by an NAD(P)(+)-dependent SLA dehydrogenase. All five enzymes are encoded in a single gene cluster that includes, for example, genes for transport and regulation. Homologous gene clusters were found in genomes of other P. putida strains, in other gamma-Proteobacteria, and in beta- and alpha-Proteobacteria, for example, in genomes of Enterobacteria, Vibrio, and Halomonas species, and in typical soil bacteria, such as Burkholderia, Herbaspirillum, and Rhizobium.

  2. Attachment of Pseudomonas putida onto differently structured kaolinite minerals: a combined ATR-FTIR and 1H NMR study.

    PubMed

    Vasiliadou, Ioanna A; Papoulis, Dimitris; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V; Panagiotaras, Dionisios; Karakosta, Eleni; Fardis, Michael; Papavassiliou, Georgios

    2011-06-01

    The attachment of Pseudomonas (P.) putida onto well (KGa-1) and poorly (KGa-2) crystallized kaolinite was investigated in this study. Batch experiments were carried out to determine the attachment isotherms of P. putida onto both types of kaolinite particles. The attachment process of P. putida onto KGa-1 and KGa-2 was adequately described by a Langmuir isotherm. Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance were employed to study the attachment mechanisms of P. putida. Experimental results indicated that KGa-2 presented higher affinity and attachment capacity than KGa-1. It was shown that electrostatic interactions and clay mineral structural disorders can influence the attachment capacity of clay mineral particles.

  3. Mechanisms of solvent resistance mediated by interplay of cellular factors in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Juan-Luis; Sol Cuenca, Maria; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Segura, Ana; Duque, Estrella; Gómez-García, María R; Udaondo, Zulema; Roca, Amalia

    2015-07-01

    A number of microorganisms have the ability to thrive in the presence of a range of toxic solvents. Tolerance to these chemicals is a multifactorial process, meaning that bacterial cells use a set of physiological and gene expression changes to overcome the damage imparted by these chemicals. This review focuses mainly on issues related to tolerance to aromatic hydrocarbons and butanol in Pseudomonas, although other microorganisms are also discussed. Pseudomonas putida strains contain a circular chromosome of approximately 6 Mbp which encodes about 5300 genes. A combination of physiological and biochemical assays, a genome-wide collection of mutants and several omics approaches have provided useful information to help identify functions involved in solvent tolerance in P. putida. The solvent response involves fine-tuning of lipid fluidity to adjust membrane functions including impermeabilization, activation of a general stress-response system, increased energy generation and induction of specific efflux pumps that extrude solvents to the medium. These responses are modulated at the transcriptional level by local and global regulators as well as by a number of sRNAs whose levels fluctuate with the presence of solvents in the environment. Taken as a whole these regulatory inputs orchestrate the complex network of metabolic responses observed after solvent addition.

  4. Temperature and pyoverdine-mediated iron acquisition control surface motility of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Matilla, Miguel A; Ramos, Juan L; Duque, Estrella; de Dios Alché, Juan; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel; Ramos-González, María Isabel

    2007-07-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is unable to swarm at its common temperature of growth in the laboratory (30 degrees C) but exhibits surface motility similar to swarming patterns in other Pseudomonas between 18 degrees C and 28 degrees C. These motile cells show differentiation, consisting on elongation and the presence of surface appendages. Analysis of a collection of mutants to define the molecular determinants of this type of surface movement in KT2440 shows that while type IV pili and lipopolysaccharide O-antigen are requisites flagella are not. Although surface motility of flagellar mutants was macroscopically undistinguishable from that of the wild type, microscopy analysis revealed that these mutants move using a distinct mechanism to that of the wild-type strain. Mutants either in the siderophore pyoverdine (ppsD) or in the FpvA siderophore receptor were also unable to spread on surfaces. Motility in the ppsD strain was totally restored with pyoverdine and partially with the wild-type ppsD allele. Phenotype of the fpvA strain was not complemented by this siderophore. We discuss that iron influences surface motility and that it can be an environmental cue for swarming-like movement in P. putida. This study constitutes the first report assigning an important role to pyoverdine iron acquisition in en masse bacterial surface movement.

  5. Molecular cloning of the Pseudomonas carboxypeptidase G2 gene and its expression in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Minton, N P; Atkinson, T; Sherwood, R F

    1983-01-01

    The gene coding for carboxypeptidase G2 was cloned from Pseudomonas sp. strain RS-16 into Escherichia coli W5445 by inserting Sau3A-generated DNA fragments into the BamHI site of pBR322. The plasmid isolated, pNM1, was restriction mapped, and the position of the gene on the 5.8-megadalton insert was pinpointed by subcloning. The expression of carboxypeptidase in E. coli was 100-fold lower than in the Pseudomonas sp. strain. When the cloned gene was subcloned into the Pseudomonas vector pKT230 and introduced into Pseudomonas putida 2440, a 30-fold increase in expression over that obtained in E. coli was observed. High expression (up to 5% soluble protein) was obtained in E. coli by subcloning a 3.1-megadalton Bg/II fragment into the BamHI site of pAT153. The increased expression was orientation dependent and is presumed to be due to transcriptional readthrough from the Tc promoter of the vector. Production of carboxypeptidase was shown to be induced (two-fold) by the presence of folic acid, and the mature protein was shown to be located in the periplasmic space of E. coli. Images PMID:6358192

  6. Interspecies signalling: Pseudomonas putida efflux pump TtgGHI is activated by indole to increase antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Fillet, Sandy; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2014-05-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, multidrug efflux pumps are responsible for the extrusion of chemicals that are deleterious for growth. Some of these efflux pumps are induced by endogenously produced effectors, while abiotic or biotic signals induce the expression of other efflux pumps. In Pseudomonas putida, the TtgABC efflux pump is the main antibiotic extrusion system that respond to exogenous antibiotics through the modulation of the expression of this operon mediated by TtgR. The plasmid-encoded TtgGHI efflux pump in P. putida plays a minor role in antibiotic resistance in the parental strain; however, its role is critical in isogenic backgrounds deficient in TtgABC. Expression of ttgGHI is repressed by the TtgV regulator that recognizes indole as an effector, although P. putida does not produce indole itself. Because indole is not produced by Pseudomonas, the indole-dependent antibiotic resistance seems to be part of an antibiotic resistance programme at the community level. Pseudomonas putida recognizes indole added to the medium or produced by Escherichia coli in mixed microbial communities. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that the indole-specific response involves activation of 43 genes and repression of 23 genes. Indole enhances not only the expression of the TtgGHI pump but also a set of genes involved in iron homeostasis, as well as genes for amino acid catabolism. In a ttgABC-deficient P. putida, background ampicillin and other bactericidal compounds lead to cell death. Co-culture of E. coli and P. putida ΔttgABC allowed growth of the P. putida mutant in the presence of ampicillin because of induction of the indole-dependent efflux pump.

  7. Characterization of Phenotypic Changes in Pseudomonas putida in Response to Surface-Associated Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Karin; Camper, Anne K.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of complex bacterial communities known as biofilms begins with the interaction of planktonic cells with a surface. A switch between planktonic and sessile growth is believed to result in a phenotypic change in bacteria. In this study, a global analysis of physiological changes of the plant saprophyte Pseudomonas putida following 6 h of attachment to a silicone surface was carried out by analysis of protein profiles and by mRNA expression patterns. Two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis revealed 15 proteins that were up-regulated following bacterial adhesion and 30 proteins that were down-regulated. N-terminal sequence analyses of 11 of the down-regulated proteins identified a protein with homology to the ABC transporter, PotF; an outer membrane lipoprotein, NlpD; and five proteins that were homologous to proteins involved in amino acid metabolism. cDNA subtractive hybridization revealed 40 genes that were differentially expressed following initial attachment of P. putida. Twenty-eight of these genes had known homologs. As with the 2-D gel analysis, NlpD and genes involved in amino acid metabolism were identified by subtractive hybridization and found to be down-regulated following surface-associated growth. The gene for PotB was up-regulated, suggesting differential expression of ABC transporters following attachment to this surface. Other genes that showed differential regulation were structural components of flagella and type IV pili, as well as genes involved in polysaccharide biosynthesis. Immunoblot analysis of PilA and FliC confirmed the presence of flagella in planktonic cultures but not in 12- or 24-h biofilms. In contrast, PilA was observed in 12-h biofilms but not in planktonic culture. Recent evidence suggests that quorum sensing by bacterial homoserine lactones (HSLs) may play a regulatory role in biofilm development. To determine if similar protein profiles occurred during quorum sensing and during early biofilm formation, HSLs

  8. Growth independent rhamnolipid production from glucose using the non-pathogenic Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhamnolipids are potent biosurfactants with high potential for industrial applications. However, rhamnolipids are currently produced with the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa during growth on hydrophobic substrates such as plant oils. The heterologous production of rhamnolipids entails two essential advantages: Disconnecting the rhamnolipid biosynthesis from the complex quorum sensing regulation and the opportunity of avoiding pathogenic production strains, in particular P. aeruginosa. In addition, separation of rhamnolipids from fatty acids is difficult and hence costly. Results Here, the metabolic engineering of a rhamnolipid producing Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a strain certified as safety strain using glucose as carbon source to avoid cumbersome product purification, is reported. Notably, P. putida KT2440 features almost no changes in growth rate and lag-phase in the presence of high concentrations of rhamnolipids (> 90 g/L) in contrast to the industrially important bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and Escherichia coli. P. putida KT2440 expressing the rhlAB-genes from P. aeruginosa PAO1 produces mono-rhamnolipids of P. aeruginosa PAO1 type (mainly C10:C10). The metabolic network was optimized in silico for rhamnolipid synthesis from glucose. In addition, a first genetic optimization, the removal of polyhydroxyalkanoate formation as competing pathway, was implemented. The final strain had production rates in the range of P. aeruginosa PAO1 at yields of about 0.15 g/gglucose corresponding to 32% of the theoretical optimum. What's more, rhamnolipid production was independent from biomass formation, a trait that can be exploited for high rhamnolipid production without high biomass formation. Conclusions A functional alternative to the pathogenic rhamnolipid producer P. aeruginosa was constructed and characterized. P. putida KT24C1 pVLT31_rhlAB featured the highest yield and titer reported from heterologous rhamnolipid

  9. First detection in Europe of the metallo-β-lactamase IMP-15 in clinical strains of Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gilarranz, R; Juan, C; Castillo-Vera, J; Chamizo, F J; Artiles, F; Álamo, I; Oliver, A

    2013-09-01

    In a prospective study (2009-2011) in healthcare institutions from the Canary Islands (Spain), 6 out of 298 carbapenem non-susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates produced a metallo-β-lactamase: four IMP-15, two VIM-2 (including one IMP-15-positive isolate) and one VIM-1. Multilocus sequence typing identified the single VIM-1-producing isolate as clone ST111 and two IMP-15-producing isolates as ST606, but, strikingly, bacterial re-identification revealed that the other three isolates (producing IMP-15 and/or VIM-2) were actually Pseudomonas putida. Further retrospective analysis revealed a very high prevalence (close to 50%) of carbapenem resistance in this environmental species. Hence, we report the simultaneous emergence in hospitals on the Canary Islands of P. putida and P. aeruginosa strains producing IMP-15, a metallo-β-lactamase not previously detected in Europe, and suggest an underestimated role of P. putida as a nosocomial reservoir of worrying transferable resistance determinants.

  10. Screening and optimization of low-cost medium for Pseudomonas putida Rs-198 culture using RSM.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yanjie; He, Yanhui; Wu, Zhansheng; Lu, Jianjiang; Li, Chun

    2014-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterial strain Pseudomonas putida Rs-198 was isolated from salinized soils from Xinjiang Province. We optimized the composition of the low-cost medium of P. putida Rs-198 based on its bacterial concentration, as well as its phosphate-dissolving and indole acetic acid (IAA)-producing capabilities using the response surface methodology (RSM), and a mathematical model was developed to show the effect of each medium component and its interactions on phosphate dissolution and IAA production. The model predicted a maximum phosphate concentration in medium containing 63.23 mg/L inorganic phosphate with 49.22 g/L corn flour, 14.63 g/L soybean meal, 2.03 g/L K₂HPO₄, 0.19 g/L MnSO₄ and 5.00 g/L NaCl. The maximum IAA concentration (18.73 mg/L) was predicted in medium containing 52.41 g/L corn flour, 15.82 g/L soybean meal, 2.40 g/L K₂HPO₄, 0.17 g/L MnSO₄ and 5.00 g/L NaCl. These predicted values were also verified through experiments, with a cell density of 10(13) cfu/mL, phosphate dissolution of 64.33 mg/L, and IAA concentration of 18.08 mg/L. The excellent correlation between predicted and measured values of each model justifies the validity of both the response models. The study aims to provide a basis for industrialized fermentation using P. putida Rs-198.

  11. Screening and optimization of low-cost medium for Pseudomonas putida Rs-198 culture using RSM

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yanjie; He, Yanhui; Wu, Zhansheng; Lu, Jianjiang; Li, Chun

    2014-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterial strain Pseudomonas putida Rs-198 was isolated from salinized soils from Xinjiang Province. We optimized the composition of the low-cost medium of P. putida Rs-198 based on its bacterial concentration, as well as its phosphate-dissolving and indole acetic acid (IAA)-producing capabilities using the response surface methodology (RSM), and a mathematical model was developed to show the effect of each medium component and its interactions on phosphate dissolution and IAA production. The model predicted a maximum phosphate concentration in medium containing 63.23 mg/L inorganic phosphate with 49.22 g/L corn flour, 14.63 g/L soybean meal, 2.03 g/L K2HPO4, 0.19 g/L MnSO4 and 5.00 g/L NaCl. The maximum IAA concentration (18.73 mg/L) was predicted in medium containing 52.41 g/L corn flour, 15.82 g/L soybean meal, 2.40 g/L K2HPO4, 0.17 g/L MnSO4 and 5.00 g/L NaCl. These predicted values were also verified through experiments, with a cell density of 1013 cfu/mL, phosphate dissolution of 64.33 mg/L, and IAA concentration of 18.08 mg/L. The excellent correlation between predicted and measured values of each model justifies the validity of both the response models. The study aims to provide a basis for industrialized fermentation using P. putida Rs-198. PMID:25763026

  12. Self-Regulation and Interplay of Rsm Family Proteins Modulate the Lifestyle of Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the plant-beneficial bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440, three genes have been identified that encode posttranscriptional regulators of the CsrA/RsmA family. Their regulatory roles in the motile and sessile lifestyles of P. putida have been investigated by generating single-, double-, and triple-null mutants and by overexpressing each protein (RsmA, RsmE, and RsmI) in different genetic backgrounds. The rsm triple mutant shows reduced swimming and swarming motilities and increased biofilm formation, whereas overexpression of RsmE or RsmI results in reduced bacterial attachment. However, biofilms formed on glass surfaces by the triple mutant are more labile than those of the wild-type strain and are easily detached from the surface, a phenomenon that is not observed on plastic surfaces. Analysis of the expression of adhesins and exopolysaccharides in the different genetic backgrounds suggests that the biofilm phenotypes are due to alterations in the composition of the extracellular matrix and in the timing of synthesis of its elements. We have also studied the expression patterns of Rsm proteins and obtained data that indicate the existence of autoregulation mechanisms. IMPORTANCE Proteins of the CsrA/RsmA family function as global regulators in different bacteria. More than one of these proteins is present in certain species. In this study, all of the RsmA homologs in P. putida are characterized and globally taken into account to investigate their roles in controlling bacterial lifestyles and the regulatory interactions among them. The results offer new perspectives on how biofilm formation is modulated in this environmentally relevant bacterium. PMID:27422830

  13. Bacterial effects and interfacial inactivation mechanism of nZVI/Pd on Pseudomonas putida strain.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yuancai; Niu, Zhuyu; Chen, Yuancai; Hu, Yongyou

    2017-05-15

    With the introduction of nano zero valent iron (nZVI) technology into our environment, its potential environmental risk to environmental microorganisms has attracted considerable attention. In this study, Pseudomonas putida was chosen as a typical strain to study the bacterial toxicity of nZVI/Pd. The CFU assay results indicated that nZVI/Pd was toxic to P. putida cells but the toxicity decreased with an increase in DO. The experiments isolated by dialysis bag and flow cytometry analysis suggested that both membrane disruption caused by direct contact and oxidative stress were the main bactericidal mechanisms under the aerobic condition, while membrane disruption resulting from direct contact was the primary bactericidal mechanism in the anaerobic system. Furthermore, according to TEM, SEM, EDS, XRD, FTIR and XPS, it was indicated that in the aerobic system, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by nZVI/Pd could oxidize the amide and hydroxyl groups into carboxyl groups, resulting in a decline in peptides and increase in polysaccharides. In addition, the ROS also accumulated inside the cell and caused cell inactivation via oxidative stress. In the anaerobic system, the adhered nZVI/Pd particles would attack the functional groups such as carboxyl, ester and amide, leading to the decline in proteins and polysaccharides and subsequent damage of the membrane. The findings provide a significant guide for the application of nano-bio combined technology.

  14. A carbon starvation survival gene of Pseudomonas putida is regulated by sigma 54.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Watrud, L S; Matin, A

    1995-04-01

    By using mini-Tn5 transposon mutagenesis, two mutants of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 were isolated which showed a marked increase in their sensitivity to carbon starvation; these mutants are presumably affected in the Pex type of proteins that P. putida induces upon carbon starvation (M. Givskov, L. Eberl, and S. Molin, J. Bacteriol. 176:4816-4824, 1994). The affected genes in our mutants were induced about threefold upon carbon starvation. The promoter region of the starvation gene in the mutant MK107 possessed a strong sigma 54-type-promoter sequence, and deletion analysis suggested that this was the major promoter regulating expression; this was confirmed by transcript mapping in rpoN+ and rpoN mutant backgrounds. The deletion analysis implicated a sequence upstream of the sigma 54 promoter, as well as a region downstream of the transcription start site, in the functioning of the promoter. Two sigma 70-type Pribnow boxes were also detected in the promoter region, but their transcriptional activity in the wild type was very weak. However, in a sigma 54-deficient background, these promoters became stronger. The mechanism and possible physiological role of this phenomenon and the possibility that the sequence upstream of the sigma 54 promoter may have a role in carbon sensing are discussed.

  15. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of the heat shock response in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Fumihiro; Tamiya, Takayuki; Ohtsu, Iwao; Fujimura, Makoto; Fukumori, Fumiyasu

    2014-01-01

    Molecular chaperones function in various important physiological processes. Null mutants of genes for the molecular chaperone ClpB (Hsp104), and those that encode J-domain proteins (DnaJ, CbpA, and DjlA), which may act as Hsp40 co-chaperones of DnaK (Hsp70), were constructed from Pseudomonas putida KT2442 (KT) to elucidate their roles. The KTΔclpB mutant showed the same heat shock response (HSR) as the wild-type, both in terms of heat-shock protein (Hsp) synthesis (other than ClpB) and in hsp gene expression; however, the mutant was quite sensitive to high temperatures and was unable to disaggregate into thermo-mediated protein aggregates, indicating that ClpB is important for cell survival after heat stress and essential for solubilization of protein aggregates. On the other hand, the KTΔdnaJ mutant was temperature-sensitive, and formed more protein aggregates (especially of high molecular weight) upon heat stress than did KT. P. putida CbpA, a probable Hsp, partially substituted the functions of DnaJ in cell growth and solubilization of thermo-mediated protein aggregates, and might be involved in the HSR which was regulated by a fine-tuning system(s) that could sense subtle changes in the ambient temperature and control the levels of σ32 activity and quantity, as well as the mRNA levels of hsp genes. PMID:25303383

  16. Biodegradation of 1-allyloxy-4-propoxybenzene by selected strains of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Parisa; Plettner, Erika

    2014-02-01

    Dialkoxybenzenes constitute a class of organic compounds with anti feeding and oviposition effects on the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni. Among them, 1-allyloxy-4-propoxybenzene has the highest feeding deterrence activity and potential for development as commercial insect control agent. To develop this compound, its fate in the environment needs to be studied. The fate of organic compounds in the environment depends on their biodegradability in the soil. We present results of laboratory biodegradation experiments of 1-allyloxy-4-propoxybenzene with three strains of Pseudomonas putida. Two of the three strains of P. putida tested were able to metabolize 1-allyloxy-4-propoxybenzene. Both strains required induction of the catabolic pathway. Specifically, strain ATCC 17453 (which contains the CAM plasmid) metabolized 1-allyloxy-4-propoxybenzene by first dealkylating. This gave both possible monoalkoxy phenols after five days, followed by dihydroquinone after 8 days. In vitro tests with CYP101A1 (cytochrome P450cam, a camphor hydroxylase), revealed that the dealkylation is catalyzed by this enzyme.

  17. Removal of mercury from chloralkali electrolysis wastewater by a mercury-resistant Pseudomonas putida strain

    SciTech Connect

    Canstein, H. von; Li, Y.; Timmis, K.N.; Deckwer, W.D.; Wagner-Doebler, I.

    1999-12-01

    A mercury-resistant bacterial strain which is able to reduce ionic mercury to metallic mercury was used to remediate in laboratory columns mercury-containing wastewater produced during electrolytic production of chlorine. Factory effluents from several chloralkali plants in Europe were analyzed, and these effluents contained total mercury concentrations between 1.6 and 7.6 mg/liter and high chloride concentrations and had pH values which were either acidic or alkaline. A mercury-resistant bacterial strain, Pseudomonas putida Spi3, was isolated from polluted river sediments. Biofilms of P.putida Spi3 were grown on porous carrier material in laboratory column bioreactors. The bioreactors were continuously fed with sterile synthetic model wastewater or nonsterile, neutralized, aerated chloralkali wastewater. The authors found that sodium chloride concentrations up to 24 g/liter did not inhibit microbial mercury retention and that mercury concentrations up to 7 mg/liter could be treated with the bacterial biofilm with no loss of activity. When wastewater samples from three different chloralkali plants in Europe were used, levels of mercury retention efficiency between 90 and 98% were obtained. Thus, microbial mercury removal is a potential biological treatment for chloralkali electrolysis wastewater.

  18. Tracing explosives in soil with transcriptional regulators of Pseudomonas putida evolved for responding to nitrotoluenes

    PubMed Central

    Garmendia, Junkal; De Las Heras, Aitor; Galvão, Teca Calcagno; De Lorenzo, Víctor

    2008-01-01

    Summary Although different biological approaches for detection of anti‐personnel mines and other unexploded ordnance (UXO) have been entertained, none of them has been rigorously documented thus far in the scientific literature. The industrial 2,4,6 trinitrotoluene (TNT) habitually employed in the manufacturing of mines is at all times tainted with a small but significant proportion of the more volatile 2,4 dinitrotoluene (2,4 DNT) and other nitroaromatic compounds. By using mutation‐prone PCR and DNA sequence shuffling we have evolved in vitro and selected in vivo variants of the effector recognition domain of the toluene‐responsive XylR regulator of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida that responds to mono‐, bi‐ and trinitro substituted toluenes. Re‐introduction of such variants in P. putida settled the transcriptional activity of the cognate promoters (Po and Pu) as a function of the presence of nitrotoluenes in the medium. When strains bearing transcriptional fusions to reporters with an optical output (luxAB, GFP) were spread on soil spotted with nitrotoluenes, the signal triggered by promoter activation allowed localization of the target compounds on the soil surface. Our data provide a proof of concept that non‐natural transcription factors evolved to respond to nitroaromatics can be engineered in soil bacteria and inoculated on a target site to pinpoint the presence of explosives. This approach thus opens new ways to tackle this gigantic humanitarian problem. PMID:21261843

  19. Assessing the safety of Pseudomonas putida introduction in the environment: an overview of ecotoxicological tests.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Vera Lúcia S S; Jonsson, Cláudio Martin; Silva, Célia Maria M; de Holanda Nunes Maia, Aline

    2010-04-01

    Risk assessment guidelines for the environmental release of microbial agents are performed in a tiered sequence which includes evaluation of exposure effects on non-target organisms. However, it becomes important to verify whether environmental risk assessment from temperate studies is applicable to tropical countries, as Brazil. Pseudomonas putida is a bacteria showing potential to be used for environmental applications as bioremediation and plant disease control. This study investigates the effects of this bacteria exposure on rodents and aquatic organisms (Daphnia similis) that are recommended to be used as non-target organism in environmental risk assessments. Also, the microbial activity in three different soils under P. putida exposure was evaluated. Rats did not show clinical alterations, although the agent was recovered 16h after the exposure in lung homogenates. The bacteria did not reduce significantly the reproduction and survival of D. similis. The soil enzymatic activities presented fluctuating values after inoculation with bacteria. The measurement of perturbations in soil biochemical characteristics is presented as an alternative way of monitoring the overall effects of the microbial agent to be introduced even in first stage (Tier I) of the risk assessment in tropical ecosystems.

  20. Phenotypic variation of Pseudomonas putida and P. tolaasii affects attachment to Agaricus bisporus mycelium.

    PubMed

    Rainey, P B

    1991-12-01

    The effect of phenotypic variation on attachment of Pseudomonas tolaasii and P. putida to Agaricus bisporus mycelium was investigated. Quantitative studies demonstrated the ability of each isolate to attach rapidly and firmly to A. bisporus mycelium and significant differences in attachment of wild-type and phenotypic variant strains were observed. This was most pronounced in P. tolaasii, where the percentage attachment of the wild-type form was always greater than that of the phenotypic variant. The medium upon which the bacteria were cultured, prior to conducting an attachment assay, had a significant effect on their ability to attach. Attachment of the wild-type form of P. putida was enhanced when the assay was performed in the presence of CaCl2, suggesting the involvement of electrostatic forces. No correlation was observed between bacterial hydrophobicity and ability to attach to A. bisporus mycelium. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the results obtained from the quantitative studies and provided further evidence for marked differences in the ability of the pseudomonads to attach to mycelium. Fibrillar structures and amorphous material were frequently associated with attached cells and appeared to anchor bacteria to each other and to the hyphal surface. A time-course study of attachment using transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of uneven fibrillar material on the surface of cells. This material stained positive for polysaccharide and may be involved in ensuring rapid, firm attachment of the cells.

  1. Pseudomonas putida as a platform for the synthesis of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Cordero, Baldo F; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Udaondo, Zulema; Manzano, Javier; Valdivia, Miguel; Segura, Ana; Ramos, Juan-Luis; Duque, Estrella

    2016-09-01

    Aromatic compounds such as l-phenylalanine, 2-phenylethanol and trans-cinnamate are aromatic compounds of industrial interest. Current trends support replacement of chemical synthesis of these compounds by 'green' alternatives produced in microbial cell factories. The solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E strain was genetically modified to produce up to 1 g l-1 of l-phenylalanine. In order to engineer this strain, we carried out the following stepwise process: (1) we selected random mutants that are resistant to toxic phenylalanine analogues; (2) we then deleted up to five genes belonging to phenylalanine metabolism pathways, which greatly diminished the internal metabolism of phenylalanine; and (3) in these mutants, we overexpressed the pheAfbr gene, which encodes a recombinant variant of PheA that is insensitive to feedback inhibition by phenylalanine. Furthermore, by introducing new genes, we were able to further extend the diversity of compounds produced. Introduction of histidinol phosphate transferase (PP_0967), phenylpyruvate decarboxylase (kdc) and an alcohol dehydrogenase (adh) enabled the strain to produce up to 180 mg l-1 2-phenylethanol. When phenylalanine ammonia lyase (pal) was introduced, the resulting strain produced up to 200 mg l-1 of trans-cinnamate. These results demonstrate that P. putida can serve as a promising microbial cell factory for the production of l-phenylalanine and related compounds.

  2. Conversion of levoglucosan and cellobiosan by Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    SciTech Connect

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Hobdey, Sarah E.; Franden, Mary Ann; Fulk, Emily M.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-02-02

    Pyrolysis offers a straightforward approach for the deconstruction of plant cell wall polymers into bio-oil. Recently, there has been substantial interest in bio-oil fractionation and subsequent use of biological approaches to selectively upgrade some of the resulting fractions. A fraction of particular interest for biological upgrading consists of polysaccharide-derived substrates including sugars and sugar dehydration products such as levoglucosan and cellobiosan, which are two of the most abundant pyrolysis products of cellulose. Levoglucosan can be converted to glucose-6-phosphate through the use of a levoglucosan kinase (LGK), but to date, the mechanism for cellobiosan utilization has not been demonstrated. Here, we engineer the microbe Pseudomonas putida KT2440 to use levoglucosan as a sole carbon and energy source through LGK integration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cellobiosan can be enzymatically converted to levoglucosan and glucose with β-glucosidase enzymes from both Glycoside Hydrolase Family 1 and Family 3. β-glucosidases are commonly used in both natural and industrial cellulase cocktails to convert cellobiose to glucose to relieve cellulase product inhibition and to facilitate microbial uptake of glucose. Using an exogenous β-glucosidase, we demonstrate that the engineered strain of P. putida can grow on levoglucosan up to 60 g/L and can also utilize cellobiosan. Overall, this study elucidates the biological pathway to co-utilize levoglucosan and cellobiosan, which will be a key transformation for the biological upgrading of pyrolysis-derived substrates.

  3. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of the heat shock response in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Ito, Fumihiro; Tamiya, Takayuki; Ohtsu, Iwao; Fujimura, Makoto; Fukumori, Fumiyasu

    2014-12-01

    Molecular chaperones function in various important physiological processes. Null mutants of genes for the molecular chaperone ClpB (Hsp104), and those that encode J-domain proteins (DnaJ, CbpA, and DjlA), which may act as Hsp40 co-chaperones of DnaK (Hsp70), were constructed from Pseudomonas putida KT2442 (KT) to elucidate their roles. The KTΔclpB mutant showed the same heat shock response (HSR) as the wild-type, both in terms of heat-shock protein (Hsp) synthesis (other than ClpB) and in hsp gene expression; however, the mutant was quite sensitive to high temperatures and was unable to disaggregate into thermo-mediated protein aggregates, indicating that ClpB is important for cell survival after heat stress and essential for solubilization of protein aggregates. On the other hand, the KTΔdnaJ mutant was temperature-sensitive, and formed more protein aggregates (especially of high molecular weight) upon heat stress than did KT. P. putida CbpA, a probable Hsp, partially substituted the functions of DnaJ in cell growth and solubilization of thermo-mediated protein aggregates, and might be involved in the HSR which was regulated by a fine-tuning system(s) that could sense subtle changes in the ambient temperature and control the levels of σ(32) activity and quantity, as well as the mRNA levels of hsp genes.

  4. Metabolic Engineering of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 for the Production of para-Hydroxy Benzoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shiqin; Plan, Manuel R.; Winter, Gal; Krömer, Jens O.

    2016-01-01

    para-Hydroxy benzoic acid (PHBA) is the key component for preparing parabens, a common preservatives in food, drugs, and personal care products, as well as high-performance bioplastics such as liquid crystal polymers. Pseudomonas putida KT2440 was engineered to produce PHBA from glucose via the shikimate pathway intermediate chorismate. To obtain the PHBA production strain, chorismate lyase UbiC from Escherichia coli and a feedback resistant 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase encoded by gene aroGD146N were overexpressed individually and simultaneously. In addition, genes related to product degradation (pobA) or competing for the precursor chorismate (pheA and trpE) were deleted from the genome. To further improve PHBA production, the glucose metabolism repressor hexR was knocked out in order to increase erythrose 4-phosphate and NADPH supply. The best strain achieved a maximum titer of 1.73 g L−1 and a carbon yield of 18.1% (C-mol C-mol−1) in a non-optimized fed-batch fermentation. This is to date the highest PHBA concentration produced by P. putida using a chorismate lyase. PMID:27965953

  5. A Pseudomonas putida strain genetically engineered for 1,2,3-trichloropropane bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Samin, Ghufrana; Pavlova, Martina; Arif, M Irfan; Postema, Christiaan P; Damborsky, Jiri; Janssen, Dick B

    2014-09-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a toxic compound that is recalcitrant to biodegradation in the environment. Attempts to isolate TCP-degrading organisms using enrichment cultivation have failed. A potential biodegradation pathway starts with hydrolytic dehalogenation to 2,3-dichloro-1-propanol (DCP), followed by oxidative metabolism. To obtain a practically applicable TCP-degrading organism, we introduced an engineered haloalkane dehalogenase with improved TCP degradation activity into the DCP-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas putida MC4. For this purpose, the dehalogenase gene (dhaA31) was cloned behind the constitutive dhlA promoter and was introduced into the genome of strain MC4 using a transposon delivery system. The transposon-located antibiotic resistance marker was subsequently removed using a resolvase step. Growth of the resulting engineered bacterium, P. putida MC4-5222, on TCP was indeed observed, and all organic chlorine was released as chloride. A packed-bed reactor with immobilized cells of strain MC4-5222 degraded >95% of influent TCP (0.33 mM) under continuous-flow conditions, with stoichiometric release of inorganic chloride. The results demonstrate the successful use of a laboratory-evolved dehalogenase and genetic engineering to produce an effective, plasmid-free, and stable whole-cell biocatalyst for the aerobic bioremediation of a recalcitrant chlorinated hydrocarbon.

  6. The cytochrome c maturation operon is involved in manganese oxidation in Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    SciTech Connect

    Vrind, J.P.M. de; Brouwers, G.J.; Corstijens, P.L.A.M.; Dulk, J. den; Vrind-de Jong, E.W. de

    1998-10-01

    A Pseudomonas putida strain, strain GB-1, oxidizes Mn{sup 2+} to Mn oxide in the early stationary growth phase. It also secretes a siderophore (identified as pyoverdine) when it is subjected to iron limitation. After transposon (Tn5) mutagenesis several classes of mutants with differences in Mn{sup 2+} oxidation and/or secretion of the Mn{sup 2+}-oxidizing activity were identified. Preliminary analysis of the Tn5 insertion site in one of the nonoxidizing mutants suggested that a multicopper oxidase-related enzyme is involved in Mn{sup 2+} oxidation. The insertion site in another mutant was preliminarily identified as a gene involved in the general protein secretion pathway. Two mutants defective in Mn{sup 2+}-oxidizing activity also secreted porphyrins into the medium and appeared to be derepressed for pyoverdine production. These strains were chosen for detailed analysis. Both mutants were shown to contain Tn5 insertions in the ccmF gene, which is part of the cytochrome c maturation operon. They were cytochrome oxidase negative and did not contain c-type cytochromes. Complementation with part of the ccm operon isolated from the wild type restored the phenotype of the parent strain. These results indicate that a functional ccm operon is required for Mn{sup 2+} oxidation in P. putida GB-1. A possible relationship between porphyrin secretion resulting from the ccm mutation and stimulation of pyoverdine production is discussed.

  7. Induction Specificity and Catabolite Repression of the Early Enzymes in Camphor Degradation by Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Hartline, Richard A.; Gunsalus, I. C.

    1971-01-01

    The ability of bornane and substituted bornanes to induce the early enzymes for d(+)-camphor degradation and control of these enzymes by catabolite repression were studied in a strain of a Pseudomonas putida. Bornane and 20 substituted bornane compounds showed induction. Of these 21 compounds, bornane and 8 of the substituted bornanes provided induction without supporting growth. Oxygen, but not nitrogen, enhanced the inductive potency of the unsubstituted bornane ring. All bornanedione isomers caused induction, and those with substituents on each of the three consecutive carbon atoms, including the methyl group at the bridgehead carbon, showed induction without supporting growth. Although it was not possible to obtain experimental data for a case of absolute gratuitous induction by compounds not supporting growth, indirect evidence in support of gratuitous induction is presented. It is proposed that the ability of P. putida to tolerate the unusually high degree of possible gratuitous induction observed for camphor catabolism may be related to the infrequent occurrence of bicyclic ring structures in nature. Survival of an organism with a broad specificity for gratuitous induction is discussed. Glucose and succinate, but not glutamate, produced catabolite repression of the early camphor-degrading enzymes. Pathway enzymes differ in their degree of sensitivity to succinate-provoked catabolite repression. The ability of a compound to produce catabolite repression is not, however, directly related to the duration of the lag period (diauxic lag) between growth on camphor and growth on the repressing compound. PMID:5573731

  8. Bypasses in intracellular glucose metabolism in iron-limited Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Sasnow, Samantha S; Wei, Hua; Aristilde, Ludmilla

    2016-02-01

    Decreased biomass growth in iron (Fe)-limited Pseudomonas is generally attributed to downregulated expression of Fe-requiring proteins accompanied by an increase in siderophore biosynthesis. Here, we applied a stable isotope-assisted metabolomics approach to explore the underlying carbon metabolism in glucose-grown Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Compared to Fe-replete cells, Fe-limited cells exhibited a sixfold reduction in growth rate but the glucose uptake rate was only halved, implying an imbalance between glucose uptake and biomass growth. This imbalance could not be explained by carbon loss via siderophore production, which accounted for only 10% of the carbon-equivalent glucose uptake. In lieu of the classic glycolytic pathway, the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway in Pseudomonas is the principal route for glucose catabolism following glucose oxidation to gluconate. Remarkably, gluconate secretion represented 44% of the glucose uptake in Fe-limited cells but only 2% in Fe-replete cells. Metabolic (13) C flux analysis and intracellular metabolite levels under Fe limitation indicated a decrease in carbon fluxes through the ED pathway and through Fe-containing metabolic enzymes. The secreted siderophore was found to promote dissolution of Fe-bearing minerals to a greater extent than the high extracellular gluconate. In sum, bypasses in the Fe-limited glucose metabolism were achieved to promote Fe availability via siderophore secretion and to reroute excess carbon influx via enhanced gluconate secretion.

  9. Amplification of the groESL operon in Pseudomonas putida increases siderophore gene promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Venturi, V; Wolfs, K; Leong, J; Weisbeek, P J

    1994-10-17

    Pseudobactin 358 is the yellow-green fluorescent siderophore [microbial iron(III) transport agent] produced by Pseudomonas putida WCS358 under iron-limiting conditions. The genes encoding pseudobactin 358 biosynthesis are iron-regulated at the level of transcription. In this study, the molecular characterization is reported of a cosmid clone of WCS358 DNA that can stimulate, in an iron-dependent manner, the activity of a WCS358 siderophore gene promoter in the heterologous Pseudomonas strain A225. The functional region in the clone was identified by subcloning, transposon mutagenesis and DNA sequencing as the groESL operon of strain WCS358. This increase in promoter activity was not observed when the groESL genes of strain WCS358 were integrated via a transposon vector into the genome of Pseudomonas A225, indicating that multiple copies of the operon are necessary for the increase in siderophore gene promoter activity. Amplification of the Escherichia coli and WCS358 groESL genes also increased iron-regulated promoter activity in the parent strain WCS358. The groESL operon codes for the chaperone proteins GroES and GroEL, which are responsible for mediating the folding and assembly of many proteins.

  10. Ultrasonic disruption of Pseudomonas putida for the release of arginine deiminase: Kinetics and predictive models.

    PubMed

    Patil, Mahesh D; Dev, Manoj J; Tangadpalliwar, Sujit; Patel, Gopal; Garg, Prabha; Chisti, Yusuf; Banerjee, Uttam Chand

    2017-06-01

    The responses of the ultrasound-mediated disruption of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 were modelled as the function of biomass concentration in the cell suspension; the treatment time of sonication; the duty cycle and the acoustic power of the sonicator. For the experimental data, the response surface (RSM), the artificial neural network (ANN) and the support vector machine (SVM) models were compared for their ability to predict the performance parameters. The satisfactory prediction of the unseen data of the responses implied the proficient generalization capabilities of ANN. The extent of the cell disruption was mainly dependent on the acoustic power and the biomass concentration. The cellmass concentration in the slurry most strongly influenced the ADI and total protein release. Nearly 28U/mL ADI was released when a biomass concentration of 300g/L was sonicated for 6min with an acoustic power of 187.5W at 40% duty cycle. Cell disruption obeyed first-order kinetics.

  11. Oxidative stress in bacteria (Pseudomonas putida) exposed to nanostructures of silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Andrzej; Szala, Mateusz; Kowalczyk, Paweł; Cłapa, Tomasz; Narożna, Dorota; Selwet, Marek

    2015-09-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanostructures produced by combustion synthesis can cause oxidative stress in the bacterium Pseudomonas putida. The results of this study showed that SiC nanostructures damaged the cell membrane, which can lead to oxidative stress in living cells and to the loss of cell viability. As a reference, micrometric SiC was also used, which did not exhibit toxicity toward cells. Oxidative stress was studied by analyzing the activity of peroxidases, and the expression of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (zwf1) using real-time PCR and northern blot techniques. Damage to nucleic acid was studied by isolating and hydrolyzing plasmids with the formamidopyrimidine [fapy]-DNA glycosylase (also known as 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase) (Fpg), which is able to detect damaged DNA. The level of viable microbial cells was investigated by propidium iodide and acridine orange staining.

  12. The crystal structure of Pseudomonas putida azoreductase - the active site revisited.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Ana Maria D; Mendes, Sónia; de Sanctis, Daniele; Martins, Lígia O; Bento, Isabel

    2013-12-01

    The enzymatic degradation of azo dyes begins with the reduction of the azo bond. In this article, we report the crystal structures of the native azoreductase from Pseudomonas putida MET94 (PpAzoR) (1.60 Å), of PpAzoR in complex with anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (1.50 Å), and of PpAzoR in complex with Reactive Black 5 dye (1.90 Å). These structures reveal the residues and subtle changes that accompany substrate binding and release. Such changes highlight the fine control of access to the catalytic site that is required by the ping-pong mechanism, and in turn the specificity offered by the enzyme towards different substrates. The topology surrounding the active site shows novel features of substrate recognition and binding that help to explain and differentiate the substrate specificity observed among different bacterial azoreductases.

  13. Purification and properties of cis-toluene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, J E; Gibson, D T

    1977-01-01

    The purification of (+)-cis-1(S),2(R)-dihydroxy-3-methylcyclohexa-3,5-diene dehydrogenase from cells of Pseudomonas putida grown with toluene as the sole source of carbon and energy is reported. The molecular weight of the enzyme is 104,000 at pH 9.7. The enzyme is composed of four apparently identical subunits with molecular weights of 27,000. The enzyme is specific for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and oxidizes a number of cis-dihydrodiols. Both enantiomers of a racemic mixture of cis-1,2-dihydroxyl-1,2-dihydronaphthalene dihydrodiol are oxidized by the enzyme. No enzymatic activity is observed with trans-1,2-dihydroxyl-1,2-dihydronaphthalene dihydrodiol. PMID:16865

  14. c-Type cytochromes and manganese oxidation in Pseudomonas putida MnB1

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, R.; Tebo, B.M.; Haygood, M.G.

    1998-10-01

    Pseudomonas putida MnB1 is an isolate from an Mn oxide-encrusted pipeline that can oxidize Mn(II) to Mn oxides. The authors used transposon mutagenesis to construct mutants of strain MnB1 that are unable to oxidize manganese, and they characterized some of these mutants. The mutants were divided into three groups: mutants defective in the biogenesis of c-type cytochromes, mutants defective in genes that encode key enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and mutants defective in the biosynthesis of tryptophan. The mutants in the first two groups were cytochrome c oxidase negative and did not contain c-type cytochromes. Mn(II) oxidation capability could be recovered in a c-type cytochrome biogenesis-defective mutant by complementation of the mutation.

  15. Characterization of Pseudooxynicotine Amine Oxidase of Pseudomonas putida S16 that Is Crucial for Nicotine Degradation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haiyang; Wang, Weiwei; Tang, Hongzhi; Xu, Ping

    2015-12-04

    Pseudooxynicotine amine oxidase (Pnao) is essential to the pyrrolidine pathway of nicotine degradation of Pseudomonas putida strain S16, which is significant for the detoxification of nicotine, through removing the CH3NH2 group. However, little is known about biochemical mechanism of this enzyme. Here, we characterized its properties and biochemical mechanism. Isotope labeling experiments provided direct evidence that the newly introduced oxygen atom in 3-succinoylsemialdehyde-pyridine is derived from H2O, but not from O2. Pnao was very stable at temperatures below 50 °C; below this temperature, the enzyme activity increased as temperature rose. Site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that residue 180 is important for its thermal stability. In addition, tungstate may enhance the enzyme activity, which has rarely been reported before. Our findings make a further understanding of the crucial Pnao in nicotine degradation.

  16. Soil bacteria Pseudomonas putida and Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans inactivate triclosan in liquid and solid substrates.

    PubMed

    Meade, M J; Waddell, R L; Callahan, T M

    2001-10-16

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent that has been incorporated into many household and medical products. Bacteria with high levels of triclosan resistance were isolated from compost, water, and soil samples. Two of these bacteria, Pseudomonas putida TriRY and Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans TR1, were able to use triclosan as a sole carbon source and clear particulate triclosan from agar. A decrease in triclosan concentration was measured by HPLC within 6 h of inoculation with strain TriRY and 24 h with strain TR1. Bioassays demonstrated that triclosan was inactivated in liquid cultures and/or embedded in plastic by the growth of strain TriRY and strain TR1, permitting the growth of triclosan-sensitive bacteria.

  17. Bioaccumulation of germanium by Pseudomonas putida in the presence of two selected substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielowski, J.; Klapcinska, B.

    1986-05-01

    The uptake of germanium by Pseudomonas putida ATCC 33015 was studied in the presence of catechol or acetate or both as representative substrates differing in their ability to form complexes with this element. The bacteria were taken from a batch culture grown on acetate as the sole carbon source. Cells introduced into a medium containing germanium and either catechol or a mixture of catechol and acetate accumulated germanium in a biphasic way. After a lower level of accumulation that corresponded to the value obtained in the presence of acetate was reached, a further increase in the germanium content up to a higher saturation level was observed. The appearance of the second step of accumulation, which corresponded to the linear degradation of catechol, proved that catechol facilitated the transport of germanium into the cells through the nonspecific uptake of the germanium-catechol complex by an inducible catechol transport system.

  18. Quorum sensing triggers the stochastic escape of individual cells from Pseudomonas putida biofilms.

    PubMed

    Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Lumjiaktase, Putthapoom; Kümmerli, Rolf; Eberl, Leo

    2015-01-16

    The term 'quorum sensing' (QS) is generally used to describe the phenomenon that bacteria release and perceive signal molecules to coordinate cooperative behaviour in response to their population size. QS-based communication has therefore been considered a social trait. Here we show that QS signals (N-acyl-homoserine lactones, AHLs) are stochastically produced in young biofilms of Pseudomonas putida and act mainly as self-regulatory signals rather than inducing neighbouring cells. We demonstrate that QS induces the expression of putisolvin biosurfactants that are not public goods, thereby triggering asocial motility of induced cells out of microcolonies. Phenotypic heterogeneity is most prominent in the early stages of biofilm development, whereas at later stages behaviour patterns across cells become more synchronized. Our findings broaden our perspective on QS by showing that AHLs can control the expression of asocial (self-directed) traits, and that heterogeneity in QS can serve as a mechanism to drive phenotypic heterogeneity in self-directed behaviour.

  19. Silver nanotoxicity using a light-emitting biosensor Pseudomonas putida isolated from a wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Dams, R I; Biswas, A; Olesiejuk, A; Fernandes, T; Christofi, N

    2011-11-15

    The effect of silver ions, nano- and micro-particles on a luminescent biosensor bacterium Pseudomonas putida originally isolated from activated sludge was assessed. The bacterium carrying a stable chromosomal copy of the lux operon (luxCDABE) was able to detect toxicity of ionic and particulate silver over short term incubations ranging from 30 to 240 min. The IC(50) values obtained at different time intervals showed that highest toxicity (lowest IC(50)) was obtained after 90 min incubation for all toxicants and this is considered the optimum incubation for testing. The data show that ionic silver is the most toxic followed by nanosilver particles with microsilver particles being least toxic. Release of nanomaterials is likely to have an effect on the activated sludge process as indicated by the study using a common sludge bacterium involved in biodegradation of organic wastes.

  20. Understanding butanol tolerance and assimilation in Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1: an integrated omics approach.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, María del Sol; Roca, Amalia; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Duque, Estrella; Armengaud, Jean; Gómez-Garcia, María R; Ramos, Juan L

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1 has the potential to be used for the industrial production of butanol due to its solvent tolerance and ability to metabolize low-cost compounds. However, the strain has two major limitations: it assimilates butanol as sole carbon source and butanol concentrations above 1% (v/v) are toxic. With the aim of facilitating BIRD-1 strain design for industrial use, a genome-wide mini-Tn5 transposon mutant library was screened for clones exhibiting increased butanol sensitivity or deficiency in butanol assimilation. Twenty-one mutants were selected that were affected in one or both of the processes. These mutants exhibited insertions in various genes, including those involved in the TCA cycle, fatty acid metabolism, transcription, cofactor synthesis and membrane integrity. An omics-based analysis revealed key genes involved in the butanol response. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies were carried out to compare short and long-term tolerance and assimilation traits. Pseudomonas putida initiates various butanol assimilation pathways via alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases that channel the compound to central metabolism through the glyoxylate shunt pathway. Accordingly, isocitrate lyase - a key enzyme of the pathway - was the most abundant protein when butanol was used as the sole carbon source. Upregulation of two genes encoding proteins PPUBIRD1_2240 and PPUBIRD1_2241 (acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA synthetase respectively) linked butanol assimilation with acyl-CoA metabolism. Butanol tolerance was found to be primarily linked to classic solvent defense mechanisms, such as efflux pumps, membrane modifications and control of redox state. Our results also highlight the intensive energy requirements for butanol production and tolerance; thus, enhancing TCA cycle operation may represent a promising strategy for enhanced butanol production.

  1. Insights into the genomic basis of niche specificity of Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, V A P Martins; Heim, S; Moore, E R B; Strätz, M; Timmis, K N

    2004-12-01

    A major challenge in microbiology is the elucidation of the genetic and ecophysiological basis of habitat specificity of microbes. Pseudomonas putida is a paradigm of a ubiquitous metabolically versatile soil bacterium. Strain KT2440, a safety strain that has become a laboratory workhorse worldwide, has been recently sequenced and its genome annotated. By drawing on both published information and on original in silico analysis of its genome, we address here the question of what genomic features of KT2440 could explain or are consistent with its ubiquity, metabolic versatility and adaptability. The genome of KT2440 exhibits combinations of features characteristic of terrestrial, rhizosphere and aquatic bacteria, which thrive in either copiotrophic or oligotrophic habitats, and suggests that P. putida has evolved and acquired functions that equip it to thrive in diverse, often inhospitable environments, either free-living, or in close association with plants. The high diversity of protein families encoded by its genome, the large number and variety of small aralogous families, insertion elements, repetitive extragenic palindromic sequences, as well as the mosaic structure of the genome (with many regions of 'atypical' composition) and the multiplicity of mobile elements, reflect a high functional diversity in P. putida and are indicative of its evolutionary trajectory and adaptation to the diverse habitats in which it thrives. The unusual wealth of determinants for high affinity nutrient acquisition systems, mono- and di-oxygenases, oxido-reductases, ferredoxins and cytochromes, dehydrogenases, sulfur metabolism proteins, for efflux pumps and glutathione-S-transfereases, and for the extensive array of extracytoplasmatic function sigma factors, regulators, and stress response systems, constitute the genomic basis for the exceptional nutritional versatility and opportunism of P. putida , its ubiquity in diverse soil, rhizosphere and aquatic systems, and its renowned

  2. Draft genome sequence analysis of a Pseudomonas putida W15Oct28 strain with antagonistic activity to Gram-positive and Pseudomonas sp. pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lumeng; Hildebrand, Falk; Dingemans, Jozef; Ballet, Steven; Laus, George; Matthijs, Sandra; Berendsen, Roeland; Cornelis, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a member of the fluorescent pseudomonads known to produce the yellow-green fluorescent pyoverdine siderophore. P. putida W15Oct28, isolated from a stream in Brussels, was found to produce compound(s) with antimicrobial activity against the opportunistic pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, an unusual characteristic for P. putida. The active compound production only occurred in media with low iron content and without organic nitrogen sources. Transposon mutants which lost their antimicrobial activity had the majority of insertions in genes involved in the biosynthesis of pyoverdine, although purified pyoverdine was not responsible for the antagonism. Separation of compounds present in culture supernatants revealed the presence of two fractions containing highly hydrophobic molecules active against P. aeruginosa. Analysis of the draft genome confirmed the presence of putisolvin biosynthesis genes and the corresponding lipopeptides were found to contribute to the antimicrobial activity. One cluster of ten genes was detected, comprising a NAD-dependent epimerase, an acetylornithine aminotransferase, an acyl CoA dehydrogenase, a short chain dehydrogenase, a fatty acid desaturase and three genes for a RND efflux pump. P. putida W15Oct28 genome also contains 56 genes encoding TonB-dependent receptors, conferring a high capacity to utilize pyoverdines from other pseudomonads. One unique feature of W15Oct28 is also the presence of different secretion systems including a full set of genes for type IV secretion, and several genes for type VI secretion and their VgrG effectors.

  3. A Metabolic Widget Adjusts the Phosphoenolpyruvate-Dependent Fructose Influx in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Chavarría, Max; Goñi-Moreno, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fructose uptake in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida occurs through a canonical phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent sugar transport system (PTSFru). The logic of the genetic circuit that rules its functioning is puzzling: the transcription of the fruBKA operon, encoding all the components of PTSFru, can escape the repression exerted by the catabolite repressor/activator protein Cra solely in the presence of intracellular fructose-1-P, an agonist formed only when fructose has been already transported. To study this apparently incongruous regulatory architecture, the changes in the transcriptome brought about by a seamless Δcra deletion in P. putida strain KT2440 were inspected under different culture conditions. The few genes found to be upregulated in the cra mutant unexpectedly included PP_3443, encoding a bona fide glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase. An in silico model was developed to explore emergent properties that could result from such connections between sugar uptake with Cra and PEP. Simulation of fructose transport revealed that sugar uptake called for an extra supply of PEP (obtained through the activity of PP_3443) that was kept (i.e., memorized) even when the carbohydrate disappeared from the medium. This feature was traced to the action of two sequential inverters that connect the availability of exogenous fructose to intracellular PEP levels via Cra/PP_3443. The loss of such memory caused a much longer lag phase in cells shifted from one growth condition to another. The term “metabolic widget” is proposed to describe a merged biochemical and regulatory patch that tailors a given node of the cell molecular network to suit species-specific physiological needs. IMPORTANCE The regulatory nodes that govern metabolic traffic in bacteria often show connectivities that could be deemed unnecessarily complex at a first glance. Being a soil dweller and plant colonizer, Pseudomonas putida frequently encounters fructose in the niches that it

  4. In situ biosurfactant production and hydrocarbon removal by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 in bioaugmented and biostimulated oil-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ángeles, Martínez-Toledo; Refugio, Rodríguez-Vázquez

    2013-01-01

    In situ biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) production by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 was achieved during a bioaugmented and biostimulated treatment to remove hydrocarbons from aged contaminated soil from oil well drilling operations. Rhamnolipid production and contaminant removal were determined for several treatments of irradiated and non-irradiated soils: nutrient addition (nitrogen and phosphorus), P. putida addition, and addition of both (P. putida and nutrients). The results were compared against a control treatment that consisted of adding only sterilized water to the soils. In treatment with native microorganisms (non-irradiated soils) supplemented with P. putida, the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was 40.6%, the rhamnolipid production was 1.54 mg/kg, and a surface tension of 64 mN/m was observed as well as a negative correlation (R = -0.54; p < 0.019) between TPH concentration (mg/kg) and surface tension (mN/m), When both bacteria and nutrients were involved, TPH levels were lowered to 33.7%, and biosurfactant production and surface tension were 2.03 mg/kg and 67.3 mN/m, respectively. In irradiated soil treated with P. putida, TPH removal was 24.5% with rhamnolipid generation of 1.79 mg/kg and 65.6 mN/m of surface tension, and a correlation between bacterial growth and biosurfactant production (R = -0.64; p < 0.009) was observed. When the nutrients and P. putida were added, TPH removal was 61.1%, 1.85 mg/kg of biosurfactants were produced, and the surface tension was 55.6 mN/m. In summary, in irradiated and non-irradiated soils, in situ rhamnolipid production by P. putida enhanced TPH decontamination of the soil.

  5. Crude glycerol as feedstock for the sustainable production of p-hydroxybenzoate by Pseudomonas putida S12.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Suzanne; Gao, Nisi; Ruijssenaars, Harald J; de Winde, Johannes H

    2014-01-25

    Crude glycerol is a promising renewable feedstock in bioconversion processes for the production of fuels and chemicals. Impurities present in crude glycerol can however, negatively impact the fermentation process. Successful crude glycerol utilization requires robust microbial production hosts that tolerate and preferably, can utilize such impurities. We investigated utilization of crude, unpurified glycerol as a substrate for the production of aromatic compounds by solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12. In high-cell density fed-batch fermentations, P. putida S12 surprisingly performed better on crude glycerol than on purified glycerol. By contrast, growth of Escherichia coli was severely compromised under these high cell density cultivation conditions on crude glycerol. For P. putida S12 the biomass-to-substrate yield, maximum biomass production rate and substrate uptake rate were consistently higher on crude glycerol. Moreover, production of p-hydroxybenzoate by engineered P. putida S12palB5 on crude glycerol showed a 10% yield improvement over production on purified glycerol. P. putida S12 is a favorable host for bioconversion processes utilizing crude glycerol as a substrate. Its intrinsic stress-tolerance properties provide the robustness required for efficient growth and metabolism on this renewable substrate.

  6. Identification of camphor oxidation and reduction products in Pseudomonas putida: new activity of the cytochrome P450cam system.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Brinda; Rojubally, Adina; Plettner, Erika

    2011-06-01

    P450 enzymes are known for catalyzing hydroxylation reactions of non-activated C-H bonds. For example, P450(cam) from Pseudomonas putida oxidizes (1R)-(+)-camphor to 5-exo-hydroxy camphor and further to 5-ketocamphor. This hydroxylation reaction proceeds via a catalytic cycle in which the reduction of dioxygen (O(2)) is coupled to the oxidation of the substrate. We have observed that under conditions of low oxygen, P. putida and isolated P450(cam) reduce camphor to borneol. We characterized the formation of borneol under conditions of low oxygen or when the catalytic cycle is shunted by artificial oxidants like m-chloro perbenzoic acid, cumene hydroperoxide, etc. We also tested the toxicity of camphor and borneol with P. putida and Escherichia coli. We have found that in P. putida borneol is less toxic than camphor, whereas in E. coli borneol is more toxic than camphor. We discuss a potental ecological advantage of the camphor reduction reaction for P. putida.

  7. The Role of CzcRS Two-Component Systems in the Heavy Metal Resistance of Pseudomonas putida X4

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pulin; Chen, Xi; Huang, Qiaoyun; Chen, Wenli

    2015-01-01

    The role of different czcRS genes in metal resistance and the cross-link between czcRS and czcCBA in Pseudomonas putida X4 were studied to advance understanding of the mechanisms by which P. putida copes with metal stress. Similar to P. putida KT2440, two complete czcRS1 and czcRS2 two-component systems, as well as a czcR3 without the corresponding sensing component were amplified in P. putida X4. The histidine kinase genes czcS1 and czcS2 were inactivated and fused to lacZ by homologous recombination. The lacZ fusion assay revealed that Cd2+ and Zn2+ caused a decrease in the transcription of czcRS1, whereas Cd2+ treatment enhanced the transcription of czcRS2. The mutation of different czcRSs showed that all czcRSs are necessary to facilitate full metal resistance in P. putida X4. A putative gene just downstream of czcR3 is related to metal ion resistance, and its transcription was activated by Zn2+. Data from quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) strongly suggested that czcRSs regulate the expression of czcCBA, and a cross-link exists between different czcRSs. PMID:26225958

  8. The coordinate regulation of multiple terminal oxidases by the Pseudomonas putida ANR global regulator.

    PubMed

    Ugidos, Ana; Morales, Gracia; Rial, Eduardo; Williams, Huw D; Rojo, Fernando

    2008-07-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 contains a branched aerobic respiratory chain with multiple terminal oxidases. Their relative proportion varies according to environmental conditions. The role of the oxygen-responsive ANR global regulator on expression of these terminal oxidases was analysed. During exponential growth in a highly aerated complete medium, ANR activated expression of the Cbb3-1 terminal oxidase (equivalent to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cbb3-2), but had little role on expression of other terminal oxidases. In early stationary phase, or under oxygen limitation, inactivation of the anr gene led to increased expression of the bo(3)-type cytochrome (Cyo) and cyanide-insensitive (CIO) terminal oxidases, and to a much lower expression of Cbb3-1. DNase I footprints identified ANR binding sites at the promoters for these oxidases. Their location suggests that ANR is a transcriptional activator of Cbb3-1 genes and a repressor of CIO genes, consistent with expression data. ANR binding sites at the promoter for Cyo genes suggests a complex regulation in combination with other factors. Therefore, ANR coordinates expression of Cyo, CIO and Cbb3-1, but does not influence cytochrome aa3 and Cbb3-2 terminal oxidases under the conditions analysed. Functional assays showed that Cyo has a leading role during aerobic exponential growth, while Cbb3-1 becomes very important in stationary phase.

  9. Integrated foam fractionation for heterologous rhamnolipid production with recombinant Pseudomonas putida in a bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Beuker, Janina; Steier, Anke; Wittgens, Andreas; Rosenau, Frank; Henkel, Marius; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2016-03-01

    Heterologeous production of rhamnolipids in Pseudomonas putida is characterized by advantages of a non-pathogenic host and avoidance of the native quorum sensing regulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Yet, downstream processing is a major problem in rhamnolipid production and increases in complexity at low rhamnolipid titers and when using chemical foam control. This leaves the necessity of a simple concentrating and purification method. Foam fractionation is an elegant method for in situ product removal when producing microbial surfactants. However, up to now in situ foam fractionation is nearly exclusively reported for the production of surfactin with Bacillus subtilis. So far no cultivation integrated foam fractionation process for rhamnolipid production has been reported. This is probably due to excessive bacterial foam enrichment in that system. In this article a simple integrated foam fractionation process is reported for heterologous rhamnolipid production in a bioreactor with easily manageable bacterial foam enrichments. Rhamnolipids were highly concentrated in the foam during the cultivation process with enrichment factors up to 200. The described process was evaluated at different pH, media compositions and temperatures. Foam fractionation processes were characterized by calculating procedural parameter including rhamnolipid and bacterial enrichment, rhamnolipid recovery, YX/S, YP/X, and specific as well as volumetric productivities. Comparing foam fractionation parameters of the rhamnolipid process with the surfactin process a high effectiveness of the integrated foam fractionation for rhamnolipid production was demonstrated.

  10. The T7-Related Pseudomonas putida Phage ϕ15 Displays Virion-Associated Biofilm Degradation Properties

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Anneleen; Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; T'Syen, Jeroen; Van Praet, Helena; Noben, Jean-Paul; Shaburova, Olga V.; Krylov, Victor N.; Volckaert, Guido; Lavigne, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Formation of a protected biofilm environment is recognized as one of the major causes of the increasing antibiotic resistance development and emphasizes the need to develop alternative antibacterial strategies, like phage therapy. This study investigates the in vitro degradation of single-species Pseudomonas putida biofilms, PpG1 and RD5PR2, by the novel phage ϕ15, a ‘T7-like virus’ with a virion-associated exopolysaccharide (EPS) depolymerase. Phage ϕ15 forms plaques surrounded by growing opaque halo zones, indicative for EPS degradation, on seven out of 53 P. putida strains. The absence of haloes on infection resistant strains suggests that the EPS probably act as a primary bacterial receptor for phage infection. Independent of bacterial strain or biofilm age, a time and dose dependent response of ϕ15-mediated biofilm degradation was observed with generally a maximum biofilm degradation 8 h after addition of the higher phage doses (104 and 106 pfu) and resistance development after 24 h. Biofilm age, an in vivo very variable parameter, reduced markedly phage-mediated degradation of PpG1 biofilms, while degradation of RD5PR2 biofilms and ϕ15 amplification were unaffected. Killing of the planktonic culture occurred in parallel with but was always more pronounced than biofilm degradation, accentuating the need for evaluating phages for therapeutic purposes in biofilm conditions. EPS degrading activity of recombinantly expressed viral tail spike was confirmed by capsule staining. These data suggests that the addition of high initial titers of specifically selected phages with a proper EPS depolymerase are crucial criteria in the development of phage therapy. PMID:21526174

  11. Active monomeric and dimeric forms of Pseudomonas putida glyoxalase I: evidence for 3D domain swapping.

    PubMed

    Saint-Jean, A P; Phillips, K R; Creighton, D J; Stone, M J

    1998-07-21

    3D domain swapping of proteins involves the interconversion of a monomer containing a single domain-domain interface and a 2-fold symmetrical dimer containing two equivalent intermolecular interfaces. Human glyoxalase I has the structure of a domain-swapped dimer [Cameron, A. D., Olin, B., Ridderström, M., Mannervik, B., and Jones, T. A. (1997) EMBO J. 16, 3386-3395] but Pseudomonas putida glyoxalase I has been reported to be monomeric [Rhee, H.-I., Murata, K., and Kimura, A. (1986) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 141, 993-999]. We show here that recombinant P. putida glyoxalase I is an active dimer (kcat approximately 500 +/- 100 s-1; KM approximately 0.4 +/- 0.2 mM) with two zinc ions per dimer. The zinc is required for structure and function. However, treatment of the dimer with glutathione yields an active monomer (kcat approximately 115 +/- 40 s-1; KM approximately 1.4 +/- 0.4 mM) containing a single zinc ion. The monomer is metastable and slowly reverts to the active dimer in the absence of glutathione. Thus, glyoxalase I appears to be a novel example of a single protein able to exist in two alternative domain-swapped forms. It is unique among domain-swapped proteins in that the active site and an essential metal binding site are apparently disassembled and reassembled by the process of domain swapping. Furthermore, it is the only example to date in which 3D domain swapping can be regulated by a small organic ligand.

  12. Proteomics reveals a core molecular response of Pseudomonas putida F1 to acute chromate challenge

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas putida is a model organism for bioremediation because of its remarkable metabolic versatility, extensive biodegradative functions, and ubiquity in contaminated soil environments. To further the understanding of molecular pathways responding to the heavy metal chromium(VI) [Cr(VI)], the proteome of aerobically grown, Cr(VI)-stressed P. putida strain F1 was characterized within the context of two disparate nutritional environments: rich (LB) media and minimal (M9L) media containing lactate as the sole carbon source. Results Growth studies demonstrated that F1 sensitivity to Cr(VI) was impacted substantially by nutrient conditions, with a carbon-source-dependent hierarchy (lactate > glucose >> acetate) observed in minimal media. Two-dimensional HPLC-MS/MS was employed to identify differential proteome profiles generated in response to 1 mM chromate under LB and M9L growth conditions. The immediate response to Cr(VI) in LB-grown cells was up-regulation of proteins involved in inorganic ion transport, secondary metabolite biosynthesis and catabolism, and amino acid metabolism. By contrast, the chromate-responsive proteome derived under defined minimal growth conditions was characterized predominantly by up-regulated proteins related to cell envelope biogenesis, inorganic ion transport, and motility. TonB-dependent siderophore receptors involved in ferric iron acquisition and amino acid adenylation domains characterized up-regulated systems under LB-Cr(VI) conditions, while DNA repair proteins and systems scavenging sulfur from alternative sources (e.g., aliphatic sulfonates) tended to predominate the up-regulated proteome profile obtained under M9L-Cr(VI) conditions. Conclusions Comparative analysis indicated that the core molecular response to chromate, irrespective of the nutritional conditions tested, comprised seven up-regulated proteins belonging to six different functional categories including transcription, inorganic ion transport

  13. The Regulation of para-Nitrophenol Degradation in Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiongzhen; Tu, Hui; Luo, Xue; Zhang, Biying; Huang, Fei; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Jue; Shen, Wenjing; Wu, Jiale; Cui, Zhongli

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4 can efficiently degrade para-nitrophenol and its intermediate metabolite hydroquinone. The regulation of para-nitrophenol degradation was studied, and PNP induced a global change in the transcriptome of P. putida DLL-E4. When grown on PNP, the wild-type strain exhibited significant downregulation of 2912 genes and upregulation of 845 genes, whereas 2927 genes were downregulated and 891 genes upregulated in a pnpR-deleted strain. Genes related to two non-coding RNAs (ins1 and ins2), para-nitrophenol metabolism, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the outer membrane porin OprB, glucose dehydrogenase Gcd, and carbon catabolite repression were significantly upregulated when cells were grown on para-nitrophenol plus glucose. pnpA, pnpR, pnpC1C2DECX1X2, and pnpR1 are key genes in para-nitrophenol degradation, whereas pnpAb and pnpC1bC2bDbEbCbX1bX2b have lost the ability to degrade para-nitrophenol. Multiple components including transcriptional regulators and other unknown factors regulate para-nitrophenol degradation, and the transcriptional regulation of para-nitrophenol degradation is complex. Glucose utilization was enhanced at early stages of para-nitrophenol supplementation. However, it was inhibited after the total consumption of para-nitrophenol. The addition of glucose led to a significant enhancement in para-nitrophenol degradation and up-regulation in the expression of genes involved in para-nitrophenol degradation and carbon catabolite repression (CCR). It seemed that para-nitrophenol degradation can be regulated by CCR, and relief of CCR might contribute to enhanced para-nitrophenol degradation. In brief, the regulation of para-nitrophenol degradation seems to be controlled by multiple factors and requires further study.

  14. The functional structure of central carbon metabolism in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Sudarsan, Suresh; Dethlefsen, Sarah; Blank, Lars M; Siemann-Herzberg, Martin; Schmid, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    What defines central carbon metabolism? The classic textbook scheme of central metabolism includes the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway of glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the citric acid cycle. The prevalence of this definition of central metabolism is, however, equivocal without experimental validation. We address this issue using a general experimental approach that combines the monitoring of transcriptional and metabolic flux changes between steady states on alternative carbon sources. This approach is investigated by using the model bacterium Pseudomonas putida with glucose, fructose, and benzoate as carbon sources. The catabolic reactions involved in the initial uptake and metabolism of these substrates are expected to show a correlated change in gene expressions and metabolic fluxes. However, there was no correlation for the reactions linking the 12 biomass precursor molecules, indicating a regulation mechanism other than mRNA synthesis for central metabolism. This result substantiates evidence for a (re)definition of central carbon metabolism including all reactions that are bound to tight regulation and transcriptional invariance. Contrary to expectations, the canonical Entner-Doudoroff and EMP pathways sensu stricto are not a part of central carbon metabolism in P. putida, as they are not regulated differently from the aromatic degradation pathway. The regulatory analyses presented here provide leads on a qualitative basis to address the use of alternative carbon sources by deregulation and overexpression at the transcriptional level, while rate improvements in central carbon metabolism require careful adjustment of metabolite concentrations, as regulation resides to a large extent in posttranslational and/or metabolic regulation.

  15. The Regulation of para-Nitrophenol Degradation in Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiongzhen; Tu, Hui; Luo, Xue; Zhang, Biying; Huang, Fei; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Jue; Shen, Wenjing; Wu, Jiale; Cui, Zhongli

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4 can efficiently degrade para-nitrophenol and its intermediate metabolite hydroquinone. The regulation of para-nitrophenol degradation was studied, and PNP induced a global change in the transcriptome of P. putida DLL-E4. When grown on PNP, the wild-type strain exhibited significant downregulation of 2912 genes and upregulation of 845 genes, whereas 2927 genes were downregulated and 891 genes upregulated in a pnpR-deleted strain. Genes related to two non-coding RNAs (ins1 and ins2), para-nitrophenol metabolism, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the outer membrane porin OprB, glucose dehydrogenase Gcd, and carbon catabolite repression were significantly upregulated when cells were grown on para-nitrophenol plus glucose. pnpA, pnpR, pnpC1C2DECX1X2, and pnpR1 are key genes in para-nitrophenol degradation, whereas pnpAb and pnpC1bC2bDbEbCbX1bX2b have lost the ability to degrade para-nitrophenol. Multiple components including transcriptional regulators and other unknown factors regulate para-nitrophenol degradation, and the transcriptional regulation of para-nitrophenol degradation is complex. Glucose utilization was enhanced at early stages of para-nitrophenol supplementation. However, it was inhibited after the total consumption of para-nitrophenol. The addition of glucose led to a significant enhancement in para-nitrophenol degradation and up-regulation in the expression of genes involved in para-nitrophenol degradation and carbon catabolite repression (CCR). It seemed that para-nitrophenol degradation can be regulated by CCR, and relief of CCR might contribute to enhanced para-nitrophenol degradation. In brief, the regulation of para-nitrophenol degradation seems to be controlled by multiple factors and requires further study. PMID:27191401

  16. Physiological and transcriptomic characterization of a fliA mutant of Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Herva, José Juan; Duque, Estrella; Molina-Henares, María Antonia; Navarro-Avilés, Gloria; Van Dillewijn, Pieter; De La Torre, Jesús; Molina-Henares, Antonio J; La Campa, Ana Sánchez-de; Ran, F Ann; Segura, Ana; Shingler, Victoria; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2010-06-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 encodes 23 alternative sigma factors. The fliA gene, which encodes σ(28) , is in a cluster with other genes involved in flagella biosynthesis and chemotaxis. Reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed that this cluster is comprised of four independent transcriptional units: flhAF, fleNfliA, cheYZA and cheBmotAB. We generated a nonpolar fliA mutant by homologous recombination and tested its motility, adhesion to biotic and abiotic surfaces, and responses to various stress conditions. The mutant strain was nonmotile and exhibited decreased capacity to bind to corn seeds, although its ability to colonize the rhizosphere of plants was unaffected. The mutant was also affected in binding to abiotic surfaces and its ability to form biofilms decreased by almost threefold. In the fliA mutant background expression of 25 genes was affected: two genes were upregulated and 23 genes were downregulated. In addition to a number of motility and chemotaxis genes, the fliA gene product is also necessary for the expression of some genes potentially involved in amino acid utilization or stress responses; however, we were unable to assign specific phenotypes linked to these genes since the fliA mutant used the same range of amino acids as the parental strain, and was as tolerant as the wild type to stress imposed by heat, antibiotics, NaCl, sodium dodecyl sulfate, H2 O2 and benzoate. Based on the sequence alignment of promoters recognized by FliA and genome in silico analysis, we propose that P. putidaσ(28) recognizes a TCAAG-t-N12 -GCCGATA consensus sequence located between -34 and -8 and that this sequence is preferentially associated with an AT-rich upstream region.

  17. Potential of Pseudomonas putida PCI2 for the Protection of Tomato Plants Against Fungal Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Nicolás; Masciarelli, Oscar; Fischer, Sonia; Luna, Virginia; Rovera, Marisa

    2016-09-01

    Tomato is one of the most economically attractive vegetable crops due to its high yields. Diseases cause significant losses in tomato production worldwide. We carried out Polymerase Chain Reaction studies to detect the presence of genes encoding antifungal compounds in the DNA of Pseudomonas putida strain PCI2. We also used liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry to detect and quantify the production of compounds that increase the resistance of plants to diseases from culture supernatants of PCI2. In addition, we investigated the presence of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase in PCI2. Finally, PCI2 was used for inoculation of tomato seeds to study its potential biocontrol activity against Fusarium oxysporum MR193. The obtained results showed that no fragments for the encoding genes of hydrogen cyanide, pyoluteorin, 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, pyrrolnitrin, or phenazine-1-carboxylic acid were amplified from the DNA of PCI2. On the other hand, PCI2 produced salicylic acid and jasmonic acid in Luria-Bertani medium and grew in a culture medium containing ACC as the sole nitrogen source. We observed a reduction in disease incidence from 53.33 % in the pathogen control to 30 % in tomato plants pre-inoculated with PCI2 as well as increases in shoot and root dry weights in inoculated plants, as compared to the pathogenicity control. This study suggests that inoculation of tomato seeds with P. putida PCI2 increases the resistance of plants to root rot caused by F. oxysporum and that PCI2 produces compounds that may be involved at different levels in increasing such resistance. Thus, PCI2 could represent a non-contaminating management strategy potentially applicable in vegetable crops such as tomato.

  18. Structures and characteristics of novel siderophores from plant deleterious Pseudomonas fluorescens A225 and Pseudomonas putida ATCC 39167.

    PubMed

    Khalil-Rizvi, S; Toth, S I; van der Helm, D; Vidavsky, I; Gross, M L

    1997-04-08

    When Pseudomonas putida ATCC 39167 and plant-deleterious Pseudomonas fluorescens A225 were grown in an iron-deficient culture medium, they each produced two different novel yellow-green fluorescent pseudobactins: P39167-I, II and PA225-I, II. Pseudobactin P39167-I has a molecular formula of C46H65O23N13 and is monoanionic at neutral pH. P39167-II has the molecular formula of C46H63O22N13 and no charge at neutral pH. Pseudobactin PA225-I has a molecular formula of C46H65O24N13 and is monoanionic at neutral pH whereas pseudobactin PA225-II has the molecular formula of C46H63O23N13 and no charge at neutral pH. All four of the pseudobactins contain a dihydroxyquinoline-based chromophore. The amino acid sequence for the octapeptide in case of pseudobactins from P. putida ATCC 39167 is Chr-Ser(1)-Ala(1)-AcOHOrn-Gly-Ala(2)-OHAsp-Ser(2)-Thr. In case of pseudobactins from P. fluorescens A225, the octapeptide has the sequence Chr-Ser(1)-Ala-AcOHOrn-Gly-Ser(2)-OHAsp-Ser(3)-Thr. For all four pseudobactins (P39167-I, II and PA225-I, II), the serine(1) residue of the octapeptide is attached to the carboxylic acid group on the C-11 of the fluorescent quinoline via an amide bond. Additionally, for pseudobactin P39167-II and PA225-II, the hydroxyl group of the serine(1) residue is also attached to the carboxyl group of threonine residue at the carboxy terminus of the peptide via an ester bond, resulting in a cyclic depsipeptide in contrast to the linear peptide chain of P39167-I and PA225-I. For all four pseudobactins, a malamide group is attached to the C-3 of the quinoline derived chromophore. The three bidentate iron(III) chelating groups in all four pseudobactins consist of a 1,2-dihydroxy aromatic group of the fluorescent chromophore, a hydroxy acid group of beta-hydroxy aspartic acid, and a hydroxamate group from the acylated Ndelta-hydroxyornithine. The amino acid constituents of the pseudobactins P39167 I, II are the same as those in pseudobactin A214, whereas those in A225

  19. Decolorization of industrial synthetic dyes using engineered Pseudomonas putida cells with surface-immobilized bacterial laccase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Microbial laccases are highly useful in textile effluent dye biodegradation. However, the bioavailability of cellularly expressed or purified laccases in continuous operations is usually limited by mass transfer impediment or enzyme regeneration difficulty. Therefore, this study develops a regenerable bacterial surface-displaying system for industrial synthetic dye decolorization, and evaluates its effects on independent and continuous operations. Results A bacterial laccase (WlacD) was engineered onto the cell surface of the solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida to construct a whole-cell biocatalyst. Ice nucleation protein (InaQ) anchor was employed, and the ability of 1 to 3 tandemly aligned N-terminal repeats to direct WlacD display were compared. Immobilized WlacD was determined to be surface-displayed in functional form using Western blot analysis, immunofluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and whole-cell enzymatic activity assay. Engineered P. putida cells were then applied to decolorize the anthraquinone dye Acid Green (AG) 25 and diazo-dye Acid Red (AR) 18. The results showed that decolorization of both dyes is Cu2+- and mediator-independent, with an optimum temperature of 35°C and pH of 3.0, and can be stably performed across a temperature range of 15°C to 45°C. A high activity toward AG25 (1 g/l) with relative decolorization values of 91.2% (3 h) and 97.1% (18 h), as well as high activity to AR18 (1 g/l) by 80.5% (3 h) and 89.0% (18 h), was recorded. The engineered system exhibited a comparably high activity compared with those of separate dyes in a continuous three-round shake-flask decolorization of AG25/AR18 mixed dye (each 1 g/l). No significant decline in decolorization efficacy was noted during first two-rounds but reaction equilibriums were elongated, and the residual laccase activity eventually decreased to low levels. However, the decolorizing capacity of the system was easily retrieved via a subsequent 4-h

  20. Effects of Cobalt on Manganese Oxidation by Pseudomonas putida MnB1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, J.; Bargar, J.; Sposito, G.

    2005-12-01

    The oxidation of Mn(II) in the environment is thought to occur predominantly through biologically mediated pathways. During the stationary phase of growth, the well-characterized freshwater and soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida MnB1 oxidizes soluble Mn(II) to a poorly crystalline layer type Mn(IV) oxide. These Mn oxide particles (2 - 5 nm thickness) are deposited in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) surrounding the cell, creating a multi-component system distinct from commonly studied synthetic Mn oxides. Accurate characterization of the reactivity of these biomineral assemblages is essential to understanding trace metal biogeochemistry in natural waters and sediments. Moreover, these biogenic oxides may potentially be used for the remediation of surface and ground waters impacted by mining, industrial pollution, and other anthropogenic activities. In this study, we consider the interactions between Co, P. putida MnB1, and its biogenic Mn oxide. Cobalt is a redox-active transition metal which exists in the environment as Co(II) and Co(III). While Co is not generally found in the environment at toxic concentrations, it may be released as a byproduct of mining activities (e.g. levels of up to 20 μM are found in Pinal Creek, AZ, a stream affected by copper mining). In addition, the radionuclide 60Co, formed by neutron activation in nuclear reactors, is of concern at Department of Energy sites, such as that at Hanford, and has several industrial applications, including radiotherapy. We address the following questions: Do high levels of Co inhibit enzymatic processes such as Mn(II) oxidation? Can the multicopper oxidase enzyme involved in Mn(II) oxidation facilitate Co(II) oxidation? Lastly, does the organic matter surrounding the oxides affect Co or Mn oxide reactivity? These issues were approached via wet chemical analysis, synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. In the

  1. Comparative proteomic analysis reveals mechanistic insights into Pseudomonas putida F1 growth on benzoate and citrate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas species are capable to proliferate under diverse environmental conditions and thus have a significant bioremediation potential. To enhance our understanding of their metabolic versatility, this study explores the changes in the proteome and physiology of Pseudomonas putida F1 resulting from its growth on benzoate, a moderate toxic compound that can be catabolized, and citrate, a carbon source that is assimilated through central metabolic pathways. A series of repetitive batch cultivations were performed to ensure a complete adaptation of the bacteria to each of these contrasting carbon sources. After several growth cycles, cell growth stabilized at the maximum level and exhibited a reproducible growth profile. The specific growth rates measured for benzoate (1.01 ± 0.11 h-1) and citrate (1.11 ± 0.12 h-1) were similar, while a higher yield was observed for benzoate (0.6 and 0.3 g cell mass per g of benzoate and citrate, respectively), reflecting the different degrees of carbon reduction in the two substrates. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed an enrichment of several oxygenases/dehydrogenases in benzoate-grown cells, indicative of the higher carbon reduction of benzoate. Moreover, the upregulation of all 14 proteins implicated in benzoate degradation via the catechol ortho-cleavage pathway was observed, while several stress-response proteins were increased to aid cells to cope with benzoate toxicity. Unexpectedly, citrate posed more challenges than benzoate in the maintenance of pH homeostasis, as indicated by the enhancement of the Na+/H+ antiporter and carbonic anhydrase. The study provides important mechanistic insights into Pseudomonas adaptation to varying carbon sources that are of great relevance to bioremediation efforts. PMID:24156539

  2. Simultaneous chromium reduction and phenol degradation in a coculture of Escherichia coli ATCC 33456 and Pseudomonas putida DMP-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Hai; Wang, Yi-Tin

    1995-07-01

    In a defined coculture of a Cr(VI) reducer, Escherichia coli ATCC 33456, and a phenol degrader, Pseudomonas putida DMP-1, simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) and degradation of phenol was observed. When Cr(VI) was present in the coculture, quantitative transformation of Cr(VI) into Cr(III) proceeded with simultaneous degradation of phenol. Cr(VI) reduction was correlated to phenol degradation in the coculture as demonstrated by a regression analysis of the cumulative Cr(VI) reduction and the cumulative phenol degradation. Both the rate and extent of Cr(VI) reduction and phenol degradation were significantly influenced by the population composition of the coculture. Although Cr(VI) reduction occurred as a result of E. coli metabolism, the rate of phenol degradation by P. putida may become a rate-limiting factor for Cr(VI) reduction at a low population ratio of P. putida to E. coli. Phenol degradation by P. putida was very susceptible to the presence of Cr(VI), whereas Cr(VI) reduction by E. coli was significantly influenced by phenol only when phenol was present at high concentrations (>9 mM). 32 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Microbial dechlorination of chloroorganics and simultaneous decolorization of pulp-paper mill effluent by Pseudomonas putida MTCC 10510 augmentation.

    PubMed

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Kumar, Shailendra; Singh, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Sanjay Kumar

    2012-09-01

    The physicochemical analyses of pulp-paper mill effluent revealed that it was dark brown with 1761 ± 2.3 color PtCo units having slightly alkaline pH, high biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand values, and contained large quantities of organic and inorganic constituents, well above the prescribed standards. The bacterial growth, color reduction, and dechlorination were evident in all the four sets of experiments with different possible combinations of nutrient supplementation and Pseudomonas putida augmentation. A high degree of decolorization at 29.7% and 27.4% was observed by the effluent native microflora during 48 and 24 h, in unaugmented effluent supplemented with glucose + yeast extract and glucose + peptone, respectively. The extent of decolorization in glucose + yeast extract unaugmented effluent also corresponded with high degree of dechlorination (59.3%) during 60-h incubation (SET III). An appreciable level of growth, decolorization, and dechlorination was evident in nutrient unsupplemented P. putida augmented effluent as well as in the control natural effluent. However, a maximum level of growth response (OD 1.641-1.902) during 36-48 h, removal of color (39.72-48.2%) during 24-36 h, and chloride ions (80.1-83.5%) during 36 h was achieved in P. putida augmented effluent supplemented with glucose + yeast extract or peptone. Therefore, supplementation of effluent with glucose and yeast extract or peptone and concomitant augmentation with P. putida is required for efficient effluent decolorization and detoxification.

  4. [Stability of the NPL-1 and NPL-41 plasmids of naphthalene biodegradation in Pseudomonas putida populations in continuous culture].

    PubMed

    Boronin, A M; Filonov, A E; Balakshina, V V; Kulakova, A N

    1985-01-01

    The stability of biodegradation plasmids NPL-1 and NPL-41, which control the synthesis of enzymes for naphthalene oxidation to salicylate, was studied in Pseudomonas putida BSA under the conditions of its continuous cultivation with limitation in glucose or salicylate in the chemostat regime and without limitation in the pH-stat regime. Plasmid NPL-1, which controls the inducible synthesis of naphthalene oxygenase, is stable in the population of P. putida cells under the conditions of continuous cultivation on glucose, but is not stable in the course of cultivation on salicylate, an inductor of the naphthalene oxygenase synthesis. Plasmid NPL-41, which controls the constitutive synthesis of naphthalene oxygenase, is not stable in the population of P. putida cells under the conditions of continuous cultivation on glucose. The operation of genes, which control the oxidation of naphthalene to salicylate (nah), makes plasmids NPL-1 and NPL-41 unstable under the conditions of continuous cultivation in the absence of naphthalene from the medium, i.e. under the conditions when the expression of these genes is not necessary. In that case, cells containing plasmids with a deletion of nah-genes as well as cells without plasmids appear in the population of P. putida, which causes a decline in its futile energy and metabolic processes.

  5. Engineering Pseudomonas putida KT2440 for simultaneous degradation of organophosphates and pyrethroids and its application in bioremediation of soil.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhenqiang; Gong, Ting; Che, You; Liu, Ruihua; Xu, Ping; Jiang, Hong; Qiao, Chuanling; Song, Cunjiang; Yang, Chao

    2015-06-01

    Agricultural soils are usually co-contaminated with organophosphate (OP) and pyrethroid pesticides. To develop a stable and marker-free Pseudomonas putida for co-expression of two pesticide-degrading enzymes, we constructed a suicide plasmid with expression cassettes containing a constitutive promoter J23119, an OP-degrading gene (mpd), a pyrethroid-hydrolyzing carboxylesterase gene (pytH) that utilizes the upp gene as a counter-selectable marker for upp-deficient P. putida. By introduction of suicide plasmid and two-step homologous recombination, both mpd and pytH genes were integrated into the chromosome of a robust soil bacterium P. putida KT2440 and no selection marker was left on chromosome. Functional expression of mpd and pytH in P. putida KT2440 was demonstrated by Western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays. Degradation experiments with liquid cultures showed that the mixed pesticides including methyl parathion, fenitrothion, chlorpyrifos, permethrin, fenpropathrin, and cypermethrin (0.2 mM each) were degraded completely within 48 h. The inoculation of engineered strain (10(6) cells/g) to soils treated with the above mixed pesticides resulted in a higher degradation rate than in noninoculated soils. All six pesticides could be degraded completely within 15 days in fumigated and nonfumigated soils with inoculation. Theses results highlight the potential of the engineered strain to be used for in situ bioremediation of soils co-contaminated with OP and pyrethroid pesticides.

  6. Cloning and high-level expression of the glutathione-independent formaldehyde dehydrogenase gene from Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, K; Takahashi, M; Yoshimoto, T; Tsuru, D

    1994-01-01

    A DNA fragment of 485 bp was specifically amplified by PCR with primers based on the N-terminal sequence of the purified formaldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.46) from Pseudomonas putida and on that of a cyanogen bromide-derived peptide. With this product as a probe, a gene coding for formaldehyde dehydrogenase (fdhA) in P. putida chromosomal DNA was cloned in Escherichia coli DH5 alpha. Sequencing analysis revealed that the fdhA gene contained 1,197-bp open reading frame, encoding a protein composed of 399 amino acid residues whose calculated molecular weight was 42,082. The transformant of E. coli DH5 alpha harboring the hybrid plasmid, pFDHK3DN71, showed about 50-fold-higher formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity than P. putida. The predicted amino acid sequence contained several features characteristic of the zinc-containing medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) family. Most of the glycine residues strictly conserved within the family, including a Gly-Xaa-Gly-Xaa-Xaa-Gly pattern in the coenzyme binding domain, were well conserved in this enzyme. Regions around both the catalytic and the structural zinc atoms were also conserved. Analyses of structural and enzymatic characteristics indicated that P. putida FDH belongs to the medium-chain ADH family, with mixed properties of mammalian class I and III ADHs. Images PMID:8169197

  7. Structural and kinetic characterization of recombinant 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida G7.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Simara Semíramis de; Neves, Cíntia Mara Leal; Guimarães, Samuel Leite; Whitman, Christian P; Johnson, William H; Aparicio, Ricardo; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto

    2015-08-01

    The first enzyme in the oxalocrotonate branch of the naphthalene-degradation lower pathway in Pseudomonas putida G7 is NahI, a 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase which converts 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde to 2-hydroxymuconate in the presence of NAD(+). NahI is in family 8 (ALDH8) of the NAD(P)(+)-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase superfamily. In this work, we report the cloning, expression, purification and preliminary structural and kinetic characterization of the recombinant NahI. The nahI gene was subcloned into a T7 expression vector and the enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli ArcticExpress as a hexa-histidine-tagged fusion protein. After purification by affinity and size-exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments were conducted to analyze the oligomeric state and the overall shape of the enzyme in solution. The protein is a tetramer in solution and has nearly perfect 222 point group symmetry. Protein stability and secondary structure content were evaluated by a circular dichroism spectroscopy assay under different thermal conditions. Furthermore, kinetic assays were conducted and, for the first time, KM (1.3±0.3μM) and kcat (0.9s(-1)) values were determined at presumed NAD(+) saturation. NahI is highly specific for its biological substrate and has no activity with salicylaldehyde, another intermediate in the naphthalene-degradation pathway.

  8. Effect of silver nanoparticles on Pseudomonas putida biofilms at different stages of maturity.

    PubMed

    Thuptimdang, Pumis; Limpiyakorn, Tawan; McEvoy, John; Prüß, Birgit M; Khan, Eakalak

    2015-06-15

    This study determined the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on Pseudomonas putida KT2440 biofilms at different stages of maturity. Three biofilm stages (1-3, representing early to late stages of development) were identified from bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) activity under static (96-well plate) and dynamic conditions (Center for Disease Control and Prevention biofilm reactor). Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) levels, measured using crystal violet and total carbohydrate assays, and expression of the EPS-associated genes, csgA and alg8, supported the conclusion that biofilms at later stages were older than those at earlier stages. More mature biofilms (stages 2 and 3) showed little to no reduction in ATP activity following exposure to AgNPs. In contrast, the same treatment reduced ATP activity by more than 90% in the less mature stage 1 biofilms. Regardless of maturity, biofilms with EPS stripped off were more susceptible to AgNPs than controls with intact EPS, demonstrating that EPS is critical for biofilm tolerance of AgNPs. The findings from this study show that stage of maturity is an important factor to consider when studying effect of AgNPs on biofilms.

  9. An improved procedure for the purification of catalytically active alkane hydroxylase from Pseudomonas putida GPo1.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meng; Alonso, Hernan; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2011-10-01

    Bacterial alkane hydroxylases are of high interest for bioremediation applications as they allow some bacteria to grow in oil-contaminated environments. Furthermore, they have tremendous biotechnological potential as they catalyse the stereo- and regio-specific hydroxylation of chemically inert alkanes, which can then be used in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other high-cost chemicals. Despite their potential, progress on the detailed characterization of these systems has so far been slow mainly due to the lack of a robust procedure to purify its membrane protein component, monooxygenase AlkB, in a stable and active form. This study reports a new method for isolating milligramme amounts of recombinant Pseudomonas putida GPo1 AlkB in a folded, catalytically active form to purity levels above 90%. AlkB solubilised and purified in the detergent lauryldimethylamine oxide was demonstrated to be active in catalysing the epoxidation reaction of 1-octene with an estimated K (m) value of 0.2 mM.

  10. Functional analysis of aromatic biosynthetic pathways in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    Molina‐Henares, M. Antonia; García‐Salamanca, Adela; Molina‐Henares, A. Jesús; De La Torre, Jesús; Herrera, M. Carmen; Ramos, Juan L.; Duque, Estrella

    2009-01-01

    Summary Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a non‐pathogenic prototrophic bacterium with high potential for biotechnological applications. Despite all that is known about this strain, the biosynthesis of essential chemicals has not been fully analysed and auxotroph mutants are scarce. We carried out massive mini‐Tn5 random mutagenesis and screened for auxotrophs that require aromatic amino acids. The biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids was analysed in detail including physical and transcriptional organization of genes, complementation assays and feeding experiments to establish pathway intermediates. There is a single pathway from chorismate leading to the biosynthesis of tryptophan, whereas the biosynthesis of phenylalanine and tyrosine is achieved through multiple convergent pathways. Genes for tryptophan biosynthesis are grouped in unlinked regions with the trpBA and trpGDE genes organized as operons and the trpI, trpE and trpF genes organized as single transcriptional units. The pheA and tyrA gene‐encoding multifunctional enzymes for phenylalanine and tyrosine biosynthesis are linked in the chromosome and form an operon with the serC gene involved in serine biosynthesis. The last step in the biosynthesis of these two amino acids requires an amino transferase activity for which multiple tyrB‐like genes are present in the host chromosome. PMID:21261884

  11. Structural and mechanistic insight into alkane hydroxylation by Pseudomonas putida AlkB.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Hernan; Kleifeld, Oded; Yeheskel, Adva; Ong, Poh C; Liu, Yu C; Stok, Jeanette E; De Voss, James J; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2014-06-01

    Pseudomonas putida GPo1 alkane hydroxylase (AlkB) is an integral membrane protein that catalyses the hydroxylation of medium-chain alkanes (C3-C12). 1-Octyne irreversibly inhibits this non-haem di-iron mono-oxygenase under turnover conditions, suggesting that it acts as a mechanism-based inactivator. Upon binding to the active site, 1-octyne is postulated to be oxidized to an oxirene that rapidly rearranges to a reactive ketene which covalently acylates nearby residues, resulting in enzyme inactivation. In analysis of inactivated AlkB by LC-MS/MS, several residues exhibited a mass increase of 126.1 Da, corresponding to the octanoyl moiety derived from oxidative activation of 1-octyne. Mutagenesis studies of conserved acylated residues showed that Lys18 plays a critical role in enzyme function, as a single-point mutation of Lys18 to alanine (K18A) completely abolished enzymatic activity. Finally, we present a computational 3D model structure of the transmembrane domain of AlkB, which revealed the overall packing arrangement of the transmembrane helices within the lipid bilayer and the location of the active site mapped by the 1-octyne modifications.

  12. Toxicity Testing of Pristine and Aged Silver Nanoparticles in Real Wastewaters Using Bioluminescent Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Mallevre, Florian; Alba, Camille; Milne, Craig; Gillespie, Simon; Fernandes, Teresa F.; Aspray, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Impact of aging on nanoparticle toxicity in real matrices is scarcely investigated due to a lack of suitable methodologies. Herein, the toxicity of pristine and aged silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) to a bioluminescent Pseudomonas putida bioreporter was measured in spiked crude and final wastewater samples (CWs and FWs, respectively) collected from four wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Results showed lower toxicity of pristine Ag NPs in CWs than in FWs. The effect of the matrix on the eventual Ag NP toxicity was related to multiple physico-chemical parameters (biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solids (TSS) pH, ammonia, sulfide and chloride) based on a multivariate analysis. However, no collection site effect was concluded. Aged Ag NPs (up to eight weeks) were found less toxic than pristine Ag NPs in CWs; evident increased aggregation and decreased dissolution were associated with aging. However, Ag NPs exhibited consistent toxicity in FWs despite aging; comparable results were obtained in artificial wastewater (AW) simulating effluent. The study demonstrates the potency of performing nanoparticle acute toxicity testing in real and complex matrices such as wastewaters using relevant bacterial bioreporters. PMID:28344306

  13. Characterization of a plasmid-specified pathway for catabolism of isopropylbenzene in Pseudomonas putida RE204

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, R.W.; Timmis, K.N.

    1986-10-01

    A Pseudomonas putida strain designated RE204, able to utilize isopropylbenzene as the sole carbon and energy source, was isolated. Tn5 transposon mutagenesis by means of the suicide transposon donor plasmid pLG221 yielded mutant derivatives defective in isopropylbenzene metabolism. These were characterized by the identification of the products which they accumulated when grown in the presence of isopropylbenzene and by the assay of enzyme activities in cell extracts. Based on the results obtained, the following metabolic pathway is proposed: isopropylbenzene ..-->.. 2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxyisopropylbenzene ..-->.. 3-isopropylcatechol ..-->.. 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-7-methylocta-2,4-dienoate ..-->.. isobutyrate + 2-oxopent-4-enoate ..-->.. amphibolic intermediates. Plasmid DNA was isolated from strain RE204 and mutant derivatives and characterized by restriction enzyme cleavage analysis. Isopropylbenzene-negative isolates carried a Tn5 insert within a 15-kilobase region of a 105-kilobase plasmid designated pRE4. DNA fragments of pRE4 carrying genes encoding isopropylbenzene catabolic enzymes were cloned in Escherichia coli with various plasmid vectors. These clones were subsequently used to generate a transposon insertion and restriction enzyme cleavage map of the isopropylbenzene metabolic region of pRE4.

  14. Suicide inactivation of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 by 3-halocatechols

    SciTech Connect

    Bartels, I.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Reineke, W.

    1984-03-01

    The inactivation of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 by 3-chloro- and 3-fluorocatechol and the iron-chelating agent Tiron (catechol-3,5-disulfonate) was studied. Whereas inactivation by Tiron is an oxygen-independent and mostly reversible process, inactivation by the 3-halocatechols was only observed in the presence of oxygen and was largely irreversible. The rate constants for inactivation (K/sub 2/) were 1.62 x 10/sup -3/ sec/sup -1/ for 3-chlorocatechol and 2.38 x 10/sup -3/ sec/sup -1/ for 3-fluorocatechol. The inhibitor constants (K/sub i/) were 23 ..mu..M for 3-chlorocatechol and 17 ..mu..M for 3-fluorocatechol. The kinetic data for 3-fluorocatechol could only be obtained in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. Besides inactivated enzyme, some 2-hydroxyhexa-2,4-dienoic acid as the actual suicide product of meta-cleavage. A side product of 3-fluorocatechol cleavage is a yellow compound with the spectral characteristics of a 2-hydroxy-6-oxohexa-2,4-dienoci acid indicating 1,6-cleavage. Rates of inactivation by 3-fluorocatechol were reduced in the presence of superoxide dismutase, catalase, formate, and mannitol, which implies that superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical exhibit additional inactivation. 64 references.

  15. Electricity generation and wastewater treatment of oil refinery in microbial fuel cells using Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Dip; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Tseng, Min-Jen; Nimje, Vanita Roshan; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chang, Young-Fo; Yang, Tsui-Chu; Chen, Chen-Yen

    2014-09-22

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a novel platform for treating wastewater and at the same time generating electricity. Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059), a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days. Our study indicated that the oil refinery wastewater containing 2213 mg/L (ppm) chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be used as a substrate for electricity generation in the reactor of the MFC. A maximum voltage of 355 mV was obtained with the highest power density of 0.005 mW/cm² in the third cycle with a maximum current density of 0.015 mA/cm² in regard to the external resistor of 1000 Ω. A maximum coulombic efficiency of 6 × 10⁻²% was obtained in the fourth cycle. The removal efficiency of the COD reached 30% as a function of time. Electron transfer mechanism was studied using cyclic voltammetry, which indicated the presence of a soluble electron shuttle in the reactor. Our study demonstrated that oil refinery wastewater could be used as a substrate for electricity generation.

  16. Synergistic effect of Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ameliorates drought stress in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Mishra, Sankalp; Dixit, Vijaykant; Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Lalit; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Two plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) Pseudomonas putida NBRIRA and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NBRISN13 with ability to tolerate abiotic stress along with multiple PGP traits like ACC deaminase activity, minerals solubilisation, hormones production, biofilm formation, siderophore activity were evaluated for their synergistic effect to ameliorate drought stress in chickpea. Earlier we have reported both the strains individually for their PGP attributes and stress amelioration in host plants. The present study explains in detail the possibilities and benefits of utilizing these 2 PGPR in consortium for improving the chickpea growth under control and drought stressed condition. In vitro results clearly demonstrate that both the PGPR strains are compatible to each other and their synergistic growth enhances the PGP attributes. Greenhouse experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of inoculation of both strains individually and consortia in drought tolerant and sensitive cultivars (BG362 and P1003). The growth parameters were observed significantly higher in consortium as compared to individual PGPR. Colonization of both PGPR in chickpea rhizosphere has been visualized by using gfp labeling. Apart from growth parameters, defense enzymes, soil enzymes and microbial diversity were significantly modulated in individually PGPR and in consortia inoculated plants. Negative effects of drought stress has been ameliorated and apparently seen by higher biomass and reversal of stress indicators in chickpea cultivars treated with PGPR individually or in consortia. Findings from the present study demonstrate that synergistic application has better potential to improve plant growth promotion under drought stress conditions.

  17. Effect of Organic Solvents on the Yield of Solvent-Tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12

    PubMed Central

    Isken, Sonja; Derks, Antoine; Wolffs, Petra F. G.; de Bont, Jan A. M.

    1999-01-01

    Solvent-tolerant microorganisms are useful in biotransformations with whole cells in two-phase solvent-water systems. The results presented here describe the effects that organic solvents have on the growth of these organisms. The maximal growth rate of Pseudomonas putida S12, 0.8 h−1, was not affected by toluene in batch cultures, but in chemostat cultures the solvent decreased the maximal growth rate by nearly 50%. Toluene, ethylbenzene, propylbenzene, xylene, hexane, and cyclohexane reduced the biomass yield, and this effect depended on the concentration of the solvent in the bacterial membrane and not on its chemical structure. The dose response to solvents in terms of yield was linear up to an approximately 200 mM concentration of solvent in the bacterial membrane, both in the wild type and in a mutant lacking an active efflux system for toluene. Above this critical concentration the yield of the wild type remained constant at 0.2 g of protein/g of glucose with increasing concentrations of toluene. The reduction of the yield in the presence of solvents is due to a maintenance higher by a factor of three or four as well as to a decrease of the maximum growth yield by 33%. Therefore, energy-consuming adaptation processes as well as the uncoupling effect of the solvents reduce the yield of the tolerant cells. PMID:10347053

  18. Complete biodegradation of chlorpyrifos by engineered Pseudomonas putida cells expressing surface-immobilized laccases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Tan, Luming; Wang, Jing; Wang, Zhiyong; Ni, Hong; Li, Lin

    2016-08-01

    The long-term abuse use of chlorpyrifos-like pesticides in agriculture and horticulture has resulted in significant soil or water contamination and a worldwide ecosystem threat. In this study, the ability of a solvent-tolerant bacterium, Pseudomonas putida MB285, with surface-displayed bacterial laccase, to biodegrade chlorpyrifos was investigated. The results of compositional analyses of the degraded products demonstrate that the engineered MB285 was capable of completely eliminating chlorpyrifos via direct biodegradation, as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assays. Two intermediate metabolites, namely 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) and diethyl phosphate, were temporarily detectable, verifying the joint and stepwise degradation of chlorpyrifos by surface laccases and certain cellular enzymes, whereas the purified free laccase incompletely degraded chlorpyrifos into TCP. The degradation reaction can be conducted over a wide range of pH values (2-7) and temperatures (5-55 °C) without the need for Cu(2+). Bioassays using Caenorhabditis elegans as an indicator organism demonstrated that the medium was completely detoxified of chlorpyrifos by degradation. Moreover, the engineered cells exhibited a high capacity of repeated degradation and good performance in continuous degradation cycles, as well as a high capacity to degrade real effluents containing chlorpyrifos. Therefore, the developed system exhibited a high degradation capacity and performance and constitutes an improved approach to address chlorpyrifos contamination in chlorpyrifos-remediation practice.

  19. Synergistic effect of Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ameliorates drought stress in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Mishra, Sankalp; Dixit, Vijaykant; Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Lalit; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Two plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) Pseudomonas putida NBRIRA and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NBRISN13 with ability to tolerate abiotic stress along with multiple PGP traits like ACC deaminase activity, minerals solubilisation, hormones production, biofilm formation, siderophore activity were evaluated for their synergistic effect to ameliorate drought stress in chickpea. Earlier we have reported both the strains individually for their PGP attributes and stress amelioration in host plants. The present study explains in detail the possibilities and benefits of utilizing these 2 PGPR in consortium for improving the chickpea growth under control and drought stressed condition. In vitro results clearly demonstrate that both the PGPR strains are compatible to each other and their synergistic growth enhances the PGP attributes. Greenhouse experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of inoculation of both strains individually and consortia in drought tolerant and sensitive cultivars (BG362 and P1003). The growth parameters were observed significantly higher in consortium as compared to individual PGPR. Colonization of both PGPR in chickpea rhizosphere has been visualized by using gfp labeling. Apart from growth parameters, defense enzymes, soil enzymes and microbial diversity were significantly modulated in individually PGPR and in consortia inoculated plants. Negative effects of drought stress has been ameliorated and apparently seen by higher biomass and reversal of stress indicators in chickpea cultivars treated with PGPR individually or in consortia. Findings from the present study demonstrate that synergistic application has better potential to improve plant growth promotion under drought stress conditions. PMID:26362119

  20. Less is more: reduced catechol production permits Pseudomonas putida F1 to grow on styrene.

    PubMed

    George, Kevin W; Hay, Anthony

    2012-11-01

    Pseudomonas putida F1 is unable to grow on styrene due to the accumulation of 3-vinylcatechol, a toxic metabolite that is produced through the toluene degradation (tod) pathway and causes catechol-2,3-dioxygenase (C23O) inactivation. In this study, we characterized a spontaneous F1 mutant, designated SF1, which acquired the ability to grow on styrene and did not accumulate 3-vinylcatechol. Whereas adaptation to new aromatic substrates has typically been shown to involve increased C23O activity or the acquisition of resistance to C23O inactivation, SF1 retained wild-type C23O activity. Surprisingly, SF1 grew more slowly on toluene, its native substrate, and exhibited reduced toluene dioxygenase (TDO) activity (approximately 50 % of that of F1), the enzyme responsible for ring hydroxylation and subsequent production of 3-vinylcatechol. DNA sequence analysis of the tod operon of SF1 revealed a single base pair mutation in todA (C479T), a gene encoding the reductase component of TDO. Replacement of the wild-type todA allele in F1 with todA(C479T) reduced TDO activity to SF1 levels, obviated vinylcatechol accumulation, and conferred the ability to grow on styrene. This novel 'less is more' strategy - reduced catechol production as a means to expand growth substrate range - sheds light on an alternative approach for managing catechol toxicity during the metabolism of aromatic compounds.

  1. Use of response surface method for maximizing the production of arginine deiminase by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Patil, Mahesh D; Shinde, Kiran D; Patel, Gopal; Chisti, Yusuf; Banerjee, Uttam Chand

    2016-06-01

    Statistically designed experiments were used to optimize the production of arginine deiminase (ADI) by Pseudomonas putida KT2440 in batch culture. A Plackett-Burman design involving eleven factors showed that ADI production was most influenced by the initial pH and the initial concentrations of glucose and yeast extract. A central composite experimental design showed that the optimal values of these factors were 8.0, 10 g/L and 12.5 g/L, respectively. The other components of the optimal culture medium were bacto peptone 7.5 g/L, Triton X-100 0.30% (v/v), and arginine 3 g/L, for a culture temperature of 25 °C. Compared with the basal medium, the ADI activity in the optimized medium had nearly 4.5-fold increase (4.31 U/mL). The optimized medium was then used for a further study of ADI production in a 14 L stirred tank bioreactor. The agitation speed and the aeration rates were varied to determine suitable values of these variables.

  2. Environmental stress speeds up DNA replication in Pseudomonas putida in chemostat cultivations.

    PubMed

    Lieder, Sarah; Jahn, Michael; Koepff, Joachim; Müller, Susann; Takors, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Cellular response to different types of stress is the hallmark of the cell's strategy for survival. How organisms adjust their cell cycle dynamics to compensate for changes in environmental conditions is an important unanswered question in bacterial physiology. A cell using binary fission for reproduction passes through three stages during its cell cycle: a stage from cell birth to initiation of replication, a DNA replication phase and a period of cell division. We present a detailed analysis of durations of cell cycle phases, investigating their dynamics under environmental stress conditions. Applying continuous steady state cultivations (chemostats), the DNA content of a Pseudomonas putida KT2440 population was quantified with flow cytometry at distinct growth rates. Data-driven modeling revealed that under stress conditions, such as oxygen deprivation, solvent exposure and decreased iron availability, DNA replication was accelerated correlated to the severity of the imposed stress (up to 1.9-fold). Cells maintained constant growth rates by balancing the shortened replication phase with extended cell cycle phases before and after replication. Transcriptome data underpin the transcriptional upregulation of crucial genes of the replication machinery. Hence adaption of DNA replication speed appears to be an important strategy to withstand environmental stress.

  3. Electricity Generation and Wastewater Treatment of Oil Refinery in Microbial Fuel Cells Using Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Dip; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Tseng, Min-Jen; Nimje, Vanita Roshan; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chang, Young-Fo; Yang, Tsui-Chu; Chen, Chen-Yen

    2014-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a novel platform for treating wastewater and at the same time generating electricity. Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059), a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days. Our study indicated that the oil refinery wastewater containing 2213 mg/L (ppm) chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be used as a substrate for electricity generation in the reactor of the MFC. A maximum voltage of 355 mV was obtained with the highest power density of 0.005 mW/cm2 in the third cycle with a maximum current density of 0.015 mA/cm2 in regard to the external resistor of 1000 Ω. A maximum coulombic efficiency of 6 × 10−2% was obtained in the fourth cycle. The removal efficiency of the COD reached 30% as a function of time. Electron transfer mechanism was studied using cyclic voltammetry, which indicated the presence of a soluble electron shuttle in the reactor. Our study demonstrated that oil refinery wastewater could be used as a substrate for electricity generation. PMID:25247576

  4. Plasmolysis induced by toluene in a cyoB mutant of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Duque, Estrella; García, Vanina; de la Torre, Jesús; Godoy, Patricia; Bernal, Patricia; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2004-10-01

    The cyoABCDE gene cluster of Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E encodes a terminal cytochrome oxidase. A 500-bp 'cyoB' DNA fragment was cloned in pCHESI Omega Km and used to generate a cyoB knock-out mutant in vivo. The mutant strain was not limited in the generation of proton-motif force, although when grown on minimal medium with glucose or citrate, the CyoB mutant exhibited a slight increase in duplication time with respect to the wild-type strain. This effect was even more pronounced when toluene was supplied in the gas phase. In consonance with the negative effect of toluene on the growth was the finding that the CyoB mutant was hypersensitive to sudden 0.3% (v/v) toluene shocks, in contrast with the wild-type strain. This effect was particularly exacerbated in cells that reached the stationary phase. The increased sensitivity to solvents of the CyoB mutant did not appear to be related to the inability of the cells to strengthen the membrane package or to induce the efflux pumps in response to the solvent, but rather to solvent-induced plasmolysis that may be triggered by wrinkles in the cytoplasmic membrane at the poles of the mutant cells, and invagination of the outer membranes, which eventually lead to cell death.

  5. Immobilization and characterization of benzoylformate decarboxylase from Pseudomonas putida on spherical silica carrier.

    PubMed

    Peper, Stephanie; Kara, Selin; Long, Wei Sing; Liese, Andreas; Niemeyer, Bernd

    2011-08-01

    If an adequate biocatalyst is identified for a specific reaction, immobilization is one possibility to further improve its properties. The immobilization allows easy recycling, improves the enzyme performance, and it often enhances the stability of the enzyme. In this work, the immobilization of the benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFD) variant, BFD A460I-F464I, from Pseudomonas putida was accomplished on spherical silica. Silicagel is characterized by its high mechanical stability, which allows its application in different reactor types without restrictions. The covalently bound enzyme was characterized in terms of its activity, stability, and kinetics for the formation of chiral 2-hydroxypropiophenone (2-HPP) from benzaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Moreover, temperature as well as pressure dependency of immobilized BFD A460I-F464I activity and enantioselectivity were analyzed. The used wide-pore silicagel shows a good accessibility of the immobilized enzyme. The activity of the immobilized BFD A460I-F464I variant was determined to be 70% related to the activity of the free enzyme. Thereby, the enantioselectivity of the enzyme was not influenced by the immobilization. In addition, a pressure-induced change in stereoselectivity was found both for the free and for the immobilized enzyme. With increasing pressure, the enantiomeric excess (ee) of (R)-2-HPP can be increased from 44% (0.1 MPa) to 76% (200 MPa) for the free enzyme and from 43% (0.1 MPa) to 66% (200 MPa) for the immobilized enzyme.

  6. Quorum sensing triggers the stochastic escape of individual cells from Pseudomonas putida biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Lumjiaktase, Putthapoom; Kümmerli, Rolf; Eberl, Leo

    2015-01-01

    The term ‘quorum sensing’ (QS) is generally used to describe the phenomenon that bacteria release and perceive signal molecules to coordinate cooperative behaviour in response to their population size. QS-based communication has therefore been considered a social trait. Here we show that QS signals (N-acyl-homoserine lactones, AHLs) are stochastically produced in young biofilms of Pseudomonas putida and act mainly as self-regulatory signals rather than inducing neighbouring cells. We demonstrate that QS induces the expression of putisolvin biosurfactants that are not public goods, thereby triggering asocial motility of induced cells out of microcolonies. Phenotypic heterogeneity is most prominent in the early stages of biofilm development, whereas at later stages behaviour patterns across cells become more synchronized. Our findings broaden our perspective on QS by showing that AHLs can control the expression of asocial (self-directed) traits, and that heterogeneity in QS can serve as a mechanism to drive phenotypic heterogeneity in self-directed behaviour. PMID:25592773

  7. A role for the regulator PsrA in the polyhydroxyalkanoate metabolism of Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Pilar; de la Peña, Fernando; Prieto, María Auxiliadora

    2014-11-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a Gram-negative bacterium capable of producing medium-chain-length-polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHA). When fatty acids are used as growth and polymer precursors, the biosynthesis is linked to fatty acid metabolism via ß-oxidation route. In the close-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the transcriptional repressor PsrA regulates the ß-oxidation, but little is known about the regulatory system in P. putida. To analyze the effect of the absence of psrA gene on the growth and PHA production in P. putida, a set of different carbon sources were assayed in the wild type strain and in a generated psrA deficient strain (KT40P). The growth rates were in all cases, lower for the mutant. The amount of PHA produced by the mutant strain is lower than the wild type. Moreover, the monomeric composition seems to be different among the strains, as there is enrichment in monomers with shorter carbon length in the mutant strain. To understand the role of the psrA gene on the metabolism of fatty acids, we have determined the expression profile of several genes related to fatty acid metabolism in the wild type and in the mutant strain. The results indicated that PsrA mostly negatively regulate genes related to fatty acid metabolism.

  8. Evaluation of Zosteric Acid for Mitigating Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas putida Isolated from a Membrane Bioreactor System

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Andrea; Foladori, Paola; Ponti, Benedetta; Bettinetti, Roberta; Gambino, Michela; Villa, Federica; Cappitelli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    This study provides data to define an efficient biocide-free strategy based on zosteric acid to counteract biofilm formation on the membranes of submerged bioreactor system plants. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis showed that gammaproteobacteria was the prevalent taxa on fouled membranes of an Italian wastewater plant. Pseudomonas was the prevalent genus among the cultivable membrane-fouler bacteria and Pseudomonas putida was selected as the target microorganism to test the efficacy of the antifoulant. Zosteric acid was not a source of carbon and energy for P. putida cells and, at 200 mg/L, it caused a reduction of bacterial coverage by 80%. Biofilm experiments confirmed the compound caused a significant decrease in biomass (−97%) and thickness (−50%), and it induced a migration activity of the peritrichous flagellated P. putida over the polycarbonate surface not amenable to a biofilm phenotype. The low octanol-water partitioning coefficient and the high water solubility suggested a low bioaccumulation potential and the water compartment as its main environmental recipient and capacitor. Preliminary ecotoxicological tests did not highlight direct toxicity effects toward Daphnia magna. For green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata an effect was observed at concentrations above 100 mg/L with a significant growth of protozoa that may be connected to a concurrent algal growth inhibition. PMID:24879523

  9. Indole-Induced Activities of β-Lactamase and Efflux Pump Confer Ampicillin Resistance in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jisun; Shin, Bora; Park, Chulwoo; Park, Woojun

    2017-01-01

    Indole, which is widespread in microbial communities, has received attention because of its effects on bacterial physiology. Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa can acquire ampicillin (Amp) resistance during growth on indole-Amp agar. Transcriptome, mutant, and inhibitor studies have suggested that Amp resistance induced by indole can be attributed to increased gene expression of ttgAB encoding two genes of RND-type multidrug efflux operons and an ampC encoding β-lactamase. Expression, enzyme activities, and mutational analyses indicated that AmpC β-lactamase is important for acquiring Amp resistance of P. putida in the presence of indole. Here, we show, for the first time, that volatile indole increased Amp-resistant cells. Consistent with results of the volatile indole assay, a low concentration of indole in liquid culture promoted growth initially, but led to mutagenesis after indole was depleted, which could not be observed at high indole concentrations. Interestingly, ttgAB and ampC gene expression levels correlate with the concentration of indole, which might explain the low number of Amp-mutated cells in high indole concentrations. The expression levels of genes involved in mutagenesis, namely rpoS, recA, and mutS, were also modulated by indole. Our data indicates that indole reduces Amp-induced heterogeneity by promoting expression of TtgABC or MexAB-OprM efflux pumps and the indole-induced β-lactamase in P. putida and P. aeruginosa. PMID:28352264

  10. Global Regulation of Food Supply by Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Craig; Godoy, Patricia; Duque, Estrella; Molina-Henares, M. Antonia; de la Torre, Jesús; del Arco, José María; Herrera, Carmen; Segura, Ana; Guazzaroni, M. Eugenia; Ferrer, Manuel; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E was used as a model to develop a “phenomics” platform to investigate the ability of P. putida to grow using different carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur sources and in the presence of stress molecules. Results for growth of wild-type DOT-T1E on 90 different carbon sources revealed the existence of a number of previously uncharted catabolic pathways for compounds such as salicylate, quinate, phenylethanol, gallate, and hexanoate, among others. Subsequent screening on the subset of compounds on which wild-type DOT-TIE could grow with four knockout strains in the global regulatory genes Δcrc, Δcrp, ΔcyoB, and ΔptsN allowed analysis of the global response to nutrient supply and stress. The data revealed that most global regulator mutants could grow in a wide variety of substrates, indicating that metabolic fluxes are physiologically balanced. It was found that the Crc mutant did not differ much from the wild-type regarding the use of carbon sources. However, certain pathways are under the preferential control of one global regulator, i.e., metabolism of succinate and d-fructose is influenced by CyoB, and l-arginine is influenced by PtsN. Other pathways can be influenced by more than one global regulator; i.e., l-valine catabolism can be influenced by CyoB and Crp (cyclic AMP receptor protein) while phenylethylamine is affected by Crp, CyoB, and PtsN. These results emphasize the cross talk required in order to ensure proper growth and survival. With respect to N sources, DOT-T1E can use a wide variety of inorganic and organic nitrogen sources. As with the carbon sources, more than one global regulator affected growth with some nitrogen sources; for instance, growth with nucleotides, dipeptides, d-amino acids, and ethanolamine is influenced by Crp, CyoB, and PtsN. A surprising finding was that the Crp mutant was unable to flourish on ammonium. Results for assayed sulfur sources revealed that CyoB controls multiple points in methionine

  11. Insights into Pseudomonas putida KT2440 response to phenol-induced stress by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Santos, Pedro M; Benndorf, Dirk; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2004-09-01

    To gain insight into the global mechanism underlying phenol toxicity and tolerance in bacteria, we have generated a two-dimensional protein reference map and used it to identify variations in protein expression levels in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 following exposure to sub-lethal inhibitory concentrations of this solvent. Inspection of the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis gels revealed that 1 h following sudden cell exposure to two different concentrations of phenol, leading to the inhibition of exponential growth (600 mg/L) or to growth arrest for, at least, 4 h before inhibited growth resumption (800 mg/L), the amount of 68 proteins was increased while the amount of 13 proteins was reduced. The up-regulated proteins include proteins involved in the: (i) oxidative stress response (AhpC, SodB,Tpx and Dsb); (ii) general stress reponse (UspA, HtpG, GrpE and Tig); (iii) energetic metabolism (AcnB, AtpH, Fpr, AceA, NuoE, and MmsA-1); (iv) fatty acid biosynthesis (FabB, AccC-1 and FabBx1); (v) inhibition of cell division (MinD); (vi) cell envelope biosynthesis (LpxC, VacJ, and MurA); (vii) transcription regulation (OmpR and Fur); and (viii) transport of small molecules (TolC, BraC, AotJ, AapJ, FbpA and OprQ). Among the down-regulated proteins are those involved in nucleotide biosynthesis (PurM, PurL, PyrH and Dcd) and cell motility (FliC). The information emerging from this genome expression profiling and the detailed investigation of the biological role of candidate genes, as targets of phenol toxicity or as determinants of phenol resistance in P. putida KT2440, will allow more rationale strategies for developing bacteria with greater solvent tolerance with impact in bioremediation and whole-cell biotransformations in media with organic solvents.

  12. Nitrogen Removal Characteristics of Pseudomonas putida Y-9 Capable of Heterotrophic Nitrification and Aerobic Denitrification at Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    He, Tengxia; Ye, Qing; Chen, Yanli; Xie, Enyu; Zhang, Xue

    2017-01-01

    The cold-adapted bacterium Pseudomonas putida Y-9 was investigated and exhibited excellent capability for nitrogen removal at 15°C. The strain capable of heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification could efficiently remove ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite at an average removal rate of 2.85 mg, 1.60 mg, and 1.83 mg NL−1 h−1, respectively. Strain Y-9 performed nitrification in preference to denitrification when ammonium and nitrate or ammonium and nitrite coexisted in the solution. Meantime, the presence of nitrate had no effect on the ammonium removal rate of strain Y-9, and yet the presence of high concentration of nitrite would inhibit the cell growth and decrease the nitrification rate. The experimental results indicate that P. putida Y-9 has potential application for the treatment of wastewater containing high concentrations of ammonium along with its oxidation products at low temperature. PMID:28293626

  13. From dirt to industrial applications: Pseudomonas putida as a Synthetic Biology chassis for hosting harsh biochemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Nikel, Pablo I; Chavarría, Max; Danchin, Antoine; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2016-10-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida is endowed with a central carbon metabolic network capable of fulfilling high demands of reducing power. This situation arises from a unique metabolic architecture that encompasses the partial recycling of triose phosphates to hexose phosphates-the so-called EDEMP cycle. In this article, the value of P. putida as a bacterial chassis of choice for contemporary, industrially-oriented metabolic engineering is addressed. The biochemical properties that make this bacterium adequate for hosting biotransformations involving redox reactions as well as toxic compounds and intermediates are discussed. Finally, novel developments and open questions in the continuous quest for an optimal microbial cell factory are presented at the light of current and future needs in the area of biocatalysis.

  14. Bioremoval of Basic Violet 3 and Acid Blue 93 by Pseudomonas putida and its adsorption isotherms and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Arunarani, A; Chandran, Preethy; Ranganathan, B V; Vasanthi, N S; Sudheer Khan, S

    2013-02-01

    Basic Violet 3 and Acid Blue 93 are the most important group of synthetic colourants extensively used in textile industries for dyeing cotton, wool, silk and nylon. Release of these dye pollutants in to the environment adversely affects the human health and aquatic organisms. The present study we used Pseudomonas putida MTCC 4910 for the adsorptive removal of Basic Violet 3 and Acid Blue 93 from the aqueous solutions. The pH (4-9) and NaCl concentrations (1mM-1M) did not influence the adsorption process. The equilibrium adsorption process fitted well to Freundlich model than Langmuir model. The kinetics of adsorption fitted well by pseudo-second-order. Thus in the present study an attempt has been made to exploit the dye removal capability of P. putida MTCC 4910, and it was found to be an efficient microbe that could be used for bio removal of dyes from textile effluents.

  15. The contribution of proteomics to the unveiling of the survival strategies used by Pseudomonas putida in changing and hostile environments.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Renata; Rojo, Fernando

    2013-10-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a ubiquitous, metabolically very versatile, Gram-negative bacterium adapted to habitats as diverse as soil, water and the rhizosphere. Most strains are nonpathogenic, many are used as experimental models, and many others have biotechnological applications in the areas of agriculture, bioremediation, biocatalysis, and the production of bioplastics. This review summarizes the contribution of proteomic technologies to our understanding of how P. putida responds to different carbon sources, how it adapts to living at suboptimal temperatures or attached to surfaces, and how it responds to the presence of toxic compounds such as aromatic molecules and heavy metals. The examples described illustrate the value of proteomics in furthering our knowledge of the physiology and behavior of bacteria, knowledge that is important for understanding how they behave in their natural habitats and for optimizing their behavior in biotechnological applications.

  16. An upp-based markerless gene replacement method for genome reduction and metabolic pathway engineering in Pseudomonas mendocina NK-01 and Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Chi; Gong, Ting; Zuo, Zhenqiang; Zhao, Fengjie; Fan, Xu; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang

    2015-06-01

    A markerless gene replacement method was adapted by combining a suicide plasmid, pEX18Tc, with a counterselectable marker, the upp gene encoding uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase), for the medium-chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA(MCL))-producing strain Pseudomonas mendocina NK-01. An NK-01 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant background strain was first constructed by deleting the chromosomal upp gene. The suicide plasmid pEX18Tc, carrying a functional allele of the upp gene of P. mendocina NK-01, was used to construct the vectors to delete the algA (encoding mannose-1-phosphate guanylyltransferase) and phaZ (encoding PHA(MCL) depolymerase) genes, and a 30 kb chromosomal fragment in the 5-FU resistant background host. The genes were removed efficiently from the genome of P. mendocina NK-01 and left a markerless chromosomal mutant. In addition, two exogenous genes were inserted into the phaC1 (PHA(MCL) polymerase) loci of Pseudomonas putida KT-∆UPP simultaneously. Thus, we constructed a genetically stable and marker-free P. putida KT2440 mutant with integrated mpd (encoding methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH)) and pytH (encoding a pyrethroid-hydrolyzing carboxylesterase (PytH)) gene on the chromosome. The upp-based counterselection system could be further adapted for P. mendocina NK-01 and P. putida KT2440 and used for genome reduction and metabolic pathway engineering.

  17. blaVIM-2 Cassette-Containing Novel Integrons in Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida Isolates Disseminated in a Korean Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Lim, Jong Back; Yum, Jong Hwa; Yong, Dongeun; Chong, Yunsop; Kim, June Myung; Livermore, David M.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the phenotypic and genetic properties of metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas isolates collected at a tertiary-care hospital in Korea since 1995. The prevalence of imipenem resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates reached 16% in 1997, when 9% of the resistant organisms were found to produce VIM-2 β-lactamase, a class B enzyme previously found only in P. aeruginosa isolates from Europe. VIM-2-producing isolates of Pseudomonas putida were also detected. Resistance was transferable from both these species to P. aeruginosa PAO4089Rp by filter mating, although the resistance determinant could not be found on any detectable plasmid. Serotyping showed that many of the VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa isolates belonged to serotypes O:11 and O:12, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of XbaI-digested genomic DNA revealed that many had identical profiles, whereas the P. putida isolates were diverse. Sequencing showed that the blaVIM-2 genes resided as cassettes in class 1 integrons. In contrast to previous VIM-encoding integrons, the integron sequenced from a P. aeruginosa isolate had blaVIM located downstream of a variant of aacA4. blaVIM also lay in a class 1 integron in a representative P. putida strain, but the organization of this integron was different from that sequenced from the P. aeruginosa strain. In conclusion, the metallo-β-lactamase produced by these imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas isolates was VIM-2, and the accumulation of producers reflected clonal dissemination as well as horizontal spread. Strict measures are required in order to control a further spread of resistance. PMID:11897589

  18. Identification and characterization of a siderophore regulatory gene (pfrA) of Pseudomonas putida WCS358: homology to the alginate regulatory gene algQ of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Venturi, V; Ottevanger, C; Leong, J; Weisbeek, P J

    1993-10-01

    Genes encoding biosynthesis of pseudobactin 358 (a microbial iron transport agent) and its cognate outer membrane receptor protein, PupA, are transcribed only under iron limitation in plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida WCS358. Two cosmid clones were identified from a gene bank of WCS358 DNA which could independently and in an iron-dependent manner activate transcription from a WCS358 siderophore gene promoter in heterologous Pseudomonas strain A225. The functional region of one of the clones was localized by subcloning, transposon Tn3Gus mutagenesis, and DNA sequencing. Genomic transposon insertion mutants in the functional region lost the capacity to activate a siderophore gene promoter fusion transcriptionally; furthermore, these mutants no longer produced pseudobactin 358. The activating region consisted of a single gene designated pfrA (Pseudomonas ferric regulator). The pfrA gene codes for a single polypeptide, PfrA, of approximately 18 kDa, which has 58% identity to AlgQ (also known as AlgR2), a positive regulator involved in transcriptionally regulating alginate biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Cross-complementation studies between the pfrA gene of P. putida and the algQ gene of P. aeruginosa revealed that pfrA can restore mucoidy (alginate production) in an algQ mutant and that algQ could poorly complement a pfrA genomic mutant. It is concluded that PfrA is involved in the positive regulation of siderophore biosynthetic genes in response to iron limitation; furthermore, pfrA and algQ appeared to be interchangeable between P. putida and P. aeruginosa.

  19. Purification and characterization of gentisate 1,2-dioxygenases from Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIB 9867 and Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9869.

    PubMed

    Feng, Y; Khoo, H E; Poh, C L

    1999-03-01

    Two 3-hydroxybenzoate-inducible gentisate 1,2-dioxygenases were purified to homogeneity from Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIB 9867 (P25X) and Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9869 (P35X), respectively. The estimated molecular mass of the purified P25X gentisate 1, 2-dioxygenase was 154 kDa, with a subunit mass of 39 kDa. Its structure is deduced to be a tetramer. The pI of this enzyme was established to be 4.8 to 5.0. The subunit mass of P35X gentisate 1, 2-dioxygenase was 41 kDa, and this enzyme was deduced to exist as a dimer, with a native molecular mass of about 82 kDa. The pI of P35X gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase was around 4.6 to 4.8. Both of the gentisate 1,2-dioxygenases exhibited typical saturation kinetics and had apparent Kms of 92 and 143 microM for gentisate, respectively. Broad substrate specificities were exhibited towards alkyl and halogenated gentisate analogs. Both enzymes had similar kinetic turnover characteristics for gentisate, with kcat/Km values of 44.08 x 10(4) s-1 M-1 for the P25X enzyme and 39.34 x 10(4) s-1 M-1 for the P35X enzyme. Higher kcat/Km values were expressed by both enzymes against the substituted gentisates. Significant differences were observed between the N-terminal sequences of the first 23 amino acid residues of the P25X and P35X gentisate 1,2-dioxygenases. The P25X gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase was stable between pH 5.0 and 7.5, with the optimal pH around 8.0. The P35X enzyme showed a pH stability range between 7.0 and 9.0, and the optimum pH was also 8.0. The optimal temperature for both P25X and P35X gentisate 1, 2-dioxygenases was around 50 degrees C, but the P35X enzyme was more heat stable than that from P25X. Both enzymes were strongly stimulated by 0.1 mM Fe2+ but were completely inhibited by the presence of 5 mM Cu2+. Partial inhibition of both enzymes was also observed with 5 mM Mn2+, Zn2+, and EDTA.

  20. Structural and kinetic characterization of recombinant 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida G7

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Simara Semíramis; Neves, Cíntia Mara Leal; Guimarães, Samuel Leite; Whitman, Christian P.; Johnson, William H.; Aparicio, Ricardo; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto

    2016-01-01

    The first enzyme in the oxalocrotonate branch of the naphthalene-degradation lower pathway in Pseudomonas putida G7 is NahI, a 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase required for conversion of 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde to 2-hydroxymuconate in the presence of NAD+. NahI is in one family of the NAD(P)+-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase superfamily (ALDH8). In this work, we report the cloning, expression, purification and preliminary structural and kinetic characterization of the recombinant NahI. The nahI gene was subcloned into a T7 expression vector and the enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli ArcticExpress at 12 ºC as an N-terminal hexa-histidine-tagged fusion protein (6xHis-NahI). After the soluble protein was purified by affinity and size-exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments were conducted to analyze the oligomeric state and the overall shape of the enzyme in solution. The protein is a tetramer in solution and has nearly perfect 222 point group symmetry. Protein stability and secondary structure content were also evaluated by a circular dichroism spectroscopy assay under different thermal conditions. Furthermore, kinetic assays were conducted for the recombinant enzyme and, for the first time, KM (1.3 ± 0.3 μM) and kcat (0.9 s−1) values were determined for this enzyme (at presumed NAD+ saturation). NahI is highly specific for its biological substrate (2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde) and has no activity with salicylaldehyde, another intermediate in the naphthalene-degradation pathway. PMID:26032336

  1. Enhanced 3-methylcatechol production by Pseudomonas putida TODE1 in a two-phase biotransformation system.

    PubMed

    Kongpol, Ajiraporn; Kato, Junichi; Tajima, Takahisa; Pongtharangkul, Thunyarat; Vangnai, Alisa S

    2014-01-01

    In this study, genetically engineered Pseudomonas putida TODE1 served as a biocatalyst for the bioproduction of valuable 3-methylcatechol (3MC) from toluene in an aqueous-organic two-phase system. The two-phase system was used as an approach to increase the biocatalyst efficiency. Among the organic solvent tested, n-decanol offered several benefits including having the highest partitioning of 3MC, with a high 3MC yield and low cell toxicity. The effect of media supplementation with carbon/energy sources (glucose, glycerol, acetate and succinate), divalent metal cations (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Mn(2+) and Fe(2+)), and short-chain alcohols (ethanol, n-propanol and n-butanol) as a cofactor regeneration system on the toluene dioxygenase (TDO) activity, cell viability, and overall 3MC yield were evaluated. Along with the two-step cell preparation protocol, supplementation of the medium with 4 mM glycerol as a carbon/energy source, and 0.4 mM Fe(2+) as a cofactor for TDO significantly enhanced the 3MC production level. When in combination with the use of n-decanol and n-butanol as the organic phase, a maximum overall 3MC concentration of 31.8 mM (166 mM in the organic phase) was obtained in a small-scale production, while it was at 160.5 mM (333.2 mM in the organic phase) in a 2-L scale. To our knowledge, this is the highest 3MC yield obtained from a TDO-based system so far.

  2. Mechanism for Biotransformation of Nonylphenol Polyethoxylates to Xenoestrogens in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    John, Dominic M.; White, Graham F.

    1998-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas putida isolated from activated sewage grew aerobically on the xenoestrogen precursor, nonylphenol polyethoxylate (NPEOx, where x is the number of ethoxylate units) as sole carbon source. Comparative growth yields on NPEOav6, NPEOav9, and NPEOav20 (mixtures with average ethoxylate numbers as indicated) were consistent with utilization of all but two ethoxylate units, and the final accumulating metabolite was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy as nonylphenol diethoxylate (NPEO2). There was no growth on nonylphenol or polyethylene glycols, and there was no evidence for production of carboxylic acid analogs of NPEOx. Biodegradation kinetics measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) for each component in NPEOx mixtures showed that biodegradation proceeded via successive exoscission of the ethoxylate chain and not by direct scission between the second and third ethoxylate residues. The NPEOx-degrading activity was inducible by substrate, and cell extracts of NPEOav9-induced cells were also active on the pure alcohol ethoxylate, dodecyl octaethoxylate (AEO8), producing sequentially, under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, AEO7, AEO6, AEO5, etc., thus demonstrating that the pathway involved removal of single ethoxylate units. HPLC analysis of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivatives revealed acetaldehyde (ethanal) as the sole aldehydic product from either NPEOav9 or AEO8 under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. We propose a mechanism for biotransformation which involves an oxygen-independent hydroxyl shift from the terminal to the penultimate carbon of the terminal ethoxylate unit of NPEOx and dissociation of the resulting hemiacetal to release acetaldehyde and the next-lower homolog, NPEOx−1, which then undergoes further cycles of the same reaction until x = 2. PMID:9721266

  3. Mechanism for biotransformation of nonylphenol polyethoxylates to Xenoestrogens in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    John, D M; White, G F

    1998-09-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas putida isolated from activated sewage grew aerobically on the xenoestrogen precursor, nonylphenol polyethoxylate (NPEOx, where x is the number of ethoxylate units) as sole carbon source. Comparative growth yields on NPEOav6, NPEOav9, and NPEOav20 (mixtures with average ethoxylate numbers as indicated) were consistent with utilization of all but two ethoxylate units, and the final accumulating metabolite was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy as nonylphenol diethoxylate (NPEO2). There was no growth on nonylphenol or polyethylene glycols, and there was no evidence for production of carboxylic acid analogs of NPEOx. Biodegradation kinetics measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) for each component in NPEOx mixtures showed that biodegradation proceeded via successive exoscission of the ethoxylate chain and not by direct scission between the second and third ethoxylate residues. The NPEOx-degrading activity was inducible by substrate, and cell extracts of NPEOav9-induced cells were also active on the pure alcohol ethoxylate, dodecyl octaethoxylate (AEO8), producing sequentially, under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, AEO7, AEO6, AEO5, etc., thus demonstrating that the pathway involved removal of single ethoxylate units. HPLC analysis of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivatives revealed acetaldehyde (ethanal) as the sole aldehydic product from either NPEOav9 or AEO8 under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. We propose a mechanism for biotransformation which involves an oxygen-independent hydroxyl shift from the terminal to the penultimate carbon of the terminal ethoxylate unit of NPEOx and dissociation of the resulting hemiacetal to release acetaldehyde and the next-lower homolog, NPEOx-1, which then undergoes further cycles of the same reaction until x = 2.

  4. Chromate-Reducing Properties of Soluble Flavoproteins from Pseudomonas putida and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ackerley, D. F.; Gonzalez, C. F.; Park, C. H.; Blake, R.; Keyhan, M.; Matin, A.

    2004-01-01

    Cr(VI) (chromate) is a toxic, soluble environmental contaminant. Bacteria can reduce chromate to the insoluble and less toxic Cr(III), and thus chromate bioremediation is of interest. Genetic and protein engineering of suitable enzymes can improve bacterial bioremediation. Many bacterial enzymes catalyze one-electron reduction of chromate, generating Cr(V), which redox cycles, generating excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS). Such enzymes are not appropriate for bioremediation, as they harm the bacteria and their primary end product is not Cr(III). In this work, the chromate reductase activities of two electrophoretically pure soluble bacterial flavoproteins—ChrR (from Pseudomonas putida) and YieF (from Escherichia coli)—were examined. Both are dimers and reduce chromate efficiently to Cr(III) (kcat/Km = ∼2 × 104 M−1 · s−1). The ChrR dimer generated a flavin semiquinone during chromate reduction and transferred >25% of the NADH electrons to ROS. However, the semiquinone was formed transiently and ROS diminished with time. Thus, ChrR probably generates Cr(V), but only transiently. Studies with mutants showed that ChrR protects against chromate toxicity; this is possibly because it preempts chromate reduction by the cellular one-electron reducers, thereby minimizing ROS generation. ChrR is thus a suitable enzyme for further studies. During chromate reduction by YieF, no flavin semiquinone was generated and only 25% of the NADH electrons were transferred to ROS. The YieF dimer may therefore be an obligatory four-electron chromate reducer which in one step transfers three electrons to chromate and one to molecular oxygen. As a mutant lacking this enzyme could not be obtained, the role of YieF in chromate protection could not be directly explored. The results nevertheless suggest that YieF may be an even more suitable candidate for further studies than ChrR. PMID:14766567

  5. Identification and characterization of the PhhR regulon in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Herrera, M Carmen; Duque, Estrella; Rodríguez-Herva, José J; Fernández-Escamilla, Ana M; Ramos, Juan L

    2010-06-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a soil microorganism that utilizes aromatic amino acids present in root exudates as a nitrogen source. We have previously shown that the PhhR transcriptional regulator induces phhAB genes encoding a phenylalanine hydroxylase. In this study we show, using microarray assays and promoter fusions, that PhhR is a global regulator responsible for the activation of genes essential for phenylalanine degradation, phenylalanine homeostasis and other genes of unknown function. Recently, it has been shown that phenylalanine catabolism occurs through more than one pathway. One of these possible pathways involves the metabolism of phenylalanine via tyrosine, p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate, and homogentisate. We identified two genes within this pathway that encode an acyl-CoA transferase involved in the metabolism of acetoacetate. All genes in this pathway were induced in response to phenylalanine in a PhhR-proficient background. The second potential degradative pathway involves the degradation of phenylalanine to produce phenylpyruvate, which seems to be degraded via phenylacetyl-CoA. A number of mutants in the paa genes encoding phenylacetyl-CoA degradation enzymes fail to grow on phenylpyruvate or phenylacetate, further supporting the existence of this second pathway. We found that the PhhR regulon also includes genes involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids that are repressed in the presence of phenylalanine, suggesting the possibility of feedback at the transcriptional level. In addition, we found that PhhR modulates the level of expression of the broad-substrate-specificity MexEF/OprN efflux pump. Expression from this pump is under the control of mexT gene product because phenylalanine-dependent transcription from the mexE promoter does not occur in a mexT mutant background. These results place PhhR as an important regulator in the control of bacterial responses to aromatic amino acids.

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas fluorescens Strains PA4C2 and PA3G8 and Pseudomonas putida PA14H7, Three Biocontrol Bacteria against Dickeya Phytopathogens

    PubMed Central

    Cigna, Jérémy; Raoul des Essarts, Yannick; Mondy, Samuel; Hélias, Valérie; Beury-Cirou, Amélie

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains PA4C2 and PA3G8 and Pseudomonas putida strain PA14H7 were isolated from potato rhizosphere and show an ability to inhibit the growth of Dickeya phytopathogens. Here, we report their draft genome sequences, which provide a basis for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in antibiosis against Dickeya. PMID:25635023

  7. Molecular characterization of the phenylacetic acid catabolic pathway in Pseudomonas putida U: The phenylacetyl-CoA catabolon

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, E. R.; Miñambres, B.; García, B.; Muñiz, C.; Moreno, M. A.; Ferrández, A.; Díaz, E.; García, J. L.; Luengo, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Fourteen different genes included in a DNA fragment of 18 kb are involved in the aerobic degradation of phenylacetic acid by Pseudomonas putida U. This catabolic pathway appears to be organized in three contiguous operons that contain the following functional units: (i) a transport system, (ii) a phenylacetic acid activating enzyme, (iii) a ring-hydroxylation complex, (iv) a ring-opening protein, (v) a β-oxidation-like system, and (vi) two regulatory genes. This pathway constitutes the common part (core) of a complex functional unit (catabolon) integrated by several routes that catalyze the transformation of structurally related molecules into a common intermediate (phenylacetyl-CoA). PMID:9600981

  8. Metabolite Profiling Reveals Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Tn5 Mutant of Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Vasvi; Bhatia, Anil; Bharti, Santosh Kumar; Mishra, Shashank Kumar; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Mishra, Aradhana; Sidhu, Om Prakash; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas is an efficient plant growth–promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR); however, intolerance to drought and high temperature limit its application in agriculture as a bioinoculant. Transposon 5 (Tn5) mutagenesis was used to generate a stress tolerant mutant from a PGPR Pseudomonas putida NBRI1108 isolated from chickpea rhizosphere. A mutant NBRI1108T, selected after screening of nearly 10,000 transconjugants, exhibited significant tolerance towards high temperature and drought. Southern hybridization analysis of EcoRI and XhoI restricted genomic DNA of NBRI1108T confirmed that it had a single Tn5 insertion. The metabolic changes in the polar and non-polar extracts of NBRI1108 and NBRI1108T were examined using 1H, 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Thirty six chemically diverse metabolites consisting of amino acids, fatty acids and phospholipids were identified and quantified. Insertion of Tn5 influenced amino acid and phospholipid metabolism and resulted in significantly higher concentration of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycinebetaine, glycerophosphatidylcholine (GPC) and putrescine in NBRI1108T as compared to that in NBRI1108. The concentration of glutamic acid, glycinebetaine and GPC increased by 34%, 95% and 100%, respectively in the NBRI1108T as compared to that in NBRI1108. High concentration of glycerophosphatidylethanolamine (GPE) and undetected GPC in NBRI1108 indicates that biosynthesis of GPE may have taken place via the methylation pathway of phospholipid biosynthesis. However, high GPC and low GPE concentration in NBRI1108T suggest that methylation pathway and phosphatidylcholine synthase (PCS) pathway of phospholipid biosynthesis are being followed in the NBRI1108T. Application of multivariate principal component analysis (PCA) on the quantified metabolites revealed clear variations in NBRI1108 and NBRI1108T in polar and non-polar metabolites. Identification of abiotic stress

  9. The response of aggregated Pseudomonas putida CP1 cells to UV-C and UV-A/B disinfection.

    PubMed

    Maganha de Almeida, Ana C; Quilty, Bríd

    2016-11-01

    UV radiation is a spread method used worldwide for the disinfection of water. However, much of the research on the disinfection of bacterial cells by UV has focused on planktonic cells. Many bacterial cells in nature are present in clumps or aggregates, and these aggregates, which are more resistant to disinfection than their planktonic counterparts, can be problematic in engineered water systems. The current research used Pseudomonas putida (P. putida) CP1, an environmental and non-pathogenic microorganism which autoaggregates when grown under certain conditions, as a model organism to simulate aggregated cells. The study investigated the response of both the planktonic and the aggregated forms of the bacterium to UV-C (λ = 253.7 nm) and UV-A/B (λ > 300 nm) disinfection at laboratory scale in a minimal medium. The planktonic cells of P. putida CP1 were inactivated within 60 s by UV-C and in 60 min by UV-A/B; however, the aggregated cells required 120 min of UV-C treatment and 240 min of UV-A/B radiation to become inactive. The size of the aggregate was reduced following UV treatment. Although all the cells had lost culturability, viability as measured by the LIVE/DEAD(®) stain and epifluorescence microscopy was not completely lost and the cells all demonstrated regrowth after overnight incubation in the dark.

  10. Experimental and kinetic study on the cometabolic biodegradation of phenol and 4-chlorophenol by psychrotrophic Pseudomonas putida LY1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Li, Yi; Li, Jing; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the kinetics of phenol and 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) biodegradation by a cold-adapted bacteria, Pseudomonas putida LY1, isolated from Songhua River sediment. The results showed that P. putida LY1 cannot grow on 4-CP as a sole carbon source. P. putida LY1 had the potential to cometabolic biodegrade phenol and 4-CP in a wide range of temperature (varying from 5 to 35 °C) with the optimal temperature around 25 °C. Mixture of phenol and 4-CP were completely removed at two 4-CP concentrations (15 and 40 mg/L) over a wide range of phenol (20-400 mg/L) concentrations, whereby the ratio of 4-CP/biomass (S 2/X) was lower than 0.03. The kinetic models of cometabolic biodegradation of phenol and 4-CP were proposed, considering the growth and nongrowth substrate inhibition. These models successfully simulate the processes of cometabolic degradation of phenol and 4-CP.

  11. Bioconversion of Styrene to Poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) by the New Bacterial Strain Pseudomonas putida NBUS12

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Giin-Yu Amy; Chen, Chia-Lung; Ge, Liya; Li, Ling; Tan, Swee Ngin; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Styrene is a toxic pollutant commonly found in waste effluents from plastic processing industries. We herein identified and characterized microorganisms for bioconversion of the organic eco-pollutant styrene into a valuable biopolymer medium-chain-length poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (mcl-PHA). Twelve newly-isolated styrene-degrading Pseudomonads were obtained and partial phaC genes were detected by PCR in these isolates. These isolates assimilated styrene to produce mcl-PHA, forming PHA contents between 0.05±0.00 and 23.10±3.25% cell dry mass (% CDM). The best-performing isolate was identified as Pseudomonas putida NBUS12. A genetic analysis of 16S rDNA and phaZ genes revealed P. putida NBUS12 as a genetically-distinct strain from existing phenotypically-similar bacterial strains. This bacterium achieved a final biomass of 1.28±0.10 g L−1 and PHA content of 32.49±2.40% CDM. The extracted polymer was mainly comprised of 3-hydroxyhexanoate (C6 ), 3-hydroxyoctanoate (C8 ), 3-hydroxydecanoate (C10 ), 3-hydroxydodecanoate (C12 ), and 3-hydroxytetradecanoate (C14 ) monomers at a ratio of 2:42:1257:17:1. These results collectively suggested that P. putida NBUS12 is a promising candidate for the biotechnological conversion of styrene into mcl-PHA. PMID:25740622

  12. Suitability of recombinant Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida strains for selective biotransformation of m-nitrotoluene by xylene monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Daniel; Witholt, Bernard; Schmid, Andreas

    2005-11-01

    Escherichia coli JM101(pSPZ3), containing xylene monooxygenase (XMO) from Pseudomonas putida mt-2, catalyzes specific oxidations and reductions of m-nitrotoluene and derivatives thereof. In addition to reactions catalyzed by XMO, we focused on biotransformations by native enzymes of the E. coli host and their effect on overall biocatalyst performance. While m-nitrotoluene was consecutively oxygenated to m-nitrobenzyl alcohol, m-nitrobenzaldehyde, and m-nitrobenzoic acid by XMO, the oxidation was counteracted by an alcohol dehydrogenase(s) from the E. coli host, which reduced m-nitrobenzaldehyde to m-nitrobenzyl alcohol. Furthermore, the enzymatic background of the host reduced the nitro groups of the reactants resulting in the formation of aromatic amines, which were shown to effectively inhibit XMO in a reversible fashion. Host-intrinsic oxidoreductases and their reaction products had a major effect on the activity of XMO during biocatalysis of m-nitrotoluene. P. putida DOT-T1E and P. putida PpS81 were compared to E. coli JM101 as alternative hosts for XMO. These promising strains contained an additional dehydrogenase that oxidized m-nitrobenzaldehyde to the corresponding acid but catalyzed the formation of XMO-inhibiting aromatic amines at a significantly lower level than E. coli JM101.

  13. Effect of the introduction of the nitrogen-fixing bacteria Pseudomonas putida 23 on the nitrogen balance in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabayev, V. P.

    2010-04-01

    The inoculation of red beets with the nitrogen-fixing bacteria Pseudomonas putida 23 increased the activity of the nitrogen fixation in the rhizosphere of the plants grown on meadow soil in the central part of the Oka River floodplain. The yield of the red beets and the uptake by plants of nitrogen from the soil and from the 15N-labeled nitrogen fertilizer applied on the trial microplot increased significantly. A statistically significant additional fixation of nitrogen from the atmosphere and a positive balance of nitrogen in the soil-plant system without significant changes in the bulk content of the soil nitrogen after the plant growing were found in a greenhouse experiment with the application of P. putida. It can be supposed that the excessive nitrogen determined in this system is related to the incorporation into plants of atmospheric nitrogen fixed in the rhizosphere of the inoculated plants. The application of P. putida 23 makes it possible to decrease the rates of NPK fertilizer by two times without losses in the yield of red beets.

  14. Pumping iron to keep fit: modulation of siderophore secretion helps efficient aromatic utilization in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Hiren; Dave, Rachna; Venugopalan, V P

    2014-07-01

    Studies of biotechnology applications of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 have been predominantly focused on regulation and expression of the toluene degradation (TOL) pathway. Unfortunately, there is limited information on the role of other physiological factors influencing aromatic utilization. In this report, we demonstrate that P. putida KT2440 increases its siderophore secretion in response to the availability of benzyl alcohol, a model aromatic substrate. It is argued that accelerated siderophore secretion in response to aromatic substrates provides an iron 'boost' which is required for the effective functioning of the iron-dependent oxygenases responsible for ring opening. Direct evidence for the cardinal role of siderophores in aromatic utilization is provided by evaluation of per capita siderophore secretion and comparative growth assessments of wild-type and siderophore-negative mutant strains grown on an alternative carbon source. Accelerated siderophore secretion can be viewed as a compensatory mechanism in P. putida in the context of its inability to secrete more than one type of siderophore (pyoverdine) or to utilize heterologous siderophores. Stimulated siderophore secretion might be a key factor in successful integration and proliferation of this organism as a bio-augmentation agent for aromatic degradation. It not only facilitates efficient aromatic utilization, but also provides better opportunities for iron assimilation amongst diverse microbial communities, thereby ensuring better survival and proliferation.

  15. Integrated bioprocessing for the pH-dependent production of 4-valerolactone from levulinate in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Martin, Collin H; Wu, Danyi; Prather, Kristala L Jones

    2010-01-01

    Enzymes are powerful biocatalysts capable of performing specific chemical transformations under mild conditions, yet as catalysts they remain subject to the laws of thermodynamics, namely, that they cannot catalyze chemical reactions beyond equilibrium. Here we report the phenomenon and application of using extracytosolic enzymes and medium conditions, such as pH, to catalyze metabolic pathways beyond their intracellular catalytic limitations. This methodology, termed "integrated bioprocessing" because it integrates intracellular and extracytosolic catalysis, was applied to a lactonization reaction in Pseudomonas putida for the economical and high-titer biosynthesis of 4-valerolactone from the inexpensive and renewable source levulinic acid. Mutant paraoxonase I (PON1) was expressed in P. putida, shown to export from the cytosol in Escherichia coli and P. putida using an N-terminal sequence, and demonstrated to catalyze the extracytosolic and pH-dependent lactonization of 4-hydroxyvalerate to 4-valerolactone. With this production system, the titer of 4-valerolactone was enhanced substantially in acidic medium using extracytosolically expressed lactonase versus an intracellular lactonase: from <0.2 g liter(-1) to 2.1 +/- 0.4 g liter(-1) at the shake flask scale. Based on these results, the production of 4-hydroxyvalerate and 4-valerolactone was examined in a 2-liter bioreactor, and titers of 27.1 g liter(-1) and 8.2 g liter(-1) for the two respective compounds were achieved. These results illustrate the utility of integrated bioprocessing as a strategy for enabling production from novel metabolic pathways and enhancing product titers.

  16. Taxis of Pseudomonas putida F1 toward phenylacetic acid is mediated by the energy taxis receptor Aer2.

    PubMed

    Luu, Rita A; Schneider, Benjamin J; Ho, Christie C; Nesteryuk, Vasyl; Ngwesse, Stacy E; Liu, Xianxian; Parales, Juanito V; Ditty, Jayna L; Parales, Rebecca E

    2013-04-01

    The phenylacetic acid (PAA) degradation pathway is a widely distributed funneling pathway for the catabolism of aromatic compounds, including the environmental pollutants styrene and ethylbenzene. However, bacterial chemotaxis to PAA has not been studied. The chemotactic strain Pseudomonas putida F1 has the ability to utilize PAA as a sole carbon and energy source. We identified a putative PAA degradation gene cluster (paa) in P. putida F1 and demonstrated that PAA serves as a chemoattractant. The chemotactic response was induced during growth with PAA and was dependent on PAA metabolism. A functional cheA gene was required for the response, indicating that PAA is sensed through the conserved chemotaxis signal transduction system. A P. putida F1 mutant lacking the energy taxis receptor Aer2 was deficient in PAA taxis, indicating that Aer2 is responsible for mediating the response to PAA. The requirement for metabolism and the role of Aer2 in the response indicate that P. putida F1 uses energy taxis to detect PAA. We also revealed that PAA is an attractant for Escherichia coli; however, a mutant lacking a functional Aer energy receptor had a wild-type response to PAA in swim plate assays, suggesting that PAA is detected through a different mechanism in E. coli. The role of Aer2 as an energy taxis receptor provides the potential to sense a broad range of aromatic growth substrates as chemoattractants. Since chemotaxis has been shown to enhance the biodegradation of toxic pollutants, the ability to sense PAA gradients may have implications for the bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons that are degraded via the PAA pathway.

  17. Taxis of Pseudomonas putida F1 toward Phenylacetic Acid Is Mediated by the Energy Taxis Receptor Aer2

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Rita A.; Schneider, Benjamin J.; Ho, Christie C.; Nesteryuk, Vasyl; Ngwesse, Stacy E.; Liu, Xianxian; Parales, Juanito V.; Ditty, Jayna L.

    2013-01-01

    The phenylacetic acid (PAA) degradation pathway is a widely distributed funneling pathway for the catabolism of aromatic compounds, including the environmental pollutants styrene and ethylbenzene. However, bacterial chemotaxis to PAA has not been studied. The chemotactic strain Pseudomonas putida F1 has the ability to utilize PAA as a sole carbon and energy source. We identified a putative PAA degradation gene cluster (paa) in P. putida F1 and demonstrated that PAA serves as a chemoattractant. The chemotactic response was induced during growth with PAA and was dependent on PAA metabolism. A functional cheA gene was required for the response, indicating that PAA is sensed through the conserved chemotaxis signal transduction system. A P. putida F1 mutant lacking the energy taxis receptor Aer2 was deficient in PAA taxis, indicating that Aer2 is responsible for mediating the response to PAA. The requirement for metabolism and the role of Aer2 in the response indicate that P. putida F1 uses energy taxis to detect PAA. We also revealed that PAA is an attractant for Escherichia coli; however, a mutant lacking a functional Aer energy receptor had a wild-type response to PAA in swim plate assays, suggesting that PAA is detected through a different mechanism in E. coli. The role of Aer2 as an energy taxis receptor provides the potential to sense a broad range of aromatic growth substrates as chemoattractants. Since chemotaxis has been shown to enhance the biodegradation of toxic pollutants, the ability to sense PAA gradients may have implications for the bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons that are degraded via the PAA pathway. PMID:23377939

  18. Sustainable production of valuable compound 3-succinoyl-pyridine by genetically engineering Pseudomonas putida using the tobacco waste.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiwei; Xu, Ping; Tang, Hongzhi

    2015-11-17

    Treatment of solid and liquid tobacco wastes with high nicotine content remains a longstanding challenge. Here, we explored an environmentally friendly approach to replace tobacco waste disposal with resource recovery by genetically engineering Pseudomonas putida. The biosynthesis of 3-succinoyl-pyridine (SP), a precursor in the production of hypotensive agents, from the tobacco waste was developed using whole cells of the engineered Pseudomonas strain, S16dspm. Under optimal conditions in fed-batch biotransformation, the final concentrations of product SP reached 9.8 g/L and 8.9 g/L from aqueous nicotine solution and crude suspension of the tobacco waste, respectively. In addition, the crystal compound SP produced from aqueous nicotine of the tobacco waste in batch biotransformation was of high purity and its isolation yield on nicotine was 54.2%. This study shows a promising route for processing environmental wastes as raw materials in order to produce valuable compounds.

  19. Sustainable production of valuable compound 3-succinoyl-pyridine by genetically engineering Pseudomonas putida using the tobacco waste

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiwei; Xu, Ping; Tang, Hongzhi

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of solid and liquid tobacco wastes with high nicotine content remains a longstanding challenge. Here, we explored an environmentally friendly approach to replace tobacco waste disposal with resource recovery by genetically engineering Pseudomonas putida. The biosynthesis of 3-succinoyl-pyridine (SP), a precursor in the production of hypotensive agents, from the tobacco waste was developed using whole cells of the engineered Pseudomonas strain, S16dspm. Under optimal conditions in fed-batch biotransformation, the final concentrations of product SP reached 9.8 g/L and 8.9 g/L from aqueous nicotine solution and crude suspension of the tobacco waste, respectively. In addition, the crystal compound SP produced from aqueous nicotine of the tobacco waste in batch biotransformation was of high purity and its isolation yield on nicotine was 54.2%. This study shows a promising route for processing environmental wastes as raw materials in order to produce valuable compounds. PMID:26574178

  20. Effects of low-molecular-weight organic ligands and phosphate on adsorption of Pseudomonas putida by clay minerals and iron oxide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huayong; Jiang, Daihua; Cai, Peng; Rong, Xingmin; Huang, Qiaoyun

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption of Pseudomonas putida on kaolinite, montmorillonite and goethite was studied in the presence of organic ligands and phosphate. Citrate, tartrate, oxalate and phosphate showed inhibitive effect on P. putida adsorption by three minerals in a broad range of anion concentrations. The highest efficiencies of the four ligands in blocking the adsorption of P. putida on goethite, kaolinite and montmorillonite were 58-90%, 35-76% and 20-48%, respectively. The ability of organic ligands in prohibiting the binding of P. putida cells to the minerals followed the sequence of citrate>tartrate>oxalate>acetate. The significant suppressive effects on P. putida adsorption were ascribed to the increased negative charges by adsorbed ligands and the competition of ligands with bacterial surface groups for binding sites. The inhibitive effects on P. putida adsorption by organic ligands were also dependent on the steric hindrance of the molecules. Acetate presented promotive effect on P. putida adsorption by kaolinite and goethite at low anion concentrations. The results obtained in this study suggested that the adsorption of bacteria in soils especially in the rhizosphere can significantly be impacted by various organic and inorganic anions.

  1. Functional characterization of the quorum sensing regulator RsaL in the plant-beneficial strain Pseudomonas putida WCS358.

    PubMed

    Rampioni, Giordano; Bertani, Iris; Pillai, Cejoice Ramachandran; Venturi, Vittorio; Zennaro, Elisabetta; Leoni, Livia

    2012-02-01

    In many bacteria, quorum sensing (QS) systems rely on a signal receptor and a synthase producing N-acyl-homoserine lactone(s) as the signal molecule(s). In some species, the rsaL gene, located between the signal receptor and synthase genes, encodes a repressor limiting signal synthase expression and hence signal molecule production. Here we investigate the molecular mechanism of action of the RsaL protein in the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida WCS358 (RsaL(WCS)). In P. putida WCS358, RsaL(WCS) displayed a strong repressive effect on the promoter of the QS signal synthase gene, ppuI, while it did not repress the same promoter in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. DNase I protection assays showed that purified RsaL(WCS) specifically binds to ppuI on a DNA region overlapping the predicted σ(70)-binding site, but such protection was observed only at high protein concentrations. Accordingly, electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the RsaL(WCS) protein was not able to form stable complexes efficiently with a probe encompassing the ppuI promoter, while it formed stable complexes with the promoter of lasI, the gene orthologous to ppuI in P. aeruginosa. This difference seems to be dictated by the lower dyad symmetry of the RsaL(WCS)-binding sequence on the ppuI promoter relative to that on the lasI promoter. Comparison of the results obtained in vivo and in vitro suggests that RsaL(WCS) needs a molecular interactor/cofactor specific for P. putida WCS358 to repress ppuI transcription. We also demonstrate that RsaL(WCS) regulates siderophore-mediated growth limitation of plant pathogens and biofilm formation, two processes relevant for plant growth-promoting activity.

  2. Functional Characterization of the Quorum Sensing Regulator RsaL in the Plant-Beneficial Strain Pseudomonas putida WCS358

    PubMed Central

    Rampioni, Giordano; Bertani, Iris; Pillai, Cejoice Ramachandran; Venturi, Vittorio; Zennaro, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    In many bacteria, quorum sensing (QS) systems rely on a signal receptor and a synthase producing N-acyl-homoserine lactone(s) as the signal molecule(s). In some species, the rsaL gene, located between the signal receptor and synthase genes, encodes a repressor limiting signal synthase expression and hence signal molecule production. Here we investigate the molecular mechanism of action of the RsaL protein in the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida WCS358 (RsaLWCS). In P. putida WCS358, RsaLWCS displayed a strong repressive effect on the promoter of the QS signal synthase gene, ppuI, while it did not repress the same promoter in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. DNase I protection assays showed that purified RsaLWCS specifically binds to ppuI on a DNA region overlapping the predicted σ70-binding site, but such protection was observed only at high protein concentrations. Accordingly, electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the RsaLWCS protein was not able to form stable complexes efficiently with a probe encompassing the ppuI promoter, while it formed stable complexes with the promoter of lasI, the gene orthologous to ppuI in P. aeruginosa. This difference seems to be dictated by the lower dyad symmetry of the RsaLWCS-binding sequence on the ppuI promoter relative to that on the lasI promoter. Comparison of the results obtained in vivo and in vitro suggests that RsaLWCS needs a molecular interactor/cofactor specific for P. putida WCS358 to repress ppuI transcription. We also demonstrate that RsaLWCS regulates siderophore-mediated growth limitation of plant pathogens and biofilm formation, two processes relevant for plant growth-promoting activity. PMID:22113916

  3. Liquid chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry based environmental metabolomics for the analysis of Pseudomonas putida Bacteria in potable water.

    PubMed

    Kouremenos, Konstantinos A; Beale, David J; Antti, Henrik; Palombo, Enzo A

    2014-09-01

    Water supply biofilms have the potential to harbour waterborne diseases, accelerate corrosion, and contribute to the formation of tuberculation in metallic pipes. One particular species of bacteria known to be found in the water supply networks is Pseudomonas sp., with the presence of Pseudomonas putida being isolated to iron pipe tubercles. Current methods for detecting and analysis pipe biofilms are time consuming and expensive. The application of metabolomics techniques could provide an alternative method for assessing biofilm risk more efficiently based on bacterial activity. As such, this paper investigates the application of metabolomic techniques and provides a proof-of-concept application using liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-ToF-MS) to three biologically independent P. putida samples, across five different growth conditions exposed to solid and soluble iron (Fe). Analysis of the samples in +ESI and -ESI mode yielded 887 and 1789 metabolite features, respectively. Chemometric analysis of the +ESI and -ESI data identified 34 and 39 significant metabolite features, respectively, where features were considered significant if the fold change was greater than 2 and obtained a p-value less than 0.05. Metabolite features were subsequently identified according to the Metabolomics Standard Initiative (MSI) Chemical Analysis Workgroup using analytical standards and standard online LC-MS databases. Possible markers for P. putida growth, with and without being exposed to solid and soluble Fe, were identified from a diverse range of different chemical classes of metabolites including nucleobases, nucleosides, dipeptides, tripeptides, amino acids, fatty acids, sugars, and phospholipids.

  4. Genetic engineering of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 for rapid and high-yield production of vanillin from ferulic acid.

    PubMed

    Graf, Nadja; Altenbuchner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin is one of the most important flavoring agents used today. That is why many efforts have been made on biotechnological production from natural abundant substrates. In this work, the nonpathogenic Pseudomonas putida strain KT2440 was genetically optimized to convert ferulic acid to vanillin. Deletion of the vanillin dehydrogenase gene (vdh) was not sufficient to prevent vanillin degradation. Additional inactivation of a molybdate transporter, identified by transposon mutagenesis, led to a strain incapable to grow on vanillin as sole carbon source. The bioconversion was optimized by enhanced chromosomal expression of the structural genes for feruloyl-CoA synthetase (fcs) and enoyl-CoA hydratase/aldolase (ech) by introduction of the strong tac promoter system. Further genetic engineering led to high initial conversion rates and molar vanillin yields up to 86% within just 3 h accompanied with very low by-product levels. To our knowledge, this represents the highest productivity and molar vanillin yield gained with a Pseudomonas strain so far. Together with its high tolerance for ferulic acid, the developed, plasmid-free P. putida strain represents a promising candidate for the biotechnological production of vanillin.

  5. An investigation of the iron-sulphur proteins of benzene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida by electron-spin-resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Geary, P J; Saboowalla, F; Patil, D; Cammack, R

    1984-01-01

    Benzene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida comprises three components, namely a flavoprotein (NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase; Mr 81000), an intermediate electron-transfer protein, or ferredoxin (Mr 12000) with a [2Fe-2S] cluster, and a terminal dioxygenase containing two [2Fe-2S] iron-sulphur clusters (Mr 215000), which requires two additional Fe2+ atoms/molecule for oxygenase activity. The ferredoxin and the dioxygenase give e.s.r. signals in the reduced state with rhombic symmetry and average g values of 1.92 and 1.896 respectively. The mid-point redox potentials were determined by e.s.r. titration at pH 7.0 to be -155 mV and -112 mV respectively. The signal from the dioxygenase shows pronounced g anisotropy and most closely resembles those of 4-methoxybenzoate mono-oxygenase from Pseudomonas putida and the [2Fe-2S] 'Rieske' proteins of the quinone-cytochrome c region of electron-transport chains of respiration and photosynthesis. PMID:6324743

  6. Organo-mineral interactions in Pseudomonas putida-birnessite assemblages: Impact on mineral reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simanova, Anna; Kroll, Alexandra; Pena, Jasquelin

    2016-04-01

    The ability of microorganisms to precipitate biogenic birnessite nanoparticles is widely spread in the bacterial and fungal trees of life, with this process accounting largely for the formation of birnessite in nature. Birnessite minerals occur typically as nanoparticles that exhibit significant chemical and structural disorder. Furthermore, the mineral is embedded within a biomass matrix composed of microbial cells and extracellular polymeric substances, where the biomass not only provides reactive surfaces but can mediate electron transfer reactions. The overarching question guiding our research is: How do nanoscale properties and admixing with microbial biomass modify the reactivity of Mn oxide minerals? In this study, we investigate the biomass-birnessite composites of Pseudomonas putida GB-1 biomass and δ-MnO2 nanoparticles. We characterized the structure and composition of the mineral fraction using X-ray diffraction, Mn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and wet-chemical methods. To characterize the biomass fraction, we employed FTIR spectroscopy and size-exclusion chromatography analysis of the extracellular polymeric substances. Finally, we measured Ni(II) sorption isotherms at pH 6 and Ni K-edge EXAFS spectra to determine the extent and mechanism of Ni sorption in the biomass-mineral composites and in biomass-only and mineral-only systems. This approach provided direct and indirect evidence for the extent of organo-mineral interactions in the composites, as well as a direct measure of sorption reactivity in the composites relative to biomass-only and mineral-only systems. We found that admixing of mineral nanoparticles with biomass reduced the reactivity of the edge sites of birnessite particles towards Ni(II) through the attachment of organic moieties to the mineral particles and/or modification of the assemblage surface charge properties. In addition, the interaction of biomass components with MnO2 particles leads to partial Mn(IV) reduction and

  7. Accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoate from styrene and phenylacetic acid by Pseudomonas putida CA-3.

    PubMed

    Ward, Patrick G; de Roo, Guy; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2005-04-01

    Pseudomonas putida CA-3 is capable of converting the aromatic hydrocarbon styrene, its metabolite phenylacetic acid, and glucose into polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) when a limiting concentration of nitrogen (as sodium ammonium phosphate) is supplied to the growth medium. PHA accumulation occurs to a low level when the nitrogen concentration drops below 26.8 mg/liter and increases rapidly once the nitrogen is no longer detectable in the growth medium. The depletion of nitrogen and the onset of PHA accumulation coincided with a decrease in the rate of substrate utilization and biochemical activity of whole cells grown on styrene, phenylacetic acid, and glucose. However, the efficiency of carbon conversion to PHA dramatically increased once the nitrogen concentration dropped below 26.8 mg/liter in the growth medium. When supplied with 67 mg of nitrogen/liter, the carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratios that result in a maximum yield of PHA (grams of PHA per gram of carbon) for styrene, phenylacetic acid, and glucose are 28:1, 21:1, and 18:1, respectively. In cells grown on styrene and phenylacetic acid, decreasing the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio below 28:1 and 21:1, respectively, by increasing the nitrogen concentration and using a fixed carbon concentration leads to lower levels of PHA per cell and lower levels of PHA per batch of cells. Increasing the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio above 28:1 and 21:1 for cells grown on styrene and phenylacetic acid, respectively, by decreasing the nitrogen concentration and using a fixed carbon concentration increases the level of PHA per cell but results in a lower level of PHA per batch of cells. Increasing the carbon and nitrogen concentrations but maintaining the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio of 28:1 and 21:1 for cells grown on styrene and phenylacetic acid, respectively, results in an increase in the total PHA per batch of cells. The maximum yields for PHA from styrene, phenylacetic acid, and glucose are 0.11, 0.17, and 0.22 g of PHA per g of carbon

  8. Purification and properties of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (pyrocatechase) from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 in comparison with that from Pseudomonas arvilla C-1.

    PubMed

    Nakai, C; Nakazawa, T; Nozaki, M

    1988-12-01

    Catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (pyrocatechase) has been purified to homogeneity from Pseudomonas putida mt-2. Most properties of this enzyme, such as the absorption spectrum, iron content, pH stability, pH optimum, substrate specificity, Km values, and amino acid composition, were similar to those of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase obtained from Pseudomonas arvilla C-1 [Y. Kojima et al. (1967) J. Biol. Chem. 242, 3270-3278]. These two catechol 1,2-dioxygenases were also found, from the results of Ouchterlony double diffusion, to share several antigenic determinants. The molecular weight of the putida enzyme was estimated to be 66,000 and 64,000 by sedimentation equilibrium analysis and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration, respectively. The enzyme gave a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, corresponding to Mr 32,000. The NH2-terminal sequence, which started with threonine, was determined up to 30 residues by Edman degradation. During the degradation, a single amino acid was released at each step. The NH2-terminal sequence up to 20 residues was identical to that of the beta subunit of the arvilla enzyme, with one exception at step 16, at which arginine was observed instead of glutamine. The COOH-terminal residue was deduced to be arginine on carboxypeptidase A and B digestions and on hydrazinolysis. These results indicate that the putida enzyme consists of two identical subunits, in contrast to the arvilla enzyme which consists of two nonidentical subunits, alpha and beta [C. Nakai et al. (1979) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 195, 12-22], although these two enzymes have very similar properties.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Pseudomonas putida Strain KG-4, Isolated from Soil Samples Collected from Krishna-Godavari Basin in India.

    PubMed

    Dawar, Chhavi; Aggarwal, Ramesh K

    2015-06-04

    We report here the 5.58-Mb draft genome of Pseudomonas putida strain KG-4 obtained from the oil fields of the Krishna-Godavari basin, Andhra Pradesh, India. The genome sequence is expected to facilitate identification and understanding of genes associated with hydrocarbon metabolism, which can help in developing strategies for managing oil spills and bioremediation.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of the Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Degrading Bacterium Pseudomonas putida KF715 (NBRC 110667) Isolated from Biphenyl-Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Yamazoe, Atsushi; Hosoyama, Akira; Kimura, Nobutada; Hirose, Jun; Watanabe, Takahito; Fujihara, Hidehiko; Futagami, Taiki; Goto, Masatoshi; Furukawa, Kensuke

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas putida KF715 (NBRC 110667) utilizes biphenyl as a sole source of carbon and degrades polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Here, we report a complete genome sequence of the KF715 strain, which comprises a circular chromosome and four plasmids. Biphenyl catabolic genes were located on the largest plasmid, pKF715A. PMID:28209826

  11. Global Genome Comparative Analysis Reveals Insights of Resistome and Life-Style Adaptation of Pseudomonas putida Strain T2-2 in Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    How, Kah Yan; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    Most Pseudomonas putida strains are environmental microorganisms exhibiting a wide range of metabolic capability but certain strains have been reported as rare opportunistic pathogens and some emerged as multidrug resistant P. putida. This study aimed to assess the drug resistance profile of, via whole genome analysis, P. putida strain T2-2 isolated from oral cavity. At the same time, we also compared the nonenvironmental strain with environmentally isolated P. putida. In silico comparative genome analysis with available reference strains of P. putida shows that T2-2 has lesser gene counts on carbohydrate and aromatic compounds metabolisms, which suggested its little versatility. The detection of its edd gene also suggested T2-2's catabolism of glucose via ED pathway instead of EMP pathway. On the other hand, its drug resistance profile was observed via in silico gene prediction and most of the genes found were in agreement with drug-susceptibility testing in laboratory by automated VITEK 2. In addition, the finding of putative genes of multidrug resistance efflux pump and ATP-binding cassette transporters in this strain suggests a multidrug resistant phenotype. In summary, it is believed that multiple metabolic characteristics and drug resistance in P. putida strain T2-2 helped in its survival in human oral cavity. PMID:25436236

  12. Contrasting colonization and plant growth promoting capacity between wild type and gfp-derative of the endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619 in hybrid poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Weyens N.; van der Lelie D.; Boulet, J.; Adriaensen, D.; Timmermans, J.-P.; Prinsen, E.; Van Oevelen, S.; D"Haen, J.; Smeets, K.; Taghavi, S.; Vangronsveld, J.

    2011-06-09

    This study aims to investigate the colonization of poplar by the endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619 and its capacity to promote plant growth. Poplar cuttings were inoculated with P. putida W619 (wild-type or gfp-labelled). The colonization of both strains was investigated and morphological, physiological and biochemical parameters were analyzed to evaluate plant growth promotion. Inoculation with P. putida W619 (wild-type) resulted in remarkable growth promotion, decreased activities of antioxidative defence related enzymes, and reduced stomatal resistance, all indicative of improved plant health and growth in comparison with the non-inoculated cuttings. In contrast, inoculation with gfp-labelled P. putida W619 did not promote growth; it even had a negative effect on plant health and growth. Furthermore, compared to the wildtype strain, colonization by the gfp-labelled P. putida W619::gfp1 was much lower; it only colonized the rhizosphere and root cortex while the wild-type strain also colonized the root xylem vessels. Despite the strong plant growth promoting capacity of P. putida W619 (wild-type), after gfp labelling its growth promoting characteristics disappeared and its colonization capacity was strongly influenced; for these reasons gfp labelling should be applied with sufficient caution.

  13. Genome-scale reconstruction and analysis of the Pseudomonas putida KT2440 metabolic network facilitates applications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Puchałka, Jacek; Oberhardt, Matthew A; Godinho, Miguel; Bielecka, Agata; Regenhardt, Daniela; Timmis, Kenneth N; Papin, Jason A; Martins dos Santos, Vítor A P

    2008-10-01

    A cornerstone of biotechnology is the use of microorganisms for the efficient production of chemicals and the elimination of harmful waste. Pseudomonas putida is an archetype of such microbes due to its metabolic versatility, stress resistance, amenability to genetic modifications, and vast potential for environmental and industrial applications. To address both the elucidation of the metabolic wiring in P. putida and its uses in biocatalysis, in particular for the production of non-growth-related biochemicals, we developed and present here a genome-scale constraint-based model of the metabolism of P. putida KT2440. Network reconstruction and flux balance analysis (FBA) enabled definition of the structure of the metabolic network, identification of knowledge gaps, and pin-pointing of essential metabolic functions, facilitating thereby the refinement of gene annotations. FBA and flux variability analysis were used to analyze the properties, potential, and limits of the model. These analyses allowed identification, under various conditions, of key features of metabolism such as growth yield, resource distribution, network robustness, and gene essentiality. The model was validated with data from continuous cell cultures, high-throughput phenotyping data, (13)C-measurement of internal flux distributions, and specifically generated knock-out mutants. Auxotrophy was correctly predicted in 75% of the cases. These systematic analyses revealed that the metabolic network structure is the main factor determining the accuracy of predictions, whereas biomass composition has negligible influence. Finally, we drew on the model to devise metabolic engineering strategies to improve production of polyhydroxyalkanoates, a class of biotechnologically useful compounds whose synthesis is not coupled to cell survival. The solidly validated model yields valuable insights into genotype-phenotype relationships and provides a sound framework to explore this versatile bacterium and to

  14. Role of the crc gene in catabolic repression of the Pseudomonas putida GPo1 alkane degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Yuste, L; Rojo, F

    2001-11-01

    Expression of the alkane degradation pathway encoded in the OCT plasmid of Pseudomonas putida GPo1 is induced in the presence of alkanes by the AlkS regulator, and it is down-regulated by catabolic repression. The catabolic repression effect reduces the expression of the two AlkS-activated promoters of the pathway, named PalkB and PalkS2. The P. putida Crc protein participates in catabolic repression of some metabolic pathways for sugars and nitrogenated compounds. Here, we show that Crc has an important role in the catabolic repression exerted on the P. putida GPo1 alkane degradation pathway when cells grow exponentially in a rich medium. Interestingly, Crc plays little or no role on the catabolic repression exerted by some organic acids in a defined medium, which shows that these two types of catabolic repression can be genetically distinguished. Disruption of the crc gene led to a six- to sevenfold increase in the levels of the mRNAs arising from the AlkS-activated PalkB and PalkS2 promoters in cells growing exponentially in rich medium. This was not due to an increase in the half-lives of these mRNAs. Since AlkS activates the expression of its own gene and seems to be present in limiting amounts, the higher mRNA levels observed in the absence of Crc could arise from an increase in either transcription initiation or in the translation efficiency of the alkS mRNA. Both alternatives would lead to increased AlkS levels and hence to elevated expression of PalkB and PalkS2. High expression of alkS from a heterologous promoter eliminated catabolic repression. Our results indicate that catabolic repression in rich medium is directed to down-regulate the levels of the AlkS activator. Crc would thus modulate, directly or indirectly, the levels of AlkS.

  15. Interaction of Pseudomonas putida with kaolinite and montmorillonite: a combination study by equilibrium adsorption, ITC, SEM and FTIR.

    PubMed

    Rong, Xingmin; Huang, Qiaoyun; He, Xiaomin; Chen, Hao; Cai, Peng; Liang, Wei

    2008-06-15

    Equilibrium adsorption along with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques were employed to investigate the adsorption of Pseudomonas putida on kaolinite and montmorillonite. A higher affinity as well as larger amounts of adsorption of P. putida was found on kaolinite. The majority of sorbed bacterial cells (88.7%) could be released by water from montmorillonite, while only a small proportion (9.3%) of bacteria desorbed from kaolinite surface. More bacterial cells were observed to form aggregates with kaolinite, while fewer cells were within the larger bacteria-montmorillonite particles. The sorption of bacteria on kaolinite was enthalpically more favorable than that on montmorillonite. Based on our findings, it is proposed that the non-electrostatic forces other than electrostatic force play a more important role in bacterial adsorption by kaolinite and montmorillonite. Adsorption of bacteria on clay minerals resulted in obvious shifts of infrared absorption bands of water molecules, showing the importance of hydrogen bonding in bacteria-clay mineral adsorption. The enthalpies of -4.1+/-2.1 x 10(-8) and -2.5+/-1.4 x 10(-8)mJ cell(-1) for the adsorption of bacteria on kaolinite and montmorillonite, respectively, at 25 degrees C and pH 7.0 were firstly reported in this paper. The enthalpy of bacteria-mineral adsorption was higher than that reported previously for bacteria-biomolecule interaction but lower than that of bacterial coaggregation. The bacteria-mineral adsorption enthalpies increased at higher temperature, suggesting that the enthalpy-entropy compensation mechanism could be involved in the adsorption of P. putida on clay minerals. Data obtained in this study would provide valuable information for a better understanding of the mechanisms of mineral-microorganism interactions in soil and associated environments.

  16. Antimicrobial effect of Al2O3, Ag and Al2O3/Ag thin films on Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelov, O.; Stoyanova, D.; Ivanova, I.; Todorova, S.

    2016-10-01

    The influence of Al2O3, Ag and Al2O3/Ag thin films on bacterial growth of Gramnegative bacteria Pseudomonas putida and Escherichia coli is studied. The nanostructured thin films are deposited on glass substrates without intentional heating through r.f. magnetron sputtering in Ar atmosphere of Al2O3 and Ag targets or through sequential sputtering of Al2O3 and Ag targets, respectively. The individual Ag thin films (thickness 8 nm) have a weak bacteriostatic effect on Escherichia coli expressed as an extended adaptive phase of the bacteria up to 5 hours from the beginning of the experiment, but the final effect is only 10 times lower bacterial density than in the control. The individual Al2O3 film (20 nm) has no antibacterial effect against two strains E. coli - industrial and pathogenic. The Al2O3/Ag bilayer films (Al2O3 20 nm/Ag 8 nm) have strong bactericidal effect on Pseudomonas putida and demonstrate an effective time of disinfection for 2 hours. The individual films Al2O3 and Ag have not pronounced antibacterial effect on Pseudomonas putida. A synergistic effect of Al2O3/Ag bilayer films in formation of oxidative species on the surface in contact with the bacterial suspension could be a reason for their antimicrobial effect on E. coli and P. putida.

  17. A tricistronic heat shock operon is important for stress tolerance of Pseudomonas putida and conserved in many environmental bacteria.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Stefanie S; Joswig, Matthias; Nagel, Miriam; Narberhaus, Franz

    2014-06-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) including the well-studied IbpA protein from Escherichia coli are molecular chaperones that bind to non-native proteins and prevent them from aggregation. We discovered an entirely unexplored tricistronic small heat shock gene cluster in Pseudomonas putida. The genes pp3314, pp3313 and pp3312 (renamed to hspX, hspY and hspZ respectively) are transcribed in a single transcript. In addition to σ(32) -dependent transcriptional control, translation of the first and second gene of the operon is controlled by RNA thermometers with novel architectures. Biochemical analysis of HspY, HspZ and P. putida IbpA demonstrated that they assemble into homo-oligomers of different sizes whose quaternary structures alter in a temperature-dependent manner. IbpA and HspY are able to prevent the model substrate citrate synthase from thermal aggregation in vitro. Increased stress sensitivity of a P. putida strain lacking HspX, HspY and HspZ revealed an important role of these sHsps in stress adaptation. The hspXYZ operon is conserved among metabolically related bacteria that live in hostile environments including polluted soils. This heat shock operon might act as a protective system to promote survival in such ecological niches.

  18. A Pseudomonas putida double mutant deficient in butanol assimilation: a promising step for engineering a biological biofuel production platform.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, María Del Sol; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Gómez-García, María R; Ramos, Juan L

    2016-03-01

    Biological production in heterologous hosts is of interest for the production of the C4 alcohol (butanol) and other chemicals. However, some hurdles need to be overcome in order to achieve an economically viable process; these include avoiding the consumption of butanol and maintaining tolerance to this solvent during production. Pseudomonas putida is a potential host for solvent production; in order to further adapt P. putida to this role, we generated mini-Tn5 mutant libraries in strain BIRD-1 that do not consume butanol. We analyzed the insertion site of the mini-Tn5 in a mutant that was deficient in assimilation of butanol using arbitrary PCR followed by Sanger sequencing and found that the transposon was inserted in the malate synthase B gene. Here, we show that in a second round of mutagenesis a double mutant unable to take up butanol had an insertion in a gene coding for a multisensor hybrid histidine kinase. The genetic context of the histidine kinase sensor revealed the presence of a set of genes potentially involved in butanol assimilation; qRT-PCR analysis showed induction of this set of genes in the wild type and the malate synthase mutant but not in the double mutant.

  19. The type II secretion system (Xcp) of Pseudomonas putida is active and involved in the secretion of phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Putker, Florian; Tommassen-van Boxtel, Ria; Stork, Michiel; Rodríguez-Herva, José J; Koster, Margot; Tommassen, Jan

    2013-10-01

    The genome of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas putida harbours a complete set of xcp genes for a type II protein secretion system (T2SS). This study shows that expression of these genes is induced under inorganic phosphate (Pi ) limitation and that the system enables the utilization of various organic phosphate sources. A phosphatase of the PhoX family, previously designated UxpB, was identified, which was produced under low Pi conditions and transported across the cell envelope in an Xcp-dependent manner demonstrating that the xcp genes encode an active T2SS. The signal sequence of UxpB contains a twin-arginine translocation (Tat) motif as well as a lipobox, and both processing by leader peptidase II and Tat dependency were experimentally confirmed. Two different tat gene clusters were detected in the P. putida genome, of which one, named tat-1, is located adjacent to the uxpB and xcp genes. Both Tat systems appeared to be capable of transporting the UxpB protein. However, expression of the tat-1 genes was strongly induced by low Pi levels, indicating a function of this system in survival during Pi starvation.

  20. Cloning and characterization of the pnb genes, encoding enzymes for 4-nitrobenzoate catabolism in Pseudomonas putida TW3.

    PubMed

    Hughes, M A; Williams, P A

    2001-02-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain TW3 is able to metabolize 4-nitrotoluene via 4-nitrobenzoate (4NBen) and 3, 4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (protocatechuate [PCA]) to central metabolites. We have cloned, sequenced, and characterized a 6-kbp fragment of TW3 DNA which contains five genes, two of which encode the enzymes involved in the catabolism of 4NBen to PCA. In order, they encode a 4NBen reductase (PnbA) which is responsible for catalyzing the direct reduction of 4NBen to 4-hydroxylaminobenzoate with the oxidation of 2 mol of NADH per mol of 4NBen, a reductase-like enzyme (Orf1) which appears to have no function in the pathway, a regulator protein (PnbR) of the LysR family, a 4-hydroxylaminobenzoate lyase (PnbB) which catalyzes the conversion of 4-hydroxylaminobenzoate to PCA and ammonium, and a second lyase-like enzyme (Orf2) which is closely associated with pnbB but appears to have no function in the pathway. The central pnbR gene is transcribed in the opposite direction to the other four genes. These genes complete the characterization of the whole pathway of 4-nitrotoluene catabolism to the ring cleavage substrate PCA in P. putida strain TW3.

  1. Pathway-Consensus Approach to Metabolic Network Reconstruction for Pseudomonas putida KT2440 by Systematic Comparison of Published Models

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qianqian; Li, Peishun; Hao, Tong; Li, Feiran; Ma, Hongwu; Wang, Zhiwen; Zhao, Xueming; Chen, Tao; Goryanin, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Over 100 genome-scale metabolic networks (GSMNs) have been published in recent years and widely used for phenotype prediction and pathway design. However, GSMNs for a specific organism reconstructed by different research groups usually produce inconsistent simulation results, which makes it difficult to use the GSMNs for precise optimal pathway design. Therefore, it is necessary to compare and identify the discrepancies among networks and build a consensus metabolic network for an organism. Here we proposed a process for systematic comparison of metabolic networks at pathway level. We compared four published GSMNs of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and identified the discrepancies leading to inconsistent pathway calculation results. The mistakes in the models were corrected based on information from literature so that all the calculated synthesis and uptake pathways were the same. Subsequently we built a pathway-consensus model and then further updated it with the latest genome annotation information to obtain modelPpuQY1140 for P. putida KT2440, which includes 1140 genes, 1171 reactions and 1104 metabolites. We found that even small errors in a GSMN could have great impacts on the calculated optimal pathways and thus may lead to incorrect pathway design strategies. Careful investigation of the calculated pathways during the metabolic network reconstruction process is essential for building proper GSMNs for pathway design. PMID:28085902

  2. Cloning and Characterization of the pnb Genes, Encoding Enzymes for 4-Nitrobenzoate Catabolism in Pseudomonas putida TW3

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michelle A.; Williams, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain TW3 is able to metabolize 4-nitrotoluene via 4-nitrobenzoate (4NBen) and 3, 4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (protocatechuate [PCA]) to central metabolites. We have cloned, sequenced, and characterized a 6-kbp fragment of TW3 DNA which contains five genes, two of which encode the enzymes involved in the catabolism of 4NBen to PCA. In order, they encode a 4NBen reductase (PnbA) which is responsible for catalyzing the direct reduction of 4NBen to 4-hydroxylaminobenzoate with the oxidation of 2 mol of NADH per mol of 4NBen, a reductase-like enzyme (Orf1) which appears to have no function in the pathway, a regulator protein (PnbR) of the LysR family, a 4-hydroxylaminobenzoate lyase (PnbB) which catalyzes the conversion of 4-hydroxylaminobenzoate to PCA and ammonium, and a second lyase-like enzyme (Orf2) which is closely associated with pnbB but appears to have no function in the pathway. The central pnbR gene is transcribed in the opposite direction to the other four genes. These genes complete the characterization of the whole pathway of 4-nitrotoluene catabolism to the ring cleavage substrate PCA in P. putida strain TW3. PMID:11157934

  3. Purification of Pseudomonas putida acyl coenzyme A ligase active with a range of aliphatic and aromatic substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Valverde, M; Reglero, A; Martinez-Blanco, H; Luengo, J M

    1993-01-01

    Acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) ligase (acyl-CoA synthetase [ACoAS]) from Pseudomonas putida U was purified to homogeneity (252-fold) after this bacterium was grown in a chemically defined medium containing octanoic acid as the sole carbon source. The enzyme, which has a mass of 67 kDa, showed maximal activity at 40 degrees C in 10 mM K2PO4H-NaPO4H2 buffer (pH 7.0) containing 20% (wt/vol) glycerol. Under these conditions, ACoAS showed hyperbolic behavior against acetate, CoA, and ATP; the Kms calculated for these substrates were 4.0, 0.7, and 5.2 mM, respectively. Acyl-CoA ligase recognizes several aliphatic molecules (acetic, propionic, butyric, valeric, hexanoic, heptanoic, and octanoic acids) as substrates, as well as some aromatic compounds (phenylacetic and phenoxyacetic acids). The broad substrate specificity of ACoAS from P. putida was confirmed by coupling it with acyl-CoA:6-aminopenicillanic acid acyltransferase from Penicillium chrysogenum to study the formation of several penicillins. Images PMID:8476289

  4. Changes in membrane fluidity and fatty acid composition of Pseudomonas putida CN-T19 in response to toluene.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Seon; Shim, Jae Han; Suh, Yong Tack

    2002-09-01

    A bacterial isolate, Pseudomonas putida CN-T19, could grow in a two-phase medium with toluene up to 50% (v/v). Changes in fatty acid composition and membrane fluidity of the isolate were investigated to understand how this microorganism responds toluene. The changes in the ratios of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids were insignificant between cells grown with and without toluene. The changes in the ratio of cis- to trans-fatty acids of C16:1 and C18:1 was, however, significantly lower in cells grown with toluene than cells grown without toluene, giving approximately 1.3 and 9.7, respectively. Toluene had a fluidizing effect on the membrane of cells grown without toluene, resulting in decrease in membrane polarization ratio. Less fluidizing effect of toluene on the membrane of cells grown with toluene was observed, giving 11% of polarization percentage, which was significantly lower than 53% in cells grown without toluene. These results suggest that cis/trans isomeration of C16:1 and C18:1 makes cell membranes more rigid to respond toluene, and is an adaptive strategy allowing P. putida CN-T19 to grow in the presence of organic solvent.

  5. Hydrogen formation by an arsenate-reducing Pseudomonas putida, isolated from arsenic-contaminated groundwater in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Freikowski, Dominik; Winter, Josef; Gallert, Claudia

    2010-12-01

    Anaerobic growth of a newly isolated Pseudomonas putida strain WB from an arsenic-contaminated soil in West Bengal, India on glucose, L: -lactate, and acetate required the presence of arsenate, which was reduced to arsenite. During aerobic growth in the presence of arsenite arsenate was formed. Anaerobic growth of P. putida WB on glucose was made possible presumably by the non-energy-conserving arsenate reductase ArsC with energy derived only from substrate level phosphorylation. Two moles of acetate were generated intermediarily and the reducing equivalents of glycolysis and pyruvate decarboxylation served for arsenate reduction or were released as H(2). Anaerobic growth on acetate and lactate was apparently made possible by arsenate reductase ArrA coupled to respiratory electron chain energy conservation. In the presence of arsenate, both substrates were totally oxidized to CO(2) and H(2) with part of the H(2) serving for respiratory arsenate reduction to deliver energy for growth. The growth yield for anaerobic glucose degradation to acetate was Y (Glucose) = 20 g/mol, leading to an energy coefficient of Y (ATP) = 10 g/mol adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), if the Emden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway with generation of 2 mol ATP/mol glucose was used. During growth on lactate and acetate no substrate chain phosphorylation was possible. The energy gain by reduction of arsenate was Y (Arsenate) = 6.9 g/mol, which would be little less than one ATP/mol of arsenate.

  6. N-acyl Homoserine Lactone-Producing Pseudomonas putida Strain T2-2 from Human Tongue Surface

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Woon; Chin, Shenyang; Tee, Kok Keng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Choo, Yeun Mun; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial cell-to-cell communication (quorum sensing) refers to the regulation of bacterial gene expression in response to changes in microbial population density. Quorum sensing bacteria produce, release and respond to chemical signal molecules called autoinducers. Bacteria use two types of autoinducers, namely autoinducer-1 (AI-1) and autoinducer-2 (AI-2) where the former are N-acylhomoserine lactones and the latter is a product of the luxS gene. Most of the reported literatures show that the majority of oral bacteria use AI-2 for quorum sensing but rarely the AI-1 system. Here we report the isolation of Pseudomonas putida strain T2-2 from the oral cavity. Using high resolution mass spectrometry, it is shown that this isolate produced N-octanoylhomoserine lactone (C8-HSL) and N-dodecanoylhomoserine lactone (C12-HSL) molecules. This is the first report of the finding of quorum sensing of P. putida strain T2-2 isolated from the human tongue surface and their quorum sensing molecules were identified. PMID:24084113

  7. Regulation of the degradative pathway enzymes coded for by the TOL plasmid (pWWO) from Pseudomonas putida mt-2.

    PubMed Central

    Worsey, M J; Franklin, F C; Williams, P A

    1978-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida mt-2 carries a plasmid (TOL, pWWO) which codes for a single set of enzymes responsible for the catabolism of toluene and m- and p-xylene to central metabolites by way of benzoate and m- and p-toluate, respectively, and subsequently by a meta cleavage pathway. Characterization of strains with mutations in structural genes of this pathway demonstrates that the inducers of the enzymes responsible for further degradation of m-toluate include m-xylene, m-methylbenzyl alcohol, and m-toluate, whereas the inducers of the enzymes responsible for oxidation of m-xylene to m-toluate include m-xylene and m-methylbenzyl alcohol but not m-toluate. A regulatory mutant is described in which m-xylene and m-methylbenzyl alcohol no longer induce any of the pathway enzymes, but m-toluate is still able to induce the enzymes responsible for its own degradation. Among revertants of this mutant are some strains in which all the enzymes are expressed constitutively and are not further induced by m-xylene. A model is proposed for the regulation of the pathway in which the enzymes are in two regulatory blocks, which are under the control of two regulator gene products. The model is essentially the same as proposed earlier for the regulation of the isofunctional pathway on the TOL20 plasmid from P. putida MT20. PMID:659369

  8. Antimicrobial effects of selected plant essential oils on the growth of a Pseudomonas putida strain isolated from meat.

    PubMed

    Oussalah, Mounia; Caillet, Stéphane; Saucier, Linda; Lacroix, Monique

    2006-06-01

    The inhibitory effect of 60 different essential oils was evaluated on a Pseudomonas putida strain of meat origin, associated with meat spoilage. Essential oils were tested at concentrations from 0.003 to 0.8% (wt/vol) to determine minimum inhibitory and maximal tolerated concentrations (MIC and MTC, respectively) using an agar medium culture. Of the 60 samples tested, Corydothymus capitatus essential oil was the most active showing a MIC of 0.025% and a MTC of 0.06%. Seven essential oils (Cinnamomum cassia, Origanum compactum, Origanum heracleoticum, Satureja hortensis, Satureja montana, Thymus vulgaris carvacroliferum, Thymus vulgaris thymoliferum) have shown a strong antimicrobial activity against P. putida with a MIC of 0.05% and a MTC ranging from 0.013% to 0.025%. Ten other oils (Cinnamomum verum (leaf and bark), Eugenia caryophyllus, Cymbopogon martinii var. motia, Cymbopogon nardus, Melaleuca linariifolia, Origanum majorana, Pimenta dioica, Thymus satureoides, Thymus serpyllum) showed a high antimicrobial activity showing a MIC ranging from 0.1% to 0.4%, while the remaining were less active showing a MIC⩾0.8%.

  9. Antimicrobial effect of TiO2 doped with Ag and Cu on Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelov, O.; Stoyanova, D.; Ivanova, I.

    2016-10-01

    Antimicrobial effect of TiO2 doped with Ag and Cu on Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida is studied. The thin films are deposited on glass substrates without heating during the deposition by r.f. magnetron co-sputtering of TiO2 target and pieces of Ag and Cu. The studied films, thickness about 65 nm, were as deposited and annealed (5200C, 4h, N2+5%H2, 4Pa). The as deposited thin films TiO2:Ag:Cu have band gap energy of 3.56 eV little higher than the band gap of crystalline anatase TiO2 which can be explained with the quantum effect of the granular structure of r.f. magnetron sputtered films. The annealed samples have band gap of 2.52 eV due to formation of donor levels from Ag and Cu atoms near the bottom of the conduction band. The toxic effect was determined through the classical Koch's method and the optical density measurements at λ=610 nm. The as deposited TiO2:Ag:Cu thin films demonstrate stronger inhibition effect - bactericidal for P. putida and bacteriostatic for E. coli (up to the 6th hour) in comparison with the annealed samples. The both methods of study show the same trends of the bacterial growth independently of their different sensitivity which confirms the observed effect.

  10. Mechanisms of trace metal sorption in Pseudomonas putida-birnessite assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, J.; Kwon, K. D.; Bargar, J. R.; Sposito, G.

    2012-04-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides (MnO2) are ubiquitous nanoparticulate minerals that contribute strongly to the adsorption of nutrient and toxicant metals in aquatic and terrestrial environments. The formation of these minerals is catalyzed by a diverse and widely-distributed group of bacteria and fungi, often through the enzymatic oxidation of aqueous Mn(II) to Mn(IV). The biogenic Mn(IV) oxide found in field settings, as well as that produced by model bacteria in laboratory culture, is typically layer-type hexagonal birnessite containing abundant cation vacancy sites and enmeshed in an organic matrix of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substances. In this talk I summarize the results from laboratory-scale research designed to investigate the mechanisms of metal sorption by the bacterial biomass-birnessite assemblages formed by Pseudomonas putida GB-1 when grown in the presence of 1 mM Mn(II) at circumneutral pH values. The goals of this research were first, to identify the structure of the surface complexes formed by trace metals (e.g., Ni, Cu and Zn) on biogenic birnessite and second, to determine the conditions under which the bacterial cell surfaces and extracellular polymeric substances contribute to metal sorption. Macroscopic and spectroscopic experiments were performed at varying pH values (6 - 8) and over a wide-range of metal concentrations. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and first-principles calculations based on density functional theory showed that cation vacancy sites in birnessite drive mineral reactivity, but that surface speciation varies from metal to metal. For, Ni we identified two species, Ni bonded to three surface oxygen atoms vacancy sites as a triple-corner-sharing (TCS) complex and Ni incorporated at vacancy sites, with surface speciation varying with pH and surface loading. Zinc formed TCS complexes at vacancy sites, with the proportion of Zn in tetrahedral or octahedral coordination geometry influenced

  11. [Effect of transposons on expression of genes for naphthalene biodegradation in Pseudomonas putida BS202(NPL-1) and derivative strains].

    PubMed

    Sokolov, S L; Kosheleva, I A; Filonov, A E; Boronin, A M

    2005-01-01

    NPL-1 and its derivative plasmid pBS106, which control the degradation of naphthalene and salicylate, were found to contain class II transposons of the Tn3 family. These transposons are involved in intraplasmid rearrangements, such as deletions and inversions, and can influence the expression of the catabolic and regulatory genes borne by biodegradation plasmids. The formation of a strong NahR-independent constitutive promoter by the inversion of a DNA fragment may be responsible for changing the character of naphthalene dioxygenase synthesis from inducible (in the case of plasmid NPL-1) to constitutive (in the case of plasmid NPL-41). The stability of plasmids NPL-1 and NPL-41 in the Pseudomonas putida strains grown on different substrates depends on the expression of the nah and tnp genes.

  12. The solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12 as host for the production of cinnamic acid from glucose.

    PubMed

    Nijkamp, Karin; van Luijk, Nicole; de Bont, Jan A M; Wery, Jan

    2005-11-01

    A Pseudomonas putida S12 strain was constructed that efficiently produced the fine chemical cinnamic acid from glucose or glycerol via the central metabolite phenylalanine. The gene encoding phenylalanine ammonia lyase from the yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides was introduced. Phenylalanine availability was the main bottleneck in cinnamic acid production, which could not be overcome by the overexpressing enzymes of the phenylalanine biosynthesis pathway. A successful approach in abolishing this limitation was the generation of a bank of random mutants and selection on the toxic phenylalanine anti-metabolite m-fluoro-phenylalanine. Following high-throughput screening, a mutant strain was obtained that, under optimised culture conditions, accumulated over 5 mM of cinnamic acid with a yield (Cmol%) of 6.7%.

  13. DNA Polymerases ImuC and DinB Are Involved in DNA Alkylation Damage Tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Jatsenko, Tatjana; Sidorenko, Julia; Saumaa, Signe; Kivisaar, Maia

    2017-01-01

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), facilitated by low-fidelity polymerases, is an important DNA damage tolerance mechanism. Here, we investigated the role and biological function of TLS polymerase ImuC (former DnaE2), generally present in bacteria lacking DNA polymerase V, and TLS polymerase DinB in response to DNA alkylation damage in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. putida. We found that TLS DNA polymerases ImuC and DinB ensured a protective role against N- and O-methylation induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in both P. aeruginosa and P. putida. DinB also appeared to be important for the survival of P. aeruginosa and rapidly growing P. putida cells in the presence of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). The role of ImuC in protection against MMS-induced damage was uncovered under DinB-deficient conditions. Apart from this, both ImuC and DinB were critical for the survival of bacteria with impaired base excision repair (BER) functions upon alkylation damage, lacking DNA glycosylases AlkA and/or Tag. Here, the increased sensitivity of imuCdinB double deficient strains in comparison to single mutants suggested that the specificity of alkylated DNA lesion bypass of DinB and ImuC might also be different. Moreover, our results demonstrated that mutagenesis induced by MMS in pseudomonads was largely ImuC-dependent. Unexpectedly, we discovered that the growth temperature of bacteria affected the efficiency of DinB and ImuC in ensuring cell survival upon alkylation damage. Taken together, the results of our study disclosed the involvement of ImuC in DNA alkylation damage tolerance, especially at low temperatures, and its possible contribution to the adaptation of pseudomonads upon DNA alkylation damage via increased mutagenesis. PMID:28118378

  14. Toxicity evaluation of selected ammonium-based ionic liquid forms with MCPP and dicamba moieties on Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Syguda, Anna; Wyrwas, Bogdan; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2017-01-01

    Combination of the hydrophilic herbicidal anion with hydrophobic, antimicrobial ammonium cation allows to obtain compounds in ionic liquid form with better properties then conventional herbicides. Both cation and anion can be modified by selection of herbicide and the length of alkyl chains in cation structure. However the knowledge of their potential toxic effects are still limited. Furthermore, the relation between hydrophobicity associated with the length of alkyl chains and toxicity for ionic liquids has not been thoroughly studied. Therefore we investigated toxic effects of herbicidal ionic liquid forms on growth inhibition, given as EC50, of the common soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida. We thereby concentrated on quaternary ammonium salts. Analyzed compounds were composed of dicamba or MCPP moieties and cation with various alkyl chain lengths (n = 6,8,10) We compared them with commercial herbicides, and ammonium-based ionic liquids with neutral anion (Br(-)). In addition, cis-trans isomerisation of unsaturated membrane fatty acids in Pseudomonas putida was applied as the proxy for toxicity and membrane activity. We showed that toxicity increased with the length of alkyl chains. However, this correlation is only valid for six and eight carbon atom in alkyl chains, where for n = 10 the EC50 values rise by one order of magnitude. In our studies, the herbicidal ionic liquids [C10,C10,C1,C1N][MCPP] and [C10,C10,C1,C1N][dicamba] showed the lowest toxicity among analyzed quaternary ammonium salts and comparable toxicity with corresponding herbicides. No clear increase in toxicity could be followed by changing the anion moieties for ammonium-based ionic liquid forms.

  15. Physiological function of the Pseudomonas putida PpG6 (Pseudomonas oleovorans) alkane hydroxylase: monoterminal oxidation of alkanes and fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Nieder, M; Shapiro, J

    1975-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida PpG6 is able to utilize purified n-alkanes of six to ten carbon atoms for growth. It can also grow on the primary terminal oxidation products of these alkanes and on 1-dodecanol but not on the corresponding 2-ketones or 1,6-hexanediol, adipic acid, or pimelic acid. Revertible point mutants can be isolated which have simultaneously lost the ability to grow on all five n-alkane growth substrates but which can still grow on octanol or nonanol. An acetate-negative mutant defective in isocitrate lysase activity is unable to grow on even-numbered alkanes and fatty acids. Analysis of double mutants defective in acetate and propionate or in acetate and glutarate metabolism shows that alkane carbon is assimilated only via acetyl-coenzyme A and propionyl-coenzyme A. These results support the following conclusions: (i) The n-alkane growth specificity of P. putida PpG6 is due to the substrate specificity of whole-cell alkane hydroxylation; (ii) there is a single alkane hydroxylase enzyme complex; (iii) the physiological role of this complex is to initiate the monoterminal oxidation of alkane chains; and (iv) straight-chain fatty acids from butyric through nonanoic are degraded exclusively by beta-oxidation from the carboxyl end of the molecule. PMID:804473

  16. Confirming Pseudomonas putida as a reliable bioassay for demonstrating biocompatibility enhancement by solar photo-oxidative processes of a biorecalcitrant effluent.

    PubMed

    García-Ripoll, A; Amat, A M; Arques, A; Vicente, R; Ballesteros Martín, M M; Pérez, J A Sánchez; Oller, I; Malato, S

    2009-03-15

    Experiments based on Vibrio fischeri, activated sludge and Pseudomonas putida have been employed to check variation in the biocompatibility of an aqueous solution of a commercial pesticide, along solar photo-oxidative process (TiO(2) and Fenton reagent). Activated sludge-based experiments have demonstrated a complete detoxification of the solution, although important toxicity is still detected according to the more sensitive V. fischeri assays. In parallel, the biodegradability of organic matter is strongly enhanced, with BOD(5)/COD ratio above 0.8. Bioassays run with P. putida have given similar trends, remarking the convenience of using P. putida culture as a reliable and reproducible method for assessing both toxicity and biodegradability, as a substitute to other more time consuming methods.

  17. Effect of silver nanoparticles and silver ions on growth and adaptive response mechanisms of Pseudomonas putida mt-2.

    PubMed

    Hachicho, Nancy; Hoffmann, Philipp; Ahlert, Kristin; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2014-06-01

    The distribution and use of nanoparticles increased rapidly during the last years, while the knowledge about mode of action, ecological tolerance and biodegradability of these chemicals is still insufficient. The effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) and free silver ions (Ag(+) , AgNO3 ) on Pseudomonas putida mt-2 as one of the best described bacterial strains for stress response were investigated. The effective concentration (EC50) causing 50% growth inhibition for AgNP was about 250 mg L(-1) , whereas this was only 0.175 mg L(-1) for AgNO3 . However, when calculating the amount of free silver ions released from AgNP both tested compounds showed very similar results. Therefore, the antibacterial activity of AgNP can be explained and reduced, respectively, to the amount of silver ions released from the nanoparticles. Both tested compounds showed a strong activation of the unique membrane adaptive response of Pseudomonas strains, the cis-trans isomerization of unsaturated fatty acids, whereas another important adaptive response of these bacteria, changes in cell surface hydrophobicity, measured as water contact angle, was not activated. These results are important informations for the estimation of environmental tolerance of newly developed, active ingredients like silver nanoparticles.

  18. Functional Identification of a Novel Gene, moaE, for 3-Succinoylpyridine Degradation in Pseudomonas putida S16

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yi; Tang, Hongzhi; Wu, Geng; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Microbial degradation of N-heterocyclic compounds, including xanthine, quinoline, nicotinate, and nicotine, frequently requires molybdenum hydroxylases. The intramolecular electron transfer chain of molybdenum hydroxylases consists of a molybdenum cofactor, two distinct [2Fe-2S] clusters, and flavin adenine dinucleotide. 3-Succinoylpyridine monooxygenase (Spm), responsible for the transformation from 3-succinoylpyridine to 6-hydroxy-3-succinoylpyridine, is a crucial enzyme in the pyrrolidine pathway of nicotine degradation in Pseudomonas. Our previous work revealed that the heterotrimeric enzyme (SpmA, SpmB, and SpmC) requires molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as a cofactor for their activities. In this study, we knocked out four genes, including PPS_1556, PPS_2936, PPS_4063, and PPS_4397, and found that a novel gene, PPS_4397 encoding moaE, is necessary for molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide biosynthesis. Resting cell reactions of the moaE deletion mutant incubated with 3 g l−1 nicotine at 30 °C resulted in accumulation of 3-succinoylpyridine, and the strain complemented by the moaE gene regained the ability to convert 3-succinoylpyridine. In addition, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that the transcriptional levels of the genes of moaE, spmA, and spmC of Pseudomonas putida S16 were distinctly higher when grown in nicotine medium than in glycerol medium. PMID:26304596

  19. Expression of Fap amyloids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. fluorescens, and P. putida results in aggregation and increased biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Dueholm, Morten S; Søndergaard, Mads T; Nilsson, Martin; Christiansen, Gunna; Stensballe, Allan; Overgaard, Michael T; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Otzen, Daniel E; Nielsen, Per H

    2013-01-01

    The fap operon, encoding functional amyloids in Pseudomonas (Fap), is present in most pseudomonads, but so far the expression and importance for biofilm formation has only been investigated for P. fluorescens strain UK4. In this study, we demonstrate the capacity of P. aeruginosa PAO1, P. fluorescens Pf-5, and P. putida F1 to express Fap fibrils, and investigated the effect of Fap expression on aggregation and biofilm formation. The fap operon in all three Pseudomonas species conferred the ability to express Fap fibrils as shown using a recombinant approach. This Fap overexpression consistently resulted in highly aggregative phenotypes and in increased biofilm formation. Detailed biophysical investigations of purified fibrils confirmed FapC as the main fibril monomer and supported the role of FapB as a minor, nucleating constituent as also indicated by bioinformatic analysis. Bioinformatics analysis suggested FapF and FapD as a potential β-barrel membrane pore and protease, respectively. Manipulation of the fap operon showed that FapA affects monomer composition of the final amyloid fibril, and that FapB is an amyloid protein, probably a nucleator for FapC polymerization. Our study highlights the fap operon as a molecular machine for functional amyloid formation. PMID:23504942

  20. Effect of growth temperature and pH on the aminopeptidase activity of Pseudomonas putida, P. fluorescens and Flavobacterium odoratum; the 4-nitroaniline test is reliable.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Tomas, L A; Ordoñez, J A; Mediavilla, C; Rodriguez-Marin, J L; Sarmiento, P; Zamora, A; Garcia de Fernando, G

    2008-01-01

    No significant difference (p > 0.05) was observed in the specific aminopeptidase activity (SAA) developed by Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. putida and Flavobacterium odoratum either growing at pH 5.0-6.5 or at 7 and 12 degrees C. Nevertheless, a significant difference was found when comparing the SAA of these organisms. The SAA of F. odoratum was lower than those of pseudomonads. The 4-nitroaniline test is reliable to estimate the G(-) load of fresh food products.

  1. Substrate Selectivity of a 3-Nitrophenol-Induced Metabolic System in Pseudomonas putida 2NP8 Transforming Nitroaromatic Compounds into Ammonia under Aerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian-Shen; Ward, Owen P.

    2001-01-01

    The 3-nitrophenol-induced enzyme system in cells of Pseudomonas putida 2NP8 manifested a wide substrate range in transforming nitroaromatic compounds through to ammonia production. All of the 30 mono- or dinitroaromatic substrates except 4-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, 3-nitroaniline, 2-nitrobenzoic acid, and 2-nitrofuran were quickly transformed. Ammonia production from most nitroaromatic substrates appeared to be stoichiometric. PMID:11229938

  2. Inoculation effects of Pseudomonas putida, Gluconacetobacter azotocaptans, and Azospirillum lipoferum on corn plant growth under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Mehnaz, Samina; Lazarovits, George

    2006-04-01

    Alcohol production from corn is gaining importance in Ontario, Canada, and elsewhere. A major cost of corn production is the cost of chemical fertilizers and these continue to increase in price. The competitiveness of alcohol with fossil fuels depends on access to low-cost corn that allows growers to earn a sustainable income. In this study we set out to determine if we can identify root-associated microorganisms from Ontario-grown corn that can enhance the nutrient flow to corn roots, directly or indirectly, and help minimize the use of extraneous fertilizer. Bacteria were isolated from corn rhizosphere and screened for their capacity to enhance corn growth. The bacteria were examined for their ability to fix nitrogen, solubilize phosphate, and produce indole acetic acid (IAA) and antifungal substances on potato dextrose agar. Bacterial suspensions were applied to pregerminated seed of four corn varieties (39D82, 39H84, 39M27, and 39T68) planted in sterilized sand and unsterilized cornfield soil. The plants were grown under greenhouse conditions for 30 days. Three isolates were identified as having growth-promoting effect. These bacteria were identified as to species by biochemical tests, fatty acid profiles, and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Corn rhizosphere isolates, Gluconacetobacter azotocaptans DS1, Pseudomonas putida CQ179, and Azospirillum lipoferum N7, provided significant plant growth promotion expressed as increased root/shoot weight when compared to uninoculated plants, in sand and/or soil. All strains except P. putida CQ179 were capable of nitrogen fixation and IAA production. Azospirillum brasilense, however, produced significantly more IAA than the other isolates. Although several of the strains were also able to solubilize phosphate and produce metabolites inhibitory to various fungal pathogens, these properties are not considered as contributing to growth promotion under the conditions used in this study. These bacteria will undergo field tests for

  3. Integrated organic-aqueous biocatalysis and product recovery for quinaldine hydroxylation catalyzed by living recombinant Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Ütkür, F Ozde; Thanh Tran, Tan; Collins, Jonathan; Brandenbusch, Christoph; Sadowski, Gabriele; Schmid, Andreas; Bühler, Bruno

    2012-07-01

    In an earlier study, biocatalytic carbon oxyfunctionalization with water serving as oxygen donor, e.g., the bioconversion of quinaldine to 4-hydroxyquinaldine, was successfully achieved using resting cells of recombinant Pseudomonas putida, containing the molybdenum-enzyme quinaldine 4-oxidase, in a two-liquid phase (2LP) system (Ütkür et al. J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol 38:1067-1077, 2011). In the study reported here, key parameters determining process performance were investigated and an efficient and easy method for product recovery was established. The performance of the whole-cell biocatalyst was shown not to be limited by the availability of the inducer benzoate (also serving as growth substrate) during the growth of recombinant P. putida cells. Furthermore, catalyst performance during 2LP biotransformations was not limited by the availability of glucose, the energy source to maintain metabolic activity in resting cells, and molecular oxygen, a possible final electron acceptor during quinaldine oxidation. The product and the organic solvent (1-dodecanol) were identified as the most critical factors affecting biocatalyst performance, to a large extent on the enzyme level (inhibition), whereas substrate effects were negligible. However, none of the 13 alternative solvents tested surpassed 1-dodecanol in terms of toxicity, substrate/product solubility, and partitioning. The use of supercritical carbon dioxide for phase separation and an easy and efficient liquid-liquid extraction step enabled 4-hydroxyquinaldine to be isolated at a purity of >99.9% with recoveries of 57 and 84%, respectively. This study constitutes the first proof of concept on an integrated process for the oxyfunctionalization of toxic substrates with a water-incorporating hydroxylase.

  4. Directed evolution of bright mutants of an oxygen-independent flavin-binding fluorescent protein from Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fluorescent reporter proteins have revolutionized our understanding of cellular bioprocesses by enabling live cell imaging with exquisite spatio-temporal resolution. Existing fluorescent proteins are predominantly based on the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and related analogs. However, GFP-family proteins strictly require molecular oxygen for maturation of fluorescence, which precludes their application for investigating biological processes in low-oxygen environments. A new class of oxygen-independent fluorescent reporter proteins was recently reported based on flavin-binding photosensors from Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida. However, flavin-binding fluorescent proteins show very limited brightness, which restricts their utility as biological imaging probes. Results In this work, we report the discovery of bright mutants of a flavin-binding fluorescent protein from P. putida using directed evolution by site saturation mutagenesis. We discovered two mutations at a chromophore-proximal amino acid (F37S and F37T) that confer a twofold enhancement in brightness relative to the wild type fluorescent protein through improvements in quantum yield and holoprotein fraction. In addition, we observed that substitution with other aromatic amino acids at this residue (F37Y and F37W) severely diminishes fluorescence emission. Therefore, we identify F37 as a key amino acid residue in determining fluorescence. Conclusions To increase the scope and utility of flavin-binding fluorescent proteins as practical fluorescent reporters, there is a strong need for improved variants of the wild type protein. Our work reports on the application of site saturation mutagenesis to isolate brighter variants of a flavin-binding fluorescent protein, which is a first-of-its-kind approach. Overall, we anticipate that the improved variants will find pervasive use as fluorescent reporters for biological studies in low-oxygen environments. PMID:23095243

  5. Fructose 1-phosphate is the one and only physiological effector of the Cra (FruR) regulator of Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Chavarría, Max; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Krell, Tino; Santiago, César; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    Fructose-1-phosphate (F1P) is the preferred effector of the catabolite repressor/activator (Cra) protein of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida but its ability to bind other metabolic intermediates in vivo is unclear. The Cra protein of this microorganism (CraPP) was submitted to mobility shift assays with target DNA sequences (the PfruB promoter) and candidate effectors fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), glucose 6-phosphate (G6P), and fructose-6-phosphate (F6P). 1 mM F1P was sufficient to release most of the Cra protein from its operators but more than 10 mM of FBP or G6P was required to free the same complex. However, isothermal titration microcalorimetry failed to expose any specific interaction between CraPP and FBP or G6P. To solve this paradox, transcriptional activity of a PfruB-lacZ fusion was measured in wild-type and ΔfruB cells growing on substrates that change the intracellular concentrations of F1P and FBP. The data indicated that PfruB activity was stimulated by fructose but not by glucose or succinate. This suggested that CraPP represses expression in vivo of the cognate fruBKA operon in a fashion dependent just on F1P, ruling out any other physiological effector. Molecular docking and dynamic simulations of the Cra-agonist interaction indicated that both metabolites can bind the repressor, but the breach in the relative affinity of CraPP for F1P vs FBP is three orders of magnitude larger than the equivalent distance in the Escherichia coli protein. This assigns the Cra protein of P. putida the sole role of transducing the presence of fructose in the medium into a variety of direct and indirect physiological responses. PMID:24918052

  6. Regulation of Pyrroloquinoline Quinone-Dependent Glucose Dehydrogenase Activity in the Model Rhizosphere-Dwelling Bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    An, Ran

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Soil-dwelling microbes solubilize mineral phosphates by secreting gluconic acid, which is produced from glucose by a periplasmic glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) that requires pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) as a redox coenzyme. While GDH-dependent phosphate solubilization has been observed in numerous bacteria, little is known concerning the mechanism by which this process is regulated. Here we use the model rhizosphere-dwelling bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 to explore GDH activity and PQQ synthesis, as well as gene expression of the GDH-encoding gene (gcd) and PQQ biosynthesis genes (pqq operon) while under different growth conditions. We also use reverse transcription-PCR to identify transcripts from the pqq operon to more accurately map the operon structure. GDH specific activity and PQQ levels vary according to growth condition, with the highest levels of both occurring when glucose is used as the sole carbon source and under conditions of low soluble phosphate. Under these conditions, however, PQQ levels limit in vitro phosphate solubilization. GDH specific activity data correlate well with gcd gene expression data, and the levels of expression of the pqqF and pqqB genes mirror the levels of PQQ synthesized, suggesting that one or both of these genes may serve to modulate PQQ levels according to the growth conditions. The pqq gene cluster (pqqFABCDEG) encodes at least two independent transcripts, and expression of the pqqF gene appears to be under the control of an independent promoter and terminator. IMPORTANCE Plant growth promotion can be enhanced by soil- and rhizosphere-dwelling bacteria by a number of different methods. One method is by promoting nutrient acquisition from soil. Phosphorus is an essential nutrient that plants obtain through soil, but in many cases it is locked up in forms that are not available for plant uptake. Bacteria such as the model bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 can solubilize insoluble soil phosphates by secreting

  7. Volatilization of Arsenic from Polluted Soil by Pseudomonas putida Engineered for Expression of the arsM Arsenic(III) S-Adenosine Methyltransferase Gene

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Even though arsenic is one of the most widespread environmental carcinogens, methods of remediation are still limited. In this report we demonstrate that a strain of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 endowed with chromosomal expression of the arsM gene encoding the As(III) S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) methyltransfase from Rhodopseudomonas palustris to remove arsenic from contaminated soil. We genetically engineered the P. putida KT2440 with stable expression of an arsM-gfp fusion gene (GE P. putida), which was inserted into the bacterial chromosome. GE P. putida showed high arsenic methylation and volatilization activity. When exposed to 25 μM arsenite or arsenate overnight, most inorganic arsenic was methylated to the less toxic methylated arsenicals methylarsenate (MAs(V)), dimethylarsenate (DMAs(V)) and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAs(V)O). Of total added arsenic, the species were about 62 ± 2.2% DMAs(V), 25 ± 1.4% MAs(V) and 10 ± 1.2% TMAs(V)O. Volatilized arsenicals were trapped, and the predominant species were dimethylarsine (Me2AsH) (21 ± 1.0%) and trimethylarsine (TMAs(III)) (10 ± 1.2%). At later times, more DMAs(V) and volatile species were produced. Volatilization of Me2AsH and TMAs(III) from contaminated soil is thus possible with this genetically engineered bacterium and could be instrumental as an agent for reducing the inorganic arsenic content of soil and agricultural products. PMID:25122054

  8. Potential of the TCE-degrading endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE to improve plant growth and reduce TCE phytotoxicity and evapotranspiration in poplar cuttings

    SciTech Connect

    Weyens, N.; van der Lelie, D.; Truyens, S.; Dupae, J.; Newman, L.; Taghavi, S.; Carleer, R.; Vangronsveld, J.

    2010-09-01

    The TCE-degrading poplar endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE was inoculated in poplar cuttings, exposed to 0, 200 and 400 mg l{sup -1} TCE, that were grown in two different experimental setups. During a short-term experiment, plants were grown hydroponically in half strength Hoagland nutrient solution and exposed to TCE for 3 days. Inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE promoted plant growth, reduced TCE phytotoxicity and reduced the amount of TCE present in the leaves. During a mid-term experiment, plants were grown in potting soil and exposed to TCE for 3 weeks. Here, inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE had a less pronounced positive effect on plant growth and TCE phytotoxicity, but resulted in strongly reduced amounts of TCE in leaves and roots of plants exposed to 400 mg l{sup -1} TCE, accompanied by a lowered evapotranspiration of TCE. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), which are known intermediates of TCE degradation, were not detected. The endophyte P. putida W619-TCE degrades TCE during its transport through the xylem, leading to reduced TCE concentrations in poplar, and decreased TCE evapotranspiration.

  9. LapF, the second largest Pseudomonas putida protein, contributes to plant root colonization and determines biofilm architecture.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gil, Marta; Yousef-Coronado, Fátima; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel

    2010-08-01

    We have investigated the role of LapF, one of the two largest proteins encoded in the genome of Pseudomonas putida KT2440, in bacterial colonization of solid surfaces. LapF is 6310 amino acids long, and is localized on the cell surface. The C-terminal region of the protein is essential for its secretion, which presumably requires the ABC transporter encoded by an operon (lapHIJ) adjacent to the lapF gene. Although the initial attachment stages are not different between the wild type and a lapF mutant, microcolony formation and subsequent development of a mature biofilm is impaired in the mutant. This is consistent with the expression pattern of lapF; activation of its promoter takes place at late stages of growth and is regulated by the alternative sigma factor RpoS. A lapF mutant is also affected in individual and competitive plant root colonization. In these assays, mixed microcolonies formed by cells of both the wild-type and the mutant strains could be observed but microcolonies of the mutant alone were not found. These data and the localization of the protein at discrete spots in areas of contact between cells in biofilms suggest that LapF determines the establishment of cell-cell interactions during sessile growth.

  10. Stability of a Pseudomonas putida KT2440 bacteriophage-carried genomic island and its impact on rhizosphere fitness.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Jose M; Soriano, María Isabel; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel

    2012-10-01

    The stability of seven genomic islands of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 with predicted potential for mobilization was studied in bacterial populations associated with the rhizosphere of corn plants by multiplex PCR. DNA rearrangements were detected for only one of them (GI28), which was lost at high frequency. This genomic island of 39.4 kb, with 53 open reading frames, shows the characteristic organization of genes belonging to tailed phages. We present evidence indicating that it corresponds to the lysogenic state of a functional bacteriophage that we have designated Pspu28. Integrated and rarely excised forms of Pspu28 coexist in KT2440 populations. Pspu28 is self-transmissible, and an excisionase is essential for its removal from the bacterial chromosome. The excised Pspu28 forms a circular element that can integrate into the chromosome at a specific location, att sites containing a 17-bp direct repeat sequence. Excision/insertion of Pspu28 alters the promoter sequence and changes the expression level of PP_1531, which encodes a predicted arsenate reductase. Finally, we show that the presence of Pspu28 in the lysogenic state has a negative effect on bacterial fitness in the rhizosphere under conditions of intraspecific competition, thus explaining why clones having lost this mobile element are recovered from that environment.

  11. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffraction Analysis of Recombinant Chlorocatechol 1 2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas Putida

    SciTech Connect

    J Rustiguel; M Pinheiro; A Araujo; M Nonato

    2011-12-31

    Chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase from the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas putida (Pp 1,2-CCD) is considered to be an important biotechnological tool owing to its ability to process a broad spectrum of organic pollutants. In the current work, the crystallization, crystallographic characterization and phasing of the recombinant Pp 1,2-CCD enzyme are described. Reddish-brown crystals were obtained in the presence of polyethylene glycol and magnesium acetate by utilizing the vapor-diffusion technique in sitting drops. Crystal dehydration was the key step in obtaining data sets, which were collected on the D03B-MX2 beamline at the CNPEM/MCT - LNLS using a MAR CCD detector. Pp 1,2-CCD crystals belonged to space group P6{sub 1}22 and the crystallographic structure of Pp 1,2-CCD has been solved by the MR-SAD technique using Fe atoms as scattering centres and the coordinates of 3-chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase from Rhodococcus opacus (PDB entry 2boy) as the search model. The initial model, which contains three molecules in the asymmetric unit, has been refined to 3.4 {angstrom} resolution.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of recombinant chlorocatechol 1,2-­dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Rustiguel, Joane Kathelen; Pinheiro, Matheus Pinto; Araújo, Ana Paula Ulian; Nonato, Maria Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase from the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas putida (Pp 1,2-CCD) is considered to be an important biotechnological tool owing to its ability to process a broad spectrum of organic pollutants. In the current work, the crystallization, crystallographic characterization and phasing of the recombinant Pp 1,2-CCD enzyme are described. Reddish-brown crystals were obtained in the presence of polyethylene glycol and magnesium acetate by utilizing the vapour-diffusion technique in sitting drops. Crystal dehydration was the key step in obtaining data sets, which were collected on the D03B-MX2 beamline at the CNPEM/MCT – LNLS using a MAR CCD detector. Pp 1,2-CCD crystals belonged to space group P6122 and the crystallographic structure of Pp 1,2-CCD has been solved by the MR-SAD technique using Fe atoms as scattering centres and the coordinates of 3-chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase from Rhodococcus opacus (PDB entry 2boy) as the search model. The initial model, which contains three molecules in the asymmetric unit, has been refined to 3.4 Å resolution. PMID:21505253

  13. Inhibited transport of graphene oxide nanoparticles in granular quartz sand coated with Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida biofilms.

    PubMed

    He, Jian-Zhou; Wang, Deng-Jun; Fang, Huan; Fu, Qing-Long; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2017-02-01

    Increasing production and use of graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONPs) boost their wide dissemination in the subsurface environments where biofilms occur ubiquitously, representative of the physical and chemical heterogeneities. This study aimed at investigating the influence of Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis (BS) and Gram-negative Pseudomonas putida (PP) biofilms on the transport of GONPs under different ionic strengths (0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mM CaCl2) at neutral pH 7.2 in water-saturated porous media. Particularly, the X-ray micro-computed tomography was used to quantitatively characterize the pore structures of sand columns in the presence and absence of biofilms. Our results indicated that the presence of biofilms reduced the porosity and narrowed down the pore sizes of packed columns. Transport experiments in biofilm-coated sand showed that biofilms, irrespective of bacterial species, significantly inhibited the mobility of GONPs compared to that in cleaned sand. This could be due to the Ca(2+) complexation, increased surface roughness and charge heterogeneities of collectors, and particularly enhanced physical straining caused by biofilms. The two-site kinetic retention model-fitted value of maximum solid-phase concentration (Smax2) for GONPs was higher for biofilm-coated sand than for cleaned sand, demonstrating that biofilms act as favorable sites for GONPs retention. Our findings presented herein are important to deepen our current understanding on the nature of particle-collector interactions.

  14. Rhizosphere selection of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 variants with increased fitness associated to changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Quesada, José Miguel; Fernández, Matilde; Soriano, María Isabel; Barrientos-Moreno, Laura; Llamas, María Antonia; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel

    2016-08-03

    As the interface between plant roots and soil, the rhizosphere is a complex environment where nutrients released by the plant promote microbial growth. Increasing evidences indicate that the plant also exerts a selective pressure on microbial populations in the rhizosphere, favouring colonization by certain groups. In this work, we have designed an experimental setup to begin analysing the evolution of a specific bacterial population in the rhizosphere, using Pseudomonas putida KT2440 as model organism. After several rounds of selection without passage through laboratory growth conditions, derivatives of this strain with increased fitness in the rhizosphere were isolated. Detailed analysis of one of these clones indicated that this effect is specific for rhizosphere conditions and derives from changes in its transcriptional profile in this environment, with 43 genes being differentially expressed with respect to the parental strain. Several of these genes belong to functional categories which could affect stress adaptation and availability of particular nutrients. By inactivating two genes identified as upregulated in the selected clone (coding for a stress-response protein and a rRNA modifying protein), these functions were shown to contribute to rhizosphere fitness. Our data also suggest the existence of different evolutionary pathways leading to increased rhizosphere fitness.

  15. Metabolism of toluene and xylenes by Pseudomonas (putida (arvilla) mt-2: evidence for a new function of the TOL plasmid.

    PubMed Central

    Worsey, M J; Williams, P A

    1975-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida (arvilla) mt-2 carries genes for the catabolism of toluene, m-xylene, and p-xylene on a transmissible plasmid, TOL. These compounds are degraded by oxidation of one of the methyl substituents via the corresponding alcohols and aldehydes to benzoate and m- and p-toluates, respectively, which are then further metabolised by the meta pathway, also coded for by the TOL plasmid. The specificities of the benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and the benzaldehyde dehydrogenase for their three respective substrates are independent of the carbon source used for growth, suggesting that a single set of nonspecific enzymes is responsible for the dissimilation of the breakdown products of toluene and m- and p-xylene. Benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase are coincidently and possible coordinately induced by toluene and the xylenes, and by the corresponding alcohols and aldehydes. They are not induced in cells grown on m-toluate but catechol 2,3-oxygenase can be induced by m-xylene. PMID:1176436

  16. Cloning, Expression, Characterization, and Biocatalytic Investigation of the 4-Hydroxyacetophenone Monooxygenase from Pseudomonas putida JD1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rehdorf, Jessica; Zimmer, Christian L.; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.

    2009-01-01

    While the number of available recombinant Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) has grown significantly over the last few years, there is still the demand for other BVMOs to expand the biocatalytic diversity. Most BVMOs that have been described are dedicated to convert efficiently cyclohexanone and related cyclic aliphatic ketones. To cover a broader range of substrate types and enantio- and/or regioselectivities, new BVMOs have to be discovered. The gene encoding a BVMO identified in Pseudomonas putida JD1 converting aromatic ketones (HAPMO; 4-hydroxyacetophenone monooxygenase) was amplified from genomic DNA using SiteFinding-PCR, cloned, and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. Furthermore, four other open reading frames could be identified clustered around this HAPMO. It has been suggested that these proteins, including the HAPMO, might be involved in the degradation of 4-hydroxyacetophenone. Substrate specificity studies revealed that a large variety of other arylaliphatic ketones are also converted via Baeyer-Villiger oxidation into the corresponding esters, with preferences for para-substitutions at the aromatic ring. In addition, oxidation of aldehydes and some heteroaromatic compounds was observed. Cycloketones and open-chain ketones were not or poorly accepted, respectively. It was also found that this enzyme oxidizes aromatic ketones such as 3-phenyl-2-butanone with excellent enantioselectivity (E ≫100). PMID:19251889

  17. PnrA, a new nitroreductase-family enzyme in the TNT-degrading strain Pseudomonas putida JLR11.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Antonio; Lázaro, Juan J; Ramos, Juan L; Esteve-Núñez, Abraham

    2005-08-01

    Nitroreductases are a group of proteins that catalyse pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of nitroaromatics compounds, showing significant human health and environmental implications. In this study we have identified the nitroreductase-family enzymes PnrA and PnrB from the TNT-degrading strain Pseudomonas putida. The enzyme encoded by the pnrA gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity and shown to be a flavoprotein that used 2 mol of NADPH to reduce 1 mol of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) to 4-hydroxylamine-2,6-dinitrotoluene, using a ping-pong bi-bi mechanism. The PnrA enzyme also recognized as substrates as a number of other nitroaromatic compounds, i.e. 2,4-dinitrotoluene, 3-nitrotoluene, 3- and 4-nitrobenzoate, 3,5-dinitrobenzamide and 3,5-dinitroaniline expanding the substrates profile from previously described nitroreductases. However, TNT resulted to be the most efficient substrate examined according to the Vmax/Km parameter. Expression analysis of pnrA- and pnrB-mRNA isolated from cells growing on different nitrogen sources suggested that expression of both genes was constitutive and that its level of expression was relatively constant regardless of the growth substrate. This is in agreement with enzyme-specific activity determined with cells growing with different N-sources.

  18. Flavin-Dependent Redox Transfers by the Two-Component Diketocamphane Monooxygenases of Camphor-Grown Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 10007

    PubMed Central

    Willetts, Andrew; Kelly, David

    2016-01-01

    The progressive titres of key monooxygenases and their requisite native donors of reducing power were used to assess the relative contribution of various camphor plasmid (CAM plasmid)- and chromosome-coded activities to biodegradation of (rac)-camphor at successive stages throughout growth of Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 10007 on the bicylic monoterpenoid. A number of different flavin reductases (FRs) have the potential to supply reduced flavin mononucleotide to both 2,5- and 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase, the key isoenzymic two-component monooxygenases that delineate respectively the (+)- and (−)-camphor branches of the convergent degradation pathway. Two different constitutive chromosome-coded ferric reductases able to act as FRs can serve such as role throughout all stages of camphor-dependent growth, whereas Fred, a chromosome-coded inducible FR can only play a potentially significant role in the relatively late stages. Putidaredoxin reductase, an inducible CAM plasmid-coded flavoprotein that serves an established role as a redox intermediate for plasmid-coded cytochrome P450 monooxygenase also has the potential to serve as an important FR for both diketocamphane monooxygenases (DKCMOs) throughout most stages of camphor-dependent growth. PMID:27754389

  19. Metabolism of naphthalene, fluorene, and phenanthrene: preliminary characterization of a cloned gene cluster from Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9816.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y; Chen, R F; Shiaris, M P

    1994-01-01

    A modified cloning procedure was used to obtain large DNA insertions (20 to 30 kb) from Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9816 that expressed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) transformation activity in Escherichia coli HB101. Four subclones (16 [in both orientations], 12, and 8.5 kb in size) were constructed from the initial clones. Naphthalene, fluorene, and phenanthrene transformations were investigated in these eight NCIB 9816 clones by a simple agar plate assay method, which was developed to detect and identify potential PAH metabolites. Results indicated that the necessary genes encoding the initial ring fission of the three PAHs in E. coli cells are located in an 8.5-kb EcoRI-XhoI portion, but the lower-pathway genes are not present in a 38-kb neighborhood region. These NCIB 9816 clones could transform naphthalene and phenanthrene to salicylic acid and 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, respectively. With the same clones, fluorene was degraded to 9-hydroxyfluorene, 9-fluorenone, and two unidentified compounds. Genetic similarity between the NAH7 upper-pathway genes and the cloned NCIB 9816 genes was confirmed by Southern blot DNA-DNA hybridization. In spite of this genetic similarity, the abilities of the two clusters to transform multiple PAHs were different. Under our experimental conditions, only the metabolites from naphthalene transformation by the NAH7 clone (pE317) were detected, whereas the NCIB 9816 clones produced metabolites from all three PAHs. Images PMID:8157584

  20. A Set of Activators and Repressors Control Peripheral Glucose Pathways in Pseudomonas putida To Yield a Common Central Intermediate▿

    PubMed Central

    del Castillo, Teresa; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan L.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 channels glucose to the central Entner-Doudoroff intermediate 6-phosphogluconate through three convergent pathways. The genes for these convergent pathways are clustered in three independent regions on the host chromosome. A number of monocistronic units and operons coexist within each of these clusters, favoring coexpression of catabolic enzymes and transport systems. Expression of the three pathways is mediated by three transcriptional repressors, HexR, GnuR, and PtxS, and by a positive transcriptional regulator, GltR-2. In this study, we generated mutants in each of the regulators and carried out transcriptional assays using microarrays and transcriptional fusions. These studies revealed that HexR controls the genes that encode glucokinase/glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase that yield 6-phosphogluconate; the genes for the Entner-Doudoroff enzymes that yield glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and pyruvate; and gap-1, which encodes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. GltR-2 is the transcriptional regulator that controls specific porins for the entry of glucose into the periplasmic space, as well as the gtsABCD operon for glucose transport through the inner membrane. GnuR is the repressor of gluconate transport and gluconokinase responsible for the conversion of gluconate into 6-phosphogluconate. PtxS, however, controls the enzymes for oxidation of gluconate to 2-ketogluconate, its transport and metabolism, and a set of genes unrelated to glucose metabolism. PMID:18245293

  1. Silver, zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticle ecotoxicity to bioluminescent Pseudomonas putida in laboratory medium and artificial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Mallevre, Florian; Fernandes, Teresa F; Aspray, Thomas J

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria based ecotoxicology assessment of manufactured nanoparticles is largely restricted to Escherichia coli bioreporters in laboratory media. Here, toxicity effects of model OECD nanoparticles (Ag NM-300K, ZnO NM-110 and TiO2 NM-104) were assessed using the switch-off luminescent Pseudomonas putida BS566::luxCDABE bioreporter in Luria Bertani (LB) medium and artificial wastewater (AW). IC50 values ∼4 mg L(-1), 100 mg L(-1) and >200 mg L(-1) at 1 h were observed in LB for Ag NM-300K, ZnO NM-110 and TiO2 NM-104, respectively. Similar results were obtained in AW for Ag NM-300K (IC50∼5 mg L(-1)) and TiO2 NM-104 (IC50>200 mg L(-1)) whereas ZnO NM-110 was significantly higher (IC50>200 mg L(-1)). Lower ZnO NM-110 toxicity in AW compared to LB was associated with differences in agglomeration status and dissolution rate. This work demonstrates the importance of nanoecotoxicological studies in environmentally relevant matrices.

  2. Growth stimulation of Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas putida using nanostructured ZnO thin film as transducer element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loukanov, Alexandre; Filipov, Chavdar; Valcheva, Violeta; Lecheva, Marta; Emin, Saim

    2015-04-01

    The semiconductor zinc oxide nanomaterial (ZnO or ZnO:H) is widely used in advanced biosensor technology for the design of highly-sensitive detector elements for various applications. In the attempt to evaluate its effect on common microorganisms, two types of nanostructured transducer films have been used (average diameter 600-1000 nm). They have been prepared by using both wet sol-gel method and magnetron sputtering. Their polycrystalline structure and specific surface features have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope, and atomic force microscope. The assessment of growth stimulation of bacteria was determined using epifluorescent microscope by cell staining with Live/Dead BacLight kit. In our experiments, the growth stimulation of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria on nanostructured ZnO film is demonstrated by Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas putida. These two bacterial species have been selected, because they are well known and studied in biosensor technologies, with structural difference of their cell walls. These pathogens are easy for with common source in the liquid food or some commercial products. Our data has revealed that the method of transducer film preparation influences strongly bacterial inhibition and division. These results present the transforming signal precisely, when ZnO is used in biosensor applications.

  3. Degradation of phenol and toxicity of phenolic compounds: a comparison of cold-tolerant Arthrobacter sp. and mesophilic Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Margesin, Rosa; Bergauer, Philipp; Gander, Silvia

    2004-06-01

    Phenol degradation efficiency of cold-tolerant Arthrobacter sp. AG31 and mesophilic Pseudomonas putida DSM6414 was compared. The cold-tolerant strain was cultivated at 10 degrees C, while the mesophile was grown at 25 degrees C. Both strains degraded 200 mg and 400 mg phenol/l within 48-72 h of cultivation, but the cold-tolerant strain produced more biomass than the mesophile. Both strains oxidized catechol by the ortho type of ring fission. Catechol 1,2 dioxygenase (C1,2D) activity was found intra- and extracellularly in the absence and in the presence of phenol. In the presence of 200 mg phenol/l, C1,2D activity of the mesophile was about 1.5- to 2-fold higher than that of the cold-tolerant strain. However, an initial phenol concentration of 400 mg/l resulted in a comparable enzyme activity of the cold-tolerant and the mesophilic strain. The two strains differed significantly in their toxicity pattern towards 12 aromatic (mostly phenolic) compounds at different growth temperatures, which was determined via growth inhibition in the presence of nutrients and toxicants. For the cold-tolerant strain, toxicity was significantly lower at 10 degrees C than at 25 degrees C. The mesophile showed a significantly lower susceptibility to high hydrocarbon concentrations when grown at 25 degrees C compared to 10 degrees C.

  4. Growth kinetics, effect of carbon substrate in biosynthesis of mcl-PHA by Pseudomonas putida Bet001

    PubMed Central

    Gumel, A.M.; Annuar, M.S.M.; Heidelberg, T.

    2014-01-01

    Growth associated biosynthesis of medium chain length poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHA) in Pseudomonas putida Bet001 isolated from palm oil mill effluent was studied. Models with substrate inhibition terms described well the kinetics of its growth. Selected fatty acids (C8:0 to C18:1) and ammonium were used as carbon and nitrogen sources during growth and PHA biosynthesis, resulting in PHA accumulation of about 50 to 69% (w/w) and PHA yields ranging from 10.12 g L−1 to 15.45 g L−1, respectively. The monomer composition of the PHA ranges from C4 to C14, and was strongly influenced by the type of carbon substrate fed. Interestingly, an odd carbon chain length (C7) monomer was also detected when C18:1 was fed. Polymer showed melting temperature (Tm) of 42.0 (± 0.2) °C, glass transition temperature (Tg) of −1.0 (± 0.2) °C and endothermic melting enthalpy of fusion (ΔHf) of 110.3 (± 0.1) J g−1. The molecular weight (Mw) range of the polymer was relatively narrow between 55 to 77 kDa. PMID:25242925

  5. Extracellular expression of natural cytosolic arginine deiminase from Pseudomonas putida and its application in the production of L-citrulline.

    PubMed

    Su, Lingqia; Ma, Yue; Wu, Jing

    2015-11-01

    The Pseudomonas putida arginine deiminase (ADI), a natural cytosolic enzyme, and Thermobifida fusca cutinase were co-expressed in Escherichia coli, and the optimized cutinase gene was used for increasing its expression level. 90.9% of the total ADI protein was released into culture medium probably through a nonspecific leaking mechanism caused by the co-expressed cutinase. The enzymatic properties of the extracellular ADI were found to be similar to those of ADI prepared by conventional cytosolic expression. Extracellular production of ADI was further scaled up in a 3-L fermentor. When the protein expression was induced by IPTG (25.0μM) and lactose (0.1gL(-1)h(-1)) at 30°C, the extracellular ADI activity reached 101.2UmL(-1), which represented the highest ADI production ever reported. In addition, the enzymatic synthesis of l-citrulline was performed using the extracellularly expressed ADI, and the conversion rate reached 100% with high substrate concentration at 650gL(-1).

  6. The Crc protein inhibits the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates in Pseudomonas putida under balanced carbon/nitrogen growth conditions.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Ruggero; de la Peña, Fernando; Prieto, María Axiliadora; Rojo, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida synthesizes polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) as storage compounds. PHA synthesis is more active when the carbon source is in excess and the nitrogen source is limiting, but can also occur at a lower rate under balanced carbon/nitrogen ratios. This work shows that PHA synthesis is controlled by the Crc global regulator, a protein that optimizes carbon metabolism by inhibiting the expression of genes involved in the use of non-preferred carbon sources. Crc acts post-transcriptionally. The mRNAs of target genes contain characteristic catabolite activity (CA) motifs near the ribosome binding site. Sequences resembling CA motifs can be predicted for the phaC1 gene, which codes for a PHA polymerase, and for phaI and phaF, which encode proteins associated to PHA granules. Our results show that Crc inhibits the translation of phaC1 mRNA, but not that of phaI or phaF, reducing the amount of PHA accumulated in the cell. Crc inhibited PHA synthesis during exponential growth in media containing a balanced carbon/nitrogen ratio. No inhibition was seen when the carbon/nitrogen ratio was imbalanced. This extends the role of Crc beyond that of controlling the hierarchical utilization of carbon sources and provides a link between PHA synthesis and the global regulatory networks controlling carbon flow.

  7. Identification of cis-diols as intermediates in the oxidation of aromatic acids by a strain of Pseudomonas putida that contains a TOL plasmid.

    PubMed Central

    Whited, G M; McCombie, W R; Kwart, L D; Gibson, D T

    1986-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida BG1 was isolated from soil by enrichment with p-toluate and selection for growth with p-xylene. Other hydrocarbons that served as growth substrates were toluene, m-xylene, 3-ethyltoluene, and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. The enzymes responsible for growth on these substrates are encoded by a large plasmid with properties similar to those of TOL plasmids isolated from other strains of Pseudomonas. Treatment of P. putida BG1 with nitrosoguanidine led to the isolation of a mutant strain which, when grown with fructose, oxidized both p-xylene and p-toluate to (-)-cis-1,2-dihydroxy-4-methylcyclohexa-3,5-diene-1-carboxylic acid (cis-p-toluate diol). The structure of the diol was determined by conventional chemical techniques including identification of the products formed by acid-catalyzed dehydration and characterization of a methyl ester derivative. The cis-relative stereochemistry of the hydroxyl groups was determined by the isolation and characterization of an isopropylidene derivative. p-Xylene-grown cells contained an inducible NAD+-dependent dehydrogenase which formed catechols from cis-p-toluate diol and the analogous acid diols formed from the other hydrocarbon substrates listed above. The catechols were converted to meta ring fission products by an inducible catechol-2,3-dioxygenase which was partially purified from p-xylene-grown cells of P. putida BG1. Images PMID:3711022

  8. FleQ of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a multimeric cyclic diguanylate binding protein that differentially regulates expression of biofilm matrix components.

    PubMed

    Molina-Henares, María Antonia; Ramos-González, María Isabel; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Fernández-Escamilla, Ana María; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The intracellular signal molecule cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is an important element in regulation of biofilm formation by bacteria. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, FleQ functions as a c-di-GMP-dependent transcriptional regulator of expression of flagellar genes and the exopolysaccharide (EPS) Pel, a component of the biofilm extracellular matrix. In the plant-beneficial bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a mutation in fleQ reduces biofilm formation and colonization of plant surfaces. Using isothermal titration calorimetry and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we show in this work that FleQ of P. putida interacts with c-di-GMP and directly binds the promoter regions of flagellar and EPS genes. Data obtained by analytical gel filtration and ultracentrifugation indicate that FleQ is in multiple oligomeric states in solution (dimers, tetramers and hexamers), which do not show altered equilibrium in the presence of c-di-GMP. DNA binding is independent of c-diGMP, although it is favored by the second messenger in the case of the promoter of the operon responsible for synthesis of the species-specific EPS Pea. Analysis of expression using transcriptional fusions showed an influence of FleQ upon two of the four EPS operons under regular growth conditions. Finally, a consensus sequence for promoter recognition by FleQ in P. putida is also proposed.

  9. Degradation of phenol and m-toluate in Pseudomonas sp. strain EST1001 and its Pseudomonas putida transconjugants is determined by a multiplasmid system.

    PubMed Central

    Kivisaar, M A; Habicht, J K; Heinaru, A L

    1989-01-01

    The utilization of phenol, m-toluate, and salicylate (Phe+, mTol+, and Sal+ characters, respectively) in Pseudomonas sp. strain EST1001 is determined by the coordinated expression of genes placed in different plasmids, i.e., by a multiplasmid system. The natural multiplasmid strain EST1001 is phenotypically unstable. In its Phe-, mTol-, and Sal- segregants, the plasmid DNA underwent structural rearrangements without a marked loss of plasmid DNA, and the majority of segregants gave revertants. The genes specifying the degradation of phenol and m-toluate were transferable to P. putida PaW340, and in this strain a new multiplasmid system with definite structural changes was formed. The 17-kilobase transposable element, a part of the TOL plasmid pWWO present in the chromosome of PaW340, was inserted into the plasmid DNA in transconjugants. In addition, transconjugant EST1020 shared pWWO-like structures. Enzyme assays demonstrated that ortho-fission reactions were used by bacteria that grew on phenol, whereas m-toluate was catabolized by a meta-fission reaction. Salicylate was a functional inducer of the enzymes of both pathways. The expression of silent metabolic pathways of phenol or m-toluate degradation has been observed in EST1001 Phe- mTol+ and Phe+ mTol- transconjugants. The switchover of phenol degradation from the ortho- to the meta-pathway in EST1033 also showed the flexibility of genetic material in EST1001 transconjugants. Images PMID:2768199

  10. Production of polyhydroxyalkanoates from sludge palm oil using Pseudomonas putida S12.

    PubMed

    Kang, Du-Kyeong; Lee, Cho-Ryong; Lee, Sun Hee; Bae, Jung-Hoon; Park, Young-Kwon; Rhee, Young Ha; Sung, Bong Hyun; Sohn, Jung-Hoon

    2017-03-09

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable plastics produced by bacteria, but their use in diverse applications is prohibited by high production costs. To reduce these costs, the conversion of PHAs from crude sludge palm oil (SPO) as an inexpensive renewable raw material by Pseudomonas strains was tested. Pseudomonasputida S12 was found to produce the highest yield (~41%) of elastomeric medium-chain-length (MCL)-PHAs from SPO. The MCL-PHA characteristics were analyzed by gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry, gel permeation chromatography, and differential scanning calorimetry. These findings may contribute to more widespread use of PHAs by reducing PHA production costs.

  11. Isolation of a Gene Responsible for the Oxidation of trans-Anethole to para-Anisaldehyde by Pseudomonas putida JYR-1 and Its Expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dongfei; Ryu, Ji-Young; Kanaly, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    A plasmid, pTA163, in Escherichia coli contained an approximately 34-kb gene fragment from Pseudomonas putida JYR-1 that included the genes responsible for the metabolism of trans-anethole to protocatechuic acid. Three Tn5-disrupted open reading frame 10 (ORF 10) mutants of plasmid pTA163 lost their abilities to catalyze trans-anethole. Heterologously expressed ORF 10 (1,047 nucleotides [nt]) under a T7 promoter in E. coli catalyzed oxidative cleavage of a propenyl group of trans-anethole to an aldehyde group, resulting in the production of para-anisaldehyde, and this gene was designated tao (trans-anethole oxygenase). The deduced amino acid sequence of TAO had the highest identity (34%) to a hypothetical protein of Agrobacterium vitis S4 and likely contained a flavin-binding site. Preferred incorporation of an oxygen molecule from water into p-anisaldehyde using 18O-labeling experiments indicated stereo preference of TAO for hydrolysis of the epoxide group. Interestingly, unlike the narrow substrate range of isoeugenol monooxygenase from Pseudomonas putida IE27 and Pseudomonas nitroreducens Jin1, TAO from P. putida JYR-1 catalyzed isoeugenol, O-methyl isoeugenol, and isosafrole, all of which contain the 2-propenyl functional group on the aromatic ring structure. Addition of NAD(P)H to the ultrafiltered cell extracts of E. coli (pTA163) increased the activity of TAO. Due to the relaxed substrate range of TAO, it may be utilized for the production of various fragrance compounds from plant phenylpropanoids in the future. PMID:22610435

  12. Deciphering the genetic determinants for aerobic nicotinic acid degradation: the nic cluster from Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, José I; Canales, Angeles; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Rychlewski, Leszek; García, José L; Díaz, Eduardo

    2008-08-12

    The aerobic catabolism of nicotinic acid (NA) is considered a model system for degradation of N-heterocyclic aromatic compounds, some of which are major environmental pollutants; however, the complete set of genes as well as the structural-functional relationships of most of the enzymes involved in this process are still unknown. We have characterized a gene cluster (nic genes) from Pseudomonas putida KT2440 responsible for the aerobic NA degradation in this bacterium and when expressed in heterologous hosts. The biochemistry of the NA degradation through the formation of 2,5-dihydroxypyridine and maleamic acid has been revisited, and some gene products become the prototype of new types of enzymes with unprecedented molecular architectures. Thus, the initial hydroxylation of NA is catalyzed by a two-component hydroxylase (NicAB) that constitutes the first member of the xanthine dehydrogenase family whose electron transport chain to molecular oxygen includes a cytochrome c domain. The Fe(2+)-dependent dioxygenase (NicX) converts 2,5-dihydroxypyridine into N-formylmaleamic acid, and it becomes the founding member of a new family of extradiol ring-cleavage dioxygenases. Further conversion of N-formylmaleamic acid to formic and maleamic acid is catalyzed by the NicD protein, the only deformylase described so far whose catalytic triad is similar to that of some members of the alpha/beta-hydrolase fold superfamily. This work allows exploration of the existence of orthologous gene clusters in saprophytic bacteria and some pathogens, where they might stimulate studies on their role in virulence, and it provides a framework to develop new biotechnological processes for detoxification/biotransformation of N-heterocyclic aromatic compounds.

  13. Effect of Genetically Modified Pseudomonas putida WCS358r on the Fungal Rhizosphere Microflora of Field-Grown Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Glandorf, Debora C. M.; Verheggen, Patrick; Jansen, Timo; Jorritsma, Jan-Willem; Smit, Eric; Leeflang, Paula; Wernars, Karel; Thomashow, Linda S.; Laureijs, Eric; Thomas-Oates, Jane E.; Bakker, Peter A. H. M.; van Loon, Leendert C.

    2001-01-01

    We released genetically modified Pseudomonas putida WCS358r into the rhizospheres of wheat plants. The two genetically modified derivatives, genetically modified microorganism (GMM) 2 and GMM 8, carried the phz biosynthetic gene locus of strain P. fluorescens 2-79 and constitutively produced the antifungal compound phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). In the springs of 1997 and 1998 we sowed wheat seeds treated with either GMM 2, GMM 8, or WCS358r (approximately 107 CFU per seed), and measured the numbers, composition, and activities of the rhizosphere microbial populations. During both growing seasons, all three bacterial strains decreased from 107 CFU per g of rhizosphere sample to below the limit of detection (102 CFU per g) 1 month after harvest of the wheat plants. The phz genes were stably maintained, and PCA was detected in rhizosphere extracts of GMM-treated plants. In 1997, but not in 1998, fungal numbers in the rhizosphere, quantified on 2% malt extract agar (total filamentous fungi) and on Komada's medium (mainly Fusarium spp.), were transiently suppressed in GMM 8-treated plants. We also analyzed the effects of the GMMs on the rhizosphere fungi by using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. Introduction of any of the three bacterial strains transiently changed the composition of the rhizosphere fungal microflora. However, in both 1997 and 1998, GMM-induced effects were distinct from those of WCS358r and lasted for 40 days in 1997 and for 89 days after sowing in 1998, whereas effects induced by WCS358r were detectable for 12 (1997) or 40 (1998) days. None of the strains affected the metabolic activity of the soil microbial population (substrate-induced respiration), soil nitrification potential, cellulose decomposition, plant height, or plant yield. The results indicate that application of GMMs engineered to have improved antifungal activity can exert nontarget effects on the natural fungal microflora. PMID:11472906

  14. Effect of genetically modified Pseudomonas putida WCS358r on the fungal rhizosphere microflora of field-grown wheat.

    PubMed

    Glandorf, D C; Verheggen, P; Jansen, T; Jorritsma, J W; Smit, E; Leeflang, P; Wernars, K; Thomashow, L S; Laureijs, E; Thomas-Oates, J E; Bakker, P A; van Loon, L C

    2001-08-01

    We released genetically modified Pseudomonas putida WCS358r into the rhizospheres of wheat plants. The two genetically modified derivatives, genetically modified microorganism (GMM) 2 and GMM 8, carried the phz biosynthetic gene locus of strain P. fluorescens 2-79 and constitutively produced the antifungal compound phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). In the springs of 1997 and 1998 we sowed wheat seeds treated with either GMM 2, GMM 8, or WCS358r (approximately 10(7) CFU per seed), and measured the numbers, composition, and activities of the rhizosphere microbial populations. During both growing seasons, all three bacterial strains decreased from 10(7) CFU per g of rhizosphere sample to below the limit of detection (10(2) CFU per g) 1 month after harvest of the wheat plants. The phz genes were stably maintained, and PCA was detected in rhizosphere extracts of GMM-treated plants. In 1997, but not in 1998, fungal numbers in the rhizosphere, quantified on 2% malt extract agar (total filamentous fungi) and on Komada's medium (mainly Fusarium spp.), were transiently suppressed in GMM 8-treated plants. We also analyzed the effects of the GMMs on the rhizosphere fungi by using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. Introduction of any of the three bacterial strains transiently changed the composition of the rhizosphere fungal microflora. However, in both 1997 and 1998, GMM-induced effects were distinct from those of WCS358r and lasted for 40 days in 1997 and for 89 days after sowing in 1998, whereas effects induced by WCS358r were detectable for 12 (1997) or 40 (1998) days. None of the strains affected the metabolic activity of the soil microbial population (substrate-induced respiration), soil nitrification potential, cellulose decomposition, plant height, or plant yield. The results indicate that application of GMMs engineered to have improved antifungal activity can exert nontarget effects on the natural fungal microflora.

  15. Microbial synthesis of poly(beta-hydroxyalkanoates) bearing phenyl groups from pseudomonas putida: chemical structure and characterization.

    PubMed

    Abraham, G A; Gallardo, A; San Roman, J; Olivera, E R; Jodra, R; García, B; Miñambres, B; García, J L; Luengo, J M

    2001-01-01

    New poly(beta-hydroxyalkanoates) having aromatics groups (so-called PHPhAs) from a microbial origin have been characterized. These polymers were produced and accumulated as reserve materials when a beta-oxidation mutant of Pseudomonas putida U, disrupted in the gene that encodes the 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase (fadA), was cultured in a chemically defined medium containing different aromatic fatty acids (6-phenylhexanoic acid, 7-phenylheptanoic acid, a mixture of them, or 8-phenyloctanoic acid) as carbon sources. The polymers were extracted from the bacteria, purified and characterized by using (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Structural studies revealed that when 6-phenylhexanoic acid was added to the cultures, an homopolymer (poly-3-hydroxy-6-phenylhexanoate) was accumulated. The feeding with 8-phenyloctanoic acid and 7-phenylheptanoic acid leads to the formation of copolymers of the corresponding units with the n - 2 carbons formed after deacetylation, copoly(3-hydroxy-8-phenyloctanoate-3-hydroxy-6-phenylhexanoate) and copoly(3-hydroxy-7-phenylheptanoate-3-hydroxy-5-phenylvalerate), respectively. The mixture of 6-phenylhexanoic acid and 7-phenylheptanoic acid gave rise to the corresponding terpolymer, copoly(3-hydroxy-7-phenylheptanoate-3-hydroxy-6-phenylhexanoate-3-hydroxy-5-phenylvalerate). Studies on the chemical structure of these three polyesters revealed that they were true copolymers but not a mixture of homopolymers and that the different monomeric units were randomly incorporated in the macromolecular chains. Thermal behavior and molecular weight distribution were also discussed. These compounds had a dual attractive interest in function of (i) their broad use as biodegradable polymers and (ii) their possible biomedical applications.

  16. Genetic analysis of plant endophytic Pseudomonas putida BP25 and chemo-profiling of its antimicrobial volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Sheoran, Neelam; Valiya Nadakkakath, Agisha; Munjal, Vibhuti; Kundu, Aditi; Subaharan, Kesavan; Venugopal, Vibina; Rajamma, Suseelabhai; Eapen, Santhosh J; Kumar, Aundy

    2015-04-01

    Black pepper associated bacterium BP25 was isolated from root endosphere of apparently healthy cultivar Panniyur-5 that protected black pepper against Phytophthora capsici and Radopholus similis - the major production constraints. The bacterium was characterized and mechanisms of its antagonistic action against major pathogens are elucidated. The polyphasic phenotypic analysis revealed its identity as Pseudomonas putida. Multi locus sequence typing revealed that the bacterium shared gene sequences with several other isolates representing diverse habitats. Tissue localization assays exploiting green fluorescence protein expression clearly indicated that PpBP25 endophytically colonized not only its host plant - black pepper, but also other distantly related plants such as ginger and arabidopsis. PpBP25 colonies could be enumerated from internal tissues of plants four weeks post inoculation indicated its stable establishment and persistence in the plant system. The bacterium inhibited broad range of pathogens such as Phytophthora capsici, Pythium myriotylum, Giberella moniliformis, Rhizoctonia solani, Athelia rolfsii, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and plant parasitic nematode, Radopholus similis by its volatile substances. GC/MS based chemical profiling revealed presence of Heneicosane; Tetratetracontane; Pyrrolo [1,2-a] pyrazine-1,4-dione, hexahydro-3-(2-methylpropyl); Tetracosyl heptafluorobutyrate; 1-3-Eicosene, (E)-; 1-Heneicosanol; Octadecyl trifluoroacetate and 1-Pentadecene in PpBP25 metabolite. Dynamic head space GC/MS analysis of airborne volatiles indicated the presence of aromatic compounds such as 1-Undecene;Disulfide dimethyl; Pyrazine, methyl-Pyrazine, 2,5-dimethyl-; Isoamyl alcohol; Pyrazine, methyl-; Dimethyl trisulfide, etc. The work paved way for profiling of broad spectrum antimicrobial VOCs in endophytic PpBP25 for crop protection.

  17. Caffeine junkie: an unprecedented glutathione S-transferase-dependent oxygenase required for caffeine degradation by Pseudomonas putida CBB5.

    PubMed

    Summers, Ryan M; Seffernick, Jennifer L; Quandt, Erik M; Yu, Chi Li; Barrick, Jeffrey E; Subramanian, Mani V

    2013-09-01

    Caffeine and other N-methylated xanthines are natural products found in many foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. Therefore, it is not surprising that bacteria have evolved to live on caffeine as a sole carbon and nitrogen source. The caffeine degradation pathway of Pseudomonas putida CBB5 utilizes an unprecedented glutathione-S-transferase-dependent Rieske oxygenase for demethylation of 7-methylxanthine to xanthine, the final step in caffeine N-demethylation. The gene coding this function is unusual, in that the iron-sulfur and non-heme iron domains that compose the normally functional Rieske oxygenase (RO) are encoded by separate proteins. The non-heme iron domain is located in the monooxygenase, ndmC, while the Rieske [2Fe-2S] domain is fused to the RO reductase gene, ndmD. This fusion, however, does not interfere with the interaction of the reductase with N1- and N3-demethylase RO oxygenases, which are involved in the initial reactions of caffeine degradation. We demonstrate that the N7-demethylation reaction absolutely requires a unique, tightly bound protein complex composed of NdmC, NdmD, and NdmE, a novel glutathione-S-transferase (GST). NdmE is proposed to function as a noncatalytic subunit that serves a structural role in the complexation of the oxygenase (NdmC) and Rieske domains (NdmD). Genome analyses found this gene organization of a split RO and GST gene cluster to occur more broadly, implying a larger function for RO-GST protein partners.

  18. Isolation and characterization of Pseudomonas putida PpF1 mutants defective in the toluene dioxygenase enzyme system.

    PubMed Central

    Finette, B A; Subramanian, V; Gibson, D T

    1984-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida PpF1 degraded toluene via a dihydrodiol pathway to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. The initial reaction was catalyzed by a multicomponent enzyme, toluene dioxygenase, which oxidized toluene to (+)-cis-1(S),2(R)-dihydroxy-3-methylcyclohexa-3,5-diene (cis-toluene dihydrodiol). The enzyme consisted of three protein components: NADH-ferredoxintol oxidoreductase (reductasetol), ferredoxintol, and a terminal oxygenase which is an iron-sulfur protein (ISPtol). Mutants blocked in each of these components were isolated after mutagenesis with nitrosoguanidine. Mutants occurred as colony morphology variants when grown in the presence of toluene on indicator plates containing agar, mineral salts, a growth-supporting nutrient (arginine), 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC), and Nitro Blue Tetrazolium (NBT). Under these conditions, wild-type colonies appeared large and red as a result of TTC reduction. Colonies of reductasetol mutants were white or white with a light blue center, ferredoxintol strains were light blue with a dark blue center, and strains that lacked ISPtol gave dark blue colonies. Blue color differences in the mutant colonies were due to variations in the extent of NBT reduction. Strains lacking all three components appeared white. Toluene dioxygenase mutants were characterized by assaying toluene dioxygenase activity in crude cell extracts which were complemented with purified preparations of each protein component. Between 40 and 60% of the putative mutants selected from the NBT-TTC indicator plates were unable to grow with toluene as the sole source of carbon and energy. This method should prove extremely useful in isolating mutants in other multicomponent oxygenase enzyme systems. Images PMID:6501223

  19. Crystal structure of the leucine aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas putida reveals the molecular basis for its enantioselectivity and broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Kale, Avinash; Pijning, Tjaard; Sonke, Theo; Dijkstra, Bauke W; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W H

    2010-05-21

    The zinc-dependent leucine aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas putida (ppLAP) is an important enzyme for the industrial production of enantiomerically pure amino acids. To provide a better understanding of its structure-function relationships, the enzyme was studied by X-ray crystallography. Crystal structures of native ppLAP at pH 9.5 and pH 5.2, and in complex with the inhibitor bestatin, show that the overall folding and hexameric organization of ppLAP are very similar to those of the closely related di-zinc leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs) from bovine lens and Escherichia coli. At pH 9.5, the active site contains two metal ions, one identified as Mn(2+) or Zn(2+) (site 1), and the other as Zn(2+) (site 2). By using a metal-dependent activity assay it was shown that site 1 in heterologously expressed ppLAP is occupied mainly by Mn(2+). Moreover, it was shown that Mn(2+) has a significant activation effect when bound to site 1 of ppLAP. At pH 5.2, the active site of ppLAP is highly disordered and the two metal ions are absent, most probably due to full protonation of one of the metal-interacting residues, Lys267, explaining why ppLAP is inactive at low pH. A structural comparison of the ppLAP-bestatin complex with inhibitor-bound complexes of bovine lens LAP, along with substrate modelling, gave clear and new insights into its substrate specificity and high level of enantioselectivity.

  20. Maintenance and induction of naphthalene degradation activity in Pseudomonas putida and an Alcaligenes sp. under different culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Guerin, W F; Boyd, S A

    1995-11-01

    The expression of xenobiotic-degradative genes in indigenous bacteria or in bacteria introduced into an ecosystem is essential for the successful bioremediation of contaminated environments. The maintenance of naphthalene utilization activity is studied in Pseudomonas putida (ATCC 17484) and an Alcaligenes sp. (strain NP-Alk) under different batch culture conditions. Levels of activity decreased exponentially in stationary phase with half-lives of 43 and 13 h for strains ATCC 17484 and NP-Alk, respectively. Activity half-lives were 2.7 and 5.3 times longer, respectively, in starved cultures than in stationary-phase cultures following growth on naphthalene. The treatment of starved cultures with chloramphenicol caused a loss of activity more rapid than that measured in untreated starved cultures, suggesting a continued enzyme synthesis in starved cultures in the absence of a substrate. Following growth in nutrient medium, activity decreased to undetectable levels in the Alcaligenes sp. but remained at measurable levels in the pseudomonad even after 9 months. The induction of naphthalene degradation activities in these cultures, when followed by radiorespirometry with 14C-labeled naphthalene as the substrate, was consistent with activity maintenance data. In the pseudomonad, naphthalene degradation activity was present constitutively at low levels under all growth conditions and was rapidly (in approximately 15 min) induced to high levels upon exposure to naphthalene. Adaptation in the uninduced Alcaligenes sp. occurred after many hours of exposure to naphthalene. In vivo labeling with 35S, to monitor the extent of de novo enzyme synthesis by naphthalene-challenged cells, provided an independent confirmation of the results.

  1. Maintenance and induction of naphthalene degradation activity in Pseudomonas putida and an Alcaligenes sp. under different culture conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, W.F.; Boyd, S.A.

    1995-11-01

    The expression of xenobiotic-degradative genes in indigenous bacteria or in bacteria introduced into an ecosystem is essential for the successful bioremediation of contaminated environments. The maintenance of naphthalene utilization activity is studied in Pseudomonas putida (ATCC 17484) and an Alcaligenes sp. (strain NP-Alk) under different batch culture conditions. Levels of activity decreased exponentially in stationary phase with half-lives of 43 and 13 h for strains ATCC 17484 nad NP-Alk, respectively. Activity half-lives were 2.7 and 5.3 times longer, respectively, in starved cultures than in stationary-phase cultures following growth on naphthalene. The treatment of starved cultures with chloramphenicol caused a loss of activity more rapid than that measured in untreated starved cultures, suggesting a continued enzyme synthesis in starved cultures in the absence of a substrate. Following growth in nutrient medium, activity decreased to undetectable levels in the Alcaligenes sp. but remained at measureable levels int he pseudomonad even after 9 months. The induction of naphthalene degradation activities in these cultures, when followed by radiorespirometry with {sup 14}C-labeled naphthalene as the substrate, was consistent with activity maintenance data. In the pseudomonad, naphthalene degradation activity was present constitutively at low levels under all growth conditions and was rapidly (in approximately 15 min) induced to high levels upon exposure to naphthalene. Adaptation in the uninduced Alcaligenes sp. occurred after many hours of exposure to naphthalene. In vivo labeling with {sup 35}S, to monitor the extent of de novo enzyme synthesis by naphthalene-challenged cells, provided an independent confirmation of the results. 43 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Genetic Dissection of the Regulatory Network Associated with High c-di-GMP Levels in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-González, María Isabel; Travieso, María L.; Soriano, María I.; Matilla, Miguel A.; Huertas-Rosales, Óscar; Barrientos-Moreno, Laura; Tagua, Víctor G.; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Most bacteria grow in nature forming multicellular structures named biofilms. The bacterial second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a key player in the regulation of the transition from planktonic to sessile lifestyles and this regulation is crucial in the development of biofilms. In Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Rup4959, a multidomain response regulator with diguanylate cyclase activity, when overexpressed causes an increment in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP that gives rise to a pleiotropic phenotype consisting of increased biofilm formation and crinkly colony morphology. In a broad genomic screen we have isolated mutant derivatives that lose the crinkly morphology, designed as cfc (crinkle free colony). A total of 19 different genes have been identified as being related with the emergence of the cfc phenotype either because the expression or functionality of Rup4959 is compromised, or due to a lack of transduction of the c-di-GMP signal to downstream elements involved in the acquisition of the phenotype. Discernment between these possibilities was investigated by using a c-di-GMP biosensor and by HPLC-MS quantification of the second messenger. Interestingly five of the identified genes encode proteins with AAA+ ATPase domain. Among the bacterial determinants found in this screen are the global transcriptional regulators GacA, AlgU and FleQ and two enzymes involved in the arginine biosynthesis pathway. We present evidences that this pathway seems to be an important element to both the availability of the free pool of the second messenger c-di-GMP and to its further transduction as a signal for biosynthesis of biopolimers. In addition we have identified an uncharacterized hybrid sensor histidine kinase whose phosphoaceptor conserved histidine residue has been shown in this work to be required for in vivo activation of the orphan response regulator Rup4959, which suggests these two elements constitute a two-component phosphorelay system

  3. Spatial Pattern of Copper Phosphate Precipitation Involves in Copper Accumulation and Resistance of Unsaturated Pseudomonas putida CZ1 Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangcun; Lin, Huirong; Chen, Xincai

    2016-12-28

    Bacterial biofilms are spatially structured communities that contain bacterial cells with a wide range of physiological states. The spatial distribution and speciation of copper in unsaturated Pseudomonas putida CZ1 biofilms that accumulated 147.0 mg copper per g dry weight were determined by transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and micro-X-ray fluorescence microscopy coupled with micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (micro-XANES) analysis. It was found that copper was mainly precipitated in a 75 μm thick layer as copper phosphate in the middle of the biofilm, while there were two living cell layers in the air-biofilm and biofilm-medium interfaces, respectively, distinguished from the copper precipitation layer by two interfaces. The X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of biofilm revealed that species resembling Cu₃(PO₄)₂ predominated in biofilm, followed by Cu-Citrate- and Cu-Glutathione-like species. Further analysis by micro-XANES revealed that 94.4% of copper were Cu₃(PO₄)₂-like species in the layer next to the air interface, whereas the copper species of the layer next to the medium interface were composed by 75.4% Cu₃(PO₄)₂, 10.9% Cu-Citrate-like species, and 11.2% Cu-Glutathione-like species. Thereby, it was suggested that copper was initially acquired by cells in the biofilm-air interface as a citrate complex, and then transported out and bound by out membranes of cells, released from the copper-bound membranes, and finally precipitated with phosphate in the extracellular matrix of the biofilm. These results revealed a clear spatial pattern of copper precipitation in unsaturated biofilm, which was responsible for the high copper tolerance and accumulation of the biofilm.

  4. Pseudomonas putida attunes morphophysiological, biochemical and molecular responses in Cicer arietinum L. during drought stress and recovery.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Shalini; Lata, Charu; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-02-01

    Drought is one of the most important abiotic stresses that adversely affect plant growth and yield potential. However, some drought resistant rhizosphere competent bacteria are known to improve plant health and promote growth during abiotic stresses. Present study showed the role of Pseudomonas putida MTCC5279 (RA) in ameliorating drought stress on cv. BG-362 (desi) and cv. BG-1003 (kabuli) chickpea cultivars under in vitro and green house conditions. Polyethylene glycol-induced drought stress severely affected seed germination in both cultivars which was considerably improved on RA-inoculation. Drought stress significantly affected various growth parameters, water status, membrane integrity, osmolyte accumulation, ROS scavenging ability and stress-responsive gene expressions, which were positively modulated upon application of RA in both chickpea cultivars. Quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR analysis showed differential expression of genes involved in transcription activation (DREB1A and NAC1), stress response (LEA and DHN), ROS scavenging (CAT, APX, GST), ethylene biosynthesis (ACO and ACS), salicylic acid (PR1) and jasmonate (MYC2) signalling in both chickpea cultivars exposed to drought stress and recovery in the presence or absence of RA. The observations imply that RA confers drought tolerance in chickpea by altering various physical, physiological and biochemical parameters, as well as by modulating differential expression of at least 11 stress-responsive genes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on detailed analysis of plant growth promotion and stress alleviation in one month old desi and kabuli chickpea subjected to drought stress for 0, 1, 3 and 7 days and recovery in the presence of a PGPR.

  5. Root inoculation with Pseudomonas putida KT2440 induces transcriptional and metabolic changes and systemic resistance in maize plants.

    PubMed

    Planchamp, Chantal; Glauser, Gaetan; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 (KT2440) rhizobacteria colonize a wide range of plants. They have been extensively studied for their capacity to adhere to maize seeds, to tolerate toxic secondary metabolites produced by maize roots and to be attracted by maize roots. However, the response of maize plants to KT2440 colonization has not been investigated yet. Maize roots were inoculated with KT2440 and the local (roots) and systemic (leaves) early plant responses were investigated. The colonization behavior of KT2440 following application to maize seedlings was investigated and transcriptional analysis of stress- and defense-related genes as well as metabolite profiling of local and systemic maize tissues of KT2440-inoculated were performed. The local and systemic responses differed and more pronounced changes were observed in roots compared to leaves. Early in the interaction roots responded via jasmonic acid- and abscisic acid-dependent signaling. Interestingly, during later steps, the salicylic acid pathway was suppressed. Metabolite profiling revealed the importance of plant phospholipids in KT2440-maize interactions. An additional important maize secondary metabolite, a form of benzoxazinone, was also found to be differently abundant in roots 3 days after KT2440 inoculation. However, the transcriptional and metabolic changes observed in bacterized plants early during the interaction were minor and became even less pronounced with time, indicating an accommodation state of the plant to the presence of KT2440. Since the maize plants reacted to the presence of KT2440 in the rhizosphere, we also investigated the ability of these bacteria to trigger induced systemic resistance (ISR) against the maize anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum graminicola. The observed resistance was expressed as strongly reduced leaf necrosis and fungal growth in infected bacterized plants compared to non-bacterized controls, showing the potential of KT2440 to act as resistance inducers.

  6. Potential of the TCE-degrading endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE to improve plant growth and reduce TCE phytotoxicity and evapotranspiration in poplar cuttings.

    PubMed

    Weyens, Nele; Truyens, Sascha; Dupae, Joke; Newman, Lee; Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Carleer, Robert; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2010-09-01

    The TCE-degrading poplar endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE was inoculated in poplar cuttings, exposed to 0, 200 and 400 mg l(-1) TCE, that were grown in two different experimental setups. During a short-term experiment, plants were grown hydroponically in half strength Hoagland nutrient solution and exposed to TCE for 3 days. Inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE promoted plant growth, reduced TCE phytotoxicity and reduced the amount of TCE present in the leaves. During a mid-term experiment, plants were grown in potting soil and exposed to TCE for 3 weeks. Here, inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE had a less pronounced positive effect on plant growth and TCE phytotoxicity, but resulted in strongly reduced amounts of TCE in leaves and roots of plants exposed to 400 mg l(-1) TCE, accompanied by a lowered evapotranspiration of TCE. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), which are known intermediates of TCE degradation, were not detected.

  7. Effects of impurities in biodiesel-derived glycerol on growth and expression of heavy metal ion homeostasis genes and gene products in Pseudomonas putida LS46.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jilagamazhi; Sharma, Parveen; Spicer, Vic; Krokhin, Oleg V; Zhang, Xiangli; Fristensky, Brian; Wilkins, John A; Cicek, Nazim; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David B

    2015-07-01

    Biodiesel production-derived waste glycerol (WG) was previously investigated as potential carbon source for medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoate (mcl-PHA) production by Pseudomonas putida LS46. In this study, we evaluated the effect of impurities in the WG on P. putida LS46 physiology during exponential growth and corresponding changes in transcription and protein expression profiles compared with cells grown on pure, reagent grade glycerol. High concentration of metal ions, such as Na(+), and numbers of heavy metals ion, such as copper, ion, zinc, were detected in biodiesel-derived WG. Omics analysis from the corresponding cultures suggested altered expression of genes involved in transport and metabolism of ammonia and heavy metal ions. Expression of three groups of heavy metal homeostasis genes was significantly changed (mostly upregulated) in WG cultures and included the following: copper-responded cluster 1 and 2 genes, primarily containing cusABC; two copies of copAB and heavy metal translocating P-type ATPase; Fur-regulated, TonB-dependent siderophore receptor; and several cobalt/zinc/cadmium transporters. Expression of these genes suggests regulation of intracellular concentrations of heavy metals during growth on biodiesel-derived glycerol. Finally, a number of genes involved in adapting to, or metabolizing free fatty acids and other nonheavy metal contaminants, such as Na(+), were also upregulated in P. putida LS46 grown on biodiesel-derived glycerol.

  8. Metabolism-dependent taxis towards (methyl)phenols is coupled through the most abundant of three polar localized Aer-like proteins of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Sarand, Inga; Osterberg, Sofia; Holmqvist, Sofie; Holmfeldt, Per; Skärfstad, Eleonore; Parales, Rebecca E; Shingler, Victoria

    2008-05-01

    Comparatively little is known about directed motility of environmental bacteria to common aromatic pollutants. Here, by expressing different parts of a (methyl)phenol-degradative pathway and the use of specific mutants, we show that taxis of Pseudomonas putida towards (methyl)phenols is dictated by its ability to catabolize the aromatic compound. Thus, in contrast to previously described chemoreceptor-mediated chemotaxis mechanisms towards benzoate, naphthalene and toluene, taxis in response to (methyl)phenols is mediated by metabolism-dependent behaviour. Here we show that P. putida differentially expresses three Aer-like receptors that are all polar-localized through interactions with CheA, and that inactivation of the most abundant Aer2 protein significantly decreases taxis towards phenolics. In addition, the participation of a sensory signal transduction protein composed of a PAS, a GGDEF and an EAL domain in motility towards these compounds is demonstrated. The results are discussed in the context of the versatility of metabolism-dependent coupling and the necessity for P. putida to integrate diverse metabolic signals from its native heterogeneous soil and water environments.

  9. Isolation and preliminary characterization of the subunits of the terminal component of naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9816-4.

    PubMed Central

    Suen, W C; Gibson, D T

    1993-01-01

    The terminal oxygenase component (ISPNAP) of naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9816-4 was purified to homogeneity. The protein contained approximately 4 g-atoms each of iron and acid-labile sulfide per mol of ISPNAP, and enzyme activity was stimulated significantly by addition of exogenous iron. The large (alpha) and small (beta) subunits of ISPNAP were isolated by two different procedures. The NH2-terminal amino acid sequences of the alpha and beta subunits were identical to the deduced amino acid sequences reported for the ndoB and ndoC genes from P. putida NCIB 9816 and almost identical to the NH2-terminal amino acid sequences determined for the large and small subunits of ISPNAP from P. putida G7. Gel filtration in the presence of 6 M urea gave an alpha subunit with an absorption maximum at 325 nm and broad absorption between 420 and 450 nm. The alpha subunit contained approximately 2 g-atoms each of iron and acid-labile sulfide per mol of the subunit. The beta subunit did not contain iron or acid-labile sulfide. These results, taken in conjunction with the deduced amino acid sequences of the large subunits from several iron-sulfur oxygenases, indicate that each alpha subunit of ISPNAP contains a Rieske [2Fe-2S] center. Images PMID:8376335

  10. Cell-cell and cell-surface interactions mediated by cellulose and a novel exopolysaccharide contribute to Pseudomonas putida biofilm formation and fitness under water-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lindsey; Li, Xiaohong; Halverson, Larry J

    2011-05-01

    The composition of the exopolysaccharide matrix of Pseudomonas putida mt2 biofilms is relatively undefined as well as the contributions of each polymer to ecological fitness. Here, we describe the role of two putative exopolysaccharide gene clusters, putida exopolysaccharide A (pea) and bacterial cellulose (bcs) in biofilm formation and stability, rhizosphere colonization and matrix hydration under water-limiting conditions. Our findings suggest that pea is involved in the production of a novel glucose, galactose, and mannose-rich polymer that contributes to cell-cell interactions necessary for pellicle and biofilm formation and stability. In contrast, Bcs plays a minor role in biofilm formation and stability, although it does contribute to rhizosphere colonization based on a competition assay. We show that pea expression is highly induced transiently under water-limiting conditions but only slightly by high osmolarity, as determined by qRT-PCR. In contrast, both forms of water stress highly induced bcs expression. Cells deficient in making one or more exopolysaccharide experienced greater dehydration-mediated cell-envelope stress, leading to increased alginate promoter activity. However, this did not lead to increased exopolysaccharide production, except in bcs or pea mutants unable to produce alginate, indicating that P. putida compensates by producing, presumably more Pea or Bcs exopolysaccharides, to facilitate biofilm hydration. Collectively, the data suggest that Pea and Bcs contribute to biofilm formation and in turn their presence contributes to fitness under water-limiting conditions, but not to the extent of alginate.

  11. Quantitative ‘Omics Analyses of Medium Chain Length Polyhydroxyalkanaote Metabolism in Pseudomonas putida LS46 Cultured with Waste Glycerol and Waste Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jilagamazhi; Sharma, Parveen; Spicer, Vic; Krokhin, Oleg V.; Zhang, Xiangli; Fristensky, Brian; Cicek, Nazim; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David. B.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptomes and proteomes of Pseudomonas putida LS46 cultured with biodiesel-derived waste glycerol or waste free fatty acids, as sole carbon sources, were compared under conditions that were either permissive or non-permissive for synthesis of medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHA). The objectives of this study were to elucidate mechanisms that influence activation of biopolymer synthesis, intra-cellular accumulation, and monomer composition, and determine if these were physiologically specific to the carbon sources used for growth of P. putida LS46. Active mcl-PHA synthesis by P. putida LS46 was associated with high expression levels of key mcl-PHA biosynthesis genes and/or gene products including monomer-supplying proteins, PHA synthases, and granule-associated proteins. ‘Omics data suggested that expression of these genes were regulated by different genetic mechanisms in P. putida LS46 cells in different physiological states, when cultured on the two waste carbon sources. Optimal polymer production by P. putida LS46 was primarily limited by less efficient glycerol metabolism during mcl-PHA synthesis on waste glycerol. Mapping the ‘Omics data to the mcl-PHA biosynthetic pathway revealed significant variations in gene expression, primarily involved in: 1) glycerol transportation; 2) enzymatic reactions that recycle reducing equivalents and produce key mcl-PHA biosynthesis pathway intermediates (e.g. NADH/NADPH, acetyl-CoA). Active synthesis of mcl-PHAs was observed during exponential phase in cultures with waste free fatty acids, and was associated with the fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway. A putative Thioesterase in the beta-oxidation pathway that may regulate the level of fatty acid beta-oxidation intermediates, and thus carbon flux to mcl-PHA biosynthesis, was highly up-regulated. Finally, the data suggested that differences in expression of selected fatty acid metabolism and mcl-PHA monomer-supplying enzymes may play a role in determining

  12. Quantitative 'Omics Analyses of Medium Chain Length Polyhydroxyalkanaote Metabolism in Pseudomonas putida LS46 Cultured with Waste Glycerol and Waste Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jilagamazhi; Sharma, Parveen; Spicer, Vic; Krokhin, Oleg V; Zhang, Xiangli; Fristensky, Brian; Cicek, Nazim; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David B

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptomes and proteomes of Pseudomonas putida LS46 cultured with biodiesel-derived waste glycerol or waste free fatty acids, as sole carbon sources, were compared under conditions that were either permissive or non-permissive for synthesis of medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHA). The objectives of this study were to elucidate mechanisms that influence activation of biopolymer synthesis, intra-cellular accumulation, and monomer composition, and determine if these were physiologically specific to the carbon sources used for growth of P. putida LS46. Active mcl-PHA synthesis by P. putida LS46 was associated with high expression levels of key mcl-PHA biosynthesis genes and/or gene products including monomer-supplying proteins, PHA synthases, and granule-associated proteins. 'Omics data suggested that expression of these genes were regulated by different genetic mechanisms in P. putida LS46 cells in different physiological states, when cultured on the two waste carbon sources. Optimal polymer production by P. putida LS46 was primarily limited by less efficient glycerol metabolism during mcl-PHA synthesis on waste glycerol. Mapping the 'Omics data to the mcl-PHA biosynthetic pathway revealed significant variations in gene expression, primarily involved in: 1) glycerol transportation; 2) enzymatic reactions that recycle reducing equivalents and produce key mcl-PHA biosynthesis pathway intermediates (e.g. NADH/NADPH, acetyl-CoA). Active synthesis of mcl-PHAs was observed during exponential phase in cultures with waste free fatty acids, and was associated with the fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway. A putative Thioesterase in the beta-oxidation pathway that may regulate the level of fatty acid beta-oxidation intermediates, and thus carbon flux to mcl-PHA biosynthesis, was highly up-regulated. Finally, the data suggested that differences in expression of selected fatty acid metabolism and mcl-PHA monomer-supplying enzymes may play a role in determining the

  13. Gene cloning, expression, and substrate specificity of an imidase from the strain Pseudomonas putida YZ-26.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ya-wei; Cui, Li-fang; Yuan, Jing-ming

    2007-07-01

    A gene-encoding imidase was isolated from Pseudomonas putdia YZ-26 genomic DNA using a combination of polymerase chain reaction and activity screening the recombinant. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed that an open reading frame (ORF) of 879 bp encoded a protein of 293 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 33712.6 kDa. The deduced amino-acid sequence showed 78% identity with the imidase from Alcaligenes eutrophus 112R4 and 80% identity with N-terminal 20 amino-acid imidase from Blastobacter sp. A17p-4. Next, the ORF was subcloned into vector pET32a to form recombinant plasmid pEI. The enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity by Ni(2+)-NTA column, with 75% activity recovery. The subunit molecular mass of the recombinant imidase as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was approximately 36 kDa, whereas its functional unit was approximately 141 kDa with four identical subunits determined by size-exclusion chromatography. The purified enzyme showed the highest activity and affinity toward succinimide, and some other substrates, such as dihydrouracil, hydantoin, succinimide, and maleimde, were investigated.

  14. Differential gene expression profile in Pseudomonas putida NBRIC19-treated wheat (Triticum aestivum) plants subjected to biotic stress of Parthenium hysterophorus.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sandhya; Srivastava, Suchi; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2014-03-01

    The inoculation of Pseudomonas putida NBRIC19 protected wheat plant from phytotoxic effect of Parthenium hysterophorus (Parthenium) and enhanced root length, shoot length, dry weight, spike length and chlorophyll content. With the aim to screen for genes differentially expressed in P. putida NBRIC19-inoculated wheat grown along with Parthenium (WPT), the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) methodology was employed. The SSH analysis was performed with WPC (uninoculated wheat grown along with Parthenium) as driver and WPT as tester. The cDNA library, enriched with differentially expressed ESTs (expressed sequence tags), were constructed from WPT. Following an initial screen of 165 ESTs in our library, 32 ESTs were identified, annotated and further validated by semiquantitative RT-PCR. The differentially expressed ESTs were associated with general stress response, defense response, growth and development, metabolic process, photosynthesis, signal transduction, and some other with unknown function. Five ESTs showing downregulation in expression level in response to Parthenium got upregulated due to P. putida NBRIC19 inoculation and further validated by quantitative real time PCR analysis at different time intervals viz. 15, 30, 45 and 90 days. SSH has been implemented for the first time to gain insights into molecular events underlying successful role of P. putida NBRIC19 in providing protection to wheat against Parthenium. The information generated in this study provides new clues to aid the understanding of genes corresponding to differentially expressed ESTs putatively involved in allelopathic interactions. Further characterization and functional analysis of these genes may provide valuable information for future studies of the molecular mechanism by which plants adapt to allelopathic effect of Parthenium.

  15. Metabolomics Analysis Reveals the Participation of Efflux Pumps and Ornithine in the Response of Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E Cells to Challenge with Propranolol

    PubMed Central

    Sayqal, Ali; Xu, Yun; Trivedi, Drupad K.; AlMasoud, Najla; Ellis, David I.; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-01-01

    Efflux pumps are critically important membrane components that play a crucial role in strain tolerance in Pseudomonas putida to antibiotics and aromatic hydrocarbons that result in these toxicants being expelled from the bacteria. Here, the effect of propranolol on P. putida was examined by sudden addition of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 mg mL-1 of this β-blocker to several strains of P. putida, including the wild type DOT-T1E and the efflux pump knockout mutants DOT-T1E-PS28 and DOT-T1E-18. Bacterial viability measurements reveal that the efflux pump TtgABC plays a more important role than the TtgGHI pump in strain tolerance to propranolol. Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy was then used as a rapid, high-throughput screening tool to investigate any phenotypic changes resulting from exposure to varying levels of propranolol. Multivariate statistical analysis of these MIR data revealed gradient trends in resultant ordination scores plots, which were related to the concentration of propranolol. MIR illustrated phenotypic changes associated with the presence of this drug within the cell that could be assigned to significant changes that occurred within the bacterial protein components. To complement this phenotypic fingerprinting approach metabolic profiling was performed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to identify metabolites of interest during the growth of bacteria following toxic perturbation with the same concentration levels of propranolol. Metabolic profiling revealed that ornithine, which was only produced by P. putida cells in the presence of propranolol, presents itself as a major metabolic feature that has important functions in propranolol stress tolerance mechanisms within this highly significant and environmentally relevant species of bacteria. PMID:27331395

  16. Co-culture with Listeria monocytogenes within a dual-species biofilm community strongly increases resistance of Pseudomonas putida to benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Giaouris, Efstathios; Chorianopoulos, Nikos; Doulgeraki, Agapi; Nychas, George-John

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a phenomenon occurring almost wherever microorganisms and surfaces exist in close proximity. This study aimed to evaluate the possible influence of bacterial interactions on the ability of Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas putida to develop a dual-species biofilm community on stainless steel (SS), as well as on the subsequent resistance of their sessile cells to benzalkonium chloride (BC) used in inadequate (sub-lethal) concentration (50 ppm). The possible progressive adaptability of mixed-culture biofilms to BC was also investigated. To accomplish these, 3 strains per species were left to develop mixed-culture biofilms on SS coupons, incubated in daily renewable growth medium for a total period of 10 days, under either mono- or dual-species conditions. Each day, biofilm cells were exposed to disinfection treatment. Results revealed that the simultaneous presence of L. monocytogenes strongly increased the resistance of P. putida biofilm cells to BC, while culture conditions (mono-/dual-species) did not seem to significantly influence the resistance of L. monocytogenes biofilm cells. BC mainly killed L. monocytogenes cells when this was applied against the dual-species sessile community during the whole incubation period, despite the fact that from the 2nd day this community was mainly composed (>90%) of P. putida cells. No obvious adaptation to BC was observed in either L. monocytogenes or P. putida biofilm cells. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis showed that the different strains behaved differently with regard to biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Such knowledge on the physiological behavior of mixed-culture biofilms could provide the information necessary to control their formation.

  17. Co-Culture with Listeria monocytogenes within a Dual-Species Biofilm Community Strongly Increases Resistance of Pseudomonas putida to Benzalkonium Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Giaouris, Efstathios; Chorianopoulos, Nikos; Doulgeraki, Agapi; Nychas, George-John

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a phenomenon occurring almost wherever microorganisms and surfaces exist in close proximity. This study aimed to evaluate the possible influence of bacterial interactions on the ability of Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas putida to develop a dual-species biofilm community on stainless steel (SS), as well as on the subsequent resistance of their sessile cells to benzalkonium chloride (BC) used in inadequate (sub-lethal) concentration (50 ppm). The possible progressive adaptability of mixed-culture biofilms to BC was also investigated. To accomplish these, 3 strains per species were left to develop mixed-culture biofilms on SS coupons, incubated in daily renewable growth medium for a total period of 10 days, under either mono- or dual-species conditions. Each day, biofilm cells were exposed to disinfection treatment. Results revealed that the simultaneous presence of L. monocytogenes strongly increased the resistance of P. putida biofilm cells to BC, while culture conditions (mono-/dual-species) did not seem to significantly influence the resistance of L. monocytogenes biofilm cells. BC mainly killed L. monocytogenes cells when this was applied against the dual-species sessile community during the whole incubation period, despite the fact that from the 2nd day this community was mainly composed (>90%) of P. putida cells. No obvious adaptation to BC was observed in either L. monocytogenes or P. putida biofilm cells. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis showed that the different strains behaved differently with regard to biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Such knowledge on the physiological behavior of mixed-culture biofilms could provide the information necessary to control their formation. PMID:24130873

  18. Catabolism of pseudocumene and 3-ethyltoluene by Pseudomonas putida (arvilla) mt-2: evidence for new functions of the TOL (pWWO) plasmid.

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, D A; Chapman, P J

    1981-01-01

    Pseudocumene (1,2,4-trimethylbenzene) and 3-ethyltoluene were found to serve as growth substrates for Pseudomonas putida (arvilla) mt-2, in addition to toluene, m-xylene, and p-xylene as previously described. Similar observations were made with several additional P. putida strains also capable of growth with toluene and the xylenes. Additional substrates which supported the growth of these organisms included 3,4-dimethylbenzyl alcohol, 3,4-dimethylbenzoate, and 3-ethylbenzoate. P. putida mt-2 cells grown either with toluene or pseudocumene rapidly oxidized toluene, pseudocumene, and 3-ethyltoluene as well as 3,4-dimethylbenzoate, 3-ethylbenzoate, 3,4-dimethylcatechol, and 3-ethylcatechol. Cell extracts from similarly grown P. putida mt-2 cells catalyzed a meta fission of 3,4-dimethylcatechol and 3-ethylcatechol to compounds having the spectral properties of 2-hydroxy-5-methyl-6-oxo-2,4-heptadienoate and 2-hydroxy-6-ox-2,4-octadienoate, respectively. The further metabolism of these intermediates was shown to be independent of oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and resulted in the formation of essentially equimolar amounts of pyruvate, indicating that each ring fission product was degraded via the hydrolytic branch of the meta fission pathway. Treatment of cells with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine led to the isolation of a mutant, which when grown with succinate in the presence of pseudocumene or 3-ethyltoluene accumulated 3,4-dimethylcatechol or 3-ethylcatechol. Cells unable to utilize toluene, m-xylene, and p-xylene, obtained by growth in benzoate, also lost the ability to utilize pseudocumene and 3-ethyltoluene. The ability to utilize these substrates could be reacquired by incubation with a leucine auxotroph otherwise able to grow on all of the aromatic substrates. PMID:7216999

  19. Direct determination of p-nitrophenyl substituent organophosphorus nerve agents using a recombinant Pseudomonas putida JS444-modified Clark oxygen electrode.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu; Mulchandani, Priti; Chen, Wilfred; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2005-02-09

    A microbial biosensor for rapid, sensitive, selective, and cost-effective determination of the total content of organophosphorus nerve agents with p-nitrophenyl substituent is reported. The biosensor consisted of genetically engineered PNP-degrader Pseudomonas putida JS444 expressing organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) on its cell surface immobilized on a dissolved oxygen electrode. Surface-expressed OPH catalyzed the hydrolysis of organophosphorus pesticides with p-nitrophenyl substituent such as paraoxon, methyl parathion, and parathion to release p-nitrophenol that was oxidized by the enzymatic machinery of Pseudomonas putida JS444 to carbon dioxide while consuming oxygen. The oxygen consumption was measured and correlated to the concentration of organophosphates. The sensor signal and response time were optimized with 0.086 mg dry weight of cell and operating in 50 mM pH 7.5 citrate-phosphate buffer with 50 microM CoCl(2) at room temperature. When operated at optimized conditions, the biosensor measured as low as 55 ppb of paraoxon, 53 ppb of methyl parathion, and 58 ppb of parathion without interference from most phenolic compounds and other commonly used pesticides, such as atrazine, coumaphos, sutan, sevin, and diazinon. The operational life of the microbial biosensor was approximately 5 days when stored in the operating buffer at 4 degrees C.

  20. Biosensor for Direct Determination of Fenitrothion and EPN Using Recombinant Pseudomonas putida JS444 with Surface Expressed Organophosphorus Hydrolase. 1. Modified Clark Oxygen Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yu; Mulchandani, Priti; Chen, Wilfred; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports a first microbial biosensor for rapid and cost-effective determination of organophosphorus pesticides fenitrothion and EPN. The biosensor consisted of recombinant PNP-degrading/oxidizing bacteria Pseudomonas putida JS444 anchoring and displaying organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) on its cell surface as biological sensing element and a dissolved oxygen electrode as the transducer. Surface-expressed OPH catalyzed the hydrolysis of fenitrothion and EPN to release 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol and p-nitrophenol, respectively, which were oxidized by the enzymatic machinery of Pseudomonas putida JS444 to carbon dioxide while consuming oxygen, which was measured and correlated to the concentration of organophosphates. Under the optimum operating conditions, the biosensor was able to measure as low as 277 ppb of fenitrothion and 1.6 ppm of EPN without interference from phenolic compounds and other commonly used pesticides such as carbamate pesticides, triazine herbicides and organophosphate pesticides without nitrophenyl substituent. The applicability of the biosensor to lake water was also demonstrated.

  1. Pseudomonas putida NCTC 10936 balances membrane fluidity in response to physical and chemical stress by changing the saturation degree and the trans/cis ratio of fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Loffhagen, Norbert; Härtig, Claus; Babel, Wolfgang

    2004-02-01

    This study explored the capability of Pseudomonas putida NCTC 10936 to maintain homeoviscosity after changing the growth temperature, incubating resting cells at different temperatures or at a constant temperature in the presence of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP). After raising the growth temperature from 20 to either 30 or 35 degrees C, the degree of saturation of the organism's fatty acids increased and the ratio of trans to cis unsaturated fatty acids decreased somewhat. In contrast, after the incubation temperature of resting cells was raised (grown at 30 degrees C) from 20 to 30 or 35 degrees C the degree of saturation of the fatty acids remained nearly constant, while the ratio of trans to cis unsaturated fatty acids increased. Incubating resting cells (grown at 30 degrees C) at 20 degrees C in the presence of 4-CP again caused no major changes in the degree of saturation, but cis to trans conversion of unsaturated fatty acids was induced, with a corresponding increase in the trans/cis ratios. Increases in both the saturation degree of the fatty acids and the trans/cis ratio of the unsaturated fatty acids correlated with increases in the fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene intercalated in the bilayers of liposomes prepared from the cells of P. putida NCTC 10936. Electron transport phosphorylation (ETP) could be stabilized by adaptive adjustments in the fluidity of the cytoplasmic membrane mediated by changes in fatty acid composition such as those observed. Whether changes in the degree of saturation or in the trans/cis ratio are more effective can be decided by studying P. putida NCTC 10936.

  2. The Homogentisate Pathway: a Central Catabolic Pathway Involved in the Degradation of l-Phenylalanine, l-Tyrosine, and 3-Hydroxyphenylacetate in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Barrau, Elsa; Olivera, Elías R.; Luengo, José M.; Fernández, Cristina; Galán, Beatriz; García, José L.; Díaz, Eduardo; Miñambres, Baltasar

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida metabolizes Phe and Tyr through a peripheral pathway involving hydroxylation of Phe to Tyr (PhhAB), conversion of Tyr into 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (TyrB), and formation of homogentisate (Hpd) as the central intermediate. Homogentisate is then catabolized by a central catabolic pathway that involves three enzymes, homogentisate dioxygenase (HmgA), fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (HmgB), and maleylacetoacetate isomerase (HmgC), finally yielding fumarate and acetoacetate. Whereas the phh, tyr, and hpd genes are not linked in the P. putida genome, the hmgABC genes appear to form a single transcriptional unit. Gel retardation assays and lacZ translational fusion experiments have shown that hmgR encodes a specific repressor that controls the inducible expression of the divergently transcribed hmgABC catabolic genes, and homogentisate is the inducer molecule. Footprinting analysis revealed that HmgR protects a region in the Phmg promoter that spans a 17-bp palindromic motif and an external direct repetition from position −16 to position 29 with respect to the transcription start site. The HmgR protein is thus the first IclR-type regulator that acts as a repressor of an aromatic catabolic pathway. We engineered a broad-host-range mobilizable catabolic cassette harboring the hmgABC, hpd, and tyrB genes that allows heterologous bacteria to use Tyr as a unique carbon and energy source. Remarkably, we show here that the catabolism of 3-hydroxyphenylacetate in P. putida U funnels also into the homogentisate central pathway, revealing that the hmg cluster is a key catabolic trait for biodegradation of a small number of aromatic compounds. PMID:15262943

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the ISC-like [2Fe–2S] ferredoxin (FdxB) from Pseudomonas putida JCM 20004

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Toshio; Ohmori, Daijiro; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2007-12-01

    A vertebrate-type [2Fe–2S] ferredoxin (FdxB), which is probably involved in the iron–sulfur cluster-biosynthesis system of the γ-proteobacterium P. putida JCM 20004, has been crystallized in space group P6{sub 1}22. The needle-shaped crystals of recombinant FdxB diffract to 1.90 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The iron–sulfur (Fe–S) cluster-biosynthesis (ISC) system of the γ-proteobacterium Pseudomonas putida JCM 20004 contains a constitutively expressed vertebrate-type [2Fe–2S] ferredoxin, FdxB, which lacks the conserved free cysteine residue near the Fe–S cluster site that has been proposed to function in the catalysis of biological Fe–S cluster assembly in other bacterial homologues. Recombinant FdxB was heterologously overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in its oxidized form by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion and streak-seeding methods using 1.6 M trisodium citrate dihydrate pH 6.5. The thin needle-shaped crystals diffract to 1.90 Å resolution and belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1}22, with unit-cell parameters a = 87.58, c = 73.14 Å. The asymmetric unit contains one protein molecule.

  4. High performance and prospective application of xanthate-modified thiourea chitosan sponge-combined Pseudomonas putida and Talaromyces amestolkiae biomass for Pb(II) removal from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nana; Xu, Xingjian; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Quanying; Yuan, Lizhu; Yu, Hongwen

    2017-02-20

    Biosorption using microbes has been proved to be an efficient technology to remove heavy metals from wastewater, whereas the imperfections in mechanical property and separation limit their practical application. In this study, Pseudomonas putida I3 and Talaromyces amestolkiae Pb respectively combined with xanthate-modified thiourea chitosan sponge (PXTCS and TXTCS) were synthesized to investigate the Pb(II) removal ability from solutions. The prepared biosorbents possessed a three-dimensional macroporous structure convenient for separation. Experimental data indicated their biosorption behaviors well followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics and Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum biosorption capacities of PXTCS and TXTCS were 232.03 and 241.61mgg(-1) with 40% P. putida I3 and 15% T. amestolkiae Pb, respectively. For the effects of co-existing metal ions on Pb(II) biosorption, the promoting degree followed the sequence: Zn(II)>Na(I)≈K(I)>Ca(II)>Mg(II)≈Al(III)≫Cd(II)>Fe(III). Both prepared biosorbents were effective in removing heavy metals from simulated industrial effluents containing various trace-level heavy metals or high concentration Pb(II).

  5. Biosensor for direct determination of fenitrothion and EPN using recombinant Pseudomonas putida JS444 with surface-expressed organophosphorous hydrolase. 2. Modified carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu; Mulchandani, Priti; Chen, Wilfred; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2007-03-01

    A whole cell-based amperometric biosensor for highly selective, sensitive, rapid, and cost-effective determination of the organophosphate pesticides fenitrothion and ethyl p-nitrophenol thio-benzene phosphonate (EPN) is discussed. The biosensor comprised genetically engineered p-nitrophenol (PNP)-degrading bacteria Pseudomonas putida JS444 anchoring and displaying organophosphorous hydrolase (OPH) on its cell surface as biological sensing element and carbon paste electrode as the amperometric transducer. Surface-expressed OPH catalyzed the hydrolysis of organophosphorous pesticides such as fenitrothion and EPN to release PNP and 3-methyl-4- nitrophenol, respectively, which were subsequently degraded by the enzymatic machinery of P. putida JS444 through electrochemically active intermediates to the TCA cycle. The electro-oxidization current of the intermediates was measured and correlated to the concentration of organophosphates. Operating at optimum conditions, 0.086 mg dry wt of cell operating at 600 mV of applied potential (vs Ag/AgCl reference) in 50 mM citrate phosphate buffer, pH 7.5, with 50 muM CoCl2 at room temperature, the biosensor measured as low as 1.4 ppb of fenitrothion and 1.6 ppb of EPN. There was no interference from phenolic compounds, carbamate pesticides, triazine herbicides, or organophosphate pesticides without nitrophenyl substituent. The service life of the biosensor and the applicability to lake water were also demonstrated.

  6. [Search for destruction factors of bacterial biofilms: comparison of phage properties in a group of Pseudomonas putida bacteriophages and specificity of their halo-formation products].

    PubMed

    Shaburova, O V; Krylov, S V; Veĭko, V P; Pleteneva, E A; Burkal'tseva, M V; Miroshnokov, K A; Kornelissen, A; Lavogne, R; Sykilinda, N N; Kadykov, V A; Mesianzhinov, V V; Volckaert, G; Krylov, V N

    2009-02-01

    Comparison of Pseudomonas putida group of phages attributed to five species (af, phi15, phi27, phi2F, and pf16) with their common property of halo-formation (formation of lightening zones) around phage plaques was conducted. The halo around phage plaques appears as a result of reduction or disappearance of bacterial polysaccharide capsules. The concentration of viable bacteria remains unchanged within the halo. A comparison of specificities of halo-formation products from various phages was conducted by a simple method. These products were shown to be highly specific and inactive on other species of pseudomonads. Phage-resistant P. putida mutants scored with respect to various phages, which lost phage adsorption ability, were tolerant to the effect of halo-formation products in most cases. Apparently, the capsular polysaccharides, which serve as a substrate for depolymerases and are the primary phage receptors, may be often lost. Results of partial sequencing of the af phage genome revealed an open reading frame that encodes the enzyme transglycosylase similar rather to transglycosylases of oligotrophic bacteria belonging to different species than to lysozymes of other phages. Possibly, it is a polyfunctional enzyme combining functions of lysozyme and an enzyme that executes the penetration of phage particle across extracellular slime and capsule.

  7. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of the global response to 17β-estradiol in estrogen-degradation strain Pseudomonas putida SJTE-1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Zhang, Lei; Hou, Jingli; Wang, Xiuli; Liu, Huan; Zheng, Daning; Liang, Rubing

    2017-01-01

    Microorganism degradation is efficient to remove the steroid hormones like 17β-estradiol (E2); but their degradation mechanism and metabolic network to these chemicals are still not very clear. Here the global responses of the estrogen-degradation strain Pseudomonas putida SJTE-1 to 17β-estradiol and glucose were analyzed and compared using the iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantization) strategy combined with LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry). 78 proteins were identified with significant changes in expression; 45 proteins and 33 proteins were up-regulated and down-regulated, respectively. These proteins were mainly involved in the processes of stress response, energy metabolism, transportation, chemotaxis and cell motility, and carbon metabolism, considered probably responding to 17β-estradiol and playing a role in its metabolism. The up-regulated proteins in electron transfer, energy generation and transport systems were thought crucial for efficient uptake, translocation and transformation of 17β-estradiol. The over-expression of carbon metabolism proteins indicated cells may activate related pathway members to utilize 17β-estradiol. Meanwhile, proteins functioning in glucose capture and metabolism were mostly down-regulated. These findings provide important clues to reveal the 17β-estradiol degradation mechanism in P. putida and promote its bioremediation applications. PMID:28155874

  8. Genetically engineered Pseudomonas putida X3 strain and its potential ability to bioremediate soil microcosms contaminated with methyl parathion and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Xu, Xingjian; Chen, Wenli; Huang, Qiaoyun

    2016-02-01

    A multifunctional Pseudomonas putida X3 strain was successfully engineered by introducing methyl parathion (MP)-degrading gene and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene in P. putida X4 (CCTCC: 209319). In liquid cultures, the engineered X3 strain utilized MP as sole carbon source for growth and degraded 100 mg L(-1) of MP within 24 h; however, this strain did not further metabolize p-nitrophenol (PNP), an intermediate metabolite of MP. No discrepancy in minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and cobalt (Co) was observed between the engineered X3 strain and its host strain. The inoculated X3 strain accelerated MP degradation in different polluted soil microcosms with 100 mg MP kg(-1) dry soil and/or 5 mg Cd kg(-1) dry soil; MP was completely eliminated within 40 h. However, the presence of Cd in the early stage of remediation slightly delayed MP degradation. The application of X3 strain in Cd-contaminated soil strongly affected the distribution of Cd fractions and immobilized Cd by reducing bioavailable Cd concentrations with lower soluble/exchangeable Cd and organic-bound Cd. The inoculated X3 strain also colonized and proliferated in various contaminated microcosms. Our results suggested that the engineered X3 strain is a potential bioremediation agent showing competitive advantage in complex contaminated environments.

  9. Antibiotic-dependent induction of Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E TtgABC efflux pump is mediated by the drug binding repressor TtgR.

    PubMed

    Terán, Wilson; Felipe, Antonia; Segura, Ana; Rojas, Antonia; Ramos, Juan-Luis; Gallegos, María-Trinidad

    2003-10-01

    Pseudomonas putida is well known for its metabolic capabilities, but recently, it has been shown to exhibit resistance to a wide range of antibiotics. In P. putida DOT-T1E, the TtgABC efflux pump, which has a broad substrate specificity, extrudes antibiotics such as ampicillin, carbenicillin, tetracycline, nalidixic acid, and chloramphenicol. We have analyzed the expression of the ttgABC efflux pump operon and its regulatory gene, ttgR, in response to several structurally unrelated antibiotics at the transcriptional level and investigated the role of the TtgR protein in this process. ttgABC and ttgR are expressed in vivo at a moderate basal level, which increases in the presence of hydrophobic antibiotics like chloramphenicol and tetracycline. In vitro experiments show that, in the absence of inducers, TtgR binds to a palindromic operator site which overlaps both ttgABC and ttgR promoters and dissociates from it in the presence of chloramphenicol and tetracycline. These results suggest that the TtgR repressor is able to bind to structurally different antibiotics, which allows induction of TtgABC multidrug efflux pump expression in response to these antimicrobial agents. This is the first case in which the expression of a drug transporter of the resistance-nodulation-division family has been shown to be regulated directly by antibiotics.

  10. The Crc/CrcZ-CrcY global regulatory system helps the integration of gluconeogenic and glycolytic metabolism in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Ruggero; Nogales, Juan; Rojo, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    In metabolically versatile bacteria, carbon catabolite repression (CCR) facilitates the preferential assimilation of the most efficient carbon sources, improving growth rates and fitness. In Pseudomonas putida, the Crc and Hfq proteins and the CrcZ and CrcY small RNAs, which are believed to antagonize Crc/Hfq, are key players in CCR. Unlike that seen in other bacterial species, succinate and glucose elicit weak CCR in this bacterium. In the present work, metabolic, transcriptomic and constraint-based metabolic flux analyses were combined to clarify whether P. putida prefers succinate or glucose, and to identify the role of the Crc protein in the metabolism of these compounds. When provided simultaneously, succinate was consumed faster than glucose, although both compounds were metabolized. CrcZ and CrcY levels were lower when both substrates were present than when only one was provided, suggesting a role for Crc in coordinating metabolism of these compounds. Flux distribution analysis suggested that, when both substrates are present, Crc works to organize a metabolism in which carbon compounds flow in opposite directions: from glucose to pyruvate, and from succinate to pyruvate. Thus, our results support that Crc not only favours the assimilation of preferred compounds, but balances carbon fluxes, optimizing metabolism and growth.

  11. Cloning and expression of a trehalose synthase from Pseudomonas putida KT2440 for the scale-up production of trehalose from maltose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tengfei; Jia, Shiru; Dai, Kun; Liu, Hongjuan; Wang, Ruiming

    2014-09-01

    Trehalose synthase (TreS) is considered to be a potential biocatalyst for trehalose production. We aimed to scale-up produce the TreS protein in Escherichia coli and further investigate the bioconversion capacity of TreS. The treS gene from Pseudomonas putida KT2440 was amplified and expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant TreS showed a molecular mass of 67 kDa. Activity analysis suggested that TreS had optimal activity at a temperature of 55 °C, a pH of 7.4, with a substrate concentration of 30%. High-pressure liquid chromatography results indicated that this enzyme had the ability to catalyze 59% maltose into trehalose, with about 5.1% glucose as by-product. Purification analysis showed that trehalose crystals with a purity of 98% were obtained by cooling trehalose solution. The TreS from P. putida KT2440 might be a candidate for trehalose production. Further study is needed to improve the trehalose conversion rate.

  12. Pseudomonas putida KT2440 Strain Metabolizes Glucose through a Cycle Formed by Enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff, Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas, and Pentose Phosphate Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Nikel, Pablo I.; Chavarría, Max; Fuhrer, Tobias; Sauer, Uwe; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 lacks a functional Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway, and glycolysis is known to proceed almost exclusively through the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) route. To investigate the raison d'être of this metabolic arrangement, the distribution of periplasmic and cytoplasmic carbon fluxes was studied in glucose cultures of this bacterium by using 13C-labeled substrates, combined with quantitative physiology experiments, metabolite quantification, and in vitro enzymatic assays under both saturating and non-saturating, quasi in vivo conditions. Metabolic flux analysis demonstrated that 90% of the consumed sugar was converted into gluconate, entering central carbon metabolism as 6-phosphogluconate and further channeled into the ED pathway. Remarkably, about 10% of the triose phosphates were found to be recycled back to form hexose phosphates. This set of reactions merges activities belonging to the ED, the EMP (operating in a gluconeogenic fashion), and the pentose phosphate pathways to form an unforeseen metabolic architecture (EDEMP cycle). Determination of the NADPH balance revealed that the default metabolic state of P. putida KT2440 is characterized by a slight catabolic overproduction of reducing power. Cells growing on glucose thus run a biochemical cycle that favors NADPH formation. Because NADPH is required not only for anabolic functions but also for counteracting different types of environmental stress, such a cyclic operation may contribute to the physiological heftiness of this bacterium in its natural habitats. PMID:26350459

  13. Broad-Host-Range ProUSER Vectors Enable Fast Characterization of Inducible Promoters and Optimization of p-Coumaric Acid Production in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Calero, Patricia; Jensen, Sheila I; Nielsen, Alex T

    2016-07-15

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 has gained increasing interest as a host for the production of biochemicals. Because of the lack of a systematic characterization of inducible promoters in this strain, we generated ProUSER broad-host-expression plasmids that facilitate fast uracil-based cloning. A set of ProUSER-reporter vectors was further created to characterize different inducible promoters. The PrhaB and Pm promoters were orthogonal and showed titratable, high, and homogeneous expression. To optimize the production of p-coumaric acid, P. putida was engineered to prevent degradation of tyrosine and p-coumaric acid. Pm and PrhaB were used to control the expression of a tyrosine ammonia lyase or AroG* and TyrA* involved in tyrosine production, respectively. Pathway expression was optimized by modulating inductions, resulting in small-scale p-coumaric acid production of 1.2 mM, the highest achieved in Pseudomonads under comparable conditions. With broad-host-range compatibility, the ProUSER vectors will serve as useful tools for optimizing gene expression in a variety of bacteria.

  14. Mineralization of paraoxon and its use as a sole C and P source by a rationally designed catabolic pathway in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    de la Peña Mattozzi, Matthew; Tehara, Sundiep K; Hong, Thomas; Keasling, Jay D

    2006-10-01

    Organophosphate compounds, which are widely used as pesticides and chemical warfare agents, are cholinesterase inhibitors. These synthetic compounds are resistant to natural degradation and threaten the environment. We constructed a strain of Pseudomonas putida that can efficiently degrade a model organophosphate, paraoxon, and use it as a carbon, energy, and phosphorus source. This strain was engineered with the pnp operon from Pseudomonas sp. strain ENV2030, which encodes enzymes that transform p-nitrophenol into beta-ketoadipate, and with a synthetic operon encoding an organophosphate hydrolase (encoded by opd) from Flavobacterium sp. strain ATCC 27551, a phosphodiesterase (encoded by pde) from Delftia acidovorans, and an alkaline phosphatase (encoded by phoA) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa HN854 under control of a constitutive promoter. The engineered strain can efficiently mineralize up to 1 mM (275 mg/liter) paraoxon within 48 h, using paraoxon as the sole carbon and phosphorus source and an inoculum optical density at 600 nm of 0.03. Because the organism can utilize paraoxon as a sole carbon, energy, and phosphorus source and because one of the intermediates in the pathway (p-nitrophenol) is toxic at high concentrations, there is no need for selection pressure to maintain the heterologous pathway.

  15. Mineralization of Paraoxon and Its Use as a Sole C and P Source by a Rationally Designed Catabolic Pathway in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    de la Peña Mattozzi, Matthew; Tehara, Sundiep K.; Hong, Thomas; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-01-01

    Organophosphate compounds, which are widely used as pesticides and chemical warfare agents, are cholinesterase inhibitors. These synthetic compounds are resistant to natural degradation and threaten the environment. We constructed a strain of Pseudomonas putida that can efficiently degrade a model organophosphate, paraoxon, and use it as a carbon, energy, and phosphorus source. This strain was engineered with the pnp operon from Pseudomonas sp. strain ENV2030, which encodes enzymes that transform p-nitrophenol into β-ketoadipate, and with a synthetic operon encoding an organophosphate hydrolase (encoded by opd) from Flavobacterium sp. strain ATCC 27551, a phosphodiesterase (encoded by pde) from Delftia acidovorans, and an alkaline phosphatase (encoded by phoA) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa HN854 under control of a constitutive promoter. The engineered strain can efficiently mineralize up to 1 mM (275 mg/liter) paraoxon within 48 h, using paraoxon as the sole carbon and phosphorus source and an inoculum optical density at 600 nm of 0.03. Because the organism can utilize paraoxon as a sole carbon, energy, and phosphorus source and because one of the intermediates in the pathway (p-nitrophenol) is toxic at high concentrations, there is no need for selection pressure to maintain the heterologous pathway. PMID:17021221

  16. Endophytic Colonization of Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) by a Novel Competent Bacterial Endophyte, Pseudomonas putida Strain P9, and Its Effect on Associated Bacterial Communities▿

    PubMed Central

    Andreote, Fernando Dini; de Araújo, Welington L.; de Azevedo, João L.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; van Overbeek, Leonard S.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain P9 is a novel competent endophyte from potato. P9 causes cultivar-dependent suppression of Phytophthora infestans. Colonization of the rhizoplane and endosphere of potato plants by P9 and its rifampin-resistant derivative P9R was studied. The purposes of this work were to follow the fate of P9 inside growing potato plants and to establish its effect on associated microbial communities. The effects of P9 and P9R inoculation were studied in two separate experiments. The roots of transplants of three different cultivars of potato were dipped in suspensions of P9 or P9R cells, and the plants were planted in soil. The fate of both strains was followed by examining colony growth and by performing PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Colonies of both strains were recovered from rhizoplane and endosphere samples of all three cultivars at two growth stages. A conspicuous band, representing P9 and P9R, was found in all Pseudomonas PCR-DGGE fingerprints for treated plants. The numbers of P9R CFU and the P9R-specific band intensities for the different replicate samples were positively correlated, as determined by linear regression analysis. The effects of plant growth stage, genotype, and the presence of P9R on associated microbial communities were examined by multivariate and unweighted-pair group method with arithmetic mean cluster analyses of PCR-DGGE fingerprints. The presence of strain P9R had an effect on bacterial groups identified as Pseudomonas azotoformans, Pseudomonas veronii, and Pseudomonas syringae. In conclusion, strain P9 is an avid colonizer of potato plants, competing with microbial populations indigenous to the potato phytosphere. Bacterization with a biocontrol agent has an important and previously unexplored effect on plant-associated communities. PMID:19329656

  17. The oxygenating constituent of 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase from the CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida: the first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Isupov, Michail N.; Schröder, Ewald; Gibson, Robert P.; Beecher, Jean; Donadio, Giuliana; Saneei, Vahid; Dcunha, Stephlina A.; McGhie, Emma J.; Sayer, Christopher; Davenport, Colin F.; Lau, Peter C.; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Kadow, Maria; Balke, Kathleen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Bourenkov, Gleb; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional structures of the native enzyme and the FMN complex of the overexpressed form of the oxygenating component of the type II Baeyer–Villiger 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase have been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure of this dimeric FMN-dependent enzyme, which is encoded on the large CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida, has been solved by a combination of multiple anomalous dispersion from a bromine crystal soak and molecular replacement using a bacterial luciferase model. The orientation of the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in the active site of this TIM-barrel fold enzyme differs significantly from that previously observed in enzymes of the bacterial luciferase-like superfamily. The Ala77 residue is in a cis conformation and forms a β-bulge at the C-terminus of β-strand 3, which is a feature observed in many proteins of this superfamily. PMID:26527149

  18. The toxicity of the quaternary ammonium compound benzalkonium chloride alone and in mixtures with other anionic compounds to bacteria in test systems with Vibrio fischeri and Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Sütterlin, H; Alexy, R; Kümmerer, K

    2008-10-01

    Mixtures of chemicals are present in the aquatic environment but standard testing methods assess only single compounds. One aspect of this question is the importance of the formation of ionic pairs, for example from quaternary ammonium compounds with organic anions, and the significance of the ionic pairs for bacterial toxicity in the aquatic environment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the toxicity of the cationic quaternary ammonium compound benzalkonium chloride (BAC) against aquatic bacteria in the presence of substances commonly found in wastewater, such as the anionic surfactant linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS), naphthalene sulfonic acid (NSA), sodium dodecylsulfonate (SDS), and benzene sulfonic acid (BSA). The growth inhibition test with Pseudomonas putida and the Vibrio fischeri luminescent inhibition test were used to determine the toxicity of single compounds and compound mixtures. The results found in this study indicate that ion pair formation is of minor significance under the test conditions applied here.

  19. Exploiting metagenomic diversity for novel polyhydroxyalkanoate synthases: production of a terpolymer poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate-co-3-hydroxyoctanoate) with a recombinant Pseudomonas putida strain.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Simrita; Bassas-Galia, Monica; Sarma, Priyangshu M; Lal, Banwari; Arias, Sagrario

    2012-01-01

    A metagenomic library of 2.1×10(6) clones was constructed using oil-contaminated soil from Gujarat (India). One of the fosmid clones, 40N22, encodes a polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase showing 76% identity with an Alcaligenes sp. synthase. The corresponding gene was expressed in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 ΔphaC1 which is impaired in PHA production. The gene conferred the recombinant strain PpKT-40N22 with the ability to produce copolymers with up to 21% in medium-chain-length content. Thus, 37% and 45% of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate-co-3-hydroxyoctanoate), respectively were obtained when using sodium heptanoate and oleic acid as carbon sources. These 3-hydroxybutyrate-(3HB)-based polymers are of interest since they incorporate the properties of medium chain length polymers and thus increase the range of applications of PHAs.

  20. Use of an ipb-lux Fusion To Study Regulation of the Isopropylbenzene Catabolism Operon of Pseudomonas putida RE204 and To Detect Hydrophobic Pollutants in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Selifonova, O. V.; Eaton, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA segment involved in the regulation of the isopropylbenzene (cumene) catabolism operon (ipb) of plasmid pRE4 from Pseudomonas putida RE204 and the Vibrio fischeri luciferase genes, luxCDABE, were used to create an ipbRo/pA(prm1)-luxCDABE reporter fusion plasmid, pOS25. Escherichia coli HMS174(pOS25) produces light in the presence of inducers of the ipb operon. These inducers were shown to be hydrophobic compounds and to include monoalkylbenzenes, substituted benzenes and toluenes, some alkanes and cycloalkanes, chlorinated solvents, and naphthalenes. Complex hydrocarbon mixtures, such as gasoline, diesel fuel, jet fuels (JP-4 and JP-5), and creosote, were also inducers of ipb-lux. Bacteria carrying the ipb-lux reporter may be useful as bioindicators of hydrocarbon pollution in the environment and may be particularly valuable for examining the bioavailability of inducing pollutants. PMID:16535269

  1. Synthesis of Diblock copolymer poly-3-hydroxybutyrate -block-poly-3-hydroxyhexanoate [PHB-b-PHHx] by a β-oxidation weakened Pseudomonas putida KT2442

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Block polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) were reported to be resistant against polymer aging that negatively affects polymer properties. Recently, more and more attempts have been directed to make PHA block copolymers. Diblock copolymers PHB-b-PHHx consisting of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) block covalently bonded with poly-3-hydroxyhexanoate (PHHx) block were for the first time produced successfully by a recombinant Pseudomonas putida KT2442 with its β-oxidation cycle deleted to its maximum. Results The chloroform extracted polymers were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), thermo- and mechanical analysis. NMR confirmed the existence of diblock copolymers consisting of 58 mol% PHB as the short chain length block with 42 mol% PHHx as the medium chain length block. The block copolymers had two glass transition temperatures (Tg) at 2.7°C and −16.4°C, one melting temperature (Tm) at 172.1°C and one cool crystallization temperature (Tc) at 69.1°C as revealed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), respectively. This is the first microbial short-chain-length (scl) and medium-chain-length (mcl) PHA block copolymer reported. Conclusions It is possible to produce PHA block copolymers of various kinds using the recombinant Pseudomonas putida KT2442 with its β-oxidation cycle deleted to its maximum. In comparison to a random copolymer poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate (P(HB-co-HHx)) and a blend sample of PHB and PHHx, the PHB-b-PHHx showed improved structural related mechanical properties. PMID:22480145

  2. Paralogous Regulators ArsR1 and ArsR2 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 as a Basis for Arsenic Biosensor Development

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Matilde; Morel, Bertrand; Ramos, Juan L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The remarkable metal resistance of many microorganisms is related to the presence of multiple metal resistance operons. Pseudomonas putida KT2440 can be considered a model for these microorganisms since its arsenic resistance is due to the action of proteins encoded by the two paralogous arsenic resistance operons ARS1 and ARS2. Both operons contain the genes encoding the transcriptional regulators ArsR1 and ArsR2 that control operon expression. We show here that purified ArsR1 and ArsR2 bind the trivalent salt of arsenic (arsenite) with similar affinities (~30 μM), whereas no binding is observed for the pentavalent salt (arsenate). Furthermore, trivalent salts of bismuth and antimony showed binding to both paralogues. The positions of cysteines, found to bind arsenic in other homologues, indicate that ArsR1 and ArsR2 employ different modes of arsenite recognition. Both paralogues are dimeric and possess significant thermal stability. Both proteins were used to construct whole-cell, lacZ-based biosensors. Whereas responses to bismuth were negligible, significant responses were observed for arsenite, arsenate, and antimony. Biosensors based on the P. putida arsB1 arsB2 arsenic efflux pump double mutant were significantly more sensitive than biosensors based on the wild-type strain. This sensitivity enhancement by pump mutation may be a convenient strategy for the construction of other biosensors. A frequent limitation found for other arsenic biosensors was their elevated background signal and interference by inorganic phosphate. The constructed biosensors show no interference by inorganic phosphate, are characterized by a very low background signal, and were found to be suitable to analyze environmental samples. IMPORTANCE Arsenic is at the top of the priority list of hazardous compounds issued by the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease. The reason for the stunning arsenic resistance of many microorganisms is the existence of paralogous arsenic

  3. Identification of a novel Gsp-related pathway required for secretion of the manganese-oxidizing factor of Pseudomonas putida strain GB-1.

    PubMed

    De Vrind, Johannes; De Groot, Arjan; Brouwers, Geert Jan; Tommassen, Jan; De Vrind-De Jong, Elisabeth

    2003-02-01

    The manganese-oxidizing factor of Pseudomonas putida strain GB-1 is associated with the outer membrane. One of the systems of protein transport across the outer membrane is the general secretory pathway (Gsp). The gsp genes are called xcp in Pseudomonas species. In a previous study, it was shown that mutation of the prepilin peptidase XcpA and of a homologue of the pseudopilin XcpT inhibited transport of the factor. In the present study, we describe the genomic region flanking the xcpT homologue (designated xcmT1). We show that xcmT1 is part of a two-gene operon that includes an xcpS homologue (designated xcmS). No other xcp-like genes are present in the regions flanking the xcmT1/xcmS cluster. We also characterized the site of transposon insertion of another transport mutant of P. putida GB-1. This insertion appeared to be located in a gene (designated xcmX) possibly encoding another pseudopilin-related protein. This xcmX is clustered with two other xcpT-related genes (designated xcmT2 and xcmT3) on one side and homologues of three csg genes (designated csmE, csmF and csmG) on the other side. The csg genes are involved in production of aggregative fibres in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. A search for XcmX homologues revealed that the recently published genome of Ralstonia solanacearum and the unannotated genome of P. putida KT2440 contain comparable gene clusters with xcmX and xcp homologues that are different from the well-described 'regular'xcp/gsp clusters. They do contain xcpR and xcpQ homologues but, for example, homologues of xcpP, Y and Z are lacking. The results suggest a novel Xcp-related system for the transport of manganese-oxidizing enzymes to the cell surface.

  4. Improved production of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates in glucose-based fed-batch cultivations of metabolically engineered Pseudomonas putida strains.

    PubMed

    Poblete-Castro, Ignacio; Rodriguez, Andre Luis; Lam, Carolyn Ming Chi; Kessler, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges in metabolic engineering for enhanced synthesis of value-added chemicals is to design and develop new strains that can be translated into well-controlled fermentation processes using bioreactors. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of various fed-batch strategies in the performance of metabolically engineered Pseudomonas putida strains, Δgcd and Δgcd-pgl, for improving production of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHAs) using glucose as the only carbon source. First we developed a fed-batch process that comprised an initial phase of biomass accumulation based on an exponential feeding carbon-limited strategy. For the mcl-PHA accumulation stage, three induction techniques were tested under nitrogen limitation. The substrate-pulse feeding was more efficient than the constant-feeding approach to promote the accumulation of the desirable product. Nonetheless, the most efficient approach for maximum PHA synthesis was the application of a dissolved-oxygen-stat feeding strategy (DO-stat), where P. putida Δgcd mutant strain showed a final PHA content and specific PHA productivity of 67% and 0.83 g·l(-1)·h(-1), respectively. To our knowledge, this mcl-PHA titer is the highest value that has been ever reported using glucose as the sole carbon and energy source. Our results also highlighted the effect of different fed-batch strategies upon the extent of realization of the intended metabolic modification of the mutant strains.

  5. Molecular level biodegradation of phenol and its derivatives through dmp operon of Pseudomonas putida: A bio-molecular modeling and docking analysis.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sujay; Banerjee, Arundhati

    2015-10-01

    Participation of Pseudomonas putida-derived methyl phenol (dmp) operon and DmpR protein in the biodegradation of phenol or other harmful, organic, toxic pollutants was investigated at a molecular level. Documentation documents that P. putida has DmpR protein which positively regulates dmp operon in the presence of inducers; like phenols. From the operon, phenol hydroxylase encoded by dmpN gene, participates in degrading phenols after dmp operon is expressed. For the purpose, the 3-D models of the four domains from DmpR protein and of the DNA sequences from the two Upstream Activation Sequences (UAS) present at the promoter region of the operon were demonstrated using discrete molecular modeling techniques. The best modeled structures satisfying their stereo-chemical properties were selected in each of the cases. To stabilize the individual structures, energy optimization was performed. In the presence of inducers, probable interactions among domains and then the two independent DNA structures with the fourth domain were perused by manifold molecular docking simulations. The complex structures were made to be stable by minimizing their overall energy. Responsible amino acid residues, nucleotide bases and binding patterns for the biodegradation, were examined. In the presence of the inducers, the biodegradation process is initiated by the interaction of phe50 from the first protein domain with the inducers. Only after the interaction of the last domain with the DNA sequences individually, the operon is expressed. This novel residue level study is paramount for initiating transcription in the operon; thereby leading to expression of phenol hydroxylase followed by phenol biodegradation.

  6. m-xylene-responsive Pu-PnifH hybrid sigma54 promoters that overcome physiological control in Pseudomonas putida KT2442.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Manuel; Fernández, Silvia; Rodríguez, María J; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2005-01-01

    The sequences surrounding the -12/-24 motif of the m-xylene-responsive sigma54 promoter Pu of the Pseudomonas putida TOL plasmid pWW0 were replaced by various DNA segments of the same size recruited from PnifH sigma54 promoter variants known to have various degrees of efficacy and affinity for sigma54-RNA polymerase (RNAP). In order to have an accurate comparison of the output in vivo of each of the hybrids, the resulting promoters were recombined at the same location of the chromosome of P. putida KT2442 with a tailored vector system. The promoters included the upstream activation sequence (UAS) for the cognate regulator of the TOL system (XylR) fused to the -12/-24 region of the wild-type PnifH and its higher sigma54-RNAP affinity variants PnifH049 and PnifH319. As a control, the downstream region of the glnAp2 promoter (lacking integration host factor) was fused to the XylR UAS as well. When the induction patterns of the corresponding lacZ fusion strains were compared in vivo, we observed that promoters bearing the RNAP binding site of PnifH049 and PnifH319 were not silenced during exponential growth, as is distinctly the case for the wild-type Pu promoter or for the Pu-PnifH variant. Taken together, our results indicate that the promoter sequence(s) spanning the -12/-24 region of Pu dictates the coupling of promoter output to growth conditions.

  7. Energetics and surface properties of Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E in a two-phase fermentation system with 1-decanol as second phase.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Grit; Cornelissen, Sjef; van Breukelen, Frank; Hunger, Steffi; Lippold, Holger; Loffhagen, Norbert; Wick, Lukas Y; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2006-06-01

    The solvent-tolerant strain Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E was grown in batch fermentations in a 5-liter bioreactor in the presence and absence of 10% (vol/vol) of the organic solvent 1-decanol. The growth behavior and cellular energetics, such as the cellular ATP content and the energy charge, as well as the cell surface hydrophobicity and charge, were measured in cells growing in the presence and absence of 1-decanol. Although the cells growing in the presence of 1-decanol showed an about 10% reduced growth rate and a 48% reduced growth yield, no significant differences were measured either in the ATP and potassium contents or in the energy charge, indicating that the cells adapted completely at the levels of membrane permeability and energetics. Although the bacteria needed additional energy for adaptation to the presence of the solvent, they were able to maintain or activate electron transport phosphorylation, allowing homeostasis of the ATP level and energy charge in the presence of the solvent, at the price of a reduced growth yield. On the other hand, significantly enhanced cell hydrophobicities and more negative cell surface charges were observed in cells grown in the presence of 1-decanol. Both reactions occurred within about 10 min after the addition of the solvent and were significantly different after killing of the cells with toxic concentrations of HgCl2. This adaptation of the surface properties of the bacterium to the presence of solvents seems to be very similar to previously observed reactions on the level of lipopolysaccharides, with which bacteria adapt to environmental stresses, such as heat shock, antibiotics, or low oxygen content. The results give clear physiological indications that the process with P. putida DOT-T1E as the biocatalyst and 1-decanol as the solvent is a stable system for two-phase biotransformations that will allow the production of fine chemicals in economically sound amounts.

  8. Compensatory role of the cis-trans-isomerase and cardiolipin synthase in the membrane fluidity of Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Patricia; Segura, Ana; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2007-07-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, cell membrane fluidity is influenced by phospholipid head group composition and linked fatty acids. Exposure of Pseudomonas putida to stressing agents results in short- and long-term modifications in membrane lipids. The main adaptive change observed in response to organic solvents in the short term is the cis- to trans-isomerization of unsaturated fatty acids in a reaction mediated by cis/trans-isomerase (CTI); whereas in the long term an increase in cardiolipin content takes place. Despite the interest of these genes in the context of stress responses, the transcriptional regulation of the cti and cls genes has not been studied before. The cti and cls (cardiolipin synthase) genes in the solvent-tolerant P. putida DOT-T1E strain form monocistronic units and are expressed from sigma-70 promoters. Expression from the cls promoter is sixfold higher in the stationary phase than in the log phase, and expression of the cls gene is not influenced by solvents. The cti gene is expressed at fairly constant levels in the log and stationary phase, but its level of expression is moderately upregulated in response to toluene. We used fluorescence polarization assays to show that mutants deficient in the cti gene exhibit less rigid membranes than the wild-type strain, whereas mutants with a knockout in the cls gene exhibit increased membrane rigidity. A double cti/cls mutant has similar membrane rigidity as the wild-type strain, which points towards a compensatory effect of the mutations with regard to membrane fluidity. However, the cls and cls/cti mutants were more sensitive to solvents than the wild-type and the cti mutant because of the impaired functioning of efflux drug transporters.

  9. Oxidation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by Alkane Hydroxylase in Dicyclopropylketone-Induced and n-Octane-Grown Pseudomonas putida GPo1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christy A.; Hyman, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    The alkane hydroxylase enzyme system in Pseudomonas putida GPo1 has previously been reported to be unreactive toward the gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). We have reexamined this finding by using cells of strain GPo1 grown in rich medium containing dicyclopropylketone (DCPK), a potent gratuitous inducer of alkane hydroxylase activity. Cells grown with DCPK oxidized MTBE and generated stoichiometric quantities of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Cells grown in the presence of DCPK also oxidized tert-amyl methyl ether but did not appear to oxidize either TBA, ethyl tert-butyl ether, or tert-amyl alcohol. Evidence linking MTBE oxidation to alkane hydroxylase activity was obtained through several approaches. First, no TBA production from MTBE was observed with cells of strain GPo1 grown on rich medium without DCPK. Second, no TBA production from MTBE was observed in DCPK-treated cells of P. putida GPo12, a strain that lacks the alkane-hydroxylase-encoding OCT plasmid. Third, all n-alkanes that support the growth of strain GPo1 inhibited MTBE oxidation by DCPK-treated cells. Fourth, two non-growth-supporting n-alkanes (propane and n-butane) inhibited MTBE oxidation in a saturable, concentration-dependent process. Fifth, 1,7-octadiyne, a putative mechanism-based inactivator of alkane hydroxylase, fully inhibited TBA production from MTBE. Sixth, MTBE-oxidizing activity was also observed in n-octane-grown cells. Kinetic studies with strain GPo1 grown on n-octane or rich medium with DCPK suggest that MTBE-oxidizing activity may have previously gone undetected in n-octane-grown cells because of the unusually high Ks value (20 to 40 mM) for MTBE. PMID:15294784

  10. Conversion of 3-Chlorocatechol by Various Catechol 2,3-Dioxygenases and Sequence Analysis of the Chlorocatechol Dioxygenase Region of Pseudomonas putida GJ31

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Astrid E.; Kingma, Jaap; Kaschabek, Stefan R.; Reineke, Walter; Janssen, Dick B.

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida GJ31 contains an unusual catechol 2,3-dioxygenase that converts 3-chlorocatechol and 3-methylcatechol, which enables the organism to use both chloroaromatics and methylaromatics for growth. A 3.1-kb region of genomic DNA of strain GJ31 containing the gene for this chlorocatechol 2,3-dioxygenase (cbzE) was cloned and sequenced. The cbzE gene appeared to be plasmid localized and was found in a region that also harbors genes encoding a transposase, a ferredoxin that was homologous to XylT, an open reading frame with similarity to a protein of a meta-cleavage pathway with unknown function, and a 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase. CbzE was most similar to catechol 2,3-dioxygenases of the 2.C subfamily of type 1 extradiol dioxygenases (L. D. Eltis and J. T. Bolin, J. Bacteriol. 178:5930–5937, 1996). The substrate range and turnover capacity with 3-chlorocatechol were determined for CbzE and four related catechol 2,3-dioxygenases. The results showed that CbzE was the only enzyme that could productively convert 3-chlorocatechol. Besides, CbzE was less susceptible to inactivation by methylated catechols. Hybrid enzymes that were made of CzbE and the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase of P. putida UCC2 (TdnC) showed that the resistance of CbzE to suicide inactivation and its substrate specificity were mainly determined by the C-terminal region of the protein. PMID:9973359

  11. Oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether by alkane hydroxylase in dicyclopropylketone-induced and n-octane-grown Pseudomonas putida GPo1.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christy A; Hyman, Michael R

    2004-08-01

    The alkane hydroxylase enzyme system in Pseudomonas putida GPo1 has previously been reported to be unreactive toward the gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). We have reexamined this finding by using cells of strain GPo1 grown in rich medium containing dicyclopropylketone (DCPK), a potent gratuitous inducer of alkane hydroxylase activity. Cells grown with DCPK oxidized MTBE and generated stoichiometric quantities of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Cells grown in the presence of DCPK also oxidized tert-amyl methyl ether but did not appear to oxidize either TBA, ethyl tert-butyl ether, or tert-amyl alcohol. Evidence linking MTBE oxidation to alkane hydroxylase activity was obtained through several approaches. First, no TBA production from MTBE was observed with cells of strain GPo1 grown on rich medium without DCPK. Second, no TBA production from MTBE was observed in DCPK-treated cells of P. putida GPo12, a strain that lacks the alkane-hydroxylase-encoding OCT plasmid. Third, all n-alkanes that support the growth of strain GPo1 inhibited MTBE oxidation by DCPK-treated cells. Fourth, two non-growth-supporting n-alkanes (propane and n-butane) inhibited MTBE oxidation in a saturable, concentration-dependent process. Fifth, 1,7-octadiyne, a putative mechanism-based inactivator of alkane hydroxylase, fully inhibited TBA production from MTBE. Sixth, MTBE-oxidizing activity was also observed in n-octane-grown cells. Kinetic studies with strain GPo1 grown on n-octane or rich medium with DCPK suggest that MTBE-oxidizing activity may have previously gone undetected in n-octane-grown cells because of the unusually high K(s) value (20 to 40 mM) for MTBE.

  12. Long-term analysis of diesel fuel consumption in a co-culture of Acinetobacter venetianus, Pseudomonas putida and Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Pepi, Milva; Minacci, Andrea; Di Cello, Francescopaolo; Baldi, Franco; Fani, Renato

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of a microbial population isolated from superficial waters of Venice Lagoon and the ability to utilise diesel fuel (n-alkanes mixture C12-C28) as the sole carbon and energy source were studied in a long-term reconstruction experiment. The reconstructed microbial population consisted of three bacterial strains belonging to the species Acinetobacter venetianus, Pseudomonas putida, and Alcaligenes faecalis, which were able to oxidise n-alkanes to alkanoates, n-alkanols to alkanoates, or only n-alkanoates, respectively. Three different approaches: plate counting, cell counting by epifluorescence microscopy with DAPI staining, and by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) by using a probe conjugate with fluoresceine isothiocyanate specifically targeted towards the 16S rRNA of bacteria belonging to the genus Acinetobacter were used to monitor the growth of the bacterial population. The growth of A. venetianus was stimulated by the presence of other strains, suggesting a beneficial interaction. After the first week of growth A. venetianus cells formed aggregates, as confirmed by confocal microscopy (CLSM), which allowed them to be distinguished from free cells. A relationship between cell number and measured areas (microm2) per aggregate was found. Each cell presented an average surface of 1.21 microm2. Each aggregate was formed by a cellular monolayer biofilm consisting of up to several thousands of cells. The A. venetianus aggregates increased in number and size over time, but after two weeks fragmentation events, which had a beneficial effect on the growth of P. putida and A. faecalis, occurred.

  13. Mutational analysis of the three cysteines and active-site aspartic acid 103 of ketosteroid isomerase from Pseudomonas putida biotype B.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S W; Joo, S; Choi, G; Cho, H S; Oh, B H; Choi, K Y

    1997-01-01

    In order to clarify the roles of three cysteines in ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) from Pseudomonas putida biotype B, each of the cysteine residues has been changed to a serine residue (C69S, C81S, and C97S) by site-directed mutagenesis. All cysteine mutations caused only a slight decrease in the k(cat) value, with no significant change of Km for the substrate. Even modification of the sulfhydryl group with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) has almost no effect on enzyme activity. These results demonstrate that none of the cysteines in the KSI from P. putida is critical for catalytic activity, contrary to the previous identification of a cysteine in an active-site-directed photoinactivation study of KSI. Based on the three-dimensional structures of KSIs with and without dienolate intermediate analog equilenin, as determined by X-ray crystallography at high resolution, Asp-103 was found to be located within the range of the hydrogen bond to the equilenin. To assess the role of Asp-103 in catalysis, Asp-103 has been replaced with either asparagine (D103N) or alanine (D103A) by site-directed mutagenesis. For D103A mutant KSI there was a significant decrease in the k(cat) value: the k(cat) of the mutant was 85-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme; however, for the D103N mutant, which retained some hydrogen bonding capability, there was a minor decrease in the k(cat) value. These findings support the idea that aspartic acid 103 in the active site is an essential catalytic residue involved in catalysis by hydrogen bonding to the dienolate intermediate. PMID:9401033

  14. Metabolic Fingerprinting of Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E Strains: Understanding the Influence of Divalent Cations in Adaptation Mechanisms Following Exposure to Toluene

    PubMed Central

    Sayqal, Ali; Xu, Yun; Trivedi, Drupad K.; AlMasoud, Najla; Ellis, David I.; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strains can adapt and overcome the activity of toxic organic solvents by the employment of several resistant mechanisms including efflux pumps and modification to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in their membranes. Divalent cations such as magnesium and calcium play a crucial role in the development of solvent tolerance in bacterial cells. Here, we have used Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy directly on cells (metabolic fingerprinting) to monitor bacterial response to the absence and presence of toluene, along with the influence of divalent cations present in the growth media. Multivariate analysis of the data using principal component-discriminant function analysis (PC-DFA) showed trends in scores plots, illustrating phenotypic alterations related to the effect of Mg2+, Ca2+ and toluene on cultures. Inspection of PC-DFA loadings plots revealed that several IR spectral regions including lipids, proteins and polysaccharides contribute to the separation in PC-DFA space, thereby indicating large phenotypic response to toluene and these cations. Finally, the saturated fatty acid ratio from the FT-IR spectra showed that upon toluene exposure, the saturated fatty acid ratio was reduced, while it increased in the presence of divalent cations. This study clearly demonstrates that the combination of metabolic fingerprinting with appropriate chemometric analysis can result in practicable knowledge on the responses of important environmental bacteria to external stress from pollutants such as highly toxic organic solvents, and indicates that these changes are manifest in the bacterial cell membrane. Finally, we demonstrate that divalent cations improve solvent tolerance in P. putida DOT‑T1E strains. PMID:27128955

  15. MrdH, a Novel Metal Resistance Determinant of Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Is Flanked by Metal-Inducible Mobile Genetic Elements▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Haritha, Adhikarla; Sagar, Korripally Prem; Tiwari, Anand; Kiranmayi, Patnala; Rodrigue, Agnes; Mohan, Pamarthi Maruthi; Singh, Surya Satyanarayana

    2009-01-01

    We report here the identification and characterization of mrdH, a novel chromosomal metal resistance determinant, located in the genomic island 55 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440. It encodes for MrdH, a predicted protein of ∼40 kDa with a chimeric domain organization derived from the RcnA and RND (for resistance-nodulation-cell division) metal efflux proteins. The metal resistance function of mrdH was identified by the ability to confer nickel resistance upon its complementation into rcnA mutant (a nickel- and cobalt-sensitive mutant) of Escherichia coli. However, the disruption of mrdH in P. putida resulted in an increased sensitivity to cadmium and zinc apart from nickel. Expression studies using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR showed the induction of mrdH by cadmium, nickel, zinc, and cobalt. In association with mrdH, we also identified a conserved hypothetical gene mreA whose encoded protein showed significant homology to NreA and NreA-like proteins. Expression of the mreA gene in rcnA mutant of E. coli enhanced its cadmium and nickel resistance. Transcriptional studies showed that both mrdH and mreA underwent parallel changes in gene expression. The mobile genetic elements Tn4652 and IS1246, flanking mrdH and mreA were found to be induced by cadmium, nickel, and zinc, but not by cobalt. This study is the first report of a single-component metal efflux transporter, mrdH, showing chimeric domain organization, a broad substrate spectrum, and a location amid metal-inducible mobile genetic elements. PMID:19648243

  16. A Pseudomonas putida bioreporter for the detection of enzymes active on 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolone signalling molecules.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christine; Fetzner, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The quorum sensing signalling molecules 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone, termed the "Pseudomonas quinolone signal" (PQS), and 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone (HHQ) play an important role in the control of virulence gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To construct a bioreporter for the specific and sensitive detection of these compounds, a plasmid with the pqsR gene encoding the PQS- and HHQ-responsive transcriptional regulator PqsR, and with the PqsR-controlled pqsA promoter fused to the lacZ gene, was established in Pseudomonas putida KT2440. The bioreporter responds to HHQ and PQS at concentrations in the range of 0.1-10 and 0.01-5 μM, respectively, with EC(50) values of 1.50 ± 0.25 μM for HHQ and 0.15 ± 0.02 μM for PQS. 2,4-Dihydroxyquinoline, a metabolite produced abundantly by P. aeruginosa, did not elicit an increase in reporter enzyme activity. To test whether the bioreporter can be used for the detection of enzymes active on AQ signalling molecules, the hodC gene coding for 2-methyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone 2,4-dioxygenase was expressed in the reporter strain. This dioxygenase catalyses the cleavage of PQS, albeit with very low activity. The response of the bioreporter to PQS was significantly quenched by co-expression of the hodC gene, and HPLC analysis of culture extracts verified that the PQS levels decreased during cultivation. The bioreporter can be applied to screen for AQ-converting enzymes, which will be useful tools to interfere with quorum sensing and thus virulence in P. aeruginosa.

  17. Genetic and Functional Characterization of Cyclic Lipopeptide White-Line-Inducing Principle (WLIP) Production by Rice Rhizosphere Isolate Pseudomonas putida RW10S2

    PubMed Central

    Rokni-Zadeh, Hassan; Li, Wen; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Aminael; Sinnaeve, Davy; Rozenski, Jef; Martins, José C.

    2012-01-01

    The secondary metabolite mediating the GacS-dependent growth-inhibitory effect exerted by the rice rhizosphere isolate Pseudomonas putida RW10S2 on phytopathogenic Xanthomonas species was identified as white-line-inducing principle (WLIP), a member of the viscosin group of cyclic lipononadepsipeptides. WLIP producers are commonly referred to by the taxonomically invalid name “Pseudomonas reactans,” based on their capacity to reveal the presence of a nearby colony of Pseudomonas tolaasii by inducing the formation of a visible precipitate (“white line”) in agar medium between both colonies. This phenomenon is attributed to the interaction of WLIP with a cyclic lipopeptide of a distinct structural group, the fungitoxic tolaasin, and has found application as a diagnostic tool to identify tolaasin-producing bacteria pathogenic to mushrooms. The genes encoding the WLIP nonribosomal peptide synthetases WlpA, WlpB, and WlpC were identified in two separate genomic clusters (wlpR-wlpA and wlpBC) with an operon organization similar to that of the viscosin, massetolide, and entolysin biosynthetic systems. Expression of wlpR is dependent on gacS, and the encoded regulator of the LuxR family (WlpR) activates transcription of the biosynthetic genes and the linked export genes, which is not controlled by the RW10S2 quorum-sensing system PmrR/PmrI. In addition to linking the known phenotypes of white line production and hemolytic activity of a WLIP producer with WLIP biosynthesis, additional properties of ecological relevance conferred by WLIP production were identified, namely, antagonism against Xanthomonas and involvement in swarming and biofilm formation. PMID:22544260

  18. Siderophore-mediated uptake of Fe sup 3+ by the plant growth-stimulating Pseudomonas putida strain WCS358 and by other rhizosphere microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    de Weger, L.A.; van Arendonk, J.J.C.M.; Recourt, K.; Lugtenberg, B. ); van der Hofstad, G.A.J.M.; Weisbeek, P.J. )

    1988-10-01

    Under iron-limited conditions, Pseudomonas putida WCS358 produces a siderophore, pseudobactin 358, which is essential for the plant growth-stimulating ability of this strain. Cells of strain WCS358, provided that they have been grown under Fe{sup 3+} limitation, take up {sup 55}Fe{sup 3+} from the {sup 55}Fe{sup 3+}-labeled pseudobactin 358 complex with K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of 0.23 {mu}M and 0.14 nmol/mg of cell dry weight per min, respectively. Uptake experiments with cells treated with various metabolic inhibitors showed that this Fe{sup 3+} uptake process was dependent on the proton motive force. Furthermore, strain WCS358 was shown to be able to take up Fe{sup 3+} complexed to the siderophore of another plant-beneficial P. fluorescens strain, WCS374. The tested pathogenic rhizobacteria and rhizofungi were neither able to grow on Fe{sup 3+}-deficient medium in the presence of pseudobactin 358 nor able to take up {sup 55}Fe{sub 3+} from {sup 55}Fe{sup 3+}-pseudobactin 358. The same applies for three cyanide-producing Pseudomonas strains which are supposed to be representatives of the minor pathogens. These results indicate that the extraordinary ability of strain WCS358 to compete efficiently for Fe{sup 3+} is based on the fact that the pathogenic and deleterious rhizosphere microorganisms, in contrast to strain WCS358 itself, are not able to take up Fe{sup 3+} from Fe{sup 3+}-pseudobactin 358 complexes.

  19. In situ X-ray data collection from highly sensitive crystals of Pseudomonas putida PtxS in complex with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Pineda-Molina, E.; Daddaoua, A.; Krell, T.; Ramos, J. L.; García-Ruiz, J. M.; Gavira, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida PtxS is a member of the LacI protein family of transcriptional regulators involved in glucose metabolism. All genes involved in this pathway are clustered into two operons, kgu and gad. PtxS controls the expression of the kgu and gad operons as well as its own transcription. The PtxS operator is a perfect palindrome, 5′-TGAAACCGGTTTCA-3′, which is present in all three promoters. Crystallization of native PtxS failed, and PtxS–DNA crystals were finally produced by the counter-diffusion technique. A portion of the capillary used for crystal growth was attached to the end of a SPINE standard cap and directly flash-cooled in liquid nitrogen for diffraction tests. A full data set was collected with a beam size of 10 × 10 µm. The crystal belonged to the trigonal space group P3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 213.71, c = 71.57 Å. Only unhandled crystals grown in capillaries of 0.1 mm inner diameter diffracted X-rays to 1.92 Å resolution. PMID:23143237

  20. Crystallization and crystallographic analysis of the ligand-binding domain of the Pseudomonas putida chemoreceptor McpS in complex with malate and succinate

    PubMed Central

    Gavira, J. A.; Lacal, J.; Ramos, J. L.; García-Ruiz, J. M.; Krell, T.; Pineda-Molina, E.

    2012-01-01

    Methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) are transmembrane proteins that sense changes in environmental signals, generating a chemotactic response and regulating other cellular processes. MCPs are composed of two main domains: a ligand-binding domain (LBD) and a cytosolic signalling domain (CSD). Here, the crystallization of the LBD of the chemoreceptor McpS (McpS-LBD) is reported. McpS-LBD is responsible for sensing most of the TCA-cycle intermediates in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440. McpS-LBD was expressed, purified and crystallized in complex with two of its natural ligands (malate and succinate). Crystals were obtained by both the counter-diffusion and the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion techniques after pre-incubation of McpS-LBD with the ligands. The crystals were isomorphous and belonged to space group C2, with two molecules per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected at the ESRF synchrotron X-ray source to resolutions of 1.8 and 1.9 Å for the malate and succinate complexes, respectively. PMID:22505412

  1. Decaffeination and measurement of caffeine content by addicted Escherichia coli with a refactored N-demethylation operon from Pseudomonas putida CBB5.

    PubMed

    Quandt, Erik M; Hammerling, Michael J; Summers, Ryan M; Otoupal, Peter B; Slater, Ben; Alnahhas, Razan N; Dasgupta, Aurko; Bachman, James L; Subramanian, Mani V; Barrick, Jeffrey E

    2013-06-21

    The widespread use of caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) and other methylxanthines in beverages and pharmaceuticals has led to significant environmental pollution. We have developed a portable caffeine degradation operon by refactoring the alkylxanthine degradation (Alx) gene cluster from Pseudomonas putida CBB5 to function in Escherichia coli. In the process, we discovered that adding a glutathione S-transferase from Janthinobacterium sp. Marseille was necessary to achieve N 7 -demethylation activity. E. coli cells with the synthetic operon degrade caffeine to the guanine precursor, xanthine. Cells deficient in de novo guanine biosynthesis that contain the refactored operon are ″addicted″ to caffeine: their growth density is limited by the availability of caffeine or other xanthines. We show that the addicted strain can be used as a biosensor to measure the caffeine content of common beverages. The synthetic N-demethylation operon could be useful for reclaiming nutrient-rich byproducts of coffee bean processing and for the cost-effective bioproduction of methylxanthine drugs.

  2. A preliminary crystallographic study of recombinant NicX, an Fe2+-dependent 2,5-dihydroxypyridine dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, José Ignacio; Acebrón, Iván; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo; Mancheño, José Miguel

    2010-01-01

    NicX from Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is an Fe2+-dependent dioxygenase that is involved in the aerobic degradation of nicotinic acid. The enzyme converts 2,5-­dihydroxypyridine to N-formylmaleamic acid when overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Biophysical characterization of NicX by analytical gel-filtration chromatography revealed that it behaves as an oligomeric assembly in solution, with an apparent molecular weight that is consistent with a hexameric species. NicX was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.0 Å at the ESRF. The crystals most probably belong to the orthorhombic space group C222 or C2221. The estimated Matthews coefficient was 2.4 Å3 Da−1, corresponding to 50% solvent content, which is consistent with the presence of three protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. Analysis of the crystal data together with chromatographic results supports NicX being a hexameric assembly composed of two cyclic trimers. Currently, crystallization of recombinant selenomethionine-containing NicX is in progress. PMID:20445257

  3. Toxicity of fungal-generated silver nanoparticles to soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a rhizospheric bacterium responsible for plant protection and bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Indarchand R; Anderson, Anne J; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-04-09

    Silver nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention due to their beneficial properties. But toxicity issues associated with them are also rising. The reports in the past suggested health hazards of silver nanoparticles at the cellular, molecular, or whole organismal level in eukaryotes. Whereas, there is also need to examine the exposure effects of silver nanoparticle to the microbes, which are beneficial to humans as well as environment. The available literature suggests the harmful effects of physically and chemically synthesised silver nanoparticles. The toxicity of biogenically synthesized nanoparticles has been less studied than physically and chemically synthesised nanoparticles. Hence, there is a greater need to study the toxic effects of biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles in general and mycosynthesized nanoparticles in particular. In the present study, attempts have been made to assess the risk associated with the exposure of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles on a beneficial soil microbe Pseudomonas putida. KT2440. The study demonstrates mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterisation by UV-vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, X-ray diffraction, nanosight LM20--a particle size distribution analyzer and TEM. Silver nanoparticles obtained herein were found to exert the hazardous effect at the concentration of 0.4 μg/ml, which warrants further detailed investigations concerning toxicity.

  4. The impact of succinate trace on pWW0 and ortho-cleavage pathway transcription in Pseudomonas putida mt-2 during toluene biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Tsipa, Argyro; Koutinas, Michalis; Vernardis, Spyros I; Mantalaris, Athanasios

    2017-06-01

    Toluene is a pollutant catabolised through the interconnected pWW0 (TOL) and ortho-cleavage pathways of Pseudomonas putida mt-2, while upon succinate and toluene mixtures introduction in batch cultures grown on M9 medium, succinate was previously reported as non-repressing. The effect of a 40 times lower succinate concentration, as compared to literature values, was explored through systematic real-time qPCR monitoring of transcriptional kinetics of the key TOL Pu, Pm and ortho-cleavage PbenR, PbenA promoters in mixed-substrate experiments. Even succinate trace inhibited transcription leading to bi-modal promoters expression. Potential carbon catabolite repression mechanisms and novel expression patterns of promoters were unfolded. Lag phase was shortened and biomass growth levels increased compared to sole toluene biodegradation suggesting enhanced pollutant removal efficiency. The study stressed the noticeable effect of a preferred compound's left-over on the main route of a bioprocess, revealing the beneficiary supply of low preferred substrates concentrations to design optimal bioremediation strategies.

  5. The catabolism of 2,4-xylenol and p-cresol share the enzymes for the oxidation of para-methyl group in Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 9866.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Fei; Chao, Hongjun; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2014-02-01

    Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 9866 utilizes p-cresol or 2,4-xylenol as a sole carbon and energy source. Enzymes catalyzing the oxidation of the para-methyl group of p-cresol have been studied in detail. However, those responsible for the oxidation of the para-methyl group in 2,4-xylenol catabolism are still not reported. In this study, real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated pchC- and pchF-encoded p-cresol methylhydroxylase (PCMH) and pchA-encoded p-hydroxybenzaldehyde dehydrogenase (PHBDD) in p-cresol catabolism were also likely involved in the catabolism of 2,4-xylenol. Enzyme activity assays and intermediate identification indicated that the PCMH and PHBDD catalyzed the oxidations of 2,4-xylenol to 4-hydroxy-3-methylbenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxy-3-methylbenzaldehyde to 4-hydroxy-3-methylbenzoic acid, respectively. Furthermore, the PCMH-encoding gene pchF was found to be necessary for the catabolism of 2,4-xylenol, whereas the PHBDD-encoding gene pchA was not essential for the catabolism by gene knockout and complementation. Analyses of the maximum specific growth rate (μ m) and specific activity of the gene-knockout strain to different intermediates revealed the presence of other enzyme(s) with PHBDD activity in strain 9866. However, PHBDD played a major role in the catabolism of 2,4-xylenol in contrast to the other enzyme(s).

  6. The LysR-type regulator SftR is involved in soil survival and sulphate ester metabolism in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Kahnert, Antje; Mirleau, Pascal; Wait, Robin; Kertesz, Michael A

    2002-04-01

    Sulphate esters make up a large proportion of the available sulphur in agricultural soils, and many pseudomonads can desulphurize a range of aryl- and alkylsulphate esters to provide sulphur for growth. After miniTn5 transposon mutagenesis of Pseudomonas putida S-313, we isolated 19 mutants that were defective in cleavage of the chromogenic sulphate ester 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indoxylsulphate (X-sulphate). Analysis of these strains revealed that they carried independent insertions in a gene cluster that comprised genes for a sulphate ester/sulphonate transporter (atsRBC) a LysR-type regulator (sftR), an oxygenolytic alkylsulphatase (atsK), an arylsulphotransferase (astA) and a putative TonB-dependent receptor (sftP). The SftP protein was localized in the outer membrane, and the arylsulfphotransferase was identified as an intracellular enzyme. Expression of sftR was repressed in the presence of inorganic sulphate, and the sftR gene was required for the expression of atsBC, atsRK and sftP-astA. An sftR mutant was unable to grow with aryl- or alkylsulphate esters in laboratory media and showed significantly reduced survival compared with the parent strain during incubation in Danish agricultural and grassland soils. This effect suggests that sulphate esters are an important sulphur source for microbes in aerobic soils and highlights the importance of the microbial population in the soil sulphur cycle.

  7. Nucleotide sequencing and characterization of Pseudomonas putida catR: a positive regulator of the catBC operon is a member of the LysR family.

    PubMed Central

    Rothmel, R K; Aldrich, T L; Houghton, J E; Coco, W M; Ornston, L N; Chakrabarty, A M

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida utilizes the catBC operon for growth on benzoate as a sole carbon source. This operon is positively regulated by the CatR protein, which is encoded from a gene divergently oriented from the catBC operon. The catR gene encodes a 32.2-kilodalton polypeptide that binds to the catBC promoter region in the presence or absence of the inducer cis-cis-muconate, as shown by gel retardation studies. However, the inducer is required for transcriptional activation of the catBC operon. The catR promoter has been localized to a 385-base-pair fragment by using the broad-host-range promoter-probe vector pKT240. This fragment also contains the catBC promoter whose -35 site is separated by only 36 nucleotides from the predicted CatR translational start. Dot blot analysis suggests that CatR binding to this dual promoter-control region, in addition to inducing the catBC operon, may also regulate its own expression. Data from a computer homology search using the predicted amino acid sequence of CatR, deduced from the DNA sequence, showed CatR to be a member of a large class of procaryotic regulatory proteins designated the LysR family. Striking homology was seen between CatR and a putative regulatory protein, TfdS. Images FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:1688844

  8. Toxicity of synthetic herbicides containing 2,4-D and MCPA moieties towards Pseudomonas putida mt-2 and its response at the level of membrane fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Syguda, Anna; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2016-02-01

    One of the attempts to create more effective herbicidal compounds includes the use of ionic liquids. Herbicidal ionic liquids have more effective biological activity, they are less volatile, more thermally stable, and exhibit superior efficiency in comparison to typically employed herbicides, allowing the reduction of the herbicide dose applied per hectare. However, studies on the environmental toxicity of this group of compounds are very rarely available. Environmental toxicity is an important factor, showing the concentration of compounds that has negative effects on soil bacteria including those responsible for biodegradation processes. Therefore, potential toxicity of four herbicidal ionic liquids (HILs) precursors containing 2,4-D and MCPA moieties was tested with the well investigated model organism for toxicity and adaptation, Pseudomonas putida mt-2. Results were compared to those obtained for commercial 2,4-D and MCPA herbicides. Next to growth inhibition, given as EC50, changes in the isomerisation of cis to trans unsaturated fatty acids were applied as proxy for cellular stress adaptation to toxic substances. The results revealed that all investigated precursors of HILs showed lower toxicity compared to commercialized synthetic herbicides 2,4-D and MCPA. The collected data on toxicity of HILs together with their physico-chemical properties might be useful for assessing the potential risk of the environmental pollution as well as guidelines for setting the legislation for their future use.

  9. Influence of pH on dynamics of microbial enhanced oil recovery processes using biosurfactant producing Pseudomonas putida: Mathematical modelling and numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, P; Suresh Kumar, G

    2017-01-01

    In present work, the influence of reservoir pH conditions on dynamics of microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) processes using Pseudomonas putida was analysed numerically from the developed mathematical model for MEOR processes. Further, a new strategy to improve the MEOR performance has also been proposed. It is concluded from present study that by reversing the reservoir pH from highly acidic to low alkaline condition (pH 5-8), flow and mobility of displaced oil, displacement efficiency, and original oil in place (OOIP) recovered gets significantly enhanced, resulting from improved interfacial tension (IFT) reduction by biosurfactants. At pH 8, maximum of 26.1% of OOIP was recovered with higher displacement efficiency. The present study introduces a new strategy to increase the recovery efficiency of MEOR technique by characterizing the biosurfactants for IFTmin/IFTmax values for different pH conditions and subsequently, reversing the reservoir pH conditions at which the IFTmin/IFTmax value is minimum.

  10. Numerical modelling of biophysicochemical effects on multispecies reactive transport in porous media involving Pseudomonas putida for potential microbial enhanced oil recovery application.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, P; Rajesh Kanna, A; Suresh Kumar, G; Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N

    2016-07-01

    pH and resident time of injected slug plays a critical role in characterizing the reservoir for potential microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) application. To investigate MEOR processes, a multispecies (microbes-nutrients) reactive transport model in porous media was developed by coupling kinetic and transport model. The present work differs from earlier works by explicitly determining parametric values required for kinetic model by experimental investigations using Pseudomonas putida at different pH conditions and subsequently performing sensitivity analysis of pH, resident time and water saturation on concentrations of microbes, nutrients and biosurfactant within reservoir. The results suggest that nutrient utilization and biosurfactant production are found to be maximum at pH 8 and 7.5 respectively. It is also found that the sucrose and biosurfactant concentrations are highly sensitive to pH rather than reservoir microbial concentration, while at larger resident time and water saturation, the microbial and nutrient concentrations were lesser due to enhanced dispersion.

  11. Degradation of Chloroaromatics: Purification and Characterization of a Novel Type of Chlorocatechol 2,3-Dioxygenase of Pseudomonas putida GJ31

    PubMed Central

    Kaschabek, Stefan R.; Kasberg, Thomas; Müller, Dagmar; Mars, Astrid E.; Janssen, Dick B.; Reineke, Walter

    1998-01-01

    A purification procedure for a new kind of extradiol dioxygenase, termed chlorocatechol 2,3-dioxygenase, that converts 3-chlorocatechol productively was developed. Structural and kinetic properties of the enzyme, which is part of the degradative pathway used for growth of Pseudomonas putida GJ31 with chlorobenzene, were investigated. The enzyme has a subunit molecular mass of 33.4 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Estimation of the native Mr value under nondenaturating conditions by gel filtration gave a molecular mass of 135 ± 10 kDa, indicating a homotetrameric enzyme structure (4 × 33.4 kDa). The pI of the enzyme was estimated to be 7.1 ± 0.1. The N-terminal amino acid sequence (43 residues) of the enzyme was determined and exhibits 70 to 42% identity with other extradiol dioxygenases. Fe(II) seems to be a cofactor of the enzyme, as it is for other catechol 2,3-dioxygenases. In contrast to other extradiol dioxygenases, the enzyme exhibited great sensitivity to temperatures above 40°C. The reactivity of this enzyme toward various substituted catechols, especially 3-chlorocatechol, was different from that observed for other catechol 2,3-dioxygenases. Stoichiometric displacement of chloride occurred from 3-chlorocatechol, leading to the production of 2-hydroxymuconate. PMID:9440519

  12. Application of the freeze-dried bioluminescent bioreporter Pseudomonas putida mt-2 KG1206 to the biomonitoring of groundwater samples from monitoring wells near gasoline leakage sites.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kyung-Seok; Kong, In Chul

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the applicability of a freeze-dried bioluminescent bioreporter, Pseudomonas putida mt-2 KG1206 (called KG1206), to the biomonitoring of groundwater samples. Samples were collected from the monitoring wells of gas station tanks or old pipeline leakage sites in Korea. In general, the freeze-dried strain in the presence of pure inducer chemicals showed low bioluminescence activity and a different activity order compared with that of the subcultured strain. The effects of KNO3 as a bioluminescence stimulant were observed on the pure inducers and groundwater samples. The stimulation rates varied according to the type of inducers and samples, ranging from 2.2 to 20.5 times (for pure inducers) and from 1.1 to 11 times (for groundwater samples) the total bioluminescence of the control. No considerable correlations were observed between the bioluminescence intensity of the freeze-dried strain and the inducer concentrations in the samples (R (2) < 0.1344). However, samples without a high methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) level and those from the gas station leakage site showed reasonable correlations with the bioluminescence activity with R (2) values of 0.3551 and 0.4131, respectively. These results highlight the potential of using freeze-dried bioluminescent bacteria as a rapid, simple, and portable tool for the preliminary biomonitoring of specific pollutants at contaminated sites.

  13. A novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage, Ab31, a chimera formed from temperate phage PAJU2 and P. putida lytic phage AF: characteristics and mechanism of bacterial resistance.

    PubMed

    Latino, Libera; Essoh, Christiane; Blouin, Yann; Vu Thien, Hoang; Pourcel, Christine

    2014-01-01

    A novel temperate bacteriophage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, phage vB_PaeP_Tr60_Ab31 (alias Ab31) is described. Its genome is composed of structural genes related to those of lytic P. putida phage AF, and regulatory genes similar to those of temperate phage PAJU2. The virion structure resembles that of phage AF and other lytic Podoviridae (S. enterica Epsilon 15 and E. coli phiv10) with similar tail spikes. Ab31 was able to infect P. aeruginosa strain PA14 and two genetically related strains called Tr60 and Tr162, out of 35 diverse strains from cystic fibrosis patients. Analysis of resistant host variants revealed different phenotypes, including induction of pigment and alginate overproduction. Whole genome sequencing of resistant variants highlighted the existence of a large deletion of 234 kbp in two strains, encompassing a cluster of genes required for the production of CupA fimbriae. Stable lysogens formed by Ab31 in strain Tr60, permitted the identification of the insertion site. During colonization of the lung in cystic fibrosis patients, P. aeruginosa adapts by modifying its genome. We suggest that bacteriophages such as Ab31 may play an important role in this adaptation by selecting for bacterial characteristics that favor persistence of bacteria in the lung.

  14. Alkanols and chlorophenols cause different physiological adaptive responses on the level of cell surface properties and membrane vesicle formation in Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Thomas; Vazquez, José; Bastisch, Christian; Veron, Wilfried; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Nietzsche, Sandor; Wick, Lukas Y; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2012-01-01

    In order to cope with the toxicity imposed by the exposure to environmental hydrocarbons, many bacteria have developed specific adaptive responses such as modifications in the cell envelope. Here we compared the influence of n-alkanols and chlorophenols on the surface properties of the solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E. In the presence of toxic concentrations of n-alkanols, this strain significantly increased its cell surface charge and hydrophobicity with changes depending on the chain length of the added n-alkanols. The adaptive response occurred within 10 min after the addition of the solvent and was demonstrated to be of physiological nature. Contrary to that, chlorophenols of similar hydrophobicity and potential toxicity as the corresponding alkanols caused only minor effects in the surface properties. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of differences in the cellular adaptive response of bacteria to compound classes of quasi equal hydrophobicity and toxicity. The observed adaptation of the physico-chemical surface properties of strain DOT-T1E to the presence of alkanols was reversible and correlated with changes in the composition of the lipopolysaccharide content of the cells. The reaction is explained by previously described reactions allowing the release of membrane vesicles that was demonstrated for cells affected by 1-octanol and heat shock, whereas no membrane vesicles were released after the addition of chlorophenols.

  15. 3-Chloro-1,2-propanediol biodegradation by Ca-alginate immobilized Pseudomonas putida DSM 437 cells applying different processes: mass transfer effects.

    PubMed

    Konti, Aikaterini; Mamma, Diomi; Hatzinikolaou, Dimitios G; Kekos, Dimitris

    2016-10-01

    3-Chloro-1,2-propanediol (3-CPD) biodegradation by Ca-alginate immobilized Pseudomonas putida cells was performed in batch system, continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), and packed-bed reactor (PBR). Batch system exhibited higher biodegradation rates and 3-CPD uptakes compared to CSTR and PBR. The two continuous systems (CSTR and PBR) when compared at 200 mg/L 3-CPD in the inlet exhibited the same removal of 3-CPD at steady state. External mass-transfer limitations are found negligible at all systems examined, since the observable modulus for external mass transfer Ω ≪ 1 and the Biot number Bi > 1. Intra-particle diffusion resistance had a significant effect on 3-CPD biodegradation in all systems studied, but to a different extent. Thiele modulus was in the range of 2.5 in batch system, but it was increased at 11 when increasing cell loading in the beads, thus lowering significantly the respective effectiveness factor. Comparing the systems at the same cell loading in the beads PBR was less affected by internal diffusional limitations compared to CSTR and batch system, and, as a result, exhibited the highest overall effectiveness factor.

  16. The oxygenating constituent of 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase from the CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida: the first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Isupov, Michail N.; Schröder, Ewald; Gibson, Robert P.; Beecher, Jean; Donadio, Giuliana; Saneei, Vahid; Dcunha, Stephlina A.; McGhie, Emma J.; Sayer, Christopher; Davenport, Colin F.; Lau, Peter C.; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Kadow, Maria; Balke, Kathleen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Bourenkov, Gleb; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2015-10-31

    The first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase reveals a different ring orientation of its FMN cofactor compared with other related bacterial luciferase-family enzymes. The three-dimensional structures of the native enzyme and the FMN complex of the overexpressed form of the oxygenating component of the type II Baeyer–Villiger 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase have been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure of this dimeric FMN-dependent enzyme, which is encoded on the large CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida, has been solved by a combination of multiple anomalous dispersion from a bromine crystal soak and molecular replacement using a bacterial luciferase model. The orientation of the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in the active site of this TIM-barrel fold enzyme differs significantly from that previously observed in enzymes of the bacterial luciferase-like superfamily. The Ala77 residue is in a cis conformation and forms a β-bulge at the C-terminus of β-strand 3, which is a feature observed in many proteins of this superfamily.

  17. Pentachlorophenol dechlorination and simultaneous Cr6+ reduction by Pseudomonas putida SKG-1 MTCC (10510): characterization of PCP dechlorination products, bacterial structure, and functional groups.

    PubMed

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Singh, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Anamika

    2013-04-01

    It is the first report in which a novel psychrotrophic Pseudomonas putida SKG-1 strain was evaluated for simultaneous bioremediation of pentachlorophenol and Cr(6+) under various cultural and nutritional conditions. Pentachlorophenol (PCP) dechlorination products, bacterial structure, and functional groups were characterized by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS), scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) techniques. The strain was extremely tolerant to excessively higher individual concentration of PCP (1,400 mg l(-1)) and Cr(6+) (4,300 mg l(-1)). Increasing concentration of PCP and Cr(6+) exerted inhibitory effect on bacterial growth and toxicants' removal. The strain exhibited growth, and concomitantly remediated both the pollutants simultaneously over a broad pH (7.0-9.0) and temperature (28-32 °C) range; maximum growth, PCP dechlorination (87.5%), and Cr(6+) removal (80.0%) occurred at optimum pH 8.0 and 30 °C (from initial PCP 100 mg l(-1) and Cr(6+) 500 mg l(-1)) under shaking (150 rpm) within 72 h incubation. Optimization of agitation (125 rpm) and aeration (0.4 vvm) in bioreactor further enhanced PCP dechlorination by ~10% and Cr(6+) removal by 2%. A direct correlation existed between growth and bioremediation of both the toxicants. Among other heavy metals, mercury exerted maximum and cobalt minimum inhibitory effect on PCP dechlorination and Cr(6+) removal. Chromate reductase activity was mainly associated with the supernatant and cytosolic fraction of bacterial cells. GC-MS analysis revealed the formation of tetrachloro-p-hydroquinone, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and 2,6-dichlorophenol as PCP dechlorination products. FTIR spectrometry indicated likely involvement of carbonyl and amide groups in Cr(3+) adsorption, and SEM-EDS showed the presence of chromium on P. putida surface. Thus, our promising isolate can be ecofriendly employed for biotreatment of various

  18. Disruption of Pseudomonas putida by high pressure homogenization: a comparison of the predictive capacity of three process models for the efficient release of arginine deiminase.

    PubMed

    Patil, Mahesh D; Patel, Gopal; Surywanshi, Balaji; Shaikh, Naeem; Garg, Prabha; Chisti, Yusuf; Banerjee, Uttam Chand

    2016-12-01

    Disruption of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 by high-pressure homogenization in a French press is discussed for the release of arginine deiminase (ADI). The enzyme release response of the disruption process was modelled for the experimental factors of biomass concentration in the broth being disrupted, the homogenization pressure and the number of passes of the cell slurry through the homogenizer. For the same data, the response surface method (RSM), the artificial neural network (ANN) and the support vector machine (SVM) models were compared for their ability to predict the performance parameters of the cell disruption. The ANN model proved to be best for predicting the ADI release. The fractional disruption of the cells was best modelled by the RSM. The fraction of the cells disrupted depended mainly on the operating pressure of the homogenizer. The concentration of the biomass in the slurry was the most influential factor in determining the total protein release. Nearly 27 U/mL of ADI was released within a single pass from slurry with a biomass concentration of 260 g/L at an operating pressure of 510 bar. Using a biomass concentration of 100 g/L, the ADI release by French press was 2.7-fold greater than in a conventional high-speed bead mill. In the French press, the total protein release was 5.8-fold more than in the bead mill. The statistical analysis of the completely unseen data exhibited ANN and SVM modelling as proficient alternatives to RSM for the prediction and generalization of the cell disruption process in French press.

  19. The 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid catabolon, a catabolic unit for degradation of biogenic amines tyramine and dopamine in Pseudomonas putida U.

    PubMed

    Arcos, Mario; Olivera, Elías R; Arias, Sagrario; Naharro, Germán; Luengo, José M

    2010-06-01

    Degradation of tyramine and dopamine by Pseudomonas putida U involves the participation of twenty one proteins organized in two coupled catabolic pathways, Tyn (tynABFEC tynG tynR tynD, 12 338 bp) and Hpa (hpaR hpaBC hpaHI hpaX hpaG1G2EDF hpaA hpaY, 12 722 bp). The Tyn pathway catalyses the conversion of tyramine and dopamine into 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4HPA) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (3,4HPA) respectively. Together, the Tyn and Hpa pathways constitute a complex catabolic unit (the 3,4HPA catabolon) in which 3,4HPA is the central intermediate. The genes encoding Tyn proteins are organized in four consecutive transcriptional units (tynABFEC, tynG, tynR and tynD), whereas those encoding Hpa proteins constitute consecutive operons (hpaBC, hpaG1G2EDF, hpaX, hpaHI) and three independent units (hpaA, hpaR and hpaY). Genetic engineering approaches were used to clone tyn and hpa genes and then express them, either individually or in tandem, in plasmids and/or bacterial chromosomes, resulting in recombinant bacterial strains able to eliminate tyramine and dopamine from different media. These results enlarge our biochemical and genetic knowledge of the microbial catabolic routes involved in the degradation of aromatic bioamines. Furthermore, they provide potent biotechnological tools to be used in food processing and fermentation as well as new strategies that could be used for pharmacological and gene therapeutic applications in the near future.

  20. Characterization of the pcaR regulatory gene from Pseudomonas putida, which is required for the complete degradation of p-hydroxybenzoate.

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Steiner, S; Parales, R E; Harwood, C S; Houghton, J E

    1994-01-01

    The pca branch of the beta-ketoadipate pathway in Pseudomonas putida is responsible for the complete degradation of p-hydroxybenzoate through ortho cleavage of the initial pathway metabolite, protocatechuate. The pcaR regulatory locus has been found to be required for both induction of all of the genes within the pca regulon (pcaBDC, pcaIJ, and pcaF) and the chemotactic response of the bacteria to aromatic compounds. Insertional inactivation mutagenesis, using Tn5 and mini-Tn5 transposons, was used to locate, clone, and sequence this pcaR regulatory gene. The pcaR gene product, when overexpressed in Escherichia coli, possessed a specific affinity for the pcaIJ promoter region and demonstrated that the entire PcaR protein was required for this function. The deduced amino acid sequence of the PcaR regulatory peptide bears little resemblance to its counterpart in the other branch of the pathway, CatR, but exhibits significant homology to its regulatory antecedent, PobR, which regulates the initial breakdown of p-hydroxybenzoate into protocatechuate. Comparisons of the pcaIJ and pcaR promoter regions revealed conservation of a 15-bp sequence centered around the -10 region in both sequences. This, together with previously defined deletional studies with the pcaIJ promoter region, suggests that PcaR exerts its regulatory effect through protein-DNA interactions within this region, which would be unusually close to the transcriptional start site of pcaIJ for a positive regulator. Images PMID:8083169

  1. Complex Interplay between FleQ, Cyclic Diguanylate and Multiple σ Factors Coordinately Regulates Flagellar Motility and Biofilm Development in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Fernández, Alicia; López-Sánchez, Aroa; Jiménez-Díaz, Lorena; Navarrete, Blanca; Calero, Patricia; Platero, Ana Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Most bacteria alternate between a free living planktonic lifestyle and the formation of structured surface-associated communities named biofilms. The transition between these two lifestyles requires a precise and timely regulation of the factors involved in each of the stages that has been likened to a developmental process. Here we characterize the involvement of the transcriptional regulator FleQ and the second messenger cyclic diguanylate in the coordinate regulation of multiple functions related to motility and surface colonization in Pseudomonas putida. Disruption of fleQ caused strong defects in flagellar motility, biofilm formation and surface attachment, and the ability of this mutation to suppress multiple biofilm-related phenotypes associated to cyclic diguanylate overproduction suggests that FleQ mediates cyclic diguanylate signaling critical to biofilm growth. We have constructed a library containing 94 promoters potentially involved in motility and biofilm development fused to gfp and lacZ, screened this library for FleQ and cyclic diguanylate regulation, and assessed the involvement of alternative σ factors σN and FliA in the transcription of FleQ-regulated promoters. Our results suggest a dual mode of action for FleQ. Low cyclic diguanylate levels favor FleQ interaction with σN-dependent promoters to activate the flagellar cascade, encompassing the flagellar cluster and additional genes involved in cyclic diguanylate metabolism, signal transduction and gene regulation. On the other hand, characterization of the FleQ-regulated σN- and FliA-independent PlapA and PbcsD promoters revealed two disparate regulatory mechanisms leading to a similar outcome: the synthesis of biofilm matrix components in response to increased cyclic diguanylate levels. PMID:27636892

  2. High Resolution Structures of Periplasmic Glucose-binding Protein of Pseudomonas putida CSV86 Reveal Structural Basis of Its Substrate Specificity.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Suman; Modak, Arnab; Phale, Prashant S; Bhaumik, Prasenjit

    2016-04-08

    Periplasmic substrate-binding proteins (SBPs) bind to the specific ligand with high affinity and mediate their transport into the cytoplasm via the cognate inner membrane ATP-binding cassette proteins. Because of low sequence identities, understanding the structural basis of substrate recognition by SBPs has remained very challenging. There are several structures available for the ligand-bound sugar SBPs, but very few unliganded structures are reported. No structural data are available for sugar SBPs fromPseudomonassp. to date. This study reports the first high resolution crystal structures of periplasmic glucose-binding protein fromPseudomonas putidaCSV86 (ppGBP) in unliganded form (2.5 Å) and complexed with glucose (1.25 Å) and galactose (1.8 Å). Asymmetric domain closure of ppGBP was observed upon substrate binding. The ppGBP was found to have an affinity of ∼ 0.3 μmfor glucose. The structural analysis showed that the sugars are bound to the protein mainly by hydrogen bonds, and the loss of two strong hydrogen bonds between ppGBP and galactose compared with glucose may be responsible for lowering its affinity toward galactose. The higher stability of ppGBP-glucose complex was also indicated by an 8 °C increase in the melting temperature compared with unliganded form and ppGBP-galactose complex. ppGBP binds to monosaccharide, but the structural features revealed it to have an oligosaccharide-binding protein fold, indicating that during evolution the sugar binding pocket may have undergone structural modulation to accommodate monosaccharide only.

  3. HipH Catalyzes the Hydroxylation of 4-Hydroxyisophthalate to Protocatechuate in 2,4-Xylenol Catabolism by Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 9866

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Hong-Jun; Chen, Yan-Fei; Fang, Ti; Xu, Ying; Huang, Wei E.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to growing on p-cresol, Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 9866 is the only reported strain capable of aerobically growing on 2,4-xylenol, which is listed as a priority pollutant by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Several enzymes involved in the oxidation of the para-methyl group, as well as the corresponding genes, have previously been reported. The enzyme catalyzing oxidation of the catabolic intermediate 4-hydroxyisophthalate to the ring cleavage substrate protocatechuate was also purified from strain NCIMB 9866, but its genetic determinant is still unavailable. In this study, the gene hipH, encoding 4-hydroxyisophthalate hydroxylase, from strain NCIMB 9866 was cloned by transposon mutagenesis. Purified recombinant HipH-His6 was found to be a dimer protein with a molecular mass of approximately 110 kDa. HipH-His6 catalyzed the hydroxylation of 4-hydroxyisophthalate to protocatechuate with a specific activity of 1.54 U mg−1 and showed apparent Km values of 11.40 ± 3.05 μM for 4-hydroxyisophthalate with NADPH and 11.23 ± 2.43 μM with NADH and similar Km values for NADPH and NADH (64.31 ± 13.16 and 72.76 ± 12.06 μM, respectively). The identity of protocatechuate generated from 4-hydroxyisophthalate hydroxylation by HipH-His6 has also been confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Gene transcriptional analysis, gene knockout, and complementation indicated that hipH is essential for 2,4-xylenol catabolism but not for p-cresol catabolism in this strain. This fills a gap in our understanding of the gene that encodes a critical step in 2,4-xylenol catabolism and also provides another example of biochemical and genetic diversity of microbial catabolism of structurally similar compounds. PMID:26567311

  4. Xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida Fu1: two molybdenum-containing dehydrogenases of novel structural composition.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, K; Andreesen, J R

    1990-01-01

    The constitutive xanthine dehydrogenase and the inducible 2-furoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase could be labeled with [185W]tungstate. This labeling was used as a reporter to purify both labile proteins. The radioactivity cochromatographed predominantly with the residual enzymatic activity of both enzymes during the first purification steps. Both radioactive proteins were separated and purified to homogeneity. Antibodies raised against the larger protein also exhibited cross-reactivity toward the second smaller protein and removed xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity up to 80 and 60% from the supernatant of cell extracts, respectively. With use of cell extract, Western immunoblots showed only two bands which correlated exactly with the activity stains for both enzymes after native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Molybdate was absolutely required for incorporation of 185W, formation of cross-reacting material, and enzymatic activity. The latter parameters showed a perfect correlation. This evidence proves that the radioactive proteins were actually xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase. The apparent molecular weight of the native xanthine dehydrogenase was about 300,000, and that of 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase was 150,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of both enzymes revealed two protein bands corresponding to molecular weights of 55,000 and 25,000. The xanthine dehydrogenase contained at least 1.6 mol of molybdenum, 0.9 ml of cytochrome b, 5.8 mol of iron, and 2.4 mol of labile sulfur per mol of enzyme. The composition of the 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase seemed to be similar, although the stoichiometry was not determined. The oxidation of furfuryl alcohol to furfural and further to 2-furoic acid by Pseudomonas putida Fu1 was catalyzed by two different dehydrogenases. Images PMID:2170335

  5. Factors Influencing Expression of luxCDABE and nah Genes in Pseudomonas putida RB1353(NAH7, pUTK9) in Dynamic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Neilson, Julia W.; Pierce, Shelley A.; Maier, Raina M.

    1999-01-01

    Bioluminescent reporter organisms have been successfully exploited as analytical tools for in situ determination of bioavailable levels of contaminants in static environmental samples. Continued characterization and development of such reporter systems is needed to extend the application of these bioreporters to in situ monitoring of degradation in dynamic environmental systems. In this study, the naphthalene-degrading, lux bioreporter bacterium Pseudomonas putida RB1353 was used to evaluate the relative influences of cell growth stage, cell density, substrate concentration, oxygen tension, and background carbon substrates on both the magnitude of the light response and the rate of salicylate disappearance. The effect of these variables on the lag time required to obtain maximum luminescence and degradation was also monitored. Strong correlations were observed between the first three factors and both the magnitude and induction time of luminescence and degradation rate. The maximum luminescence response to nonspecific background carbon substrates (soil extract broth or Luria broth) was 50% lower than that generated in response to 1 mg of sodium salicylate liter−1. Oxygen tension was evaluated over the range of 0.5 to 40 mg liter−1, with parallel inhibition to luminescence and degradation rate (20 mg of sodium salicylate liter−1) observed at 1.5 mg liter−1 and below and no effect observed above 5 mg liter−1. Oxygen tensions from 2 to 4 mg liter−1 influenced the magnitude of luminescence but not the salicylate degradation rate. The results suggest that factors causing parallel shifts in the magnitude of both luminescence and degradation rate were influencing regulation of the nah operon promoters. For factors that cause nonparallel shifts, other regulatory mechanisms are explored. This study demonstrates that lux reporter bacteria can be used to monitor both substrate concentration and metabolic response in dynamic systems. However, each lux reporter

  6. Camphor revisited: involvement of a unique monooxygenase in metabolism of 2-oxo-delta 3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetic acid by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Ougham, H J; Taylor, D G; Trudgill, P W

    1983-01-01

    Previously, Pseudomonas putida was shown to degrade (+)-camphor, and cleavage of the first ring of the bicyclic structure involved two monooxygenases (a hydroxylase and a ring oxygen-inserting enzyme), a dehydrogenase, and spontaneous cleavage of an unstable oxygenation product (lactone). Cleavage of the second ring was not demonstrated but was assumed also to occur by ring oxygen insertion, since the predicted oxygenation product was extracted from whole-cell incubation systems. Our investigation established that metabolism of the first ring cleavage intermediate, 2-oxo-delta 3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetic acid, occurred through the sequential action of two inducible enzymes, a coenzyme A ester synthetase and an oxygenase. The oxygenase was purified to homogeneity and had a molecular weight of 106,000. This enzyme carried a single molecule of flavin adenine dinucleotide and consisted of two identical subunits. Iron was not present at a significant level. The oxygenase was specific for NADPH as the electron donor and absolutely specific for the coenzyme A ester of 2-oxo-delta 3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetic acid as the substrate. The reaction stoichiometry was compatible with this enzyme being a monooxygenase, and a mass spectral analysis of the methyl ester of the product confirmed the insertion of a single oxygen atom. The enzyme appeared to be analogous to, although distinct from. 2,5-diketocamphane 1,2-monooxygenase in catalyzing a "biological Baeyer-Villiger" reaction with the formation of a lactone. Structural analogy suggested that this lactone, like the first, was also unstable and susceptible to spontaneous ring opening, although this was not experimentally established. Images PMID:6848481

  7. The Complete Nucleotide Sequence of the Carbapenem Resistance-Conferring Conjugative Plasmid pLD209 from a Pseudomonas putida Clinical Strain Reveals a Chimeric Design Formed by Modules Derived from Both Environmental and Clinical Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Marchiaro, Patricia M.; Brambilla, Luciano; Morán-Barrio, Jorgelina; Revale, Santiago; Pasteran, Fernando; Vila, Alejandro J.; Viale, Alejandro M.

    2014-01-01

    The complete sequence of the carbapenem-resistance-conferring conjugative plasmid pLD209 from a Pseudomonas putida clinical strain is presented. pLD209 is formed by 3 well-defined regions: an adaptability module encompassing a Tn402-like class 1 integron of clinical origin containing blaVIM-2 and aacA4 gene cassettes, partitioning and transfer modules, and a replication module derived from plasmids of environmental bacteria. pLD209 is thus a mosaic of modules originating in both the clinical and environmental (nonclinical) microbiota. PMID:24395220

  8. The Potential of the Ni-Resistant TCE-Degrading Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE to Reduce Phytotoxicity and Improve Phytoremediation Efficiency of Poplar Cuttings on A Ni-TCE Co-Contamination.

    PubMed

    Weyens, Nele; Beckers, Bram; Schellingen, Kerim; Ceulemans, Reinhart; van der Lelie, Daniel; Newman, Lee; Taghavi, Safiyh; Carleer, Robert; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2015-01-01

    To examine the potential of Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE to improve phytoremediation of Ni-TCE co-contamination, the effects of inoculation of a Ni-resistant, TCE-degrading root endophyte on Ni-TCE phytotoxicity, Ni uptake and trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation of Ni-TCE-exposed poplar cuttings are evaluated. After inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE, root weight of non-exposed poplar cuttings significantly increased. Further, inoculation induced a mitigation of the Ni-TCE phytotoxicity, which was illustrated by a diminished exposure-induced increase in activity of antioxidative enzymes. Considering phytoremediation efficiency, inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE resulted in a 45% increased Ni uptake in roots as well as a slightly significant reduction in TCE concentration in leaves and TCE evapotranspiration to the atmosphere. These results indicate that endophytes equipped with the appropriate characteristics can assist their host plant to deal with co-contamination of toxic metals and organic contaminants during phytoremediation. Furthermore, as poplar is an excellent plant for biomass production as well as for phytoremediation, the obtained results can be exploited to produce biomass for energy and industrial feedstock applications in a highly productive manner on contaminated land that is not suited for normal agriculture. Exploiting this land for biomass production could contribute to diminish the conflict between food and bioenergy production.

  9. Metabolic potential of the organic-solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E deduced from its annotated genome

    PubMed Central

    Udaondo, Zulema; Molina, Lazaro; Daniels, Craig; Gómez, Manuel J; Molina-Henares, María A; Matilla, Miguel A; Roca, Amalia; Fernández, Matilde; Duque, Estrella; Segura, Ana; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2013-01-01

    Summary Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E is an organic solvent tolerant strain capable of degrading aromatic hydrocarbons. Here we report the DOT-T1E genomic sequence (6 394 153 bp) and its metabolic atlas based on the classification of enzyme activities. The genome encodes for at least 1751 enzymatic reactions that account for the known pattern of C, N, P and S utilization by this strain. Based on the potential of this strain to thrive in the presence of organic solvents and the subclasses of enzymes encoded in the genome, its metabolic map can be drawn and a number of potential biotransformation reactions can be deduced. This information may prove useful for adapting desired reactions to create value-added products. This bioengineering potential may be realized via direct transformation of substrates, or may require genetic engineering to block an existing pathway, or to re-organize operons and genes, as well as possibly requiring the recruitment of enzymes from other sources to achieve the desired transformation. Funding Information Work in our laboratory was supported by Fondo Social Europeo and Fondos FEDER from the European Union, through several projects (BIO2010-17227, Consolider-Ingenio CSD2007-00005, Excelencia 2007 CVI-3010, Excelencia 2011 CVI-7391 and EXPLORA BIO2011-12776-E). PMID:23815283

  10. Application of AlkBGT and AlkL from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 for Selective Alkyl Ester ω-Oxyfunctionalization in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, Gerrit; Weusthuis, Ruud A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The enzyme system AlkBGT from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 can efficiently ω-functionalize fatty acid methyl esters. Outer membrane protein AlkL boosts this ω-functionalization. In this report, it is shown that whole cells of Escherichia coli expressing the AlkBGT system can also ω-oxidize ethyl nonanoate (NAEE). Coexpression of AlkBGT and AlkL resulted in 1.7-fold-higher ω-oxidation activity on NAEE. With this strain, initial activity on NAEE was 70 U/g (dry weight) of cells (gcdw), 67% of the initial activity on methyl nonanoate. In time-lapse conversions with 5 mM NAEE the main product was 9-hydroxy NAEE (3.6 mM), but also 9-oxo NAEE (0.1 mM) and 9-carboxy NAEE (0.6 mM) were formed. AlkBGT also ω-oxidized ethyl, propyl, and butyl esters of fatty acids ranging from C6 to C10. Increasing the length of the alkyl chain improved the ω-oxidation activity of AlkBGT on esters of C6 and C7 fatty acids. From these esters, application of butyl hexanoate resulted in the highest ω-oxidation activity, 82 U/gcdw. Coexpression of AlkL only had a positive effect on ω-functionalization of substrates with a total length of C11 or longer. These findings indicate that AlkBGT(L) can be applied as a biocatalyst for ω-functionalization of ethyl, propyl, and butyl esters of medium-chain fatty acids. IMPORTANCE Fatty acid esters are promising renewable starting materials for the production of ω-hydroxy fatty acid esters (ω-HFAEs). ω-HFAEs can be used to produce sustainable polymers. Chemical conversion of the fatty acid esters to ω-HFAEs is challenging, as it generates by-products and needs harsh reaction conditions. Biocatalytic production is a promising alternative. In this study, biocatalytic conversion of fatty acid esters toward ω-HFAEs was investigated using whole cells. This was achieved with recombinant Escherichia coli cells that produce the AlkBGT enzymes. These enzymes can produce ω-HFAEs from a wide variety of fatty acid esters. Medium-chain-length acids (C

  11. FTIR Spectroscopic Study of Mn(II) Oxidizing Pseudomonas putida GB1 Biofilms on ZnSe, Ge, and CdTe Crystal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, S. J.; Gilbert, H. L.; Conklin, M. H.; Chorover, J.

    2003-12-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain GB1 is an aerobic, gram-negative bacterium capable of gaining energy from the biological oxidation of Mn(II). The increased kinetics of Mn(II) oxidation resulting from this microbial catalysis is known to contribute to the formation of Mn(IV) oxides in natural waters. Environmental conditions, including aqueous and surface chemistry, greatly affect the macromolecular composition and surface adhesion behavior of bacteria. For example, the chemistry of GB1 biofilms forming on crystal surfaces is expected to vary with Mn(II) concentration in solution. We used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to probe the formation of GB1 biofilms on the surfaces of negatively-charged IR transparent ZnSe, Ge, and CdTe crystal windows. Bacterial adhesion experiments were carried out both in the presence and absence of Mn(II)(aq) with FTIR windows suspended in a bioreactor comprising GB1 cells in a mineral growth medium at pH 7.6 and 30° C. After 85 h, windows were removed from the reactor and IR spectra were collected. Oxidation of Mn(II) was confirmed via leucoberbelin blue (LBB) indicator and the appearance of Mn-O stretches in biofilm IR spectra. Transmission FTIR spectra do not reveal detectable effects of crystal type on biofilm composition, but do indicate changes in chemistry resulting from introduction of Mn(II). In the presence of Mn(II), spectra of biofilms show higher relative intensity in the carbohydrate region (specifically 1160, 1052 cm-1). A down frequency shift in the P=O absorbance was also observed (1240 to 1222 cm-1). These results indicate a modification of bacterial cell/biofilm composition resulting during biological oxidation of Mn(II). The CdTe transmission window permits measurements to low wavenumbers (<600 cm-1) and a peak at 588 cm-1 was observed when bacteria were surface-adhered in the presence of Mn(II). This peak, which has been attributed to Mn-O stretching vibrations, may provide an index of Mn oxide crystal

  12. Binary combination of epsilon-poly-L-lysine and isoeugenol affect progression of spoilage microbiota in fresh turkey meat, and delay onset of spoilage in Pseudomonas putida challenged meat.

    PubMed

    Hyldgaard, Morten; Meyer, Rikke L; Peng, Min; Hibberd, Ashley A; Fischer, Jana; Sigmundsson, Arnar; Mygind, Tina

    2015-12-23

    Proliferation of microbial population on fresh poultry meat over time elicits spoilage when reaching unacceptable levels, during which process slime production, microorganism colony formation, negative organoleptic impact and meat structure change are observed. Spoilage organisms in raw meat, especially Gram-negative bacteria can be difficult to combat due to their cell wall composition. In this study, the natural antimicrobial agents ε-poly-L-lysine (ε-PL) and isoeugenol were tested individually and in combinations for their activities against a selection of Gram-negative strains in vitro. All combinations resulted in additive interactions between ε-PL and isoeugenol towards the bacteria tested. The killing efficiency of different ratios of the two antimicrobial agents was further evaluated in vitro against Pseudomonas putida. Subsequently, the most efficient ratio was applied to a raw turkey meat model system which was incubated for 96 h at spoilage temperature. Half of the samples were challenged with P. putida, and the bacterial load and microbial community composition was followed over time. CFU counts revealed that the antimicrobial blend was able to lower the amount of viable Pseudomonas spp. by one log compared to untreated samples of challenged turkey meat, while the single compounds had no effect on the population. However, the compounds had no effect on Pseudomonas spp. CFU in unchallenged meat. Next-generation sequencing offered culture-independent insight into population diversity and changes in microbial composition of the meat during spoilage and in response to antimicrobial treatment. Spoilage of unchallenged turkey meat resulted in decreasing species diversity over time, regardless of whether the samples received antimicrobial treatment. The microbiota composition of untreated unchallenged meat progressed from a Pseudomonas spp. to a Pseudomonas spp., Photobacterium spp., and Brochothrix thermosphacta dominated food matrix on the expense of low

  13. Genetic and ultrastructural analysis of different mutants of Pseudomonas putida affected in the poly-3-hydroxy-n-alkanoate gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Angel; Arias-Barrau, Elsa; Arcos, Mario; Naharro, Germán; Olivera, Elías R; Luengo, José M

    2007-03-01

    Functional analyses of the different proteins involved in the synthesis and accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) in P. putida U were performed using a mutant in which the pha locus had been deleted (PpUDeltapha). These studies showed that: (i) Pha enzymes cannot be replaced by other proteins in this bacterium, (ii) the transformation of PpDeltapha with a plasmid containing the locus pha fully restores the synthesis of bioplastics, (iii) the transformation of PpDeltapha with a plasmid harbouring the gene encoding the polymerase PhaC1 (pMCphaC1) permits the synthesis of polyesters (even in absence of phaC2ZDFI); however, in this strain (PpUDeltapha-pMCphaC1) the number of PHAs granules was higher than in the wild type, (iv) the expression of phaF in PpUDeltapha-pMCphaC1 restores the original phenotype, showing that PhaF is involved in the coalescence of the PHAs granules. Furthermore, the deletion of the phaDFI genes in P. putida U considerably decreases (> 70%) the biosynthesis of PHAs consisting of hydroxyalkanoates with aliphatic constituents, and completely prevents the synthesis of those ones containing aromatic monomers. Additional experiments revealed that the deletion of phaD in P. putida U strongly reduces the synthesis of PHA, this effect being restored by PhaF. Moreover, the overexpression of phaF in P. putida U, or in its DeltafadBA mutant, led to the collection of PHA over-producer strains.

  14. Inactivation of the Pseudomonas putida cytochrome o ubiquinol oxidase leads to a significant change in the transcriptome and to increased expression of the CIO and cbb3-1 terminal oxidases.

    PubMed

    Morales, Gracia; Ugidos, Ana; Rojo, Fernando

    2006-10-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 contains a branched aerobic respiratory chain with several terminal oxidases. Inactivation of the cyo terminal ubiquinol oxidase has little effect on growth rate but is known to relieve the inhibition by global control that modulates induction of genes required to assimilate alkanes in cells growing in the presence of preferred carbon sources. We show that inactivation of other terminal oxidases has no effect on regulation of the alkane degradation pathway, which points to cyo as the oxidase that transmits a regulatory signal related to the activity of the electron transport chain. Using a genome-wide DNA microarray we found that inactivation of cyo has a significant effect on the transcriptome, supporting that it participates in global regulation of gene expression. Among the genes affected stand out those coding for transporters of organic acids, porins, transcriptional regulators and terminal oxidases. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that, in cells growing exponentially in a complete medium, the absence of cyo was compensated by increased expression of the cyanide-insensitive and cbb3-1 terminal oxidases, while cbb3-2 and aa3 oxidases remained unaffected. When cells enter into stationary phase cyo levels decrease and inhibition of the alkane degradation genes ceases. This was paralleled by upregulation of the cyanide-insensitive, cbb3-1, cbb3-2 and aa3 terminal oxidases. The results suggest that P. putida adapts the composition of the electron transport chain not only to optimize energy generation, but also to influence the transcriptome profile of the cell through global control of gene expression.

  15. Characterization of ACC deaminase gene in Pseudomonas entomophila strain PS-PJH isolated from the rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan; Lee, Kui-Jae; Park, Seung-Moon; Chae, Jong-Chan; Yun, Bong-Sik; Lee, Yong Hoon; Park, Yool-Jin; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2010-04-01

    The enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase cleaves the ethylene precursor ACC into alpha-ketobutyrate and ammonia. The decreased level of ethylene allows the plant to be more resistant to a wide environmental stress including plant pathogens. In the present study, we characterized the ACC deaminase activity of a Pseudomonas entomophila strain PS-PJH isolated from the red pepper rhizosphere region of red pepper grown at Jinan, Korea. The isolate produced 23.8 +/- 0.4 micromol of alpha-ketobutyrate/mg of protein/h during ACC deamination under in vitro conditions. Polymerase chain reaction for acdS gene showed that the isolated P. entomophila strain PS-PJH carry sequences similar to the known acdS genes. Results of the multiple sequence alignment revealed >99% identity (nucleotide and amino acid) with acdS gene of Pseudomonas putida strains AM15 and UW4. The isolated bacteria promoted 43.3 and 34.1% of growth in Raphanus sativus and Lactuca sativa plants, respectively. Based on the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer region sequences, the isolate was identified as P. entomophila. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study to report the acdS gene in P. entomophila.

  16. A facile approach for surface alteration of Pseudomonas putida I3 by supplying K2SO4 into growth medium: Enhanced removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xingjian; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Quanying; Li, Dandan; Han, Xuerong; Yu, Hongwen

    2017-05-01

    A new sight of obtaining a high efficient biosorbent by supplying specific salts into bacterial growth medium was investigated in this study for Pb(II). Among a series of salts including Na2SO4, Na2S2O3, KCl, and K2SO4, the highest Pb(II) removal efficiency was observed by psychrotrophilic Pseudomonas putida I3 grown in the presence of 30g/L K2SO4 (KSI3-30) with biosorption capacity of 62.89mg/g under cold condition (15°C), which was increased by 42.35% as compared to control (without any additive, RI3). This stimulation effect was ascribed to the increase of potassium and sulfur containing groups on KSI3-30 surface via metabolic dependent ways. The probable mechanism for Pb(II) adsorption was ion-exchange and chemical complexation. The thermal and kinetic data well fitted to Langmuir adsorption model and pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic model. Good recyclability and effectively dealing with real wastewater suggested KSI3-30 was a promising biosorbent for Pb-contaminated wastewater treatment.

  17. Singlet oxygen photosensitisation by the fluorescent protein Pp2FbFP L30M, a novel derivative of Pseudomonas putida flavin-binding Pp2FbFP.

    PubMed

    Torra, Joaquim; Burgos-Caminal, Andrés; Endres, Stephan; Wingen, Marcus; Drepper, Thomas; Gensch, Thomas; Ruiz-González, Rubén; Nonell, Santi

    2015-02-01

    Flavin-binding fluorescent proteins (FbFPs) are a class of fluorescent reporters that have been increasingly used as reporters in the study of cellular structures and dynamics. Flavin's intrinsic high singlet oxygen ((1)O2) quantum yield (ΦΔ = 0.51) provides a basis for the development of new FbFP mutants capable of photosensitising (1)O2 for mechanistic and therapeutic applications, as recently exemplified by the FbFP miniSOG. In the present work we report an investigation on the (1)O2 photoproduction by Pp2FbFP L30M, a novel derivative of Pseudomonas putida Pp2FbFP. Direct detection of (1)O2 through its phosphorescence at 1275 nm yielded the value ΦΔ = 0.09 ± 0.01, which is the highest (1)O2 quantum yield reported to date for any FP and is approximately 3-fold higher than the ΦΔ for miniSOG. Unlike miniSOG, transient absorption measurements revealed the existence of two independent triplet states each with a different ability to sensitise (1)O2.

  18. Polymicrobial ventriculitis involving Pseudomonas fulva.

    PubMed

    Rebolledo, Paulina A; Vu, Catphuong Cathy L; Carlson, Renee Donahue; Kraft, Colleen S; Anderson, Evan J; Burd, Eileen M

    2014-06-01

    Infections due to Pseudomonas fulva remain a rare but emerging concern. A case of ventriculitis due to Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas fulva following placement of an external ventricular drain is described. Similar to other reports, the organism was initially misidentified as Pseudomonas putida. The infection was successfully treated with levofloxacin.

  19. Interactive effects of phosphorus and Pseudomonas putida on chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) growth, nutrient uptake, antioxidant enzymes and organic acids exudation.

    PubMed

    Israr, Dania; Mustafa, Ghulam; Khan, Khalid Saifullah; Shahzad, Muhammad; Ahmad, Niaz; Masood, Sajid

    2016-11-01

    Phosphorus (P) availability in alkaline soils of arid and semi-arid regions is a major constraint for decreased crop productivity. Use of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) may enhance plant growth through the increased plant antioxidation activity. Additionally, PGPR may increase nutrient uptake by plants as a result of induced root exudation and rhizosphere acidification. The current study was aimed to investigate combined effects of P and Pesudomonas putida (PGPR) on chickpea growth with reference to antioxidative enzymatic activity and root exudation mediated plant nutrient uptake, particularly P. Half of the seeds were soaked in PGPR solution, whereas others in sterile water and latter sown in soils. Plants were harvested 8 weeks after onset of experiment and analyzed for leaf nutrient contents, antioxidant enzymes activities and organic acids concentrations. Without PGPR, P application (+P) increased various plant growth attributes, plant uptake of P and Ca, soil pH, citric acid and oxalic acid concentrations, whereas decreased the leaf POD enzymatic activity as compared to the P-deficiency. PGPR supply both under -P and +P improved the plant growth, plant uptake of N, P, and K, antioxidative activity of SOD and POD enzymes and concentrations of organic acids, whereas reduced the rhizosphere soil pH. Growth enhancement by PGPR supply was related to higher plant antioxidation activity as well as nutrient uptake of chickpea including P as a result of root exudation mediated rhizosphere acidification.

  20. Effect of Temperature, pH, and Initial Cell Number on luxCDABE and nah Gene Expression during Naphthalene and Salicylate Catabolism in the Bioreporter Organism Pseudomonas putida RB1353

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Jonathan G.; Frye, Robert J.; Maier, Raina M.

    2003-01-01

    One limitation of employing lux bioreporters to monitor in situ microbial gene expression in dynamic, laboratory-scale systems is the confounding variability in the luminescent responses. For example, despite careful control of oxygen tension, growth stage, and cell number, luminescence from Pseudomonas putida RB1353, a naphthalene-degrading lux bioreporter, varied by more than sevenfold during saturated flow column experiments in our laboratory. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine what additional factors influence the luminescent response. Specifically, this study investigated the impact of temperature, pH, and initial cell number (variations within an order of magnitude) on the peak luminescence of P. putida RB1353 and the maximum degradation rate (Vmax) during salicylate and naphthalene catabolism. Statistical analyses based on general linear models indicated that under constant oxygen tension, temperature and pH accounted for 98.1% of the variability in luminescence during salicylate catabolism and 94.2 and 49.5% of the variability in Vmax during salicylate and naphthalene catabolism, respectively. Temperature, pH, and initial substrate concentration accounted for 99.9% of the variability in luminescence during naphthalene catabolism. Initial cell number, within an order of magnitude, did not have a significant influence on either peak luminescence or Vmax during salicylate and naphthalene catabolism. Over the ranges of temperature and pH evaluated, peak luminescence varied by more than 4 orders of magnitude. The minimum parameter deviation required to alter lux gene expression during salicylate and naphthalene catabolism was a change in temperature of 1°C, a change in pH of 0.2, or a change in initial cell number of 1 order of magnitude. Results from this study indicate that there is a need for careful characterization of the impact of environmental conditions on both the expression of the reporter and catabolic genes and the activities of the

  1. High specificity in CheR methyltransferase function: CheR2 of Pseudomonas putida is essential for chemotaxis, whereas CheR1 is involved in biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    García-Fontana, Cristina; Reyes-Darias, José Antonio; Muñoz-Martínez, Francisco; Alfonso, Carlos; Morel, Bertrand; Ramos, Juan Luis; Krell, Tino

    2013-06-28

    Chemosensory pathways are a major signal transduction mechanism in bacteria. CheR methyltransferases catalyze the methylation of the cytosolic signaling domain of chemoreceptors and are among the core proteins of chemosensory cascades. These enzymes have primarily been studied Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, which possess a single CheR involved in chemotaxis. Many other bacteria possess multiple cheR genes. Because the sequences of chemoreceptor signaling domains are highly conserved, it remains to be established with what degree of specificity CheR paralogues exert their activity. We report here a comparative analysis of the three CheR paralogues of Pseudomonas putida. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies show that these paralogues bind the product of the methylation reaction, S-adenosylhomocysteine, with much higher affinity (KD of 0.14-2.2 μM) than the substrate S-adenosylmethionine (KD of 22-43 μM), which indicates product feedback inhibition. Product binding was particularly tight for CheR2. Analytical ultracentrifugation experiments demonstrate that CheR2 is monomeric in the absence and presence of S-adenosylmethionine or S-adenosylhomocysteine. Methylation assays show that CheR2, but not the other paralogues, methylates the McpS and McpT chemotaxis receptors. The mutant in CheR2 was deficient in chemotaxis, whereas mutation of CheR1 and CheR3 had either no or little effect on chemotaxis. In contrast, biofilm formation of the CheR1 mutant was largely impaired but not affected in the other mutants. We conclude that CheR2 forms part of a chemotaxis pathway, and CheR1 forms part of a chemosensory route that controls biofilm formation. Data suggest that CheR methyltransferases act with high specificity on their cognate chemoreceptors.

  2. Cloning, Baeyer-Villiger Biooxidations, and Structures of the Camphor Pathway 2-Oxo-Δ3-4,5,5-Trimethylcyclopentenylacetyl-Coenzyme A Monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17453

    PubMed Central

    Leisch, Hannes; Shi, Rong; Grosse, Stephan; Morley, Krista; Bergeron, Hélène; Cygler, Miroslaw; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Yoshie

    2012-01-01

    A dimeric Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) catalyzing the lactonization of 2-oxo-Δ3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetyl-coenzyme A (CoA), a key intermediate in the metabolism of camphor by Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17453, had been initially characterized in 1983 by Ougham and coworkers (H. J. Ougham, D. G. Taylor, and P. W. Trudgill, J. Bacteriol. 153:140–152, 1983). Here we cloned and overexpressed the 2-oxo-Δ3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetyl-CoA monooxygenase (OTEMO) in Escherichia coli and determined its three-dimensional structure with bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) at a 1.95-Å resolution as well as with bound FAD and NADP+ at a 2.0-Å resolution. OTEMO represents the first homodimeric type 1 BVMO structure bound to FAD/NADP+. A comparison of several crystal forms of OTEMO bound to FAD and NADP+ revealed a conformational plasticity of several loop regions, some of which have been implicated in contributing to the substrate specificity profile of structurally related BVMOs. Substrate specificity studies confirmed that the 2-oxo-Δ3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetic acid coenzyme A ester is preferred over the free acid. However, the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) favors 2-n-hexyl cyclopentanone (4.3 × 105 M−1 s−1) as a substrate, although its affinity (Km = 32 μM) was lower than that of the CoA-activated substrate (Km = 18 μM). In whole-cell biotransformation experiments, OTEMO showed a unique enantiocomplementarity to the action of the prototypical cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) and appeared to be particularly useful for the oxidation of 4-substituted cyclohexanones. Overall, this work extends our understanding of the molecular structure and mechanistic complexity of the type 1 family of BVMOs and expands the catalytic repertoire of one of its original members. PMID:22267661

  3. Type III Secretion System and Virulence Markers Highlight Similarities and Differences between Human- and Plant-Associated Pseudomonads Related to Pseudomonas fluorescens and P. putida

    PubMed Central

    Mazurier, Sylvie; Merieau, Annabelle; Bergeau, Dorian; Decoin, Victorien; Sperandio, Daniel; Crépin, Alexandre; Barbey, Corinne; Jeannot, Katy; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Plésiat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is commonly considered a saprophytic rhizobacterium devoid of pathogenic potential. Nevertheless, the recurrent isolation of strains from clinical human cases could indicate the emergence of novel strains originating from the rhizosphere reservoir, which could be particularly resistant to the immune system and clinical treatment. The importance of type three secretion systems (T3SSs) in the related Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial species and the occurrence of this secretion system in plant-associated P. fluorescens raise the question of whether clinical isolates may also harbor T3SSs. In this study, isolates associated with clinical infections and identified in hospitals as belonging to P. fluorescens were compared with fluorescent pseudomonads harboring T3SSs isolated from plants. Bacterial isolates were tested for (i) their genetic relationships based on their 16S rRNA phylogeny, (ii) the presence of T3SS genes by PCR, and (iii) their infectious potential on animals and plants under environmental or physiological temperature conditions. Two groups of bacteria were delineated among the clinical isolates. The first group encompassed thermotolerant (41°C) isolates from patients suffering from blood infections; these isolates were finally found to not belong to P. fluorescens but were closely related and harbored highly conserved T3SS genes belonging to the Ysc-T3SS family, like the T3SSs from P. aeruginosa. The second group encompassed isolates from patients suffering from cystic fibrosis; these isolates belonged to P. fluorescens and harbored T3SS genes belonging to the Hrp1-T3SS family found commonly in plant-associated P. fluorescens. PMID:25636837

  4. The Crc and Hfq proteins of Pseudomonas putida cooperate in catabolite repression and formation of ribonucleic acid complexes with specific target motifs.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Renata; Hernández-Arranz, Sofía; La Rosa, Ruggero; Yuste, Luis; Madhushani, Anjana; Shingler, Victoria; Rojo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The Crc protein is a global regulator that has a key role in catabolite repression and optimization of metabolism in Pseudomonads. Crc inhibits gene expression post-transcriptionally, preventing translation of mRNAs bearing an AAnAAnAA motif [the catabolite activity (CA) motif] close to the translation start site. Although Crc was initially believed to bind RNA by itself, this idea was recently challenged by results suggesting that a protein co-purifying with Crc, presumably the Hfq protein, could account for the detected RNA-binding activity. Hfq is an abundant protein that has a central role in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Herein, we show that the Pseudomonas putida Hfq protein can recognize the CA motifs of RNAs through its distal face and that Crc facilitates formation of a more stable complex at these targets. Crc was unable to bind RNA in the absence of Hfq. However, pull-down assays showed that Crc and Hfq can form a co-complex with RNA containing a CA motif in vitro. Inactivation of the hfq or the crc gene impaired catabolite repression to a similar extent. We propose that Crc and Hfq cooperate in catabolite repression, probably through forming a stable co-complex with RNAs containing CA motifs to result in inhibition of translation initiation.

  5. Aerobic catabolism of phenylacetic acid in Pseudomonas putida U: biochemical characterization of a specific phenylacetic acid transport system and formal demonstration that phenylacetyl-coenzyme A is a catabolic intermediate.

    PubMed Central

    Schleissner, C; Olivera, E R; Fernández-Valverde, M; Luengo, J M

    1994-01-01

    The phenylacetic acid transport system (PATS) of Pseudomonas putida U was studied after this bacterium was cultured in a chemically defined medium containing phenylacetic acid (PA) as the sole carbon source. Kinetic measurement was carried out, in vivo, at 30 degrees C in 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.0). Under these conditions, the uptake rate was linear for at least 3 min and the value of Km was 13 microM. The PATS is an active transport system that is strongly inhibited by 2,4-dinitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol (100%), KCN (97%), 2-nitrophenol (90%), or NaN3 (80%) added at a 1 mM final concentration (each). Glucose or D-lactate (10 mM each) increases the PATS in starved cells (140%), whereas arsenate (20 mM), NaF, or N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (1 mM) did not cause any effect. Furthermore, the PATS is insensitive to osmotic shock. These data strongly suggest that the energy for the PATS is derived only from an electron transport system which causes an energy-rich membrane state. The thiol-containing compounds mercaptoethanol, glutathione, and dithiothreitol have no significant effect on the PATS, whereas thiol-modifying reagents such as N-ethylmaleimide and iodoacetate strongly inhibit uptake (100 and 93%, respectively). Molecular analogs of PA with a substitution (i) on the ring or (ii) on the acetyl moiety or those containing (iii) a different ring but keeping the acetyl moiety constant inhibit uptake to different extents. None of the compounds tested significantly increase the PA uptake rate except adipic acid, which greatly stimulates it (163%). The PATS is induced by PA and also, gratuitously, by some phenyl derivatives containing an even number of carbon atoms on the aliphatic moiety (4-phenyl-butyric, 6-phenylhexanoic, and 8-phenyloctanoic acids). However, similar compounds with an odd number of carbon atoms (benzoic, 3-phenylpropionic, 5-phenylvaleric, 7-phenylheptanoic, and 9-phenylnonanoic acids) as well as many other PA derivatives do not induce the system

  6. Loss of the toluene-xylene catabolic genes of TOL plasmid pWW0 during growth of Pseudomonas putida on benzoate is due to a selective growth advantage of 'cured' segregants.

    PubMed

    Williams, P A; Taylor, S D; Gibb, L E

    1988-07-01

    During growth on benzoate-minimal medium Pseudomonas putida mt-2 (PaW1) segregates derivative ('cured') strains which have lost the ability to use the pathway encoded by its resident catabolic plasmid pWW0. Experiments with two plasmids identical to pWW0 but each with an insert of Tn401, which confers resistance to carbenicillin, suggested that the 'benzoate curing' occurs far more frequently by the specific deletion of the 39 kbp region carrying the catabolic genes than by total plasmid loss. This effect was not pH-dependent, and was not produced during growth on other weak organic acids, such as succinate or propionate, or when benzoate was present in the medium with an alternative, preferentially used carbon source such as succinate. Growth on benzoate did not cause loss from strain PaW174 of the plasmid pWW0174, a derivative of pWW0 which has deleted the 39 kbp region but carries Tn401. Similarly the naphthalene-catabolic plasmid pWW60-1, of the same incompatibility group as pWW0, was not lost from PaW701 during growth on benzoate. Competition between wild-type PaW1 and PaW174, which has the 'cured' phenotype, showed that the latter has a distinct growth advantage on benzoate over the wild-type even when initially present as only 1% of the population: when PaW174 was seeded at lower cell ratios, spontaneously 'cured' derivatives of PaW1 took over the culture after 60-80 generations, indicating that they are present in PaW1 cultures at frequencies between 10(-2) and 10(-3). We conclude that the progressive takeover of populations of PaW1 only occurs when benzoate is present as the sole growth source and that neither benzoate, nor other weak acids, affect plasmid segregation or deletion events: a sufficient explanation is that the 'cured' segregants grow faster than the wild-type using the chromosomally determined beta-ketoadipate pathway.

  7. Coordination of the Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster of the terminal iron-sulfur protein of Pseudomonas putida benzene 1,2-dioxygenase, studied by one- and two-dimensional electron spin-echo envelope modulation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shergill, J K; Joannou, C L; Mason, J R; Cammack, R

    1995-12-26

    One- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy has been used to investigate the ligand environment of the [2Fe-2S] cluster from the terminal dioxygenase (ISPBED) of the Pseudomonas putida benzene dioxygenase complex. The modulation frequencies observed in the 0.5-8.5 MHz region of the Fourier transforms of 1D and 2D ESEEM spectra measured across the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) absorbance envelope (from gz through to gx) are consistent with their assignment to two 14N nuclei. Using hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy (HYSCORE), two sets of correlated double quantum transitions sharing the same hyperfine coupling were observed and were identified as being due to the same two 14N nuclei. On the basis of the isotropic hyperfine and quadrupolar couplings estimated for these 14N nuclei [N(1), Aiso = 3.6 MHz and e2qQ = 2.2-2.8 MHz; N(2), Aiso = 4.8 MHz and e2qQ = 2.2-2.4 MHz], the ESEEM pattern of ISPBED is assigned to two histidine nitrogens which are directly coordinated to the reduced iron-sulfur cluster. Bonding parameters of the two [14N]histidine ligands were calculated from these hyperfine couplings. The primary covalent contributions to the hyperfine interaction arise from 14N-to-Fe2+ sigma bonds. For N(1), our analysis of the percentage of unpaired 2s and 2p electrons gave f2s approximately 1.3% and f2p approximately 0.2%, while values of f2s approximately 1.7% and f2p approximately 1.4% were estimated for N(2). Comparison of these values with those determined from electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) data of the Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] center of Pseudomonas cepacia phthalate dioxygenase [Gurbiel, R. J., Batie, C. J., Sivaraja, M., True, A. E., Fee, J. A., Hoffman, B. M., & Ballou, D. P. (1989) Biochemistry 28, 4861-4871] indicates an apparent reduction in unpaired electron spin density residing on the two 14N ligands of ISPBED. Analysis of slices of the HYSCORE spectrum has provided evidence

  8. Isolation and identification of Pseudomonas spp. from Schirmacher Oasis, Antarctica.

    PubMed Central

    Shivaji, S; Rao, N S; Saisree, L; Sheth, V; Reddy, G S; Bhargava, P M

    1989-01-01

    Ten cultures of Pseudomonas spp. were established from soil samples collected in and around a lake in Antarctica. Based on their morphology, biochemical and physiological characteristics, and moles percent G + C of their DNA, they were identified as P. fluorescens, P. putida, and P. syringae. This is the first report on the identification of Pseudomonas spp. from continental Antarctica. PMID:2930174

  9. High quality draft genome sequences of Pseudomonas fulva DSM 17717(T), Pseudomonas parafulva DSM 17004(T) and Pseudomonas cremoricolorata DSM 17059(T) type strains.

    PubMed

    Peña, Arantxa; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Mulet, Magdalena; Gomila, Rosa M; Reddy, T B K; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; García-Valdés, Elena; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos; Lalucat, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas has the highest number of species out of any genus of Gram-negative bacteria and is phylogenetically divided into several groups. The Pseudomonas putida phylogenetic branch includes at least 13 species of environmental and industrial interest, plant-associated bacteria, insect pathogens, and even some members that have been found in clinical specimens. In the context of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project, we present the permanent, high-quality draft genomes of the type strains of 3 taxonomically and ecologically closely related species in the Pseudomonas putida phylogenetic branch: Pseudomonas fulva DSM 17717(T), Pseudomonas parafulva DSM 17004(T) and Pseudomonas cremoricolorata DSM 17059(T). All three genomes are comparable in size (4.6-4.9 Mb), with 4,119-4,459 protein-coding genes. Average nucleotide identity based on BLAST comparisons and digital genome-to-genome distance calculations are in good agreement with experimental DNA-DNA hybridization results. The genome sequences presented here will be very helpful in elucidating the taxonomy, phylogeny and evolution of the Pseudomonas putida species complex.

  10. Plasmid-determined silver resistance in Pseudomonas stutzeri isolated from a silver mine.

    PubMed Central

    Haefeli, C; Franklin, C; Hardy, K

    1984-01-01

    A silver-resistant strain of Pseudomonas stutzeri was isolated from a silver mine. It harbored three plasmids, the largest of which (pKK1; molecular weight, 49.4 X 10(6)) specified silver resistance. Plasmid pKK1 was apparently nonconjugative but could be transferred to Pseudomonas putida by mobilization with plasmid R68.45. Images PMID:6715284

  11. EXPRESSION OF MARKER RNAS IN PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA. (R825354)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  12. Phospholipid Biosynthesis and Solvent Tolerance in Pseudomonas putida Strains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    11. Franklin, T. J., and G. A. Snow. 1989. Resistance to antimicrobial drugs, p. 173–200. In K. J. Barrett-Bee and R. D. Nolan (ed.), Biochemistry of...transforming (8, 20, 35, 44). Most of these organisms do not harbor plasmids, indicating that the resistance factors reside on the chromosome (8, 35...Extrusion pumps similar to those described for antibiotic resistance have also been postulated as having a role in solvent tolerance (21). The 1996 study

  13. Diversity of small RNAs expressed in Pseudomonas species.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Lozano, María; Marvig, Rasmus L; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Tribelli, Paula M; Ramos, Juan-Luis; Molin, Søren

    2015-04-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revealed several hundreds of previously undetected small RNAs (sRNAs) in all bacterial species investigated, including strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas syringae. Nonetheless, only little is known about the extent of conservation of expressed sRNAs across strains and species. In this study, we have used RNA-seq to identify sRNAs in P. putida DOT-T1E and Pseudomonas extremaustralis 14-3b. This is the first strain of P. extremaustralis and the second strain of P. putida to have their transcriptomes analysed for sRNAs, and we identify the presence of around 150 novel sRNAs in each strain. Furthermore, we provide a comparison based on sequence conservation of all the sRNAs detected by RNA-seq in the Pseudomonas species investigated so far. Our results show that the extent of sRNA conservation across different species is very limited. In addition, when comparing the sRNAs expressed in different strains of the same species, we observe that numerous sRNAs exhibit a strain-specific expression pattern. These results support the idea that the evolution of most bacterial sRNAs is rapid, which limits the extent of both interspecies and intraspecies conservation.

  14. Development and Dynamics of Pseudomonas sp. Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Brinch, Ulla C.; Ragas, Paula C.; Andersen, Jens Bo; Jacobsen, Carsten Suhr; Molin, Søren

    2000-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain B13 and Pseudomonas putida OUS82 were genetically tagged with the green fluorescent protein and the Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein, and the development and dynamics occurring in flow chamber-grown two-colored monospecies or mixed-species biofilms were investigated by the use of confocal scanning laser microscopy. Separate red or green fluorescent microcolonies were formed initially, suggesting that the initial small microcolonies were formed simply by growth of substratum attached cells and not by cell aggregation. Red fluorescent microcolonies containing a few green fluorescent cells and green fluorescent microcolonies containing a few red fluorescent cells were frequently observed in both monospecies and two-species biofilms, suggesting that the bacteria moved between the microcolonies. Rapid movement of P. putida OUS82 bacteria inside microcolonies was observed before a transition from compact microcolonies to loose irregularly shaped protruding structures occurred. Experiments involving a nonflagellated P. putida OUS82 mutant suggested that the movements between and inside microcolonies were flagellum driven. The results are discussed in relation to the prevailing hypothesis that biofilm bacteria are in a physiological state different from planktonic bacteria. PMID:11053394

  15. Plant lectin-like antibacterial proteins from phytopathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Xanthomonas citri.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Li, Wen; Proost, Paul; Loris, Remy; De Mot, René

    2012-08-01

    The genomes of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae 642 and Xanthomonas citri pv. malvacearum LMG 761 each carry a putative homologue of the plant lectin-like bacteriocin (llpA) genes previously identified in the rhizosphere isolate Pseudomonas putida BW11M1 and the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. The respective purified recombinant proteins, LlpAPss642 and LlpAXcm761 , display genus-specific antibacterial activity across species boundaries. The inhibitory spectrum of the P. syringae bacteriocin overlaps partially with those of the P. putida and P. fluorescens LlpAs. Notably, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri str. 306 secretes a protein identical to LlpAXcm761 . The functional characterization of LlpA proteins from two different phytopathogenic γ-proteobacterial species expands the lectin-like bacteriocin family beyond the Pseudomonas genus and suggests its involvement in competition among closely related plant-associated bacteria with different lifestyles.

  16. Different Ancestries of R Tailocins in Rhizospheric Pseudomonas Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ghequire, Maarten G.K.; Dillen, Yörg; Lambrichts, Ivo; Proost, Paul; Wattiez, Ruddy; De Mot, René

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial genomes accommodate a variety of mobile genetic elements, including bacteriophage-related clusters that encode phage tail-like protein complexes playing a role in interactions with eukaryotic or prokaryotic cells. Such tailocins are unable to replicate inside target cells due to the lack of a phage head with associated DNA. A subset of tailocins mediate antagonistic activities with bacteriocin-like specificity. Functional characterization of bactericidal tailocins of two Pseudomonas putida rhizosphere isolates revealed not only extensive similarity with the tail assembly module of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa R-type pyocins but also differences in genomic integration site, regulatory genes, and lytic release modules. Conversely, these three features are quite similar between strains of the P. putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens clades, although phylogenetic analysis of tail genes suggests them to have evolved separately. Unlike P. aeruginosa R pyocin elements, the tailocin gene clusters of other pseudomonads frequently carry cargo genes, including bacteriocins. Compared with P. aeruginosa, the tailocin tail fiber sequences that act as specificity determinants have diverged much more extensively among the other pseudomonad species, mostly isolates from soil and plant environments. Activity of the P. putida antibacterial particles requires a functional lipopolysaccharide layer on target cells, but contrary to R pyocins from P. aeruginosa, strain susceptibilities surpass species boundaries. PMID:26412856

  17. Biofilm formation and cellulose expression among diverse environmental Pseudomonas isolates.

    PubMed

    Ude, Susanne; Arnold, Dawn L; Moon, Christina D; Timms-Wilson, Tracey; Spiers, Andrew J

    2006-11-01

    The ability to form biofilms is seen as an increasingly important colonization strategy among both pathogenic and environmental bacteria. A survey of 185 plant-associated, phytopathogenic, soil and river Pseudomonas isolates resulted in 76% producing biofilms at the air-liquid (A-L) interface after selection in static microcosms. Considerable variation in biofilm phenotype was observed, including waxy aggregations, viscous and floccular masses, and physically cohesive biofilms with continuously varying strengths over 1500-fold. Calcofluor epifluorescent microscopy identified cellulose as the matrix component in biofilms produced by Pseudomonas asplenii, Pseudomonas corrugata, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas marginalis, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas savastanoi and Pseudomonas syringae isolates. Cellulose expression and biofilm formation could be induced by the constitutively active WspR19 mutant of the cyclic-di-GMP-associated, GGDEF domain-containing response regulator involved in the P. fluorescens SBW25 wrinkly spreader phenotype and cellular aggregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01. WspR19 could also induce P. putida KT2440, which otherwise did not produce a biofilm or express cellulose, as well as Escherichia coli K12 and Salmonella typhimurium LT2, both of which express cellulose yet lack WspR homologues. Statistical analysis of biofilm parameters suggest that biofilm development is a more complex process than that simply described by the production of attachment and matrix components and bacterial growth. This complexity was also seen in multivariate analysis as a species-ecological habitat effect, underscoring the fact that in vitro biofilms are abstractions of those surface and volume colonization processes used by bacteria in their natural environments.

  18. Antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas spp. isolated from wastewater and wastewater-impacted marine coastal zone.

    PubMed

    Luczkiewicz, Aneta; Kotlarska, Ewa; Artichowicz, Wojciech; Tarasewicz, Katarzyna; Fudala-Ksiazek, Sylwia

    2015-12-01

    In this study, species distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of cultivated Pseudomonas spp. were studied in influent (INF), effluent (EFF), and marine outfall (MOut) of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The susceptibility was tested against 8 antimicrobial classes, active against Pseudomonas spp.: aminoglycosides, carbapenems, broad-spectrum cephalosporins from the 3rd and 4th generation, extended-spectrum penicillins, as well as their combination with the β-lactamase inhibitors, monobactams, fluoroquinolones, and polymyxins. Among identified species, resistance to all antimicrobials but colistin was shown by Pseudomonas putida, the predominant species in all sampling points. In other species, resistance was observed mainly against ceftazidime, ticarcillin, ticarcillin-clavulanate, and aztreonam, although some isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, and Pseudomonas protegens showed multidrug-resistance (MDR) phenotype. Among P. putida, resistance to β-lactams and to fluoroquinolones as well as multidrug resistance become more prevalent after wastewater treatment, but the resistance rate decreased in marine water samples. Obtained data, however, suggests that Pseudomonas spp. are equipped or are able to acquire a wide range of antibiotic resistance mechanisms, and thus should be monitored as possible source of resistance genes.

  19. Synthesis of chiral 2-alkanols from n-alkanes by a P. putida whole-cell biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Tieves, Florian; Erenburg, Isabelle N; Mahmoud, Osama; Urlacher, Vlada B

    2016-09-01

    The cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP154A8 from Nocardia farcinica was previously found to catalyze hydroxylation of linear alkanes (C7 -C9 ) with a high regio- and stereoselectivity. The objective of this study was to integrate CYP154A8 along with suitable redox partners into a whole-cell system for the production of chiral 2-alkanols starting from alkanes. Both recombinant Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida whole-cell biocatalysts tested for this purpose showed the ability to produce chiral alkanols, but a solvent tolerant P. putida strain demonstrated several advantages in the applied biphasic reaction system. The optimized P. putida whole-cell system produced ∼16 mM (S)-2-octanol with 87% ee from octane, which is more than sevenfold higher than the previously described system with isolated enzymes. The achieved enantiopurity of the product could further be increased up to 99% ee by adding an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) to the alkane-oxidizing P. putida whole-cell systems. By using this setup for the individual conversions of heptane, octane or nonane, 2.6 mM (S)-2-heptanol with 91% ee, 5.4 mM (S)-2-octanol with 97% ee, or 5.5 mM (S)-2-nonanol with 97% ee were produced, respectively. The achieved concentrations of chiral 2-alkanols are the highest reported for a P450-based whole-cell system so far. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1845-1852. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. IS1491 from Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIB 9867: characterization and distribution among Pseudomonas species.

    PubMed

    Yeo, C C; Wong, D T; Poh, C L

    1998-01-01

    A new insertion sequence, IS1491, has been cloned and sequenced. The 2489-bp IS1491 was isolated from a Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIB 9867 (strain P25X) 4.8-kb PstI chromosomal fragment. IS1491 is flanked by an imperfect inverted repeat of 23 bp and carries two overlapping open reading frames, ORF1 and ORF2. Both ORF1 and ORF2 displayed homology to the IstA-like and IstB-like transposases encoded by the IS21 family of insertion sequences, which include two IS elements previously isolated from P. alcaligenes P25X, IS1474, and IS1475 (Yeo, C. C., and Poh, C. L. (1997). FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 149, 257-263). Transposition assays showed that IS1491 transposed at a frequency of approximately 1.4 x 10(-6). Transposition of IS1491 into the target pRK415 replicon was observed but when ORF2 was disrupted, a fusion between the donor and target replicons was detected. IS1491-like sequences were detected in total DNA of Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9869 (strain P35X), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas mendocina, Comomonas acidovorans, and Comomonas testosteroni by hybridization with IS1491 DNA.

  1. Biodegradation of chlorpyrifos by bacterial genus Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Razia Alam; Rafique, Mazhar; Rehman, Abdul; Munis, Muhammad Farooq Hussain; Rehman, Shafiq Ur; Chaudhary, Hassan Javed

    2016-02-01

    Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphorus pesticide commonly used in agriculture. It is noxious to a variety of organisms that include living soil biota along with beneficial arthropods, fish, birds, humans, animals, and plants. Exposure to chlorpyrifos may cause detrimental effects as delayed seedling emergence, fruit deformities, and abnormal cell division. Contamination of chlorpyrifos has been found about 24 km from the site of its application. There are many physico-chemical and biological approaches to remove organophosphorus pesticides from the ecosystem, among them most promising is biodegradation. The 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) and diethylthiophosphate (DETP) as primary products are made when chlorpyrifos is degraded by soil microorganisms which further break into nontoxic metabolites as CO(2), H(2)O, and NH(3). Pseudomonas is a diversified genus possessing a series of catabolic pathways and enzymes involved in pesticide degradation. Pseudomonas putida MAS-1 is reported to be more efficient in chlorpyrifos degradation by a rate of 90% in 24 h among Pseudomonas genus. The current review analyzed the comparative potential of bacterial species in Pseudomonas genus for degradation of chlorpyrifos thus, expressing an ecofriendly approach for the treatment of environmental contaminants like pesticides.

  2. Differential infectivity of two Pseudomonas species and the immune response in the milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus (Insecta: Hemiptera).

    PubMed

    Schneider, M; Dorn, A

    2001-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida show a profound differential infectivity after inoculation in Oncopeltus fasciatus. Whereas P. putida has no significant impact on nymphs, P. aeruginosa kills all experimental animals within 48 h. Both Pseudomonas species, however, induce the same four hemolymph peptides in O. fasciatus. Also injection of saline solution and injury induced these peptides. In general peptide induction was stronger in nymphs than in adult males. A significantly higher number of nymphs survived a challenge with P. aeruginosa when an immunization with P. putida preceded. The antibacterial properties of the hemolymph were demonstrated in inhibition experiments with P. putida. Two of the four inducible peptides (peptides 1 and 4) could be partially sequenced after Edman degradation and were compared with known antibacterial peptides. Peptide 1, of 15 kDa, showed 47.1% identity with the glycine-rich hemiptericin of Pyrrhocoris apterus. Peptide 4, of 2 kDa, had a 77.8% identity with the proline-rich pyrrhocoricin of P. apterus and a 76.9% identity with metalnikowin 1 of Palomena prasina. Peptides 2 and 3 are also small, with molecular weights of 8 and 5 kDa.

  3. Genetic Analysis of the Nature of Genes Coding Early Enzymes in the Metabolism of Cresol in JPT3-4, a Derivative Strain of Pseudomonas Aeroginosis J1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-29

    sections, The cresols, phenol, and catechols were purchased from Aldrich. Crystalline catechols were vacuum- sublimated and stored in brown phials under...transmissible plasmid controlling camphor oxidation in Pseudomonas putida. Proc, Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 70:855-889. Ribbons, D, W. 1966, Metabolism of o

  4. Differential habitat use and niche partitioning by Pseudomonas species in human homes.

    PubMed

    Remold, Susanna K; Brown, Christopher K; Farris, Justin E; Hundley, Thomas C; Perpich, Jessica A; Purdy, Megan E

    2011-10-01

    Many species of Pseudomonas have the ability to use a variety of resources and habitats, and as a result Pseudomonas are often characterized as having broad fundamental niches. We questioned whether actual habitat use by Pseudomonas species is equally broad. To do this, we sampled extensively to describe the biogeography of Pseudomonas within the human home, which presents a wide variety of habitats for microbes that live in close proximity to humans but are not part of the human flora, and for microbes that are opportunistic pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. From 960 samples taken in 20 homes, we obtained 163 Pseudomonas isolates. The most prevalent based on identification using the SepsiTest BLAST analysis of 16S rRNA (http://www.sepsitest-blast.de) were Pseudomonas monteilii (42 isolates), Pseudomonas plecoglossicida, Pseudomonas fulva, and P. aeruginosa (approximately 25 each). Of these, all but P. fulva differed in recovery rates among evaluated habitat types (drains, soils, water, internal vertebrate sites, vertebrate skin, inanimate surfaces, and garbage/compost) and all four species also differed in recovery rates among subcategories of habitat types (e.g., types of soils or drains). We also found that at both levels of habitat resolution, each of these six most common species (the four above plus Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans) were over- or under-represented in some habitats relative to their contributions to the total Pseudomonas collected across all habitats. This pattern is consistent with niche partitioning. These results suggest that, whereas Pseudomonas are often characterized as generalists with broad fundamental niches, these species in fact have more restricted realized niches. Furthermore, niche partitioning driven by competition among Pseudomonas species may be contributing to the observed variability in habitat use by Pseudomonas in this system.

  5. Regulation of biofilm formation in Pseudomonas and Burkholderia species.

    PubMed

    Fazli, Mustafa; Almblad, Henrik; Rybtke, Morten Levin; Givskov, Michael; Eberl, Leo; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-07-01

    In the present review, we describe and compare the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the regulation of biofilm formation by Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia. Our current knowledge suggests that biofilm formation is regulated by cyclic diguanosine-5'-monophosphate (c-di-GMP), small RNAs (sRNA) and quorum sensing (QS) in all these bacterial species. The systems that employ c-di-GMP as a second messenger regulate the production of exopolysaccharides and surface proteins which function as extracellular matrix components in the biofilms formed by the bacteria. The systems that make use of sRNAs appear to regulate the production of exopolysaccharide biofilm matrix material in all these species. In the pseudomonads, QS regulates the production of extracellular DNA, lectins and biosurfactants which all play a role in biofilm formation. In B.cenocepacia QS regulates the expression of a large surface protein, lectins and extracellular DNA that all function as biofilm matrix components. Although the three regulatory systems all regulate the production of factors used for biofilm formation, the molecular mechanisms involved in transducing the signals into expression of the biofilm matrix components differ between the species. Under the conditions tested, exopolysaccharides appears to be the most important biofilm matrix components for P.aeruginosa, whereas large surface proteins appear to be the most important biofilm matrix components for P.putida, P.fluorescens, and B.cenocepacia.

  6. Nosocomial Infections with IMP-19−Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Linked to Contaminated Sinks, France

    PubMed Central

    Amoureux, Lucie; Riedweg, Karena; Chapuis, Angélique; Bador, Julien; Siebor, Eliane; Péchinot, André; Chrétien, Marie-Lorraine; de Curraize, Claire

    2017-01-01

    We isolated IMP-19–producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa from 7 patients with nosocomial infections linked to contaminated sinks in France. We showed that blaIMP-19 was located on various class 1 integrons among 8 species of gram-negative bacilli detected in sinks: P. aeruginosa, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, A. aegrifaciens, P. putida, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, P. mendocina, Comamonas testosteroni, and Sphingomonas sp. PMID:28098548

  7. Characterization of the ability to form biofilms by plant-associated Pseudomonas species.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Akihiro; Saneoka, Hirofumi

    2015-04-01

    Successful colonization is the initial step for plant-bacteria interactions; therefore, the development of strategies to improve adherence to plant surfaces is critically important for environmental bacteria. Biofilm formation is thought to be one such strategy for bacteria to establish stable colonization on inert and living surfaces. Although biofilms play potential roles in enabling persistent bacterial colonization, little attention has been paid to biofilms formed by plant-associated bacteria. In this study, we characterized the biofilm-forming ability of 6 species of bacteria from the family Pseudomonadaceae: Pseudomonas protegens, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Pseudomonas mendocina, and Pseudomonas syringae. These strains exhibit different degrees of biofilm formation depending on incubation time and nutrient availability. Distinct preferences for growth media were observed, as biofilms were formed by P. protegens with rich nutrients and by P. fluorescens and P. putida with poor nutrients. Likewise, P. stutzeri did not form biofilms with rich nutrients but did form biofilms under nutrient-poor conditions. These observations indicate that particular components in media may influence biofilm formation. P. putida, one of the strains with high biofilm-forming ability, showed the highest ability for initial attachment, which may be mediated by the hydrophobicity of its cell surface. P. mendocina also has high ability for initial attachment, and this strain produces cell surface-attached extracellular polysaccharides that promote cell aggregation. Thus, each strain possesses different properties that facilitate biofilm formation. Shedding light on bacterial strategies for colonization via biofilm formation would enable a better understanding of plant-bacteria interactions.

  8. Cohabitation of Two Different lexA Regulons in Pseudomonas putida▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Abella, Marc; Campoy, Susana; Erill, Ivan; Rojo, Fernando; Barbé, Jordi

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to the vast majority of the members of the domain Bacteria, several Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas species have two lexA genes, whose products have been shown to recognize different LexA binding motifs, making them an interesting target for studying the interplay between cohabiting LexA regulons in a single species. Here we report an analysis of the genetic composition of the two LexA regulons of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 performed with a genomic microarray. The data obtained indicate that one of the two LexA proteins (LexA1) seems to be in control of the conventional Escherichia coli-like SOS response, while the other LexA protein (LexA2) regulates only its own transcriptional unit, which includes the imuA, imuB, and dnaE2 genes, and a gene (PP_3901) from a resident P. putida prophage. Furthermore, PP_3901 is also regulated by LexA1 and is required for DNA damage-mediated induction of several P. putida resident prophage genes. In silico searches suggested that this marked asymmetry in regulon contents also occurs in other Pseudomonas species with two lexA genes, and the implications of this asymmetry in the evolution of the SOS network are discussed. PMID:17933893

  9. Pseudomonas chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Sampedro, Inmaculada; Parales, Rebecca E; Krell, Tino; Hill, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonads sense changes in the concentration of chemicals in their environment and exhibit a behavioral response mediated by flagella or pili coupled with a chemosensory system. The two known chemotaxis pathways, a flagella-mediated pathway and a putative pili-mediated system, are described in this review. Pseudomonas shows chemotaxis response toward a wide range of chemicals, and this review includes a summary of them organized by chemical structure. The assays used to measure positive and negative chemotaxis swimming and twitching Pseudomonas as well as improvements to those assays and new assays are also described. This review demonstrates that there is ample research and intellectual space for future investigators to elucidate the role of chemotaxis in important processes such as pathogenesis, bioremediation, and the bioprotection of plants and animals.

  10. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Two Pseudomonas Flavoprotein Xenobiotic Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Blehert, David S.; Fox, Brian G.; Chambliss, Glenn H.

    1999-01-01

    The genes encoding flavin mononucleotide-containing oxidoreductases, designated xenobiotic reductases, from Pseudomonas putida II-B and P. fluorescens I-C that removed nitrite from nitroglycerin (NG) by cleavage of the nitroester bond were cloned, sequenced, and characterized. The P. putida gene, xenA, encodes a 39,702-Da monomeric, NAD(P)H-dependent flavoprotein that removes either the terminal or central nitro groups from NG and that reduces 2-cyclohexen-1-one but did not readily reduce 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). The P. fluorescens gene, xenB, encodes a 37,441-Da monomeric, NAD(P)H-dependent flavoprotein that exhibits fivefold regioselectivity for removal of the central nitro group from NG and that transforms TNT but did not readily react with 2-cyclohexen-1-one. Heterologous expression of xenA and xenB was demonstrated in Escherichia coli DH5α. The transcription initiation sites of both xenA and xenB were identified by primer extension analysis. BLAST analyses conducted with the P. putida xenA and the P. fluorescens xenB sequences demonstrated that these genes are similar to several other bacterial genes that encode broad-specificity flavoprotein reductases. The prokaryotic flavoprotein reductases described herein likely shared a common ancestor with old yellow enzyme of yeast, a broad-specificity enzyme which may serve a detoxification role in antioxidant defense systems. PMID:10515912

  11. Efficacy of lactoferricin B in controlling ready-to-eat vegetable spoilage caused by Pseudomonas spp.

    PubMed

    Federico, Baruzzi; Pinto, Loris; Quintieri, Laura; Carito, Antonia; Calabrese, Nicola; Caputo, Leonardo

    2015-12-23

    The microbial content of plant tissues has been reported to cause the spoilage of ca. 30% of chlorine-disinfected fresh vegetables during cold storage. The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of antimicrobial peptides in controlling microbial vegetable spoilage under cold storage conditions. A total of 48 bacterial isolates were collected from ready-to-eat (RTE) vegetables and identified as belonging to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Aeromonas media, Pseudomonas cichorii, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas jessenii, Pseudomonas koreensis, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas simiae and Pseudomonas viridiflava species. Reddish or brownish pigmentation was found when Pseudomonas strains were inoculated in wounds on leaves of Iceberg and Trocadero lettuce and escarole chicory throughout cold storage. Bovine lactoferrin (BLF) and its hydrolysates (LFHs) produced by pepsin, papain and rennin, were assayed in vitro against four Pseudomonas spp. strains selected for their heavy spoiling ability. As the pepsin-LFH showed the strongest antimicrobial effect, subsequent experiments were carried out using the peptide lactoferricin B (LfcinB), well known to be responsible for its antimicrobial activity. LfcinB significantly reduced (P ≤ 0.05) spoilage by a mean of 36% caused by three out of four inoculated spoiler pseudomonads on RTE lettuce leaves after six days of cold storage. The reduction in the extent of spoilage was unrelated to viable cell density in the inoculated wounds. This is the first paper providing direct evidence regarding the application of an antimicrobial peptide to control microbial spoilage affecting RTE leafy vegetables during cold storage.

  12. Combined inoculation of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Trichoderma harzianum for enhancing plant growth of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia).

    PubMed

    Sandheep, A R; Asok, A K; Jisha, M S

    2013-06-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the plant growth promoting efficiency of combined inoculation of rhizobacteria on Vanilla plants. Based on the in vitro performance of indigenous Trichoderma spp. and Pseudomonas spp., four effective antagonists were selected and screened under greenhouse experiment for their growth enhancement potential. The maximum percentage of growth enhancement were observed in the combination of Trichoderma harzianum with Pseudomonas fluorescens treatment followed by Pseudomonas fluorescens, Trichoderma harzianum, Pseudomonas putida and Trichoderma virens, respectively in decreasing order. Combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens registered the maximum length of vine (82.88 cm), highest number of leaves (26.67/plant), recorded the highest fresh weight of shoots (61.54 g plant(-1)), fresh weight of roots (4.46 g plant(-1)) and dry weight of shoot (4.56 g plant(-1)) where as the highest dry weight of roots (2.0806 g plant(-1)) were achieved with treatments of Pseudomonas fluorescens. Among the inoculated strains, combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens recorded the maximum nitrogen uptake (61.28 mg plant(-1)) followed by the combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum (std) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (std) (55.03 mg plant(-1)) and the highest phosphorus uptake (38.80 mg plant(-1)) was recorded in dual inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

  13. Anaerobic growth and cyanide synthesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa depend on anr, a regulatory gene homologous with fnr of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, A; Reimmann, C; Galimand, M; Haas, D

    1991-06-01

    Anaerobic growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on nitrate or arginine requires the anr gene, which codes for a positive control element (ANR) capable of functionally complementing an fnr mutation in Escherichia coli. The anr gene was sequenced; it showed 51% identity with the fnr gene at the amino acid sequence level. Four cysteine residues known to be essential in the FNR protein are conserved in ANR. The anr gene product (deduced Mr 27,129) was visualized by the maxicell method and migrated like a 32 kDa protein in gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. An anr mutant of P. aeruginosa constructed by gene replacement was defective in nitrate respiration, arginine deiminase activity, and hydrogen cyanide biosynthesis, underscoring the diverse metabolic functions of ANR during oxygen limitation. Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas syringae, and Pseudomonas mendocina all had a functional analogue of ANR, indicating that similar anaerobic control mechanisms exist in these bacteria.

  14. Pseudomonas soli sp. nov., a novel producer of xantholysin congeners.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Javier; García-López, Marina; Carmona, Cristina; Sousa, Thiciana da S; de Pedro, Nuria; Cautain, Bastien; Martín, Jesús; Vicente, Francisca; Reyes, Fernando; Bills, Gerald F; Genilloud, Olga

    2014-09-01

    A chemoorganotrophic Gram-negative bacterium was isolated by means of a diffusion sandwich system from a soil sample from the Sierra Nevada National Park, Spain. Strain F-279,208(T) was oxidase and catalase positive, strictly aerobic, non-spore-forming and motile by single polar flagellum. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD genes revealed that strain F-279,208(T) belongs to the Pseudomonas putida group with Pseudomonas mosselii and Pseudomonas entomophila as its closest relatives. DNA-DNA hybridization assays and phenotypic traits confirmed that this strain belongs to a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas soli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is F-279,208(T) (=DSM 28043(T)=LMG 27941(T)), and during fermentation it produces xantholysins, a family of lipodepsipeptides. The major compound, xantholysin A, showed an interesting activity in a RCC4 kidney tumor cell line with inactivation of VHL linked with the HIF pathway, without any cytotoxic effects against other human tumor cell lines tested including, liver, pancreas and breast.

  15. Phylogeny of the genus Pseudomonas: intrageneric structure reconstructed from the nucleotide sequences of gyrB and rpoD genes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, S; Kasai, H; Arnold, D L; Jackson, R W; Vivian, A; Harayama, S

    2000-10-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of the genus Pseudomonas: was conducted by using the combined gyrB and rpoD nucleotide sequences of 31 validly described species of Pseudomonas: (a total of 125 strains). Pseudomonas: strains diverged into two major clusters designated intrageneric cluster I (IGC I) and intrageneric cluster II (IGC II). IGC I was further split into two subclusters, the 'P: aeruginosa complex', which included P: aeruginosa, P: alcaligenes, P: citronellolis, P: mendocina, P: oleovorans and P: pseudoalcaligenes, and the 'P: stutzeri complex', which included P: balearica and P: stutzeri. IGC II was further split into three subclusters that were designated the 'P: putida complex', the 'P: syringae complex' and the 'P: fluorescens complex'. The 'P: putida complex' included P: putida and P: fulva. The 'P: syringae complex' was the cluster of phytopathogens including P: amygdali, P: caricapapayae, P: cichorii, P: ficuserectae, P: viridiflava and the pathovars of P. savastanoi and P. syringae. The 'P. fluorescens complex' was further divided into two subpopulations, the 'P. fluorescens lineage' and the 'P. chlororaphis lineage'. The 'P. fluorescens lineage' contained P. fluorescens biotypes A, B and C, P. azotoformans, P. marginalis pathovars, P. mucidolens, P. synxantha and P. tolaasii, while the 'P. chlororaphis lineage' included P. chlororaphis, P. agarici, P. asplenii, P. corrugata, P. fluorescens biotypes B and G and P. putida biovar B. The strains of P. fluorescens biotypes formed a polyphyletic group within the 'P. fluorescens complex'.

  16. Inferring the Chemotactic Strategy of P. putida and E. coli Using Modified Kramers-Moyal Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Hintsche, Marius; Beta, Carsten; Stark, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Many bacteria perform a run-and-tumble random walk to explore their surrounding and to perform chemotaxis. In this article we present a novel method to infer the relevant parameters of bacterial motion from experimental trajectories including the tumbling events. We introduce a stochastic model for the orientation angle, where a shot-noise process initiates tumbles, and analytically calculate conditional moments, reminiscent of Kramers-Moyal coefficients. Matching them with the moments calculated from experimental trajectories of the bacteria E. coli and Pseudomonas putida, we are able to infer their respective tumble rates, the rotational diffusion constants, and the distributions of tumble angles in good agreement with results from conventional tumble recognizers. We also define a novel tumble recognizer, which explicitly quantifies the error in recognizing tumbles. In the presence of a chemical gradient we condition the moments on the bacterial direction of motion and thereby explore the chemotaxis strategy. For both bacteria we recover and quantify the classical chemotactic strategy, where the tumble rate is smallest along the chemical gradient. In addition, for E. coli we detect some cells, which bias their mean tumble angle towards smaller values. Our findings are supported by a scaling analysis of appropriate ratios of conditional moments, which are directly calculated from experimental data. PMID:28114420

  17. The Pseudomonas community in metal-contaminated sediments as revealed by quantitative PCR: a link with metal bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Roosa, Stéphanie; Wauven, Corinne Vander; Billon, Gabriel; Matthijs, Sandra; Wattiez, Ruddy; Gillan, David C

    2014-10-01

    Pseudomonas bacteria are ubiquitous Gram-negative and aerobic microorganisms that are known to harbor metal resistance mechanisms such as efflux pumps and intracellular redox enzymes. Specific Pseudomonas bacteria have been quantified in some metal-contaminated environments, but the entire Pseudomonas population has been poorly investigated under these conditions, and the link with metal bioavailability was not previously examined. In the present study, quantitative PCR and cell cultivation were used to monitor and characterize the Pseudomonas population at 4 different sediment sites contaminated with various levels of metals. At the same time, total metals and metal bioavailability (as estimated using an HCl 1 m extraction) were measured. It was found that the total level of Pseudomonas, as determined by qPCR using two different genes (oprI and the 16S rRNA gene), was positively and significantly correlated with total and HCl-extractable Cu, Co, Ni, Pb and Zn, with high correlation coefficients (>0.8). Metal-contaminated sediments featured isolates of the Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas lutea and Pseudomonas aeruginosa groups, with other bacterial genera such as Mycobacterium, Klebsiella and Methylobacterium. It is concluded that Pseudomonas bacteria do proliferate in metal-contaminated sediments, but are still part of a complex community.

  18. Systematic Unraveling of the Unsolved Pathway of Nicotine Degradation in Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hongzhi; Zhang, Kunzhi; Yao, Yuxiang; Xu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms such as Pseudomonas putida play important roles in the mineralization of organic wastes and toxic compounds. To comprehensively and accurately elucidate key processes of nicotine degradation in Pseudomonas putida, we measured differential protein abundance levels with MS-based spectral counting in P. putida S16 grown on nicotine or glycerol, a non-repressive carbon source. In silico analyses highlighted significant clustering of proteins involved in a functional pathway in nicotine degradation. The transcriptional regulation of differentially expressed genes was analyzed by using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. We observed the following key results: (i) The proteomes, containing 1,292 observed proteins, provide a detailed view of enzymes involved in nicotine metabolism. These proteins could be assigned to the functional groups of transport, detoxification, and amino acid metabolism. There were significant differences in the cytosolic protein patterns of cells growing in a nicotine medium and those in a glycerol medium. (ii) The key step in the conversion of 3-succinoylpyridine to 6-hydroxy-3-succinoylpyridine was catalyzed by a multi-enzyme reaction consisting of a molybdopeterin binding oxidase (spmA), molybdopterin dehydrogenase (spmB), and a (2Fe-2S)-binding ferredoxin (spmC) with molybdenum molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as a cofactor. (iii) The gene of a novel nicotine oxidoreductase (nicA2) was cloned, and the recombinant protein was characterized. The proteins and functional pathway identified in the current study represent attractive targets for degradation of environmental toxic compounds. PMID:24204321

  19. Biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dihydrolinalool and terpineol are sources of fragrances that provide a unique volatile terpenoid alcohol of low toxicity and thus are widely used in the perfumery industry, in folk medicine, and in aromatherapy. They are important chemical constituents of the essential oil of many plants. Previous studies have concerned the biotransformation of limonene by Pseudomonas putida. The objective of this research was to study biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The culture preparation was done using such variables as different microbial methods and incubation periods to obtain maximum cells of P. aeruginosa for myrcene biotransformation. Results It was found that myrcene was converted to dihydrolinalool and 2,6-dimethyloctane in high percentages. The biotransformation products were identified by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), ultraviolet (UV) analysis, gas chromatography (GC), and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Comparison of the different incubation times showed that 3 days was more effective, the major products being 2,6-dimethyloctane (90.0%) and α-terpineol (7.7%) and comprising 97.7%. In contrast, the main compounds derived for an incubation time of 1.5 days were dihydrolinalool (79.5%) and 2,6-dimethyloctane (9.3%), with a total yield of 88.8%. PMID:21609445

  20. PHYSICAL MORPHOLOGY AND SURFACE PROPERTIES OF UNSATURATED PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA BIOFILMS. (R827133)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  1. A two-column flash chromatography approach to pyoverdin production from Pseudomonas putida GB1.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Owen W; Markarian, Dawn S; Parker, Dorothy L; Harrington, James M

    2017-04-01

    Our knowledge of the biological and environmental reactivity of siderophores is limited by the difficulty and cost of obtaining reasonable quantities by purification or synthesis. In this note, we describe a modified procedure for the low-cost, mg-scale purification of pyoverdin-type siderophores using a dual-flash chromatography (reverse-phase absorption and size exclusion) approach.

  2. Cloning and Characterisation of (R)-3-hydroxyacyl-acyl Carrier Protein-coenzyme A Transferase Gene (phaG) from Pseudomonas sp. USM 4-55.

    PubMed

    Arsad, Hasni; Sudesh, Kumar; Nazalan, Najimudin; Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul Tengku; Wahab, Habibah; Razip Samian, Mohd

    2009-12-01

    The (R)-3-hydroxyacyl-ACP-CoA transferase catalyses the conversion of (R)-3-hydroxyacyl-ACP to (R)-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA derivatives, which serves as the ultimate precursor for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) polymerisation from unrelated substrates in pseudomonads. PhaG was found to be responsible for channelling precursors for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase from a de novo fatty acid biosynthesis pathway when cultured on carbohydrates, such as glucose or gluconate. The phaG gene was cloned from Pseudomonas sp. USM 4-55 using a homologous probe. The gene was located in a 3660 bp Sal I fragment (GenBank accession number EU305558). The open reading frame (ORF) was 885 bp long and encoded a 295 amino acid protein. The predicted molecular weight was 33251 Da, and it showed a 62% identity to the PhaG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The function of the cloned phaG of Pseudomonas sp. USM 4-55 was confirmed by complementation studies. Plasmid pBCS39, which harboured the 3660 bp Sal I fragment, was found to complement the PhaG-mutant heterologous host cell, Pseudomonas putida PhaGN-21. P. putida PhaGN-21, which harboured pBCS39, accumulated PHA that accounted for up to 18% of its cellular dry weight (CDW). P. putida PhaGN-21, which harboured the vector alone (PBBR1MCS-2), accumulated only 0.6% CDW of PHA.

  3. Discovery of a cutinase-producing Pseudomonas sp. cohabiting with an apparently nitrogen-fixing Corynebacterium sp. in the phyllosphere.

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, J; Chandra, A K; Kolattukudy, P E

    1987-01-01

    A phyllospheric bacterial culture, previously reported to partially replace nitrogen fertilizer (B. R. Patti and A. K. Chandra, Plant Soil 61:419-427, 1981) was found to contain a fluorescent pseudomonas which was identified as Pseudomonas putida and a Corynebacterium sp. The P. putida isolate was found to produce an extracellular cutinase when grown in a medium containing cutin, the polyester structural component of plant cuticle. The Corynebacterium sp. grew on nitrogen-free medium but could not produce cutinase under any induction conditions tested, whereas P. putida could not grow on nitrogen-free medium. When cocultured with the nitrogen-fixing Corynebacterium sp., the P. putida isolate grew in a nitrogen-free medium, suggesting that the former provided fixed N2 for the latter. These results suggest that the two species coexist on the plant surface, with one providing carbon and the other providing reduced nitrogen for their growth. The presence of cutin in the medium induced cutinase production by P. putida. However, unlike the previously studied fungal systems, cutin hydrolysate did not induce cutinase. Thin-layer chromatographic analysis of the products released from labeled apple fruit cutin showed that the extracellular enzyme released all classes of cutin monomers. This enzyme also catalyzed hydrolysis of the model ester substrates, p-nitrophenyl esters of fatty acids, and optimal conditions were determined for a spectrophotometric assay with p-nitrophenyl butyrate as the substrate. It did not hydrolyze triacyl glycerols, indicating that the cutinase activity was not due to a nonspecific lipase. It showed a broad pH optimum between 8.0 and 10.5 with 3H-labeled apple cutin as the substrate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3793714

  4. High prevalence of Pseudomonas species in soil samples from Ternate Island-Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Noura; Salih, K M; Jusuf, N H; Hamid, A A; Yusoff, W M W

    2009-07-15

    In the present study, Ten soil samples were examined and the pH of the soil was recorded. For bacterial isolation, a sterile nutrient and blood agars were used. Gram stain and biochemical tests were done for identification. A total of 384 genus were isolated, 314 (81.8%) were identified as Pseudomonas species of which 245 (78.0%) were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 42 (13.4%) were Pseudomonas fluorescens, 13 (4.2%) were Pseudomonas mallei, 10 (3.1%) were Pseudomonas putida and 4 (1.3%) were Pseudomonas syringe and are regarded as pathogenic and harmful to man, animal and plants. This study shows that Pseudomonas aeruginosa had a high adaptation capability to grow in soil samples from Ternate, Indonesia. The rest of the bacterial isolates (18.2%) were identified as follows: 24 samples (6.2%) were Micrococcus, 23 samples (6.0%) were E. coli, 12 samples (3.1%) were Pasteurella and 11 samples (2.9%) were Staphylococcus. Pencillium was also isolated.

  5. Pseudomonas diversity in crude-oil-contaminated intertidal sand samples obtained after the Prestige oil spill.

    PubMed

    Mulet, Magdalena; David, Zoyla; Nogales, Balbina; Bosch, Rafael; Lalucat, Jorge; García-Valdés, Elena

    2011-02-01

    The Galicia seashore, in northwestern Spain, was one of the shorelines affected by the Prestige oil spill in November 2002. The diversity of autochthonous Pseudomonas populations present at two beaches (Carnota municipality) was analyzed using culture-independent and culture-dependent methods. The first analysis involved the screening of an rpoD gene library. The second involved the isolation of 94 Pseudomonas strains that were able to grow on selective media by direct plating or after serial enrichments on several carbon sources: biphenyl, gentisate, hexadecane, methylnaphthalene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, salicylate, xylene, and succinate. Eight denitrifying Pseudomonas strains were also isolated by their ability to grow anaerobically with nitrate. The calculated coverage index for Pseudomonas species was 89% when clones and isolates were considered together, and there were 29 phylospecies detected. The most abundant were members of the species P. stutzeri, P. putida, P. anguilliseptica, and P. oleovorans. Thirty-one isolates could not be identified at the species level and were considered representatives of 16 putative novel Pseudomonas species. One isolate was considered representative of a novel P. stutzeri genomovar. Concordant results were obtained when the diversities of the cloned DNA library and the cultured strains were compared. The clone library obtained by the rpoD PCR method was a useful tool for evaluating Pseudomonas communities and also for microdiversity studies of Pseudomonas populations.

  6. Homologous functional expression of cryptic phaG from Pseudomonas oleovorans establishes the transacylase-mediated polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, N; Steinbüchel, A; Rehm, B H

    2000-11-01

    Various pseudomonads are capable of the synthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA), composed of medium chain length (MCL) 3-hydroxy fatty acids (C6-C14), when grown on simple carbon sources such as, for example, gluconate or acetate. In Pseudomonas putida, the fatty acid de novo synthesis and PHA synthesis are linked by the transacylase PhaG. Southern hybridization experiments with digoxigenin-labeled phaG(Pp) from P. putida and genomic DNA from various pseudomonads indicate that phaG homologues are present in various other pseudomonads. Although P. oleovorans does not accumulate PHA(MCL) from non-related carbon sources, its genomic DNA reveals a strong hybridization signal. We employed PCR to amplify this phaG homologue. The respective PCR product comprising the coding region of phaG(Po) was cloned into pBBR1MCS-2, resulting in plasmid pBHR84. DNA sequencing revealed that putative PhaG(Po) from P. oleovorans exhibited about 95% amino acid sequence identity to PhaG(Pp) from P. putida. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis demonstrated that phaG(Po) was not transcribed even tinder inducing conditions, i.e. in the presence of gluconate as carbon source, whereas induction of phaG(Pp) transcription was obtained in P. putida. When octanoate was used as sole carbon source, only low levels of phaG mRNA were detected in P. putida. Plasmid pBHR84 complemented the phaG-negative mutant PhaG(N)-21 from P. putida. Interestingly, reintroduction of phaG(Po) under lac promoter control into the natural host P. oleovorans established PHA(MCL) synthesis from non-related carbon sources in this bacterium. These data indicated that phaG(Po) in P. oleovorans is not functionally expressed and does not exert its original function.

  7. Molecular and Phenotypic Characterization of Pseudomonas spp. Isolated from Milk

    PubMed Central

    Wiedmann, Martin; Weilmeier, Denise; Dineen, Sean S.; Ralyea, Robert; Boor, Kathryn J.

    2000-01-01

    Putative Pseudomonas spp. isolated predominantly from raw and processed milk were characterized by automated ribotyping and by biochemical reactions. Isolates were biochemically profiled using the Biolog system and API 20 NE and by determining the production of proteases, lipases, and lecithinases for each isolate. Isolates grouped into five coherent clusters, predominated by the species P. putida (cluster A), P. fluorescens (cluster B), P. fragi (as identified by Biolog) or P. fluorescens (as identified by API 20 NE) (cluster C), P. fragi (as identified by Biolog) or P. putida (as identified by API 20 NE) (cluster D), and P. fluorescens (cluster E). Isolates within each cluster also displayed similar enzyme activities. Isolates in clusters A, C, and D were generally negative for all three enzyme activities; isolates in cluster B were predominantly positive for all three enzyme activities; and isolates in cluster E were negative for lecithinase but predominantly positive for protease and lipase activities. Thus, only isolates from clusters B and E produced enzyme activities associated with dairy product flavor defects. Thirty-eight ribogroups were differentiated among the 70 isolates. Ribotyping was highly discriminatory for dairy Pseudomonas isolates, with a Simpson's index of discrimination of 0.955. Isolates of the same ribotype were never classified into different clusters, and ribotypes within a given cluster generally showed similar ribotype patterns; thus, specific ribotype fragments may be useful markers for tracking the sources of pseudomonads in dairy production systems. Our results suggest that ribogroups are generally homogeneous with respect to nomenspecies and biovars, confirming the identification potential of ribotyping for Pseudomonas spp. PMID:10788386

  8. Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov.: a novel γ-proteobacteria isolated from a hexazinone degrading bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Hunter, William J; Manter, Daniel K

    2012-08-01

    Three strains of Gram-negative bacteria designated strains H2(T), H6, and H7 were isolated from bioreactors that degraded the herbicide hexazinone. Similar morphological characteristics, cellular fatty acid profiles, and 16S rRNA gene sequences show that the isolates are members of the same species. These characteristics also show that the isolates belong to the genus Pseudomonas with P. graminis, P. putida, and P. stutzeri as close relatives. The 16S rRNA gene of the H2(T) strain differed from that of type strains for P. graminis, P. putida, and P. stutzeri by 1.9, 2.5, and 2.7 %, respectively, indicating that the H2(T), H6, and H7 strains are related to P. graminis, P. putida, and P. stutzeri but are different enough to represent a novel species. The G+C content of the three strains averaged 61.2 ± 0.8 mol% which is similar to the values reported for P. graminis (61), P. putida (61.6), and P. stutzeri (62.2-65.5). The major cellular fatty acids present in the H2(T) strain were C(18:1) ω7c/C (18:1) ω6c (34.3 %), C(16:1) ω6c/C(16:1) ω7c (27.4 %), C(16:0) (20.6 %), C(12:0) (7.9 %), C(12:0) 3-OH (4.5 %), and C(10:0) 3-OH (3.1 %). The name Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov. is proposed for these bacteria.

  9. Pseudomonas 2007 Meeting Review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas is an important genus of bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the third most common nosocomial pathogen in our society, associated with chronic and eventually fatal lung disease in cystic fibrosis patients, while Pseudomonas syringae species are prominent plant pathogens. The fluorescen...

  10. Functional characterization of a StyS sensor kinase reveals distinct domains associated with intracellular and extracellular sensing of styrene in P. putida CA-3.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Niall D; Mooney, Aisling; O'Mahony, Mark; Dobson, Alan Dw

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial two-component systems (TCSs) are of vital importance in the translation of rapidly changing environmental conditions into appropriate cellular regulatory responses enabling adaptation, growth, and survival. The diverse range of environmental signals that TCSs can process, coupled with discrete modular domains within TCS proteins, offers considerable potential for the rational design of bio-sensor and/or bio-reporter strains. In this study we functionally characterize the multi-domain StyS sensor kinase associated with sensing of the aromatic pollutant styrene by Pseudomonas putida CA-3. Deletion analysis of discrete domains was performed and the ability of the truncated StyS sensor proteins to activate a cognate reporter system in an E. coli host assessed. The essential histidine kinase and PAS input domains were identified for StyS dependent activation of the reporter system. However, co-expression of an ABC-transporter protein StyE, previously linked to styrene transport in P. putida CA-3, enabled activation of the reporter system with a StyS construct containing a non-essential PAS input domain, suggesting a novel role for intracellular detection and/or activation. Site directed mutagenesis and amino acid deletions were employed to further characterize the PAS sensing domains of both input regions. The potential implications of these findings in the use of multi-domain sensor kinases in rational design strategies and the potential link between transport and intracellular sensing are discussed.

  11. Functional characterization of a StyS sensor kinase reveals distinct domains associated with intracellular and extracellular sensing of styrene in P. putida CA-3

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Niall D; Mooney, Aisling; O'Mahony, Mark; Dobson, Alan DW

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial two-component systems (TCSs) are of vital importance in the translation of rapidly changing environmental conditions into appropriate cellular regulatory responses enabling adaptation, growth, and survival. The diverse range of environmental signals that TCSs can process, coupled with discrete modular domains within TCS proteins, offers considerable potential for the rational design of bio-sensor and/or bio-reporter strains. In this study we functionally characterize the multi-domain StyS sensor kinase associated with sensing of the aromatic pollutant styrene by Pseudomonas putida CA-3. Deletion analysis of discrete domains was performed and the ability of the truncated StyS sensor proteins to activate a cognate reporter system in an E. coli host assessed. The essential histidine kinase and PAS input domains were identified for StyS dependent activation of the reporter system. However, co-expression of an ABC-transporter protein StyE, previously linked to styrene transport in P. putida CA-3, enabled activation of the reporter system with a StyS construct containing a non-essential PAS input domain, suggesting a novel role for intracellular detection and/or activation. Site directed mutagenesis and amino acid deletions were employed to further characterize the PAS sensing domains of both input regions. The potential implications of these findings in the use of multi-domain sensor kinases in rational design strategies and the potential link between transport and intracellular sensing are discussed. PMID:24637704

  12. Engineering Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 for Nitrogen Fixation and its Application to Improve Plant Growth under Nitrogen-Deficient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Setten, Lorena; Soto, Gabriela; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Fox, Ana Romina; Lisi, Christian; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Angeletti, Mauro; Pagano, Elba; Díaz-Paleo, Antonio; Ayub, Nicolás Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen is the second most critical factor for crop production after water. In this study, the beneficial rhizobacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 was genetically modified to fix nitrogen using the genes encoding the nitrogenase of Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 via the X940 cosmid. Pf-5 X940 was able to grow in L medium without nitrogen, displayed high nitrogenase activity and released significant quantities of ammonium to the medium. Pf-5 X940 also showed constitutive expression and enzymatic activity of nitrogenase in ammonium medium or in nitrogen-free medium, suggesting a constitutive nitrogen fixation. Similar to Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas veronii and Pseudomonas taetrolens but not Pseudomonas balearica and Pseudomonas stutzeri transformed with cosmid X940 showed constitutive nitrogenase activity and high ammonium production, suggesting that this phenotype depends on the genome context and that this technology to obtain nitrogen-fixing bacteria is not restricted to Pf-5. Interestingly, inoculation of Arabidopsis, alfalfa, tall fescue and maize with Pf-5 X940 increased the ammonium concentration in soil and plant productivity under nitrogen-deficient conditions. In conclusion, these results open the way to the production of effective recombinant inoculants for nitrogen fixation on a wide range of crops. PMID:23675499

  13. Is L-arabinose important for the endophytic lifestyle of Pseudomonas spp.?

    PubMed

    Malfanova, Natalia; Kamilova, Faina; Validov, Shamil; Chebotar, Vladimir; Lugtenberg, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Twenty endophytic bacteria were isolated from surface-sterilized stems and roots of cucumber plants. After removal of potential siblings and human pathogens, the remaining seven strains were identified based on their 16S rDNA as Pseudomonas fluorescens (2 strains) and P. putida (5 strains). Three strains, namely P. fluorescens CS1, P. fluorescens CR2 and P. putida CR3, were able to suppress tomato foot and root rot (TFRR). Special attention was paid to the characterization of the BIOLOG carbon oxidation profiles of the isolated pseudomonads in order to identify nutrients which might be important for their endophytic lifestyle. Comparative analysis of the profiles of these seven strains with those of seven rhizospheric Pseudomonas spp. revealed that endophytes were able to oxidize L-arabinose and 2,3-butanediol significantly more often than the rhizospheric group. An independent growth experiment performed in tubes using L-arabinose and 2,3-butanediol as sole carbon sources showed the same results as seen using BIOLOG for L-arabinose, but not for 2,3-butanediol. Since L-arabinose is one of the most abundant sugars in xylem of cucumber plants and was not detected in their rhizosphere, our data suggest that utilization of L-arabinose might be a trait contributing to the endophytic lifestyle of the isolated Pseudomonas endophytes.

  14. Analysis of preference for carbon source utilization among three strains of aromatic compounds degrading Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Karishma, M; Trivedi, Vikas D; Choudhary, Alpa; Mhatre, Akanksha; Kambli, Pranita; Desai, Jinal; Phale, Prashant S

    2015-10-01

    Soil isolates Pseudomonas putida CSV86, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PP4 and Pseudomonas sp. C5pp degrade naphthalene, phthalate isomers and carbaryl, respectively. Strain CSV86 displayed a diauxic growth pattern on phenylpropanoid compounds (veratraldehyde, ferulic acid, vanillin or vanillic acid) plus glucose with a distinct second lag-phase. The glucose concentration in the medium remained constant with higher cell respiration rates on aromatics and maximum protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase activity in the first log-phase, which gradually decreased in the second log-phase with concomitant depletion of the glucose. In strains PP4 and C5pp, growth profile and metabolic studies suggest that glucose is utilized in the first log-phase with the repression of utilization of aromatics (phthalate or carbaryl). All three strains utilize benzoate via the catechol 'ortho' ring-cleavage pathway. On benzoate plus glucose, strain CSV86 showed preference for benzoate over glucose in contrast to strains PP4 and C5pp. Additionally, organic acids like succinate were preferred over aromatics in strains PP4 and C5pp, whereas strain CSV86 co-metabolizes them. Preferential utilization of aromatics over glucose and co-metabolism of organic acids and aromatics are found to be unique properties of P. putida CSV86 as compared with strains PP4 and C5pp and this property of strain CSV86 can be exploited for effective bioremediation.

  15. Diversity of Pseudomonas Genomes, Including Populus-Associated Isolates, as Revealed by Comparative Genome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jun, Se-Ran; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Nookaew, Intawat; Hauser, Loren; Wanchai, Visanu; Land, Miriam; Timm, Collin M; Lu, Tse-Yuan S; Schadt, Christopher W; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Pelletier, Dale A; Ussery, David W

    2015-10-30

    The Pseudomonas genus contains a metabolically versatile group of organisms that are known to occupy numerous ecological niches, including the rhizosphere and endosphere of many plants. Their diversity influences the phylogenetic diversity and heterogeneity of these communities. On the basis of average amino acid identity, comparative genome analysis of >1,000 Pseudomonas genomes, including 21 Pseudomonas strains isolated from the roots of native Populus deltoides (eastern cottonwood) trees resulted in consistent and robust genomic clusters with phylogenetic homogeneity. All Pseudomonas aeruginosa genomes clustered together, and these were clearly distinct from other Pseudomonas species groups on the basis of pangenome and core genome analyses. In contrast, the genomes of Pseudomonas fluorescens were organized into 20 distinct genomic clusters, representing enormous diversity and heterogeneity. Most of our 21 Populus-associated isolates formed three distinct subgroups within the major P. fluorescens group, supported by pathway profile analysis, while two isolates were more closely related to Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Pseudomonas putida. Genes specific to Populus-associated subgroups were identified. Genes specific to subgroup 1 include several sensory systems that act in two-component signal transduction, a TonB-dependent receptor, and a phosphorelay sensor. Genes specific to subgroup 2 contain hypothetical genes, and genes specific to subgroup 3 were annotated with hydrolase activity. This study justifies the need to sequence multiple isolates, especially from P. fluorescens, which displays the most genetic variation, in order to study functional capabilities from a pangenomic perspective. This information will prove useful when choosing Pseudomonas strains for use to promote growth and increase disease resistance in plants.

  16. Characterization of Bacillus and Pseudomonas strains with suppressive traits isolated from tomato hydroponic-slow filtration unit.

    PubMed

    Renault, D; Déniel, F; Benizri, E; Sohier, D; Barbier, G; Rey, P

    2007-06-01

    Bacillus and Pseudomonas spp. are known to be involved in plant pathogenic fungi elimination during the slow filtration process used in tomato soilless cultures. We isolated 6-8 strains of both Bacillus and Pseudomonas from the top, middle, and bottom sections of filters and identified them after 16S rDNA sequencing. Four Pseudomonas strains were identified as Pseudomonas fulva, 5 as Pseudomonas plecoglossicida, and 12 as Pseudomonas putida. The use of specific oligonucleotide polymerase chain reaction primer sets designed from gyrB gene sequences additionally permitted the identification of 17 Bacillus cereus and 3 Bacillus thuringiensis strains. Ribotyping with EcoRI pointed out an important polymorphism within Bacillus and Pseudomonas strains. Molecular characterization did not reveal a correlation between the location of isolates within the filter (top, middle, or bottom) and bacterial identification or riboclusters. Functional aspects assessed by community-level physiological profiling showed marked phenotypic differences between Pseudomonas communities isolated from the top and bottom filter layers; differences were lower between Bacillus communities of different layers and far less noticeable between mixed communities of Bacillus and Pseudomonas. These strains were tested for several suppressive activities. Conversely to most Bacillus, the majority of Pseudomonas strains were auxin producers and promoted the growth of tomato plantlet roots. On the other hand, only Bacillus strains displayed antagonistic activities by inhibiting the growth of pathogenic fungi frequently detected in soilless cultures. Siderophores were produced by nearly all bacteria, but at higher amounts by Pseudomonas than Bacillus strains. The biocontrol agent potentiality of certain strains to optimize the slow filtration process and to promote the suppressive potential of nutrient solution is discussed.

  17. Further characterization of o-nitrobenzaldehyde degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ONBA-17 and deduction on its metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang-Bo; Li, Xiao-Dan; Ali, Shinawar Waseem; Shan, Sheng-Dao; Luo, Lin-Ping; Guan, Li-Bo

    2014-01-01

    A previously reported o-nitrobenzaldehyde (ONBA) degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ONBA-17 was further identified and characterized. Based on results of DNA base composition and DNA-DNA hybridization, the strain was identified as P. putida. Its degradation effect enhanced with increase of inoculum amount and no lag phase was observed. Higher removal rate was achieved under shaking conditions. All tested ONBA with different initial concentrations could be completely degraded within 5 d. In addition, degradative enzyme(s) involved was confirmed as intra-cellular distributed and constitutively expressed. Effects of different compounds on relative activity of degradative enzyme(s) within cell-free extract were also evaluated. Finally, 2-nitrobenzoic acid and 2, 3-dihydroxybenzoic acid were detected as metabolites of ONBA degradation by P. putida ONBA-17, and relevant metabolic pathway was preliminary proposed. This study might help with future research in better understanding of nitroaromatics biodegradation.

  18. Pseudomonas Diversity in Crude-Oil-Contaminated Intertidal Sand Samples Obtained after the Prestige Oil Spill▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mulet, Magdalena; David, Zoyla; Nogales, Balbina; Bosch, Rafael; Lalucat, Jorge; García-Valdés, Elena

    2011-01-01

    The Galicia seashore, in northwestern Spain, was one of the shorelines affected by the Prestige oil spill in November 2002. The diversity of autochthonous Pseudomonas populations present at two beaches (Carnota municipality) was analyzed using culture-independent and culture-dependent methods. The first analysis involved the screening of an rpoD gene library. The second involved the isolation of 94 Pseudomonas strains that were able to grow on selective media by direct plating or after serial enrichments on several carbon sources: biphenyl, gentisate, hexadecane, methylnaphthalene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, salicylate, xylene, and succinate. Eight denitrifying Pseudomonas strains were also isolated by their ability to grow anaerobically with nitrate. The calculated coverage index for Pseudomonas species was 89% when clones and isolates were considered together, and there were 29 phylospecies detected. The most abundant were members of the species P. stutzeri, P. putida, P. anguilliseptica, and P. oleovorans. Thirty-one isolates could not be identified at the species level and were considered representatives of 16 putative novel Pseudomonas species. One isolate was considered representative of a novel P. stutzeri genomovar. Concordant results were obtained when the diversities of the cloned DNA library and the cultured strains were compared. The clone library obtained by the rpoD PCR method was a useful tool for evaluating Pseudomonas communities and also for microdiversity studies of Pseudomonas populations. PMID:21131512

  19. Isolation of VIM-2-Producing Pseudomonas monteilii Clinical Strains Disseminated in a Tertiary Hospital in Northern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Gómez, Laura P.; Fernández-Martínez, Marta; Román, Elena; Rodríguez, Cristina; Marco, Francesc; Vila, Jordi; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2014-01-01

    We describe here the occurrence of blaVIM-2 in 10 carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas monteilii strains isolated from different clinical samples from patients at the University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla in northern Spain. All the blaVIM-2-harboring P. monteilii isolates possessed a class 1 integron, with the cassette array [intI1_blaVIM-2_aac(6′)-Ib_qacEΔ1_sul1]. Our results show the emergence of VIM-2-producing multidrug-resistant species other than Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Pseudomonas putida in a Spanish hospital. P. monteilii, although sporadically isolated, should also be considered an important metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) reservoir. PMID:25421471

  20. Antibiotic Resistance Patterns of Pseudomonas spp. Isolated from the River Danube

    PubMed Central

    Kittinger, Clemens; Lipp, Michaela; Baumert, Rita; Folli, Bettina; Koraimann, Günther; Toplitsch, Daniela; Liebmann, Astrid; Grisold, Andrea J.; Farnleitner, Andreas H.; Kirschner, Alexander; Zarfel, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    Spread and persistence of antibiotic resistance pose a severe threat to human health, yet there is still lack of knowledge about reservoirs of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the environment. We took the opportunity of the Joint Danube Survey 3 (JDS3), the world's biggest river research expedition of its kind in 2013, to analyse samples originating from different sampling points along the whole length of the river. Due to its high clinical relevance, we concentrated on the characterization of Pseudomonas spp. and evaluated the resistance profiles of Pseudomonas spp. which were isolated from eight sampling points. In total, 520 Pseudomonas isolates were found, 344 (66.0%) isolates were identified as Pseudomonas putida, and 141 (27.1%) as Pseudomonas fluorescens, all other Pseudomonas species were represented by less than five isolates, among those two P. aeruginosa isolates. Thirty seven percent (37%) of all isolated Pseudomonas species showed resistance to at least one out of 10 tested antibiotics. The most common resistance was against meropenem (30.4%/158 isolates) piperacillin/tazobactam (10.6%/55 isolates) and ceftazidime (4.2%/22 isolates). 16 isolates (3.1%/16 isolates) were multi-resistant. For each tested antibiotic at least one resistant isolate could be detected. Sampling points from the upper stretch of the River Danube showed more resistant isolates than downriver. Our results suggest that antibiotic resistance can be acquired by and persists even in Pseudomonas species that are normally not in direct contact with humans. A possible scenario is that these bacteria provide a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes that can spread to related human pathogens by horizontal gene transfer. PMID:27199920

  1. Occurrence of multi-antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas spp. in drinking water produced from karstic hydrosystems.

    PubMed

    Flores Ribeiro, Angela; Bodilis, Josselin; Alonso, Lise; Buquet, Sylvaine; Feuilloley, Marc; Dupont, Jean-Paul; Pawlak, Barbara

    2014-08-15

    Aquatic environments could play a role in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes by enabling antibiotic-resistant bacteria transferred through wastewater inputs to connect with autochthonous bacteria. Consequently, drinking water could be a potential pathway to humans and animals for antibiotic resistance genes. The aim of this study was to investigate occurrences of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas spp. in drinking water produced from a karst, a vulnerable aquifer with frequent increases in water turbidity after rainfall events and run-offs. Water samples were collected throughout the system from the karstic springs to the drinking water tap during three non-turbid periods and two turbid events. E. coli densities in the springs were 10- to 1000-fold higher during the turbid events than during the non-turbid periods, indicating that, with increased turbidity, surface water had entered the karstic system and contaminated the spring water. However, no E. coli were isolated in the drinking water. In contrast, Pseudomonas spp. were isolated from the drinking water only during turbid events, while the densities in the springs were from 10- to 100-fold higher than in the non-turbid periods. All the 580 Pseudomonas spp. isolates obtained from the sampling periods were resistant (to between 1 and 10 antibiotics), with similar resistance patterns. Among all the Pseudomonas isolated throughout the drinking water production system, between 32% and 86% carried the major resistance pattern: ticarcillin, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid, cefsulodin, and/or aztreonam, and/or sulfamethoxazol-trimethoprim, and/or fosfomycin. Finally, 8 Pseudomonas spp. isolates, related to the Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens species, were isolated from the drinking water. Thus, Pseudomonas could be involved in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance via drinking water during critical periods.

  2. Pseudomonas hunanensis sp. nov., isolated from soil subjected to long-term manganese pollution.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Li, Bai-Yuan; Wang, Hai-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Qiang

    2014-07-01

    A Gram-negative, polar flagella, rod-shaped bacterium LV (T) was isolated from a soil sample subjected to long-term manganese pollution in Hunan Province, China. Cells grow optimally on Luria-Bertani agar medium at 30 °C in the presence of 0-5.0 % (w/v) NaCl and pH 7-8. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain LV (T) belonged to the genus Pseudomonas, with sequence similarity values of 98.6, 98.2, 98.7, and 97.3 % to Pseudomonas monteilii BCRC 17520 (T) , Pseudomonas putida BCRC 10459 (T) , Pseudomonas plecoglossicida BCRC 17517 (T) , and Pseudomonas asplenii BCRC 17131 (T) , respectively. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the five strains was <30 %. The DNA G+C content of strain LV (T) is 68.8 mol%. Chemotaxonomic data revealed that the strain LV(T) possesses ubiquinone Q-9. The polar lipid profile of strain LV (T) contained diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidylethanolamine. The major cellular fatty acids present are C10:03-OH (12.33 %), C16:0 (23.99 %), summed feature 3(C16:1ω7c and/or C16:1ω6c), and summed feature 8(C18:1 ω7c and C18:1 ω6c). Based on the genotypic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data, strain LV (T) is distinguishable from related members of the genus Pseudomonas. Thus, strain LV (T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas hunanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LV (T) (=CICC 10558(T) = NCCB 100446(T)).

  3. Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a submission to the list of microorganisms with standing in nomenclature maintained by the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. We wish to have Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov. added to the list as a valid species belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. Three str...

  4. Pseudomonas screening assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method for the detection of Pseudomonas bacteria is described where an Azurin-specific antibody is employed for detecting the presence of Azurin in a test sample. The detection of the presence of Azurin in the sample is a conclusive indicator of the presence of the Pseudomonas bacteria since the Azurin protein is a specific marker for this bacterial strain.

  5. Genetic Lineages and Antimicrobial Resistance in Pseudomonas spp. Isolates Recovered from Food Samples.

    PubMed

    Estepa, Vanesa; Rojo-Bezares, Beatriz; Torres, Carmen; Sáenz, Yolanda

    2015-06-01

    Raw food is a reservoir of Pseudomonas isolates that could be disseminated to consumers. The presence of Pseudomonas spp. was studied in food samples, and the phenotypic and genotypic characterizations of the recovered isolates were analyzed. Two samples of meat (3%, turkey and beef) and 13 of vegetables (22%, 7 green peppers and 6 tomatoes) contained Pseudomonas spp. A total of 20 isolates were identified, and were classified as follows (number of isolates): P. aeruginosa (5), P. putida (5), P. nitroreducens (4), P. fulva (2), P. mosselli (1), P. mendocina (1), P. monteilii (1), and Pseudomonas sp. (1). These 20 Pseudomonas isolates were clonally different by pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis, and were resistant to the following antibiotics: ticarcillin (85%), aztreonam (30%), cefepime (10%), imipenem (10%), and meropenem (5%), but were susceptible to ceftazidime, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, doripenem, gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and colistin. Only one strain (Ps158) presented a class 1 integron lacking the 3' conserved segment. The five P. aeruginosa strains were typed by multilocus sequence typing in five different sequence-types (ST17, ST270, ST800, ST1455, and ST1456), and different mutations were detected in protein OprD that were classified in three groups. One strain (Ps159) showed a new insertion sequence (ISPa47) truncating the oprD gene, and conferring resistance to imipenem.

  6. Metallo-β-Lactamases in Clinical Pseudomonas Isolates in Taiwan and Identification of VIM-3, a Novel Variant of the VIM-2 Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing-Jou; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Ko, Wen-Chien; Luh, Kwen-Tay; Tsai, Shu-Huei; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2001-01-01

    A total of 209 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas (193 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 P. putida, 4 P. stutzeri, and 2 P. fluorescens isolates) with reduced susceptibilities to imipenem and/or ceftazidime were subjected to PCR assays with primers specific for blaIMP-1, blaIMP-2, blaVIM-1, and blaVIM-2 and sequence analysis to identify the metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) prevalent among these organisms in Taiwan; and 21 isolates gave positive results. Five isolates including two P. putida and three P. stutzeri isolates were found to carry blaIMP-1, and six isolates including five P. putida and one P. stutzeri isolates harbored blaVIM-2. The remaining 10 isolates were P. aeruginosa, and all were found to carry a novel variant of blaVIM-2, designated blaVIM-3. There are only two nucleotide differences between blaVIM-2 and blaVIM-3, leading to two amino acid alterations. Our findings indicate that VIM-2 and its variant have become the most prevalent metalloenzymes in Pseudomonas in Taiwan. Southern hybridization with the blaVIM-2-, blaVIM-3-, and blaIMP-1 -specific probes revealed that only two VIM-2-producing P. putida isolates appeared to carry the MBL gene on plasmids. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that six VIM-3-producing P. aeruginosa isolates and two IMP-1-producing P. stutzeri isolates were genetically related, suggesting that the spread of these MBL genes in Taiwan could be due to clonal dissemination as well as genetic exchange between different clones. PMID:11451678

  7. Monocyte Profiles in Critically Ill Patients With Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Sepsis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-02

    Pseudomonas Infections; Pseudomonas Septicemia; Pseudomonas; Pneumonia; Pseudomonal Bacteraemia; Pseudomonas Urinary Tract Infection; Pseudomonas Gastrointestinal Tract Infection; Sepsis; Sepsis, Severe; Critically Ill

  8. Comparative genomic analysis of solvent extrusion pumps in Pseudomonas strains exhibiting different degrees of solvent tolerance.

    PubMed

    Segura, Ana; Rojas, Antonia; Hurtado, Ana; Huertas, María-José; Ramos, Juan L

    2003-10-01

    Organic solvents are inherently toxic for microorganisms. Their effects depend not only on the nature of the compound, but also on the intrinsic tolerance of the bacterial species and strains. Three efflux pumps belonging to the RND (resistance-nodulation-cell division) family of multidrug extrusion pumps are the main factor involved in the high intrinsic tolerance to toluene of Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E. We have analyzed the tolerance to toluene shocks [0.1% and 0.3% (v/v)] of a number of strains belonging to different species of the genus Pseudomonas upon growth in the absence and in the presence of sublethal concentrations of toluene. The strains can be grouped in three categories: (1) highly resistant strains, in which almost 100% of the cells precultured in the presence of sublethal concentrations of toluene withstood a 0.3% (v/v) toluene shock, (2) moderately resistant strains, in which only a fraction (10(-4)-1) of the cells withstood a 0.1% (v/v) toluene shock, but fewer than 1 in 10(7) cells survived a sudden 0.3% (v/v) toluene shock regardless of the growth conditions, and (3) sensitive strains, in which regardless of the growth conditions fewer than 10(-5) cells survived a 0.1% (v/v) toluene shock. We also studied the number and type of efflux pumps in different strains in comparison with the P. putida DOT-T1E strain.

  9. Anthranilate degradation by a cold-adapted Pseudomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dockyu; Yoo, Miyoun; Kim, Eungbin; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2015-03-01

    An alpine soil bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain PAMC 25931 was characterized as eurypsychrophilic (both psychrophilic and mesotolerant) with a broad temperature range of 5-30 °C both for anthranilate (2-aminobenzoate) degradation and concomitant cell growth. Two degradative gene clusters (antABC and catBCA) were detected from a fosmid clone in the PAMC 25931 genomic library; each cluster was confirmed to be specifically induced by anthranilate. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant AntABC (anthranilate 1,2-dioxygenase, AntDO) converted anthranilate into catechol, exhibiting strict specificity toward anthranilate. Recombinant CatA (catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, C12O) from the organism was active over a broad temperature range (5-37 °C). However, CatA rapidly lost the enzyme activity when incubated at above 25 °C. For example, 1 h-preincubation at 37 °C resulted in 100% loss of enzyme activity, while a counterpart from mesophilic Pseudomonas putida mt-2 did not show any negative effect on the initial enzyme activity. These results suggest that CatA is a new cold-adapted thermolabile enzyme, which might be a product through the adaptation process of PAMC 25931 to naturally cold environments and contribute to its ability to grow on anthranilate there.

  10. Indicator For Pseudomonas Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    Characteristic protein extracted and detected. Natural protein marker found in Pseudomonas bacteria. Azurin, protein containing copper readily extracted, purified, and used to prepare antibodies. Possible to develop simple, fast, and accurate test for marker carried out in doctor's office.

  11. Pseudomonas orchitis in puberty.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Ambil S

    2004-10-01

    Acute epididymo-orchitis is a common cause of 'acute scrotum' in adolescence and young adults, and the common causative pathogens are Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This is a rare case of acute epididymo-orchitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a pubertal boy with a history of 'ano-receptive' intercourse. On Medline search there are no reports of pseudomonas orchitis in this age group.

  12. In vitro data support the investigation of vinegar as an antimicrobial agent for PD-associated Pseudomonas exit site infections.

    PubMed

    Carson, Christine F; Ash, Oliver; Chakera, Aron

    2017-02-01

    Peritoneal dialysis exit site infections caused by Pseudomonas spp. are difficult to treat and can lead to peritonitis and/or modality failure. Effective alternative or adjunct non-antibiotic antimicrobial agents could improve treatment as well as reduce the use of antibiotics and contribute to a reduction in antibiotic selection pressure and the further development of antibiotic resistance. Vinegar is popularly promoted as a topical antimicrobial agent and has been recommended as an adjunct treatment for Pseudomonas exit site infections in PD patients. Systematic empirical data on the susceptibility of pseudomonads to vinegar are lacking. This study aimed to determine the susceptibility to vinegar of 57 isolates of Pseudomonas. The MICs and MBCs of four vinegars were determined for clinical, environmental and/or reference isolates of P. aeruginosa (n = 34), P. fluorescens (n = 11) and P. putida (n = 12) using a broth microdilution method. The MIC90 and MBC90 were also determined for each species. The MIC90 of all four vinegars against P. aeruginosa was 2% (vol/vol). The MBC90 was 8%. The MIC90 s for P. fluorescens and P. putida were also 2%. The MIC90 s were 4%. Dilutions of vinegar recommended for the treatment of Pseudomonas exit site infections have in vitro activity against these notoriously resistant bacteria. In light of increasing rates of antibiotic resistance and the need to reduce antibiotic selection pressure as part of good antibiotic stewardship, the efficacy of vinegar, or its active constituent acetic acid, for the treatment of Pseudomonas exit site infections should be investigated further.

  13. Construction of a Pseudomonas hybrid strain that mineralizes 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene.

    PubMed Central

    Duque, E; Haidour, A; Godoy, F; Ramos, J L

    1993-01-01

    A bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain C1S1, able to grow on 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrotoluene, and 2-nitrotoluene as N sources, was isolated. The bacterium grew at 30 degrees C with fructose as a C source and accumulated nitrite. Through batch culture enrichment, we isolated a derivative strain, called Pseudomonas sp. clone A, which grew faster on TNT and did not accumulate nitrite in the culture medium. Use of TNT by these two strains as an N source involved the successive removal of nitro groups to yield 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2-nitrotoluene, and toluene. Transfer of the Pseudomonas putida TOL plasmid pWW0-Km to Pseudomonas sp. clone A allowed the transconjugant bacteria to grow on TNT as the sole C and N source. All bacteria in this study, in addition to removing nitro groups from TNT, reduced nitro groups on the aromatic ring via hydroxylamine to amino derivatives. Azoxy dimers probably resulting from the condensation of partially reduced TNT derivatives were also found. PMID:8468288

  14. Specificity of pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake among fluorescent Pseudomonas strains.

    PubMed Central

    Hohnadel, D; Meyer, J M

    1988-01-01

    Pyoverdine-mediated iron transport was determined for seven fluorescent Pseudomonas strains belonging to different species. For all strains, cell or cell outer membrane and iron(III)-pyoverdine combinations were compared with their homologous counterparts in uptake, binding, and cross-feeding experiments. For four strains (Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633, Pseudomonas fluorescens W, P. fluorescens ATCC 17400, and Pseudomonas tolaasii NCPPB 2192), the pyoverdine-mediated iron transport appeared to be strictly strain specific; pyoverdine-facilitated iron uptake by iron-starved cells and binding of ferripyoverdine to the purified outer membranes of such cells were efficient only in the case of the homologous systems. Cross-feeding assays, in liquid or solid cultures, resulted, however, especially for P. fluorescens ATCC 17400, in some discrepancies compared with uptake and binding assays, suggesting that growth experiments are the least likely to yield correct information on specificity of the pyoverdine-mediated iron transport. For the three other strains (P. fluorescens ATCC 13525, P. chlororaphis ATCC 9446, and P. aeruginosa ATCC 15692), cross-reactivity was demonstrated by the uptake, binding, and cross-feeding experiments. In an attempt to determine which parts of the iron transport system were responsible for the specificity, the differences in amino acid composition of the pyoverdines, together with the differences observed at the level of the iron-sensitive outer membrane protein pattern of the seven strains, are discussed. PMID:3170485

  15. Physiological and Biochemical Characterization of a Novel Nicotine-Degrading Bacterium Pseudomonas geniculata N1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kaiming; Wang, Weiwei; Nie, Xueling; Jiang, Yi; Li, Pengpeng; Liu, Shanshan; Xu, Ping; Tang, Hongzhi

    2014-01-01

    Management of solid wastes with high nicotine content, such as those accumulated during tobacco manufacturing, poses a major challenge, which can be addressed by using bacteria such as Pseudomonas and Arthrobacter. In this study, a new species of Pseudomonas geniculata, namely strain N1, which is capable of efficiently degrading nicotine, was isolated and identified. The optimal growth conditions for strain N1 are a temperature of 30°C, and a pH 6.5, at a rotation rate of 120 rpm min−1 with 1 g l−1 nicotine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. Myosmine, cotinine, 6-hydroxyni