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Sample records for pseudomonas syringae pathovars1

  1. Ice crystallization by Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Cochet, N; Widehem, P

    2000-08-01

    Several bacterial species can serve as biological ice nuclei. The best characterized of these is Pseudomonas syringae, a widely distributed bacterial epiphyte of plants. These biological ice nuclei find various applications in different fields, but an optimized production method was required in order to obtain the highly active cells which may be exploited as ice nucleators. The results presented here show that P. syringae cells reduce supercooling of liquid or solid media and enhance ice crystal formation at sub-zero temperatures, thus leading to a remarkable control of the crystallization phenomenon and a potential for energy savings. Our discussion focuses on recent and future applications of these ice nucleators in freezing operations, spray-ice technology and biotechnological processes.

  2. Draft genome sequences of pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae ALF3 isolated from alfalfa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We report the annotated draft genome of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain ALF3, isolated in Wyoming, USA. Comparison of this genome sequence with those of closely related strains of P. syringae pv. syringae adapted to other hosts will facilitate research into interactions between this pathoge...

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae ALF3 Isolated from Alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Harrison, James; Dornbusch, Melinda R; Samac, Deborah; Studholme, David J

    2016-02-11

    We report here the annotated draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain ALF3, isolated in Wyoming. A comparison of this genome sequence with those of closely related strains of P. syringae adapted to other hosts will facilitate research into interactions between this pathogen and alfalfa.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae ALF3 Isolated from Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, James; Dornbusch, Melinda R.; Samac, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    We report here the annotated draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain ALF3, isolated in Wyoming. A comparison of this genome sequence with those of closely related strains of P. syringae adapted to other hosts will facilitate research into interactions between this pathogen and alfalfa. PMID:26868403

  5. Impact of siderophore production by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 on epiphytic fitness and biocontrol activity against Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea 1a/96.

    PubMed

    Wensing, Annette; Braun, Sascha D; Büttner, Petra; Expert, Dominique; Völksch, Beate; Ullrich, Matthias S; Weingart, Helge

    2010-05-01

    The use of naturally occurring microbial antagonists to suppress plant diseases offers a favorable alternative to classical methods of plant protection. The soybean epiphyte Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain 22d/93 shows great potential for controlling P. syringae pv. glycinea, the causal agent of bacterial blight of soybean. Its activity against P. syringae pv. glycinea is highly reproducible even in field trials, and the suppression mechanisms involved are of special interest. In this work we demonstrated that P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 produced a significantly larger amount of siderophores than the pathogen P. syringae pv. glycinea produced. While P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 and P. syringae pv. glycinea produce the same siderophores, achromobactin and pyoverdin, the regulation of siderophore biosynthesis in the former organism is very different from that in the latter organism. The epiphytic fitness of P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 mutants defective in siderophore biosynthesis was determined following spray inoculation of soybean leaves. The population size of the siderophore-negative mutant P. syringae pv. syringae strain 22d/93DeltaSid was 2 orders of magnitude lower than that of the wild type 10 days after inoculation. The growth deficiency was compensated for when wound inoculation was used, indicating the availability of iron in the presence of small lesions on the leaves. Our results suggest that siderophore production has an indirect effect on the biocontrol activity of P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93. Although siderophore-defective mutants of P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 still suppressed development of bacterial blight caused by P. syringae pv. glycinea, siderophore production enhanced the epiphytic fitness and thus the competitiveness of the antagonist.

  6. Cellulose production in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae: a compromise between epiphytic and pathogenic lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Arrebola, Eva; Carrión, Víctor J; Gutiérrez-Barranquero, José Antonio; Pérez-García, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; Cazorla, Francisco M; de Vicente, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Genome sequencing and annotation have revealed a putative cellulose biosynthetic operon in the strain Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158, the causal agent of bacterial apical necrosis. Bioinformatics analyses and experimental methods were used to confirm the functionality of the cellulose biosynthetic operon. In addition, the results showed the contribution of the cellulose operon to important aspects of P. syringae pv. syringae biology, such as the formation of biofilms and adhesion to the leaf surface of mango, suggesting that this operon increases epiphytic fitness. However, based on the incidence and severity of the symptoms observed in tomato leaflets, cellulose expression reduces virulence, as cellulose-deficient mutants increased the area of necrosis, whereas the cellulose-overproducing strain decreased the area of necrosis compared with the wild type. In conclusion, the results of this study show that the epiphytic and pathogenic stages of the P. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158 lifestyle are intimately affected by cellulose production.

  7. New strategies for genetic engineering Pseudomonas syringae using recombination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Here we report that DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced directly into bacteria by electroporation can recombine with the bacterial chromosome. This phenomenon was identified in Pseudomonas syringae and we subsequently found that Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Shigella flexneri are...

  8. Strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae from pea are phylogenetically and pathogenically diverse.

    PubMed

    Martín-Sanz, Alberto; de la Vega, Marcelino Pérez; Murillo, Jesús; Caminero, Constantino

    2013-07-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae causes extensive yield losses in the pea crop worldwide, although there is little information on its host specialization and its interactions with pea. A collection of 88 putative P. syringae pv. syringae strains (including 39 strains isolated from pea) was characterized by repetitive polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and syrB amplification and evaluated for pathogenicity and virulence. rep-PCR data grouped the strains from pea into two groups (1B and 1C) together with strains from other hosts; a third group (1A) was formed exclusively with strains isolated from non-legume species. MLST data included all strains from pea in the genomospecies 1 of P. syringae pathovars defined in previous studies; they were distributed in the same three groups defined by rep-PCR. The inoculations performed in two pea cultivars showed that P. syringae pv. syringae strains from groups 1A and 1C were less virulent than strains from group 1B, suggesting a possible pathogenic specialization in this group. This study shows the existence of genetically and pathogenically distinct P. syringae pv. syringae strain groups from pea, which will be useful for the diagnostic and epidemiology of this pathogen and for disease resistance breeding.

  9. Gene Expression Profiling in Viable but Nonculturable (VBNC) Cells of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae

    PubMed Central

    Postnikova, Olga A.; Shao, Jonathan; Mock, Norton M.; Baker, Con J.; Nemchinov, Lev G.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae infects diverse crop plants and comprises at least 50 different pathovar strains with different host ranges. More information on the physiological and molecular effects of the host inhibitory environment on the pathogen is needed to develop resistant cultivars. Recently, we reported an in vitro model system that mimics the redox pulse associated with the oxidative burst in plant cells inoculated with Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae. Using this system, we demonstrated that oxidation of acetosyringone, a major extracellular phenolic compound induced in some plants in response to bacteria, rendered Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae to a “viable but nonculturable” (VBNC) state. Here we performed a large scale transcriptome profiling of P. s. pv. syringae in the VBNC state induced by acetosyringone treatment and identified bacterial genes and pathways presumably associated with this condition. The findings offer insight into what events occur when bacterial pathogens are first encountered and host defense responses are triggered. The acquired knowledge will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of stress tolerance. We believe that this is the first work on global gene expression profiling of VBNC cells in plant pathogenic bacteria. PMID:26733964

  10. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas...

  11. Gene expression profiling in viable but not culturable (VBNC) cells of Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas syringae infects diverse crop plants and comprises at least 50 different pathovar strains with different host ranges. One of our objectives is related to understanding molecular mechanisms of stress tolerance in alfalfa, the most widely grown forage crop in the wo...

  12. Ecological and genetic analysis of copper and streptomycin resistance in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae.

    PubMed Central

    Sundin, G W; Bender, C L

    1993-01-01

    Strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae resistant to copper, streptomycin, or both compounds were recovered from symptomless and diseased tissue of four woody hosts in three nurseries in Oklahoma. In strains resistant to copper and streptomycin (Cur Smr), resistance to both compounds was cotransferred with a single plasmid which was either 68, 190, or 220 kilobase pairs (kb). All Cus Smr strains contained a 68-kb conjugative plasmid. Cur Sms strains contained one plasmid which varied in size from 60 to 73 kb. All conjugative plasmids which transferred streptomycin resistance contained sequences homologous to the strA and strB Smr genes from the broad-host-range plasmid RSF1010. The Smr determinant was subsequently cloned from a 68-kb Cur Smr plasmid designated pPSR1. A restriction map detailing the organization of the homologous Smr genes from pPSR1 and RSF1010 and cloned Smr genes from P. syringae pv. papulans and Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria revealed the conservation of all sites studied. The Cur genes cloned from P. syringae pv. tomato PT23 and X. campestris pv. vesicatoria XV10 did not hybridize to the Cur plasmids identified in the present study, indicating that copper resistance in these P. syringae pv. syringae strains may be conferred by a distinct genetic determinant. Images PMID:8476279

  13. Characterization of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, Causal Agent of Citrus Blast of Mandarin in Montenegro

    PubMed Central

    Ivanović, Žarko; Perović, Tatjana; Popović, Tatjana; Blagojević, Jovana; Trkulja, Nenad; Hrnčić, Snježana

    2017-01-01

    Citrus blast caused by bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is a very important disease of citrus occuring in many areas of the world, but with few data about genetic structure of the pathogen involved. Considering the above fact, this study reports genetic characterization of 43 P. syringae isolates obtained from plant tissue displaying citrus blast symptoms on mandarin (Citrus reticulata) in Montenegro, using multilocus sequence analysis of gyrB, rpoD, and gap1 gene sequences. Gene sequences from a collection of 54 reference pathotype strains of P. syringae from the Plant Associated and Environmental Microbes Database (PAMDB) was used to establish a genetic relationship with our isolates obtained from mandarin. Phylogenetic analyses of gyrB, rpoD, and gap1 gene sequences showed that P. syringae pv. syringae causes citrus blast in mandarin in Montenegro, and belongs to genomospecies 1. Genetic homogeneity of isolates suggested that the Montenegrian population might be clonal which indicates a possible common source of infection. These findings may assist in further epidemiological studies of this pathogen and for determining mandarin breeding strategies for P. syringae control. PMID:28167885

  14. Characterization of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, Causal Agent of Citrus Blast of Mandarin in Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Ivanović, Žarko; Perović, Tatjana; Popović, Tatjana; Blagojević, Jovana; Trkulja, Nenad; Hrnčić, Snježana

    2017-02-01

    Citrus blast caused by bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is a very important disease of citrus occuring in many areas of the world, but with few data about genetic structure of the pathogen involved. Considering the above fact, this study reports genetic characterization of 43 P. syringae isolates obtained from plant tissue displaying citrus blast symptoms on mandarin (Citrus reticulata) in Montenegro, using multilocus sequence analysis of gyrB, rpoD, and gap1 gene sequences. Gene sequences from a collection of 54 reference pathotype strains of P. syringae from the Plant Associated and Environmental Microbes Database (PAMDB) was used to establish a genetic relationship with our isolates obtained from mandarin. Phylogenetic analyses of gyrB, rpoD, and gap1 gene sequences showed that P. syringae pv. syringae causes citrus blast in mandarin in Montenegro, and belongs to genomospecies 1. Genetic homogeneity of isolates suggested that the Montenegrian population might be clonal which indicates a possible common source of infection. These findings may assist in further epidemiological studies of this pathogen and for determining mandarin breeding strategies for P. syringae control.

  15. The Biology and Biological Activity of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tagetis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tagetis (Pst) is a disease of plants in the family Asteraceae. A distinctive characteristic of this bacterial pathogen is the symptom of apical chlorosis in infected plants, caused by the phytotoxin tagetitoxin. Strains of Pst have been isolated from several plant species ...

  16. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato. ...

  17. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  18. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  19. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  20. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  1. [Pseudomonas syringae - the agent of bacterial diseases of weeds].

    PubMed

    Pasichnik, L A; Savenko, E A; Butsenko, L N; Shcherbina, T N; Patyka, V F

    2013-01-01

    The symptoms of bacterial diseases of the associated weeds have been identified and described in the wheat crops grown in different farming systems. On the basis of its morphological, biochemical and serological properties the agent isolated from frost-blite, barnyard grass, wild radish, couch grass, bottle-brush, bindweed and sow thistle has been identified as Pseudomonas syringae. Serological affinity between the weed bacteria and the agent of bacterial diseases of cereals has been established.

  2. Mangotoxin production of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae is regulated by MgoA

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The antimetabolite mangotoxin is a key factor in virulence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains which cause apical necrosis of mango trees. Previous studies showed that mangotoxin biosynthesis is governed by the mbo operon. Random mutagenesis led to the identification of two other gene clusters that affect mangotoxin biosynthesis. These are the gacS/gacA genes and mgo operon which harbors the four genes mgoBCAD. Results The current study shows that disruption of the nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene mgoA resulted in loss of mangotoxin production and reduced virulence on tomato leaves. Transcriptional analyses by qPCR and promoter reporter fusions revealed that mbo expression is regulated by both gacS/gacA and mgo genes. Also, expression of the mgo operon was shown to be regulated by gacS/gacA. Heterologous expression under the native promoter of the mbo operon resulted in mangotoxin production in non-producing P. syringae strains, but not in other Pseudomonas species. Also introduction of the mbo and mgo operons in nonproducing P. protegens Pf-5 did not confer mangotoxin production but did enhance transcription of the mbo promoter. Conclusions From the data obtained in this study, we conclude that both mbo and mgo operons are under the control of the gacS/gacA two-component system and that the MgoA product acts as a positive regulator of mangotoxin biosynthesis. PMID:24555804

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. lapsa Strain ATCC 10859, Isolated from Infected Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jun; Jiang, Hongshan; Li, Baiyun; Zhao, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. lapsa is a pathovar of Pseudomonas syringae that can infect wheat. The complete genome of P. syringae pv. lapsa strain ATCC 10859 contains a 5,918,899-bp circular chromosome with 4,973 coding sequences, 16 rRNAs, 69 tRNAs, and an average GC content of 59.13%. The analysis of this genome revealed several gene clusters that are related to pathogenesis and virulence. PMID:26941133

  4. HOPM1 mediated disease resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    DOEpatents

    He, Sheng Yang [Okemos, MI; Nomura, Kinya [East Lansing, MI

    2011-11-15

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for enhancing plant defenses against pathogens. More particularly, the invention relates to enhancing plant immunity against bacterial pathogens, wherein HopM1.sub.1-300 mediated protection is enhanced, such as increased protection to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HopM1 and/or there is an increase in activity of an ATMIN associated plant protection protein, such as ATMIN7. Reagents of the present invention further provide a means of studying cellular trafficking while formulations of the present inventions provide increased pathogen resistance in plants.

  5. Draft genome sequences of five Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidifoliorum strains isolated in France.

    PubMed

    Cunty, Amandine; Cesbron, Sophie; Briand, Martial; Carrère, Sébastien; Poliakoff, Françoise; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Manceau, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidifoliorum causes necrotic spots on the leaves of Actinidia deliciosa and Actinidia chinensis. P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum has been detected in New Zealand, Australia, France and Spain. Four lineages were previously identified within the P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum species group. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of five strains of P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum representative of lineages 1, 2 and 4, isolated in France. The whole genomes of strains isolated in New Zealand, representative of P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum lineages 1 and 3, were previously sequenced. The availability of supplementary P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum genome sequences will be useful for developing molecular tools for pathogen detection and for performing comparative genomic analyses to study the relationship between P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum and other kiwifruit pathogens, such as P. syringae pv. actinidiae.

  6. Plasmid-determined copper resistance in Pseudomonas syringae from impatiens

    SciTech Connect

    Cooksey, D.A. )

    1990-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas syringae was recently identified as the cause of a new foliar blight of impatiens. The bacterium was resistant to copper compounds, which are used on a variety of crops for bacterial and fungal disease control. The bacterium contained a single 47-kilobase plasmid (pPSI1) that showed homology to a copper resistance operon previously cloned and characterized from P. syringae pv. tomato plasmid pPT23D (D. Cooksey, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 53:454-456, 1987). pPSI1 was transformed by electroporation into a copper-sensitive P. syringae strain, and the resulting transformants were copper resistant. A physical map of pPSI1 was constructed, and the extent of homology to pPT23D outside the copper resistance operon was determined in Southern hybridizations. The two plasmids shared approximately 20 kilobases of homologous DNA, with the remainder of each plasmid showing no detectable homology. The homologous regions hybridized strongly, but there was little or no conservation of restriction enzyme recognition sites.

  7. Analysis of Arabidopsis JAZ gene expression during Pseudomonas syringae pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Demianski, Agnes J; Chung, Kwi Mi; Kunkel, Barbara N

    2012-01-01

    The jasmonates (JAs) comprise a family of plant hormones that regulate several developmental processes and mediate responses to various abiotic and biotic stresses, including pathogens. JA signalling is manipulated by several strains of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, including P. syringae strain DC3000, using the virulence factor coronatine (COR) as a mimic of jasmonyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile). To better understand the JA-Ile-mediated processes contributing to P. syringae disease susceptibility, it is important to investigate the regulation of JA signalling during infection. In Arabidopsis thaliana, JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins are negative regulators of JA signalling. The transcription factor JASMONATE INSENSITIVE1 (JIN1/ATMYC2) has been implicated in the regulation of JAZ gene expression. To investigate the regulation of JAZ genes during P. syringae pathogenesis, we examined JAZ gene expression during infection of Arabidopsis by DC3000. We found that eight of the 12 JAZ genes are induced during infection in a COR-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, the induction of the majority of JAZ genes during infection was not dependent on JIN1, indicating that JIN1 is not the only transcription factor regulating JAZ genes. A T-DNA insertion mutant and an RNA interference line disrupted for the expression of JAZ10, one of the few JAZ genes regulated by JIN1 during infection, exhibited enhanced JA sensitivity and increased susceptibility to DC3000, with the primary effect being increased disease symptom severity. Thus, JAZ10 is a negative regulator of both JA signalling and disease symptom development.

  8. Chemical and Metabolic Aspects of Antimetabolite Toxins Produced by Pseudomonas syringae Pathovars

    PubMed Central

    Arrebola, Eva; Cazorla, Francisco M.; Perez-García, Alejandro; de Vicente, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is a phytopathogenic bacterium present in a wide variety of host plants where it causes diseases with economic impact. The symptoms produced by Pseudomonas syringae include chlorosis and necrosis of plant tissues, which are caused, in part, by antimetabolite toxins. This category of toxins, which includes tabtoxin, phaseolotoxin and mangotoxin, is produced by different pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae. These toxins are small peptidic molecules that target enzymes of amino acids’ biosynthetic pathways, inhibiting their activity and interfering in the general nitrogen metabolism. A general overview of the toxins’ chemistry, biosynthesis, activity, virulence and potential applications will be reviewed in this work. PMID:22069758

  9. Chemical and metabolic aspects of antimetabolite toxins produced by Pseudomonas syringae pathovars.

    PubMed

    Arrebola, Eva; Cazorla, Francisco M; Perez-García, Alejandro; de Vicente, Antonio

    2011-09-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is a phytopathogenic bacterium present in a wide variety of host plants where it causes diseases with economic impact. The symptoms produced by Pseudomonas syringae include chlorosis and necrosis of plant tissues, which are caused, in part, by antimetabolite toxins. This category of toxins, which includes tabtoxin, phaseolotoxin and mangotoxin, is produced by different pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae. These toxins are small peptidic molecules that target enzymes of amino acids' biosynthetic pathways, inhibiting their activity and interfering in the general nitrogen metabolism. A general overview of the toxins' chemistry, biosynthesis, activity, virulence and potential applications will be reviewed in this work.

  10. Complete DNA Sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae, the Causal Agent of Kiwifruit Canker Disease.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Matthew D; Warren, Benjamin A; Andersen, Mark T; Rikkerink, Erik H A; Fineran, Peter C

    2015-09-17

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is the causal agent of bacterial canker of kiwifruit, a disease that has rapidly spread worldwide. We have fully sequenced and assembled the chromosomal and plasmid DNA from P. syringae pv. actinidiae ICMP 18884 using the PacBio RS II platform.

  11. Substrate and target sequence lengths influence RecTEPsy recombineering efficiency in Pseudomonas syringae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We are developing a new recombineering system to assist experimental manipulation of the Pseudomonas syringae genome. P. syringae is a globally dispersed plant pathogen and an important model species used to study the molecular biology of bacteria-plant interactions. We have previously identified ...

  12. Characterization of Pseudomonas syringae from blueberry fields in Oregon and Washington

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial canker, caused by Pseudomonas syringae, is a common disease that kills buds and stems in blueberry fields in Oregon and western Washington. Management is primarily through application of copper; antibiotics are not registered for blueberry. Little is known about the diversity of P. syringa...

  13. Management of Bacterial Blight of Lilac Caused by Pseudomonas syringae by Growing Plants under Plastic Shelters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae causes some of the most economically-important bacterial diseases affecting woody perennials grown by the nursery industry in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. In this study, we evaluated a cultural control practice, placement of plants in plastic shelter...

  14. Pseudomonas syringae coordinates production of a motility-enabling surfactant with flagellar assembly

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using a sensitive assay, we observed low levels of an unknown surfactant produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a that was undetectable with traditional methods. Much larger quantities of this surfactant were produced by cells colonizing a porous hydrated paper surface than on agar surfac...

  15. Organic ligands reduce copper toxicity in Pseudomonas syringae

    SciTech Connect

    Azenha, M.; Vasconcelos, M.T.; Cabral, J.P.S.

    1995-03-01

    Pseudomonas syringae cells were exposed to 100 {mu}M copper alone, or to previously equilibrated copper sulfate-ligand solutions. Ligand concentrations were determined experimentally as those that reduced the free copper concentration to 5 {mu}M (determined with a Cu{sup 2+}-selective electrode). These values were in agreement with those calculated by computational equilibrium simulation based on published stability constants. Exposure of P. syringae cells to copper sulfate, chloride, or nitrate resulted in similar high mortality, suggesting that copper was responsible for cell death. Acetate, succinate, proline, lysine, cysteine, and EDTA significantly reduced both the amount of copper bound to the cells and cell death, indicating that not only strong chelating agents but also weak and moderate copper ligands can effectively antagonize copper toxicity. However, cysteine and EDTA were considerably more effective than acetate, succinate, proline, and lysine, indicating that copper toxicity is not simply a function of free copper concentration but depends on the nature of the ligand. The results suggested that a significant fraction of copper bound to acetate, succinate, proline, or lysine was displaced to the bacteria or, alternatively, mixed copper-ligand-cell complexes could be formed. On the contrary, none of these phenomena occurred for the copper complexes with cysteine or EDTA.

  16. Ethylene Production by Pseudomonas syringae Pathovars In Vitro and In Planta

    PubMed Central

    Weingart, H.; Volksch, B.

    1997-01-01

    Significant amounts of ethylene were produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea, pv. phaseolicola (which had been isolated from viny weed Pueraria lobata [Willd.] Ohwi [common name, kudzu]), and pv. pisi in synthetic medium. On the other hand, the bean strains of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola and strains of 17 other pathovars did not produce ethylene. P. syringae pv. glycinea and P. syringae pv. phaseolicola produced nearly identical levels of ethylene (about 5 x 10(sup-7) nl h(sup-1) cell(sup-1)), which were about 10 times higher than the ethylene level of P. syringae pv. pisi. Two 22-bp oligonucleotide primers derived from the ethylene-forming enzyme (efe) gene of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola PK2 were investigated for their ability to detect ethylene-producing P. syringae strains by PCR analysis. PCR amplification with this primer set resulted in a specific 0.99-kb fragment in all ethylene-producing strains with the exception of the P. syringae pv. pisi strains. Therefore, P. syringae pv. pisi may use a different biosynthetic pathway for ethylene production or the sequence of the efe gene is less conserved in this bacterium. P. syringae pv. phaseolicola isolated from kudzu and P. syringae pv. glycinea also produced ethylene in planta. It could be shown that the enhanced ethylene production in diseased tissue was due to the production of ethylene by the inoculated bacteria. Ethylene production in vitro and in planta was strictly growth associated. PMID:16535480

  17. Evolution of plant pathogenesis in Pseudomonas syringae: a genomics perspective.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Heath E; Thakur, Shalabh; Guttman, David S

    2011-01-01

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae causes serious diseases in a wide range of important crop plants, with recent severe outbreaks on the New Zealand kiwifruit crop and among British horse chestnut trees. Next-generation genome sequencing of over 25 new strains has greatly broadened our understanding of how this species adapts to a diverse range of plant hosts. Not unexpectedly, the genomes were found to be highly dynamic, and extensive polymorphism was found in the distribution of type III secreted effectors (T3SEs) and other virulence-associated genes, even among strains within the same pathovar. An underexplored area brought to light by these data is the specific metabolic adaptations required for growth on woody hosts. These studies provide a tremendous wealth of candidates for more refined functional characterization, which is greatly enhancing our ability to disentangle the web of host-pathogen interactions that determine disease outcomes. Copyright © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  18. 40 CFR 180.1145 - Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN... tolerance. Pseudomonas syringae is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance on all raw agricultural commodities when applied postharvest according to good agricultural practices....

  19. Pseudomonas syringae enhances herbivory by suppressing the reactive oxygen burst in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Groen, Simon C.; Humphrey, Parris T.; Chevasco, Daniela; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Pierce, Naomi E.; Whiteman, Noah K.

    2015-01-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions have evolved in the presence of plant-colonizing microbes. These microbes can have important third-party effects on herbivore ecology, as exemplified by drosophilid flies that evolved from ancestors feeding on plant-associated microbes. Leaf-mining flies in the genus Scaptomyza, which is nested within the paraphyletic genus Drosophila, show strong associations with bacteria in the genus Pseudomonas, including Pseudomonas syringae. Adult females are capable of vectoring these bacteria between plants and larvae show a preference for feeding on P. syringae-infected leaves. Here we show that Scaptomyza flava larvae can also vector P. syringae to and from feeding sites, and that they not only feed more, but also develop faster on plants previously infected with P. syringae. Our genetic and physiological data show that P. syringae enhances S. flava feeding on infected plants at least in part by suppressing anti-herbivore defenses mediated by reactive oxygen species. PMID:26205072

  20. Ice nucleating activity of Pseudomonas syringae and Erwinia herbicola.

    PubMed Central

    Kozloff, L M; Schofield, M A; Lute, M

    1983-01-01

    Chemical and biological properties of the ice nucleating sites of Pseudomonas syringae, strain C-9, and Erwinia herbicola have been characterized. The ice nucleating activity (INA) for both bacteria was unchanged in buffers ranging from pH 5.0 to 9.2, suggesting that there were no essential groups for which a change in charge in this range was critical. The INA of both bacteria was also unaffected by the addition of metal chelating compounds. Borate compounds and certain lectins markedly inhibited the INA of both types of bacterial cells. Butyl borate was not an inhibitor, but borate, phenyl borate, and m-nitrophenyl borate were, in order, increasingly potent inhibitors. These compounds have a similar order of affinity for cis hydroxyls, particularly for those found on sugars. Lentil lectin and fava bean lectin, which have binding sites for mannose or glucose, inhibited the INA of both bacteria. All other lectins examined had no effect. The inhibition of INA by these two types of reagents indicate that sugar-like groups are at or near the ice nucleating site. Sulfhydryl reagents were potent inhibitors of the INA of both bacteria. When treated with N-ethylmaleimide, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, or iodoacetamide, the INA was irreversibly inhibited by 99%. The kinetics of inactivation with N-ethylmaleimide suggested that E. herbicola cells have at least two separate ice nucleating sites, whereas P. syringae cells have possibly four or more separate sites. The effect of infection with a virulent phage (Erh 1) on the INA of E. herbicola was examined. After multiple infection of a bacterial culture the INA was unchanged until 40 to 45 min, which was midway through the 95-min latent period. At that time, the INA activity began falling and 99% of the INA was lost by 55 min after infection, well before any cells had lysed. This decrease in INA before lysis is attributed to phage-induced changes in the cell wall. PMID:6848483

  1. Multilocus sequence typing of Pseudomonas syringae sensu lato confirms previously described genomospecies and permits rapid identification of P. syringae pv. coriandricola and P. syringae pv. apii causing bacterial leaf spot on parsley.

    PubMed

    Bull, Carolee T; Clarke, Christopher R; Cai, Rongman; Vinatzer, Boris A; Jardini, Teresa M; Koike, Steven T

    2011-07-01

    Since 2002, severe leaf spotting on parsley (Petroselinum crispum) has occurred in Monterey County, CA. Either of two different pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae sensu lato were isolated from diseased leaves from eight distinct outbreaks and once from the same outbreak. Fragment analysis of DNA amplified between repetitive sequence polymerase chain reaction; 16S rDNA sequence analysis; and biochemical, physiological, and host range tests identified the pathogens as Pseudomonas syringae pv. apii and P. syringae pv. coriandricola. Koch's postulates were completed for the isolates from parsley, and host range tests with parsley isolates and pathotype strains demonstrated that P. syringae pv. apii and P. syringae pv. coriandricola cause leaf spot diseases on parsley, celery, and coriander or cilantro. In a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) approach, four housekeeping gene fragments were sequenced from 10 strains isolated from parsley and 56 pathotype strains of P. syringae. Allele sequences were uploaded to the Plant-Associated Microbes Database and a phylogenetic tree was built based on concatenated sequences. Tree topology directly corresponded to P. syringae genomospecies and P. syringae pv. apii was allocated appropriately to genomospecies 3. This is the first demonstration that MLST can accurately allocate new pathogens directly to P. syringae sensu lato genomospecies. According to MLST, P. syringae pv. coriandricola is a member of genomospecies 9, P. cannabina. In a blind test, both P. syringae pv. coriandricola and P. syringae pv. apii isolates from parsley were correctly identified to pathovar. In both cases, MLST described diversity within each pathovar that was previously unknown.

  2. Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae Uses Proteasome Inhibitor Syringolin A to Colonize from Wound Infection Sites

    PubMed Central

    Misas-Villamil, Johana C.; Kolodziejek, Izabella; Crabill, Emerson; Kaschani, Farnusch; Niessen, Sherry; Shindo, Takayuki; Kaiser, Markus; Alfano, James R.; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Infection of plants by bacterial leaf pathogens at wound sites is common in nature. Plants defend wound sites to prevent pathogen invasion, but several pathogens can overcome spatial restriction and enter leaf tissues. The molecular mechanisms used by pathogens to suppress containment at wound infection sites are poorly understood. Here, we studied Pseudomonas syringae strains causing brown spot on bean and blossom blight on pear. These strains exist as epiphytes that can cause disease upon wounding caused by hail, sand storms and frost. We demonstrate that these strains overcome spatial restriction at wound sites by producing syringolin A (SylA), a small molecule proteasome inhibitor. Consequently, SylA-producing strains are able to escape from primary infection sites and colonize adjacent tissues along the vasculature. We found that SylA diffuses from the primary infection site and suppresses acquired resistance in adjacent tissues by blocking signaling by the stress hormone salicylic acid (SA). Thus, SylA diffusion creates a zone of SA-insensitive tissue that is prepared for subsequent colonization. In addition, SylA promotes bacterial motility and suppresses immune responses at the primary infection site. These local immune responses do not affect bacterial growth and were weak compared to effector-triggered immunity. Thus, SylA facilitates colonization from wounding sites by increasing bacterial motility and suppressing SA signaling in adjacent tissues. PMID:23555272

  3. A Mathematical model to investigate quorum sensing regulation and its heterogenecity in pseudomonas syringae on leaves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is a plant-pathogen, which through quorum sensing (QS), controls virulence. In this paper, by means of mathematical modeling, we investigate QS of this bacterium when living on leaf surfaces. We extend an existing stochastic model for the formation of Pseudomonas s...

  4. Plant lectin-like antibacterial proteins from phytopathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Xanthomonas citri.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Li, Wen; Proost, Paul; Loris, Remy; De Mot, René

    2012-08-01

    The genomes of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae 642 and Xanthomonas citri pv. malvacearum LMG 761 each carry a putative homologue of the plant lectin-like bacteriocin (llpA) genes previously identified in the rhizosphere isolate Pseudomonas putida BW11M1 and the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. The respective purified recombinant proteins, LlpAPss642 and LlpAXcm761 , display genus-specific antibacterial activity across species boundaries. The inhibitory spectrum of the P. syringae bacteriocin overlaps partially with those of the P. putida and P. fluorescens LlpAs. Notably, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri str. 306 secretes a protein identical to LlpAXcm761 . The functional characterization of LlpA proteins from two different phytopathogenic γ-proteobacterial species expands the lectin-like bacteriocin family beyond the Pseudomonas genus and suggests its involvement in competition among closely related plant-associated bacteria with different lifestyles.

  5. Pseudomonas syringae Catalases Are Collectively Required for Plant Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ming; Block, Anna; Bryan, Crystal D; Becker, Donald F; Alfano, James R

    2012-09-01

    The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 must detoxify plant-produced hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in order to survive in its host plant. Candidate enzymes for this detoxification include the monofunctional catalases KatB and KatE and the bifunctional catalase-peroxidase KatG of DC3000. This study shows that KatG is the major housekeeping catalase of DC3000 and provides protection against menadione-generated endogenous H(2)O(2). In contrast, KatB rapidly and substantially accumulates in response to exogenous H(2)O(2). Furthermore, KatB and KatG have nonredundant roles in detoxifying exogenous H(2)O(2) and are required for full virulence of DC3000 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Therefore, the nonredundant ability of KatB and KatG to detoxify plant-produced H(2)O(2) is essential for the bacteria to survive in plants. Indeed, a DC3000 catalase triple mutant is severely compromised in its ability to grow in planta, and its growth can be partially rescued by the expression of katB, katE, or katG. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that although KatB and KatG are the major catalases involved in the virulence of DC3000, KatE can also provide some protection in planta. Thus, our results indicate that these catalases are virulence factors for DC3000 and are collectively required for pathogenesis.

  6. Quantitative proteomics of tomato defense against Pseudomonas syringae infection.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jennifer; Koh, Jin; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Zhu, Ning; Feole, Michelle; Yi, Sarah; Chen, Sixue

    2013-06-01

    Genetic and microarray analyses have provided useful information in the area of plant and pathogen interactions. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst) causes bacterial speck disease in tomato. Previous studies have shown that changes in response to pathogen infection at transcript level are variable at different time points. This study provides information not only on proteomic changes between a resistant and a susceptible genotype, but also information on changes between an early and a late time point. Using the iTRAQ quantitative proteomics approach, we have identified 2369 proteins in tomato leaves, and 477 of them were determined to be responsive to Pst inoculation. Unique and differential proteins after each comparison were further analyzed to provide information about protein changes and the potential functions they play in the pathogen response. This information is applicable not only to tomato proteomics, but also adds to the repertoire of proteins now available for crop proteomic analysis and how they change in response to pathogen infection. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Stochastic modeling of Pseudomonas syringae growth in the phyllosphere.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Velázquez, J; Schlicht, R; Dulla, G; Hense, B A; Kuttler, C; Lindow, S E

    2012-09-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is a gram-negative bacterium which lives on leaf surfaces. Its growth has been described using epifluorescence microscopy and image analysis; it was found to be growing in aggregates of a wide range of sizes. We develop a stochastic model to describe aggregate distribution and determine the mechanisms generating experimental observations. We found that a logistic birth-death model with migration (time-homogeneous Markov process) provides the best description of the observed data. We discuss how to analyze the joint distribution of the numbers of aggregates of different sizes at a given time and explore how to account for new aggregates being created, that is, the joint distribution of the family size statistics conditional on the total number of aggregates. We compute the first two moments. Through simulations we examine how the model's parameters affect the aggregate size distribution and successfully explain the quantitative experimental data available. Aggregation formation is thought to be the first step towards pathogenic behavior of this bacterium; understanding aggregate size distribution would prove useful to understand the switch from epiphytic to pathogenic behavior. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Coronatine Facilitates Pseudomonas syringae Infection of Arabidopsis Leaves at Night

    PubMed Central

    Panchal, Shweta; Roy, Debanjana; Chitrakar, Reejana; Price, Lenore; Breitbach, Zachary S.; Armstrong, Daniel W.; Melotto, Maeli

    2016-01-01

    In many land plants, the stomatal pore opens during the day and closes during the night. Thus, periods of darkness could be effective in decreasing pathogen penetration into leaves through stomata, the primary sites for infection by many pathogens. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 produces coronatine (COR) and opens stomata, raising an intriguing question as to whether this is a virulence strategy to facilitate bacterial infection at night. In fact, we found that (a) biological concentration of COR is effective in opening dark-closed stomata of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, (b) the COR defective mutant Pst DC3118 is less effective in infecting Arabidopsis in the dark than under light and this difference in infection is reduced with the wild type bacterium Pst DC3000, and (c) cma, a COR biosynthesis gene, is induced only when the bacterium is in contact with the leaf surface independent of the light conditions. These findings suggest that Pst DC3000 activates virulence factors at the pre-invasive phase of its life cycle to infect plants even when environmental conditions (such as darkness) favor stomatal immunity. This functional attribute of COR may provide epidemiological advantages for COR-producing bacteria on the leaf surface. PMID:27446113

  9. Pseudomonas syringae Catalases Are Collectively Required for Plant Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ming; Block, Anna; Bryan, Crystal D.; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 must detoxify plant-produced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in order to survive in its host plant. Candidate enzymes for this detoxification include the monofunctional catalases KatB and KatE and the bifunctional catalase-peroxidase KatG of DC3000. This study shows that KatG is the major housekeeping catalase of DC3000 and provides protection against menadione-generated endogenous H2O2. In contrast, KatB rapidly and substantially accumulates in response to exogenous H2O2. Furthermore, KatB and KatG have nonredundant roles in detoxifying exogenous H2O2 and are required for full virulence of DC3000 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Therefore, the nonredundant ability of KatB and KatG to detoxify plant-produced H2O2 is essential for the bacteria to survive in plants. Indeed, a DC3000 catalase triple mutant is severely compromised in its ability to grow in planta, and its growth can be partially rescued by the expression of katB, katE, or katG. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that although KatB and KatG are the major catalases involved in the virulence of DC3000, KatE can also provide some protection in planta. Thus, our results indicate that these catalases are virulence factors for DC3000 and are collectively required for pathogenesis. PMID:22797762

  10. Application of high-throughput genome sequencing to intrapathovar variation in Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Studholme, David J

    2011-10-01

    One reason for the success of Pseudomonas syringae as a model pathogen has been the availability of three complete genome sequences since 2005. Now, at the beginning of 2011, more than 25 strains of P. syringae have been sequenced and many more will soon be released. To date, published analyses of P. syringae have been largely descriptive, focusing on catalogues of genetic differences among strains and between species. Numerous powerful statistical tools are now available that have yet to be applied to P. syringae genomic data for robust and quantitative reconstruction of evolutionary events. The aim of this review is to provide a snapshot of the current status of P. syringae genome sequence data resources, including very recent and unpublished studies, and thereby demonstrate the richness of resources available for this species. Furthermore, certain specific opportunities and challenges in making the best use of these data resources are highlighted.

  11. A Pseudomonas syringae diversity survey reveals a differentiated phylotype of the pathovar syringae associated with the mango host and mangotoxin production.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Barranquero, José A; Carrión, Víctor J; Murillo, Jesús; Arrebola, Eva; Arnold, Dawn L; Cazorla, Francisco M; de Vicente, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, the causal agent of bacterial apical necrosis (BAN) in mango crops, has been isolated in different mango-producing areas worldwide. An extensive collection of 87 P. syringae pv. syringae strains isolated from mango trees affected by BAN from different countries, but mainly from Southern Spain, were initially examined by repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) to analyze the genetic diversity with an epidemiological aim. rep-PCR was powerful in assessing intrapathovar distribution and also allowing clustering of the P. syringae pv. syringae strains isolated from mango, depending on the isolation area. A clear pattern of clustering was observed for all the P. syringae pv. syringae strains isolated from mango distinct from strains from other hosts, including strains for the same geographical regions as the mango isolates. For this reason, a representative group of 51 P. syringae pv. syringae strains isolated from mango and other hosts, as well as some P. syringae strains from other pathovars, were further characterized to determine their possible genetic, phenotypic, and phylogenetic relationships. Similar to the rep-PCR results, the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR (RAPD-PCR) and catabolic diversity analysis using the Biolog GN2 profile grouped 90% of the mango isolates together in a unique cluster. Interestingly, the majority of P. syringae pv. syringae strains isolated from mango produced mangotoxin. The analysis of the phylogenetic distribution using the multilocus sequence typing analysis strongly supports the existence of a differentiated phylotype of the pathovar syringae mainly associated with the mango host and characterized by the mangotoxin production.

  12. Pseudomonas syringae strains naturally lacking the classical P. syringae hrp/hrc Locus are common leaf colonizers equipped with an atypical type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Christopher R; Cai, Rongman; Studholme, David J; Guttman, David S; Vinatzer, Boris A

    2010-02-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is best known as a plant pathogen that causes disease by translocating immune-suppressing effector proteins into plant cells through a type III secretion system (T3SS). However, P. syringae strains belonging to a newly described phylogenetic subgroup (group 2c) are missing the canonical P. syringae hrp/hrc cluster coding for a T3SS, flanking effector loci, and any close orthologue of known P. syringae effectors. Nonetheless, P. syringae group 2c strains are common leaf colonizers and grow on some tested plant species to population densities higher than those obtained by other P. syringae strains on nonhost species. Moreover, group 2c strains have genes necessary for the production of phytotoxins, have an ice nucleation gene, and, most interestingly, contain a novel hrp/hrc cluster, which is only distantly related to the canonical P. syringae hrp/hrc cluster. This hrp/hrc cluster appears to encode a functional T3SS although the genes hrpK and hrpS, present in the classical P. syringae hrp/hrc cluster, are missing. The genome sequence of a representative group 2c strain also revealed distant orthologues of the P. syringae effector genes avrE1 and hopM1 and the P. aeruginosa effector genes exoU and exoY. A putative life cycle for group 2c P. syringae is discussed.

  13. 62-kb plasmids harboring rulAB homologues confer UV-tolerance and epiphytic fitness to Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae mango isolates.

    PubMed

    Cazorla, F M; Codina, J C; Abad, C; Arrebola, E; Torés, J A; Murillo, J; Pérez-García, A; de Vicente, A

    2008-08-01

    The presence of genetic determinants homologous to rulAB genes for ultraviolet (UV) radiation resistance was determined in a collection of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains isolated from mango. The potential role of these plasmids in UV tolerance and ecological fitness in the mango phyllosphere was also evaluated. Nearly all of the 62-kb plasmids present in the P. syringae pv. syringae strains hybridized with a rulAB probe, but these 62-kb plasmids showed differences in restriction patterns. In vitro assays of tolerance to UV radiation of P. syringae pv. syringae strains showed a higher survival of the strains harboring the 62-kb plasmids compared to strains lacking plasmids when exposed to UVC or UVA+B fractions. Similar results were observed when transconjugants harboring the 62-kb plasmid were tested. Survival assays were carried out under field conditions, and a higher survival of P. syringae pv. syringae strains harboring 62-kb plasmids under direct solar radiation on the adaxial surface of leaves was also observed. When the assays were carried out in shady areas or on the abaxial surface of leaves, survival time was comparable for all the assayed strains, whether or not they contained a 62-kb plasmid hybridizing to rulAB. Our results indicate that P. syringae pv. syringae strains harboring 62-kb plasmids show an increase in ecological fitness when colonizing the mango phyllosphere.

  14. Housekeeping Gene Sequencing and Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis To Identify Subpopulations within Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato That Correlate with Host Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Gironde, S.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola causes bacterial spot on Brassicaceae worldwide, and for the last 10 years severe outbreaks have been reported in the Loire Valley, France. P. syringae pv. maculicola resembles P. syringae pv. tomato in that it is also pathogenic for tomato and causes the same types of symptoms. We used a collection of 106 strains of P. syringae to characterize the relationships between P. syringae pv. maculicola and related pathovars, paying special attention to P. syringae pv. tomato. Phylogenetic analysis of gyrB and rpoD gene sequences showed that P. syringae pv. maculicola, which causes diseases in Brassicaceae, forms six genetic lineages within genomospecies 3 of P. syringae strains as defined by L. Gardan et al. (Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 49[Pt 2]:469–478, 1999), whereas P. syringae pv. tomato forms two distinct genetic lineages. A multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) conducted with eight minisatellite loci confirmed the genetic structure obtained with rpoD and gyrB sequence analyses. These results provide promising tools for fine-scale epidemiological studies on diseases caused by P. syringae pv. maculicola and P. syringae pv. tomato. The two pathovars had distinct host ranges; only P. syringae pv. maculicola strains were pathogenic for Brassicaceae. A subpopulation of P. syringae pv. maculicola strains that are pathogenic for Pto-expressing tomato plants were shown to lack avrPto1 and avrPtoB or to contain a disrupted avrPtoB homolog. Taking phylogenetic and pathological features into account, our data suggest that the DC3000 strain belongs to P. syringae pv. maculicola. This study shows that P. syringae pv. maculicola and P. syringae pv. tomato appear multiclonal, as they did not diverge from a single common ancestral group within the ancestral P. syringae genomospecies 3, and suggests that pathovar specificity within P. syringae may be due to independent genetic events. PMID:22389364

  15. Arabidopsis PECTIN METHYLESTERASEs contribute to immunity against Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Bethke, Gerit; Grundman, Rachael E; Sreekanta, Suma; Truman, William; Katagiri, Fumiaki; Glazebrook, Jane

    2014-02-01

    Pectins, major components of dicot cell walls, are synthesized in a heavily methylesterified form in the Golgi and are partially deesterified by pectin methylesterases (PMEs) upon export to the cell wall. PME activity is important for the virulence of the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Here, the roles of Arabidopsis PMEs in pattern-triggered immunity and immune responses to the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola and the bacterial hemibiotroph Pseudomonas syringae pv maculicola ES4326 (Pma ES4326) were studied. Plant PME activity increased during pattern-triggered immunity and after inoculation with either pathogen. The increase of PME activity in response to pathogen treatment was concomitant with a decrease in pectin methylesterification. The pathogen-induced PME activity did not require salicylic acid or ethylene signaling, but was dependent on jasmonic acid signaling. In the case of induction by A. brassicicola, the ethylene response factor, but not the MYC2 branch of jasmonic acid signaling, contributed to induction of PME activity, whereas in the case of induction by Pma ES4326, both branches contributed. There are 66 PME genes in Arabidopsis, suggesting extensive genetic redundancy. Nevertheless, selected pme single, double, triple and quadruple mutants allowed significantly more growth of Pma ES4326 than wild-type plants, indicating a role of PMEs in resistance to this pathogen. No decreases in total PME activity were detected in these pme mutants, suggesting that the determinant of immunity is not total PME activity; rather, it is some specific effect of PMEs such as changes in the pattern of pectin methylesterification.

  16. Genome-driven investigation of compatible solute biosynthesis pathways of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae and their contribution to water stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Matthias; Burch, Adrien Y; Seip, Britta; Lindow, Steven E; Gross, Harald

    2010-08-01

    The foliar pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae exhibits an exceptional ability to survive on asymptomatic plants as an epiphyte. Intermittent wetting events on plants lead to osmotic and matric stresses which must be tolerated for survival as an epiphyte. In this study, we have applied bioinformatic, genetic, and biochemical approaches to address water stress tolerance in P. syringae pv. syringae strain B728a, for which a complete genome sequence is available. P. syringae pv. syringae B728a is able to produce the compatible solutes betaine, ectoine, N-acetylglutaminylglutamine amide (NAGGN), and trehalose. Analysis of osmolyte profiles of P. syringae pv. syringae B728a under a variety of in vitro and in planta conditions reveals that the osmolytes differentially contribute to water stress tolerance in this species and that they interact at the level of transcription to yield a hierarchy of expression. While the interruption of a putative gene cluster coding for NAGGN biosynthesis provided the first experimental evidence of the NAGGN biosynthetic pathway, application of this knockout strain and also a gfp reporter gene fusion strain demonstrated the small contribution of NAGGN to cell survival and desiccation tolerance of P. syringae pv. syringae B728a under in planta conditions. Additionally, detailed investigation of ectC, an orphan of the ectoine cluster (lacking the ectA and ectB homologs), revealed its functionality and that ectoine production could be detected in NaCl-amended cultures of P. syringae pv. syringae B728a to which sterilized leaves of Syringa vulgaris had been added.

  17. Relationship of total viable and culturable cells in epiphytic populations of Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M; Lindow, S E

    1992-12-01

    The direct viable count method, used to detect viable but nonculturable bacteria in aquatic systems, was modified to examine epiphytic populations of Pseudomonas syringae. Viable-population sizes determined from the number of cells that elongated when incubated with yeast extract and nalidixic acid were compared with those determined by the conventional plate count method. The plate count method accurately determined the number of viable cells in epiphytic P. syringae populations in a state of active growth under conditions of high relative humidity. The plate count method also accurately determined the number of viable cells in P. syringae inoculum, or a growing P. syringae population, subject to desiccation stress under conditions of low relative humidity. In epiphytic populations of P. syringae older than 80 h, however, the plate count underestimated the viable-population size by about two- to fourfold, suggesting that up to 75% of the P. syringae population was nonculturable. These nonculturable cells may have entered a starvation-survival state, induced by low nutrient availability in the phyllosphere environment. Epiphytic P. syringae populations undergoing rapid size changes due to growth and death under fluctuating environmental conditions in the field should be accurately enumerated by the plate count method. However, the possible underestimation of viable-population size under some circumstances should be considered in epidemiological studies of phytopathogenic bacteria and when genetically engineered microorganisms in terrestrial ecosystems are monitored.

  18. Diversity and Abundance of Ice Nucleating Strains of Pseudomonas syringae in a Freshwater Lake in Virginia, USA.

    PubMed

    Pietsch, Renée B; Vinatzer, Boris A; Schmale, David G

    2017-01-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is found in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic environments. Some strains of P. syringae express an ice nucleation protein (hereafter referred to as Ice+) allowing them to catalyze the heterogeneous freezing of water. Though P. syringae has been sampled intensively from freshwater sources in France, little is known about the genetic diversity of P. syringae in natural aquatic habitats in North America. We collected samples of freshwater from three different depths in Claytor Lake, Virginia, USA between November 2015 and June 2016. Samples were plated on non-selective medium (TSA) and on medium selective for Pseudomonas (KBC) and closely related species to estimate the total number of culturable bacteria and of Pseudomonas, respectively. A droplet freezing assay was used to screen colonies for the Ice+ phenotype. Ice+ colonies were then molecularly identified based on the cts (citrate synthase) gene and the 16S rDNA gene. Phylogenetic analysis of cts sequences showed a surprising diversity of phylogenetic subgroups of P. syringae. Frequencies of Ice+ isolates on P. syringae selective medium ranged from 0 to 15% per sample with the highest frequency being found in spring. Our work shows that freshwater lakes can be a significant reservoir of Ice+ P. syringae. Future work is needed to determine the contribution of P. syringae from freshwater lakes to the P. syringae populations present in the atmosphere and on plants and, in particular, if freshwater lakes could be an inoculum source of P. syringae-caused plant disease outbreaks.

  19. Diversity and Abundance of Ice Nucleating Strains of Pseudomonas syringae in a Freshwater Lake in Virginia, USA

    PubMed Central

    Pietsch, Renée B.; Vinatzer, Boris A.; Schmale, David G.

    2017-01-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is found in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic environments. Some strains of P. syringae express an ice nucleation protein (hereafter referred to as Ice+) allowing them to catalyze the heterogeneous freezing of water. Though P. syringae has been sampled intensively from freshwater sources in France, little is known about the genetic diversity of P. syringae in natural aquatic habitats in North America. We collected samples of freshwater from three different depths in Claytor Lake, Virginia, USA between November 2015 and June 2016. Samples were plated on non-selective medium (TSA) and on medium selective for Pseudomonas (KBC) and closely related species to estimate the total number of culturable bacteria and of Pseudomonas, respectively. A droplet freezing assay was used to screen colonies for the Ice+ phenotype. Ice+ colonies were then molecularly identified based on the cts (citrate synthase) gene and the 16S rDNA gene. Phylogenetic analysis of cts sequences showed a surprising diversity of phylogenetic subgroups of P. syringae. Frequencies of Ice+ isolates on P. syringae selective medium ranged from 0 to 15% per sample with the highest frequency being found in spring. Our work shows that freshwater lakes can be a significant reservoir of Ice+ P. syringae. Future work is needed to determine the contribution of P. syringae from freshwater lakes to the P. syringae populations present in the atmosphere and on plants and, in particular, if freshwater lakes could be an inoculum source of P. syringae-caused plant disease outbreaks. PMID:28337177

  20. Drought Stress Predominantly Endures Arabidopsis thaliana to Pseudomonas syringae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aarti; Dixit, Sandeep K.; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa

    2016-01-01

    Plant responses to a combination of drought and bacterial pathogen infection, an agronomically important and altogether a new stress, are not well-studied. While occurring concurrently, these two stresses can lead to synergistic or antagonistic effects on plants due to stress-interaction. It is reported that plant responses to the stress combinations consist of both strategies, unique to combined stress and those shared between combined and individual stresses. However, the combined stress response mechanisms governing stress interaction and net impact are largely unknown. In order to study these adaptive strategies, an accurate and convenient methodology is lacking even in model plants like Arabidopsis thaliana. The gradual nature of drought stress imposition protocol poses a hindrance in simultaneously applying pathogen infection under laboratory conditions to achieve combined stress. In present study we aimed to establish systematic combined stress protocol and to study physiological responses of the plants to various degrees of combined stress. Here, we have comprehensively studied the impact of combined drought and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 infection on A. thaliana. Further, by employing different permutations of drought and pathogen stress intensities, an attempt was made to dissect the contribution of each individual stress effects during their concurrence. We hereby present two main aspects of combined stress viz., stress interaction and net impact of the stress on plants. Mainly, this study established a systematic protocol to assess the impact of combined drought and bacterial pathogen stress. It was observed that as a result of net impact, some physiological responses under combined stress are tailored when compared to the plants exposed to individual stresses. We also infer that plant responses under combined stress in this study are predominantly influenced by the drought stress. Our results show that pathogen multiplication was reduced by

  1. Plant signal molecules activate the syrB gene, which is required for syringomycin production by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae.

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Y Y; Gross, D C

    1991-01-01

    The syrB gene is required for syringomycin production by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae and full virulence during plant pathogenesis. Strain B3AR132 containing a syrB::lacZ fusion was used to detect transcriptional activation of the syrB gene in syringomycin minimal medium by plant metabolites with signal activity. Among 34 plant phenolic compounds tested, arbutin, phenyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside, and salicin were shown to be strong inducers of syrB, giving rise to approximately 1,200 U of beta-galactosidase activity at 100 microM; esculin and helicin were moderate inducers, with about 250 to 400 U of beta-galactosidase activity at 100 microM. Acetosyringone and flavonoids that serve as signal molecules in Agrobacterium and Rhizobium species, respectively, did not induce the syrB::lacZ fusion. All syrB inducers were phenolic glucosides and none of the aglucone derivatives were active, suggesting that the beta-glycosidic linkage was necessary for signal activity. Phenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside containing galactose substituted for glucose in the beta-glycosidic linkage also lacked inducer activity. Phenolic signal activity was enhanced two- to fivefold by specific sugars common to plant tissues, including D-fructose, D-mannose, and sucrose. The effect of sugars on syrB induction was most noticeable at low concentrations of phenolic glucoside (i.e., 1 to 10 microM), indicating that sugars such as D-fructose increase the sensitivity of P. syringae pv. syringae to the phenolic plant signal. Besides induction of syrB, syringomycin biosynthesis by parental strain B3A-R was induced to yield over 250 U of toxin by the additions of arbutin and D-fructose to syringomycin minimal medium. These data indicate that syringomycin production by most strains of P. syringae pv. syringae is modulated by the perception of two classes of plant signal molecules and transduced to the transcriptional apparatus of syringomycin (syr) genes such as syrB. PMID:1885550

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of a Diazotrophic, Plant Growth–Promoting Rhizobacterium of the Pseudomonas syringae Complex

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Blakney, Andrew J. C.; Wallace, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas syringae GR12-2, a nitrogen-fixing, plant growth–promoting bacterium, isolated from the rhizosphere of an Arctic grass. The 6.6-Mbp genome contains 5,676 protein-coding genes, including a nitrogen-fixation island similar to that in P. stutzeri. PMID:27660794

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of a Diazotrophic, Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium of the Pseudomonas syringae Complex.

    PubMed

    Patten, Cheryl L; Jeong, Haeyoung; Blakney, Andrew J C; Wallace, Natalie

    2016-09-22

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas syringae GR12-2, a nitrogen-fixing, plant growth-promoting bacterium, isolated from the rhizosphere of an Arctic grass. The 6.6-Mbp genome contains 5,676 protein-coding genes, including a nitrogen-fixation island similar to that in P. stutzeri.

  4. Identification of a previously uncharacterized global regulator in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst) is used as a model system to understand the dynamics behind molecular plant-microbe interactions. Identification of conserved genes necessary for survival of bacterial plant pathogens in the apoplast could lead to new management methods. We have identifie...

  5. The small RNA transcriptome of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato DC3000

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are regarded as important global regulators in prokaryotes and play critical roles in a variety of metabolic and cellular processes. Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato strain DC3000 (DC3000) is an important plant pathogenic bacterium that causes bacterial speck of to...

  6. Immunomodulation by the Pseudomonas syringae HopZ Type III Effector Family in Aribidopsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas syringae employs a type III secretion system to inject 20-30 different type III effector (T3SE) proteins into plant host cells. A major role of T3SEs is to suppress plant immune responses and promote bacterial infection. The YopJ/HopZ acetyltransferases are a superfamily of T3SEs found i...

  7. Multilocus sequence typing of Pseudomonas syringae sensu lato confirms previously described genomospecies and permits rapid identification.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since 2002, severe leaf spotting on parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.) has occurred in Monterey County, California. One of two different pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae sensu lato were isolated from diseased leaves from seven distinct outbreaks and twice from the same outbreak (2002 and 2009). Frag...

  8. The involvement of catabolite repression in the virulence of Pseudomonas syringae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas syringae infects diverse plant species and is widely used as a model system in the study of effector function and the molecular basis of plant diseases. Although the relationship between bacterial metabolism, nutrient acquisition and virulence has attracted increasing attention in bacter...

  9. Evaluation of Pseudomonas syringae Strain ESC11 for Biocontrol of Crown Rot and Anthracnose of Banana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas syringae strain ESC11, and 250 'g/ml each of thiabendazole (TBZ) and imazalil reduced crown rot of banana caused by a Fusarium sp. by 0-88% and 73-88%, respectively, in laboratory experiments. ESC11 alone did not significantly reduce rot, mold, or anthracnose in most field trials. TBZ an...

  10. AlgU controls expression of virulence genes in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant pathogenic bacteria are able to integrate information about their environment and adjust gene expression to provide adaptive functions. AlgU, an ECF sigma factor encoded by Pseudomonas syringae, controls expression of genes for alginate biosynthesis and is active while the bacteria are associa...

  11. Indigenous plasmids in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato: conjugative transfer and role in copper resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, C.L.; Cooksey, D.A.

    1986-02-01

    Twenty strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato were examined for the presence of plasmid DNA. P. syringae pv. tomato plasmids were grouped into five size classes: class A ranged from 95 to 103 kilobases (kb); class B ranged from 71 to 83 kb; class C ranged from 59 to 67 kb; class D ranged from 37 to 39 kb; and class E was 29 kb. All strains contained at least two plasmids in classes A and B. The conjugative ability of P. syringae pv. tomato plasmids in three strains was demonstrated by mobilization of the nonconjugative plasmid RSF1010 into Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae recipients. Plasmids from the three conjugative strains were labeled with Tn5. Four conjugative plasmids were identified by their repeated transfer to P. syringae pv. syringae recipients. P. syringae pv. tomato strains varied in sensitivity to copper sulfate (CuSO/sub 4/): MICs were 0.4 to 0.6 mM for sensitive strains, 1.2 mM for moderately resistant strains, and 1.6 to 2.0 mM for very resistant strains. One very resistant strain, PT23, functioned as a donor of copper resistance. Recipient P. syringae pv. syringae strains PS51 and PS 61 were inhibited by 0.1 mM CuSO/sub 4/, whereas the CuSO/sub 4/ MICs for transconjugant strains PS51(pPT23A) and PS61(pPT23C) were 1.8 and 2.6 mM, respectively. P. syringae pv. tomato strains PT12.2 and PT 17.2 were inhibited by 0.6 mM copper sulfate, but their copper sulfate MICs were 2.6 and 1.8 mM, respectively, when they acquired pPT23C. Therefore, copper resistance in PT23 was controlled by two conjugative plasmids, designated pPT23A (101 kb) and pPT23C (67 kb).

  12. Differences between Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a and Pantoea agglomerans BRT98 in Epiphytic and Endophytic Colonization of Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Sabaratnam, Siva; Beattie, Gwyn A.

    2003-01-01

    The leaf colonization strategies of two bacterial strains were investigated. The foliar pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain B728a and the nonpathogen Pantoea agglomerans strain BRT98 were marked with a green fluorescent protein, and surface (epiphytic) and subsurface (endophytic) sites of bean and maize leaves in the laboratory and the field were monitored to see if populations of these strains developed. The populations were monitored using both fluorescence microscopy and counts of culturable cells recovered from nonsterilized and surface-sterilized leaves. The P. agglomerans strain exclusively colonized epiphytic sites on the two plant species. Under favorable conditions, the P. agglomerans strain formed aggregates that often extended over multiple epidermal cells. The P. syringae pv. syringae strain established epiphytic and endophytic populations on asymptomatic leaves of the two plant species in the field, with most of the P. syringae pv. syringae B728a cells remaining in epiphytic sites of the maize leaves and an increasing number occupying endophytic sites of the bean leaves in the 15-day monitoring period. The epiphytic P. syringae pv. syringae B728a populations appeared to originate primarily from multiplication in surface sites rather than from the movement of cells from subsurface to surface sites. The endophytic P. syringae pv. syringae B728a populations appeared to originate primarily from inward movement through the stomata, with higher levels of multiplication occurring in bean than in maize. A rainstorm involving a high raindrop momentum was associated with rapid growth of the P. agglomerans strain on both plant species and with rapid growth of both the epiphytic and endophytic populations of the P. syringae pv. syringae strain on bean but not with growth of the P. syringae pv. syringae strain on maize. These results demonstrate that the two bacterial strains employed distinct colonization strategies and that the epiphytic and

  13. Comparison of the complete genome sequences of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a and pv. tomato DC3000

    SciTech Connect

    Feil, H; Feil, W S; Chain, P; Larimer, F; DiBartolo, G; Copeland, A; Lykidis, A; Trong, S; Nolan, M; Goltsman, E; Thiel, J; Malfatti, S; Loper, J E; Lapidus, A; Detter, J C; Land, M; Richardson, P M; Kyrpides, N C; Ivanova, N; Lindow, S E

    2005-07-14

    The complete genomic sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar syringae B728a (Pss B728a), has been determined and is compared with that of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000). The two pathovars of this economically important species of plant pathogenic bacteria differ in host range and other interactions with plants, with Pss having a more pronounced epiphytic stage of growth and higher abiotic stress tolerance and Pst DC3000 having a more pronounced apoplastic growth habitat. The Pss B728a genome (6.1 megabases) contains a circular chromosome and no plasmid, whereas the Pst DC3000 genome is 6.5 mbp in size, composed of a circular chromosome and two plasmids. While a high degree of similarity exists between the two sequenced Pseudomonads, 976 protein-encoding genes are unique to Pss B728a when compared to Pst DC3000, including large genomic islands likely to contribute to virulence and host specificity. Over 375 repetitive extragenic palindromic sequences (REPs) unique to Pss B728a when compared to Pst DC3000 are widely distributed throughout the chromosome except in 14 genomic islands, which generally had lower GC content than the genome as a whole. Content of the genomic islands vary, with one containing a prophage and another the plasmid pKLC102 of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Among the 976 genes of Pss B728a with no counterpart in Pst DC3000 are those encoding for syringopeptin (SP), syringomycin (SR), indole acetic acid biosynthesis, arginine degradation, and production of ice nuclei. The genomic comparison suggests that several unique genes for Pss B728a such as ectoine synthase, DNA repair, and antibiotic production may contribute to epiphytic fitness and stress tolerance of this organism.

  14. Comparison of the complete genome sequences of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a and pv. tomato DC3000

    SciTech Connect

    Feil, Helene; Feil, William; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Larimer, Frank W; DiBartolo, Genevieve; Copeland, A; Lykidis, A; Trong, Stephen; Nolan, Matt; Goltsman, Eugene; Thiel, James; Malfatti, Stephanie; Loper, Joyce E.; Detter, J C; Lapidus, Alla L.; Land, Miriam L; Richardson, P M; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Lindow, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    The complete genomic sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a (Pss B728a) has been determined and is compared with that of A syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000). The two pathovars of this economically important species of plant pathogenic bacteria differ in host range and other interactions with plants, with Pss having a more pronounced epiphytic stage of growth and higher abiotic stress tolerance and Pst DC3000 having a more pronounced apoplastic growth habitat. The Pss B728a genome (6.1 Mb) contains a circular chromosome and no plasmid, whereas the Pst DC3000 genome is 6.5 mbp in size, composed of a circular chromosome and two plasmids. Although a high degree of similarity exists between the two sequenced Pseudomonads, 976 protein-encoding genes are unique to Pss B728a when compared with Pst DC3000, including large genomic islands likely to contribute to virulence and host specificity. Over 375 repetitive extragenic palindromic sequences unique to Pss B728a when compared with Pst DC3000 are widely distributed throughout the chromosome except in 14 genomic islands, which generally had lower GC content than the genome as a whole. Content of the genomic islands varies, with one containing a prophage and another the plasmid pKLC102 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Among the 976 genes of Pss B728a with no counterpart in Pst DC3000 are those encoding for syringopeptin, syringomycin, indole acetic acid biosynthesis, arginine degradation, and production of ice nuclei. The genomic comparison suggests that several unique genes for Pss B728a such as ectoine synthase, DNA repair, and antibiotic production may contribute to the epiphytic fitness and stress tolerance of this organism.

  15. The mbo operon is specific and essential for biosynthesis of mangotoxin in Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Carrión, Víctor J; Arrebola, Eva; Cazorla, Francisco M; Murillo, Jesús; de Vicente, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Mangotoxin is an antimetabolite toxin produced by certain Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains. This toxin is an oligopeptide that inhibits ornithine N-acetyl transferase, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ornithine and arginine. Previous studies have reported the involvement of the putative nonribosomal peptide synthetase MgoA in virulence and mangotoxin production. In this study, we analyse a new chromosomal region of P. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158, which contains six coding sequences arranged as an operon (mbo operon). The mbo operon was detected in only mangotoxin-producing strains, and it was shown to be essential for the biosynthesis of this toxin. Mutants in each of the six ORFs of the mbo operon were partially or completely impaired in the production of the toxin. In addition, Pseudomonas spp. mangotoxin non-producer strains transformed with the mbo operon gained the ability to produce mangotoxin, indicating that this operon contains all the genetic information necessary for mangotoxin biosynthesis. The generation of a single transcript for the mbo operon was confirmed and supported by the allocation of a unique promoter and Rho-independent terminator. The phylogenetic analysis of the P. syringae strains harbouring the mbo operon revealed that these strains clustered together.

  16. Soil water flow is a source of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae in subalpine headwaters.

    PubMed

    Monteil, Caroline L; Lafolie, François; Laurent, Jimmy; Clement, Jean-Christophe; Simler, Roland; Travi, Yves; Morris, Cindy E

    2014-07-01

    The airborne plant pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is ubiquitous in headwaters, snowpack and precipitation where its populations are genetically and phenotypically diverse. Here, we assessed its population dynamics during snowmelt in headwaters of the French Alps. We revealed a continuous and significant transport of P.syringae by these waters in which the population density is correlated with water chemistry. Via in situ observations and laboratory experiments, we validated that P.syringae is effectively transported with the snow melt and rain water infiltrating through the soil of subalpine grasslands, leading to the same range of concentrations as measured in headwaters (10(2) -10(5) CFU l(-1) ). A population structure analysis confirmed the relatedness between populations in percolated water and those above the ground (i.e. rain, leaf litter and snowpack). However, the transport study in porous media suggested that water percolation could have different efficiencies for different strains of P.syringae. Finally, leaching of soil cores incubated for up to 4 months at 8°C showed that indigenous populations of P.syringae were able to survive in subalpine soil under cold temperature. This study brings to light the underestimated role of hydrological processes involved in the long distance dissemination of P.syringae.

  17. Tomato–Pseudomonas syringae interactions under elevated CO2 concentration: the role of stomata

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Sun, Zenghui; Shao, Shujun; Zhang, Shuai; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Zhang, Guanqun; Jiang, Yuping; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Xiaojian; Zhou, Yanhong; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) in agricultural and natural ecosystems is known to reduce plant stomatal opening, but it is unclear whether these CO2-induced stomatal alterations are associated with foliar pathogen infections. In this study, tomato plants were grown under ambient and elevated [CO2] and inoculated with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000, a strain that is virulent on tomato plants. We found that elevated [CO2] enhanced tomato defence against P. syringae. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that stomatal aperture of elevated [CO2] plants was considerably smaller than their ambient counterparts, which affected the behaviour of P. syringae bacteria on the upper surface of epidermal peels. Pharmacological experiments revealed that nitric oxide (NO) played a role in elevated [CO2]-induced stomatal closure. Silencing key genes involved in NO generation and stomatal closing, nitrate reductase (NR) and guard cell slow-type anion channel 1 (SLAC1), blocked elevated [CO2]-induced stomatal closure and resulted in significant increases in P. syringae infection. However, the SLAC1-silenced plants, but not the NR-silenced plants, still had significantly higher defence under elevated [CO2] compared with plants treated with ambient [CO2]. Similar results were obtained when the stomata-limiting factor for P. syringae entry was excluded by syringe infiltration inoculation. These results indicate that elevated [CO2] induces defence against P. syringae in tomato plants, not only by reducing the stomata-mediated entry of P. syringae but also by invoking a stomata-independent pathway to counteract P. syringae. This information is valuable for designing proper strategies against bacterial pathogens under changing agricultural and natural ecosystems. PMID:25336683

  18. Diel Variation in Population Size and Ice Nucleation Activity of Pseudomonas syringae on Snap Bean Leaflets.

    PubMed

    Hirano, S S; Upper, C D

    1989-03-01

    The extent to which diel changes in the physical environment affect changes in population size and ice nucleation activity of Pseudomonas syringae on snap bean leaflets was determined under field conditions. To estimate bacterial population size and ice nucleation activity, bean leaflets were harvested at 2-h intervals during each of three 26-h periods. A tube nucleation test was used to assay individual leaflets for ice nuclei. Population sizes of P. syringae were determined by dilution plating of leaflet homogenates. The overall diel changes in P. syringae population sizes differed during each of the 26-h periods. In one 26-h period, there was a continuous increase in the logarithm of P. syringae population size despite intense solar radiation, absence of free moisture on leaf surfaces, and low relative humidity during the day. A mean doubling time of approximately 4.9 h was estimated for the 28-fold increase in P. syringae population size that occurred from 0900 to 0900 h during the 26-h period. However, doubling times of 3.3 and 1.9 h occurred briefly during this period from 1700 to 2300 h and from 0100 to 0700 h, respectively. Thus, growth rates of P. syringae in association with leaves in the field were of the same order of magnitude as optimal rates measured in the laboratory. The frequency with which leaflets bore ice nuclei active at -2.0, -2.2, and -2.5 degrees C varied greatly within each 26-h period. These large diel changes were inversely correlated primarily with the diel changes in air temperature and reflected changes in nucleation frequency rather than changes in population size of P. syringae. Thus, the response of bacterial ice nucleation activity to the physical environment was distinct from the changes in population size of ice nucleation-active P. syringae.

  19. The life history of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae is linked to the water cycle.

    PubMed

    Morris, Cindy E; Sands, David C; Vinatzer, Boris A; Glaux, Catherine; Guilbaud, Caroline; Buffière, Alain; Yan, Shuangchun; Dominguez, Hélène; Thompson, Brian M

    2008-03-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is a plant pathogen well known for its capacity to grow epiphytically on diverse plants and for its ice-nucleation activity. The ensemble of its known biology and ecology led us to postulate that this bacterium is also present in non-agricultural habitats, particularly those associated with water. Here, we report the abundance of P. syringae in rain, snow, alpine streams and lakes and in wild plants, in addition to the previously reported abundance in epilithic biofilms. Each of these substrates harbored strains that corresponded to P. syringae in terms of biochemical traits, pathogenicity and pathogenicity-related factors and that were ice-nucleation active. Phylogenetic comparisons of sequences of four housekeeping genes of the non-agricultural strains with strains of P. syringae from disease epidemics confirmed their identity as P. syringae. Moreover, strains belonging to the same clonal lineage were isolated from snow, irrigation water and a diseased crop plant. Our data suggest that the different substrates harboring P. syringae modify the structure of the associated populations. Here, we propose a comprehensive life cycle for P. syringae--in agricultural and non-agricultural habitats--driven by the environmental cycle of water. This cycle opens the opportunity to evaluate the importance of non-agricultural habitats in the evolution of a plant pathogen and the emergence of virulence. The ice-nucleation activity of all strains from snow, unlike from other substrates, strongly suggests that P. syringae plays an active role in the water cycle as an ice nucleus in clouds.

  20. Disruption of the carA gene in pseudomonas syringae results in reduced fitness and alters motility

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Pseudomonas syringae infects diverse plant species and is widely used in the study of effector function and the molecular basis of disease. Although the relationship between bacterial metabolism, nutrient acquisition and virulence has attracted increasing attention in bacterial pathology...

  1. Genetic background of host-pathogen interaction between Cucumis sativus L. and Pseudomonas syringae pv. lachrymans.

    PubMed

    Olczak-Woltman, H; Schollenberger, M; Niemirowicz-Szczytt, K

    2009-01-01

    The interplay of plant resistance mechanisms and bacterial pathogenicity is very complex. This applies also to the interaction that takes place between the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. lachrymans (Smith et Bryan) and the cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) as its host plant. Research on P. syringae pv. lachrymans has led to the discovery of specific factors produced during pathogenesis, i.e. toxins or enzymes. Similarly, studies on cucumber have identified the specific types of plant resistance expressed, namely Systemic Acquired Resistance (SAR) or Induced Systemic Resistance (ISR). This paper presents a summary of the current state of knowledge about this particular host-pathogen interaction, with reference to general information about interactions of P. syringae pathovars with host plants.

  2. Characterization of type IV pilus genes in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    PubMed

    Roine, E; Raineri, D M; Romantschuk, M; Wilson, M; Nunn, D N

    1998-11-01

    Many strains of Pseudomonas syringae produce retractile pili that act as receptors for lytic bacteriophage phi 6. As these are also characteristics of type IV pili, it was postulated that P. syringae may possess genes for type IV pilus biogenesis. A cosmid clone bank of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 genomic DNA was used to complement a mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa defective in the PilD (XcpA) prepilin peptidase gene by selection for restoration of extracellular protein secretion, a function also known to require PilD. A cosmid able to complement this mutant was also able to complement mutations in the pilB and pilC genes, suggesting that, if the organization of these genes is similar to that of P. aeruginosa, the cosmid may contain the P. syringae pilA. This was confirmed by sequencing a region from this plasmid that was shown to hybridize at low stringency to the P. aeruginosa pilA gene. The deduced P. syringae PilA polypeptide possesses the characteristic properties of the type IV pilins. Heterologous expression of the P. syringae pilA in P. aeruginosa was also shown, conferring not only phi 6 phage sensitivity to P. aeruginosa pilA mutants but also sensitivity to PO4, a lytic bacteriophage specific for the pilus of P. aeruginosa. This suggests that additional components might be present in the mature pilus of P. aeruginosa that are the true receptors for this phage. Chromosomal mutations in P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 pilA and pilD genes were shown to abolish its sensitivity to bacteriophage phi 6. To determine the importance of P. syringae pilus in plant leaf interactions, these mutations were tested under laboratory and field conditions. Although little effect was seen on pathogenicity, culturable leaf-associated population sizes of the pilA mutant were significantly different from those of the wild-type parent. In addition, the expression of the DC3000 pilA gene appears to contribute to the UV tolerance of P. syringae and may play a role in survival on

  3. Characterization of five ECF sigma factors in the genome of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Poulami Basu; Vaughn-Diaz, Vanessa L; Greenwald, Jessica W; Gross, Dennis C

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a, a bacterial pathogen of bean, utilizes large surface populations and extracellular signaling to initiate a fundamental change from an epiphytic to a pathogenic lifestyle. Extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma (σ) factors serve as important regulatory factors in responding to various environmental signals. Bioinformatic analysis of the B728a genome revealed 10 ECF sigma factors. This study analyzed deletion mutants of five previously uncharacterized ECF sigma factor genes in B728a, including three FecI-type ECF sigma factors (ECF5, ECF6, and ECF7) and two ECF sigma factors placed in groups ECF11 and ECF18. Transcriptional profiling by qRT-PCR analysis of ECF sigma factor mutants was used to measure expression of their associated anti-sigma and outer membrane receptor proteins, and expression of genes associated with production of extracellular polysaccharides, fimbriae, glycine betaine and syringomycin. Notably, the B728aΔecf7 mutant displayed reduced swarming and had decreased expression of CupC fimbrial genes. Growth and pathogenicity assays, using a susceptible bean host, revealed that none of the tested sigma factor genes are required for in planta growth and lesion formation.

  4. The Facultative Symbiont Rickettsia Protects an Invasive Whitefly against Entomopathogenic Pseudomonas syringae Strains

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Martha S.; Baltrus, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Facultative endosymbionts can benefit insect hosts in a variety of ways, including context-dependent roles, such as providing defense against pathogens. The role of some symbionts in defense may be overlooked, however, when pathogen infection is transient, sporadic, or asymptomatic. The facultative endosymbiont Rickettsia increases the fitness of the sweet potato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in some populations through mechanisms that are not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the role of Rickettsia in mediating the interaction between the sweet potato whitefly and Pseudomonas syringae, a common environmental bacterium, some strains of which are pathogenic to aphids. Our results show that P. syringae multiplies within whiteflies, leading to host death, and that whiteflies infected with Rickettsia show a decreased rate of death due to P. syringae. Experiments using plants coated with P. syringae confirmed that whiteflies can acquire the bacteria at a low rate while feeding, leading to increased mortality, particularly when the whiteflies are not infected with Rickettsia. These results suggest that P. syringae may affect whitefly populations in nature and that Rickettsia can ameliorate this effect. This study highlights the possible importance of interactions among opportunistic environmental pathogens and endosymbionts of insects. PMID:25217020

  5. Detection and characterization of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidifoliorum in kiwifruit in Spain.

    PubMed

    Abelleira, A; Ares, A; Aguin, O; Peñalver, J; Morente, M C; López, M M; Sainz, M J; Mansilla, J P

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial canker of kiwifruit caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) is currently the major threat to its commercial production worldwide. In 2011, the most virulent type (Psa3) was detected for the first time in Northwest-Spain, in the province of Pontevedra. In 2013 surveys, leaves and flower buds with mild symptoms were observed in Actinidia deliciosa 'Hayward' vines in an orchard at the province of A Coruña, suggesting the presence of P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum (Psaf). Isolates obtained from such orchard were characterized by morphological, biochemical and physiological tests, fatty acids (FA) profile and molecular tests (PCR, BOX-PCR, duplex PCR, multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, PCR-C, phytotoxins, housekeeping and effector genes). Pathogenicity tests were also carried out on plants and fruits of A. deliciosa 'Hayward' and on different cultivated plants and fruits. Results demonstrated the presence of P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum in Spain. The work provides new information on the pathovar P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum, which has only been found previously in New Zealand, Australia and France. The results are relevant for taxonomy of isolates of P. syringae from kiwifruit, especially those of low virulence not belonging to pathovar actinidiae. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Bacteriophages Against Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Causing Bacterial Canker Disease in Kiwifruit.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji-Gang; Lim, Jeong-A; Song, Yu-Rim; Heu, Sunggi; Kim, Gyoung Hee; Koh, Young Jin; Oh, Chang-Sik

    2016-02-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae causes bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit. Owing to the prohibition of agricultural antibiotic use in major kiwifruit-cultivating countries, alternative methods need to be developed to manage this disease. Bacteriophages are viruses that specifically infect target bacteria and have recently been reconsidered as potential biological control agents for bacterial pathogens owing to their specificity in terms of host range. In this study, we isolated bacteriophages against P. syringae pv. actinidiae from soils collected from kiwifruit orchards in Korea and selected seven bacteriophages for further characterization based on restriction enzyme digestion patterns of genomic DNA. Among the studied bacteriophages, two belong to the Myoviridae family and three belong to the Podoviridae family, based on morphology observed by transmission electron microscopy. The host range of the selected bacteriophages was confirmed using 18 strains of P. syringae pv. actinidiae, including the Psa2 and Psa3 groups, and some were also effective against other P. syringae pathovars. Lytic activity of the selected bacteriophages was sustained in vitro until 80 h, and their activity remained stable up to 50°C, at pH 11, and under UV-B light. These results indicate that the isolated bacteriophages are specific to P. syringae species and are resistant to various environmental factors, implying their potential use in control of bacterial canker disease in kiwifruits.

  7. The Facultative Symbiont Rickettsia Protects an Invasive Whitefly against Entomopathogenic Pseudomonas syringae Strains.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Tory A; Hunter, Martha S; Baltrus, David A

    2014-12-01

    Facultative endosymbionts can benefit insect hosts in a variety of ways, including context-dependent roles, such as providing defense against pathogens. The role of some symbionts in defense may be overlooked, however, when pathogen infection is transient, sporadic, or asymptomatic. The facultative endosymbiont Rickettsia increases the fitness of the sweet potato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in some populations through mechanisms that are not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the role of Rickettsia in mediating the interaction between the sweet potato whitefly and Pseudomonas syringae, a common environmental bacterium, some strains of which are pathogenic to aphids. Our results show that P. syringae multiplies within whiteflies, leading to host death, and that whiteflies infected with Rickettsia show a decreased rate of death due to P. syringae. Experiments using plants coated with P. syringae confirmed that whiteflies can acquire the bacteria at a low rate while feeding, leading to increased mortality, particularly when the whiteflies are not infected with Rickettsia. These results suggest that P. syringae may affect whitefly populations in nature and that Rickettsia can ameliorate this effect. This study highlights the possible importance of interactions among opportunistic environmental pathogens and endosymbionts of insects. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Environmental control in tea fields to reduce infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. theae.

    PubMed

    Tomihama, T; Nonaka, T; Nishi, Y; Arai, K

    2009-02-01

    Bacterial shoot blight (BSB) disease, caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. theae, is a major bacterial disease of tea plants in Japan. BSB mainly occurs in the low-temperature season, and lesion formation by P. syringae pv. theae is enhanced by both low temperature and the presence of ice nucleation-active Xanthomonas campestris (INAX), which catalyzes ice formation at -2 to -4 degrees C and is frequently co-isolated with P. syringae pv. theae from tea plants. Low temperature is thus the most important environmental factor influencing the incidence of BSB; however, the effects of low temperature on infection of the host by P. syringae pv. theae and of environmental controls in fields on the occurrence of the disease are poorly understood. In this study, we show that ice formation on tea leaves by INAX enhanced P. syringae pv. theae invasion into leaf tissue. The natural incidence of BSB in the field was closely related to early autumn frost. Frost protection in late autumn, which prevented ice formation on tea plants, significantly decreased the incidence of BSB, and frost protection combined with bactericide application held the incidence under the economic threshold level. Our data indicate that environmental control in the field based on microbial interactions in the host offers a new strategy for plant disease control.

  9. Aerosolization of two strains (ice+ and ice-) of Pseudomonas syringae in a Collison nebulizer at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, Renee; David, Ray; Marr, Linsey; Vinatzer, Boris; Schmale, David

    2015-04-01

    The aerosolization of microorganisms from aquatic environments is understudied. In this study, an ice nucleation active (ice+) strain and a non-ice nucleation active (ice-) strain of the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae were aerosolized from aqueous suspensions under artificial laboratory conditions using a Collison nebulizer. The aerosolization of P. syringae was not influenced by water temperatures between 5° and 30°C. In general, the culturability (viability) of P. syringae in aerosols increased with temperature between 5 and 30°C. The ice+ strain was aerosolized in greater numbers than the ice- strain at all temperatures studied, suggesting a possible connection between the ice nucleation phenotype and aerosol production. Together, our results suggest that P. syringae has the potential to be aerosolized from natural aquatic environments, such as streams, rivers, ponds, and lakes; known reservoirs of P. syringae. Future work is needed to elucidate the mechanisms of aerosolization of P. syringae from natural aquatic systems.

  10. Spatial and temporal dynamics of primary and secondary metabolism in Phaseolus vulgaris challenged by Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bueno, María Luisa; Pineda, Mónica; Díaz-Casado, Elena; Barón, Matilde

    2015-01-01

    Many defense mechanisms contribute to the plant immune system against pathogens, involving the regulation of different processes of the primary and secondary metabolism. At the same time, pathogens have evolved mechanisms to hijack the plant defense in order to establish the infection and proliferate. Localization and timing of the host response are essential to understand defense mechanisms and resistance to pathogens (Rico et al. 2011). Imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging and thermography, are a very valuable tool providing spatial and temporal information about a series of plant processes. In this study, bean plants challenged with two pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae have been investigated. Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A and P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 elicit a compatible and incompatible interaction in bean, respectively. Both types of host-pathogen interaction triggered different changes in the activity of photosynthesis and the secondary metabolism. We conclude that the combined analysis of leaf temperature, chlorophyll fluorescence and green fluorescence emitted by phenolics allows to discriminate compatible from incompatible P. syringae-Phaseolus vulgaris interactions in very early times of the infection, prior to the development of symptoms. These can constitute disease signatures that would allow an early identification of emerging plagues in crops. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  11. Bioinformatics Analysis of the Complete Genome Sequence of the Mango Tree Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158 Reveals Traits Relevant to Virulence and Epiphytic Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Arrebola, Eva; Carrión, Víctor J.; Gutiérrez-Barranquero, José Antonio; Pérez-García, Alejandro; Ramos, Cayo; Cazorla, Francisco M.; de Vicente, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of more than 100 Pseudomonas syringae strains has been sequenced to date; however only few of them have been fully assembled, including P. syringae pv. syringae B728a. Different strains of pv. syringae cause different diseases and have different host specificities; so, UMAF0158 is a P. syringae pv. syringae strain related to B728a but instead of being a bean pathogen it causes apical necrosis of mango trees, and the two strains belong to different phylotypes of pv.syringae and clades of P. syringae. In this study we report the complete sequence and annotation of P. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158 chromosome and plasmid pPSS158. A comparative analysis with the available sequenced genomes of other 25 P. syringae strains, both closed (the reference genomes DC3000, 1448A and B728a) and draft genomes was performed. The 5.8 Mb UMAF0158 chromosome has 59.3% GC content and comprises 5017 predicted protein-coding genes. Bioinformatics analysis revealed the presence of genes potentially implicated in the virulence and epiphytic fitness of this strain. We identified several genetic features, which are absent in B728a, that may explain the ability of UMAF0158 to colonize and infect mango trees: the mangotoxin biosynthetic operon mbo, a gene cluster for cellulose production, two different type III and two type VI secretion systems, and a particular T3SS effector repertoire. A mutant strain defective in the rhizobial-like T3SS Rhc showed no differences compared to wild-type during its interaction with host and non-host plants and worms. Here we report the first complete sequence of the chromosome of a pv. syringae strain pathogenic to a woody plant host. Our data also shed light on the genetic factors that possibly determine the pathogenic and epiphytic lifestyle of UMAF0158. This work provides the basis for further analysis on specific mechanisms that enable this strain to infect woody plants and for the functional analysis of host specificity in the P

  12. Identification and expression of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. aptata hrpZ(Psa) gene which encodes an harpin elicitor.

    PubMed

    Musa, A R; Minard, P; Mazzucchi, U

    2001-01-01

    A sequence homologous to an internal fragment 0.75 kb BstXI of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae hrpZ gene was identified in Pseudomonas syringae pv. aptata NCPPB 2664, the causal agent of bacterial blight in sugar beet, lettuce and other plants. and in E. coli DH10B (pCCP1069) containing the P. syringae pv. aptata hrp gene cluster. PCR with oligonucleotides, based on the hrpZ(Pss) gene and used as primers with the total genomic DNA of P. syringae pv. aptata, amplified a 1 kb fragment that hybridized with the probe in highly stringent conditions. The amplicon was cloned into the pGEM-T plasmid vector, amplified in E. coli DH5alpha and sequenced. The sequence showed 95%, 83% and 61% identity with those of hrpZ(Pss), hrpZ(Psg and hrpZ(Pst) genes encoding the harpins of the P. syringae pv. syringae, glycinea and tomato, respectively. The amplicon was cloned into the pMAL expression system. The expressed protein, fused with maltose-binding protein, was cleaved with a specific protease factor Xa, and purified using affinity chromatography. On the basis of the amino acid sequence and its ability to induce HR in tobacco leaves, it was identified as a P. syringae pv. aptata harpin.

  13. Comparative genomics of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains B301D and HS191 and insights into intrapathovar traits associated with plant pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Aravind; Jalan, Neha; Yuan, Joshua S; Wang, Nian; Gross, Dennis C

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae is a common plant-associated bacterium that causes diseases of both monocot and dicot plants worldwide. To help delineate traits critical to adaptation and survival in the plant environment, we generated complete genome sequences of P. syringae pv. syringae strains B301D and HS191, which represent dicot and monocot strains with distinct host specificities. Intrapathovar comparisons of the B301D (6.09 Mb) and HS191 (5.95 Mb plus a 52 kb pCG131 plasmid) genomes to the previously sequenced B728a genome demonstrated that the shared genes encompass about 83% of each genome, and include genes for siderophore biosynthesis, osmotolerance, and extracellular polysaccharide production. Between 7% and 12% of the genes are unique among the genomes, and most of the unique gene regions carry transposons, phage elements, or IS elements associated with horizontal gene transfer. Differences are observed in the type III effector composition for the three strains that likely influences host range. The HS191 genome had the largest number at 25 of effector genes, and seven effector genes are specific to this monocot strain. Toxin production is another major trait associated with virulence of P. syringae pv. syringae, and HS191 is distinguished by genes for production of syringopeptin SP25 and mangotoxin. PMID:25940918

  14. A mutation in the indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis pathway of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae affects growth in Phaseolus vulgaris and syringomycin production.

    PubMed Central

    Mazzola, M; White, F F

    1994-01-01

    Homologs of the genes for indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis from Pseudomonas syringae pv. savastanoi were retrieved from a genomic library of P. syringae pv. syringae, and their nucleotide sequences were determined. Sequence relatedness between the P. syringae pv. syringae and P. syringae pv. savastanoi iaa operons is greater than 90% within the iaaM and iaaH loci but declines dramatically at a position approximately 200 bp 5' of the iaaM translation initiation codon. A third open reading frame was detected downstream of iaaH. Production of IAA was undetectable in mutant strain Y30-53.29, which was generated by transposition of Tn5 into the iaaM gene of P. syringae pv. syringae Y30. The IAA-deficient (IAA-) mutant retained the ability to colonize the bean phylloplane and induced disease symptoms on bean which were similar to those produced by the parental strain. However, the population dynamics of the IAA- strain during the parasitic phase in leaves differed from those of both the parental strain and the mutant genetically restored for IAA biosynthesis. The mutant was capable of inducing disease symptoms when established in bean tissues at a lower initial cell density than either IAA-producing strain. Syringomycin biosynthesis by the IAA- strain was diminished in comparison with the parental strain or the mutant genetically restored for IAA production. The results indicate that bacterially derived IAA, or its biosynthesis, is involved in the regulation of in planta growth and in the expression of other factors that affect the host-pathogen interaction. Images PMID:8113177

  15. Comparative genomics reveals genes significantly associated with woody hosts in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Laue, Bridget E.; Sharp, Paul M.; Green, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Summary The diversification of lineages within Pseudomonas syringae has involved a number of adaptive shifts from herbaceous hosts onto various species of tree, resulting in the emergence of highly destructive diseases such as bacterial canker of kiwi and bleeding canker of horse chestnut. This diversification has involved a high level of gene gain and loss, and these processes are likely to play major roles in the adaptation of individual lineages onto their host plants. In order to better understand the evolution of P. syringae onto woody plants, we have generated de novo genome sequences for 26 strains from the P. syringae species complex that are pathogenic on a range of woody species, and have looked for statistically significant associations between gene presence and host type (i.e. woody or herbaceous) across a phylogeny of 64 strains. We have found evidence for a common set of genes associated with strains that are able to colonize woody plants, suggesting that divergent lineages have acquired similarities in genome composition that may form the genetic basis of their adaptation to woody hosts. We also describe in detail the gain, loss and rearrangement of specific loci that may be functionally important in facilitating this adaptive shift. Overall, our analyses allow for a greater understanding of how gene gain and loss may contribute to adaptation in P. syringae. PMID:27145446

  16. Transcriptional responses of Pseudomonas syringae to growth in epiphytic versus apoplastic leaf sites

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xilan; Lund, Steven P.; Scott, Russell A.; Greenwald, Jessica W.; Records, Angela H.; Nettleton, Dan; Lindow, Steven E.; Gross, Dennis C.; Beattie, Gwyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Some strains of the foliar pathogen Pseudomonas syringae are adapted for growth and survival on leaf surfaces and in the leaf interior. Global transcriptome profiling was used to evaluate if these two habitats offer distinct environments for bacteria and thus present distinct driving forces for adaptation. The transcript profiles of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a support a model in which leaf surface, or epiphytic, sites specifically favor flagellar motility, swarming motility based on 3-(3-hydroxyalkanoyloxy)alkanoic acid surfactant production, chemosensing, and chemotaxis, indicating active relocation primarily on the leaf surface. Epiphytic sites also promote high transcript levels for phenylalanine degradation, which may help counteract phenylpropanoid-based defenses before leaf entry. In contrast, intercellular, or apoplastic, sites favor the high-level expression of genes for GABA metabolism (degradation of these genes would attenuate GABA repression of virulence) and the synthesis of phytotoxins, two additional secondary metabolites, and syringolin A. These findings support roles for these compounds in virulence, including a role for syringolin A in suppressing defense responses beyond stomatal closure. A comparison of the transcriptomes from in planta cells and from cells exposed to osmotic stress, oxidative stress, and iron and nitrogen limitation indicated that water availability, in particular, was limited in both leaf habitats but was more severely limited in the apoplast than on the leaf surface under the conditions tested. These findings contribute to a coherent model of the adaptations of this widespread bacterial phytopathogen to distinct habitats within its host. PMID:23319638

  17. Different Biosynthetic Pathways to Fosfomycin in Pseudomonas syringae and Streptomyces Species

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Young; Ju, Kou-San; Metcalf, William W.; Evans, Bradley S.; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa

    2012-01-01

    Fosfomycin is a wide-spectrum antibiotic that is used clinically to treat acute cystitis in the United States. The compound is produced by several strains of streptomycetes and pseudomonads. We sequenced the biosynthetic gene cluster responsible for fosfomycin production in Pseudomonas syringae PB-5123. Surprisingly, the biosynthetic pathway in this organism is very different from that in Streptomyces fradiae and Streptomyces wedmorensis. The pathways share the first and last steps, involving conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to phosphonopyruvate (PnPy) and 2-hydroxypropylphosphonate (2-HPP) to fosfomycin, respectively, but the enzymes converting PnPy to 2-HPP are different. The genome of P. syringae PB-5123 lacks a gene encoding the PnPy decarboxylase found in the Streptomyces strains. Instead, it contains a gene coding for a citrate synthase-like enzyme, Psf2, homologous to the proteins that add an acetyl group to PnPy in the biosynthesis of FR-900098 and phosphinothricin. Heterologous expression and purification of Psf2 followed by activity assays confirmed the proposed activity of Psf2. Furthermore, heterologous production of fosfomycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a fosmid encoding the fosfomycin biosynthetic cluster from P. syringae PB-5123 confirmed that the gene cluster is functional. Therefore, two different pathways have evolved to produce this highly potent antimicrobial agent. PMID:22615277

  18. The life history of Pseudomonas syringae: linking agriculture to earth system processes.

    PubMed

    Morris, Cindy E; Monteil, Caroline L; Berge, Odile

    2013-01-01

    The description of the ecology of Pseudomonas syringae is moving away from that of a ubiquitous epiphytic plant pathogen to one of a multifaceted bacterium sans frontières in fresh water and other ecosystems linked to the water cycle. Discovery of the aquatic facet of its ecology has led to a vision of its life history that integrates spatial and temporal scales spanning billions of years and traversing catchment basins, continents, and the planet and that confronts the implication of roles that are potentially conflicting for agriculture (as a plant pathogen and as an actor in processes leading to rain and snowfall). This new ecological perspective has also yielded insight into epidemiological phenomena linked to disease emergence. Overall, it sets the stage for the integration of more comprehensive contexts of ecology and evolutionary history into comparative genomic analyses to elucidate how P. syringae subverts the attack and defense responses of the cohabitants of the diverse environments it occupies.

  19. The release of alginate lyase from growing Pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. M.; Day, D. F.; Koenig, D. W.; Pierson, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola, which produces alginate during stationary growth phase, displayed elevated extracellular alginate lyase activity during both mid-exponential and late-stationary growth phases of batch growth. Intracellular activity remained below 22% of the total activity during exponential growth, suggesting that alginate lyase has an extracellular function for this organism. Extracellular enzyme activity in continuous cultures, grown in either nutrient broth or glucose-simple salts medium, peaked at 60% of the washout rate, although nutrient broth-grown cultures displayed more than twice the activity per gram of cell mass. These results imply that growth rate, nutritional composition, or both initiate a release of alginate lyase from viable P. syringae pv. phaseolicola, which could modify its entrapping biofilm.

  20. Dual Effect of the Cubic Ag3PO4 Crystal on Pseudomonas syringae Growth and Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Kyung; Yeo, Byul-Ee; Park, Heonyong; Huh, Young-Duk; Kwon, Chian; Yun, Hye Sup

    2016-01-01

    We previously found that the antibacterial activity of silver phosphate crystals on Escherichia coli depends on their structure. We here show that the cubic form of silver phosphate crystal (SPC) can also be applied to inhibit the growth of a plant-pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae bacterium. SPC pretreatment resulted in reduced in planta multiplication of P. syringae. Induced expression of a plant defense marker gene PR1 by SPC alone is suggestive of its additional plant immunity-stimulating activity. Since SPC can simultaneously inhibit P. syringae growth and induce plant defense responses, it might be used as a more effective plant disease-controlling agent. PMID:27147937

  1. Suppression of plant defense responses by extracellular metabolites from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seonghee; Yang, Dong Sik; Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao; Sumner, Lloyd W; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2013-04-18

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pstab) is the causal agent of wildfire disease in tobacco plants. Several pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae produce a phytotoxic extracellular metabolite called coronatine (COR). COR has been shown to suppress plant defense responses. Interestingly, Pstab does not produce COR but still actively suppresses early plant defense responses. It is not clear if Pstab produces any extracellular metabolites that actively suppress early defense during bacterial pathogenesis. We found that the Pstab extracellular metabolite extracts (Pstab extracts) remarkably suppressed stomatal closure and nonhost hypersensitive response (HR) cell death induced by a nonhost pathogen, P. syringae pv. tomato T1 (Pst T1), in Nicotiana benthamiana. We also found that the accumulation of nonhost pathogens, Pst T1 and P. syringae pv. glycinea (Psgly), was increased in N. benthamiana plants upon treatment with Pstab extracts . The HR cell death induced by Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern (INF1), gene-for-gene interaction (Pto/AvrPto and Cf-9/AvrCf-9) and ethanol was not delayed or suppressed by Pstab extracts. We performed metabolite profiling to investigate the extracellular metabolites from Pstab using UPLC-qTOF-MS and identified 49 extracellular metabolites from the Pstab supernatant culture. The results from gene expression profiling of PR-1, PR-2, PR-5, PDF1.2, ABA1, COI1, and HSR203J suggest that Pstab extracellular metabolites may interfere with SA-mediated defense pathways. In this study, we found that Pstab extracts suppress plant defense responses such as stomatal closure and nonhost HR cell death induced by the nonhost bacterial pathogen Pst T1 in N. benthamiana.

  2. Overlapping Yet Response-Specific Transcriptome Alterations Characterize the Nature of Tobacco–Pseudomonas syringae Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bozsó, Zoltán; Ott, Péter G.; Kámán-Tóth, Evelin; Bognár, Gábor F.; Pogány, Miklós; Szatmári, Ágnes

    2016-01-01

    In this study transcriptomic alterations of bacterially induced pattern triggered immunity (PTI) were compared with other types of tobacco–Pseudomonas interactions. In addition, using pharmacological agents we blocked some signal transduction pathways (Ca2+ influx, kinases, phospholipases, proteasomic protein degradation) to find out how they contribute to gene expression during PTI. PTI is the first defense response of plant cells to microbes, elicited by their widely conserved molecular patterns. Tobacco is an important model of Solanaceae to study resistance responses, including defense mechanisms against bacteria. In spite of these facts the transcription regulation of tobacco genes during different types of plant bacterial interactions is not well-described. In this paper we compared the tobacco transcriptomic alterations in microarray experiments induced by (i) PTI inducer Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae type III secretion mutant (hrcC) at earlier (6 h post inoculation) and later (48 hpi) stages of defense, (ii) wild type P. syringae (6 hpi) that causes effector triggered immunity (ETI) and cell death (HR), and (iii) disease-causing P. syringae pv. tabaci (6 hpi). Among the different treatments the highest overlap was between the PTI and ETI at 6 hpi, however, there were groups of genes with specifically altered activity for either type of defenses. Instead of quantitative effects of the virulent P. tabaci on PTI-related genes it influenced transcription qualitatively and blocked the expression changes of a special set of genes including ones involved in signal transduction and transcription regulation. P. tabaci specifically activated or repressed other groups of genes seemingly not related to either PTI or ETI. Kinase and phospholipase A inhibitors had highest impacts on the PTI response and effects of these signal inhibitors on transcription greatly overlapped. Remarkable interactions of phospholipase C-related pathways with the proteasomal system were

  3. Emigration of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae from leaf litter contributes to its population dynamics in alpine snowpack.

    PubMed

    Monteil, Caroline L; Guilbaud, Caroline; Glaux, Catherine; Lafolie, François; Soubeyrand, Samuel; Morris, Cindy E

    2012-08-01

    The recently discovered ubiquity of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae in headwaters and alpine ecosystems worldwide elicits new questions about the ecology of this bacterium and subsequent consequences for disease epidemiology. Because of the major contribution of snow to river run-off during crop growth, we evaluated the population dynamics of P.syringae in snowpack and the underlying leaf litter during two years in the Southern French Alps. High population densities of P.syringae were found on alpine grasses, and leaf litter was identified as the main source of populations of P.syringae in snowpack, contributing more than the populations arriving with the snowfall. The insulating properties of snow foster survival of P.syringae throughout the winter in the 10 cm layer of snow closest to the soil. Litter and snowpack harboured populations of P.syringae that were very diverse in terms of phenotypes and genotypes. Neither substrate nor sampling site had a marked effect on the structure of P.syringae populations, and snow and litter had genotypes in common with other non-agricultural habitats and with crops. These results contribute to the mounting evidence that a highly diverse P.syringae metapopulation is disseminated throughout drainage basins between cultivated and non-cultivated zones.

  4. AtMIN7 mediated disease resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    DOEpatents

    He, Sheng Yang; Nomura, Kinya

    2011-07-26

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for enhancing plant defenses against pathogens. More particularly, the invention relates to enhancing plant immunity against bacterial pathogens, wherein AtMIN7 mediated protection is enhanced and/or there is a decrease in activity of an AtMIN7 associated virulence protein such as a Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HopM1. Reagents of the present invention provide a means of studying cellular trafficking while formulations of the present inventions provide increased pathogen resistance in plants.

  5. Draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar syringae strain FF5, causal agent of stem tip dieback disease on ornamental pear.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Kee Hoon; Jones, Jonathan D G; Studholme, David J

    2012-07-01

    Pseudomonas syringae FF5 causes stem tip dieback disease on ornamental pear (Pyrus calleryana). Its genome encodes a complete type III secretion system (T3SS) and HopAC1, HopM1, AvrE1, HopI1, HopAA1, HopJ1, HopAH2, HopAH1, HopAG1, and HopAZ1. Lacking detectable homologues of other T3SS effectors, it may encode novel, undiscovered effectors.

  6. Bactericidal Compounds Controlling Growth of the Plant Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae, Which Forms Biofilms Composed of a Novel Exopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Ghods, Shirin; Sims, Ian M.; Moradali, M. Fata

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is the major cause of bacterial canker and is a severe threat to kiwifruit production worldwide. Many aspects of the disease caused by P. syringae pv. actinidiae, such as the pathogenicity-relevant formation of a biofilm composed of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), are still unknown. Here, a highly virulent strain of P. syringae pv. actinidiae, NZ V-13, was studied with respect to biofilm formation and architecture using a flow cell system combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy. The biofilm formed by P. syringae pv. actinidiae NZ V-13 was heterogeneous, consisting of a thin cellular base layer 5 μm thick and microcolonies with irregular structures. The major component of the EPSs produced by P. syringae pv. actinidiae NZ V-13 bacteria was isolated and identified to be an exopolysaccharide. Extensive compositional and structural analysis showed that rhamnose, fucose, and glucose were the major constituents, present at a ratio of 5:1.5:2. Experimental evidence that P. syringae pv. actinidiae NZ V-13 produces two polysaccharides, a branched α-d-rhamnan with side chains of terminal α-d-Fucf and an α-d-1,4-linked glucan, was obtained. The susceptibility of the cells in biofilms to kasugamycin and chlorine dioxide was assessed. About 64 and 73% of P. syringae pv. actinidiae NZ V-13 cells in biofilms were killed when kasugamycin and chlorine dioxide were used at 5 and 10 ppm, respectively. Kasugamycin inhibited the attachment of P. syringae pv. actinidiae NZ V-13 to solid surfaces at concentrations of 80 and 100 ppm. Kasugamycin was bacteriostatic against P. syringae pv. actinidiae NZ V-13 growth in the planktonic mode, with the MIC being 40 to 60 ppm and a bactericidal effect being found at 100 ppm. Here we studied the formation, architecture, and composition of P. syringae pv. actinidiae biofilms as well as used the biofilm as a model to assess the efficacies of bactericidal compounds. PMID:25841017

  7. Yersiniabactin Production by Pseudomonas syringae and Escherichia coli, and Description of a Second Yersiniabactin Locus Evolutionary Group

    PubMed Central

    Bultreys, Alain; Gheysen, Isabelle; de Hoffmann, Edmond

    2006-01-01

    The siderophore and virulence factor yersiniabactin is produced by Pseudomonas syringae. Yersiniabactin was originally detected by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC); commonly used PCR tests proved ineffective. Yersiniabactin production in P. syringae correlated with the possession of irp1 located in a predicted yersiniabactin locus. Three similarly divergent yersiniabactin locus groups were determined: the Yersinia pestis group, the P. syringae group, and the Photorhabdus luminescens group; yersiniabactin locus organization is similar in P. syringae and P. luminescens. In P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000, the locus has a high GC content (63.4% compared with 58.4% for the chromosome and 60.1% and 60.7% for adjacent regions) but it lacks high-pathogenicity-island features, such as the insertion in a tRNA locus, the integrase, and insertion sequence elements. In P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and pv. phaseolicola 1448A, the locus lies between homologues of Psyr_2284 and Psyr_2285 of P. syringae pv. syringae B728a, which lacks the locus. Among tested pseudomonads, a PCR test specific to two yersiniabactin locus groups detected a locus in genospecies 3, 7, and 8 of P. syringae, and DNA hybridization within P. syringae also detected a locus in the pathovars phaseolicola and glycinea. The PCR and HPLC methods enabled analysis of nonpathogenic Escherichia coli. HPLC-proven yersiniabactin-producing E. coli lacked modifications found in irp1 and irp2 in the human pathogen CFT073, and it is not clear whether CFT073 produces yersiniabactin. The study provides clues about the evolution and dispersion of yersiniabactin genes. It describes methods to detect and study yersiniabactin producers, even where genes have evolved. PMID:16751485

  8. Population-genomic insights into emergence, crop adaptation and dissemination of Pseudomonas syringae pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Monteil, Caroline L.; Yahara, Koji; Studholme, David J.; Mageiros, Leonardos; Méric, Guillaume; Swingle, Bryan; Morris, Cindy E.

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens are well characterized but, in some cases, little is known about the populations from which they emerged. This limits understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying disease. The crop pathogen Pseudomonas syringae sensu lato has been widely isolated from the environment, including wild plants and components of the water cycle, and causes disease in several economically important crops. Here, we compared genome sequences of 45 P. syringae crop pathogen outbreak strains with 69 closely related environmental isolates. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed that crop pathogens emerged many times independently from environmental populations. Unexpectedly, differences in gene content between environmental populations and outbreak strains were minimal with most virulence genes present in both. However, a genome-wide association study identified a small number of genes, including the type III effector genes hopQ1 and hopD1, to be associated with crop pathogens, but not with environmental populations, suggesting that this small group of genes may play an important role in crop disease emergence. Intriguingly, genome-wide analysis of homologous recombination revealed that the locus Psyr 0346, predicted to encode a protein that confers antibiotic resistance, has been frequently exchanged among lineages and thus may contribute to pathogen fitness. Finally, we found that isolates from diseased crops and from components of the water cycle, collected during the same crop disease epidemic, form a single population. This provides the strongest evidence yet that precipitation and irrigation water are an overlooked inoculum source for disease epidemics caused by P. syringae. PMID:28348830

  9. Negative Regulation of Pathogenesis in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 11528 by ATP-Dependent Lon Protease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hyun Ju; Lee, Jun Seung; Cha, Ji Young; Baik, Hyung Suk

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci causes wildfire disease in tobacco plants. The hrp pathogenicity island (hrp PAI) of P. syringae pv. tabaci encodes a type III secretion system (TTSS) and its regulatory system, which are required for pathogenesis in plants. Three important regulatory proteins- HrpR, HrpS, and HrpL-have been identified to activate hrp PAI gene expression. The bacterial Lon protease regulates the expression of various genes. To investigate the regulatory mechanism of the Lon protease in P. syringae pv. tabaci 11528, we cloned the lon gene, and then a Δlon mutant was generated by allelic exchange. lon mutants showed increased UV sensitivity, which is a typical feature of such mutants. The Δlon mutant produced higher levels of tabtoxin than the wild-type. The lacZ gene was fused with hrpA promoter and activity of β-galactosidase was measured in hrp-repressing and hrp-inducing media. The Lon protease functioned as a negative regulator of hrp PAI under hrp-repressing conditions. We found that strains with lon disruption elicited the host defense system more rapidly and strongly than the wild-type strain, suggesting that the Lon protease is essential for systemic pathogenesis. PMID:21904881

  10. The coronatine toxin of Pseudomonas syringae is a multifunctional suppressor of Arabidopsis defense.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xueqing; Cheng, Jiye; Gangadharan, Anju; Mackey, David

    2012-11-01

    The phytotoxin coronatine (COR) promotes various aspects of Pseudomonas syringae virulence, including invasion through stomata, growth in the apoplast, and induction of disease symptoms. COR is a structural mimic of active jasmonic acid (JA) conjugates. Known activities of COR are mediated through its binding to the F-box-containing JA coreceptor CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1. By analyzing the interaction of P. syringae mutants with Arabidopsis thaliana mutants, we demonstrate that, in the apoplastic space of Arabidopsis, COR is a multifunctional defense suppressor. COR and the critical P. syringae type III effector HopM1 target distinct signaling steps to suppress callose deposition. In addition to its well-documented ability to suppress salicylic acid (SA) signaling, COR suppresses an SA-independent pathway contributing to callose deposition by reducing accumulation of an indole glucosinolate upstream of the activity of the PEN2 myrosinase. COR also suppresses callose deposition and promotes bacterial growth in coi1 mutant plants, indicating that COR may have multiple targets inside plant cells.

  11. Nonagricultural reservoirs contribute to emergence and evolution of Pseudomonas syringae crop pathogens.

    PubMed

    Monteil, Caroline L; Cai, Rongman; Liu, Haijie; Llontop, Marco E Mechan; Leman, Scotland; Studholme, David J; Morris, Cindy E; Vinatzer, Boris A

    2013-08-01

    While the existence of environmental reservoirs of human pathogens is well established, less is known about the role of nonagricultural environments in emergence, evolution, and spread of crop pathogens. Here, we analyzed phylogeny, virulence genes, host range, and aggressiveness of Pseudomonas syringae strains closely related to the tomato pathogen P. syringae pv. tomato (Pto), including strains isolated from snowpack and streams. The population of Pto relatives in nonagricultural environments was estimated to be large and its diversity to be higher than that of the population of Pto and its relatives on crops. Ancestors of environmental strains, Pto, and other genetically monomorphic crop pathogens were inferred to have frequently recombined, suggesting an epidemic population structure for P. syringae. Some environmental strains have repertoires of type III-secreted effectors very similar to Pto, are almost as aggressive on tomato as Pto, but have a wider host range than typical Pto strains. We conclude that crop pathogens may have evolved through a small number of evolutionary events from a population of less aggressive ancestors with a wider host range present in nonagricultural environments.

  12. Population-genomic insights into emergence, crop adaptation and dissemination of Pseudomonas syringae pathogens.

    PubMed

    Monteil, Caroline L; Yahara, Koji; Studholme, David J; Mageiros, Leonardos; Méric, Guillaume; Swingle, Bryan; Morris, Cindy E; Vinatzer, Boris A; Sheppard, Samuel K

    2016-10-01

    Many bacterial pathogens are well characterized but, in some cases, little is known about the populations from which they emerged. This limits understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying disease. The crop pathogen Pseudomonas syringae sensu lato has been widely isolated from the environment, including wild plants and components of the water cycle, and causes disease in several economically important crops. Here, we compared genome sequences of 45 P. syringae crop pathogen outbreak strains with 69 closely related environmental isolates. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed that crop pathogens emerged many times independently from environmental populations. Unexpectedly, differences in gene content between environmental populations and outbreak strains were minimal with most virulence genes present in both. However, a genome-wide association study identified a small number of genes, including the type III effector genes hopQ1 and hopD1, to be associated with crop pathogens, but not with environmental populations, suggesting that this small group of genes may play an important role in crop disease emergence. Intriguingly, genome-wide analysis of homologous recombination revealed that the locus Psyr 0346, predicted to encode a protein that confers antibiotic resistance, has been frequently exchanged among lineages and thus may contribute to pathogen fitness. Finally, we found that isolates from diseased crops and from components of the water cycle, collected during the same crop disease epidemic, form a single population. This provides the strongest evidence yet that precipitation and irrigation water are an overlooked inoculum source for disease epidemics caused by P. syringae.

  13. The Coronatine Toxin of Pseudomonas syringae Is a Multifunctional Suppressor of Arabidopsis Defense[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xueqing; Cheng, Jiye; Gangadharan, Anju; Mackey, David

    2012-01-01

    The phytotoxin coronatine (COR) promotes various aspects of Pseudomonas syringae virulence, including invasion through stomata, growth in the apoplast, and induction of disease symptoms. COR is a structural mimic of active jasmonic acid (JA) conjugates. Known activities of COR are mediated through its binding to the F-box–containing JA coreceptor CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1. By analyzing the interaction of P. syringae mutants with Arabidopsis thaliana mutants, we demonstrate that, in the apoplastic space of Arabidopsis, COR is a multifunctional defense suppressor. COR and the critical P. syringae type III effector HopM1 target distinct signaling steps to suppress callose deposition. In addition to its well-documented ability to suppress salicylic acid (SA) signaling, COR suppresses an SA-independent pathway contributing to callose deposition by reducing accumulation of an indole glucosinolate upstream of the activity of the PEN2 myrosinase. COR also suppresses callose deposition and promotes bacterial growth in coi1 mutant plants, indicating that COR may have multiple targets inside plant cells. PMID:23204405

  14. Occurrence of thermoregulation of genes involved in coronatine biosynthesis among various Pseudomonas syringae strains.

    PubMed

    Rohde, B H; Pohlack, B; Ullrich, M S

    1998-01-01

    Several pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae produce the polyketide phytotoxin coronatine (COR). In the bacterial blight pathogen of soybean, P. syringae pv. glycinea PG4180, COR is produced at high levels at 18 degrees C whereas no toxin is synthesized at 28 degrees C. Previously, activation of three promoters inside the COR biosynthetic gene cluster by a modified two-component regulatory system was shown to influence thermoregulation of COR biosynthesis. Using phenotypic determination of COR synthesis, a transcriptional reporter gene fusion, and Western blot analysis, we screened a representative number of natural isolates of P. syringae for effects of temperature on expression of cmaA, cmaB, and cmaT, which encode enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of COR. Thermoregulation of cmaABT expression was frequent among the tested strains. However, intensities of the temperature effects varied widely. Coronatine synsthesis was found to differ at up to six-fold among COR producing strains. There was no strain which synthesized COR at 28 degrees C although some of them showed increased basal cmaABT promoter activities at this temperature. Transcriptional fusions between the cmaABT promoter and a promoterless reporter gene were found to be down regulated at 28 degrees C only in COR producing strains but not in the non-producing strains tested. The geographic origin of the bacterial strains did not influence the occurrence of temperature-dependent gene expression.

  15. Multiple loci of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae are involved in pathogenicity on bean: restoration of one lesion-deficient mutant requires two tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Rich, J J; Willis, D K

    1997-01-01

    A mutational analysis of lesion-forming ability was undertaken in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a, causal agent of bacterial brown spot disease of bean. Following a screen of 6,401 Tn5-containing derivatives of B728a on bean pods, 26 strains that did not form disease lesions were identified. Nine of the mutant strains were defective in the ability to elicit the hypersensitive reaction (HR) and were shown to contain Tn5 insertions within the P. syringae pv. syringae hrp region. Ten HR+ mutants were defective in the production of the toxin syringomycin, and a region of the chromosome implicated in the biosynthesis of syringomycin was deleted in a subset of these mutants. The remaining seven lesion-defective mutants retained the ability to produce protease and syringomycin. Marker exchange mutagenesis confirmed that the Tn5 insertion was causal to the mutant phenotype in several lesion-defective, HR+ strains. KW239, a lesion- and syringomycin-deficient mutant, was characterized at the molecular level. Sequence analysis of the chromosomal region flanking the Tn5 within KW239 revealed strong similarities to a number of known Escherichia coli gene products and DNA sequences: the nusA operon, including the complete initiator tRNA(Met) gene, metY; a tRNA(Leu) gene; the tpiA gene product; and the MrsA protein. Removal of sequences containing the two potential tRNA genes prevented restoration of mutant KW239 in trans. The Tn5 insertions within the lesion-deficient strains examined, including KW239, were not closely linked to each other or to the lemA or gacA genes previously identified as involved in lesion formation by P. syringae pv. syringae. PMID:9079910

  16. Dynamic Evolution of Pathogenicity Revealed by Sequencing and Comparative Genomics of 19 Pseudomonas syringae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Romanchuk, Artur; Chang, Jeff H.; Mukhtar, M. Shahid; Cherkis, Karen; Roach, Jeff; Grant, Sarah R.; Jones, Corbin D.; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2011-01-01

    Closely related pathogens may differ dramatically in host range, but the molecular, genetic, and evolutionary basis for these differences remains unclear. In many Gram- negative bacteria, including the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae, type III effectors (TTEs) are essential for pathogenicity, instrumental in structuring host range, and exhibit wide diversity between strains. To capture the dynamic nature of virulence gene repertoires across P. syringae, we screened 11 diverse strains for novel TTE families and coupled this nearly saturating screen with the sequencing and assembly of 14 phylogenetically diverse isolates from a broad collection of diseased host plants. TTE repertoires vary dramatically in size and content across all P. syringae clades; surprisingly few TTEs are conserved and present in all strains. Those that are likely provide basal requirements for pathogenicity. We demonstrate that functional divergence within one conserved locus, hopM1, leads to dramatic differences in pathogenicity, and we demonstrate that phylogenetics-informed mutagenesis can be used to identify functionally critical residues of TTEs. The dynamism of the TTE repertoire is mirrored by diversity in pathways affecting the synthesis of secreted phytotoxins, highlighting the likely role of both types of virulence factors in determination of host range. We used these 14 draft genome sequences, plus five additional genome sequences previously reported, to identify the core genome for P. syringae and we compared this core to that of two closely related non-pathogenic pseudomonad species. These data revealed the recent acquisition of a 1 Mb megaplasmid by a sub-clade of cucumber pathogens. This megaplasmid encodes a type IV secretion system and a diverse set of unknown proteins, which dramatically increases both the genomic content of these strains and the pan-genome of the species. PMID:21799664

  17. The Mangotoxin Biosynthetic Operon (mbo) Is Specifically Distributed within Pseudomonas syringae Genomospecies 1 and Was Acquired Only Once during Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Víctor J.; Gutiérrez-Barranquero, José A.; Arrebola, Eva; Bardaji, Leire; Codina, Juan C.; de Vicente, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Mangotoxin production was first described in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains. A phenotypic characterization of 94 P. syringae strains was carried out to determine the genetic evolution of the mangotoxin biosynthetic operon (mbo). We designed a PCR primer pair specific for the mbo operon to examine its distribution within the P. syringae complex. These primers amplified a 692-bp DNA fragment from 52 mangotoxin-producing strains and from 7 non-mangotoxin-producing strains that harbor the mbo operon, whereas 35 non-mangotoxin-producing strains did not yield any amplification. This, together with the analysis of draft genomes, allowed the identification of the mbo operon in five pathovars (pathovars aptata, avellanae, japonica, pisi, and syringae), all of which belong to genomospecies 1, suggesting a limited distribution of the mbo genes in the P. syringae complex. Phylogenetic analyses using partial sequences from housekeeping genes differentiated three groups within genomospecies 1. All of the strains containing the mbo operon clustered in groups I and II, whereas those lacking the operon clustered in group III; however, the relative branching order of these three groups is dependent on the genes used to construct the phylogeny. The mbo operon maintains synteny and is inserted in the same genomic location, with high sequence conservation around the insertion point, for all the strains in groups I and II. These data support the idea that the mbo operon was acquired horizontally and only once by the ancestor of groups I and II from genomospecies 1 within the P. syringae complex. PMID:23144138

  18. The mangotoxin biosynthetic operon (mbo) is specifically distributed within Pseudomonas syringae genomospecies 1 and was acquired only once during evolution.

    PubMed

    Carrión, Víctor J; Gutiérrez-Barranquero, José A; Arrebola, Eva; Bardaji, Leire; Codina, Juan C; de Vicente, Antonio; Cazorla, Francisco M; Murillo, Jesús

    2013-02-01

    Mangotoxin production was first described in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains. A phenotypic characterization of 94 P. syringae strains was carried out to determine the genetic evolution of the mangotoxin biosynthetic operon (mbo). We designed a PCR primer pair specific for the mbo operon to examine its distribution within the P. syringae complex. These primers amplified a 692-bp DNA fragment from 52 mangotoxin-producing strains and from 7 non-mangotoxin-producing strains that harbor the mbo operon, whereas 35 non-mangotoxin-producing strains did not yield any amplification. This, together with the analysis of draft genomes, allowed the identification of the mbo operon in five pathovars (pathovars aptata, avellanae, japonica, pisi, and syringae), all of which belong to genomospecies 1, suggesting a limited distribution of the mbo genes in the P. syringae complex. Phylogenetic analyses using partial sequences from housekeeping genes differentiated three groups within genomospecies 1. All of the strains containing the mbo operon clustered in groups I and II, whereas those lacking the operon clustered in group III; however, the relative branching order of these three groups is dependent on the genes used to construct the phylogeny. The mbo operon maintains synteny and is inserted in the same genomic location, with high sequence conservation around the insertion point, for all the strains in groups I and II. These data support the idea that the mbo operon was acquired horizontally and only once by the ancestor of groups I and II from genomospecies 1 within the P. syringae complex.

  19. Compartment-specific antioxidative defense in Arabidopsis against virulent and avirulent Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Großkinsky, Dominik K; Koffler, Barbara E; Roitsch, Thomas; Maier, Romana; Zechmann, Bernd

    2012-07-01

    The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during biotic stress is either part of a hypersensitive response of the plant or induced directly by the pathogen. Antioxidants such as ascorbate and glutathione counteract the accumulation of ROS and are part of the defense reaction. The aim of the present study was to investigate the compartment-specific importance of ascorbate and glutathione during a virulent and avirulent Pseudomonas syringae infection in Arabidopsis thaliana. Peroxisomes were found to be the hotspot for glutathione accumulation reaching 452% and 258% of control levels 24 h postinoculation during the virulent and avirulent infection, respectively. An accumulation of ascorbate could also be observed in vacuoles during Pseudomonas syringae infection, whereas glutathione remained absent in this cell compartment. Neither glutathione nor ascorbate accumulated in the apoplast during pathogen infection demonstrating an only negligible role of these antioxidants in the apoplast during pathogen infection. Compartment-specific changes followed a recently proposed stress model with an increase of ascorbate and glutathione in most cell compartments at the early stages of infection and a strong drop at the later stage of infection when a strong accumulation of ROS and symptoms occurred in the leaves. This study highlights the importance of certain cell compartments and antioxidants in general for the protection of pathogen-induced ROS accumulation.

  20. Efficiency of procedures for induction and cultivation of Pseudomonas syringae pv. pisi L-form.

    PubMed

    Elvira-Recuenco, Margarita; van Vuurde, Jim W L

    2003-01-01

    The L-form of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola has been proved to induce resistance to bean halo blight. Various procedures were tested to induce the L-form of Pseudomonas syringae pv. pisi for its potential use as biocontrol agent of pea bacterial blight. Cell-wall deficient cells were induced in a liquid medium with penicillin following a protocol described for P. s. pv. phaseolicola. Cell growth on solid induction medium developed as typical granular and vacuolated structures, and characteristic colonies were observed in the first transfer. However, there was poor growth in subsequent transfers and some reversion to the parental type. To improve the induction procedure, the following new procedures were applied: (1) viability of cells was monitored during induction. The optimum induction time in liquid medium with penicillin was lower for pv. pisi than for pv. phaseolicola. Viability of L-forms in solid induction medium with penicillin was low and decreased in time. (2) the inducer ticarcillin was combined with clavulanic acid, which prevented the reversion to the parental type and (3) a range of concentrations of penicillin and ticarcillin/clavulanic acid was applied by the spiral gradient endpoint method for calculation of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC). Based on the results from these tests an induction method for P. s. pv. pisi L-form is proposed and the relevance of L-form is discussed for practice.

  1. Compartment-Specific Antioxidative Defense in Arabidopsis Against Virulent and Avirulent Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Großkinsky, Dominik K.; Koffler, Barbara E.; Roitsch, Thomas; Maier, Romana; Zechmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during biotic stress is either part of a hypersensitive response of the plant or induced directly by the pathogen. Antioxidants such as ascorbate and glutathione counteract the accumulation of ROS and are part of the defense reaction. The aim of the present study was to investigate the compartment-specific importance of ascorbate and glutathione during a virulent and avirulent Pseudomonas syringae infection in Arabidopsis thaliana. Peroxisomes were found to be the hotspot for glutathione accumulation reaching 452% and 258% of control levels 24 h postinoculation during the virulent and avirulent infection, respectively. An accumulation of ascorbate could also be observed in vacuoles during Pseudomonas syringae infection, whereas glutathione remained absent in this cell compartment. Neither glutathione nor ascorbate accumulated in the apoplast during pathogen infection demonstrating an only negligible role of these antioxidants in the apoplast during pathogen infection. Compartment-specific changes followed a recently proposed stress model with an increase of ascorbate and glutathione in most cell compartments at the early stages of infection and a strong drop at the later stage of infection when a strong accumulation of ROS and symptoms occurred in the leaves. This study highlights the importance of certain cell compartments and antioxidants in general for the protection of pathogen-induced ROS accumulation. PMID:22571419

  2. A Boolean Model of the Pseudomonas syringae hrp Regulon Predicts a Tightly Regulated System

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Daniel; Studholme, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The Type III secretion system (TTSS) is a protein secretion machinery used by certain gram-negative bacterial pathogens of plants and animals to deliver effector molecules to the host and is at the core of the ability to cause disease. Extensive molecular and biochemical study has revealed the components and their interactions within this system but reductive approaches do not consider the dynamical properties of the system as a whole. In order to gain a better understanding of these dynamical behaviours and to create a basis for the refinement of the experimentally derived knowledge we created a Boolean model of the regulatory interactions within the hrp regulon of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato strain DC3000 Pseudomonas syringae. We compared simulations of the model with experimental data and found them to be largely in accordance, though the hrpV node shows some differences in state changes to that expected. Our simulations also revealed interesting dynamical properties not previously predicted. The model predicts that the hrp regulon is a biologically stable two-state system, with each of the stable states being strongly attractive, a feature indicative of selection for a tightly regulated and responsive system. The model predicts that the state of the GacS/GacA node confers control, a prediction that is consistent with experimental observations that the protein has a role as master regulator. Simulated gene “knock out” experiments with the model predict that HrpL is a central information processing point within the network. PMID:20169167

  3. A draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain T1 reveals a repertoire of type III related genes significantly divergent from that of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato strain DC3000

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Comparative genomics of pathogens with different host specificity can be used to identify genes related to host range determination. A draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pto) T1, non-pathogenic on Arabidopsis thaliana, was obtained for this purpose and compared to the genome o...

  4. The type III effector repertoire of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a and its role in survival and disease on host and non-host plants.

    PubMed

    Vinatzer, Boris A; Teitzel, Gail M; Lee, Min-Woo; Jelenska, Joanna; Hotton, Sara; Fairfax, Keke; Jenrette, Jenny; Greenberg, Jean T

    2006-10-01

    The bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae injects a large repertoire of effector proteins into plant cells using a type III secretion apparatus. Effectors can trigger or suppress defences in a host-dependent fashion. Host defences are often accompanied by programmed cell death, while interference with defences is sometimes associated with cell death suppression. We previously predicted the effector repertoire of the sequenced bean pathogen P. syringae pv. syringae (Psy) B728a using bioinformatics. Here we show that PsyB728a is also pathogenic on the model plant species Nicotiana benthamiana (tobacco). We confirm our effector predictions and clone the nearly complete PsyB728a effector repertoire. We find effectors to have different cell death-modulating activities and distinct roles during the infection of the susceptible bean and tobacco hosts. Unexpectedly, we do not find a strict correlation between cell death-eliciting and defence-eliciting activity and between cell death-suppressing activity and defence-interfering activity. Furthermore, we find several effectors with quantitative avirulence activities on their susceptible hosts, but with growth-promoting effects on Arabidopsis thaliana, a species on which PsyB728a does not cause disease. We conclude that P. syringae strains may have evolved large effector repertoires to extend their host ranges or increase their survival on various unrelated plant species.

  5. Molecular cloning, characterization, and mutagenesis of a pel gene from Pseudomonas syringae pv. lachyrmans encoding a member of the Erwinia chrysanthemi pelADE family of pectate lyases.

    PubMed

    Bauer, D W; Collmer, A

    1997-04-01

    The pelS gene from Pseudomonas syringae pv. lachrymans 859 was cloned by heterologous expression in nonpectolytic P. syringae pv. syringae BUVS1, using genomic DNA libraries constructed with two novel broad-host-range cosmid vectors, pCPP34 and pCPP47. Screening of P. syringae pv. syringae transconjugants for the ability to pit pectate media at pH 6.0 and 8.5 yielded several overlapping clones of the same DNA region. Ultrathin-layer isoelectric focusing gels, activity-stained with diagnostically buffered substrate overlays, revealed that this region encoded a single pectate lyase (PelS) with a pI of 9.4. pelS was subcloned from cosmid pCPP5020 and sequenced, revealing it to encode a member of the Erwinia chrysanthemi PelADE family, with highest similarity to Pseudomonas viridiflava PelV. A pelS probe hybridized at high stringency in DNA gel blots with total DNA from P. syringae pv. lachrymans strains 859 and Pla5, P. syringae pv. tabaci, P. syringae pv. phaseolicola, P. syringae pv. glycinea, P. fluorescens (marginalis), P. viridiflava, and Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, but not with P. syringae pv. pisi, P. syringae pv. syringae, P. syringae pv. tomato, P. syringae pv. papulans, E. chrysanthemi, or Ralstonia (Pseudomonas or Burkholderia) solanacearum. The PelS sequence revealed an N-terminal signal peptide, whose processing in Escherichia coli was confirmed by protein sequence analysis. PelS was similar to E. chrysanthemi PelE in its substrate preference and ability to reduce the viscosity of pectate and to macerate potato tuber tissue. A pelS:: omega Kmr mutation was marker-exchanged into P. syringae pv. lachrymans Pla5, pelS was also subcloned into the broad-host-range expression vector pML122 under control of the vector nptII promoter, and then transformed into P. syringae pv. lachrymans Pla5 to produce a strain overproducing PelS. Necrotic lesions developed in cotyledons following inoculation with all of the P. syringae pv. lachrymans Pla5 derivatives

  6. Virulence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is modulated through the Catabolite Repression Control protein Crc

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas syringae (P.s.) infects diverse plant species and several P.s. pathovars have been used in the study of molecular events that occur during plant-microbe interactions. Although the relationship between bacterial metabolism, nutrient acquisition and virulence has attracted increasing atten...

  7. The conserved hypothetical protein PSPTO_3957 is essential for virulence in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae accounts for substantial crop losses and is considered an important agricultural issue. Although many genes involved in interactions of this pathogen with hosts have been identified and characterized, little is known about processes involving bacterial metabol...

  8. Damage to the cytoplasmic membrane and cell death caused by dodine (dodecylguanidine monoacetate) in Pseudomonas syringae ATCC 12271.

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, J P

    1991-01-01

    Treatment of Pseudomonas syringae cells with low concentrations of the fungicide dodecylguanidine monoacetate (dodine) resulted in cell death and leakage of K+, UV-absorbing materials, and ribose-containing molecules. The results suggest that dodine causes gross and extensive damage to the cytoplasmic membrane, which is probably implicated in the death of cells. PMID:1902648

  9. Novel Pseudomonas syringae strains associated with leaf spot diseases on watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and squash (Cucurbita pepo) in California

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2006 and 2011, bacteria, fluorescent on KMB, were isolated from leaf spots of greenhouse-grown watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and field-grown squash (Cucurbita pepo) in coastal California. Biochemical characterization of the isolates indicated that they belonged to Pseudomonas syringae. Multilocu...

  10. Mutations in y-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transaminase genes in plants or Pseudomonas syringae reduce bacterial virulence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is a bacterial pathogen of Arabidopsis and tomato that grows in the apoplast. The non-protein amino acid '-amino butyric acid (GABA) is produced by Arabidopsis and tomato and is the most abundant amino acid in the apoplastic fluid of tomato. The DC3000 genome h...

  11. Virulence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is influenced by the catabolite repression control protein Crc

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas syringae infects diverse plant species and is widely used as a model system in the study of effector function and the molecular basis of plant diseases. Although the relationship between bacterial metabolism, nutrient acquisition, and virulence has attracted increasing attention in bacte...

  12. Iron concentration limits growth rate and the expression of virulence factors in hrp-inducing minimal medium with Pseudomonas syringae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although chemically-defined media have been developed and widely used to study the expression of virulence factors in the model plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, it has been difficult to link specific medium components to the induction response. Using a chemostat system, we found that iron is th...

  13. Regulons of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 iron starvation sigma factors PSPTO_0444, PSPTO_1209 and PSPTO_1286

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas syringae is a globally dispersed environmental bacteria that is well known for its ability to cause destructive plant diseases in agricultural and horticultural settings. The ability of bacteria to survive in diverse environments is correlated with a large number of transcription regulat...

  14. The alternative sigma factor AlgT, but not alginate synthesis, promotes in planta multiplication of Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Alexander; Weingart, Helge; Ullrich, Matthias S

    2008-02-01

    The phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea produces the exopolysaccharide (EPS) alginate, which is thought to function in epiphytic fitness and virulence. A key regulator for alginate biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. syringae is the alternative sigma factor AlgT (sigma(22)). In this study, the contribution of alginate synthesis and AlgT to in planta epiphytic fitness and virulence of P. syringae was examined. Alginate biosynthesis mutants were generated for the P. syringae pv. glycinea strains PG4180 and PG4180.muc, representing a comprehensive set of alginate- and AlgT-positive or -negative derivatives. Analysis of in vitro and in planta phenotypes revealed that AlgT strongly promoted in planta growth, survival and symptom development, but decreased the ability to grow in vitro. In contrast, alginate biosynthesis had only marginal impact. Quantitative in vitro and in planta gene expression analyses for alginate biosynthesis and algT were carried out at two temperatures in AlgT-negative and -positive backgrounds. algT as well as algD gene expression was AlgT-dependent, plant-inducible and temperature-dependent, with higher expression at 18 compared to 28 degrees C; however, no temperature dependence was observed in vitro. Our data suggest that AlgT may act as a global regulator for virulence and in planta fitness traits of P. syringae independent of its role in EPS biosynthesis.

  15. A high-throughput chemical screen for resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Karl; Ckurshumova, Wenzislava; Peek, James; Desveaux, Darrell

    2008-05-01

    The study of plant pathogenesis and the development of effective treatments to protect plants from diseases could be greatly facilitated by a high-throughput pathosystem to evaluate small-molecule libraries for inhibitors of pathogen virulence. The interaction between the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas syringae and Arabidopsis thaliana is a model for plant pathogenesis. However, a robust high-throughput assay to score the outcome of this interaction is currently lacking. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis seedlings incubated with P. syringae in liquid culture display a macroscopically visible 'bleaching' symptom within 5 days of infection. Bleaching is associated with a loss of chlorophyll from cotyledonary tissues, and is correlated with bacterial virulence. Gene-for-gene resistance is absent in the liquid environment, possibly because of the suppression of the hypersensitive response under these conditions. Importantly, bleaching can be prevented by treating seedlings with known inducers of plant defence, such as salicylic acid (SA) or a basal defence-inducing peptide of bacterial flagellin (flg22) prior to inoculation. Based on these observations, we have devised a high-throughput liquid assay using standard 96-well plates to investigate the P. syringae-Arabidopsis interaction. An initial screen of small molecules active on Arabidopsis revealed a family of sulfanilamide compounds that afford protection against the bleaching symptom. The most active compound, sulfamethoxazole, also reduced in planta bacterial growth when applied to mature soil-grown plants. The whole-organism liquid assay provides a novel approach to probe chemical libraries in a high-throughput manner for compounds that reduce bacterial virulence in plants.

  16. The Pseudomonas syringae effector protein HopZ1a suppresses effector-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Guevara, Carlos M; Tornero, Pablo; Ruiz-Albert, Javier; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2010-09-01

    *The Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae type III effector HopZ1a is a member of the HopZ effector family of cysteine-proteases that triggers immunity in Arabidopsis. This immunity is dependent on HopZ1a cysteine-protease activity, and independent of known resistance genes. We have previously shown that HopZ1a-triggered immunity is partially additive to that triggered by AvrRpt2. These partially additive effects could be caused by at least two mechanisms: their signalling pathways share a common element(s), or one effector interferes with the response triggered by the other. *Here, we investigate the molecular basis for the partially additive effect displayed by AvrRpt2- and HopZ1a-triggered immunities, by analysing competitive indices, hypersensitive response and symptom induction, PR-1 accumulation, expression of PR genes, and systemic acquired resistance (SAR) induction. *Partially additive effects between these defence responses require HopZ1a cysteine-protease activity, and also take place between HopZ1a and AvrRps4 or AvrRpm1-triggered responses. We establish that HopZ1a-triggered immunity is independent of salicylic acid (SA), EDS1, jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET)-dependent pathways, and show that HopZ1a suppresses the induction of PR-1 and PR-5 associated with P. syringae pv tomato (Pto)-triggered effector-triggered immunity (ETI)-like defences, AvrRpt2-triggered immunity, and Pto or Pto (avrRpt2) activation of SAR, and that suppression requires HopZ1a cysteine-protease activity. *Our results indicate that HopZ1a triggers an unusual resistance independent of known pathways and suppresses SA and EDS1-dependent resistance.

  17. Construction and Use of a Nonradioactive DNA Hybridization Probe for Detection of Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato on Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Cuppels, D. A.; Moore, R. A.; Morris, V. L.

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, the causal agent for bacterial speck of tomato, produces the phytotoxin coronatine. A 5.3-kilobase XhoI fragment from the chromosomal region controlling toxin production was cloned into the plasmid pGB2, and the resulting recombinant plasmid, pTPR1, was tested for its ability to serve as a diagnostic probe for P. syringae pv. tomato. In a survey of 75 plant-associated bacteria, pTPR1 hybridized exclusively to those strains that produced coronatine. The detection limit for this probe, which was labeled with the Chemiprobe nonradioactive reporter system, was approximately 4 × 103 CFU of lesion bacteria. During the 1989 growing season, a total of 258 leaf and fruit lesions from nine tomato fields were screened for P. syringae pv. tomato by using pTPR1 and the culture method of detection. The best agreement between the two methods, 90%, occurred early in the season with samples taken from relatively young (5-week-old) plants. Young plants also had a higher percentage of P. syringae pv. tomato-positive lesions. P. syringae pv. tomato was the only coronatine producer recovered from the nine tomato fields. All 244 P. syringae pv. tomato strains isolated during this study reacted strongly with the probe. The P. syringae pv. tomato population of healthy field tomato leaves was determined by a pTPR1 colony hybridization procedure. Every probe-positive colony that was isolated and characterized was identified as P. syringae pv. tomato. The pTPR1 probe should expedite disease diagnosis and facilitate epidemiological studies of this pathogen. It also should aid in screening transplant seedlings for bacterial speck infestation. Images PMID:16348215

  18. Comprehensive analysis of draft genomes of two closely related Pseudomonas syringae phylogroup 2b strains infecting mono and dicotyledon host plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In recent years, the damage caused by bacterial pathogens to major crops has been increasing worldwide. Pseudomonas syringae is a widespread bacterial species that infects almost all major crops. Different P. syringae strains use a wide range of biochemical mechanisms, including phytotoxins and effe...

  19. Type III secretion chaperones of Pseudomonas syringae protect effectors from Lon-associated degradation.

    PubMed

    Losada, Liliana C; Hutcheson, Steven W

    2005-02-01

    The hrp type III secretion system (TTSS) of Pseudomonas syringae translocates effector proteins into the cytoplasm of host cells. Proteolysis of HrpR by Lon has been shown to negatively regulate the hrp TTSS. The inability to bypass Lon-associated effects on the regulatory system by ectopic expression of the known regulators suggested a second site of action for Lon in TTSS-dependent effector secretion. In this study we report that TTSS-dependent effectors are subject to the proteolytic degradation that appears to be rate-limiting to secretion. The half-lives of the effectors AvrPto, AvrRpt2, HopPsyA, HopPsyB1, HopPtoB2, HopPsyV1, HopPtoG and HopPtoM were substantially higher in bacteria lacking Lon. TTSS-dependent secretion of several effectors was enhanced from Lon mutants. A primary role for chaperones appears to be protection of effectors from Lon-associated degradation prior to secretion. When coexpressed with their cognate chaperone, HopPsyB1, HopPsyV1 and HopPtoM were at least 10 times more stable in strains expressing Lon. Distinct Lon-targeting and chaperone-binding domains were identified in HopPtoM. The results imply that Lon is involved at two distinct levels in the regulation of the P. syringae TTSS: regulation of assembly of the secreton and modulation of effector secretion.

  20. Genomic Plasticity Enables Phenotypic Variation of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhongmeng; Stodghill, Paul V.; Myers, Christopher R.; Lam, Hanh; Wei, Hai-Lei; Chakravarthy, Suma; Kvitko, Brian H.; Collmer, Alan; Cartinhour, Samuel W.; Schweitzer, Peter; Swingle, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing revealed the presence of a genomic anomaly in the region of 4.7 to 4.9 Mb of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 genome. The average read depth coverage of Pst DC3000 whole genome sequencing results suggested that a 165 kb segment of the chromosome had doubled in copy number. Further analysis confirmed the 165 kb duplication and that the two copies were arranged as a direct tandem repeat. Examination of the corresponding locus in Pst NCPPB1106, the parent strain of Pst DC3000, suggested that the 165 kb duplication most likely formed after the two strains diverged via transposition of an ISPsy5 insertion sequence (IS) followed by unequal crossing over between ISPsy5 elements at each end of the duplicated region. Deletion of one copy of the 165 kb region demonstrated that the duplication facilitated enhanced growth in some culture conditions, but did not affect pathogenic growth in host tomato plants. These types of chromosomal structures are predicted to be unstable and we have observed resolution of the 165 kb duplication to single copy and its subsequent re-duplication. These data demonstrate the role of IS elements in recombination events that facilitate genomic reorganization in P. syringae. PMID:24516535

  1. Differential Coexpression Analysis Reveals Extensive Rewiring of Arabidopsis Gene Coexpression in Response to Pseudomonas syringae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhenhong; Dong, Xiaobao; Li, Zhi-Gang; He, Fei; Zhang, Ziding

    2016-01-01

    Plant defense responses to pathogens involve massive transcriptional reprogramming. Recently, differential coexpression analysis has been developed to study the rewiring of gene networks through microarray data, which is becoming an important complement to traditional differential expression analysis. Using time-series microarray data of Arabidopsis thaliana infected with Pseudomonas syringae, we analyzed Arabidopsis defense responses to P. syringae through differential coexpression analysis. Overall, we found that differential coexpression was a common phenomenon of plant immunity. Genes that were frequently involved in differential coexpression tend to be related to plant immune responses. Importantly, many of those genes have similar average expression levels between normal plant growth and pathogen infection but have different coexpression partners. By integrating the Arabidopsis regulatory network into our analysis, we identified several transcription factors that may be regulators of differential coexpression during plant immune responses. We also observed extensive differential coexpression between genes within the same metabolic pathways. Several metabolic pathways, such as photosynthesis light reactions, exhibited significant changes in expression correlation between normal growth and pathogen infection. Taken together, differential coexpression analysis provides a new strategy for analyzing transcriptional data related to plant defense responses and new insights into the understanding of plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:27721457

  2. Biophysical characterization of soluble Pseudomonas syringae ice nucleation protein InaZ fragments.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu Jin; Song, HyoJin; Lee, Chang Woo; Ly, Nguyễn Hoàng; Joo, Sang-Woo; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Kim, Soon-Jong; Park, SangYoun

    2017-01-01

    Ice nucleation protein (INP) with its functional domain consisting of multiple 48-residue repeat units effectively induces super-cooled water into ice. Circular dichroism and infrared deconvolution analyses on a soluble 240-residue fragment of Pseudomonas syringae InaZ (InaZ240) containing five 48-residue repeat units indicated that it is mostly composed of β-sheet and random coil. Analytical ultracentrifugation suggested that InaZ240 behaves as a monomer of an elongated ellipsoid. However, InaZ240 showed only minimum ice binding compared to anti-freeze proteins. Other P. syringae InaZ proteins with more 48-residue repeat units were made, in which the largest soluble fragment obtainable was an InaZ with twelve 48-residue repeat units. Size-exclusion chromatography analyses further suggested that the overall shape of the expressed InaZ fragments is pH-dependent, which becomes compact as the numbers of 48-residue repeat unit increase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pseudomonas syringae Differentiates into Phenotypically Distinct Subpopulations During Colonization of a Plant Host.

    PubMed

    Rufián, José S; Sánchez-Romero, María-Antonia; López-Márquez, Diego; Macho, Alberto P; Mansfield, John W; Arnold, Dawn L; Ruiz-Albert, Javier; Casadesús, Josep; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial microcolonies with heterogeneous sizes are formed during colonization of Phaseolus vulgaris by Pseudomonas syringae. Heterogeneous expression of structural and regulatory components of the P. syringae type III secretion system (T3SS), essential for colonization of the host apoplast and disease development, is likewise detected within the plant apoplast. T3SS expression is bistable in the homogeneous environment of nutrient-limited T3SS-inducing medium, suggesting that subpopulation formation is not a response to different environmental cues. T3SS bistability is reversible, indicating a non-genetic origin, and the T3SS(HIGH) and T3SS(LOW) subpopulations show differences in virulence. T3SS bistability requires the transcriptional activator HrpL, the double negative regulatory loop established by HrpV and HrpG, and may be enhanced through a positive feedback loop involving HrpA, the main component of the T3SS pilus. To our knowledge, this is the first example of phenotypic heterogeneity in the expression of virulence determinants during colonization of a non-mammalian host. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The form of nitrogen nutrition affects resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola in tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kapuganti J.; Mur, Luis A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Different forms of nitrogen (N) fertilizer affect disease development; however, this study investigated the effects of N forms on the hypersensitivity response (HR)—a pathogen-elicited cell death linked to resistance. HR-eliciting Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola was infiltrated into leaves of tobacco fed with either or . The speed of cell death was faster in -fed compared with -fed plants, which correlated, respectively, with increased and decreased resistance. Nitric oxide (NO) can be generated by nitrate reductase (NR) to influence the formation of the HR. NO generation was reduced in -fed plants where N assimilation bypassed the NR step. This was similar to that elicited by the disease-forming P. syringae pv. tabaci strain, further suggesting that resistance was compromised with feeding. PR1a is a biomarker for the defence signal salicylic acid (SA), and expression was reduced in -fed compared with fed plants at 24h after inoculation. This pattern correlated with actual SA measurements. Conversely, total amino acid, cytosolic and apoplastic glucose/fructose and sucrose were elevated in - treated plants. Gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy was used to characterize metabolic events following different N treatments. Following nutrition, polyamine biosynthesis was predominant, whilst after nutrition, flux appeared to be shifted towards the production of 4-aminobutyric acid. The mechanisms whereby feeding enhances SA, NO, and polyamine-mediated HR-linked defence whilst these are compromised with , which also increases the availability of nutrients to pathogens, are discussed. PMID:23230025

  5. Differential Coexpression Analysis Reveals Extensive Rewiring of Arabidopsis Gene Coexpression in Response to Pseudomonas syringae Infection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhenhong; Dong, Xiaobao; Li, Zhi-Gang; He, Fei; Zhang, Ziding

    2016-10-10

    Plant defense responses to pathogens involve massive transcriptional reprogramming. Recently, differential coexpression analysis has been developed to study the rewiring of gene networks through microarray data, which is becoming an important complement to traditional differential expression analysis. Using time-series microarray data of Arabidopsis thaliana infected with Pseudomonas syringae, we analyzed Arabidopsis defense responses to P. syringae through differential coexpression analysis. Overall, we found that differential coexpression was a common phenomenon of plant immunity. Genes that were frequently involved in differential coexpression tend to be related to plant immune responses. Importantly, many of those genes have similar average expression levels between normal plant growth and pathogen infection but have different coexpression partners. By integrating the Arabidopsis regulatory network into our analysis, we identified several transcription factors that may be regulators of differential coexpression during plant immune responses. We also observed extensive differential coexpression between genes within the same metabolic pathways. Several metabolic pathways, such as photosynthesis light reactions, exhibited significant changes in expression correlation between normal growth and pathogen infection. Taken together, differential coexpression analysis provides a new strategy for analyzing transcriptional data related to plant defense responses and new insights into the understanding of plant-pathogen interactions.

  6. The hygroscopic biosurfactant syringafactin produced by Pseudomonas syringae enhances fitness on leaf surfaces during fluctuating humidity.

    PubMed

    Burch, Adrien Y; Zeisler, Viktoria; Yokota, Kenji; Schreiber, Lukas; Lindow, Steven E

    2014-07-01

    Biosurfactant production by bacteria on leaf surfaces is poorly documented, and its role in this habitat has not been explored. Therefore, we investigated the production and fitness benefits of syringafactin by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a on leaves. Syringafactin largely adsorbed to the waxy leaf cuticle both when topically applied and when produced by cells on plants. Syringafactin increased the rate of diffusion of water across isolated cuticles and attracted water to hydrophobic surfaces exposed to high relative humidity due to its hygroscopic properties. While a wild-type and syringafactin mutant exhibited similar fitness on bean leaves incubated in static conditions, the fitness of the wild-type strain was higher under fluctuating humidity conditions typical of field conditions. When co-inoculated onto either the host plant bean or the non-host plant romaine lettuce, the proportion of viable wild-type cells recovered from plants relative to that of a mutant unable to produce syringafactin increased 10% over 10 days. The number of disease lesions incited by the wild-type strain on bean was also significantly higher than that of the syringafactin mutant. The production of hygroscopic biosurfactants on waxy leaf surfaces apparently benefits bacteria by both attracting moisture and facilitating access to nutrients. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Characterization of the hrpZ gene from Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicolaM2

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Mejía, César; Rodríguez-Ríos, Dalia; Hernández-Guzmán, Gustavo; López-Ramírez, Varinia; Valenzuela-Soto, Humberto; Marsch, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola is a natural pathogen of members of the Brassicaceae plant family. Using a transposon-based mutagenesis strategy in Pseudomonas syringaepv. maculicola M2 (PsmM2), we conducted a genetic screen to identify mutants that were capable of growing in M9 medium supplemented with a crude extract from the leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. A mutant containing a transposon insertion in the hrpZ gene (PsmMut8) was unable to infect adult plants from Arabidopsis thaliana or Brassica oleracea, suggesting a loss of pathogenicity. The promotorless cat reporter present in the gene trap was expressed if PsmMut8 was grown in minimal medium (M9) supplemented with the leaf extract but not if grown in normal rich medium (KB). We conducted phylogenetic analysis using hrpAZB genes, showing the classical 5-clade distribution, and nucleotide diversity analysis, showing the putative position for selective pressure in this operon. Our results indicate that the hrpAZB operon from Pseudomonas syringaepv. maculicola M2 is necessary for its pathogenicity and that its diversity would be under host-mediated diversifying selection. PMID:26413080

  8. Characterization of the hrpZ gene from Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola M2.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Mejía, César; Rodríguez-Ríos, Dalia; Hernández-Guzmán, Gustavo; López-Ramírez, Varinia; Valenzuela-Soto, Humberto; Marsch, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola is a natural pathogen of members of the Brassicaceae plant family. Using a transposon-based mutagenesis strategy in Pseudomonas syringaepv. maculicola M2 (PsmM2), we conducted a genetic screen to identify mutants that were capable of growing in M9 medium supplemented with a crude extract from the leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. A mutant containing a transposon insertion in the hrpZ gene (PsmMut8) was unable to infect adult plants from Arabidopsis thaliana or Brassica oleracea, suggesting a loss of pathogenicity. The promotorless cat reporter present in the gene trap was expressed if PsmMut8 was grown in minimal medium (M9) supplemented with the leaf extract but not if grown in normal rich medium (KB). We conducted phylogenetic analysis using hrpAZB genes, showing the classical 5-clade distribution, and nucleotide diversity analysis, showing the putative position for selective pressure in this operon. Our results indicate that the hrpAZB operon from Pseudomonas syringaepv. maculicola M2 is necessary for its pathogenicity and that its diversity would be under host-mediated diversifying selection.

  9. The phytotoxin coronatine is a multifunctional component of the virulence armament of Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xueqing; Jin, Lin; Shimada, Mikiko; Kim, Min Gab; Mackey, David

    2014-12-01

    Plant pathogens deploy an array of virulence factors to suppress host defense and promote pathogenicity. Numerous strains of Pseudomonas syringae produce the phytotoxin coronatine (COR). A major aspect of COR function is its ability to mimic a bioactive jasmonic acid (JA) conjugate and thus target the JA-receptor COR-insensitive 1 (COI1). Biological activities of COR include stimulation of JA-signaling and consequent suppression of SA-dependent defense through antagonistic crosstalk, antagonism of stomatal closure to allow bacterial entry into the interior of plant leaves, contribution to chlorotic symptoms in infected plants, and suppression of plant cell wall defense through perturbation of secondary metabolism. Here, we review the virulence function of COR, including updates on these established activities as well as more recent findings revealing COI1-independent activity of COR and shedding light on cooperative or redundant defense suppression between COR and type III effector proteins.

  10. Intercellular salicylic acid accumulation during compatible and incompatible Arabidopsis-Pseudomonas syringae interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Daniel C; Carella, Philip; Cameron, Robin K

    2014-01-01

    The phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) plays an important role in several disease resistance responses. During the Age-Related Resistance (ARR) response that occurs in mature Arabidopsis responding to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst), SA accumulates in the intercellular space where it may act as an antimicrobial agent. Recently we measured intracellular and intercellular SA levels in young, ARR-incompetent plants responding to virulent and avirulent strains of Pst to determine if intercellular SA accumulation is a component of additional defense responses to Pst. In young plants virulent Pst suppressed both intra- and intercellular SA accumulation in a coronatine-dependent manner. In contrast, high levels of intra- and intercellular SA accumulated in response to avirulent Pst. Our results support the idea that SA accumulation in the intercellular space is an important component of multiple defense responses. Future research will include understanding how mature plants counteract the effects of coronatine during the ARR response. PMID:25763618

  11. Novel cyclic lipodepsipeptide from Pseudomonas syringae pv. lachrymans strain 508 and syringopeptin antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Grgurina, Ingeborg; Bensaci, Mekki; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Mannina, Luisa; Cruciani, Oscar; Fiore, Alberto; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Sorensen, Kevin N; Takemoto, Jon Y

    2005-12-01

    The syringopeptins are a group of antimicrobial cyclic lipodepsipeptides produced by several plant-associated pseudomonads. A novel syringopeptin, SP508, was shown to be produced as two homologs (A and B) by Pseudomonas syringae pv. lachrymans strain 508 from apple and to structurally resemble syringopeptin SP22. SP508 differed from SP22 and other syringopeptins by having three instead of four alpha,beta-unsaturated amino acids and a longer beta-hydroxy acyl chain. Both SP508 and SP22 displayed growth-inhibitory activities against Mycobacterium smegmatis, other gram-positive bacteria, and yeasts but not against gram-negative bacteria. Structure-activity analyses of the SP508 and SP22 homologs indicated chemical structural features that lead to enhanced antimycobacterial activity by these pseudomonad cyclic lipodepsipeptides.

  12. JUB1 suppresses Pseudomonas syringae-induced defense responses through accumulation of DELLA proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shahnejat-Bushehri, Sara; Nobmann, Barbara; Devi Allu, Annapurna; Balazadeh, Salma

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phytohormones act in concert to coordinate plant growth and the response to environmental cues. Gibberellins (GAs) are growth-promoting hormones that recently emerged as modulators of plant immune signaling. By regulating the stability of DELLA proteins, GAs intersect with the signaling pathways of the classical primary defense hormones, salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA), thereby altering the final outcome of the immune response. DELLA proteins confer resistance to necrotrophic pathogens by potentiating JA signaling and raise the susceptibility to biotrophic pathogens by attenuating the SA pathway. Here, we show that JUB1, a core element of the GA - brassinosteroid (BR) - DELLA regulatory module, functions as a negative regulator of defense responses against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000) and mediates the crosstalk between growth and immunity. PMID:27159137

  13. Intercellular salicylic acid accumulation during compatible and incompatible Arabidopsis-Pseudomonas syringae interactions.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Daniel C; Carella, Philip; Cameron, Robin K

    2014-01-01

    The phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) plays an important role in several disease resistance responses. During the Age-Related Resistance (ARR) response that occurs in mature Arabidopsis responding to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst), SA accumulates in the intercellular space where it may act as an antimicrobial agent. Recently we measured intracellular and intercellular SA levels in young, ARR-incompetent plants responding to virulent and avirulent strains of Pst to determine if intercellular SA accumulation is a component of additional defense responses to Pst. In young plants virulent Pst suppressed both intra- and intercellular SA accumulation in a coronatine-dependent manner. In contrast, high levels of intra- and intercellular SA accumulated in response to avirulent Pst. Our results support the idea that SA accumulation in the intercellular space is an important component of multiple defense responses. Future research will include understanding how mature plants counteract the effects of coronatine during the ARR response.

  14. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 uses constitutive and apoplast-induced nutrient assimilation pathways to catabolize nutrients that are abundant in the tomato apoplast.

    PubMed

    Rico, Arantza; Preston, Gail M

    2008-02-01

    The plant apoplast is the intercellular space that surrounds plant cells, in which metabolic and physiological processes relating to cell wall biosynthesis, nutrient transport, and stress responses occur. The apoplast is also the primary site of infection for hemibiotrophic pathogens such as P. syringae, which obtain nutrients directly from apoplastic fluid. We have used apoplastic fluid extracted from healthy tomato leaves as a growth medium for Pseudomonas spp. in order to investigate the role of apoplastic nutrients in plant colonization by Pseudomonas syringae. We have confirmed that apoplast extracts mimic some of the environmental and nutritional conditions that bacteria encounter during apoplast colonization by demonstrating that expression of the plant-induced type III protein secretion pathway is upregulated during bacterial growth in apoplast extracts. We used a modified phenoarray technique to show that apoplast-adapted P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 expresses nutrient utilization pathways that allow it to use sugars, organic acids, and amino acids that are highly abundant in the tomato apoplast. Comparative analyses of the nutrient utilization profiles of the genome-sequenced strains P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000, P. syringae pv. syringae B728a, P. syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A, and the unsequenced strain P. syringae pv. tabaci 11528 with nine other genome-sequenced strains of Pseudomonas provide further evidence that P. syringae strains are adapted to use nutrients that are abundant in the leaf apoplast. Interestingly, P. syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A lacks many of the nutrient utilization abilities that are present in three other P. syringae strains tested, which can be directly linked to differences in the P. syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A genome.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas syringae Pathovar Syringae Strain FF5, Causal Agent of Stem Tip Dieback Disease on Ornamental Pear

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Kee Hoon; Jones, Jonathan D. G.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae FF5 causes stem tip dieback disease on ornamental pear (Pyrus calleryana). Its genome encodes a complete type III secretion system (T3SS) and HopAC1, HopM1, AvrE1, HopI1, HopAA1, HopJ1, HopAH2, HopAH1, HopAG1, and HopAZ1. Lacking detectable homologues of other T3SS effectors, it may encode novel, undiscovered effectors. PMID:22740663

  16. E-2-hexenal promotes susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae by activating jasmonic acid pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Scala, Alessandra; Mirabella, Rossana; Mugo, Cynthia; Matsui, Kenji; Haring, Michel A.; Schuurink, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are C6-molecules – alcohols, aldehydes, and esters – produced by plants upon herbivory or during pathogen infection. Exposure to this blend of volatiles induces defense-related responses in neighboring undamaged plants, thus assigning a role to GLVs in regulating plant defenses. Here we compared Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Landsberg erecta (Ler) with a hydroperoxide lyase line, hpl1, unable to synthesize GLVs, for susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (DC3000). We found that the growth of DC3000 was significantly reduced in the hpl1 mutant. This phenomenon correlated with lower jasmonic acid (JA) levels and higher salicylic acid levels in the hpl1 mutant. Furthermore, upon infection, the JA-responsive genes VSP2 and LEC were only slightly or not induced, respectively, in hpl1. This suggests that the reduced growth of DC3000 in hpl1 plants is due to the constraint of JA-dependent responses. Treatment of hpl1 plants with E-2-hexenal, one of the more reactive GLVs, prior to infection with DC3000, resulted in increased growth of DC3000 in hpl1, thus complementing this mutant. Interestingly, the growth of DC3000 also increased in Ler plants treated with E-2-hexenal. This stronger growth was not dependent on the JA-signaling component MYC2, but on ORA59, an integrator of JA and ethylene signaling pathways, and on the production of coronatine by DC3000. GLVs may have multiple effects on plant–pathogen interactions, in this case reducing resistance to Pseudomonas syringae via JA and ORA59. PMID:23630530

  17. Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola isolated from weeds in bean crop fields.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sanz, A M; Rodicio, M R; González, A J

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, the causative agent of halo blight in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), was isolated from weeds associated with bean crops in Spain. The bacterium was recovered from Fumaria sp, Mercurialis annua, Solanum nigrum and Sonchus oleraceus. Ps. s. pv. phaseolicola had previously been isolated from leguminous plants and S. nigrum, but to our knowledge, this is the first time it was recovered from the other three species. The isolates were phenotypically and genetically characterized, and they were compared with isolates recovered from common beans. Five different genotypic profiles were detected by PmeI-PFGE, two of them being of new description. Weed isolates were as pathogenic on bean plants as bean isolates, but they were not pathogenic on S. nigrum. Regarding the survival of the pathogen in weeds, Ps. s. pv. phaseolicola was isolated from So. oleraceus 11 weeks after the end of the bean crop. These results strongly support the idea of weeds as a potential source of inoculum for halo blight in bean. It has traditionally been considered that the main source of inoculum of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola causing halo blight disease in Phaseolus vulgaris are the bean seeds, and that the host range of the bacterium is almost restricted to leguminous plants. In this study, the bacterium was recovered from four nonleguminous weed species collected in bean fields, and its permanence in weeds for at least 11 weeks after the harvesting of the beans was demonstrated. We have also proved that the strains isolated from weeds were pathogenic on bean plants. Accordingly, the host range of Ps. s. pv. phaseolicola could be broader than previously thought and weeds appear to be acting as a reservoir of the pathogen until the next crop. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Phosphatidylcholine synthesis is essential for HrpZ harpin secretion in plant pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae and non-pathogenic Pseudomonas sp. 593.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Min; Long, Deliang; He, Huoguang; Li, Yang; Li, Yadong; Wang, Xingguo

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae van Hall is important phytopathogenic bacterium of stone fruit trees, and able to elicit hypersensitive response (HR) in nonhost plants. The HrpZ, secreted via type III secretion system (T3SS) to the extracellular space of the plant, is a T3SS-dependent protein and a sole T3SS effector able to induce the host defense response outside host cells. We deleted the phosphatidylcholine synthase gene (pcs) of P. syringae pv. syringae van Hall CFCC 1336, and found that the 1336 pcs(-) mutant was unable to synthesize phosphatidylcholine and elicit a typical HR in soybean. Further studies showed that the 1336 pcs(-) mutant was unable to secrete HrpZ harpin but could express HrpZ protein in cytoplasm as effectively as the wild type. To confirm if phosphatidylcholine affects HrpZ harpin secretion, we introduced the hrpZ gene into the soil-dwelling bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 593 and the 593 pcs(-) mutant, which were unable to express HrpZ harpin and elicit HR in tobacco or soybean. Western blotting and HR assay showed that the 593H not only secreted HrpZ harpin but also caused a strong HR in tobacco and soybean. In contrast, the 593 pcs(-)H only expressed HrpZ protein in its cytoplasm at the wild type level, but did not secrete HrpZ harpin or elicit HR reaction. Our results demonstrate that phosphatidylcholine is essential for the secretion of HrpZ harpin in P. syringae pv. syringae van Hall and other Pseudomonas strains.

  19. Pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae causing bacterial brown spot and halo blight in phaseolus vulgaris L. are distinguishable by ribotyping.

    PubMed

    González, A J; Landeras, E; Mendoza, M C

    2000-02-01

    Ribotyping was evaluated as a method to differentiate between Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola and pv. syringae strains causing bacterial brown spot and halo blight diseases in Phaseolus vulgaris L. Ribotyping, with restriction enzymes BglI and SalI and using the Escherichia coli rrnB operon as the probe, differentiated 11 and 14 ribotypes, respectively, and a combination of data from both procedures yielded 19 combined ribotypes. Cluster analysis of the combined ribotypes differentiated the pathovars phaseolicola and syringae, as well as different clonal lineages within these pathovars. The potential of ribotyping to screen for correlations between lineages and factors such as geographical region and/or bean varieties is also reported.

  20. Pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae Causing Bacterial Brown Spot and Halo Blight in Phaseolus vulgaris L. Are Distinguishable by Ribotyping

    PubMed Central

    González, Ana J.; Landeras, Elena; Mendoza, M. Carmen

    2000-01-01

    Ribotyping was evaluated as a method to differentiate between Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola and pv. syringae strains causing bacterial brown spot and halo blight diseases in Phaseolus vulgaris L. Ribotyping, with restriction enzymes BglI and SalI and using the Escherichia coli rrnB operon as the probe, differentiated 11 and 14 ribotypes, respectively, and a combination of data from both procedures yielded 19 combined ribotypes. Cluster analysis of the combined ribotypes differentiated the pathovars phaseolicola and syringae, as well as different clonal lineages within these pathovars. The potential of ribotyping to screen for correlations between lineages and factors such as geographical region and/or bean varieties is also reported. PMID:10653764

  1. Proteomic analysis of the Actinidia deliciosa leaf apoplast during biotrophic colonization by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae.

    PubMed

    Petriccione, Milena; Salzano, Anna Maria; Di Cecco, Ilaria; Scaloni, Andrea; Scortichini, Marco

    2014-04-14

    For plant pathogenic bacteria, adaptation to the apoplast is considered as key in the establishment of the parasitic lifestyle. Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa), the causal agent of the bacterial canker of kiwifruit, uses leaves as the entry site to colonize plants. Through a combined approach based on 2-DE, nanoLC-ESI-LIT-MS/MS and quantitative PCR, we investigated Psa colonization of the Actinidia deliciosa "Hayward" leaf apoplast during the bacterial biotrophic phase. A total of 58 differentially represented protein species were identified in artificially inoculated leaves. Although the pathogen increased its population density during the initial period of apoplast colonization, plant defense mechanisms were able to impede further disease development. We identified a concerted action of different proteins mainly belonging to the plant defense and metabolism category, which intervened at different times and participated in reducing the pathogen population. On the other hand, bacterial BamA was highly represented during the first week of leaf apoplast colonization, whereas OmpA and Cpn60 were induced later. In addition to presenting further proteomic information on the molecular factors actively participating in this pathosystem, our data characterize the early events of host colonization and will promote the eventual development of novel bioassays for pathogen detection in kiwiplants. This original study evaluates on a proteomic perspective the interaction occurring into the leaf apoplast between Actinidia deliciosa and its specific pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae. Despite the initial bacterial multiplication, a concerted action of the plant defense mechanisms blocked the infection during 21days of apoplast colonization, as revealed by the number of differentially-represented proteins identified in artificially-inoculated and control leaves. Three bacterial proteins were also recognized among the over-represented molecules in infected plants

  2. The Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae 61 hrpH product, an envelope protein required for elicitation of the hypersensitive response in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, H C; He, S Y; Bauer, D W; Collmer, A

    1992-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae 61 contains a 25-kb cluster of hrp genes that are required for elicitation of the hypersensitive response (HR) in tobacco. TnphoA mutagenesis of cosmid pHIR11, which contains the hrp cluster, revealed two genes encoding exported or inner-membrane-spanning proteins (H.-C. Huang, S. W. Hutcheson, and A. Collmer, Mol. Plant-Microbe Interact. 4:469-476, 1991). The gene in complementation group X, designated hrpH, was subcloned on a 3.1-kb SalI fragment into pCPP30, a broad-host-range, mobilizable vector. The subclone restored the ability of hrpH mutant P. syringae pv. syringae 61-2089 to elicit the HR in tobacco. DNA sequence analysis of the 3.1-kb SalI fragment revealed a single open reading frame encoding an 81,956-Da preprotein with a typical amino-terminal signal peptide and no likely inner-membrane-spanning hydrophobic regions. hrpH was expressed in the presence of [35S]methionine by using the T7 RNA polymerase-promoter system and vector pT7-3 in Escherichia coli and was shown to encode a protein with an apparent molecular weight of 83,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The HrpH protein in E. coli was located in the membrane fraction and was absent from the periplasm and cytoplasm. The HrpH protein possessed similarity with several outer membrane proteins that are known to be involved in protein or phage secretion, including the Klebsiella oxytoca PulD protein, the Yersinia enterocolitica YscC protein, and the pIV protein of filamentous coliphages. All of these proteins possess a possible secretion motif, GG(X)12VP(L/F)LXXIPXIGXL(F/L), near the carboxyl terminus, and they lack a carboxyl-terminal phenylalanine, in contrast to other outer membrane proteins with no known secretion function. These results suggest that the P. syringae pv. syringae HrpH protein is involved in the secretion of a proteinaceous HR elicitor. Images PMID:1400238

  3. The widespread plant-colonizing bacterial species Pseudomonas syringae detects and exploits an extracellular pool of choline in hosts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiliang; Li, Shanshan; McKeever, Dana R; Beattie, Gwyn A

    2013-09-01

    The quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) choline is a major component of membrane lipids in eukaryotes and, if available to microbial colonists of plants, could provide benefits for growth and protection from stress. Free choline is found in homogenized plant tissues, but its subcellular location and availability to plant microbes are not known. Whole-cell bacterial bioreporters of the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae were constructed that couple a QAC-responsive transcriptional fusion with well-characterized bacterial QAC transporters. These bioreporters demonstrated the presence of abundant free choline compounds released from germinating seeds and seedlings of the bean Phaseolus vulgaris, and a smaller but consistently detectable amount of QACs, probably choline, from leaves. The localization of P. syringae bioreporter cells to the surface and intercellular sites of plant tissues demonstrated the extracellular location of these QAC pools. Moreover, P. syringae mutants that were deficient in the uptake of choline compounds exhibited reduced fitness on leaves, highlighting the importance of extracellular choline to P. syringae on leaves. Our data support a model in which this choline pool is derived from the phospholipid phosphatidylcholine through plant-encoded phospholipases that release choline into the intercellular spaces of plant tissues, such as for membrane lipid recycling. The consequent extracellular release of choline compounds enables their interception and exploitation by plant-associated microbes, and thus provides a selective advantage for microbes such as P. syringae that are adapted to maximally exploit choline.

  4. Tomato photorespiratory glycolate oxidase-derived H2 O2 production contributes to basal defense against Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Li, Xin; Zhang, Guanqun; Zhang, Huan; Shi, Junying; Pan, Caizhe; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai

    2017-02-06

    Despite being essential for C3 plants, photorespiration is believed to cause a significant crop yield loss even under future climates. However, how photorespiration affects plant basal defense still remains largely unknown. Here, we studied the involvement of photorespiration in tomato-Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 interaction focusing on three photorespiratory genes. Inoculation with P. syringae increased photorespiration rate (Pr) and expression of GLYCOLATE OXIDASE (GOX2), SERINE GLYOXYLATE AMINOTRANSFERASE (SGT) and SERINE HYDROXYL METHYLTRANSFERASE (SHMT1), however, inhibition of photorespiration by isonicotinic acid hydrazide decreased tomato basal defense against P. syringae. Furthermore, silencing of GOX2, SGT or SHMT1 genes in tomato decreased Pr but increased susceptibility to P. syringae, whereas transient overexpression of GOX2, SGT or SHMT1 in tobacco increased basal defense. Further study revealed that salicylic acid (SA) signaling is involved in GOX2-, SGT- and SHMT1-mediated defense. Moreover, H2 O2 pretreatment remarkably alleviated the GOX2 silencing-induced depression in basal defense and SA signaling, whereas had no effect on that of SGT- and SHMT1-silenced plants. Taken together, these results suggest that H2 O2 is critical for GOX2- but not SGT- or SHMT1-modulated SA signaling and subsequent basal defense against P. syringae. This work deepens the understanding of photorespiration-involved defense responses to bacterial attack in plants.

  5. Pseudomonas syringae infection triggers de novo synthesis of phytosphingosine from sphinganine in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Peer, Markus; Stegmann, Martin; Mueller, Martin J; Waller, Frank

    2010-09-24

    Sphingolipids are important membrane components and also regulate cell proliferation and apoptosis. We detected a fast increase of the free sphingobase t18:0 (phytosphinganine) in Arabidopsis leaves after inoculation with an avirulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato, characterized by host cell death reactions. The induction of phytosphinganine was more transient in virulent interactions lacking cell death reactions, suggesting a positive role of t18:0 in the plants' response to pathogens, e.g. the hypersensitive response. In the mutant sphingobase hydroxylase 1 (sbh1-1), Pseudomonas induced elevated free d18:0 levels. As total t18:0 contents (after hydrolysis of ceramides) were not reduced in sbh1-1, the pathogen-triggered t18:0 increase most likely results from de novo synthesis from d18:0 which would require SBH1. Copyright © 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Light regulates motility, attachment and virulence in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000.

    PubMed

    Río-Álvarez, Isabel; Rodríguez-Herva, José Juan; Martínez, Pedro Manuel; González-Melendi, Pablo; García-Casado, Gloria; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; López-Solanilla, Emilia

    2014-07-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (Pto) is the causal agent of the bacterial speck of tomato, which leads to significant economic losses in this crop. Pto inhabits the tomato phyllosphere, where the pathogen is highly exposed to light, among other environmental factors. Light represents a stressful condition and acts as a source of information associated with different plant defence levels. Here, we analysed the presence of both blue and red light photoreceptors in a group of Pseudomonas. In addition, we studied the effect of white, blue and red light on Pto features related to epiphytic fitness. While white and blue light inhibit motility, bacterial attachment to plant leaves is promoted. Moreover, these phenotypes are altered in a blue-light receptor mutant. These light-controlled changes during the epiphytic stage cause a reduction in virulence, highlighting the relevance of motility during the entry process to the plant apoplast. This study demonstrated the key role of light perception in the Pto phenotype switching and its effect on virulence.

  7. Defense Responses in Two Ecotypes of Lotus japonicus against Non-Pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Bordenave, Cesar D.; Escaray, Francisco J.; Menendez, Ana B.; Serna, Eva; Carrasco, Pedro; Ruiz, Oscar A.; Gárriz, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Lotus japonicus is a model legume broadly used to study many important processes as nitrogen fixing nodule formation and adaptation to salt stress. However, no studies on the defense responses occurring in this species against invading microorganisms have been carried out at the present. Understanding how this model plant protects itself against pathogens will certainly help to develop more tolerant cultivars in economically important Lotus species as well as in other legumes. In order to uncover the most important defense mechanisms activated upon bacterial attack, we explored in this work the main responses occurring in the phenotypically contrasting ecotypes MG-20 and Gifu B-129 of L. japonicus after inoculation with Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 pv. tomato. Our analysis demonstrated that this bacterial strain is unable to cause disease in these accessions, even though the defense mechanisms triggered in these ecotypes might differ. Thus, disease tolerance in MG-20 was characterized by bacterial multiplication, chlorosis and desiccation at the infiltrated tissues. In turn, Gifu B-129 plants did not show any symptom at all and were completely successful in restricting bacterial growth. We performed a microarray based analysis of these responses and determined the regulation of several genes that could play important roles in plant defense. Interestingly, we were also able to identify a set of defense genes with a relative high expression in Gifu B-129 plants under non-stress conditions, what could explain its higher tolerance. The participation of these genes in plant defense is discussed. Our results position the L. japonicus-P. syringae interaction as a interesting model to study defense mechanisms in legume species. PMID:24349460

  8. Ice nucleators, bacterial cells and Pseudomonas syringae in precipitation at Jungfraujoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopelli, Emiliano; Conen, Franz; Guilbaud, Caroline; Zopfi, Jakob; Alewell, Christine; Morris, Cindy E.

    2017-03-01

    Ice nucleation is a means by which the deposition of an airborne microorganism can be accelerated under favourable meteorological conditions. Analysis of 56 snow samples collected at the high-altitude observatory Jungfraujoch (3580 m a.s.l.) revealed an order-of-magnitude-larger dynamic range of ice-nucleating particles active at -8 °C (INPs-8) compared to the total number of bacterial cells (of which on average 60 % was alive). This indicates a shorter atmospheric residence time for INPs-8. Furthermore, concentrations of INPs-8 decreased much faster, with an increasing fraction of water precipitated from the air mass prior to sampling, than the number of total bacterial cells. Nevertheless, at high wind speeds (> 50 km h-1) the ratio of INPs-8 to total bacterial cells largely remained in a range between 10-2 and 10-3, independent of prior precipitation, likely because of recent injections of particles in regions upwind. Based on our field observations, we conclude that ice nucleators travel shorter legs of distance with the atmospheric water cycle than the majority of bacterial cells. A prominent ice-nucleating bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae, has been previously supposed to benefit from this behaviour as a means to spread via the atmosphere and to colonise new host plants. Therefore, we targeted this bacterium with a selective cultivation approach. P. syringae was successfully isolated for the first time at such an altitude in 3 of 13 samples analysed. Colony-forming units of this species constituted a minor fraction (10-4) of the numbers of INPs-8 in these samples. Overall, our findings expand the geographic range of habitats where this bacterium has been found and corroborate theories on its robustness in the atmosphere and its propensity to spread to colonise new habitats.

  9. Two flagellar stators and their roles in motility and virulence in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 6605.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Eiko; Tatsuta, Takafumi; Suzuki, Tomoko; Taguchi, Fumiko; Naito, Kana; Inagaki, Yoshishige; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Ichinose, Yuki

    2011-02-01

    The motor proteins around the flagellar basal body consist of two cytoplasmic membrane proteins, MotA and MotB, and function as a complex that acts as the stator to generate the torque that drives rotation. Genome analysis of several Pseudomonas syringae pathovars revealed that there are two sets of genes encoding motor proteins: motAB and motCD. Deduced amino acid sequences for MotA/B and MotC/D showed homologies to the H(+)-driven stator from Escherichia coli and Na(+)-driven stator from Vibrio alginolyticus, respectively. However, the swimming motility of P. syringae pv. tabaci (Pta) 6605 was inhibited by the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not by the sodium stator-specific inhibitor phenamil. To identify a gene encoding the stator protein required for motility, ∆motAB, ∆motCD, and ∆motABCD mutants were generated. The ∆motCD mutant had remarkably reduced and the ∆motABCD mutant completely abolished swimming motilities, whereas the ∆motAB mutant retained some degree of these abilities. The ∆motCD and ∆motABCD mutants did not produce N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), quorum-sensing molecules in this pathogen, and remarkably reduced the ability to cause disease in host tobacco leaves, as we previously observed in the ∆fliC mutant strain. These results strongly indicate that both stator pairs in Pta 6605 are proton-dependent and that MotCD is important for not only flagellar motility but also for production of AHLs and the ability to cause disease in host plants.

  10. Survival, growth, and localization of epiphytic fitness mutants of pseudomonas syringae on leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, G.A.; Lindow, S.E. )

    1994-10-01

    Among 82 epiphytic fitness mutants of a Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain that were characterized in a previous study, 4 mutants were particularly intolerant of the stresses associated with dry leaf surfaces. These four mutants each exhibited distinctive behaviors when inoculated into and into plant leaves. For example, while non showed measurable growth on dry potato leaf surfaces, they grew to different population sizes in the intercellular space of bean leaves and on dry bean leaf surfaces, and one mutant appeared incapable of growth in both environments although it grew well on moist bean leaves. The presence of the parental strain did not influence the survival of the mutants immediately following exposure of leaves to dry, high-light incubation conditions, suggesting that the reduced survival of the mutants did not result from an inability to produce extracellular factors in planta. On moist bean leaves that were colonized by either a mutant or the wild type, the proportion of the total epiphytic population that was located in sizes protected from a surface sterilant was smaller for the mutants than for the wild type, indicating that the mutants were reduced in their ability to locate, multiply in, and/or survive in such protected sites. This reduced ability was only one of possible several factors contributing to the reduced epiphytic fitness of each mutant. Their reduced fitness was not specific to the host plant bean, since they also exhibited reduced fitness on the nonhost plant potato; the functions altered in these strains are thus of interest for their contribution to the general fitness of bacterial epiphytes. 52 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Interference of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas syringae by bacterial epiphytes that limit iron availability.

    PubMed

    Dulla, Glenn F J; Krasileva, Ksenia V; Lindow, Steven E

    2010-06-01

    Leaf surfaces harbour bacterial epiphytes that are capable of influencing the quorum sensing (QS) system, density determination through detection of diffusible signal molecules, of the plant-pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (Pss) which controls expression of extracellular polysaccharide production, motility and other factors contributing to virulence to plants. Approximately 11% of the bacterial epiphytes recovered from a variety of plants produced a diffusible factor capable of inhibiting the QS system of Pss as indicated by suppression of ahlI. Blockage of QS by these interfering strains correlated strongly with their ability to limit iron availability to Pss. A direct relationship between the ability of isogenic Escherichia coli strains to sequester iron via their production of different siderophores and their ability to suppress QS in Pss was also observed. Quorum sensing induction was inversely related to iron availability in culture media supplemented with iron chelators or with FeCl(3). Co-inoculation of interfering strains with Pss onto leaves increased the number of resultant disease lesions over twofold compared with that on plants inoculated with Pss alone. Transposon-generated mutants of interfering strains in which QS inhibition was blocked did not increase disease when co-inoculated with Pss. Increased disease incidence was also not observed when a non-motile mutant of Pss was co-inoculated onto plants with QS interfering bacteria suggesting that these strains enhanced the motility of Pss in an iron-dependent manner, leading to an apparent increase in virulence of this pathogen. Considerable cross-talk mediated by iron scavenging apparently occurs on plants, thereby altering the behaviour of bacteria such as Pss that exhibit important QS-dependent traits in this habitat.

  12. Purification and Characterization of the Epoxidase Catalyzing the Formation of Fosfomycin from Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Munos, Jeffrey W.; Moon, Sung-Ju; Mansoorabadi, Steven O.; Chang, Weichen; Hong, Lin; Yan, Feng; Liu, Aimin; Liu, Hung-wen

    2009-01-01

    The final step in the biosynthesis of fosfomycin in Streptomyces wedmorensis is catalyzed by (S)-2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid (HPP) epoxidase (Sw-HppE). A homologous enzyme from Pseudomonas syringae has recently been isolated whose encoding gene (orf3) shares relatively low sequence homology to the corresponding Sw-HppE gene. This purified P. syringae protein was determined to catalyze the epoxidation of (S)-HPP to fosfomycin and the oxidation of (R)-HPP to 2-oxopropylphosphonic acid under the same conditions as Sw-HppE. Therefore, this protein is indeed a true HPP epoxidase and is termed Ps-HppE. Like Sw-HppE, Ps-HppE was determined to be post-translationally modified by the hydroxylation of a putative active site tyrosine (Tyr95). Analysis of the Fe(II)-center by EPR spectroscopy using NO as a spin probe and molecular oxygen surrogate reveals that Ps-HppE’s metal center is similar, but not identical, to that of Sw-HppE. The identity of the rate determining step for the (S)-HPP and (R)-HPP reactions was determined by measuring primary deuterium kinetic effects, and the outcome of these results were correlated with density functional theory calculations. Interestingly, the reaction using the non-physiological substrate (R)-HPP was 1.9 times faster than that with (S)-HPP for both Ps-HppE and Sw-HppE. This is likely due to the difference in bond dissociation energy of the abstracted hydrogen atom for each respective reaction. Thus, despite low amino acid sequence identity, Ps-HppE is a close mimic of Sw-HppE, representing a second example of a non-heme iron-dependent enzyme capable of catalyzing dehydrogenation of a secondary alcohol to form a new C-O bond. PMID:18656958

  13. Transcriptional Analysis of the Global Regulatory Networks Active in Pseudomonas syringae during Leaf Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xilan; Lund, Steven P.; Greenwald, Jessica W.; Records, Angela H.; Scott, Russell A.; Nettleton, Dan; Lindow, Steven E.; Gross, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a grows and survives on leaf surfaces and in the leaf apoplast of its host, bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). To understand the contribution of distinct regulators to B728a fitness and pathogenicity, we performed a transcriptome analysis of strain B728a and nine regulatory mutants recovered from the surfaces and interior of leaves and exposed to environmental stresses in culture. The quorum-sensing regulators AhlR and AefR influenced few genes in planta or in vitro. In contrast, GacS and a downstream regulator, SalA, formed a large regulatory network that included a branch that regulated diverse traits and was independent of plant-specific environmental signals and a plant signal-dependent branch that positively regulated secondary metabolite genes and negatively regulated the type III secretion system. SalA functioned as a central regulator of iron status based on its reciprocal regulation of pyoverdine and achromobactin genes and also sulfur uptake, suggesting a role in the iron-sulfur balance. RetS functioned almost exclusively to repress secondary metabolite genes when the cells were not on leaves. Among the sigma factors examined, AlgU influenced many more genes than RpoS, and most AlgU-regulated genes depended on RpoN. RpoN differentially impacted many AlgU- and GacS-activated genes in cells recovered from apoplastic versus epiphytic sites, suggesting differences in environmental signals or bacterial stress status in these two habitats. Collectively, our findings illustrate a central role for GacS, SalA, RpoN, and AlgU in global regulation in B728a in planta and a high level of plasticity in these regulators’ responses to distinct environmental signals. PMID:25182327

  14. Apoplastic peroxidases are required for salicylic acid-mediated defense against Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Mammarella, Nicole D; Cheng, Zhenyu; Fu, Zheng Qing; Daudi, Arsalan; Bolwell, G Paul; Dong, Xinnian; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2015-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by NADPH oxidases or apoplastic peroxidases play an important role in the plant defense response. Diminished expression of at least two Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase encoding genes, PRX33 (At3g49110) and PRX34 (At3g49120), as a consequence of anti-sense expression of a heterologous French bean peroxidase gene (asFBP1.1), were previously shown to result in reduced levels of ROS following pathogen attack, enhanced susceptibility to a variety of bacterial and fungal pathogens, and reduced levels of callose production and defense-related gene expression in response to the microbe associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules flg22 and elf26. These data demonstrated that the peroxidase-dependent oxidative burst plays an important role in the elicitation of pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). Further work reported in this paper, however, shows that asFBP1.1 antisense plants are not impaired in all PTI-associated responses. For example, some but not all flg22-elicited genes are induced to lower levels by flg22 in asFPB1.1, and callose deposition in asFPB1.1 is similar to wild-type following infiltration with a Pseudomonas syringae hrcC mutant or with non-host P. syringae pathovars. Moreover, asFPB1.1 plants did not exhibit any apparent defect in their ability to mount a hypersensitive response (HR). On the other hand, salicylic acid (SA)-mediated activation of PR1 was dramatically impaired in asFPB1.1 plants. In addition, P. syringae-elicited expression of many genes known to be SA-dependent was significantly reduced in asFBP1.1 plants. Consistent with this latter result, in asFBP1.1 plants the key regulator of SA-mediated responses, NPR1, showed both dramatically decreased total protein abundance and a failure to monomerize, which is required for its translocation into the nucleus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Apoplastic Peroxidases are Required for Salicylic Acid-Mediated Defense Against Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Mammarella, Nicole D.; Cheng, Zhenyu; Fu, Zheng Qing; Daudi, Arsalan; Bolwell, G. Paul; Dong, Xinnian; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by NADPH oxidases or apoplastic peroxidases play an important role in the plant defense response. Diminished expression of at least two Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase encoding genes, PRX33 (At3g49110) and PRX34 (At3g49120), as a consequence of anti-sense expression of a heterologous French bean peroxidase gene (asFBP1.1), were previously shown to result in reduced levels of ROS following pathogen attack, enhanced susceptibility to a variety of bacterial and fungal pathogens, and reduced levels of callose production and defense-related gene expression in response to the microbe associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules flg22 and elf26. These data demonstrated that the peroxidase-dependent oxidative burst plays an important role in the elicitation of pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). Further work reported in this paper, however, shows that asFBP1.1 antisense plants are not impaired in all PTI-associated responses. For example, some but not all flg22-elicited genes are induced to lower levels by flg22 in asFPB1.1, and callose deposition in asFPB1.1 is similar to wild-type following infiltration with a Pseudomonas syringae hrcC mutant or with non-host P. syringae pathovars. Moreover, asFPB1.1 plants did not exhibit any apparent defect in their ability to mount a hypersensitive response (HR). On the other hand, salicylic acid (SA)-mediated activation of PR1 was dramatically impaired in asFPB1.1 plants. In addition, P. syringae-elicited expression of many genes known to be SA-dependent was significantly reduced in asFBP1.1 plants. Consistent with this latter result, in asFBP1.1 plants the key regulator of SA-mediated responses, NPR1, showed both dramatically decreased total protein abundance and a failure to monomerize, which is required for its translocation into the nucleus. PMID:25096754

  16. Bacterial non-host resistance: interactions of Arabidopsis with non-adapted Pseudomonas syringae strains.

    PubMed

    Mishina, Tatiana E; Zeier, Jürgen

    2007-11-01

    Although interactions of plants with virulent and avirulent host pathogens are under intensive study, relatively little is known about plant interactions with non-adapted pathogens and the molecular events underlying non-host resistance. Here we show that two Pseudomonas syringae strains for which Arabidopsis is a non-host plant, P. syringae pathovar (pv.) glycinea (Psg) and P. syringae pv. phaseolicola (Psp),induce salicylic acid (SA) accumulation and pathogenesis-related gene expression at inoculation sites, and that induction of these defences is largely dependent on bacterial type III secretion. The defence signalling components activated by non-adapted bacteria resemble those initiated by host pathogens, including SA, non-expressor of PR-1, non-race specific disease resistance 1, phytoalexin-deficient 4 and enhanced disease susceptibility 1. However, some differences in individual defence pathways induced by Psg and Psp exist, suggesting that for each strain, distinct sets of type III effectors are recognized by the plant. Although induction of SA-related defences occurs, it does not directly contribute to bacterial non-host resistance, because Arabidopsis mutants compromised in SA signalling and other classical defence pathways do not permit enhanced survival of Psg or Psp in leaves. The finding that numbers of non-adapted bacteria in leaf extracellular spaces rapidly decline after inoculation suggests that they fail to overcome toxic or structural defence barriers preceding SA-related responses. Consistent with this hypothesis, rapid, type III secretion system-independent upregulation of the lignin biosynthesis genes, PAL1 and BCB, which might contribute to an early induced, cell wall-based defence mechanism, occurs in response to non-adapted bacteria. Moreover, knockout of PAL1 permits increased leaf survival of non-host bacteria. In addition, different survival rates of non-adapted bacteria in leaves from Arabidopsis accessions and mutants with distinct

  17. Repetitive extragenic palindromic sequences in the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 genome: extragenic signals for genome reannotation.

    PubMed

    Tobes, Raquel; Pareja, Eduardo

    2005-04-01

    Repetitive extragenic palindromic (REPs) sequences were first described in enterobacteriacea and later in Pseudomonas putida. We have detected a new variant (51 base pairs) of REP sequences that appears to be disseminated in more than 300 copies in the Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 genome. The finding of REP sequences in P. syringae confirms the broad presence of this type of repetitive sequence in bacteria. We analyzed the distribution of REP sequences and the structure of the clusters, and we show that palindromy is conserved. REP sequences appear to be allocated to the extragenic space, with a special preference for the intergenic spaces limited by convergent genes, while their presence is scarce between divergent genes. Using REP sequences as markers of extragenicity we re-annotated a set of genes of the P. syringae DC3000 genome demonstrating that REP sequences can be used for refinement of annotation of a genome. The similarity detected between virulence genes from evolutionarily distant pathogenic bacteria suggests the acquisition of clusters of virulence genes by horizontal gene transfer. We did not detect the presence of P. syringae REP elements in the principal pathogenicity gene clusters. This absence suggests that genome fragments lacking REP sequences could point to regions recently acquired from other organisms, and REP sequences might be new tracers for gaining insight into key aspects of bacterial genome evolution, especially when studying pathogenicity acquisition. In addition, as the P. syringae REP sequence is species-specific with respect to the sequenced genomes, it is an exceptional candidate for use as a fingerprint in precise genotyping and epidemiological studies.

  18. Early Arabidopsis root hair growth stimulation by pathogenic strains of Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Pecenková, Tamara; Janda, Martin; Ortmannová, Jitka; Hajná, Vladimíra; Stehlíková, Zuzana; Žárský, Viktor

    2017-09-01

    Selected beneficial Pseudomonas spp. strains have the ability to influence root architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana by inhibiting primary root elongation and promoting lateral root and root hair formation. A crucial role for auxin in this long-term (1week), long-distance plant-microbe interaction has been demonstrated. Arabidopsis seedlings were cultivated in vitro on vertical plates and inoculated with pathogenic strains Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola (Psm) and P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst), as well as Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu) and Escherichia coli (Eco). Root hair lengths were measured after 24 and 48h of direct exposure to each bacterial strain. Several Arabidopsis mutants with impaired responses to pathogens, impaired ethylene perception and defects in the exocyst vesicle tethering complex that is involved in secretion were also analysed. Arabidopsis seedling roots infected with Psm or Pst responded similarly to when infected with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria; root hair growth was stimulated and primary root growth was inhibited. Other plant- and soil-adapted bacteria induced similar root hair responses. The most compromised root hair growth stimulation response was found for the knockout mutants exo70A1 and ein2. The single immune pathways dependent on salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and PAD4 are not directly involved in root hair growth stimulation; however, in the mutual cross-talk with ethylene, they indirectly modify the extent of the stimulation of root hair growth. The Flg22 peptide does not initiate root hair stimulation as intact bacteria do, but pretreatment with Flg22 prior to Psm inoculation abolished root hair growth stimulation in an FLS2 receptor kinase-dependent manner. These early response phenomena are not associated with changes in auxin levels, as monitored with the pDR5::GUS auxin reporter. Early stimulation of root hair growth is an effect of an unidentified component of living plant pathogenic bacteria. The root

  19. Cytokinin production by Pseudomonas fluorescens G20-18 determines biocontrol activity against Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Großkinsky, Dominik K.; Tafner, Richard; Moreno, María V.; Stenglein, Sebastian A.; García de Salamone, Inés E.; Nelson, Louise M.; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Plant beneficial microbes mediate biocontrol of diseases by interfering with pathogens or via strengthening the host. Although phytohormones, including cytokinins, are known to regulate plant development and physiology as well as plant immunity, their production by microorganisms has not been considered as a biocontrol mechanism. Here we identify the ability of Pseudomonas fluorescens G20-18 to efficiently control P. syringae infection in Arabidopsis, allowing maintenance of tissue integrity and ultimately biomass yield. Microbial cytokinin production was identified as a key determinant for this biocontrol effect on the hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen. While cytokinin-deficient loss-of-function mutants of G20-18 exhibit impaired biocontrol, functional complementation with cytokinin biosynthetic genes restores cytokinin-mediated biocontrol, which is correlated with differential cytokinin levels in planta. Arabidopsis mutant analyses revealed the necessity of functional plant cytokinin perception and salicylic acid-dependent defence signalling for this biocontrol mechanism. These results demonstrate microbial cytokinin production as a novel microbe-based, hormone-mediated concept of biocontrol. This mechanism provides a basis to potentially develop novel, integrated plant protection strategies combining promotion of growth, a favourable physiological status and activation of fine-tuned direct defence and abiotic stress resilience. PMID:26984671

  20. Cytokinin production by Pseudomonas fluorescens G20-18 determines biocontrol activity against Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Großkinsky, Dominik K; Tafner, Richard; Moreno, María V; Stenglein, Sebastian A; García de Salamone, Inés E; Nelson, Louise M; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2016-03-17

    Plant beneficial microbes mediate biocontrol of diseases by interfering with pathogens or via strengthening the host. Although phytohormones, including cytokinins, are known to regulate plant development and physiology as well as plant immunity, their production by microorganisms has not been considered as a biocontrol mechanism. Here we identify the ability of Pseudomonas fluorescens G20-18 to efficiently control P. syringae infection in Arabidopsis, allowing maintenance of tissue integrity and ultimately biomass yield. Microbial cytokinin production was identified as a key determinant for this biocontrol effect on the hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen. While cytokinin-deficient loss-of-function mutants of G20-18 exhibit impaired biocontrol, functional complementation with cytokinin biosynthetic genes restores cytokinin-mediated biocontrol, which is correlated with differential cytokinin levels in planta. Arabidopsis mutant analyses revealed the necessity of functional plant cytokinin perception and salicylic acid-dependent defence signalling for this biocontrol mechanism. These results demonstrate microbial cytokinin production as a novel microbe-based, hormone-mediated concept of biocontrol. This mechanism provides a basis to potentially develop novel, integrated plant protection strategies combining promotion of growth, a favourable physiological status and activation of fine-tuned direct defence and abiotic stress resilience.

  1. FleQ Coordinates Flagellum-Dependent and -Independent Motilities in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000

    PubMed Central

    Nogales, Joaquina; Vargas, Paola; Farias, Gabriela A.; Olmedilla, Adela; Sanjuán, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Motility plays an essential role in bacterial fitness and colonization in the plant environment, since it favors nutrient acquisition and avoidance of toxic substances, successful competition with other microorganisms, the ability to locate the preferred hosts, access to optimal sites within them, and dispersal in the environment during the course of transmission. In this work, we have observed that the mutation of the flagellar master regulatory gene, fleQ, alters bacterial surface motility and biosurfactant production, uncovering a new type of motility for Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 on semisolid surfaces. We present evidence that P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 moves over semisolid surfaces by using at least two different types of motility, namely, swarming, which depends on the presence of flagella and syringafactin, a biosurfactant produced by this strain, and a flagellum-independent surface spreading or sliding, which also requires syringafactin. We also show that FleQ activates flagellum synthesis and negatively regulates syringafactin production in P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Finally, it was surprising to observe that mutants lacking flagella or syringafactin were as virulent as the wild type, and only the simultaneous loss of both flagella and syringafactin impairs the ability of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 to colonize tomato host plants and cause disease. PMID:26296726

  2. Genome, Proteome and Structure of a T7-Like Bacteriophage of the Kiwifruit Canker Phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, Rebekah A.; Lopez Acedo, Elena; Young, Vivienne L.; Chen, Danni; Tong, Brian; Taylor, Corinda; Easingwood, Richard A.; Pitman, Andrew R.; Kleffmann, Torsten; Bostina, Mihnea; Fineran, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an economically significant pathogen responsible for severe bacterial canker of kiwifruit (Actinidia sp.). Bacteriophages infecting this phytopathogen have potential as biocontrol agents as part of an integrated approach to the management of bacterial canker, and for use as molecular tools to study this bacterium. A variety of bacteriophages were previously isolated that infect P. syringae pv. actinidiae, and their basic properties were characterized to provide a framework for formulation of these phages as biocontrol agents. Here, we have examined in more detail φPsa17, a phage with the capacity to infect a broad range of P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains and the only member of the Podoviridae in this collection. Particle morphology was visualized using cryo-electron microscopy, the genome was sequenced, and its structural proteins were analysed using shotgun proteomics. These studies demonstrated that φPsa17 has a 40,525 bp genome, is a member of the T7likevirus genus and is closely related to the pseudomonad phages φPSA2 and gh-1. Eleven structural proteins (one scaffolding) were detected by proteomics and φPsa17 has a capsid of approximately 60 nm in diameter. No genes indicative of a lysogenic lifecycle were identified, suggesting the phage is obligately lytic. These features indicate that φPsa17 may be suitable for formulation as a biocontrol agent of P. syringae pv. actinidiae. PMID:26114474

  3. Features of air masses associated with the deposition of Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea by rain and snowfall

    PubMed Central

    Monteil, Caroline L; Bardin, Marc; Morris, Cindy E

    2014-01-01

    Clarifying the role of precipitation in microbial dissemination is essential for elucidating the processes involved in disease emergence and spread. The ecology of Pseudomonas syringae and its presence throughout the water cycle makes it an excellent model to address this issue. In this study, 90 samples of freshly fallen rain and snow collected from 2005–2011 in France were analyzed for microbiological composition. The conditions favorable for dissemination of P. syringae by this precipitation were investigated by (i) estimating the physical properties and backward trajectories of the air masses associated with each precipitation event and by (ii) characterizing precipitation chemistry, and genetic and phenotypic structures of populations. A parallel study with the fungus Botrytis cinerea was also performed for comparison. Results showed that (i) the relationship of P. syringae to precipitation as a dissemination vector is not the same for snowfall and rainfall, whereas it is the same for B. cinerea and (ii) the occurrence of P. syringae in precipitation can be linked to electrical conductivity and pH of water, the trajectory of the air mass associated with the precipitation and certain physical conditions of the air mass (i.e. temperature, solar radiation exposure, distance traveled), whereas these predictions are different for B. cinerea. These results are pertinent to understanding microbial survival, emission sources and atmospheric processes and how they influence microbial dissemination. PMID:24722630

  4. Genome, Proteome and Structure of a T7-Like Bacteriophage of the Kiwifruit Canker Phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae.

    PubMed

    Frampton, Rebekah A; Acedo, Elena Lopez; Young, Vivienne L; Chen, Danni; Tong, Brian; Taylor, Corinda; Easingwood, Richard A; Pitman, Andrew R; Kleffmann, Torsten; Bostina, Mihnea; Fineran, Peter C

    2015-06-24

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an economically significant pathogen responsible for severe bacterial canker of kiwifruit (Actinidia sp.). Bacteriophages infecting this phytopathogen have potential as biocontrol agents as part of an integrated approach to the management of bacterial canker, and for use as molecular tools to study this bacterium. A variety of bacteriophages were previously isolated that infect P. syringae pv. actinidiae, and their basic properties were characterized to provide a framework for formulation of these phages as biocontrol agents. Here, we have examined in more detail φPsa17, a phage with the capacity to infect a broad range of P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains and the only member of the Podoviridae in this collection. Particle morphology was visualized using cryo-electron microscopy, the genome was sequenced, and its structural proteins were analysed using shotgun proteomics. These studies demonstrated that φPsa17 has a 40,525 bp genome, is a member of the T7likevirus genus and is closely related to the pseudomonad phages φPSA2 and gh-1. Eleven structural proteins (one scaffolding) were detected by proteomics and φPsa17 has a capsid of approximately 60 nm in diameter. No genes indicative of a lysogenic lifecycle were identified, suggesting the phage is obligately lytic. These features indicate that φPsa17 may be suitable for formulation as a biocontrol agent of P. syringae pv. actinidiae.

  5. N-acylhomoserine lactone-regulation of genes mediating motility and pathogenicity in Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tabaci 11528.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feifei; Ma, Anzhou; Luo, Jinxue; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2017-01-29

    Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tabaci 11528 (P. syringae 11528) is a phytopathogen that causes wild-fire disease in soybean and tobacco plants. It utilizes a cell density-dependent regulation system known as quorum sensing (QS). In its QS system, the psyI is responsible for the biosynthesis of N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). By comparing the transcripts from P. syringae 11528 wild-type strain with those of the ΔpsyI mutant using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) technology, 1118 AHL-regulated genes were identified in the transition from exponential to stationary growth phase. Numerous AHL-regulated genes involved in pathogenicity were negatively controlled, including genes linked to flagella, chemotaxis, pilus, extracellular polysaccharides, secretion systems, and two-component system. Moreover, gene ontology and pathway enrichment analysis revealed that the most pronounced regulation was associated with bacterial motility. Finally, phenotypic assays showed that QS-regulated traits were involved in epiphytic growth of pathogens and disease development in plants. These findings imply that the AHL-mediated QS system in P. syringae 11528 plays significant roles in distinct stages of interactions between plants and pathogens, including early plant colonization and late plant infection.

  6. Features of air masses associated with the deposition of Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea by rain and snowfall.

    PubMed

    Monteil, Caroline L; Bardin, Marc; Morris, Cindy E

    2014-11-01

    Clarifying the role of precipitation in microbial dissemination is essential for elucidating the processes involved in disease emergence and spread. The ecology of Pseudomonas syringae and its presence throughout the water cycle makes it an excellent model to address this issue. In this study, 90 samples of freshly fallen rain and snow collected from 2005-2011 in France were analyzed for microbiological composition. The conditions favorable for dissemination of P. syringae by this precipitation were investigated by (i) estimating the physical properties and backward trajectories of the air masses associated with each precipitation event and by (ii) characterizing precipitation chemistry, and genetic and phenotypic structures of populations. A parallel study with the fungus Botrytis cinerea was also performed for comparison. Results showed that (i) the relationship of P. syringae to precipitation as a dissemination vector is not the same for snowfall and rainfall, whereas it is the same for B. cinerea and (ii) the occurrence of P. syringae in precipitation can be linked to electrical conductivity and pH of water, the trajectory of the air mass associated with the precipitation and certain physical conditions of the air mass (i.e. temperature, solar radiation exposure, distance traveled), whereas these predictions are different for B. cinerea. These results are pertinent to understanding microbial survival, emission sources and atmospheric processes and how they influence microbial dissemination.

  7. Disruption of the ammonium transporter AMT1.1 alters basal defenses generating resistance against Pseudomonas syringae and Plectosphaerella cucumerina

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Victoria; Gamir, Jordi; Camañes, Gemma; Cerezo, Miguel; Sánchez-Bel, Paloma; Flors, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of the high-affinity nitrate transporter NRT2.1 activates the priming defense against Pseudomonas syringae, resulting in enhanced resistance. In this study, it is demonstrated that the high-affinity ammonium transporter AMT1.1 is a negative regulator of Arabidopsis defense responses. The T-DNA knockout mutant amt1.1 displays enhanced resistance against Plectosphaerella cucumerina and reduced susceptibility to P. syringae. The impairment of AMT1.1 induces significant metabolic changes in the absence of challenge, suggesting that amt1.1 retains constitutive defense responses. Interestingly, amt1.1 combats pathogens differently depending on the lifestyle of the pathogen. In addition, N starvation enhances the susceptibility of wild type plants and the mutant amt1.1 to P. syringae whereas it has no effect on P. cucumerina resistance. The metabolic changes of amt1.1 against P. syringae are subtler and are restricted to the phenylpropanoid pathway, which correlates with its reduced susceptibility. By contrast, the amt1.1 mutant responds by activating higher levels of camalexin and callose against P. cucumerina. In addition, amt1.1 shows altered levels of aliphatic and indolic glucosinolates and other Trp-related compounds following infection by the necrotroph. These observations indicate that AMT1.1 may play additional roles that affect N uptake and plant immune responses. PMID:24910636

  8. Exogenous N-acyl-homoserine lactones enhance the expression of flagella of Pseudomonas syringae and activate defence responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feifei; Ma, Anzhou; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Fray, Rupert G

    2016-10-18

    In order to cope with pathogens, plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to sense pathogenic attacks and to induce defence responses. The N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing in bacteria regulates diverse physiological processes, including those involved in pathogenicity. In this work, we study the interactions between AHL-producing transgenic tobacco plants and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 11528 (P. syringae 11528). Both a reduced incidence of disease and decrease in the growth of P. syringae 11528 were observed in AHL-producing plants compared with wild-type plants. The present data indicate that plant-produced AHLs enhance disease resistance against this pathogen. Subsequent RNA-sequencing analysis showed that the exogenous addition of AHLs up-regulated the expression of P. syringae 11528 genes for flagella production. Expression levels of plant defence genes in AHL-producing and wild-type plants were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. These data showed that plant-produced AHLs activated a wide spectrum of defence responses in plants following inoculation, including the oxidative burst, hypersensitive response, cell wall strengthening, and the production of certain metabolites. These results demonstrate that exogenous AHLs alter the gene expression patterns of pathogens, and plant-produced AHLs either directly or indirectly enhance plant local immunity during the early stage of plant infection.

  9. Inhibitory effect of Thymus vulgaris and Origanum vulgare essential oils on virulence factors of phytopatogenic Pseudomonas syringae strains.

    PubMed

    Carezzano, M E; Sotelo, J P; Primo, E; Reinoso, E B; Paletti Rovey, M F; Demo, M S; Giordano, W F; de Las M Oliva, M

    2017-04-12

    Pseudomonas syringae is a phytopathogenic bacterium that causes lesions in the leaves during the colonization process. The damage is associated to the production of many virulence factors such as biofilm and phytotoxins. The essential oils of Thymus vulgaris and Origanum vulgare have demonstrated the ability to inhibit P. syringae. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of T. vulgaris and O. vulgare essential oils on the production of virulence factors of phytopatogenic P. syringae strains, including anti-biofilm and anti-toxins activities. The broth microdilution method was performed for the determination of MIC and biofilm inhibition assays. Coronatine, syringomycin and tabtoxin was pheno- and genotipically evaluated. Both oils showed good inhibitory activity with MIC values ranging from 1.43 to 11.5 mg/mL for thyme and 5.8 to 11.6 mg/mL for oregano. The biofilm formation, the production of coronatine, syringomycin and tabtoxin were inhibited by thyme and oregano essential oils in the majority of the strains. The results presented here are promising, demonstrating the bactericidal activity and the reduction of the virulence factor production by thymus and oregano oils, providing some insight into how they exert their antibacterial activity. These natural products could be considered in the future for the control of bacteriosis caused by P. syringae. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. RNA-seq Analysis Reveals That an ECF σ Factor, AcsS, Regulates Achromobactin Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Jessica W.; Greenwald, Charles J.; Philmus, Benjamin J.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Gross, Dennis C.

    2012-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain B728a and many other microorganisms; therefore, B728a has evolved methods of iron acquirement including the use of iron-chelating siderophores. In this study an extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor, AcsS, encoded within the achromobactin gene cluster is shown to be a major regulator of genes involved in the biosynthesis and secretion of this siderophore. However, production of achromobactin was not completely abrogated in the deletion mutant, implying that other regulators may be involved such as PvdS, the sigma factor that regulates pyoverdine biosynthesis. RNA-seq analysis identified 287 genes that are differentially expressed between the AcsS deletion mutant and the wild type strain. These genes are involved in iron response, secretion, extracellular polysaccharide production, and cell motility. Thus, the transcriptome analysis supports a role for AcsS in the regulation of achromobactin production and the potential activity of both AcsS and achromobactin in the plant-associated lifestyle of strain B728a. PMID:22529937

  11. Involvement of plasma membrane calcium influx in bacterial induction of the K sup + /H sup + and hypersensitive responses in tobacco. [Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, M.M.; Keppler, L.D.; Orlandi, E.W.; Baker, C.J.; Mischke, C.F. Univ. of Maryland, College Park )

    1990-01-01

    An early event in the hypersensitive response of tobacco to Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae is the initiation of a K{sup +}/H{sup +} response characterized by specific plasma membrane K{sup +} efflux, extracellular alkalinization, and intracellular acidification. We investigated the role of calcium in induction of these host responses. Suspension-cultured tobacco cells exhibited a baseline Ca{sup 2+} influx of 0.02 to 0.06 micromole per gram per hour as determined from {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake. Following bacterial inoculation, uptake rates began to increase coincidently with onset of the K{sup +}/H{sup +} response. Rates increased steadily for 2 to 3 hours, reaching 0.5 to 1 micromole per gram per hour. This increased Ca{sup 2+} influx was prevented by EGTA and calcium channel blockers such as La{sup 3+}, Co{sup 2+}, and Cd{sup 2+} but not by verapamil and nifedipine. Lanthanum, cobalt, cadmium, and EGTA inhibited the K{sup +}/H{sup +} response in both suspension-cultured cells and leaf discs and prevented hypersensitive cell death in leaf discs. We conclude that increase plasmalemma Ca{sup 2+} influx is required for the K{sup +}/H{sup +} and hypersensitive responses in tobacco.

  12. Plant flavonoids target Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 flagella and type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Paola; Farias, Gabriela A; Nogales, Joaquina; Prada, Harold; Carvajal, Vivian; Barón, Matilde; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta; Olmedilla, Adela; Gallegos, María-Trinidad

    2013-12-01

    Flavonoids are among the most abundant plant secondary metabolites involved in plant protection against pathogens, but micro-organisms have developed resistance mechanisms to those compounds. We previously demonstrated that the MexAB-OprM efflux pump mediates resistance of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000 to flavonoids, facilitating its survival and the colonization of the host. Here, we have shown that tomato plants respond to Pto infection producing flavonoids and other phenolic compounds. The effects of flavonoids on key traits of this model plant-pathogen bacterium have also been investigated observing that they reduce Pto swimming and swarming because of the loss of flagella, and also inhibited the expression and assembly of a functional type III secretion system. Those effects were more severe in a mutant lacking the MexAB-OprM pump. Our results suggest that flavonoids inhibit the function of the GacS/GacA two-component system, causing a depletion of rsmY RNA, therefore affecting the synthesis of two important virulence factors in Pto DC3000, flagella and the type III secretion system. These data provide new insights into the flavonoid role in the molecular dialog between host and pathogen.

  13. Maladaptation in wild populations of the generalist plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Kniskern, Joel M.; Barrett, Luke G.; Bergelson, Joy

    2010-01-01

    Multi-host pathogens occur widely on both natural and agriculturally managed hosts. Despite the importance of such generalists, evolutionary studies of host-pathogen interactions have largely focused on tightly coupled interactions between species pairs. We characterized resistance in a collection of Arabidopsis thaliana hosts, including 24 accessions collected from the Midwest USA and 24 from around the world, and patterns of virulence in a collection of Pseudomonas syringae strains, including 24 strains collected from wild Midwest populations of A. thaliana (residents) and 18 from an array of cultivated species (non-residents). All of the non-resident strains and half of the resident strains elicited a resistance response on one or more A. thaliana accessions. The resident strains that failed to elicit any resistance response possessed an alternative type III secretion system (T3SS) that is unable to deliver effectors into plant host cells; as a result, these seemingly non-pathogenic strains are incapable of engaging in gene for gene interactions with A. thaliana. The remaining resident strains triggered greater resistance compared to non-resident strains, consistent with maladaptation of the resident bacterial population. We weigh the plausibility of two explanations: general maladaptation of pathogen strains and a more novel hypothesis whereby community level epidemiological dynamics result in adaptive dynamics favoring ephemeral hosts like A. thaliana. PMID:21044058

  14. Resistance Inducers Modulate Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato Strain DC3000 Response in Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Scalschi, Loredana; Camañes, Gemma; Llorens, Eugenio; Fernández-Crespo, Emma; López, María M.; García-Agustín, Pilar; Vicedo, Begonya

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of hexanoic acid (Hx) as an inducer of resistance in tomato plants against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 was previously demonstrated, and the plant response was characterized. Because little is known about the reaction of the pathogen to this effect, the goal of the present work was to determine whether the changes in the plant defence system affect the pathogen behaviour. This work provides the first demonstration of the response of the pathogen to the changes observed in plants after Hx application in terms of not only the population size but also the transcriptional levels of genes involved in quorum sensing establishment and pathogenesis. Therefore, it is possible that Hx treatment attenuates the virulence and survival of bacteria by preventing or diminishing the appearance of symptoms and controlling the growth of the bacteria in the mesophyll. It is interesting to note that the gene transcriptional changes in the bacteria from the treated plants occur at the same time as the changes in the plants. Hx is able to alter bacteria pathogenesis and survival only when it is applied as a resistance inducer because the changes that it promotes in plants affect the bacteria. PMID:25244125

  15. Optimal level of purple acid phosphatase5 is required for maintaining complete resistance to Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Sridhar; Stone, Sophia L; Benkel, Bernhard; Zhang, Junzeng; Berrue, Fabrice; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Plants possess an exceedingly complex innate immune system to defend against most pathogens. However, a relative proportion of the pathogens overcome host's innate immunity and impair plant growth and productivity. We previously showed that mutation in purple acid phosphatase (PAP5) lead to enhanced susceptibility of Arabidopsis to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000). Here, we report that an optimal level of PAP5 is crucial for mounting complete basal resistance. Overexpression of PAP5 impaired ICS1, PR1 expression and salicylic acid (SA) accumulation similar to pap5 knockout mutant plants. Moreover, plant overexpressing PAP5 was impaired in H2O2 accumulation in response to Pst DC3000. PAP5 is localized in to peroxisomes, a known site of generation of reactive oxygen species for activation of defense responses. Taken together, our results demonstrate that optimal levels of PAP5 is required for mounting resistance against Pst DC3000 as both knockout and overexpression of PAP5 lead to compromised basal resistance.

  16. Arabidopsis thaliana transgenics overexpressing IBR3 show enhanced susceptibility to the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Huang, T-Y; Desclos-Theveniau, M; Chien, C-T; Zimmerli, L

    2013-09-01

    The gene, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA)-RESPONSE (IBR) 3, is thought to participate in peroxisomal β-oxidation of IBA to indole-3-acetic acid. Here we show that IBR3 may also play a role in Arabidopsis thaliana defence response to microbial pathogens. IBR3 is up-regulated during infection by virulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 bacteria. Although mutant ibr3-4 did not show a pathogen phenotype, lines overexpressing IBR3 demonstrated enhanced susceptibility to Pst DC3000. Increased susceptibility phenotypes of IBR3 overexpressors were correlated with defective SA defence signalling and impairment of pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) activation. Notably, reactive oxygen species production was reduced in IBR3 overexpressors after treatment with the microbe-associated molecular patterns flg22 and efl26. Later PTI responses, such as accumulation of FRK1 transcripts and callose deposition were also reduced in transgenics overexpressing IBR3 after inoculation with the Type III secretion system deficient bacterial mutant Pst DC3000 hrcC or treatment with flg22 or elf26. Importantly, overexpression of IBR3 did not affect indole-3-acetic acid content or auxin-responsive gene expression. These results suggest a novel role for IBR3 in A. thaliana defence response against bacterial pathogens. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  17. Controlled ice nucleation using freeze-dried Pseudomonas syringae encapsulated in alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lindong; Tessier, Shannon N; Swei, Anisa; Stott, Shannon L; Toner, Mehmet

    2017-03-14

    The control of ice nucleation is of fundamental significance in many process technologies related to food and pharmaceutical science and cryobiology. Mechanical perturbation, electromagnetic fields and ice-nucleating agents (INAs) have been known to induce ice nucleation in a controlled manner. But these ice-nucleating methods may suffer from cumbersome manual operations, safety concerns of external fields, and biocompatibility and recovery issues of INA particles, especially when used in living systems. Given the automatic ice-seeding nature of INAs, a promising solution to overcome some of the above limitations is to engineer a biocomposite that accommodates the INA particles but minimizes their interactions with biologics, as well as enabling the recovery of used particles. In this study, freeze-dried Pseudomonas syringae, a model ice-nucleating agent, was encapsulated into microliter-sized alginate beads. We evaluated the performance of the bacterial hydrogel beads to initiate ice nucleation in water and aqueous glycerol solution by investigating factors including the size and number of the beads and the local concentration of INA particles. In the aqueous sample of a fixed volume, the total mass of the INA particles (m) was found to be the governing parameter that is solely responsible for determining the ice nucleation performance of the bacterial hydrogel beads. The freezing temperature has a strong positive linear correlation with log10m. The findings in this study provide an effective, predictable approach to control ice nucleation, which can improve the outcome and standardization of many ice-assisted process technologies.

  18. Identification, Cloning, and Characterization of l-Phenylserine Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas syringae NK-15

    PubMed Central

    Ueshima, Sakuko; Muramatsu, Hisashi; Nakajima, Takanori; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Kato, Shin-ichiro; Misono, Haruo; Nagata, Shinji

    2010-01-01

    The gene encoding d-phenylserine dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas syringae NK-15 was identified, and a 9,246-bp nucleotide sequence containing the gene was sequenced. Six ORFs were confirmed in the sequenced region, four of which were predicted to form an operon. A homology search of each ORF predicted that orf3 encoded l-phenylserine dehydrogenase. Hence, orf3 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells and recombinant ORF3 was purified to homogeneity and characterized. The purified ORF3 enzyme showed l-phenylserine dehydrogenase activity. The enzymological properties and primary structure of l-phenylserine dehydrogenase (ORF3) were quite different from those of d-phenylserine dehydrogenase previously reported. l-Phenylserine dehydrogenase catalyzed the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the β-hydroxyl group of l-β-phenylserine. l-Phenylserine and l-threo-(2-thienyl)serine were good substrates for l-phenylserine dehydrogenase. The genes encoding l-phenylserine dehydrogenase and d-phenylserine dehydrogenase, which is induced by phenylserine, are located in a single operon. The reaction products of both enzymatic reactions were 2-aminoacetophenone and CO2. PMID:21048868

  19. Abscisic Acid-Cytokinin Antagonism Modulates Resistance Against Pseudomonas syringae in Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Großkinsky, Dominik K; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Phytohormones are known as essential regulators of plant defenses, with ethylene, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid as the central immunity backbone, while other phytohormones have been demonstrated to interact with this. Only recently, a function of the classic phytohormone cytokinin in plant immunity has been described in Arabidopsis, rice, and tobacco. Although interactions of cytokinins with salicylic acid and auxin have been indicated, the complete network of cytokinin interactions with other immunity-relevant phytohormones is not yet understood. Therefore, we studied the interaction of kinetin and abscisic acid as a negative regulator of plant immunity to modulate resistance in tobacco against Pseudomonas syringae. By analyzing infection symptoms, pathogen proliferation, and accumulation of the phytoalexin scopoletin as a key mediator of kinetin-induced resistance in tobacco, antagonistic interaction of these phytohormones in plant immunity was identified. Kinetin reduced abscisic acid levels in tobacco, while increased abscisic acid levels by exogenous application or inhibition of abscisic acid catabolism by diniconazole neutralized kinetin-induced resistance. Based on these results, we conclude that reduction of abscisic acid levels by enhanced abscisic acid catabolism strongly contributes to cytokinin-mediated resistance effects. Thus, the identified cytokinin-abscisic acid antagonism is a novel regulatory mechanism in plant immunity.

  20. Modeling Pseudomonas syringae ice-nucleation protein as a beta-helical protein.

    PubMed Central

    Graether, S P; Jia, Z

    2001-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) inhibit the growth of ice, whereas ice-nucleation proteins (INPs) promote its formation. Although the structures of several AFPs are known, the structure of INP has been modeled thus far because of the difficulty in determining membrane protein structures. Here, we present a novel model of an INP structure from Pseudomonas syringae based on comparison with two newly determined insect AFP structures. The results suggest that both this class of AFPs and INPs may have a similar beta-helical fold and that they could interact with water through the repetitive TXT motif. By theoretical arguments, we show that the distinguishing feature between an ice inhibitor and an ice nucleator lies in the size of the ice-interacting surface. For INPs, the larger surface area acts as a template that is larger than the critical ice embryo surface area required for growth. In contrast, AFPs are small enough so that they bind to ice and inhibit further growth without acting as a nucleator. PMID:11222281

  1. The metabolic transition during disease following infection of Arabidopsis thaliana by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jane L; Forcat, Silvia; Beckmann, Manfred; Bennett, Mark; Miller, Sonia J; Baker, John M; Hawkins, Nathaniel D; Vermeer, Cornelia P; Lu, Chuan; Lin, Wanchang; Truman, William M; Beale, Michael H; Draper, John; Mansfield, John W; Grant, Murray

    2010-08-01

    The outcome of bacterial infection in plants is determined by the ability of the pathogen to successfully occupy the apoplastic space and deliver a constellation of effectors that collectively suppress basal and effector-triggered immune responses. In this study, we examined the metabolic changes associated with establishment of disease using analytical techniques that interrogated a range of chemistries. We demonstrated clear differences in the metabolome of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves infected with virulent Pseudomonas syringae within 8 h of infection. In addition to confirmation of changes in phenolic and indolic compounds, we identified rapid alterations in the abundance of amino acids and other nitrogenous compounds, specific classes of glucosinolates, disaccharides, and molecules that influence the prevalence of reactive oxygen species. Our data illustrate that, superimposed on defence suppression, pathogens reconfigure host metabolism to provide the sustenance required to support exponentially growing populations of apoplastically localized bacteria. We performed a detailed baseline study reporting the metabolic dynamics associated with bacterial infection. Moreover, we have integrated these data with the results of transcriptome profiling to distinguish metabolomic pathways that are transcriptionally activated from those that are post-transcriptionally regulated.

  2. Pseudomonas syringae Phytotoxins: Mode of Action, Regulation, and Biosynthesis by Peptide and Polyketide Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Carol L.; Alarcón-Chaidez, Francisco; Gross, Dennis C.

    1999-01-01

    Coronatine, syringomycin, syringopeptin, tabtoxin, and phaseolotoxin are the most intensively studied phytotoxins of Pseudomonas syringae, and each contributes significantly to bacterial virulence in plants. Coronatine functions partly as a mimic of methyl jasmonate, a hormone synthesized by plants undergoing biological stress. Syringomycin and syringopeptin form pores in plasma membranes, a process that leads to electrolyte leakage. Tabtoxin and phaseolotoxin are strongly antimicrobial and function by inhibiting glutamine synthetase and ornithine carbamoyltransferase, respectively. Genetic analysis has revealed the mechanisms responsible for toxin biosynthesis. Coronatine biosynthesis requires the cooperation of polyketide and peptide synthetases for the assembly of the coronafacic and coronamic acid moieties, respectively. Tabtoxin is derived from the lysine biosynthetic pathway, whereas syringomycin, syringopeptin, and phaseolotoxin biosynthesis requires peptide synthetases. Activation of phytotoxin synthesis is controlled by diverse environmental factors including plant signal molecules and temperature. Genes involved in the regulation of phytotoxin synthesis have been located within the coronatine and syringomycin gene clusters; however, additional regulatory genes are required for the synthesis of these and other phytotoxins. Global regulatory genes such as gacS modulate phytotoxin production in certain pathovars, indicating the complexity of the regulatory circuits controlling phytotoxin synthesis. The coronatine and syringomycin gene clusters have been intensively characterized and show potential for constructing modified polyketides and peptides. Genetic reprogramming of peptide and polyketide synthetases has been successful, and portions of the coronatine and syringomycin gene clusters could be valuable resources in developing new antimicrobial agents. PMID:10357851

  3. Defence Responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to Infection by Pseudomonas syringae Are Regulated by the Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Vaibhav; Meier, Stuart; Petersen, Lindsay N.; Ingle, Robert A.; Roden, Laura C.

    2011-01-01

    The circadian clock allows plants to anticipate predictable daily changes in abiotic stimuli, such as light; however, whether the clock similarly allows plants to anticipate interactions with other organisms is unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) has circadian clock-mediated variation in resistance to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000), with plants being least susceptible to infection in the subjective morning. We suggest that the increased resistance to Pst DC3000 observed in the morning in Col-0 plants results from clock-mediated modulation of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity. Analysis of publicly available microarray data revealed that a large number of Arabidopsis defence-related genes showed both diurnal- and circadian-regulation, including genes involved in the perception of the PAMP flagellin which exhibit a peak in expression in the morning. Accordingly, we observed that PAMP-triggered callose deposition was significantly higher in wild-type plants inoculated with Pst DC3000 hrpA in the subjective morning than in the evening, while no such temporal difference was evident in arrhythmic plants. Our results suggest that PAMP-triggered immune responses are modulated by the circadian clock and that temporal regulation allows plants to anticipate and respond more effectively to pathogen challenges in the daytime. PMID:22066021

  4. Multilayered Regulation of Ethylene Induction Plays a Positive Role in Arabidopsis Resistance against Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Guan, Rongxia; Su, Jianbin; Meng, Xiangzong; Li, Sen; Liu, Yidong; Xu, Juan; Zhang, Shuqun

    2015-09-01

    Ethylene, a key phytohormone involved in plant-pathogen interaction, plays a positive role in plant resistance against fungal pathogens. However, its function in plant bacterial resistance remains unclear. Here, we report a detailed analysis of ethylene induction in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) in response to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (Pst). Ethylene biosynthesis is highly induced in both pathogen/microbe-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity and effector-triggered immunity (ETI), and the induction is potentiated by salicylic acid (SA) pretreatment. In addition, Pst actively suppresses PAMP-triggered ethylene induction in a type III secretion system-dependent manner. SA potentiation of ethylene induction is dependent mostly on MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE6 (MPK6) and MPK3 and their downstream ACS2 and ACS6, two type I isoforms of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthases (ACSs). ACS7, a type III ACS whose expression is enhanced by SA pretreatment, is also involved. Pst expressing the avrRpt2 effector gene (Pst-avrRpt2), which is capable of triggering ETI, induces a higher level of ethylene production, and the elevated portion is dependent on SALICYLIC ACID INDUCTION DEFICIENT2 and NONEXPRESSER OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENE1, two key players in SA biosynthesis and signaling. High-order ACS mutants with reduced ethylene induction are more susceptible to both Pst and Pst-avrRpt2, demonstrating a positive role of ethylene in plant bacterial resistance mediated by both PAMP-triggered immunity and ETI.

  5. Defence responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to infection by Pseudomonas syringae are regulated by the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Vaibhav; Meier, Stuart; Petersen, Lindsay N; Ingle, Robert A; Roden, Laura C

    2011-01-01

    The circadian clock allows plants to anticipate predictable daily changes in abiotic stimuli, such as light; however, whether the clock similarly allows plants to anticipate interactions with other organisms is unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) has circadian clock-mediated variation in resistance to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000), with plants being least susceptible to infection in the subjective morning. We suggest that the increased resistance to Pst DC3000 observed in the morning in Col-0 plants results from clock-mediated modulation of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity. Analysis of publicly available microarray data revealed that a large number of Arabidopsis defence-related genes showed both diurnal- and circadian-regulation, including genes involved in the perception of the PAMP flagellin which exhibit a peak in expression in the morning. Accordingly, we observed that PAMP-triggered callose deposition was significantly higher in wild-type plants inoculated with Pst DC3000 hrpA in the subjective morning than in the evening, while no such temporal difference was evident in arrhythmic plants. Our results suggest that PAMP-triggered immune responses are modulated by the circadian clock and that temporal regulation allows plants to anticipate and respond more effectively to pathogen challenges in the daytime.

  6. Crystal structures of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 quinone oxidoreductase and its complex with NADPH

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Hongmei; Gao, Yu; Li, Mei; Chang, Wenrui

    2009-12-18

    Zeta-crystallin-like quinone oxidoreductase is NAD(P)H-dependent and catalyzes one-electron reduction of certain quinones to generate semiquinone. Here we present the crystal structures of zeta-crystallin-like quinone oxidoreductase from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (PtoQOR) and its complexes with NADPH determined at 2.4 and 2.01 A resolutions, respectively. PtoQOR forms as a homologous dimer, each monomer containing two domains. In the structure of the PtoQOR-NADPH complex, NADPH locates in the groove between the two domains. NADPH binding causes obvious conformational changes in the structure of PtoQOR. The putative substrate-binding site of PtoQOR is wider than that of Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus HB8. Activity assays show that PtoQOR has weak 1,4-benzoquinone catalytic activity, and very strong reduction activity towards large substrates such as 9,10-phenanthrenequinone. We propose a model to explain the conformational changes which take place during reduction reactions catalyzed by PtoQOR.

  7. Screen of Non-annotated Small Secreted Proteins of Pseudomonas syringae Reveals a Virulence Factor That Inhibits Tomato Immune Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, Takayuki; Kaschani, Farnusch; Kovács, Judit; Tian, Fang; Kourelis, Jiorgos; Hong, Tram Ngoc; Colby, Tom; Shabab, Mohammed; Chawla, Rohini; Kumari, Selva; Ilyas, Muhammad; Hörger, Anja C.; Alfano, James R.; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (PtoDC3000) is an extracellular model plant pathogen, yet its potential to produce secreted effectors that manipulate the apoplast has been under investigated. Here we identified 131 candidate small, secreted, non-annotated proteins from the PtoDC3000 genome, most of which are common to Pseudomonas species and potentially expressed during apoplastic colonization. We produced 43 of these proteins through a custom-made gateway-compatible expression system for extracellular bacterial proteins, and screened them for their ability to inhibit the secreted immune protease C14 of tomato using competitive activity-based protein profiling. This screen revealed C14-inhibiting protein-1 (Cip1), which contains motifs of the chagasin-like protease inhibitors. Cip1 mutants are less virulent on tomato, demonstrating the importance of this effector in apoplastic immunity. Cip1 also inhibits immune protease Pip1, which is known to suppress PtoDC3000 infection, but has a lower affinity for its close homolog Rcr3, explaining why this protein is not recognized in tomato plants carrying the Cf-2 resistance gene, which uses Rcr3 as a co-receptor to detect pathogen-derived protease inhibitors. Thus, this approach uncovered a protease inhibitor of P. syringae, indicating that also P. syringae secretes effectors that selectively target apoplastic host proteases of tomato, similar to tomato pathogenic fungi, oomycetes and nematodes. PMID:27603016

  8. Bacteria Associated with Hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) Decline Are of Two Groups: Pseudomonas avellanae and Strains Resembling P. syringae pv. syringae

    PubMed Central

    Scortichini, Marco; Marchesi, Ugo; Rossi, Maria Pia; Di Prospero, Paola

    2002-01-01

    A total of 118 fluorescent pseudomonads associated with hazelnut decline, which has been occurring for many years in different areas of northern Greece and Italy, were assessed by performing a repetitive PCR analysis with enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus, box element, and repetive extragenic palindromic primer sets, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of whole-cell protein extracts, a carbon compound utilization analysis, and an analysis to determine the presence of the syrB gene. A subset of 53 strains was also characterized by amplified 16S ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) by using nine restriction endonucleases. The virulence of 40 representative strains was assessed by using serial doses. The pathogenic specificities of the strains were also verified. ARDRA carried out with HinfI revealed two main groups of strains, groups A and B, which exhibited a level of similarity of 57%. The other eight restriction endonucleases used did not separate the strains. In addition, a cluster analysis performed by the unweighted pair group method using arithmetic averages after repetitive PCR and SDS-PAGE of protein extracts also revealed the same two groups. Furthermore, the differential utilization of some carbon compounds made it possible to differentiate the groups. Virulence assessment clearly indicated that the group A strains are very virulent, whereas the group B strains proved to be mildly virulent for hazelnut. Group A included the strains isolated in northern Greece and central Italy (i.e., the province of Viterbo); these strains do not have the syrB gene, are pathogenically restricted to Corylus avellana, and belong to Pseudomonas avellanae. Group B includes the other strains obtained from hazelnut cultivated in Piedmont, Campania, Latium, Sicily, and Sardinia. They represent a distinct taxon closely related to Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae. PMID:11823181

  9. [The immunochemical characteristics of the lipopolysaccharides of Pseudomonas syringae (pathovars atrofaciens and phaseolicola) and P. holci (serogroup VI)].

    PubMed

    Iakovleva, L M; Zdorovenko, G M; Gubanova, N Ia; Gvozdiak, R I

    1991-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of the representatives of strains of serogroup VI Pseudomonas syringae (P. syringae pv. atrofaciens 2399, pv. phaseolicola 120a, 7842 and P. holci 8299) possessing virulence and confinement to the host-plant are characterized by high serological activity in direct and cross reactions of the binary diffusion in agar, immunoelectrophoresis, passive hemagglutination and inhibition of passive hemagglutination. A supernatant and a sediment obtained after ultracentrifugation of LPS preparations possessed O-antigenic activity. O-specific polysaccharide (PS) is serologically less active than the LPS preparations. Problems of the intergroup and intragroup serological affinity in connection with the structure of O-specific PS. It is proved that the basic chain of O-specific polysaccharide (D-rhamnane) plays definite (but not a single) part in displaying antigenic properties of the whole LPS macromolecule.

  10. Bacterial canker of plum trees, caused by Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, as a serious threat for plum production in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Wenneker, M; Janse, J D; De Bruine, J A

    2011-01-01

    In the Netherlands, bacterial canker in plum trees (Prunus domestica) is a serious and recent problem in plum production. It is caused by Pseudomonas syringae pathovars syringae and morsprunorum. The trunks of the affected plum trees are girdled by bacterial cankers resulting in sudden death of infected trees in 3-4 years after planting. Disease incidences can be very high, and sometimes complete orchards have to be removed. Recently, plum cultivation in the Netherlands has changed from a relatively extensive into an intensive cultivation. However, due to the risks of losses of trees due to bacterial canker, growers are reluctant to plant new plum orchards. In general nurseries and fruit growers are not familiar with bacterial diseases and lack knowledge in order to prevent infections. Therefore, control strategies to manage plum decline have to be developed.

  11. Gac two-component system in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci is required for virulence but not for hypersensitive reaction.

    PubMed

    Marutani, Mizuri; Taguchi, Fumiko; Ogawa, Yujiro; Hossain, Md Mijan; Inagaki, Yoshishige; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Ichinose, Yuki

    2008-04-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 6605 causes wildfire disease on host tobacco plants. To investigate the regulatory mechanism of the expression of virulence, Gac two-component system-defective mutants, DeltagacA and DeltagacS, and a double mutant, DeltagacADeltagacS, were generated. These mutants produced smaller amounts of N-acyl homoserine lactones required for quorum sensing, had lost swarming motility, and had reduced expression of virulence-related hrp genes and the algT gene required for exopolysaccharide production. The ability of the mutants to cause disease symptoms in their host tobacco plant was remarkably reduced, while they retained the ability to induce hypersensitive reaction (HR) in the nonhost plants. These results indicated that the Gac two-component system of P. syringae pv. tabaci 6605 is indispensable for virulence on the host plant, but not for HR induction in the nonhost plants.

  12. Dynamics of Defense Responses and Cell Fate Change during Arabidopsis-Pseudomonas syringae Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hamdoun, Safae; Liu, Zhe; Gill, Manroop; Yao, Nan; Lu, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Plant-pathogen interactions involve sophisticated action and counteraction strategies from both parties. Plants can recognize pathogen derived molecules, such as conserved pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and effector proteins, and subsequently activate PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI), respectively. However, pathogens can evade such recognitions and suppress host immunity with effectors, causing effector-triggered susceptibility (ETS). The differences among PTI, ETS, and ETI have not been completely understood. Toward a better understanding of PTI, ETS, and ETI, we systematically examined various defense-related phenotypes of Arabidopsis infected with different Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326 strains, using the virulence strain DG3 to induce ETS, the avirulence strain DG34 that expresses avrRpm1 (recognized by the resistance protein RPM1) to induce ETI, and HrcC- that lacks the type three secretion system to activate PTI. We found that plants infected with different strains displayed dynamic differences in the accumulation of the defense signaling molecule salicylic acid, expression of the defense marker gene PR1, cell death formation, and accumulation/localization of the reactive oxygen species, H2O2. The differences between PTI, ETS, and ETI are dependent on the doses of the strains used. These data support the quantitative nature of PTI, ETS, and ETI and they also reveal qualitative differences between PTI, ETS, and ETI. Interestingly, we observed the induction of large cells in the infected leaves, most obviously with HrcC- at later infection stages. The enlarged cells have increased DNA content, suggesting a possible activation of endoreplication. Consistent with strong induction of abnormal cell growth by HrcC-, we found that the PTI elicitor flg22 also activates abnormal cell growth, depending on a functional flg22-receptor FLS2. Thus, our study has revealed a comprehensive picture of dynamic

  13. Type IV pilin is glycosylated in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 6605 and is required for surface motility and virulence.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Linh Chi; Taguchi, Fumiko; Tran, Quang Minh; Naito, Kana; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Ono, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Mitsuru; Chiku, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Tadashi; Inagaki, Yoshishige; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Ichinose, Yuki

    2012-09-01

    Type IV pilin (PilA) is a major constituent of pilus and is required for bacterial biofilm formation, surface motility and virulence. It is known that mature PilA is produced by cleavage of the short leader sequence of the pilin precursor, followed by methylation of N-terminal phenylalanine. The molecular mass of the PilA mature protein from the tobacco bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 6605 (Pta 6605) has been predicted to be 12 329 Da from its deduced amino acid sequence. Previously, we have detected PilA as an approximately 13-kDa protein by immunoblot analysis with anti-PilA-specific antibody. In addition, we found the putative oligosaccharide-transferase gene tfpO downstream of pilA. These findings suggest that PilA in Pta 6605 is glycosylated. The defective mutant of tfpO (ΔtfpO) shows reductions in pilin molecular mass, surface motility and virulence towards host tobacco plants. Thus, pilin glycan plays important roles in bacterial motility and virulence. The genetic region around pilA was compared among P. syringae pathovars. The tfpO gene exists in some strains of pathovars tabaci, syringae, lachrymans, mori, actinidiae, maculicola and P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi. However, some strains of pathovars tabaci, syringae, glycinea, tomato, aesculi and oryzae do not possess tfpO, and the existence of tfpO is independent of the classification of pathovars/strains in P. syringae. Interestingly, the PilA amino acid sequences in tfpO-possessing strains show higher homology with each other than with tfpO-nonpossessing strains. These results suggest that tfpO and pilA might co-evolve in certain specific bacterial strains.

  14. Biocontrol of Bacillus subtilis against infection of Arabidopsis roots by Pseudomonas syringae is facilitated by biofilm formation and surfactin production.

    PubMed

    Bais, Harsh Pal; Fall, Ray; Vivanco, Jorge M

    2004-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the exact mechanisms used by Bacillus subtilis in its behavior as a biocontrol agent on plants. Here, we report the development of a sensitive plant infection model demonstrating that the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 is capable of infecting Arabidopsis roots both in vitro and in soil. Using this infection model, we demonstrated the biocontrol ability of a wild-type B. subtilis strain 6051 against P. syringae. Arabidopsis root surfaces treated with B. subtilis were analyzed with confocal scanning laser microscopy to reveal a three-dimensional B. subtilis biofilm. It is known that formation of biofilms by B. subtilis is a complex process that includes secretion of surfactin, a lipopeptide antimicrobial agent. To determine the role of surfactin in biocontrol by B. subtilis, we tested a mutant strain, M1, with a deletion in a surfactin synthase gene and, thus, deficient in surfactin production. B. subtilis M1 was ineffective as a biocontrol agent against P. syringae infectivity in Arabidopsis and also failed to form robust biofilms on either roots or inert surfaces. The antibacterial activity of surfactin against P. syringae was determined in both broth and agar cultures and also by live-dead staining methods. Although the minimum inhibitory concentrations determined were relatively high (25 microg mL(-1)), the levels of the lipopeptide in roots colonized by B. subtilis are likely to be sufficient to kill P. syringae. Our results collectively indicate that upon root colonization, B. subtilis 6051 forms a stable, extensive biofilm and secretes surfactin, which act together to protect plants against attack by pathogenic bacteria.

  15. Sequence Diversity of rulA among Natural Isolates of Pseudomonas syringae and Effect on Function of rulAB-Mediated UV Radiation Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Sundin, George W.; Jacobs, Janette L.; Murillo, Jesús

    2000-01-01

    The rulAB locus confers tolerance to UV radiation and is borne on plasmids of the pPT23A family in Pseudomonas syringae. We sequenced 14 rulA alleles from P. syringae strains representing seven pathovars and found sequence differences of 1 to 12% within pathovar syringae, and up to 15% differences between pathovars. Since the sequence variation within rulA was similar to that of P. syringae chromosomal alleles, we hypothesized that rulAB has evolved over a long time period in P. syringae. A phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of rulA resulted in seven clusters. Strains from the same plant host grouped together in three cases; however, strains from different pathovars grouped together in two cases. In particular, the rulA alleles from P. syringae pv. lachrymans and P. syringae pv. pisi were grouped but were clearly distinct from the other sequenced alleles, suggesting the possibility of a recent interpathovar transfer. We constructed chimeric rulAB expression clones and found that the observed sequence differences resulted in significant differences in UV (wavelength) radiation sensitivity. Our results suggest that specific amino acid changes in RulA could alter UV radiation tolerance and the competitiveness of the P. syringae host in the phyllosphere. PMID:11097885

  16. Calcium Efflux as a Component of Hypersensitive Response of Nicotiana benthamiana to Pseudomonas syringae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using a model plant Nicotiana benthamiana we have demonstrated that initial calcium uptake in response to HR (hypersensitive response)-causing pathogen, P. syringae pv syringae 61 is followed by the net calcium efflux initiated at about 12 hrs after the bacterial challenge and sustained for at least...

  17. Structure of Microcin B-Like Compounds Produced by Pseudomonas syringae and Species Specificity of Their Antibacterial Action

    PubMed Central

    Metelev, Mikhail; Serebryakova, Marina; Ghilarov, Dmitry; Zhao, Youfu

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli microcin B (Ec-McB) is a posttranslationally modified antibacterial peptide containing multiple oxazole and thiazole heterocycles and targeting the DNA gyrase. We have found operons homologous to the Ec-McB biosynthesis-immunity operon mcb in recently sequenced genomes of several pathovars of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, and we produced two variants of P. syringae microcin B (Ps-McB) in E. coli by heterologous expression. Like Ec-McB, both versions of Ps-McB target the DNA gyrase, but unlike Ec-McB, they are active against various species of the Pseudomonas genus, including human pathogen P. aeruginosa. Through analysis of Ec-McB/Ps-McB chimeras, we demonstrate that three centrally located unmodified amino acids of Ps-McB are sufficient to determine activity against Pseudomonas, likely by allowing specific recognition by a transport system that remains to be identified. The results open the way for construction of McB-based antibacterial molecules with extended spectra of biological activity. PMID:23852863

  18. Glycan-binding F-box protein from Arabidopsis thaliana protects plants from Pseudomonas syringae infection.

    PubMed

    Stefanowicz, Karolina; Lannoo, Nausicaä; Zhao, Yafei; Eggermont, Lore; Van Hove, Jonas; Al Atalah, Bassam; Van Damme, Els J M

    2016-10-04

    A small group of F-box proteins consisting of a conserved F-box domain linked to a domain homologous to the glycan-binding protein has been identified within the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana. Previously, the so-called F-box-Nictaba protein, encoded by the gene At2g02360, was shown to be a functional lectin which binds N-acetyllactosamine structures. Here, we present a detailed qRT-PCR expression analysis of F-box-Nictaba in Arabidopsis plants upon different stresses and hormone treatments. Expression of the F-box-Nictaba gene was enhanced after plant treatment with salicylic acid and after plant infection with the virulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (Pst DC3000). β-glucuronidase histochemical staining of transgenic Arabidopsis plants displayed preferential activity of the At2g02360 promoter in trichomes present on young rosette leaves. qRT-PCR analyses confirmed high expression of F-box-Nictaba in leaf trichomes. A. thaliana plants overexpressing the gene showed less disease symptoms after Pst DC3000 infection with reduced bacterial colonization compared to infected wild type and F-box-Nictaba knock-out plants. Our data show that the Arabidopsis F-box-Nictaba gene is a stress-inducible gene responsive to SA, bacterial infection and heat stress, and is involved in salicylic acid related plant defense responses. This knowledge enriched our understanding of the physiological importance of F-box-Nictaba, and can be used to create plants with better performance in changing environmental conditions.

  19. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana containing increased levels of ATP and sucrose is more susceptible to Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Renshan; Qi, Hua; Sun, Yuzhe; Xiao, Shi

    2017-01-01

    Disease resistance exerts a fitness cost on plants, presumably due to the extra consumption of energy and carbon. In this study, we examined whether transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana with increased levels of ATP and sucrose is more resistant or susceptible to pathogen infection. Lines of A. thaliana over-expressing purple acid phosphatase 2 (AtPAP2) (OE lines) contain increased levels of ATP and sucrose, with improved growth rate and seed production. Compared to wild type (WT) and pap2 lines, the OE lines were more susceptible to several Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) strains carrying AvrRpm1, AvrRpt2 AvrRps4, AvrPtoB, HrcC and WT strain DC3000. The increased susceptibility of the OE lines to Pst strains cannot solely be attributed to the suppressed expression of R-genes but must also be attributed to the suppression of downstream signaling components, such as MOS2, EDS1 and EDS5. Before infection, the levels of salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) precursor OPDA were similar in the leaves of OE, pap2 and WT plants, whereas the levels of JA and its derivative JA-Ile were significantly lower in the leaves of OE lines and higher in the pap2 line. The expression of JA marker defense gene PDF1.2 was up-regulated in the OE lines compared to the WT prior to Pst DC3000 infection, but its expression was lower in the OE lines after infection. In summary, high fitness Arabidopsis thaliana exhibited altered JA metabolism and broad suppression of R-genes and downstream genes as well as a higher susceptibility to Pst infections. PMID:28152090

  20. Purple Acid Phosphatase5 is required for maintaining basal resistance against Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Sridhar; Stone, Sophia L; Benkel, Bernhard; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2013-07-29

    Plants have evolved an array of constitutive and inducible defense strategies to restrict pathogen ingress. However, some pathogens still manage to invade plants and impair growth and productivity. Previous studies have revealed several key regulators of defense responses, and efforts have been made to use this information to develop disease resistant crop plants. These efforts are often hampered by the complexity of defense signaling pathways. To further elucidate the complexity of defense responses, we screened a population of T-DNA mutants in Colombia-0 background that displayed altered defense responses to virulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000). In this study, we demonstrated that the Arabidopsis Purple Acid Phosphatse5 (PAP5) gene, induced under prolonged phosphate (Pi) starvation, is required for maintaining basal resistance to certain pathogens. The expression of PAP5 was distinctly induced only under prolonged Pi starvation and during the early stage of Pst DC3000 infection (6 h.p.i). T-DNA tagged mutant pap5 displayed enhanced susceptibility to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pst DC3000. The pap5 mutation greatly reduced the expression of pathogen inducible gene PR1 compared to wild-type plants. Similarly, other defense related genes including ICS1 and PDF1.2 were impaired in pap5 plants. Moreover, application of BTH (an analog of SA) restored PR1 expression in pap5 plants. Taken together, our results demonstrate the requirement of PAP5 for maintaining basal resistance against Pst DC3000. Furthermore, our results provide evidence that PAP5 acts upstream of SA accumulation to regulate the expression of other defense responsive genes. We also provide the first experimental evidence indicating the role PAP5 in plant defense responses.

  1. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana containing increased levels of ATP and sucrose is more susceptible to Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Renshan; Qi, Hua; Sun, Yuzhe; Xiao, Shi; Lim, Boon Leong

    2017-01-01

    Disease resistance exerts a fitness cost on plants, presumably due to the extra consumption of energy and carbon. In this study, we examined whether transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana with increased levels of ATP and sucrose is more resistant or susceptible to pathogen infection. Lines of A. thaliana over-expressing purple acid phosphatase 2 (AtPAP2) (OE lines) contain increased levels of ATP and sucrose, with improved growth rate and seed production. Compared to wild type (WT) and pap2 lines, the OE lines were more susceptible to several Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) strains carrying AvrRpm1, AvrRpt2 AvrRps4, AvrPtoB, HrcC and WT strain DC3000. The increased susceptibility of the OE lines to Pst strains cannot solely be attributed to the suppressed expression of R-genes but must also be attributed to the suppression of downstream signaling components, such as MOS2, EDS1 and EDS5. Before infection, the levels of salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) precursor OPDA were similar in the leaves of OE, pap2 and WT plants, whereas the levels of JA and its derivative JA-Ile were significantly lower in the leaves of OE lines and higher in the pap2 line. The expression of JA marker defense gene PDF1.2 was up-regulated in the OE lines compared to the WT prior to Pst DC3000 infection, but its expression was lower in the OE lines after infection. In summary, high fitness Arabidopsis thaliana exhibited altered JA metabolism and broad suppression of R-genes and downstream genes as well as a higher susceptibility to Pst infections.

  2. Purple Acid Phosphatase5 is required for maintaining basal resistance against Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plants have evolved an array of constitutive and inducible defense strategies to restrict pathogen ingress. However, some pathogens still manage to invade plants and impair growth and productivity. Previous studies have revealed several key regulators of defense responses, and efforts have been made to use this information to develop disease resistant crop plants. These efforts are often hampered by the complexity of defense signaling pathways. To further elucidate the complexity of defense responses, we screened a population of T-DNA mutants in Colombia-0 background that displayed altered defense responses to virulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000). Results In this study, we demonstrated that the Arabidopsis Purple Acid Phosphatse5 (PAP5) gene, induced under prolonged phosphate (Pi) starvation, is required for maintaining basal resistance to certain pathogens. The expression of PAP5 was distinctly induced only under prolonged Pi starvation and during the early stage of Pst DC3000 infection (6 h.p.i). T-DNA tagged mutant pap5 displayed enhanced susceptibility to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pst DC3000. The pap5 mutation greatly reduced the expression of pathogen inducible gene PR1 compared to wild-type plants. Similarly, other defense related genes including ICS1 and PDF1.2 were impaired in pap5 plants. Moreover, application of BTH (an analog of SA) restored PR1 expression in pap5 plants. Conclusion Taken together, our results demonstrate the requirement of PAP5 for maintaining basal resistance against Pst DC3000. Furthermore, our results provide evidence that PAP5 acts upstream of SA accumulation to regulate the expression of other defense responsive genes. We also provide the first experimental evidence indicating the role PAP5 in plant defense responses. PMID:23890153

  3. NH4+ protects tomato plants against Pseudomonas syringae by activation of systemic acquired acclimation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Crespo, Emma; Scalschi, Loredana; Llorens, Eugenio; García-Agustín, Pilar; Camañes, Gemma

    2015-11-01

    NH4 (+) nutrition provokes mild toxicity by enhancing H2O2 accumulation, which acts as a signal activating systemic acquired acclimation (SAA). Until now, induced resistance mechanisms in response to an abiotic stimulus and related to SAA were only reported for exposure to a subsequent abiotic stress. Herein, the first evidence is provided that this acclimation to an abiotic stimulus induces resistance to later pathogen infection, since NH4 (+) nutrition (N-NH4 (+))-induced resistance (NH4 (+)-IR) against Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (Pst) in tomato plants was demonstrated. N-NH4 (+) plants displayed basal H2O2, abscisic acid (ABA), and putrescine (Put) accumulation. H2O2 accumulation acted as a signal to induce ABA-dependent signalling pathways required to prevent NH4 (+) toxicity. This acclimatory event provoked an increase in resistance against later pathogen infection. N-NH4 (+) plants displayed basal stomatal closure produced by H2O2 derived from enhanced CuAO and rboh1 activity that may reduce the entry of bacteria into the mesophyll, diminishing the disease symptoms as well as strongly inducing the oxidative burst upon Pst infection, favouring NH4 (+)-IR. Experiments with inhibitors of Put accumulation and the ABA-deficient mutant flacca demonstrated that Put and ABA downstream signalling pathways are required to complete NH4 (+)-IR. The metabolic profile revealed that infected N-NH4 (+) plants showed greater ferulic acid accumulation compared with control plants. Although classical salicylic acid (SA)-dependent responses against biotrophic pathogens were not found, the important role of Put in the resistance of tomato against Pst was demonstrated. Moreover, this work revealed the cross-talk between abiotic stress acclimation (NH4 (+) nutrition) and resistance to subsequent Pst infection.

  4. An ice nucleation reporter gene system: identification of inducible pathogenicity genes in Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola.

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, P B; Frederick, R; Govindarajan, A G; Panopoulos, N J; Staskawicz, B J; Lindow, S E

    1989-01-01

    We have constructed derivatives of the transposon Tn3 that allow an ice nucleation gene (inaZ) to be used as 'reporter' of the transcriptional activity of genes into which it is inserted. In these derivatives (Tn3-Ice and Tn3-Spice), the lacZYA sequences of transposon Tn3-HoHo1 were replaced with inaZ lacking its native promoter. The ice nucleation activity of virB::inaZ fusions in the correct transcriptional orientation was inducible by acetosyringone, a plant metabolite which activates the vir operon of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti plasmids, while fusions in the opposite orientation were unresponsive to the inducer. Tn3-Spice was also used to investigate the expression of a cluster of genes (hrp) which control pathogenicity and hypersensitivity elicited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola. An inducible region was identified which is expressed at low levels in vitro but becomes activated when the bacteria come into contact with the susceptible host, bean. Activation of this region occurred within 2 h post-inoculation and was nearly complete by the time the bacteria began to multiply in the leaf tissue. The inaZ reporter appears to be at least 10(5)-fold more sensitive than lacZ in P.s.phaseolicola. Thus, the inaZ fusion system provides a sensitive, convenient and inexpensive tool for the study of bacterial gene expression, particularly during plant pathogenesis, and should be generally useful as a reporter gene system in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:2548841

  5. NH4 + protects tomato plants against Pseudomonas syringae by activation of systemic acquired acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Crespo, Emma; Scalschi, Loredana; Llorens, Eugenio; García-Agustín, Pilar; Camañes, Gemma

    2015-01-01

    NH4 + nutrition provokes mild toxicity by enhancing H2O2 accumulation, which acts as a signal activating systemic acquired acclimation (SAA). Until now, induced resistance mechanisms in response to an abiotic stimulus and related to SAA were only reported for exposure to a subsequent abiotic stress. Herein, the first evidence is provided that this acclimation to an abiotic stimulus induces resistance to later pathogen infection, since NH4 + nutrition (N-NH4 +)-induced resistance (NH4 +-IR) against Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (Pst) in tomato plants was demonstrated. N-NH4 + plants displayed basal H2O2, abscisic acid (ABA), and putrescine (Put) accumulation. H2O2 accumulation acted as a signal to induce ABA-dependent signalling pathways required to prevent NH4 + toxicity. This acclimatory event provoked an increase in resistance against later pathogen infection. N-NH4 + plants displayed basal stomatal closure produced by H2O2 derived from enhanced CuAO and rboh1 activity that may reduce the entry of bacteria into the mesophyll, diminishing the disease symptoms as well as strongly inducing the oxidative burst upon Pst infection, favouring NH4 +-IR. Experiments with inhibitors of Put accumulation and the ABA-deficient mutant flacca demonstrated that Put and ABA downstream signalling pathways are required to complete NH4 +-IR. The metabolic profile revealed that infected N-NH4 + plants showed greater ferulic acid accumulation compared with control plants. Although classical salicylic acid (SA)-dependent responses against biotrophic pathogens were not found, the important role of Put in the resistance of tomato against Pst was demonstrated. Moreover, this work revealed the cross-talk between abiotic stress acclimation (NH4 + nutrition) and resistance to subsequent Pst infection. PMID:26246613

  6. Isolation and characterisation of EfeM, a periplasmic component of the putative EfeUOBM iron transporter of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekaran, Mohan B; Mitchell, Sue A; Gibson, Trevor M; Hussain, Rohanah; Siligardi, Giuliano; Andrews, Simon C; Watson, Kimberly A

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} Bioinformatic analysis reveals EfeM is a metallopeptidase with conserved HXXE motif. {yields} Mass spectrometry confirms EfeM consists of 251 residues, molecular weight 27,772Da. {yields} SRCD spectroscopy shows an {alpha}-helical secondary structure. {yields} Single crystals of EfeM are orthorhombic and diffract to 1.6A resolution. {yields} Space group is P22{sub 1}2{sub 1} with cell dimensions a = 46.74, b = 95.17 and c = 152.61 A. -- Abstract: The EfeM protein is a component of the putative EfeUOBM iron-transporter of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar syringae and is thought to act as a periplasmic, ferrous-iron binding protein. It contains a signal peptide of 34 amino acid residues and a C-terminal 'Peptidase{sub M}75' domain of 251 residues. The C-terminal domain contains a highly conserved 'HXXE' motif thought to act as part of a divalent cation-binding site. In this work, the gene (efeM or 'Psyr{sub 3}370') encoding EfeM was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and the mature protein was purified from the periplasm. Mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of the protein (M{sub W} 27,772 Da). Circular dichroism spectroscopy of EfeM indicated a mainly {alpha}-helical structure, consistent with bioinformatic predictions. Purified EfeM was crystallised by hanging-drop vapor diffusion to give needle-shaped crystals that diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 A. This is the first molecular study of a peptidase M75 domain with a presumed iron transport role.

  7. Extensive Field Survey, Laboratory and Greenhouse Studies Reveal Complex Nature of Pseudomonas syringae-Associated Hazelnut Decline in Central Italy.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Jay Ram; Bartoli, Claudia; Varvaro, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas avellanae (Pav) has been reported as the causal agent of bacterial decline and bacterial canker of hazelnut in Italy and Greece, respectively. Both hazelnut diseases were reported to be similar in terms of symptoms, severity and persistence. In this study, we found that both symptomatic and asymptomatic trees in the field were colonized by Pav. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) analysis showed that Pav strains isolated during this study in Italy belong to the P. syringae phylogroup 1 and they are closely related to Pav strains previously isolated in Greece from hazelnut bacterial canker. On the other hand, strains isolated in earlier studies from hazelnut decline in Italy belong to both phylogroup 1 and 2 of P. syringae. Both phylogroup 1 strains of P. syringae from Greece and Italy are different than strains isolated in this study in terms of their capacity to excrete fluorescent pigments on different media. Despite the same plant genotype and cropping practices adopted, the incidence of hazelnut decline ranged from nearly 0 to 91% across our study sites. No disease developed on plants inoculated with Pav through wounding while leaf scar inoculations produced only mild disease symptoms. Based on our results and the previously reported correlation between pedo-climatic conditions and hazelnut decline, we conclude that hazelnut decline in central Italy could be incited by a combination of predisposing (adverse pedo-climatic conditions) and contributing factors (Pav). Because this is a true decline different from "bacterial canker" described in Greece, we refer to it as hazelnut decline (HD).

  8. The Pseudomonas syringae phytotoxin coronatine promotes virulence by overcoming salicylic acid-dependent defences in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Brooks, David M; Bender, Carol L; Kunkel, Barbara N

    2005-11-01

    SUMMARY Successful pathogen infection likely involves the suppression of general antimicrobial host defences. One Pseudomonas syringae virulence factor proposed to act in this manner is coronatine (COR), a phytotoxin believed to function as an analogue of one or more jasmonates, a family of plant growth regulators. COR biosynthetic (COR(-)) mutants of P. syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 exhibit reduced virulence on Arabidopsis thaliana and tomato. In the present study, three genetically and biochemically defined COR(-) mutants of DC3000 were used to explore potential effects of COR and its precursors, coronafacic acid (CFA) and coronamic acid (CMA), on defence signalling pathways in A. thaliana. Inoculation with wild-type DC3000 resulted in the accumulation of several jasmonate-responsive transcripts, whereas infection with a mutant strain that accumulates CFA, which is structurally similar to methyl jasmonate (MeJA), did not. Thus, COR, but not CFA, stimulates jasmonate signalling during P. syringae infection of A. thaliana. The ability of the COR(-) mutants to grow to high levels in planta was fully restored in A. thaliana lines deficient for salicylic acid (SA) accumulation. Although the COR(-) mutants grew to high levels in SA-deficient plants, disease symptoms were reduced in these plants. Collectively, these results indicate that COR is required both for overcoming or suppressing SA-dependent defences during growth in plant tissue and for normal disease symptom development in A. thaliana.

  9. Molecular mechanisms of two-component system RhpRS regulating type III secretion system in Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xin; Liang, Haihua; Chen, Kai; He, Chuan; Lan, Lefu; Tang, Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae uses the two-component system RhpRS to regulate the expression of type III secretion system (T3SS) genes and bacterial virulence. However, the molecular mechanisms and the regulons of RhpRS have yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we show that RhpS functions as a kinase and a phosphatase on RhpR and as an autokinase upon itself. RhpR is phosphorylated by the small phosphodonor acetyl phosphate. A specific RhpR-binding site containing the inverted repeat (IR) motif GTATC-N6-GATAC, was mapped to its own promoter by a DNase I footprint analysis. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay indicated that P-RhpR has a higher binding affinity to the IR motif than RhpR. To identify additional RhpR targets in P. syringae, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) and detected 167 enriched loci including the hrpR promoter, suggesting the direct regulation of T3SS cascade genes by RhpR. A genome-wide microarray analysis showed that, in addition to the T3SS cascade genes, RhpR differentially regulates a large set of genes with various functions in response to different growth conditions. Together, these results suggested that RhpRS is a global regulator that allows P. syringae to sense and respond to environmental changes by coordinating T3SS expression and many other biological processes. PMID:25249629

  10. Diverse evolutionary mechanisms shape the type III effector virulence factor repertoire in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed Central

    Rohmer, Laurence; Guttman, David S; Dangl, Jeffery L

    2004-01-01

    Many gram-negative pathogenic bacteria directly translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells via type III delivery systems. Type III effector proteins are determinants of virulence on susceptible plant hosts; they are also the proteins that trigger specific disease resistance in resistant plant hosts. Evolution of type III effectors is dominated by competing forces: the likely requirement for conservation of virulence function, the avoidance of host defenses, and possible adaptation to new hosts. To understand the evolutionary history of type III effectors in Pseudomonas syringae, we searched for homologs to 44 known or candidate P. syringae type III effectors and two effector chaperones. We examined 24 gene families for distribution among bacterial species, amino acid sequence diversity, and features indicative of horizontal transfer. We assessed the role of diversifying and purifying selection in the evolution of these gene families. While some P. syringae type III effectors were acquired recently, others have evolved predominantly by descent. The majority of codons in most of these genes were subjected to purifying selection, suggesting selective pressure to maintain presumed virulence function. However, members of 7 families had domains subject to diversifying selection. PMID:15280247

  11. Identification and characterization of a well-defined series of coronatine biosynthetic mutants of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    PubMed

    Brooks, David M; Hernández-Guzmán, Gustavo; Kloek, Andrew P; Alarcón-Chaidez, Francisco; Sreedharan, Aswathy; Rangaswamy, Vidhya; Peñaloza-Vázquez, Alejandro; Bender, Carol L; Kunkel, Barbara N

    2004-02-01

    To identify Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato genes involved in pathogenesis, we carried out a screen for Tn5 mutants of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 with reduced virulence on Arabidopsis thaliana. Several mutants defining both known and novel virulence loci were identified. Six mutants contained insertions in biosynthetic genes for the phytotoxin coronatine (COR). The P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 COR genes are chromosomally encoded and are arranged in two separate clusters, which encode enzymes responsible for the synthesis of coronafacic acid (CFA) or coronamic acid (CMA), the two defined intermediates in COR biosynthesis. High-performance liquid chromatography fractionation and exogenous feeding studies confirmed that Tn5 insertions in the cfa and cma genes disrupt CFA and CMA biosynthesis, respectively. All six COR biosynthetic mutants were significantly impaired in their ability to multiply to high levels and to elicit disease symptoms on A. thaliana plants. To assess the relative contributions of CFA, CMA, and COR in virulence, we constructed and characterized cfa6 cmaA double mutant strains. These exhibited virulence phenotypes on A. thalliana identical to those observed for the cmaA or cfa6 single mutants, suggesting that reduced virulence of these mutants on A. thaliana is caused by the absence of the intact COR toxin. This is the first study to use biochemically and genetically defined COR mutants to address the role of COR in pathogenesis.

  12. Allelic variants of the Pseudomonas syringae type III effector HopZ1 are differentially recognized by plant resistance systems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huanbin; Morgan, Robyn L; Guttman, David S; Ma, Wenbo

    2009-02-01

    The bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae depends on the type III secretion system and type III-secreted effectors to cause disease in plants. HopZ is a diverse family of type III effectors widely distributed in P. syringae isolates. Among the HopZ homologs, HopZ1 is ancient to P. syringae and has been shown to be under strong positive selection driven by plant resistance-imposed selective pressure. Here, we characterized the virulence and avirulence functions of the three HopZ1 alleles in soybean and Nicotiana benthamiana. In soybean, HopZ1 alleles have distinct functions: HopZ1a triggers defense response, HopZ1b promotes bacterial growth, and HopZ1c has no observable effect. In N. benthamiana, HopZ1a and HopZ1b both induce plant defense responses. However, they appear to trigger different resistance pathways, evidenced by two major differences between HopZ1a- and HopZ1b-triggered hypersensitive response (HR): i) the putative N-acylation sites had no effect on HopZ1a-triggered cell death, whereas it greatly enhanced HopZ1b-triggered cell death; and ii) the HopZ1b-triggered HR, but not the HopZ1a-triggered HR, was suppressed by another HopZ homolog, HopZ3. We previously demonstrated that HopZ1a most resembled the ancestral allelic form of HopZ1; therefore, this new evidence suggested that differentiated resistance systems have evolved in plant hosts to adapt to HopZ1 diversification in P. syringae.

  13. The Stealth Episome: Suppression of Gene Expression on the Excised Genomic Island PPHGI-1 from Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, Scott A. C.; Lovell, Helen C.; Mansfield, John W.; Corry, David S.; Jackson, Robert W.; Arnold, Dawn L.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola is the causative agent of halo blight in the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris. P. syringae pv. phaseolicola race 4 strain 1302A contains the avirulence gene avrPphB (syn. hopAR1), which resides on PPHGI-1, a 106 kb genomic island. Loss of PPHGI-1 from P. syringae pv. phaseolicola 1302A following exposure to the hypersensitive resistance response (HR) leads to the evolution of strains with altered virulence. Here we have used fluorescent protein reporter systems to gain insight into the mobility of PPHGI-1. Confocal imaging of dual-labelled P. syringae pv. phaseolicola 1302A strain, F532 (dsRFP in chromosome and eGFP in PPHGI-1), revealed loss of PPHGI-1::eGFP encoded fluorescence during plant infection and when grown in vitro on extracted leaf apoplastic fluids. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of fluorescent and non-fluorescent PPHGI-1::eGFP F532 populations showed that cells lost fluorescence not only when the GI was deleted, but also when it had excised and was present as a circular episome. In addition to reduced expression of eGFP, quantitative PCR on sub-populations separated by FACS showed that transcription of other genes on PPHGI-1 (avrPphB and xerC) was also greatly reduced in F532 cells harbouring the excised PPHGI-1::eGFP episome. Our results show how virulence determinants located on mobile pathogenicity islands may be hidden from detection by host surveillance systems through the suppression of gene expression in the episomal state. PMID:21483484

  14. Effects of Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae infection on the antioxidant profile of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum C3/CAM intermediate plant.

    PubMed

    Libik-Konieczny, Marta; Surówka, Ewa; Kuźniak, Elżbieta; Nosek, Michał; Miszalski, Zbigniew

    2011-07-01

    Mesembryathemum crystallinum plants performing C(3) or CAM (crassulacean acid metabolism) appear to be highly resistant to Botrytis cinerea as well as to Pseudomonas syringae. Fungal hyphae growth was restricted to 48h post-inoculation (hpi) in both metabolic types and morphology of hyphae differed between those growing in C(3) and CAM plants. Growth of bacteria was inhibited significantly 24 hpi in both C(3) and CAM plants. B. cinerea and P. syringae infection led to an increase in the concentration of H(2)O(2) in C(3) plants 3 hpi, while a decrease in H(2)O(2) content was observed in CAM performing plants. The concentration of H(2)O(2) returned to the control level 24 and 48 hpi. Changes in H(2)O(2) content corresponded with the activity of guaiacol peroxidase (POD), mostly 3 hpi. We noted that its activity decreased significantly in C(3) plants and increased in CAM plants in response to inoculation with both pathogens. On the contrary, changes in the activity of CAT did not correlate with H(2)O(2) level. It increased significantly after interaction of C(3) plants with B. cinerea or P. syringae, but in CAM performing plants, the activity of this enzyme was unchanged. Inoculation with B. cinerea or P. syringae led to an increase in the total SOD activity in C(3) plants while CAM plants did not exhibit changes in the total SOD activity after interaction with both pathogens. In conclusion, the pathogen-induced changes in H(2)O(2) content and in SOD, POD and CAT activities in M. crystallinum leaves, were related to the photosynthetic metabolism type of the stressed plants rather than to the lifestyle of the invading pathogen.

  15. Antimicrobial Effects of a Hexapetide KCM21 against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jeahyuk; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Moon, Eunpyo

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small but effective cationic peptides with variable length. In previous study, four hexapeptides were identified that showed antimicrobial activities against various phytopathogenic bacteria. KCM21, the most effective antimicrobial peptide, was selected for further analysis to understand its modes of action by monitoring inhibitory effects of various cations, time-dependent antimicrobial kinetics, and observing cell disruption by electron microscopy. The effects of KCM21 on Gram-negative strain, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and Gram-positive strain, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis were compared. Treatment with divalent cations such as Ca2+ and Mg2+ inhibited the bactericidal activities of KCM21 significantly against P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The bactericidal kinetic study showed that KCM21 killed both bacteria rapidly and the process was faster against C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. The electron microscopic analysis revealed that KCM21 induced the formation of micelles and blebs on the surface of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 cells, while it caused cell rupture against C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis cells. The outer membrane alteration and higher sensitivity to Ca2+ suggest that KCM21 interact with the outer membrane of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 cells during the process of killing, but not with C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis cells that lack outer membrane. Considering that both strains had similar sensitivity to KCM21 in LB medium, outer membrane could not be the main target of KCM21, instead common compartments such as cytoplasmic membrane or internal macromolecules might be a possible target(s) of KCM21. PMID:25289010

  16. Antimicrobial Effects of a Hexapetide KCM21 against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeahyuk; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Moon, Eunpyo

    2014-09-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small but effective cationic peptides with variable length. In previous study, four hexapeptides were identified that showed antimicrobial activities against various phytopathogenic bacteria. KCM21, the most effective antimicrobial peptide, was selected for further analysis to understand its modes of action by monitoring inhibitory effects of various cations, time-dependent antimicrobial kinetics, and observing cell disruption by electron microscopy. The effects of KCM21 on Gram-negative strain, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and Gram-positive strain, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis were compared. Treatment with divalent cations such as Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) inhibited the bactericidal activities of KCM21 significantly against P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The bactericidal kinetic study showed that KCM21 killed both bacteria rapidly and the process was faster against C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. The electron microscopic analysis revealed that KCM21 induced the formation of micelles and blebs on the surface of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 cells, while it caused cell rupture against C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis cells. The outer membrane alteration and higher sensitivity to Ca(2+) suggest that KCM21 interact with the outer membrane of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 cells during the process of killing, but not with C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis cells that lack outer membrane. Considering that both strains had similar sensitivity to KCM21 in LB medium, outer membrane could not be the main target of KCM21, instead common compartments such as cytoplasmic membrane or internal macromolecules might be a possible target(s) of KCM21.

  17. Analysis of the syrB and syrC genes of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae indicates that syringomycin is synthesized by a thiotemplate mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J H; Quigley, N B; Gross, D C

    1995-01-01

    The syrB and syrC genes are required for synthesis of syringomycin, a lipodepsipeptide phytotoxin produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, and are induced by plant-derived signal molecules. A 4,842-bp chromosomal region containing the syrB and syrC genes of strain B301D was sequenced and characterized. The open reading frame (ORF) of syrB was 2,847 bp in length and was predicted to encode an approximately 105-kDa protein, SyrB, with 949 amino acids. Searches of databases revealed that SyrB shares homology with members of a superfamily of adenylate-forming enzymes involved in peptide antibiotic and siderophore synthesis in a diverse spectrum of microorganisms. SyrB exhibited the highest degree of overall similarity (56.4%) and identity (33.8%) with the first amino acid-activating domain of pyoverdin synthetase, PvdD, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The N-terminal portion of SyrB contained a domain of approximately 600 amino acids that resembles the amino acid-activating domains of thiotemplate-employing peptide synthetases. The SyrB domain contained six signature core sequences with the same order and spacing as observed in all known amino acid-activating domains involved in nonribosomal peptide synthesis. Core sequence 6 of SyrB, for example, was similar to the binding site for 4'-phosphopantetheine, a cofactor required for thioester formation. The syrC ORF (1,299 bp) was located 175 bp downstream of the syrB ORF. Analysis of the transcriptional and translational relationship between the syrB and syrC genes demonstrated that they are expressed independently. The syrC ORF was predicted to encode an approximately 48-kDa protein product of 433 amino acids which is 42 to 48% similar to a number of thioesterases, including fatty acid thioesterases, haloperoxidases, and acyltransferases, that contain a characteristic GXS (C) XG motif. In addition, a zinc-binding motif was found near the C terminus of SyrC. The data suggest that SyrB and SyrC function as peptide

  18. Genetic analysis of the individual contribution to virulence of the type III effector inventory of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Zumaquero, Adela; Gonzalez-Plaza, Juan J; Ortiz-Martín, Inmaculada; Rufián, José S; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2012-01-01

    Several reports have recently contributed to determine the effector inventory of the sequenced strain Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph) 1448a. However, the contribution to virulence of most of these effectors remains to be established. Genetic analysis of the contribution to virulence of individual P. syringae effectors has been traditionally hindered by the lack of phenotypes of the corresponding knockout mutants, largely attributed to a high degree of functional redundancy within their effector inventories. In support of this notion, effectors from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000 have been classified into redundant effector groups (REGs), analysing virulence of polymutants in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana. However, using competitive index (CI) as a virulence assay, we were able to establish the individual contribution of AvrPto1(Pto) (DC3000) to Pto DC3000 virulence in tomato, its natural host, even though typically, contribution to virulence of AvrPto1 is only shown in strains also lacking AvrPtoB (also called HopAB2), a member of its REG. This report raised the possibility that even effectors targeting the same defence signalling pathway may have an individual contribution to virulence, and pointed out to CI assays as the means to establish such a contribution for individual effectors. In this work, we have analysed the individual contribution to virulence of the majority of previously uncharacterised Pph 1448a effectors, by monitoring the development of disease symptoms and determining the CI of single knockout mutants at different stages of growth within bean, its natural host. Despite their potential functional redundancy, we have found individual contributions to virulence for six out of the fifteen effectors analysed. In addition, we have analysed the functional relationships between effectors displaying individual contribution to virulence, highlighting the diversity that these relationships may present, and the interest of

  19. Genetic Analysis of the Individual Contribution to Virulence of the Type III Effector Inventory of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Plaza, Juan J.; Ortiz-Martín, Inmaculada; Rufián, José S.; Beuzón, Carmen R.

    2012-01-01

    Several reports have recently contributed to determine the effector inventory of the sequenced strain Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph) 1448a. However, the contribution to virulence of most of these effectors remains to be established. Genetic analysis of the contribution to virulence of individual P. syringae effectors has been traditionally hindered by the lack of phenotypes of the corresponding knockout mutants, largely attributed to a high degree of functional redundancy within their effector inventories. In support of this notion, effectors from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000 have been classified into redundant effector groups (REGs), analysing virulence of polymutants in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana. However, using competitive index (CI) as a virulence assay, we were able to establish the individual contribution of AvrPto1PtoDC3000 to Pto DC3000 virulence in tomato, its natural host, even though typically, contribution to virulence of AvrPto1 is only shown in strains also lacking AvrPtoB (also called HopAB2), a member of its REG. This report raised the possibility that even effectors targeting the same defence signalling pathway may have an individual contribution to virulence, and pointed out to CI assays as the means to establish such a contribution for individual effectors. In this work, we have analysed the individual contribution to virulence of the majority of previously uncharacterised Pph 1448a effectors, by monitoring the development of disease symptoms and determining the CI of single knockout mutants at different stages of growth within bean, its natural host. Despite their potential functional redundancy, we have found individual contributions to virulence for six out of the fifteen effectors analysed. In addition, we have analysed the functional relationships between effectors displaying individual contribution to virulence, highlighting the diversity that these relationships may present, and the interest of

  20. Induced systemic resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato by 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Weller, David M; Mavrodi, Dmitri V; van Pelt, Johan A; Pieterse, Corné M J; van Loon, Leendert C; Bakker, Peter A H M

    2012-04-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains that produce the polyketide antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) are among the most effective rhizobacteria that suppress root and crown rots, wilts, and damping-off diseases of a variety of crops, and they play a key role in the natural suppressiveness of some soils to certain soilborne pathogens. Root colonization by 2,4-DAPG-producing P. fluorescens strains Pf-5 (genotype A), Q2-87 (genotype B), Q8r1-96 (genotype D), and HT5-1 (genotype N) produced induced systemic resistance (ISR) in Arabidopsis thaliana accession Col-0 against bacterial speck caused by P. syringae pv. tomato. The ISR-eliciting activity of the four bacterial genotypes was similar, and all genotypes were equivalent in activity to the well-characterized strain P. fluorescens WCS417r. The 2,4-DAPG biosynthetic locus consists of the genes phlHGF and phlACBDE. phlD or phlBC mutants of Q2-87 (2,4-DAPG minus) were significantly reduced in ISR activity, and genetic complementation of the mutants restored ISR activity back to wild-type levels. A phlF regulatory mutant (overproducer of 2,4-DAPG) had ISR activity equivalent to the wild-type Q2-87. Introduction of DAPG into soil at concentrations of 10 to 250 μM 4 days before challenge inoculation induced resistance equivalent to or better than the bacteria. Strain Q2-87 induced resistance on transgenic NahG plants but not on npr1-1, jar1, and etr1 Arabidopsis mutants. These results indicate that the antibiotic 2,4-DAPG is a major determinant of ISR in 2,4-DAPG-producing P. fluorescens, that the genotype of the strain does not affect its ISR activity, and that the activity induced by these bacteria operates through the ethylene- and jasmonic acid-dependent signal transduction pathway.

  1. Transposon insertion libraries for the characterization of mutants from the kiwifruit pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae.

    PubMed

    Mesarich, Carl H; Rees-George, Jonathan; Gardner, Paul P; Ghomi, Fatemeh Ashari; Gerth, Monica L; Andersen, Mark T; Rikkerink, Erik H A; Fineran, Peter C; Templeton, Matthew D

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa), the causal agent of kiwifruit canker, is one of the most devastating plant diseases of recent times. We have generated two mini-Tn5-based random insertion libraries of Psa ICMP 18884. The first, a 'phenotype of interest' (POI) library, consists of 10,368 independent mutants gridded into 96-well plates. By replica plating onto selective media, the POI library was successfully screened for auxotrophic and motility mutants. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis mutants with 'Fuzzy-Spreader'-like morphologies were also identified through a visual screen. The second, a 'mutant of interest' (MOI) library, comprises around 96,000 independent mutants, also stored in 96-well plates, with approximately 200 individuals per well. The MOI library was sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform using Transposon-Directed Insertion site Sequencing (TraDIS) to map insertion sites onto the Psa genome. A grid-based PCR method was developed to recover individual mutants, and using this strategy, the MOI library was successfully screened for a putative LPS mutant not identified in the visual screen. The Psa chromosome and plasmid had 24,031 and 1,236 independent insertion events respectively, giving insertion frequencies of 3.65 and 16.6 per kb respectively. These data suggest that the MOI library is near saturation, with the theoretical probability of finding an insert in any one chromosomal gene estimated to be 97.5%. However, only 47% of chromosomal genes had insertions. This surprisingly low rate cannot be solely explained by the lack of insertions in essential genes, which would be expected to be around 5%. Strikingly, many accessory genes, including most of those encoding type III effectors, lacked insertions. In contrast, 94% of genes on the Psa plasmid had insertions, including for example, the type III effector HopAU1. These results suggest that some chromosomal sites are rendered inaccessible to transposon insertion, either by DNA

  2. Transposon insertion libraries for the characterization of mutants from the kiwifruit pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae

    PubMed Central

    Mesarich, Carl H.; Rees-George, Jonathan; Gardner, Paul P.; Ghomi, Fatemeh Ashari; Gerth, Monica L.; Andersen, Mark T.; Rikkerink, Erik H. A.; Fineran, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa), the causal agent of kiwifruit canker, is one of the most devastating plant diseases of recent times. We have generated two mini-Tn5-based random insertion libraries of Psa ICMP 18884. The first, a ‘phenotype of interest’ (POI) library, consists of 10,368 independent mutants gridded into 96-well plates. By replica plating onto selective media, the POI library was successfully screened for auxotrophic and motility mutants. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis mutants with ‘Fuzzy-Spreader’-like morphologies were also identified through a visual screen. The second, a ‘mutant of interest’ (MOI) library, comprises around 96,000 independent mutants, also stored in 96-well plates, with approximately 200 individuals per well. The MOI library was sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform using Transposon-Directed Insertion site Sequencing (TraDIS) to map insertion sites onto the Psa genome. A grid-based PCR method was developed to recover individual mutants, and using this strategy, the MOI library was successfully screened for a putative LPS mutant not identified in the visual screen. The Psa chromosome and plasmid had 24,031 and 1,236 independent insertion events respectively, giving insertion frequencies of 3.65 and 16.6 per kb respectively. These data suggest that the MOI library is near saturation, with the theoretical probability of finding an insert in any one chromosomal gene estimated to be 97.5%. However, only 47% of chromosomal genes had insertions. This surprisingly low rate cannot be solely explained by the lack of insertions in essential genes, which would be expected to be around 5%. Strikingly, many accessory genes, including most of those encoding type III effectors, lacked insertions. In contrast, 94% of genes on the Psa plasmid had insertions, including for example, the type III effector HopAU1. These results suggest that some chromosomal sites are rendered inaccessible to transposon insertion, either

  3. Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato DC3000 Type III secretion effector polymutants reveal an interplay between hopAD1 and AvrPtoB

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The model pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 suppresses the two-tiered innate immune system of plants by injecting a complex repertoire of effector proteins into host cells via the type III secretion system. The model effector AvrPtoB has multiple domains and plant protein interactors i...

  4. The ECF sigma factor, PSPTO_1043, in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is induced by oxidative stress and regulates genes involved in oxidative stress response

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae adapts to changes in the environment by modifying its gene expression profile. In many cases, the response is mediated by the activation of extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors that direct RNA polymerase to transcribe specific sets of genes....

  5. An ECF sigma factor mediated cell surface signaling system in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 regulates gene expression in response to heterologous siderophores

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The diversity of regulatory systems encoded by bacteria provides an indication of the variety of stresses and interactions that these organisms encounter in nature. We have been investigating how the plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, responds to iron limitation and have focuse...

  6. Identification of the CvsSR regulon in Pseudomonas syringae reveals overlap with the Type-III secretion and AlgU regulons

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pto) lives epiphytically and endophytically during its infection cycle. Two-component systems (TCSs) and extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors are used by Pto to sense environmental changes within the leaf apoplast during pathogenesis. The TCS, CvsSR i...

  7. Global analysis of the HrpL regulon in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 reveals new regulon members with diverse functions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is required for virulence in the gram-negative plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The alternative sigma factor HrpL directly regulates expression of T3SS genes via a consensus promoter sequence, often designated as the “hrp promoter.” Although...

  8. Role of nucleotide excision repair and photoreactivation in the solar UVB radiation survival of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a.

    PubMed

    Gunasekera, T S; Sundin, G W

    2006-05-01

    To assess the role of DNA repair and photoreactivation in the solar radiation survival of the plant pathogen and leaf surface epiphyte Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (Pss). Mutants of Pss B728a, with insertional mutations within the nucleotide excision repair gene uvrA, photolyase gene phr, or uvrA phr double mutants, were constructed to examine the importance of individual repair mechanisms in solar UV radiation (UVR) survival. The survival of either the uvrA mutant or the phr mutant was reduced by approx. 10(2)-fold following exposure to a dose of 4.5 kJ m(-2) solar UVB (290-320 nm wavelengths) while the uvrA phr double mutant was reduced >10(6)-fold by the same dose. We constructed a transcriptional fusion between the Pss recA promoter and gfp to examine the induction of the SOS response in wild-type and mutant strains. Initiation of the recA mediated SOS response was more rapid and peaked at higher levels in mutant strains suggesting both increased DNA damage in mutant strains and also that photoreactivation and nucleotide excision repair remove DNA damage as it is incurred which is reflected in a delay of recA expression. Visualization of expression of B728a cells containing the recA::gfp reporter on UVB-irradiated bean leaves highlighted the movement of cells to intercellular spaces over time and that SOS induction was detectable when leaves were irradiated 48 h following leaf inoculation. This study indicated that solar UVB is detrimental to Pss B728a, DNA repair mechanisms play an important role in strain survival and expression of the SOS regulon on leaf surfaces contributes to survival of UVR-exposed cells during plant colonization. This work links previous laboratory-based UVR analyses with solar UVB dose-response analyses and highlights the role of photoreactivation in delaying induction of the SOS response following solar irradiation. Knowledge of population dynamics following direct solar irradiation will enhance our understanding of the biology of

  9. Extensive Field Survey, Laboratory and Greenhouse Studies Reveal Complex Nature of Pseudomonas syringae-Associated Hazelnut Decline in Central Italy

    PubMed Central

    Lamichhane, Jay Ram; Bartoli, Claudia; Varvaro, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas avellanae (Pav) has been reported as the causal agent of bacterial decline and bacterial canker of hazelnut in Italy and Greece, respectively. Both hazelnut diseases were reported to be similar in terms of symptoms, severity and persistence. In this study, we found that both symptomatic and asymptomatic trees in the field were colonized by Pav. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) analysis showed that Pav strains isolated during this study in Italy belong to the P. syringae phylogroup 1 and they are closely related to Pav strains previously isolated in Greece from hazelnut bacterial canker. On the other hand, strains isolated in earlier studies from hazelnut decline in Italy belong to both phylogroup 1 and 2 of P. syringae. Both phylogroup 1 strains of P. syringae from Greece and Italy are different than strains isolated in this study in terms of their capacity to excrete fluorescent pigments on different media. Despite the same plant genotype and cropping practices adopted, the incidence of hazelnut decline ranged from nearly 0 to 91% across our study sites. No disease developed on plants inoculated with Pav through wounding while leaf scar inoculations produced only mild disease symptoms. Based on our results and the previously reported correlation between pedo-climatic conditions and hazelnut decline, we conclude that hazelnut decline in central Italy could be incited by a combination of predisposing (adverse pedo-climatic conditions) and contributing factors (Pav). Because this is a true decline different from “bacterial canker” described in Greece, we refer to it as hazelnut decline (HD). PMID:26840951

  10. Comparative Genome Analysis Provides Insights into the Evolution and Adaptation of Pseudomonas syringae pv. aesculi on Aesculus hippocastanum

    PubMed Central

    Green, Sarah; Studholme, David J.; Laue, Bridget E.; Dorati, Federico; Lovell, Helen; Arnold, Dawn; Cottrell, Joan E.; Bridgett, Stephen; Blaxter, Mark; Huitema, Edgar; Thwaites, Richard; Sharp, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    A recently emerging bleeding canker disease, caused by Pseudomonas syringae pathovar aesculi (Pae), is threatening European horse chestnut in northwest Europe. Very little is known about the origin and biology of this new disease. We used the nucleotide sequences of seven commonly used marker genes to investigate the phylogeny of three strains isolated recently from bleeding stem cankers on European horse chestnut in Britain (E-Pae). On the basis of these sequences alone, the E-Pae strains were identical to the Pae type-strain (I-Pae), isolated from leaf spots on Indian horse chestnut in India in 1969. The phylogenetic analyses also showed that Pae belongs to a distinct clade of P. syringae pathovars adapted to woody hosts. We generated genome-wide Illumina sequence data from the three E-Pae strains and one strain of I-Pae. Comparative genomic analyses revealed pathovar-specific genomic regions in Pae potentially implicated in virulence on a tree host, including genes for the catabolism of plant-derived aromatic compounds and enterobactin synthesis. Several gene clusters displayed intra-pathovar variation, including those encoding type IV secretion, a novel fatty acid biosynthesis pathway and a sucrose uptake pathway. Rates of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the four Pae genomes indicate that the three E-Pae strains diverged from each other much more recently than they diverged from I-Pae. The very low genetic diversity among the three geographically distinct E-Pae strains suggests that they originate from a single, recent introduction into Britain, thus highlighting the serious environmental risks posed by the spread of an exotic plant pathogenic bacterium to a new geographic location. The genomic regions in Pae that are absent from other P. syringae pathovars that infect herbaceous hosts may represent candidate genetic adaptations to infection of the woody parts of the tree. PMID:20419105

  11. Characterization of Novel Bacteriophages for Biocontrol of Bacterial Blight in Leek Caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. porri

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, Sofie; Volckaert, Anneleen; Venneman, Sofie; Declercq, Bart; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Allonsius, Camille N.; Van Malderghem, Cinzia; Jang, Ho B.; Briers, Yves; Noben, Jean P.; Klumpp, Jochen; Van Vaerenbergh, Johan; Maes, Martine; Lavigne, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. porri, the causative agent of bacterial blight in leek (Allium porrum), is increasingly frequent causing problems in leek cultivation. Because of the current lack of control measures, novel bacteriophages were isolated to control this pathogen using phage therapy. Five novel phages were isolated from infected fields in Flanders (vB_PsyM_KIL1, vB_PsyM_KIL2, vB_PsyM_KIL3, vB_PsyM_KIL4, and vB_PsyM_KIL5), and were complemented with one selected host range mutant phage (vB_PsyM_KIL3b). Genome analysis of the phages revealed genome sizes between 90 and 94 kb and an average GC-content of 44.8%. Phylogenomic networking classified them into a novel clade, named the “KIL-like viruses,” related to the Felixounalikevirus genus, together with phage phiPsa374 from P. syringae pv. actinidiae. In vitro characterization demonstrated the stability and lytic potential of these phages. Host range analysis confirmed heterogeneity within P. syringae pv. porri, leading to the development of a phage cocktail with a range that covers the entire set of 41 strains tested. Specific bio-assays demonstrated the in planta efficacy of phages vB_PsyM_KIL1, vB_PsyM_KIL2, vB_PsyM_KIL3, and vB_PsyM_KIL3b. In addition, two parallel field trial experiments on three locations using a phage cocktail of the six phages showed variable results. In one trial, symptom development was attenuated. These data suggest some potential for phage therapy in controlling bacterial blight of leek, pending optimization of formulation and application methods. PMID:27014204

  12. Arabidopsis clade I TGA factors regulate apoplastic defences against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae through endoplasmic reticulum-based processes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lipu; Fobert, Pierre R

    2013-01-01

    During the plant immune response, large-scale transcriptional reprogramming is modulated by numerous transcription (co) factors. The Arabidopsis basic leucine zipper transcription factors TGA1 and TGA4, which comprise the clade I TGA factors, have been shown to positively contribute to disease resistance against virulent strains of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Despite physically interacting with the key immune regulator, NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES 1 (NPR1), following elicitation with salicylic acid (SA), clade I function was shown to be largely independent of NPR1. Unlike mutants in NPR1, tga1-1 tga4-1 plants do not display reductions in steady-state levels of SA-pathway marker genes following treatment with this phenolic signaling metabolite or after challenge with virulent or avirulent P. syringae. By exploiting bacterial strains that have limited capacity to suppress Arabidopsis defence responses, the present study demonstrates that tga1-1 tga4-1 plants are compromised in basal resistance and defective in several apoplastic defence responses, including the oxidative burst of reactive oxygen species, callose deposition, as well as total and apoplastic PATHOGENESIS-RELATED 1 (PR-1) protein accumulation. Furthermore, analysis of npr1-1 and the tga1-1 tga4-1 npr1-1 triple mutant indicates that clade I TGA factors act substantially independent of NPR1 in mediating disease resistance against these strains of P. syringae. Increased sensitivity to the N-glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin and elevated levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker genes encoding ER-resident chaperones in mutant seedlings suggest that loss of apoplastic defence responses is associated with aberrant protein secretion and implicate clade I TGA factors as positive regulators of one or more ER-related secretion pathways.

  13. Arabidopsis Clade I TGA Factors Regulate Apoplastic Defences against the Bacterial Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae through Endoplasmic Reticulum-Based Processes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lipu; Fobert, Pierre R.

    2013-01-01

    During the plant immune response, large-scale transcriptional reprogramming is modulated by numerous transcription (co) factors. The Arabidopsis basic leucine zipper transcription factors TGA1 and TGA4, which comprise the clade I TGA factors, have been shown to positively contribute to disease resistance against virulent strains of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Despite physically interacting with the key immune regulator, NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES 1 (NPR1), following elicitation with salicylic acid (SA), clade I function was shown to be largely independent of NPR1. Unlike mutants in NPR1, tga1-1 tga4-1 plants do not display reductions in steady-state levels of SA-pathway marker genes following treatment with this phenolic signaling metabolite or after challenge with virulent or avirulent P. syringae. By exploiting bacterial strains that have limited capacity to suppress Arabidopsis defence responses, the present study demonstrates that tga1-1 tga4-1 plants are compromised in basal resistance and defective in several apoplastic defence responses, including the oxidative burst of reactive oxygen species, callose deposition, as well as total and apoplastic PATHOGENESIS-RELATED 1 (PR-1) protein accumulation. Furthermore, analysis of npr1-1 and the tga1-1 tga4-1 npr1-1 triple mutant indicates that clade I TGA factors act substantially independent of NPR1 in mediating disease resistance against these strains of P. syringae. Increased sensitivity to the N-glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin and elevated levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker genes encoding ER-resident chaperones in mutant seedlings suggest that loss of apoplastic defence responses is associated with aberrant protein secretion and implicate clade I TGA factors as positive regulators of one or more ER-related secretion pathways. PMID:24086773

  14. Characterization of Novel Bacteriophages for Biocontrol of Bacterial Blight in Leek Caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. porri.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, Sofie; Volckaert, Anneleen; Venneman, Sofie; Declercq, Bart; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Allonsius, Camille N; Van Malderghem, Cinzia; Jang, Ho B; Briers, Yves; Noben, Jean P; Klumpp, Jochen; Van Vaerenbergh, Johan; Maes, Martine; Lavigne, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. porri, the causative agent of bacterial blight in leek (Allium porrum), is increasingly frequent causing problems in leek cultivation. Because of the current lack of control measures, novel bacteriophages were isolated to control this pathogen using phage therapy. Five novel phages were isolated from infected fields in Flanders (vB_PsyM_KIL1, vB_PsyM_KIL2, vB_PsyM_KIL3, vB_PsyM_KIL4, and vB_PsyM_KIL5), and were complemented with one selected host range mutant phage (vB_PsyM_KIL3b). Genome analysis of the phages revealed genome sizes between 90 and 94 kb and an average GC-content of 44.8%. Phylogenomic networking classified them into a novel clade, named the "KIL-like viruses," related to the Felixounalikevirus genus, together with phage phiPsa374 from P. syringae pv. actinidiae. In vitro characterization demonstrated the stability and lytic potential of these phages. Host range analysis confirmed heterogeneity within P. syringae pv. porri, leading to the development of a phage cocktail with a range that covers the entire set of 41 strains tested. Specific bio-assays demonstrated the in planta efficacy of phages vB_PsyM_KIL1, vB_PsyM_KIL2, vB_PsyM_KIL3, and vB_PsyM_KIL3b. In addition, two parallel field trial experiments on three locations using a phage cocktail of the six phages showed variable results. In one trial, symptom development was attenuated. These data suggest some potential for phage therapy in controlling bacterial blight of leek, pending optimization of formulation and application methods.

  15. Dynamics of Membrane Potential Variation and Gene Expression Induced by Spodoptera littoralis, Myzus persicae, and Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Bricchi, Irene; Bertea, Cinzia M.; Occhipinti, Andrea; Paponov, Ivan A.; Maffei, Massimo E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Biotic stress induced by various herbivores and pathogens invokes plant responses involving different defense mechanisms. However, we do not know whether different biotic stresses share a common response or which signaling pathways are involved in responses to different biotic stresses. We investigated the common and specific responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to three biotic stress agents: Spodoptera littoralis, Myzus persicae, and the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Methodology/Principal Findings We used electrophysiology to determine the plasma membrane potential (Vm) and we performed a gene microarray transcriptome analysis on Arabidopsis upon either herbivory or bacterial infection. Vm depolarization was induced by insect attack; however, the response was much more rapid to S. littoralis (30 min −2 h) than to M. persicae (4–6 h). M. persicae differentially regulated almost 10-fold more genes than by S. littoralis with an opposite regulation. M. persicae modulated genes involved in flavonoid, fatty acid, hormone, drug transport and chitin metabolism. S. littoralis regulated responses to heat, transcription and ion transport. The latest Vm depolarization (16 h) was found for P. syringae. The pathogen regulated responses to salicylate, jasmonate and to microorganisms. Despite this late response, the number of genes differentially regulated by P. syringae was closer to those regulated by S. littoralis than by M. persicae. Conclusions/Significance Arabidopsis plasma membranes respond with a Vm depolarization at times depending on the nature of biotic attack which allow setting a time point for comparative genome-wide analysis. A clear relationship between Vm depolarization and gene expression was found. At Vm depolarization timing, M. persicae regulates a wider array of Arabidopsis genes with a clear and distinct regulation than S. littoralis. An almost completely opposite regulation was observed between the aphid and the pathogen, with the former

  16. Comparative genome analysis provides insights into the evolution and adaptation of Pseudomonas syringae pv. aesculi on Aesculus hippocastanum.

    PubMed

    Green, Sarah; Studholme, David J; Laue, Bridget E; Dorati, Federico; Lovell, Helen; Arnold, Dawn; Cottrell, Joan E; Bridgett, Stephen; Blaxter, Mark; Huitema, Edgar; Thwaites, Richard; Sharp, Paul M; Jackson, Robert W; Kamoun, Sophien

    2010-04-19

    A recently emerging bleeding canker disease, caused by Pseudomonas syringae pathovar aesculi (Pae), is threatening European horse chestnut in northwest Europe. Very little is known about the origin and biology of this new disease. We used the nucleotide sequences of seven commonly used marker genes to investigate the phylogeny of three strains isolated recently from bleeding stem cankers on European horse chestnut in Britain (E-Pae). On the basis of these sequences alone, the E-Pae strains were identical to the Pae type-strain (I-Pae), isolated from leaf spots on Indian horse chestnut in India in 1969. The phylogenetic analyses also showed that Pae belongs to a distinct clade of P. syringae pathovars adapted to woody hosts. We generated genome-wide Illumina sequence data from the three E-Pae strains and one strain of I-Pae. Comparative genomic analyses revealed pathovar-specific genomic regions in Pae potentially implicated in virulence on a tree host, including genes for the catabolism of plant-derived aromatic compounds and enterobactin synthesis. Several gene clusters displayed intra-pathovar variation, including those encoding type IV secretion, a novel fatty acid biosynthesis pathway and a sucrose uptake pathway. Rates of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the four Pae genomes indicate that the three E-Pae strains diverged from each other much more recently than they diverged from I-Pae. The very low genetic diversity among the three geographically distinct E-Pae strains suggests that they originate from a single, recent introduction into Britain, thus highlighting the serious environmental risks posed by the spread of an exotic plant pathogenic bacterium to a new geographic location. The genomic regions in Pae that are absent from other P. syringae pathovars that infect herbaceous hosts may represent candidate genetic adaptations to infection of the woody parts of the tree.

  17. The causal agent of halo blight in bean, Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, attaches to stomata via its pili.

    PubMed

    Romantschuk, M; Bamford, D H

    1986-04-01

    The phytopathogenic pseudomonad Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola causes halo blight of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Initiation of infection depends on the ability of the cells to adhere to the target cell surface. P. syringae pv. phaseolicola expresses pili, which are the receptors of the lipid-containing dsRNA bacteriophage phi 6. phi 6-resistant bacterial strains can be divided into different piliation types. It was possible to show that the adhesion of the bacteria onto plant cell surface was dependent on the pili. Non-piliated bacterial stains showed a much lower adherence to the leaf surface than strains expressing phi 6 specific pili. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the piliated bacteria attached to the leaf surface at the site of stomata. Non-piliated bacteria were evenly distributed on the leaf surface. All bacterial strains used in this study were capable of causing halo blight if injected into the plant. If the bacteria were sprayed on the plants, followed by spraying of sterile buffer, only piliated bacteria caused symptoms.

  18. Transgenic tomato plants overexpressing tyramine N-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase exhibit elevated hydroxycinnamic acid amide levels and enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Campos, Laura; Lisón, Purificación; López-Gresa, María Pilar; Rodrigo, Ismael; Zacarés, Laura; Conejero, Vicente; Bellés, José María

    2014-10-01

    Hydroxycinnamic acid amides (HCAA) are secondary metabolites involved in plant development and defense that have been widely reported throughout the plant kingdom. These phenolics show antioxidant, antiviral, antibacterial, and antifungal activities. Hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tyramine N-hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (THT) is the key enzyme in HCAA synthesis and is induced in response to pathogen infection, wounding, or elicitor treatments, preceding HCAA accumulation. We have engineered transgenic tomato plants overexpressing tomato THT. These plants displayed an enhanced THT gene expression in leaves as compared with wild type (WT) plants. Consequently, leaves of THT-overexpressing plants showed a higher constitutive accumulation of the amide coumaroyltyramine (CT). Similar results were found in flowers and fruits. Moreover, feruloyltyramine (FT) also accumulated in these tissues, being present at higher levels in transgenic plants. Accumulation of CT, FT and octopamine, and noradrenaline HCAA in response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato infection was higher in transgenic plants than in the WT plants. Transgenic plants showed an enhanced resistance to the bacterial infection. In addition, this HCAA accumulation was accompanied by an increase in salicylic acid levels and pathogenesis-related gene induction. Taken together, these results suggest that HCAA may play an important role in the defense of tomato plants against P. syringae infection.

  19. The Hexapeptide Repeated Segment LIAGY is a Hot Spot of Aggregation of the Pseudomonas syringae Ice Nucleation Protein.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Ice nucleation proteins (INPs) form oligomeric structures by self-assembly and aggregation. We looked for the presence of potential aggregating sequences inside the INP from Pseudomonas syringae by a computational approach with the AGGRESCAN, FOMDAMYLOID and TANGO softwares. A total of 38 hot spots of aggregation were predicted in the INP sequence: 7 localized in the Nterminal domain, 2 in the C-terminal region, 28 in the highly repetitive central (HRC) region and 1 shared between the HRC and the Carboxyl-terminus regions of the protein. All the hot spots of aggregation identified in the HRC domain overlapped a 8-residue low fidelity repeat including a LIAGYrelated sequence. We confirmed the predictions by an experimental approach using synthetic peptides corresponding to different parts of the INP central sequence, absorbance spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy in the presence of Congo red (CR) or Thioflavin T (ThT), respectively. Peptide 620-SFIIAGYG-627 predicted to aggregate by the three softwares induced an increase in fluorescence of ThT. Peptide 729-GFKSILTAGY-738 predicted to aggregate by AGGRESCAN and FOLDAMYLOID induced a shift in the maximum of absorbance of CR. Peptide 1124-SVLTAGA-1130 predicted to aggregate only by TANGO did not interfere with CR absorbance or ThT fluorescence. In conclusion, the use of three aggregation prediction algorithms and two biochemical assays showed that the hexapeptide repeated segment LIAGY, previously shown to form a hairpin loop may be involved in the aggregation of the P. syringae INP.

  20. The bacteriophage-derived transcriptional regulator, LscR, activates the expression of levansucrase genes in Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Khaled; Hartman, Katharina; Pletzer, Daniel; Zhurina, Daria; Ullrich, Matthias S

    2016-12-01

    Synthesis of the exopolysaccharide levan occurs in the bacterial blight pathogen of soybean, Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea PG4180, when this bacterium encounters moderate to high concentrations of sucrose inside its host plant. The process is mediated by the temperature-dependent expression and secretion of two levansucrases, LscB and LscC. Previous studies showed the importance of a prophage-associated promoter element in driving the expression of levansucrase genes. Herein, heterologous screening for transcriptional activators revealed that the prophage-borne transcriptional regulator, LscR, from P. syringae mediates expression of levansucrase. A lscR-deficient mutant was generated and exhibited a levan-negative phenotype when grown on a sucrose-rich medium. This phenotype was confirmed by zymographic analysis and Western blots which demonstrated absence of levansucrase in the supernatant and total cell lysates. Transcriptional analysis showed a down-regulation of expression levels of levansucrase and glycosyl hydrolase genes in the lscR-deficient mutant. Ultimately, a direct binding of LscR to the promoter region of levansucrase was demonstrated using electrophoretic mobility shift assays allowing to conclude that a bacteriophage-derived regulator dictates expression of bacterial genes involved in in planta fitness.

  1. Analysis of the small RNA spf in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000.

    PubMed

    Park, So Hae; Bao, Zhongmeng; Butcher, Bronwyn G; D'Amico, Katherine; Xu, Yun; Stodghill, Paul; Schneider, David J; Cartinhour, Samuel; Filiatrault, M J

    2014-05-01

    Bacteria contain small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that are typically responsible for altering transcription, translation or mRNA stability. ncRNAs are important because they often regulate virulence factors and susceptibility to various stresses. Here, the regulation of a recently described ncRNA of Pseudomonas syringae DC3000, spot 42 (now referred to as spf), was investigated. A putative RpoE binding site was identified upstream of spf in strain DC3000. RpoE is shown to regulate the expression of spf. Also, deletion of spf results in increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide compared with the wild-type strain, suggesting that spf plays a role in susceptibility to oxidative stress. Furthermore, expression of alg8 is shown to be influenced by spf, suggesting that this ncRNA plays a role in alginate biosynthesis. Structural and comparative genomic analyses show this ncRNA is well conserved among the pseudomonads. The findings provide new information on the regulation and role of this ncRNA in P. syringae.

  2. Identification of Pseudomonas syringae pathogens of Arabidopsis and a bacterial locus determining avirulence on both Arabidopsis and soybean.

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, M C; Innes, R W; Bent, A F; Staskawicz, B J

    1991-01-01

    To develop a model system for molecular genetic analysis of plant-pathogen interactions, we studied the interaction between Arabidopsis thaliana and the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst). Pst strains were found to be virulent or avirulent on specific Arabidopsis ecotypes, and single ecotypes were resistant to some Pst strains and susceptible to others. In many plant-pathogen interactions, disease resistance is controlled by the simultaneous presence of single plant resistance genes and single pathogen avirulence genes. Therefore, we tested whether avirulence genes in Pst controlled induction of resistance in Arabidopsis. Cosmids that determine avirulence were isolated from Pst genomic libraries, and the Pst avirulence locus avrRpt2 was defined. This allowed us to construct pathogens that differed only by the presence or absence of a single putative avirulence gene. We found that Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0 was susceptible to Pst strain DC3000 but resistant to the same strain carrying avrRpt2, suggesting that a single locus in Col-0 determines resistance. As a first step toward genetically mapping the postulated resistance locus, an ecotype susceptible to infection by DC3000 carrying avrRpt2 was identified. The avrRpt2 locus from Pst was also moved into virulent strains of the soybean pathogen P. syringae pv glycinea to test whether this locus could determine avirulence on soybean. The resulting strains induced a resistant response in a cultivar-specific manner, suggesting that similar resistance mechanisms may function in Arabidopsis and soybean. PMID:1824334

  3. Growth phase and temperature influence promoter activity, transcript abundance, and protein stability during biosynthesis of the Pseudomonas syringae phytotoxin coronatine.

    PubMed

    Budde, I P; Rohde, B H; Bender, C L; Ullrich, M S

    1998-03-01

    The plant-pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea PG4180.N9 synthesizes high levels of the polyketide phytotoxin coronatine (COR) at 18 degrees C, whereas no detectable toxin is produced at 28 degrees C. Previously, we reported that the temperature-sensitive activation of three promoters within the COR biosynthetic gene cluster might explain thermoregulation of COR biosynthesis. The present study was aimed at furthering our understanding of the transcriptional as well as the posttranslational effects of temperature on expression of cmaB, which encodes an enzyme involved in COR biosynthesis. Transcriptional fusions using a promoterless glucuronidase gene and Northern blot analyses were used to monitor promoter activities and transcript abundance for the cmaABT operon during bacterial growth at 18 and 28 degrees C. Promoter activity and transcription rates were maximal when cells were incubated at 18 degrees C and sampled at mid-logarithmic phase. Transcription declined moderately during the transition to stationary phase but remained higher at 18 C than at 28 degrees C. Western blot analysis indicated that CmaB accumulated in the late stationary phase of P. syringae cultures grown at 18 degrees C but not in cultures incubated at 28 degrees C. Temperature shift experiments indicated that CmaB stability was more pronounced at 18 degrees C than at 28 degrees C. Although temperature has a strong impact on transcription of COR biosynthetic genes, we propose that thermoregulation of protein stability might also control COR synthesis.

  4. Selective Photoreceptor Gene Knock-out Reveals a Regulatory Role for the Growth Behavior of Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi; Pathak, Gopal; Drepper, Thomas; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae (Ps) is a well-established model organism for bacterial infection of plants. The genome sequences of two pathovars, pv. syringae and pv. tomato, revealed one gene encoding a blue and two genes encoding red/far red light-sensing photoreceptors. Continuing former molecular characterization of the photoreceptor proteins, we here report selective photoreceptor gene disruption for pv. tomato aiming at identification of potentially regulatory functions of these photoreceptors. Transformation of Ps cells with linear DNA constructs yielded interposon mutations of the corresponding genes. Cell growth studies of the generated photoreceptor knock-out mutants revealed their role in light-dependent regulation of cell growth and motility. Disruption of the blue-light (BL) receptor gene caused a growth deregulation, in line with an observed increased virulence of this mutant (Moriconi et al., Plant J., 2013, 76, 322). Bacterial phytochrome-1 (BphP1) deletion mutant caused unaltered cell growth, but a stronger swarming capacity. Inactivation of its ortholog, BphP2, however, caused reduced growth and remarkably altered dendritic swarming behavior. Combined knock-out of both bacteriophytochromes reproduced the swarming pattern observed for the BphP2 mutant alone. A triple knock-out mutant showed a growth rate between that of the BL (deregulation) and the phytochrome-2 mutant (growth reduction). © 2016 The American Society of Photobiology.

  5. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000: a model pathogen for probing disease susceptibility and hormone signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xiu-Fang; He, Sheng Yang

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, various strains of the gram-negative bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae have been used as models for understanding plant-bacterial interactions. In 1991, a P. syringae pathovar tomato (Pst) strain, DC3000, was reported to infect not only its natural host tomato but also Arabidopsis in the laboratory, a finding that spurred intensive efforts in the subsequent two decades to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which this strain causes disease in plants. Genomic analysis shows that Pst DC3000 carries a large repertoire of potential virulence factors, including proteinaceous effectors that are secreted through the type III secretion system and a polyketide phytotoxin called coronatine, which structurally mimics the plant hormone jasmonate (JA). Study of Pst DC3000 pathogenesis has not only provided several conceptual advances in understanding how a bacterial pathogen employs type III effectors to suppress plant immune responses and promote disease susceptibility but has also facilitated the discovery of the immune function of stomata and key components of JA signaling in plants. The concepts derived from the study of Pst DC3000 pathogenesis may prove useful in understanding pathogenesis mechanisms of other plant pathogens.

  6. Arabidopsis CYP86A2 represses Pseudomonas syringae type III genes and is required for cuticle development

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fangming; Mark Goodwin, S; Xiao, Yanmei; Sun, Zhaoyu; Baker, Douglas; Tang, Xiaoyan; Jenks, Matthew A; Zhou, Jian-Min

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae relies on type III secretion system to deliver effector proteins into the host cell for parasitism. Type III genes are induced in planta, but host factors affecting the induction are poorly understood. Here we report on the identification of an Arabidopsis mutant, att1 (for aberrant induction of type three genes), that greatly enhances the expression of bacterial type III genes avrPto and hrpL. att1 plants display enhanced disease severity to a virulent strain of P. syringae, suggesting a role of ATT1 in disease resistance. ATT1 encodes CYP86A2, a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase catalyzing fatty acid oxidation. The cutin content is reduced to 30% in att1, indicating that CYP86A2 plays a major role in the biosynthesis of extracellular lipids. att1 has a loose cuticle membrane ultrastructure and shows increased permeability to water vapor, demonstrating the importance of the cuticle membrane in controlling water loss. The enhanced avrPto-luc expression is specific to att1, but not another cuticle mutant, wax2. The results suggest that certain cutin-related fatty acids synthesized by CYP86A2 may repress bacterial type III gene expression in the intercellular spaces. PMID:15241470

  7. Effector proteins of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae alter the extracellular proteome of the host plant, Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kaffarnik, Florian A R; Jones, Alexandra M E; Rathjen, John P; Peck, Scott C

    2009-01-01

    In plants, potential pathogenic bacteria do not enter the host cell. Therefore, a large portion of the molecular interaction between microbial pathogen and host occurs in the extracellular space. To investigate potential mechanisms of disease resistance and susceptibility, we analyzed changes in the extracellular proteome, or secretome, using the Arabidopsis-Pseudomonas syringae pathosystem. This system provides the possibility to directly compare interactions resulting in basal resistance, susceptibility, and gene-specific resistance by using different genotypes of Pseudomonas on the same host. After infecting suspension-cultured cells of Arabidopsis with the Pseudomonas strain of interest, we isolated protein from the cell culture medium representing the secretome. After one-dimensional gel separation and in-gel digestion of proteins, we used iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) labeling in conjunction with LC-MS/MS to perform relative quantitative comparisons of the secretomes from each of these interactions. We obtained quantitative information from 45 Arabidopsis proteins that were present in all three biological experiments. We observed complex patterns of accumulation, ranging from proteins that decreased in abundance in the presence of all three bacterial strains to proteins that specifically increased or decreased during only one of the interactions. A particularly intriguing result was that the virulent bacteria (e.g. a susceptible interaction) caused the extracellular accumulation of a specific subset of host proteins lacking traditional signal peptides. These results indicate that the pathogen may manipulate host secretion to promote the successful invasion of plants.

  8. Pseudomonas syringae self-protection from tabtoxinine-β-lactam by ligase TblF and acetylase Ttr.

    PubMed

    Wencewicz, Timothy A; Walsh, Christopher T

    2012-10-02

    Plant pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae produce the hydroxy-β-lactam antimetabolite tabtoxinine-β-lactam (TβL) as a time-dependent inactivating glutamine analogue of plant glutamine synthetases. The producing pseudomonads use multiple modes of self-protection, two of which are characterized in this study. The first is the dipeptide ligase TblF which converts tabtoxinine-β-lactam to the TβL-Thr dipeptide known as tabtoxin. The dipeptide is not recognized by glutamine synthetase. This represents a Trojan Horse strategy: the dipeptide is secreted, taken up by dipeptide permeases in neighboring cells, and TβL is released by peptidase action. The second self-protection mode is elaboration by the acetyltransferase Ttr, which acetylates the α-amino group of the proximal inactivator TβL, but not the tabtoxin dipeptide.

  9. Induction of plant defense gene expression by plant activators and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in greenhouse-grown tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Herman, M A B; Davidson, J K; Smart, C D

    2008-11-01

    Plant activators provide an appealing management option for bacterial diseases of greenhouse-grown tomatoes. Two types of plant activators, one that induces systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and a second that activates induced systemic resistance (ISR), were evaluated for control of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and effect on plant defense gene activation. Benzothiadiazole (BTH, SAR-inducing compound) effectively reduced bacterial speck incidence and severity, both alone and in combination with the ISR-inducing product. Application of BTH also led to elevated activation of salicylic acid and ethylene-mediated responses, based on real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of marker gene expression levels. In contrast, the ISR-inducing product (made up of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria) inconsistently modified defense gene expression and did not provide disease control to the same level as did BTH. No antagonism was observed by combining the two activators as control of bacterial speck was similar to or better than BTH alone.

  10. Competitive Index: Mixed Infection-Based Virulence Assays for Genetic Analysis in Pseudomonas syringae-Plant Interactions.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Rufián, José S; Ruiz-Albert, Javier; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2016-01-01

    When studying bacterial plant pathogens, the genetic analysis of the contribution of virulence factors to the infection process has traditionally been hindered by their high degree of functional redundancy. In recent years, it has become clear that the use of competitive index in mixed infections provides an accurate and sensitive manner of establishing virulence phenotypes for mutants for which other assays have failed. Such increases in sensitivity and accuracy are due to the direct comparison between the respective growths of the co-inoculated strains within the same infection, each strain replicating as they would in individual infections. Interferences between the co-inoculated strains must be therefore avoided using the appropriate experimental settings. In this chapter, we will present the optimal experimental conditions to achieve maximum sensitivity on virulence assays using the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae, as well as some additional considerations to ensure the correct interpretations of the results.

  11. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the cold-inducible hutU gene from the antarctic psychrotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Janiyani, Kamala L; Ray, M K

    2002-01-01

    A promoter-fusion study with a Tn 5-based promoter probe vector had earlier found that the hutU gene which encodes the enzyme urocanase for the histidine utilization pathway is upregulated at a lower temperature (4 degrees C) in the Antarctic psychrotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. To examine the characteristics of the urocanase gene and its promoter elements from the psychrotroph, the complete hutU and its upstream region from P. syringae were cloned, sequenced, and analyzed in the present study. Northern blot and primer extension analyses suggested that the hutU gene is inducible upon a downshift of temperature (22 to 4 degrees C) and that there is more than one transcription initiation site. One of the initiation sites was specific to the cells grown at 4 degrees C, which was different from the common initiation sites observed at both 4 and 22 degrees C. Although no typical promoter consensus sequences were observed in the flanking region of the transcription initiation sites, there was a characteristic CAAAA sequence at the -10 position of the promoters. Additionally, the location of the transcription and translation initiation sites suggested that the hutU mRNA contains a long 5'-untranslated region, a characteristic feature of many cold-inducible genes of mesophilic bacteria. A comparison of deduced amino acid sequences of urocanase from various bacteria, including the mesophilic and psychrotrophic Pseudomonas spp., suggests that there is a high degree of similarity between the enzymes. The enzyme sequence contains a signature motif (GXGX(2)GX(10)G) of the Rossmann fold for dinucleotide (NAD(+)) binding and two conserved cysteine residues in and around the active site. The psychrotrophic enzyme, however, has an extended N-terminal end.

  12. Light regulation of swarming motility in Pseudomonas syringae integrates signaling pathways mediated by a bacteriophytochrome and a LOV protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; McGrane, Regina S; Beattie, Gwyn A

    2013-06-11

    The biological and regulatory roles of photosensory proteins are poorly understood for nonphotosynthetic bacteria. The foliar bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae has three photosensory protein-encoding genes that are predicted to encode the blue-light-sensing LOV (light, oxygen, or voltage) histidine kinase (LOV-HK) and two red/far-red-light-sensing bacteriophytochromes, BphP1 and BphP2. We provide evidence that LOV-HK and BphP1 form an integrated network that regulates swarming motility in response to multiple light wavelengths. The swarming motility of P. syringae B728a deletion mutants indicated that LOV-HK positively regulates swarming motility in response to blue light and BphP1 negatively regulates swarming motility in response to red and far-red light. BphP2 does not detectably regulate swarming motility. The histidine kinase activity of each LOV-HK and BphP1 is required for this regulation based on the loss of complementation upon mutation of residues key to their kinase activity. Surprisingly, mutants lacking both lov and bphP1 were similar in motility to a bphP1 single mutant in blue light, indicating that the loss of bphP1 is epistatic to the loss of lov and also that BphP1 unexpectedly responds to blue light. Moreover, whereas expression of bphP1 did not alter motility under blue light in a bphP1 mutant, it reduced motility in a mutant lacking lov and bphP1, demonstrating that LOV-HK positively regulates motility by suppressing negative regulation by BphP1. These results are the first to show cross talk between the LOV protein and phytochrome signaling pathways in bacteria, and the similarity of this regulatory network to that of photoreceptors in plants suggests a possible common ancestry. IMPORTANCE Photosensory proteins enable organisms to perceive and respond to light. The biological and ecological roles of these proteins in nonphotosynthetic bacteria are largely unknown. This study discovered that a blue-light-sensing LOV (light, oxygen, or

  13. Pto- and Prf-mediated recognition of AvrPto and AvrPtoB restricts the ability of diverse pseudomonas syringae pathovars to infect tomato.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nai-Chun; Martin, Gregory B

    2007-07-01

    The molecular basis underlying the ability of pathogens to infect certain plant species and not others is largely unknown. Pseudomonas syringae is a useful model species for investigating this phenomenon because it comprises more than 50 pathovars which have narrow host range specificities. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a host for P. syringae pv. tomato, the causative agent of bacterial speck disease, but is considered a nonhost for other P. syringae pathovars. Host resistance in tomato to bacterial speck disease is conferred by the Pto protein kinase which acts in concert with the Prf nucleotide-binding lucine-rich repeat protein to recognize P. syringae pv. tomato strains expressing the type III effectors AvrPto or AvrPtoB (HopAB2). The Pto and Prf genes were isolated from the wild tomato species S. pimpinellifolium and functional alleles of both of these genes now are known to exist in many species of tomato and in other Solanaceous species. Here, we extend earlier reports that avrPto and avrPtoB genes are widely distributed among pathovars of P. syringae which are considered nonhost pathogens of tomato. This observation prompted us to examine the possibility that recognition of these type III effectors by Pto or Prf might contribute to the inability of many P. syringae pathovars to infect tomato species. We show that 10 strains from presumed nonhost P. syringae pathovars are able to grow and cause pathovar-unique disease symptoms in tomato leaves lacking Pto or Prf, although they did not reach the population levels or cause symptoms as severe as a control P. syringae pv. tomato strain. Seven of these strains were found to express avrPto or avrPtoB. The AvrPto- and AvrPtoB-expressing strains elicited disease resistance on tomato leaves expressing Pto and Prf. Thus, a gene-for-gene recognition event may contribute to host range restriction of many P. syringae pathovars on tomato species. Furthermore, we conclude that the diverse disease symptoms caused by

  14. Identification of an ISR-related metabolite produced by Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 against the wildfire pathogen pseudomonas syringae pv.tabaci in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Park, Myung Ryeol; Kim, Young Cheol; Park, Ju Yeon; Han, Song Hee; Kim, Kil Yong; Lee, Sun Woo; Kim, In Seon

    2008-10-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 exhibits induced systemic resistance (ISR) against P. syringae pv. tabaci in tobacco. To identify one of the ISR metabolites, O6 cultures were extracted with organic solvents, and the organic extracts were subjected to column chromatography followed by spectroscopy analyses. The ISR bioassay-guided fractionation was carried out for isolation of the metabolite. Highresolution mass spectrometric analysis of the metabolite found C(9)H(9)O(3)N with an exact mass of 179.0582. LC/MS analysis in positive mode showed an (M+H)(+) peak at m/zeta 180. Nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H, (13)C) analyses identified all protons and carbons of the metabolite. Based on the spectroscopy data, the metabolite was identified 4-(aminocarbonyl) phenylacetate (4-ACPA). 4-ACPA applied at 68.0 mM exhibited ISR activity at a level similar 1.0 mM salicylic acid. This is the first report to identify an ISR metabolite produced by P. chlororaphis O6 against the wildfire pathogen P. syringae pv. tabaci in tobacco.

  15. Molecular cloning of copper resistance genes from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, C.L.; Cooksey, D.A.

    1987-02-01

    A cosmid library of copper-resistant (Cu/sup r/) Psuedomonas syringe pv. tomato PT23 plasmid DNA was constructed and mobilized into the copper-sensitive recipient P. syringae pv. syringae PS61. One resultant cosmid clone, pCOP1 (46 kilobases), conferred copper resistance. The PT23 Cu/sup r/ gene(s) was located on pCOP1 by subcloning PstI restriction endonuclease fragments of pCOP1 in the broad-host-range vector pRK404. A subclone containing a 4.4-kilobase PstI fragment conferred Cu/sup r/ on PS61. The Cu/sup r/ gene(s0 was further located by insertional inactivation with Tn5. A subcloned fragment internal to the Cu/sup r/ determinant on pCOP2 was probed to plasmid and chromosomal DNA of four copper-resistant and three copper-sensitive strains of P. syringae pv. tomato. The probe hybridized to plasmids in resistant strains, but showed no detectable homology to copper-sensitive strains.

  16. Origin of the Outbreak in France of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Biovar 3, the Causal Agent of Bacterial Canker of Kiwifruit, Revealed by a Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cunty, A; Cesbron, S; Poliakoff, F; Jacques, M-A; Manceau, C

    2015-10-01

    The first outbreaks of bacterial canker of kiwifruit caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 were detected in France in 2010. P. syringae pv. actinidiae causes leaf spots, dieback, and canker that sometimes lead to the death of the vine. P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum, which is pathogenic on kiwi as well, causes only leaf spots. In order to conduct an epidemiological study to track the spread of the epidemics of these two pathogens in France, we developed a multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA). MLVA was conducted on 340 strains of P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 isolated in Chile, China, France, Italy, and New Zealand and on 39 strains of P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum isolated in Australia, France, and New Zealand. Eleven polymorphic VNTR loci were identified in the genomes of P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 ICMP 18744 and of P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum ICMP 18807. MLVA enabled the structuring of P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 and P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum strains in 55 and 16 haplotypes, respectively. MLVA and discriminant analysis of principal components revealed that strains isolated in Chile, China, and New Zealand are genetically distinct from P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains isolated in France and in Italy, which appear to be closely related at the genetic level. In contrast, no structuring was observed for P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum. We developed an MLVA scheme to explore the diversity within P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 and to trace the dispersal routes of epidemic P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 in Europe. We suggest using this MLVA scheme to trace the dispersal routes of P. syringae pv. actinidiae at a global level.

  17. Origin of the Outbreak in France of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Biovar 3, the Causal Agent of Bacterial Canker of Kiwifruit, Revealed by a Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cunty, A.; Cesbron, S.; Poliakoff, F.; Jacques, M.-A.

    2015-01-01

    The first outbreaks of bacterial canker of kiwifruit caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 were detected in France in 2010. P. syringae pv. actinidiae causes leaf spots, dieback, and canker that sometimes lead to the death of the vine. P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum, which is pathogenic on kiwi as well, causes only leaf spots. In order to conduct an epidemiological study to track the spread of the epidemics of these two pathogens in France, we developed a multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA). MLVA was conducted on 340 strains of P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 isolated in Chile, China, France, Italy, and New Zealand and on 39 strains of P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum isolated in Australia, France, and New Zealand. Eleven polymorphic VNTR loci were identified in the genomes of P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 ICMP 18744 and of P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum ICMP 18807. MLVA enabled the structuring of P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 and P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum strains in 55 and 16 haplotypes, respectively. MLVA and discriminant analysis of principal components revealed that strains isolated in Chile, China, and New Zealand are genetically distinct from P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains isolated in France and in Italy, which appear to be closely related at the genetic level. In contrast, no structuring was observed for P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum. We developed an MLVA scheme to explore the diversity within P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 and to trace the dispersal routes of epidemic P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 in Europe. We suggest using this MLVA scheme to trace the dispersal routes of P. syringae pv. actinidiae at a global level. PMID:26209667

  18. Protection of tomato seedlings against infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato by using the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Bashan, Yoav; De-Bashan, Luz E

    2002-06-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, the causal agent of bacterial speck of tomato, and the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense were inoculated onto tomato plants, either alone, as a mixed culture, or consecutively. The population dynamics in the rhizosphere and foliage, the development of bacterial speck disease, and their effects on plant growth were monitored. When inoculated onto separate plants, the A. brasilense population in the rhizosphere of tomato plants was 2 orders of magnitude greater than the population of P. syringae pv. tomato (10(7) versus 10(5) CFU/g [dry weight] of root). Under mist chamber conditions, the leaf population of P. syringae pv. tomato was 1 order of magnitude greater than that of A. brasilense (10(7) versus 10(6) CFU/g [dry weight] of leaf). Inoculation of seeds with a mixed culture of the two bacterial strains resulted in a reduction of the pathogen population in the rhizosphere, an increase in the A. brasilense population, the prevention of bacterial speck disease development, and improved plant growth. Inoculation of leaves with the mixed bacterial culture under mist conditions significantly reduced the P. syringae pv. tomato population and significantly decreased disease severity. Challenge with P. syringae pv. tomato after A. brasilense was established in the leaves further reduced both the population of P. syringae pv. tomato and disease severity and significantly enhanced plant development. Both bacteria maintained a large population in the rhizosphere for 45 days when each was inoculated separately onto tomato seeds (10(5) to 10(6) CFU/g [dry weight] of root). However, P. syringae pv. tomato did not survive in the rhizosphere in the presence of A. brasilense. Foliar inoculation of A. brasilense after P. syringae pv. tomato was established on the leaves did not alleviate bacterial speck disease, and A. brasilense did not survive well in the phyllosphere under these conditions, even in a mist chamber. Several

  19. Whole-Genome Sequence Analysis of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A Reveals Divergence among Pathovars in Genes Involved in Virulence and Transposition†

    PubMed Central

    Joardar, Vinita; Lindeberg, Magdalen; Jackson, Robert W.; Selengut, Jeremy; Dodson, Robert; Brinkac, Lauren M.; Daugherty, Sean C.; DeBoy, Robert; Durkin, A. Scott; Giglio, Michelle Gwinn; Madupu, Ramana; Nelson, William C.; Rosovitz, M. J.; Sullivan, Steven; Crabtree, Jonathan; Creasy, Todd; Davidsen, Tanja; Haft, Dan H.; Zafar, Nikhat; Zhou, Liwei; Halpin, Rebecca; Holley, Tara; Khouri, Hoda; Feldblyum, Tamara; White, Owen; Fraser, Claire M.; Chatterjee, Arun K.; Cartinhour, Sam; Schneider, David J.; Mansfield, John; Collmer, Alan; Buell, C. Robin

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, a gram-negative bacterial plant pathogen, is the causal agent of halo blight of bean. In this study, we report on the genome sequence of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola isolate 1448A, which encodes 5,353 open reading frames (ORFs) on one circular chromosome (5,928,787 bp) and two plasmids (131,950 bp and 51,711 bp). Comparative analyses with a phylogenetically divergent pathovar, P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000, revealed a strong degree of conservation at the gene and genome levels. In total, 4,133 ORFs were identified as putative orthologs in these two pathovars using a reciprocal best-hit method, with 3,941 ORFs present in conserved, syntenic blocks. Although these two pathovars are highly similar at the physiological level, they have distinct host ranges; 1448A causes disease in beans, and DC3000 is pathogenic on tomato and Arabidopsis. Examination of the complement of ORFs encoding virulence, fitness, and survival factors revealed a substantial, but not complete, overlap between these two pathovars. Another distinguishing feature between the two pathovars is their distinctive sets of transposable elements. With access to a fifth complete pseudomonad genome sequence, we were able to identify 3,567 ORFs that likely comprise the core Pseudomonas genome and 365 ORFs that are P. syringae specific. PMID:16159782

  20. Light Regulation of Swarming Motility in Pseudomonas syringae Integrates Signaling Pathways Mediated by a Bacteriophytochrome and a LOV Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liang; McGrane, Regina S.; Beattie, Gwyn A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The biological and regulatory roles of photosensory proteins are poorly understood for nonphotosynthetic bacteria. The foliar bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae has three photosensory protein-encoding genes that are predicted to encode the blue-light-sensing LOV (light, oxygen, or voltage) histidine kinase (LOV-HK) and two red/far-red-light-sensing bacteriophytochromes, BphP1 and BphP2. We provide evidence that LOV-HK and BphP1 form an integrated network that regulates swarming motility in response to multiple light wavelengths. The swarming motility of P. syringae B728a deletion mutants indicated that LOV-HK positively regulates swarming motility in response to blue light and BphP1 negatively regulates swarming motility in response to red and far-red light. BphP2 does not detectably regulate swarming motility. The histidine kinase activity of each LOV-HK and BphP1 is required for this regulation based on the loss of complementation upon mutation of residues key to their kinase activity. Surprisingly, mutants lacking both lov and bphP1 were similar in motility to a bphP1 single mutant in blue light, indicating that the loss of bphP1 is epistatic to the loss of lov and also that BphP1 unexpectedly responds to blue light. Moreover, whereas expression of bphP1 did not alter motility under blue light in a bphP1 mutant, it reduced motility in a mutant lacking lov and bphP1, demonstrating that LOV-HK positively regulates motility by suppressing negative regulation by BphP1. These results are the first to show cross talk between the LOV protein and phytochrome signaling pathways in bacteria, and the similarity of this regulatory network to that of photoreceptors in plants suggests a possible common ancestry. PMID:23760465

  1. Functional Characterization of the Gene Cluster from Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 Involved in Synthesis of Phaseolotoxin▿

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Selene; López-López, Karina; Nieto, Yudith; Garcidueñas-Piña, Rogelio; Hernández-Guzmán, Gustavo; Hernández-Flores, José Luis; Murillo, Jesús; Alvarez-Morales, Ariel

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola is the causal agent of halo blight disease of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), which is characterized by water-soaked lesions surrounded by a chlorotic halo resulting from the action of a non-host-specific toxin known as phaseolotoxin. This phytotoxin inhibits the enzyme ornithine carbamoyltransferase involved in arginine biosynthesis. Different evidence suggested that genes involved in phaseolotoxin production were clustered. Two genes had been previously identified in our laboratory within this cluster: argK, which is involved in the immunity of the bacterium to its own toxin, and amtA, which is involved in the synthesis of homoarginine. We sequenced the region around argK and amtA in P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 to determine the limits of the putative phaseolotoxin gene cluster and to determine the transcriptional pattern of the genes comprising it. We report that the phaseolotoxin cluster (Pht cluster) is composed of 23 genes and is flanked by insertion sequences and transposases. The mutation of 14 of the genes within the cluster lead to a Tox− phenotype for 11 of them, while three mutants exhibited low levels of toxin production. The analysis of fusions of selected DNA fragments to uidA, Northern probing, and reverse transcription-PCR indicate the presence of five transcriptional units, two monocistronic and three polycistronic; one is internal to a larger operon. The site for transcription initiation has been determined for each promoter, and the putative promoter regions were identified. Preliminary results also indicate that the gene product of phtL is involved in the regulation of the synthesis of phaseolotoxin. PMID:17237165

  2. Sensor Kinases RetS and LadS Regulate Pseudomonas syringae Type VI Secretion and Virulence Factors▿

    PubMed Central

    Records, Angela R.; Gross, Dennis C.

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a is a resident on leaves of common bean, where it utilizes several well-studied virulence factors, including secreted effectors and toxins, to develop a pathogenic interaction with its host. The B728a genome was recently sequenced, revealing the presence of 1,297 genes with unknown function. This study demonstrates that a 29.9-kb cluster of genes in the B728a genome shares homology to the novel type VI secretion system (T6SS) locus recently described for other Gram-negative bacteria. Western blot analyses showed that B728a secretes Hcp, a T6SS protein, in culture and that this secretion is dependent on clpV, a gene that likely encodes an AAA+ ATPase. In addition, we have identified two B728a sensor kinases that have homology to the P. aeruginosa proteins RetS and LadS. We demonstrate that B728a RetS and LadS reciprocally regulate the T6SS and collectively modulate several virulence-related activities. Quantitative PCR analyses indicated that RetS and LadS regulate genes associated with the type III secretion system and that LadS controls the expression of genes involved in the production of the exopolysaccharides alginate and levan. These analyses also revealed that LadS and the hybrid sensor kinase GacS positively regulate the expression of a putative novel exopolysaccharide called Psl. Plate assays demonstrated that RetS negatively controls mucoidy, while LadS negatively regulates swarming motility. A mutation in retS affected B728a population levels on the surfaces of bean leaves. A model for the LadS and RetS control of B728a virulence activities is proposed. PMID:20472799

  3. Growth Phase and Temperature Influence Promoter Activity, Transcript Abundance, and Protein Stability during Biosynthesis of the Pseudomonas syringae Phytotoxin Coronatine

    PubMed Central

    Budde, Ina P.; Rohde, Bettina H.; Bender, Carol L.; Ullrich, Matthias S.

    1998-01-01

    The plant-pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea PG4180.N9 synthesizes high levels of the polyketide phytotoxin coronatine (COR) at 18°C, whereas no detectable toxin is produced at 28°C. Previously, we reported that the temperature-sensitive activation of three promoters within the COR biosynthetic gene cluster might explain thermoregulation of COR biosynthesis. The present study was aimed at furthering our understanding of the transcriptional as well as the posttranslational effects of temperature on expression of cmaB, which encodes an enzyme involved in COR biosynthesis. Transcriptional fusions using a promoterless glucuronidase gene and Northern blot analyses were used to monitor promoter activities and transcript abundance for the cmaABT operon during bacterial growth at 18 and 28°C. Promoter activity and transcription rates were maximal when cells were incubated at 18°C and sampled at mid-logarithmic phase. Transcription declined moderately during the transition to stationary phase but remained higher at 18°C than at 28°C. Western blot analysis indicated that CmaB accumulated in the late stationary phase of P. syringae cultures grown at 18°C but not in cultures incubated at 28°C. Temperature shift experiments indicated that CmaB stability was more pronounced at 18°C than at 28°C. Although temperature has a strong impact on transcription of COR biosynthetic genes, we propose that thermoregulation of protein stability might also control COR synthesis. PMID:9515901

  4. Type III secretion and effectors shape the survival and growth pattern of Pseudomonas syringae on leaf surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyoung; Teitzel, Gail M; Munkvold, Kathy; del Pozo, Olga; Martin, Gregory B; Michelmore, Richard W; Greenberg, Jean T

    2012-04-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae B728a (PsyB728a) uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject effector proteins into plant cells, a process that modulates the susceptibility of different plants to infection. Analysis of GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN-expressing PsyB728a after spray inoculation without additives under moderate relative humidity conditions permitted (1) a detailed analysis of this strain's survival and growth pattern on host (Nicotiana benthamiana) and nonhost (tomato [Solanum lycopersicum]) leaf surfaces, (2) an assessment of the role of plant defenses in affecting PsyB728a leaf surface (epiphytic) growth, and (3) the contribution of the T3SS and specific effectors to PsyB728a epiphytic survival and growth. On host leaf surfaces, PsyB728a cells initially persist without growing, and show an increased population only after 48 h, unless plants are pretreated with the defense-inducing chemical benzothiazole. During the persistence period, some PsyB728a cells induce a T3SS reporter, whereas a T3SS-deficient mutant shows reduced survival. By 72 h, rare invasion by PsyB728a to the mesophyll region of host leaves occurs, but endophytic and epiphytic bacterial growths are not correlated. The effectors HopZ3 and HopAA1 delay the onset of epiphytic growth of PsyB728a on N. benthamiana, whereas they promote epiphytic survival/growth on tomato. These effectors localize to distinct sites in plant cells and likely have different mechanisms of action. HopZ3 may enzymatically modify host targets, as it requires residues important for the catalytic activity of other proteins in its family of proteases. Thus, the T3SS, HopAA1, HopZ3, and plant defenses strongly influence epiphytic survival and/or growth of PsyB728a.

  5. NTRC and chloroplast-generated reactive oxygen species regulate Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato disease development in tomato and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Ishiga, Takako; Wangdi, Tamding; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao

    2012-03-01

    Coronatine (COR)-producing pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae, including pvs. tomato, maculicola, and glycinea, cause important diseases on tomato, crucifers, and soybean, respectively, and produce symptoms with necrotic lesions surrounded by chlorosis. The chlorosis is mainly attributed to COR. However, the significance of COR-induced chlorosis in localized lesion development and the molecular basis of disease-associated cell death is largely unknown. To identify host (chloroplast) genes that play a role in COR-mediated chlorosis, we used a forward genetics approach using Nicotiana benthamiana and virus-induced gene silencing and identified a gene which encodes 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prxs) that, when silenced, produced a spreading hypersensitive or necrosis-like phenotype instead of chlorosis after COR application in a COI1-dependent manner. Loss-of-function analysis of Prx and NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC), the central players of a chloroplast redox detoxification system, resulted in spreading accelerated P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 disease-associated cell death with enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in a COR-dependent manner in tomato and Arabidopsis. Consistent with these results, virulent strain DC3000 suppressed the expression of Prx and NTRC in Arabidopsis and tomato during pathogenesis. However, interestingly, authentic COR suppressed the expression of Prx and NTRC in tomato but not in Arabidopsis, suggesting that COR in conjunction with other effectors may modulate ROS and cell death in different host species. Taken together, these results indicated that NTRC or Prx function as a negative regulator of pathogen-induced cell death in the healthy tissues that surround the lesions, and COR-induced chloroplast-localized ROS play a role in enhancing the disease-associated cell death.

  6. Extensive remodeling of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. avellanae type III secretome associated with two independent host shifts onto hazelnut

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hazelnut (Corylus avellana) decline disease in Greece and Italy is caused by the convergent evolution of two distantly related lineages of Pseudomonas syringae pv. avellanae (Pav). We sequenced the genomes of three Pav isolates to determine if their convergent virulence phenotype had a common genetic basis due to either genetic exchange between lineages or parallel evolution. Results We found little evidence for horizontal transfer (recombination) of genes between Pav lineages, but two large genomic islands (GIs) have been recently acquired by one of the lineages. Evolutionary analyses of the genes encoding type III secreted effectors (T3SEs) that are translocated into host cells and are important for both suppressing and eliciting defense responses show that the two Pav lineages have dramatically different T3SE profiles, with only two shared putatively functional T3SEs. One Pav lineage has undergone unprecedented secretome remodeling, including the acquisition of eleven new T3SEs and the loss or pseudogenization of 15, including five of the six core T3SE families that are present in the other Pav lineage. Molecular dating indicates that divergence within both of the Pav lineages predates their observation in the field. This suggest that both Pav lineages have been cryptically infecting hazelnut trees or wild relatives for many years, and that the emergence of hazelnut decline in the 1970s may have been due to changes in agricultural practice. Conclusions These data show that divergent lineages of P. syringae can converge on identical disease etiology on the same host plant using different virulence mechanisms and that dramatic shifts in the arsenal of T3SEs can accompany disease emergence. PMID:22800299

  7. Functional and Computational Analysis of Amino Acid Patterns Predictive of Type III Secretion System Substrates in Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Schechter, Lisa M.; Valenta, Joy C.; Schneider, David J.; Collmer, Alan; Sakk, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial type III secretion systems (T3SSs) deliver proteins called effectors into eukaryotic cells. Although N-terminal amino acid sequences are required for translocation, the mechanism of substrate recognition by the T3SS is unknown. Almost all actively deployed T3SS substrates in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato strain DC3000 possess characteristic patterns, including (i) greater than 10% serine within the first 50 amino acids, (ii) an aliphatic residue or proline at position 3 or 4, and (iii) a lack of acidic amino acids within the first 12 residues. Here, the functional significance of the P. syringae T3SS substrate compositional patterns was tested. A mutant AvrPto effector protein lacking all three patterns was secreted into culture and translocated into plant cells, suggesting that the compositional characteristics are not absolutely required for T3SS targeting and that other recognition mechanisms exist. To further analyze the unique properties of T3SS targeting signals, we developed a computational algorithm called TEREE (Type III Effector Relative Entropy Evaluation) that distinguishes DC3000 T3SS substrates from other proteins with a high sensitivity and specificity. Although TEREE did not efficiently identify T3SS substrates in Salmonella enterica, it was effective in another P. syringae strain and Ralstonia solanacearum. Thus, the TEREE algorithm may be a useful tool for identifying new effector genes in plant pathogens. The nature of T3SS targeting signals was additionally investigated by analyzing the N-terminus of FtsX, a putative membrane protein that was classified as a T3SS substrate by TEREE. Although the first 50 amino acids of FtsX were unable to target a reporter protein to the T3SS, an AvrPto protein substituted with the first 12 amino acids of FtsX was translocated into plant cells. These results show that the T3SS targeting signals are highly mutable and that secretion may be directed by multiple features of

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of a gene cluster encoding an additional, rhizobial-like type III secretion system that is narrowly distributed among Pseudomonas syringae strains.

    PubMed

    Gazi, Anastasia D; Sarris, Panagiotis F; Fadouloglou, Vasiliki E; Charova, Spyridoula N; Mathioudakis, Nikolaos; Panopoulos, Nicholas J; Kokkinidis, Michael

    2012-09-02

    The central role of Type III secretion systems (T3SS) in bacteria-plant interactions is well established, yet unexpected findings are being uncovered through bacterial genome sequencing. Some Pseudomonas syringae strains possess an uncharacterized cluster of genes encoding putative components of a second T3SS (T3SS-2) in addition to the well characterized Hrc1 T3SS which is associated with disease lesions in host plants and with the triggering of hypersensitive response in non-host plants. The aim of this study is to perform an in silico analysis of T3SS-2, and to compare it with other known T3SSs. Based on phylogenetic analysis and gene organization comparisons, the T3SS-2 cluster of the P. syringae pv. phaseolicola strain is grouped with a second T3SS found in the pNGR234b plasmid of Rhizobium sp. These additional T3SS gene clusters define a subgroup within the Rhizobium T3SS family. Although, T3SS-2 is not distributed as widely as the Hrc1 T3SS in P. syringae strains, it was found to be constitutively expressed in P. syringae pv phaseolicola through RT-PCR experiments. The relatedness of the P. syringae T3SS-2 to a second T3SS from the pNGR234b plasmid of Rhizobium sp., member of subgroup II of the rhizobial T3SS family, indicates common ancestry and/or possible horizontal transfer events between these species. Functional analysis and genome sequencing of more rhizobia and P. syringae pathovars may shed light into why these bacteria maintain a second T3SS gene cluster in their genome.

  9. Iron-regulated metabolites produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374r are not required for eliciting induced systemic resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Djavaheri, Mohammad; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Versluis, C; Meyer, J-M; Loon, L C; Bakker, Peter A H M

    2012-09-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374r produces several iron-regulated metabolites, including the fluorescent siderophore pseudobactin (Psb374), salicylic acid (SA), and pseudomonine (Psm), a siderophore that contains a SA moiety. After purification of Psb374 from culture supernatant of WCS374r, its structure was determined following isoelectrofocusing and tandem mass spectrometry, and found to be identical to the fluorescent siderophore produced by P. fluorescens ATCC 13525. To study the role of SA and Psm production in colonization of Arabidopsis thaliana roots and in induced systemic resistance (ISR) against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) by strain WCS374r, mutants disrupted in the production of these metabolites were obtained by homologous recombination. These mutants were further subjected to transposon Tn5 mutagenesis to generate mutants also deficient in Psb374 production. The mutants behaved similar to the wild type in both their Arabidopsis rhizosphere-colonizing capacity and their ability to elicit ISR against Pst. We conclude that Psb374, SA, and Psm production by P. fluorescens WCS374r are not required for eliciting ISR in Arabidopsis.

  10. Silencing and heterologous expression of ppo-2 indicate a specific function of a single polyphenol oxidase isoform in resistance of dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato.

    PubMed

    Richter, Carolin; Dirks, Mareike E; Gronover, Christian Schulze; Prüfer, Dirk; Moerschbacher, Bruno M

    2012-02-01

    Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) possesses an unusually high degree of disease resistance. As this plant exhibits high polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity and PPO have been implicated in resistance against pests and pathogens, we analyzed the potential involvement of five PPO isoenzymes in the resistance of dandelion against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Only one PPO (ppo-2) was induced during infection, and ppo-2 promoter and β-glucuronidase marker gene fusions revealed strong induction of the gene surrounding lesions induced by B. cinerea. Specific RNAi silencing reduced ppo-2 expression only, and concomitantly increased plant susceptibility to P. syringae pv. tomato. At 4 days postinoculation, P. syringae pv. tomato populations were strongly increased in the ppo-2 RNAi lines compared with wild-type plants. When the dandelion ppo-2 gene was expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana, a plant having no PPO gene, active protein was formed and protein extracts of the transgenic plants exhibited substrate-dependent antimicrobial activity against P. syringae pv. tomato. These results clearly indicate a strong contribution of a specific, single PPO isoform to disease resistance. Therefore, we propose that specific PPO isoenzymes be included in a new family of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins.

  11. Elicitation of induced resistance against Pectobacterium carotovorum and Pseudomonas syringae by specific individual compounds derived from native Korean plant species.

    PubMed

    Song, Geun Cheol; Ryu, Shi Yong; Kim, Young Sup; Lee, Ji Young; Choi, Jung Sup; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2013-10-16

    Plants have developed general and specific defense mechanisms for protection against various enemies. Among the general defenses, induced resistance has distinct characteristics, such as broad-spectrum resistance and long-lasting effectiveness. This study evaluated over 500 specific chemical compounds derived from native Korean plant species to determine whether they triggered induced resistance against Pectobacterium carotovorum supsp. carotovorum (Pcc) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) in Arabidopsis thaliana. To select target compound(s) with direct and indirect (volatile) effects, a new Petri-dish-based in vitro disease assay system with four compartments was developed. The screening assay showed that capsaicin, fisetin hydrate, jaceosidin, and farnesiferol A reduced the disease severity significantly in tobacco. Of these four compounds, capsaicin and jaceosidin induced resistance against Pcc and Pst, which depended on both salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling, using Arabidopsis transgenic and mutant lines, including npr1 and NahG for SA signaling and jar1 for JA signaling. The upregulation of the PR2 and PDF1.2 genes after Pst challenge with capsaicin pre-treatment indicated that SA and JA signaling were primed. These results demonstrate that capsaicin and jaceosidin can be effective triggers of strong induced resistance against both necrotrophic and biotrophic plant pathogens.

  12. The Identification of Genes Important in Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola Plant Colonisation Using In Vitro Screening of Transposon Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, John T.; Jackson, Robert W.; Arnold, Dawn L.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph) colonises the surface of common bean plants before moving into the interior of plant tissue, via wounds and stomata. In the intercellular spaces the pathogen proliferates in the apoplastic fluid and forms microcolonies (biofilms) around plant cells. If the pathogen can suppress the plant’s natural resistance response, it will cause halo blight disease. The process of resistance suppression is fairly well understood, but the mechanisms used by the pathogen in colonisation are less clear. We hypothesised that we could apply in vitro genetic screens to look for changes in motility, colony formation, and adhesion, which are proxies for infection, microcolony formation and cell adhesion. We made transposon (Tn) mutant libraries of Pph strains 1448A and 1302A and found 106/1920 mutants exhibited alterations in colony morphology, motility and biofilm formation. Identification of the insertion point of the Tn identified within the genome highlighted, as expected, a number of altered motility mutants bearing mutations in genes encoding various parts of the flagellum. Genes involved in nutrient biosynthesis, membrane associated proteins, and a number of conserved hypothetical protein (CHP) genes were also identified. A mutation of one CHP gene caused a positive increase in in planta bacterial growth. This rapid and inexpensive screening method allows the discovery of genes important for in vitro traits that can be correlated to roles in the plant interaction. PMID:26325299

  13. Atmospheric CO2 Alters Resistance of Arabidopsis to Pseudomonas syringae by Affecting Abscisic Acid Accumulation and Stomatal Responsiveness to Coronatine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yeling; Vroegop-Vos, Irene; Schuurink, Robert C; Pieterse, Corné M J; Van Wees, Saskia C M

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 influences plant growth and stomatal aperture. Effects of high or low CO2 levels on plant disease resistance are less well understood. Here, resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana against the foliar pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst) was investigated at three different CO2 levels: high (800 ppm), ambient (450 ppm), and low (150 ppm). Under all conditions tested, infection by Pst resulted in stomatal closure within 1 h after inoculation. However, subsequent stomatal reopening at 4 h, triggered by the virulence factor coronatine (COR), occurred only at ambient and high CO2, but not at low CO2. Moreover, infection by Pst was reduced at low CO2 to the same extent as infection by mutant Pst cor(-) . Under all CO2 conditions, the ABA mutants aba2-1 and abi1-1 were as resistant to Pst as wild-type plants under low CO2, which contained less ABA. Moreover, stomatal reopening mediated by COR was dependent on ABA. Our results suggest that reduced ABA levels at low CO2 contribute to the observed enhanced resistance to Pst by deregulation of virulence responses. This implies that enhanced ABA levels at increasing CO2 levels may have a role in weakening plant defense.

  14. A Blue Light Inducible Two-Component Signal Transduction System in the Plant Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato☆

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Z.; Buttani, V.; Losi, A.; Gärtner, W.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The open reading frame PSPTO2896 from the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato encodes a protein of 534 amino acids showing all salient features of a blue light-driven two-component system. The N-terminal LOV (light, oxygen, voltage) domain, potentially binding a flavin chromophore, is followed by a histidine kinase (HK) motif and a response regulator (RR). The full-length protein (PST-LOV) and, separately, the RR and the LOV+HK part (PST-LOVΔRR) were heterologously expressed and functionally characterized. The two LOV proteins showed typical LOV-like spectra and photochemical reactions, with the blue light-driven, reversible formation of a covalent flavin-cysteine bond. The fluorescence changes in the lit state of full-length PST-LOV, but not in PST-LOVΔRR, indicating a direct interaction between the LOV core and the RR module. Experiments performed with radioactive ATP uncover the light-driven kinase activity. For both PST-LOV and PST-LOVΔRR, much more radioactivity is incorporated when the protein is in the lit state. Furthermore, addition of the RR domain to the fully phosphorylated PST-LOVΔRR leads to a very fast transfer of radioactivity, indicating a highly efficient HK activity and a tight interaction between PST-LOVΔRR and RR, possibly facilitated by the LOV core itself. PMID:17905842

  15. Decreased abundance of type III secretion system-inducing signals in Arabidopsis mkp1 enhances resistance against Pseudomonas syringae

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jeffrey C.; Wan, Ying; Kim, Young-Mo; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Peck, Scott C.

    2014-04-21

    Many phytopathogenic bacteria use a type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject defense-suppressing effector proteins into host cells. Genes encoding the T3SS are induced at the start of infection, yet host signals that initiate T3SS gene expression are poorly understood. Here we identify several plant-derived metabolites that induce the T3SS in the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. In addition, we report that mkp1 (mapk phosphatase 1), an Arabidopsis mutant that is more resistant to bacterial infection, produces decreased levels of these T3SS-inducing metabolites. Consistent with the observed decrease in these metabolites, T3SS effector delivery by DC3000 was impaired in mkp1. Addition of the bioactive metabolites to the mkp1-DC3000 interaction fully restored T3SS effector delivery and suppressed enhanced resistance in mkp1. Together, these results demonstrate that DC3000 perceives multiple signals derived from plants to initiate their virulence program, and reveal a new layer of molecular communication between plants and these pathogenic bacteria.

  16. Regulation of miR163 and its targets in defense against Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Chow, Hiu Tung; Ng, Danny W-K

    2017-04-12

    Small RNAs are important regulators for a variety of biological processes, including leaf development, flowering-time, embryogenesis and defense responses. miR163 is a non-conserved miRNA and its locus has evolved recently through inverted duplication of its target genes to which they belong to the SABATH family of related small-molecule methyltransferases (MTs). In Arabidopsis thaliana, previous study demonstrated that miR163 accumulation was induced by alamethicin treatment, suggesting its roles in defense response pathways. Enhanced resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) was observed in the mir163 mutant, whereas transgenic lines overexpressing miR163 showed increase sensitivity to Pst, suggesting that miR163 is a negative regulator of defense response. Elevated level of miR163 and its targets in A. thaliana were observed upon Pst treatment, suggesting a modulating relationship between miR163 and its targets. In addition, miR163 and histone deacetylase were found to act cooperatively in mediating defense against Pst. Transgenic plants overexpressing miR163-resistant targets suggested their different contributions in defense. Results from this study revealed that the stress-inducible miR163 and its targets act in concert to modulate defense responses against bacterial pathogen in A. thaliana.

  17. JMJ27, an Arabidopsis H3K9 histone demethylase, modulates defense against Pseudomonas syringae and flowering time.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Aditya; Choudhary, Pratibha; Caruana, Julie; Raina, Ramesh

    2017-09-01

    Histone methylation is known to dynamically regulate diverse developmental and physiological processes. Histone methyl marks are written by methyltransferases and erased by demethylases, and result in modification of chromatin structure to repress or activate transcription. However, little is known about how histone methylation may regulate defense mechanisms and flowering time in plants. Here we report characterization of JmjC DOMAIN-CONTAINING PROTEIN 27 (JMJ27), an Arabidopsis JHDM2 (JmjC domain-containing histone demethylase 2) family protein, which modulates defense against pathogens and flowering time. JMJ27 is a nuclear protein containing a zinc-finger motif and a catalytic JmjC domain with conserved Fe(II) and α-ketoglutarate binding sites, and displays H3K9me1/2 demethylase activity both in vitro and in vivo. JMJ27 is induced in response to virulent Pseudomonas syringae pathogens and is required for resistance against these pathogens. JMJ27 is a negative modulator of WRKY25 (a repressor of defense) and a positive modulator of several pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. Additionally, loss of JMJ27 function leads to early flowering. JMJ27 negatively modulates the major flowering regulator CONSTANS (CO) and positively modulates FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Taken together, our results indicate that JMJ27 functions as a histone demethylase to modulate both physiological (defense) and developmental (flowering time) processes in Arabidopsis. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The Identification of Genes Important in Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola Plant Colonisation Using In Vitro Screening of Transposon Libraries.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, Bharani; Neale, Helen C; Hancock, John T; Jackson, Robert W; Arnold, Dawn L

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph) colonises the surface of common bean plants before moving into the interior of plant tissue, via wounds and stomata. In the intercellular spaces the pathogen proliferates in the apoplastic fluid and forms microcolonies (biofilms) around plant cells. If the pathogen can suppress the plant's natural resistance response, it will cause halo blight disease. The process of resistance suppression is fairly well understood, but the mechanisms used by the pathogen in colonisation are less clear. We hypothesised that we could apply in vitro genetic screens to look for changes in motility, colony formation, and adhesion, which are proxies for infection, microcolony formation and cell adhesion. We made transposon (Tn) mutant libraries of Pph strains 1448A and 1302A and found 106/1920 mutants exhibited alterations in colony morphology, motility and biofilm formation. Identification of the insertion point of the Tn identified within the genome highlighted, as expected, a number of altered motility mutants bearing mutations in genes encoding various parts of the flagellum. Genes involved in nutrient biosynthesis, membrane associated proteins, and a number of conserved hypothetical protein (CHP) genes were also identified. A mutation of one CHP gene caused a positive increase in in planta bacterial growth. This rapid and inexpensive screening method allows the discovery of genes important for in vitro traits that can be correlated to roles in the plant interaction.

  19. Proteomic changes in Actinidia chinensis shoot during systemic infection with a pandemic Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae strain.

    PubMed

    Petriccione, Milena; Di Cecco, Ilaria; Arena, Simona; Scaloni, Andrea; Scortichini, Marco

    2013-01-14

    A pandemic, very aggressive population of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is currently causing severe economic losses to kiwifruit crops worldwide. Upon leaf attack, this Gram-negative bacterium systemically reaches the plant shoot in a week period. In this study, combined 2-DE and nanoLC-ESI-LIT-MS/MS procedures were used to describe major proteomic changes in Actinidia chinensis shoot following bacterial inoculation in host leaf. A total of 117 differentially represented protein spots were identified in infected and control shoots. Protein species associated with plant defence, including type-members of the plant basal defence, pathogenesis, oxidative stress and heat shock, or with transport and signalling events, were the most represented category of induced components. Proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism and photosynthesis were also augmented upon infection. In parallel, a bacterial outer membrane polypeptide component was identified in shoot tissues, whose homologues were already linked to bacterial virulence in other eukaryotes. Semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed expression data for all selected plant gene products. All these data suggest a general reprogramming of shoot metabolism following pathogen systemic infection, highlighting organ-specific differences within the context of a general similarity with respect to other pathosystems. In addition to present preliminary information on the molecular mechanisms regulating this specific plant-microbe interaction, our results will foster future proteomic studies aimed at characterizing the very early events of host colonization, thus promoting the development of novel bioassays for pathogen detection in kiwifruit material.

  20. Atmospheric CO2 Alters Resistance of Arabidopsis to Pseudomonas syringae by Affecting Abscisic Acid Accumulation and Stomatal Responsiveness to Coronatine

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yeling; Vroegop-Vos, Irene; Schuurink, Robert C.; Pieterse, Corné M. J.; Van Wees, Saskia C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 influences plant growth and stomatal aperture. Effects of high or low CO2 levels on plant disease resistance are less well understood. Here, resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana against the foliar pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst) was investigated at three different CO2 levels: high (800 ppm), ambient (450 ppm), and low (150 ppm). Under all conditions tested, infection by Pst resulted in stomatal closure within 1 h after inoculation. However, subsequent stomatal reopening at 4 h, triggered by the virulence factor coronatine (COR), occurred only at ambient and high CO2, but not at low CO2. Moreover, infection by Pst was reduced at low CO2 to the same extent as infection by mutant Pst cor-. Under all CO2 conditions, the ABA mutants aba2-1 and abi1-1 were as resistant to Pst as wild-type plants under low CO2, which contained less ABA. Moreover, stomatal reopening mediated by COR was dependent on ABA. Our results suggest that reduced ABA levels at low CO2 contribute to the observed enhanced resistance to Pst by deregulation of virulence responses. This implies that enhanced ABA levels at increasing CO2 levels may have a role in weakening plant defense. PMID:28559899

  1. Structural basis for ligand recognition by a Cache chemosensory domain that mediates carboxylate sensing in Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, Jodi L.; McKellar, James L. O.; Finn, Thomas J.; Newman, Janet; Peat, Thomas S.; Gerth, Monica L.

    2016-01-01

    Chemoreceptors enable bacteria to detect chemical signals in the environment and navigate towards niches that are favourable for survival. The sensor domains of chemoreceptors function as the input modules for chemotaxis systems, and provide sensory specificity by binding specific ligands. Cache-like domains are the most common extracellular sensor module in prokaryotes, however only a handful have been functionally or structurally characterised. Here, we have characterised a chemoreceptor Cache-like sensor domain (PscD-SD) from the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa). High-throughput fluorescence thermal shift assays, combined with isothermal thermal titration calorimetry, revealed that PscD-SD binds specifically to C2 (glycolate and acetate) and C3 (propionate and pyruvate) carboxylates. We solved the structure of PscD-SD in complex with propionate using X-ray crystallography. The structure reveals the key residues that comprise the ligand binding pocket and dictate the specificity of this sensor domain for C2 and C3 carboxylates. We also demonstrate that all four carboxylate ligands are chemoattractants for Psa, but only two of these (acetate and pyruvate) are utilisable carbon sources. This result suggests that in addition to guiding the bacteria towards nutrients, another possible role for carboxylate sensing is in locating potential sites of entry into the host plant. PMID:27734909

  2. ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAM1 has conflicting effects on the tolerance to heat shock and symptom development after Pseudomonas syringae infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Woo; Seo, Rira; Lee, Yu Jeong; Bae, Ju Hye; Park, Jung-Kwon; Yoon, Joung-Hahn; Lee, Jei Wan; Jung, Ho Won

    2016-11-18

    An Arabidopsis thaliana ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAM1 (AtAMP1), which encodes a putative glutamate carboxypeptidase, not only controls shoot apical meristem development, but also is involved in tolerance response to abiotic stresses. Here, we introduce a novel mutant; named amp1-32 that is a phenocopier to previously isolated different amp1 mutant alleles. Interestingly, tiny leaves were continuously developed at the bottom of pre-emerged leaves in the amp1-32. The amp1-32 mutant was less sensitive to heat shock treatment lasting for 3 h, whereas disease symptoms were severely developed in the mutant after Pseudomonas syringae infection. The mRNA levels of 171 genes were significantly altered in the mutant, as compared to wild-type plants. The transcription of genes involved in hormone signaling, post-embryonic development, and shoot development were up-regulated in the amp1-32 mutant, whereas expression of genes related to responsiveness to pathogens and (in)organic matters, were decreased in the mutant. Taken together, perturbation of CK- and ABA-related events by AMP1 mutation caused aberrant development phenotype and conflicting responses against abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genomics-Based Exploration of Virulence Determinants and Host-Specific Adaptations of Pseudomonas syringae Strains Isolated from Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Dudnik, Alexey; Dudler, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The Pseudomonas syringae species complex has recently been named the number one plant pathogen, due to its economic and environmental impacts, as well as for its role in scientific research. The bacterium has been repeatedly reported to cause outbreaks on bean, cucumber, stone fruit, kiwi and olive tree, as well as on other crop and non-crop plants. It also serves as a model organism for research on the Type III secretion system (T3SS) and plant-pathogen interactions. While most of the current work on this pathogen is either carried out on one of three model strains found on dicot plants with completely sequenced genomes or on isolates obtained from recent outbreaks, not much is known about strains isolated from grasses (Poaceae). Here, we use comparative genomics in order to identify putative virulence-associated genes and other Poaceae-specific adaptations in several newly available genome sequences of strains isolated from grass species. All strains possess only a small number of known Type III effectors, therefore pointing to the importance of non-Type III secreted virulence factors. The implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:25437611

  4. A Non-targeted Metabolomics Approach Unravels the VOCs Associated with the Tomato Immune Response against Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    López-Gresa, María Pilar; Lisón, Purificación; Campos, Laura; Rodrigo, Ismael; Rambla, José Luis; Granell, Antonio; Conejero, Vicente; Bellés, José María

    2017-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by plants are secondary metabolites that mediate the plant interaction with pathogens and herbivores. These compounds may perform direct defensive functions, i.e., acting as antioxidant, antibacterial, or antifungal agents, or indirectly by signaling the activation of the plant's defensive responses. Using a non-targeted GC-MS metabolomics approach, we identified the profile of the VOCs associated with the differential immune response of the Rio Grande tomato leaves infected with either virulent or avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 pv. tomato. The VOC profile of the tomato leaves infected with avirulent bacteria is characterized by esters of (Z)-3-hexenol with acetic, propionic, isobutyric or butyric acids, and several hydroxylated monoterpenes, e.g., linalool, α-terpineol, and 4-terpineol, which defines the profile of an immunized plant response. In contrast, the same tomato cultivar infected with the virulent bacteria strain produced a VOC profile characterized by monoterpenes and SA derivatives. Interestingly, the differential VOCs emission correlated statistically with the induction of the genes involved in their biosynthetic pathway. Our results extend plant defense system knowledge and suggest the possibility for generating plants engineered to over-produce these VOCs as a complementary strategy for resistance.

  5. Advances in experimental methods for the elucidation of Pseudomonas syringae effector function with a focus on AvrPtoB

    PubMed Central

    Munkvold, Kathy R.; Martin, Gregory B.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Pseudomonas syringae infects a wide range of plant species through the use of a type III secretion system. The effector proteins injected into the plant cell through this molecular syringe serve as promoters of disease by subverting the plant immune response to the benefit of the bacteria in the intercellular space. The targets and activities of a subset of effectors have been elucidated recently. In this article, we focus on the experimental approaches that have proved most successful in probing the molecular basis of effectors, ranging from loss-of-function to gain-of-function analyses utilizing several techniques for effector delivery into plants. In particular, we highlight how these diverse approaches have been applied to the study of one effector—AvrPtoB—a multifunctional protein with the ability to suppress both effector-triggered immunity and pathogen (or microbe)-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity. Taken together, advances in this field illustrate the need for multiple experimental approaches when elucidating the function of a single effector. PMID:19849784

  6. Pseudomonas syringae type III effector HopAF1 suppresses plant immunity by targeting methionine recycling to block ethylene induction

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Erica J.; Mukhtar, M. Shahid; Finkel, Omri M.; Wan, Li; Kieber, Joseph J.; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2016-01-01

    HopAF1 is a type III effector protein of unknown function encoded in the genomes of several strains of Pseudomonas syringae and other plant pathogens. Structural modeling predicted that HopAF1 is closely related to deamidase proteins. Deamidation is the irreversible substitution of an amide group with a carboxylate group. Several bacterial virulence factors are deamidases that manipulate the activity of specific host protein substrates. We identified Arabidopsis methylthioadenosine nucleosidase proteins MTN1 and MTN2 as putative targets of HopAF1 deamidation. MTNs are enzymes in the Yang cycle, which is essential for the high levels of ethylene biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. We hypothesized that HopAF1 inhibits the host defense response by manipulating MTN activity and consequently ethylene levels. We determined that bacterially delivered HopAF1 inhibits ethylene biosynthesis induced by pathogen-associated molecular patterns and that Arabidopsis mtn1 mtn2 mutant plants phenocopy the effect of HopAF1. Furthermore, we identified two conserved asparagines in MTN1 and MTN2 from Arabidopsis that confer loss of function phenotypes when deamidated via site-specific mutation. These residues are potential targets of HopAF1 deamidation. HopAF1-mediated manipulation of Yang cycle MTN proteins is likely an evolutionarily conserved mechanism whereby HopAF1 orthologs from multiple plant pathogens contribute to disease in a large variety of plant hosts. PMID:27274076

  7. Confocal microscopy reveals in planta dynamic interactions between pathogenic, avirulent and non-pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae strains.

    PubMed

    Rufián, José S; Macho, Alberto P; Corry, David S; Mansfield, John W; Ruiz-Albert, Javier; Arnold, Dawn L; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2017-01-24

    Recent advances in genomics and single-cell analysis have demonstrated the extraordinary complexity reached by microbial populations within their hosts. Communities range from complex multispecies groups to homogeneous populations differentiating into lineages through genetic or non-genetic mechanisms. Diversity within bacterial populations is recognized as a key driver of the evolution of animal pathogens. In plants, however, little is known about how interactions between different pathogenic and non-pathogenic variants within the host impact on defence responses, or how the presence within a mixture may affect the development or the fate of each variant. Using confocal fluorescence microscopy, we analysed the colonization of the plant apoplast by individual virulence variants of Pseudomonas syringae within mixed populations. We found that non-pathogenic variants can proliferate and even spread beyond the inoculated area to neighbouring tissues when in close proximity to pathogenic bacteria. The high bacterial concentrations reached at natural entry points promote such interactions during the infection process. We also found that a diversity of interactions take place at a cellular level between virulent and avirulent variants, ranging from dominant negative effects on proliferation of virulent bacteria to in trans suppression of defences triggered by avirulent bacteria. Our results illustrate the spatial dynamics and complexity of the interactions found within mixed infections, and their potential impact on pathogen evolution. © 2017 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  8. Coronatine Gene Expression In Vitro and In Planta, and Protein Accumulation During Temperature Downshift in Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Yvonne; Smirnova, Angela V.; Weingart, Helge; Schenk, Alexander; Ullrich, Matthias S.

    2009-01-01

    The plant pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae PG4180 synthesizes high levels of the phytotoxin coronatine (COR) at the virulence-promoting temperature of 18 °C, but negligible amounts at 28 °C. Temperature-dependent COR gene expression is regulated by a modified two-component system, consisting of a response regulator, CorR, the histidine protein kinase CorS, and a third component, termed CorP. We analyzed at transcriptional and translational levels the expression of corS and the cma operon involved in COR biosynthesis after a temperature downshift from 28 to 18 °C. Expression of cma was induced within 20 min and increased steadily whereas corS expression was only slightly temperature-dependent. Accumulation of CmaB correlated with accumulation of cma mRNA. However, cma transcription was suppressed by inhibition of de novo protein biosynthesis. A transcriptional fusion of the cma promoter to a promoterless egfp gene was used to monitor the cma expression in vitro and in planta. A steady induction of cma::egfp by temperature downshift was observed in both environments. The results indicate that PG4180 responds to a temperature decrease with COR gene expression. However, COR gene expression and protein biosynthesis increased steadily, possibly reflecting adaptation to long-term rather than rapid temperature changes. PMID:22408526

  9. The hrp pathogenicity island of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is induced by plant phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Seung; Ryu, Hye Ryun; Cha, Ji Young; Baik, Hyung Suk

    2015-10-01

    Plants produce a wide array of antimicrobial compounds, such as phenolic compounds, to combat microbial pathogens. The hrp PAI is one of the major virulence factors in the plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae. A major role of hrp PAI is to disable the plant defense system during bacterial invasion. We examined the influence of phenolic compounds on hrp PAI gene expression at low and high concentrations. There was approximately 2.5 times more hrpA and hrpZ mRNA in PtoDC3000 that was grown in minimal media (MM) supplemented with 10 -M of ortho-coumaric acid than in PtoDC3000 grown in MM alone. On the other hand, a significantly lower amount of hrpA mRNA was observed in bacteria grown in MM supplemented with a high concentration of phenolic compounds. To determine the regulation pathway for hrp PAI gene expression, we performed qRTPCR using gacS, gacA, and hrpS deletion mutants.

  10. Decreased abundance of type III secretion system-inducing signals in Arabidopsis mkp1 enhances resistance against Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jeffrey C.; Wan, Ying; Kim, Young-Mo; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Peck, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Genes encoding the virulence-promoting type III secretion system (T3SS) in phytopathogenic bacteria are induced at the start of infection, indicating that recognition of signals from the host plant initiates this response. However, the precise nature of these signals and whether their concentrations can be altered to affect the biological outcome of host–pathogen interactions remain speculative. Here we use a metabolomic comparison of resistant and susceptible genotypes to identify plant-derived metabolites that induce T3SS genes in Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 and report that mapk phosphatase 1 (mkp1), an Arabidopsis mutant that is more resistant to bacterial infection, produces decreased levels of these bioactive compounds. Consistent with these observations, T3SS effector expression and delivery by DC3000 was impaired when infecting the mkp1 mutant. The addition of bioactive metabolites fully restored T3SS effector delivery and suppressed the enhanced resistance in the mkp1 mutant. Pretreatment of plants with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) to induce PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) also restricts T3SS effector delivery and enhances resistance by unknown mechanisms, and the addition of the bioactive metabolites similarly suppressed both aspects of PTI. Together, these results demonstrate that DC3000 perceives multiple signals derived from plants to initiate its T3SS and that the level of these host-derived signals impacts bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:24753604

  11. Tissue-specific changes of glutamine synthetase activity in oats after rhizosphere infestation by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, T.J.; Temple, S.; Sengupta-Gopalan, C.

    1996-05-15

    Oats (Avena sativa L. lodi) tolerant of rhizosphere infestation by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci when challenged by the pathogen experience tissue-specific alterations of ammonia assimilatory capabilities. Altered ammonia assimilatory potentials between root and leaf tissue result from selective inactivation of glutamine synthetase (GS) by the toxin Tabtoxinine-B-lactam (TBL). Root GS is sensitive and leaf GSs are resistant to TBL inactivation. With prolonged challenge by the pathogen root GS activity decreases but leaf GS specific activity increase. Higher leaf GS activity is due to decreased rates of degradation rather than increased GS synthesis. Higher leaf GS activity and elevated levels of GS polypeptide appear to result from a limited interaction between GS and TBL leading to the accumulation of a less active but more stable GS holoenzyme. Tolerant challenged oats besides surviving rhizosphere infestation, experience enhanced growth. A strong correlation exists between leaf GS activity and whole plant fresh weight, suggesting that tissue-specific changes in ammonia assimilatory capability provides the plant a more efficient mechanism for uptake and utilization of nitrogen.

  12. Variation in extragenic repetitive DNA sequences in Pseudomonas syringae and potential use of modified REP primers in the identification of closely related isolates

    PubMed Central

    Çepni, Elif; Gürel, Filiz

    2012-01-01

    In this study, Pseudomonas syringe pathovars isolated from olive, tomato and bean were identified by species-specific PCR and their genetic diversity was assessed by repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP)-PCR. Reverse universal primers for REP-PCR were designed by using the bases of A, T, G or C at the positions of 1, 4 and 11 to identify additional polymorphism in the banding patterns. Binding of the primers to different annealing sites in the genome revealed additional fingerprint patterns in eight isolates of P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi and two isolates of P. syringae pv. tomato. The use of four different bases in the primer sequences did not affect the PCR reproducibility and was very efficient in revealing intra-pathovar diversity, particularly in P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi. At the pathovar level, the primer BOX1AR yielded shared fragments, in addition to five bands that discriminated among the pathovars P. syringae pv. phaseolicola, P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi and P. syringae pv. tomato. REP-PCR with a modified primer containing C produced identical bands among the isolates in a pathovar but separated three pathovars more distinctly than four other primers. Although REP- and BOX-PCRs have been successfully used in the molecular identification of Pseudomonas isolates from Turkish flora, a PCR based on inter-enterobacterial repetitive intergenic concensus (ERIC) sequences failed to produce clear banding patterns in this study. PMID:23055805

  13. Pyoverdine and beyond: PvdS dependent gene regulation in Pseudomonas syringae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor PvdS regulates the expression of genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa encoding virulence factors and the biosynthesis and transport of pyoverdine, a siderophore involved in iron acquisition. The production of pyoverdine is a distinctive trait of the fluor...

  14. A modified two-component regulatory system is involved in temperature-dependent biosynthesis of the Pseudomonas syringae phytotoxin coronatine.

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, M; Peñaloza-Vázquez, A; Bailey, A M; Bender, C L

    1995-01-01

    Biosynthesis of the phytotoxin coronatine (COR) in Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea PG4180 is regulated by temperature at the transcriptional level. A 3.4-kb DNA fragment from the COR biosynthetic gene cluster restored temperature-regulated phytotoxin production to Tn5 mutants defective in COR production. Nucleotide sequence analysis of this fragment revealed three genes, corS, corP, and corR, which encode a modified two-component regulatory system consisting of one sensor protein, CorS, and two response regulator proteins, CorP and CorR. Although only one response regulator, CorR, had a DNA-binding domain, the phosphate-receiving domains of both response regulator proteins were highly conserved. Transcriptional fusions of the corP and corR promoters to a promoterless glucuronidase gene (uidA) indicated that these two genes are expressed constitutively at 18 and 28 degrees C. In contrast, a corS::uidA fusion exhibited the temperature dependence previously observed for COR biosynthetic promoters and exhibited maximal transcriptional activity at 18 degrees C and low activity at 28 degrees C. Furthermore, glucuronidase activity for corS::uidA was decreased in corP, corR, and corS mutants relative to the levels observed for PG4180(corS::uidA). This difference was not observed for corP::uidA and corR::uidA transcriptional fusions since expression of these fusions remained low and constitutive regardless of the genetic background. The three regulatory genes functioned in a P. syringae strain lacking the COR gene cluster to achieve temperature-dependent activation of an introduced COR biosynthetic promoter, indicating that this triad of genes is the primary control for COR biosynthesis and responsible for thermoregulation. Our data suggest that the modified two-component regulatory system described in this study might transduce and amplify a temperature signal which results in transcriptional activation of COR biosynthetic genes. PMID:7592381

  15. Negative Autogenous Control of the Master Type III Secretion System Regulator HrpL in Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Christopher; Schumacher, Jörg; Jovanovic, Milija; Bennett, Mark

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a principal virulence determinant of the model bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. T3SS effector proteins inhibit plant defense signaling pathways in susceptible hosts and elicit evolved immunity in resistant plants. The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor HrpL coordinates the expression of most T3SS genes. Transcription of hrpL is dependent on sigma-54 and the codependent enhancer binding proteins HrpR and HrpS for hrpL promoter activation. hrpL is oriented adjacently to and divergently from the HrpL-dependent gene hrpJ, sharing an intergenic upstream regulatory region. We show that association of the RNA polymerase (RNAP)-HrpL complex with the hrpJ promoter element imposes negative autogenous control on hrpL transcription in P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The hrpL promoter was upregulated in a ΔhrpL mutant and was repressed by plasmid-borne hrpL. In a minimal Escherichia coli background, the activity of HrpL was sufficient to achieve repression of reconstituted hrpL transcription. This repression was relieved if both the HrpL DNA-binding function and the hrp-box sequence of the hrpJ promoter were compromised, implying dependence upon the hrpJ promoter. DNA-bound RNAP-HrpL entirely occluded the HrpRS and partially occluded the integration host factor (IHF) recognition elements of the hrpL promoter in vitro, implicating inhibition of DNA binding by these factors as a cause of negative autogenous control. A modest increase in the HrpL concentration caused hypersecretion of the HrpA1 pilus protein but intracellular accumulation of later T3SS substrates. We argue that negative feedback on HrpL activity fine-tunes expression of the T3SS regulon to minimize the elicitation of plant defenses. PMID:28119474

  16. Inferring the Evolutionary History of the Plant Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae from Its Biogeography in Headwaters of Rivers in North America, Europe, and New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Morris, C. E.; Sands, D. C.; Vanneste, J. L.; Montarry, J.; Oakley, B.; Guilbaud, C.; Glaux, C.

    2010-01-01

    Nonhost environmental reservoirs of pathogens play key roles in their evolutionary ecology and in particular in the evolution of pathogenicity. In light of recent reports of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae in pristine waters outside agricultural regions and its dissemination via the water cycle, we have examined the genetic and phenotypic diversity, population structure, and biogeography of P. syringae from headwaters of rivers on three continents and their phylogenetic relationship to strains from crops. A collection of 236 strains from 11 sites in the United States, in France, and in New Zealand was characterized for genetic diversity based on housekeeping gene sequences and for phenotypic diversity based on measures of pathogenicity and ice nucleation activity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed several new genetic clades from water. The genetic structure of P. syringae populations was not influenced by geographic location or water chemistry, whereas the phenotypic structure was affected by these parameters. Comparison with strains from crops revealed that the metapopulation of P. syringae is structured into three genetic ecotypes: a crop-specific type, a water-specific type, and an abundant ecotype found in both habitats. Aggressiveness of strains was significantly and positively correlated with ice nucleation activity. Furthermore, the ubiquitous genotypes were the most aggressive, on average. The abundance and diversity in water relative to crops suggest that adaptation to the freshwater habitat has played a nonnegligible role in the evolutionary history of P. syringae. We discuss how adaptation to the water cycle is linked to the epidemiological success of this plant pathogen. PMID:20802828

  17. Biological activities of pseudomycin A, a lipodepsinonapeptide from Pseudomonas syringae MSU 16H.

    PubMed

    Di Giorgio, D; Camoni, L; Marchiafava, C; Ballio, A

    1997-08-01

    Similarly to other Pseudomonas lipodepsinonapeptides, pseudomycin A inhibits proton extrusion from maize roots, promotes closure of stomata in Vicia faba, necrosis of tobacco leaves, haemolysis of human erythrocytes, affects H(+)-ATPase activity and proton translocation in plasma membrane vesicles, and stimulates succinate respiration in pea mitochondria. In general, the biological activities of pseudomycin A are lower than those of syringomycin-E, the prototype member of this family of bacterial metabolities. This difference might depend on the diverse number and distribution of charged residues in the peptide moiety of these compounds.

  18. Protection of Arabidopsis thaliana against leaf-pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae by Sphingomonas strains in a controlled model system.

    PubMed

    Innerebner, Gerd; Knief, Claudia; Vorholt, Julia A

    2011-05-01

    Diverse bacterial taxa live in association with plants without causing deleterious effects. Previous analyses of phyllosphere communities revealed the predominance of few bacterial genera on healthy dicotyl plants, provoking the question of whether these commensals play a particular role in plant protection. Here, we tested two of them, Methylobacterium and Sphingomonas, with respect to their ability to diminish disease symptom formation and the proliferation of the foliar plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 on Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants were grown under gnotobiotic conditions in the absence or presence of the potential antagonists and then challenged with the pathogen. No effect of Methylobacterium strains on disease development was observed. However, members of the genus Sphingomonas showed a striking plant-protective effect by suppressing disease symptoms and diminishing pathogen growth. A survey of different Sphingomonas strains revealed that most plant isolates protected A. thaliana plants from developing severe disease symptoms. This was not true for Sphingomonas strains isolated from air, dust, or water, even when they reached cell densities in the phyllosphere comparable to those of the plant isolates. This suggests that plant protection is common among plant-colonizing Sphingomonas spp. but is not a general trait conserved within the genus Sphingomonas. The carbon source profiling of representative isolates revealed differences between protecting and nonprotecting strains, suggesting that substrate competition plays a role in plant protection by Sphingomonas. However, other mechanisms cannot be excluded at this time. In conclusion, the ability to protect plants as shown here in a model system may be an unexplored, common trait of indigenous Sphingomonas spp. and may be of relevance under natural conditions.

  19. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Pogorelko, Gennady V.; Kambakam, Sekhar; Nolan, Trevor; Foudree, Andrew; Zabotina, Olga A.; Rodermel, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    The immutans (im) variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues) and sinks (white tissues) early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplification of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-to-nucleus) signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. We conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27050746

  20. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae

    DOE PAGES

    Pogorelko, Gennady V.; Kambakam, Sekhar; Nolan, Trevor; ...

    2016-04-06

    The immutans (im) variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues) and sinks (white tissues) early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplificationmore » of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-tonucleus) signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. Lastly, we conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and hostpathogen interactions.« less

  1. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelko, Gennady V.; Kambakam, Sekhar; Nolan, Trevor; Foudree, Andrew; Zabotina, Olga A.; Rodermel, Steven R.

    2016-04-06

    The immutans (im) variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues) and sinks (white tissues) early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplification of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-tonucleus) signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. Lastly, we conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and hostpathogen interactions.

  2. Protection of Arabidopsis thaliana against Leaf-Pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae by Sphingomonas Strains in a Controlled Model System ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Innerebner, Gerd; Knief, Claudia; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2011-01-01

    Diverse bacterial taxa live in association with plants without causing deleterious effects. Previous analyses of phyllosphere communities revealed the predominance of few bacterial genera on healthy dicotyl plants, provoking the question of whether these commensals play a particular role in plant protection. Here, we tested two of them, Methylobacterium and Sphingomonas, with respect to their ability to diminish disease symptom formation and the proliferation of the foliar plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 on Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants were grown under gnotobiotic conditions in the absence or presence of the potential antagonists and then challenged with the pathogen. No effect of Methylobacterium strains on disease development was observed. However, members of the genus Sphingomonas showed a striking plant-protective effect by suppressing disease symptoms and diminishing pathogen growth. A survey of different Sphingomonas strains revealed that most plant isolates protected A. thaliana plants from developing severe disease symptoms. This was not true for Sphingomonas strains isolated from air, dust, or water, even when they reached cell densities in the phyllosphere comparable to those of the plant isolates. This suggests that plant protection is common among plant-colonizing Sphingomonas spp. but is not a general trait conserved within the genus Sphingomonas. The carbon source profiling of representative isolates revealed differences between protecting and nonprotecting strains, suggesting that substrate competition plays a role in plant protection by Sphingomonas. However, other mechanisms cannot be excluded at this time. In conclusion, the ability to protect plants as shown here in a model system may be an unexplored, common trait of indigenous Sphingomonas spp. and may be of relevance under natural conditions. PMID:21421777

  3. Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae draft genomes comparison reveal strain-specific features involved in adaptation and virulence to Actinidia species.

    PubMed

    Marcelletti, Simone; Ferrante, Patrizia; Petriccione, Milena; Firrao, Giuseppe; Scortichini, Marco

    2011-01-01

    A recent re-emerging bacterial canker disease incited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) is causing severe economic losses to Actinidia chinensis and A. deliciosa cultivations in southern Europe, New Zealand, Chile and South Korea. Little is known about the genetic features of this pathovar. We generated genome-wide Illumina sequence data from two Psa strains causing outbreaks of bacterial canker on the A. deliciosa cv. Hayward in Japan (J-Psa, type-strain of the pathovar) and in Italy (I-Psa) in 1984 and 1992, respectively as well as from a Psa strain (I2-Psa) isolated at the beginning of the recent epidemic on A. chinensis cv. Hort16A in Italy. All strains were isolated from typical leaf spot symptoms. The phylogenetic relationships revealed that Psa is more closely related to P. s. pv. theae than to P. avellanae within genomospecies 8. Comparative genomic analyses revealed both relevant intrapathovar variations and putative pathovar-specific genomic regions in Psa. The genomic sequences of J-Psa and I-Psa were very similar. Conversely, the I2-Psa genome encodes four additional effector protein genes, lacks a 50 kb plasmid and the phaseolotoxin gene cluster, argK-tox but has acquired a 160 kb plasmid and putative prophage sequences. Several lines of evidence from the analysis of the genome sequences support the hypothesis that this strain did not evolve from the Psa population that caused the epidemics in 1984-1992 in Japan and Italy but rather is the product of a recent independent evolution of the pathovar actinidiae for infecting Actinidia spp. All Psa strains share the genetic potential for copper resistance, antibiotic detoxification, high affinity iron acquisition and detoxification of nitric oxide of plant origin. Similar to other sequenced phytopathogenic pseudomonads associated with woody plant species, the Psa strains isolated from leaves also display a set of genes involved in the catabolism of plant-derived aromatic compounds.

  4. An in vitro study of the anti-biofilm properties of proanthocyanidin and chitosan in Pseudomonas syringae pv. papulans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kai

    Biofilm-forming bacteria are a form of planktonic microorganisms that can become resistant against conventional antibiotics. Because they are difficult to eradicate, biofilm-forming bacteria are extremely problematic for the medical industry areas. Thus, materials that can distort biofilm structure would be helpful for eliminating chronic infection and decreasing bacterial resistance. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the anti-biofilm effect of two bio-derived substances, proanthocyanidin and chitosan. Proanthocyanidins are secondary plant metabolites that are reported to have antibiotic and antioxidant functions. Chitosan (poly [beta-(1, 4)-amino-2-deoxy-beta-D-glucose]) is a deacetylated derivative of chitin, which is abundant in the exoskeleton of crustaceans and insects. It is reported to be a suitable substitute for conventional fungicides and can enhance the proanthocyanidin content in plants when used as an agrochemical. Chitosan-tripolyphosphate (TPP) nanoparticles, which have good neutral water solubility and are nanoscale in size, can be used as carriers for gene and drug therapy and are thus favorable to be tested as a treatment method against bacterial biofilms. In this study, the anti-biofilm and antibacterial properties of proanthocyanidin, chitosan-TPP nanoparticles and proanthocyanidins-loaded chitosan-TPP nanoparticles were tested using the model plant bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae pv. papulans (Psp), a pathogen isolated from infected apples. At a lower concentration (1 mg/mL and 2.5 mg/mL), both chitosan nanoparticles and proanthocyanidins can postpone the formation of biofilms and eventually disrupted part of the biofilm. While higher concentration (above 5 mg/mL) of chitosan nanoparticles or proanthocyanidins can eliminate most of the biofilm in this study. PAC-loaded chitosan nanoparticles also can also distort biofilms. Both proanthocyanidins and chitosan-TPP nanoparticle showed a mild antibacterial property. PAC

  5. The Plant Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato Is Genetically Monomorphic and under Strong Selection to Evade Tomato Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shuangchun; Liu, Haijie; Clarke, Christopher R.; Campanile, Francesco; Almeida, Nalvo F.; Studholme, David J.; Lindeberg, Magdalen; Schneider, David; Zaccardelli, Massimo; Setubal, Joao C.; Morales-Lizcano, Nadia P.; Bernal, Adriana; Coaker, Gitta; Baker, Christy; Bender, Carol L.; Leman, Scotland; Vinatzer, Boris A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, genome sequencing of many isolates of genetically monomorphic bacterial human pathogens has given new insights into pathogen microevolution and phylogeography. Here, we report a genome-based micro-evolutionary study of a bacterial plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Only 267 mutations were identified between five sequenced isolates in 3,543,009 nt of analyzed genome sequence, which suggests a recent evolutionary origin of this pathogen. Further analysis with genome-derived markers of 89 world-wide isolates showed that several genotypes exist in North America and in Europe indicating frequent pathogen movement between these world regions. Genome-derived markers and molecular analyses of key pathogen loci important for virulence and motility both suggest ongoing adaptation to the tomato host. A mutational hotspot was found in the type III-secreted effector gene hopM1. These mutations abolish the cell death triggering activity of the full-length protein indicating strong selection for loss of function of this effector, which was previously considered a virulence factor. Two non-synonymous mutations in the flagellin-encoding gene fliC allowed identifying a new microbe associated molecular pattern (MAMP) in a region distinct from the known MAMP flg22. Interestingly, the ancestral allele of this MAMP induces a stronger tomato immune response than the derived alleles. The ancestral allele has largely disappeared from today's Pto populations suggesting that flagellin-triggered immunity limits pathogen fitness even in highly virulent pathogens. An additional non-synonymous mutation was identified in flg22 in South American isolates. Therefore, MAMPs are more variable than expected differing even between otherwise almost identical isolates of the same pathogen strain. PMID:21901088

  6. Localization of hydrogen peroxide accumulation during the hypersensitive reaction of lettuce cells to Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola.

    PubMed

    Bestwick, C S; Brown, I R; Bennett, M H; Mansfield, J W

    1997-02-01

    The active oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was detected cytochemically by its reaction with cerium chloride to produce electron-dense deposits of cerium perhydroxides. In uninoculated lettuce leaves, H2O2 was typically present within the secondary thickened walls of xylem vessels. Inoculation with wild-type cells of Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola caused a rapid hypersensitive reaction (HR) during which highly localized accumulation of H2O2 was found in plant cell walls adjacent to attached bacteria. Quantitative analysis indicated a prolonged burst of H2O2 occurring between 5 to 8 hr after inoculation in cells undergoing the HR during this example of non-host resistance. Cell wall alterations and papilla deposition, which occurred in response to both the wild-type strain and a nonpathogenic hrpD mutant, were not associated with intense staining for H2O2, unless the responding cell was undergoing the HR. Catalase treatment to decompose H2O2 almost entirely eliminated staining, but 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (catalase inhibitor) did not affect the pattern of distribution of H2O2 detected. H2O2 production was reduced more by the inhibition of plant peroxidases (with potassium cyanide and sodium azide) than by inhibition of neutrophil-like NADPH oxidase (with diphenylene iodonium chloride). Results suggest that CeCl3 reacts with excess H2O2 that is not rapidly metabolized during cross-linking reactions occurring in cell walls; such an excess of H2O2 in the early stages of the plant-bacterium interaction was only produced during the HR. The highly localized accumulation of H2O2 is consistent with its direct role as an antimicrobial agent and as the cause of localized membrane damage at sites of bacterial attachment.

  7. Genomic and Gene-Expression Comparisons among Phage-Resistant Type-IV Pilus Mutants of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola.

    PubMed

    Sistrom, Mark; Park, Derek; O'Brien, Heath E; Wang, Zheng; Guttman, David S; Townsend, Jeffrey P; Turner, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph) is a significant bacterial pathogen of agricultural crops, and phage Φ6 and other members of the dsRNA virus family Cystoviridae undergo lytic (virulent) infection of Pph, using the type IV pilus as the initial site of cellular attachment. Despite the popularity of Pph/phage Φ6 as a model system in evolutionary biology, Pph resistance to phage Φ6 remains poorly characterized. To investigate differences between phage Φ6 resistant Pph strains, we examined genomic and gene expression variation among three bacterial genotypes that differ in the number of type IV pili expressed per cell: ordinary (wild-type), non-piliated, and super-piliated. Genome sequencing of non-piliated and super-piliated Pph identified few mutations that separate these genotypes from wild type Pph--and none present in genes known to be directly involved in type IV pilus expression. Expression analysis revealed that 81.1% of gene ontology (GO) terms up-regulated in the non-piliated strain were down-regulated in the super-piliated strain. This differential expression is particularly prevalent in genes associated with respiration--specifically genes in the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) cycle, aerobic respiration, and acetyl-CoA metabolism. The expression patterns of the TCA pathway appear to be generally up and down-regulated, in non-piliated and super-piliated Pph respectively. As pilus retraction is mediated by an ATP motor, loss of retraction ability might lead to a lower energy draw on the bacterial cell, leading to a different energy balance than wild type. The lower metabolic rate of the super-piliated strain is potentially a result of its loss of ability to retract.

  8. Genomic and Gene-Expression Comparisons among Phage-Resistant Type-IV Pilus Mutants of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola

    PubMed Central

    Sistrom, Mark; Park, Derek; O’Brien, Heath E.; Wang, Zheng; Guttman, David S.; Townsend, Jeffrey P.; Turner, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph) is a significant bacterial pathogen of agricultural crops, and phage Φ6 and other members of the dsRNA virus family Cystoviridae undergo lytic (virulent) infection of Pph, using the type IV pilus as the initial site of cellular attachment. Despite the popularity of Pph/phage Φ6 as a model system in evolutionary biology, Pph resistance to phage Φ6 remains poorly characterized. To investigate differences between phage Φ6 resistant Pph strains, we examined genomic and gene expression variation among three bacterial genotypes that differ in the number of type IV pili expressed per cell: ordinary (wild-type), non-piliated, and super-piliated. Genome sequencing of non-piliated and super-piliated Pph identified few mutations that separate these genotypes from wild type Pph–and none present in genes known to be directly involved in type IV pilus expression. Expression analysis revealed that 81.1% of gene ontology (GO) terms up-regulated in the non-piliated strain were down-regulated in the super-piliated strain. This differential expression is particularly prevalent in genes associated with respiration—specifically genes in the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) cycle, aerobic respiration, and acetyl-CoA metabolism. The expression patterns of the TCA pathway appear to be generally up and down-regulated, in non-piliated and super-piliated Pph respectively. As pilus retraction is mediated by an ATP motor, loss of retraction ability might lead to a lower energy draw on the bacterial cell, leading to a different energy balance than wild type. The lower metabolic rate of the super-piliated strain is potentially a result of its loss of ability to retract. PMID:26670219

  9. Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (PSA) isolates from recent bacterial canker of kiwifruit outbreaks belong to the same genetic lineage.

    PubMed

    Mazzaglia, Angelo; Studholme, David J; Taratufolo, Maria C; Cai, Rongman; Almeida, Nalvo F; Goodman, Tokia; Guttman, David S; Vinatzer, Boris A; Balestra, Giorgio M

    2012-01-01

    Intercontinental spread of emerging plant diseases is one of the most serious threats to world agriculture. One emerging disease is bacterial canker of kiwi fruit (Actinidia deliciosa and A. chinensis) caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (PSA). The disease first occurred in China and Japan in the 1980s and in Korea and Italy in the 1990s. A more severe form of the disease broke out in Italy in 2008 and in additional countries in 2010 and 2011 threatening the viability of the global kiwi fruit industry. To start investigating the source and routes of international transmission of PSA, genomes of strains from China (the country of origin of the genus Actinidia), Japan, Korea, Italy and Portugal have been sequenced. Strains from China, Italy, and Portugal have been found to belong to the same clonal lineage with only 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3,453,192 bp and one genomic island distinguishing the Chinese strains from the European strains. Not more than two SNPs distinguish each of the Italian and Portuguese strains from each other. The Japanese and Korean strains belong to a separate genetic lineage as previously reported. Analysis of additional European isolates and of New Zealand isolates exploiting genome-derived markers showed that these strains belong to the same lineage as the Italian and Chinese strains. Interestingly, the analyzed New Zealand strains are identical to European strains at the tested SNP loci but test positive for the genomic island present in the sequenced Chinese strains and negative for the genomic island present in the European strains. Results are interpreted in regard to the possible direction of movement of the pathogen between countries and suggest a possible Chinese origin of the European and New Zealand outbreaks.

  10. The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato is genetically monomorphic and under strong selection to evade tomato immunity.

    PubMed

    Cai, Rongman; Lewis, James; Yan, Shuangchun; Liu, Haijie; Clarke, Christopher R; Campanile, Francesco; Almeida, Nalvo F; Studholme, David J; Lindeberg, Magdalen; Schneider, David; Zaccardelli, Massimo; Setubal, Joao C; Morales-Lizcano, Nadia P; Bernal, Adriana; Coaker, Gitta; Baker, Christy; Bender, Carol L; Leman, Scotland; Vinatzer, Boris A

    2011-08-01

    Recently, genome sequencing of many isolates of genetically monomorphic bacterial human pathogens has given new insights into pathogen microevolution and phylogeography. Here, we report a genome-based micro-evolutionary study of a bacterial plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Only 267 mutations were identified between five sequenced isolates in 3,543,009 nt of analyzed genome sequence, which suggests a recent evolutionary origin of this pathogen. Further analysis with genome-derived markers of 89 world-wide isolates showed that several genotypes exist in North America and in Europe indicating frequent pathogen movement between these world regions. Genome-derived markers and molecular analyses of key pathogen loci important for virulence and motility both suggest ongoing adaptation to the tomato host. A mutational hotspot was found in the type III-secreted effector gene hopM1. These mutations abolish the cell death triggering activity of the full-length protein indicating strong selection for loss of function of this effector, which was previously considered a virulence factor. Two non-synonymous mutations in the flagellin-encoding gene fliC allowed identifying a new microbe associated molecular pattern (MAMP) in a region distinct from the known MAMP flg22. Interestingly, the ancestral allele of this MAMP induces a stronger tomato immune response than the derived alleles. The ancestral allele has largely disappeared from today's Pto populations suggesting that flagellin-triggered immunity limits pathogen fitness even in highly virulent pathogens. An additional non-synonymous mutation was identified in flg22 in South American isolates. Therefore, MAMPs are more variable than expected differing even between otherwise almost identical isolates of the same pathogen strain.

  11. Light Suppresses Bacterial Population through the Accumulation of Hydrogen Peroxide in Tobacco Leaves Infected with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Dan-Dan; Liu, Mei-Jun; Sun, Xing-Bin; Zhao, Min; Chow, Wah S.; Sun, Guang-Yu; Zhang, Zi-Shan; Hu, Yan-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pst) is a hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen responsible for tobacco wildfire disease. Although considerable research has been conducted on the tobacco plant’s tolerance to Pst, the role of light in the responses of the photosystems to Pst infection is poorly understood. This study aimed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of the reduced photosystem damage in tobacco leaves due to Pst infection under light conditions. Compared to dark conditions, Pst infection under light conditions resulted in less chlorophyll degradation and a smaller decline in photosynthetic function. Although the maximal quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) and the activity of the photosystem I (PSI) complex decreased as Pst infection progressed, damage to PSI and PSII after infection was reduced under light conditions compared to dark conditions. Pst was 17-fold more abundant in tobacco leaves under dark compared to light conditions at 3 days post inoculation (dpi). Additionally, H2O2 accumulated to a high level in tobacco leaves after Pst infection under light conditions; although to a lesser extent, H2O2 accumulation was also significant under dark conditions. Pretreatment with H2O2 alleviated chlorotic lesions and decreased Pst abundance in tobacco leaves at 3 dpi under dark conditions. MV pretreatment had the same effects under light conditions, whereas 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea pretreatment aggravated chlorotic lesions and increased the Pst population. These results indicate that chlorotic symptoms and the size of the bacterial population are each negatively correlated with H2O2 accumulation. In other words, light appears to suppress the Pst population in tobacco leaves through the accumulation of H2O2 during infection. PMID:27148334

  12. Allelic variation in two distinct Pseudomonas syringae flagellin epitopes modulates the strength of plant immune responses but not bacterial motility

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Christopher R.; Chinchilla, Delphine; Hind, Sarah R.; Taguchi, Fumiko; Miki, Ryuji; Ichinose, Yuki; Martin, Gregory B.; Leman, Scotland; Felix, Georg; Vinatzer, Boris A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The bacterial flagellin (FliC) epitopes flg22 and flgII-28 are microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). While flg22 is recognized by many plant species via the pattern recognition receptor FLS2, neither the flgII-28 receptor nor the extent of flgII-28 recognition by different plant families is known.Here we tested the significance of flgII-28 as a MAMP and the importance of allelic diversity in flg22 and flgII-28 in plant–pathogen interactions using purified peptides and a Pseudomonas syringae ΔfliC mutant complemented with different fliC alleles.Plant genotype and allelic diversity in flg22 and flgII-28 were found to significantly affect the plant immune response but not bacterial motility. Recognition of flgII-28 is restricted to a number of Solanaceous species. While the flgII-28 peptide does not trigger any immune response in Arabidopsis, mutations in both flg22 and flgII-28 have FLS2-dependent effects on virulence. However, expression of a tomato allele of FLS2 does not confer to Nicotiana benthamiana the ability to detect flgII-28 and tomato plants silenced for FLS2 are not altered in flgII-28 recognition.Therefore, MAMP diversification is an effective pathogen virulence strategy and flgII-28 appears to be perceived by a yet unidentified receptor in the Solanaceae although it has an FLS2-dependent virulence effect in Arabidopsis. PMID:23865782

  13. Comparative genomics of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato reveals novel chemotaxis pathways associated with motility and plant pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Byron W.; Runde, Brendan J.; Markel, Eric; Swingle, Bryan M.; Vinatzer, Boris A.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of bacterial foliar plant pathogens must invade the apoplast of host plants through points of ingress, such as stomata or wounds, to replicate to high population density and cause disease. How pathogens navigate plant surfaces to locate invasion sites remains poorly understood. Many bacteria use chemical-directed regulation of flagellar rotation, a process known as chemotaxis, to move towards favorable environmental conditions. Chemotactic sensing of the plant surface is a potential mechanism through which foliar plant pathogens home in on wounds or stomata, but chemotactic systems in foliar plant pathogens are not well characterized. Comparative genomics of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato (Pto) implicated annotated chemotaxis genes in the recent adaptations of one Pto lineage. We therefore characterized the chemosensory system of Pto. The Pto genome contains two primary chemotaxis gene clusters, che1 and che2. The che2 cluster is flanked by flagellar biosynthesis genes and similar to the canonical chemotaxis gene clusters of other bacteria based on sequence and synteny. Disruption of the primary phosphorelay kinase gene of the che2 cluster, cheA2, eliminated all swimming and surface motility at 21 °C but not 28 °C for Pto. The che1 cluster is located next to Type IV pili biosynthesis genes but disruption of cheA1 has no observable effect on twitching motility for Pto. Disruption of cheA2 also alters in planta fitness of the pathogen with strains lacking functional cheA2 being less fit in host plants but more fit in a non-host interaction. PMID:27812402

  14. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Pogorelko, Gennady V; Kambakam, Sekhar; Nolan, Trevor; Foudree, Andrew; Zabotina, Olga A; Rodermel, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    The immutans (im) variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues) and sinks (white tissues) early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplification of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-to-nucleus) signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. We conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and host-pathogen interactions.

  15. Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (PSA) Isolates from Recent Bacterial Canker of Kiwifruit Outbreaks Belong to the Same Genetic Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Taratufolo, Maria C.; Cai, Rongman; Almeida, Nalvo F.; Goodman, Tokia; Guttman, David S.; Vinatzer, Boris A.; Balestra, Giorgio M.

    2012-01-01

    Intercontinental spread of emerging plant diseases is one of the most serious threats to world agriculture. One emerging disease is bacterial canker of kiwi fruit (Actinidia deliciosa and A. chinensis) caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (PSA). The disease first occurred in China and Japan in the 1980s and in Korea and Italy in the 1990s. A more severe form of the disease broke out in Italy in 2008 and in additional countries in 2010 and 2011 threatening the viability of the global kiwi fruit industry. To start investigating the source and routes of international transmission of PSA, genomes of strains from China (the country of origin of the genus Actinidia), Japan, Korea, Italy and Portugal have been sequenced. Strains from China, Italy, and Portugal have been found to belong to the same clonal lineage with only 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3,453,192 bp and one genomic island distinguishing the Chinese strains from the European strains. Not more than two SNPs distinguish each of the Italian and Portuguese strains from each other. The Japanese and Korean strains belong to a separate genetic lineage as previously reported. Analysis of additional European isolates and of New Zealand isolates exploiting genome-derived markers showed that these strains belong to the same lineage as the Italian and Chinese strains. Interestingly, the analyzed New Zealand strains are identical to European strains at the tested SNP loci but test positive for the genomic island present in the sequenced Chinese strains and negative for the genomic island present in the European strains. Results are interpreted in regard to the possible direction of movement of the pathogen between countries and suggest a possible Chinese origin of the European and New Zealand outbreaks. PMID:22590555

  16. Comparative genomics of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato reveals novel chemotaxis pathways associated with motility and plant pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Christopher R; Hayes, Byron W; Runde, Brendan J; Markel, Eric; Swingle, Bryan M; Vinatzer, Boris A

    2016-01-01

    The majority of bacterial foliar plant pathogens must invade the apoplast of host plants through points of ingress, such as stomata or wounds, to replicate to high population density and cause disease. How pathogens navigate plant surfaces to locate invasion sites remains poorly understood. Many bacteria use chemical-directed regulation of flagellar rotation, a process known as chemotaxis, to move towards favorable environmental conditions. Chemotactic sensing of the plant surface is a potential mechanism through which foliar plant pathogens home in on wounds or stomata, but chemotactic systems in foliar plant pathogens are not well characterized. Comparative genomics of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato (Pto) implicated annotated chemotaxis genes in the recent adaptations of one Pto lineage. We therefore characterized the chemosensory system of Pto. The Pto genome contains two primary chemotaxis gene clusters, che1 and che2. The che2 cluster is flanked by flagellar biosynthesis genes and similar to the canonical chemotaxis gene clusters of other bacteria based on sequence and synteny. Disruption of the primary phosphorelay kinase gene of the che2 cluster, cheA2, eliminated all swimming and surface motility at 21 °C but not 28 °C for Pto. The che1 cluster is located next to Type IV pili biosynthesis genes but disruption of cheA1 has no observable effect on twitching motility for Pto. Disruption of cheA2 also alters in planta fitness of the pathogen with strains lacking functional cheA2 being less fit in host plants but more fit in a non-host interaction.

  17. Natural Variation in Partial Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae Is Controlled by Two Major QTLs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Perchepied, Laure; Kroj, Thomas; Tronchet, Maurice; Loudet, Olivier; Roby, Dominique

    2006-01-01

    Background Low-level, partial resistance is pre-eminent in natural populations, however, the mechanisms underlying this form of resistance are still poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, we used the model pathosystem Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst) - Arabidopsis thaliana to study the genetic basis of this form of resistance. Phenotypic analysis of a set of Arabidopsis accessions, based on evaluation of in planta pathogen growth revealed extensive quantitative variation for partial resistance to Pst. It allowed choosing a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between the accessions Bayreuth and Shahdara for quantitative genetic analysis. Experiments performed under two different environmental conditions led to the detection of two major and two minor quantitative trait loci (QTLs) governing partial resistance to Pst and called PRP-Ps1 to PRP-Ps4. The two major QTLs, PRP-Ps1 and PRP-Ps2, were confirmed in near isogenic lines (NILs), following the heterogeneous inbred families (HIFs) strategy. Analysis of marker gene expression using these HIFs indicated a negative correlation between the induced amount of transcripts of SA-dependent genes PR1, ICS and PR5, and the in planta bacterial growth in the HIF segregating at PRP-Ps2 locus, suggesting an implication of PRP-Ps2 in the activation of SA dependent responses. Conclusions/Significance These results show that variation in partial resistance to Pst in Arabidopsis is governed by relatively few loci, and the validation of two major loci opens the way for their fine mapping and their cloning, which will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying partial resistance. PMID:17205127

  18. Outbreak and Spread of Bacterial Canker of Kiwifruit Caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Biovar 3 in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gyoung Hee; Kim, Kwang-Hyung; Son, Kyeong In; Choi, Eu Ddeum; Lee, Young Sun; Jung, Jae Sung; Koh, Young Jin

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa), is a causal agent of kiwifruit bacterial canker worldwide. Psa biovar 3 (Psa3) was first detected in 2011 at an orchard in Dodeok-myeon, Goheunggun, Jeonnam Province in Korea. In this study, we present the results of an epidemiological study regarding Psa3 occurrence on kiwifruit orchards in Korea for the period of 2013 to 2015. Since the first detection of Psa3 in 2011, there was no further case reported by 2013. However, Psa3 was rapidly spreading to 33 orchards in 2014; except for three orchards in Sacheonsi, Gyeongnam Province, most cases were reported in Jeju Island. Entering 2015, bacterial canker by Psa3 became a pandemic in Korea, spreading to 72 orchards in Jeju Island, Jeonnam, and Gyeongnam Provinces. Our epidemiological study indicated that the first Psa3 incidence in 2011 might result from an introduction of Psa3 through imported seedlings from China in 2006. Apart from this, it was estimated that most Psa3 outbreaks from 2014 to 2015 were caused by pollens imported from New Zealand and China for artificial pollination. Most kiwifruit cultivars growing in Korea were infected with Psa3; yellow-fleshed cultivars (Yellow-king, Hort16A, Enza-gold, Zecy-gold, and Haegeum), red-fleshed cultivars (Hongyang and Enza-Red), green-fleshed cultivars (Hayward and Daeheung), and even a kiwiberry (Skinny-green). However, susceptibility to canker differed among cultivars; yellow- and red-fleshed cultivars showed much more severe symptoms compared to the green-fleshed cultivars of kiwifruit and a kiwiberry. PMID:27904461

  19. Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Draft Genomes Comparison Reveal Strain-Specific Features Involved in Adaptation and Virulence to Actinidia Species

    PubMed Central

    Marcelletti, Simone; Ferrante, Patrizia; Petriccione, Milena; Firrao, Giuseppe; Scortichini, Marco

    2011-01-01

    A recent re-emerging bacterial canker disease incited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) is causing severe economic losses to Actinidia chinensis and A. deliciosa cultivations in southern Europe, New Zealand, Chile and South Korea. Little is known about the genetic features of this pathovar. We generated genome-wide Illumina sequence data from two Psa strains causing outbreaks of bacterial canker on the A. deliciosa cv. Hayward in Japan (J-Psa, type-strain of the pathovar) and in Italy (I-Psa) in 1984 and 1992, respectively as well as from a Psa strain (I2-Psa) isolated at the beginning of the recent epidemic on A. chinensis cv. Hort16A in Italy. All strains were isolated from typical leaf spot symptoms. The phylogenetic relationships revealed that Psa is more closely related to P. s. pv. theae than to P. avellanae within genomospecies 8. Comparative genomic analyses revealed both relevant intrapathovar variations and putative pathovar-specific genomic regions in Psa. The genomic sequences of J-Psa and I-Psa were very similar. Conversely, the I2-Psa genome encodes four additional effector protein genes, lacks a 50 kb plasmid and the phaseolotoxin gene cluster, argK-tox but has acquired a 160 kb plasmid and putative prophage sequences. Several lines of evidence from the analysis of the genome sequences support the hypothesis that this strain did not evolve from the Psa population that caused the epidemics in 1984–1992 in Japan and Italy but rather is the product of a recent independent evolution of the pathovar actinidiae for infecting Actinidia spp. All Psa strains share the genetic potential for copper resistance, antibiotic detoxification, high affinity iron acquisition and detoxification of nitric oxide of plant origin. Similar to other sequenced phytopathogenic pseudomonads associated with woody plant species, the Psa strains isolated from leaves also display a set of genes involved in the catabolism of plant-derived aromatic compounds. PMID

  20. Analysis of Sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) Leaves for Plant Signal Molecules That Activate the syrB Gene Required for Synthesis of the Phytotoxin, Syringomycin, by Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae.

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Y. Y.; Geibel, M.; Bonsall, R. F.; Gross, D. C.

    1995-01-01

    An important aspect of the interaction of Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae with plant hosts is the perception of plant signal molecules that regulate expression of genes, such as syrB, required for synthesis of the phytotoxin, syringomycin. In this study, the leaves of sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) were analyzed to determine the nature of the syrB-inducing activity associated with tissues of a susceptible host. Crude leaf extracts yielded high amounts of total signal activity of more than 12,000 units g-1 (fresh weight) based on activation of a syrB-lacZ fusion in strain B3AR132. The signal activity was fractionated by C18 reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and found to be composed of phenolic glycosides, which were resolved in three regions of the high-performance liquid chromatography profile, and sugars, which eluted with the void volume. Two flavonol glycosides, quercetin 3-rutinosyl-4[prime]-glucoside and kaempferol 3-rutinosyl-4[prime]-glucoside, and a flavanone glucoside, dihydrowogonin 7-glucoside, were identified. The flavonoid glycosides displayed similar specific signal activities and were comparable in signal activity to arbutin, a phenyl [beta]-glucoside, giving rise to between 120 and 160 units of [beta]-galactosidase activity at 10 [mu]M. Although D-fructose exhibits intrinsic low level syrB-inducing signal activity, D-fructose enhanced by about 10-fold the signal activities of the flavonoid glycosides at low concentrations (e.g. 10 [mu]M). This demonstrates that flavonoid glycosides, which represent a new class of phenolic plant signals sensed by P. s. syringae, are in sufficient quantities in the leaves of P. avium to activate phytotoxin synthesis. PMID:12228385

  1. Ornithine Transcarbamylase ArgK Plays a Dual role for the Self-defense of Phaseolotoxin Producing Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Li, Pin; Deng, Zixin; Zhao, Changming

    2015-08-10

    Pseudomonas syringae is a phytopathogenic bacterium widely spread on terrestrial plants. Sulfodiaminophosphinyl tripeptide Phaseolotoxins (PHTs), produced by P. syringae pv. phaseolicola and P. syringae pv. actinidiae, represent a kind of antimetabolic phytotoxins. PHTs inhibit host cell Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTCase) activity and induce Arginine auxotrophic phenotype. The biosynthesis of PHT is temperature dependent, being optically produced at around 18 °C, while blocked above 28 °C. PHT resistant OTCase ArgK acts as a functional replacement of housekeeping OTCase ArgF, which is the acting target of PHT, to confer PHT producers with self-resistance. It was postulated that argK might be regulated directly by a PHT biosynthetic precursor and indirectly by temperature with an unknown manner. Neither transcriptional regulator nor thermal regulation related protein encoding gene was detected from PHT biosynthetic gene cluster. The tripeptide, Cit-Ala-hArg, was identified to be a by-product of PHT biosynthetic pathway in this report. Formation of Cit-Ala-hArg was catalyzed by ArgK with tripeptide Orn-Ala-hArg and carbamyl phosphate as substrates. It showed that ArgK not only provided alternative Arginine source as reported previously, but also controlled the production of PHTs by converting PHT biosynthetic precursors to nontoxic Cit-Ala-hArg reservoir for producers' self-defense.

  2. Transcriptional profile of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 in response to tissue extracts from a susceptible Phaseolus vulgaris L. cultivar

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola is a Gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacterium that causes "halo blight" disease of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). This disease affects both foliage and pods, and is a major problem in temperate areas of the world. Although several bacterial genes have been determined as participants in pathogenesis, the overall process still remains poorly understood, mainly because the identity and function of many of the genes are largely unknown. In this work, a genomic library of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 was constructed and PCR amplification of individual fragments was carried out in order to print a DNA microarray. This microarray was used to identify genes that are differentially expressed when bean leaf extracts, pod extracts or apoplastic fluid were added to the growth medium. Results Transcription profiles show that 224 genes were differentially expressed, the majority under the effect of bean leaf extract and apoplastic fluid. Some of the induced genes were previously known to be involved in the first stages of the bacterial-plant interaction and virulence. These include genes encoding type III secretion system proteins and genes involved in cell-wall degradation, phaseolotoxin synthesis and aerobic metabolism. On the other hand, most repressed genes were found to be involved in the uptake and metabolism of iron. Conclusion This study furthers the understanding of the mechanisms involved, responses and the metabolic adaptation that occurs during the interaction of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola with a susceptible host plant. PMID:20003402

  3. Identification of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae strains causing bacterial canker of kiwifruit in the Anhui Province of China, and determination of their streptomycin sensitivities.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Yi, X-K; Chen, Y; Zhang, A-F; Zhang, J-Y; Gao, Z-H; Qi, Y-J; Xu, Y-L

    2015-07-27

    Bacterial canker, caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae, is one of the most severe diseases of kiwifruit. It has become an international pandemic and threatens the sustainable development of kiwifruit production in all main kiwi-growing regions worldwide. Streptomycin has been the major bactericide for the control of kiwifruit canker, especially in Anhui Province, one of the main kiwifruit production regions in China. However, until now, no studies on the baseline sensitivity to streptomycin of field isolates of P. syringae pv. actinidiae from China have been available. During 2012-2013, a total of 102 single-colony P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains were isolated: 36, 12, 13, 26, and 15 strains from Yuexi, Jinzhai, Huoshan, Qianshan, and Taihu counties, respectively. All strains were confirmed by production of a 280-bp fragment using the specific primers PsaF1/R2 upon polymerase chain reaction amplification, followed by an assay for confirmation of pathogenicity to fulfill Koch's postulates. In this study, the streptomycin sensitivity of the 102 isolated strains was determined. The half-maximal effective concentration values for inhibition of growth by streptomycin were 0.03-0.42 μg/mL (average 0.12 ± 0.06 μg/mL). The baseline sensitivity curve was unimodal, representing range-of-variation factors of 14.0. No resistant subpopulation was identified among the strains used in the study. Thus, these sensitivity data could be used as a baseline for monitoring the shift in sensitivity of P. syringae pv. actinidiae populations to streptomycin in Anhui Province. Continuous resistance monitoring should be carried out, as streptomycin is an at-risk bactericide agent.

  4. RecD Plays an Essential Function During Growth at Low Temperature in the Antarctic Bacterium Pseudomonas syringae Lz4W

    PubMed Central

    Regha, K.; Satapathy, Ajit K.; Ray, Malay K.

    2005-01-01

    The Antarctic psychrotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae Lz4W has been used as a model system to identify genes that are required for growth at low temperature. Transposon mutagenesis was carried out to isolate mutant(s) of the bacterium that are defective for growth at 4° but normal at 22°. In one such cold-sensitive mutant (CS1), the transposon-disrupted gene was identified to be a homolog of the recD gene of several bacteria. Trans-complementation and freshly targeted gene disruption studies reconfirmed that the inactivation of the recD gene leads to a cold-sensitive phenotype. We cloned, sequenced, and analyzed ∼11.2 kbp of DNA from recD and its flanking region from the bacterium. recD was the last gene of a putative recCBD operon. The RecD ORF was 694 amino acids long and 40% identical (52% similar) to the Escherichia coli protein, and it could complement the E. coli recD mutation. The recD gene of E. coli, however, could not complement the cold-sensitive phenotype of the CS1 mutant. Interestingly, the CS1 strain showed greater sensitivity toward the DNA-damaging agents, mitomycin C and UV. The inactivation of recD in P. syringae also led to cell death and accumulation of DNA fragments of ∼25–30 kbp in size at low temperature (4°). We propose that during growth at a very low temperature the Antarctic P. syringae is subjected to DNA damage, which requires direct participation of a unique RecD function. Additional results suggest that a truncated recD encoding the N-terminal segment of (1–576) amino acids is sufficient to support growth of P. syringae at low temperature. PMID:15956672

  5. Analysis of the role of the type III effector inventory of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448a in interaction with the plant.

    PubMed

    Zumaquero, Adela; Macho, Alberto P; Rufián, José S; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2010-09-01

    In Pseudomonas syringae, the type III secretion system (T3SS) is essential for disease in compatible hosts and for eliciting the hypersensitive response in incompatible hosts. P. syringae pathovars secrete a variable number of type III effectors that form their secretomes. The secretome of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448a (Pph1448a) currently includes 22 experimentally validated effectors, one HrpL-regulated candidate for which translocation results have been inconsistent, two translocated candidates for which in planta expression has not been established, one bioinformatically identified candidate, and six candidates that have been experimentally discarded. We analyzed the translocation and/or expression of these and other candidates to complete the Pph1448a effector inventory, bringing this inventory to 27 bona fide effectors, including a new one that does not belong to any of the previously described effector families. We developed a simple process for rapidly making single and double knockout mutants and apply it to the generation of an effector mutant collection that includes single knockouts for the majority of the Pph1448a effector inventory. We also generated two double mutant strains containing effectors with potentially redundant functions and analyzed the virulence of the single and double mutant strains as well as strains expressing each of the effectors from a plasmid. We demonstrate that AvrB4-1 and AvrB4-2, as well as HopW1-1 and HopW1-2, are fully redundant and contribute to virulence in bean plants, thus validating this approach for dissecting the contribution of the Pph1448a type III effector inventory to virulence. We also analyzed the effect that the expression of these four effectors from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (PtoDC3000) has during its interaction with Arabidopsis thaliana, establishing that AvrB4-1, but not the others, determines a restriction of bacterial growth that takes place mostly independently of the

  6. Analysis of the Role of the Type III Effector Inventory of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448a in Interaction with the Plant ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zumaquero, Adela; Macho, Alberto P.; Rufián, José S.; Beuzón, Carmen R.

    2010-01-01

    In Pseudomonas syringae, the type III secretion system (T3SS) is essential for disease in compatible hosts and for eliciting the hypersensitive response in incompatible hosts. P. syringae pathovars secrete a variable number of type III effectors that form their secretomes. The secretome of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448a (Pph1448a) currently includes 22 experimentally validated effectors, one HrpL-regulated candidate for which translocation results have been inconsistent, two translocated candidates for which in planta expression has not been established, one bioinformatically identified candidate, and six candidates that have been experimentally discarded. We analyzed the translocation and/or expression of these and other candidates to complete the Pph1448a effector inventory, bringing this inventory to 27 bona fide effectors, including a new one that does not belong to any of the previously described effector families. We developed a simple process for rapidly making single and double knockout mutants and apply it to the generation of an effector mutant collection that includes single knockouts for the majority of the Pph1448a effector inventory. We also generated two double mutant strains containing effectors with potentially redundant functions and analyzed the virulence of the single and double mutant strains as well as strains expressing each of the effectors from a plasmid. We demonstrate that AvrB4-1 and AvrB4-2, as well as HopW1-1 and HopW1-2, are fully redundant and contribute to virulence in bean plants, thus validating this approach for dissecting the contribution of the Pph1448a type III effector inventory to virulence. We also analyzed the effect that the expression of these four effectors from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (PtoDC3000) has during its interaction with Arabidopsis thaliana, establishing that AvrB4-1, but not the others, determines a restriction of bacterial growth that takes place mostly independently of the

  7. Cis-trans isomerase gene in psychrophilic Pseudomonas syringae is constitutively expressed during growth and under conditions of temperature and solvent stress.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Madanahally D; Annapoorni, Sampath; Suzuki, Iwane; Murata, Norio; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2005-04-01

    In a recent study, we established that psychrophilic Pseudomonas syringae (Lz4W) requires trans-monounsaturated fatty acid for growth at higher temperatures (Kiran et al. in Extremophiles, 2004). It was also demonstrated that the cti gene was highly conserved and exhibited high sequence identity with cti of other Pseudomonas spp. (Kiran et al. in Extremophiles, 2004). Therefore it would be interesting to understand the expression of the cti gene so as to unravel the molecular basis of adaptation of microorganisms to high temperature. In the present study, the expression of cti was monitored by RT-PCR analysis during different growth stages and under conditions of high temperature and solvent stress in P. syringae. Results indicated that the cti gene is constitutively expressed during different stages of growth and the transcript level is unaltered even under conditions of temperature and solvent stress implying that the observed increase in trans-monounsaturated fatty acids (Kiran et al. in Extremophiles, 2004) is not under transcriptional control. A putative promoter present in the intergenic region of the metH and cti gene has also been characterized. The translation start site ATG, the Shine-Dalgarno sequence AGGA and the transcription start site "C" were also identified. These results provide evidence for the first time that the cti gene is constitutively expressed under normal conditions of growth and under conditions of temperature and solvent stress thus implying that the Cti enzyme is post-transcriptionally regulated.

  8. A draft genome sequence and functional screen reveals the repertoire of type III secreted proteins of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tabaci 11528

    PubMed Central

    Studholme, David J; Ibanez, Selena Gimenez; MacLean, Daniel; Dangl, Jeffery L; Chang, Jeff H; Rathjen, John P

    2009-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas syringae is a widespread bacterial pathogen that causes disease on a broad range of economically important plant species. Pathogenicity of P. syringae strains is dependent on the type III secretion system, which secretes a suite of up to about thirty virulence 'effector' proteins into the host cytoplasm where they subvert the eukaryotic cell physiology and disrupt host defences. P. syringae pathovar tabaci naturally causes disease on wild tobacco, the model member of the Solanaceae, a family that includes many crop species as well as on soybean. Results We used the 'next-generation' Illumina sequencing platform and the Velvet short-read assembly program to generate a 145X deep 6,077,921 nucleotide draft genome sequence for P. syringae pathovar tabaci strain 11528. From our draft assembly, we predicted 5,300 potential genes encoding proteins of at least 100 amino acids long, of which 303 (5.72%) had no significant sequence similarity to those encoded by the three previously fully sequenced P. syringae genomes. Of the core set of Hrp Outer Proteins that are conserved in three previously fully sequenced P. syringae strains, most were also conserved in strain 11528, including AvrE1, HopAH2, HopAJ2, HopAK1, HopAN1, HopI, HopJ1, HopX1, HrpK1 and HrpW1. However, the hrpZ1 gene is partially deleted and hopAF1 is completely absent in 11528. The draft genome of strain 11528 also encodes close homologues of HopO1, HopT1, HopAH1, HopR1, HopV1, HopAG1, HopAS1, HopAE1, HopAR1, HopF1, and HopW1 and a degenerate HopM1'. Using a functional screen, we confirmed that hopO1, hopT1, hopAH1, hopM1', hopAE1, hopAR1, and hopAI1' are part of the virulence-associated HrpL regulon, though the hopAI1' and hopM1' sequences were degenerate with premature stop codons. We also discovered two additional HrpL-regulated effector candidates and an HrpL-regulated distant homologue of avrPto1. Conclusion The draft genome sequence facilitates the continued development of P

  9. A genetic screen reveals Arabidopsis stomatal and/or apoplastic defenses against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Weiqing; Brutus, Alexandre; Kremer, James M; Withers, John C; Gao, Xiaoli; Jones, A Daniel; He, Sheng Yang

    2011-10-01

    Bacterial infection of plants often begins with colonization of the plant surface, followed by entry into the plant through wounds and natural openings (such as stomata), multiplication in the intercellular space (apoplast) of the infected tissues, and dissemination of bacteria to other plants. Historically, most studies assess bacterial infection based on final outcomes of disease and/or pathogen growth using whole infected tissues; few studies have genetically distinguished the contribution of different host cell types in response to an infection. The phytotoxin coronatine (COR) is produced by several pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae. COR-deficient mutants of P. s. tomato (Pst) DC3000 are severely compromised in virulence, especially when inoculated onto the plant surface. We report here a genetic screen to identify Arabidopsis mutants that could rescue the virulence of COR-deficient mutant bacteria. Among the susceptible to coronatine-deficient Pst DC3000 (scord) mutants were two that were defective in stomatal closure response, two that were defective in apoplast defense, and four that were defective in both stomatal and apoplast defense. Isolation of these three classes of mutants suggests that stomatal and apoplastic defenses are integrated in plants, but are genetically separable, and that COR is important for Pst DC3000 to overcome both stomatal guard cell- and apoplastic mesophyll cell-based defenses. Of the six mutants defective in bacterium-triggered stomatal closure, three are defective in salicylic acid (SA)-induced stomatal closure, but exhibit normal stomatal closure in response to abscisic acid (ABA), and scord7 is compromised in both SA- and ABA-induced stomatal closure. We have cloned SCORD3, which is required for salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis, and SCORD5, which encodes an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein, AtGCN20/AtABCF3, predicted to be involved in stress-associated protein translation control. Identification of SCORD5 begins to implicate

  10. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 CmaL (PSPTO4723), a DUF1330 family member, is needed to produce L-allo-isoleucine, a precursor for the phytotoxin coronatine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato DC3000 produces the phytotoxin coronatine, a major determinant of the leaf chlorosis associated with DC3000 pathogenesis. The DC3000 PSPTO4723 (cmaL) gene is located in a genomic region encoding type III effectors, however it promotes chlorosis in the model plant...

  11. All Three Subunits of RecBCD Enzyme Are Essential for DNA Repair and Low-Temperature Growth in the Antarctic Pseudomonas syringae Lz4W

    PubMed Central

    Pavankumar, Theetha L.; Sinha, Anurag K.; Ray, Malay K.

    2010-01-01

    Background The recD mutants of the Antarctic Pseudomonas syringae Lz4W are sensitive to DNA-damaging agents and fail to grow at 4°C. Generally, RecD associates with two other proteins (RecB and RecC) to produce RecBCD enzyme, which is involved in homologous recombination and DNA repair in many bacteria, including Escherichia coli. However, RecD is not essential for DNA repair, nor does its deletion cause any growth defects in E. coli. Hence, the assessment of the P. syringae RecBCD pathway was imperative. Methodology/Principal Findings Mutational analysis and genetic complementation studies were used to establish that the individual null-mutations of all three genes, recC, recB, and recD, or the deletion of whole recCBD operon of P. syringae, lead to growth inhibition at low temperature, and sensitivity to UV and mitomycin C. Viability of the mutant cells dropped drastically at 4°C, and the mutants accumulated linear chromosomal DNA and shorter DNA fragments in higher amounts compared to 22°C. Additional genetic data using the mutant RecBCD enzymes that were inactivated either in the ATPase active site of RecB (RecBK29Q) or RecD (RecDK229Q), or in the nuclease center of RecB (RecBD1118A and RecBΔnuc) suggested that, while the nuclease activity of RecB is not so critical in vivo, the ATP-dependent functions of both RecB and RecD are essential. Surprisingly, E. coli recBCD or recBC alone on plasmid could complement the defects of the ΔrecCBD strain of P. syringae. Conclusions/Significance All three subunits of the RecBCDPs enzyme are essential for DNA repair and growth of P. syringae at low temperatures (4°C). The RecD requirement is only a function of the RecBCD complex in the bacterium. The RecBCD pathway protects the Antarctic bacterium from cold-induced DNA damages, and is critically dependent on the helicase activities of both RecB and RecD subunits, but not on the nuclease of RecBCDPs enzyme. PMID:20195537

  12. Characterization of salA, syrF, and syrG Genes and Attendant Regulatory Networks Involved in Plant Pathogenesis by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Vanessa L.; Gross, Dennis C.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a, causal agent of brown spot on bean, is an economically important plant pathogen that utilizes extracellular signaling to initiate a lifestyle change from an epiphyte to a pathogen. LuxR regulatory proteins play an important role in the transcriptional regulation of a variety of biological processes involving two-component signaling, quorum sensing, and secondary metabolism. Analysis of the B728a genome identified 24 LuxR-like proteins, three of which are encoded by salA, syrF, and syrG located adjacent to the syringomycin gene cluster. The LuxR-like proteins encoded by these three genes exhibit a domain architecture that places them in a subfamily of LuxR-like proteins associated with regulation of secondary metabolism in B728a. Deletion mutants of salA, syrF, and syrG failed to produce syringomycin and displayed reduction of virulence on bean. The transcriptional start sites of salA, syrG, and syrF were located 63, 235, and 498 bp upstream of the start codons, respectively, using primer extension analysis. The predicted -10/-35 promoter regions of syrF and syrG were confirmed using site-directed mutagenesis and GFP reporters that showed conserved promoter sequences around the -35 promoter region. Overexpression analysis and GFP reporters identified SyrG as an upstream transcriptional activator of syrF, where both SyrG and SyrF activate promoters of syringomycin biosynthesis genes. This study shows that syrG and syrF encode important transcriptional regulators of syringomycin biosynthesis genes. PMID:26954255

  13. Functional analysis of PSPTO_1203 a FecI-like ECF Sigma Factor of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have been investigating how P. syringae responds to limited iron availability, a common stress in aerobic environments. We are mainly focused on the role of the extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors, which are one of the mechanisms used by bacteria to adjust gene regulation in response to...

  14. A two-strain mixture of rhizobacteria elicits induction of systemic resistance against Pseudomonas syringae and Cucumber mosaic virus coupled to promotion of plant growth on Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Choong-Min; Murphy, John F; Reddy, M S; Kloepper, Joseph W

    2007-02-01

    We evaluated a commercial biopreparation of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strains Bacillus subtilis GB03 and B. amyloliquefaciens IN937a formulated with the carrier chitosan (BioYield) for its capacity to elicit growth promotion and induced systemic resistance against infection by Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV) and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Arabidopsis thaliana. The biopreparation promoted plant growth of Arabidopsis hormonal mutants, which included auxin, gibberellic acid, ethylene, jasmonate, salicylic acid, and brassinosteroid insensitive lines as well as each wild-type. The biopreparation protected plants against CMV based on disease severity in wild-type plants. However, virus titre was not lower in control plants and those treated with biopreparation, suggesting that the biopreparation induced tolerance rather than resistance against CMV. Interestingly, the biopreparation induced resistance against CMV in NahG plants, as evidenced by both reduced disease severity and virus titer. The biopreparation also elicited induced resistance against P. syringae pv. tomato in the wild-type but not in NahG transgenic plants, which degrade endogenous salicylic acid, indicating the involvement of salicylic acid signaling. Our results indicate that some PGPR strains can elicit plant growth promotion by mechanisms that are different from known hormonal signaling pathways. In addition, the mechanism for elicitation of induced resistance by PGPR may be pathogen-dependent. Collectively, the two-Bacilli strain mixture can be utilized as a biological inoculant for both protection of plant against bacterial and viral pathogens and enhancement of plant growth.

  15. Yeast increases resistance in Arabidopsis against Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea by salicylic acid-dependent as well as -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Raacke, Ines C; von Rad, Uta; Mueller, Martin J; Berger, Susanne

    2006-10-01

    Cell-wall and glucopeptide components of yeast have been reported to exhibit elicitor activity. The mode of action of defense activation by yeast is not known so far. In this study, we used the model plant Arabidopsis to investigate the activation of defense responses by yeast, the effect on resistance against different pathogens, and the mode of action. Treatment of Arabidopsis plants with an autoclaved yeast suspension induced the expression of systemic acquired resistance-related genes and accumulation of the phytoalexin camalexin. Symptom development and bacterial growth after infection with a virulent strain of the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae was reduced in yeast-pretreated plants. No protection was detectable in mutants affected in the salicylate pathway, while mutants in the jasmonate or camalexin pathway were protected by yeast, indicating that the salicylate pathway is necessary for the yeast-induced resistance against P. syringae. Yeast also reduced symptom development after challenge with Botrytis cinerea. This protection was detectable in all mutants tested, indicating that it is independent of the salicylate, jasmonate, and camalexin pathway.

  16. RPS2, an Arabidopsis disease resistance locus specifying recognition of Pseudomonas syringae strains expressing the avirulence gene avrRpt2.

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, B N; Bent, A F; Dahlbeck, D; Innes, R W; Staskawicz, B J

    1993-01-01

    A molecular genetic approach was used to identify and characterize plant genes that control bacterial disease resistance in Arabidopsis. A screen for mutants with altered resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) expressing the avirulence gene avrRpt2 resulted in the isolation of four susceptible rps (resistance to P. syringae) mutants. The rps mutants lost resistance specifically to bacterial strains expressing avrRpt2 as they retained resistance to Pst strains expressing the avirulence genes avrB or avrRpm1. Genetic analysis indicated that in each of the four rps mutants, susceptibility was due to a single mutation mapping to the same locus on chromosome 4. Identification of a resistance locus with specificity for a single bacterial avirulence gene suggests that this locus, designated RPS2, controls specific recognition of bacteria expressing the avirulence gene avrRpt2. Ecotype Wü-0, a naturally occurring line that is susceptible to Pst strains expressing avrRpt2, appears to lack a functional allele at RPS2, demonstrating that there is natural variation at the RPS2 locus among wild populations of Arabidopsis. PMID:8400869

  17. Induction of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 MexAB-OprM multidrug efflux pump by flavonoids is mediated by the repressor PmeR.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Paola; Felipe, Antonia; Michán, Carmen; Gallegos, María-Trinidad

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we have analyzed the expression of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 mexAB-oprM efflux pump operon and of the regulatory gene pmeR, and we have investigated the role of the PmeR protein on transcription from both promoters. We demonstrate that mexAB-oprM and pmeR are expressed in vivo at a relatively high and moderate basal level, respectively, which, in both cases, increases in the presence of different flavonoids and other compounds, such as butyl and methylparaben. We show that PmeR is the local repressor of the mexAB-oprM promoter and is able to regulate its own expression. The mechanism for this regulation includes binding to a pseudopalindromic operator site which overlaps both mexAB-oprM and pmeR promoters. We have also proven that flavonoids are able to interact with PmeR and induce a conformational change that interferes with the DNA binding ability of PmeR, thereby modulating mexAB-oprM and pmeR expression. Finally, we demonstrate by in vivo experiments that the PmeR/MexAB-OprM system contributes to the colonization of tomato plants. These results provide new insight into a transcriptional regulator and a transport system that play essential roles in the ability of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 to resist the action of flavonoids produced by the host.

  18. Specific resistances against Pseudomonas syringae effectors AvrB and AvrRpm1 have evolved differently in common bean, soybean, and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nicolas W. G.; Sévignac, Mireille; Thareau, Vincent; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; David, Perrine; Ashfield, Tom; Innes, Roger W.; Geffroy, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Summary In plants, the evolution of specific resistance is poorly understood. Pseudomonas syringae effectors AvrB and AvrRpm1 are recognized by phylogenetically distinct resistance (R) proteins in Arabidopsis (Brassicaceae) and soybean (Glycine max, Fabaceae). In soybean, these resistances are encoded by two tightly linked R genes Rpg1-b and Rpg1-r. To study the evolution of these specific resistances, we investigated AvrB- and AvrRpm1-induced responses in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, Fabaceae).Common bean genotypes of various geographical origins were inoculated with P. syringae strains expressing AvrB or AvrRpm1. A common bean recombinant-inbred-line (RIL) population was used to map R genes to AvrRpm1.No common bean genotypes recognized AvrB. By contrast, multiple genotypes responded to AvrRpm1, and two independent R genes conferring AvrRpm1-specific resistance were mapped to the ends of linkage group B11 (Rpsar-1) and B8 (Rpsar-2). Rpsar-1 is located in a region syntenic with the soybean Rpg1 cluster. However, mapping of specific Rpg1 homologous genes suggests that AvrRpm1 recognition evolved independently in common bean and soybean.The conservation of genomic position of AvrRpm1-specific genes between soybean and common bean suggests a model whereby specific clusters of R genes are predisposed to evolve recognition of the same effector molecules. PMID:20561214

  19. The Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 type III effector HopF2 has a putative myristoylation site required for its avirulence and virulence functions.

    PubMed

    Robert-Seilaniantz, Alexandre; Shan, Libo; Zhou, Jian-Min; Tang, Xiaoyan

    2006-02-01

    The HopPtoF locus in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 harbors two genes, ShcF and HopF2 (previously named ShcF(Pto) and HopF(Pto)), that encode a type III chaperone and a cognate effector protein, respectively. The HopF2 gene has a rare initiation codon, ATA that was reported to be functional only in mitochondrial genes. Here, we report that the native HopPtoF locus of DC3000 confers an avirulence function in tobacco W38 plants, indicating that the ATA start codon directs the synthesis of a functional effector. However, disruption of HopF2 in DC3000 genome did not alter the bacterial virulence in tomato plants. The HopPtoF locus displayed a measurable virulence activity in two strains of P. syringae pv. tomato when the ATA start codon was changed to ATG, and this change also elevated the avirulence function in W38 plants. HopF2 contains a putative myristoylation site. Mutational analysis indicated that this site is required for plasma membrane localization and virulence and avirulence activities of HopF2.

  20. Early changes in apoplast composition associated with defence and disease in interactions between Phaseolus vulgaris and the halo blight pathogen Pseudomonas syringae Pv. phaseolicola

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Brendan M.; Neale, Helen C.; Geilfus, Christoph‐Martin; Jackson, Robert W.; Arnold, Dawn L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The apoplast is the arena in which endophytic pathogens such as Pseudomonas syringae grow and interact with plant cells. Using metabolomic and ion analysis techniques, this study shows how the composition of Phaseolus vulgaris leaf apoplastic fluid changes during the first six hours of compatible and incompatible interactions with two strains of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph) that differ in the presence of the genomic island PPHGI‐1. Leaf inoculation with the avirulent island‐carrying strain Pph 1302A elicited effector‐triggered immunity (ETI) and resulted in specific changes in apoplast composition, including increases in conductivity, pH, citrate, γ‐aminobutyrate (GABA) and K+, that are linked to the onset of plant defence responses. Other apoplastic changes, including increases in Ca2+, Fe2/3+ Mg2+, sucrose, β‐cyanoalanine and several amino acids, occurred to a relatively similar extent in interactions with both Pph 1302A and the virulent, island‐less strain Pph RJ3. Metabolic footprinting experiments established that Pph preferentially metabolizes malate, glucose and glutamate, but excludes certain other abundant apoplastic metabolites, including citrate and GABA, until preferred metabolites are depleted. These results demonstrate that Pph is well‐adapted to the leaf apoplast metabolic environment and that loss of PPHGI‐1 enables Pph to avoid changes in apoplast composition linked to plant defences. PMID:27239727

  1. Hexanoic acid is a resistance inducer that protects tomato plants against Pseudomonas syringae by priming the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid pathways.

    PubMed

    Scalschi, Loredana; Vicedo, Begonya; Camañes, Gemma; Fernandez-Crespo, Emma; Lapeña, Leonor; González-Bosch, Carmen; García-Agustín, Pilar

    2013-05-01

    Hexanoic acid-induced resistance (Hx-IR) is effective against several pathogens in tomato plants. Our study of the mechanisms implicated in Hx-IR against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 suggests that hexanoic acid (Hx) treatment counteracts the negative effect of coronatine (COR) and jasmonyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) on the salicylic acid (SA) pathway. In Hx-treated plants, an increase in the expression of jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (JMT) and the SA marker genes PR1 and PR5 indicates a boost in this signalling pathway at the expense of a decrease in JA-Ile. Moreover, Hx treatment potentiates 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid accumulation, which suggests that this molecule might play a role per se in Hx-IR. These results support a positive relationship between the SA and JA pathways in Hx-primed plants. Furthermore, one of the mechanisms of virulence mediated by COR is stomatal re-opening on infection with P. syringae. In this work, we observed that Hx seems to inhibit stomatal opening in planta in the presence of COR, which suggests that, on infection in tomato, this treatment suppresses effector action to prevent bacterial entry into the mesophyll.

  2. Functional analysis of endo-1,4-β-glucanases in response to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae reveals their involvement in plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Finiti, I; Leyva, M O; López-Cruz, J; Calderan Rodrigues, B; Vicedo, B; Angulo, C; Bennett, A B; Grant, M; García-Agustín, P; González-Bosch, C

    2013-09-01

    Plant cell wall modification is a critical component in stress responses. Endo-1,4-β-glucanases (EGs) take part in cell wall editing processes, e.g. elongation, ripening and abscission. Here we studied the infection response of Solanum lycopersicum and Arabidopsis thaliana with impaired EGs. Transgenic TomCel1 and TomCel2 tomato antisense plants challenged with Pseudomonas syringae showed higher susceptibility, callose priming and increased jasmonic acid pathway marker gene expression. These two EGs could be resistance factors and may act as negative regulators of callose deposition, probably by interfering with the defence-signalling network. A study of a set of Arabidopsis EG T-DNA insertion mutants challenged with P. syringae and Botrytis cinerea revealed that the lack of other EGs interferes with infection phenotype, callose deposition, expression of signalling pathway marker genes and hormonal balance. We conclude that a lack of EGs could alter plant response to pathogens by modifying the properties of the cell wall and/or interfering with signalling pathways, contributing to generate the appropriate signalling outcomes. Analysis of microarray data demonstrates that EGs are differentially expressed upon many different plant-pathogen challenges, hormone treatments and many abiotic stresses. We found some Arabidopsis EG mutants with increased tolerance to osmotic and salt stress. Our results show that impairing EGs can alter plant-pathogen interactions and may contribute to appropriate signalling outcomes in many different biotic and abiotic plant stress responses.

  3. Transcriptional Dynamics Driving MAMP-Triggered Immunity and Pathogen Effector-Mediated Immunosuppression in Arabidopsis Leaves Following Infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Laura A; Polanski, Krzysztof; de Torres-Zabala, Marta; Jayaraman, Siddharth; Bowden, Laura; Moore, Jonathan; Penfold, Christopher A; Jenkins, Dafyd J; Hill, Claire; Baxter, Laura; Kulasekaran, Satish; Truman, William; Littlejohn, George; Prusinska, Justyna; Mead, Andrew; Steinbrenner, Jens; Hickman, Richard; Rand, David; Wild, David L; Ott, Sascha; Buchanan-Wollaston, Vicky; Smirnoff, Nick; Beynon, Jim; Denby, Katherine; Grant, Murray

    2015-11-01

    Transcriptional reprogramming is integral to effective plant defense. Pathogen effectors act transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally to suppress defense responses. A major challenge to understanding disease and defense responses is discriminating between transcriptional reprogramming associated with microbial-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-triggered immunity (MTI) and that orchestrated by effectors. A high-resolution time course of genome-wide expression changes following challenge with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 and the nonpathogenic mutant strain DC3000hrpA- allowed us to establish causal links between the activities of pathogen effectors and suppression of MTI and infer with high confidence a range of processes specifically targeted by effectors. Analysis of this information-rich data set with a range of computational tools provided insights into the earliest transcriptional events triggered by effector delivery, regulatory mechanisms recruited, and biological processes targeted. We show that the majority of genes contributing to disease or defense are induced within 6 h postinfection, significantly before pathogen multiplication. Suppression of chloroplast-associated genes is a rapid MAMP-triggered defense response, and suppression of genes involved in chromatin assembly and induction of ubiquitin-related genes coincide with pathogen-induced abscisic acid accumulation. Specific combinations of promoter motifs are engaged in fine-tuning the MTI response and active transcriptional suppression at specific promoter configurations by P. syringae. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  4. Defects in D-rhamnosyl residue biosynthetic genes affect lipopolysaccharide structure, motility, and cell-surface hydrophobicity in Pseudomonas syringae pathovar glycinea race 4.

    PubMed

    Chiku, Kazuhiro; Tsunemi, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Yoshida, Mitsuru; Ishii, Tadashi; Taguchi, Fumiko; Iwaki, Masako; Ichinose, Yuki; Ono, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    D-rhamnose (D-Rha) residue is a major component of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) in strains of the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar glycinea. To investigate the effects of a deficiency in GDP-D-rhamnose biosynthetic genes on LPS structure and pathogenicity, we generated three mutants defective in D-Rha biosynthetic genes, encoding proteins GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD), GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose reductase (RMD), and a putative α-D-rhamnosyltransferase (WbpZ) in P. syringae pv. glycinea race 4. The Δgmd, Δrmd, and ΔwbpZ mutants had a reduced O-antigen polysaccharide consisting of D-Rha residues as compared with the wild type (WT). The swarming motility of the Δgmd, Δrmd, and ΔwbpZ mutant strains decreased and hydrophobicity and adhesion ability increased as compared with WT. Although the mutants had truncated O-antigen polysaccharides, and altered surface properties, they showed virulence to soybean, as WT did.

  5. The Pseudomonas viridiflava phylogroups in the P. syringae species complex are characterized by genetic variability and phenotypic plasticity of pathogenicity-related traits.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Claudia; Berge, Odile; Monteil, Caroline L; Guilbaud, Caroline; Balestra, Giorgio M; Varvaro, Leonardo; Jones, Corbin; Dangl, Jeffery L; Baltrus, David A; Sands, David C; Morris, Cindy E

    2014-07-01

    As a species complex, Pseudomonas syringae exists in both agriculture and natural aquatic habitats. P.viridiflava, a member of this complex, has been reported to be phenotypically largely homogenous. We characterized strains from different habitats, selected based on their genetic similarity to previously described P.viridiflava strains. We revealed two distinct phylogroups and two different kinds of variability in phenotypic traits and genomic content. The strains exhibited phase variation in phenotypes including pathogenicity and soft rot on potato. We showed that the presence of two configurations of the Type III Secretion System [single (S-PAI) and tripartite (T-PAI) pathogenicity islands] are not correlated with pathogenicity or with the capacity to induce soft rot in contrast to previous reports. The presence/absence of the avrE effector gene was the only trait we found to be correlated with pathogenicity of P.viridiflava. Other Type III secretion effector genes were not correlated with pathogenicity. A genomic region resembling an exchangeable effector locus (EEL) was found in S-PAI strains, and a probable recombination between the two PAIs is described. The ensemble of the variability observed in these phylogroups of P.syringae likely contributes to their adaptability to alternating opportunities for pathogenicity or saprophytic survival.

  6. Transcriptional Dynamics Driving MAMP-Triggered Immunity and Pathogen Effector-Mediated Immunosuppression in Arabidopsis Leaves Following Infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Laura A.; Polanski, Krzysztof; de Torres-Zabala, Marta; Bowden, Laura; Jenkins, Dafyd J.; Hill, Claire; Baxter, Laura; Truman, William; Prusinska, Justyna; Hickman, Richard; Wild, David L.; Ott, Sascha; Buchanan-Wollaston, Vicky; Beynon, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional reprogramming is integral to effective plant defense. Pathogen effectors act transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally to suppress defense responses. A major challenge to understanding disease and defense responses is discriminating between transcriptional reprogramming associated with microbial-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-triggered immunity (MTI) and that orchestrated by effectors. A high-resolution time course of genome-wide expression changes following challenge with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 and the nonpathogenic mutant strain DC3000hrpA- allowed us to establish causal links between the activities of pathogen effectors and suppression of MTI and infer with high confidence a range of processes specifically targeted by effectors. Analysis of this information-rich data set with a range of computational tools provided insights into the earliest transcriptional events triggered by effector delivery, regulatory mechanisms recruited, and biological processes targeted. We show that the majority of genes contributing to disease or defense are induced within 6 h postinfection, significantly before pathogen multiplication. Suppression of chloroplast-associated genes is a rapid MAMP-triggered defense response, and suppression of genes involved in chromatin assembly and induction of ubiquitin-related genes coincide with pathogen-induced abscisic acid accumulation. Specific combinations of promoter motifs are engaged in fine-tuning the MTI response and active transcriptional suppression at specific promoter configurations by P. syringae. PMID:26566919

  7. Temperature-mediated biosynthesis of the phytotoxin phaseolotoxin by Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola depends on the autoregulated expression of the phtABC genes.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Selene; Alvarez-Morales, Ariel; Murillo, Jesús; Hernández-Flores, José Luis; Bravo, Jaime; De la Torre-Zavala, Susana

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola produces phaseolotoxin in a temperature dependent manner, being optimally synthesized between 18°C and 20°C, while no detectable amounts are present above 28°C. The Pht cluster, involved in the biosynthesis of phaseolotoxin, contains 23 genes that are organized in five transcriptional units. The function of most of the genes from the Pht cluster is still unknown and little information about the regulatory circuitry leading to expression of these genes has been reported. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the participation of pht genes in the regulation of the operons coded into the Pht cluster. We conducted Northern blot, uidA fusions and reverse transcription-PCR assays of pht genes in several mutants unable to produce phaseolotoxin. This allowed us to determine that, in P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121, genes phtABC are essential to prevent their own expression at 28°C, a temperature at which no detectable amounts of the toxin are present. We obtained evidence that the phtABC genes also participate in the regulation of the phtD, phtM and phtL operons. According to our results, we propose that PhtABC and other Pht product activities could be involved in the synthesis of the sulfodiaminophosphinyl moiety of phaseolotoxin, which indirectly could be involved in the transcriptional regulation of the phtA operon.

  8. Temperature-mediated biosynthesis of the phytotoxin phaseolotoxin by Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola depends on the autoregulated expression of the phtABC genes

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Morales, Ariel; Murillo, Jesús; Hernández-Flores, José Luis; Bravo, Jaime; De la Torre-Zavala, Susana

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola produces phaseolotoxin in a temperature dependent manner, being optimally synthesized between 18°C and 20°C, while no detectable amounts are present above 28°C. The Pht cluster, involved in the biosynthesis of phaseolotoxin, contains 23 genes that are organized in five transcriptional units. The function of most of the genes from the Pht cluster is still unknown and little information about the regulatory circuitry leading to expression of these genes has been reported. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the participation of pht genes in the regulation of the operons coded into the Pht cluster. We conducted Northern blot, uidA fusions and reverse transcription-PCR assays of pht genes in several mutants unable to produce phaseolotoxin. This allowed us to determine that, in P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121, genes phtABC are essential to prevent their own expression at 28°C, a temperature at which no detectable amounts of the toxin are present. We obtained evidence that the phtABC genes also participate in the regulation of the phtD, phtM and phtL operons. According to our results, we propose that PhtABC and other Pht product activities could be involved in the synthesis of the sulfodiaminophosphinyl moiety of phaseolotoxin, which indirectly could be involved in the transcriptional regulation of the phtA operon. PMID:28570637

  9. Thermo-responsive expression and differential secretion of the extracellular enzyme levansucrase in the plant pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongqiao; Schenk, Alexander; Srivastava, Abhishek; Zhurina, Daria; Ullrich, Matthias S

    2006-12-01

    In the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, production of the exopolysaccharide levan is mediated by extracellular levansucrase (Lsc), which is encoded by two functional genes, lscB and lscC. Comparison of extracellular protein profiles of P. syringae pv. glycinea PG4180 grown at 18 and 28 degrees C and Western blots revealed that Lsc was predominantly found in the supernatant at 18 degrees C, a temperature fostering virulence of this pathogen. Northern blot analysis indicated that transcription of lscB and lscC was temperature-dependent. Quantification of Lsc in supernatants and cellular protein samples of mutants defective in either lscB or lscC confirmed that LscB secretion at low temperature was due to a combination of thermo-regulated transcription and secretion. In contrast, LscC accumulated in the periplasmic space. LscB and LscC differ in only five amino acid residues, one of which is a cysteine residue. Temperature shift experiments suggested that de novo synthesized protein(s) at 18 degrees C might be responsible for differential LscB secretion and that the presumed secretory machinery was stable when cells were shifted to 28 degrees C. Our results imply that Lsc export and secretion may occur by yet-to-be identified novel mechanism(s).

  10. Altered growth and improved resistance of Arabidopsis against Pseudomonas syringae by overexpression of the basic amino acid transporter AtCAT1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huaiyu; Postel, Sandra; Kemmerling, Birgit; Ludewig, Uwe

    2014-06-01

    Amino acid transporters in plants are crucial for distributing amino acids between plant organs and cellular compartments. The H(+)-coupled plasma membrane transporter CAT1 (cationic amino acid transporter 1) facilitates the high-affinity uptake of basic amino acids. The uptake of lysine (Lys) via the roots was not altered in loss-of-function mutants, in accordance with the minor expression of CAT1 in roots, but plants ectopically overexpressing CAT1 incorporated Lys at higher rates. Exogenous Lys inhibited the primary root of Arabidopsis, whereas lateral roots were stimulated. These effects were augmented by the presence or absence of CAT1. Furthermore, the total biomass of soil-grown plants ectopically overexpressing CAT1 was reduced and the time to flowering was accelerated. These effects were accompanied by only minor changes in the overall amino acid profile. Interestingly, CAT1 belongs to a specific small cluster of nitrogen-containing metabolite transporter genes that are rapidly up-regulated upon infection with Pseudomonas syringae and that may participate in the systemic response of plants to pathogen attack. The overexpression of CAT1 indeed enhanced the resistance to the hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen P. syringae via a constitutively activated salicylic acid (SA) pathway, which is consistent with the developmental defects and the resistance phenotype.

  11. Constitutive activation of jasmonate signaling in an Arabidopsis mutant correlates with enhanced resistance to Erysiphe cichoracearum, Pseudomonas syringae, and Myzus persicae.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Christine; Karafyllidis, Ioannis; Turner, John G

    2002-10-01

    In Arabidopsis spp., the jasmonate (JA) response pathway generally is required for defenses against necrotrophic pathogens and chewing insects, while the salicylic acid (SA) response pathway is generally required for specific, resistance (R) gene-mediated defenses against both biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens. For example, SA-dependent defenses are required for resistance to the biotrophic fungal pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum UCSC1 and the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola, and also are expressed during response to the green peach aphid Myzus persicae. However, recent evidence indicates that the expression of JA-dependent defenses also may confer resistance to E. cichoracearum. To confirm and to extend this observation, we have compared the disease and pest resistance of wild-type Arabidopsis plants with that of the mutants coil, which is insensitive to JA, and cev1, which has constitutive JA signaling. Measurements of the colonization of these plants by E. cichoracearum, P. syringae pv. maculicola, and M. persicae indicated that activation of the JA signal pathway enhanced resistance, and was associated with the activation of JA-dependent defense genes and the suppression of SA-dependent defense genes. We conclude that JA and SA induce alternative defense pathways that can confer resistance to the same pathogens and pests.

  12. GacS-dependent production of 2R, 3R-butanediol by Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 is a major determinant for eliciting systemic resistance against Erwinia carotovora but not against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Han, Song Hee; Lee, Seung Je; Moon, Jae Hak; Park, Keun Hyung; Yang, Kwang Yeol; Cho, Balk Ho; Kim, Kil Yong; Kim, Yong Whan; Lee, Myung Chul; Anderson, Anne J; Kim, Young Cheol

    2006-08-01

    Root colonization by a plant-beneficial rhizobacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6, induces disease resistance in tobacco against leaf pathogens Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora SCC1, causing soft-rot, and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci, causing wildfire. In order to identify the bacterial determinants involved in induced systemic resistance against plant diseases, extracellular components produced by the bacterium were fractionated and purified. Factors in the culture filtrate inducing systemic resistance were retained in the aqueous fraction rather than being partitioned into ethyl acetate. Fractionation on high-performance liquid chromatography followed by nuclear magnetic resonance mass spectrometry analysis identified the active compound as 2R, 3R-butanediol. 2R, 3R butanediol induced systemic resistance in tobacco to E. carotovora subsp. carotovora SCC1, but not to P. syringae pv. tabaci. Treatment of tobacco with the volatile 2R, 3R-butanediol enhanced aerial growth, a phenomenon also seen in plants colonized by P. chlororaphis O6. The isomeric form of the butanediol was important because 2S, 3S-butandiol did not affect the plant. The global sensor kinase, GacS, of P. chlororaphis O6 was a key regulator for induced systemic resistance against E. carotovora through regulation of 2R, 3R-butanediol production. This is the first report of the production of these assumed fermentation products by a pseudomonad and the role of the sensor kinase GacS in production of 2R, 3R-butanediol.

  13. Levansucrases from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and P. chlororaphis subsp. aurantiaca: substrate specificity, polymerizing properties and usage of different acceptors for fructosylation.

    PubMed

    Visnapuu, Triinu; Mardo, Karin; Mosoarca, Cristina; Zamfir, Alina D; Vigants, Armands; Alamäe, Tiina

    2011-09-20

    Levansucrases of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Lsc3) and Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aurantiaca (also Pseudomonas aurantiaca) (LscA) have 73% identity of protein sequences, similar substrate specificity and kinetic properties. Both enzymes produce levan and fructooligosaccharides (FOS) of varied length from sucrose, raffinose and sugar beet molasses. A novel high-throughput chip-based nanoelectrospray mass spectrometric method was applied to screen alternative fructosyl acceptors for levansucrases. Lsc3 and LscA could both transfructosylate D-xylose, D-fucose, L- and D-arabinose, D-ribose, D-sorbitol, xylitol, xylobiose, D-mannitol, D-galacturonic acid and methyl-α-D-glucopyranoside and heterooligofructans with degree of polymerization up to 5 were detected. The ability of D-sorbitol, xylobiose, D-galacturonic acid, D-mannitol, xylitol and methyl-α-D-glucopyranoside to serve as fructosyl acceptors for levansucrases is shown for the first time. Expectedly, site-directed mutagenesis of His321 in Lsc3 to Arg, Lys, Leu and Ser resulted in proteins with decreased catalytic activity, affinity for sucrose and polymerizing ability. Random mutagenesis yielded a Lsc3 mutant Thr302Pro with reduced synthesis of levan and long-chain FOS. Thr302 is located in conserved DQTERP region of levansucrases adjacent to predicted acid-base catalyst Glu303. Thr302 and His321 are predicted to belong to +1 subsite of the substrate binding region of Lsc3.

  14. Molecular basis of a microbe-mediated enhancement of symbiotic N/sub 2/-fixation. [Rhizobium meliloti; Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, P.J.; Knight, T.J.

    1987-04-01

    Improvement of biological nitrogen fixation represents a potential source of both increased food production and decreased dependence on costly chemical fertilizer. They report the results of an investigation of the molecular basis of a unique, microbial-mediated mechanism for increased growth and nitrogen fixation rates in alfalfa. Inoculation of alfalfa plants with both Rhizobium meliloti and Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci provides increased growth and N/sub 2/-fixation rates of alfalfa. Tabaci produces tabtoxinine-..beta..-lactam (T..beta..L), an exocellular product and glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitor. The association of this pathogen with nodulating alfalfa plants appears to alter the normal regulation of nitrogen fixation such that nitrogenase activity is stimulated and GS activity is inhibited. Studies of the soluble amino acids in these nodules and the activities of the ammonia assimilatory enzymes indicate alternative pathways of ammonia assimilation are being employed.

  15. Overexpression of SAMDC1 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana increases expression of defense-related genes as well as resistance to Pseudomonas syringae and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis

    PubMed Central

    Marco, Francisco; Busó, Enrique; Carrasco, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    It has been previously described that elevation of endogenous spermine levels in Arabidopsis could be achieved by transgenic overexpression of S-Adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC) or Spermine synthase (SPMS). In both cases, spermine accumulation had an impact on the plant transcriptome, with up-regulation of a set of genes enriched in functional categories involved in defense-related processes against both biotic and abiotic stresses. In this work, the response of SAMDC1-overexpressing plants against bacterial and oomycete pathogens has been tested. The expression of several pathogen defense-related genes was induced in these plants as well as in wild type plants exposed to an exogenous supply of spermine. SAMDC1-overexpressing plants showed an increased tolerance to infection by Pseudomonas syringae and by Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Both results add more evidence to the hypothesis that spermine plays a key role in plant resistance to biotic stress. PMID:24734036

  16. Induction of 3'-O-beta-D-ribofuranosyl adenosine during compatible, but not during incompatible, interactions of Arabidopsis thaliana or Lycopersicon esculentum with Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Paweł; Winter, Jens; Hamberger, Björn; Oldham, Neil J; Schneider, Bernd; Tan, Jianwen; Hahlbrock, Klaus

    2004-02-01

    All hitherto identified aromatic compounds accumulating in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. upon infection with virulent or avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato ( Pst) were indolic metabolites. We now report the strong accumulation of a novel type of natural product, 3'-O-beta-D-ribofuranosyl adenosine (3'RA), exclusively during compatible interactions. In contrast to the various indolic metabolites, 3'RA was undetectable in incompatible interactions of A. thaliana leaves with an avirulent Pst strain, as well as in uninfected control leaves. A similar, strong induction of 3'RA was observed in compatible but, again, not in incompatible interactions of Pst with its natural host, Lycopersicon esculentum. The strength of the effect and its confinement to compatible interactions suggests that it may be applicable as a diagnostic tool.

  17. Antibacterial Activity of Cinnamaldehyde and Estragole Extracted from Plant Essential Oils against Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Causing Bacterial Canker Disease in Kiwifruit

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yu-Rim; Choi, Min-Seon; Choi, Geun-Won; Park, Il-Kwon; Oh, Chang-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) causes bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit. Antibacterial activity of plant essential oils (PEOs) originating from 49 plant species were tested against Psa by a vapor diffusion and a liquid culture assays. The five PEOs from Pimenta racemosa, P. dioica, Melaleuca linariifolia, M. cajuputii, and Cinnamomum cassia efficiently inhibited Psa growth by either assays. Among their major components, estragole, eugenol, and methyl eugenol showed significant antibacterial activity by only the liquid culture assay, while cinnamaldehyde exhibited antibacterial activity by both assays. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of estragole and cinnamaldehyde by the liquid culture assay were 1,250 and 2,500 ppm, respectively. The MIC of cinnamaldehyde by the vapor diffusion assay was 5,000 ppm. Based on the formation of clear zones or the decrease of optical density caused by these compounds, they might kill the bacterial cells and this feature might be useful for managing the bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit. PMID:27493612

  18. Crystal structure of the PSPTO-PSP protein from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato str. DC3000 in complex with D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-mei; Gao, Yu; Li, Mei; Chang, Wen-rui

    2010-06-18

    The perchloric acid-soluble protein (PSP) is an endoribonuclease and on the basis of sequence similarity has been assigned to the YjgF/YER057c/UK114 family. These family members are ubiquitous and highly conserved in evolution, and participate in regulating basic cellular metabolism. Here we present the 2.1A crystal structure of the PSP protein from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato str. DC3000 (PSPTO-PSP), in complex with D-glucose. The quaternary structure of PSPTO-PSP is a homologous trimer. Glucose is located in the cavity between each two monomers. Comparison of the hydrogen bonds between ligands and YjgF/YER057c/UK114 family homologues confirms that the conserved Arg(103) of PSPTO-PSP is a key amino acid in this cavity for ligand binding. It indicated that the involvement of PSPTO-PSP in essential cellular mechanism was regulated by glucose occupying this active site.

  19. Absence of endo-1,4-β-glucanase KOR1 alters the jasmonate-dependent defence response to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Jaime; Finiti, Ivan; Fernández-Crespo, Emma; Crespo-Salvador, Oscar; García-Agustín, Pilar; González-Bosch, Carmen

    2014-10-15

    During plant-pathogen interactions, the plant cell wall forms part of active defence against invaders. In recent years, cell wall-editing enzymes, associated with growth and development, have been related to plant susceptibility or resistance. Our previous work identified a role for several tomato and Arabidopsis endo-1,4-β-glucanases (EGs) in plant-pathogen interactions. Here we studied the response of the Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertion mutant lacking EG Korrigan1 (KOR1) infected with Pseudomonas syringae. KOR1 is predicted to be an EG which is thought to participate in cellulose biosynthesis. We found that kor1-1 plants were more susceptible to P. syringae, and displayed severe disease symptoms and enhanced bacterial growth if compared to Wassilewskija (Ws) wild-type plants. Hormonal and gene expression analyses revealed that the jasmonic acid (JA) pathway was activated more in kor1-1 plants with an increase in the JA-biosynthesis gene LOX3 and a greater accumulation of JA. Upon infection the accumulation of JA and JA-isoleucine (JA-Ile) was higher than in wild-type plants and increased the induction of LOX3 and the JA-responsive PDF1.2 gene. In addition, the increase of salicylic acid (SA) in healthy and infected kor1-1 may reflect the complex interaction between JA and SA, which results in the more susceptible phenotype displayed by the infected mutant plants. Callose deposition was enhanced in infected kor1-1 and an increase in pathogen-induced hydrogen peroxide took place. The susceptible phenotype displayed by KOR1-deficient plants was coronatine-independent. No significant changes were detected in the hormonal profile of the kor1-1 plants infected by coronatine-deficient P. syringae cmaA, which supports that absence of EG KOR1 alters per se the plant response to infection. We previously reported increased resistance of kor1-1 to B. cinerea, hence, the lack of this EG alters cell wall properties and plant responses in such a way that benefits P

  20. The Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato type III effector HopM1 suppresses Arabidopsis defenses independent of suppressing salicylic acid signaling and of targeting AtMIN7.

    PubMed

    Gangadharan, Anju; Sreerekha, Mysore-Venkatarau; Whitehill, Justin; Ham, Jong Hyun; Mackey, David

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato strain DC3000 (Pto) delivers several effector proteins promoting virulence, including HopM1, into plant cells via type III secretion. HopM1 contributes to full virulence of Pto by inducing degradation of Arabidopsis proteins, including AtMIN7, an ADP ribosylation factor-guanine nucleotide exchange factor. Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola strain NPS3121 (Pph) lacks a functional HopM1 and elicits robust defenses in Arabidopsis thaliana, including accumulation of pathogenesis related 1 (PR-1) protein and deposition of callose-containing cell wall fortifications. We have examined the effects of heterologously expressed HopM1Pto on Pph-induced defenses. HopM1 suppresses Pph-induced PR-1 expression, a widely used marker for salicylic acid (SA) signaling and systemic acquired resistance. Surprisingly, HopM1 reduces PR-1 expression without affecting SA accumulation and also suppresses the low levels of PR-1 expression apparent in SA-signaling deficient plants. Further, HopM1 enhances the growth of Pto in SA-signaling deficient plants. AtMIN7 contributes to Pph-induced PR-1 expression. However, HopM1 fails to degrade AtMIN7 during Pph infection and suppresses Pph-induced PR-1 expression and callose deposition in wild-type and atmin7 plants. We also show that the HopM1-mediated suppression of PR-1 expression is not observed in plants lacking the TGA transcription factor, TGA3. Our data indicate that HopM1 promotes bacterial virulence independent of suppressing SA-signaling and links TGA3, AtMIN7, and other HopM1 targets to pathways distinct from the canonical SA-signaling pathway contributing to PR-1 expression and callose deposition. Thus, efforts to understand this key effector must consider multiple targets and unexpected outputs of its action.

  1. Development of SCAR markers for rapid and specific detection of Pseudomonas syringae pv. morsprunorum races 1 and 2, using conventional and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Kałużna, Monika; Albuquerque, Pedro; Tavares, Fernando; Sobiczewski, Piotr; Puławska, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    Specific primers were developed to detect the causal agent of stone fruit bacterial canker using conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. PCR melting profile (PCR MP) used for analysis of diversity of Pseudomonas syringae strains, allowed to pinpoint the amplified fragments specific for P. syringae pv. morsprunorum race 1 (Psm1) and race 2 (Psm2), which were sequenced. Using obtained data, specific sequence characterised amplified region (SCAR) primers were designed. Conventional and real-time PCRs, using genomic DNA isolated from different bacterial strains belonging to the Pseudomonas genus, confirmed the specificity of selected primers. Additionally, the specificity of the selected DNA regions for Psm1 and Psm2 was confirmed by dot blot hybridisation. Conventional and real-time PCR assays enabled accurate detection of Psm1 and Psm2 in pure cultures and in plant material. For conventional PCR, the detection limits were the order of magnitude ~10(0) cfu/reaction for Psm1 and 10(1) cfu/reaction for Psm2 in pure cultures, while in plant material were 10(0)-10(1) cfu/reaction using primers for Psm1 and 3 × 10(2) cfu/reaction using primers for Psm2. Real-time PCR assays with SYBR Green I showed a higher limit of detection (LOD) - 10(0) cfu/reaction in both pure culture and in plant material for each primer pairs designed, which corresponds to 30-100 and 10-50 fg of DNA of Psm1 and Psm2, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first PCR-based method for detection of the causal agents of bacterial canker of stone fruit trees.

  2. The Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato Type III Effector HopM1 Suppresses Arabidopsis Defenses Independent of Suppressing Salicylic Acid Signaling and of Targeting AtMIN7

    PubMed Central

    Gangadharan, Anju; Sreerekha, Mysore-Venkatarau; Whitehill, Justin; Ham, Jong Hyun; Mackey, David

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato strain DC3000 (Pto) delivers several effector proteins promoting virulence, including HopM1, into plant cells via type III secretion. HopM1 contributes to full virulence of Pto by inducing degradation of Arabidopsis proteins, including AtMIN7, an ADP ribosylation factor-guanine nucleotide exchange factor. Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola strain NPS3121 (Pph) lacks a functional HopM1 and elicits robust defenses in Arabidopsis thaliana, including accumulation of pathogenesis related 1 (PR-1) protein and deposition of callose-containing cell wall fortifications. We have examined the effects of heterologously expressed HopM1Pto on Pph-induced defenses. HopM1 suppresses Pph-induced PR-1 expression, a widely used marker for salicylic acid (SA) signaling and systemic acquired resistance. Surprisingly, HopM1 reduces PR-1 expression without affecting SA accumulation and also suppresses the low levels of PR-1 expression apparent in SA-signaling deficient plants. Further, HopM1 enhances the growth of Pto in SA-signaling deficient plants. AtMIN7 contributes to Pph-induced PR-1 expression. However, HopM1 fails to degrade AtMIN7 during Pph infection and suppresses Pph-induced PR-1 expression and callose deposition in wild-type and atmin7 plants. We also show that the HopM1-mediated suppression of PR-1 expression is not observed in plants lacking the TGA transcription factor, TGA3. Our data indicate that HopM1 promotes bacterial virulence independent of suppressing SA-signaling and links TGA3, AtMIN7, and other HopM1 targets to pathways distinct from the canonical SA-signaling pathway contributing to PR-1 expression and callose deposition. Thus, efforts to understand this key effector must consider multiple targets and unexpected outputs of its action. PMID:24324742

  3. CrcZ and CrcX regulate carbon utilization in Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato strain DC3000

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are important components of many regulatory pathways in bacteria and play key roles in regulating factors important for virulence. Carbon catabolite repression control is modulated by small RNAs (crcZ or crcZ and crcY) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida. ...

  4. Forward genetic in planta screen for identification of plant-protective traits of Sphingomonas sp. strain Fr1 against Pseudomonas syringae DC3000.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Christine; Innerebner, Gerd; Zingg, Judith; Guder, Jan; Vorholt, Julia A

    2012-08-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain Fr1 has recently been shown to protect Arabidopsis thaliana against the bacterial leaf pathogen Pseudomonas syringae DC3000. Here, we describe a forward genetic in planta screen to identify genes in Sphingomonas sp. Fr1 necessary for this effect. About 5,000 Sphingomonas sp. Fr1 mini-Tn5 mutants were assayed for a defect in plant protection against a luxCDABE-tagged P. syringae DC3000 derivative in a space-saving 24-well plate system. The bioluminescence of the pathogen was used as the indicator of pathogen proliferation and allowed for the identification of Sphingomonas sp. Fr1 mutants that had lost the ability to restrict pathogen growth before disease symptoms were visible. Potential candidates were validated using the same miniaturized experimental system. Of these mutants, 10 were confirmed as plant protection defective yet colonization competent. The mutants were subsequently evaluated in a previously described standard microbox system, and plants showed enhanced disease phenotypes after pathogen infection relative to those inoculated with the parental strain as a control. However, the disease severities were lower than those observed for control plants that were grown axenically prior to pathogen challenge, which suggests that several traits may contribute to plant protection. Transposon insertion sites of validated mutants with defects in plant protection were determined and mapped to 7 distinct genomic regions. In conclusion, the established screening protocol allowed us to identify mutations that affect plant protection, and it opens the possibility to uncover traits important for in planta microbe-microbe interactions.

  5. Cytokinins Mediate Resistance against Pseudomonas syringae in Tobacco through Increased Antimicrobial Phytoalexin Synthesis Independent of Salicylic Acid Signaling1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Großkinsky, Dominik K.; Naseem, Muhammad; Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan; Plickert, Nicole; Engelke, Thomas; Griebel, Thomas; Zeier, Jürgen; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; Pfeifhofer, Hartwig; van der Graaff, Eric; Simon, Uwe; Roitsch, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Cytokinins are phytohormones that are involved in various regulatory processes throughout plant development, but they are also produced by pathogens and known to modulate plant immunity. A novel transgenic approach enabling autoregulated cytokinin synthesis in response to pathogen infection showed that cytokinins mediate enhanced resistance against the virulent hemibiotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci. This was confirmed by two additional independent transgenic approaches to increase endogenous cytokinin production and by exogenous supply of adenine- and phenylurea-derived cytokinins. The cytokinin-mediated resistance strongly correlated with an increased level of bactericidal activities and up-regulated synthesis of the two major antimicrobial phytoalexins in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), scopoletin and capsidiol. The key role of these phytoalexins in the underlying mechanism was functionally proven by the finding that scopoletin and capsidiol substitute in planta for the cytokinin signal: phytoalexin pretreatment increased resistance against P. syringae. In contrast to a cytokinin defense mechanism in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) based on salicylic acid-dependent transcriptional control, the cytokinin-mediated resistance in tobacco is essentially independent from salicylic acid and differs in pathogen specificity. It is also independent of jasmonate levels, reactive oxygen species, and high sugar resistance. The novel function of cytokinins in the primary defense response of solanaceous plant species is rather mediated through a high phytoalexin-pathogen ratio in the early phase of infection, which efficiently restricts pathogen growth. The implications of this mechanism for the coevolution of host plants and cytokinin-producing pathogens and the practical application in agriculture are discussed. PMID:21813654

  6. GABA (γ-Aminobutyric Acid) Uptake Via the GABA Permease GabP Represses Virulence Gene Expression in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    PubMed

    McCraw, S L; Park, D H; Jones, R; Bentley, M A; Rico, A; Ratcliffe, R G; Kruger, N J; Collmer, A; Preston, G M

    2016-12-01

    The nonprotein amino acid γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the most abundant amino acid in the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaf apoplast and is synthesized by Arabidopsis thaliana in response to infection by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (hereafter called DC3000). High levels of exogenous GABA have previously been shown to repress the expression of the type III secretion system (T3SS) in DC3000, resulting in reduced elicitation of the hypersensitive response (HR) in the nonhost plant tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). This study demonstrates that the GABA permease GabP provides the primary mechanism for GABA uptake by DC3000 and that the gabP deletion mutant ΔgabP is insensitive to GABA-mediated repression of T3SS expression. ΔgabP displayed an enhanced ability to elicit the HR in young tobacco leaves and in tobacco plants engineered to produce increased levels of GABA, which supports the hypothesis that GABA uptake via GabP acts to regulate T3SS expression in planta. The observation that P. syringae can be rendered insensitive to GABA through loss of gabP but that gabP is retained by this bacterium suggests that GabP is important for DC3000 in a natural setting, either for nutrition or as a mechanism for regulating gene expression. [Formula: see text] Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license .

  7. A Deletion in NRT2.1 Attenuates Pseudomonas syringae-Induced Hormonal Perturbation, Resulting in Primed Plant Defenses1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Camañes, Gemma; Pastor, Victoria; Cerezo, Miguel; García-Andrade, Javier; Vicedo, Begonya; García-Agustín, Pilar; Flors, Victor

    2012-01-01

    For an efficient defense response against pathogens, plants must coordinate rapid genetic reprogramming to produce an incompatible interaction. Nitrate Trasnporter2 (NRT2) gene family members are sentinels of nitrate availability. In this study, we present an additional role for NRT2.1 linked to plant resistance against pathogens. This gene antagonizes the priming of plant defenses against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (Pst). The nrt2 mutant (which is deficient in two genes, NRT2.1 and NRT2.2) displays reduced susceptibility to this bacterium. We demonstrate that modifying environmental conditions that stimulate the derepression of the NRT2.1 gene influences resistance to Pst independently of the total level of endogenous nitrogen. Additionally, hormonal homeostasis seemed to be affected in nrt2, which displays priming of salicylic acid signaling and concomitant irregular functioning of the jasmonic acid and abscisic acid pathways upon infection. Effector-triggered susceptibility and hormonal perturbation by the bacterium seem to be altered in nrt2, probably due to reduced sensitivity to the bacterial phytotoxin coronatine. The main genetic and metabolic targets of coronatine in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) remain largely unstimulated in nrt2 mutants. In addition, a P. syringae strain defective in coronatine synthesis showed the same virulence toward nrt2 as the coronatine-producing strain. Taken together, the reduced susceptibility of nrt2 mutants seems to be a combination of priming of salicylic acid-dependent defenses and reduced sensitivity to the bacterial effector coronatine. These results suggest additional functions for NRT2.1 that may influence plant disease resistance by down-regulating biotic stress defense mechanisms and favoring abiotic stress responses. PMID:22158760

  8. Type III Secretion and Effectors Shape the Survival and Growth Pattern of Pseudomonas syringae on Leaf Surfaces1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiyoung; Teitzel, Gail M.; Munkvold, Kathy; del Pozo, Olga; Martin, Gregory B.; Michelmore, Richard W.; Greenberg, Jean T.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae B728a (PsyB728a) uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject effector proteins into plant cells, a process that modulates the susceptibility of different plants to infection. Analysis of GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN-expressing PsyB728a after spray inoculation without additives under moderate relative humidity conditions permitted (1) a detailed analysis of this strain’s survival and growth pattern on host (Nicotiana benthamiana) and nonhost (tomato [Solanum lycopersicum]) leaf surfaces, (2) an assessment of the role of plant defenses in affecting PsyB728a leaf surface (epiphytic) growth, and (3) the contribution of the T3SS and specific effectors to PsyB728a epiphytic survival and growth. On host leaf surfaces, PsyB728a cells initially persist without growing, and show an increased population only after 48 h, unless plants are pretreated with the defense-inducing chemical benzothiazole. During the persistence period, some PsyB728a cells induce a T3SS reporter, whereas a T3SS-deficient mutant shows reduced survival. By 72 h, rare invasion by PsyB728a to the mesophyll region of host leaves occurs, but endophytic and epiphytic bacterial growths are not correlated. The effectors HopZ3 and HopAA1 delay the onset of epiphytic growth of PsyB728a on N. benthamiana, whereas they promote epiphytic survival/growth on tomato. These effectors localize to distinct sites in plant cells and likely have different mechanisms of action. HopZ3 may enzymatically modify host targets, as it requires residues important for the catalytic activity of other proteins in its family of proteases. Thus, the T3SS, HopAA1, HopZ3, and plant defenses strongly influence epiphytic survival and/or growth of PsyB728a. PMID:22319072

  9. The HopZ family of Pseudomonas syringae type III effectors require myristoylation for virulence and avirulence functions in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer D; Abada, Wasan; Ma, Wenbo; Guttman, David S; Desveaux, Darrell

    2008-04-01

    Pseudomonas syringae utilizes the type III secretion system to translocate effector proteins into plant cells, where they can contribute to the pathogen's ability to infect and cause disease. Recognition of these effectors by resistance proteins induces defense responses that typically include a programmed cell death reaction called the hypersensitive response. The YopJ/HopZ family of type III effector proteins is a common family of effector proteins found in animal- and plant-pathogenic bacteria. The HopZ family in P. syringae includes HopZ1a(PsyA2), HopZ1b(PgyUnB647), HopZ1c(PmaE54326), HopZ2(Ppi895A) and HopZ3(PsyB728a). HopZ1a is predicted to be most similar to the ancestral hopZ allele and causes a hypersensitive response in multiple plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana. Therefore, it has been proposed that host defense responses have driven the diversification of this effector family. In this study, we further characterized the hypersensitive response induced by HopZ1a and demonstrated that it is not dependent on known resistance genes. Further, we identified a novel virulence function for HopZ2 that requires the catalytic cysteine demonstrated to be required for protease activity. Sequence analysis of the HopZ family revealed the presence of a predicted myristoylation sequence in all members except HopZ3. We demonstrated that the myristoylation site is required for membrane localization of this effector family and contributes to the virulence and avirulence activities of HopZ2 and HopZ1a, respectively. This paper provides insight into the selective pressures driving virulence protein evolution by describing a detailed functional characterization of the diverse HopZ family of type III effectors with the model plant Arabidopsis.

  10. The HopZ Family of Pseudomonas syringae Type III Effectors Require Myristoylation for Virulence and Avirulence Functions in Arabidopsis thaliana▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jennifer D.; Abada, Wasan; Ma, Wenbo; Guttman, David S.; Desveaux, Darrell

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae utilizes the type III secretion system to translocate effector proteins into plant cells, where they can contribute to the pathogen's ability to infect and cause disease. Recognition of these effectors by resistance proteins induces defense responses that typically include a programmed cell death reaction called the hypersensitive response. The YopJ/HopZ family of type III effector proteins is a common family of effector proteins found in animal- and plant-pathogenic bacteria. The HopZ family in P. syringae includes HopZ1aPsyA2, HopZ1bPgyUnB647, HopZ1cPmaE54326, HopZ2Ppi895A and HopZ3PsyB728a. HopZ1a is predicted to be most similar to the ancestral hopZ allele and causes a hypersensitive response in multiple plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana. Therefore, it has been proposed that host defense responses have driven the diversification of this effector family. In this study, we further characterized the hypersensitive response induced by HopZ1a and demonstrated that it is not dependent on known resistance genes. Further, we identified a novel virulence function for HopZ2 that requires the catalytic cysteine demonstrated to be required for protease activity. Sequence analysis of the HopZ family revealed the presence of a predicted myristoylation sequence in all members except HopZ3. We demonstrated that the myristoylation site is required for membrane localization of this effector family and contributes to the virulence and avirulence activities of HopZ2 and HopZ1a, respectively. This paper provides insight into the selective pressures driving virulence protein evolution by describing a detailed functional characterization of the diverse HopZ family of type III effectors with the model plant Arabidopsis. PMID:18263728

  11. Forward Genetic In Planta Screen for Identification of Plant-Protective Traits of Sphingomonas sp. Strain Fr1 against Pseudomonas syringae DC3000

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Christine; Innerebner, Gerd; Zingg, Judith; Guder, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain Fr1 has recently been shown to protect Arabidopsis thaliana against the bacterial leaf pathogen Pseudomonas syringae DC3000. Here, we describe a forward genetic in planta screen to identify genes in Sphingomonas sp. Fr1 necessary for this effect. About 5,000 Sphingomonas sp. Fr1 mini-Tn5 mutants were assayed for a defect in plant protection against a luxCDABE-tagged P. syringae DC3000 derivative in a space-saving 24-well plate system. The bioluminescence of the pathogen was used as the indicator of pathogen proliferation and allowed for the identification of Sphingomonas sp. Fr1 mutants that had lost the ability to restrict pathogen growth before disease symptoms were visible. Potential candidates were validated using the same miniaturized experimental system. Of these mutants, 10 were confirmed as plant protection defective yet colonization competent. The mutants were subsequently evaluated in a previously described standard microbox system, and plants showed enhanced disease phenotypes after pathogen infection relative to those inoculated with the parental strain as a control. However, the disease severities were lower than those observed for control plants that were grown axenically prior to pathogen challenge, which suggests that several traits may contribute to plant protection. Transposon insertion sites of validated mutants with defects in plant protection were determined and mapped to 7 distinct genomic regions. In conclusion, the established screening protocol allowed us to identify mutations that affect plant protection, and it opens the possibility to uncover traits important for in planta microbe-microbe interactions. PMID:22660707

  12. Molecular Characterization of an Ice Nucleation Protein Variant (InaQ) from Pseudomonas syringae and the Analysis of Its Transmembrane Transport Activity in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qianqian; Yan, Qi; Chen, Jinsi; He, Yan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Hongxing; Yu, Ziniu; Li, Lin

    2012-01-01

    The ice nucleation protein (INP) of Pseudomonas syringae has gained scientific interest not only because of its pathogenicity of foliar necroses but also for its wide range of potential applications, such as in snow making, frozen food preparation, and surface-display system development. However, studies on the transport activity of INP remain lacking. In the present study, a newly identified INP-gene variant, inaQ, from a P. syringae MB03 strain was cloned. Its structural domains, signal sequences, and the hydrophilicity or hydrophobicity of each domain, were then characterized. The deduced amino acid sequence of InaQ shares similar protein domains with three P. syringae INPs, namely, InaK, InaZ, and InaV, which were identified as an N-terminal domain, a central repeating domain, and a C-terminal domain. The expression of the full-length InaQ and of various truncated variants was induced in Escherichia coli to analyze their transmembrane transport and surface-binding activities, while using the green fluorescence protein (GFP) as the fusion partner. With two transmembrane segments and a weak secretion signal, the N-terminal domain (InaQ-N) alone was found to be responsible for the transport process as well as for the binding to the outer membrane, whereas the C-terminal region was nonfunctional in protein transport. Increased membrane transport and surface-binding capacities were induced by a low isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside concentration (0.1 mmol/l) but not by culture temperatures (15 ºC to 37 ºC). Furthermore, by constructing the GFP-fused proteins with a single InaQ-N, as well as two and three tandemly aligned InaQ-N molecules, the transport and membrane-binding activities of these proteins were compared using Western blot analysis, immmunofluorescence microscopy, and assays of the GFP specific fluorescence intensity of subcellular fractions and flow cytometry, which showed that the increase of InaQ-N repeats resulted in a coordinated increase of the

  13. Molecular characterization of an ice nucleation protein variant (inaQ) from Pseudomonas syringae and the analysis of its transmembrane transport activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Qianqian; Yan, Qi; Chen, Jinsi; He, Yan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Hongxing; Yu, Ziniu; Li, Lin

    2012-01-01

    The ice nucleation protein (INP) of Pseudomonas syringae has gained scientific interest not only because of its pathogenicity of foliar necroses but also for its wide range of potential applications, such as in snow making, frozen food preparation, and surface-display system development. However, studies on the transport activity of INP remain lacking. In the present study, a newly identified INP-gene variant, inaQ, from a P. syringae MB03 strain was cloned. Its structural domains, signal sequences, and the hydrophilicity or hydrophobicity of each domain, were then characterized. The deduced amino acid sequence of InaQ shares similar protein domains with three P. syringae INPs, namely, InaK, InaZ, and InaV, which were identified as an N-terminal domain, a central repeating domain, and a C-terminal domain. The expression of the full-length InaQ and of various truncated variants was induced in Escherichia coli to analyze their transmembrane transport and surface-binding activities, while using the green fluorescence protein (GFP) as the fusion partner. With two transmembrane segments and a weak secretion signal, the N-terminal domain (InaQ-N) alone was found to be responsible for the transport process as well as for the binding to the outer membrane, whereas the C-terminal region was nonfunctional in protein transport. Increased membrane transport and surface-binding capacities were induced by a low isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside concentration (0.1 mmol/l) but not by culture temperatures (15 ºC to 37 ºC). Furthermore, by constructing the GFP-fused proteins with a single InaQ-N, as well as two and three tandemly aligned InaQ-N molecules, the transport and membrane-binding activities of these proteins were compared using Western blot analysis, immmunofluorescence microscopy, and assays of the GFP specific fluorescence intensity of subcellular fractions and flow cytometry, which showed that the increase of InaQ-N repeats resulted in a coordinated increase of the

  14. The presence of INA proteins on the surface of single cells of Pseudomonas syringae R10.79 isolated from rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Ling, Meilee; Holm, Stine; Finster, Kai; Boesen, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    One of the important open questions in atmospheric ice nucleation is the impact of bioaerosols on the ice content of mix phase clouds (DeMott and Prenni 2010). Biogenic ice nuclei have a unique capacity of facilitating ice formation at temperatures between -1 and -10 °C. The model biogenic ice nuclei are produced by a few species of plant-surface bacteria, such as Pseudomonas syringae, that are commonly transported through the atmosphere. These bacterial species have highly specialized proteins, the so-called ice nucleation active (INA) proteins, which are exposed at the outer membrane surface of the cell where they promote ice particle formation. The mechanisms behind the onset of INA protein synthesis in single bacterial cells are not well understood. We performed a laboratory study in order to (i) investigate the presence of INA proteins on single bacterial cells and (ii) understand the conditions that induce INA protein production. We previously isolated an INA-positive strain of Pseudomonas syringae from rain samples collected in Denmark. Bacterial cells initiated ice nucleation activity at temperatures ≤-2°C and the cell fragments at temperatures ≤-8°C (Šantl-Temkiv et al 2015). We determined the amino-acid sequence of the INA protein and used the sequence to produce custom-made antibodies (GenScript, Germany). These antibodies were used to specifically stain and visualize the INA protein on the surfaces of single cells, which can then be quantified by a technique called flow cytometry. The synthesis of INA proteins by individual cells was followed during a batch growth experiment. An unusually high proportion of cells that were adapting to the new conditions prior to growth produced INA proteins (~4.4% of all cells). A smaller fraction of actively growing cells was carrying INA proteins (~1.2 % of all cells). The cells that stopped growing due to unfavorable conditions had the lowest fraction of cells carrying INA proteins (~0.5 % of all cells). To

  15. Comparative analysis of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae and pv. phaseolicola based on phaseolotoxin-resistant ornithine carbamoyltransferase gene (argK) and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Sawada, H; Takeuchi, T; Matsuda, I

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, which causes halo blight on various legumes, and pv. actinidiae, responsible for canker or leaf spot on actinidia plants, are known as phaseolotoxin producers, and the former possesses phaseolotoxin-resistant ornithine carbamoyltransferase (ROCT) which confers resistance to the toxin. We confirmed that the latter is also resistant to phaseolotoxin and possesses ROCT, and we compared the two pathovars by using sequence data of the ROCT gene and the intergenic spacer region located between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes (16S-23S spacer region) as an index. It was found that the identical ROCT gene (argK) is contained not only in bean isolates of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola in Mexico and the United States but also in bean isolates in Japan and Canada, and that it is also distributed in the kudzu (Pueraria lobata) isolates of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola. Moreover, the kiwifruit and tara vine isolates of P. syringae pv. actinidiae were also found to possess the identical argK. On the contrary, the 16S-23S spacer regions showed a significant level of sequence variation between P. syringae pv. actinidiae and pv. phaseolicola, suggesting that these two pathovars evolved differently from each other in the phylogenetic development. The fact that even synonymous substitution has not occurred in argK among these strains despite their extreme differences in phylogenetic evolution and geographical distribution suggests that it was only recently in evolutionary time that argK was transferred from its origin to P. syringae pv. actinidiae and/or pv. phaseolicola.

  16. Comparative analysis of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae and pv. phaseolicola based on phaseolotoxin-resistant ornithine carbamoyltransferase gene (argK) and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, H; Takeuchi, T; Matsuda, I

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, which causes halo blight on various legumes, and pv. actinidiae, responsible for canker or leaf spot on actinidia plants, are known as phaseolotoxin producers, and the former possesses phaseolotoxin-resistant ornithine carbamoyltransferase (ROCT) which confers resistance to the toxin. We confirmed that the latter is also resistant to phaseolotoxin and possesses ROCT, and we compared the two pathovars by using sequence data of the ROCT gene and the intergenic spacer region located between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes (16S-23S spacer region) as an index. It was found that the identical ROCT gene (argK) is contained not only in bean isolates of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola in Mexico and the United States but also in bean isolates in Japan and Canada, and that it is also distributed in the kudzu (Pueraria lobata) isolates of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola. Moreover, the kiwifruit and tara vine isolates of P. syringae pv. actinidiae were also found to possess the identical argK. On the contrary, the 16S-23S spacer regions showed a significant level of sequence variation between P. syringae pv. actinidiae and pv. phaseolicola, suggesting that these two pathovars evolved differently from each other in the phylogenetic development. The fact that even synonymous substitution has not occurred in argK among these strains despite their extreme differences in phylogenetic evolution and geographical distribution suggests that it was only recently in evolutionary time that argK was transferred from its origin to P. syringae pv. actinidiae and/or pv. phaseolicola. PMID:8979356

  17. Cultivar-specific avirulence and virulence functions assigned to avrPphF in Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, the cause of bean halo-blight disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsiamis, George; Mansfield, John W.; Hockenhull, Ruth; Jackson, Robert W.; Sesma, Ane; Athanassopoulos, Evangelos; Bennett, Mark A.; Stevens, Conrad; Vivian, Alan; Taylor, John D.; Murillo, Jesus

    2000-01-01

    The avrPphF gene was cloned from Pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola (Pph) races 5 and 7, based on its ability to confer avirulence towards bean cultivars carrying the R1 gene for halo-blight resistance, such as Red Mexican. avrPphF comprised two open reading frames, which were both required for function, and was located on a 154 kb plasmid (pAV511) in Pph. Strain RW60 of Pph, lacking pAV511, displayed a loss in virulence to a range of previously susceptible cultivars such as Tendergreen and Canadian Wonder. In Tendergreen virulence was restored to RW60 by avrPphF alone, whereas subcloned avrPphF in the absence of pAV511 greatly accelerated the hypersensitive resistance reaction caused by RW60 in Canadian Wonder. A second gene from pAV511, avrPphC, which controls avirulence to soybean, was found to block the activity of avrPphF in Canadian Wonder, but not in Red Mexican. avrPphF also conferred virulence in soybean. The multiple functions of avrPphF illustrate how effector proteins from plant pathogens have evolved to be recognized by R gene products and, therefore, be classified as encoded by avirulence genes. PMID:10880434

  18. The differential spatial distribution of secondary metabolites in Arabidopsis leaves reacting hypersensitively to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato is dependent on the oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    Simon, Clara; Langlois-Meurinne, Mathilde; Bellvert, Floriant; Garmier, Marie; Didierlaurent, Laure; Massoud, Kamal; Chaouch, Sejir; Marie, Arul; Bodo, Bernard; Kauffmann, Serge; Noctor, Graham; Saindrenan, Patrick

    2010-07-01

    Secondary metabolites (SMs) play key roles in pathogen responses, although knowledge of their precise functions is limited by insufficient characterization of their spatial response. The present study addressed this issue in Arabidopsis leaves by non-targeted and targeted metabolite profiling of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst-AvrRpm1) infected and adjacent uninfected leaf tissues. While overlap was observed between infected and uninfected areas, the non-targeted metabolite profiles of these regions differed quantitatively and clustering analysis underscores a differential distribution of SMs within distinct metabolic pathways. Targeted metabolite profiling revealed that infected tissues accumulate more salicylic acid and the characteristic phytoalexin of Arabidopsis, camalexin, than uninfected adjacent areas. On the contrary, the antioxidant coumarin derivative, scopoletin, was induced in infected tissues while its glucoside scopolin predominated in adjacent tissues. To elucidate the still unclear relationship between the accumulation of SMs and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and signalling, a catalase-deficient line (cat2) in which ROS signalling is up-regulated, was used. Metabolic analysis of cat2 suggests that some SMs have important interactions with ROS in redox homeostasis during the hypersensitive response to Pst-AvrRpm1. Overall, the study demonstrates that ROS availability influences both the amount and the pattern of infection-induced SM accumulation.

  19. Gaseous 3-pentanol primes plant immunity against a bacterial speck pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato via salicylic acid and jasmonic acid-dependent signaling pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Geun C.; Choi, Hye K.; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-01-01

    3-Pentanol is an active organic compound produced by plants and is a component of emitted insect sex pheromones. A previous study reported that drench application of 3-pentanol elicited plant immunity against microbial pathogens and an insect pest in crop plants. Here, we evaluated whether 3-pentanol and the derivatives 1-pentanol and 2-pentanol induced plant systemic resistance using the in vitro I-plate system. Exposure of Arabidopsis seedlings to 10 μM and 100 nM 3-pentanol evaporate elicited an immune response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. We performed quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the 3-pentanol-mediated Arabidopsis immune responses by determining Pathogenesis-Related (PR) gene expression levels associated with defense signaling through salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene signaling pathways. The results show that exposure to 3-pentanol and subsequent pathogen challenge upregulated PDF1.2 and PR1 expression. Selected Arabidopsis mutants confirmed that the 3-pentanol-mediated immune response involved SA and JA signaling pathways and the NPR1 gene. Taken together, this study indicates that gaseous 3-pentanol triggers induced resistance in Arabidopsis by priming SA and JA signaling pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a volatile compound of an insect sex pheromone triggers plant systemic resistance against a bacterial pathogen. PMID:26500665

  20. Studies on the Infection, Colonization, and Movement of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae in Kiwifruit Tissues Using a GFPuv-Labeled Strain

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaoning; Huang, Qiling; Zhao, Zhibo; Han, Qingmei; Ke, Xiwang; Qin, Huqiang; Huang, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Kiwifruit bacterial canker, an economically important disease caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa), has caused severe losses in all major areas of kiwifruit cultivation. Using a GFPuv-labeled strain of Psa, we monitored the invasion, colonization, and movement of the pathogen in kiwifruit twigs, leaves and veins. The pathogen can invade twigs through both wounds and natural openings; the highest number of Psa is obtained in cut tissues. We determined that, following spray inoculation, Psa-GFPuv could infect leaves and cause lesions in the presence and absence of wounds. Light and transmission electron microscopic observations showed that bacterial cells colonize both phloem and xylem vessels. Bacterial infection resulted in marked alterations of host tissues including the disintegration of organelles and degeneration of protoplasts and cell walls. Furthermore, low temperature was conducive to colonization and movement of Psa-GFPuv in kiwifruit tissues. Indeed, the pathogen migrated faster at 4°C than at 16°C or 25°C in twigs. However, the optimum temperature for colonization and movement of Psa in leaf veins was 16°C. Our results, revealing a better understanding of the Psa infection process, might contribute to develop more efficacious disease management strategies. PMID:26999596

  1. The Pseudomonas syringae Type III Effector HopG1 Induces Actin Remodeling to Promote Symptom Development and Susceptibility during Infection1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Shimono, Masaki; Porter, Katie; Kvitko, Brian H.; Henty-Ridilla, Jessica; Creason, Allison; Chang, Jeff H.; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The plant cytoskeleton underpins the function of a multitude of cellular mechanisms, including those associated with developmental- and stress-associated signaling processes. In recent years, the actin cytoskeleton has been demonstrated to play a key role in plant immune signaling, including a recent demonstration that pathogens target actin filaments to block plant defense and immunity. Herein, we quantified spatial changes in host actin filament organization after infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000), demonstrating that the type-III effector HopG1 is required for pathogen-induced changes to actin filament architecture and host disease symptom development during infection. Using a suite of pathogen effector deletion constructs, coupled with high-resolution microscopy, we found that deletion of hopG1 from Pst DC3000 resulted in a reduction in actin bundling and a concomitant increase in the density of filament arrays in Arabidopsis, both of which correlate with host disease symptom development. As a mechanism underpinning this activity, we further show that the HopG1 effector interacts with an Arabidopsis mitochondrial-localized kinesin motor protein. Kinesin mutant plants show reduced disease symptoms after pathogen infection, which can be complemented by actin-modifying agents. In total, our results support a model in which HopG1 induces changes in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton as part of its virulence function in promoting disease symptom development. PMID:27217495

  2. Release of cell-free ice nuclei from Halomonas elongata expressing the ice nucleation gene inaZ of Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Tegos, G; Vargas, C; Perysinakis, A; Koukkou, A I; Christogianni, A; Nieto, J J; Ventosa, A; Drainas, C

    2000-11-01

    Release of ice nuclei in the growth medium of recombinant Halomonas elongata cells expressing the inaZ gene of Pseudomonas syringae was studied in an attempt to produce cell-free active ice nuclei for biotechnological applications. Cell-free ice nuclei were not retained by cellulose acetate filters of 0.2 microm pore size. Highest activity of cell-free ice nuclei was obtained when cells were grown in low salinity (0.5-5% NaCl, w/v). Freezing temperature threshold, estimated to be below -7 degrees C indicating class C nuclei, was not affected by medium salinity. Their density, as estimated by Percoll density centrifugation, was 1.018 +/- 0.002 gml(-1) and they were found to be free of lipids. Ice nuclei are released in the growth medium of recombinant H. elongata cells probably because of inefficient anchoring of the ice-nucleation protein aggregates in the outer membrane. The ice+ recombinant H. elongata cells could be useful for future use as a source of active cell-free ice nucleation protein.

  3. Interplay among Pseudomonas syringae HrpR, HrpS and HrpV proteins for regulation of the type III secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovic, Milija; Lawton, Edward; Schumacher, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, a plant pathogenic gram-negative bacterium, employs the type III secretion system (T3SS) to cause disease in tomato and Arabidopsis and to induce the hypersensitive response in nonhost plants. The expression of T3SS is regulated by the HrpL extracytoplasmic sigma factor. Expression of HrpL is controlled by transcriptional activators HrpR and HrpS and negative regulator HrpV. In this study, we analysed the organization of HrpRS and HrpV regulatory proteins and interplay between them. We identified one key residue I26 in HrpS required for repression by HrpV. Substitution of I26 in HrpS abolishes its interaction with HrpV and impairs interactions between HrpS and HrpR and the self-association of HrpS. We show that HrpS self-associates and can associate simultaneously with HrpR and HrpV. We now propose that HrpS has a central role in the assembly of the regulatory HrpRSV complex. Deletion analysis of HrpR and HrpS proteins showed that C-terminal parts of HrpR and HrpS confer determinants indispensable for their self-assembly. PMID:24863420

  4. Reference gene selection for normalization of RT-qPCR gene expression data from Actinidia deliciosa leaves infected with Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae

    PubMed Central

    Petriccione, Milena; Mastrobuoni, Francesco; Zampella, Luigi; Scortichini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Normalization of data, by choosing the appropriate reference genes (RGs), is fundamental for obtaining reliable results in reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). In this study, we assessed Actinidia deliciosa leaves inoculated with two doses of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae during a period of 13 days for the expression profile of nine candidate RGs. Their expression stability was calculated using four algorithms: geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper and the deltaCt method. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) were the most stable genes, while β-tubulin and 7s-globulin were the less stable. Expression analysis of three target genes, chosen for RGs validation, encoding the reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes ascorbate peroxidase (APX), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) indicated that a combination of stable RGs, such as GAPDH and PP2A, can lead to an accurate quantification of the expression levels of such target genes. The APX level varied during the experiment time course and according to the inoculum doses, whereas both SOD and CAT resulted down-regulated during the first four days, and up-regulated afterwards, irrespective of inoculum dose. These results can be useful for better elucidating the molecular interaction in the A. deliciosa/P. s. pv. actinidiae pathosystem and for RGs selection in bacteria-plant pathosystems. PMID:26581656

  5. Gaseous 3-pentanol primes plant immunity against a bacterial speck pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato via salicylic acid and jasmonic acid-dependent signaling pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Song, Geun C; Choi, Hye K; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-01-01

    3-Pentanol is an active organic compound produced by plants and is a component of emitted insect sex pheromones. A previous study reported that drench application of 3-pentanol elicited plant immunity against microbial pathogens and an insect pest in crop plants. Here, we evaluated whether 3-pentanol and the derivatives 1-pentanol and 2-pentanol induced plant systemic resistance using the in vitro I-plate system. Exposure of Arabidopsis seedlings to 10 μM and 100 nM 3-pentanol evaporate elicited an immune response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. We performed quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the 3-pentanol-mediated Arabidopsis immune responses by determining Pathogenesis-Related (PR) gene expression levels associated with defense signaling through salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene signaling pathways. The results show that exposure to 3-pentanol and subsequent pathogen challenge upregulated PDF1.2 and PR1 expression. Selected Arabidopsis mutants confirmed that the 3-pentanol-mediated immune response involved SA and JA signaling pathways and the NPR1 gene. Taken together, this study indicates that gaseous 3-pentanol triggers induced resistance in Arabidopsis by priming SA and JA signaling pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a volatile compound of an insect sex pheromone triggers plant systemic resistance against a bacterial pathogen.

  6. Functional analysis of NtMPK2 uncovers its positive role in response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingtan; Wang, Genhong; Gao, Junping; Nie, Mengyun; Liu, Wenshan; Xia, Qingyou

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades are highly conserved signaling modules downstream of receptors/sensors and play pivotal roles in signaling plant defense against pathogen attack. Extensive studies on Arabidopsis MPK4 have implicated that the MAP kinase is involved in multilayered plant defense pathways. In this study, we identified tobacco NtMPK2 as an ortholog of AtMPK4. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing NtMPK2 markedly enhances resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000) virulent and avirulent strains. Transcriptome analysis of NtMPK2-dependent genes shows that possibly the basal resistance system is activated by NtMPK2 overexpression. In addition to NtMPK2-mediated resistance, multiple pathways are involved in response to the avirulent bacteria based on analysis of Pst-responding genes, including SA and ET pathways. Notably, it is possible that biosynthesis of antibacterial compounds is responsible for inhibition of Pst DC3000 avirulent strain when programmed cell death processes in the host. Our results uncover that NtMPK2 positively regulate tobacco defense response to Pst DC3000 and improve our understanding of plant molecular defense mechanism.

  7. Studies on the Infection, Colonization, and Movement of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae in Kiwifruit Tissues Using a GFPuv-Labeled Strain.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoning; Huang, Qiling; Zhao, Zhibo; Han, Qingmei; Ke, Xiwang; Qin, Huqiang; Huang, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Kiwifruit bacterial canker, an economically important disease caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa), has caused severe losses in all major areas of kiwifruit cultivation. Using a GFPuv-labeled strain of Psa, we monitored the invasion, colonization, and movement of the pathogen in kiwifruit twigs, leaves and veins. The pathogen can invade twigs through both wounds and natural openings; the highest number of Psa is obtained in cut tissues. We determined that, following spray inoculation, Psa-GFPuv could infect leaves and cause lesions in the presence and absence of wounds. Light and transmission electron microscopic observations showed that bacterial cells colonize both phloem and xylem vessels. Bacterial infection resulted in marked alterations of host tissues including the disintegration of organelles and degeneration of protoplasts and cell walls. Furthermore, low temperature was conducive to colonization and movement of Psa-GFPuv in kiwifruit tissues. Indeed, the pathogen migrated faster at 4°C than at 16°C or 25°C in twigs. However, the optimum temperature for colonization and movement of Psa in leaf veins was 16°C. Our results, revealing a better understanding of the Psa infection process, might contribute to develop more efficacious disease management strategies.

  8. Genetic analysis of genes involved in synthesis of modified 4-amino-4,6-dideoxyglucose in flagellin of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Linh Chi; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Andi, Salamah; Taguchi, Fumiko; Iwaki, Masako; Yoshida, Mitsuru; Ishii, Tadashi; Konishi, Tomoyuki; Tsunemi, Kazuhiko; Ichinose, Yuki

    2009-12-01

    Glycosylation of flagellin contributes to swimming and swarming motilities, adhesion ability, and consequently virulence in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 6605. Glycans attached to six serine residues are located in the central region of the flagellin polypeptide. The glycan structure at position Ser 201 was recently revealed to consist of two L-rhamnoses and one modified 4-amino-4,6-dideoxyglucose (viosamine). To clarify the mechanisms for glycosylation of modified viosamine, genes encoding dTDP-viosamine aminotransferase (vioA), dTDP-viosamine acetyltransferase (vioB), and viosamine-derivative transferase (vioT) were isolated and defective mutants were generated. MALDI-TOF-MS analysis of a lysyl endopeptidase-digested peptide including all six glycosylation sites from each flagellin indicated that the molecular masses of the three flagellin mutants were reduced with highly heterogeneous patterns at regular intervals of 146 Da in the mass range from m/z 13,819 to 15,732. The data indicated that the glycopeptides obtained from mutants had glycans consisting only of deoxyhexose instead of the flagellin glycans including the viosamine derivatives determined previously. The motility and virulence on host tobacco leaves were strongly impaired in the Delta vioA mutant and were weakly reduced in the Delta vioB and Delta vioT mutant strains. These results suggest that the genes vioA, vioB, and vioT are essential for glycosylation of flagellin, and accordingly are required for bacterial virulence.

  9. Role of type IV pili in virulence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 6605: correlation of motility, multidrug resistance, and HR-inducing activity on a nonhost plant.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Fumiko; Ichinose, Yuki

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the role of type IV pili in the virulence of phytopathogenic bacteria, four mutant strains for pilus biogenesis-related genes were generated in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 6605. PilA encodes the pilin protein as a major subunit of type IV pili, and the pilO product is reported to be required for pilus assembly. The fimU and fimT genes are predicted to produce minor pilins. Western blot analysis revealed that pilA, pilO, and fimU mutants but not the fimT mutant failed to construct type IV pili. Although the swimming motility of all mutant strains was not impaired in liquid medium, they showed remarkably reduced motilities on semisolid agar medium, suggesting that type IV pili are required for surface motilities. Virulence toward host tobacco plants and hypersensitive response-inducing ability in nonhost Arabidopsis leaves of pilA, pilO, and fimU mutant strains were reduced. These results might be a consequence of reduced expression of type III secretion system-related genes in the mutant strains. Further, all mutant strains showed enhanced expression of resistance-nodulation-division family members mexA, mexB, and oprM, and higher tolerance to antimicrobial compounds. These results indicate that type IV pili are an important virulence factor of this pathogen.

  10. Expression profiling soybean response to Pseudomonas syringae reveals new defense-related genes and rapid HR-specific downregulation of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jijun; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra; Aldea, Mihai; Li, Min; Zhu, Jin; Gonzalez, Delkin O; Vodkin, Lila O; DeLucia, Evan; Clough, Steven J

    2005-11-01

    Transcript profiling during susceptible (S) and hypersensitive response-associated resistance (R) interactions was determined in soybean (Glycine max). Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea carrying or lacking the avirulence gene avrB, was infiltrated into cultivar Williams 82. Leaf RNA was sampled at 2, 8, and 24 h postinoculation (hpi). Significant changes in transcript abundance were observed for 3,897 genes during the experiment at P < or = 0.000005. Many of the genes showed a similar direction of increase or decrease in abundance in both the S and R responses, but the R response generally showed a significantly greater degree of differential expression. More than 25% of these responsive genes had not been previously reported as being associated with pathogen interactions, as 704 had no functional annotation and 378 had no homolog in National Center for Biotechnology Information databases. The highest number of transcriptional changes was noted at 8 hpi, including the downregulation of 94 chloroplast-associated genes specific to the R response. Photosynthetic measurements were consistent with an R-specific reduction in photosystem II operating efficiency (phiPSII) that was apparent at 8 hpi for the R response with little effect in the S or control treatments. Imaging analyses suggest that the decreased phiPSII was a result of physical damage to PSII reaction centers.

  11. Evidence on antimicrobial properties and mode of action of a chitosan obtained from crustacean exoskeletons on Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    PubMed

    Mansilla, A Y; Albertengo, L; Rodríguez, M S; Debbaudt, A; Zúñiga, A; Casalongué, C A

    2013-08-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pto DC3000) causes bacterial speck of tomato, a widely spread disease that causes significant economical losses worldwide. It is representative of many bacterial plant diseases for which effective controls are still needed. Despite the antimicrobial properties of chitosan has been previously described in phytopathogenic fungi, its action on bacteria is still poorly explored. In this work, we report that the chitosan isolated from shrimp exoskeletons (70 kDa and 78 % deacetylation degree) exerts cell damage on Pto DC3000. Chitosan inhibited Pto DC3000 bacterial growth depending on its concentration, medium-pH, and presence of metal ion (Mg(+2)). Biochemical and cellular changes resulting in cell aggregation and impaired bacterial growth were also viewed. In vivo studies using fluorescent probes showed cell aggregation, increase in membrane permeability, and cell death, suggesting the chitosan antibacterial activity is due to its interaction as a polycation with Pto DC3000 membranes. Transmission electron microscopic analysis revealed that chitosan also caused morphological changes and damage in bacterial surfaces. Also, the disease incidence in tomato inoculated with Pto DC3000 was significantly reduced in chitosan pretreated seedlings, revealing a promising action of chitosan as nontoxic biopesticide in tomato plants. Indeed, a wider comprehensive knowledge of the mechanism of action of chitosan in phytopathogenic bacterial cells will increase the chances of its successful application to the control of spread disease in plants.

  12. The 7B-1 mutation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) confers a blue light-specific lower sensitivity to coronatine, a toxin produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato.

    PubMed

    Bergougnoux, Véronique; Hlavácková, Vladimíra; Plotzová, Renáta; Novák, Ondrej; Fellner, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The spontaneous mutant 7B-1 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum=Lycopersicon esculentum) is a photoperiod-dependent male-sterile mutant previously reported as resistant to various abiotic stresses specifically under blue light. Since this finding improved the potential of 7B-1's use in breeding programmes, its susceptibility to stress induced by coronatine (COR), the phytotoxine produced by several Pseudomonas syringae strains, was assessed in this study. The 7B-1 mutant was found to be less sensitive than the corresponding wild type (WT) to COR treatment in a blue light-dependent manner. Treatment of WT and 7B-1 plants with COR induced a strong accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and abscisic acid (ABA) in hypocotyls. Interestingly, accumulation of ABA and SA in the 7B-1 mutant was distinctly greater than in WT, especially in blue light. Based on the cross-talk between SA- and JA-signalling pathways, expression analysis of NPR1 and COI1 genes, respectively involved in these pathways, was investigated in COR-stressed plants. The blue light-specific lower sensitivity of 7B-1 plants to COR was found to be associated with blue light-specific overexpression of the NPR1 gene. These data suggest that the SA-dependent NPR1-dependent pathway could be involved in the lower sensitivity of the 7B-1 mutant to COR. The role of anthocyanins and ABA accumulation during the response to COR is also discussed in the present study.

  13. Modifications to the Arabidopsis Defense Proteome Occur Prior to Significant Transcriptional Change in Response to Inoculation with Pseudomonas syringae1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Alexandra M.E.; Thomas, Vincent; Bennett, Mark H.; Mansfield, John; Grant, Murray

    2006-01-01

    Alterations in the proteome of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves during responses to challenge by Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 were analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein changes characteristic of the establishment of disease, basal resistance, and resistance-gene-mediated resistance were examined by comparing responses to DC3000, a hrp mutant, and DC3000 expressing avrRpm1, respectively. The abundance of each protein identified was compared with that of selected transcripts obtained from comparable GeneChip experiments. We report changes in three subcellular fractions: total soluble protein, chloroplast enriched, and mitochondria enriched over four time points (1.5–6 h after inoculation). In total, 73 differential spots representing 52 unique proteins were successfully identified. Many of the changes in protein spot density occurred before significant transcriptional reprogramming was evident between treatments. The high proportion of proteins represented by more than one spot indicated that many of the changes to the proteome can be attributed to posttranscriptional modifications. Proteins found to show significant change after bacterial challenge are representative of two main functional groups: defense-related antioxidants and metabolic enzymes. Significant changes to photosystem II and to components of the mitochondrial permeability transition were also identified. Rapid communication between organelles and regulation of primary metabolism through redox-mediated signaling are supported by our data. PMID:17028151

  14. Paraburkholderia phytofirmans PsJN Protects Arabidopsis thaliana Against a Virulent Strain of Pseudomonas syringae Through the Activation of Induced Resistance.

    PubMed

    Timmermann, Tania; Armijo, Grace; Donoso, Raúl; Seguel, Aldo; Holuigue, Loreto; González, Bernardo

    2017-03-01

    Paraburkholderia phytofirmans PsJN is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) that stimulates plant growth and improves tolerance to abiotic stresses. This study analyzed whether strain PsJN can reduce plant disease severity and proliferation of the virulent strain Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, in Arabidopsis plants, through the activation of induced resistance. Arabidopsis plants previously exposed to strain PsJN showed a reduction in disease severity and pathogen proliferation in leaves compared with noninoculated, infected plants. The plant defense-related genes WRKY54, PR1, ERF1, and PDF1.2 demonstrated increased and more rapid expression in strain PsJN-treated plants compared with noninoculated, infected plants. Transcriptional analyses and functional analysis using signaling mutant plants suggested that resistance to infection by DC3000 in plants treated with strain PsJN involves salicylic acid-, jasmonate-, and ethylene-signaling pathways to activate defense genes. Additionally, activation occurs through a specific PGPR-host recognition, being a necessary metabolically active state of the bacterium to trigger the resistance in Arabidopsis, with a strain PsJN-associated molecular pattern only partially involved in the resistance response. This study provides the first report on the mechanism used by the PGPR P. phytofirmans PsJN to protect A. thaliana against a widespread virulent pathogenic bacterium.

  15. The Arabidopsis Elongator complex is required for nonhost resistance against the bacterial pathogens Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri and Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121.

    PubMed

    An, Chuanfu; Wang, Chenggang; Mou, Zhonglin

    2017-01-30

    Although in recent years nonhost resistance has attracted considerable attention for its broad spectrum and durability, the genetic and mechanistic components of nonhost resistance have not been fully understood. We used molecular and histochemical approaches including quantitative PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine and aniline blue staining. The evolutionarily conserved histone acetyltransferase complex Elongator was identified as a major component of nonhost resistance against Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) and Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Psp) NPS3121. Mutations in Elongator genes inhibit Xcc-, Psp NPS3121- and/or flg22-induced defense responses including defense gene expression, callose deposition, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and salicylic acid (SA) accumulation. Mutations in Elongator also attenuate the ROS-SA amplification loop. We show that suppressed ROS and SA accumulation in Elongator mutants is correlated with reduced expression of the Arabidopsis respiratory burst oxidase homologue AtrbohD and the SA biosynthesis gene ISOCHORISMATE SYNTHASE1 (ICS1). Furthermore, we found that the Elongator subunit ELP2 is associated with the chromatin of AtrbohD and ICS1 and is required for maintaining basal histone H3 acetylation levels in these key defense genes. As both AtrbohD and ICS1 contribute to nonhost resistance against Xcc, our results reveal an epigenetic mechanism by which Elongator regulates nonhost resistance in Arabidopsis.

  16. Plant Innate Immunity Induced by Flagellin Suppresses the Hypersensitive Response in Non-Host Plants Elicited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. averrhoi

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chia-Fong; Hsu, Shih-Tien; Deng, Wen-Ling; Wen, Yu-Der; Huang, Hsiou-Chen

    2012-01-01

    A new pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. averrhoi (Pav), which causes bacterial spot disease on carambola was identified in Taiwan in 1997. Many strains of this pathovar have been isolated from different locations and several varieties of hosts. Some of these strains, such as HL1, are nonmotile and elicit a strong hypersensitive response (HR) in nonhost tobacco leaves, while other strains, such as PA5, are motile and elicit a weak HR. Based on the image from a transmission electron microscope, the results showed that HL1 is flagellum-deficient and PA5 has normal flagella. Here we cloned and analyzed the fliC gene and glycosylation island from Pav HL1 and PA5. The amino acid sequences of FliC from HL1 and PA5 are identical to P. s. pvs. tabaci (Pta), glycinea and phaseolicola and share very high similarity with other pathovars of P. syringae. In contrast to the flagellin mutant PtaΔfliC, PA5ΔfliC grows as well as wild type in the host plant, but it elicits stronger HR than wild type does in non-host plants. Furthermore, the purified Pav flagellin, but not the divergent flagellin from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, is able to impair the HR induced by PA5ΔfliC. PA5Δfgt1 possessing nonglycosylated flagella behaved as its wild type in both bacterial growth in host and HR elicitation. Flagellin was infiltrated into tobacco leaves either simultaneously with flagellum-deficient HL1 or prior to the inoculation of wild type HL1, and both treatments impaired the HR induced by HL1. Moreover, the HR elicited by PA5 and PA5ΔfliC was enhanced by the addition of cycloheximide, suggesting that the flagellin is one of the PAMPs (pathogen-associated molecular patterns) contributed to induce the PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Taken together, the results shown in this study reveal that flagellin in Pav is capable of suppressing HR via PTI induction during an incompatible interaction. PMID:22911741

  17. Plant innate immunity induced by flagellin suppresses the hypersensitive response in non-host plants elicited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. averrhoi.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chia-Fong; Hsu, Shih-Tien; Deng, Wen-Ling; Wen, Yu-Der; Huang, Hsiou-Chen

    2012-01-01

    A new pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. averrhoi (Pav), which causes bacterial spot disease on carambola was identified in Taiwan in 1997. Many strains of this pathovar have been isolated from different locations and several varieties of hosts. Some of these strains, such as HL1, are nonmotile and elicit a strong hypersensitive response (HR) in nonhost tobacco leaves, while other strains, such as PA5, are motile and elicit a weak HR. Based on the image from a transmission electron microscope, the results showed that HL1 is flagellum-deficient and PA5 has normal flagella. Here we cloned and analyzed the fliC gene and glycosylation island from Pav HL1 and PA5. The amino acid sequences of FliC from HL1 and PA5 are identical to P. s. pvs. tabaci (Pta), glycinea and phaseolicola and share very high similarity with other pathovars of P. syringae. In contrast to the flagellin mutant PtaΔfliC, PA5ΔfliC grows as well as wild type in the host plant, but it elicits stronger HR than wild type does in non-host plants. Furthermore, the purified Pav flagellin, but not the divergent flagellin from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, is able to impair the HR induced by PA5ΔfliC. PA5Δfgt1 possessing nonglycosylated flagella behaved as its wild type in both bacterial growth in host and HR elicitation. Flagellin was infiltrated into tobacco leaves either simultaneously with flagellum-deficient HL1 or prior to the inoculation of wild type HL1, and both treatments impaired the HR induced by HL1. Moreover, the HR elicited by PA5 and PA5ΔfliC was enhanced by the addition of cycloheximide, suggesting that the flagellin is one of the PAMPs (pathogen-associated molecular patterns) contributed to induce the PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Taken together, the results shown in this study reveal that flagellin in Pav is capable of suppressing HR via PTI induction during an incompatible interaction.

  18. Genomic Analysis of the Kiwifruit Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Provides Insight into the Origins of an Emergent Plant Disease

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Honour C.; Rikkerink, Erik H. A.; Bertels, Frederic; Fiers, Mark; Lu, Ashley; Rees-George, Jonathan; Andersen, Mark T.; Gleave, Andrew P.; Haubold, Bernhard; Wohlers, Mark W.; Guttman, David S.; Wang, Pauline W.; Straub, Christina; Vanneste, Joel; Rainey, Paul B.; Templeton, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    The origins of crop diseases are linked to domestication of plants. Most crops were domesticated centuries – even millennia – ago, thus limiting opportunity to understand the concomitant emergence of disease. Kiwifruit (Actinidia spp.) is an exception: domestication began in the 1930s with outbreaks of canker disease caused by P. syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) first recorded in the 1980s. Based on SNP analyses of two circularized and 34 draft genomes, we show that Psa is comprised of distinct clades exhibiting negligible within-clade diversity, consistent with disease arising by independent samplings from a source population. Three clades correspond to their geographical source of isolation; a fourth, encompassing the Psa-V lineage responsible for the 2008 outbreak, is now globally distributed. Psa has an overall clonal population structure, however, genomes carry a marked signature of within-pathovar recombination. SNP analysis of Psa-V reveals hundreds of polymorphisms; however, most reside within PPHGI-1-like conjugative elements whose evolution is unlinked to the core genome. Removal of SNPs due to recombination yields an uninformative (star-like) phylogeny consistent with diversification of Psa-V from a single clone within the last ten years. Growth assays provide evidence of cultivar specificity, with rapid systemic movement of Psa-V in Actinidia chinensis. Genomic comparisons show a dynamic genome with evidence of positive selection on type III effectors and other candidate virulence genes. Each clade has highly varied complements of accessory genes encoding effectors and toxins with evidence of gain and loss via multiple genetic routes. Genes with orthologs in vascular pathogens were found exclusively within Psa-V. Our analyses capture a pathogen in the early stages of emergence from a predicted source population associated with wild Actinidia species. In addition to candidate genes as targets for resistance breeding programs, our findings highlight the

  19. Induced systemic resistance (ISR) in Arabidopsis thaliana against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato by 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains that produce the polyketide antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) are among the most effective rhizobacteria that suppress root and crown rots, wilts and damping-off diseases of a variety of crops, and they play a key role in the natural suppressiveness of ...

  20. Concomitant induction of systemic resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. lachrymans in cucumber by Trichoderma asperellum (T-203) and accumulation of phytoalexins.

    PubMed

    Yedidia, Iris; Shoresh, Michal; Kerem, Zohar; Benhamou, Nicole; Kapulnik, Yoram; Chet, Ilan

    2003-12-01

    Most studies on the reduction of disease incidence in soil treated with Trichoderma asperellum have focused on microbial interactions rather than on plant responses. This study presents conclusive evidence for the induction of a systemic response against angular leaf spot of cucumber (Pseudomonas syringae pv. lachrymans) following application of T. asperellum to the root system. To ascertain that T. asperellum was the only microorganism present in the root milieu, plants were grown in an aseptic hydroponic growth system. Disease symptoms were reduced by as much as 80%, corresponding to a reduction of 2 orders of magnitude in bacterial cell densities in leaves of plants pretreated with T. asperellum. As revealed by electron microscopy, bacterial cell proliferation in these plants was halted. The protection afforded by the biocontrol agent was associated with the accumulation of mRNA of two defense genes: the phenylpropanoid pathway gene encoding phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and the lipoxygenase pathway gene encoding hydroxyperoxide lyase (HPL). This was further supported by the accumulation of secondary metabolites of a phenolic nature that showed an increase of up to sixfold in inhibition capacity of bacterial growth in vitro. The bulk of the antimicrobial activity was found in the acid-hydrolyzed extract containing the phenolics in their aglycone form. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of phenolic compounds showed a marked change in their profile in the challenged, preelicited plants relative to that in challenged controls. The results suggest that similar to beneficial rhizobacteria, T. asperellum may activate separate metabolic pathways in cucumber that are involved in plant signaling and biosynthesis, eventually leading to the systemic accumulation of phytoalexins.

  1. Persistence and translocation of a benzothiadiazole derivative in tomato plants in relation to systemic acquired resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato.

    PubMed

    Scarponi, L; Buonaurio, R; Martinetti, L

    2001-03-01

    A reproducible and accurate procedure, based on HPLC analysis, has been developed to determine simultaneously acibenzolar-S-methyl (CGA 245 704) and its acid derivative (CGA 210 007) in tomato leaves. The limit of detection and quantification of the method are 0.015 and 0.15 mg litre-1 for CGA 245 704 and 0.030 and 0.30 mg litre-1 for CGA 210 007. In tomato plants treated with 250 microM CGA 245 704, it was found that the inducer rapidly translocates from treated leaves (cotyledons, 1st and 2nd) to untreated leaves (3rd to 5th), with the maximum translocation (40% of the total quantity found) occurring 8 h after the treatment. CGA 245 704 residues decreased as time elapsed in both treated and untreated tomato leaves, reaching negligible values 72 h after treatment. The acid derivative, CGA 210 007, was formed in tomato plants as early as 2 h after CGA 245 704 treatment, albeit only in the treated leaves. CGA 210 007 residues decreased in treated tomato leaves with a trend similar to that observed for CGA 245 704. Treatment of tomato plants with CGA 245 704 or CGA 210 007 at 250 microM systemically protected the plants against Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato attacks, the causal agent of bacterial speak disease. Evidence of this were reductions in the degree of infection, the bacterial lesion diameter and the bacterial growth in planta. Since neither CGA 245 704 nor CGA 210 007 inhibited bacterial growth in vitro and the protection against bacterial speak of tomato was observed when the two compounds were completely degraded, the protection must be due to the activation of the plant's defence mechanisms.

  2. Natural Variation for Responsiveness to flg22, flgII-28, and csp22 and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in Heirloom Tomatoes

    PubMed Central

    Veluchamy, Selvakumar; Hind, Sarah R.; Dunham, Diane M.; Martin, Gregory B.; Panthee, Dilip R.

    2014-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is susceptible to many diseases including bacterial speck caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Bacterial speck disease is a serious problem worldwide in tomato production areas where moist conditions and cool temperatures occur. To enhance breeding of speck resistant fresh-market tomato cultivars we identified a race 0 field isolate, NC-C3, of P. s. pv. tomato in North Carolina and used it to screen a collection of heirloom tomato lines for speck resistance in the field. We observed statistically significant variation among the heirloom tomatoes for their response to P. s. pv. tomato NC-C3 with two lines showing resistance approaching a cultivar that expresses the Pto resistance gene, although none of the heirloom lines have Pto. Using an assay that measures microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we investigated whether the heirloom lines showed differential responsiveness to three bacterial-derived peptide MAMPs: flg22 and flgII-28 (from flagellin) and csp22 (from cold shock protein). Significant differences were observed for MAMP responsiveness among the lines, although these differences did not correlate strongly with resistance or susceptibility to bacterial speck disease. The identification of natural variation for MAMP responsiveness opens up the possibility of using a genetic approach to identify the underlying loci and to facilitate breeding of cultivars with enhanced disease resistance. Towards this goal, we discovered that responsiveness to csp22 segregates as a single locus in an F2 population of tomato. PMID:25180693

  3. Overexpression of Nictaba-Like Lectin Genes from Glycine max Confers Tolerance toward Pseudomonas syringae Infection, Aphid Infestation and Salt Stress in Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants

    PubMed Central

    Van Holle, Sofie; Smagghe, Guy; Van Damme, Els J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved a sophisticated immune system that allows them to recognize invading pathogens by specialized receptors. Carbohydrate-binding proteins or lectins are part of this immune system and especially the lectins that reside in the nucleocytoplasmic compartment are known to be implicated in biotic and abiotic stress responses. The class of Nictaba-like lectins (NLL) groups all proteins with homology to the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) lectin, known as a stress-inducible lectin. Here we focus on two Nictaba homologs from soybean (Glycine max), referred to as GmNLL1 and GmNLL2. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of fusion constructs with the green fluorescent protein either transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves or stably transformed in tobacco BY-2 suspension cells revealed a nucleocytoplasmic localization for the GmNLLs under study. RT-qPCR analysis of the transcript levels for the Nictaba-like lectins in soybean demonstrated that the genes are expressed in several tissues throughout the development of the plant. Furthermore, it was shown that salt treatment, Phytophthora sojae infection and Aphis glycines infestation trigger the expression of particular NLL genes. Stress experiments with Arabidopsis lines overexpressing the NLLs from soybean yielded an enhanced tolerance of the plant toward bacterial infection (Pseudomonas syringae), insect infestation (Myzus persicae) and salinity. Our data showed a better performance of the transgenic lines compared to wild type plants, indicating that the NLLs from soybean are implicated in the stress response. These data can help to further elucidate the physiological importance of the Nictaba-like lectins from soybean, which can ultimately lead to the design of crop plants with a better tolerance to changing environmental conditions. PMID:27826309

  4. Histological Examination of Horse Chestnut Infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. aesculi and Non-Destructive Heat Treatment to Stop Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    de Keijzer, Jeroen; van den Broek, Lambertus A. M.; Ketelaar, Tijs; van Lammeren, André A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Since its emergence in Northwest Europe as a pathogen that infects trunks and branches of Aesculus spp. (the horse chestnuts) approximately one decade ago, Pseudomonas syringae pv. aesculi has rapidly established itself as major threat to these trees. Infected trees exhibit extensive necrosis of phloem and cambium, which can ultimately lead to dieback. The events after host entry leading to extensive necrosis are not well documented. In this work, the histopathology of this interaction is investigated and heat-treatment is explored as method to eradicate bacteria associated with established infections. The early wound-repair responses of A. hippocastanum, both in absence and presence of P. s. pv. aesculi, included cell wall lignification by a distinct layer of phloem and cortex parenchyma cells. The same cells also deposited suberin lamellae later on, suggesting this layer functions in compartmentalizing healthy from disrupted tissues. However, monitoring bacterial ingress, its construction appeared inadequate to constrain pathogen spread. Microscopic evaluation of bacterial dispersal in situ using immunolabelling and GFP-tagging of P. s. pv. aesculi, revealed two discriminative types of bacterial colonization. The forefront of lesions was found to contain densely packed bacteria, while necrotic areas housed bacterial aggregates with scattered individuals embedded in an extracellular matrix of bacterial origin containing alginate. The endophytic localization and ability of P. s. pv aesculi to create a protective matrix render it poorly accessible for control agents. To circumvent this, a method based on selective bacterial lethality at 39°C was conceived and successfully tested on A. hippocastanum saplings, providing proof of concept for controlling this disease by heat-treatment. This may be applicable for curing other tree cankers, caused by related phytopathogens. PMID:22808044

  5. Histological examination of horse chestnut infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. aesculi and non-destructive heat treatment to stop disease progression.

    PubMed

    de Keijzer, Jeroen; van den Broek, Lambertus A M; Ketelaar, Tijs; van Lammeren, André A M

    2012-01-01

    Since its emergence in Northwest Europe as a pathogen that infects trunks and branches of Aesculus spp. (the horse chestnuts) approximately one decade ago, Pseudomonas syringae pv. aesculi has rapidly established itself as major threat to these trees. Infected trees exhibit extensive necrosis of phloem and cambium, which can ultimately lead to dieback. The events after host entry leading to extensive necrosis are not well documented. In this work, the histopathology of this interaction is investigated and heat-treatment is explored as method to eradicate bacteria associated with established infections. The early wound-repair responses of A. hippocastanum, both in absence and presence of P. s. pv. aesculi, included cell wall lignification by a distinct layer of phloem and cortex parenchyma cells. The same cells also deposited suberin lamellae later on, suggesting this layer functions in compartmentalizing healthy from disrupted tissues. However, monitoring bacterial ingress, its construction appeared inadequate to constrain pathogen spread. Microscopic evaluation of bacterial dispersal in situ using immunolabelling and GFP-tagging of P. s. pv. aesculi, revealed two discriminative types of bacterial colonization. The forefront of lesions was found to contain densely packed bacteria, while necrotic areas housed bacterial aggregates with scattered individuals embedded in an extracellular matrix of bacterial origin containing alginate. The endophytic localization and ability of P. s. pv aesculi to create a protective matrix render it poorly accessible for control agents. To circumvent this, a method based on selective bacterial lethality at 39 °C was conceived and successfully tested on A. hippocastanum saplings, providing proof of concept for controlling this disease by heat-treatment. This may be applicable for curing other tree cankers, caused by related phytopathogens.

  6. Biochemical and Spectroscopic Characterization of the Non-Heme Fe(II)- and 2-Oxoglutarate-Dependent Ethylene-Forming Enzyme from Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola PK2.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Salette; Hausinger, Robert P

    2016-11-01

    The ethylene-forming enzyme (EFE) from Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola PK2 is a member of the mononuclear non-heme Fe(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent oxygenase superfamily. This enzyme is reported to simultaneously catalyze the conversion of 2OG into ethylene and three CO2 molecules and the Cδ hydroxylation of l-arginine (l-Arg) while oxidatively decarboxylating 2OG to form succinate and carbon dioxide. A new plasmid construct for expression in recombinant Escherichia coli cells allowed for the purification of large amounts of EFE with activity greater than that previously recorded. A variety of assays were used to quantify and confirm the identity of the proposed products, including the first experimental demonstration of l-Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate and guanidine derived from 5-hydroxyarginine. Selected l-Arg derivatives could induce ethylene formation without undergoing hydroxylation, demonstrating that ethylene production and l-Arg hydroxylation activities are not linked. Similarly, EFE utilizes the alternative α-keto acid 2-oxoadipate as a cosubstrate (forming glutaric acid) during the hydroxylation of l-Arg, with this reaction unlinked from ethylene formation. Kinetic constants were determined for both ethylene formation and l-Arg hydroxylation reactions. Anaerobic UV-visible difference spectra were used to monitor the binding of Fe(II) and substrates to the enzyme. On the basis of our results and what is generally known about EFE and Fe(II)- and 2OG-dependent oxygenases, an updated model for the reaction mechanism is presented.

  7. Arabidopsis AtERF014 acts as a dual regulator that differentially modulates immunity against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-07-22

    ERF transcription factors play critical roles in plant immune responses. Here, we report the function of AtERF014, a nucleus-localized transcriptional activator, in Arabidopsis immunity. Expression of AtERF014 was induced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) and Botrytis cinerea (Bc). AtERF014-overexpressing (OE) plants displayed increased Pst resistance but decreased Bc resistance, whereas AtERF014-RNAi plants exhibited decreased Pst resistance but increased Bc resistance. After Pst infection, expression of salicylic acid (SA)-responsive genes AtPR1 and AtPR5 in AtERF014-OE plants and of a jasmonic acid/ethylene-responsive gene AtPDF1.2 in AtERF014-RNAi plants was intensified but expression of AtPDF1.2 in AtERF014-OE plants and of AtPR1 and AtPR5 in AtERF014-RNAi plants was weakened. After Bc infection, expression of AtPR1 and AtPR5 in AtERF014-OE plants was attenuated but expression of AtPR1, AtPR5 and AtPDF1.2 in AtERF014-RNAi plants was strengthened. Pathogen- and flg22-induced ROS burst, expression of PTI genes and SA-induced defense were partially suppressed in AtERF014-RNAi plants, whereas pathogen-induced ROS and flg22-induced immune response were strengthened in AtER014-OE plants. Altered expression of AtERR014 affected expression of pectin biosynthetic genes and pectin content in AtERF014-RNAi plants was decreased. These data demonstrate that AtERF014 acts as a dual regulator that differentially modulates immunity against Pst and Bc in Arabidopsis.

  8. Folding kinetics and thermodynamics of Pseudomonas syringae effector protein AvrPto provide insight into translocation via the type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Jennifer E; Nicholson, Linda K

    2008-07-01

    In order to infect their hosts, many Gram-negative bacteria translocate agents of infection, called effector proteins, through the type III secretion system (TTSS) into the host cytoplasm. This process is thought to require at least partial unfolding of these agents, raising the question of how an effector protein might unfold to enable its translocation and then refold once it reaches the host cytoplasm. AvrPto is a well-studied effector protein of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato. The presence of a readily observed unfolded population of AvrPto in aqueous solution and the lack of a known secretion chaperone make it ideal for studying the kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics that facilitate translocation. Application of Nzz exchange spectroscopy revealed a global, two-state folding equilibrium with 16% unfolded population, a folding rate of 1.8 s(-1), and an unfolding rate of 0.33 s(-1) at pH 6.1. TrAvrPto stability increases with increasing pH, with only 2% unfolded population observed at pH 7.0. The R(1) relaxation of TrAvrPto, which is sensitive to both the global anisotropy of folded TrAvrPto and slow exchange between folded and unfolded conformations, provided independent verification of the global kinetic rate constants. Given the acidic apoplast in which the pathogen resides and the more basic host cytoplasm, these results offer an intriguing mechanism by which the pH dependence of stability and slow folding kinetics of AvrPto would allow efficient translocation of the unfolded form through the TTSS and refolding into its functional folded form once inside the host.

  9. Development of a Multiple Loci Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA) to Unravel the Intra-Pathovar Structure of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Populations Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Ciarroni, Serena; Gallipoli, Lorenzo; Taratufolo, Maria C.; Butler, Margi I.; Poulter, Russell T. M.; Pourcel, Christine; Vergnaud, Gilles; Balestra, Giorgio M.; Mazzaglia, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial canker of kiwifruit by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an emblematic example of a catastrophic disease of fruit crops. In 2008 a new, extremely virulent form of the pathogen emerged and rapidly devastated many Actinidia spp. orchards all over the world. In order to understand differences in populations within this pathovar and to elucidate their diffusion and movements on world scale, it is necessary to be able to quickly and on a routine basis compare new isolates with previous records. In this report a worldwide collection of 142 strains was analyzed by MLVA, chosen as investigative technique for its efficacy, reproducibility, simplicity and low cost. A panel of 13 Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR) loci was identified and used to describe the pathogen population. The MLVA clustering is highly congruent with the population structure as previously established by other molecular approaches including whole genome sequencing and correlates with geographic origin, time of isolation and virulence. For convenience, we divided the VNTR loci in two panels. Panel 1 assay, using six loci, recognizes 23 different haplotypes, clustered into ten complexes with highest congruence with previous classifications. Panel 2, with seven VNTR loci, provides discriminatory power. Using the total set of 13 VNTR loci, 58 haplotypes can be distinguished. The recent hypervirulent type shows very limited diversity and includes, beside the strains from Europe, New Zealand and Chile, a few strains from Shaanxi, China. A broad genetic variability is observed in China, but different types are also retrievable in Japan and Korea. The low virulent strains cluster together and are very different from the other MLVA genotypes. Data were used to generate a public database in MLVAbank. MLVA represents a very promising first-line assay for large-scale routine genotyping, prior to whole genome sequencing of only the most relevant samples. PMID:26262683

  10. Natural variation for responsiveness to flg22, flgII-28, and csp22 and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in heirloom tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Veluchamy, Selvakumar; Hind, Sarah R; Dunham, Diane M; Martin, Gregory B; Panthee, Dilip R

    2014-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is susceptible to many diseases including bacterial speck caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Bacterial speck disease is a serious problem worldwide in tomato production areas where moist conditions and cool temperatures occur. To enhance breeding of speck resistant fresh-market tomato cultivars we identified a race 0 field isolate, NC-C3, of P. s. pv. tomato in North Carolina and used it to screen a collection of heirloom tomato lines for speck resistance in the field. We observed statistically significant variation among the heirloom tomatoes for their response to P. s. pv. tomato NC-C3 with two lines showing resistance approaching a cultivar that expresses the Pto resistance gene, although none of the heirloom lines have Pto. Using an assay that measures microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we investigated whether the heirloom lines showed differential responsiveness to three bacterial-derived peptide MAMPs: flg22 and flgII-28 (from flagellin) and csp22 (from cold shock protein). Significant differences were observed for MAMP responsiveness among the lines, although these differences did not correlate strongly with resistance or susceptibility to bacterial speck disease. The identification of natural variation for MAMP responsiveness opens up the possibility of using a genetic approach to identify the underlying loci and to facilitate breeding of cultivars with enhanced disease resistance. Towards this goal, we discovered that responsiveness to csp22 segregates as a single locus in an F2 population of tomato.

  11. The Pseudomonas syringae effector HopQ1 promotes bacterial virulence and interacts with tomato 14-3-3 proteins in a phosphorylation-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Yadeta, Koste A; Elmore, James Mitch; Coaker, Gitta

    2013-04-01

    A key virulence strategy of bacterial pathogens is the delivery of multiple pathogen effector proteins into host cells during infection. The Hrp outer protein Q (HopQ1) effector from Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pto) strain DC3000 is conserved across multiple bacterial plant pathogens. Here, we investigated the virulence function and host targets of HopQ1 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Transgenic tomato lines expressing dexamethasone-inducible HopQ1 exhibited enhanced disease susceptibility to virulent Pto DC3000, the Pto ΔhrcC mutant, and decreased expression of a pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered marker gene after bacterial inoculation. HopQ1-interacting proteins were coimmunoprecipitated and identified by mass spectrometry. HopQ1 can associate with multiple tomato 14-3-3 proteins, including TFT1 and TFT5. HopQ1 is phosphorylated in tomato, and four phosphorylated peptides were identified by mass spectrometry. HopQ1 possesses a conserved mode I 14-3-3 binding motif whose serine-51 residue is phosphorylated in tomato and regulates its association with TFT1 and TFT5. Confocal microscopy and fractionation reveal that HopQ1 exhibits nucleocytoplasmic localization, while HopQ1 dephosphorylation mimics exhibit more pronounced nuclear localization. HopQ1 delivered from Pto DC3000 was found to promote bacterial virulence in the tomato genotype Rio Grande 76R. However, the HopQ1(S51A) mutant delivered from Pto DC3000 was unable to promote pathogen virulence. Taken together, our data demonstrate that HopQ1 enhances bacterial virulence and associates with tomato 14-3-3 proteins in a phosphorylation-dependent manner that influences HopQ1's subcellular localization and virulence-promoting activities in planta.

  12. Expression of Pseudomonas syringae type III effectors in yeast under stress conditions reveals that HopX1 attenuates activation of the high osmolarity glycerol MAP kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Dor; Bosis, Eran; Dar, Daniel; Nachman, Iftach; Sessa, Guido

    2012-11-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) is the causal agent of speck disease in tomato. Pst pathogenicity depends on a type III secretion system that delivers effector proteins into host cells, where they promote disease by manipulating processes to the advantage of the pathogen. Previous studies identified seven Pst effectors that inhibit growth when expressed in yeast under normal growth conditions, suggesting that they interfere with cellular processes conserved in yeast and plants. We hypothesized that effectors also target conserved cellular processes that are required for yeast growth only under stress conditions. We therefore examined phenotypes induced by expression of Pst effectors in yeast grown in the presence of various stressors. Out of 29 effectors tested, five (HopX1, HopG1, HopT1-1, HopH1 and AvrPtoB) displayed growth inhibition phenotypes only in combination with stress conditions. Viability assays revealed that the HopX1 effector caused loss of cell viability under prolonged osmotic stress. Using transcription reporters, we found that HopX1 attenuated the activation of the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, which is responsible for yeast survival under osmotic stress, while other MAPK pathways were mildly affected by HopX1. Interestingly, HopX1-mediated phenotypes in yeast were dependent on the putative transglutaminase catalytic triad of the effector. This study enlarges the pool of phenotypes available for the functional analysis of Pst type III effectors in yeast, and exemplifies how analysis of phenotypes detected in yeast under stress conditions can lead to the identification of eukaryotic cellular processes affected by bacterial effectors.

  13. A virus-induced gene silencing screen identifies a role for Thylakoid Formation1 in Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato symptom development in tomato and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wangdi, Tamding; Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao; Nagaraj, Satish; Ryu, Choong-Min; Bender, Carol L; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000), which causes disease in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), produces coronatine (COR), a non-host-specific phytotoxin. COR, which functions as a jasmonate mimic, is required for full virulence of Pst DC3000 and for the induction of chlorosis in host plants. Previous genetic screens based on insensitivity to COR and/or methyl jasmonate identified several potential targets for COR and methyl jasmonate. In this study, we utilized Nicotiana benthamiana and virus-induced gene silencing to individually reduce the expression of over 4,000 genes. The silenced lines of N. benthamiana were then screened for altered responses to purified COR. Using this forward genetics approach, several genes were identified with altered responses to COR. These were designated as ALC (for altered COR response) genes. When silenced, one of the identified genes, ALC1, produced a hypersensitive/necrosis-like phenotype upon COR application in a Coronatine-Insensitive1 (COI1)-dependent manner. To understand the involvement of ALC1 during the Pst DC3000-host interaction, we used the nucleotide sequence of ALC1 and identified its ortholog in Arabidopsis (Thylakoid Formation1 [THF1]) and tomato (SlALC1). In pathogenicity assays performed on Arabidopsis thf1 mutant and SlALC1-silenced tomato plants, Pst DC3000 induced accelerated coalescing necrotic lesions. Furthermore, we showed that COR affects ALC1 localization in chloroplasts in a COI1-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results show that the virus-induced gene silencing-based forward genetic screen has the potential to identify new players in COR signaling and disease-associated necrotic cell death.

  14. The Arabidopsis ZED1 pseudokinase is required for ZAR1-mediated immunity induced by the Pseudomonas syringae type III effector HopZ1a

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jennifer D.; Lee, Amy Huei-Yi; Hassan, Jana A.; Wan, Janet; Hurley, Brenden; Jhingree, Jacquelyn R.; Wang, Pauline W.; Lo, Timothy; Youn, Ji-Young; Guttman, David S.; Desveaux, Darrell

    2013-01-01

    Plant and animal pathogenic bacteria can suppress host immunity by injecting type III secreted effector (T3SE) proteins into host cells. However, T3SEs can also elicit host immunity if the host has evolved a means to recognize the presence or activity of specific T3SEs. The diverse YopJ/HopZ/AvrRxv T3SE superfamily, which is found in both animal and plant pathogens, provides examples of T3SEs playing this dual role. The T3SE HopZ1a is an acetyltransferase carried by the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae that elicits effector-triggered immunity (ETI) when recognized in Arabidopsis thaliana by the nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) protein ZAR1. However, recognition of HopZ1a does not require any known ETI-related genes. Using a forward genetics approach, we identify a unique ETI-associated gene that is essential for ZAR1-mediated immunity. The hopZ-ETI-deficient1 (zed1) mutant is specifically impaired in the recognition of HopZ1a, but not the recognition of other unrelated T3SEs or in pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-triggered immunity. ZED1 directly interacts with both HopZ1a and ZAR1 and is acetylated on threonines 125 and 177 by HopZ1a. ZED1 is a nonfunctional kinase that forms part of small genomic cluster of kinases in Arabidopsis. We hypothesize that ZED1 acts as a decoy to lure HopZ1a to the ZAR1–resistance complex, resulting in ETI activation. PMID:24170858

  15. Development of a Multiple Loci Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA) to Unravel the Intra-Pathovar Structure of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Populations Worldwide.

    PubMed

    Ciarroni, Serena; Gallipoli, Lorenzo; Taratufolo, Maria C; Butler, Margi I; Poulter, Russell T M; Pourcel, Christine; Vergnaud, Gilles; Balestra, Giorgio M; Mazzaglia, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial canker of kiwifruit by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an emblematic example of a catastrophic disease of fruit crops. In 2008 a new, extremely virulent form of the pathogen emerged and rapidly devastated many Actinidia spp. orchards all over the world. In order to understand differences in populations within this pathovar and to elucidate their diffusion and movements on world scale, it is necessary to be able to quickly and on a routine basis compare new isolates with previous records. In this report a worldwide collection of 142 strains was analyzed by MLVA, chosen as investigative technique for its efficacy, reproducibility, simplicity and low cost. A panel of 13 Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR) loci was identified and used to describe the pathogen population. The MLVA clustering is highly congruent with the population structure as previously established by other molecular approaches including whole genome sequencing and correlates with geographic origin, time of isolation and virulence. For convenience, we divided the VNTR loci in two panels. Panel 1 assay, using six loci, recognizes 23 different haplotypes, clustered into ten complexes with highest congruence with previous classifications. Panel 2, with seven VNTR loci, provides discriminatory power. Using the total set of 13 VNTR loci, 58 haplotypes can be distinguished. The recent hypervirulent type shows very limited diversity and includes, beside the strains from Europe, New Zealand and Chile, a few strains from Shaanxi, China. A broad genetic variability is observed in China, but different types are also retrievable in Japan and Korea. The low virulent strains cluster together and are very different from the other MLVA genotypes. Data were used to generate a public database in MLVAbank. MLVA represents a very promising first-line assay for large-scale routine genotyping, prior to whole genome sequencing of only the most relevant samples.

  16. Mqo, a tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme, is required for virulence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 on Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mellgren, Eve M; Kloek, Andrew P; Kunkel, Barbara N

    2009-05-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria, such as Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000, the causative agent of tomato bacterial speck disease, grow to high levels in the apoplastic space between plant cells. Colonization of plant tissue requires expression of virulence factors that modify the apoplast to make it more suitable for pathogen growth or facilitate adaptation of the bacteria to the apoplastic environment. To identify new virulence factors involved in these processes, DC3000 Tn5 transposon insertion mutants with reduced virulence on Arabidopsis thaliana were identified. In one of these mutants, the Tn5 insertion disrupted the malate:quinone oxidoreductase gene (mqo), which encodes an enzyme of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. mqo mutants do not grow to wild-type levels in plant tissue at early time points during infection. Further, plants infected with mqo mutants develop significantly reduced disease symptoms, even when the growth of the mqo mutant reaches wild-type levels at late stages of infection. Mutants lacking mqo function grow more slowly in culture than wild-type bacteria when dicarboxylates are the only available carbon source. To explore whether dicarboxylates are important for growth of DC3000 in the apoplast, we disrupted the dctA1 dicarboxylate transporter gene. DC3000 mutants lacking dctA1 do not grow to wild-type levels in planta, indicating that transport and utilization of dicarboxylates are important for virulence of DC3000. Thus, mqo may be required by DC3000 to meet nutritional requirements in the apoplast and may provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the important, but poorly understood process of adaptation to the host environment.

  17. Use of dominant-negative HrpA mutants to dissect Hrp pilus assembly and type III secretion in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Hoon; Kolade, Olatomirin O; Nomura, Kinya; Arvidson, Dennis N; He, Sheng Yang

    2005-06-03

    The Hrp pilus plays an essential role in the long-distance type III translocation of effector proteins from bacteria into plant cells. HrpA is the structural subunit of the Hrp pilus in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000. Little is known about the molecular features in the HrpA protein for pilus assembly or for transporting effector proteins. From previous collections of nonfunctional HrpA derivatives that carry random pentapeptide insertions or single amino acid mutations, we identified several dominant-negative mutants that blocked the ability of wild-type Pst DC3000 to elicit host responses. The dominant-negative phenotype was correlated with the disappearance of the Hrp pilus in culture and inhibition of wild-type HrpA protein self-assembly in vitro. Dominant-negative HrpA mutants can be grouped into two functional classes: one class exerted a strong dominant-negative effect on the secretion of effector proteins AvrPto and HopPtoM in culture, and the other did not. The two classes of mutant HrpA proteins carry pentapeptide insertions in discrete regions, which are interrupted by insertions without a dominant-negative effect. These results enable prediction of possible subunit-subunit interaction sites in the assembly of the Hrp pilus and suggest the usefulness of dominant-negative mutants in dissection of the role of the wild-type HrpA protein in various stages of type III translocation: protein exit across the bacterial cell wall, the assembly and/or stabilization of the Hrp pilus in the extracellular space, and Hrp pilus-mediated long-distance transport beyond the bacterial cell wall.

  18. Arabidopsis AtERF014 acts as a dual regulator that differentially modulates immunity against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    ERF transcription factors play critical roles in plant immune responses. Here, we report the function of AtERF014, a nucleus-localized transcriptional activator, in Arabidopsis immunity. Expression of AtERF014 was induced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) and Botrytis cinerea (Bc). AtERF014-overexpressing (OE) plants displayed increased Pst resistance but decreased Bc resistance, whereas AtERF014-RNAi plants exhibited decreased Pst resistance but increased Bc resistance. After Pst infection, expression of salicylic acid (SA)-responsive genes AtPR1 and AtPR5 in AtERF014-OE plants and of a jasmonic acid/ethylene-responsive gene AtPDF1.2 in AtERF014-RNAi plants was intensified but expression of AtPDF1.2 in AtERF014-OE plants and of AtPR1 and AtPR5 in AtERF014-RNAi plants was weakened. After Bc infection, expression of AtPR1 and AtPR5 in AtERF014-OE plants was attenuated but expression of AtPR1, AtPR5 and AtPDF1.2 in AtERF014-RNAi plants was strengthened. Pathogen- and flg22-induced ROS burst, expression of PTI genes and SA-induced defense were partially suppressed in AtERF014-RNAi plants, whereas pathogen-induced ROS and flg22-induced immune response were strengthened in AtER014-OE plants. Altered expression of AtERR014 affected expression of pectin biosynthetic genes and pectin content in AtERF014-RNAi plants was decreased. These data demonstrate that AtERF014 acts as a dual regulator that differentially modulates immunity against Pst and Bc in Arabidopsis. PMID:27445230

  19. A Prominent Role of the Flagellin Receptor FLAGELLIN-SENSING2 in Mediating Stomatal Response to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Weiqing; He, Sheng Yang

    2010-01-01

    The FLAGELLIN-SENSING2 (FLS2) receptor kinase recognizes bacterial flagellin and initiates a battery of downstream defense responses to reduce bacterial invasion through stomata in the epidermis and bacterial multiplication in the apoplast of infected plants. Recent studies have shown that during Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) DC3000 infection of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), FLS2-mediated immunity is actively suppressed by effector proteins (such as AvrPto and AvrPtoB) secreted through the bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS). We provide evidence here that T3SS effector-based suppression does not appear to be sufficient to overcome FLS2-based immunity during Pst DC3000 infection, but that the phytotoxin coronatine (COR) produced by Pst DC3000 also plays a critical role. COR-deficient mutants of Pst DC3000 are severely reduced in virulence when inoculated onto the leaf surface of wild-type Columbia-0 plants, but this defect was rescued almost fully in fls2 mutant plants. Although bacteria are thought to carry multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns, stomata of fls2 plants are completely unresponsive to COR-deficient mutant Pst DC3000 bacteria. The responses of fls2 plants were similar to those of the Arabidopsis G-protein alpha subunit1-3 mutant, which is defective in abscisic acid-regulated stomatal closure, but were distinct from those of the Arabidopsis non-expressor of PR genes1 mutant, which is defective in salicylic acid-dependent stomatal closure and apoplast defense. Epistasis analyses show that salicylic acid signaling acts upstream of abscisic acid signaling in bacterium-triggered stomatal closure. Taken together, these results suggest a particularly important role of FLS2-mediated resistance to COR-deficient mutant Pst DC3000 bacteria, and nonredundant roles of COR and T3SS effector proteins in the suppression of FLS2-mediated resistance in the Arabidopsis-Pst DC3000 interaction. PMID:20457804

  20. Altered Epiphytic Colonization of Mannityl Opine-Producing Transgenic Tobacco Plants by a Mannityl Opine-Catabolizing Strain of Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M.; Savka, M. A.; Hwang, I.; Farrand, S. K.; Lindow, S. E.

    1995-01-01

    The plasmid pYDH208, which confers the ability to catabolize the mannityl opines mannopine and agropine, was mobilized into the nonpathogenic Pseudomonas syringae strain Cit7. The growth of the mannityl opine-catabolizing strain Cit7(pYDH208) was compared with that of the near-isogenic non-opine-catabolizing strain Cit7xylE on leaves of wild-type tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi) and transgenic mannityl opine-producing tobacco plants (N. tabacum cv. Xanthi, line 2-26). The population size of Cit7(pYDH208) was significantly greater on the lower leaves of transgenic plants than on middle or upper leaves of those plants. The population size of Cit7(pYDH208) on lower leaves of transgenic plants was also significantly greater than the population size of Cit7xylE on similar leaves of wild-type plants. High-voltage paper electrophoresis demonstrated higher levels of mannityl opines in washings from lower- and mid-level leaves than in washings from upper-level leaves. The ability of Cit7(pYDH208) to catabolize mannityl opines in the carbon-limited phyllosphere increased the carrying capacity of the lower leaves of transgenic plants for Cit7(pYDH208). In coinoculations, the increase in the ratio of population sizes of Cit7(pYDH208) to Cit7xylE on transgenic plants was apparently due to a subtle difference in the growth rates of the two strains and to the difference in final population sizes. An ability to utilize additional carbon sources on the transgenic plants also enabled Cit7(pYDH208) to achieve a higher degree of coexistence with Cit7xylE on transgenic plants than on wild-type plants. This supports the hypothesis that the level of coexistence between epiphytic bacterial populations can be altered through nutritional resource partitioning. PMID:16535040

  1. The Arabidopsis thaliana lectin receptor kinase LecRK-I.9 is required for full resistance to Pseudomonas syringae and affects jasmonate signalling.

    PubMed

    Balagué, Claudine; Gouget, Anne; Bouchez, Olivier; Souriac, Camille; Haget, Nathalie; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Govers, Francine; Roby, Dominique; Canut, Hervé

    2016-07-11

    On microbial attack, plants can detect invaders and activate plant innate immunity. For the detection of pathogen molecules or cell wall damage, plants employ receptors that trigger the activation of defence responses. Cell surface proteins that belong to large families of lectin receptor kinases are candidates to function as immune receptors. Here, the function of LecRK-I.9 (At5g60300), a legume-type lectin receptor kinase involved in cell wall-plasma membrane contacts and in extracellular ATP (eATP) perception, was studied through biochemical, gene expression and reverse genetics approaches. In Arabidopsis thaliana, LecRK-I.9 expression is rapidly, highly and locally induced on inoculation with avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst). Two allelic lecrk-I.9 knock-out mutants showed decreased resistance to Pst. Conversely, over-expression of LecRK-I.9 led to increased resistance to Pst. The analysis of defence gene expression suggests an alteration of both the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signalling pathways. In particular, LecRK-I.9 expression during plant-pathogen interaction was dependent on COI1 (CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1) and JAR1 (JASMONATE RESISTANT 1) components, and JA-responsive transcription factors (TFs) showed altered levels of expression in plants over-expressing LecRK-I.9. A similar misregulation of these TFs was obtained by JA treatment. This study identified LecRK-I.9 as necessary for full resistance to Pst and demonstrated its involvement in the control of defence against pathogens through a regulation of JA signalling components. The role of LecRK-I.9 is discussed with regard to the potential molecular mechanisms linking JA signalling to cell wall damage and/or eATP perception.

  2. Identification of a locus in arabidopsis controlling both the expression of rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) and basal resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato.

    PubMed

    Ton, J; Pieterse, C M; Van Loon, L C

    1999-10-01

    Selected nonpathogenic rhizobacteria with biological disease control activity are able to elicit an induced systemic resistance (ISR) response that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Ten ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana were screened for their potential to express rhizobacteria-mediated ISR and pathogen-induced SAR against the leaf pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst). All ecotypes expressed SAR. However, of the 10 ecotypes tested, ecotypes RLD and Wassilewskija (Ws) did not develop ISR after treatment of the roots with nonpathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS417r bacteria. This nonresponsive phenotype was associated with relatively high susceptibility to Pst infection. The F1 progeny of crosses between the non-responsive ecotypes RLD and Ws on the one hand, and the responsive ecotypes Columbia (Col) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) on the other hand, were fully capable of expressing ISR and exhibited a relatively high level of basal resistance, similar to that of their WCS417r-responsive parent. This indicates that the potential to express ISR and the relatively high level of basal resistance against Pst are both inherited as dominant traits. Analysis of the F2 and F3 progeny of a Col x RLD cross revealed that inducibility of ISR and relatively high basal resistance against Pst cosegregate in a 3:1 fashion, suggesting that both resistance mechanisms are monogenically determined and genetically linked. Neither the responsiveness to WCS417r nor the relatively high level of basal resistance against Pst were complemented in the F1 progeny of crosses between RLD and Ws, indicating that RLD and Ws are both affected in the same locus, necessary for the expression of ISR and basal resistance against Pst. The corresponding locus, designated ISR1, was mapped between markers B4 and GL1 on chromosome 3. The observed association between ISR and basal resistance against Pst suggests that rhizobacteria-mediated ISR

  3. Product of fosC, a gene from Pseudomonas syringae, mediates fosfomycin resistance by using ATP as cosubstrate.

    PubMed Central

    García, P; Arca, P; Evaristo Suárez, J

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringe PB-5123, a producer of fosfomycin, is resistant to high concentrations of the antibiotic. Two possible mechanisms of resistance have been detected: (i) impermeability to exogenous fosfomycin, even in the presence of sugar phosphate uptake inducers, and (ii) antibiotic phosphorylation. The gene responsible for this last activity, fosC, encodes a ca. 19,000-Da protein and is immediately followed by a second open reading frame, which shows sequence similarities to glutathione S-transferases. FosC uses ATP as a cosubstrate in an inactivation reaction that can be reversed with alkaline phosphatase. Other nucleotide triphosphates cannot be substituted for ATP in this reaction. No relationship between fosC and the previously described genes of fosfomycin resistance was found. PMID:7492106

  4. The hrpZ gene of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola enhances resistance to rhizomania disease in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana and sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Pavli, Ourania I; Kelaidi, Georgia I; Tampakaki, Anastasia P; Skaracis, George N

    2011-03-04

    To explore possible sources of transgenic resistance to the rhizomania-causing Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV), Nicotiana benthamiana plants were constructed to express the harpin of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (HrpZ(Psph)). The HrpZ protein was expressed as an N-terminal fusion to the PR1 signal peptide (SP/HrpZ) to direct harpin accumulation to the plant apoplast. Transgene integration was verified by mPCR in all primary transformants (T0), while immunoblot analysis confirmed that the protein HrpZ(Psph) was produced and the signal peptide was properly processed. Neither T0 plants nor selfed progeny (T1) showed macroscopically visible necrosis or any other macroscopic phenotypes. However, plants expressing the SP/HrpZ(Psph) showed increased vigor and grew faster in comparison with non-transgenic control plants. Transgenic resistance was assessed after challenge inoculation with BNYVV on T1 progeny by scoring of disease symptoms and by DAS-ELISA at 20 and 30 dpi. Transgenic and control lines showed significant differences in terms of the number of plants that became infected, the timing of infection and the disease symptoms displayed. Plants expressing the SP/HrpZ(Psph) developed localized leaf necrosis in the infection area and had enhanced resistance upon challenge with BNYVV. In order to evaluate the SP/HrpZ-based resistance in the sugar beet host, A. rhizogenes-mediated root transformation was exploited as a transgene expression platform. Upon BNYVV inoculation, transgenic sugar beet hairy roots showed high level of BNYVV resistance. In contrast, the aerial non-transgenic parts of the same seedlings had virus titers that were comparable to those of the seedlings that were untransformed or transformed with wild type R1000 cells. These findings indicate that the transgenically expressed SP/HrpZ protein results in enhanced rhizomania resistance both in a model plant and sugar beet, the natural host of BNYVV. Possible molecular mechanisms

  5. Recognition of the Protein Kinase AVRPPHB SUSCEPTIBLE1 by the Disease Resistance Protein RESISTANCE TO PSEUDOMONAS SYRINGAE5 Is Dependent on S-Acylation and an Exposed Loop in AVRPPHB SUSCEPTIBLE11[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Dong; Dubiella, Ullrich; Kim, Sang Hee; Sloss, D. Isaiah; Dowen, Robert H.; Dixon, Jack E.; Innes, Roger W.

    2014-01-01

    The recognition of pathogen effector proteins by plants is typically mediated by intracellular receptors belonging to the nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) family. NLR proteins often detect pathogen effector proteins indirectly by detecting modification of their targets. How NLR proteins detect such modifications is poorly understood. To address these questions, we have been investigating the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) NLR protein RESISTANCE TO PSEUDOMONAS SYRINGAE5 (RPS5), which detects the Pseudomonas syringae effector protein Avirulence protein Pseudomonas phaseolicolaB (AvrPphB). AvrPphB is a cysteine protease that specifically targets a subfamily of receptor-like cytoplasmic kinases, including the Arabidopsis protein kinase AVRPPHB Susceptible1 (PBS1). RPS5 is activated by the cleavage of PBS1 at the apex of its activation loop. Here, we show that RPS5 activation requires that PBS1 be localized to the plasma membrane and that plasma membrane localization of PBS1 is mediated by amino-terminal S-acylation. We also describe the development of a high-throughput screen for mutations in PBS1 that block RPS5 activation, which uncovered four new pbs1 alleles, two of which blocked cleavage by AvrPphB. Lastly, we show that RPS5 distinguishes among closely related kinases by the amino acid sequence (SEMPH) within an exposed loop in the C-terminal one-third of PBS1. The SEMPH loop is located on the opposite side of PBS1 from the AvrPphB cleavage site, suggesting that RPS5 associates with the SEMPH loop while leaving the AvrPphB cleavage site exposed. These findings provide support for a model of NLR activation in which NLR proteins form a preactivation complex with effector targets and then sense a conformational change in the target induced by effector modification. PMID:24225654

  6. Expression of a metacaspase gene of Nicotiana benthamiana after inoculation with Colletotrichum destructivum or Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, and the effect of silencing the gene on the host response.

    PubMed

    Hao, L; Goodwin, P H; Hsiang, T

    2007-10-01

    Metacaspases are cysteine proteinases that have homology to caspases, which play a central role in signaling and executing programmed cell death in animals. A type II metacaspase cDNA, NbMCA1, was amplified from Nicotiana benthamiana infected with Colletotrichum destructivum. It showed a peak in expression at 72 h post-inoculation corresponding with the switch to necrotrophy by C. destructivum. Inoculation of N. benthamiana with an incompatible bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, which should induce a non-host hypersensitive response (HR), did not result in an increase in NbMCA1 expression at the time of necrosis development at 20-24 h postinoculation. Virus-induced silencing of NbMCA1 resulted in three to four times more lesions due to C. destructivum compared with leaves inoculated with the PVX vector without the cloned metacaspase gene or inoculated with water only. However, virus-induced silencing of NbMCA1 did not affect the HR necrosis or population levels of P. syringae pv. tomato. Although this metacaspase gene does not appear to be involved in the programmed cell death of non-host HR resistance to P. syringae, it does affect the susceptibility of N. benthami