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Sample records for pseudorotating molecular top

  1. Pseudorotational Dynamics of Small Molecular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2001-03-01

    A variety of dynamic effects related to the pseudorotation of triatomic singly charged species is explored using the Electron Nuclear Dynamics(END)Theory. The concepts relevant to the motion studied are developed through the analysis of the simplest polyatomic molecule, namely H3+. It is shown that the limiting situation of circular pseudorotation is unattainable for this case. This observation is explained by the anisotropy of the ground state potential energy surface caused by the interaction between the D3h ground state of the molecule and its twofold degenerate first excited state. Further, pseudorotational motion is demonstrated to induce a rotational mode which in turn couples the two shape oscillation modes by action of the Coriolis force. Analogous phenomena are found for Li3+. The Jahn-Teller system C3+ exhibits a range of new motional effects. Particularly, a characteristic frequency shift between the two shape oscillation modes is obtained, resulting from the anisotropy in the curvature of the C2v minimum of C3+. The Jahn-Teller parameters of the system are determined from Electron Nuclear Dynamics simulations.

  2. Pseudorotation in fullerene anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Janette L.; Hands, Ian D.; Bates, Colin A.

    2007-07-01

    Jahn-Teller (JT) problems are often characterised by an adiabatic potential energy surface (APES) containing either a set of isoenergetic wells or a trough of equivalent-energy points, which may be warped by higher-order coupling terms or anisotropic effects. In all three cases, the JT effect will be dynamic. Either tunnelling between the wells or rotation (of a distortion) around the trough will restore the original symmetry of the system. This motion is referred to as pseudorotation. It should be possible to observe a JT system in a distorted geometry if measurements are made on a sufficiently short timescale. In various cubic systems, this timescale has been calculated to be the order of picoseconds. Such timescales are accessible using modern methods of ultrafast spectroscopy. Measurements of pseudorotation rates can lead to important information on the strength and nature of the JT coupling present. We will present analytical calculations that allow the rate of pseudorotation to be determined in terms of the vibronic coupling parameters. We will show how these results can be applied to E ⊗ e systems and then to the more complicated system applicable to C60- anions. This is of particular interest because of the high icosahedral symmetry of fullerene ions and also because of the many potential uses of materials containing these ions. We conclude by outlining experiments that should be capable of measuring pseudorotation in C 60 anions.

  3. Probing the Structure, Pseudorotation, and Radial Vibrations of Cyclopentane by Femtosecond Rotational Raman Coherence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, Philipp; Frey, Hans-Martin; Infanger, Daniel; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2015-11-12

    Femtosecond time-resolved Raman rotational coherence spectroscopy (RCS) is employed to determine accurate rotational, vibration–rotation coupling constants, and centrifugal distortion constants of cyclopentane (C5H10). Its lowest-frequency vibration is a pseudorotating ring deformation that interconverts 10 permutationally distinct but energetically degenerate "twist" minima interspersed by 10 "bent" conformers. While the individual twist and bent structures are polar asymmetric tops, the pseudorotation is fast on the time scale of external rotation, rendering cyclopentane a fluxionally nonpolar symmetric top molecule. The pseudorotational level pattern corresponds to a one-dimensional internal rotor with a pseudorotation constant Bps ≈ 2.8 cm(-1). The pseudorotational levels are significantly populated up to l = ± 13 at 298 K; <10% of the molecules are in the l = 0 level. The next-higher vibration is the “radial” ν23 ring deformation mode at 273 cm–1, which is far above the pseudorotational fundamental. Femtosecond Raman RCS measurements were performed in a gas cell at T = 293 K and in a pulsed supersonic jet at T ≈ 90 K. The jet cooling reduces the pseudorotational distribution to l < ±8 and eliminates the population of ν23, allowing one to determine the rotational constant as A0 = B0 = 6484.930(11) MHz. This value is ∼300 times more precise than the previous value. The fit of the RCS transients reveals that the rotation–pseudorotation coupling constant αe,psB = −0.00070(1) MHz is diminutive, implying that excitation of the pseudorotation has virtually no effect on the B0 rotational constant of cyclopentane. The smallness of αe,psB can be realized when comparing to the vibration–rotation coupling constant of the ν23 vibration, αe,23B = -9.547(1) MHz, which is about 104 times larger.

  4. Computation of the pseudorotation matrix to satisfy the Eckart axis conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymarsky, Anatoly Y.; Kudin, Konstantin N.

    2005-03-01

    A general solution for satisfying the Eckart axis conditions [C. Eckart, Phys. Rev. 47, 552 (1935)] is presented. The goal is to find such a pseudorotation matrix T that the vector product between the reference molecular conformation R and another transformed conformation r' is zero [∑amara'×Ra=0;ra'=Tra]. Our solution avoids the limitations of the earlier one [H. M. Pickett and H. L. Strauss, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 92, 7281 (1970)], which fails when one of the involved intermediate matrices is singular. We also discuss how to choose among the always nonunique pseudorotation matrices T the one that represents a true rotation for situations when an alignment of the two conformations is desired.

  5. Pseudorotation dynamics in liquid cyclopentane by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPhail, Richard A.; Variyar, Jayasankar E.

    1989-09-01

    We have measured isotropic Raman spectra of cyclopentane- d9 in the CH stretching region from 180 to 300 K. The spectra show what is apparently a partial motional averaging of the CH stretching bands by pseudorotation, a barrierless conformational rearrangement. We have fit the experimental spectra with a model in which the pseudorotation dynamics are described as one-dimensional diffusion on a ring, with an exponentially decaying temporal memory function. Although the fit to the data is good the resulting values of the parameters indicate that the model is unsatisfactory and that inertial behavior must be included.

  6. Cyclotetraphosphinophosphonium ions: synthesis, structures, and pseudorotation.

    PubMed

    Dyker, C Adam; Riegel, Susanne D; Burford, Neil; Lumsden, Michael D; Decken, Andreas

    2007-06-13

    The first derivatives of catenated cyclotetraphosphinophosphonium cations, [(PhP)4PPhMe]+ (8a), [(MeP)4PMe2]+ (8b), [(CyP)4PPh2]+ (8d), [(CyP)4PMe2]+ (8e), [(PhP)4PPh2]+ (8f), [(PhP)4PMe2]+ (8g), are synthesized as trifluoromethanesulfonate (triflate, OSO2CF3-) salts through the reaction of cyclopentaphosphines (PhP)5 (4a) or (MeP)5 (4b) with methyl triflate (MeOTf) or by a net phosphenium ion [PR2+, R = Ph, Me; from R2PCl and trimethylsilyltriflate (Me3SiOTf)] insertion into the P-P bond of either cyclotetraphosphine (CyP)4 (3c) or cyclopentaphosphines (PhP)5 (4a) or (MeP)5 (4b). Although more conveniently prepared from 4a, compound 8a[OTf] can also be formed from (PhP)4 (3a) and MeOTf, and derivatives 8f[OTf] and 8g[OTf] are also accessible through reactions of 3a and R2PCl/Me3SiOTf with R = Ph or Me, respectively. A tetrachlorogallate salt of [(PhP)4PPhtBu]+ (8c) has been synthesized by alkylation of 4a with tBuCl/GaCl3. 31P[1H] NMR parameters for all derivatives of 8 have been determined by iterative simulation of experimental data. Derivatives 8a[OTf], 8b[OTf], 8c[GaCl4], 8e[OTf], 8f[OTf], and 8g[OTf] and have been characterized by X-ray crystallography, showing the most favorable all-trans configuration of substituents for the phosphine centers, thus minimizing steric interactions. Each derivative adopts a unique envelope or twist conformation of C1 symmetry. The effective C2 symmetry observed for 8b, d, e, f, and g in solution, signified by their 31P[1H] NMR AA'BB'X spin systems, implies a rapid conformational exchange for derivatives of 8. The core frameworks of the cations in the solid state are viewed as snapshots of different conformational isomers within the solution-phase pseudorotation process.

  7. Theoretical ab initio study of Xenon pentafluoride anion. Mechanism of Xenon pseudorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleurat-Lessard, Paul; Durupthy, Olivier; Volatron, François

    2002-09-01

    Ab initio calculations have been performed on XeF 5- anion at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels with a large basis set. Four extrema have been optimized and characterized by frequencies analysis. We find the absolute minimum to be of D 5h symmetry in accordance with the experimental data; the theoretical vibrational spectrum of this minimum is in good agreement with the experimental one. Three other extrema are found to be higher in energy depending on the angular separation of the Xenon lone pairs as predicted by the VSEPR theory. Finally the characterized transition state has been found to belong to the Xenon pseudorotation pathway.

  8. Quantum friction of pseudorotation in Jahn-Teller system: Passage through conical intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pae, Kaja; Hizhnyakov, Vladimir

    2016-08-01

    A theoretical study of the relaxation of an excited impurity center with strong E × e-type Jahn-Teller effect, caused by the emission of phonons to the bulk, is presented. The dependence of the passing the system through the conical intersection of the potential surface on the momentum of the pseudorotation is figured out. An analytical description of the quantum states of the conical intersection (Slonczewski resonances) is given. It is found that for realistic vibronic interactions with phonons, the characteristic time of the energy loss is several tenths of mean periods of phonons, i.e., it is in the picosecond range. It is also found that there is a finite probability of the speeding-up of the pseudorotation of the system at the intermediate stage of relaxation. In particular, this probability increases close to the Slonczewski resonances. During the relaxation, the system may change the direction of the pseudomoment; the probability of such a change also increases near the resonances.

  9. Top 10 Plant Viruses in Molecular Plant Pathology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scientific and economic importance were used to rank plant viruses to indicate the Top 10. Each virus is discussed to open debate and conversation within and beyond the plant virology community as new pathogens come and go in importance....

  10. Pseudorotational epitaxy of self-assembled octadecyltrichlorosilane monolayers on sapphire (0001)

    DOE PAGES

    Steinrück, H. -G.; Magerl, A.; Deutsch, M.; ...

    2014-10-06

    The structure of octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on sapphire (0001) was studied by Å-resolution surface-specific x-ray scattering methods. The monolayer was found to consist of three sublayers where the outermost layer corresponds to vertically oriented, closely packed alkyl tails. Laterally, the monolayer is hexagonally packed and exhibits pseudorotational epitaxy to the sapphire, manifested by a broad scattering peak at zero relative azimuthal rotation, with long powderlike tails. The lattice mismatch of ~1% – 3% to the sapphire’s and the different length scale introduced by the lateral Si-O-Si bonding prohibit positional epitaxy. However, the substrate induces an intriguing increase in themore » crystalline coherence length of the SAM’s powderlike crystallites when rotationally aligned with the sapphire’s lattice. As a result, the increase correlates well with the rotational dependence of the separation of corresponding substrate-monolayer lattice sites.« less

  11. Non-adiabatic effects in the pseudorotational motion of triatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelberg, Frank; Deumens, Erik

    2002-03-01

    Electron-Nuclear Dynamics (END) theory simulations have been performed with the aim to understand the dynamic aspects of triatomic molecules in pseudorotational motion. More specifically, the units H_3^+ and Li_3^+ are investigated close to the threshold of dissociation. For both species, the dynamic response of the electronic system to the nuclear motion is examined by the computation of electronic angular momentum expectation values. The respective results differ markedly for alpha and beta spin orientations, reflecting the emergence of rapid spin oscillations. This phenomenon is investigated by a detailed analysis of the electronic excitation content in both molecules. This is achieved by projection of the dynamic wavefunction on adiabatic electronic states which are evaluated along the nuclear trajectories. From an inspection of the phase relations between the expansion coefficients for electronic excitations with alpha and beta spin orientation, we conclude that the systems maximize the observed spin polarization effects.

  12. Pseudorotational epitaxy of self-assembled octadecyltrichlorosilane monolayers on sapphire (0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Steinrück, H. -G.; Magerl, A.; Deutsch, M.; Ocko, B. M.

    2014-10-06

    The structure of octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on sapphire (0001) was studied by Å-resolution surface-specific x-ray scattering methods. The monolayer was found to consist of three sublayers where the outermost layer corresponds to vertically oriented, closely packed alkyl tails. Laterally, the monolayer is hexagonally packed and exhibits pseudorotational epitaxy to the sapphire, manifested by a broad scattering peak at zero relative azimuthal rotation, with long powderlike tails. The lattice mismatch of ~1% – 3% to the sapphire’s and the different length scale introduced by the lateral Si-O-Si bonding prohibit positional epitaxy. However, the substrate induces an intriguing increase in the crystalline coherence length of the SAM’s powderlike crystallites when rotationally aligned with the sapphire’s lattice. As a result, the increase correlates well with the rotational dependence of the separation of corresponding substrate-monolayer lattice sites.

  13. Top 10 plant-parasitic nematodes in molecular plant pathology.

    PubMed

    Jones, John T; Haegeman, Annelies; Danchin, Etienne G J; Gaur, Hari S; Helder, Johannes; Jones, Michael G K; Kikuchi, Taisei; Manzanilla-López, Rosa; Palomares-Rius, Juan E; Wesemael, Wim M L; Perry, Roland N

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review was to undertake a survey of researchers working with plant-parasitic nematodes in order to determine a 'top 10' list of these pathogens based on scientific and economic importance. Any such list will not be definitive as economic importance will vary depending on the region of the world in which a researcher is based. However, care was taken to include researchers from as many parts of the world as possible when carrying out the survey. The top 10 list emerging from the survey is composed of: (1) root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.); (2) cyst nematodes (Heterodera and Globodera spp.); (3) root lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus spp.); (4) the burrowing nematode Radopholus similis; (5) Ditylenchus dipsaci; (6) the pine wilt nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus; (7) the reniform nematode Rotylenchulus reniformis; (8) Xiphinema index (the only virus vector nematode to make the list); (9) Nacobbus aberrans; and (10) Aphelenchoides besseyi. The biology of each nematode (or nematode group) is reviewed briefly. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  14. Molecular characterisation of banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Amin, Imran; Qazi, Javaria; Mansoor, Shahid; Ilyas, Muhammad; Briddon, Rob W

    2008-02-01

    Banana bunchy top disease is caused by a single-stranded circular DNA virus, banana bunchy top virus (BBTV), which is a member of the genus Babuvirus (family Nanoviridae). We have cloned and sequenced five components (DNA-R, DNA-S, DNA-N, DNA-M and DNA-C) of a BBTV isolate originating from Pakistan. In addition, the DNA-R and several other components of five further isolates, originating from geographically distinct sites across the banana-growing area of Sindh province, Pakistan, were cloned and sequenced. Analysis of the sequences indicates that BBTV present in Pakistan belongs to the "South Pacific" group of isolates and that the genetic diversity of the virus in the country is very low. The virus shows the highest levels of sequence identity to BBTV isolates originating from Egypt, India and Australia. The significance of these results with respect to the possible origin of the virus in Pakistan and the prospects for obtaining genetically engineered resistance to the virus are discussed.

  15. The Top 10 oomycete pathogens in molecular plant pathology.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Sophien; Furzer, Oliver; Jones, Jonathan D G; Judelson, Howard S; Ali, Gul Shad; Dalio, Ronaldo J D; Roy, Sanjoy Guha; Schena, Leonardo; Zambounis, Antonios; Panabières, Franck; Cahill, David; Ruocco, Michelina; Figueiredo, Andreia; Chen, Xiao-Ren; Hulvey, Jon; Stam, Remco; Lamour, Kurt; Gijzen, Mark; Tyler, Brett M; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Mukhtar, M Shahid; Tomé, Daniel F A; Tör, Mahmut; Van Den Ackerveken, Guido; McDowell, John; Daayf, Fouad; Fry, William E; Lindqvist-Kreuze, Hannele; Meijer, Harold J G; Petre, Benjamin; Ristaino, Jean; Yoshida, Kentaro; Birch, Paul R J; Govers, Francine

    2015-05-01

    Oomycetes form a deep lineage of eukaryotic organisms that includes a large number of plant pathogens which threaten natural and managed ecosystems. We undertook a survey to query the community for their ranking of plant-pathogenic oomycete species based on scientific and economic importance. In total, we received 263 votes from 62 scientists in 15 countries for a total of 33 species. The Top 10 species and their ranking are: (1) Phytophthora infestans; (2, tied) Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis; (2, tied) Phytophthora ramorum; (4) Phytophthora sojae; (5) Phytophthora capsici; (6) Plasmopara viticola; (7) Phytophthora cinnamomi; (8, tied) Phytophthora parasitica; (8, tied) Pythium ultimum; and (10) Albugo candida. This article provides an introduction to these 10 taxa and a snapshot of current research. We hope that the list will serve as a benchmark for future trends in oomycete research.

  16. Comprehensive Analysis of Low-Molecular-Weight Human Plasma Proteome Using Top-Down Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Dong Huey; Nam, Eun Ji; Park, Kyu Hyung; Woo, Se Joon; Lee, Hye Jin; Kim, Hee Cheol; Yang, Eun Gyeong; Lee, Cheolju; Lee, Ji Eun

    2016-01-04

    While human plasma serves as a great source for disease diagnosis, low-molecular-weight (LMW) proteome (<30 kDa) has been shown to contain a rich source of diagnostic biomarkers. Here we employ top-down mass spectrometry to analyze the LMW proteoforms present in four types of human plasma samples pooled from three healthy controls (HCs) without immunoaffinity depletion and with depletion of the top two, six, and seven high-abundance proteins. The LMW proteoforms were first fractionated based on molecular weight using gel-eluted liquid fraction entrapment electrophoresis (GELFrEE). Then, the GELFrEE fractions containing up to 30 kDa were subjected to nanocapillary-LC-MS/MS, and the high-resolution MS and MS/MS data were processed using ProSightPC 3.0. As a result, a total of 442 LMW proteins and cleaved products, including those with post-translational modifications and single amino acid variations, were identified. From additional comparative analysis of plasma samples without immunoaffinity depletion between HCs and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients via top-down approach, tens of LMW proteoforms, including platelet factor 4, were found to show >1.5-fold changes between the plasma samples of HCs and CRC patients, and six of the LMW proteins were verified by Western blot analysis.

  17. Acid catalyzed alcoholysis of sulfinamides: unusual stereochemistry, kinetics and a question of mechanism involving sulfurane intermediates and their pseudorotation.

    PubMed

    Bujnicki, Bogdan; Drabowicz, Józef; Mikołajczyk, Marian

    2015-02-11

    The synthesis of optically active sulfinic acid esters has been accomplished by the acid catalyzed alcoholysis of optically active sulfinamides. Sulfinates are formed in this reaction with a full or predominant inversion of configuration at chiral sulfur or with predominant retention of configuration. The steric course of the reaction depends mainly on the size of the dialkylamido group in the sulfinamides and of the alcohols used as nucleophilic reagents. It has been found that bulky reaction components preferentially form sulfinates with retention of configuration. It has been demonstrated that the stereochemical outcome of the reaction can be changed from inversion to retention and vice versa by adding inorganic salts to the acidic reaction medium. The unusual stereochemistry of this typical bimolecular nucleophilic substitution reaction, as confirmed by kinetic measurements, has been rationalized in terms of the addition-elimination mechanism, A-E, involving sulfuranes as intermediates which undergo pseudorotations.

  18. Low-Molecular-Weight Plasma Proteome Analysis Using Top-Down Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Dong Huey; Yang, Eun Gyeong; Lee, Cheolju; Lee, Ji Eun

    2017-01-01

    While human plasma has a wealth of diagnostic information regarding the state of the human body in heath and disease, low molecular weight (LMW) proteome (<30 kDa) has been shown to contain a rich source of diagnostic biomarkers. Here we describe a protocol for top-down proteomic analysis to identify and characterize the LMW proteoforms present in four types of human plasma samples without immunoaffinity depletion and with depletion of the top two, six, and seven high-abundance proteins. Each type of plasma sample was first fractionated based on molecular weight using gel-eluted liquid fraction entrapment electrophoresis (GELFrEE). Then, the GELFrEE fractions containing up to 30 kDa were subjected to nanocapillary-LC-MS/MS, and the high-resolution MS and MS/MS data were processed using ProSightPC software. As a result, a total of 442 LMW proteins and cleaved products, including those with posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and single amino acid variations (SAAVs), were identified with a threshold E-value of 1 × 10(-4) from the four types of plasma samples.

  19. Pooling samples for "top-down" molecular exposomics research: the methodology.

    PubMed

    Shen, Heqing; Xu, Weipan; Peng, Siyuan; Scherb, Hagen; She, Jianwen; Voigt, Kristina; Alamdar, Ambreen; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2014-02-13

    Exposomics is the cutting-edge concept of screening the environmental risk factors for disease. In the novel "top-down" approach, we estimate the molecular exposome by measuring all body fluid analytes in a case-controlled study. However, to detect diverse pollutants, a sufficient sample size and multiple analytical methods are required. This may lead to dramatically increased costs and research workload. To help reduce complexity, we suggest a sample pooling strategy along with a scheme for combining both general unknown or multi-targeted screening with targeted analysis. The sample pooling method was tested using computer simulations. By comprehensively analysis of pooled samples, it is possible to identify environmental risk factors. Factors are initially screened in the pooled case and control population samples, then in the randomized grouped and pooled case and control subpopulation samples. In the sample grouping, five or more pools were suggested for groups having 30 individuals per pool. This study suggests that sample pooling is a useful strategy for exposomics research, which provides a hypothesis-free method for pollutant risk screening.

  20. Pooling samples for “top-down” molecular exposomics research: the methodology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposomics is the cutting-edge concept of screening the environmental risk factors for disease. In the novel “top-down” approach, we estimate the molecular exposome by measuring all body fluid analytes in a case-controlled study. However, to detect diverse pollutants, a sufficient sample size and multiple analytical methods are required. This may lead to dramatically increased costs and research workload. Methods To help reduce complexity, we suggest a sample pooling strategy along with a scheme for combining both general unknown or multi-targeted screening with targeted analysis. The sample pooling method was tested using computer simulations. Results By comprehensively analysis of pooled samples, it is possible to identify environmental risk factors. Factors are initially screened in the pooled case and control population samples, then in the randomized grouped and pooled case and control subpopulation samples. In the sample grouping, five or more pools were suggested for groups having 30 individuals per pool. Conclusions This study suggests that sample pooling is a useful strategy for exposomics research, which provides a hypothesis-free method for pollutant risk screening. PMID:24524244

  1. Molecular collisions. 11: Semiclassical approximation to atom-symmetric top rotational excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D.; Curtiss, C. F.

    1973-01-01

    In a paper of this series a distorted wave approximation to the T matrix for atom-symmetric top scattering was developed which is correct to first order in the part of the interaction potential responsible for transitions in the component of rotational angular momentum along the symmetry axis of the top. A semiclassical expression for this T matrix is derived by assuming large values of orbital and rotational angular momentum quantum numbers.

  2. Top-down models in biology: explanation and control of complex living systems above the molecular level

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    It is widely assumed in developmental biology and bioengineering that optimal understanding and control of complex living systems follows from models of molecular events. The success of reductionism has overshadowed attempts at top-down models and control policies in biological systems. However, other fields, including physics, engineering and neuroscience, have successfully used the explanations and models at higher levels of organization, including least-action principles in physics and control-theoretic models in computational neuroscience. Exploiting the dynamic regulation of pattern formation in embryogenesis and regeneration requires new approaches to understand how cells cooperate towards large-scale anatomical goal states. Here, we argue that top-down models of pattern homeostasis serve as proof of principle for extending the current paradigm beyond emergence and molecule-level rules. We define top-down control in a biological context, discuss the examples of how cognitive neuroscience and physics exploit these strategies, and illustrate areas in which they may offer significant advantages as complements to the mainstream paradigm. By targeting system controls at multiple levels of organization and demystifying goal-directed (cybernetic) processes, top-down strategies represent a roadmap for using the deep insights of other fields for transformative advances in regenerative medicine and systems bioengineering. PMID:27807271

  3. Top-down models in biology: explanation and control of complex living systems above the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Pezzulo, Giovanni; Levin, Michael

    2016-11-01

    It is widely assumed in developmental biology and bioengineering that optimal understanding and control of complex living systems follows from models of molecular events. The success of reductionism has overshadowed attempts at top-down models and control policies in biological systems. However, other fields, including physics, engineering and neuroscience, have successfully used the explanations and models at higher levels of organization, including least-action principles in physics and control-theoretic models in computational neuroscience. Exploiting the dynamic regulation of pattern formation in embryogenesis and regeneration requires new approaches to understand how cells cooperate towards large-scale anatomical goal states. Here, we argue that top-down models of pattern homeostasis serve as proof of principle for extending the current paradigm beyond emergence and molecule-level rules. We define top-down control in a biological context, discuss the examples of how cognitive neuroscience and physics exploit these strategies, and illustrate areas in which they may offer significant advantages as complements to the mainstream paradigm. By targeting system controls at multiple levels of organization and demystifying goal-directed (cybernetic) processes, top-down strategies represent a roadmap for using the deep insights of other fields for transformative advances in regenerative medicine and systems bioengineering.

  4. A top-down approach to prepare silicoaluminophosphate molecular sieve nanocrystals with improved catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Miao; Tian, Peng; Wang, Chan; Yuan, Yangyang; Yang, Yue; Xu, Shutao; He, Yanli; Liu, Zhongmin

    2014-02-21

    Silicoaluminophosphate SAPO-34 molecular sieve nanocrystals have been prepared by a post-synthesis milling and recrystallization method, which is further proven to be universally applicable to other SAPO molecular sieves. The obtained SAPO-34 with reduced Si enrichment on the external surface shows considerably improved catalytic performance in the MTO reaction.

  5. Web-Based Learning Support for Experimental Design in Molecular Biology: A Top-Down Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, Tinri; Hartog, Rob; Bisseling, Ton

    2003-01-01

    An important learning goal of a molecular biology curriculum is the attainment of a certain competence level in experimental design. Currently, undergraduate students are confronted with experimental approaches in textbooks, lectures and laboratory courses. However, most students do not reach a satisfactory level of competence in the designing of…

  6. Web-Based Learning Support for Experimental Design in Molecular Biology: A Top-Down Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, Tinri; Hartog, Rob; Bisseling, Ton

    2003-01-01

    An important learning goal of a molecular biology curriculum is the attainment of a certain competence level in experimental design. Currently, undergraduate students are confronted with experimental approaches in textbooks, lectures and laboratory courses. However, most students do not reach a satisfactory level of competence in the designing of…

  7. Symmetry-Based Techniques for Qualitative Understanding of Rovibrational Effects in Spherical-Top Molecular Spectra and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Justin Chadwick

    2011-12-01

    Using light to probe the structure of matter is as natural as opening our eyes. Modern physics and chemistry have turned this art into a rich science, measuring the delicate interactions possible at the molecular level. Perhaps the most commonly used tool in computational spectroscopy is that of matrix diagonalization. While this is invaluable for calculating everything from molecular structure and energy levels to dipole moments and dynamics, the process of numerical diagonalization is an opaque one. This work applies symmetry and semi-classical techniques to elucidate numerical spectral analysis for high-symmetry molecules. Semi-classical techniques, such as the Potential Energy Surfaces, have long been used to help understand molecular vibronic and rovibronic spectra and dynamics. This investigation focuses on newer semi-classical techniques that apply Rotational Energy Surfaces (RES) to rotational energy level clustering effects in high-symmetry molecules. Such clusters exist in rigid rotor molecules as well as deformable spherical tops. This study begins by using the simplicity of rigid symmetric top molecules to clarify the classical-quantum correspondence of RES semi-classical analysis and then extends it to a more precise and complete theory of modern high-resolution spectra. RES analysis is extended to molecules having more complex and higher rank tensorial rotational and rovibrational Hamiltonians than were possible to understand before. Such molecules are shown to produce an extraordinary range of rotational level clusters, corresponding to a panoply of symmetries ranging from C4v to C2 and C1 (no symmetry) with a corresponding range of new angular momentum localization and J-tunneling effects. Using RES topography analysis and the commutation duality relations between symmetry group operators in the lab-frame to those in the body-frame, it is shown how to better describe and catalog complex splittings found in rotational level clusters. Symmetry

  8. Inhibition of DNA Topoisomerase Type IIα (TOP2A) by Mitoxantrone and Its Halogenated Derivatives: A Combined Density Functional and Molecular Docking Study

    PubMed Central

    Abu Saleh, Md.; Solayman, Md.; Hoque, Mohammad Mazharol; Khan, Mohammad A. K.; Sarwar, Mohammed G.; Halim, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, mitoxantrone and its halogenated derivatives have been designed by density functional theory (DFT) to explore their structural and thermodynamical properties. The performance of these drugs was also evaluated to inhibit DNA topoisomerase type IIα (TOP2A) by molecular docking calculation. Noncovalent interactions play significant role in improving the performance of halogenated drugs. The combined quantum and molecular mechanics calculations revealed that CF3 containing drug shows better preference in inhibiting the TOP2A compared to other modified drugs. PMID:27088089

  9. Pseudo-rotation mechanism for fast olefin exchange and substitution processes at orthometalated C,N-complexes of platinum(II).

    PubMed

    Otto, Stefanus; Samuleev, Pavel V; Polyakov, Vladimir A; Ryabov, Alexander D; Elding, Lars I

    2004-11-07

    Bridge splitting in chloroform of the orthometalated chloro-bridged complex [Pt(micro-Cl)(2-Me(2)NCH(2)C(6)H(4))](2)(1), with ethene, cyclooctene, allyl alcohol and phosphine according to 1+ 2L --> 2[PtCl(2-Me(2)NCH(2)C(6)H(4))(L)], where L = C(2)H(4)(3a), C(8)H(14), (3b), CH(2)CHCH(2)OH (3c), and PPh(3)(4a and 4b) gives monomeric species with L coordinated trans or cis to aryl. With olefins the thermodynamically stable isomer with L coordinated cis to aryl is formed directly without an observable intermediate. With phosphine and pyridine, the kinetically controlled trans-product isomerizes slowly to the more stable cis-isomer. Bridge splitting by olefins is slow and first-order in 1 and L, with largely negative DeltaS(++). Substitution of ethene cis to aryl by cyclooctene and allyl alcohol to form 3b and 3c, and substitution of cot from 3b by allyl alcohol to form 3c are first order in olefin and complex, ca. six orders of magnitude faster than bridge cleavage due to a large decrease in DeltaH(++), and with largely negative DeltaS(++). Cyclooctene exchange at 3b is first-order with respect to free cyclooctene and platinum complex. All experimental data for olefin substitution and exchange are compatible with a concerted substitution/isomerization process via a turnstile twist pseudo-rotation in a short-lived labile five-coordinated intermediate, involving initial attack on the labile coordination position trans to the sigma-bonded aryl. Bridge-cleavage reactions of the analogous bridged complexes occur similarly, but are much slower because of their ground-state stabilization and steric hindrance.

  10. GlycCompSoft: Software for Automated Comparison of Low Molecular Weight Heparins Using Top-Down LC/MS Data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohua; Liu, Xinyue; Li, Lingyun; Zhang, Fuming; Hu, Min; Ren, Fuji; Chi, Lianli; Linhardt, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Low molecular weight heparins are complex polycomponent drugs that have recently become amenable to top-down analysis using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Even using open source deconvolution software, DeconTools, and automatic structural assignment software, GlycReSoft, the comparison of two or more low molecular weight heparins is extremely time-consuming, taking about a week for an expert analyst and provides no guarantee of accuracy. Efficient data processing tools are required to improve analysis. This study uses the programming language of Microsoft Excel™ Visual Basic for Applications to extend its standard functionality for macro functions and specific mathematical modules for mass spectrometric data processing. The program developed enables the comparison of top-down analytical glycomics data on two or more low molecular weight heparins. The current study describes a new program, GlycCompSoft, which has a low error rate with good time efficiency in the automatic processing of large data sets. The experimental results based on three lots of Lovenox®, Clexane® and three generic enoxaparin samples show that the run time of GlycCompSoft decreases from 11 to 2 seconds when the data processed decreases from 18000 to 1500 rows.

  11. Molecular characterization of banana bunchy top virus isolate from Sri Lanka and its genetic relationship with other isolates.

    PubMed

    Wickramaarachchi, W A R T; Shankarappa, K S; Rangaswamy, K T; Maruthi, M N; Rajapakse, R G A S; Ghosh, Saptarshi

    2016-06-01

    Bunchy top disease of banana caused by Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV, genus Babuvirus family Nanoviridae) is one of the most important constraints in production of banana in the different parts of the world. Six genomic DNA components of BBTV isolate from Kandy, Sri Lanka (BBTV-K) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific primers using total DNA extracted from banana tissues showing typical symptoms of bunchy top disease. The amplicons were of expected size of 1.0-1.1 kb, which were cloned and sequenced. Analysis of sequence data revealed the presence of six DNA components; DNA-R, DNA-U3, DNA-S, DNA-N, DNA-M and DNA-C for Sri Lanka isolate. Comparisons of sequence data of DNA components followed by the phylogenetic analysis, grouped Sri Lanka-(Kandy) isolate in the Pacific Indian Oceans (PIO) group. Sri Lanka-(Kandy) isolate of BBTV is classified a new member of PIO group based on analysis of six components of the virus.

  12. The release of trapped gases from amorphous solid water films. I. "Top-down" crystallization-induced crack propagation probed using the molecular volcano.

    PubMed

    May, R Alan; Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2013-03-14

    In this (Paper I) and the companion paper (Paper II; R. May, R. Smith, and B. Kay, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 104502 (2013)), we investigate the mechanisms for the release of trapped gases from underneath amorphous solid water (ASW) films. In prior work, we reported the episodic release of trapped gases in concert with the crystallization of ASW, a phenomenon that we termed the "molecular volcano." The observed abrupt desorption is due to the formation of cracks that span the film to form a connected pathway for release. In this paper, we utilize the "molecular volcano" desorption peak to characterize the formation of crystallization-induced cracks. We find that the crack length distribution is independent of the trapped gas (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, O2, or CO). Selective placement of the inert gas layer is used to show that cracks form near the top of the film and propagate downward into the film. Isothermal experiments reveal that, after some induction time, cracks propagate linearly in time with an Arrhenius dependent velocity corresponding to an activation energy of 54 kJ∕mol. This value is consistent with the crystallization growth rates reported by others and establishes a direct connection between crystallization growth rate and the crack propagation rate. A two-step model in which nucleation and crystallization occurs in an induction zone near the top of the film followed by the propagation of a crystallization∕crack front into the film is in good agreement with the temperature programmed desorption results.

  13. The Release of Trapped Gases from Amorphous Solid Water Films: I. “Top-Down” Crystallization-Induced Crack Propagation Probed using the Molecular Volcano

    SciTech Connect

    May, Robert A.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2013-03-14

    In this (Paper I) and the companion paper (Paper II) we investigate the mechanisms for the release of trapped gases from underneath of amorphous solid water (ASW) films. In prior work, we reported the episodic release of trapped gases in concert with the crystallization ASW, a phenomenon that we termed the "molecular volcano". The observed abrupt desorption is due to the formation of cracks that span the film to form a connected pathway for release. In this paper we utilize the "molecular volcano" desorption peak to characterize the formation of crystallization-induced cracks. We find that the crack length and distribution are independent of the trapped gas (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, O2 or CO). Selective placement of the inert gas layer is used to show that cracks form near the top of the film and propagate downward into the film. Isothermal experiments reveal that, after some induction time, cracks propagate linearly in time with an Arrhenius dependent velocity corresponding to an activation energy of 54 kJ/mol. This value is consistent with the crystallization growth rate reported by others and establishes a direct connection between crystallization growth rate and the crack propagation rate. A two-step model in which nucleation and crystallization occurs in an induction zone near the top of the film followed by the propagation of a crystallization/crack front into the film is in good agreement with the temperature programmed desorption results.

  14. Molecular characterization and construction of an infectious clone of a pepper isolate of Beet curly top Iran virus

    PubMed Central

    Eini, Omid; Ebadzad Sahraei, Ghazal; Behjatnia, Seyed Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Geminiviruses cause curly top disease, in dicotyledonous plants which constrains host crop production. Beet curly top Iran virus (BCTIV) is a widespread Becurtovirus (family Geminiviridae) in numerous areas within Iran. In this study, we isolated and analyzed a full-length genomic DNA of a new variant of BCTIV from pepper crops in the Kaftark region, east of Shiraz (proposed acronym: BCTIV-Kaf [IR: Kaf:2016:Pepper]). Infected pepper plants showed shortening of internodes, severe interveinal chlorosis, upward leaf rolling and leaf curling. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed this BCTIV variant grouped with sugar beet isolates of BCTIV and has the highest similarity to a sugar beet BCTIV isolate from Negar town in Kerman province, Iran. It was more distantly related to a bean isolate of BCTIV from northeast region of Iran. A tandem repeat partial dimmer of BCTIV was constructed and found to be infectious in pepper, tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Results of this study indicated that BCTIV-Kaf is a new variant of BCTIV infecting pepper plants in Shiraz and that geographic location rather than the type of host plant has more effect on genetic diversity of BCTIV in Iran. PMID:28097164

  15. Molecular structure determination from x-ray scattering patterns of laser-aligned symmetric-top molecules.

    PubMed

    Ho, P J; Starodub, D; Saldin, D K; Shneerson, V L; Ourmazd, A; Santra, R

    2009-10-07

    We investigate the molecular structure information contained in the x-ray diffraction patterns of an ensemble of rigid CF(3)Br molecules aligned by an intense laser pulse at finite rotational temperature. The diffraction patterns are calculated at an x-ray photon energy of 20 keV to probe molecular structure at angstrom-scale resolution. We find that a structural reconstruction algorithm based on iterative phase retrieval fails to extract a reliable structure. However, the high atomic number of Br compared with C or F allows each diffraction pattern to be treated as a hologram. Using this approach, the azimuthal projection of the molecular electron density about the alignment axis may be retrieved.

  16. Top studies

    SciTech Connect

    T. Dorigo

    2003-01-02

    The top quark, discovered in 1994 at the Tevatron, has proven a very interesting particle. Its characteristics allow both to perform stringent tests of electroweak theory, and to search for new physics through a deviation from standard model predictions for several of its peculiar properties. I will review the status of top physics and briefly describe the potential of experiments of the near future.

  17. Molecular and cytogenetic analysis of lymphoblastoid and colon cancer cell lines from cotton-top tamarin (Sagiunus oedipus).

    PubMed

    Mao, X; McGuire, S; Hamoudi, R A

    2000-07-01

    The cotton-top tamarin (CTT) (Sagiunus oedipus) has been used as an animal model to investigate the etiology and pathophysiology of several human diseases, including ulcerative colitis and its associated colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Little is known, however, about genetic synteny between CTT and humans, and about chromosome aberrations in CTT CRC. To address these issues, we have analyzed CTT lymphoblastoid and CRC cell lines using cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization (Zoo-FISH), and direct sequencing. The CTT lymphocytes had pseudodiploid chromosomes of 46. The CTT CRC cells showed near-diploid chromosomes of 45. Several clonal structural aberrations were observed, including der(1), a marker chromosome, and double minutes. Zoo-FISH using human chromosome 2, 3, 5, 6, 9, 11, 13, 15, 16, 17, 19, 22, and X paints identified homologous chromosomes and subchromosomal regions in the CTT genome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with human telomeric probe also detected a homologous sequence in CTT genome. Direct sequencing of CTT genomic DNA using primers amplifying exons 4 and 15 of the human APC gene identified DNA sequences in CTT genome with 99% and 95% homology, respectively. These results provide a basis for further comparative studies of CTT and human genome.

  18. Estimate of Top-of-Atmosphere Albedo for a Molecular Atmosphere over Ocean using Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, S.; Loeb, N. G.; Rutledge, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    The shortwave broadband albedo at the top of a molecular atmosphere over ocean between 40deg N and 40deg S is estimated using radiance measurements from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument and the Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The albedo monotonically increases from 0.059 at a solar zenith angle of 10deg to 0.107 at a solar zenith angle of 60deg. The estimated uncertainty in the albedo is 3.5 x 10(exp -3) caused by the uncertainty in CERES-derived irradiances, uncertainty in VIRS-derived aerosol optical thicknesses, variations in ozone and water vapor, and variations in surface wind speed. The estimated uncertainty is similar in magnitude to the standard deviation of 0.003 that is derived from 72 areas divided by 20deg latitude by 20deg longitude grid boxes. The empirically estimated albedo is compared with the modeled albedo using a radiative transfer model combined with an ocean surface bidirectional reflectivity model. The modeled albedo with standard tropical atmosphere is 0.061 and 0.111 at the solar zenith angles of 10deg and 60deg, respectively. This empirically estimated albedo can be used to estimate the direct radiative effect of aerosols at the top of the atmosphere over oceans.

  19. Estimate of Top-of-Atmosphere Albedo for a Molecular Atmosphere over Ocean using Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, S.; Loeb, N. G.; Rutledge, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    The shortwave broadband albedo at the top of a molecular atmosphere over ocean between 40deg N and 40deg S is estimated using radiance measurements from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument and the Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The albedo monotonically increases from 0.059 at a solar zenith angle of 10deg to 0.107 at a solar zenith angle of 60deg. The estimated uncertainty in the albedo is 3.5 x 10(exp -3) caused by the uncertainty in CERES-derived irradiances, uncertainty in VIRS-derived aerosol optical thicknesses, variations in ozone and water vapor, and variations in surface wind speed. The estimated uncertainty is similar in magnitude to the standard deviation of 0.003 that is derived from 72 areas divided by 20deg latitude by 20deg longitude grid boxes. The empirically estimated albedo is compared with the modeled albedo using a radiative transfer model combined with an ocean surface bidirectional reflectivity model. The modeled albedo with standard tropical atmosphere is 0.061 and 0.111 at the solar zenith angles of 10deg and 60deg, respectively. This empirically estimated albedo can be used to estimate the direct radiative effect of aerosols at the top of the atmosphere over oceans.

  20. Molecular diagnostics of the HBB gene in an Omani cohort using bench-top DNA Ion Torrent PGM technology.

    PubMed

    Hassan, S M; Vossen, R H A M; Chessa, R; den Dunnen, J T; Bakker, E; Giordano, P C; Harteveld, C L

    2014-09-01

    Hemoglobinopathies, such as sickle cell disease (SCD) and beta-thalassemia major (TM), are severe diseases and the most common autosomal recessive condition worldwide and in particular in Oman. Early screening and diagnosis of carriers are the key for primary prevention. Once a country-wide population screening program is mandated by law, a sequencing technology that can rapidly confirm or identify disease-causing mutations for a large number of patients in a short period of time will be necessary. While Sanger sequencing is the standard protocol for molecular diagnosis, next generation sequencing starts to become available to reference laboratories. Using the Ion Torrent PGM sequencer, we have analyzed a cohort of 297 unrelated Omani cases and reliably identified mutations in the beta-globin (HBB) gene. Our model study has shown that Ion Torrent PGM can rapidly sequence such a small gene in a large number of samples using a barcoded uni-directional or bi-directional sequence methodology, reducing cost, workload and providing accurate diagnosis. Based on our results we believe that the Ion Torrent PGM sequencing platform, able to analyze hundreds of patients simultaneously for a single disease gene can be a valid molecular screening alternative to ABI sequencing in the diagnosis of hemoglobinopathies and other genetic disorders in the near future.

  1. Generalized Vibrational Perturbation Theory for Rotovibrational Energies of Linear, Symmetric and Asymmetric Tops: Theory, Approximations, and Automated Approaches to Deal with Medium-to-Large Molecular Systems.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, Matteo; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-08-05

    Models going beyond the rigid-rotor and the harmonic oscillator levels are mandatory for providing accurate theoretical predictions for several spectroscopic properties. Different strategies have been devised for this purpose. Among them, the treatment by perturbation theory of the molecular Hamiltonian after its expansion in power series of products of vibrational and rotational operators, also referred to as vibrational perturbation theory (VPT), is particularly appealing for its computational efficiency to treat medium-to-large systems. Moreover, generalized (GVPT) strategies combining the use of perturbative and variational formalisms can be adopted to further improve the accuracy of the results, with the first approach used for weakly coupled terms, and the second one to handle tightly coupled ones. In this context, the GVPT formulation for asymmetric, symmetric, and linear tops is revisited and fully generalized to both minima and first-order saddle points of the molecular potential energy surface. The computational strategies and approximations that can be adopted in dealing with GVPT computations are pointed out, with a particular attention devoted to the treatment of symmetry and degeneracies. A number of tests and applications are discussed, to show the possibilities of the developments, as regards both the variety of treatable systems and eligible methods.

  2. Generalized Vibrational Perturbation Theory for Rotovibrational Energies of Linear, Symmetric and Asymmetric Tops: Theory, Approximations, and Automated Approaches to Deal with Medium-to-Large Molecular Systems

    PubMed Central

    Piccardo, Matteo; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Models going beyond the rigid-rotor and the harmonic oscillator levels are mandatory for providing accurate theoretical predictions for several spectroscopic properties. Different strategies have been devised for this purpose. Among them, the treatment by perturbation theory of the molecular Hamiltonian after its expansion in power series of products of vibrational and rotational operators, also referred to as vibrational perturbation theory (VPT), is particularly appealing for its computational efficiency to treat medium-to-large systems. Moreover, generalized (GVPT) strategies combining the use of perturbative and variational formalisms can be adopted to further improve the accuracy of the results, with the first approach used for weakly coupled terms, and the second one to handle tightly coupled ones. In this context, the GVPT formulation for asymmetric, symmetric, and linear tops is revisited and fully generalized to both minima and first-order saddle points of the molecular potential energy surface. The computational strategies and approximations that can be adopted in dealing with GVPT computations are pointed out, with a particular attention devoted to the treatment of symmetry and degeneracies. A number of tests and applications are discussed, to show the possibilities of the developments, as regards both the variety of treatable systems and eligible methods. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26345131

  3. Towards the fabrication of the top-contact electrode in molecular junctions by photoreduction of a metal precursor.

    PubMed

    Martín, Santiago; Pera, Gorka; Ballesteros, Luz M; Hope, Adam J; Marqués-González, Santiago; Low, Paul J; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; Nichols, Richard J; Cea, Pilar

    2014-03-17

    Langmuir films of 4-{[4-({4-[(trimethylsilyl)ethynyl]phenyl}ethynyl)phenyl]ethynyl} benzenaminium chloride ([1 H]Cl) undergo anion metathesis when assembled on an aqueous auric acid (HAuCl4 ) subphase. Subsequent transfer to solid supports gives well-formed Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers of [1 H]AuCl4 in which the trimethylsilyl group serves as the surface contacting group. Photoreduction of the aurate on these monolayers leads to the formation of metallic gold nanoislands, which were distributed over the surface of the film. Electrical properties of these nascent devices were determined by recording current-voltage (I-V) curves with conductive atomic force microscopy (c-AFM) using the PeakForce tunneling AFM (PF-TUNA) mode. This gives consistent sigmoidal I-V curves that are indicative of well-behaved junctions free of metallic filaments and short circuits. The photoreduction of a metal precursor incorporated onto monomolecular films is therefore proposed as an effective method for the fabrication of molecular junctions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. TOPping off meiosis.

    PubMed

    Haber, James E

    2015-02-19

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) threaten chromosome integrity. The most accurate repair of DSBs is by homologous recombination (HR), catalyzed by recombination proteins such as Rad51. Three papers in this issue of Molecular Cell (Fasching et al., 2015; Kaur et al., 2015; Tang et al., 2015) now reveal the role of three of these proteins in budding yeast: Sgs1 (BLM homolog), Top3 (TOPIIIα homolog), and Rmi1. They demonstrate several steps where all three proteins act together, and find additional functions of the Top3-Rmi1 subcomplex that are critical for the completion of meiosis.

  5. Architectural Tops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The development of the skyscraper is an American story that combines architectural history, economic power, and technological achievement. Each city in the United States can be identified by the profile of its buildings. The design of the tops of skyscrapers was the inspiration for the students in the author's high-school ceramic class to develop…

  6. Architectural Tops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The development of the skyscraper is an American story that combines architectural history, economic power, and technological achievement. Each city in the United States can be identified by the profile of its buildings. The design of the tops of skyscrapers was the inspiration for the students in the author's high-school ceramic class to develop…

  7. Protein-Protein Interaction and Pathway Analyses of Top Schizophrenia Genes Reveal Schizophrenia Susceptibility Genes Converge on Common Molecular Networks and Enrichment of Nucleosome (Chromatin) Assembly Genes in Schizophrenia Susceptibility Loci

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiongjian; Huang, Liang; Jia, Peilin

    2014-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified many promising schizophrenia candidate genes and demonstrated that common polygenic variation contributes to schizophrenia risk. However, whether these genes represent perturbations to a common but limited set of underlying molecular processes (pathways) that modulate risk to schizophrenia remains elusive, and it is not known whether these genes converge on common biological pathways (networks) or represent different pathways. In addition, the theoretical and genetic mechanisms underlying the strong genetic heterogeneity of schizophrenia remain largely unknown. Using 4 well-defined data sets that contain top schizophrenia susceptibility genes and applying protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis, we investigated the interactions among proteins encoded by top schizophrenia susceptibility genes. We found proteins encoded by top schizophrenia susceptibility genes formed a highly significant interconnected network, and, compared with random networks, these PPI networks are statistically highly significant for both direct connectivity and indirect connectivity. We further validated these results using empirical functional data (transcriptome data from a clinical sample). These highly significant findings indicate that top schizophrenia susceptibility genes encode proteins that significantly directly interacted and formed a densely interconnected network, suggesting perturbations of common underlying molecular processes or pathways that modulate risk to schizophrenia. Our findings that schizophrenia susceptibility genes encode a highly interconnected protein network may also provide a novel explanation for the observed genetic heterogeneity of schizophrenia, ie, mutation in any member of this molecular network will lead to same functional consequences that eventually contribute to risk of schizophrenia. PMID:23671194

  8. Protein-protein interaction and pathway analyses of top schizophrenia genes reveal schizophrenia susceptibility genes converge on common molecular networks and enrichment of nucleosome (chromatin) assembly genes in schizophrenia susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiongjian; Huang, Liang; Jia, Peilin; Li, Ming; Su, Bing; Zhao, Zhongming; Gan, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified many promising schizophrenia candidate genes and demonstrated that common polygenic variation contributes to schizophrenia risk. However, whether these genes represent perturbations to a common but limited set of underlying molecular processes (pathways) that modulate risk to schizophrenia remains elusive, and it is not known whether these genes converge on common biological pathways (networks) or represent different pathways. In addition, the theoretical and genetic mechanisms underlying the strong genetic heterogeneity of schizophrenia remain largely unknown. Using 4 well-defined data sets that contain top schizophrenia susceptibility genes and applying protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis, we investigated the interactions among proteins encoded by top schizophrenia susceptibility genes. We found proteins encoded by top schizophrenia susceptibility genes formed a highly significant interconnected network, and, compared with random networks, these PPI networks are statistically highly significant for both direct connectivity and indirect connectivity. We further validated these results using empirical functional data (transcriptome data from a clinical sample). These highly significant findings indicate that top schizophrenia susceptibility genes encode proteins that significantly directly interacted and formed a densely interconnected network, suggesting perturbations of common underlying molecular processes or pathways that modulate risk to schizophrenia. Our findings that schizophrenia susceptibility genes encode a highly interconnected protein network may also provide a novel explanation for the observed genetic heterogeneity of schizophrenia, ie, mutation in any member of this molecular network will lead to same functional consequences that eventually contribute to risk of schizophrenia.

  9. Top physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Thom

    2004-06-24

    Precision studies of top quark properties are a primary goal of the Run II physics program at the Fermilab Tevatron. Marking the first stages of this program, the CDF collaboration presents recent results on top pair production cross section, single top physics and top mass, using between 109 and 200 pb{sup -1} of Run II data.

  10. Top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadov, A.; Azuelos, G.; Bauer, U.; Belyaev, A.; Berger, E. L.; Sullivan, Z.; Tait, T. M. P.

    2000-03-24

    The top quark, when it was finally discovered at Fermilab in 1995 completed the three-generation structure of the Standard Model (SM) and opened up the new field of top quark physics. Viewed as just another SM quark, the top quark appears to be a rather uninteresting species. Produced predominantly, in hadron-hadron collisions, through strong interactions, it decays rapidly without forming hadrons, and almost exclusively through the single mode t {r_arrow} Wb. The relevant CKM coupling V{sub tb} is already determined by the (three-generation) unitarity of the CKM matrix. Rare decays and CP violation are unmeasurable small in the SM. Yet the top quark is distinguished by its large mass, about 35 times larger than the mass of the next heavy quark, and intriguingly close to the scale of electroweak (EW) symmetry breaking. This unique property raises a number of interesting questions. Is the top quark mass generated by the Higgs mechanism as the SM predicts and is its mass related to the top-Higgs-Yukawa coupling? Or does it play an even more fundamental role in the EW symmetry breaking mechanism? If there are new particles lighter than the top quark, does the top quark decay into them? Could non-SM physics first manifest itself in non-standard couplings of the top quark which show up as anomalies in top quark production and decays? Top quark physics tries to answer these questions. Several properties of the top quark have already been examined at the Tevatron. These include studies of the kinematical properties of top production, the measurements of the top mass, of the top production cross-section, the reconstruction of t{bar t}pairs in the fully hadronic final states, the study of {tau} decays of the top quark, the reconstruction of hadronic decays of the W boson from top decays, the search for flavor changing neutral current decays, the measurement of the W helicity in top decays, and bounds on t{bar t} spin correlations. Most of these measurements are limited by

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation study of lanthanide ions Ln{sup 3+} in aqueous solution. Analysis of the structure of the first hydration shell and of the origin of symmetry fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kowall, T.; Foglia, F.; Helm, L.; Merbach, A.E.

    1995-08-31

    We have analyzed molecular dynamics simulations of tripositive lanthanide ions Ln{sup 3+} in aqueous solution. We were able to extract in detail their angular structure and their dynamic behavior along the series of Ln{sup 3+} ions. For a heavy lanthanide ion (Yb{sup 3+}) the eight water molecules of the first hydration shell form a well-defined square antiprism, whereas for a nine-coordinate light lanthanide ion (Nd{sup 3+}) the first hydration shell adopts the tricapped trigonal prism geometry. In the middle of the series both geometries coexist. Both the square antiprism and the tricapped trigonal prism rearrange via 90{degree} pseudorotations of the main symmetry axis. The pertaining transition state of lowered symmetry is a dodecahedron for the Yb{sup 3+} octaaqua complex and a capped square antiprism for the Nd{sup 3+} enneaaqua complex. The lifetime of a square antiprism between two pseudorotations is 11 ps but amounts to only 2 ps for a tricapped trigonal prism. The lifetime of a square antiprism from the simulation of Yb{sup 3+} (CN = 8) is in quantitative agreement with the correlation time for the fluctuation of the zero-field splitting from experimental EPR spectra of the Gd{sup 3+} octaaqua complex. On the basis of our MD-simulations we can go beyond these general notions and propose a model with 90{degree} pseudorotations of the coordination polyhedron as the principal mechanism for distortions of the first hydration shell. 26 refs., 11 figs.

  12. Photoelectron and electron momentum spectroscopy of tetrahydrofuran from a molecular dynamical perspective.

    PubMed

    Shojaei, S H Reza; Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael S

    2013-03-07

    The results of experimental studies of the valence electronic structure of tetrahydrofuran employing He I photoelectron spectroscopy as well as Electron Momentum Spectroscopy (EMS) have been reinterpreted on the basis of Molecular Dynamical simulations employing the classical MM3 force field and large-scale quantum mechanical simulations employing Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics in conjunction with the dispersion corrected ωB97XD exchange-correlation functional. Analysis of the produced atomic trajectories demonstrates the importance of thermal deviations from the lowest energy path for pseudorotation, in the form of considerable variations of the ring-puckering amplitude. These deviations are found to have a significant influence on several outer-valence electron momentum distributions, as well as on the He I photoelectron spectrum.

  13. Spherical Tippe Tops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2013-01-01

    A tippe top (see Fig. 1) is usually constructed as a truncated sphere with a cylindrical peg on top, as indicated in Fig. 2(a). When spun rapidly on a horizontal surface, a tippe top spins about a vertical axis while rotating slowly about a horizontal axis until the peg touches the surface. At that point, weight is transferred to the peg, the…

  14. Dare We Teach Tops?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Featonby, David

    2010-01-01

    "Tops" are mentioned in classical literature and references are even found in the ancient world. For many children a top is one of the first mechanical toys that they play with by themselves, yet a full appreciation of their motion is rare. My hope is that this article will stimulate the reader's interest in tops, will help with the first stages…

  15. Spherical Tippe Tops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2013-01-01

    A tippe top (see Fig. 1) is usually constructed as a truncated sphere with a cylindrical peg on top, as indicated in Fig. 2(a). When spun rapidly on a horizontal surface, a tippe top spins about a vertical axis while rotating slowly about a horizontal axis until the peg touches the surface. At that point, weight is transferred to the peg, the…

  16. Dare We Teach Tops?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Featonby, David

    2010-01-01

    "Tops" are mentioned in classical literature and references are even found in the ancient world. For many children a top is one of the first mechanical toys that they play with by themselves, yet a full appreciation of their motion is rare. My hope is that this article will stimulate the reader's interest in tops, will help with the first stages…

  17. CDF Top Physics

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Tartarelli, G. F.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-05-01

    The authors present the latest results about top physics obtained by the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data sample used for these analysis (about 110 pb{sup{minus}1}) represents almost the entire statistics collected by CDF during four years (1992--95) of data taking. This large data size has allowed detailed studies of top production and decay properties. The results discussed here include the determination of the top quark mass, the measurement of the production cross section, the study of the kinematics of the top events and a look at top decays.

  18. CDF top physics

    SciTech Connect

    Tartarelli, G.F.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-05-01

    The authors present the latest results about top physics obtained by the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data sample used for these analysis (about 110 pb{sup {minus}1}) represents almost the entire statistics collected by CDF during four years (1992--95) of data taking. This large data size has allowed detailed studies of top production and decay properties. The results discussed here include the determination of the top quark mass, the measurement of the production cross section, the study of the kinematics of the top events and a look at top decays.

  19. Morphological and molecular phylogenetic context of the angiosperms: contrasting the 'top-down' and 'bottom-up' approaches used to infer the likely characteristics of the first flowers.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Richard M; Hilton, Jason; Rudall, Paula J

    2006-01-01

    Recent attempts to address the long-debated 'origin' of the angiosperms depend on a phylogenetic framework derived from a matrix of taxa versus characters; most assume that empirical rigour is proportional to the size of the matrix. Sequence-based genotypic approaches increase the number of characters (nucleotides and indels) in the matrix but are confined to the highly restricted spectrum of extant species, whereas morphology-based approaches increase the number of phylogenetically informative taxa (including fossils) at the expense of accessing only a restricted spectrum of phenotypic characters. The two approaches are currently delivering strongly contrasting hypotheses of relationship. Most molecular studies indicate that all extant gymnosperms form a natural group, suggesting surprisingly early divergence of the lineage that led to angiosperms, whereas morphology-only phylogenies indicate that a succession of (mostly extinct) gymnosperms preceded a later angiosperm origin. Causes of this conflict include: (i) the vast phenotypic and genotypic lacuna, largely reflecting pre-Cenozoic extinctions, that separates early-divergent living angiosperms from their closest relatives among the living gymnosperms; (ii) profound uncertainty regarding which (a) extant and (b) extinct angiosperms are most closely related to gymnosperms; and (iii) profound uncertainty regarding which (a) extant and (b) extinct gymnosperms are most closely related to angiosperms, and thus best serve as 'outgroups' dictating the perceived evolutionary polarity of character transitions among the early-divergent angiosperms. These factors still permit a remarkable range of contrasting, yet credible, hypotheses regarding the order of acquisition of the many phenotypic characters, reproductive and vegetative, that distinguish 'classic' angiospermy from 'classic' gymnospermy. The flower remains ill-defined and its mode (or modes) of origin remains hotly disputed; some definitions and hypotheses of

  20. Top Physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Chang-Seong

    2011-06-01

    We present the recent results of top-quark physics using up to 6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV analyzed by the CDF collaboration. Thanks to this large data sample, precision top quark measurements are now a reality at the Tevatron. Further, several new physics signals could appear in this large dataset. We will present the latest measurements of top quark intrinsic properties as well as direct searches for new physics in the top sector.

  1. The Top Triangle Moose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivukula, R. S.; Christensen, N. D.; Coleppa, B.; Simmons, E. H.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a deconstructed model that incorporates both Higgsless and top-color mechanisms. The model alleviates the typical tension in Higgsless models between obtaining the correct top quark mass and keeping Δρ small. It does so by singling out the top quark mass generation as arising from a Yukawa coupling to an effective top-Higgs which develops a small vacuum expectation value, while electroweak symmetry breaking results largely from a Higgsless mechanism. As a result, the heavy partners of the SM fermions can be light enough to be seen at the LHC.

  2. Training Top 125

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Top companies realize how vital training is to their success and continue to invest in it, even in trying times. This article presents "Training" magazine's 11th annual ranking of the top companies with employee-sponsored workforce training and development. First-time No. 1 winner Farmers Insurance puts such a premium on learning that its new…

  3. Training Top 125

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The best learning and development organizations support business initiatives tactically "and" help drive strategic change. Verizon did just that, earning it the No. 1 spot for the first time on the Training Top 125. Verizon and the other 2012 Top 125 winners continued to invest in training, collectively dedicating a mean of 4.52 percent of their…

  4. Training Top 125

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Top companies realize how vital training is to their success and continue to invest in it, even in trying times. This article presents "Training" magazine's 11th annual ranking of the top companies with employee-sponsored workforce training and development. First-time No. 1 winner Farmers Insurance puts such a premium on learning that its new…

  5. The Driven Spinning Top

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosu, Ioan; Featonby, David

    2016-01-01

    This driven top is quite a novelty and can, with some trials, be made using the principles outlined here. This new top has many applications in developing both understanding and skills and these are detailed in the article. Depending on reader's available time and motivation they may feel an urge to make one themselves, or simply invest a few…

  6. The Driven Spinning Top

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosu, Ioan; Featonby, David

    2016-01-01

    This driven top is quite a novelty and can, with some trials, be made using the principles outlined here. This new top has many applications in developing both understanding and skills and these are detailed in the article. Depending on reader's available time and motivation they may feel an urge to make one themselves, or simply invest a few…

  7. Training Top 125

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The best learning and development organizations support business initiatives tactically "and" help drive strategic change. Verizon did just that, earning it the No. 1 spot for the first time on the Training Top 125. Verizon and the other 2012 Top 125 winners continued to invest in training, collectively dedicating a mean of 4.52 percent of their…

  8. Top search at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, M.; The CDF Collaboration

    1991-10-01

    We review top quark searches carried out at CDF with data collected during the 1988--1989 Collider Run. The latest analyses give a lower limit on the top quark mass of 91 GeV/c{sup 2} at the 95% confidence level, assuming Standard Model decays. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Top physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    We report on top physics results using a 100 pb{sup -1} data sample of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We have identified top signals in a variety of decay channels, and used these channels to extract a measurement of the top mass and production cross section. A subset of the data (67 pb{sup -1}) is used to determine M{sub top} = 176 {+-} 8(stat) {+-} 10(syst) and {sigma}(tt) = 7.6 {sub -2.0}{sup +2.4} pb. We present studies of the kinematics of t{bar t} events and extract the first direct measurement of V{sub tb}. Finally, we indicate prospects for future study of top physics at the Tevatron.

  10. Top quark mass measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Tuula

    2008-03-18

    The top quark is the heaviest elementary particle. Its mass is one of the fundamental parameters of the standard model of particle physics, and an important input to precision electroweak tests. This thesis describes three measurements of the top-quark mass in the dilepton decay channel. The dilepton events have two neutrinos in the final state; neutrinos are weakly interacting particles that cannot be detected with a multipurpose experiment. Therefore, the signal of dilepton events consists of a large amount of missing energy and momentum carried off by the neutrinos. The top-quark mass is reconstructed for each event by assuming an additional constraint from a top mass independent distribution. Template distributions are constructed from simulated samples of signal and background events, and parametrized to form continuous probability density functions. The final top-quark mass is derived using a likelihood fit to compare the reconstructed top mass distribution from data to the parametrized templates. One of the analyses uses a novel technique to add top mass information from the observed number of events by including a cross-section-constraint in the likelihood function. All measurements use data samples collected by the CDF II detector.

  11. Top physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Palencia, Enrique; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-06-01

    The top quark is the most massive fundamental particle observed so far, and the study of its properties is interesting for several reasons ranging from its possible special role in electroweak symmetry breaking to its sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). This article focuses on the latest top physics results from CDF based on 320-750 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The t{bar t} cross section and the top mass have been measured in different decay channels and using different methods. They have also searched for massive t{bar t} resonances.

  12. The driven spinning top

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosu, Ioan; Featonby, David

    2016-05-01

    This driven top is quite a novelty and can, with some trials, be made using the principles outlined here. This new top has many applications in developing both understanding and skills and these are detailed in the article. Depending on reader’s available time and motivation they may feel an urge to make one themselves, or simply invest a few pounds in the one that has been designed, tested and manufactured to a high standard. Either way the unique design of the driven top can provide several hours of interesting experimentation. Our aim here is simply to inform and inspire readers to further investigation and experimentation.

  13. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher S.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2004-12-01

    The top quark, with its extraordinarily large mass (nearly that of a gold atom), plays a significant role in the phenomenology of EWSB in the Standard Model. In particular, the top quark mass when combined with the W mass constrains the mass of the as yet unobserved Higgs boson. Thus, a precise determination of the mass of the top quark is a principal goal of the CDF and D0 experiments. With the data collected thus far in Runs 1 and 2 of the Tevatron, CDF and D0 have measured the top quark mass in both the lepton+jets and dilepton decay channels using a variety of complementary experimental techniques. The author presents an overview of the most recent of the measurements.

  14. Top physics: CDF results

    SciTech Connect

    K. Bloom

    2004-06-23

    The top quark plays an important role in the grand scheme of particle physics, and is also interesting on its own merits. We present recent results from CDF on top-quark physics based on 100-200 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data. We have measured the t{bar t} cross section in different decay modes using several different techniques, and are beginning our studies of top-quark properties. New analyses for this conference include a measurement of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} in the lepton-plus-jets channel using a neural net to distinguish signal and background events, and measurements of top-quark branching fractions.

  15. VAB Topping Off Ceremony

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-04-14

    Colonel Rocco Patrone (Director, Plans, Programs and Resources Office NASA-KSC) signs the last major beam also autographed by construction workers, NASA, and Corps of Engineers employees to be installed during the VAB Topping-Off Ceremony. MILA.

  16. Top quark properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Ziqing

    2014-10-31

    The top quark physics has entered the precision era. The CDF and D0 collaborations are finalizing their legacy results of the properties of the top quark after the shutdown of the Fermilab Tevatron three years ago. The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have been publishing results from the LHC Run I with 7 TeV and 8 TeV proton-proton collisions, with many more forthcoming. We present a selection of recent results produced by the Tevatron and LHC experiments.

  17. Kernel mucking in top

    SciTech Connect

    LeFebvre, W.

    1994-08-01

    For many years, the popular program top has aided system administrations in examination of process resource usage on their machines. Yet few are familiar with the techniques involved in obtaining this information. Most of what is displayed by top is available only in the dark recesses of kernel memory. Extracting this information requires familiarity not only with how bytes are read from the kernel, but also what data needs to be read. The wide variety of systems and variants of the Unix operating system in today`s marketplace makes writing such a program very challenging. This paper explores the tremendous diversity in kernel information across the many platforms and the solutions employed by top to achieve and maintain ease of portability in the presence of such divergent systems.

  18. Top-ophilia

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    Almost from the moment in June 1977 when the discovery of the Upsilon resonance revealed the existence of what we now call the bottom quark, physicists began searching for its partner. Through the years, as we established the electric charge and weak isospin of the b-quark, and detected the virtual influence of its mate, it became clear that the top quark must exist. Exactly at what mass, we couldn't say, but we knew just how top events would look. We also knew that top events would be rare--if the Tevatron could make them at all--and that picking out the events would pose a real challenge for the experimenters and their detectors.

  19. Molecular structures and intramolecular dynamics of pentahalides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ischenko, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews advances of modern gas electron diffraction (GED) method combined with high-resolution spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations in studies of the impact of intramolecular dynamics in free molecules of pentahalides. Some recently developed approaches to the electron diffraction data interpretation, based on direct incorporation of the adiabatic potential energy surface parameters to the diffraction intensity are described. In this way, complementary data of different experimental and computational methods can be directly combined for solving problems of the molecular structure and its dynamics. The possibility to evaluate some important parameters of the adiabatic potential energy surface - barriers to pseudorotation and saddle point of intermediate configuration from diffraction intensities in solving the inverse GED problem is demonstrated on several examples. With increasing accuracy of the electron diffraction intensities and the development of the theoretical background of electron scattering and data interpretation, it has become possible to investigate complex nuclear dynamics in fluxional systems by the GED method. Results of other research groups are also included in the discussion.

  20. TOPS optical correlation program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindell, Scott D.

    1993-09-01

    Martin Marietta is conducting a TOPS optical correlation program in which several algorithms and four optical correlators involving two spatial light modulator technologies will be developed and tested. The program will culminate in 1994 with an automatic target recognition flight demonstration using a UH-1 helicopter flying a Fiber Optic Guide Missile (FOG-M) mission profile. The flight demonstration will be conducted by US Army Missile Command (MICOM) and Martin Marietta and will involve detecting, locating and tracking a M60A2 tank positioned among an array of five vehicle types. Current status of the TOPS program will be given.

  1. Structure of the Arabidopsis thaliana TOP2 oligopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruiying; Rajagopalan, Krithika; Sadre-Bazzaz, Kianoush; Moreau, Magali; Klessig, Daniel F.; Tong, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Thimet oligopeptidase (TOP) is a zinc-dependent metallopeptidase. Recent studies suggest that Arabidopsis thaliana TOP1 and TOP2 are targets for salicylic acid (SA) binding and participate in SA-mediated plant innate immunity. The crystal structure of A. thaliana TOP2 has been determined at 3.0 Å resolution. Comparisons to the structure of human TOP revealed good overall structural conservation, especially in the active-site region, despite their weak sequence conservation. The protein sample was incubated with the photo-activated SA analog 4-azido-SA and exposed to UV irradiation before crystallization. However, there was no conclusive evidence for the binding of SA based on the X-ray diffraction data. Further studies are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of how SA regulates the activity of A. thaliana TOP1 and TOP2. PMID:24817709

  2. Choosing a Top Ten.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IUCN Bulletin, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents an annotated list of 34 animals and 32 plants which are candidates for a list of the top 10 endangered species. Also presents the criteria used to formulate these lists. They include the conservation value (urgency prominance, biological value) and operational considerations (such as cost factors) for each species. (JN)

  3. Ten Top Tech Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLester, Susan

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the major technical issues, products, and practices of the day. The top ten tech trends are listed and discussed. These include: (1) data mining; (2) cyberbullying; (3) 21st century skills; (4) digital content; (5) learning at leisure; (6) personal responders; (7) mobile tools; (8) bandwidth; (9) open-source…

  4. Photonics Academy: TOPS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, Nick; Barwis, Vicky; Maghuk, Faris

    2009-06-01

    Technicians in Opto-Electronics Project (TOP) has five targets: one, to develop and pilot train with at least 10 learners; two, to implement a marketing plan; three, to raise awareness of the sector with young people to increase new entrants into the sector; four, to engage employers in development; and five, to provide information on leadership and management.

  5. Ten Top Tech Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLester, Susan

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the major technical issues, products, and practices of the day. The top ten tech trends are listed and discussed. These include: (1) data mining; (2) cyberbullying; (3) 21st century skills; (4) digital content; (5) learning at leisure; (6) personal responders; (7) mobile tools; (8) bandwidth; (9) open-source…

  6. Brevard Top Scholars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-05

    About 40 Brevard County high school seniors take in the enormity of the Vehicle Assembly Building during Brevard Top Scholars Day on May 5. Kennedy's Office of Education coordinated the event that featured a special behind-the-scenes tour of Kennedy, including prototype shops, cryogenic labs and the Launch Control Center firing rooms.

  7. Brevard Top Scholars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-05

    About 40 Brevard County high school seniors attended Brevard Top Scholars Day at Kennedy Space Center on May 5. Kennedy's Office of Education coordinated the event that featured a special behind-the-scenes tour of Kennedy, including prototype shops, cryogenic labs and facilities such as the Vehicle Assembly Building and the Launch Control Center firing rooms.

  8. Top quark physics: Future measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.; Vejcik, S.; Berger, E.L.

    1997-04-04

    The authors discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top`s large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. They emphasize measurements of the top quark`s mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  9. Molecular pharmacognosy.

    PubMed

    Huang, LuQi; Xiao, PeiGen; Guo, LanPing; Gao, WenYuan

    2010-06-01

    This article analyzes the background and significance of molecular pharmacognosy, including the molecular identification of medicinal raw materials, phylogenetic evolution of medicinal plants and animals, evaluation and preservation of germplasm resources for medicinal plants and animals, etiology of endangerment and protection of endangered medicinal plants and animals, biosynthesis and bioregulation of active components in medicinal plants, and characteristics and the molecular bases of top-geoherbs.

  10. Top of the hill.

    PubMed

    Lubell, Jennifer

    2009-08-24

    With healthcare reform the hottest topic in Washington (and at congressional town halls) this summer, it's no surprise President Barack Obama tops our 100 Most Powerful People in Healthcare ranking, joined by plenty of other power players on the Hill. "Clearly, the president is pushing hard on his goals to expand access to care, to reform health insurance and to control costs," says LifePoint's Bill Carpenter.

  11. Brevard Top Scholars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-05

    Kennedy Space Center Associate Director Kelvin Manning addresses about 40 Brevard County high school seniors regarding NASA's and Kennedy’s roles and missions during Brevard Top Scholars Day at Kennedy Space Center on May 5. Kennedy's Office of Education coordinated the event that featured a special behind-the-scenes tour of Kennedy, including prototype shops, cryogenic labs and facilities such as the Vehicle Assembly Building and the Launch Control Center firing rooms.

  12. Four tops for LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Ezequiel; Faroughy, Darius A.; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Morales, Roberto; Szynkman, Alejandro

    2017-02-01

    We design a search strategy for the Standard Model t t bar t t bar production at the LHC in the same-sign dilepton and trilepton channels. We study different signal features and, given the small expected number of signal events, we scrutinize in detail all reducible and irreducible backgrounds. Our analysis shows that by imposing a basic set of jet and lepton selection criteria, the SM pp → t t bar t t bar process could be evidenced in the near future, within Run-II, when combining both multi-lepton search channels. We argue that this search strategy should also be used as a guideline to test New Physics coupling predominantly to top-quarks. In particular, we show that a non-resonant New Physics enhancement in the four-top final state would be detectable through this search strategy. We study two top-philic simplified models of this kind, a neutral scalar boson and a Z‧, and present current and future exclusion limits on their mass and couplings.

  13. Cloud top entrainment instability and cloud top distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, Reinout; Spinhirne, James D.

    1990-01-01

    Classical cloud-top entrainment instability condition formulation is discussed. A saturation point diagram is used to investigate the details of mixing in cases where the cloud-top entrainment instability criterion is satisfied.

  14. 22. Top Lateral Bracing & Top Chord, Vertical Tension Member ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Top Lateral Bracing & Top Chord, Vertical Tension Member 6, end Vertical Compression Members 5 & 4; South Swing Span; looking N. - Pacific Shortline Bridge, U.S. Route 20,spanning Missouri River, Sioux City, Woodbury County, IA

  15. 11. VIEW SHOWING TOP OF WATER TANK TAKEN FROM TOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW SHOWING TOP OF WATER TANK TAKEN FROM TOP OF ELEVATOR SHAFT. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Signal Tower, Corner of Seventh Street & Avenue D east of Drydock No. 1, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. 7. DETAIL VIEW OF TOP CHORD AND TOP CHORD CONNECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL VIEW OF TOP CHORD AND TOP CHORD CONNECTION - Springfield-Des Arc Bridge, Spanning North Branch of Cadron Creek at Old Springfield-Des Arc Road (County Road 222), Springfield, Conway County, AR

  17. Dimerization and thiol sensitivity of the salicylic acid binding thimet oligopeptidases TOP1 and TOP2 define their functions in redox-sensitive cellular pathways

    PubMed Central

    Westlake, Timothy J.; Ricci, William A.; Popescu, George V.; Popescu, Sorina C.

    2015-01-01

    A long-term goal in plant research is to understand how plants integrate signals from multiple environmental stressors. The importance of salicylic acid (SA) in plant response to biotic and abiotic stress is known, yet the molecular details of the SA-mediated pathways are insufficiently understood. Our recent work identified the peptidases TOP1 and TOP2 as critical components in plant response to pathogens and programmed cell death (PCD). In this study, we investigated the characteristics of TOPs related to the regulation of their enzymatic activity and function in oxidative stress response. We determined that TOP1 and TOP2 interact with themselves and each other and their ability to associate in dimers is influenced by SA and the thiol-based reductant DTT. Biochemical characterization of TOP1 and TOP2 indicated distinct sensitivities to DTT and similarly robust activity under a range of pH values. Treatments of top mutants with Methyl Viologen (MV) revealed TOP1 and TOP2 as a modulators of the plant tolerance to MV, and that exogenous SA alleviates the toxicity of MV in top background. Finally, we generated a TOP-centered computational model of a plant cell whose simulation outputs replicate experimental findings and predict novel functions of TOP1 and TOP2. Altogether, our work indicates that TOP1 and TOP2 mediate plant responses to oxidative stress through spatially separated pathways and positions proteolysis in a network for plant response to diverse stressors. PMID:26042129

  18. Top quark physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Jason

    2004-04-30

    The existence of the top quark, discovered by CDF and D0 in 1995, has been re-established in the burgeoning dataset being collected in Run 2 of the Tevatron at Fermilab. Results from CDF on the top quark production cross section and top quark mass are consistent with the Standard Model expectations. The well-characterized top data samples will make it possible in the future to probe further for new physics in the top quark sector. This report summarizes recent CDF top quark physics results.

  19. Top physics results at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Vickey, Trevor; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-05-01

    The most recent results on top quark physics at CDF are reported. Measurements of cross-section and mass are presented, and the status of single top quark production searches are discussed. The results obtained from probing various top quark properties are also presented.

  20. Top quark physics: Future Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, Raymond; Gerdes, David; Jaros, John; Vejcik, Steve; Berger, Edmond L.; Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Cuypers, Frank; Drell, Persis S.; Fero, Michael; Hadley, Nicholas; Han, Tao; Heinson, Ann P.; Knuteson, Bruce; Larios, Francisco; Miettinen, Hannu; Orr, Lynne H.; Peskin, Michael E.; Rizzo, Thomas; Sarid, Uri; Schmidt, Carl; Stelzer, Tim; Sullivan, Zack

    1996-12-31

    We discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top's large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. We emphasize measurements of the top quark's mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  1. Curly Top Disease of Tomato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Curly top disease, caused by viruses in the genus, Curtovirus, has impacted western US agriculture for over a century; and is a significant threat to tomato production. The two most abundant curtovirus species today are Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV) and Beet mild curly top virus (BMCTV) but ot...

  2. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    L. Cerrito

    2004-07-16

    Preliminary results on the measurement of the top quark mass at the Tevatron Collider are presented. In the dilepton decay channel, the CDF Collaboration measures m{sub t} = 175.0{sub -16.9}{sup +17.4}(stat.){+-}8.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 126 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV (Run II). In the lepton plus jets channel, the CDF Collaboration measures 177.5{sub -9.4}{sup +12.7}(stat.) {+-} 7.1(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 102 pb{sup -1} at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The D0 Collaboration has newly applied a likelihood technique to improve the analysis of {approx} 125 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV (Run I), with the result: m{sub t} = 180.1 {+-} 3.6(stat.) {+-}3.9(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The latter is combined with all the measurements based on the data collected in Run I to yield the most recent and comprehensive experimental determination of the top quark mass: m{sub t} = 178.0 {+-} 2.7(stat.) {+-} 3.3(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  3. CDF results on top

    SciTech Connect

    Beretvas, A.; CDF Collaboration

    1995-08-01

    CDF has established the existence of the top quark. Results from p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV are presented. In the dilepton final state the authors found seven events with a background of 1.3 {+-} 0.3. In the e, {mu} + {nu} + jets channel with a b identified via a secondary vertex detector (SVX), they found twenty one events with a background of 5.5 {+-} 1.8. They measure the top quark mass to be 176 {+-} 8 (stat) {+-} 10 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}, and the t{anti t} production cross section to be 7.6{sub {minus}2.0}{sup +2.4} pb. The integrated luminosity for the results presented in this talk is 67 pb{sup {minus}1}. The CDF detector needs to be upgraded for the next run. The integrated luminosity for the next run is expected to be more than 1,000 pb{sup {minus}1}.

  4. Top properties at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarelli, G.; The CDF Collaboration

    1997-05-01

    We present the latest results associated with top properties at the Tevatron. The large data set collected in four years of running has allowed, after top discovery, the study of various top properties. The results presented here include the measurement of the CKM matrix element {vert_bar}V{sub if}{vert_bar}, the search for top FCNC, the study of properties of W in t decays and the search for heavy states decaying to tt pairs. Future measurements in top physics at the Tevatron are briefly discussed.

  5. Top quark physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Potamianos, Karolos

    2011-12-01

    We present the recent results of top-quark physics using up to 6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions analyzed by the CDF collaboration. The large number of top quark events analyzed, of the order of several thousands, allows stringent checks of the standard model predictions. Also, the top quark is widely believed to be a window to new physics. We present the latest measurements of top quark intrinsic properties as well as direct searches for new physics in the top sector.

  6. Top quark pair production and top quark properties at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Chang-Seong

    2016-06-02

    We present the most recent measurements of top quark pairs production and top quark properties in proton-antiproton collisions with center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using CDF II detector at the Tevatron. The combination of top pair production cross section measurements and the direct measurement of top quark width are reported. The test of Standard Model predictions for top quark decaying into $b$-quarks, performed by measuring the ratio $R$ between the top quark branching fraction to $b$-quark and the branching fraction to any type of down quark is shown. The extraction of the CKM matrix element $|V_{tb}|$ from the ratio $R$ is discussed. We also present the latest measurements on the forward-backward asymmetry ($A_{FB}$) in top anti-top quark production. With the full CDF Run II data set, the measurements are performed in top anti-top decaying to final states that contain one or two charged leptons (electrons or muons). In addition, we combine the results of the leptonic forward-backward asymmetry in $t\\bar t$ system between the two final states. All the results show deviations from the next-to-leading order (NLO) standard model (SM) calculation.

  7. The top ten.

    PubMed

    Davis, C

    1985-10-01

    3 lists were compiled to answer the question of what countries have experienced the most population growth from World War II to the present. The 1st list includes the 10 countries which accounted for the largest gain in world population. The 2nd list shows the 10 countries with the highest growth rates of the 150 or so most populous countries in the world. The last list also shows countries ranked by growth rate but is limited to those with a current population of at least 10 million. To deal with the fact that some countries did not exist at 1 of the reference points, a set of estimates for 1940 provided a convenient starting point. China and India headed the list of countries ranked by absolute gains. They contributed half again as much growth as the next 8 nations combined. Altogether Asia, home to almost 60% of the world's population, captured 5 of the top 10 slots. The US and the USSR are the only developed countries on the list. The Soviet Union also presents the 1st case on the list of a country with a lower ranking in population gain (6th) than in absolute size in 1985 (3rd). Many of the population giants of 1940 (Japan, Great Britain, Germany, France, and Italy) are not on the list. Despite large base populations, their growth has been slow in the intervening years. All of the countries with the highest growth rates experienced over 3% annual average growth during the last 45 years: Kuwait, United Arab Emirates, Libya, Venezuela, Costa Rica, Kenya, Ivory Coast, Mexico, Honduras, and Syria. The influence of immigration is much in evidence in this list and explains otherwise unachievable rates of growth. The top 4 countries in annual rates of growth are all oil exporters. The top 3 countries in the 3rd list -- Venezuela, Kenya, and Mexico -- are carried over from the 2nd list, sharing the characteristics of rapid population growth and substantial base populations. The geographic mix of this list is notable. Asia, Africa, and Latin America each have at least

  8. Under Jupiter's Cloud Tops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-25

    NASA's Juno spacecraft carries an instrument called the Microwave Radiometer, which examines Jupiter's atmosphere beneath the planet's cloud tops. This image shows the instrument's view of the outer part of Jupiter's atmosphere. Before Juno began using this instrument, scientists expected the atmosphere to be uniform at depths greater than 60 miles (100 kilometers). But with the Microwave Radiometer, scientists have discovered that the atmosphere has variations down to at least 220 miles (350 kilometers), as deep as the instrument can see. In the cut-out image to the right, orange signifies high ammonia abundance and blue signifies low ammonia abundance. Jupiter appears to have a band around its equator high in ammonia abundance, with a column shown in orange. This is contrary to scientists' expectations that ammonia would be uniformly mixed. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21642

  9. Top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Menzione, A.

    1995-10-01

    Most of the material presented in this report, comes from contributions to the parallel session PL20 of this conference. We summarise the experimental results of direct production of Top quarks, coming from the CDF and C0 Collaborations at Fermilab, and compare these results to what one expects within current theoretical understanding. Particular attention is given to new results such as all hadronic modes of t{bar t} decay. As far as the mass is concerned, a comparison is made with precision measurements of related quantities, coming from LEP and other experiments. An attempt is made to look at the medium-term future and understand which variables and with what accuracy one can measure them with increased integrated luminosity.

  10. Top-Higgs and top-pion phenomenology in the top triangle moose model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; Coleppa, Baradhwaj; Logan, Heather E.; Martin, Adam

    2011-03-01

    We discuss the deconstructed version of a topcolor-assisted technicolor model wherein the mechanism of top quark mass generation is separated from the rest of electroweak symmetry breaking. The minimal deconstructed version of this scenario is a “triangle moose” model, where the top quark gets its mass from coupling to a top-Higgs field, while the gauge boson masses are generated from a Higgsless sector. The spectrum of the model includes scalar (top-Higgs) and pseudoscalar (top-pion) states. In this paper, we study the properties of these particles, discuss their production mechanisms and decay modes, and suggest how best to search for them at the LHC.

  11. Top-Higgs and top-pion phenomenology in the top triangle moose model

    SciTech Connect

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; Coleppa, Baradhwaj; Logan, Heather E.; Martin, Adam

    2011-03-01

    We discuss the deconstructed version of a topcolor-assisted technicolor model wherein the mechanism of top quark mass generation is separated from the rest of electroweak symmetry breaking. The minimal deconstructed version of this scenario is a ''triangle moose'' model, where the top quark gets its mass from coupling to a top-Higgs field, while the gauge boson masses are generated from a Higgsless sector. The spectrum of the model includes scalar (top-Higgs) and pseudoscalar (top-pion) states. In this paper, we study the properties of these particles, discuss their production mechanisms and decay modes, and suggest how best to search for them at the LHC.

  12. Buckling of Patterned Top Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Dokyeong; Suh, Hyo Seon; Char, Kookheon

    Buckling of thin films on elastomeric substrates such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is the well-known phenomenon in buckling instability originating from the moduli mismatch between a substrate and a thin film placed on the top. Recently, many studies on the microstructure created by the buckling with flat top films have been reported and physics behind them has almost been well received. However, only a few work has been done for the buckling structure with micro- or nano-patterned top films and buckling mechanics for patterned top film-PDMS bilayers has not yet been established in detail. Here, we present the buckling of various patterned top films placed on top of elastomeric PDMS substrates. Geometrical patterns were prepared by unconventional lithography techniques such as thermal imprinting of polystyrene (PS) films. Buckling instability was induced by applying mechanical stress to the patterned top surface-PDMS bilayers. Resulting buckled structures showed different mechanical structures as shape and structural parameters of the top thin films were varied. The structural changes were analyzed by introducing a beam theory or a plate theory for the simple modeling of the top surfaces, giving insights on the buckling mechanics of top films with complicated patterns placed on PDMS substrates.

  13. Gas turbine topping combustor

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Janos; Dowdy, Thomas E.; Bachovchin, Dennis M.

    1997-01-01

    A combustor for burning a mixture of fuel and air in a rich combustion zone, in which the fuel bound nitrogen in converted to molecular nitrogen. The fuel rich combustion is followed by lean combustion. The products of combustion from the lean combustion are rapidly quenched so as to convert the fuel bound nitrogen to molecular nitrogen without forming NOx. The combustor has an air radial swirler that directs the air radially inward while swirling it in the circumferential direction and a radial fuel swirler that directs the fuel radially outward while swirling it in the same circumferential direction, thereby promoting vigorous mixing of the fuel and air. The air inlet has a variable flow area that is responsive to variations in the heating value of the fuel, which may be a coal-derived fuel gas. A diverging passage in the combustor in front of a bluff body causes the fuel/air mixture to recirculate with the rich combustion zone.

  14. Top physics results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Gervasio; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2005-05-01

    The top quark is by far the most massive fundamental particle observed so far, and the study of its properties is interesting for several reasons ranging from its possible special role in electroweak symmetry breaking to its sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model. They present recent top physics results from CDF based on 160-320 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The t{bar t} cross section and the top mass have been measured in different decay channels and using different methods. they have searched for evidence of single top production, setting upper limits on its production rate. Other results shown in this conference include studies of the polarization of W bosons from top decays, a search for charged Higgs decaying from top, and a search for additional heavy t' quarks.

  15. Complete maps of molecular-loop conformational spaces.

    PubMed

    Porta, Josep M; Ros, Lluís; Thomas, Federico; Corcho, Francesc; Cantó, Josep; Pérez, Juan Jesús

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents a numerical method to compute all possible conformations of distance-constrained molecular loops, i.e., loops where some interatomic distances are held fixed, while others can vary. The method is general (it can be applied to single or multiple intermingled loops of arbitrary topology) and complete (it isolates all solutions, even if they form positive-dimensional sets). Generality is achieved by reducing the problem to finding all embeddings of a set of points constrained by pairwise distances, which can be formulated as computing the roots of a system of Cayley-Menger determinants. Completeness is achieved by expressing these determinants in Bernstein form and using a numerical algorithm that exploits such form to bound all root locations at any desired precision. The method is readily parallelizable, and the current implementation can be run on single- or multiprocessor machines. Experiments are included that show the method's performance on rigid loops, mobile loops, and multiloop molecules. In all cases, complete maps including all possible conformations are obtained, thus allowing an exhaustive analysis and visualization of all pseudo-rotation paths between different conformations satisfying loop closure.

  16. Revisiting the polytopal rearrangements in penta-coordinate d7-metallocomplexes: modified Berry pseudorotation, octahedral switch, and butterfly isomerization† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc00703e Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Ruckenstein, Eli

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides a first-principles theoretical investigation of the polytopal rearrangements and fluxional behavior of five-coordinate d7-transition metal complexes. Our work is primarily based on a potential energy surface analysis of the iron tetracarbonyl hydride radical HFe˙(CO)4. We demonstrate the existence of distorted coordination geometries in this prototypical system and, for the first time, introduce three general rearrangement mechanisms, which account for the non-ideal coordination. The first of these mechanisms constitutes a modified version of the Berry pseudorotation via a square-based pyramidal C 4v transition state that connects two chemically identical edge-bridged tetrahedral stereoisomers of C 2v symmetry. It differs from the classical Berry mechanism, which involves two regular D 3h equilibrium structures and a C 4v transition state. The second mechanism is related to the famous “tetrahedral jump” hypothesis, postulated by Muetterties for a number of d6 HML4 and H2ML4 complexes. Here, our study suggests two fluxional rearrangement pathways via distinct types of C 2v transition states. Both pathways of this mechanism can be described as a single-ligand migration to a vacant position of an “octahedron”, thus interchanging (switching) the apical and basal ligands of the initial quasi-square pyramidal isomer, which is considered as an idealized octahedron with a vacancy. Accordingly, we call this mechanism “octahedral switch”. The third mechanism follows a butterfly-type isomerization featuring a key-angle deformation, and we thus call it “butterfly isomerization”. It connects the quasi-square pyramidal and edge-bridged tetrahedral isomers of HFe˙(CO)4 through a distorted edge-bridged tetrahedral transition state of C s symmetry. Our paper discusses the overall features of the isomers and rearrangement mechanisms as well as their implications. We rationalize the existence of each stationary point through an electronic

  17. 4. DETAIL VIEW OF TOP CHORD AND TOP CHORD CONNECTIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW OF TOP CHORD AND TOP CHORD CONNECTIONS NEAR NORTH CORNER OF BRIDGE, LOOKING WEST - Springfield-Des Arc Bridge, Spanning North Branch of Cadron Creek at Old Springfield-Des Arc Road (County Road 222), Springfield, Conway County, AR

  18. Turbulence near thunderstorm tops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Peter F.

    1993-01-01

    For several years, scientists at San Jose State University, NASA-Ames, and the University of Arizona have carried out cooperative research programs to understand the causes and effects of severe turbulence. The primary sources of data for this work are Digital Flight Data Recorder (DFDR) tapes from airliners that have been involved in turbulence incidents. A significant result of the analysis of these data has been the identification and quantification of the turbulence causes. Turbulence signatures include breaking Kelvin-Helmholtz waves, large amplitude mountain lee waves, turbulence in and around thunderstorms, and maneuvering. The requirements that must be met for a turbulence incident to be included in the NASA study are rather straightforward: (1) severe or greater turbulence must have been reported (usually with passenger injuries) and (2) the flight data tapes must be available. Despite these rather general criteria, and the fact that our cases are drawn from a wide geographical area over the U.S. and the Atlantic Ocean, we have found an interesting bias in our sample. Of 12 cases at cruise altitude, four were definitely associated with thunderstorms and two are suspected thunderstorm cases. The others were due to mountain waves, CAT, high level windshear/maneuvering, or to causes not yet determined. Although our sample is small, these numbers have raised several questions, not the least of which are: How pervasive is the problem of aircraft encounters with severe turbulence in or near thunderstorm tops (TNTT)? Given the available visible and radar evidence of thunderstorms, Why do such incidents occur? Can anything be done to allevaite the problem? This paper outlines some very preliminary efforts to answer these questions. In the following sections, physical and statistical characteristics of TNTT are discussed (Section 2), TNTT causes are summarized (Section 3), current recommendations for TNTT avoidance are reviewed (Section 4), and some suggestions to

  19. Gas turbine topping combustor

    DOEpatents

    Beer, J.; Dowdy, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1997-06-10

    A combustor is described for burning a mixture of fuel and air in a rich combustion zone, in which the fuel bound nitrogen in converted to molecular nitrogen. The fuel rich combustion is followed by lean combustion. The products of combustion from the lean combustion are rapidly quenched so as to convert the fuel bound nitrogen to molecular nitrogen without forming NOx. The combustor has an air radial swirler that directs the air radially inward while swirling it in the circumferential direction and a radial fuel swirler that directs the fuel radially outward while swirling it in the same circumferential direction, thereby promoting vigorous mixing of the fuel and air. The air inlet has a variable flow area that is responsive to variations in the heating value of the fuel, which may be a coal-derived fuel gas. A diverging passage in the combustor in front of a bluff body causes the fuel/air mixture to recirculate with the rich combustion zone. 14 figs.

  20. Learning at the Top. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on learning at the top that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Learning at the Top: An Investigation of Nonprofit CEOs' (Chief Executive Officers') Learning Experiences" (John J. Sherlock) reports on a study that used Mezirow's theory of adult…

  1. Properties of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Déliot, Frédéric; Hadley, Nicholas; Parke, Stephen; Schwarz, Tom

    2014-10-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known elementary particle, and it is often seen as a window to search for new physics processes in particle physics. A large program to study the top-quark properties has been performed both at the Tevatron and LHC colliders by the D0, CDF, ATLAS and CMS experiments. The most recent results are discussed in this article.

  2. Top results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    E. Barberis

    2002-01-18

    This paper summarizes the latest measurements of the properties of the top quark as determined by the CDF and D0 collaborations during the first run of the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider (1992-1996). Prospects for future measurements of the top quark at the upgraded Tevatron collider are also presented.

  3. Naturalness from a composite top?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Aaron; Zhao, Yue

    2017-01-01

    We consider a theory with composite top quarks but an elementary Higgs boson. The hierarchy problem can be solved by supplementing TeV scale top compositeness with either supersymmetry or Higgs compositeness appearing at the multi-TeV scale. The Higgs boson couples to uncolored partons within the top quark. We study how this approach can give rise to a novel screening effect that suppresses production of the colored top partners at the LHC. Strong constraints arise from Z to overline{b}b , as well potentially from flavor physics. Independent of flavor considerations, current constraints imply a compositeness scale ≳ TeV; this implies that the model is likely tuned at the percent level. Four top quark production at the LHC is a smoking-gun probe of this scenario. New CP violation in D meson mixing is also possible.

  4. Naturalness from a composite top?

    DOE PAGES

    Pierce, Aaron; Zhao, Yue

    2017-01-12

    Here, we consider a theory with composite top quarks but an elementary Higgs boson. The hierarchy problem can be solved by supplementing TeV scale top compositeness with either supersymmetry or Higgs compositeness appearing at the multi-TeV scale. Furthermore, the Higgs boson couples to uncolored partons within the top quark. We also study how this approach can give rise to a novel screening effect that suppresses production of the colored top partners at the LHC. Strong constraints arise from Z tomore » $$\\bar{b}$$b, as well potentially from avor physics. Independent of flavor considerations, current constraints imply a compositeness scale &TeV; this implies that the model is likely tuned at the percent level. Four top quark production at the LHC is a smoking-gun probe of this scenario. New CP violation in D meson mixing is also possible.« less

  5. Wave Engine Topping Cycle Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    The performance benefits derived by topping a gas turbine engine with a wave engine are assessed. The wave engine is a wave rotor that produces shaft power by exploiting gas dynamic energy exchange and flow turning. The wave engine is added to the baseline turboshaft engine while keeping high-pressure-turbine inlet conditions, compressor pressure ratio, engine mass flow rate, and cooling flow fractions fixed. Related work has focused on topping with pressure-exchangers (i.e., wave rotors that provide pressure gain with zero net shaft power output); however, more energy can be added to a wave-engine-topped cycle leading to greater engine specific-power-enhancement The energy addition occurs at a lower pressure in the wave-engine-topped cycle; thus the specific-fuel-consumption-enhancement effected by ideal wave engine topping is slightly lower than that effected by ideal pressure-exchanger topping. At a component level, however, flow turning affords the wave engine a degree-of-freedom relative to the pressure-exchanger that enables a more efficient match with the baseline engine. In some cases, therefore, the SFC-enhancement by wave engine topping is greater than that by pressure-exchanger topping. An ideal wave-rotor-characteristic is used to identify key wave engine design parameters and to contrast the wave engine and pressure-exchanger topping approaches. An aerodynamic design procedure is described in which wave engine design-point performance levels are computed using a one-dimensional wave rotor model. Wave engines using various wave cycles are considered including two-port cycles with on-rotor combustion (valved-combustors) and reverse-flow and through-flow four-port cycles with heat addition in conventional burners. A through-flow wave cycle design with symmetric blading is used to assess engine performance benefits. The wave-engine-topped turboshaft engine produces 16% more power than does a pressure-exchanger-topped engine under the specified topping

  6. Status of the top quark: Top production cross section and top properties

    SciTech Connect

    Boisvert, V.; /Rochester U.

    2006-08-01

    This report describes the latest cross section and property measurements associated with the top quark at the Tevatron Run II. The largest data sample used is 760 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. Due to its large mass, the top quark might be involved in the process of electroweak symmetry breaking, making it a useful probe for signs of new physics.

  7. Properties of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, A. W.

    2014-09-24

    Recent measurements of top-quark properties at the LHC and the Tevatron are presented. Most recent measurements of the top quark mass have been carried out by CMS using $19.7/$fb of $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV data including the study of the dependence on event kinematics. ATLAS uses the full Run I data at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV for a "3D" measurement that significantly reduces systematic uncertainties. D0 employs the full Run II data using the matrix element method to measure the top quark mass with significantly reduced systematic uncertainties. Many different measurements of the top quark exist to date and the most precise ones per decay channel per experiment have been combined into the first world combination with a relative precision of 0.44%. Latest updates of measurements of production asymmetries include the measurement of the \\ttbar production asymmetry by D0 employing the full Run II data set, by CMS and ATLAS (including the polarization of the top quark) employing both the full data set at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV. CMS uses the full $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV data to measure the top quark polarization in single top production, the ratio ${\\cal R}$ of the branching fractions ${\\cal B}(t \\rightarrow Wb) / {\\cal B}(t \\rightarrow Wq)$ and to search for flavor changing neutral currents. The results from all these measurements agree well with their respective Standard Model expectation.

  8. Australia's Next Top Fraction Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peter Gould suggests Australia's next top fraction model should be a linear model rather than an area model. He provides a convincing argument and gives examples of ways to introduce a linear model in primary classrooms.

  9. Trajectory correction propulsion for TOPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, H. R.; Bjorklund, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A blowdown-pressurized hydrazine propulsion system was selected to provide trajectory correction impulse for outer planet flyby spacecraft as the result of cost/mass/reliability tradeoff analyses. Present hydrazine component and system technology and component designs were evaluated for application to the Thermoelectric Outer Planet Spacecraft (TOPS); while general hydrazine technology was adequate, component design changes were deemed necessary for TOPS-type missions. A prototype hydrazine propulsion system was fabricated and fired nine times for a total of 1600 s to demonstrate the operation and performance of the TOPS propulsion configuration. A flight-weight trajectory correction propulsion subsystem (TCPS) was designed for the TOPS based on actual and estimated advanced components.

  10. Forum outlines top emerging technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Extance, Andy

    2015-04-01

    Additive manufacturing, next-generation robotics, "sense and avoid" drones that fly themselves, artificial intelligence and "neuromorphic" computing have all made it into the World Economic Forum's top 10 emerging technologies for 2015.

  11. Top 10 Products of 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In 2011, American School & University (AS&U) showcased some of the hottest products in the industry. This article presents the top ten most requested products as determined by readers. The top one on the list is the Bulb crusher which can cut recycling costs by 50%, can hold 1,350 4-foot lamps in a single 55-gallon drum, can crush a 4-foot lamp in…

  12. Top 10 Products of 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In 2011, American School & University (AS&U) showcased some of the hottest products in the industry. This article presents the top ten most requested products as determined by readers. The top one on the list is the Bulb crusher which can cut recycling costs by 50%, can hold 1,350 4-foot lamps in a single 55-gallon drum, can crush a 4-foot lamp in…

  13. Systematic studies of molecular vibrational anharmonicity and vibration-rotation interaction by self-consistent-field higher derivative methods: Applications to asymmetric and symmetric top and linear polyatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Clabo, D.A. Jr.

    1987-04-01

    Inclusion of the anharmonicity normal mode vibrations (i.e., the third and fourth (and higher) derivatives of a molecular Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface) is necessary in order to theoretically reproduce experimental fundamental vibrational frequencies of a molecule. Although ab initio determinations of harmonic vibrational frequencies may give errors of only a few percent by the inclusion of electron correlation within a large basis set for small molecules, in general, molecular fundamental vibrational frequencies are more often available from high resolution vibration-rotation spectra. Recently developed analytic third derivatives methods for self-consistent-field (SCF) wavefunctions have made it possible to examine with previously unavailable accuracy and computational efficiency the anharmonic force fields of small molecules.

  14. Uncovering the single top: observation of electroweak top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, Jorge Armando

    2009-01-01

    The top quark is generally produced in quark and anti-quark pairs. However, the Standard Model also predicts the production of only one top quark which is mediated by the electroweak interaction, known as 'Single Top'. Single Top quark production is important because it provides a unique and direct way to measure the CKM matrix element Vtb, and can be used to explore physics possibilities beyond the Standard Model predictions. This dissertation presents the results of the observation of Single Top using 2.3 fb-1 of Data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The analysis includes the Single Top muon+jets and electron+jets final states and employs Boosted Decision Tress as a method to separate the signal from the background. The resulting Single Top cross section measurement is: (1) σ(p$\\bar{p}$→ tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.74-0.74+0.95 pb, where the errors include both statistical and systematic uncertainties. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is p = 1.9 x 10-6. This corresponds to a standard deviation Gaussian equivalence of 4.6. When combining this result with two other analysis methods, the resulting cross section measurement is: (2) σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.94 ± 0.88 pb, and the corresponding measurement significance is 5.0 standard deviations.

  15. Pseudorotation motion in tetrahydrofuran: an ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Rayón, Víctor M; Sordo, Jose A

    2005-05-22

    The use of different models based on experimental information about the observed level splitings, rotational constants, and far-infrared transition frequencies leads to different predictions on the equilibrium geometry for tetrahydrofuran. High-level ab initio calculations [coupled cluster singles, doubles (triples)/complete basis set (second order Moller-Plesset triple, quadrupole, quintuple)+zero-point energy(anharmonic)] suggest that the equilibrium conformation of tetrahydrofuran is an envelope C(s) structure. The theoretical geometrical parameters might be helpful to plan further microwave spectroscopic studies in order to get a physical interpretation of the measurements.

  16. A transient α-helical molecular recognition element in the disordered N-terminus of the Sgs1 helicase is critical for chromosome stability and binding of Top3/Rmi1

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Jessica A.; Daughdrill, Gary W.; Schmidt, Kristina H.

    2013-01-01

    The RecQ-like DNA helicase family is essential for the maintenance of genome stability in all organisms. Sgs1, a member of this family in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, regulates early and late steps of double-strand break repair by homologous recombination. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we show that the N-terminal 125 residues of Sgs1 are disordered and contain a transient α-helix that extends from residue 25 to 38. Based on the residue-specific knowledge of transient secondary structure, we designed proline mutations to disrupt this α-helix and observed hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents and increased frequency of genome rearrangements. In vitro binding assays show that the defects of the proline mutants are the result of impaired binding of Top3 and Rmi1 to Sgs1. Extending mutagenesis N-terminally revealed a second functionally critical region that spans residues 9–17. Depending on the position of the proline substitution in the helix functional impairment of Sgs1 function varied, gradually increasing from the C- to the N-terminus. The multiscale approach we used to interrogate structure/function relationships in the long disordered N-terminal segment of Sgs1 allowed us to precisely define a functionally critical region and should be generally applicable to other disordered proteins. PMID:24038467

  17. Healthcare IS industry top 100. HBOC tops out 100.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J

    1997-06-01

    The Healthcare Informatics Top 100 ranks the leading information system software providers to the healthcare industry by revenues. Due to the limited focus of the healthcare IS industry, many Top 100 companies serve other markets in addition to IS or healthcare. Thus, to most accurately compare companies, we asked cross-industry companies and companies with non-IS specific offerings to separate out those revenues specific to healthcare information systems. For some companies this proved an impossible task. In such cases, we relied on estimated revenues provided by professional sources throughout the industry. (Such companies are marked by an asterisk on the Top 100 list). According to industry analyst Sheldon I. Dorenfest of Sheldon I. Dorenfest & Associates, Chicago, the healthcare information systems marketplace can be divided into three parts: sales of computer and networking equipment account for 62 percent of revenue, software and software associated management services account for 33 percent, and consultation and other management services account for 5 percent. The Healthcare Informatics Top 100 features companies offering software and software associated management services as primary source of revenue (this includes resales of hardware and networking equipment). Companies not eligible for the Top 100 include investment companies, and companies for which consulting, non-software management services, or hardware or medical equipment is the primary source of revenue.

  18. SW New Mexico Oil Well Formation Tops

    SciTech Connect

    Shari Kelley

    2015-10-21

    Rock formation top picks from oil wells from southwestern New Mexico from scout cards and other sources. There are differing formation tops interpretations for some wells, so for those wells duplicate formation top data are presented in this file.

  19. Observation of the Top Quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alitti, J.; Álvarez, G.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Aronson, S. H.; Astur, R.; Avery, R. E.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Bendich, J.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Bischoff, A.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Chevalier, L.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; de, K.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisenko, K.; Denisenko, N.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Dharmaratna, W.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Dixon, R.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dugad, S. R.; Durston-Johnson, S.; Edmunds, D.; Efimov, A. O.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahey, S.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Yu.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Franzini, P.; Fredriksen, S.; Fuess, S.; Galjaev, A. N.; Gallas, E.; Gao, C. S.; Gao, S.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J., II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glaubman, M.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gomez, B.; Goncharov, P. I.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Griffin, G.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Guryn, W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hatcher, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernandez-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Igarashi, S.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johari, H.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnstad, H.; Jonckheere, A.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kang, J. S.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M.; Kernan, A.; Kerth, L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klochkov, B. I.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lanou, R. E.; Lebrat, J.-F.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li, Y. K.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Mandrichenko, I. V.; Mangeot, Ph.; Mani, S.; Mansoulié, B.; Mao, H. S.; Margulies, S.; Markeloff, R.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Marx, M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; Melanson, H. L.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Milder, A.; Milner, C.; Mincer, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Mishra, C. S.; Mohammadi-Baarmand, M.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; Mudan, M.; Murphy, C.; Murphy, C. T.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neis, E.; Nemethy, P.; NešiĆ, D.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, C. H.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Perkins, J.; Peryshkin, A.; Peters, M.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pluquet, A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Pušeljić, D.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rao, M. V.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rasmussen, L.; Read, A. L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Roldan, J. M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rusin, S.; Rutherfoord, J.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schmid, D.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stocker, F.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Taketani, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Taylor, T. L.; Teiger, J.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Virador, P. R.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; von Goeler, E.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, J.; Wang, L. Z.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; Wenzel, W. A.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Wilcox, J.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Wolf, Z.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, Y. H.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zinchenko, A.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1995-04-01

    The D0 Collaboration reports on a search for the standard model top quark in pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron with an integrated luminosity of approximately 50 pb-1. We have searched for tt¯ production in the dilepton and single-lepton decay channels with and without tagging of b-quark jets. We observed 17 events with an expected background of 3.8+/-0.6 events. The probability for an upward fluctuation of the background to produce the observed signal is 2×10-6 (equivalent to 4.6 standard deviations). The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with top quark decay. We conclude that we have observed the top quark and measured its mass to be 199+19-21 (stat) +/-22 (syst) GeV/c2 and its production cross section to be 6.4+/-2.2 pb.

  20. TOPS attitude propulsion subsystem technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moynihan, P. I.

    1971-01-01

    The thermoelectric outer-planet spacecraft (TOPS) attitude propulsion subsystem effort is summarized. It includes the tradeoff rationale that went into the selection of anhydrous hydrazine as the propellant, and a brief description of three types of 0.445-N (100-mlbf) thrusters that were purchased for in-house evaluation. A discussion is also included of the 0.2224-N (50-mlbf)-developed thrusters and their integration with a portable, completely enclosed, propulsion module that was designed and developed to support the TOPS single-axis attitude control tests in the celestarium.

  1. Observation of the Top Quark

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kim, S. B.

    1995-08-01

    Top quark production is observed in{bar p}p collisions at{radical}s= 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D{O} observe signals consistent with t{bar t} to WWb{bar b}, but inconsistent with the background prediction by 4.8{sigma} (CDF), 4.6a (D{O}). Additional evidence for the top quark Is provided by a peak in the reconstructed mass distribution. The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with the top quark decay. They measure the top quark mass to be 176{plus_minus}8(stat.){plus_minus}10(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (CDF), 199{sub -21}{sup+19}(stat.){plus_minus}22(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (D{O}), and the t{bar t} production cross section to be 6.8{sub -2.4}{sup+3.6}pb (CDF), 6.4{plus_minus}2.2 pb (D{O}).

  2. The Top STEM Degree Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a list of the top Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) degree producers in the U.S. This list is broken down into seven categories: (1) Total Minority Research/Scholarship and Other Doctoral: Mathematics and Statistics; (2) Total Minority Bachelors: Biological and Biomedical Sciences; (3) Total Minority…

  3. "Top School Problems" Are Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Males, Mike

    1992-01-01

    A well-known "study" comparing the top school problems of 1940 (talking and gum chewing) with those of 1987 (drug abuse, pregnancy, and violence) is nonexistent. In 1940, 49 percent of all youth did not finish high school, 37,000 teenagers died from violence or disease, and 335,000 teens gave birth. Educators should discount pastoral…

  4. Kowalevski top in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, A.

    2013-09-15

    The quantum mechanical Kowalevski top is studied by the direct diagonalization of the Hamiltonian. The spectra show different behaviors depending on the region divided by the bifurcation sets of the classical invariant tori. Some of these spectra are nearly degenerate due to the multiplicity of the invariant tori. The Kowalevski top has several symmetries and symmetry quantum numbers can be assigned to the eigenstates. We have also carried out the semiclassical quantization of the Kowalevski top by the EBK formulation. It is found that the semiclassical spectra are close to the exact values, thus the eigenstates can be also labeled by the integer quantum numbers. The symmetries of the system are shown to have close relations with the semiclassical quantum numbers and the near-degeneracy of the spectra. -- Highlights: •Quantum spectra of the Kowalevski top are calculated. •Semiclassical quantization is carried out by the EBK formulation. •Quantum states are labeled by the semiclassical integer quantum numbers. •Multiplicity of the classical torus makes the spectra nearly degenerate. •Symmetries, quantum numbers and near-degenerate spectra are closely related.

  5. "Top School Problems" Are Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Males, Mike

    1992-01-01

    A well-known "study" comparing the top school problems of 1940 (talking and gum chewing) with those of 1987 (drug abuse, pregnancy, and violence) is nonexistent. In 1940, 49 percent of all youth did not finish high school, 37,000 teenagers died from violence or disease, and 335,000 teens gave birth. Educators should discount pastoral…

  6. The Top STEM Degree Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a list of the top Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) degree producers in the U.S. This list is broken down into seven categories: (1) Total Minority Research/Scholarship and Other Doctoral: Mathematics and Statistics; (2) Total Minority Bachelors: Biological and Biomedical Sciences; (3) Total Minority…

  7. [Top five neonatal articles 2015].

    PubMed

    Flamant, C; Fischer Fumeaux, C J

    2016-09-01

    This review includes five randomized controlled trials, published in the Medline database in 2015, which were selected by the Scientific commission of the French society of neonatology, taking into account their influence in perinatology. This selection was presented during the specific "Top five" session in the French congress of neonatal research.

  8. Tether Optical Phenomena (TOP) experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-03-14

    STS075-310-002 (22 Feb.-9 March 1996) --- Astronaut Maurizio Cheli, STS-75 mission specialist, works with the Tether Optical Phenomenon System (TOPS) on the flight deck of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia. Cheli, representing the European Space Agency (ESA), joined four other astronauts and an international payload specialists for 16 days of scientific research in Earth-orbit.

  9. China offshore has top priority

    SciTech Connect

    Cornitius, T.A.

    1983-11-01

    Joint venture development of offshore petroleum reserves has top priority in the mammoth effort to modernize the People's Republic of China. While the country works to overcome a critical shortage of skilled personnel, export of oil, coal, consumer goods, and metals will finance technological imports.

  10. Kinematic top analyses at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Cobal-Grassman, M.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-01-01

    We present an update of the top quark analysis using kinematic techniques in {rho}{ovr string {rho}} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We reported before on a study which used 19.3 pb{sup -1} of data from the 1992-93 collider run, but now we use a larger data sample of 67 pb{sup -1}. First, we analyze the total transverse energy of the hard collision in W+{ge}3 jet events, showing the likely presence of a t{ovr string t} component in the event sample. Next, we compare in more detail the kinematic structure of W+{ge}3 jet events with expectations for top pair production and with background processes, predominantly direct W+ jet production. We again find W+{ge}3 jet events which cannot be explained in terms of background, but show kinematic features as expected from top. These events also show evidence for beauty quarks. The findings confirm the observation of top events made earlier in the data of the 1992-93 collider run.

  11. Observation of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.B.

    1995-08-01

    Top quark production is observed in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D{O} observe signals consistent with t{bar t} to WWb{bar b}, but inconsistent with the background prediction by 4.8{sigma} (CDF), 4.6a (D{O}). Additional evidence for the top quark Is provided by a peak in the reconstructed mass distribution. The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with the top quark decay. They measure the top quark mass to be 176{plus_minus}8(stat.){plus_minus}10(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (CDF), 199{sub -21}{sup +19}(stat.){plus_minus}22(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (D{O}), and the t{bar t} production cross section to be 6.8{sub -2.4}{sup +3.6}pb (CDF), 6.4{plus_minus}2.2 pb (D{O}).

  12. The Top Theological Degree Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Each year, "Diverse: Issues in Higher Education" publishes a list of the Top 100 producers of associate, bachelor's and graduate degrees awarded to minority students based on research conducted by Dr. Victor M. H. Borden, professor of educational leadership and policy studies at Indiana University Bloomington. This year, for the first…

  13. Top quark mass and kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Barberis, Emanuela; /Northeastern U.

    2006-05-01

    A summary of the results on the measurement of the Top Quark mass and the study of the kinematics of the t{bar t} system at the Tevatron collider is presented here. Results from both the CDF and D0 collaborations are reported.

  14. Top, Higgs and Electroweak Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, Paul L.

    2006-11-17

    Hadron colliders are, and will continue to be, an excellent venue for testing the standard model of particle physics. We describe the status of top-quark physics and the direct search for a standard model Higgs boson. We briefly describe the use of Tevatron and LEP data to indirectly infer the standard model Higgs mass through precision electroweak measurements.

  15. Top quark properties measurements in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazgan, E.; CMS Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Recent top quark properties measurements made with the CMS detector at the LHC are presented. The measurements summarized include spin correlation of top quark pairs, asymmetries, top quark mass, and the underlying event in top quark pair events. The results are compared to the standard model predictions and new physics models.

  16. Top Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.H.L.S.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    We present the latest measurements of the top quark mass from the Tevatron. The different top decay channels and measurement techniques used for these results are also described. The world average of the top quark mass based on some of these new results combined with previous results is m{sub top} = 172.6 {+-} 1.4 GeV.

  17. Training Top 10 Hall of Fame

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Microsoft Corporation and SCC Soft Computer are the newest inductees into the Training Top 10 Hall of Fame, joining the ranks of the 11 companies named to the hall since its inception in 2008 (Wyeth Pharmaceuticals subsequently was acquired by Pfizer Inc. in 2009). These 11 companies held Top 10 spots in the Training Top 50, Top 100, and now Top…

  18. Training Top 10 Hall of Fame

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Microsoft Corporation and SCC Soft Computer are the newest inductees into the Training Top 10 Hall of Fame, joining the ranks of the 11 companies named to the hall since its inception in 2008 (Wyeth Pharmaceuticals subsequently was acquired by Pfizer Inc. in 2009). These 11 companies held Top 10 spots in the Training Top 50, Top 100, and now Top…

  19. Top Jets at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, L.G.; Lee, S.J.; Perez, G.; Sung, I.; Virzi, J.

    2008-10-06

    We investigatethe reconstruction of high pT hadronically-decaying top quarksat the Large Hadron Collider. One of the main challenges in identifying energetictop quarks is that the decay products become increasingly collimated. This reducesthe efficacy of conventional reconstruction methods that exploit the topology of thetop quark decay chain. We focus on the cases where the decay products of the topquark are reconstructed as a single jet, a"top-jet." The most basic"top-tag" methodbased on jet mass measurement is considered in detail. To analyze the feasibility ofthe top-tagging method, both theoretical and experimental aspects of the large QCDjet background contribution are examined. Based on a factorization approach, wederive a simple analytic approximation for the shape of the QCD jet mass spectrum.We observe very good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation. We consider high pT tt bar production in the Standard Model as an example, and show that our theoretical QCD jet mass distributions can efficiently characterize the background via sideband analyses. We show that with 25 fb-1 of data, our approach allows us to resolve top-jets with pT _> 1 TeV, from the QCD background, and about 1.5 TeV top-jets with 100 fb-1, without relying on b-tagging. To further improve the significancewe consider jet shapes (recently analyzed in 0807.0234 [hep-ph]), which resolve thesubstructure of energy flow inside cone jets. A method of measuring the top quarkpolarization by using the transverse momentum of the bottom quark is also presented.The main advantages of our approach are: (i) the mass distributions are driven byfirst principle calculations, instead of relying solely on Monte Carlo simulation; (ii) for high pT jets (pT _> 1 TeV), IR-safe jet shape variables are robust against detectorresolution effects. Our analysis can be applied to other boosted massive particlessuch as the electroweak gauge bosons and the Higgs.

  20. Testing the Standard Model with Top Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnes, Erich W.

    2011-10-01

    The top quark, by far the most massive known fermion, provides a unique laboratory in which to study phyiscs at the electroweak scale. I report on recent top quark measurements from the CDF and DØ experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron pbar p collider, including the first observation of single top quark production, measurement of the top quark mass, the tbar t production rate, and several searches for new physics in the properties of the top quark, and in its production and decay.

  1. Properties of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Wicke, Daniel; /Wuppertal U., Dept. Math.

    2009-08-01

    The aim of particle physics is the understanding of elementary particles and their interactions. The current theory of elementary particle physics, the Standard Model, contains twelve different types of fermions which (neglecting gravity) interact through the gauge bosons of three forces. In addition a scalar particle, the Higgs boson, is needed for theoretical consistency. These few building blocks explain all experimental results found in the context of particle physics, so far. Nevertheless, it is believed that the Standard Model is only an approximation to a more complete theory. First of all the fourth known force, gravity, has withstood all attempts to be included until now. Furthermore, the Standard Model describes several features of the elementary particles like the existence of three families of fermions or the quantisation of charges, but does not explain these properties from underlying principles. Finally, the lightness of the Higgs boson needed to explain the symmetry breaking is difficult to maintain in the presence of expected corrections from gravity at high scales. This is the so called hierarchy problem. In addition astrophysical results indicate that the universe consists only to a very small fraction of matter described by the Standard Model. Large fractions of dark energy and dark matter are needed to describe the observations. Both do not have any correspondence in the Standard Model. Also the very small asymmetry between matter and anti-matter that results in the observed universe built of matter (and not of anti-matter) cannot be explained until now. It is thus an important task of experimental particle physics to test the predictions of the Standard Model to the best possible accuracy and to search for deviations pointing to necessary extensions or modifications of our current theoretical understanding. The top quark was predicted to exist by the Standard Model as the partner of the bottom quark. It was first observed in 1995 by the

  2. Attitude propulsion technology for TOPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moynihan, P. I.

    1972-01-01

    The thermoelectric outer planet spacecraft (TOPS) attitude propulsion subsystem (APS) effort is discussed. It includes the tradeoff rationale that went into the selection of an anhydrous hydrazine baseline system, followed by a discussion of the 0.22 N thruster and its integration into a portable, self-contained propulsion module that was designed, developed, and man rated to support the TOPS single-axis attitude control tests. The results of a cold-start feasibility demonstration with a modified thruster are presented. A description of three types of 0.44 thrusters that were procured for in-house evaluation is included along with the results of the test program. This is followed by a description of the APS feed system components, their evaluations, and a discussion of an evaluation of elastomeric material for valve seat seals. A list of new technology items which will be of value for application to future systems of this type is included.

  3. Thermoelectric Outer Planets Spacecraft (TOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The research and advanced development work is reported on a ballistic-mode, outer planet spacecraft using radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) power. The Thermoelectric Outer Planet Spacecraft (TOPS) project was established to provide the advanced systems technology that would allow the realistic estimates of performance, cost, reliability, and scheduling that are required for an actual flight mission. A system design of the complete RTG-powered outer planet spacecraft was made; major technical innovations of certain hardware elements were designed, developed, and tested; and reliability and quality assurance concepts were developed for long-life requirements. At the conclusion of its active phase, the TOPS Project reached its principal objectives: a development and experience base was established for project definition, and for estimating cost, performance, and reliability; an understanding of system and subsystem capabilities for successful outer planets missions was achieved. The system design answered long-life requirements with massive redundancy, controlled by on-board analysis of spacecraft performance data.

  4. Single top at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Taffard, Anyes; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-11-01

    The authors review the status of the search for the electroweak production of single top quarks by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider using Run II data. With a dataset of approximately 160 pb{sup -1} for CDF and 230 pb{sup -1} for D0, neither experiment finds evidence for single top production and sets 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross-sections. The CDF limits are 10.1 pb for the t channel, 13.6 pb for the s channel and 17.8 pb for the combined production cross-sections of s and t channel. The D0 limits are 5.0 pb for the t channel, 6.4 pb for the s-channel production cross-sections. Both experiments investigate the prospect for a 3{sigma} evidence and a 5{sigma} discovery.

  5. Top decays in extended models

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2009-04-20

    Top quark decays are interesting as a mean to test the Standard Model (SM) predictions. The Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM)-suppressed process t{yields}cWW, and the rare decays t{yields}cZ, t{yields}H{sup 0}+c, and t{yields}c{gamma} an excellent window to probe the predictions of theories beyond the SM. We evaluate the flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decay t{yields}H{sup 0}+c in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions; the FCNC decays may place at tree level and are only supressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks. We also comment on the decay process t{yields}c+{gamma}, which involves radiative corrections.

  6. Top quark results at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, S.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    We present the latest results on the top quark obtained by the CDF experiment using a data sample of about 110 {ital pb}{sup -1} collected at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We briefly describe the candidate events selection and then discuss the production cross section determination and the mass measurement. The study of two new decay channels (all hadronic and ``tau dilepton``) is also reported.

  7. Cloud Top Scanning radiometer (CTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A scanning radiometer to be used for measuring cloud radiances in each of three spectral regions is described. Significant features incorporated in the Cloud Top Scanner design are: (1) flexibility and growth potential through use of easily replaceable modular detectors and filters; (2) full aperture, multilevel inflight calibration; (3) inherent channel registration through employment of a single shared field stop; and (4) radiometric sensitivity margin in a compact optical design through use of Honeywell developed (Hg,Cd)Te detectors and preamplifiers.

  8. Boosted top quarks and jet structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schätzel, Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is the first particle accelerator that provides high enough energy to produce large numbers of boosted top quarks. The decay products of these top quarks are confined to a cone in the top quark flight direction and can be clustered into a single jet. Top quark reconstruction then amounts to analysing the structure of the jet and looking for subjets that are kinematically compatible with top quark decay. Many techniques have been developed in this context to identify top quarks in a large background of non-top jets. This article reviews the results obtained using data recorded in the years 2010-2012 by the experiments ATLAS and CMS. Studies of Standard Model top quark production and searches for new massive particles that decay to top quarks are presented.

  9. Observation of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Aihara, H.; Alitti, J.; Alvarez, G.; Alves, G.A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E.W.; Aronson, S.H.; Astur, R.; Avery, R.E.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bazizi, K.; Bendich, J.; Beri, S.B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Bhat, P.C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Bischoff, A.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N.I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V.S.; Butler, J.M.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Chen, L.; Chen, W.; Chevalier, L.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B.C.; Christenson, J.H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.R.; Cobau, W.G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W.E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O.I.; De, K.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisenko, K.; Denisenko, N.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.P.; Dharmaratna, W.; Diehl, H.T.; Diesburg, M.; Di Loreto, G.; Dixon, R.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dugad, S.R.; Durston-Johnson, S.; Edmunds, D.; Efimov, A.O.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O.V.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Fahey, S.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M.K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H.E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G.E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K.C.; Franzini, P.; Fredriksen, S.; Fuess, S.; Galjaev, A.N.; Gallas, E.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, S.; Geld, T.L.; Genik, R.J. II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C.E.; Gibbard, B.; Glaubman, M.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Glicenstein, J.F.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gomez, B.; Goncharov, P.I.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L.T.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P.D.; Green, D.R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Griffin, G.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Gruenendahl, S.; Guida, J.A.; Guida, J.M.; Guryn, W.; Gurzhiev, S.N.; Gutnikov, Y.E.

    1995-04-03

    The D0 Collaboration reports on a search for the standard model top quark in {ital p{bar p}} collisions at {radical}{ital s}=1.8TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron with an integrated luminosity of approximately 50pb{sup {minus}1}. We have searched for {ital t{bar t}} production in the dilepton and single-lepton decay channels with and without tagging of {ital b}-quark jets. We observed 17 events with an expected background of 3.8{plus_minus}0.6 events. The probability for an upward fluctuation of the background to produce the observed signal is 2{times}10{sup {minus}6} (equivalent to 4.6 standard deviations). The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with top quark decay. We conclude that we have observed the top quark and measured its mass to be 199{sub {minus}21}{sup +19} (stat) {plus_minus}22 (syst) GeV/{ital c}{sup 2} and its production cross section to be 6.4{plus_minus}2.2pb.

  10. Recent Top Properties Measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarelli, Giorgio

    2014-11-26

    We present the most recent CDF results on the measurements of the decay and production vertex of the top-quark. New results on forward-backward asymmetry in top-antitop events are presented. Also, recent measurements of the branching fractions of top-quark are discussed. Finally, measurements in single top events, where top-quark is produced through electroweak processes, are presented. Despite the much larger number of top events collected at the LHC, due to the symmetric initial state and the better signal-to-background ratio in specific channels, some results will be lasting heritage of the Tevatron.

  11. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  12. Results on top-quark physics and top-quark-like signatures by CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabert, Eric; CMS Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    This report reviews the results obtained by the CMS Collaboration on top quark physics, focusing on the latest ones based on p-p collisions provided by the LHC at \\sqrt{s}=13{{TeV}} during Run II. It covers measurements of single-top, top quark pairs and associated productions as well as measurements of top quark properties. Finally several beyond the standard model searches involving top quark in the final states are presented, such as searches for supersymmetry in the third generation, heavy resonances decaying into a top quark pair, or dark matter produced in association to a single-top or a top quark pair.

  13. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This eighteenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period November 1, 1991 to January 31, 1992. The precombustor is fully assembled. Manufacturing of all slagging stage components has been completed. All cooling panels were welded in place and the panel/shell gap was filled with RTV. Final combustor assembly is in progress. The low pressure cooling subsystem (LPCS) was delivered to the CDIF. Second stage brazing issues were resolved. The construction of the two anode power cabinets was completed.

  14. Top-down cellular pyramids

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, A.Y.; Rosenfeld, A.

    1982-07-01

    A cellular pyramid is an exponentially tapering stack of arrays of processors ('cells'), where each cell is connected to its neighbors ('siblings') on its own level, to a 'parent' on the level above, and to its 'children' on the level below. It is shown that in some situations, if information flows top-down only, from fathers to sons, then a cellular pyramid may be no faster than a one-level cellular array; but it may be possible to use simpler cells in the pyramid case.

  15. HUBBLE'S TOP TEN GRAVITATIONAL LENSES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Hubble Space Telescope serendipitous survey of the sky has uncovered exotic patterns, rings, arcs and crosses that are all optical mirages produced by a gravitational lens, nature's equivalent of having giant magnifying glass in space. Shown are the top 10 lens candidates uncovered in the deepest 100 Hubble fields. Hubble's sensitivity and high resolution allow it to see faint and distant lenses that cannot be detected with ground-based telescopes whose images are blurred by Earth's atmosphere. [Top Left] - HST 01248+0351 is a lensed pair on either side of the edge-on disk lensing galaxy. [Top Center] - HST 01247+0352 is another pair of bluer lensed source images around the red spherical elliptical lensing galaxy. Two much fainter images can be seen near the detection limit which might make this a quadruple system. [Top Right] - HST 15433+5352 is a very good lens candidate with a bluer lensed source in the form of an extended arc about the redder elliptical lensing galaxy. [Middle Far Left] - HST 16302+8230 could be an 'Einstein ring' and the most intriguing lens candidate. It has been nicknamed the 'the London Underground' since it resembles that logo. [Middle Near Left] - HST 14176+5226 is the first, and brightest lens system discovered in 1995 with the Hubble telescope. This lens candidate has now been confirmed spectroscopically using large ground-based telescopes. The elliptical lensing galaxy is located 7 billion light-years away, and the lensed quasar is about 11 billion light-years distant. [Middle Near Right] - HST 12531-2914 is the second quadruple lens candidate discovered with Hubble. It is similar to the first, but appears smaller and fainter. [Middle Far Right] - HST 14164+5215 is a pair of bluish lensed images symmetrically placed around a brighter, redder galaxy. [Bottom Left] - HST 16309+8230 is an edge-on disk-like galaxy (blue arc) which has been significantly distorted by the redder lensing elliptical galaxy. [Bottom Center] - HST 12368

  16. HUBBLE'S TOP TEN GRAVITATIONAL LENSES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Hubble Space Telescope serendipitous survey of the sky has uncovered exotic patterns, rings, arcs and crosses that are all optical mirages produced by a gravitational lens, nature's equivalent of having giant magnifying glass in space. Shown are the top 10 lens candidates uncovered in the deepest 100 Hubble fields. Hubble's sensitivity and high resolution allow it to see faint and distant lenses that cannot be detected with ground-based telescopes whose images are blurred by Earth's atmosphere. [Top Left] - HST 01248+0351 is a lensed pair on either side of the edge-on disk lensing galaxy. [Top Center] - HST 01247+0352 is another pair of bluer lensed source images around the red spherical elliptical lensing galaxy. Two much fainter images can be seen near the detection limit which might make this a quadruple system. [Top Right] - HST 15433+5352 is a very good lens candidate with a bluer lensed source in the form of an extended arc about the redder elliptical lensing galaxy. [Middle Far Left] - HST 16302+8230 could be an 'Einstein ring' and the most intriguing lens candidate. It has been nicknamed the 'the London Underground' since it resembles that logo. [Middle Near Left] - HST 14176+5226 is the first, and brightest lens system discovered in 1995 with the Hubble telescope. This lens candidate has now been confirmed spectroscopically using large ground-based telescopes. The elliptical lensing galaxy is located 7 billion light-years away, and the lensed quasar is about 11 billion light-years distant. [Middle Near Right] - HST 12531-2914 is the second quadruple lens candidate discovered with Hubble. It is similar to the first, but appears smaller and fainter. [Middle Far Right] - HST 14164+5215 is a pair of bluish lensed images symmetrically placed around a brighter, redder galaxy. [Bottom Left] - HST 16309+8230 is an edge-on disk-like galaxy (blue arc) which has been significantly distorted by the redder lensing elliptical galaxy. [Bottom Center] - HST 12368

  17. Table-top job analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to establish general training program guidelines for training personnel in developing training for operation, maintenance, and technical support personnel at Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. TTJA is not the only method of job analysis; however, when conducted properly TTJA can be cost effective, efficient, and self-validating, and represents an effective method of defining job requirements. The table-top job analysis is suggested in the DOE Training Accreditation Program manuals as an acceptable alternative to traditional methods of analyzing job requirements. DOE 5480-20A strongly endorses and recommends it as the preferred method for analyzing jobs for positions addressed by the Order.

  18. Cloud-top parameters - A hail indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearl, E. W.; Shenk, W. E.; Skillman, W.

    1975-01-01

    Airborne photographic observations of four hail-producing storms are discussed. With the exception of one storm producing a tornadic event, the overshooting tops were nearly steady-state. The tops were consistently high and wide, reaching maximum heights within about 5 minutes of the initiation of hail. Measured updraft velocities in the turrets composing the overshooting top were 25 m/sec. The dimensions of the overshooting tops were sufficiently large to permit satellite observation.

  19. Heavy flavour physics from top to bottom

    SciTech Connect

    Paulini, M.; CDF and D0 Collaboration

    1998-02-01

    We review the status of heavy flavour physics at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by summarizing recent top quark and B physics results from CDF and D0. In particular we discuss the measurement of the top quark mass and top production cross section as well as B meson lifetimes and time dependent B{anti B} mixing results. An outlook of perspectives for top and B physics in Run II starting in 1999 is also given.

  20. Cloud-top parameters - A hail indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearl, E. W.; Shenk, W. E.; Skillman, W.

    1975-01-01

    Airborne photographic observations of four hail-producing storms are discussed. With the exception of one storm producing a tornadic event, the overshooting tops were nearly steady-state. The tops were consistently high and wide, reaching maximum heights within about 5 minutes of the initiation of hail. Measured updraft velocities in the turrets composing the overshooting top were 25 m/sec. The dimensions of the overshooting tops were sufficiently large to permit satellite observation.

  1. Top quark physics expectations at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    ATLAS Collaboration; CMS Collaboration; Gaponenko, Andrei

    2008-09-30

    The top quark will be produced copiously at the LHC. This will make possible detailed physics studies, and also the use of top quark decays for detector calibration. This talk reviews plans and prospects for top physics activities in ATLAS and CMS experiments.

  2. In Praise of Top-Down Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufour, Richard

    2007-01-01

    In the ongoing debate of the efficacy of top-down versus bottom-up strategies to improve school districts, top-down is clearly losing. Many district leaders are reluctant to champion improvement for fear of being labeled with the epithet "top-down leader," the unkindest cut of all. In this article, the author presents the change…

  3. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) Project represents the culmination of the proof-of-concept (POC) development stage in the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to advance MHD technology to early commercial development stage utility power applications. The project is a joint effort, combining the skills of three topping cycle component developers: TRW, Avco/TDS, and Westinghouse. TRW, the prime contractor and system integrator, is responsible for the 50 thermal megawatt (50 MW{sub t}) slagging coal combustion subsystem. Avco/TDS is responsible for the MHD channel subsystem (nozzle, channel, diffuser, and power conditioning circuits), and Westinghouse is responsible for the current consolidation subsystem. The ITC Project will advance the state-of-the-art in MHD power systems with the design, construction, and integrated testing of 50 MW{sub t} power train components which are prototypical of the equipment that will be used in an early commercial scale MHD utility retrofit. Long duration testing of the integrated power train at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana will be performed, so that by the early 1990's, an engineering data base on the reliability, availability, maintainability and performance of the system will be available to allow scaleup of the prototypical designs to the next development level. This Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period May 1, 1991 to July 31, 1991.

  4. Top quark physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Caner, A.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    We present preliminary results on top quark physics recently obtained by the CDF collaboration. The data sample consists of 110 {ital pb}{sup -1} of {ital p{anti p}} collisions at {radical}{ital s} = 1.8 TeV, collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during the period 1992 - 1995. We report on the {ital t{anti t}} production cross section and on the top quark mass. The measurements are made in three topologies, corresponding to the decay modes of the {ital Wb} pairs in the final state: lepton + multi-jets, dilepton and all hadronic final state. The analysis performed on the single lepton sample yields the most accurate measurements, due to the good acceptance and the favorable signal to noise ratio obtained after applying some b-tagging techniques. In this channel we measure: {sigma}{sub {ital t{anti t}}} = 6.8{sup +2.3}{sub -1.8} pb M{sub {ital t}} = 175.6 {+-} 5.7 ({ital stat}) {+-} 7.1 ({ital syst.}) {ital GeV/c{sup 2}} Combining the cross sections measured with the lepton + multi-jet and dilepton data we obtain: {sigma}{sub {ital t{anti t}}} = 7.5{sup +1.9}{sub -1.6} {ital pb} A preliminary investigation of the production mechanism of the {ital t{anti t}} system is shown and compared to Standard Model expectations.

  5. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the project is to design and construct prototypical hardware for an integrated MHD topping cycle, and conduct long duration proof-of-concept tests of integrated system at the US DOE Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The results of the long duration tests will augment the existing engineering design data base on MHD power train reliability, availability, maintainability, and performance, and will serve as a basis for scaling up the topping cycle design to the next level of development, an early commercial scale power plant retrofit. The components of the MHD power train to be designed, fabricated, and tested include: A slagging coal combustor with a rated capacity of 50 MW thermal input, capable of operation with an Eastern (Illinois {number sign}6) or Western (Montana Rosebud) coal, a segmented supersonic nozzle, a supersonic MHD channel capable of generating at least 1.5 MW of electrical power, a segmented supersonic diffuser section to interface the channel with existing facility quench and exhaust systems, a complete set of current control circuits for local diagonal current control along the channel, and a set of current consolidation circuits to interface the channel with the existing facility inverter.

  6. The top 10 oomycete pathogens in molecular plant pathology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oomycetes form a deep lineage of eukaryotic organisms that includes a large number of plant pathogens that threaten natural and managed ecosystems. We undertook a survey to query the community for their ranking of plant pathogenic oomycete taxa based on scientific and economic importance. In total, ...

  7. CP Violation in Single Top Quark Production

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Weigang

    2012-01-01

    We present a search for CP violation in single top quark production with the DØ experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. CP violation in the top electroweak interaction results in different single top quark production cross sections for top and antitop quarks. We perform the search in the single top quark final state using 5.4 fb-1 of data, in the s-channel, t-channel, and for both combined. At this time, we do not see an observable CP asymmetry.

  8. Measurements of top quark properties at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Kraan, Aafke C.; /Pennsylvania U.

    2006-11-01

    The top quark with its mass of about 172 GeV/c{sup 2} is the most massive fundamental particle observed by experiment. In this talk they highlight the most recent measurements of several top quark properties performed with the CDF detector based on data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities up to 1 fb{sup -1}. These results include a search for top quark pair production via new massive resonances, measurements of the helicity of the W boson from top-quark decay, and a direct limit on the lifetime of the top quark.

  9. Top Quark Studies at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2014-11-26

    Years after its discovery in 1995 by CDF and D0, the top quark still undergoes intense investigations at the Tevatron. Using up to the full Run II data sample, new measurements of top quark production and properties by the D0 Collaboration are presented. In particular, the first observation of single top quark s-channel production, the measurement of differential tbar t distributions, forward-backward tbar t asymmetry, a new measurement of the top quark mass, and a measurement of the top quark charge are discussed.

  10. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This seventeenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period August 1, 1991 to October 31, 1991. Manufacturing of the prototypical combustor pressure shell has been completed including leak, proof, and assembly fit checking. Manufacturing of forty-five cooling panels was also completed including leak, proof, and flow testing. All precombustor internal components (combustion can baffle and swirl box) were received and checked, and integration of the components was initiated. A decision was made regarding the primary and backup designs for the 1A4 channel. The assembly of the channel related prototypical hardware continued. The cathode wall electrical wiring is now complete. The mechanical design of the diffuser has been completed.

  11. The rise and fall of spinning tops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2013-04-01

    The motion of four different spinning tops was filmed with a high-speed video camera. Unlike pointed tops, tops with a rounded peg precess initially about a vertical axis that lies well outside the top, and then spiral inward until the precession axis passes through a point close to the center-of-mass. The center-of-mass of a top with a rounded peg can rise as a result of rolling rather than sliding friction, contrary to the explanation normally given for the rise of spinning tops. A tippe top was also filmed and was observed to jump vertically off a horizontal surface several times while the center-of-mass was rising, contrary to the usual assumption that the normal reaction force on a tippe top remains approximately equal to its weight. It was found that the center-of-mass of a tippe top rises as a result of rolling friction at low spin frequencies and as a result of sliding friction at high spin frequencies. It was also found that, at low spin frequencies, a tippe top can precess at two different frequencies simultaneously.

  12. Top quark mass measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, Erik; /Chicago U., EFI

    2006-05-01

    The mass of the top quark M{sub top} is interesting both as a fundamental parameter of the standard model and as an important input to precision electroweak tests. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) has a robust program of top quark mass analyses, including the most precise single measurement, M{sub top} = 173.4 {+-} 2.8 GeV/c{sup 2}, using 680 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data. A combination of current results from CDF gives M{sub top} = 172.0 {+-} 2.7 GeV/c{sup 2}, surpassing the stated goal of 3 GeV/c{sup 2} precision using 2 fb{sup -1} of data. Finally, a combination with current D0 results gives a world average top quark mass of 172.5 {+-} 2.3 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  13. Top quark mass measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Tuula; /Helsinki U. /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark mass is interesting both as a fundamental parameter of the standard model as well as an important input to precision electroweak tests. The CDF Collaboration has measured the top quark mass with high precision in all decay channels with complementary methods. A combination of the results from CDF gives a top quark mass of 170.5{+-}1.3(stat.){+-}1.8(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  14. TOP500 Supercomputers for June 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Meuer, Hans W.; Dongarra, Jack; Simon, Horst D.

    2004-06-23

    23rd Edition of TOP500 List of World's Fastest Supercomputers Released: Japan's Earth Simulator Enters Third Year in Top Position MANNHEIM, Germany; KNOXVILLE, Tenn.;&BERKELEY, Calif. In what has become a closely watched event in the world of high-performance computing, the 23rd edition of the TOP500 list of the world's fastest supercomputers was released today (June 23, 2004) at the International Supercomputer Conference in Heidelberg, Germany.

  15. TOP500 Supercomputers for June 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Meuer, Hans W.; Dongarra, Jack; Simon, Horst D.

    2005-06-22

    25th Edition of TOP500 List of World's Fastest Supercomputers Released: DOE/L LNL BlueGene/L and IBM gain Top Positions MANNHEIM, Germany; KNOXVILLE, Tenn.; BERKELEY, Calif. In what has become a closely watched event in the world of high-performance computing, the 25th edition of the TOP500 list of the world's fastest supercomputers was released today (June 22, 2005) at the 20th International Supercomputing Conference (ISC2005) in Heidelberg Germany.

  16. TOP500 Supercomputers for November 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Meuer, Hans W.; Dongarra, Jack; Simon, Horst D.

    2004-11-08

    24th Edition of TOP500 List of World's Fastest Supercomputers Released: DOE/IBM BlueGene/L and NASA/SGI's Columbia gain Top Positions MANNHEIM, Germany; KNOXVILLE, Tenn.; BERKELEY, Calif. In what has become a closely watched event in the world of high-performance computing, the 24th edition of the TOP500 list of the worlds fastest supercomputers was released today (November 8, 2004) at the SC2004 Conference in Pittsburgh, Pa.

  17. Top quark mass: past, present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, Gaston; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    The top quark is the most massive elementary particle discovered thus far. Its large mass may help explain the mechanism by which fundamental particles gain mass - the Standard Model's greatest standing mystery. Today the top quark mass, together with the W boson mass, plays an important role in constraining the Higgs boson mass. The current status of the top quark mass measurement and a brief outline of the expectation at the Large Hadron Collider and the International Linear Collider will be covered.

  18. Top quark physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    D. Gerdes

    2004-01-28

    Precision studies of the top quark are a prime goal of the Run II physics program at the Fermilab Tevatron. Since the start of Run II in early 2002, the CDF and D0 experiments have analyzed approximately 100 pb{sup -1} of data and have re-established the top quark signal. In this article the author summarizes recent measurements of the top production cross section and mass.

  19. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    This fourteenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period November 1, 1990 to January 31, 1991. Testing of the High Pressure Cooling Subsystem electrical isolator was completed. The PEEK material successfully passed the high temperature, high pressure duration tests (50 hours). The Combustion Subsystem drawings were CADAM released. The procurement process is in progress. An equipment specification and RFP were prepared for the new Low Pressure Cooling System (LPCS) and released for quotation. Work has been conducted on confirmation tests leading to final gas-side designs and studies to assist in channel fabrication.The final cathode gas-side design and the proposed gas-side designs of the anode and sidewall are presented. Anode confirmation tests and related analyses of anode wear mechanisms used in the selection of the proposed anode design are presented. Sidewall confirmation tests, which were used to select the proposed gas-side design, were conducted. The design for the full scale CDIF system was completed. A test program was initiated to investigate the practicality of using Avco current controls for current consolidation in the power takeoff (PTO) regions and to determine the cause of past current consolidation failures. Another important activity was the installation of 1A4-style coupons in the 1A1 channel. A description of the coupons and their location with 1A1 channel is presented herein.

  20. Top-of-Rail lubricant

    SciTech Connect

    Alzoubi, M. F.; Fenske, G. R.; Erck, R. A.; Boparai, A. S.

    2000-07-14

    Analysis of the volatile and semivolatile fractions collected after use of the TOR lubricant indicated that other than contaminants in the collection laboratory, no compounds on the EPA's Target Compound Lists (Tables 2 and 5) were detected in these fractions. The data of these qualitative analyses, given in the various tables in the text, indicate only the relative amounts of the tentatively identified compounds. The authors recommend that quantitative analysis be performed on the volatile and semivolatile fractions to allow confirmation of the tentatively identified compounds and to obtain absolute amounts of the detected compounds. Additionally, the semivolatile fraction should be analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to identify compounds that are not chromatographable under the temperature program used for determination of semivolatile compounds. Introducing the top-of-rail (TOR) lubricant into the wheel/rail interface results in a reduction of almost 60% of lateral friction force over the forces encountered under dry conditions. This reveals good potential for energy savings, as well as wear reduction, for railroad companies. In TOR lubrication, an increase in the angle of attack and axle load results in increased lateral friction and rate of lubricant consumption. The most efficient TOR lubricant quantity to be used in the wheel/rail interface must be calculated precisely according to the number of cars, axle loads, train speed, and angle of attack.

  1. Observations of severe turbulence near thunderstorm tops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantley, K. C.; Lester, Peter F.

    1990-01-01

    Data derived from the flight tapes of two airliners that experienced severe turbulence near thunderstorm tops are used to produce quantitative descriptions of the turbulence and its environment. The likely turbulence-producing processes include a three-dimensional turbulent wake in the lee of a squall line and an updraft in the top of a thunderstorm. Results suggest that current procedures for using surface and airborne weather radar for routing aircraft near thunderstorm tops should be reexamined. Also, although useful rules for safe flight near thunderstorm tops already exist, there is evidence that they are not universally applied.

  2. Top Quark Production Asymmetries AFBt and AFBl

    DOE PAGES

    Berger, Edmond L.; Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; ...

    2012-02-14

    A large forward-backward asymmetry is seen in both the top quark rapidity distribution AFBt and in the rapidity distribution of charged leptons AFBl from top quarks produced at the Tevatron. We study the kinematic and dynamic aspects of the relationship of the two observables arising from the spin correlation between the charged lepton and the top quark with different polarization states. We emphasize the value of both measurements, and we conclude that a new physics model which produces more right-handed than left-handed top quarks is favored by the present data.

  3. Top Quark Physics at the CDF Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stelzer, Bernd; Collaboration, for the CDF

    2010-07-01

    Fermilab's Tevatron accelerator is recently performing at record luminosities that enables a program systematically addressing the physics of top quarks. The CDF collaboration has analyzed up to 5 fb{sup -1} of proton anti-proton collisions from the Tevatron at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The large datasets available allow to push top quark measurements to higher and higher precision and have lead to the recent observation of electroweak single top quark production at the Tevatron. This article reviews recent results on top quark physics from the CDF experiment.

  4. Top Quark Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of the top quark in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron proton antiproton collider, precise measurements of its mass are ongoing. Using data recorded by the D0 and CDF experiment, corresponding to up to the full Tevatron data sample, top quark mass measurements performed in different final states using various extraction techniques are presented in this article. The recent Tevatron top quark mass combination yields m_t=173.20 +-0.87 GeV. Furthermore, measurements of the top antitop quark mass difference from the Tevatron are discussed.

  5. Boat Deck, Cabin Deck, Bridge Deck, Flat House Top, Stage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Boat Deck, Cabin Deck, Bridge Deck, Flat House Top, Stage Top, Mast House Top, Upper Deck, Flat House Tops, Forecastle Deck, Main Deck - American Racer, Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  6. Measuring top-quark polarization in top-pair + missing-energy events.

    PubMed

    Berger, Edmond L; Cao, Qing-Hong; Yu, Jiang-Hao; Zhang, Hao

    2012-10-12

    The polarization of a top quark can be sensitive to new physics beyond the standard model. Since the charged lepton from top-quark decay is maximally correlated with the top-quark spin, it is common to measure the polarization from the distribution in the angle between the charged lepton and the top-quark directions. We propose a novel method based on the charged lepton energy fraction and illustrate the method with a detailed simulation of top-quark pairs produced in supersymmetric top squark pair production. We show that the lepton energy ratio distribution that we define is very sensitive to the top-quark polarization but insensitive to the precise measurement of the top-quark energy.

  7. Top 12 Web Resources for 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Lisa; Vodicka, Devin

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe some of the top websites recommended by colleagues for the Association of California School Administrators. The Top 12 for 2012 are: (1) Facebook (facebook.com); (2) Twitter (twitter.com); (3) Tungle (tungle.me); (4) FCMAT (fcmat.org); (5) YouSendIt (yousendit.com); (6) Slideshare (slideshare.net); (7) QR…

  8. Review of Top Quark Physics Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kehoe, R.; Narain, M.; Kumar, A.

    2007-12-01

    As the heaviest known fundamental particle, the top quark has taken a central role in the study of fundamental interactions. Production of top quarks in pairs provides an important probe of strong interactions. The top quark mass is a key fundamental parameter which places a valuable constraint on the Higgs boson mass and electroweak symmetry breaking. Observations of the relative rates and kinematics of top quark final states constrain potential new physics. In many cases, the tests available with study of the top quark are both critical and unique. Large increases in data samples from the Fermilab Tevatron have been coupled with major improvements in experimental techniques to produce many new precision measurements of the top quark. The first direct evidence for electroweak production of top quarks has been obtained, with a resulting direct determination of V{sub tb}. Several of the properties of the top quark have been measured. Progress has also been made in obtaining improved limits on potential anomalous production and decay mechanisms. This review presents an overview of recent theoretical and experimental developments in this field. We also provide a brief discussion of the implications for further efforts.

  9. Search for top quark at Fermilab Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Sliwa, K.; The CDF Collaboration

    1991-10-01

    The status of a search for the top quark with Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), based on a data sample recorded during the 1988--1989 run is presented. The plans for the next Fermilab Collider run in 1992--1993 and the prospects of discovering the top quark are discussed. 19 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Pinch Experiments in a Table Top Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, Jose; Soto, Leopoldo; Tarifeno, Ariel

    2009-01-21

    The design and construction of a table top multipurpose capacitor bank of hundred of Joules and hundred of kiloAmperes conceived to be used in small scale Z-pinch experiments is reported. A recent result on a Z-pinch gas embedded discharge using hollow conical electrodes done in a similar table top generator is also presented.

  11. Race to Top Draws out New Suitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The list of 61 finalists for the latest Race to the Top competition shows that the U.S. Department of Education was successful in enticing high-scoring applications from districts in rural America and in states that had not shared in the Race to the Top bounty before. But whether the ultimate winners, which will be announced this month, will be…

  12. The Sakai Spinner: A Paperclip Top

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrao, Christian T.

    2014-01-01

    A challenge: Can you create a stable top from a single paper clip? Several interesting solutions to this problem were provided by Takao Sakai from Japan, the requirement of each being that the center of gravity be located on the vertical y-axis at the center of the top. In the simplest configuration, we see that there exists a single angle ?…

  13. World average top-quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzinski, D.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes a talk given at the Top2008 Workshop at La Biodola, Isola d Elba, Italy. The status of the world average top-quark mass is discussed. Some comments about the challanges facing the experiments in order to further improve the precision are offered.

  14. The Sakai Spinner: A Paperclip Top

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrao, Christian T.

    2014-01-01

    A challenge: Can you create a stable top from a single paper clip? Several interesting solutions to this problem were provided by Takao Sakai from Japan, the requirement of each being that the center of gravity be located on the vertical y-axis at the center of the top. In the simplest configuration, we see that there exists a single angle ?…

  15. Controlling Severe Curly Top in Sugarbeets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Controlling curly top in sugarbeet has been industry priority in the western United States since the 1920s. Curly top is a virus disease that is vectored by the beet leafhopper. If the beet leafhopper moves into commercial fields early in the season, virus is more likely to be transmitted to sugar...

  16. 49 CFR 236.779 - Plate, top.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plate, top. 236.779 Section 236.779 Transportation... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.779 Plate, top. A metal plate secured to a locking bracket to prevent the cross locking from being forced out of the...

  17. 49 CFR 236.779 - Plate, top.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plate, top. 236.779 Section 236.779 Transportation... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.779 Plate, top. A metal plate secured to a locking bracket to prevent the cross locking from being forced out of the...

  18. 49 CFR 236.779 - Plate, top.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plate, top. 236.779 Section 236.779 Transportation... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.779 Plate, top. A metal plate secured to a locking bracket to prevent the cross locking from being forced out of the...

  19. 49 CFR 236.779 - Plate, top.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plate, top. 236.779 Section 236.779 Transportation... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.779 Plate, top. A metal plate secured to a locking bracket to prevent the cross locking from being forced out of the...

  20. 49 CFR 236.779 - Plate, top.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plate, top. 236.779 Section 236.779 Transportation... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.779 Plate, top. A metal plate secured to a locking bracket to prevent the cross locking from being forced out of the...

  1. Physics of the top quark at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Vejcik, S.; CDF Collaboration

    1997-07-01

    Measurements of Top quark properties with the CDF detector are reported. The production cross section and mass provide a consistent picture of the Top quark as described by the Standard Model. Initial studies of other properties such as estimates of branching ratios are also reported.

  2. Tools for top physics at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Harel, Amnon

    2008-07-01

    Top quark measurements rely on the jet energy calibration and often on b-quark identification. We discuss these and other tools and how they apply to top quark analyses at D0. In particular some of the nuances that result from D0's data driven approach to these issues are presented.

  3. The Process of becoming a Top Worker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uusiautti, Satu; Määttä, Kaarina

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study the phenomenon of success at work: of which elements success is constructed and what factors define the process of becoming a top worker in Finland. As an example of the top workers, "Employees of the Year" (N = 8) from different occupational fields were chosen to represent the successful workers.…

  4. Top-Ten IT Issues, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Debra H.; DeBlois, Peter B.

    2008-01-01

    EDUCAUSE presents the top-ten IT-related issues in terms of strategic importance to the higher education institution, as revealed by the ninth annual EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey. This year, "Security" moves back to the top of the list. (Contains 20 notes.)

  5. Race to Top Draws out New Suitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The list of 61 finalists for the latest Race to the Top competition shows that the U.S. Department of Education was successful in enticing high-scoring applications from districts in rural America and in states that had not shared in the Race to the Top bounty before. But whether the ultimate winners, which will be announced this month, will be…

  6. Top Quark Pair Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Jason

    2005-05-17

    The measurement of the top quark pair production crosssection inproton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV is a test ofquantumchromodynamics and could potentially be sensitive to newphysics beyondthe standard model. I report on the latest t-tbarcross section resultsfrom the CDF and DZero experiments in various finalstate topologies whicharise from decays of top quark pairs.

  7. Protein Identification Using Top-Down

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaowen; Sirotkin, Yakov; Shen, Yufeng; Anderson, Gordon A.; Tsai, Yi-Hsuan S.; Ting, Ying S.; Goodlett, David R.; Smith, Richard D.; Bafna, Vineet; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2012-06-01

    In the last two years, due to advances in protein separation and mass spectrometry, top-down mass spectrometry moved from analyzing single proteins to analyzing complex samples and identifying hundreds and even thousands of proteins. However, computational tools for database search of top-down spectra against protein databases are still in infancy. We describe MS-Align+, a fast algorithm for top-down protein identification based on spectral alignment that enables searches for unexpected post-translational modifications (PTMs). We also propose a method for evaluating statistical significance of top-down protein identifications and further benchmark MS-Align+ along with PIITA, ProSightPTM and SEQUEST, which were previously used for top-down MS/MS database searches. We demonstrate that MS-Align+ and PIITA significantly increase the number of identified proteins as compared to ProSightPTM and SEQUEST.

  8. Thermionic topping of electric power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.; Fitzpatrick, G. O.; Rasor, N. S.

    1975-01-01

    The most likely use of thermionic conversion is in the form of a topping cycle combined with a steam-turbogenerator plant. A specific reference system is chosen in which the thermionic topping cycle occurs in thermionic heat exchangers referred to as large, modular thermionic units to which heat is transferred from a separate heat source and which reject their heat to a conventional steam turboelectric system. Results of analysis show that the performance and cost criteria for practical thermionic topping of large electric power plants are well within the reach of demonstrated and foreseeable converter capabilities. Thermionic topping has many significant advantages over unconventional cycles proposed for topping applications, including level of demonstrated and projected performance and lifetime, development time, and design simplicity.

  9. Thermionic topping of electric power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.; Fitzpatrick, G. O.; Rasor, N. S.

    1975-01-01

    The most likely use of thermionic conversion is in the form of a topping cycle combined with a steam-turbogenerator plant. A specific reference system is chosen in which the thermionic topping cycle occurs in thermionic heat exchangers referred to as large, modular thermionic units to which heat is transferred from a separate heat source and which reject their heat to a conventional steam turboelectric system. Results of analysis show that the performance and cost criteria for practical thermionic topping of large electric power plants are well within the reach of demonstrated and foreseeable converter capabilities. Thermionic topping has many significant advantages over unconventional cycles proposed for topping applications, including level of demonstrated and projected performance and lifetime, development time, and design simplicity.

  10. TOP500 Supercomputers for June 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Meuer, Hans W.; Dongarra, Jack; Simon, Horst D.

    2002-06-20

    19th Edition of TOP500 List of World's Fastest Supercomputers Released MANNHEIM, Germany; KNOXVILLE, Tenn.;&BERKELEY, Calif. In what has become a much-anticipated event in the world of high-performance computing, the 19th edition of the TOP500 list of the worlds fastest supercomputers was released today (June 20, 2002). The recently installed Earth Simulator supercomputer at the Earth Simulator Center in Yokohama, Japan, is as expected the clear new number 1. Its performance of 35.86 Tflop/s (trillions of calculations per second) running the Linpack benchmark is almost five times higher than the performance of the now No.2 IBM ASCI White system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (7.2 Tflop/s). This powerful leap frogging to the top by a system so much faster than the previous top system is unparalleled in the history of the TOP500.

  11. Creation of Functional Micro/Nano Systems through Top-down and Bottom-up Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tak-Sing; Brough, Branden; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Mimicking nature’s approach in creating devices with similar functional complexity is one of the ultimate goals of scientists and engineers. The remarkable elegance of these naturally evolved structures originates from bottom-up self-assembly processes. The seamless integration of top-down fabrication and bottom-up synthesis is the challenge for achieving intricate artificial systems. In this paper, technologies necessary for guided bottom-up assembly such as molecular manipulation, molecular binding, and the self assembling of molecules will be reviewed. In addition, the current progress of synthesizing mechanical devices through top-down and bottom-up approaches will be discussed. PMID:19382535

  12. Measurements and searches with top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2008-08-01

    In 1995 the last missing member of the known families of quarks, the top quark, was discovered by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron, a proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab near Chicago. Until today, the Tevatron is the only place where top quarks can be produced. The determination of top quark production and properties is crucial to understand the Standard Model of particle physics and beyond. The most striking property of the top quark is its mass--of the order of the mass of a gold atom and close to the electroweak scale--making the top quark not only interesting in itself but also as a window to new physics. Due to the high mass, much higher than of any other known fermion, it is expected that the top quark plays an important role in electroweak symmetry breaking, which is the most prominent candidate to explain the mass of particles. In the Standard Model, electroweak symmetry breaking is induced by one Higgs field, producing one additional physical particle, the Higgs boson. Although various searches have been performed, for example at the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP), no evidence for the Higgs boson could yet be found in any experiment. At the Tevatron, multiple searches for the last missing particle of the Standard Model are ongoing with ever higher statistics and improved analysis techniques. The exclusion or verification of the Higgs boson can only be achieved by combining many techniques and many final states and production mechanisms. As part of this thesis, the search for Higgs bosons produced in association with a top quark pair (t$\\bar{t}$H) has been performed. This channel is especially interesting for the understanding of the coupling between Higgs and the top quark. Even though the Standard Model Higgs boson is an attractive candidate, there is no reason to believe that the electroweak symmetry breaking is induced by only one Higgs field. In many models more than one Higgs boson are expected to exist, opening even more

  13. Discovery of single top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Gillberg, Dag

    2009-04-01

    The top quark is by far the heaviest known fundamental particle with a mass nearing that of a gold atom. Because of this strikingly high mass, the top quark has several unique properties and might play an important role in electroweak symmetry breaking - the mechanism that gives all elementary particles mass. Creating top quarks requires access to very high energy collisions, and at present only the Tevatron collider at Fermilab is capable of reaching these energies. Until now, top quarks have only been observed produced in pairs via the strong interaction. At hadron colliders, it should also be possible to produce single top quarks via the electroweak interaction. Studies of single top quark production provide opportunities to measure the top quark spin, how top quarks mix with other quarks, and to look for new physics beyond the standard model. Because of these interesting properties, scientists have been looking for single top quarks for more than 15 years. This thesis presents the first discovery of single top quark production. An analysis is performed using 2.3 fb-1 of data recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at centre-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. Boosted decision trees are used to isolate the single top signal from background, and the single top cross section is measured to be σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.74-0.74+0.95 pb. Using the same analysis, a measurement of the amplitude of the CKM matrix element Vtb, governing how top and b quarks mix, is also performed. The measurement yields: |V{sub tb}|f1L| = 1.05 -0.12+0.13, where f1L is the left-handed Wtb coupling. The separation of signal from background is improved by combining the boosted decision trees with two other multivariate techniques. A new cross section measurement is performed, and the significance for the excess over the predicted background exceeds 5

  14. The Top Quark, QCD, And New Physics.

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Dawson, S.

    2002-06-01

    The role of the top quark in completing the Standard Model quark sector is reviewed, along with a discussion of production, decay, and theoretical restrictions on the top quark properties. Particular attention is paid to the top quark as a laboratory for perturbative QCD. As examples of the relevance of QCD corrections in the top quark sector, the calculation of e{sup+}e{sup -}+ t{bar t} at next-to-leading-order QCD using the phase space slicing algorithm and the implications of a precision measurement of the top quark mass are discussed in detail. The associated production of a t{bar t} pair and a Higgs boson in either e{sup+}e{sup -} or hadronic collisions is presented at next-to-leading-order QCD and its importance for a measurement of the top quark Yulrawa coupling emphasized. Implications of the heavy top quark mass for model builders are briefly examined, with the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model and topcolor discussed as specific examples.

  15. Deuterium in North Atlantic storm tops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ronald B.

    1992-01-01

    During the ERICA project in 1989, ice crystals were collected from the tops of two winter storms and one broad cirrus cloud. Deuterium concentration in the storm ice samples, together with a model of isotope fractionation, are used to determine the temperature where the ice was formed. Knowledge of the ice formation temperature allows us to determine whether the ice has fallen or been lofted to the altitude of collection. In both storms, the estimated fall distance decreases upward. In the 21 January storm, the fall distance decreases to zero at the cloud top. In the 23 January storm, the fall distance decreases to zero at a point 2 km below the cloud top and appears to become negative above, indicating lofted ice. Cloud particle data from the cloud tops show an ice-to-vapor ratio greater than one and indicate the presence of particles with small terminal velocities; both observations support the idea of ice lofting. The satellite-derived cloud tops lie well below the actual cloud top (e.g., 2.5 km below on 23 January), indicating that the lofted ice in winter storms may not be detectable from space using IR radiance techniques. A comparison of deuterium in cloud-top ice and clear-air vapor suggests that even in winter, when vertical air motions are relatively weak, lofted ice crystals are the dominant source of water vapor in the upper troposphere.

  16. Measurement of the top quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Blusk, Steven R.

    1998-05-01

    The first evidence and subsequent discovery of the top quark was reported nearly 4 years ago. Since then, CDF and D0 have analyzed their full Run 1 data samples, and analysis techniques have been refined to make optimal use of the information. In this paper, we report on the most recent measurements of the top quark mass, performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron. The CDF collaboration has performed measurements of the top quark mass in three decay channels from which the top quark mass is measured to be 175.5 {+-} 6.9 GeV=c{sup 2}. The D0 collaboration combines measurements from two decay channels to obtain a top quark mass of 172.1 {+-} 7.1 GeV/c{sup 2}. Combining the measurements from the two experiments, assuming a 2 GeV GeV/c{sup 2} correlated systematic uncertainty, the measurement of the top quark mass at the Tevatron is 173.9 {+-} 5.2 GeV/c{sup 2}. This report presents the measurements of the top quark mass from each of the decay channels which contribute to this measurement.

  17. Tevatron Top-Quark Combinations and World Top-Quark Mass Combination

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2014-11-04

    Almost 20 years after its discovery, the top quark is still an interesting particle, undergoing precise investigation of its properties. For many years, the Tevatron proton antiproton collider at Fermilab was the only place to study top quarks in detail, while with the recent start of the LHC proton proton collider a top quark factory has opened. An important ingredient for the full understanding of the top quark is the combination of measurements from the individual experiments. In particular, the Tevaton combinations of single top-quark cross sections, the ttbar production cross section, the W helicity in top-quark decays as well as the Tevatron and the world combination of the top-quark mass are discussed.

  18. Single Top Quark Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzani, Manfredi

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the most recent measurements of single top quark production performed by CDF and D0 collaborations in proton-antiproton collisions at Tevatron. Events are selected in the lepton+jets final state by CDF and D0 and in the missing transverse energy plus jets final state by CDF. The small single top signal in s-channel, t-channel and inclusive s+t channel is separated from the large background by using different multivariate techniques. We also present the most recent results on extraction of the CKM matrix element $|V_{tb}|$ from the single top quark cross section.

  19. Single top quark production at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Jabeen, S.; /Boston U.

    2008-07-01

    We present first evidence for the production of single top quarks at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. Using a 0.9 fb{sup -1} dataset, we apply a multivariate analysis to separate signal from background and measure cross section for single top quark production. We use the cross section measurement to directly determine the CKM matrix element that describes the Wtb coupling. We also present results of W0 and charged Higgs searches with the same final states as standard model single top quark production.

  20. Top quark mass measurement at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; /Harvard U.

    2004-12-01

    The authors report on the latest experimental measurements of the top quark mass by the CDF and D0 Collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron. They present a new top mass measurement using the t{bar t} events collected by the D0 Collaboration in Run I between 1994 and 1996. This result is combined with previous measurements to yield a new world top mass average. They also describe several preliminary results using up to 193 pb{sup -1} of t{bar t} events produced in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV during the Run II of the Tevatron.

  1. Precision Determination of the Top Quark Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Movilla Fernandez, Pedro A.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-05-01

    The CDF and D0 collaborations have updated their measurements of the mass of the top quark using proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV produced at the Tevatron. The uncertainties in each of the top-antitop decay channels have been reduced. The new Tevatron average for the mass of the top quark based on about 1 fb{sup -1} of data per experiment is 170.9 {+-} 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  2. Top quark properties from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Klute, Markus; /MIT, LNS

    2006-05-01

    This report describes latest measurements and studies of top quark properties from the Tevatron in Run II with an integrated luminosity of up to 750 pb{sup -1}. Due to its large mass of about 172 GeV/c{sup 2}, the top quark provides a unique environment for tests of the Standard Model and is believed to yield sensitivity to new physics beyond the Standard Model. With data samples of close to 1 fb{sup -1} the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron enter a new area of precision top quark measurements.

  3. Top-quark physics: Status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husemann, Ulrich

    2017-07-01

    After the discovery of the top quark more than 20 years ago, its properties have been studied in great detail both in production and in decay. Increasingly sophisticated experimental results from the Fermilab Tevatron and from Run 1 and Run 2 of the LHC at CERN are complemented by very precise theoretical predictions in the framework of the standard model of particle physics and beyond. In this article the current status of top-quark physics is reviewed, focusing on experimental results, and a perspective of top-quark physics at the LHC and at future colliders is given.

  4. Single Top Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhenbin; /Baylor U.

    2012-05-01

    We present recent results of single top quark production in the lepton plus jet final state, performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations based on 7.5 and 5.4 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data collected at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV from the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Multivariate techniques are used to separate the single top signal from the backgrounds. Both collaborations present measurements of the single top quark cross section and the CKM matrix element |V{sub tb}|. A search for anomalous Wtb coupling from D0 is also presented.

  5. Top-down Proteomics: Technology Advancements and Applications to Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wenxuan; Tucholski, Trisha M.; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diseases of the heart are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality for both men and women worldwide, and impose significant economic burdens on the healthcare systems. Despite substantial effort over the last several decades, the molecular mechanisms underlying diseases of the heart remain poorly understood. Areas covered Altered protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) and protein isoform switching are increasingly recognized as important disease mechanisms. Top-down high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has emerged as the most powerful method for the comprehensive analysis of PTMs and protein isoforms. Here, we will review recent technology developments in the field of top-down proteomics, as well as highlight recent studies utilizing top-down proteomics to decipher the cardiac proteome for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying diseases of the heart. Expert commentary Top-down proteomics is a premier method for the global and comprehensive study of protein isoforms and their PTMs, enabling the identification of novel protein isoforms and PTMs, characterization of sequence variations, and quantification of disease-associated alterations. Despite significant challenges, continuous development of top-down proteomics technology will greatly aid the dissection of the molecular mechanisms underlying diseases of the hearts for the identification of novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27448560

  6. Green Power Partnership National Top 100

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. The National Top 100 lists the largest green power users within the Green Power Partnership.

  7. Green Power Partnership Top Partner Rankings

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. Top Partner Rankings highlight the annual green power use of leading Green Power Partners.

  8. The Top 10 Issues Impacting School Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the top challenges commonly confronted nationwide by school districts districts, facilities, and business. Challenges include construction and repair, enrollment, funding, security and safety, technology, maintenance, staff training and retention, and unfunded mandates. (GR)

  9. Best of "Earth As Art" -- Top Five

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Counting down the Top Five Earth As Art images, as voted on by the public. Landsat has been collecting data of the Earth's surface since 1972. Some of the images are visually striking, and they hav...

  10. Top partner probes of extended Higgs sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Pierce, Aaron; Thaler, Jesse

    2013-08-01

    Natural theories of the weak scale often include fermionic partners of the top quark. If the electroweak symmetry breaking sector contains scalars beyond a single Higgs doublet, then top partners can have sizable branching ratios to these extended Higgs sector states. In fact, top partner decays may provide the most promising discovery mode for such scalars, especially given the large backgrounds to direct and associated production. In this paper, we present a search strategy for top partner decays to a charged Higgs boson and a bottom quark, focusing on the case where the charged Higgs dominantly decays to third-generation quarks to yield a multi- b final state. We also discuss ways to extend this search to exotic neutral scalars decaying to bottom quark pairs.

  11. Top Quark Physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Andreas W.

    2015-05-21

    An overview of recent top quark measurements using the full Run II data set of CDF or D0 at the Tevatron is presented. Results are complementary to the ones at the LHC. Recent measurements of the production cross section of top quarks in strong and electroweak production and of top quark production asymmetries are presented. The latter includes the measurement of the tt-bar production asymmetry by D0 in the dilepton decay channel. Within their uncertainties the results from all these measurements agree with their respective Standard Model expectation. Finally latest updates on measurements of the top quark mass are discussed, which at the time of the conference are the most precise determinations.

  12. TEST STAND 4697 CONSTRUCTION TOP OUT

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-04

    ON MARCH 4, CREW MEMBERS READIED A 900-POUND STEEL BEAM TO "TOP OUT" TEST STAND 4697, WHICH IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION TO TEST THE SPACE LAUNCH SYSTEM LIQUID OXYGEN TANK AT NASA'S MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER.

  13. Wind Energy Program: Top 10 Program Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-18

    Brochure on the top accomplishments of the Wind Energy Program, including the development of large wind machines, small machines for the residential market, wind tunnel testing, computer codes for modeling wind systems, high definition wind maps, and successful collaborations.

  14. Top decays and mass with CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-06-01

    The authors report preliminary results on top quark decays and measurements of the top mass recently obtained by the CDF collaboration, using a data sample of about 110 pb{sup {minus}1} collected at the Tevatron collider. Upper limits for non Standard model top decays into W + q (non b quark), Z + q and {gamma} + q are given. Top mass measurements are obtained in three topologies for t{anti t} production and decay into W b: lepton + {ge} 4 jets, di-lepton and all hadronic final states. The most precise measurement is obtained in the lepton + {ge} 4 jets topology using 34 events which have at least one jet tagged by the SVX or SLT b-tagging algorithms and a good constrained kinematics fit.

  15. Giving top quark effective operators a boost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, Christoph; Moore, Liam; Nordström, Karl; Russell, Michael

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the prospects to systematically improve generic effective field theory-based searches for new physics in the top sector during LHC run 2 as well as the high luminosity phase. In particular, we assess the benefits of high momentum transfer final states on top EFT-fit as a function of systematic uncertainties in comparison with sensitivity expected from fully-resolved analyses focusing on t t bar production. We find that constraints are typically driven by fully-resolved selections, while boosted top quarks can serve to break degeneracies in the global fit. This demystifies and clarifies the importance of high momentum transfer final states for global fits to new interactions in the top sector from direct measurements.

  16. Higgs Effects in Top Quark Pair Production

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, J.H.

    2003-06-13

    Top quark production in p{bar p} and e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions is enhanced by the exchange of a Higgs boson. The enhancement factors are calculated in the threshold region using the Greens function method.

  17. Top Ten Technology Breakthroughs for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateman, Bill; Crystal, Jerry; Davidson, Hall; Holzberg, Carol S.; McIntire, Todd; McLester, Susan; Ohler, Jason; Rose, Ray; Shields, Jean; Warlick, David

    2001-01-01

    Contributors discuss the top ten technologies that allow for thinking in new and innovative ways about the concept of "school": virtual learning; wireless networking; collaboration tools; digital video; Application Service Providers; handheld devices; optical networking; videoconferencing; XML; and simulations. (AEF)

  18. Top and higgs physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre Savard

    2002-12-23

    We present a summary of our experimental understanding of the top quark and discuss the significant improvements expected in Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We also discuss prospects for a Higgs boson discovery at the Tevatron.

  19. Dark Decay of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye-Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. The top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6sigma deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t-->bW+Z's. This is the same as the dominant top quark decay (t-->bW) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. We discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.

  20. Dark decay of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye -Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. Top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6 σ deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t → b W + Z's. This is the same as the dominant top quark decay (t → b W) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. In addition, we discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.

  1. Review of recent top quark measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, A.P.; /UC, Riverside

    2004-11-01

    At the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab, a large number of top quarks have been produced in the ongoing run. The CDF and D0 collaborations have made first measurements of the t{bar t} cross section in several decay channels, and have measured the top quark mass. In addition, they have set new limits on the cross sections for single top quark production, and have started to measure some of the properties of the top quark via studies of its decays. This paper summarizes the status of these measurements and discusses where they are heading in the next few years. The paper is based on a talk I gave at the Rencontres du Vietnam in Hanoi, August 2004; the results have been updated to show the latest values and new measurements.

  2. The Discovery of the Top Quark

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1995-12-01

    The top quark and the Higgs boson are the heaviest elementary particles predicted by the standard model. The four lightest quark flavours, the up, down, strange and charm quarks, were well-established by the mid-1970's. The discovery in 1977 of the {Tau} resonances, a new family of massive hadrons, required the introduction of the fifth quark flavour. Experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that this quark also has a heavier partner, the top quark.

  3. Tools for top physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Palencia, E.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    The authors describe here the different tools used for top physics analysis in the CDF Collaboration. In particular, they discuss how the jet energy scale, lepton identification, b tagging algorithms and the neural networks help to improve the signal to background ratio of the top sample in some cases and to reduce the dominant uncertainties in other. Results using each one of these tools are also presented.

  4. ENERGY STAR Certified Set Top Boxes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Set-top Boxes that are effective as of September 1, 2011 or the Version 4.1 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Set-top Boxes that are effective as of December 19, 2014. A detailed listing of key efficiency criteria are available at http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=find_a_product.showProductGroup&pgw_code=ST

  5. Top Down Chemistry Versus Bottom up Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Takeshi; Witt, Adolf N.

    2016-06-01

    The idea of interstellar top down chemistry (TDC), in which molecules are produced from decomposition of larger molecules and dust in contrast to ordinary bottom up chemistry (BUC) in which molecules are produced synthetically from smaller molecules and atoms in the ISM, has been proposed in the chemistry of PAH and carbon chain molecules both for diffusea,c and dense cloudsb,d. A simple and natural idea, it must have occurred to many people and has been in the air for sometime. The validity of this hypothesis is apparent for diffuse clouds in view of the observed low abundance of small molecules and its rapid decrease with molecular size on the one hand and the high column densities of large carbon molecules demonstrated by the many intense diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) on the other. Recent identification of C60^+ as the carrier of 5 near infrared DIBs with a high column density of 2×1013 cm-2 by Maier and others confirms the TDC. This means that the large molecules and dust produced in the high density high temperature environment of circumstellar envelopes are sufficiently stable to survive decompositions due to stellar UV radiaiton, cosmic rays, C-shocks etc. for a long time (≥ 10^7 year) of their migration to diffuse clouds and seems to disagree with the consensus in the field of interstellar grains. The stability of molecules and aggregates in the diffuse interstellar medium will be discussed. Duley, W. W. 2006, Faraday Discuss. 133, 415 Zhen,J., Castellanos, P., Paardekooper, D. M., Linnartz, H., Tielens, A. G. G. M. 2014, ApJL, 797, L30 Huang, J., Oka, T. 2015, Mol. Phys. 113, 2159 Guzmán, V. V., Pety, J., Goicoechea, J. R., Gerin, M., Roueff, E., Gratier, P., Öberg, K. I. 2015, ApJL, 800, L33 L. Ziurys has sent us many papers beginning Ziurys, L. M. 2006, PNAS 103, 12274 indicating she had long been a proponent of the idea. Campbell, E. K., Holz, M., Maier, J. P., Gerlich, D., Walker, G. A. H., Bohlender, D, 2016, ApJ, in press Draine, B. T. 2003

  6. An informatic framework for decoding protein complexes by top-down mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Owen S; Havugimana, Pierre C; Haverland, Nicole A; Fornelli, Luca; Early, Bryan P; Greer, Joseph B; Fellers, Ryan T; Durbin, Kenneth R; Do Vale, Luis H F; Melani, Rafael D; Seckler, Henrique S; Nelp, Micah T; Belov, Mikhail E; Horning, Stevan R; Makarov, Alexander A; LeDuc, Richard D; Bandarian, Vahe; Compton, Philip D; Kelleher, Neil L

    2016-03-01

    Efforts to map the human protein interactome have resulted in information about thousands of multi-protein assemblies housed in public repositories, but the molecular characterization and stoichiometry of their protein subunits remains largely unknown. Here, we report a computational search strategy that supports hierarchical top-down analysis for precise identification and scoring of multi-proteoform complexes by native mass spectrometry.

  7. Measurement of top quark polarisation in t-channel single top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-13

    Our first measurement of the top quark spin asymmetry, sensitive to the top quark polarisation, in t-channel single top quark production is presented. It is based on a sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. A high-purity sample of t-channel single top quark events with an isolated muon is selected. Signal and background components are estimated using a fit to data. Furthermore, a differential cross section measurement, corrected for detector effects, of an angular observable sensitive to the top quark polarisation is performed. The differential distribution is used to extract a top quark spin asymmetry of 0.26 ± 0.03 (stat) ± 0.10 (syst), which is compatible with a p-value of 4.6% with the standard model prediction of 0.44.

  8. Measurement of top quark polarisation in t-channel single top quark production

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-13

    Our first measurement of the top quark spin asymmetry, sensitive to the top quark polarisation, in t-channel single top quark production is presented. It is based on a sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. A high-purity sample of t-channel single top quark events with an isolated muon is selected. Signal and background components are estimated using a fit to data. Furthermore, a differential cross section measurement, corrected for detector effects, of an angular observable sensitive to the top quark polarisation is performed. The differential distribution is usedmore » to extract a top quark spin asymmetry of 0.26 ± 0.03 (stat) ± 0.10 (syst), which is compatible with a p-value of 4.6% with the standard model prediction of 0.44.« less

  9. Measurement of top quark polarisation in t-channel single top quark production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Awad, A.; El Sawy, M.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; de Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kothekar, K.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. 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M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fanzago, F.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'Imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. 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L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; McGinn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-04-01

    A first measurement of the top quark spin asymmetry, sensitive to the top quark polarisation, in t-channel single top quark production is presented. It is based on a sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. A high-purity sample of t-channel single top quark events with an isolated muon is selected. Signal and background components are estimated using a fit to data. A differential cross section measurement, corrected for detector effects, of an angular observable sensitive to the top quark polarisation is performed. The differential distribution is used to extract a top quark spin asymmetry of 0.26 ± 0.03(stat) ± 0.10(syst), which is compatible with a p-value of 4.6% with the standard model prediction of 0.44. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Top Quark Properties in Little Higgs Models

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.F.; Perelstein, M.; Petriello, F.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-12-08

    Identifying the mechanism which breaks electroweak symmetry and generates fermion masses is one of the main physics goals for both the LHC and the ILC. Studies of the top quark have the potential to illuminate this issue; since it is the heaviest of the Standard Model (SM) fermions, the top is expected to couple strongly to the symmetry-breaking sector. Consequently, the structure of that sector can have significant, potentially observable effects on the properties of the top. for example, it is well known that the vector and axial t{bar t}Z form factors receive large corrections (of order 5-10%) in certain models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking [1]. At future colliders such as the LHC and the ILC, we will be able to pursue a program of precision top physics, similar to the program studying the Z at LEP and SLC. In this manuscript, they study the corrections to the top quark properties in ''Little Higgs'' models of electroweak symmetry breaking [2], and compare the expected deviations from the SM predictions with expected sensitivities of experiments at the LHC and the ILC. In the Little Higgs models, electroweak symmetry is driven by the radiative effects from the top sector, including the SM-like top and its heavy counterpart, a TeV-scale ''heavy top'' T. Probing this structure experimentally is quite difficult. While the LHC should be able to discover the T quark, its potential for studying its couplings is limited [3,4]. Direct production of the T will likely be beyond the kinematic reach of the ILC. However, we will show below that the corrections to the gauge couplings of the SM top, induced by its mixing with the T, will be observable at the ILC throughout the parameter range consistent with naturalness. Measuring these corrections will provide a unique window on the top sector of the Little Higgs. Many Little Higgs models have been proposed in the literature. We will consider two examples in this study, the ''Littlest Higgs'' model [5], and its

  11. Production and decay of heavy top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.P.

    1989-08-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that the top quark exists and has a mass between 50 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}. The decays of a top quark with a mass in this range are studied with emphasis placed on the mass region near the threshold for production of real W bosons. Topics discussed are: (1) possible enhancement of strange quark production when M{sub W} + m{sub s} < m{sub t} < M{sub W} + m{sub b}; (2) exclusive decays of T mesons to B and B{asterisk} mesons using the non-relativistic quark model; (3) polarization of intermediate W's in top quark decay as a source of information on the top quark mass. The production of heavy top quarks in an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider with a center-of-mass energy of 2 TeV is studied. The effective-boson approximation for photons, Z{sup 0}'s and W's is reviewed and an analogous approximation for interfaces between photons and Z{sup 0}'s is developed. The cross sections for top quark pair production from photon-photon, photon-Z{sup 0}, Z{sup 0}Z{sup 0}, and W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} fusion are calculated using the effective-boson approximation. Production of top quarks along with anti-bottom quarks via {gamma}W{sup +} and Z{sup 0}W{sup +} fusion is studied. An exact calculation of {gamma}e{sup +} {yields} {bar {nu}}t{bar b} is made and compared with the effective-W approximation. 31 refs., 46 figs.

  12. Top-down Metabolomic Approaches for Nitrogen-Containing Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Ryo; Hashimoto, Kei; Toyooka, Kiminori; Saito, Kazuki

    2017-03-07

    Streamlining the processes that reveal heteroatom-containing metabolites and their biosynthetic genes is essential in integrated metabolomics studies. These metabolites are especially targeted for their potential pharmaceutical activities. By using a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) instrument, we provide top-down targeted metabolomic analyses using ultrahigh-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), high-resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), and high-resolution imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) with (15)N labeling of nitrogen-containing metabolites. In this study, we efficiently extract known and unknown chemicals and spatial information from the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus, which sources several cancer drugs. The ultrahigh-resolution LC-MS analysis showed that the molecular formula of 65 N-metabolites were identified using the petals, peduncles, leaves, petioles, stems, and roots of the non- and (15)N-labeled Catharanthus plants. The high resolution MALDI analysis showed the molecular formula of 64 N-metabolites using the petals, leaves, and stems of the non- and (15)N-labeled Catharanthus. The chemical assignments using molecular formulas stored in databases identified known and unknown metabolites. The comparative analyses using the assigned metabolites revealed that most of the organ-specific ions are derived from unknown N-metabolites. The high-resolution IMS analysis characterized the spatial accumulation patterns of 32 N-metabolites using the buds, leaves, stems, and roots in Catharanthus. The comparative analysis using the non- and (15)N-labeled IMS data showed the same spatial accumulation patterns of a non- and (15)N-labeled metabolite in the organs, showing that top-down analysis can be performed even in IMS analysis.

  13. Top-cited articles in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Lun; Lee, Chien-Chang; Chen, Shyr-Chyr; Yen, Zui-Shen

    2006-10-01

    Our purpose was to identify and examine the characteristics of the most frequently cited articles in the field of emergency medicine (EM). Top-cited EM articles in 9 EM journals were identified by searching the computerized database of the Science Citation Index Expanded and the Web of Science (1972 to present). Median citation numbers, authors' nationalities, publication year, and fields of study were described and discussed. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare groups. All top-cited articles were published during 1972 and 2002. We identified 100 top-cited articles published in 6 EM journals, led by Annals of Emergency Medicine (66) and American Journal of Emergency Medicine (22). Toxicology, traumatology, resuscitation medicine, and cardiovascular medicine were the primary focus of study. The median citation number for these top-cited articles was 102 (range, 71-335). Our analysis gives an encyclopedic review of citation frequency of top-cited articles published in EM journals, which may provide information for those who want to find the history, evolution, and areas of high-impact research activities of EM.

  14. Holograms of a dynamical top quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, Will; Evans, Nick; Scott, Marc

    2017-09-01

    We present holographic descriptions of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking models that incorporate the top mass generation mechanism. The models allow computation of the spectrum in the presence of large anomalous dimensions due to walking and strong Nambu-Jona-Lasinio interactions. Technicolor and QCD dynamics are described by the bottom-up Dynamic AdS/QCD model for arbitrary gauge groups and numbers of quark flavors. An assumption about the running of the anomalous dimension of the quark bilinear operator is input, and the model then predicts the spectrum and decay constants for the mesons. We add Nambu-Jona-Lasinio interactions responsible for flavor physics from extended technicolor, top-color, etc., using Witten's multitrace prescription. We show the key behaviors of a top condensation model can be reproduced. We study generation of the top mass in (walking) one doublet and one family technicolor models and with strong extended technicolor interactions. The models clearly reveal the tensions between the large top mass and precision data for δ ρ . The necessary tunings needed to generate a model compatible with precision constraints are simply demonstrated.

  15. Top-down causation and social structures.

    PubMed

    Elder-Vass, Dave

    2012-02-06

    Top-down causation has been implicit in many sociological accounts of social structure and its influence on social events, but the social sciences have struggled to provide a coherent account of top-down causation itself. This paper summarizes a critical realist view of causation and emergence, shows how it supports a plausible account of top-down causation and then applies this account to the social world. The argument is illustrated by an examination of the concept of a norm circle, a kind of social entity that, it is argued, is causally responsible for the influence of normative social institutions. Nevertheless, social entities are structured rather differently from ordinary material ones, with the result that the compositional level structure of reality implicit in the concept of top-down causation has some limitations in the social world. The paper closes by considering what might be involved in examining how top-down causation can be shown to be at work in the social domain.

  16. Single top quarks and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, Deborah; Zucchetta, Alberto; Buckley, Matthew R.; Canelli, Florencia

    2017-08-01

    Processes with dark matter interacting with the standard model fermions through new scalars or pseudoscalars with flavor-diagonal couplings proportional to fermion mass are well motivated theoretically, and provide a useful phenomenological model with which to interpret experimental results. Two modes of dark matter production from these models have been considered in the existing literature: pairs of dark matter produced through top quark loops with an associated monojet in the event, and pair production of dark matter with pairs of heavy flavored quarks (tops or bottoms). In this paper, we demonstrate that a third, previously overlooked channel yields a non-negligible contribution to LHC dark matter searches in these models. In spite of a generally lower production cross section at LHC when compared to the associated top-pair channel, non-flavor violating single top quark processes are kinematically favored and can significantly increase the sensitivity to these models. Including dark matter production in association with a single top quark through scalar or pseudoscalar mediators, the exclusion limit set by the LHC searches for dark matter can be improved by 30% up to a factor of two, depending on the mass assumed for the mediator particle.

  17. Towards the Top with D0

    SciTech Connect

    Deliot, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    The plan of this manuscript follows my research path over the past 10 years: the muon identification and common analysis tools at DØ, the measurement of the inclusive production of W boson decaying into muon and top quark studies. In the first section, I describe my work about muon identification, certification of the standard muon identification criteria, measurement of the muon selection efficiency and about the development of common analysis format and tools. In the second section, I explain how these efficiency measurements can be used to measure the inclusive W boson production cross section in the muon channel. The W ! μν cross section measurement can be seen as a standard candle to establish several analysis pieces that have to be put in place to perform more complex measurements like top quark analyses. In the last section I introduce more extensively the top quark physics at the Tevatron and describe in more details the main analyses in the dilepton channel I was involved in: the measurement of the tt inclusive cross section in the dilepton channel as well as the ratio of cross sections, the measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel, the extraction of the mass from the tt cross section and the Tevatron top quark mass combination. Before concluding, I finish the section with the description of the latest results on the tt charge asymmetry both at the Tevatron and at the LHC.

  18. Top Stars: An Opportunity for Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnison, S. M. P.

    2010-08-01

    Think you're a Top Star? Want to find out what it takes? Learn about NASA's Top Stars contest and how you can participate. Throughout its lifetime, the Hubble Space Telescope has inspired and promoted education. The final Hubble servicing mission in May of this year and the celebration of Hubble's 20th anniversary in 2010 are key mission milestones, and both enrich activities for the 2009 International Year of Astronomy. U.S. formal (K-12 and college) and informal educators are invited to submit their best examples of using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope for science, technology, engineering or mathematics education. Those selected as Top Stars will receive national recognition and awards. Participants will learn about the contest, the recognition and awards, and how to register and save their entries on the Top Stars Web site. Educators are allowed and encouraged to revise, improve and re-submit their entries up to the final deadline of January 2, 2010. The contest is open to individuals and teams of up to four people who are U.S. citizens and are at least 21 years old. NASA and Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) employees or their contractors are not eligible. IGES is conducting Top Stars with NASA funding and in cooperation with the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  19. Top quark and neutrino composite Higgs bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smetana, Adam

    2013-08-01

    In the context of top-quark condensation models, the top quark alone is too light to saturate the correct value of the electroweak scale by its condensate. Within the seesaw scenario the neutrinos can have their Dirac masses large enough so that their condensates can provide a significant contribution to the value of the electroweak scale. We address the question of a phenomenological feasibility of the top-quark and neutrino condensation conspiracy against the electroweak symmetry. It is mandatory to reproduce the masses of electroweak gauge bosons, the top-quark mass and the recently observed scalar mass of 125 GeV and to satisfy the upper limits on absolute value of active neutrino masses. To accomplish that we design a reasonably simplified effective model with two composite Higgs doublets. Additionally, we work with a general number N of right-handed neutrino flavor triplets participating on the seesaw mechanism. There are no experimental constraints limiting this number. The upper limit is set by the model itself. Provided that the condensation scale is of order 1017-18 GeV and the number of right-handed neutrinos is , the model predicts masses of additional Higgs bosons below 250 GeV and a suppression of the top-quark Yukawa coupling to the 125 GeV particle at the ˜60 % level of the Standard model value.

  20. Top-down causation and social structures

    PubMed Central

    Elder-Vass, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Top-down causation has been implicit in many sociological accounts of social structure and its influence on social events, but the social sciences have struggled to provide a coherent account of top-down causation itself. This paper summarizes a critical realist view of causation and emergence, shows how it supports a plausible account of top-down causation and then applies this account to the social world. The argument is illustrated by an examination of the concept of a norm circle, a kind of social entity that, it is argued, is causally responsible for the influence of normative social institutions. Nevertheless, social entities are structured rather differently from ordinary material ones, with the result that the compositional level structure of reality implicit in the concept of top-down causation has some limitations in the social world. The paper closes by considering what might be involved in examining how top-down causation can be shown to be at work in the social domain. PMID:23386963

  1. Drilling of wells with top drive unit

    SciTech Connect

    Boyadjieff, G.I.

    1984-05-22

    Well drilling apparatus including a top drive drilling assembly having a motor driven stem adapted to be attached to the upper end of a drill string and drive it during a drilling operation, a torque wrench carried by the top drive assembly and movable upwardly and downwardly therewith and operable to break a threated connection between the drill string and the stem, and an elevator carried by and suspended from the top drive assembly and adapted to engage a section of drill pipe beneath the torque wrench in suspending relation. The torque wrench and elevator are preferably retained against rotation with the rotary element which drives the drill string, but may be movable vertically relative to that rotary element and relative to one another in a manner actuating the apparatus between various different operating conditions.

  2. Polarized view of the top asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Krohn, David; Liu Tao; Shelton, Jessie; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2011-10-01

    Recent experimental results from the CDF collaboration which study the top forward-backward asymmetry have strengthened the case that new physics is playing a role in tt production. Here, we propose a set of measurements, built from the charged lepton kinematics in semileptonic and fully leptonic tt events, designed to further probe the underlying causes of this asymmetry both at the Tevatron and at the LHC. Using a set of conservative reference models, we find that measurements of the charged lepton asymmetry, top polarization, and tt spin correlation can establish the existence of new physics and distinguish between competing models both at the Tevatron and the LHC. At the Tevatron, discrimination between models is possible at the 3{sigma} level. At the LHC, we demonstrate that a top forward-backward asymmetry can be established at > or approx. 3{sigma} in the first {approx}5 fb{sup -1} of data and show how competing explanations can be further disentangled.

  3. A tumbling top-quark condensate model

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.P.

    1992-07-01

    We propose a renormalizable model with no fundamental scalars which breaks itself in the manner of a ``tumbling`` gauge theory down to the standard model with a top-quark condensate. Because of anomaly cancellation requirements, this model contains two color sextet fermions (quixes), which are vector-like with respect to the standard model gauge group. The model also has a large number of pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons, some of which can be light. The top-quark condensate is responsible for breaking the electroweak gauge symmetry and gives the top quark a large mass. We discuss the qualitative features and instructive shortcomings of the model in its present form. We also show that this model can be naturally embedded into an aesthetically pleasing model in which the standard model fermion appear symmetrically.

  4. Experimental Study of Top Heat Mode Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashima, Masao; Kimura, Kenichiro; Utsumi, Yoichi; Kimura, Kenichi; Negishi, Kanji

    The purpose of this study is to develop the top heat mode thermosyphon that is very attractive means, for example, to accumulate directly the summer solar energy into the underground soil for the winter season. In this case, it can exclude the complex piping and mechanical pump to circulate the hot water absorbed the solar energy through the piping system buried in the soil layer. The several ideas concerning the top heat thermosyphon had been proposed, however, there were few reports on the definite experiments. The authors have carried out the experimental study of the top heat mode thermosyphon, with a simple lifting pipe, which could draw the working liquid from the under condenser to the upper evaporator section. The improvement of the main construction parts such as evaporator, lifting pipe, liquid reservoir trap and vapour nozzle have been performed in the present experiment in order to obtain the optimum operation range.

  5. Top differential cross section measurements (Tevatron)

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Andreas W.

    2012-01-01

    Differential cross sections in the top quark sector measured at the Fermilab Tevatron collider are presented. CDF used 2.7 fb{sup -1} of data and measured the differential cross section as a function of the invariant mass of the t{bar t} system. The measurement shows good agreement with the standard model and furthermore is used to derive limits on the ratio {kappa}/M{sub Pl} for gravitons which decay to top quarks in the Randall-Sundrum model. D0 used 1.0 fb{sup -1} of data to measure the differential cross section as a function of the transverse momentum of the top-quark. The measurement shows a good agreement to the next-to-leading order perturbative QCD prediction and various other standard model predictions.

  6. CDF top quark production and mass

    SciTech Connect

    Incandela, J.; CDF Collaboration

    1995-07-18

    The top search in the dilepton and lepton plus jets channels with the Collider Detector at Fermilab is presented. The analysis uses a 67 pb{sup {minus}1} sample of p{bar p} collisions at 1.8 TeV. A 4.8{sigma} excess of candidate events establishes the existence of the top quark. The t{bar t} production cross section is measured to be {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.6{sub {minus}2.0}{sup +2.4} pb with branching Br(t {yields} Wb) = 0.87{sub {minus}0.30}{sup +0.13}(stat) {sub {minus}0.11}{sup +0.13}(syst). The measured mass is M{sub top} = 176{plus_minus}8{plus_minus}10 GeV.

  7. Top B physics at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Gedalia, Oram; Isidori, Gino; Maltoni, Fabio; Perez, Gilad; Selvaggi, Michele; Soreq, Yotam

    2013-06-07

    In top-pair events where at least one of the tops decays semileptonically, the identification of the lepton charge allows us to tag not only the top quark charge but also that of the subsequent b quark. In cases where the b also decays semileptonically, the charge of the two leptons can be used to probe CP violation in heavy flavor mixing and decays. This strategy to measure CP violation is independent of those adopted so far in experiments, and can already constrain non standard model sources of CP violation with current and near future LHC data. To demonstrate the potential of this method we construct two CP asymmetries based on same-sign and opposite-sign leptons and estimate their sensitivities. This proposal opens a new window for doing precision measurements of CP violation in b and c quark physics via high p(T) processes at ATLAS and CMS.

  8. The Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) top box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Daniel R.; Janes, Clinton C.; Montgomery, John W.; Ouellette, David B.; Sharp, Frank H.

    1986-01-01

    So named because it resides on top of the focal plane instrument, the MMT top box is a two-level optical bench with many remotely controlled features which can be configured for experimental use of the MMT. It houses the relay optics and television cameras for focusing, coaligning and guiding the six telescopes of the MMT, as well as the integrating sphere, filter wheel, Hartmann mask wheel, and relay optics of the comparison source for instrumental calibration. It also provides a rigid mounting platform for research instruments as well as special fixtures for telescope tests and collimation. In accommodating these tasks the top box incorporates several novel features which may interest designers of other large telescopes.

  9. Top-cited articles in rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Shadgan, Babak; Roig, Marc; Hajghanbari, Bahareh; Reid, W Darlene

    2010-05-01

    To identify the 100 top-cited articles ever published in rehabilitation journals and to analyze their characteristics as a quantitative approach to investigating the quality and evolution of rehabilitation research. The Institute for Scientific Information Web of Knowledge Database and the 2007 and 2008 Journal Citation Report Science Editions were used to retrieve the 100 top-cited articles from 30 rehabilitation dedicated journals. The 100 top-cited articles included randomized controlled trials, case-control studies, case series studies, case reports, methodologic studies, systematic reviews, narrative reviews, and expert opinions. Two independent reviewers performed data extraction from the retrieved articles and compared their results. The Sackett's initial rules of evidence were used to categorize the type of study design as well as to evaluate the level of evidence provided by the results of the 100 top-cited articles. Among the 45,700 articles published in these journals, the 100 top-cited articles were published between 1959 and 2002 with an average of 200 citations an article (range, 131-1109). Top-cited articles were all English-language, primarily from North America (United States=67%; Canada=11%) and published in 11 journals led by the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Eighty-four percent of the articles were original publications and were most commonly prospective (76%) case series studies (67%) that used human subjects (96%) providing level 4 evidence. Neurorehabilitation (41%), disability (19%), and biomechanics (18%) were the most common fields of study. We demonstrated that methodologic observational studies performed in North America and published in English have had the highest citations in rehabilitation journals.

  10. A measurement of the top quark's charge

    SciTech Connect

    Unalan, Zeynep Gunay

    2007-01-01

    The top quark was discovered in 1995 at the Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). One way to confirm if the observed top quark is really the top quark posited in the Standard Model (SM) is to measure its electric charge. In the Standard Model the top quark is the isospin partner of the bottom quark and is expected to have a charge of +2/3. However, an alternative 'exotic' model has been proposed with a fourth generation exotic quark that has the same characteristics, such as mass, as our observed top but with a charge of -4/3. This thesis presents the first CDF measurement of the top quark's charge via its decay products, a W boson and a bottom quark, using ~ 1 fb-1 of data. The data were collected by the CDF detector from proton anti-proton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at Fermilab. We classify events depending on the charges of the bottom quark and associated W boson and count the number of events which appear 'SM-like' or 'exotic-like' with a SM-like event decaying as t → W+b and an exotic event as t → W-b. We find the p-value under the Standard Model hypothesis to be 0.35 which is consistent with the Standard Model. We exclude the exotic quark hypothesis at an 81% confidence level, for which we have chosen a priori that the probability of incorrectly rejecting the SM would be 1%. The calculated Bayes Factor (BF) is 2 x Ln(BF)=8.54 which is interpreted as the data strongly favors the Standard Model over the exotic quark hypothesis.

  11. An Efficiency Comparison of MBA Programs: Top 10 versus Non-Top 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Maxwell K.; James, Marcia L.; Chao, Gary H.

    2009-01-01

    The authors compared the cohort group of the top-10 MBA programs in the United States with their lower-ranking counterparts on their value-added efficiency. The findings reveal that the top-10 MBA programs in the United States are associated with statistically higher average "technical and scale efficiency" and "scale efficiency", but not with a…

  12. Top-down vortices developed in a cylindrical annulus cooled on the top.

    PubMed

    Navarro, M C; Herrero, H

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we study the generation of top-down vortices by thermoconvective mechanisms in a cylindrical annulus nonhomogeneously cooled on the top. Assuming axisymmetry we study the structure of the vortices, characterized by a spiral downward motion, similar to that observed in tornadoes generated in supercell storms.

  13. Top2 and Sgs1-Top3 Act Redundantly to Ensure rDNA Replication Termination

    PubMed Central

    Fredsøe, Jacob; Nielsen, Ida; Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Bentsen, Iben Bach; Lisby, Michael; Bjergbaek, Lotte; Andersen, Anni H

    2015-01-01

    Faithful DNA replication with correct termination is essential for genome stability and transmission of genetic information. Here we have investigated the potential roles of Topoisomerase II (Top2) and the RecQ helicase Sgs1 during late stages of replication. We find that cells lacking Top2 and Sgs1 (or Top3) display two different characteristics during late S/G2 phase, checkpoint activation and accumulation of asymmetric X-structures, which are both independent of homologous recombination. Our data demonstrate that checkpoint activation is caused by a DNA structure formed at the strongest rDNA replication fork barrier (RFB) during replication termination, and consistently, checkpoint activation is dependent on the RFB binding protein, Fob1. In contrast, asymmetric X-structures are formed independent of Fob1 at less strong rDNA replication fork barriers. However, both checkpoint activation and formation of asymmetric X-structures are sensitive to conditions, which facilitate fork merging and progression of replication forks through replication fork barriers. Our data are consistent with a redundant role of Top2 and Sgs1 together with Top3 (Sgs1-Top3) in replication fork merging at rDNA barriers. At RFB either Top2 or Sgs1-Top3 is essential to prevent formation of a checkpoint activating DNA structure during termination, but at less strong rDNA barriers absence of the enzymes merely delays replication fork merging, causing an accumulation of asymmetric termination structures, which are solved over time. PMID:26630413

  14. Tennessee to the Top: One State's Pursuit to Win Race to the Top

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, Maida A.

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, a seldom-used policy lever emerged in the form of a competitive grant program, Race to the Top (RTTT), and sparked a flurry of state-led initiatives as states vied for federal dollars. The current study examines the policymaking context that surrounded these events and propelled Tennessee to the top of the race among the states. Through…

  15. An Efficiency Comparison of MBA Programs: Top 10 versus Non-Top 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Maxwell K.; James, Marcia L.; Chao, Gary H.

    2009-01-01

    The authors compared the cohort group of the top-10 MBA programs in the United States with their lower-ranking counterparts on their value-added efficiency. The findings reveal that the top-10 MBA programs in the United States are associated with statistically higher average "technical and scale efficiency" and "scale efficiency", but not with a…

  16. Total on-line purchasing system (TOPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, N.

    1995-11-01

    The Information Management Division (IMD) at LLNL is developing a new purchasing system for the Procurement Department. The first major development of this new system is called, {open_quotes}Total On-Line Purchasing System{close_quotes} (TOPS). TOPS will help speed up the requisitioning process by having requisitions electronically entered by requesters and electronically sent to buyers to be put on Purchase Orders. The new purchasing system will use Electronic Commerce (EC)/Electronic Data Interchange (EDI), to help increase transaction flows for shipping notices, RFQs, Quotes, Purchase Orders, and Invoices. ANSI X.12 is the EDI standard that this new EC will use.

  17. Thermionic Energy Conversion (TEC) topping thermoelectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Performance expectations for thermionic and thermoelectric energy conversion systems are reviewed. It is noted that internal radiation effects diminish thermoelectric figures of merit significantly at 1000 K and substantially at 2000 K; the effective thermal conductivity contribution of intrathermoelectric radiative dissipation increases with the third power of temperature. It is argued that a consideration of thermoelectric power generation with high temperature heat sources should include utilization of thermionic energy conversion (TEC) topping thermoelectrics. However TEC alone or TEC topping more efficient conversion systems like steam or gas turbines, combined cycles, or Stirling engines would be more desirable generally.

  18. Evidence for production of single top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Michigan U.

    2008-03-01

    We present first evidence for the production of single top quarks in the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. The standard model predicts that the electroweak interaction can produce a top quark together with an antibottom quark or light quark, without the antiparticle top quark partner that is always produced from strong coupling processes. Top quarks were first observed in pair production in 1995, and since then, single top quark production has been searched for in ever larger datasets. In this analysis, we select events from a 0.9 fb{sup -1} dataset that have an electron or muon and missing transverse energy from the decay of a W boson from the top quark decay, and two, three, or four jets, with one or two of the jets identified as originating from a b hadron decay. The selected events are mostly backgrounds such as W+jets and t{bar t} events, which we separate from the expected signals using three multivariate analysis techniques: boosted decision trees, Bayesian neural networks, and matrix element calculations. A binned likelihood fit of the signal cross section plus background to the data from the combination of the results from the three analysis methods gives a cross section for single top quark production of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.7 {+-} 1.3 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 0.014%, corresponding to a 3.6 standard deviation significance. The measured cross section value is compatible at the 10% level with the standard model prediction for electroweak top quark production. We use the cross section measurement to directly determine the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix element that describes the Wtb coupling and find |V{sub tb}f{sub 1}{sup L}| = 1.31{sub -0.21}{sup +0.25}, where f{sub 1}{sup L} is a generic vector coupling. This model-independent measurement translates into 0.68 < |V{sub tb}| {le} 1 at the 95% C.L. in the standard model.

  19. Observation of Single Top Quark Production

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, Ann; Junk, Tom R.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The field of experimental particle physics has become more sophisticated over time, as fewer, larger experimental collaborations search for small signals in samples with large components of background. The search for and the observation of electroweak single top quark production by the CDF and D0 collaborations at Fermilab's Tevatron collider are an example of an elaborate effort to measure the rate of a very rare process in the presence of large backgrounds and to learn about the properties of the top quark's weak interaction. We present here the techniques used to make this groundbreaking measurement and the interpretation of the results in the context of the Standard Model.

  20. Top and electroweak measurements at the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoš, P.; CDF Collaboration; D0 Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    In this report, we summarize the latest results of the top-quark mass and electroweak measurements from the Tevatron. Since the world combination of top-quark mass measurements was done, CDF and D0 experiments improved the precision of several results. Some of them reach the relative precision below 1% for a single measurement. From the electroweak results, we report on the WW and WZ production cross-section, measurements of the weak mixing angle and indirect measurements of W boson mass. The Tevatron results of the weak mixing angle are still the most precise ones of hadron colliders.

  1. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, R.E.; Byrum, K.L.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.E.; LeCompte, T.; Nodulman, L.; Breccia, L.; Brunetti, R.; Deninno, M.; Fiori, I.; Mazzanti, P.; Behrends, S.; Bensinger, J.; Blocker, C.; Kirsch, L.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Bonushkin, Y.; Hauser, J.; Lindgren, M.; Amadon, A.; Berryhill, J.; Contreras, M.; Culbertson, R.; Frisch, H.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Hohlmann, M.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dittmann, J.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Khazins, D.; Kowald, W.; Oh, S.H.; Albrow, M.G.; Atac, M.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J.P.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Byon-Wagner, A.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cooper, J.; DeJongh, F.; Demina, R.; Derwent, P.F.; Elias, J.E.; Erdmann, W.; Flaugher, B.; Foster, G.W.; Freeman, J.; Geer, S.; Hahn, S.R.; Harris, R.M.; Incandela, J.; Jensen, H.; Joshi, U.; Kennedy, R.D.; Kephart, R.; Lammel, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Limon, P.; Lukens, P.; Maeshima, K.; Marriner, J.P.; Miao, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Nelson, C.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Patrick, J.; Klimenko, S.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Nomerotski, A.; Barone, M.; Bertolucci, S.; Cordelli, M.; DellAgnello, S.; Giromini, P.; Happacher, F.; Miscetti, S.; Parri, A.; Clark, A.G.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Kambara, H.; Baumann, T.; Franklin, M.; Gordon, A.; Hamilton, R.; Huth, J.; and others

    1998-03-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass using a sample of t{bar t} decays into an electron or a muon, a neutrino, and four jets. The data were collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}(s)=1.8 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 109 pb{sup {minus}1} . We measure the top quark mass to be 175.9{plus_minus}4.8(stat){plus_minus}4.9( syst) GeV /c{sup 2} . {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. TOP500 Supercomputers for November 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Meuer, Hans W.; Dongarra, Jack; Simon, Horst D.

    2003-11-16

    22nd Edition of TOP500 List of World s Fastest Supercomputers Released MANNHEIM, Germany; KNOXVILLE, Tenn.; BERKELEY, Calif. In what has become a much-anticipated event in the world of high-performance computing, the 22nd edition of the TOP500 list of the worlds fastest supercomputers was released today (November 16, 2003). The Earth Simulator supercomputer retains the number one position with its Linpack benchmark performance of 35.86 Tflop/s (''teraflops'' or trillions of calculations per second). It was built by NEC and installed last year at the Earth Simulator Center in Yokohama, Japan.

  3. Top and Electroweak Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bartos, P.

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we summarize the latest results of the top-quark mass and electroweak measurements from the Tevatron. Since the world combination of top-quark mass measurements was done, CDF and D0 experiments improved the precision of several results. Some of them reach the relative precition below 1% for a single measurement. From the electroweak results, we report on the WW and WZ production cross section, measurements of the weak mixing angle and indirect measurements of W boson mass. The Tevatron results of the weak mixing angle are still the most precise ones of hadron colliders.

  4. TopN-Pareto Front Search

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.; Lu, Lu; Burke, Sarah E.

    2016-12-21

    The JMP Add-In TopN-PFS provides an automated tool for finding layered Pareto front to identify the top N solutions from an enumerated list of candidates subject to optimizing multiple criteria. The approach constructs the N layers of Pareto fronts, and then provides a suite of graphical tools to explore the alternatives based on different prioritizations of the criteria. The tool is designed to provide a set of alternatives from which the decision-maker can select the best option for their study goals.

  5. Top quark mass measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Youn, S. W.

    2014-03-01

    We present recent measurements of the mass of the top quark performed at the Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ collider at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. These measurements use the full Run II data samples corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 9.3 fb$^{-1}$. We also report the first world combination of the measurements from the Large Hadron Collider and Tevatron experiments resulting in a top mass of 173.34 {\\pm} 0.76 GeV with a relative precision of 0.44\\%.

  6. Top Quark Spin Correlations at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Head, Tim; /Manchester U.

    2010-07-01

    Recent measurements of the correlation between the spin of the top and the spin of the anti-top quark produced in proton anti-proton scattering at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 Tev by the CDF and D0 collaborations are discussed. using up to 4.3 fb{sup -1} of data taken with the CDF and D0 detectors the spin correlation parameter C, the degree to which the spins are correlated, is measured in dileptonic and semileptonic final states. The measurements are found to be in agreement with Standard Model predictions.

  7. Studies of top quark properties and search for electroweak single top quark production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Mousumi; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    The top quark was discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron during the Run I operation. Since the start of the Tevatron Run II in 2001, both experiments have collected {approx}2 fb{sup -1} data samples, which are over twenty times larger than that used in the Run 1 discovery. This larger data sample allows more precise studies of top-quark properties; differences between observed top-quark properties and the Standard Model (SM) prediction may give hints to possible physics beyond the SM. Here we present the latest results on the measurements of top-quark properties and the search for electroweak (EW) single top quark production from the CDF and D0 collaborations. The integrated luminosity used for the measurements corresponds to about 1 fb{sup -1}.

  8. Top Tagging: A Method for Identifying Boosted Hadronically Decaying Top Quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, David E.; Rehermann, Keith; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Tweedie, Brock

    2008-10-03

    A method is introduced for distinguishing top jets (boosted, hadronically decaying top quarks) from light-quark and gluon jets using jet substructure. The procedure involves parsing the jet cluster to resolve its subjets and then imposing kinematic constraints. With this method, light-quark or gluon jets with p{sub T}{approx_equal}1 TeV can be rejected with an efficiency of around 99% while retaining up to 40% of top jets. This reduces the dijet background to heavy tt resonances by a factor of {approx}10 000, thereby allowing resonance searches in tt to be extended into the all-hadronic channel. In addition, top tagging can be used in tt events when one of the top quarks decays semileptonically, in events with missing energy, and in studies of b-tagging efficiency at high p{sub T}.

  9. Top tagging: a method for identifying boosted hadronically decaying top quarks.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, David E; Rehermann, Keith; Schwartz, Matthew D; Tweedie, Brock

    2008-10-03

    A method is introduced for distinguishing top jets (boosted, hadronically decaying top quarks) from light-quark and gluon jets using jet substructure. The procedure involves parsing the jet cluster to resolve its subjets and then imposing kinematic constraints. With this method, light-quark or gluon jets with p{T} approximately 1 TeV can be rejected with an efficiency of around 99% while retaining up to 40% of top jets. This reduces the dijet background to heavy tt[over ] resonances by a factor of approximately 10 000, thereby allowing resonance searches in tt[over ] to be extended into the all-hadronic channel. In addition, top tagging can be used in tt[over ] events when one of the top quarks decays semileptonically, in events with missing energy, and in studies of b-tagging efficiency at high p{T}.

  10. Determination of the top-quark mass from hadro-production of single top-quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhin, S.; Moch, S.; Thier, S.

    2016-12-01

    We present a new determination of the top-quark mass mt based on the experimental data from the Tevatron and the LHC for single-top hadro-production. We use the inclusive cross sections of s- and t-channel top-quark production to extract mt and to minimize the dependence on the strong coupling constant and the gluon distribution in the proton compared to the hadro-production of top-quark pairs. As part of our analysis we compute the next-to-next-to-leading order approximation for the s-channel cross section in perturbative QCD based on the known soft-gluon corrections and implement it in the program HATHOR for the numerical evaluation of the hadronic cross section. Results for the top-quark mass are reported in the MS ‾ and in the on-shell renormalization scheme.

  11. Adiabatic Field-Free Alignment of Asymmetric Top Molecules with an Optical Centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenko, A.; Milner, V.

    2016-05-01

    We use an optical centrifuge to align asymmetric top SO2 molecules by adiabatically spinning their most polarizable O-O axis. The effective centrifugal potential in the rotating frame confines the sulfur atoms to the plane of the laser-induced rotation, leading to the planar molecular alignment that persists after the molecules are released from the centrifuge. The periodic appearance of the full three-dimensional alignment, typically observed only with linear and symmetric top molecules, is also detected. Together with strong in-plane centrifugal forces, which bend the molecules by up to 10 deg, permanent field-free alignment offers new ways of controlling molecules with laser light.

  12. Adiabatic field-free alignment of asymmetric top molecules with an optical centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Valery

    2016-05-01

    We use an optical centrifuge to align asymmetric top SO2 molecules by adiabatically spinning their most polarizable O-O axis. The effective centrifugal potential in the rotating frame confines sulfur atoms to the plane of the laser-induced rotation, leading to the planar molecular alignment which persists after the molecules are released from the centrifuge. Periodic appearance of the full three-dimensional alignment, typically observed only with linear and symmetric top molecules, is also detected. Together with strong in-plane centrifugal forces, which bend the molecules by up to 10 degrees, permanent field-free alignment offers new ways of controlling molecules with laser light.

  13. Race to Top Round Two Heating Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2010-01-01

    With the second-round deadline for federal Race to the Top Fund grants less than six weeks away, states are rushing to raise the stakes on their education reform plans as they fight over the remaining $3.4 billion in prize money. But in doing so, states from Massachusetts to Colorado are tangling with their teachers' unions as they test how far…

  14. Top Four Trends in Student Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weathers, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The modern student information systems (SIS) is a powerful administrative tool with robust functionality. As such, it is essential that school and district administrators consider the top trends in modern student information systems before going forward with system upgrades or new purchases. These trends, described herein, are: (1) Support for…

  15. Top classic citations in pancreatic cancer research.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Jiang, Yuan

    2016-11-29

    The number of times that articles are cited by is widely used to evaluate the impact of an article or an individual author has on its scientific community. This bibliometric analysis aimed to explore the top classic citations in pancreatic cancer (PC) research. A computerized literature search was conducted using the database, the Science Citation Index Expanded. The top 100 highly cited articles were included and further analyzed. The most cited article had 3,032 citations, with a mean of 626 citations per paper. These highly cited articles were published in 37 journals, led by Cancer Research (15 articles). Of the 100 articles, 40 were observational studies, 36 dealt with basic science, and 14 were randomized controlled trials. These articles came from 11 countries, with the USA contributing 79 articles. Fifty-one institutions produced these 100 citation classics, led by Johns Hopkins University (20 articles). Twenty-seven persons authored two or more of the top-cited articles, led by Kern SE (6) and Yeo CJ (5). This analysis of the top highly cited articles allows for the recognition of major advances in PC research and gives a historic perspective on the progress of this specialty of PC research.

  16. Top Management Education, An Evaluation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerkedal, Ake

    A study of top management education was carried out in a practical training situation to determine attitude change and relationships between training objectives and training evaluation, initial standing and change, and initial standing and background factors. Subjects were 140 people completing one of five management courses. A questionnaire and…

  17. Top-Ten IT Issues: 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agee, Anne Scrivener; Yang, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the top-ten IT-related issues in terms of strategic importance to the institution, as revealed by the tenth annual EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey. These IT-related issues include: (1) Funding IT; (2) Administrative/ERP Information Systems; (3) Security; (4) Infrastructure/Cyberinfrastructure; (5) Teaching and Learning with…

  18. Top Four Trends in Student Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weathers, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The modern student information systems (SIS) is a powerful administrative tool with robust functionality. As such, it is essential that school and district administrators consider the top trends in modern student information systems before going forward with system upgrades or new purchases. These trends, described herein, are: (1) Support for…

  19. America's Star Libraries: Top-Rated Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Keith Curry; Lyons, Ray

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service 2009, Round 2, identifies 258 "star" libraries. Created by Keith Curry Lance and Ray Lyons and based on 2007 data from the IMLS, it rates 7,268 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three stars. All included libraries,…

  20. Green Power Partnership Top 30 College & University

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. The Top 30 College & University list details the largest higher ed green power users in GPP.

  1. Race to Top Districts "Personalize" Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The 16 Race to the Top district winners, pushed by $400 million in federal grants that put a premium on personalized learning, are embarking on vastly different makeovers of the classroom experience--from districtwide approaches to a narrower blueprint focused on middle school math. Despite the divergent approaches, a review of the winning…

  2. Hurdles Ahead in "Race to Top"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2009-01-01

    As states scramble to spend and report on millions of dollars of education stimulus funds already flowing their way, they face another daunting task if they want a shot at even more money: navigating the complex application process for $4 billion from the Race to the Top Fund. Merely filling out the award application will take each state 642…

  3. Child Care on Top of the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombro, Amy Laura

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experiences on her visit to Kullungen barnehage in Longyearbyen, Norway and discusses how Kullungen strives to create quality learning experiences for children. Much of the children's play and work at Kullungen reflects the climate, wildlife, and way of being on the top of the world. Like quality programs…

  4. Top Tips for Buying Telecommunication Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    Examines top regulatory issues and other unique issues resulting from this regulatory overlay when negotiating for corporate telecom services. Issues cover such topics as tariffs, rate negotiation, exclusivity provisions, revenue commitments, mid-term negotiations, service-level agreements, and dispute resolution. (GR)

  5. Topping pressure for gas-storage cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haben, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    With charts derived from gas-storage system model, required topping pressure can be determined from initial cylinder pressure and temperature of gas entering cylinder. Charts are available for hydrogen and oxygen and can be developed for other important industrial gases as well.

  6. States Press Race to Top Blueprints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2010-01-01

    States are pushing ahead with efforts to make sweeping changes to education policy through the Race to the Top program, despite some of them having seen individual schools and districts back out of the process because of concerns over the time and money required to make those plans a reality. The Obama administration has envisioned Race to the…

  7. International Workshop on Top Quark Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofre, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this workshop is to discuss recent and expected results on the physics of the top quark. In particular we hope to foster current and future research in this area from both the experimental and the theoretical point of view.

  8. Top-Ten IT Issues, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grajek, Susan

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, "EDUCAUSE" appointed a research panel of IT leaders from nineteen representative member institutions to both identify and prioritize the top IT issues facing their institutions. In two focus group sessions in September and October 2011, the panel members were asked the question: "What is the single-biggest IT-related issue currently…

  9. Race to Top Districts "Personalize" Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The 16 Race to the Top district winners, pushed by $400 million in federal grants that put a premium on personalized learning, are embarking on vastly different makeovers of the classroom experience--from districtwide approaches to a narrower blueprint focused on middle school math. Despite the divergent approaches, a review of the winning…

  10. Race to Top Enters Home Stretch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele; Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2010-01-01

    When 16 finalists come to Washington next week to make their final pitches in the $4 billion Race to the Top competition, most can expect to go home empty-handed. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, in announcing the finalists last week, said that no more than $2 billion will be divided among "very few winners" when the awards are…

  11. Lindsey with lap top in the Spacehab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-11-04

    STS095-E-5218 (4 Nov. 1998) --- Astronaut Steven W. Lindsey, STS-95 pilot, inputs data on a lap top computer in the Spacehab facility onboard the Space Shuttle Discovery. The photo was taken with an electronic still camera (ESC) at 02:58:43 GMT, Nov. 4.

  12. FY 2003 Top 200 Users Survey Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    rating of 90 percent. This may be because we have been unable to print brochures and announcements. Comparative Analysis on Effectiveness of Corporate ... Communication FY 2001 Top 200 Users Survey Strongly Agree or Agree Strongly Disagree or Disagree No Opinion New Product/ Service 92 2 6 Product

  13. What Top Management Expects from the Communicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fegley, Robert L.

    Top corporate management requires communications departments that maintain credibility with the public by developing the following qualities: integrity established through consistent and honest messages; accuracy based on solid research; authority derived from an understanding of the subject and from drawing on appropriate expertise; a…

  14. Race to Top Now Faces Acid Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2010-01-01

    With the conclusion of the second round of the federal Race to the Top competition, states across the country--winners and losers alike--are vowing to move forward with ambitious plans to reshape teacher-evaluation systems, fix struggling schools, revamp antiquated data systems, and make other changes aimed at raising student achievement. Yet…

  15. Top-Ten IT Issues, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingerman, Bret L.; Yang, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The eleventh annual EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey shows some very familiar themes among the top-ten IT issues of strategic importance to technology leaders in higher education. Indeed, all ten of the issues from the 2009 survey are back, albeit in a slightly different order. In addition, Strategic Planning returns as an issue of renewed…

  16. Top-Ten IT Issues, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingerman, Bret L.; Yang, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The eleventh annual EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey shows some very familiar themes among the top-ten IT issues of strategic importance to technology leaders in higher education. Indeed, all ten of the issues from the 2009 survey are back, albeit in a slightly different order. In addition, Strategic Planning returns as an issue of renewed…

  17. The Top American Indian Degree Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Each year, "Diverse: Issues In Higher Education" publishes lists of the Top 100 producers of associate, bachelor's and graduate degrees awarded to minority students based on research conducted by Dr. Victor M.H. Borden, professor of educational leadership and policy studies at the Indiana University Bloomington. This year, Diverse staff…

  18. The Top 10 Issues Impacting College Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the top challenges commonly confronted nationwide by college and universities, and similar facilities and businesses. Challenges include construction and repair, funding, housing, auxiliary services, maintenance and operations, marketing and recruiting, security and safety, staff training and retention, and technology. (GR)

  19. America's Star Libraries: Top-Rated Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Keith Curry; Lyons, Ray

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service 2009, Round 2, identifies 258 "star" libraries. Created by Keith Curry Lance and Ray Lyons and based on 2007 data from the IMLS, it rates 7,268 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three stars. All included libraries,…

  20. A-3 Test Stand tops out

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-13

    A construction 'topping out' milestone was reached April 13 with placement of the test cell dome atop NASA's new A-3 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center. NASA broke ground in 2007 for the new stand, which is being built to provide simulated high-altitude testing for next-generation rocket engines that could carry humans into deep space.

  1. A-3 Test Stand tops out

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-13

    Stennis Space Center Director Patrick Scheuermann presents center director coins to employees following the 'topping out' of the A-3 Test Stand with placement of test cell dome on April 13. The stand is the first large test structure built at Stennis since the 1960s.

  2. What Top Management Expects from the Communicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fegley, Robert L.

    Top corporate management requires communications departments that maintain credibility with the public by developing the following qualities: integrity established through consistent and honest messages; accuracy based on solid research; authority derived from an understanding of the subject and from drawing on appropriate expertise; a…

  3. W-Z-top-quark bags

    SciTech Connect

    Crichigno, Marcos P.; Shuryak, Edward; Flambaum, Victor V.; Kuchiev, Michael Yu.

    2010-10-01

    We discuss a new family of multiquanta-bound states in the standard model which exist due to the mutual Higgs-based attraction of the heaviest members of the standard model, namely, gauge quanta W, Z, and (anti)top quarks, t, t. We use a self-consistent mean-field approximation, up to a rather large particle number N. In this paper we do not focus on weakly bound, nonrelativistic bound states, but rather on 'bags' in which the Higgs vacuum expectation value is significantly modified or depleted. The minimal number N above which such states appear strongly depends on the ratio of the Higgs mass to the masses of W, Z, t, t: For a light Higgs mass, m{sub H{approx}}50 GeV, bound states start from N{approx}O(10), but for a ''realistic'' Higgs mass, m{sub H{approx}}100 GeV, one finds metastable/bound W, Z bags only for N{approx}O(1000). We also found that in the latter case pure top bags disappear for all N, although top quarks can still be well bound to the W bags. Anticipating the cosmological applications (discussed in the following Article [Phys. Rev. D 82, 073019]) of these bags as 'doorway states' for baryosynthesis, we also consider here the existence of such metastable bags at finite temperatures, when standard-model parameters such as Higgs, gauge, and top masses are significantly modified.

  4. Venus Cloud Tops Viewed by Hubble

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-18

    Venus Cloud Tops Viewed by Hubble. This is a NASA Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet-light image of the planet Venus, taken on January 24 1995, when Venus was at a distance of 70.6 million miles 113.6 million kilometers from Earth.

  5. Top-Ten IT Issues, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grajek, Susan

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, "EDUCAUSE" appointed a research panel of IT leaders from nineteen representative member institutions to both identify and prioritize the top IT issues facing their institutions. In two focus group sessions in September and October 2011, the panel members were asked the question: "What is the single-biggest IT-related issue currently…

  6. A Top Physicist Turns to Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollag, Burton

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how a top physicist took charge of reforming undergraduate science education at the University of British Columbia. Carl E. Wieman, the 2001 Nobel Prize winner in Physics, gave up his research career to devote himself to improving the way college science is taught. Wieman is heading up a $10.2 million science education…

  7. Top-Ten IT Issues: 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agee, Anne Scrivener; Yang, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the top-ten IT-related issues in terms of strategic importance to the institution, as revealed by the tenth annual EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey. These IT-related issues include: (1) Funding IT; (2) Administrative/ERP Information Systems; (3) Security; (4) Infrastructure/Cyberinfrastructure; (5) Teaching and Learning with…

  8. Electroweak symmetry breaking: Top quard condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1990-12-01

    The fundamental mechanisms for the dynamical breaking of the electroweak gauge symmetries remain a mystery. This paper examines the possible role of heavy fermions, particularly the top quark, in generating the observed electroweak symmetry breaking, the masses of the W and Z bosons and the masses of all observed quarks and leptons. 27 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Race to Top Round Two Heating Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2010-01-01

    With the second-round deadline for federal Race to the Top Fund grants less than six weeks away, states are rushing to raise the stakes on their education reform plans as they fight over the remaining $3.4 billion in prize money. But in doing so, states from Massachusetts to Colorado are tangling with their teachers' unions as they test how far…

  10. More Top Students Answer the Ministry's Call

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supiano, Beckie

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to help reverse a decades-long decline in the number of top students entering seminaries, the Lilly Endowment invited colleges to compete for grants to be used for three related purposes: (1) to help students explore the relationship between faith and work; (2) to encourage talented students to consider entering Christian ministry;…

  11. Race to Top Enters Home Stretch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele; Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2010-01-01

    When 16 finalists come to Washington next week to make their final pitches in the $4 billion Race to the Top competition, most can expect to go home empty-handed. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, in announcing the finalists last week, said that no more than $2 billion will be divided among "very few winners" when the awards are…

  12. Designer nanoscale DNA assemblies programmed from the top down

    PubMed Central

    Veneziano, Rémi; Ratanalert, Sakul; Zhang, Kaiming; Zhang, Fei; Yan, Hao; Chiu, Wah; Bathe, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Scaffolded DNA origami is a versatile means of synthesizing complex molecular architectures. However, the approach is limited by the need to forward-design specific Watson-Crick base-pairing manually for any given target structure. Here, we report a general, top-down strategy to design nearly arbitrary DNA architectures autonomously based only on target shape. Objects are represented as closed surfaces rendered as polyhedral networks of parallel DNA duplexes, which enables complete DNA scaffold routing with a spanning tree algorithm. The asymmetric polymerase chain reaction was applied to produce stable, monodisperse assemblies with custom scaffold length and sequence that are verified structurally in 3D to be high fidelity using single-particle cryo-electron microscopy. Their long-term stability in serum and low-salt buffer confirms their utility for biological as well as nonbiological applications. PMID:27229143

  13. Designer nanoscale DNA assemblies programmed from the top down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veneziano, Rémi; Ratanalert, Sakul; Zhang, Kaiming; Zhang, Fei; Yan, Hao; Chiu, Wah; Bathe, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Scaffolded DNA origami is a versatile means of synthesizing complex molecular architectures. However, the approach is limited by the need to forward-design specific Watson-Crick base pairing manually for any given target structure. Here, we report a general, top-down strategy to design nearly arbitrary DNA architectures autonomously based only on target shape. Objects are represented as closed surfaces rendered as polyhedral networks of parallel DNA duplexes, which enables complete DNA scaffold routing with a spanning tree algorithm. The asymmetric polymerase chain reaction is applied to produce stable, monodisperse assemblies with custom scaffold length and sequence that are verified structurally in three dimensions to be high fidelity by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy. Their long-term stability in serum and low-salt buffer confirms their utility for biological as well as nonbiological applications.

  14. 14. TIP TOP MINE. TAILINGS LOCATED DIRECTLY WEST FROM TIP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. TIP TOP MINE. TAILINGS LOCATED DIRECTLY WEST FROM TIP TOP HOUSE. ID-31-C-12 WOODEN STRUCTURE IS VISIBLE IN TOP LEFT. CABLES VISIBLE LEFT AND CENTER OF TAILINGS. HOUSE IS JUST OVER APEX OF TAILINGS. CAMERA POINTED EAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  15. 49 CFR 178.812 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.812 Section 178.812... Testing of IBCs § 178.812 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the.... (b) Special preparation for the top lift test. (1) Metal, rigid plastic, and composite IBC design...

  16. 49 CFR 178.975 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.975 Section 178.975... Testing of Large Packagings § 178.975 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for... Large Packagings, from the side. (b) Special preparation for the top lift test. (1) Metal and rigid...

  17. 49 CFR 178.812 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... preparation for the top lift test. (1) Metal, rigid plastic, and composite IBC design types must be loaded to... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.812 Section 178.812... Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all...

  18. 5 CFR 1312.27 - Top secret control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Top secret control. 1312.27 Section 1312... Classified Information § 1312.27 Top secret control. The EOP Security Officer serves as the Top Secret... Top Secret material. The ATSCOs will be responsible for the accountability and custodianship of...

  19. 5 CFR 1312.27 - Top secret control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Top secret control. 1312.27 Section 1312... Classified Information § 1312.27 Top secret control. The EOP Security Officer serves as the Top Secret... Top Secret material. The ATSCOs will be responsible for the accountability and custodianship of...

  20. 5 CFR 1312.27 - Top secret control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Top secret control. 1312.27 Section 1312... Classified Information § 1312.27 Top secret control. The EOP Security Officer serves as the Top Secret... Top Secret material. The ATSCOs will be responsible for the accountability and custodianship of...

  1. 5 CFR 1312.27 - Top secret control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Top secret control. 1312.27 Section 1312... Classified Information § 1312.27 Top secret control. The EOP Security Officer serves as the Top Secret... Top Secret material. The ATSCOs will be responsible for the accountability and custodianship of...

  2. 5 CFR 1312.27 - Top secret control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Top secret control. 1312.27 Section 1312... Classified Information § 1312.27 Top secret control. The EOP Security Officer serves as the Top Secret... Top Secret material. The ATSCOs will be responsible for the accountability and custodianship of...

  3. 49 CFR 178.812 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.812 Section 178.812... Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all IBC design types designed to be lifted from the top or, for flexible IBCs, from the side. (b)...

  4. 49 CFR 178.975 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.975 Section 178.975... Packagings § 178.975 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all of Large Packagings design types to be lifted from the top or, for flexible Large Packagings,...

  5. Tall tower or mountain top measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamberger, Ines; Eugster, Werner; Oney, Brian; Brunner, Dominik; Leuenberger, Markus; Schanda, Rüdiger; Henne, Stephan; Buchmann, Nina

    2014-05-01

    Resolving the regional transport and distribution of greenhouse gases in the troposphere is a key topic that challenges both modelers and experimentalists. A dense network of measurement stations would be required, in particular including measurements at high elevation to better represent the entire lower troposphere, and not only small-scale local conditions in the near-surface atmosphere. While this can be achieved by tall towers, also mountain top stations (e.g. Schauinsland, Brocken) and other stations at high elevation (e.g., Mouna Loa, Jungfraujoch) are often appropriate, due to their extended concentration footprint. However, especially over complex, mountainous terrain, the transport of atmospheric gases and their spatio-temporal distribution is difficult to predict due to the development of thermally induced local wind patterns and boundary layer processes. Therefore, the main goal of our study is to test to what extend boundary layer processes at the surface and local wind patterns close to the ground at a mountain top site influence the ambient greenhouse gas patterns compared to measurements taken at a similar altitude but at a tall tower site. To this end we use measurements from the Zugerberg mountain top station, located at a pre-Alpine mountain ridge (987 m a.s.l., 4 m above ground) exposed to the prevailing synoptic winds in Switzerland, and compare these measurements with a neighboring tall tower site (Beromünster radio broadcast tower with its top at 1014 m a.s.l., 217 m above local ground level, and ≡500 m above the Swiss Plateau). The Beromünster tall tower is located at a distance of only 30 km from the mountain top station as the bird flies, and hence a direct comparison minimizes confounding factors that are not related to the tall tower vs. mountain top position of the measurements. Both stations are part of the CarboCount CH greenhouse gas observation network (http://www.carbocount.ch) initiated for long-term monitoring and modeling of

  6. Search for top quark at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    There is a vast theoretical and experimental support for idea that op quark as a weak isospin partner to b-quark should exist. Production cross section is steeply falling function of top quark mass. Therefore realistically at present only Tevatron p[anti p] collider at FNAL, with total energy 1.8 TeV in CMS system, still has a chance of top quark discovery. Dominant production mechanism for top quarks at Tevatron is pair production of t[anti t]. With almost 100% probability t ([anti t]) decays in mode t [yields] W[sup +]b. Distinct features of this decay provide very good signatures of top quark production which helps to reduce otherwise very high level of background. Based on simple combinatorial arguments one can show that W should decay in 1/9 cases into W [yields] l + [nu] where l stands for lepton (e,[mu],[tau]). Very clean signature represents case when both W's from t and [anti t] decay into e ([mu]) + [nu]. In this case experimental observation will be two isolated leptons characterized by large transverse momentum, large missing transverse energy E[sub T] and 2 b quark jets. Jets originated from b quarks can be quite frequently recognized by presence of secondary vertices associated with jets. Another feature of b-jets which can be used for their identification is frequent association of so called soft leptons with jets. Two experimental setups CDF and D0 are able to take advantage of Tevatron for top quark discovery. Recently CDF collaboration presented evidence for direct observation of t[anti t] production in 19.3 pb[sup [minus]1] of p[anti p] collisions at [radical](s) = 1.8TeV. Very brief account of these results is presented here.

  7. Recent Results of Top Quark Physics from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R. Y.

    2015-07-09

    Twenty years after its discovery in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab, the top quark still undergoes intensive studies at the Tevatron and the LHC at CERN. In this article, recent top quark physics results from CDF and D0 are reported. In particular, measurements of single top quark and double top quark production, the $t\\bar{t}$ forward-backward asymmetry and the top quark mass are discussed.

  8. 5. VIEW OF TIP TOP WITH FAR RIGHT SADDLE PROVIDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF TIP TOP WITH FAR RIGHT SADDLE PROVIDING ORIENTATION FOR THE GENERAL DIRECTION TO NOTTINGHAM. CAMERA POINTED SOUTH-SOUTHWEST. NORTH SIDE OF TIP TOP BUILDING IS VISIBLE. (RUN STRAIGHT EDGE FROM LOWER LEFT CORNER TO TOP CENTER OF PRINT; TIP TOP LOCATED LIGHT AREA) ONTARIO IS LOCATED BELOW AND RIGHT OF TIP TOP. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  9. Top quark physics results from CDF and D-Zero

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, D.

    1996-10-01

    I summarize recent top quark physics results from the Fermilab Tevatron experiments. Since the observation of the top quark by CDF and D{null} in 1995, the experimental focus has shifted to a detailed study of the top quark`s properties. This article describes recent measurements of the top quark production cross section, mass, kinematic properties, branching ratios, V{sub {ital tb}}, and the {ital W} polarization in top decays.

  10. Top-down MS, a powerful complement to the high capabilities of proteolysis proteomics.

    PubMed

    McLafferty, Fred W; Breuker, Kathrin; Jin, Mi; Han, Xuemei; Infusini, Giuseppe; Jiang, Honghai; Kong, Xianglei; Begley, Tadhg P

    2007-12-01

    For the characterization of protein sequences and post-translational modifications by MS, the 'top-down' proteomics approach utilizes molecular and fragment ion mass data obtained by ionizing and dissociating a protein in the mass spectrometer. This requires more complex instrumentation and methodology than the far more widely used 'bottom-up' approach, which instead uses such data of peptides from the protein's digestion, but the top-down data are far more specific. The ESI MS spectrum of a 14 protein mixture provides full separation of its molecular ions for MS/MS dissociation of the individual components. False-positive rates for the identification of proteins are far lower with the top-down approach, and quantitation of multiply modified isomers is more efficient. Bottom-up proteolysis destroys the information on the size of the protein and the connectivities of the peptide fragments, but it has no size limit for protein digestion. In contrast, the top-down approach has a approximately 500 residue, approximately 50 kDa limitation for the extensive molecular ion dissociation required. Basic studies indicate that this molecular ion intractability arises from greatly strengthened electrostatic interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, in the gas-phase molecular ions. This limit is now greatly extended by variable thermal and collisional activation just after electrospray ('prefolding dissociation'). This process can cleave 287 inter-residue bonds in the termini of a 1314 residue (144 kDa) protein, specify previously unidentified disulfide bonds between eight of 27 cysteines in a 1714 residue (200 kDa) protein, and correct sequence predictions in two proteins, one of 2153 residues (229 kDa).

  11. PREFACE: 5th International Workshop on Top Quark Physics (TOP2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamanna, G.; Boisvert, V.; Cerrito, L.; Khan, A.; Moretti, S.; Owen, M.; Schwanenberger, C.

    2013-07-01

    The 5th International Workshop on Top Quark Physics (TOP 2012) took place in Winchester, UK, from the 16-21 September. It gathered students as well as people active in the top quark sector and provided a framework to highlight the newest results and matters related to top quark physics. Discovered in 1995, the top quark is the sixth and heaviest of all quarks, and it is the only one with a lifetime short enough to be observed 'naked'. This makes it an important testing ground in the search for new physics. In fact, the fact of its mass being so much larger than the other quarks, hints at its special role in the Higgs mechanism. For the same reason, in many models of New Physics, new heavy resonances are expected to couple mostly with top quarks. Even if no new particles are observed, the direct correlation between its angular momentum and that of its detectable decay products allows us to probe indirectly New Physics in action when top quarks are created. In this edition of the TOP conference series, for the first time, the agenda was equally balanced between 'traditional' measurements and the now vast number of searches for physics BSM in the top quark sector, thanks mostly to the amount of data collected at the LHC in its Run I. New results were presented by both the Tevatron and the LHC collaborations: improved ttbar and single top cross-section measurements, refined techniques to measure the top quark mass and a large number of results on properties such as spin correlation and W boson polarization in top quark decays were shown. More technical discussions on the experimental issues, both from the detector and the simulation side also took place, drawing together experimentalists and theorists. Reviews of the latest results on ttbar asymmetry both from CDF and D0 and from ATLAS and CMS were shown, and theorists active in the field made some interesting points on this hot topic. Additionally, results on the search for fourth generation fermions and new

  12. Associated production of the top-pions and single top at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Yue Chongxing; Zong Zhengjun; Xu Lili; Chen Jianxing

    2006-01-01

    In the context of topcolor-assisted technicolor (TC2) models, we study the production of the top-pions {pi}{sub t}{sup 0,{+-}} with single top quark via the processes pp{yields}t{pi}{sub t}{sup 0}+X and pp{yields}t{pi}{sub t}{sup {+-}}+X, and discuss the possibility of detecting these new particles at Tevatron and LHC. We find that it is very difficult to observe the signals of these particles via these processes at Tevatron, while the neutral and charged top-pions {pi}{sub t}{sup 0} and {pi}{sub t}{sup {+-}} can be detecting via considering the same sign top pair ttc event and the ttb (or ttb) event at LHC, respectively.

  13. The fully differential top decay distribution

    DOE PAGES

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Boudreau, J.; Escobar, C.; ...

    2017-03-29

    We write down the four-dimensional fully differential decay distribution for the top quark decay t → Wb → ℓνb. We discuss how its eight physical parameters can be measured, either with a global fit or with the use of selected one-dimensional distributions and asymmetries. We give expressions for the top decay amplitudes for a general tbW interaction, and show how the untangled measurement of the two components of the fraction of longitudinal W bosons – those with b quark helicities of 1/2 and –1/2, respectively – could improve the precision of a global fit to the tbW vertex.

  14. Top-down visual search in Wimmelbild

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergbauer, Julia; Tari, Sibel

    2013-03-01

    Wimmelbild which means "teeming figure picture" is a popular genre of visual puzzles. Abundant masses of small figures are brought together in complex arrangements to make one scene in a Wimmelbild. It is picture hunt game. We discuss what type of computations/processes could possibly underlie the solution of the discovery of figures that are hidden due to a distractive influence of the context. One thing for sure is that the processes are unlikely to be purely bottom-up. One possibility is to re-arrange parts and see what happens. As this idea is linked to creativity, there are abundant examples of unconventional part re-organization in modern art. A second possibility is to define what to look for. That is to formulate the search as a top-down process. We address top-down visual search in Wimmelbild with the help of diffuse distance and curvature coding fields.

  15. TOP500 Supercomputers for November 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Meuer, Hans W.; Dongarra, Jack; Simon, Horst D.

    2002-11-15

    20th Edition of TOP500 List of World's Fastest Supercomputers Released MANNHEIM, Germany; KNOXVILLE, Tenn.;&BERKELEY, Calif. In what has become a much-anticipated event in the world of high-performance computing, the 20th edition of the TOP500 list of the world's fastest supercomputers was released today (November 15, 2002). The Earth Simulator supercomputer installed earlier this year at the Earth Simulator Center in Yokohama, Japan, is with its Linpack benchmark performance of 35.86 Tflop/s (trillions of calculations per second) retains the number one position. The No.2 and No.3 positions are held by two new, identical ASCI Q systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (7.73Tflop/s each). These systems are built by Hewlett-Packard and based on the Alpha Server SC computer system.

  16. The heavy top quark and supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.J. |

    1997-01-01

    Three aspects of supersymmetric theories are discussed: electroweak symmetry breaking, the issues of flavor, and gauge unification. The heavy top quark plays an important, sometimes dominant, role in each case. Additional symmetries lead to extensions of the Standard Model which can provide an understanding for many of the outstanding problems of particle physics. A broken supersymmetric extension of spacetime allows electroweak symmetry breaking to follow from the dynamics of the heavy top quark; an extension of isospin provides a constrained framework for understanding the pattern of quark and lepton masses; and a grand unified extension of the Standard Model gauge group provides an elegant understanding of the gauge quantum numbers of the components of a generation. Experimental signatures for each of these additional symmetries are discussed.

  17. TOP500 Supercomputers for June 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Meuer, Hans W.; Dongarra, Jack; Simon, Horst D.

    2003-06-23

    21st Edition of TOP500 List of World's Fastest Supercomputers Released MANNHEIM, Germany; KNOXVILLE, Tenn.;&BERKELEY, Calif. In what has become a much-anticipated event in the world of high-performance computing, the 21st edition of the TOP500 list of the world's fastest supercomputers was released today (June 23, 2003). The Earth Simulator supercomputer built by NEC and installed last year at the Earth Simulator Center in Yokohama, Japan, with its Linpack benchmark performance of 35.86 Tflop/s (teraflops or trillions of calculations per second), retains the number one position. The number 2 position is held by the re-measured ASCI Q system at Los Alamos National Laboratory. With 13.88 Tflop/s, it is the second system ever to exceed the 10 Tflop/smark. ASCIQ was built by Hewlett-Packard and is based on the AlphaServerSC computer system.

  18. Top quark production measurements at ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, R.; Atlas Collaboration

    2012-09-01

    An overview of top quark production measurements using the ATLAS detector at the LHC is presented. Using 35 pb-1 of data, we measured the tt¯ cross-section in the lepton+jets channel to 13% precision and set limits on the cross-section for the all hadronic decay channel[1, 2]. The measurement in the dilepton channel was performed using 0.70 fb-1 of data and was combined with the lepton+jets channel result for our most precise tt¯ cross-section measurement of σpp→tt¯+X = 176±5 (stat)+13-10 (syst)±7 (lumi)[3,4]. Single top production was also measured in the t-channel using 0.70 fb-1 of data[5].

  19. The Sakai spinner: A paperclip top

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrao, Christian T.

    2014-02-01

    A challenge: Can you create a stable top from a single paper clip? Several interesting solutions to this problem were provided by Takao Sakai from Japan, the requirement of each being that the center of gravity be located on the vertical y-axis at the center of the top. In the simplest configuration, we see that there exists a single angle θ between the spokes for which this requirement is met (Figs. 1 and 2). While a rigorous calculation of this angle is a nice task for first-year university students, one simple approximation allows for a more high school-ready analysis.2 Even a qualitative study without any math makes for interesting and fun science.

  20. Entanglement entropy in top-down models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Peter A. R.; Taylor, Marika

    2016-08-01

    We explore holographic entanglement entropy in ten-dimensional supergravity solutions. It has been proposed that entanglement entropy can be computed in such top-down models using minimal surfaces which asymptotically wrap the compact part of the geometry. We show explicitly in a wide range of examples that the holographic entan-glement entropy thus computed agrees with the entanglement entropy computed using the Ryu-Takayanagi formula from the lower-dimensional Einstein metric obtained from reduc-tion over the compact space. Our examples include not only consistent truncations but also cases in which no consistent truncation exists and Kaluza-Klein holography is used to identify the lower-dimensional Einstein metric. We then give a general proof, based on the Lewkowycz-Maldacena approach, of the top-down entanglement entropy formula.

  1. The heavy top quark and supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.J. |

    1996-05-08

    Three aspects of supersymmetric theories are discussed: electroweak symmetry breaking, the issues of flavor, and gauge unification. The heavy top quark plays an important, sometimes dominant, role in each case. Additional symmetries lead to extensions of the standard model which can provide an understanding for many of the outstanding problems of particle physics. A broken supersymmetric extension of spacetime allows electroweak symmetry breaking to follow from the dynamics of the heavy top quark; an extension of isospin provides a constrained framework for understanding the pattern of quark and lepton masses; and a grand unified extension of the standard model gauge group provides an elegant understanding of the gauge quantum numbers of the components of a generation. Experimental signatures for each of these additional symmetries are discussed.

  2. Top quark and electroweak results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Sandra Leone

    2003-11-04

    In 2001 the Tevatron run II began, after a five year period of significant upgrade of the accelerator itself and of the experiments CDF and D0. After a detector commissioning run, the CDF experiment is now taking high quality data with all subsystems functional. We report in this talk the first preliminary CDF results on top quark and W/Z boson properties, based on run II data. The top quark, discovered in 1995 at the Tevatron, has proven to be a very interesting particle. Its properties allow to perform stringent tests of the Standard Model (SM) and to search for new physics through a deviation from SM predictions. We give here some expectations of what Tevatron run II will ultimately provide to our understanding of matter.

  3. Kodiak seamount not flat-topped.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, E L; von Huene, R E

    1966-12-09

    Earlier surveys in the Aleutian Trench southeast of Kodiak Island, Alaska, indicated that Kodiak Seamount had a flat top and was a tablemount or guyot. This seamount is of special significance because it has been supposed that its surface was eroded at the same time as those of a line of guyots to the southeast. If so, its present position in the axis of the Aleutian Trench indicates that the line of guyots was formed before the trench. A two-part survey in 1965 showed that Kodiak Seamount is not flat-topped, and should be eliminated from the category of guyots. Reflection profiling records indicate that the seamount was formed before the adjacent sediments were deposited, and that the small trough, or moat, on the south side is a depositional feature probably formed by a scouring effect or by the acceleration of turbidity currents around the base of the mount.

  4. Top quark kinematics and mass determination

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, H.H.

    1994-10-01

    An analysis is presented of 10 W + {ge} 3 jet events, each with evidence for the presence of a b quark, that were recently observed by the CDF collaboration. Seven of these events include a fourth jet and can be explicitly reconstructed as t{bar t} production. The best estimate of the top quark mass is M{sub t} = 174 {+-} 10{sub {minus}12}{sup +13} GeV/c{sup 2}. A study has also been performed to see if the kinematical properties of events with W + {ge} 3 jets gives evidence for top production. An excess of events with large jet energies, compared to that expected from direct production of W + {ge} 3 jets, is observed. A large fraction of these events also contain a b-quark and a fourth jet.

  5. Top cross section measurement at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Compostella, Gabriele; /INFN, CNAF /Padua U.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the latest measurements of the t{bar t} pair production cross section performed by the CDF Collaboration analyzing p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV from Fermilab Tevatron, as presented at the XVIII International Workshop on Deep-Inelastic Scattering and Related Subjects. In order to test Standard Model predictions, several analysis methods are explored and all the top decay channels are considered, to better constrain the properties of the top quark and to search for possible sources of new physics affecting the pair production mechanism. Experimental results using an integrated luminosity up to 5.1 fb{sup -1} are presented.

  6. Slow Pace for Race to Top Spending

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Almost two years into the federal Race to the Top program, states are spending their shares of the $4 billion prize at a snail's pace--a reflection of the challenges the 12 winners face as they try to get ambitious education improvement plans off the ground. Through the end of March, the 11 states and the District of Columbia had spent just 14…

  7. Braking, Wheeled Vehicles. Test Operations Procedure (TOP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-20

    of snubs and overall brake temperature rise are recorded and used to determine the effectiveness of the braking device. 4.3 Endurance/Durability...TOP 2-2-608 20 May 2008 17 d. Test duration. e. Brake control force, if required. f. Brake temperature , if required. g. Comments...g. Brake temperature rise . h. Number of brake snubs per test run. 5.3 Endurance /Durability Testing. 5.3.1 Structural Integrity. a

  8. The myth of the top management team.

    PubMed

    Katzenbach, J R

    1997-01-01

    Companies all across the economic spectrum are making use of teams. They go by a variety of names and can be found at all levels. In fact, you are likely to find the group at the very top of an organization professing to be a team. But even in the best of companies, a so-called top team seldom functions as a real team. Real teams must follow a well-defined discipline to achieve their performance potential. And performance is the key issue--not the fostering of "team values" such as empowerment, sensitivity, or involvement. In recent years, the focus on performance was lost in many companies. Even today, CEOs and senior executives often see few gains in performance from their attempts to become more teamlike. Nevertheless, a team effort at the top can be essential to capturing the highest performance results possible--when the conditions are right. Good leadership requires differentiating between team and nonteam opportunities, and then acting accordingly. Three litmus tests must be passed for a team at the top to be effective. First, the team must shape collective work-products--these are tangible performance results that the group can achieve working together that surpass what the team members could have achieved working on their own. Second, the leadership role must shift, depending on the task at hand. And third, the team's members must be mutually accountable for the group's results. When these criteria can be met, senior executives should come together to achieve real team performance. When the criteria cannot be met, they should rely on the individual leadership skills that they have honed over the years.

  9. The Top 10 Lists of 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents lists of the top ten schools with most students, largest enrollment, and other categories for 2011 in the U.S. The school districts with most student for 2010-2011 are New York City with 1,043,886 followed by Los Angeles with 667,251, Chicago with 403,770 and down to the 10th spot Orange County (Fla.) with 175,986. The…

  10. A Study of Turbulence Near Thunderstorm Tops

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    isolated cumulonimbus . . . 37 2.11 Large amplitude " mountain " waves formed by forcing flow over the top of a thunderstorm or line of thunderstorms... mountains , especially during the winter in mid-latitudes, when both wind speeds and stabilities are high. Standing gravity waves develop in the lee of... mountains and, under certain conditions, may propagate to very high levels in the atmosphere, carrying wave energy upward and momentum downward (Alaka, 1960

  11. Top-cited articles in endodontic journals.

    PubMed

    Fardi, Anastasia; Kodonas, Konstantinos; Gogos, Christos; Economides, Nikolaos

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the 100 top-cited articles published in journals dedicated to endodontology and analyze their characteristics to describe the quality and evolution of research in the field of endodontology. The Institute for Scientific Information Web of Knowledge Database and the Journal Citation Report Science Editions were used to retrieve the 100 most cited articles published in journals dedicated to endodontics. The top-cited articles were selected and analyzed with regard to journals, authors, institution, country of origin, publication title and year, number of citations, article type, study design, level of evidence, and field of study. The top 100 articles were cited between 87 and 554 times. These articles appeared in 4 different journals, with more than half in the Journal of Endodontics, followed by the journals Oral Surgery Oral Medicine Oral Pathology Oral Radiology and Endodontology, the International Endodontic Journal, and Endodontics & Dental Traumatology. Forty-eight articles were published between 1990 and 1999. All articles were published in English and primarily originated from the United States (n = 52). The majority of articles were basic science articles (n = 55), followed by clinical research studies (n = 28) and nonsystematic reviews (n = 17). Uncontrolled case series with level IV of evidence and narrative reviews with level V of evidence were the most frequent types of study design. The main topics covered by the top-cited articles were microleakage and endodontic microbiology. This analysis of citation rates reveals useful and interesting information about scientific progress in the field of endodontics. Basic research and observational studies published in high-impact endodontic journals had the highest citation rates. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Charm, beauty and top at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, O.; Geiser, A.; Lisovyi, M.

    2015-09-01

    Results on open charm and beauty production and on the search for top production in high-energy electron-proton collisions at HERA are reviewed. This includes a discussion of relevant theoretical aspects, a summary of the available measurements and measurement techniques, and their impact on improved understanding of QCD and its parameters, such as parton density functions and charm- and beauty-quark masses. The impact of these results on measurements at the LHC and elsewhere is also addressed.

  13. Top physics at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Margaroli, Fabrizio; /Purdue U.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark has been discovered in 1995 at the CDF and DO experiments located in the Tevatron ring at the Fermilab laboratory. After more than a decade the Tevatron collider, with its center-of-mass energy collisions of 1.96 TeV, is still the only machine capable of producing such exceptionally heavy particle. Here I present a selection of the most recent CDF and DO measurements performed analyzing {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity.

  14. Slow Pace for Race to Top Spending

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Almost two years into the federal Race to the Top program, states are spending their shares of the $4 billion prize at a snail's pace--a reflection of the challenges the 12 winners face as they try to get ambitious education improvement plans off the ground. Through the end of March, the 11 states and the District of Columbia had spent just 14…

  15. Rare top quark decays in extended models

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2006-09-25

    Flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decays t {yields} H0 + c, t {yields} Z + c, and H0 {yields} t + c-bar are discussed in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions where FCNC decays may take place at tree-level and are only suppressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks, which is poorly constraint by current experimental values. The non-manifest case is also briefly discussed.

  16. The Top 10 Lists of 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents lists of the top ten schools with most students, largest enrollment, and other categories for 2011 in the U.S. The school districts with most student for 2010-2011 are New York City with 1,043,886 followed by Los Angeles with 667,251, Chicago with 403,770 and down to the 10th spot Orange County (Fla.) with 175,986. The…

  17. Dark decay of the top quark

    DOE PAGES

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye -Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. Top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6 σ deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t → b W + Z's. This is the same as the dominant topmore » quark decay (t → b W) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. In addition, we discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.« less

  18. Top-down facilitation of visual recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bar, M.; Kassam, K. S.; Ghuman, A. S.; Boshyan, J.; Schmid, A. M.; Dale, A. M.; Hämäläinen, M. S.; Marinkovic, K.; Schacter, D. L.; Rosen, B. R.; Halgren, E.

    2006-01-01

    Cortical analysis related to visual object recognition is traditionally thought to propagate serially along a bottom-up hierarchy of ventral areas. Recent proposals gradually promote the role of top-down processing in recognition, but how such facilitation is triggered remains a puzzle. We tested a specific model, proposing that low spatial frequencies facilitate visual object recognition by initiating top-down processes projected from orbitofrontal to visual cortex. The present study combined magnetoencephalography, which has superior temporal resolution, functional magnetic resonance imaging, and a behavioral task that yields successful recognition with stimulus repetitions. Object recognition elicited differential activity that developed in the left orbitofrontal cortex 50 ms earlier than it did in recognition-related areas in the temporal cortex. This early orbitofrontal activity was directly modulated by the presence of low spatial frequencies in the image. Taken together, the dynamics we revealed provide strong support for the proposal of how top-down facilitation of object recognition is initiated, and our observations are used to derive predictions for future research. PMID:16407167

  19. Observation of Single Top Quark Production

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Cecilia E.; /Illinois U., Chicago

    2009-09-01

    The author reports on the observation of electroweak production of single top quarks in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 Tev using 2.3 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using events containing an isolated electron or muon, missing transverse energy, two, three or four jets, with one or two of them identified as originating from the fragmentation of a b quark, the measured cross section for the process p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X is 3.94 {+-} 0.88 pb (for a top quark mass of 170 GeV). the probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 2.5 x 10{sup -7}, corresponding to a 5.0 standard deviation significance. Using the same dataset, the measured cross sections for the t- and the s-channel processes when determined simultaneously with no assumption on their relative production rate are 3.14{sub -0.80}{sup +0.94} pb and 1.05 {+-} 0.81 pb respectively, consistent with standard model expectations. The measured t-channel cross section has a significance of 4.8 standard deviations, representing the first evidence for the production of an individual single top process to be detected.

  20. Top quark physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio Sidoti

    2004-03-17

    After the successful Run I of the Tevatron (1992-1996),with the top quark discovery, both CDF and D0 experiments were extensively upgraded to meet the challenges of the Tevatron Run II collider. The energy of p{bar p} collisions at the Tevatron was increased from {radical}s = 1.8 TeV to {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. t{bar t} production cross section is expected to increase by a factor of {approx} 30%. Major upgrades in the Tevatron accelerator chain will increase the Run II instantaneous luminosity: the goal is to achieve L = 5 - 20 x 10{sup 31} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} while the highest luminosity reached up to now (September 2003) is 5.2 x 10{sup 31} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. In this paper we will present the top quark properties measured by both CDF and D0 with the first physics-quality data collected during the Run II (March 2002-January 2003). First we will review t{bar t} cross section measurements in the various decay channels; then top quark mass measurements will be presented.

  1. TOP500 Sublist for November 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Meuer, Hans W.; Dongarra, Jack J.; Simon,Horst D.

    2001-11-09

    18th Edition of TOP500 List of World's Fastest Supercomputers Released MANNHEIM, GERMANY; KNOXVILLE, TENN.; BERKELEY, CALIF. In what has become a much-anticipated event in the world of high-performance computing, the 18th edition of the TOP500 list of the world's fastest supercomputers was released today (November 9, 2001). The latest edition of the twice-yearly ranking finds IBM as the leader in the field, with 32 percent in terms of installed systems and 37 percent in terms of total performance of all the installed systems. In a surprise move Hewlett-Packard captured the second place with 30 percent of the systems. Most of these systems are smaller in size and as a consequence HP's share of installed performance is smaller with 15 percent. This is still enough for second place in this category. SGI, Cray and Sun follow in the number of TOP500 systems with 41 (8 percent), 39 (8 percent), and 31 (6 percent) respectively. In the category of installed performance Cray Inc. keeps the third position with 11 percent ahead of SGI (8 percent) and Compaq (8 percent).

  2. Tracking down hyper-boosted top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele

    2015-06-05

    The identification of hadronically decaying heavy states, such as vector bosons, the Higgs, or the top quark, produced with large transverse boosts has been and will continue to be a central focus of the jet physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At a future hadron collider working at an order-of-magnitude larger energy than the LHC, these heavy states would be easily produced with transverse boosts of several TeV. At these energies, their decay products will be separated by angular scales comparable to individual calorimeter cells, making the current jet substructure identification techniques for hadronic decay modes not directly employable. In addition, at the high energy and luminosity projected at a future hadron collider, there will be numerous sources for contamination including initial- and final-state radiation, underlying event, or pile-up which must be mitigated. We propose a simple strategy to tag such "hyper-boosted" objects that defines jets with radii that scale inversely proportional to their transverse boost and combines the standard calorimetric information with charged track-based observables. By means of a fast detector simulation, we apply it to top quark identification and demonstrate that our method efficiently discriminates hadronically decaying top quarks from light QCD jets up to transverse boosts of 20 TeV. Lastly, our results open the way to tagging heavy objects with energies in the multi-TeV range at present and future hadron colliders.

  3. MFH Top-Half Ring Connectros

    SciTech Connect

    Nachtrieb, Rob; /Fermilab

    1988-10-24

    In the end calorimeter of the D-zero experiment, uranium and stainless steel plates are assembled into modules which are to be installed into the cryostat as individual units. A single inner module will be surrounded by 16 middle modules, which are surrounded by 16 outer modules. The 16 modules which comprise the middle ring are to be connected at the outer radius by a link, which is pinned to each front plate. The expected forces at each of the 16 connections vary from 1400 Ib to 69,000 lb (Appendix 1). At the inner radius. the forces are known to be compressive; hence, the edges of the front plates will be allowed to bear directly upon one another. Since it is desirable to minimize the volume of material used, an Inconnel connector plate and pins were chosen. Furthermore, it was observed that the forces between the 9 modules of the top half of the ring are all less than 7,700 lb. Accordingly, a connector was designed for the top half of the ring, with the intention that a separate design be performed for the bottom connections. The purpose of the test was to experimentally verify that the connector scheme designed for the top half of the MH ring (end calorimeter) was adequate for the expected structural loads. The test proved that the design was acceptable.

  4. The top 100 cited neurorehabilitation papers.

    PubMed

    Kreutzer, Jeffrey S; Agyemang, Amma A; Weedon, David; Zasler, Nathan; Oliver, Melissa; Sorensen, Aaron A; van Wijngaarden, Saskia; Leahy, Eileen

    2017-01-01

    Neurorehabilitation covers a large range of disorders, assessment approaches and treatment methods. There have been previous citation analyses of rehabilitation and of its subfields. However, there has never been a comprehensive citation analysis in neurorehabilitation. The present study reports findings from a citation analysis of the top 100 most cited neurorehabilitation papers to describe the research trends in the field. A de-novo keyword search of papers indexed in the Web of Science Core Collection database yielded 52,581 papers. A candidate pool of the 200 most-cited papers published between 2005 and 2016 was reviewed by the clinician authors. The papers in the top 100 deemed to be irrelevant were discarded and replaced by the most highly-cited articles in the second tier deemed to be clinically relevant. The most frequently cited neurorehablitation papers appeared in Stroke, Movement Disorders, and Neurology. Papers tended to focus on treatments, especially for stroke. Authorship trends suggest that top cited papers result from group endeavors, with 90% of the papers involving a collaboration among 3 or more authors. Treatment studies, often focused on stroke, appear to have the highest impact in the field of neurorehabilitation.

  5. Tracking down hyper-boosted top quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The identification of hadronically decaying heavy states, such as vector bosons, the Higgs, or the top quark, produced with large transverse boosts has been and will continue to be a central focus of the jet physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At a future hadron collider working at an order-of-magnitude larger energy than the LHC, these heavy states would be easily produced with transverse boosts of several TeV. At these energies, their decay products will be separated by angular scales comparable to individual calorimeter cells, making the current jet substructure identification techniques for hadronic decay modes not directly employable. In addition, at the high energy and luminosity projected at a future hadron collider, there will be numerous sources for contamination including initial- and final-state radiation, underlying event, or pile-up which must be mitigated. We propose a simple strategy to tag such "hyper-boosted" objects that defines jets with radii that scale inversely proportional to their transverse boost and combines the standard calorimetric information with charged track-based observables. By means of a fast detector simulation, we apply it to top quark identification and demonstrate that our method efficiently discriminates hadronically decaying top quarks from light QCD jets up to transverse boosts of 20 TeV. Our results open the way to tagging heavy objects with energies in the multi-TeV range at present and future hadron colliders.

  6. Tracking down hyper-boosted top quarks

    DOE PAGES

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele

    2015-06-05

    The identification of hadronically decaying heavy states, such as vector bosons, the Higgs, or the top quark, produced with large transverse boosts has been and will continue to be a central focus of the jet physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At a future hadron collider working at an order-of-magnitude larger energy than the LHC, these heavy states would be easily produced with transverse boosts of several TeV. At these energies, their decay products will be separated by angular scales comparable to individual calorimeter cells, making the current jet substructure identification techniques for hadronic decay modes not directlymore » employable. In addition, at the high energy and luminosity projected at a future hadron collider, there will be numerous sources for contamination including initial- and final-state radiation, underlying event, or pile-up which must be mitigated. We propose a simple strategy to tag such "hyper-boosted" objects that defines jets with radii that scale inversely proportional to their transverse boost and combines the standard calorimetric information with charged track-based observables. By means of a fast detector simulation, we apply it to top quark identification and demonstrate that our method efficiently discriminates hadronically decaying top quarks from light QCD jets up to transverse boosts of 20 TeV. Lastly, our results open the way to tagging heavy objects with energies in the multi-TeV range at present and future hadron colliders.« less

  7. MASH Suite Pro: A Comprehensive Software Tool for Top-Down Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wenxuan; Guner, Huseyin; Gregorich, Zachery R; Chen, Albert J; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Peng, Ying; Valeja, Santosh G; Liu, Xiaowen; Ge, Ying

    2016-02-01

    Top-down mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is arguably a disruptive technology for the comprehensive analysis of all proteoforms arising from genetic variation, alternative splicing, and posttranslational modifications (PTMs). However, the complexity of top-down high-resolution mass spectra presents a significant challenge for data analysis. In contrast to the well-developed software packages available for data analysis in bottom-up proteomics, the data analysis tools in top-down proteomics remain underdeveloped. Moreover, despite recent efforts to develop algorithms and tools for the deconvolution of top-down high-resolution mass spectra and the identification of proteins from complex mixtures, a multifunctional software platform, which allows for the identification, quantitation, and characterization of proteoforms with visual validation, is still lacking. Herein, we have developed MASH Suite Pro, a comprehensive software tool for top-down proteomics with multifaceted functionality. MASH Suite Pro is capable of processing high-resolution MS and tandem MS (MS/MS) data using two deconvolution algorithms to optimize protein identification results. In addition, MASH Suite Pro allows for the characterization of PTMs and sequence variations, as well as the relative quantitation of multiple proteoforms in different experimental conditions. The program also provides visualization components for validation and correction of the computational outputs. Furthermore, MASH Suite Pro facilitates data reporting and presentation via direct output of the graphics. Thus, MASH Suite Pro significantly simplifies and speeds up the interpretation of high-resolution top-down proteomics data by integrating tools for protein identification, quantitation, characterization, and visual validation into a customizable and user-friendly interface. We envision that MASH Suite Pro will play an integral role in advancing the burgeoning field of top-down proteomics. © 2016 by The American

  8. Measurements of top quark properties at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Margaroli, Fabrizio

    2011-05-01

    The discovery of the top quark in 1995 opened a whole new sector of investigation of the Standard Model; today top quark physics remains a key priority of the Tevatron program. Some of the measurements of top quark properties, for example its mass, will be a long-standing legacy. The recent evidence of an anomalously large charge asymmetry in top quark events suggests that new physics could couple preferably with top quarks. I will summarize this long chapter of particle physics history and discuss the road the top quark is highlighting for the LHC program.

  9. Humanism in nursing homes: the impact of top management.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G; Ferguson, Jamie C; Hughes, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    We provide a review of ways in which top managers of nursing homes can provide or impact the humanistic component of care provided in their facilities. We describe the nursing home top management team; the role of top managers in nursing homes; the role of top managers as leaders in the nursing home; the literature examining the impact of top managers in nursing homes; and, examine developments in the nursing home industry that are influencing (or could potentially influence) the humanistic components of care. We conclude with suggestions for top managers, nursing home owners, and policy makers to create more caring humanistic environments. Suggestions include resident-directed care initiatives and culture change.

  10. Deep-learning top taggers or the end of QCD?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasieczka, Gregor; Plehn, Tilman; Russell, Michael; Schell, Torben

    2017-05-01

    Machine learning based on convolutional neural networks can be used to study jet images from the LHC. Top tagging in fat jets offers a well-defined framework to establish our DeepTop approach and compare its performance to QCD-based top taggers. We first optimize a network architecture to identify top quarks in Monte Carlo simulations of the Standard Model production channel. Using standard fat jets we then compare its performance to a multivariate QCD-based top tagger. We find that both approaches lead to comparable performance, establishing convolutional networks as a promising new approach for multivariate hypothesis-based top tagging.

  11. Enhanced solar energy harvesting using top n-contact GaAs solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, N. C.

    2015-05-01

    We fabricated single-junction solar cell on molecular beam epitaxially grown p-n junction on n-type gallium arsenide (GaAs) substrate. We used a germanium (Ge)/gold (Au)/nickel (Ni)/Au metal contact from the top side on a highly doped n+ epitaxial layer as well as the bottom side on an n-type GaAs substrate. We observed 10-15% increase in solar cell power when the top contact is used for the n+ GaAs epi layer compared to the bottom side n-type GaAs substrate. Solar cell fill factor, sheet, and shunt resistances are same for both the top and bottom contact type devices. We also observed higher external quantum efficiency (EQE) for top contact devices compared to bottom contact devices. We conclude that to achieve higher power, it is advantageous to use an n-type contact from a highly doped top n+ epitaxial layer rather than a bottom n-type GaAs substrate.

  12. Top1 May Do More Than Relax DNA | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Topoisomerase 1 (Top1) is an enzyme with a well known role in relaxing DNA supercoils by making reversible nicks in DNA. The ribonuclease (RNase) H class of enzymes is equally well known for removing ribonucleotides from hybrid duplex DNA when they are misincorporated during DNA replication. Recently, Shar-yin Huang, Ph.D., and Yves Pommier, M.D., Ph.D., in CCR’s Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology teamed up with Sue Jinks-Robertson of Duke University’s Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology and Thomas Kunkel of the NIEHS, NIH to show that in yeast, Top1 can act like the RNase H class enzymes and convert misincorporated single ribonucleotides into irreversible single-strand breaks, an activity that produces deletion mutations.  They reported this discovery in Science.

  13. Aluminum oxide-n-Si field effect inversion layer solar cells with organic top contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, A. S.; Kedem, N. K.; Haj-Yahia, A. E.; Cahen, D.

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate a solar cell that uses fixed negative charges formed at the interface of n-Si with Al2O3 to generate strong inversion at the surface of n-Si by electrostatic repulsion. Built-in voltages of up to 755 mV are found at this interface. In order to harness this large built-in voltage, we present a photovoltaic device where the photocurrent generated in this inversion layer is extracted via an inversion layer induced by a high work function transparent organic top contact, deposited on top of a passivating and dipole-inducing molecular monolayer. Results of the effect of the molecular monolayer on device performance yield open-circuit voltages of up to 550 mV for moderately doped Si, demonstrating the effectiveness of this contact structure in removing the Fermi level pinning that has hindered past efforts in developing this type of solar cell with n-type Si.

  14. Dynamics of a cliff top dune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, K. R.

    2012-12-01

    Morphological changes during more than 100 years have been investigated for a cliff-top dune complex at Rubjerg at the Danish North Sea coast. Here the lower 50 m of the cliff front is composed of Pleistocene steeply inclined floes of silt and clay with coarse sand in between which gives it a saw-tooth appearance. On top of this the dunes are found for several kilometres along the coastline. Due to erosion by the North Sea the cliff has retreated about 120 m between approximately 1880 and 1970 as indicated from two national surveys, and recent GPS-surveys indicate that erosion is continuing at a similar rate. Nevertheless the cliff top dune complex has survived, but its morphology has undergone some changed. The old maps indicate that around 1880 the dune complex was composed of several up to about 20 m high dunes streamlined in the East-West direction which is parallel to the prevailing wind direction. When protective planting started during the first half of the 20th Century the cliff top dunes gradually merged together forming a narrow, tall ridge parallel to the shore line with the highest part reaching about 90 m near 1970. In 1993 the highest points along the ridge was almost 95 m high, but then the protective planting was considerably reduced and recent annual GPS-surveys indicate that the dunes respond quickly to this by changing their morphology towards the original appearance. It is remarkable that despite the mass wasting caused by the constant erosion of the cliff front the dunes have remained more or less intact. Theoretical studies of hill flow indicate given the proper geometry of the cliff then suspension of even coarse grains can be a very effective agent for carrying sand from the exposed parts of the cliff front to and beyond the cliff-top. Mostly the sand grains are deposited within some hundred meters downwind of the cliff dune while silt is often carried more than 10 km inland. Field observations indicate that where the dislodged floes and

  15. An informatic framework for decoding protein complexes by top-down mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Owen S.; Havugimana, Pierre C.; Haverland, Nicole A.; Fornelli, Luca; Early, Bryan P.; Greer, Joseph B.; Fellers, Ryan T.; Durbin, Kenneth R.; Do Vale, Luis H. F.; Melani, Rafael D.; Seckler, Henrique S.; Nelp, Micah T.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Horning, Stevan R.; Makarov, Alexander A.; LeDuc, Richard D.; Bandarian, Vahe; Compton, Philip D.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to map the human protein interactome have resulted in information about hundreds to thousands of multi-protein assemblies housed in public repositories, but the molecular characterization and stoichiometry of their protein subunits remains largely unknown. Here, we combined the CORUM and UniProt databases to create candidates for an error-tolerant search engine designed for hierarchical top-down analyses, identification, and scoring of multi-proteoform complexes by native mass spectrometry. PMID:26780093

  16. The race to decipher the top secrets of TOP mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Meyuhas, Oded; Kahan, Tamar

    2015-07-01

    Cells encountering hostile growth conditions, like those residing in the middle of a newly developing solid tumor, conserve resources and energy by downregulating protein synthesis. One mechanism in this response is the translational repression of multiple mRNAs that encode components of the translational apparatus. This coordinated translational control is carried through a common cis-regulatory element, the 5' Terminal OligoPyrimidine motif (5'TOP), after which these mRNAs are referred to as TOP mRNAs. Subsequent to the initial structural and functional characterization of members of this family, the research of TOP mRNAs has progressed in three major directions: a) delineating the landscape of the family; b) establishing the pathways that transduce stress cues into selective translational repression; and c) attempting to decipher the most proximal trans-acting factor(s) and defining its mode of action--a repressor or activator. The present chapter critically reviews the development in these three avenues of research with a special emphasis on the two "top secrets" of the TOP mRNA family: the scope of its members and the identity of the proximal cellular regulator(s). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translation and Cancer.

  17. Recovery of residue tops in selectively cut northern hardwood stands.

    Treesearch

    James A. Johnson; Rodger A. Arola; Edwin S. Miyata

    1982-01-01

    Tests the feasibility and economics of compacting hardwood tops with a prototype shearing and bunching device prior to skidding. Presents productivity levels and costs associated with compacting, skidding, and chipping hardwood tops.

  18. 2. TIP TOP MINE. NORTH AND EAST SIDE OF HOUSE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. TIP TOP MINE. NORTH AND EAST SIDE OF HOUSE. CAMERA POINTED SOUTH. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  19. 3. TIP TOP MINE. SOUTH SIDE OF HOUSE. CAMERA POINTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. TIP TOP MINE. SOUTH SIDE OF HOUSE. CAMERA POINTED NORTH-NORTHWEST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  20. 6. TIP TOP MINE. DETAIL OF SIDING. SOUTHWEST CORNER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. TIP TOP MINE. DETAIL OF SIDING. SOUTHWEST CORNER OF STRUCTURE. CAMERA POINTED NORTHEAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  1. 1. TIP TOP MINE. WEST SIDE OF STRUCTURE. CAMERA POINTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. TIP TOP MINE. WEST SIDE OF STRUCTURE. CAMERA POINTED EAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  2. 11. TIP TOP MINE. DETAIL OF TONGUE AND GROOVE INTERIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. TIP TOP MINE. DETAIL OF TONGUE AND GROOVE INTERIOR SIDING IN LIVING QUARTERS. CAMERA POINTED EAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  3. 5. TIP TOP MINE. EAST SIDE OF STRUCTURE WITH COLLAPSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. TIP TOP MINE. EAST SIDE OF STRUCTURE WITH COLLAPSED ADIT. CAMERA POINTED WEST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  4. 30. DETAIL OF HOISTWAY AT THE TOP OF THE ARCH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. DETAIL OF HOISTWAY AT THE TOP OF THE ARCH, TRAIN IS IN BACKROUND, NOTE TRAIN IS ON TOP OF TRACKS - Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Arch, Mississippi River between Washington & Poplar Streets, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  5. 13. DETAIL VIEW SHOWING HIP VERTICAL, TOP CHORD, SWAY BRACING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL VIEW SHOWING HIP VERTICAL, TOP CHORD, SWAY BRACING, TOP STRUTS, CENTER OF SOUTH TRUSS - Marathon City Bridge, Spanning Big Rib River, on state Trunk Highway 107, Marathon, Marathon County, WI

  6. 30. Elevator no. 3: top floor, rollers for southeast conveyor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Elevator no. 3: top floor, rollers for southeast conveyor belt flanked by top openings of grain bins, with tripper in background, facing northeast - Washburn Crosby Company Elevators No. 2 & 3, 900 & 1000 Second Avenue, South, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  7. 13. VIEW OF TOP CHORD CONNECTION, SHOWING DIAGONAL AND VERTICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF TOP CHORD CONNECTION, SHOWING DIAGONAL AND VERTICAL WEB MEMBERS AND TOP LATERAL BRACING, SOUTHEAST SPAN, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Linden Avenue Bridge, Spanning Purgatoire River on Linden Avenue, Trinidad, Las Animas County, CO

  8. 11. VIEW OF PIN CONNECTION, SOUTH WEB, SHOWING TOP CHORD, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW OF PIN CONNECTION, SOUTH WEB, SHOWING TOP CHORD, LATTICE BRACING, HIP VERTICAL, EYEBARS, TOP LATERAL BRACING, AND STRUTS, LOOKING SOUTH - Four Mile Bridge, Spanning Elk River on County Road 42, Steamboat Springs, Routt County, CO

  9. 15. DETAIL OF TOP CHORD, SECONDARY VERTICAL POST, DIAGONAL MEMBERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL OF TOP CHORD, SECONDARY VERTICAL POST, DIAGONAL MEMBERS, AND TOP LATERAL CONNECTION ON WEST SIDE OF TRUSS, VIEW NORTHWEST - Shaytown Road Bridge, Spanning Thornapple River, Vermontville, Eaton County, MI

  10. Top-down vertical itemset mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, Mohammad Karim; Ghods, Vahid

    2015-03-01

    Vertical itemset mining is an important frequent pattern mining problem with broad applications. It is challenging since one may need to examine a combinatorial explosive number of possible patterns of items of a dataset in a traditional horizontal algorithm. Since high dimensional datasets typically contain a large number of columns and a small number of rows, vertical itemset mining algorithms, which extract the frequent itemsets of dataset by producing all combination of rows ids, are a good alternative for horizontal algorithms in mining frequent itemsets from high dimensional dataset. Since a rowset can be simply produced from its subsets by adding a new row id to a sub rowset, many bottom up vertical itemset mining algorithms are designed and represented in the literature. However, bottom up vertical mining algorithms suffer from a main drawback. Bottom-up algorithms start the process of generating and testing of rowsets from the small rowsets and go on to the larger rowsets, whereas the small rowsets cannot produce a frequent itemsets because they contain less than minimum support threshold number of rows. In this paper, we described a new efficient vertical top down algorithm called VTD (Vertical Top Down) to conduct mining of frequent itemsets in high dimensional datasets. Our top down approach employed the minimum support threshold to prune the rowsets which any itemset could not be extracted from them. Several experiments on real bioinformatics datasets showed that VTD is orders of magnitude better than previous closed pattern mining algorithms. Our performance study showed that this algorithm outperformed substantially the best former algorithms.

  11. Altmetric: Top 50 dental articles in 2014.

    PubMed

    Kolahi, J; Khazaei, S

    2016-06-10

    Introduction Altmetrics is a new and emerging scholarly tool that measures online attention surrounding journal articles. Altmetric data resources include: policy documents, news outlets, blogs, online reference managers (eg Mendeley and CiteULike), post-publication peer-review forums (eg PubPeer and Publons), social media (eg Twitter, Facebook, Weibo, Google(+), Pinterest, Reddit), Wikipedia, sites running Stack Exchange (Q&A), and reviews on F1000 and YouTube.Methods To identify the top 50 dental articles in 2014, PubMed was searched using the following query "("2014/1/1"[PDAT]:"2014/12/31"[PDAT]) and jsubsetd[text]" in December, 2015. Consequently, all PubMed records were extracted and sent to Altmetric LLP (London, UK) as a CSV file for examination. Data were analysed by Microsoft Office Excel 2010 using descriptive statistics and charts.Results Using PubMed searches,15,132 dental articles were found in 2014. The mean Altmetric score of 50 top dental articles in 2014 was 69.5 ± 73.3 (95% CI: -74.14 to 213.14). The British Dental Journal (48%) and Journal of Dental Research (16%) had the maximum number of top articles. Twitter (67.13%), Mendeley (15.89%) and news outlets (10.92%) were the most popular altmetric data resources.Discussion Altmetrics are intended to supplement bibliometrics, not replace them. Altmetrics is a fresh and emerging arena for the dental research community. We believe that dental clinical practitioners, research scientists, research directors and journal editors must pay more attention to altmetrics as a new and rapid tool to measure the social impact of scholarly articles.

  12. Top-down holographic glueball decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünner, F.; Parganlija, D.; Rebhan, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present new results on the decay patterns of scalar and tensor glueballs in the top-down holographic Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model. This model, which has only one free dimensionless parameter, gives semi-quantitative predictions for the vector meson spectrum, their decay widths, and also a gluon condensate in agreement with SVZ sum rules. The holographic predictions for scalar glueball decay rates are compared with experimental data for the widely discussed gluon candidates f0(1500) and f0(1710).

  13. Flat top solitons on linear gaussian potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umarov, B. A.; Aklan, N. A. B.; Rosly, M. R.; Hassan, T. H.

    2017-09-01

    The study of Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation has been wide focus from many researchers especially analysing the result of collision as it describes the soliton propagation. This paper considers the soliton scattering of cubic-quintic Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation on localized Gaussian potential. By applying Super-Gaussian ansatz as the trial function for variational approximation (VA) method, the soliton interaction may acquire flat-top shape with appropriate parameters. The result of VA will be compared to numerical analysis to check the accuracy of analytical predictions.

  14. Cloud top remote sensing by airborne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, J. D.; Hansen, M. Z.; Caudill, L. O.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of cloud top height, backscattering, and signal depolarization have been obtained by a lidar system operating onboard a high-altitude research aircraft. The transmitter for the cloud lidar system is a doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at 5 Hz. The system functions as a fully automated sensor under microprocessor control and operates from a nominal 19-km altitude. Measurements have been acquired over a wide variety of cloud cover in conjunction with passive visible and infrared measurements. Initial observation results are reported

  15. Top Production Cross Sections at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Kvita, Jiri

    2009-07-01

    We report on measurements of the ttbar production cross section at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the D0 experiment during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We use candidate events in lepton+jets and dilepton final states. In the most sensitive channel (lepton+jets channel), a neural network algorithm that uses lifetime information to identify b-quark jets is used to distinguish signal from background processes. We also present measurements of single top quark production at D0 using several multivariate techniques to separate signal from background.

  16. Sediments at the top of Earth's core.

    PubMed

    Buffett, B A; Garnero, E J; Jeanloz, R

    2000-11-17

    Unusual physical properties at the core-mantle boundary have been inferred from seismic and geodetic observations in recent years. We show how both types of observations can be explained by a layer of silicate sediments, which accumulate at the top of the core as Earth cools. Compaction of the sediments expels most of the liquid iron but leaves behind a small amount of core material, which is entrained in mantle convection and may account for the isotopic signatures of core material in some hot spot plumes. Extraction of light elements from the liquid core also enhances the vigor of convection in the core and may increase the power available to the geodynamo.

  17. Top 10 Replicated Findings from Behavioral Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Plomin, Robert; DeFries, John C.; Knopik, Valerie S.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2015-01-01

    In the context of current concerns about replication in psychological science, we describe 10 findings from behavioral genetic research that have robustly replicated. These are ‘big’ findings, both in terms of effect size and potential impact on psychological science, such as linearly increasing heritability of intelligence from infancy (20%) through adulthood (60%). Four of our top-10 findings involve the environment, discoveries that could only have been found using genetically sensitive research designs. We also consider reasons specific to behavioral genetics that might explain why these findings replicate. PMID:26817721

  18. Measurement of the top quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Tzu-Chung Frank

    1998-01-01

    From p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV in the Fermilab Tevatron collider, top quarks are produced predominantly in t$\\bar{t}$ pairs. After applying a sophisticated event selection to the ≈ 100pb -1 data recorded by the D0 detector, we have 35 t$\\bar{t}$ → e(μ) + jets candidates with the backgrounds estimated to be 16.3 ± 2.2. We perform a kinematically constrained fit for individual events, and the results are input to a likelihood analysis.

  19. Top-down holographic glueball decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Brünner, F.; Parganlija, D.; Rebhan, A.

    2016-01-22

    We present new results on the decay patterns of scalar and tensor glueballs in the top-down holographic Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model. This model, which has only one free dimensionless parameter, gives semi-quantitative predictions for the vector meson spectrum, their decay widths, and also a gluon condensate in agreement with SVZ sum rules. The holographic predictions for scalar glueball decay rates are compared with experimental data for the widely discussed gluon candidates f{sub 0}(1500) and f{sub 0}(1710)

  20. Extension of the measurement, assignment, and fit of the rotational spectrum of the two-top molecule methyl acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam; Kleiner, Isabelle; Shipman, Steven T.; Mae, Yoshiaki; Hirose, Kazue; Hatanaka, Shota; Kobayashi, Kaori

    2014-05-01

    New and previous spectroscopic data were recorded for the two-top molecule methyl acetate using five spectrometers in four different labs: a room temperature chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectrometer in the frequency range from 8.7 to 26.5 GHz, two molecular beam FTMW spectrometers (2-40 GHz), a free jet absorption Stark-modulated spectrometer (60-78 GHz), and a room temperature millimeter-wave spectrometer (44-68 GHz). Approximately 800 new lines with J up to 40 and K up to 16 were assigned. In total, 1603 lines were fitted with 34 parameters using an internal rotation Hamiltonian in the Rho Axis Method (RAM) and the program BELGI-Cs-2tops to standard deviations close to the experimental uncertainties. More precise determinations of the top-top interaction and the J, K dependent parameters were carried out.

  1. Top quark forward-backward asymmetry and same-sign top quark pairs.

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E. L.; Cao, Q.-H.; Chen, C.-R.; Li, C. S.; Zhang, H.

    2011-05-20

    The top quark forward-backward asymmetry measured at the Tevatron collider shows a large deviation from standard model expectations. Among possible interpretations, a nonuniversal Z{prime} model is of particular interest as it naturally predicts a top quark in the forward region of large rapidity. To reproduce the size of the asymmetry, the couplings of the Z{prime} to standard model quarks must be large, inevitably leading to copious production of same-sign top quark pairs at the energies of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We explore the discovery potential for tt and ttj production in early LHC experiments at 7-8 TeV and conclude that if no tt signal is observed with 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, then a nonuniversal Z{prime} alone cannot explain the Tevatron forward-backward asymmetry.

  2. Top quark forward-backward asymmetry and same-sign top quark pairs.

    PubMed

    Berger, Edmond L; Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Li, Chong Sheng; Zhang, Hao

    2011-05-20

    The top quark forward-backward asymmetry measured at the Tevatron collider shows a large deviation from standard model expectations. Among possible interpretations, a nonuniversal Z' model is of particular interest as it naturally predicts a top quark in the forward region of large rapidity. To reproduce the size of the asymmetry, the couplings of the Z' to standard model quarks must be large, inevitably leading to copious production of same-sign top quark pairs at the energies of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We explore the discovery potential for tt and ttj production in early LHC experiments at 7-8 TeV and conclude that if no tt signal is observed with 1 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity, then a nonuniversal Z' alone cannot explain the Tevatron forward-backward asymmetry.

  3. 12. TIP TOP MINE. WOODEN STRUCTURE ASSOCIATED WITH CABLES IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. TIP TOP MINE. WOODEN STRUCTURE ASSOCIATED WITH CABLES IN ID-31-C-13 AND ID-31-C-14 LOCATED ON SLOPE JUST BELOW TIP TOP HOUSE. CAMERA IS POINTED NORTH-NORTHWEST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  4. 49 CFR 178.1050 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Containers § 178.1050 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification... permissible gross mass, the load being evenly distributed. (c) Test method. (1) A Flexible Bulk Container must... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.1050 Section...

  5. 49 CFR 178.975 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Packagings § 178.975 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of... distributed. (c) Test method. (1) A Large Packaging must be lifted in the manner for which it is designed... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.975 Section...

  6. 75 FR 16668 - Race to the Top Fund

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... CFR Subtitle B, Chapter II RIN 1810-AB10 Race to the Top Fund ACTION: Interim final requirements... for the Race to the Top Fund to incorporate and make binding for Phase 2 of the competition State... Secretary published final requirements for the Race to the Top Fund in the Federal Register on November 18...

  7. 75 FR 30007 - Race to the Top Fund Assessment Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... Overview Information Race to the Top Fund Assessment Program Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA... applications for new awards for FY 2010 (NIA) for the Race to the Top Fund Assessment Program. This notice... grant category under the Race to the Top Fund Assessment Program competition. The mailing address and...

  8. 76 FR 23487 - Race to the Top Fund

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... CFR Subtitle B, Chapter II RIN 1810-AB10 Race to the Top Fund ACTION: Final requirements. SUMMARY: The... requirements for the Race to the Top Fund to incorporate and make binding for Phase 2 of the competition State... for the Race to the Top Fund in the Federal Register (75 FR 16668). The interim final requirements...

  9. 29 CFR 1960.54 - Training of top management officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.54 Training of top management officials. Each agency shall provide top management officials with orientation and other learning experiences which will enable them to... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Training of top management officials. 1960.54 Section...

  10. 29 CFR 1960.54 - Training of top management officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.54 Training of top management officials. Each agency shall provide top management officials with orientation and other learning experiences which will enable them to... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Training of top management officials. 1960.54 Section...

  11. It's about Time: The Literacy TopPics Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Swafford, Jeanne

    1997-01-01

    Examines the last five years of articles in this journal to show what topics were most often written about (the "Top Picks" or "TopPics"). Discusses these results and makes recommendations that deserve considerable attention in the future. Notes that integrated language arts was a perennial TopPic. (SR)

  12. Top Contributors to the School Psychology Literature: 1996-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Gabrielle A.; Davis, Kim S.; Zanger, Dinorah; Gerrard-Morris, Aimee; Robinson, Daniel H.

    2006-01-01

    S.G. Little (1997) reported the top contributors to the school psychology literature from 1987 to 1995. The present study represents a follow-up by examining the top contributors from 1996 to 2005. Similar to Little, a list of the top 50 contributors was developed using a point system that assigned more credit based on fewer coauthors and higher…

  13. Control in Highly Focused Top-Spinning. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkson, Gershon

    1998-01-01

    Three studies analyzed stimulus feedback and the concept of control with three children and two adults having autism. The first study explored feedback from spinning tops, while the second and third emphasized control of various stimuli including spinning tops. Results indicate that autistic individuals' common interest in spinning tops is…

  14. 29 CFR 1960.54 - Training of top management officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training of top management officials. 1960.54 Section 1960... PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.54 Training of top management officials. Each agency shall provide top management officials with orientation and other learning experiences which will enable them...

  15. 49 CFR 229.71 - Clearance above top of rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clearance above top of rail. 229.71 Section 229.71....71 Clearance above top of rail. No part or appliance of a locomotive except the wheels, flexible nonmetallic sand pipe extension tips, and trip cock arms may be less than 21/2 inches above the top of rail....

  16. 29 CFR 1960.54 - Training of top management officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Training of top management officials. 1960.54 Section 1960... PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.54 Training of top management officials. Each agency shall provide top management officials with orientation and other learning experiences which will enable them...

  17. 49 CFR 229.71 - Clearance above top of rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Clearance above top of rail. 229.71 Section 229.71....71 Clearance above top of rail. No part or appliance of a locomotive except the wheels, flexible nonmetallic sand pipe extension tips, and trip cock arms may be less than 21/2 inches above the top of rail....

  18. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from the Top Group's Top Quark Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Top group studies the properties of the top quark, the heaviest known fundamental particle. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  19. Alligator clips to molecular dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopuk, Nicholas; Son, Kyung-Ah

    2008-09-01

    Techniques for fabricating nanospaced electrodes suitable for studying electron tunneling through metal-molecule-metal junctions are described. In one approach, top contacts are deposited/placed on a self-assembled monolayer or Langmuir-Blodgett film resting on a conducting substrate, the bottom contact. The molecular component serves as a permanent spacer that controls and limits the electrode separations. The top contact can be a thermally deposited metal film, liquid mercury drop, scanning probe tip, metallic wire or particle. Introduction of the top contact can greatly affect the electrical conductance of the intervening molecular film by chemical reaction, exerting pressure, or simply migrating through the organic layer. Alternatively, vacant nanogaps can be fabricated and the molecular component subsequently inserted. Strategies for constructing vacant nanogaps include mechanical break junction, electromigration, shadow mask lithography, focused ion beam deposition, chemical and electrochemical plating techniques, electron-beam lithography, and molecular and atomic rulers. The size of the nanogaps must be small enough to allow the molecule to connect both leads and large enough to keep the molecules in a relaxed and undistorted state. A significant advantage of using vacant nanogaps in the construction of metal-molecule-metal devices is that the junction can be characterized with and without the molecule in place. Any electrical artifacts introduced by the electrode fabrication process are more easily deconvoluted from the intrinsic properties of the molecule.

  20. Top-down control in contour grouping.

    PubMed

    Volberg, Gregor; Wutz, Andreas; Greenlee, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    Human observers tend to group oriented line segments into full contours if they follow the Gestalt rule of 'good continuation'. It is commonly assumed that contour grouping emerges automatically in early visual cortex. In contrast, recent work in animal models suggests that contour grouping requires learning and thus involves top-down control from higher brain structures. Here we explore mechanisms of top-down control in perceptual grouping by investigating synchronicity within EEG oscillations. Human participants saw two micro-Gabor arrays in a random order, with the task to indicate whether the first (S1) or the second stimulus (S2) contained a contour of collinearly aligned elements. Contour compared to non-contour S1 produced a larger posterior post-stimulus beta power (15-21 Hz). Contour S2 was associated with a pre-stimulus decrease in posterior alpha power (11-12 Hz) and in fronto-posterior theta (4-5 Hz) phase couplings, but not with a post-stimulus increase in beta power. The results indicate that subjects used prior knowledge from S1 processing for S2 contour grouping. Expanding previous work on theta oscillations, we propose that long-range theta synchrony shapes neural responses to perceptual groupings regulating lateral inhibition in early visual cortex.

  1. Top Down Proteomics: Facts and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Catherman, Adam D.; Skinner, Owen S.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2014-01-01

    The rise of the “Top Down” method in the field of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has ushered in a new age of promise and challenge for the characterization and identification of proteins. Injecting intact proteins into the mass spectrometer allows for better characterization of post-translational modifications and avoids several of the serious “inference” problems associated with peptide-based proteomics. However, successful implementation of a Top Down approach to endogenous or other biologically relevant samples often requires the use of one or more forms of separation prior to mass spectrometric analysis, which have only begun to mature for whole protein MS. Recent advances in instrumentation have been used in conjunction with new ion fragmentation using photons and electrons that allow for better (and often complete) protein characterization on cases simply not tractable even just a few years ago. Finally, the use of native electrospray mass spectrometry has shown great promise for the identification and characterization of whole protein complexes in the 100 kDa to 1 MDa regime, with prospects for complete compositional analysis for endogenous protein assemblies a viable goal over the coming few years. PMID:24556311

  2. Top marine predators track Lagrangian coherent structures

    PubMed Central

    Tew Kai, Emilie; Rossi, Vincent; Sudre, Joel; Weimerskirch, Henri; Lopez, Cristobal; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Marsac, Francis; Garçon, Veronique

    2009-01-01

    Meso- and submesoscales (fronts, eddies, filaments) in surface ocean flow have a crucial influence on marine ecosystems. Their dynamics partly control the foraging behavior and the displacement of marine top predators (tuna, birds, turtles, and cetaceans). In this work we focus on the role of submesoscale structures in the Mozambique Channel in the distribution of a marine predator, the Great Frigatebird. Using a newly developed dynamic concept, the finite-size Lyapunov exponent (FSLE), we identified Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) present in the surface flow in the channel over a 2-month observation period (August and September 2003). By comparing seabird satellite positions with LCS locations, we demonstrate that frigatebirds track precisely these structures in the Mozambique Channel, providing the first evidence that a top predator is able to track these FSLE ridges to locate food patches. After comparing bird positions during long and short trips and different parts of these trips, we propose several hypotheses to understand how frigatebirds can follow these LCSs. The birds might use visual and/or olfactory cues and/or atmospheric current changes over the structures to move along these biologic corridors. The birds being often associated with tuna schools around foraging areas, a thorough comprehension of their foraging behavior and movement during the breeding season is crucial not only to seabird ecology but also to an appropriate ecosystemic approach to fisheries in the channel. PMID:19416811

  3. Top production and decay at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A.

    1996-09-01

    We report on the measurement of top production and decay properties obtained by the CDF experiment with {ital p{anti p}} collisions at {radical}{ital s} = 1.8 TeV. the analyses presented here refer to {integral}{ital Ldt}{approx} 110 {ital pb}{sup -1} collected at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. About 85% of the possible {ital t{anti t}} decays have been studied in different channels according to the number of high-{ital p{sub T}} leptons found in the final state. Combining the results from the channels with at least one {ital W} decaying leptonically into an {ital e} or {mu} we measure {delta}{sub {ital t{anti t}}} = 7.5 {sup +1.9}{sub -1.6}{ital pb}. We report also on the observation of {ital t{anti t}} production in all of the hadronic decay channels using kinematic selection and {ital b} identification, and in the channel containing one hadronically decaying {tau} lepton. Finally we discuss the kinematics of top events and measure the matrix element {vert_bar}V{sub {ital tb}}{vert_bar} = 1.12 {+-} 0.12.

  4. Ash plume top height estimation using AATSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, T. H.; Kolmonen, P.; Rodríguez, E.; Sogacheva, L.; Sundström, A.-M.; de Leeuw, G.

    2014-08-01

    An algorithm is presented for the estimation of volcanic ash plume top height using the stereo view of the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) aboard Envisat. The algorithm is based on matching top of the atmosphere (TOA) reflectances and brightness temperatures of the nadir and 55° forward views, and using the resulting parallax to obtain the height estimate. Various retrieval parameters are discussed in detail, several quality parameters are introduced, and post-processing methods for screening out unreliable data have been developed. The method is compared to other satellite observations and in situ data. The proposed algorithm is designed to be fully automatic and can be implemented in operational retrieval algorithms. Combined with automated ash detection using the brightness temperature difference between the 11 and 12 μm channels, the algorithm allows efficient simultaneous retrieval of the horizontal and vertical dispersion of volcanic ash. A case study on the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 is presented.

  5. Ash plume top height estimate using AATSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, T. H.; Kolmonen, P.; Rodríguez, E.; Sogacheva, L.; Sundström, A.-M.; de Leeuw, G.

    2014-04-01

    An algorithm is presented for estimation of volcanic ash plume top height using the stereo view of the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) aboard ENVISAT. The algorithm is based on matching the top of atmosphere (TOA) reflectances and brightness temperatures of the nadir and 55° forward views, and using the resulting parallax to obtain the height estimate. Various retrieval parameters are discussed in detail, several quality parameters are introduced, and post-processing methods for screening out unreliable data have been developed. The method is compared against other satellite observations and in-situ data. The proposed algorithm is designed to be fully automatic, and can be implemented into operational retrieval algorithms. Combined with automated ash detection using the brightness temperature difference between the 11 μm and 12 μm channels, the algorithm allows simultaneous retrieval of horizontal and vertical dispersion of volcanic ash efficiently. A case study on the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 is presented. The height estimate method results are validated against available satellite and ground based data.

  6. Top marine predators track Lagrangian coherent structures.

    PubMed

    Tew Kai, Emilie; Rossi, Vincent; Sudre, Joel; Weimerskirch, Henri; Lopez, Cristobal; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Marsac, Francis; Garçon, Veronique

    2009-05-19

    Meso- and submesoscales (fronts, eddies, filaments) in surface ocean flow have a crucial influence on marine ecosystems. Their dynamics partly control the foraging behavior and the displacement of marine top predators (tuna, birds, turtles, and cetaceans). In this work we focus on the role of submesoscale structures in the Mozambique Channel in the distribution of a marine predator, the Great Frigatebird. Using a newly developed dynamic concept, the finite-size Lyapunov exponent (FSLE), we identified Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) present in the surface flow in the channel over a 2-month observation period (August and September 2003). By comparing seabird satellite positions with LCS locations, we demonstrate that frigatebirds track precisely these structures in the Mozambique Channel, providing the first evidence that a top predator is able to track these FSLE ridges to locate food patches. After comparing bird positions during long and short trips and different parts of these trips, we propose several hypotheses to understand how frigatebirds can follow these LCSs. The birds might use visual and/or olfactory cues and/or atmospheric current changes over the structures to move along these biologic corridors. The birds being often associated with tuna schools around foraging areas, a thorough comprehension of their foraging behavior and movement during the breeding season is crucial not only to seabird ecology but also to an appropriate ecosystemic approach to fisheries in the channel.

  7. The top 100 cited articles in urology.

    PubMed

    Hennessey, Kiara; Afshar, Kourosh; Macneily, Andrew E

    2009-08-01

    BACKGROUND: We identified and analyzed the characteristics of the 100 most frequently cited articles published between 1965 and 2007 in journals pertaining to urology and related fields. METHODS: We selected 69 of the highest impact urology and sub-specialty journals and 22 of the highest impact general medical and medical research journals from the 2006 edition of Journal Citation Reports: Science edition. We identified the 100 most frequently cited urological articles published in these 91 journals using the Science Citation Index Expanded (1965-present). We reviewed and analyzed the articles. RESULTS: The top 100 articles were cited a mean of 629 times (range 418-1435) and published between 1965 and 2003, with 89% published after 1979 and 54% published in the 1990s. Fifteen journals were represented, led by The New England Journal of Medicine (30), The Journal of Urology (22) and Lancet (11). Ninety publications originated from North America (81) or the United Kingdom (9). Johns Hopkins University (13), Harvard University (5), Stanford University (5) and University of California, Los Angeles (5) published the most articles. Five urologists were first authors of 2 or more of the articles. Fifty-six articles reported observational studies. Oncology (51) and transplantation (20) were the most commonly represented urological subfields. CONCLUSION: These top-cited articles in urology identify topics and authors that contributed to major advances in urology. Observational studies and randomized controlled trials in oncology published in high-impact urological or medical journals constitute the most common type of highly cited publications.

  8. Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    2010-05-01

    Conventional reservoir simulation and modeling is a bottom-up approach. It starts with building a geological model of the reservoir that is populated with the best available petrophysical and geophysical information at the time of development. Engineering fluid flow principles are added and solved numerically so as to arrive at a dynamic reservoir model. The dynamic reservoir model is calibrated using the production history of multiple wells and the history matched model is used to strategize field development in order to improve recovery. Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Modeling approaches the reservoir simulation and modeling from an opposite angle by attempting to build a realization of the reservoir starting with the measured well production behavior (history). The production history is augmented by core, log, well test and seismic data in order to increase the accuracy of the Top-Down modeling technique. Although not intended as a substitute for the conventional reservoir simulation of large, complex fields, this novel approach to reservoir modeling can be used as an alternative (at a fraction of the cost) to conventional reservoir simulation and modeling in cases where performing conventional modeling is cost (and man-power) prohibitive. In cases where a conventional model of a reservoir already exists, Top-Down modeling should be considered as a compliment to, rather than a competition for the conventional technique, to provide an independent look at the data coming from the reservoir/wells for optimum development strategy and recovery enhancement. Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Modeling starts with well-known reservoir engineering techniques such as Decline Curve Analysis, Type Curve Matching, History Matching using single well numerical reservoir simulation, Volumetric Reserve Estimation and calculation of Recovery Factors for all the wells (individually) in the field. Using statistical techniques multiple Production Indicators (3, 6, and 9 months cum

  9. Top 10% Admissions in the Borderlands: Access and Success of Borderland Top Students at Texas Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodríguez, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on Texas Borderland students admitted through the Texas Top 10% admissions policy, which assumes that Top 10% students are college ready for any public university and provides Top 10% high school graduates automatic admission to any 4-year public university in Texas. Using descriptive and inferential statistics, results…

  10. Measurements of top quark properties in top pair production and decay at the LHC using the CMS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Jindariani, Sergo

    2016-05-31

    Measurements are presented of the properties of top quarks in pair production and decay from proton-proton collisions at the LHC. The data were collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV by the CMS experiment during the years 2011 and 2012. The top quark-antiquark charge asymmetry is measured using the difference of the absolute rapidities of the reconstructed top and anti-top kinematics, as well as from distributions of the top quark decay products. The measurements are performed in the decay channels of the tt¯ pair into both one and two leptons in the final state. The polarization of top quarks and top pair spin correlations are measured from the angular distributions of top quark decay products. The W-boson helicity fractions and angular asymmetries are extracted and limits on anomalous contributions to the Wtb vertex are determined. The flavor content in top-quark pair events is measured using the fraction of top quarks decaying into a W-boson and a b -quark relative to all top quark decays, R=B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq) , and the result is used to determine the CKM matrix element Vtb as well as the width of the top quark resonance. Finally, all of the results are found to be in good agreement with standard model predictions.

  11. Top 10% Admissions in the Borderlands: Access and Success of Borderland Top Students at Texas Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodríguez, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on Texas Borderland students admitted through the Texas Top 10% admissions policy, which assumes that Top 10% students are college ready for any public university and provides Top 10% high school graduates automatic admission to any 4-year public university in Texas. Using descriptive and inferential statistics, results…

  12. Partially coherent flat-topped beam and its propagation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Di; Cai, Yangjian; Lin, Qiang

    2004-08-20

    A partially coherent beam with flat-topped profile is proposed. The cross-spectral density of this beam can be expressed as a finite series of the cross-spectral density of partially coherent Gaussian-Schell-model beams with different parameters. Analytical propagation formulas for partially coherent flat-topped beams are derived through aligned and misaligned optical systems. The propagation property of partially coherent flat-topped beams in free space is illustrated numerically. The fractional Fourier transform of partially coherent fiat-topped beams is also studied. Our method provides a convenient way to describe partially coherent flat-topped beams and treat their propagation and transformation.

  13. Summary of Single top quark production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Schwienhorst, R.; CDF, on the

    2014-01-01

    The production of single-top quarks occurs via the weak interaction at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. Single top quark events are selected in the lepton+jets final state by CDF and D0 and in the missing transverse energy plus jets final state by CDF. Multivariate classifiers separate the s-channel and t-channel single-top signals from the large backgrounds. The combination of CDF and D0 results leads to the first observation of the s-channel mode of single top quark production. The t-channel and single top combined cross sections have also been measured.

  14. Precision Measurements of Top Quark Production with the ATLAS Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolte, Philipp

    2017-03-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle. It is the only quark that decays before it hadronises which gives us the unique opportunity to probe the properties of bare quarks and to test perturbative QCD. This overview will focus on a few recent precision top quark measurements by the ATLAS Collaboration at the LHC: Fiducial top pair and single top production cross-sections including differential distributions will be presented and compared with QCD predictions. The results include the first top quark measurements at 13 TeV using data from LHC Run 2.

  15. Searches for new physics in top events at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Eusebi, Ricardo; collaboration, CDF; collaboration, D0

    2009-05-01

    During the past years the CDF and D0 detectors have collected large amounts of data obtaining a relatively pure sample of pair-produced top quarks and a well understood sample containing singly-produced top quarks. These samples have been used for the precise measurement of the top quark properties, and have set stringent limits on new physics in the top sample. This reports presents the latest results from the CDF and D0 collaborations on the search for new physics within the top sample using an integrated data sample of up to 3.6 fb{sup -1}.

  16. Comprehensive analysis of protein modifications by top-down mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Ge, Ying

    2011-12-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is playing an increasingly important role in cardiovascular research. Proteomics includes identification and quantification of proteins and the characterization of protein modifications, such as posttranslational modifications and sequence variants. The conventional bottom-up approach, involving proteolytic digestion of proteins into small peptides before MS analysis, is routinely used for protein identification and quantification with high throughput and automation. Nevertheless, it has limitations in the analysis of protein modifications, mainly because of the partial sequence coverage and loss of connections among modifications on disparate portions of a protein. An alternative approach, top-down MS, has emerged as a powerful tool for the analysis of protein modifications. The top-down approach analyzes whole proteins directly, providing a "bird's-eye" view of all existing modifications. Subsequently, each modified protein form can be isolated and fragmented in the mass spectrometer to locate the modification site. The incorporation of the nonergodic dissociation methods, such as electron-capture dissociation (ECD), greatly enhances the top-down capabilities. ECD is especially useful for mapping labile posttranslational modifications that are well preserved during the ECD fragmentation process. Top-down MS with ECD has been successfully applied to cardiovascular research, with the unique advantages in unraveling the molecular complexity, quantifying modified protein forms, complete mapping of modifications with full-sequence coverage, discovering unexpected modifications, identifying and quantifying positional isomers, and determining the order of multiple modifications. Nevertheless, top-down MS still needs to overcome some technical challenges to realize its full potential. Herein, we reviewed the advantages and challenges of the top-down method, with a focus on its application in cardiovascular research.

  17. Colorful Twisted Top Partners and Partnerium at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, Yevgeny; McCullough, Matthew; Perez, Gilad; Soreq, Yotam; Thaler, Jesse

    2017-06-01

    In scenarios that stabilize the electroweak scale, the top quark is typically accompanied by partner particles. In this work, we demonstrate how extended stabilizing symmetries can yield scalar or fermionic top partners that transform as ordinary color triplets but carry exotic electric charges. We refer to these scenarios as "hypertwisted" since they involve modifications to hypercharge in the top sector. As proofs of principle, we construct two hypertwisted scenarios: a supersymmetric construction with spin-0 top partners, and a composite Higgs construction with spin-1/2 top partners. In both cases, the top partners are still phenomenologically compatible with the mass range motivated by weak-scale naturalness. The phenomenology of hypertwisted scenarios is diverse, since the lifetimes and decay modes of the top partners are model dependent. The novel coupling structure opens up search channels that do not typically arise in top-partner scenarios, such as pair production of top-plus-jet resonances. Furthermore, hypertwisted top partners are typically sufficiently long lived to form "top-partnerium" bound states that decay predominantly via annihilation, motivating searches for rare narrow resonances with diboson decay modes.

  18. A view from the top: CDF results of top counting experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarelli, G.; CDF Collaboration

    1995-09-01

    We present the CDF results relative to the observation of the top quark and its Properties obtained with 100 pb{sup {minus}1} of data collected in the period 1992--1993 and 1994--1995. Updated results of the counting experiments are given, and consistency between this data and earlier published mass and cross section is shown.

  19. Environmental assessment of curly top virus control in California. [Curly Top Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-15

    Curly top is a viral disease of sugarbeets, tomatoes, melons, peppers, beans, cucumbers, squash, pumpkins, spinach, vineseed and other commercially important crops, including ornamentals. Curly top not only infects commercial crops, but at times devastates backyard vegetable and flower gardens. The only known vector of curly top is Circulifer tenellus, commonly known as the beet leafhopper. Control of the beet leafhopper may take place at various locations throughout the San Joaquin Valley, Salinas Valley, Cuyama Valley, Antelope Valley of northern Los Angeles County, Riverside County and the Imperial Valley (See Maps in Appendix E''), including portions of Merced, Fresno, Kings. Kern, San Luis Obispo, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Riverside and Imperial Counties. The size of the control program is totally dependent on the location, size, nd distribution of the beet leafhopper population. In a year with a low population, only 80,000 acres in western Fresno, Kings, and Kern Counties may require treatment. In a drought year, the treatment required may increase to more than 200,000 acres and include some inter-coastal valleys of Monterey, San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties. Not all areas require treatment on an annual basis and at no time is the entire area subject to blanket treatment. The Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) was instrumental in supporting research which developed an antisera allowing the use of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay to determine the presence, on a percentage basis, of curly top virus. Thus, the amount of virus found in a given area lends weight to treatment priorities.

  20. Radiative corrections to top-quark decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilam, G.; Mendel, R. R.; Migneron, R.; Soni, A.

    1991-06-01

    We calculate all radiative corrections to one-loop order for the main decay of the top quark, t-->b+W, in the standard model, retaining exact dependence on all masses. For mt=150 GeV and MH=100 GeV we find a -2.9% (-6.9%) correction with a very weak dependence on the Higgs-boson mass, in renormalization schemes that use α, GF, and MZ (GF, MW, and MZ) as input parameters. Out of the above results, -8.5% is due to QCD. The mt and MH dependence is given up to 300 and 1000 GeV, respectively. The inadequacy of a leading mt calculation is pointed out.

  1. Who rises to the top? Early indicators.

    PubMed

    Kell, Harrison J; Lubinski, David; Benbow, Camilla P

    2013-05-01

    Youth identified before age 13 (N = 320) as having profound mathematical or verbal reasoning abilities (top 1 in 10,000) were tracked for nearly three decades. Their awards and creative accomplishments by age 38, in combination with specific details about their occupational responsibilities, illuminate the magnitude of their contribution and professional stature. Many have been entrusted with obligations and resources for making critical decisions about individual and organizational well-being. Their leadership positions in business, health care, law, the professoriate, and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) suggest that many are outstanding creators of modern culture, constituting a precious human-capital resource. Identifying truly profound human potential, and forecasting differential development within such populations, requires assessing multiple cognitive abilities and using atypical measurement procedures. This study illustrates how ultimate criteria may be aggregated and longitudinally sequenced to validate such measures.

  2. The Great White Guppy: Top Predator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, G. M.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrogen isotopes are often used to trace the trophic level of members of an ecosystem. As part of a stable isotope biogeochemistry and forensics course at Purdue University, students are introduced to this concept by analyzing nitrogen isotopes in sea food purchased from local grocery stores. There is a systematic increase in 15N/14N ratios going from kelp to clams/shrimp, to sardines, to tuna and finally to shark. These enrichments demonstrate how nitrogen is enriched in biomass as predators consume prey. Some of the highest nitrogen isotope enrichments observed, however, are in the common guppy. We investigated a number of aquarium fish foods and find they typically have high nitrogen isotope ratios because they are made form fish meal that is produced primarily from the remains of predator fish such as tuna. From, a isotope perspective, the guppy is the top of the food chain, more ferocious than even the Great White shark.

  3. Observation of single top-quark production.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuplov, V; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-08-28

    We report observation of the electroweak production of single top quarks in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV based on 2.3 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using events containing an isolated electron or muon and missing transverse energy, together with jets originating from the fragmentation of b quarks, we measure a cross section of sigma(pp[over ]--> tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.94 + or - 0.88 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 2.5 x 10(-7), corresponding to a 5.0 standard deviation significance for the observation.

  4. Top partners searches and composite Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsedonskyi, Oleksii; Panico, Giuliano; Wulzer, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Colored fermionic partners of the top quark are well-known signatures of the Composite Higgs scenario and for this reason they have been and will be subject of an intensive experimental study at the LHC. Performing an assessment of the theoretical implications of this experimental effort is the goal of the present paper. We proceed by analyzing a set of simple benchmark models, characterized by simple two-dimensional parameter spaces where the results of the searches are conveniently visualized and their impact quantified. We only draw exclusion contours, in the hypothesis of no signal, but of course our formalism could equally well be used to report discoveries in a theoretically useful format.

  5. Top 16 Earth Images of 2016

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-12

    Astronauts on the International Space Station take pictures of Earth out their windows nearly every day; over a year that adds up to thousands of photos. The people at the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston pored through this year’s crop to pick their top 16 photos of Earth for 2016—enjoy! Download the images: https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasa2explore/albums/72157674260752223 HD download link: https://archive.org/details/TheSpaceProgram _______________________________________ FOLLOW THE SPACE STATION! Twitter: https://twitter.com/Space_Station Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ISS Instagram: https://instagram.com/iss/

  6. Observation of single top at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Casal, Bruno; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2009-01-01

    We present observation of electroweak single top quark production using 3.2 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF experiment. Candidate events are selected for further classification by five parallel analysis techniques: one using a likelihood discriminant, one using a matrix-element discriminant, one using decision trees, one using a neural network, and one using a complementary dataset. The results of these analyses are combined in order to improve the expected sensitivity. The significance of the observed data is 5.0 standard deviations, and the expected sensitivity is in excess of 5.9 standard deviations. We also present the most current value of the CKM matrix element |V{sub tb}|.

  7. Studies on selenium in top athletes.

    PubMed

    Drâgan, I; Ploeşteanu, E; Cristea, E; Mohora, M; Dinu, V; Troescu, V S

    1988-01-01

    The authors performed a controlled trial in 18 top athletes (9 weight lifters and 9 rowers, girls) in order to make evident some chronic and acute effects (antioxidant) of selenium. Nonprotein--SH (essential glutathione), lipid peroxides (MDA-malondialdehyde), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases (G-6-PDH) and fructose-1,6-diphosphate aldolase in serum, have been recorded initially on basal conditions, after 3 weeks of treatment (100 micrograms/day selenium or placebo) and again after 3 weeks of treatment, also on basal conditions, when crossing over the groups (between a free interval of 10 days). In another trial we registered these parameters on basal conditions and after two hours of hard training accompanied by a per oral administration of 150 micrograms selenium (respectively placebo). The results show significant changes under selenium treatment of the peroxides, G-6-PDH and light changes, not significant of the nonprotein--SH, changes which could suggest an antioxidant effect of this element.

  8. Direct Measurement of the Top Quark Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J., II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Grim, G.; Grinstein, S.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Lan, H.; Lander, R.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Q.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Nes̆iĆ, D.; Nicola, M.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Pus̆eljić, D.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1997-08-01

    We measure the top quark mass mt using tt¯ pairs produced in the D0 detector by s = 1.8 TeVpp¯ collisions in a 125 pb-1 exposure at the Fermilab Tevatron. We make a two constraint fit to mt in tt¯-->bW+b¯W- final states with one W decaying to qq¯ and the other to eν or μν. Events are binned in fit mass versus a measure of probability for events to be signal rather than background. Likelihood fits to the data yield mt = 173.3+/-5.6\\(stat\\)+/-6.2\\(syst\\) GeV/c2.

  9. Platts top 250 global energy company rankings

    SciTech Connect

    2006-11-15

    The third annual survey of global energy companies measures companies' financial performance using four metrics: asset worth, revenues, profits and return on invested capital. The following industry segments were analysed: coal and consumable fuel companies; diversified utilities; exploration and production; electric utilities; gas utilities; integrated oil and gas companies; refining and marketing; independent power producers and storage and transfer companies. Integrated oil and gas companies (IOGs) captured nine out of the top ten spots while IPPS struggled in 2005 as the sector on a whole lost money. The exploration and production segment showed financial stability while gas utilities saw their financials climb. The Exxon Mobile Corp. continued its reign of the number one spot.

  10. Measurement of the top quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Varnes, Erich Ward

    1997-01-01

    This dissertation describes the measurement of the top quark mass mt using events recorded during a 125 pb-1 exposure of the D0 detector to √s=1.8 TeV $\\bar{p}$p collisions. Six events consistent with the hypothesis t$\\bar{t}$ → bW+, $\\bar{b}$W-t based on these relative solution likelihoods gives mt2+, $\\bar{b}$W- → b$\\bar{l}$v, $\\bar{b}$q$\\bar{q}$ , and this, in combination with an estimate on the likelihood that each event is top, yields mt = 173.3 ± 5.6 (stat.) ± 6.2 (syst.) GeV/c2t = 173.1 ± 5.2 (stat.) ± 5.7 (syst.) GeV/c2

  11. Jet Dipolarity: Top Tagging with Color Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Anson; Jankowiak, Martin; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    A new jet observable, dipolarity, is introduced that can distinguish whether a pair of subjets arises from a color singlet source. This observable is incorporated into the HEPTopTagger and is shown to improve discrimination between top jets and QCD jets for moderate to high p{sub T}. The impressive resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors means that a typical QCD jet at the LHC deposits energy in {Omicron}(10-100) calorimeter cells. Such fine-grained calorimetry allows for jets to be studied in much greater detail than previously, with sophisticated versions of current techniques making it possible to measure more than just the bulk properties of jets (e.g. event jet multiplicities or jet masses). One goal of the LHC is to employ these techniques to extend the amount of information available from each jet, allowing for a broader probe of the properties of QCD. The past several years have seen significant progress in developing such jet substructure techniques. A number of general purpose tools have been developed, including: (i) top-tagging algorithms designed for use at both lower and higher p{sub T} as well as (ii) jet grooming techniques such as filtering, pruning, and trimming, which are designed to improve jet mass resolution. Jet substructure techniques have also been studied in the context of specific particle searches, where they have been shown to substantially extend the reach of traditional search techniques in a wide variety of scenarios, including for example boosted Higgses, neutral spin-one resonances, searches for supersymmetry, and many others. Despite these many successes, however, there is every reason to expect that there remains room for refinement of jet substructure techniques.

  12. Top-Cited Articles in Implant Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Fardi, Anastasia; Kodonas, Konstantinos; Lillis, Theodoros; Veis, Alexander

    Citation analysis is the field of bibliometrics that uses citation data to evaluate the scientific recognition and the influential performance of a research article in the scientific community. The aim of this study was to conduct a bibliometric analysis of the top-cited articles pertaining to implant dentistry, to analyze the main characteristics, and to display the most interesting topics and evolutionary trends. The 100 top-cited articles published in "Dentistry, Oral Surgery, and Medicine" journals were identified using the Science Citation Index Database. The articles were further reviewed, and basic information was collected, including the number of citations, journals, authors, publication year, study design, level of evidence, and field of study. The highly cited articles in implant dentistry were cited between 199 and 2,229 times. The majority of them were published in four major journals: Clinical Oral Implants Research, International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, and Journal of Periodontology. The publication year ranged from 1981 to 2009, with 45% published in a nine-year period (2001 to 2009). Publications from the United States (29%) were the most heavily cited, followed by those from Sweden (23%) and Switzerland (17%). The University of Göteborg from Sweden produced the highest number of publications (n = 19), followed by the University of Bern in Switzerland (n = 13). There was a predominance of clinical papers (n = 42), followed by reviews (n = 25), basic science research (n = 21), and proceedings papers (n = 12). Peri-implant tissue healing and health (24%), implant success/failures (19.2%), and biomechanical topics (16.8%) were the most common fields of study. Citation analysis in the field of implant dentistry reveals interesting information about the topics and trends negotiated by researchers and elucidates which characteristics are required for a paper to attain a "classic" status. Clinical

  13. The analysis of the market success of FDA approvals by probing top 100 bestselling drugs.

    PubMed

    Polanski, Jaroslaw; Bogocz, Jacek; Tkocz, Aleksandra

    2016-05-01

    Target-oriented drug discovery is the main research paradigm of contemporary drug discovery. In target-oriented approaches, we attempt to maximize in vitro drug potency by finding the optimal fit to the target. This can result in a higher molecular complexity, in particular, the higher molecular weight (MW) of the drugs. However, a comparison of the successful developments of pharmaceuticals with the general trends that can be observed in medicinal chemistry resulted in the conclusion that the so-called molecular obesity is an important reason for the attrition rate of drugs. When analyzing the list of top 100 drug bestsellers versus all of the FDA approvals, we discovered that on average lower-complexity (MW, ADMET score) drugs are winners of the top 100 list in terms of numbers but that, especially, up to some optimal MW value, a higher molecular complexity can pay off with higher incomes. This indicates that slim drugs are doing better but that fat drugs are bigger fishes to catch.

  14. The analysis of the market success of FDA approvals by probing top 100 bestselling drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanski, Jaroslaw; Bogocz, Jacek; Tkocz, Aleksandra

    2016-05-01

    Target-oriented drug discovery is the main research paradigm of contemporary drug discovery. In target-oriented approaches, we attempt to maximize in vitro drug potency by finding the optimal fit to the target. This can result in a higher molecular complexity, in particular, the higher molecular weight (MW) of the drugs. However, a comparison of the successful developments of pharmaceuticals with the general trends that can be observed in medicinal chemistry resulted in the conclusion that the so-called molecular obesity is an important reason for the attrition rate of drugs. When analyzing the list of top 100 drug bestsellers versus all of the FDA approvals, we discovered that on average lower-complexity (MW, ADMET score) drugs are winners of the top 100 list in terms of numbers but that, especially, up to some optimal MW value, a higher molecular complexity can pay off with higher incomes. This indicates that slim drugs are doing better but that fat drugs are bigger fishes to catch.

  15. Measurements of top quark properties in top pair production and decay at the LHC using the CMS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Jindariani, Sergo

    2016-05-31

    Measurements are presented of the properties of top quarks in pair production and decay from proton-proton collisions at the LHC. The data were collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV by the CMS experiment during the years 2011 and 2012. The top quark-antiquark charge asymmetry is measured using the difference of the absolute rapidities of the reconstructed top and anti-top kinematics, as well as from distributions of the top quark decay products. The measurements are performed in the decay channels of the tt¯ pair into both one and two leptons in the final state. The polarization of topmore » quarks and top pair spin correlations are measured from the angular distributions of top quark decay products. The W-boson helicity fractions and angular asymmetries are extracted and limits on anomalous contributions to the Wtb vertex are determined. The flavor content in top-quark pair events is measured using the fraction of top quarks decaying into a W-boson and a b -quark relative to all top quark decays, R=B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq) , and the result is used to determine the CKM matrix element Vtb as well as the width of the top quark resonance. Finally, all of the results are found to be in good agreement with standard model predictions.« less

  16. Alignment of asymetric-top molecules using multiple-pulse trains.

    SciTech Connect

    Pabst, S.; Santra, R.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. Erlangen-Nuremberg; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-06-07

    We theoretically analyze the effectiveness of multiple-pulse laser alignment methods for asymmetric-top molecules. As an example, we choose SO2 and investigate the alignment dynamics induced by two different sequences, each consisting of four identical laser pulses. Each sequence differs only in the time delay between the pulses. Equally spaced pulses matching the alignment revival of the symmetrized SO2 rotor model are exploited in the first sequence. The pulse separations in the second sequence are short compared to the rotation dynamics of the molecule and monotonically increase the degree of alignment until the maximum alignment is reached. We point out the significant differences between the alignment dynamics of SO2 treated as an asymmetric-top and a symmetric-top rotor, respectively. We also explain why the fast sequence of laser pulses creates considerably stronger one-dimensional molecular alignment for asymmetric-top molecules. In addition, we show that multiple-pulse trains with elliptically polarized pulses do not enhance one-dimensional alignment or create three-dimensional alignment.

  17. Top-down causation and emergence: some comments on mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ellis, George F R

    2012-02-06

    Both bottom-up and top-down causation occur in the hierarchy of structure and causation. A key feature is multiple realizability of higher level functions, and consequent existence of equivalence classes of lower level variables that correspond to the same higher level state. Five essentially different classes of top-down influence can be identified, and their existence demonstrated by many real-world examples. They are: algorithmic top-down causation; top-down causation via non-adaptive information control, top-down causation via adaptive selection, top-down causation via adaptive information control and intelligent top-down causation (the effect of the human mind on the physical world). Through the mind, abstract entities such as mathematical structures have causal power. The causal slack enabling top-down action to take place lies in the structuring of the system so as to attain higher level functions; in the way the nature of lower level elements is changed by context, and in micro-indeterminism combined with adaptive selection. Understanding top-down causation can have important effects on society. Two cases will be mentioned: medical/healthcare issues, and education-in particular, teaching reading and writing. In both cases, an ongoing battle between bottom-up and top-down approaches has important consequences for society.

  18. Top-down causation and emergence: some comments on mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, George F. R.

    2012-01-01

    Both bottom-up and top-down causation occur in the hierarchy of structure and causation. A key feature is multiple realizability of higher level functions, and consequent existence of equivalence classes of lower level variables that correspond to the same higher level state. Five essentially different classes of top-down influence can be identified, and their existence demonstrated by many real-world examples. They are: algorithmic top-down causation; top-down causation via non-adaptive information control, top-down causation via adaptive selection, top-down causation via adaptive information control and intelligent top-down causation (the effect of the human mind on the physical world). Through the mind, abstract entities such as mathematical structures have causal power. The causal slack enabling top-down action to take place lies in the structuring of the system so as to attain higher level functions; in the way the nature of lower level elements is changed by context, and in micro-indeterminism combined with adaptive selection. Understanding top-down causation can have important effects on society. Two cases will be mentioned: medical/healthcare issues, and education—in particular, teaching reading and writing. In both cases, an ongoing battle between bottom-up and top-down approaches has important consequences for society. PMID:23386967

  19. Variations of (pseudo-)rotations and the Laplace-Beltrami operator on homogeneous spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brezov, D. S.; Mladenova, C. D.; Mladenov, I. M.

    2015-10-28

    In this paper we obtain the Lie derivatives of the scalar parameters in the generalized Euler decomposition with respect to arbitrary axes under left and right deck transformations. This problem can be directly related to the representation of the angular momentum in quantum mechanics. As a particular example, we calculate the angular momentum and the corresponding quantum hamiltonian in the standard Euler and Bryan representations. Similarly, in the hyperbolic case, the Laplace-Beltrami operator is retrieved for the Iwasawa decomposition. The case of two axes is considered as well.

  20. GGsTOP increases migration of human periodontal ligament cells in vitro via reactive oxygen species pathway

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, YING; WANG, XIANG; LI, YING; MU, SEN; ZHOU, SHUANG; LIU, YI; ZHANG, BIN

    2016-01-01

    GGsTOP is a novel and selective inhibitor of gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), a cell-surface enzyme that has a key role in glutathione homeostasis and the maintenance of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS are essential for wound healing. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibition of GGT by GGsTOP in human periodontal ligament cells (hPLCs). The present study assessed GGT expression in mouse periodontal ligament tissues, GGT activity in hPLCs, and the potential physiological effect of GGsTOP on hPLC migration. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that GGT was widely expressed in mouse periodontal ligament tissue. Treatment with GGsTOP was associated with greater proliferation and migration of hPLCs, and higher levels of cellular ROS compared with untreated hPLCs. However, the increase in intracellular ROS was attenuated in hPLCs co-cultured with the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a precursor of glutathione. The higher ROS levels associated with GGsTOP treatment were in parallel with increases in the levels of type I collagen and alpha smooth muscle actin, which was inhibited in hPLCs co-cultured with NAC. Thus, GGsTOP may promote hPLC migration and participate in the maintenance of the periodontal ligament apparatus via the ROS pathway. PMID:27035100