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Sample records for pseudorotating molecular top

  1. Pseudorotational Dynamics of Small Molecular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2001-03-01

    A variety of dynamic effects related to the pseudorotation of triatomic singly charged species is explored using the Electron Nuclear Dynamics(END)Theory. The concepts relevant to the motion studied are developed through the analysis of the simplest polyatomic molecule, namely H3+. It is shown that the limiting situation of circular pseudorotation is unattainable for this case. This observation is explained by the anisotropy of the ground state potential energy surface caused by the interaction between the D3h ground state of the molecule and its twofold degenerate first excited state. Further, pseudorotational motion is demonstrated to induce a rotational mode which in turn couples the two shape oscillation modes by action of the Coriolis force. Analogous phenomena are found for Li3+. The Jahn-Teller system C3+ exhibits a range of new motional effects. Particularly, a characteristic frequency shift between the two shape oscillation modes is obtained, resulting from the anisotropy in the curvature of the C2v minimum of C3+. The Jahn-Teller parameters of the system are determined from Electron Nuclear Dynamics simulations.

  2. Pseudorotation in fullerene anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Janette L.; Hands, Ian D.; Bates, Colin A.

    2007-07-01

    Jahn-Teller (JT) problems are often characterised by an adiabatic potential energy surface (APES) containing either a set of isoenergetic wells or a trough of equivalent-energy points, which may be warped by higher-order coupling terms or anisotropic effects. In all three cases, the JT effect will be dynamic. Either tunnelling between the wells or rotation (of a distortion) around the trough will restore the original symmetry of the system. This motion is referred to as pseudorotation. It should be possible to observe a JT system in a distorted geometry if measurements are made on a sufficiently short timescale. In various cubic systems, this timescale has been calculated to be the order of picoseconds. Such timescales are accessible using modern methods of ultrafast spectroscopy. Measurements of pseudorotation rates can lead to important information on the strength and nature of the JT coupling present. We will present analytical calculations that allow the rate of pseudorotation to be determined in terms of the vibronic coupling parameters. We will show how these results can be applied to E ⊗ e systems and then to the more complicated system applicable to C60- anions. This is of particular interest because of the high icosahedral symmetry of fullerene ions and also because of the many potential uses of materials containing these ions. We conclude by outlining experiments that should be capable of measuring pseudorotation in C 60 anions.

  3. The free energy landscape of pseudorotation in 3'-5' and 2'-5' linked nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Szostak, Jack W

    2014-02-19

    The five-membered furanose ring is a central component of the chemical structure of biological nucleic acids. The conformations of the furanose ring can be analytically described using the concept of pseudorotation, and for RNA and DNA they are dominated by the C2'-endo and C3'-endo conformers. While the free energy difference between these two conformers can be inferred from NMR measurements, a free energy landscape of the complete pseudorotation cycle of nucleic acids in solution has remained elusive. Here, we describe a new free energy calculation method for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the two pseudorotation parameters directly as the collective variables. To validate our approach, we calculated the free energy surface of ribose pseudorotation in guanosine and 2'-deoxyguanosine. The calculated free energy landscape reveals not only the relative stability of the different pseudorotation conformers, but also the main transition path between the stable conformations. Applying this method to a standard A-form RNA duplex uncovered the expected minimum at the C3'-endo state. However, at a 2'-5' linkage, the minimum shifts to the C2'-endo conformation. The free energy of the C3'-endo conformation is 3 kcal/mol higher due to a weaker hydrogen bond and a reduced base stacking interaction. Unrestrained MD simulations suggest that the conversion from C3'-endo to C2'-endo and vice versa is on the nanosecond and microsecond time scale, respectively. These calculations suggest that 2'-5' linkages may enable folded RNAs to sample a wider spectrum of their pseudorotation conformations.

  4. Ab initio quantum mechanical study of the structures and energies for the pseudorotation of 5{prime}-dehydroxy analogues of 2{prime}-deoxyribose and ribose sugars

    SciTech Connect

    Brameld, K.A.; Goddard, W.A. III

    1999-02-10

    The authors have used ab initio quantum mechanical (QM) methods to determine the potential energy of pseudorotation for 3,4-dihydroxy-5-methyl-2-(1-pyrollyl)tetrahydrofuran and 4-hydroxy-5-methyl-2-(1-pyrollyl)-tetrahydrofuran, close analogues of 2{prime}-deoxyribose and ribose sugars. The pyrrole is a substitute for the naturally occurring nucleic acid bases: adenine, thymine, guanine, cytosine, and uracil. At the highest calculation level (LMP2/cc-pVTZ(-f)//HF/6-31G**) for 2{prime}-deoxyribose, they find the C2{prime}-endo conformation is the global minimum. The C3{prime}-endo conformation is a local minimum 0.6 kcal/mol higher in energy, and an eastern barrier of 1.6 kcal/mol separates the two minima. Pseudorotation energies of ribose are quite complex and are strongly affected by local orientations of the 2{prime} and 3{prime} hydroxyl groups. When the hydroxyl groups are allowed to assume any conformation, the global minimum remains the C2{prime}-endo conformation. The eastern barrier increases slightly to 1.8 kcal/mol, and the C3{prime}-endo local minimum lies 0.6 kcal/mol above the global minimum. Constraining the torsion angle of the C3{prime} hydroxyl group to {minus}146{degree}, as is found in RNA polymers, results in the C3{prime}-endo conformation becoming the only energy minimum with a C2{prime}-endo conformation 1.9 kcal/mol higher in energy. Bond angles within the pentofuranose ring are correlated to the pseudorotational phase, as is observed by X-ray crystallography and is predicted by pseudorotation theory. Finally, a force field for use in molecular mechanics and dynamics simulations is presented which reproduces the QM potential energies for the 2{prime}-deoxyribose and ribose sugars.

  5. Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteria in molecular plant pathology.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, John; Genin, Stephane; Magori, Shimpei; Citovsky, Vitaly; Sriariyanum, Malinee; Ronald, Pamela; Dow, Max; Verdier, Valérie; Beer, Steven V; Machado, Marcos A; Toth, Ian; Salmond, George; Foster, Gary D

    2012-08-01

    Many plant bacteriologists, if not all, feel that their particular microbe should appear in any list of the most important bacterial plant pathogens. However, to our knowledge, no such list exists. The aim of this review was to survey all bacterial pathologists with an association with the journal Molecular Plant Pathology and ask them to nominate the bacterial pathogens they would place in a 'Top 10' based on scientific/economic importance. The survey generated 458 votes from the international community, and allowed the construction of a Top 10 bacterial plant pathogen list. The list includes, in rank order: (1) Pseudomonas syringae pathovars; (2) Ralstonia solanacearum; (3) Agrobacterium tumefaciens; (4) Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae; (5) Xanthomonas campestris pathovars; (6) Xanthomonas axonopodis pathovars; (7) Erwinia amylovora; (8) Xylella fastidiosa; (9) Dickeya (dadantii and solani); (10) Pectobacterium carotovorum (and Pectobacterium atrosepticum). Bacteria garnering honourable mentions for just missing out on the Top 10 include Clavibacter michiganensis (michiganensis and sepedonicus), Pseudomonas savastanoi and Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. This review article presents a short section on each bacterium in the Top 10 list and its importance, with the intention of initiating discussion and debate amongst the plant bacteriology community, as well as laying down a benchmark. It will be interesting to see, in future years, how perceptions change and which bacterial pathogens enter and leave the Top 10. PMID:22672649

  6. Strong nuclear ring currents and magnetic fields in pseudorotating OsH4 molecules induced by circularly polarized laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Barth, Ingo; Bressler, Christian; Koseki, Shiro; Manz, Jörn

    2012-06-01

    We design a circularly polarized laser pulse in the infrared frequency and femtosecond time domains, for excitation of the OsH(4) molecule in its first excited pseudorotational state of the triply-degenerate bend. The OsH(4) molecule need not be pre-oriented. After excitation, the central nucleus Os carries out pseudorotation about the axis parallel to the direction of propagation of the laser pulse. This pseudorotation causes a strong electric ring current with a value I=1.53 e fs(-1). The mean value of the radius of the ring current is very small, R=0.0031 a(0), where a(0) is the Bohr radius. According to the Biot-Savart law (|B(R=0)| ~I/R)), this nuclear ring current induces the strongest magnetic field predicted so far in molecules, with a central peak absolute value |B(R=0)| =623 T. To monitor the effect, we propose an IR-pump-X-ray-probe versus an X-ray-probe-only experiment, at the K- and L-edges of X-ray ionization. The results are based on the general quantum theory of excitations of pseudorotations in tetrahedral molecules AB(4), driven by a circularly polarized laser pulse. PMID:22389250

  7. Top 10 Plant Viruses in Molecular Plant Pathology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scientific and economic importance were used to rank plant viruses to indicate the Top 10. Each virus is discussed to open debate and conversation within and beyond the plant virology community as new pathogens come and go in importance....

  8. Breaking Pseudo-Rotational Symmetry through H_+^2 Metric Deformation in the Eckart Potential Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leija-Martinez, Nehemias; Alvarez-Castillo, David Edwin; Kirchbach, Mariana

    2011-12-01

    The peculiarity of the Eckart potential problem on H+2 (the upper sheet of the two-sheeted two-dimensional hyperboloid), to preserve the (2l+1)-fold degeneracy of the states typical for the geodesic motion there, is usually explained in casting the respective Hamiltonian in terms of the Casimir invariant of an so(2,1) algebra, referred to as potential algebra. In general, there are many possible similarity transformations of the symmetry algebras of the free motions on curved surfaces towards potential algebras, which are not all necessarily unitary. In the literature, a transformation of the symmetry algebra of the geodesic motion on H+2 towards the potential algebra of Eckart's Hamiltonian has been constructed for the prime purpose to prove that the Eckart interaction belongs to the class of Natanzon potentials. We here take a different path and search for a transformation which connects the (2l+1) dimensional representation space of the pseudo-rotational so(2,1) algebra, spanned by the rank-l pseudo-spherical harmonics, to the representation space of equal dimension of the potential algebra and find a transformation of the scaling type. Our case is that in so doing one is producing a deformed isometry copy to H+2 such that the free motion on the copy is equivalent to a motion on H+2, perturbed by a coth interaction. In this way, we link the so(2,1) potential algebra concept of the Eckart Hamiltonian to a subtle type of pseudo-rotational symmetry breaking through H+2 metric deformation. From a technical point of view, the results reported here are obtained by virtue of certain nonlinear finite expansions of Jacobi polynomials into pseudo-spherical harmonics. In due places, the pseudo-rotational case is paralleled by its so(3) compact analogue, the cotangent perturbed motion on S2. We expect awareness of different so(2,1)/so(3) isomet ry copies to benefit simulation studies on curved manifolds of many-body systems.

  9. Pseudorotational epitaxy of self-assembled octadecyltrichlorosilane monolayers on sapphire (0001)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Steinrück, H. -G.; Magerl, A.; Deutsch, M.; Ocko, B. M.

    2014-10-06

    The structure of octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on sapphire (0001) was studied by Å-resolution surface-specific x-ray scattering methods. The monolayer was found to consist of three sublayers where the outermost layer corresponds to vertically oriented, closely packed alkyl tails. Laterally, the monolayer is hexagonally packed and exhibits pseudorotational epitaxy to the sapphire, manifested by a broad scattering peak at zero relative azimuthal rotation, with long powderlike tails. The lattice mismatch of ~1% – 3% to the sapphire’s and the different length scale introduced by the lateral Si-O-Si bonding prohibit positional epitaxy. However, the substrate induces an intriguing increase in themore » crystalline coherence length of the SAM’s powderlike crystallites when rotationally aligned with the sapphire’s lattice. As a result, the increase correlates well with the rotational dependence of the separation of corresponding substrate-monolayer lattice sites.« less

  10. Pseudorotational epitaxy of self-assembled octadecyltrichlorosilane monolayers on sapphire (0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Steinrück, H. -G.; Magerl, A.; Deutsch, M.; Ocko, B. M.

    2014-10-06

    The structure of octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on sapphire (0001) was studied by Å-resolution surface-specific x-ray scattering methods. The monolayer was found to consist of three sublayers where the outermost layer corresponds to vertically oriented, closely packed alkyl tails. Laterally, the monolayer is hexagonally packed and exhibits pseudorotational epitaxy to the sapphire, manifested by a broad scattering peak at zero relative azimuthal rotation, with long powderlike tails. The lattice mismatch of ~1% – 3% to the sapphire’s and the different length scale introduced by the lateral Si-O-Si bonding prohibit positional epitaxy. However, the substrate induces an intriguing increase in the crystalline coherence length of the SAM’s powderlike crystallites when rotationally aligned with the sapphire’s lattice. As a result, the increase correlates well with the rotational dependence of the separation of corresponding substrate-monolayer lattice sites.

  11. Non-adiabatic effects in the pseudorotational motion of triatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelberg, Frank; Deumens, Erik

    2002-03-01

    Electron-Nuclear Dynamics (END) theory simulations have been performed with the aim to understand the dynamic aspects of triatomic molecules in pseudorotational motion. More specifically, the units H_3^+ and Li_3^+ are investigated close to the threshold of dissociation. For both species, the dynamic response of the electronic system to the nuclear motion is examined by the computation of electronic angular momentum expectation values. The respective results differ markedly for alpha and beta spin orientations, reflecting the emergence of rapid spin oscillations. This phenomenon is investigated by a detailed analysis of the electronic excitation content in both molecules. This is achieved by projection of the dynamic wavefunction on adiabatic electronic states which are evaluated along the nuclear trajectories. From an inspection of the phase relations between the expansion coefficients for electronic excitations with alpha and beta spin orientation, we conclude that the systems maximize the observed spin polarization effects.

  12. Molecular characterisation of banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Amin, Imran; Qazi, Javaria; Mansoor, Shahid; Ilyas, Muhammad; Briddon, Rob W

    2008-02-01

    Banana bunchy top disease is caused by a single-stranded circular DNA virus, banana bunchy top virus (BBTV), which is a member of the genus Babuvirus (family Nanoviridae). We have cloned and sequenced five components (DNA-R, DNA-S, DNA-N, DNA-M and DNA-C) of a BBTV isolate originating from Pakistan. In addition, the DNA-R and several other components of five further isolates, originating from geographically distinct sites across the banana-growing area of Sindh province, Pakistan, were cloned and sequenced. Analysis of the sequences indicates that BBTV present in Pakistan belongs to the "South Pacific" group of isolates and that the genetic diversity of the virus in the country is very low. The virus shows the highest levels of sequence identity to BBTV isolates originating from Egypt, India and Australia. The significance of these results with respect to the possible origin of the virus in Pakistan and the prospects for obtaining genetically engineered resistance to the virus are discussed.

  13. Comprehensive Analysis of Low-Molecular-Weight Human Plasma Proteome Using Top-Down Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Dong Huey; Nam, Eun Ji; Park, Kyu Hyung; Woo, Se Joon; Lee, Hye Jin; Kim, Hee Cheol; Yang, Eun Gyeong; Lee, Cheolju; Lee, Ji Eun

    2016-01-01

    While human plasma serves as a great source for disease diagnosis, low-molecular-weight (LMW) proteome (<30 kDa) has been shown to contain a rich source of diagnostic biomarkers. Here we employ top-down mass spectrometry to analyze the LMW proteoforms present in four types of human plasma samples pooled from three healthy controls (HCs) without immunoaffinity depletion and with depletion of the top two, six, and seven high-abundance proteins. The LMW proteoforms were first fractionated based on molecular weight using gel-eluted liquid fraction entrapment electrophoresis (GELFrEE). Then, the GELFrEE fractions containing up to 30 kDa were subjected to nanocapillary-LC-MS/MS, and the high-resolution MS and MS/MS data were processed using ProSightPC 3.0. As a result, a total of 442 LMW proteins and cleaved products, including those with post-translational modifications and single amino acid variations, were identified. From additional comparative analysis of plasma samples without immunoaffinity depletion between HCs and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients via top-down approach, tens of LMW proteoforms, including platelet factor 4, were found to show >1.5-fold changes between the plasma samples of HCs and CRC patients, and six of the LMW proteins were verified by Western blot analysis.

  14. Solution-processed ultrathin chemically derived graphene films as soft top contacts for solid-state molecular electronic junctions.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Hauptmann, Jonas Rahlf; Wei, Zhongming; Petersen, Søren; Bovet, Nicolas; Vosch, Tom; Nygård, Jesper; Hu, Wenping; Liu, Yunqi; Bjørnholm, Thomas; Nørgaard, Kasper; Laursen, Bo W

    2012-03-01

    A novel method using solution-processed ultrathin chemically derived graphene films as soft top contacts for the non-destructive fabrication of molecular junctions is demonstrated. We believe this protocol will greatly enrich the solid-state test beds for molecular electronics due to its low-cost, easy-processing and flexible nature.

  15. Molecular basis of the structural stability of a Top7-based scaffold at extreme pH and temperature conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Soares, Thereza A.; Boschek, Curt B.; Apiyo, David O.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Straatsma, TP

    2010-07-01

    The development of stable scaffolds that can tolerate environmental extremes has an immense potential for applications in industry and defense. Recently, we have engineered an eight-residue loop into the de novo designed Top7 protein, which specifically binds the glycoprotein CD4. The robust properties of the Top7, coupled with the ease in production, make it a robust scaffold to design novel functionalities for use under extreme environmental conditions. In the present work, a series of explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations are reported which investigates the effect of mutations and extreme conditions of temperature and pH on the structure, stability, and dynamics of the native and engineered Top7. These simulations indicate that i. The structural dynamics of the engineered and native Top7 in solution are equivalent under corresponding conditions of pH and temperature. Ensemble-averaged structures of the native and engineered Top7 maintain the overall tertiary structure pattern, albeit with loss of helical content when at low pH and high-temperature conditions. Mutations of residues E43A, D46A, E67A, E69A, EA81A along the ?-helices of the engineered Top7 did not lead to significant changes in the native fold under pH 2 and 400 K, suggesting that the helices can accommodate varying sequences. iii. The anti-parallel ?-sheet is the structural core responsible for the stability of the native and engineered Top7 and is well maintained under extreme pH and temperature conditions. These findings indicate that the insertion of an eight-residue loop into the structure of Top7 does not adversely affect the global fold or the structural stability of the Top7 scaffold.

  16. Correlation between molecular recoil and molecular orientation in collisions of symmetric top molecules with hot hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, C. K.; Flynn, G. W.

    1992-05-01

    Nascent Doppler profiles are measured for hot H-atom—molecule collisions in numerous rotational sublevels of two symmetric tops. Linewidths for CDF 3 molecules due to hot H-atom collisions increase with the quantum number K. In contrast, linewidths for CD 3F molecules due to hot H-atom collisions decrease with the quantum number K. A simple model is proposed to explain the K dependent linewidths.

  17. Inhibition of DNA Topoisomerase Type IIα (TOP2A) by Mitoxantrone and Its Halogenated Derivatives: A Combined Density Functional and Molecular Docking Study

    PubMed Central

    Abu Saleh, Md.; Solayman, Md.; Hoque, Mohammad Mazharol; Khan, Mohammad A. K.; Sarwar, Mohammed G.; Halim, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, mitoxantrone and its halogenated derivatives have been designed by density functional theory (DFT) to explore their structural and thermodynamical properties. The performance of these drugs was also evaluated to inhibit DNA topoisomerase type IIα (TOP2A) by molecular docking calculation. Noncovalent interactions play significant role in improving the performance of halogenated drugs. The combined quantum and molecular mechanics calculations revealed that CF3 containing drug shows better preference in inhibiting the TOP2A compared to other modified drugs. PMID:27088089

  18. Role of Topoisomerases in Pediatric High Grade Osteosarcomas: TOP2A Gene Is One of the Unique Molecular Biomarkers of Chemoresponse

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Aurelia; Lasthaus, Christelle; Guerin, Eric; Marcellin, Luc; Pencreach, Erwan; Gaub, Marie-Pierre; Guenot, Dominique; Entz-Werle, Natacha

    2013-01-01

    Currently, the treatment of pediatric high-grade osteosarcomas systematically includes one topoisomerase IIα inhibitor. This chemotherapy is usually adapted to the response to the neo-adjuvant therapy after surgery. The current and unique marker of chemoresponsiveness is the percentage of viable residual cells in the surgical resection. This late patient management marker has to be evaluated earlier in the therapeutic history of the patients on initial biopsy. Therefore, new biomarkers, especially those involved in the topoisomerase IIα inhibitor response might be good candidates. Therefore, our study was designed to target TOP1, TOP2A and TOP2B genes in 105 fresh-frozen diagnostic biopsies by allelotyping and real-time quantitative PCR. Our analyses in those pediatric osteosarcomas, homogeneously treated, highlighted the frequent involvement of topo-isomerase genes. The main and most important observation was the statistical link between the presence of TOP2A amplification and the good response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Compared to adult cancers, the 17q21 amplicon, including TOP2A and ERBB2 genes, seems to be differentially implicated in the osteosarcoma chemoresponsiveness. Surprisingly, there is no ERBB2 gene co-amplification and the patients harboring TOP2A amplification tend to show a worse survival, so TOP2A analyses remain a preliminary, but a good molecular approach for the evaluation at diagnosis of pediatric osteosarcoma chemoresponsiveness. PMID:24216996

  19. Pseudo-rotation mechanism for fast olefin exchange and substitution processes at orthometalated C,N-complexes of platinum(II).

    PubMed

    Otto, Stefanus; Samuleev, Pavel V; Polyakov, Vladimir A; Ryabov, Alexander D; Elding, Lars I

    2004-11-01

    Bridge splitting in chloroform of the orthometalated chloro-bridged complex [Pt(micro-Cl)(2-Me(2)NCH(2)C(6)H(4))](2)(1), with ethene, cyclooctene, allyl alcohol and phosphine according to 1+ 2L --> 2[PtCl(2-Me(2)NCH(2)C(6)H(4))(L)], where L = C(2)H(4)(3a), C(8)H(14), (3b), CH(2)CHCH(2)OH (3c), and PPh(3)(4a and 4b) gives monomeric species with L coordinated trans or cis to aryl. With olefins the thermodynamically stable isomer with L coordinated cis to aryl is formed directly without an observable intermediate. With phosphine and pyridine, the kinetically controlled trans-product isomerizes slowly to the more stable cis-isomer. Bridge splitting by olefins is slow and first-order in 1 and L, with largely negative DeltaS(++). Substitution of ethene cis to aryl by cyclooctene and allyl alcohol to form 3b and 3c, and substitution of cot from 3b by allyl alcohol to form 3c are first order in olefin and complex, ca. six orders of magnitude faster than bridge cleavage due to a large decrease in DeltaH(++), and with largely negative DeltaS(++). Cyclooctene exchange at 3b is first-order with respect to free cyclooctene and platinum complex. All experimental data for olefin substitution and exchange are compatible with a concerted substitution/isomerization process via a turnstile twist pseudo-rotation in a short-lived labile five-coordinated intermediate, involving initial attack on the labile coordination position trans to the sigma-bonded aryl. Bridge-cleavage reactions of the analogous bridged complexes occur similarly, but are much slower because of their ground-state stabilization and steric hindrance.

  20. Topological sub-structural molecular design (TOPS-MODE): a useful tool to explore key fragments of human A3 adenosine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Saíz-Urra, Liane; Teijeira, Marta; Rivero-Buceta, Virginia; Helguera, Aliuska Morales; Celeiro, Maria; Terán, Ma Carmen; Besada, Pedro; Borges, Fernanda

    2016-02-01

    Adenosine regulates tissue function by activating four G-protein-coupled adenosine receptors (ARs). Selective agonists and antagonists for A3 ARs have been investigated for the treatment of a variety of immune disorders, cancer, brain, and heart ischemic conditions. We herein present a QSAR study based on a Topological sub-structural molecular design (TOPS-MODE) approach, intended to predict the A3 ARs of a diverse dataset of 124 (94 training set/ 30 prediction set) adenosine derivatives. The final model showed good fit and predictive capability, displaying 85.1 % of the experimental variance. The TOPS-MODE approach afforded a better understanding and interpretation of the developed model based on the useful information extracted from the analysis of the contribution of different molecular fragments to the affinity.

  1. Formation of hydroxyl-functionalized stilbenoid molecular sieves at the liquid/solid interface on top of a 1-decanol monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellec, Amandine; Arrigoni, Claire; Douillard, Ludovic; Fiorini-Debuisschert, Céline; Mathevet, Fabrice; Kreher, David; Attias, André-Jean; Charra, Fabrice

    2014-10-01

    Specific molecular tectons can be designed to form molecular sieves through self-assembly at the solid-liquid interface. After demonstrating a model tecton bearing apolar alkyl chains, we then focus on a modified structure involving asymmetric functionalization of some alkyl chains with polar hydroxyl groups in order to get chemical selectivity in the sieving. As the formation of supramolecular self-assembled networks strongly depends on molecule-molecule, molecule-substrate and molecule-solvent interactions, we compared the tectons’ self-assembly on graphite for two types of solvent. We demonstrate the possibility to create hydroxylated stilbenoid molecular sieves by using 1-decanol as a solvent. Interestingly, with this solvent, the porous network is developed on top of a 1-decanol monolayer.

  2. Molecular characterization of banana bunchy top virus isolate from Sri Lanka and its genetic relationship with other isolates.

    PubMed

    Wickramaarachchi, W A R T; Shankarappa, K S; Rangaswamy, K T; Maruthi, M N; Rajapakse, R G A S; Ghosh, Saptarshi

    2016-06-01

    Bunchy top disease of banana caused by Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV, genus Babuvirus family Nanoviridae) is one of the most important constraints in production of banana in the different parts of the world. Six genomic DNA components of BBTV isolate from Kandy, Sri Lanka (BBTV-K) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific primers using total DNA extracted from banana tissues showing typical symptoms of bunchy top disease. The amplicons were of expected size of 1.0-1.1 kb, which were cloned and sequenced. Analysis of sequence data revealed the presence of six DNA components; DNA-R, DNA-U3, DNA-S, DNA-N, DNA-M and DNA-C for Sri Lanka isolate. Comparisons of sequence data of DNA components followed by the phylogenetic analysis, grouped Sri Lanka-(Kandy) isolate in the Pacific Indian Oceans (PIO) group. Sri Lanka-(Kandy) isolate of BBTV is classified a new member of PIO group based on analysis of six components of the virus.

  3. Molecular characterization of banana bunchy top virus isolate from Sri Lanka and its genetic relationship with other isolates.

    PubMed

    Wickramaarachchi, W A R T; Shankarappa, K S; Rangaswamy, K T; Maruthi, M N; Rajapakse, R G A S; Ghosh, Saptarshi

    2016-06-01

    Bunchy top disease of banana caused by Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV, genus Babuvirus family Nanoviridae) is one of the most important constraints in production of banana in the different parts of the world. Six genomic DNA components of BBTV isolate from Kandy, Sri Lanka (BBTV-K) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific primers using total DNA extracted from banana tissues showing typical symptoms of bunchy top disease. The amplicons were of expected size of 1.0-1.1 kb, which were cloned and sequenced. Analysis of sequence data revealed the presence of six DNA components; DNA-R, DNA-U3, DNA-S, DNA-N, DNA-M and DNA-C for Sri Lanka isolate. Comparisons of sequence data of DNA components followed by the phylogenetic analysis, grouped Sri Lanka-(Kandy) isolate in the Pacific Indian Oceans (PIO) group. Sri Lanka-(Kandy) isolate of BBTV is classified a new member of PIO group based on analysis of six components of the virus. PMID:27366766

  4. Contributions in biochemistry and molecular biology from China and other top-ranking countries: a 10-year survey of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaohua; Li, Zhongwu; Wang, Mei

    2009-01-01

    Over the past decade, research in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology has developed rapidly worldwide. The present study was designed to study the characteristics of publications in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology journals between 1999 and 2008 from the six top-ranking countries - the United States (USA), Japan, Germany, United Kingdom (UK), China and France. We also examined the research output from three different regions - Mainland China (ML), Hong Kong (HK) and Taiwan (TW). The USA contributed 34.1% of the world's total output and ranked first, but its percentage of research articles in this field went down. In total, 26,867 articles were published in journals with an impact factor (IF) <10.000, and 46.5% of these were from the USA. China contributed 4.2% of the total in 268 journals, 0.5% of which were journals with the top 10 IF. Our analysis describes the output from each country and region, and reveals the positive trend in China during the period of 1999-2008. In contrast to other countries, our results suggest that China is behind in conducting high-quality research.

  5. The Release of Trapped Gases from Amorphous Solid Water Films: I. “Top-Down” Crystallization-Induced Crack Propagation Probed using the Molecular Volcano

    SciTech Connect

    May, Robert A.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2013-03-14

    In this (Paper I) and the companion paper (Paper II) we investigate the mechanisms for the release of trapped gases from underneath of amorphous solid water (ASW) films. In prior work, we reported the episodic release of trapped gases in concert with the crystallization ASW, a phenomenon that we termed the "molecular volcano". The observed abrupt desorption is due to the formation of cracks that span the film to form a connected pathway for release. In this paper we utilize the "molecular volcano" desorption peak to characterize the formation of crystallization-induced cracks. We find that the crack length and distribution are independent of the trapped gas (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, O2 or CO). Selective placement of the inert gas layer is used to show that cracks form near the top of the film and propagate downward into the film. Isothermal experiments reveal that, after some induction time, cracks propagate linearly in time with an Arrhenius dependent velocity corresponding to an activation energy of 54 kJ/mol. This value is consistent with the crystallization growth rate reported by others and establishes a direct connection between crystallization growth rate and the crack propagation rate. A two-step model in which nucleation and crystallization occurs in an induction zone near the top of the film followed by the propagation of a crystallization/crack front into the film is in good agreement with the temperature programmed desorption results.

  6. The release of trapped gases from amorphous solid water films. I. "Top-down" crystallization-induced crack propagation probed using the molecular volcano.

    PubMed

    May, R Alan; Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2013-03-14

    In this (Paper I) and the companion paper (Paper II; R. May, R. Smith, and B. Kay, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 104502 (2013)), we investigate the mechanisms for the release of trapped gases from underneath amorphous solid water (ASW) films. In prior work, we reported the episodic release of trapped gases in concert with the crystallization of ASW, a phenomenon that we termed the "molecular volcano." The observed abrupt desorption is due to the formation of cracks that span the film to form a connected pathway for release. In this paper, we utilize the "molecular volcano" desorption peak to characterize the formation of crystallization-induced cracks. We find that the crack length distribution is independent of the trapped gas (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, O2, or CO). Selective placement of the inert gas layer is used to show that cracks form near the top of the film and propagate downward into the film. Isothermal experiments reveal that, after some induction time, cracks propagate linearly in time with an Arrhenius dependent velocity corresponding to an activation energy of 54 kJ∕mol. This value is consistent with the crystallization growth rates reported by others and establishes a direct connection between crystallization growth rate and the crack propagation rate. A two-step model in which nucleation and crystallization occurs in an induction zone near the top of the film followed by the propagation of a crystallization∕crack front into the film is in good agreement with the temperature programmed desorption results.

  7. Electron-beam lithography and molecular liftoff for directed attachment of DNA nanostructures on silicon: top-down meets bottom-up.

    PubMed

    Pillers, Michelle; Goss, Valerie; Lieberman, Marya

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Our work on lithographic patterning of DNA nanostructures was inspired by a collaboration on molecular electronic devices known as quantum-dot cellular automata or QCA. QCA is a paradigm for computation in which information is transmitted and processed through the interaction of coupled electrical charges or magnetic dipoles. We began to explore the idea of molecular scale QCA and found that ab initio methods, a thermodynamic Ising model, and larger scale circuit design work suggested that circuits that did computationally interesting things could function at room temperature if made from molecular QCA cells of chemically reasonable design. But how could the QCA cells be patterned to form the complex arrays needed for computationally interesting circuitry, and how could those arrays of molecular circuitry be integrated with conventional electronic inputs and outputs? Top-down methods lacked the spatial resolution and high level of parallelism needed to make molecular circuits. Bottom-up chemical synthesis lacked the ability to fabricate arbitrary and heterogeneous structures tens to hundreds of nanometers in size. Chemical self-assembly at the time could produce structures in the right size scale, but was limited to homogeneous arrays. A potential solution to this conundrum was just being demonstrated in the late 1990s and early 2000s: DNA nanostructures self-assembled from oligonucleotides, whose high information density could handle the creation of arbitrary structures and chemical inhomogeneity. Our group became interested in whether DNA nanostructures could function as self-assembling circuit boards for electrical or magnetic QCA systems. This Account focuses on what we learned about the interactions of DNA nanostructures with silicon substrates and, particularly, on how electron-beam lithography could be used to direct the binding of DNA nanostructures on a variety of functional substrates.

  8. Estimate of Top-of-Atmosphere Albedo for a Molecular Atmosphere over Ocean using Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, S.; Loeb, N. G.; Rutledge, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    The shortwave broadband albedo at the top of a molecular atmosphere over ocean between 40deg N and 40deg S is estimated using radiance measurements from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument and the Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The albedo monotonically increases from 0.059 at a solar zenith angle of 10deg to 0.107 at a solar zenith angle of 60deg. The estimated uncertainty in the albedo is 3.5 x 10(exp -3) caused by the uncertainty in CERES-derived irradiances, uncertainty in VIRS-derived aerosol optical thicknesses, variations in ozone and water vapor, and variations in surface wind speed. The estimated uncertainty is similar in magnitude to the standard deviation of 0.003 that is derived from 72 areas divided by 20deg latitude by 20deg longitude grid boxes. The empirically estimated albedo is compared with the modeled albedo using a radiative transfer model combined with an ocean surface bidirectional reflectivity model. The modeled albedo with standard tropical atmosphere is 0.061 and 0.111 at the solar zenith angles of 10deg and 60deg, respectively. This empirically estimated albedo can be used to estimate the direct radiative effect of aerosols at the top of the atmosphere over oceans.

  9. Top studies

    SciTech Connect

    T. Dorigo

    2003-01-02

    The top quark, discovered in 1994 at the Tevatron, has proven a very interesting particle. Its characteristics allow both to perform stringent tests of electroweak theory, and to search for new physics through a deviation from standard model predictions for several of its peculiar properties. I will review the status of top physics and briefly describe the potential of experiments of the near future.

  10. The release of trapped gases from amorphous solid water films. I. ``Top-down'' crystallization-induced crack propagation probed using the molecular volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, R. Alan; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2013-03-01

    In this (Paper I) and the companion paper (Paper II; R. May, R. Smith, and B. Kay, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 104502 (2013), 10.1063/1.4793312), we investigate the mechanisms for the release of trapped gases from underneath amorphous solid water (ASW) films. In prior work, we reported the episodic release of trapped gases in concert with the crystallization of ASW, a phenomenon that we termed the "molecular volcano." The observed abrupt desorption is due to the formation of cracks that span the film to form a connected pathway for release. In this paper, we utilize the "molecular volcano" desorption peak to characterize the formation of crystallization-induced cracks. We find that the crack length distribution is independent of the trapped gas (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, O2, or CO). Selective placement of the inert gas layer is used to show that cracks form near the top of the film and propagate downward into the film. Isothermal experiments reveal that, after some induction time, cracks propagate linearly in time with an Arrhenius dependent velocity corresponding to an activation energy of 54 kJ/mol. This value is consistent with the crystallization growth rates reported by others and establishes a direct connection between crystallization growth rate and the crack propagation rate. A two-step model in which nucleation and crystallization occurs in an induction zone near the top of the film followed by the propagation of a crystallization/crack front into the film is in good agreement with the temperature programmed desorption results.

  11. The release of trapped gases from amorphous solid water films. I. "Top-down" crystallization-induced crack propagation probed using the molecular volcano.

    PubMed

    May, R Alan; Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2013-03-14

    In this (Paper I) and the companion paper (Paper II; R. May, R. Smith, and B. Kay, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 104502 (2013)), we investigate the mechanisms for the release of trapped gases from underneath amorphous solid water (ASW) films. In prior work, we reported the episodic release of trapped gases in concert with the crystallization of ASW, a phenomenon that we termed the "molecular volcano." The observed abrupt desorption is due to the formation of cracks that span the film to form a connected pathway for release. In this paper, we utilize the "molecular volcano" desorption peak to characterize the formation of crystallization-induced cracks. We find that the crack length distribution is independent of the trapped gas (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, O2, or CO). Selective placement of the inert gas layer is used to show that cracks form near the top of the film and propagate downward into the film. Isothermal experiments reveal that, after some induction time, cracks propagate linearly in time with an Arrhenius dependent velocity corresponding to an activation energy of 54 kJ∕mol. This value is consistent with the crystallization growth rates reported by others and establishes a direct connection between crystallization growth rate and the crack propagation rate. A two-step model in which nucleation and crystallization occurs in an induction zone near the top of the film followed by the propagation of a crystallization∕crack front into the film is in good agreement with the temperature programmed desorption results. PMID:23514503

  12. Molecular diagnostics of the HBB gene in an Omani cohort using bench-top DNA Ion Torrent PGM technology.

    PubMed

    Hassan, S M; Vossen, R H A M; Chessa, R; den Dunnen, J T; Bakker, E; Giordano, P C; Harteveld, C L

    2014-09-01

    Hemoglobinopathies, such as sickle cell disease (SCD) and beta-thalassemia major (TM), are severe diseases and the most common autosomal recessive condition worldwide and in particular in Oman. Early screening and diagnosis of carriers are the key for primary prevention. Once a country-wide population screening program is mandated by law, a sequencing technology that can rapidly confirm or identify disease-causing mutations for a large number of patients in a short period of time will be necessary. While Sanger sequencing is the standard protocol for molecular diagnosis, next generation sequencing starts to become available to reference laboratories. Using the Ion Torrent PGM sequencer, we have analyzed a cohort of 297 unrelated Omani cases and reliably identified mutations in the beta-globin (HBB) gene. Our model study has shown that Ion Torrent PGM can rapidly sequence such a small gene in a large number of samples using a barcoded uni-directional or bi-directional sequence methodology, reducing cost, workload and providing accurate diagnosis. Based on our results we believe that the Ion Torrent PGM sequencing platform, able to analyze hundreds of patients simultaneously for a single disease gene can be a valid molecular screening alternative to ABI sequencing in the diagnosis of hemoglobinopathies and other genetic disorders in the near future.

  13. Generalized Vibrational Perturbation Theory for Rotovibrational Energies of Linear, Symmetric and Asymmetric Tops: Theory, Approximations, and Automated Approaches to Deal with Medium-to-Large Molecular Systems

    PubMed Central

    Piccardo, Matteo; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Models going beyond the rigid-rotor and the harmonic oscillator levels are mandatory for providing accurate theoretical predictions for several spectroscopic properties. Different strategies have been devised for this purpose. Among them, the treatment by perturbation theory of the molecular Hamiltonian after its expansion in power series of products of vibrational and rotational operators, also referred to as vibrational perturbation theory (VPT), is particularly appealing for its computational efficiency to treat medium-to-large systems. Moreover, generalized (GVPT) strategies combining the use of perturbative and variational formalisms can be adopted to further improve the accuracy of the results, with the first approach used for weakly coupled terms, and the second one to handle tightly coupled ones. In this context, the GVPT formulation for asymmetric, symmetric, and linear tops is revisited and fully generalized to both minima and first-order saddle points of the molecular potential energy surface. The computational strategies and approximations that can be adopted in dealing with GVPT computations are pointed out, with a particular attention devoted to the treatment of symmetry and degeneracies. A number of tests and applications are discussed, to show the possibilities of the developments, as regards both the variety of treatable systems and eligible methods. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26345131

  14. Towards the fabrication of the top-contact electrode in molecular junctions by photoreduction of a metal precursor.

    PubMed

    Martín, Santiago; Pera, Gorka; Ballesteros, Luz M; Hope, Adam J; Marqués-González, Santiago; Low, Paul J; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; Nichols, Richard J; Cea, Pilar

    2014-03-17

    Langmuir films of 4-{[4-({4-[(trimethylsilyl)ethynyl]phenyl}ethynyl)phenyl]ethynyl} benzenaminium chloride ([1 H]Cl) undergo anion metathesis when assembled on an aqueous auric acid (HAuCl4 ) subphase. Subsequent transfer to solid supports gives well-formed Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers of [1 H]AuCl4 in which the trimethylsilyl group serves as the surface contacting group. Photoreduction of the aurate on these monolayers leads to the formation of metallic gold nanoislands, which were distributed over the surface of the film. Electrical properties of these nascent devices were determined by recording current-voltage (I-V) curves with conductive atomic force microscopy (c-AFM) using the PeakForce tunneling AFM (PF-TUNA) mode. This gives consistent sigmoidal I-V curves that are indicative of well-behaved junctions free of metallic filaments and short circuits. The photoreduction of a metal precursor incorporated onto monomolecular films is therefore proposed as an effective method for the fabrication of molecular junctions.

  15. Towards the fabrication of the top-contact electrode in molecular junctions by photoreduction of a metal precursor.

    PubMed

    Martín, Santiago; Pera, Gorka; Ballesteros, Luz M; Hope, Adam J; Marqués-González, Santiago; Low, Paul J; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; Nichols, Richard J; Cea, Pilar

    2014-03-17

    Langmuir films of 4-{[4-({4-[(trimethylsilyl)ethynyl]phenyl}ethynyl)phenyl]ethynyl} benzenaminium chloride ([1 H]Cl) undergo anion metathesis when assembled on an aqueous auric acid (HAuCl4 ) subphase. Subsequent transfer to solid supports gives well-formed Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers of [1 H]AuCl4 in which the trimethylsilyl group serves as the surface contacting group. Photoreduction of the aurate on these monolayers leads to the formation of metallic gold nanoislands, which were distributed over the surface of the film. Electrical properties of these nascent devices were determined by recording current-voltage (I-V) curves with conductive atomic force microscopy (c-AFM) using the PeakForce tunneling AFM (PF-TUNA) mode. This gives consistent sigmoidal I-V curves that are indicative of well-behaved junctions free of metallic filaments and short circuits. The photoreduction of a metal precursor incorporated onto monomolecular films is therefore proposed as an effective method for the fabrication of molecular junctions. PMID:24532391

  16. Investigation of InGaP/(In)AlGaAs/GaAs triple-junction top cells for smart stacked multijunction solar cells grown using molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugaya, Takeyoshi; Mochizuki, Toru; Makita, Kikuo; Oshima, Ryuji; Matsubara, Koji; Okano, Yoshinobu; Niki, Shigeru

    2015-08-01

    We report high-quality InGaP/(In)AlGaAs/GaAs triple-junction solar cells fabricated using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) for the first time. The triple-junction cells can be used as top cells for smart stacked multijunction solar cells. A growth temperature of 480 °C was found to be suitable for an (In)AlGaAs second cell to obtain high-quality tunnel junctions. The properties of AlGaAs solar cells were better than those of InAlGaAs solar cells when a second cell was grown at 480 °C. The high-quality InGaP/AlGaAs/GaAs solar cell had an impressive open-circuit voltage of 3.1 V. This result indicates that high-performance InGaP/AlGaAs/GaAs triple-junction solar cells can be fabricated using solid-source MBE.

  17. Architectural Tops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The development of the skyscraper is an American story that combines architectural history, economic power, and technological achievement. Each city in the United States can be identified by the profile of its buildings. The design of the tops of skyscrapers was the inspiration for the students in the author's high-school ceramic class to develop…

  18. Protein-protein interaction and pathway analyses of top schizophrenia genes reveal schizophrenia susceptibility genes converge on common molecular networks and enrichment of nucleosome (chromatin) assembly genes in schizophrenia susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiongjian; Huang, Liang; Jia, Peilin; Li, Ming; Su, Bing; Zhao, Zhongming; Gan, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified many promising schizophrenia candidate genes and demonstrated that common polygenic variation contributes to schizophrenia risk. However, whether these genes represent perturbations to a common but limited set of underlying molecular processes (pathways) that modulate risk to schizophrenia remains elusive, and it is not known whether these genes converge on common biological pathways (networks) or represent different pathways. In addition, the theoretical and genetic mechanisms underlying the strong genetic heterogeneity of schizophrenia remain largely unknown. Using 4 well-defined data sets that contain top schizophrenia susceptibility genes and applying protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis, we investigated the interactions among proteins encoded by top schizophrenia susceptibility genes. We found proteins encoded by top schizophrenia susceptibility genes formed a highly significant interconnected network, and, compared with random networks, these PPI networks are statistically highly significant for both direct connectivity and indirect connectivity. We further validated these results using empirical functional data (transcriptome data from a clinical sample). These highly significant findings indicate that top schizophrenia susceptibility genes encode proteins that significantly directly interacted and formed a densely interconnected network, suggesting perturbations of common underlying molecular processes or pathways that modulate risk to schizophrenia. Our findings that schizophrenia susceptibility genes encode a highly interconnected protein network may also provide a novel explanation for the observed genetic heterogeneity of schizophrenia, ie, mutation in any member of this molecular network will lead to same functional consequences that eventually contribute to risk of schizophrenia.

  19. The twisted top

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiffeault, Jean-Luc; Morrison, P. J.

    2001-05-01

    We describe a new type of top, the twisted top, obtained by appending a cocycle to the Lie-Poisson bracket for the charged heavy top, thus breaking its semidirect product structure. The twisted top has an integrable case that corresponds to the Lagrange (symmetric) top. We give a canonical description of the twisted top in terms of Euler angles. We also show by a numerical calculation of the largest Lyapunov exponent that the Kovalevskaya case of the twisted top is chaotic.

  20. Top physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Thom

    2004-06-24

    Precision studies of top quark properties are a primary goal of the Run II physics program at the Fermilab Tevatron. Marking the first stages of this program, the CDF collaboration presents recent results on top pair production cross section, single top physics and top mass, using between 109 and 200 pb{sup -1} of Run II data.

  1. Top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadov, A.; Azuelos, G.; Bauer, U.; Belyaev, A.; Berger, E. L.; Sullivan, Z.; Tait, T. M. P.

    2000-03-24

    The top quark, when it was finally discovered at Fermilab in 1995 completed the three-generation structure of the Standard Model (SM) and opened up the new field of top quark physics. Viewed as just another SM quark, the top quark appears to be a rather uninteresting species. Produced predominantly, in hadron-hadron collisions, through strong interactions, it decays rapidly without forming hadrons, and almost exclusively through the single mode t {r_arrow} Wb. The relevant CKM coupling V{sub tb} is already determined by the (three-generation) unitarity of the CKM matrix. Rare decays and CP violation are unmeasurable small in the SM. Yet the top quark is distinguished by its large mass, about 35 times larger than the mass of the next heavy quark, and intriguingly close to the scale of electroweak (EW) symmetry breaking. This unique property raises a number of interesting questions. Is the top quark mass generated by the Higgs mechanism as the SM predicts and is its mass related to the top-Higgs-Yukawa coupling? Or does it play an even more fundamental role in the EW symmetry breaking mechanism? If there are new particles lighter than the top quark, does the top quark decay into them? Could non-SM physics first manifest itself in non-standard couplings of the top quark which show up as anomalies in top quark production and decays? Top quark physics tries to answer these questions. Several properties of the top quark have already been examined at the Tevatron. These include studies of the kinematical properties of top production, the measurements of the top mass, of the top production cross-section, the reconstruction of t{bar t}pairs in the fully hadronic final states, the study of {tau} decays of the top quark, the reconstruction of hadronic decays of the W boson from top decays, the search for flavor changing neutral current decays, the measurement of the W helicity in top decays, and bounds on t{bar t} spin correlations. Most of these measurements are limited by

  2. Spherical Tippe Tops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2013-03-01

    A tippe top (see Fig. 1) is usually constructed as a truncated sphere with a cylindrical peg on top, as indicated in Fig. 2(a). When spun rapidly on a horizontal surface, a tippe top spins about a vertical axis while rotating slowly about a horizontal axis until the peg touches the surface. At that point, weight is transferred to the peg, the truncated sphere rises off the surface, and the top spins on the peg until it is upright. A feature of a tippe top is that its center of mass, labeled G in Fig. 2, is below the geometric center of the sphere, C, when the top is at rest. That is where it will return if the top is tilted sideways and released since that is the stable equilibrium position. The fact that a tippe top turns upside down when it spins is therefore astonishing. The behavior of a tippe top is quite unlike that of a regular top since the spin axis remains closely vertical the whole time. The center of mass of a regular top can also rise, but the spin axis tilts upward as the top rises and enters a "sleeping" position.

  3. Dare We Teach Tops?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Featonby, David

    2010-01-01

    "Tops" are mentioned in classical literature and references are even found in the ancient world. For many children a top is one of the first mechanical toys that they play with by themselves, yet a full appreciation of their motion is rare. My hope is that this article will stimulate the reader's interest in tops, will help with the first stages…

  4. Spherical Tippe Tops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2013-01-01

    A tippe top (see Fig. 1) is usually constructed as a truncated sphere with a cylindrical peg on top, as indicated in Fig. 2(a). When spun rapidly on a horizontal surface, a tippe top spins about a vertical axis while rotating slowly about a horizontal axis until the peg touches the surface. At that point, weight is transferred to the peg, the…

  5. Study of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase in complex with the top three OMP, BMP, and PMP ligands by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Shirin; Jalili, Seifollah; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic mechanism of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC), one of the nature most proficient enzymes which provides large rate enhancement, has not been fully understood yet. A series of 30 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were run on X-ray structure of the OMPDC from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in its free form as well as in complex with different ligands, namely 1-(5'-phospho-D-ribofuranosyl) barbituric acid (BMP), orotidine 5'-monophosphate (OMP), and 6-phosphonouridine 5'-monophosphate (PMP). The importance of this biological system is justified both by its high rate enhancement and its potential use as a target in chemotherapy. This work focuses on comparing two physicochemical states of the enzyme (protonated and deprotonated Asp91) and three ligands (substrate OMP, inhibitor, and transition state analog BMP and substrate analog PMP). Detailed analysis of the active site geometry and its interactions is properly put in context by extensive comparison with relevant experimental works. Our overall results show that in terms of hydrogen bond occupancy, electrostatic interactions, dihedral angles, active site configuration, and movement of loops, notable differences among different complexes are observed. Comparison of the results obtained from these simulations provides some detailed structural data for the complexes, the enzyme, and the ligands, as well as useful insights into the inhibition mechanism of the OMPDC enzyme. Furthermore, these simulations are applied to clarify the ambiguous mechanism of the OMPDC enzyme, and imply that the substrate destabilization and transition state stabilization contribute to the mechanism of action of the most proficient enzyme, OMPDC.

  6. CDF Top Physics

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Tartarelli, G. F.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-05-01

    The authors present the latest results about top physics obtained by the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data sample used for these analysis (about 110 pb{sup{minus}1}) represents almost the entire statistics collected by CDF during four years (1992--95) of data taking. This large data size has allowed detailed studies of top production and decay properties. The results discussed here include the determination of the top quark mass, the measurement of the production cross section, the study of the kinematics of the top events and a look at top decays.

  7. Study of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase in complex with the top three OMP, BMP, and PMP ligands by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Shirin; Jalili, Seifollah; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic mechanism of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC), one of the nature most proficient enzymes which provides large rate enhancement, has not been fully understood yet. A series of 30 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were run on X-ray structure of the OMPDC from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in its free form as well as in complex with different ligands, namely 1-(5'-phospho-D-ribofuranosyl) barbituric acid (BMP), orotidine 5'-monophosphate (OMP), and 6-phosphonouridine 5'-monophosphate (PMP). The importance of this biological system is justified both by its high rate enhancement and its potential use as a target in chemotherapy. This work focuses on comparing two physicochemical states of the enzyme (protonated and deprotonated Asp91) and three ligands (substrate OMP, inhibitor, and transition state analog BMP and substrate analog PMP). Detailed analysis of the active site geometry and its interactions is properly put in context by extensive comparison with relevant experimental works. Our overall results show that in terms of hydrogen bond occupancy, electrostatic interactions, dihedral angles, active site configuration, and movement of loops, notable differences among different complexes are observed. Comparison of the results obtained from these simulations provides some detailed structural data for the complexes, the enzyme, and the ligands, as well as useful insights into the inhibition mechanism of the OMPDC enzyme. Furthermore, these simulations are applied to clarify the ambiguous mechanism of the OMPDC enzyme, and imply that the substrate destabilization and transition state stabilization contribute to the mechanism of action of the most proficient enzyme, OMPDC. PMID:24559040

  8. F429 Regulation of Tunnels in Cytochrome P450 2B4: A Top Down Study of Multiple Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Giordano; Zazza, Costantino

    2015-01-01

    The root causes of the outcomes of the single-site mutation in enzymes remain by and large not well understood. This is the case of the F429H mutant of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B4 enzyme where the substitution, on the proximal surface of the active site, of a conserved phenylalanine 429 residue with histidine seems to hamper the formation of the active species, Compound I (porphyrin cation radical-Fe(IV) = O, Cpd I) from the ferric hydroperoxo (Fe(III)OOH-, Cpd 0) precursor. Here we report a study based on extensive molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of 4 CYP-2B4 point mutations compared to the WT enzyme, having the goal of better clarifying the importance of the proximal Phe429 residue on CYP 2B4 catalytic properties. To consolidate the huge amount of data coming from five simulations and extract the most distinct structural features of the five species studied we made an extensive use of cluster analysis. The results show that all studied single polymorphisms of F429, with different side chain properties: i) drastically alter the reservoir of conformations accessible by the protein, perturbing global dynamics ii) expose the thiolate group of residue Cys436 to the solvent, altering the electronic properties of Cpd0 and iii) affect the various ingress and egress channels connecting the distal sites with the bulk environment, altering the reversibility of these channels. In particular, it was observed that the wild type enzyme exhibits unique structural features as compared to all mutant species in terms of weak interactions (hydrogen bonds) that generate a completely different dynamical behavior of the complete system. Albeit not conclusive, the current computational investigation sheds some light on the subtle and critical effects that proximal single-site mutations can exert on the functional mechanisms of human microsomal CYPs which should go rather far beyond local structure characterization. PMID:26415031

  9. Top Quark Mass Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, A.P.; /UC, Riverside

    2006-08-01

    First observed in 1995, the top quark is one of a pair of third-generation quarks in the Standard Model of particle physics. It has charge +2/3e and a mass of 171.4 GeV, about 40 times heavier than its partner, the bottom quark. The CDF and D0 collaborations have identified several hundred events containing the decays of top-antitop pairs in the large dataset collected at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider over the last four years. They have used these events to measure the top quark's mass to nearly 1% precision and to study other top quark properties. The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model, and knowledge of its value with small uncertainty allows us to predict properties of the as-yet-unobserved Higgs boson. This paper presents the status of the measurements of the top quark mass.

  10. The Top Triangle Moose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivukula, R. S.; Christensen, N. D.; Coleppa, B.; Simmons, E. H.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a deconstructed model that incorporates both Higgsless and top-color mechanisms. The model alleviates the typical tension in Higgsless models between obtaining the correct top quark mass and keeping Δρ small. It does so by singling out the top quark mass generation as arising from a Yukawa coupling to an effective top-Higgs which develops a small vacuum expectation value, while electroweak symmetry breaking results largely from a Higgsless mechanism. As a result, the heavy partners of the SM fermions can be light enough to be seen at the LHC.

  11. Top Physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Chang-Seong

    2011-06-01

    We present the recent results of top-quark physics using up to 6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV analyzed by the CDF collaboration. Thanks to this large data sample, precision top quark measurements are now a reality at the Tevatron. Further, several new physics signals could appear in this large dataset. We will present the latest measurements of top quark intrinsic properties as well as direct searches for new physics in the top sector.

  12. The final step of the ethylene biosynthesis pathway in turnip tops (Brassica rapa): molecular characterization of the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase BrACO1 throughout zygotic embryogenesis and germination of heterogeneous seeds.

    PubMed

    Del Carmen Rodríguez-Gacio, María; Nicolás, Carlos; Matilla, Angel Jesús

    2004-05-01

    In a previous report from the present authors, it was shown that the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidation may play a crucial role during zygotic embryogenesis of turnip tops seeds. The present study was performed to elucidate the contribution of the silique-wall and seeds in ethylene production during this developmental process. ACC content in the silique wall is only higher than in seeds during the middle phases of zygotic embryogenesis. The ACC-oxidase (ACO) activity peaks in the silique-wall and seeds during the onset of embryogenesis, declining gradually afterwards, being undetectable during desiccation period. Using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, one cDNA clone coding for an ACO and called BrACO1, was isolated. The deduced protein for BrACO1 has a molecular weight of 36.8 kDa and a high homology with other crucifer ACOs. The heterologous expression of this cDNA confirmed that BrACO1 is an ACO. The expression of this gene was high during the first phases of silique-wall development, low during the middle phases and undetectable during desiccation. By contrast, BrACO1 transcript was accumulated only in the earliest phases of seed embryogenesis and may participate in the highest ACO activity and ethylene production by seeds at the beginning of embryogenesis. Finally, in this work a correlation between the heterogeneity of Brassica rapa L. cv. Rapa seeds and the ability to oxidize the ACC to ethylene has been demonstrated.

  13. Top search at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, M.; The CDF Collaboration

    1991-10-01

    We review top quark searches carried out at CDF with data collected during the 1988--1989 Collider Run. The latest analyses give a lower limit on the top quark mass of 91 GeV/c{sup 2} at the 95% confidence level, assuming Standard Model decays. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. The Driven Spinning Top

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosu, Ioan; Featonby, David

    2016-01-01

    This driven top is quite a novelty and can, with some trials, be made using the principles outlined here. This new top has many applications in developing both understanding and skills and these are detailed in the article. Depending on reader's available time and motivation they may feel an urge to make one themselves, or simply invest a few…

  15. Training Top 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Identifies the top 50 companies in terms of the amount spent on training and development, the number of hours of training per employee, and percentage of payroll spent on training. Profiles the top five plus four additional companies selected by the magazine's editors. (SK)

  16. Training Top 125

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The best learning and development organizations support business initiatives tactically "and" help drive strategic change. Verizon did just that, earning it the No. 1 spot for the first time on the Training Top 125. Verizon and the other 2012 Top 125 winners continued to invest in training, collectively dedicating a mean of 4.52 percent of their…

  17. Training Top 125

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Top companies realize how vital training is to their success and continue to invest in it, even in trying times. This article presents "Training" magazine's 11th annual ranking of the top companies with employee-sponsored workforce training and development. First-time No. 1 winner Farmers Insurance puts such a premium on learning that its new…

  18. Top physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    We report on top physics results using a 100 pb{sup -1} data sample of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We have identified top signals in a variety of decay channels, and used these channels to extract a measurement of the top mass and production cross section. A subset of the data (67 pb{sup -1}) is used to determine M{sub top} = 176 {+-} 8(stat) {+-} 10(syst) and {sigma}(tt) = 7.6 {sub -2.0}{sup +2.4} pb. We present studies of the kinematics of t{bar t} events and extract the first direct measurement of V{sub tb}. Finally, we indicate prospects for future study of top physics at the Tevatron.

  19. Top Quark Mass Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, A. P.

    2006-11-17

    First observed in 1995, the top quark is one of a pair of third-generation quarks in the Standard Model of particle physics. It has charge +2/3e and a mass of 171.4 GeV, about 40 times heavier than its partner, the bottom quark. The CDF and DO collaborations have identified several hundred events containing the decays of top-antitop pairs in the large dataset collected at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider over the last four years. They have used these events to measure the top quark's mass to nearly 1% precision and to study other top quark properties. The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model, and knowledge of its value with small uncertainty allows us to predict properties of the as-yet-unobserved Higgs boson. This paper presents the status of the measurements of the top quark mass. It is based on a talk I gave at the Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics in Puerto Rico, May 2006, which also included discussion of measurements of other top quark properties.

  20. Top Quark Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Yvonne

    2011-12-01

    Since its discovery in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, the top quark has undergone intensive studies. Besides the Tevatron experiments, with the start of the LHC in 2010 a top quark factory started its operation. It is now possible to measure top quark properties simultaneously at four different experiments, namely ATLAS and CMS at LHC and CDF and D0 at Tevatron. Having collected thousands of top quarks each, several top quark properties have been measured precisely, while others are being measured for the first time. In this article, recent measurements of top quark properties from ATLAS, CDF, CMS and D0 are presented, using up to 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at the Tevatron and 1.1 fb{sup -1} at the LHC. In particular, measurements of the top quark mass, mass difference, foward backward charge asymmetry, t{bar t} spin correlations, the ratio of branching fractions, W helicity, anomalous couplings, color flow and the search for flavor changing neutral currents are discussed.

  1. The driven spinning top

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosu, Ioan; Featonby, David

    2016-05-01

    This driven top is quite a novelty and can, with some trials, be made using the principles outlined here. This new top has many applications in developing both understanding and skills and these are detailed in the article. Depending on reader’s available time and motivation they may feel an urge to make one themselves, or simply invest a few pounds in the one that has been designed, tested and manufactured to a high standard. Either way the unique design of the driven top can provide several hours of interesting experimentation. Our aim here is simply to inform and inspire readers to further investigation and experimentation.

  2. Top physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Palencia, Enrique; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-06-01

    The top quark is the most massive fundamental particle observed so far, and the study of its properties is interesting for several reasons ranging from its possible special role in electroweak symmetry breaking to its sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). This article focuses on the latest top physics results from CDF based on 320-750 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The t{bar t} cross section and the top mass have been measured in different decay channels and using different methods. They have also searched for massive t{bar t} resonances.

  3. Top physics: CDF results

    SciTech Connect

    K. Bloom

    2004-06-23

    The top quark plays an important role in the grand scheme of particle physics, and is also interesting on its own merits. We present recent results from CDF on top-quark physics based on 100-200 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data. We have measured the t{bar t} cross section in different decay modes using several different techniques, and are beginning our studies of top-quark properties. New analyses for this conference include a measurement of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} in the lepton-plus-jets channel using a neural net to distinguish signal and background events, and measurements of top-quark branching fractions.

  4. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher S.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2004-12-01

    The top quark, with its extraordinarily large mass (nearly that of a gold atom), plays a significant role in the phenomenology of EWSB in the Standard Model. In particular, the top quark mass when combined with the W mass constrains the mass of the as yet unobserved Higgs boson. Thus, a precise determination of the mass of the top quark is a principal goal of the CDF and D0 experiments. With the data collected thus far in Runs 1 and 2 of the Tevatron, CDF and D0 have measured the top quark mass in both the lepton+jets and dilepton decay channels using a variety of complementary experimental techniques. The author presents an overview of the most recent of the measurements.

  5. Flat Top & rocky terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Flat Top, the rectangular rock at lower right, is part of a stretch of rocky terrain in this image, taken by the deployed Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. Dust has accumulated on the top of Flat Top, but is not present on the sides due to the steep angles of the rock. This dust may have been placed by dust storms moving across the Martian surface. Flat Top has been studied using several different color filters on the IMP camera.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  6. Top quark properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Ziqing

    2014-10-31

    The top quark physics has entered the precision era. The CDF and D0 collaborations are finalizing their legacy results of the properties of the top quark after the shutdown of the Fermilab Tevatron three years ago. The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have been publishing results from the LHC Run I with 7 TeV and 8 TeV proton-proton collisions, with many more forthcoming. We present a selection of recent results produced by the Tevatron and LHC experiments.

  7. Top Quark Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulders, Martijn

    2016-10-01

    Ever since the discovery of the top quark at the Tevatron collider in 1995 the measurement of its mass has been a high priority. As one of the fundamental parameters of the Standard Theory of particle physics, the precise value of the top quark mass together with other inputs provides a test for the self-consistency of the theory, and has consequences for the stability of the Higgs field that permeates the Universe. In this review I will briefly summarize the experimental techniques used at the Tevatron and the LHC experiments throughout the years to measure the top quark mass with ever improving accuracy, and highlight the recent progress in combining all measurements in a single world average combination. As experimental measurements became more precise, the question of their theoretical interpretation has become important. The difficulty of relating the measured quantity to the fundamental top mass parameter has inspired alternative measurement methods that extract the top mass in complementary ways. I will discuss the status of those techniques and their results, and present a brief outlook of further improvements in the experimental determination of the top quark mass to be expected at the LHC and beyond.

  8. Top-ophilia

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    Almost from the moment in June 1977 when the discovery of the Upsilon resonance revealed the existence of what we now call the bottom quark, physicists began searching for its partner. Through the years, as we established the electric charge and weak isospin of the b-quark, and detected the virtual influence of its mate, it became clear that the top quark must exist. Exactly at what mass, we couldn't say, but we knew just how top events would look. We also knew that top events would be rare--if the Tevatron could make them at all--and that picking out the events would pose a real challenge for the experimenters and their detectors.

  9. Kernel mucking in top

    SciTech Connect

    LeFebvre, W.

    1994-08-01

    For many years, the popular program top has aided system administrations in examination of process resource usage on their machines. Yet few are familiar with the techniques involved in obtaining this information. Most of what is displayed by top is available only in the dark recesses of kernel memory. Extracting this information requires familiarity not only with how bytes are read from the kernel, but also what data needs to be read. The wide variety of systems and variants of the Unix operating system in today`s marketplace makes writing such a program very challenging. This paper explores the tremendous diversity in kernel information across the many platforms and the solutions employed by top to achieve and maintain ease of portability in the presence of such divergent systems.

  10. Top quark physics: Future measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.; Vejcik, S.; Berger, E.L.

    1997-04-04

    The authors discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top`s large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. They emphasize measurements of the top quark`s mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  11. Top Hispanic Degree Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a list of the top 100 producers of associate, bachelor's and graduate degrees awarded to minority students based on research conducted by Dr. Victor M.H. Borden, professor of educational leadership and policy students at the Indiana University Bloomington. For the year 2012, the listings focus on Hispanic students. Data for…

  12. Choosing a Top Ten.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IUCN Bulletin, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents an annotated list of 34 animals and 32 plants which are candidates for a list of the top 10 endangered species. Also presents the criteria used to formulate these lists. They include the conservation value (urgency prominance, biological value) and operational considerations (such as cost factors) for each species. (JN)

  13. Ten Top Tech Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLester, Susan

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the major technical issues, products, and practices of the day. The top ten tech trends are listed and discussed. These include: (1) data mining; (2) cyberbullying; (3) 21st century skills; (4) digital content; (5) learning at leisure; (6) personal responders; (7) mobile tools; (8) bandwidth; (9) open-source…

  14. Top quark production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Moed, Shulamit; /Harvard U.

    2010-01-01

    The large data samples of top quark candidate events collected at the Tevatron CDF II experiment allow for a variety of measurements to analyze the production of the top quark. This article discusses recent results of top quark production at CDF presented at the SUSY09 conference, including updates to the top pair production cross section, forward-backward asymmetry in t{bar t} production, single top search, search for top resonances and a search for heavy top. The discussed measurements utilize up to 3.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at CDF.

  15. Dimerization and thiol sensitivity of the salicylic acid binding thimet oligopeptidases TOP1 and TOP2 define their functions in redox-sensitive cellular pathways

    PubMed Central

    Westlake, Timothy J.; Ricci, William A.; Popescu, George V.; Popescu, Sorina C.

    2015-01-01

    A long-term goal in plant research is to understand how plants integrate signals from multiple environmental stressors. The importance of salicylic acid (SA) in plant response to biotic and abiotic stress is known, yet the molecular details of the SA-mediated pathways are insufficiently understood. Our recent work identified the peptidases TOP1 and TOP2 as critical components in plant response to pathogens and programmed cell death (PCD). In this study, we investigated the characteristics of TOPs related to the regulation of their enzymatic activity and function in oxidative stress response. We determined that TOP1 and TOP2 interact with themselves and each other and their ability to associate in dimers is influenced by SA and the thiol-based reductant DTT. Biochemical characterization of TOP1 and TOP2 indicated distinct sensitivities to DTT and similarly robust activity under a range of pH values. Treatments of top mutants with Methyl Viologen (MV) revealed TOP1 and TOP2 as a modulators of the plant tolerance to MV, and that exogenous SA alleviates the toxicity of MV in top background. Finally, we generated a TOP-centered computational model of a plant cell whose simulation outputs replicate experimental findings and predict novel functions of TOP1 and TOP2. Altogether, our work indicates that TOP1 and TOP2 mediate plant responses to oxidative stress through spatially separated pathways and positions proteolysis in a network for plant response to diverse stressors. PMID:26042129

  16. Wedge and Flat Top

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Flat Top, the rectangular rock at right, is part of a stretch of rocky terrain in this image, taken by the deployed Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. Dust has accumulated on the top of Flat Top, but is not present on the sides due to the steep angles of the rock. This dust may have been placed by dust storms moving across the Martian surface. The rock dubbed 'Wedge' is at left. The objects have been studied using several different color filters on the IMP camera.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  17. 22. Top Lateral Bracing & Top Chord, Vertical Tension Member ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Top Lateral Bracing & Top Chord, Vertical Tension Member 6, end Vertical Compression Members 5 & 4; South Swing Span; looking N. - Pacific Shortline Bridge, U.S. Route 20,spanning Missouri River, Sioux City, Woodbury County, IA

  18. Cloud top entrainment instability and cloud top distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, Reinout; Spinhirne, James D.

    1990-01-01

    Classical cloud-top entrainment instability condition formulation is discussed. A saturation point diagram is used to investigate the details of mixing in cases where the cloud-top entrainment instability criterion is satisfied.

  19. Conformational properties of cyclooctane: a molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharadwaj, Rishikesh K.

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have been used to elucidate the conformational properties of cyclooctane in the gas and bulk liquid phases. Accurate reproduction of the gas phase structure, and of the liquid phase densities and solubility parameters have been used as prerequisites to the prediction of conformational properties. The gas phase results clearly indicate the presence of a conformational mixture consisting of the crown, boat-chair, twist-boat-chair and boat-boat conformers at all temperatures (161, 313 and 400K) studied. The fraction of the crown family of conformers was found to be relatively insensitive to temperature. However, the relative concentrations of the twist-boat-chair and boat-chair conformations was found to be highly temperature dependent with the boat-chair being favoured at low temperatures. Bulk packing was found to have a profound effect on the conformational properties in the liquid phase. At the temperatures studied(313 and 400K) the boat-chair family was predominant, with the crown and boat families being essentially absent. The twist-boatchair conformation was detected in the liquid phase at both temperatures. The pseudorotation pathway for the twist-boat-chair to boat-chair interconversion was prevalent in both gas and liquid phases establishing the conformational flexibility and the relative importance of the twist-boat-chair conformer in comparison to the crown family. The study successfully explains the separate experimental findings in both the gas and liquid phases of cyclooctane.

  20. Complete maps of molecular-loop conformational spaces.

    PubMed

    Porta, Josep M; Ros, Lluís; Thomas, Federico; Corcho, Francesc; Cantó, Josep; Pérez, Juan Jesús

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents a numerical method to compute all possible conformations of distance-constrained molecular loops, i.e., loops where some interatomic distances are held fixed, while others can vary. The method is general (it can be applied to single or multiple intermingled loops of arbitrary topology) and complete (it isolates all solutions, even if they form positive-dimensional sets). Generality is achieved by reducing the problem to finding all embeddings of a set of points constrained by pairwise distances, which can be formulated as computing the roots of a system of Cayley-Menger determinants. Completeness is achieved by expressing these determinants in Bernstein form and using a numerical algorithm that exploits such form to bound all root locations at any desired precision. The method is readily parallelizable, and the current implementation can be run on single- or multiprocessor machines. Experiments are included that show the method's performance on rigid loops, mobile loops, and multiloop molecules. In all cases, complete maps including all possible conformations are obtained, thus allowing an exhaustive analysis and visualization of all pseudo-rotation paths between different conformations satisfying loop closure.

  1. Top physics results at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Vickey, Trevor; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-05-01

    The most recent results on top quark physics at CDF are reported. Measurements of cross-section and mass are presented, and the status of single top quark production searches are discussed. The results obtained from probing various top quark properties are also presented.

  2. Curly Top Disease of Tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Curly top disease, caused by viruses in the genus, Curtovirus, has impacted western US agriculture for over a century; and is a significant threat to tomato production. The two most abundant curtovirus species today are Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV) and Beet mild curly top virus (BMCTV) but ot...

  3. Top quark physics: Future Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, Raymond; Gerdes, David; Jaros, John; Vejcik, Steve; Berger, Edmond L.; Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Cuypers, Frank; Drell, Persis S.; Fero, Michael; Hadley, Nicholas; Han, Tao; Heinson, Ann P.; Knuteson, Bruce; Larios, Francisco; Miettinen, Hannu; Orr, Lynne H.; Peskin, Michael E.; Rizzo, Thomas; Sarid, Uri; Schmidt, Carl; Stelzer, Tim; Sullivan, Zack

    1996-12-31

    We discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top's large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. We emphasize measurements of the top quark's mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  4. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    L. Cerrito

    2004-07-16

    Preliminary results on the measurement of the top quark mass at the Tevatron Collider are presented. In the dilepton decay channel, the CDF Collaboration measures m{sub t} = 175.0{sub -16.9}{sup +17.4}(stat.){+-}8.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 126 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV (Run II). In the lepton plus jets channel, the CDF Collaboration measures 177.5{sub -9.4}{sup +12.7}(stat.) {+-} 7.1(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 102 pb{sup -1} at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The D0 Collaboration has newly applied a likelihood technique to improve the analysis of {approx} 125 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV (Run I), with the result: m{sub t} = 180.1 {+-} 3.6(stat.) {+-}3.9(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The latter is combined with all the measurements based on the data collected in Run I to yield the most recent and comprehensive experimental determination of the top quark mass: m{sub t} = 178.0 {+-} 2.7(stat.) {+-} 3.3(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  5. Top quark physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Potamianos, Karolos

    2011-12-01

    We present the recent results of top-quark physics using up to 6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions analyzed by the CDF collaboration. The large number of top quark events analyzed, of the order of several thousands, allows stringent checks of the standard model predictions. Also, the top quark is widely believed to be a window to new physics. We present the latest measurements of top quark intrinsic properties as well as direct searches for new physics in the top sector.

  6. The top ten.

    PubMed

    Davis, C

    1985-10-01

    3 lists were compiled to answer the question of what countries have experienced the most population growth from World War II to the present. The 1st list includes the 10 countries which accounted for the largest gain in world population. The 2nd list shows the 10 countries with the highest growth rates of the 150 or so most populous countries in the world. The last list also shows countries ranked by growth rate but is limited to those with a current population of at least 10 million. To deal with the fact that some countries did not exist at 1 of the reference points, a set of estimates for 1940 provided a convenient starting point. China and India headed the list of countries ranked by absolute gains. They contributed half again as much growth as the next 8 nations combined. Altogether Asia, home to almost 60% of the world's population, captured 5 of the top 10 slots. The US and the USSR are the only developed countries on the list. The Soviet Union also presents the 1st case on the list of a country with a lower ranking in population gain (6th) than in absolute size in 1985 (3rd). Many of the population giants of 1940 (Japan, Great Britain, Germany, France, and Italy) are not on the list. Despite large base populations, their growth has been slow in the intervening years. All of the countries with the highest growth rates experienced over 3% annual average growth during the last 45 years: Kuwait, United Arab Emirates, Libya, Venezuela, Costa Rica, Kenya, Ivory Coast, Mexico, Honduras, and Syria. The influence of immigration is much in evidence in this list and explains otherwise unachievable rates of growth. The top 4 countries in annual rates of growth are all oil exporters. The top 3 countries in the 3rd list -- Venezuela, Kenya, and Mexico -- are carried over from the 2nd list, sharing the characteristics of rapid population growth and substantial base populations. The geographic mix of this list is notable. Asia, Africa, and Latin America each have at least

  7. Top-Higgs and top-pion phenomenology in the top triangle moose model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; Coleppa, Baradhwaj; Logan, Heather E.; Martin, Adam

    2011-03-01

    We discuss the deconstructed version of a topcolor-assisted technicolor model wherein the mechanism of top quark mass generation is separated from the rest of electroweak symmetry breaking. The minimal deconstructed version of this scenario is a “triangle moose” model, where the top quark gets its mass from coupling to a top-Higgs field, while the gauge boson masses are generated from a Higgsless sector. The spectrum of the model includes scalar (top-Higgs) and pseudoscalar (top-pion) states. In this paper, we study the properties of these particles, discuss their production mechanisms and decay modes, and suggest how best to search for them at the LHC.

  8. Top-Higgs and top-pion phenomenology in the top triangle moose model

    SciTech Connect

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; Coleppa, Baradhwaj; Logan, Heather E.; Martin, Adam

    2011-03-01

    We discuss the deconstructed version of a topcolor-assisted technicolor model wherein the mechanism of top quark mass generation is separated from the rest of electroweak symmetry breaking. The minimal deconstructed version of this scenario is a ''triangle moose'' model, where the top quark gets its mass from coupling to a top-Higgs field, while the gauge boson masses are generated from a Higgsless sector. The spectrum of the model includes scalar (top-Higgs) and pseudoscalar (top-pion) states. In this paper, we study the properties of these particles, discuss their production mechanisms and decay modes, and suggest how best to search for them at the LHC.

  9. Top quark properties and single top at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skovpenon, K.; CMS Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Measurements of top-quark properties as well as single top-quark production are presented, obtained from the CMS data collected in 2011 and 2012 at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8TeV. The results include measurements of the top pair charge asymmetry, the W helicity in top decays, the t bar{{t}} spin correlation and the search for anomalous couplings. The cross sections for the electroweak production of single top quarks in the t-channel and in association with W-bosons are measured and the results are used to place constraints on the CKM matrix element Vtb. In the t-channel the ratio of top and antitop production cross sections is determined and compared with predictions from different parton density distribution functions. The results are compared with predictions from the standard model as well as new physics models.

  10. Gas turbine topping combustor

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Janos; Dowdy, Thomas E.; Bachovchin, Dennis M.

    1997-01-01

    A combustor for burning a mixture of fuel and air in a rich combustion zone, in which the fuel bound nitrogen in converted to molecular nitrogen. The fuel rich combustion is followed by lean combustion. The products of combustion from the lean combustion are rapidly quenched so as to convert the fuel bound nitrogen to molecular nitrogen without forming NOx. The combustor has an air radial swirler that directs the air radially inward while swirling it in the circumferential direction and a radial fuel swirler that directs the fuel radially outward while swirling it in the same circumferential direction, thereby promoting vigorous mixing of the fuel and air. The air inlet has a variable flow area that is responsive to variations in the heating value of the fuel, which may be a coal-derived fuel gas. A diverging passage in the combustor in front of a bluff body causes the fuel/air mixture to recirculate with the rich combustion zone.

  11. Top physics results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Gervasio; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2005-05-01

    The top quark is by far the most massive fundamental particle observed so far, and the study of its properties is interesting for several reasons ranging from its possible special role in electroweak symmetry breaking to its sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model. They present recent top physics results from CDF based on 160-320 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The t{bar t} cross section and the top mass have been measured in different decay channels and using different methods. they have searched for evidence of single top production, setting upper limits on its production rate. Other results shown in this conference include studies of the polarization of W bosons from top decays, a search for charged Higgs decaying from top, and a search for additional heavy t' quarks.

  12. Dark matter on top

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez, M.A.; Jackson, C.B.; Shaughnessy, G. E-mail: chris@uta.edu

    2014-12-01

    We consider a simplified model of fermionic dark matter which couples exclusively to the right-handed top quark via a renormalizable interaction with a color-charged scalar. We first compute the relic abundance of this type of dark matter and investigate constraints placed on the model parameter space by the latest direct detection data. We also perform a detailed analysis for the production of dark matter at the LHC for this model. We find several kinematic variables that allow for a clean signal extraction and we show that the parameter space of this model will be well probed during LHC Run-II. Finally, we investigate the possibility of detecting this type of dark matter via its annihilations into gamma rays. We compute the continuum and the line emission (which includes a possible ''Higgs in Space!'' line) and its possible discovery by future gamma-ray telescopes. We find that the annihilation spectrum has distinctive features which may distinguish it from other models.

  13. Gas turbine topping combustor

    DOEpatents

    Beer, J.; Dowdy, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1997-06-10

    A combustor is described for burning a mixture of fuel and air in a rich combustion zone, in which the fuel bound nitrogen in converted to molecular nitrogen. The fuel rich combustion is followed by lean combustion. The products of combustion from the lean combustion are rapidly quenched so as to convert the fuel bound nitrogen to molecular nitrogen without forming NOx. The combustor has an air radial swirler that directs the air radially inward while swirling it in the circumferential direction and a radial fuel swirler that directs the fuel radially outward while swirling it in the same circumferential direction, thereby promoting vigorous mixing of the fuel and air. The air inlet has a variable flow area that is responsive to variations in the heating value of the fuel, which may be a coal-derived fuel gas. A diverging passage in the combustor in front of a bluff body causes the fuel/air mixture to recirculate with the rich combustion zone. 14 figs.

  14. Genome-Destabilizing Effects Associated with Top1 Loss or Accumulation of Top1 Cleavage Complexes in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Petes, Thomas D.; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Topoisomerase 1 (Top1), a Type IB topoisomerase, functions to relieve transcription- and replication-associated torsional stress in DNA. We investigated the effects of Top1 on genome stability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using two different assays. First, a sectoring assay that detects loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on a specific chromosome was used to measure reciprocal crossover (RCO) rates. Features of individual RCO events were then molecularly characterized using chromosome-specific microarrays. In the second assay, cells were sub-cultured for 250 generations and LOH was examined genome-wide using microarrays. Though loss of Top1 did not destabilize single-copy genomic regions, RCO events were more complex than in a wild-type strain. In contrast to the stability of single-copy regions, sub-culturing experiments revealed that top1 mutants had greatly elevated levels of instability within the tandemly-repeated ribosomal RNA genes (in agreement with previous results). An intermediate in the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by Top1 is the covalent attachment of Top1 to the cleaved DNA. The resulting Top1 cleavage complex (Top1cc) is usually transient but can be stabilized by the drug camptothecin (CPT) or by the top1-T722A allele. We found that increased levels of the Top1cc resulted in a five- to ten-fold increase in RCOs and greatly increased instability within the rDNA and CUP1 tandem arrays. A detailed analysis of the events in strains with elevated levels of Top1cc suggests that recombinogenic DNA lesions are introduced during or after DNA synthesis. These results have important implications for understanding the effects of CPT as a chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:25830313

  15. Learning at the Top. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on learning at the top that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Learning at the Top: An Investigation of Nonprofit CEOs' (Chief Executive Officers') Learning Experiences" (John J. Sherlock) reports on a study that used Mezirow's theory of adult learning as…

  16. Wave Engine Topping Cycle Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    The performance benefits derived by topping a gas turbine engine with a wave engine are assessed. The wave engine is a wave rotor that produces shaft power by exploiting gas dynamic energy exchange and flow turning. The wave engine is added to the baseline turboshaft engine while keeping high-pressure-turbine inlet conditions, compressor pressure ratio, engine mass flow rate, and cooling flow fractions fixed. Related work has focused on topping with pressure-exchangers (i.e., wave rotors that provide pressure gain with zero net shaft power output); however, more energy can be added to a wave-engine-topped cycle leading to greater engine specific-power-enhancement The energy addition occurs at a lower pressure in the wave-engine-topped cycle; thus the specific-fuel-consumption-enhancement effected by ideal wave engine topping is slightly lower than that effected by ideal pressure-exchanger topping. At a component level, however, flow turning affords the wave engine a degree-of-freedom relative to the pressure-exchanger that enables a more efficient match with the baseline engine. In some cases, therefore, the SFC-enhancement by wave engine topping is greater than that by pressure-exchanger topping. An ideal wave-rotor-characteristic is used to identify key wave engine design parameters and to contrast the wave engine and pressure-exchanger topping approaches. An aerodynamic design procedure is described in which wave engine design-point performance levels are computed using a one-dimensional wave rotor model. Wave engines using various wave cycles are considered including two-port cycles with on-rotor combustion (valved-combustors) and reverse-flow and through-flow four-port cycles with heat addition in conventional burners. A through-flow wave cycle design with symmetric blading is used to assess engine performance benefits. The wave-engine-topped turboshaft engine produces 16% more power than does a pressure-exchanger-topped engine under the specified topping

  17. Status of the top quark: Top production cross section and top properties

    SciTech Connect

    Boisvert, V.; /Rochester U.

    2006-08-01

    This report describes the latest cross section and property measurements associated with the top quark at the Tevatron Run II. The largest data sample used is 760 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. Due to its large mass, the top quark might be involved in the process of electroweak symmetry breaking, making it a useful probe for signs of new physics.

  18. Properties of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, A. W.

    2014-09-24

    Recent measurements of top-quark properties at the LHC and the Tevatron are presented. Most recent measurements of the top quark mass have been carried out by CMS using $19.7/$fb of $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV data including the study of the dependence on event kinematics. ATLAS uses the full Run I data at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV for a "3D" measurement that significantly reduces systematic uncertainties. D0 employs the full Run II data using the matrix element method to measure the top quark mass with significantly reduced systematic uncertainties. Many different measurements of the top quark exist to date and the most precise ones per decay channel per experiment have been combined into the first world combination with a relative precision of 0.44%. Latest updates of measurements of production asymmetries include the measurement of the \\ttbar production asymmetry by D0 employing the full Run II data set, by CMS and ATLAS (including the polarization of the top quark) employing both the full data set at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV. CMS uses the full $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV data to measure the top quark polarization in single top production, the ratio ${\\cal R}$ of the branching fractions ${\\cal B}(t \\rightarrow Wb) / {\\cal B}(t \\rightarrow Wq)$ and to search for flavor changing neutral currents. The results from all these measurements agree well with their respective Standard Model expectation.

  19. Pseudorotation motion in tetrahydrofuran: an ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Rayón, Víctor M; Sordo, Jose A

    2005-05-22

    The use of different models based on experimental information about the observed level splitings, rotational constants, and far-infrared transition frequencies leads to different predictions on the equilibrium geometry for tetrahydrofuran. High-level ab initio calculations [coupled cluster singles, doubles (triples)/complete basis set (second order Moller-Plesset triple, quadrupole, quintuple)+zero-point energy(anharmonic)] suggest that the equilibrium conformation of tetrahydrofuran is an envelope C(s) structure. The theoretical geometrical parameters might be helpful to plan further microwave spectroscopic studies in order to get a physical interpretation of the measurements.

  20. Top Mass Measurement at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Kordas, Kostas; /Frascati

    2006-03-01

    We report on recent measurements of the top quark mass using t{bar t} candidate events selected in {approx_equal} 320 pb{sup -1} of data from the ''Run II'' operation period of the Tevatron p{bar p} collider. More emphasis is given on the best single measurement to date (M{sub top} = 173.5{sub -3.8}{sup +3.9} GeV/c{sup 2}), provided by CDF using the ''lepton plus jets'' channel, where one W decays to a lepton-neutrino pair and the other into quarks (top quarks decay to Wb almost 100% of the time).

  1. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymers regulate DNA topoisomerase I (Top1) nuclear dynamics and camptothecin sensitivity in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Subhendu K.; Rehman, Ishita; Ghosh, Arijit; Sengupta, Souvik; Majumdar, Papiya; Jana, Biman; Das, Benu Brata

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase 1 (Top1) is essential for removing the DNA supercoiling generated during replication and transcription. Anticancer drugs like camptothecin (CPT) and its clinical derivatives exert their cytotoxicity by reversibly trapping Top1 in covalent complexes on the DNA (Top1cc). Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) catalyses the addition of ADP-ribose polymers (PAR) onto itself and Top1. PARP inhibitors enhance the cytotoxicity of CPT in the clinical trials. However, the molecular mechanism by which PARylation regulates Top1 nuclear dynamics is not fully understood. Using live-cell imaging of enhanced green fluorescence tagged-human Top1, we show that PARP inhibitors (Veliparib, ABT-888) delocalize Top1 from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, which is independent of Top1–PARP1 interaction. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and subsequent fitting of the data employing kinetic modelling we demonstrate that ABT-888 markedly increase CPT-induced bound/immobile fraction of Top1 (Top1cc) across the nuclear genome, suggesting Top1-PARylation counteracts CPT-induced stabilization of Top1cc. We further show Trp205 and Asn722 of Top1 are critical for subnuclear dynamics. Top1 mutant (N722S) was restricted to the nucleolus in the presence of CPT due to its deficiency in the accumulation of CPT-induced Top1-PARylation and Top1cc formation. This work identifies ADP-ribose polymers as key determinant for regulating Top1 subnuclear dynamics. PMID:27466387

  2. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymers regulate DNA topoisomerase I (Top1) nuclear dynamics and camptothecin sensitivity in living cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Subhendu K; Rehman, Ishita; Ghosh, Arijit; Sengupta, Souvik; Majumdar, Papiya; Jana, Biman; Das, Benu Brata

    2016-09-30

    Topoisomerase 1 (Top1) is essential for removing the DNA supercoiling generated during replication and transcription. Anticancer drugs like camptothecin (CPT) and its clinical derivatives exert their cytotoxicity by reversibly trapping Top1 in covalent complexes on the DNA (Top1cc). Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) catalyses the addition of ADP-ribose polymers (PAR) onto itself and Top1. PARP inhibitors enhance the cytotoxicity of CPT in the clinical trials. However, the molecular mechanism by which PARylation regulates Top1 nuclear dynamics is not fully understood. Using live-cell imaging of enhanced green fluorescence tagged-human Top1, we show that PARP inhibitors (Veliparib, ABT-888) delocalize Top1 from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, which is independent of Top1-PARP1 interaction. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and subsequent fitting of the data employing kinetic modelling we demonstrate that ABT-888 markedly increase CPT-induced bound/immobile fraction of Top1 (Top1cc) across the nuclear genome, suggesting Top1-PARylation counteracts CPT-induced stabilization of Top1cc. We further show Trp205 and Asn722 of Top1 are critical for subnuclear dynamics. Top1 mutant (N722S) was restricted to the nucleolus in the presence of CPT due to its deficiency in the accumulation of CPT-induced Top1-PARylation and Top1cc formation. This work identifies ADP-ribose polymers as key determinant for regulating Top1 subnuclear dynamics.

  3. Forum outlines top emerging technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Extance, Andy

    2015-04-01

    Additive manufacturing, next-generation robotics, "sense and avoid" drones that fly themselves, artificial intelligence and "neuromorphic" computing have all made it into the World Economic Forum's top 10 emerging technologies for 2015.

  4. Australia's Next Top Fraction Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peter Gould suggests Australia's next top fraction model should be a linear model rather than an area model. He provides a convincing argument and gives examples of ways to introduce a linear model in primary classrooms.

  5. Trajectory correction propulsion for TOPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, H. R.; Bjorklund, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A blowdown-pressurized hydrazine propulsion system was selected to provide trajectory correction impulse for outer planet flyby spacecraft as the result of cost/mass/reliability tradeoff analyses. Present hydrazine component and system technology and component designs were evaluated for application to the Thermoelectric Outer Planet Spacecraft (TOPS); while general hydrazine technology was adequate, component design changes were deemed necessary for TOPS-type missions. A prototype hydrazine propulsion system was fabricated and fired nine times for a total of 1600 s to demonstrate the operation and performance of the TOPS propulsion configuration. A flight-weight trajectory correction propulsion subsystem (TCPS) was designed for the TOPS based on actual and estimated advanced components.

  6. Top 10 Products of 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In 2011, American School & University (AS&U) showcased some of the hottest products in the industry. This article presents the top ten most requested products as determined by readers. The top one on the list is the Bulb crusher which can cut recycling costs by 50%, can hold 1,350 4-foot lamps in a single 55-gallon drum, can crush a 4-foot lamp in…

  7. Uncovering the single top: observation of electroweak top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, Jorge Armando

    2009-01-01

    The top quark is generally produced in quark and anti-quark pairs. However, the Standard Model also predicts the production of only one top quark which is mediated by the electroweak interaction, known as 'Single Top'. Single Top quark production is important because it provides a unique and direct way to measure the CKM matrix element Vtb, and can be used to explore physics possibilities beyond the Standard Model predictions. This dissertation presents the results of the observation of Single Top using 2.3 fb-1 of Data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The analysis includes the Single Top muon+jets and electron+jets final states and employs Boosted Decision Tress as a method to separate the signal from the background. The resulting Single Top cross section measurement is: (1) σ(p$\\bar{p}$→ tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.74-0.74+0.95 pb, where the errors include both statistical and systematic uncertainties. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is p = 1.9 x 10-6. This corresponds to a standard deviation Gaussian equivalence of 4.6. When combining this result with two other analysis methods, the resulting cross section measurement is: (2) σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.94 ± 0.88 pb, and the corresponding measurement significance is 5.0 standard deviations.

  8. SW New Mexico Oil Well Formation Tops

    DOE Data Explorer

    Shari Kelley

    2015-10-21

    Rock formation top picks from oil wells from southwestern New Mexico from scout cards and other sources. There are differing formation tops interpretations for some wells, so for those wells duplicate formation top data are presented in this file.

  9. Consider topped crude for FCC

    SciTech Connect

    Louder, K.E.; Juno, E.J.; Kulapaditharom, L.

    1985-09-01

    A case study is presented that illustrates the mechanics for evaluating use of topped crude to load the FCC for more profit. Declining product demands combined with high crude costs has shut down many refineries and left others operting well below design capacity. The study illustrates the step-by-step requirements to debottleneck an existing Kellogg Orthoflow Model B FCC to process topped crude mixed with gas oils. This study was limited to the catalytic converter defined as the reactor, regenerator, air blower, and wet gas compressor. The scope was to examine the ability to process topped crude and to consider modernizing the FCC to employ riser cracking and complete CO combustion regeneration.

  10. Light 't Hooft top partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Parolini, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Vectorlike quarks, usually dubbed top partners, are a common presence in composite Higgs models. Being composite objects, their mass is expected to be of the order of their inverse size, that is the condensation scale of the new strong interactions. Light top partners, while not being a generic prediction, are, however, often considered in phenomenological models. We suggest that their lightness may be due to the matching of global 't Hooft anomalies of the underlying theory. We check this mechanism in explicit models, showing that, in one case, composite fermions with the quantum numbers of the top quark obtain a mass which is controlled by a soft breaking term and can be made parametrically small.

  11. Top-down morphogenesis of colorectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Ie-Ming; Wang, Tian-Li; Traverso, Giovanni; Romans, Kathy; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Ben-Sasson, Shmuel; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert

    2001-01-01

    One of the fundamental tenets of oncology is that tumors arise from stem cells. In the colon, stem cells are thought to reside at the base of crypts. In the early stages of tumorigenesis, however, dysplastic cells are routinely found at the luminal surface of the crypts whereas the cells at the bases of these same crypts appear morphologically normal. To understand this discrepancy, we evaluated the molecular characteristics of cells isolated from the bases and orifices of the same crypts in small colorectal adenomas. We found that the dysplastic cells at the tops of the crypts often exhibited genetic alterations of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and neoplasia-associated patterns of gene expression. In contrast, cells located at the base of these same crypts did not contain such alterations and were not clonally related to the contiguous transformed cells above them. These results imply that development of adenomatous polyps proceeds through a top-down mechanism. Genetically altered cells in the superficial portions of the mucosae spread laterally and downward to form new crypts that first connect to preexisting normal crypts and eventually replace them. PMID:11226292

  12. Training Top 10 Hall of Fame

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Microsoft Corporation and SCC Soft Computer are the newest inductees into the Training Top 10 Hall of Fame, joining the ranks of the 11 companies named to the hall since its inception in 2008 (Wyeth Pharmaceuticals subsequently was acquired by Pfizer Inc. in 2009). These 11 companies held Top 10 spots in the Training Top 50, Top 100, and now Top…

  13. Top Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.H.L.S.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    We present the latest measurements of the top quark mass from the Tevatron. The different top decay channels and measurement techniques used for these results are also described. The world average of the top quark mass based on some of these new results combined with previous results is m{sub top} = 172.6 {+-} 1.4 GeV.

  14. Top quark mass and kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Barberis, Emanuela; /Northeastern U.

    2006-05-01

    A summary of the results on the measurement of the Top Quark mass and the study of the kinematics of the t{bar t} system at the Tevatron collider is presented here. Results from both the CDF and D0 collaborations are reported.

  15. The Top Theological Degree Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Each year, "Diverse: Issues in Higher Education" publishes a list of the Top 100 producers of associate, bachelor's and graduate degrees awarded to minority students based on research conducted by Dr. Victor M. H. Borden, professor of educational leadership and policy studies at Indiana University Bloomington. This year, for the first time, it has…

  16. The Top STEM Degree Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a list of the top Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) degree producers in the U.S. This list is broken down into seven categories: (1) Total Minority Research/Scholarship and Other Doctoral: Mathematics and Statistics; (2) Total Minority Bachelors: Biological and Biomedical Sciences; (3) Total Minority…

  17. Observation of the Top Quark

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kim, S. B.

    1995-08-01

    Top quark production is observed in{bar p}p collisions at{radical}s= 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D{O} observe signals consistent with t{bar t} to WWb{bar b}, but inconsistent with the background prediction by 4.8{sigma} (CDF), 4.6a (D{O}). Additional evidence for the top quark Is provided by a peak in the reconstructed mass distribution. The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with the top quark decay. They measure the top quark mass to be 176{plus_minus}8(stat.){plus_minus}10(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (CDF), 199{sub -21}{sup+19}(stat.){plus_minus}22(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (D{O}), and the t{bar t} production cross section to be 6.8{sub -2.4}{sup+3.6}pb (CDF), 6.4{plus_minus}2.2 pb (D{O}).

  18. Top, Higgs and Electroweak Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, Paul L.

    2006-11-17

    Hadron colliders are, and will continue to be, an excellent venue for testing the standard model of particle physics. We describe the status of top-quark physics and the direct search for a standard model Higgs boson. We briefly describe the use of Tevatron and LEP data to indirectly infer the standard model Higgs mass through precision electroweak measurements.

  19. "Top School Problems" Are Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Males, Mike

    1992-01-01

    A well-known "study" comparing the top school problems of 1940 (talking and gum chewing) with those of 1987 (drug abuse, pregnancy, and violence) is nonexistent. In 1940, 49 percent of all youth did not finish high school, 37,000 teenagers died from violence or disease, and 335,000 teens gave birth. Educators should discount pastoral memories and…

  20. The 2002 Training Top 100.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Identifies the top 100 companies in terms of the amount spent on training and development, the number of hours of training per employee, percentage of payroll spent on training, and tuition allotment per employee. Describes best practices in succession planning and leadership development, mentoring, and job shadowing and provides a detailed…

  1. The 2003 Training Top 100.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvin, Tammy

    2003-01-01

    Identifies the top 100 U.S. companies in terms of the amount spent on training and development, the number of hours of training per employee, percentage of payroll spent on training, and tuition allotment per employee. Describes best practices in succession planning and leadership development, mentoring, and job shadowing and provides a detailed…

  2. The Top 100: Associate Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmon, Olivia

    2009-01-01

    This year, Diverse has added a new addition to its annual Top 100 degree producers series--recognizing, with this edition, the institutions that award the most associate degrees to students of color. More than half of minority undergraduate students start their degree quest at a community college with 55 percent of all Hispanic and Native American…

  3. Top Jets at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, L.G.; Lee, S.J.; Perez, G.; Sung, I.; Virzi, J.

    2008-10-06

    We investigatethe reconstruction of high pT hadronically-decaying top quarksat the Large Hadron Collider. One of the main challenges in identifying energetictop quarks is that the decay products become increasingly collimated. This reducesthe efficacy of conventional reconstruction methods that exploit the topology of thetop quark decay chain. We focus on the cases where the decay products of the topquark are reconstructed as a single jet, a"top-jet." The most basic"top-tag" methodbased on jet mass measurement is considered in detail. To analyze the feasibility ofthe top-tagging method, both theoretical and experimental aspects of the large QCDjet background contribution are examined. Based on a factorization approach, wederive a simple analytic approximation for the shape of the QCD jet mass spectrum.We observe very good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation. We consider high pT tt bar production in the Standard Model as an example, and show that our theoretical QCD jet mass distributions can efficiently characterize the background via sideband analyses. We show that with 25 fb-1 of data, our approach allows us to resolve top-jets with pT _> 1 TeV, from the QCD background, and about 1.5 TeV top-jets with 100 fb-1, without relying on b-tagging. To further improve the significancewe consider jet shapes (recently analyzed in 0807.0234 [hep-ph]), which resolve thesubstructure of energy flow inside cone jets. A method of measuring the top quarkpolarization by using the transverse momentum of the bottom quark is also presented.The main advantages of our approach are: (i) the mass distributions are driven byfirst principle calculations, instead of relying solely on Monte Carlo simulation; (ii) for high pT jets (pT _> 1 TeV), IR-safe jet shape variables are robust against detectorresolution effects. Our analysis can be applied to other boosted massive particlessuch as the electroweak gauge bosons and the Higgs.

  4. Can current force fields reproduce ring puckering in 2-O-sulfo-alpha-L-iduronic acid? A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Neha S; Mancera, Ricardo L

    2010-03-30

    The monosaccharide 2-O-sulfo-alpha-L-iduronic acid (IdoA2S) is one of the major components of glycosaminoglycans. The ability of molecular mechanics force fields to reproduce ring-puckering conformational equilibrium is important for the successful prediction of the free energies of interaction of these carbohydrates with proteins. Here we report unconstrained molecular dynamics simulations of IdoA2S monosaccharide that were carried out to investigate the ability of commonly used force fields to reproduce its ring conformational flexibility in aqueous solution. In particular, the distribution of ring conformer populations of IdoA2S was determined. The GROMOS96 force field with the SPC/E water potential can predict successfully the dominant skew-boat to chair conformational transition of the IdoA2S monosaccharide in aqueous solution. On the other hand, the GLYCAM06 force field with the TIP3P water potential sampled transitional conformations between the boat and chair forms. Simulations using the GROMOS96 force field showed no pseudorotational equilibrium fluctuations and hence no inter-conversion between the boat and twist boat ring conformers. Calculations of theoretical proton NMR coupling constants showed that the GROMOS96 force field can predict the skew-boat to chair conformational ratio in good agreement with the experiment, whereas GLYCAM06 shows worse agreement. The omega rotamer distribution about the C5-C6 bond was predicted by both force fields to have torsions around 10 degrees , 190 degrees , and 360 degrees .

  5. Top quark production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Varnes, Erich W.; /Arizona U.

    2010-09-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron has, until recently, been the only accelerator with sufficient energy to produce top quarks. The CDF and D0 experiments have collected large samples of top quarks. We report on recent top quark production measurements of the single top and t{bar t} production cross sections, as well as studies of the t{bar t} invariant mass distribution and a search for highly boosted top quarks.

  6. Properties of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Wicke, Daniel; /Wuppertal U., Dept. Math.

    2009-08-01

    The aim of particle physics is the understanding of elementary particles and their interactions. The current theory of elementary particle physics, the Standard Model, contains twelve different types of fermions which (neglecting gravity) interact through the gauge bosons of three forces. In addition a scalar particle, the Higgs boson, is needed for theoretical consistency. These few building blocks explain all experimental results found in the context of particle physics, so far. Nevertheless, it is believed that the Standard Model is only an approximation to a more complete theory. First of all the fourth known force, gravity, has withstood all attempts to be included until now. Furthermore, the Standard Model describes several features of the elementary particles like the existence of three families of fermions or the quantisation of charges, but does not explain these properties from underlying principles. Finally, the lightness of the Higgs boson needed to explain the symmetry breaking is difficult to maintain in the presence of expected corrections from gravity at high scales. This is the so called hierarchy problem. In addition astrophysical results indicate that the universe consists only to a very small fraction of matter described by the Standard Model. Large fractions of dark energy and dark matter are needed to describe the observations. Both do not have any correspondence in the Standard Model. Also the very small asymmetry between matter and anti-matter that results in the observed universe built of matter (and not of anti-matter) cannot be explained until now. It is thus an important task of experimental particle physics to test the predictions of the Standard Model to the best possible accuracy and to search for deviations pointing to necessary extensions or modifications of our current theoretical understanding. The top quark was predicted to exist by the Standard Model as the partner of the bottom quark. It was first observed in 1995 by the

  7. Top decays in extended models

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2009-04-20

    Top quark decays are interesting as a mean to test the Standard Model (SM) predictions. The Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM)-suppressed process t{yields}cWW, and the rare decays t{yields}cZ, t{yields}H{sup 0}+c, and t{yields}c{gamma} an excellent window to probe the predictions of theories beyond the SM. We evaluate the flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decay t{yields}H{sup 0}+c in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions; the FCNC decays may place at tree level and are only supressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks. We also comment on the decay process t{yields}c+{gamma}, which involves radiative corrections.

  8. Attitude propulsion technology for TOPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moynihan, P. I.

    1972-01-01

    The thermoelectric outer planet spacecraft (TOPS) attitude propulsion subsystem (APS) effort is discussed. It includes the tradeoff rationale that went into the selection of an anhydrous hydrazine baseline system, followed by a discussion of the 0.22 N thruster and its integration into a portable, self-contained propulsion module that was designed, developed, and man rated to support the TOPS single-axis attitude control tests. The results of a cold-start feasibility demonstration with a modified thruster are presented. A description of three types of 0.44 thrusters that were procured for in-house evaluation is included along with the results of the test program. This is followed by a description of the APS feed system components, their evaluations, and a discussion of an evaluation of elastomeric material for valve seat seals. A list of new technology items which will be of value for application to future systems of this type is included.

  9. Thermoelectric Outer Planets Spacecraft (TOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The research and advanced development work is reported on a ballistic-mode, outer planet spacecraft using radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) power. The Thermoelectric Outer Planet Spacecraft (TOPS) project was established to provide the advanced systems technology that would allow the realistic estimates of performance, cost, reliability, and scheduling that are required for an actual flight mission. A system design of the complete RTG-powered outer planet spacecraft was made; major technical innovations of certain hardware elements were designed, developed, and tested; and reliability and quality assurance concepts were developed for long-life requirements. At the conclusion of its active phase, the TOPS Project reached its principal objectives: a development and experience base was established for project definition, and for estimating cost, performance, and reliability; an understanding of system and subsystem capabilities for successful outer planets missions was achieved. The system design answered long-life requirements with massive redundancy, controlled by on-board analysis of spacecraft performance data.

  10. Cloud Top Scanning radiometer (CTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A scanning radiometer to be used for measuring cloud radiances in each of three spectral regions is described. Significant features incorporated in the Cloud Top Scanner design are: (1) flexibility and growth potential through use of easily replaceable modular detectors and filters; (2) full aperture, multilevel inflight calibration; (3) inherent channel registration through employment of a single shared field stop; and (4) radiometric sensitivity margin in a compact optical design through use of Honeywell developed (Hg,Cd)Te detectors and preamplifiers.

  11. Top quark results at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, S.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    We present the latest results on the top quark obtained by the CDF experiment using a data sample of about 110 {ital pb}{sup -1} collected at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We briefly describe the candidate events selection and then discuss the production cross section determination and the mass measurement. The study of two new decay channels (all hadronic and ``tau dilepton``) is also reported.

  12. Open-top wood gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Mukunda, H.S.; Dasappa, S.; Shrinivasa, U.

    1993-12-31

    The technology and economics of a new class of open-top gasifiers for use with diesel engines in dual-fuel mode are described. The performance of systems that range in capacity from 3.7 to 100 kilowatts are discussed, with special emphasis placed on gasifiers at extreme ends of the capacity range. The essential differences and benefits of the new technology are compared with World War 2 closed-top models. Studies indicate that the open-top design achieves diesel replacement values greater than 80 percent and is less dependent on feedstock quality, moisture content, and density. The amount of diesel fuel saved per system among motivated users (mostly small farmers) exceeds 70 percent. A comparative analysis of two gasifier systems: a 5 kilowatt system that runs the village power station in Hosahalli, Karnatka (India), and a 100 kilowatt system that powers a sawmill on the remote island of Port Blair in the Andaman and Nicobar archipelago was undertaken. The cost of installing the larger system, including computerized data acquisition and control systems, was US $625 (Rs 12,500) per kilowatt, with an energy cost of $0.074 (Rs 1.60) per kWh (the cost of energy subsidized by the state is RS 1.25 per kWh).

  13. Measurements of Top Quark Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Cerrito, Lucio

    2009-05-01

    Preliminary results on the measurement of four selected properties of the top quark are presented. The relative fraction of t{bar t} production through gluon fusion has been measured in the t{bar t} dilepton decay channel by the CDF Collaboration as F{sub gg} = 0.53{sub -0.38}{sup +0.36}. Using an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb{sup -1} collected with the CDF II detector, we also determine the t{bar t} differential cross section with respect to values up to {approx}1 TeV of the t{bar t} invariant mass. We present a model-independent measurement of the helicity of W bosons produced in top quark decays, using an integrated luminosity of up to 2.7 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 detector, and find the fraction of longitudinal W bosons f{sub 0} = 0.49 {+-} 0.14, and the fraction of right-handed W bosons f{sub +} = 0.11 {+-} 0.08. Finally, we measure the parton level forward-backward asymmetry of pair produced top quarks using an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb{sup -1} collected with the CDF II detector, and find A{sub FB} = 0.19 {+-} 0.07. All results are consistent with the predictions of the standard model.

  14. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sinervo, P.K.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag {ital b} quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and D{null} collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  15. Recent Top Properties Measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarelli, Giorgio

    2014-11-26

    We present the most recent CDF results on the measurements of the decay and production vertex of the top-quark. New results on forward-backward asymmetry in top-antitop events are presented. Also, recent measurements of the branching fractions of top-quark are discussed. Finally, measurements in single top events, where top-quark is produced through electroweak processes, are presented. Despite the much larger number of top events collected at the LHC, due to the symmetric initial state and the better signal-to-background ratio in specific channels, some results will be lasting heritage of the Tevatron.

  16. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  17. The top 10 oomycete pathogens in molecular plant pathology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oomycetes form a deep lineage of eukaryotic organisms that includes a large number of plant pathogens that threaten natural and managed ecosystems. We undertook a survey to query the community for their ranking of plant pathogenic oomycete taxa based on scientific and economic importance. In total, ...

  18. Heavy flavour physics from top to bottom

    SciTech Connect

    Paulini, M.; CDF and D0 Collaborations

    1997-01-01

    We review the status of heavy flavour physics at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by summarizing recent top quark and B physics results from CDF and D0. In particular we discuss the measurement of the top quark mass and top production cross section as well as B meson lifetimes and time dependent B{bar B} mixing results. An outlook of perspectives for top and B physics in Run II starting in 1999 is also given. 38 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Heavy flavour physics from top to bottom

    SciTech Connect

    Paulini, M.; CDF and D0 Collaboration

    1998-02-01

    We review the status of heavy flavour physics at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by summarizing recent top quark and B physics results from CDF and D0. In particular we discuss the measurement of the top quark mass and top production cross section as well as B meson lifetimes and time dependent B{anti B} mixing results. An outlook of perspectives for top and B physics in Run II starting in 1999 is also given.

  20. Top 10 TARN research publications.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Antoinette

    2015-12-01

    The last 25 years have seen Trauma Audit and Research Network's (TARN) research agenda develop into a significant portfolio of over 100 publications, including a number of international collaborations. Holding the largest trauma registry in Europe, TARN continues to provide researchers with the ability to pursue their interests in both epidemiological and clinical topics relating to traumatic injury. This edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal provides an opportunity to celebrate some of these papers with a 'Top 10', which have been voted by members of the TARN Research Committee on the basis of their impact. PMID:26598632

  1. Top 10 TARN research publications.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Antoinette

    2015-12-01

    The last 25 years have seen Trauma Audit and Research Network's (TARN) research agenda develop into a significant portfolio of over 100 publications, including a number of international collaborations. Holding the largest trauma registry in Europe, TARN continues to provide researchers with the ability to pursue their interests in both epidemiological and clinical topics relating to traumatic injury. This edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal provides an opportunity to celebrate some of these papers with a 'Top 10', which have been voted by members of the TARN Research Committee on the basis of their impact.

  2. HUBBLE'S TOP TEN GRAVITATIONAL LENSES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Hubble Space Telescope serendipitous survey of the sky has uncovered exotic patterns, rings, arcs and crosses that are all optical mirages produced by a gravitational lens, nature's equivalent of having giant magnifying glass in space. Shown are the top 10 lens candidates uncovered in the deepest 100 Hubble fields. Hubble's sensitivity and high resolution allow it to see faint and distant lenses that cannot be detected with ground-based telescopes whose images are blurred by Earth's atmosphere. [Top Left] - HST 01248+0351 is a lensed pair on either side of the edge-on disk lensing galaxy. [Top Center] - HST 01247+0352 is another pair of bluer lensed source images around the red spherical elliptical lensing galaxy. Two much fainter images can be seen near the detection limit which might make this a quadruple system. [Top Right] - HST 15433+5352 is a very good lens candidate with a bluer lensed source in the form of an extended arc about the redder elliptical lensing galaxy. [Middle Far Left] - HST 16302+8230 could be an 'Einstein ring' and the most intriguing lens candidate. It has been nicknamed the 'the London Underground' since it resembles that logo. [Middle Near Left] - HST 14176+5226 is the first, and brightest lens system discovered in 1995 with the Hubble telescope. This lens candidate has now been confirmed spectroscopically using large ground-based telescopes. The elliptical lensing galaxy is located 7 billion light-years away, and the lensed quasar is about 11 billion light-years distant. [Middle Near Right] - HST 12531-2914 is the second quadruple lens candidate discovered with Hubble. It is similar to the first, but appears smaller and fainter. [Middle Far Right] - HST 14164+5215 is a pair of bluish lensed images symmetrically placed around a brighter, redder galaxy. [Bottom Left] - HST 16309+8230 is an edge-on disk-like galaxy (blue arc) which has been significantly distorted by the redder lensing elliptical galaxy. [Bottom Center] - HST 12368

  3. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This eighteenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period November 1, 1991 to January 31, 1992. The precombustor is fully assembled. Manufacturing of all slagging stage components has been completed. All cooling panels were welded in place and the panel/shell gap was filled with RTV. Final combustor assembly is in progress. The low pressure cooling subsystem (LPCS) was delivered to the CDIF. Second stage brazing issues were resolved. The construction of the two anode power cabinets was completed.

  4. Top 10 TARN research publications

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Antoinette

    2015-01-01

    The last 25 years have seen Trauma Audit and Research Network's (TARN) research agenda develop into a significant portfolio of over 100 publications, including a number of international collaborations. Holding the largest trauma registry in Europe, TARN continues to provide researchers with the ability to pursue their interests in both epidemiological and clinical topics relating to traumatic injury. This edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal provides an opportunity to celebrate some of these papers with a ‘Top 10’, which have been voted by members of the TARN Research Committee on the basis of their impact. PMID:26598632

  5. Table-top job analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to establish general training program guidelines for training personnel in developing training for operation, maintenance, and technical support personnel at Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. TTJA is not the only method of job analysis; however, when conducted properly TTJA can be cost effective, efficient, and self-validating, and represents an effective method of defining job requirements. The table-top job analysis is suggested in the DOE Training Accreditation Program manuals as an acceptable alternative to traditional methods of analyzing job requirements. DOE 5480-20A strongly endorses and recommends it as the preferred method for analyzing jobs for positions addressed by the Order.

  6. In Praise of Top-Down Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufour, Richard

    2007-01-01

    In the ongoing debate of the efficacy of top-down versus bottom-up strategies to improve school districts, top-down is clearly losing. Many district leaders are reluctant to champion improvement for fear of being labeled with the epithet "top-down leader," the unkindest cut of all. In this article, the author presents the change…

  7. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the project is to design and construct prototypical hardware for an integrated MHD topping cycle, and conduct long duration proof-of-concept tests of integrated system at the US DOE Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The results of the long duration tests will augment the existing engineering design data base on MHD power train reliability, availability, maintainability, and performance, and will serve as a basis for scaling up the topping cycle design to the next level of development, an early commercial scale power plant retrofit. The components of the MHD power train to be designed, fabricated, and tested include: A slagging coal combustor with a rated capacity of 50 MW thermal input, capable of operation with an Eastern (Illinois {number sign}6) or Western (Montana Rosebud) coal, a segmented supersonic nozzle, a supersonic MHD channel capable of generating at least 1.5 MW of electrical power, a segmented supersonic diffuser section to interface the channel with existing facility quench and exhaust systems, a complete set of current control circuits for local diagonal current control along the channel, and a set of current consolidation circuits to interface the channel with the existing facility inverter.

  8. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) Project represents the culmination of the proof-of-concept (POC) development stage in the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to advance MHD technology to early commercial development stage utility power applications. The project is a joint effort, combining the skills of three topping cycle component developers: TRW, Avco/TDS, and Westinghouse. TRW, the prime contractor and system integrator, is responsible for the 50 thermal megawatt (50 MW{sub t}) slagging coal combustion subsystem. Avco/TDS is responsible for the MHD channel subsystem (nozzle, channel, diffuser, and power conditioning circuits), and Westinghouse is responsible for the current consolidation subsystem. The ITC Project will advance the state-of-the-art in MHD power systems with the design, construction, and integrated testing of 50 MW{sub t} power train components which are prototypical of the equipment that will be used in an early commercial scale MHD utility retrofit. Long duration testing of the integrated power train at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana will be performed, so that by the early 1990's, an engineering data base on the reliability, availability, maintainability and performance of the system will be available to allow scaleup of the prototypical designs to the next development level. This Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period May 1, 1991 to July 31, 1991.

  9. Top Quark Studies at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2014-11-26

    Years after its discovery in 1995 by CDF and D0, the top quark still undergoes intense investigations at the Tevatron. Using up to the full Run II data sample, new measurements of top quark production and properties by the D0 Collaboration are presented. In particular, the first observation of single top quark s-channel production, the measurement of differential tbar t distributions, forward-backward tbar t asymmetry, a new measurement of the top quark mass, and a measurement of the top quark charge are discussed.

  10. CP Violation in Single Top Quark Production

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Weigang

    2012-01-01

    We present a search for CP violation in single top quark production with the DØ experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. CP violation in the top electroweak interaction results in different single top quark production cross sections for top and antitop quarks. We perform the search in the single top quark final state using 5.4 fb-1 of data, in the s-channel, t-channel, and for both combined. At this time, we do not see an observable CP asymmetry.

  11. Measurements of top quark properties at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Kraan, Aafke C.; /Pennsylvania U.

    2006-11-01

    The top quark with its mass of about 172 GeV/c{sup 2} is the most massive fundamental particle observed by experiment. In this talk they highlight the most recent measurements of several top quark properties performed with the CDF detector based on data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities up to 1 fb{sup -1}. These results include a search for top quark pair production via new massive resonances, measurements of the helicity of the W boson from top-quark decay, and a direct limit on the lifetime of the top quark.

  12. Top Quark Physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Deliot, Frederic; Glenzinski, Douglas A.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    The authors review the field of top-quark physics with an emphasis on experimental techniques. The role of the top quark in the Standard Model of particle physics is summarized and the basic phenomenology of top-quark production and decay is introduced. They discuss how contributions from physics beyond the Standard model could affect the top-quark properties or event samples. The many measurements made at the Fermilab Tevatron, which test the Standard model predictions or probe for direct evidence of new physics using the top-quark event samples, are reviewed here.

  13. Radiatively Driven Turbulence at the Cloud Top

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lozar, Alberto; Mellado, Juan Pedro

    2012-11-01

    We use Direct Numerical Simulations to investigate a radiatively-driven smoke cloud-top mixing layer. This configuration mimics relevant aspects of stratocumuls clouds, in particular the mixing across an inversion that bounds a radiatively driven turbulent flow. A 1D formulation is employed for the radiation calculations. Below the inversion a convective boundary layer propagates downwards into the cloud-bulk. The convective boundary layer decouples from the inversion properties other than the injected buoyancy flux. This buoyancy flux is equal to the total radiative cooling minus the cooling of the inversion layer where the cloud mixes with the free atmosphere. An exact equation at a properly defined inversion point divides the inversion cooling into three components: a molecular flux, a turbulent flux and the direct radiative cooling by the smoke inside the inversion layer. The normalized turbulent flux levels to a constant value (0 . 175 +/- 0 . 05), which is independent of the stratification. As suggested by earlies studies, we observe that the turbulent entrainment only occurs at the small scales and that eddies larger than four optical lengths (50 m in a typical DYCOMS-II cloud) perform little or no entrainment.

  14. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This seventeenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period August 1, 1991 to October 31, 1991. Manufacturing of the prototypical combustor pressure shell has been completed including leak, proof, and assembly fit checking. Manufacturing of forty-five cooling panels was also completed including leak, proof, and flow testing. All precombustor internal components (combustion can baffle and swirl box) were received and checked, and integration of the components was initiated. A decision was made regarding the primary and backup designs for the 1A4 channel. The assembly of the channel related prototypical hardware continued. The cathode wall electrical wiring is now complete. The mechanical design of the diffuser has been completed.

  15. Entanglement and chaos in the kicked top.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, M; Matzkin, A

    2011-01-01

    The standard kicked top involves a periodically kicked angular momentum. By considering this angular momentum as a collection of entangled spins, we compute the bipartite entanglement dynamics as a function of the dynamics of the classical counterpart. Our numerical results indicate that the entanglement of the quantum top depends on the specific details of the dynamics of the classical top rather than depending universally on the global properties of the classical regime. These results are grounded on linking the entanglement rate to averages involving the classical angular momentum, thereby explaining why regular dynamics can entangle as efficiently as the classically chaotic regime. The findings are in line with previous results obtained with a two-particle top model, and we show here that the standard kicked top can be obtained as a limiting case of the two-particle top.

  16. Chemical routes to top-down nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai-Dong; Regulacio, Michelle D; Ye, Enyi; Han, Ming-Yong

    2013-07-21

    In fabricating materials at the nanometer scale, nanotechnologists typically employ two general strategies: bottom-up and top-down. While the bottom-up approach constructs nanomaterials from basic building blocks like atoms or molecules, the top-down approach produces nanostructures by deconstructing larger materials with the use of lithographic tools (i.e., physical top-down) or through chemical-based processes (i.e., chemical top-down). This tutorial review summarizes the various top-down nanofabrication methods, with great emphasis on the chemical routes that can generate nanoporous materials and ordered arrays of nanostructures with three-dimensional features. The chemical top-down routes that are discussed in detail include (1) templated etching, (2) selective dealloying, (3) anisotropic dissolution, and (4) thermal decomposition. These emerging nanofabrication tools open up new avenues in the creation of functional nanostructures with a wide array of promising applications.

  17. TOP500 Supercomputers for June 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Meuer, Hans W.; Dongarra, Jack; Simon, Horst D.

    2004-06-23

    23rd Edition of TOP500 List of World's Fastest Supercomputers Released: Japan's Earth Simulator Enters Third Year in Top Position MANNHEIM, Germany; KNOXVILLE, Tenn.;&BERKELEY, Calif. In what has become a closely watched event in the world of high-performance computing, the 23rd edition of the TOP500 list of the world's fastest supercomputers was released today (June 23, 2004) at the International Supercomputer Conference in Heidelberg, Germany.

  18. TOP500 Supercomputers for November 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Meuer, Hans W.; Dongarra, Jack; Simon, Horst D.

    2004-11-08

    24th Edition of TOP500 List of World's Fastest Supercomputers Released: DOE/IBM BlueGene/L and NASA/SGI's Columbia gain Top Positions MANNHEIM, Germany; KNOXVILLE, Tenn.; BERKELEY, Calif. In what has become a closely watched event in the world of high-performance computing, the 24th edition of the TOP500 list of the worlds fastest supercomputers was released today (November 8, 2004) at the SC2004 Conference in Pittsburgh, Pa.

  19. TOP500 Supercomputers for June 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Meuer, Hans W.; Dongarra, Jack; Simon, Horst D.

    2005-06-22

    25th Edition of TOP500 List of World's Fastest Supercomputers Released: DOE/L LNL BlueGene/L and IBM gain Top Positions MANNHEIM, Germany; KNOXVILLE, Tenn.; BERKELEY, Calif. In what has become a closely watched event in the world of high-performance computing, the 25th edition of the TOP500 list of the world's fastest supercomputers was released today (June 22, 2005) at the 20th International Supercomputing Conference (ISC2005) in Heidelberg Germany.

  20. Top quark mass measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Tuula; /Helsinki U. /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark mass is interesting both as a fundamental parameter of the standard model as well as an important input to precision electroweak tests. The CDF Collaboration has measured the top quark mass with high precision in all decay channels with complementary methods. A combination of the results from CDF gives a top quark mass of 170.5{+-}1.3(stat.){+-}1.8(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  1. Boat Deck, Cabin Deck, Bridge Deck, Flat House Top, Stage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Boat Deck, Cabin Deck, Bridge Deck, Flat House Top, Stage Top, Mast House Top, Upper Deck, Flat House Tops, Forecastle Deck, Main Deck - American Racer, Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  2. Top Quark Physics at the CDF Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stelzer, Bernd; Collaboration, for the CDF

    2010-07-01

    Fermilab's Tevatron accelerator is recently performing at record luminosities that enables a program systematically addressing the physics of top quarks. The CDF collaboration has analyzed up to 5 fb{sup -1} of proton anti-proton collisions from the Tevatron at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The large datasets available allow to push top quark measurements to higher and higher precision and have lead to the recent observation of electroweak single top quark production at the Tevatron. This article reviews recent results on top quark physics from the CDF experiment.

  3. Beyond the minimal top partner decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Javi

    2015-09-01

    Light top partners are the prime sign of naturalness in composite Higgs models. We explore here the possibility of non-standard top partner phenomenology. We show that even in the simplest extension of the minimal composite Higgs model, featuring an extra singlet pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson, the branching ratios of the top partners into standard channels can be significantly altered, with no substantial change in the generated Higgs potential. Together with the variety of possible final states from the decay of the pseudo-scalar singlet, this motivates more extensive analyses in the search for the top partners.

  4. Top Quark Production Asymmetries AFBt and AFBl

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berger, Edmond L.; Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Yu, Jiang-Hao; Zhang, Hao

    2012-02-14

    A large forward-backward asymmetry is seen in both the top quark rapidity distribution AFBt and in the rapidity distribution of charged leptons AFBl from top quarks produced at the Tevatron. We study the kinematic and dynamic aspects of the relationship of the two observables arising from the spin correlation between the charged lepton and the top quark with different polarization states. We emphasize the value of both measurements, and we conclude that a new physics model which produces more right-handed than left-handed top quarks is favored by the present data.

  5. Top-of-Rail lubricant

    SciTech Connect

    Alzoubi, M. F.; Fenske, G. R.; Erck, R. A.; Boparai, A. S.

    2000-07-14

    Analysis of the volatile and semivolatile fractions collected after use of the TOR lubricant indicated that other than contaminants in the collection laboratory, no compounds on the EPA's Target Compound Lists (Tables 2 and 5) were detected in these fractions. The data of these qualitative analyses, given in the various tables in the text, indicate only the relative amounts of the tentatively identified compounds. The authors recommend that quantitative analysis be performed on the volatile and semivolatile fractions to allow confirmation of the tentatively identified compounds and to obtain absolute amounts of the detected compounds. Additionally, the semivolatile fraction should be analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to identify compounds that are not chromatographable under the temperature program used for determination of semivolatile compounds. Introducing the top-of-rail (TOR) lubricant into the wheel/rail interface results in a reduction of almost 60% of lateral friction force over the forces encountered under dry conditions. This reveals good potential for energy savings, as well as wear reduction, for railroad companies. In TOR lubrication, an increase in the angle of attack and axle load results in increased lateral friction and rate of lubricant consumption. The most efficient TOR lubricant quantity to be used in the wheel/rail interface must be calculated precisely according to the number of cars, axle loads, train speed, and angle of attack.

  6. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    This fourteenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period November 1, 1990 to January 31, 1991. Testing of the High Pressure Cooling Subsystem electrical isolator was completed. The PEEK material successfully passed the high temperature, high pressure duration tests (50 hours). The Combustion Subsystem drawings were CADAM released. The procurement process is in progress. An equipment specification and RFP were prepared for the new Low Pressure Cooling System (LPCS) and released for quotation. Work has been conducted on confirmation tests leading to final gas-side designs and studies to assist in channel fabrication.The final cathode gas-side design and the proposed gas-side designs of the anode and sidewall are presented. Anode confirmation tests and related analyses of anode wear mechanisms used in the selection of the proposed anode design are presented. Sidewall confirmation tests, which were used to select the proposed gas-side design, were conducted. The design for the full scale CDIF system was completed. A test program was initiated to investigate the practicality of using Avco current controls for current consolidation in the power takeoff (PTO) regions and to determine the cause of past current consolidation failures. Another important activity was the installation of 1A4-style coupons in the 1A1 channel. A description of the coupons and their location with 1A1 channel is presented herein.

  7. Table-top EUV reflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, U.; Chichkov, B.

    2006-03-01

    A novel compact EUV-reflectometer recently developed is presented. The designconcept relies on a flexible approach, thus this reflectometer can be set up as a compact table-top tool for a specified task as well as a full all-purpose reflectometer. As an EUV-source an electron-based microfocus EUV-tube is used. This EUV source is debris-free and provides a typical output of 30μW at 13.5 nm. The reflectometer benefits from the very good long-time stability and spatial stability of this tube. Reflectivity measurements from grazing incidence to nearly normal incidence as well as transmission studies can be realized in the same setup at a typical precision of measurements of 0.5%. A precise computer-controlled positioning unit allows to vary and scan all important parameters online, allowing for example complex surface scans and angle variations. The concept of the reflectometer is discussed and recent results are presented. This device can be purchased from the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.

  8. Creation of Functional Micro/Nano Systems through Top-down and Bottom-up Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tak-Sing; Brough, Branden; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Mimicking nature’s approach in creating devices with similar functional complexity is one of the ultimate goals of scientists and engineers. The remarkable elegance of these naturally evolved structures originates from bottom-up self-assembly processes. The seamless integration of top-down fabrication and bottom-up synthesis is the challenge for achieving intricate artificial systems. In this paper, technologies necessary for guided bottom-up assembly such as molecular manipulation, molecular binding, and the self assembling of molecules will be reviewed. In addition, the current progress of synthesizing mechanical devices through top-down and bottom-up approaches will be discussed. PMID:19382535

  9. Measuring top-quark polarization in top-pair + missing-energy events.

    PubMed

    Berger, Edmond L; Cao, Qing-Hong; Yu, Jiang-Hao; Zhang, Hao

    2012-10-12

    The polarization of a top quark can be sensitive to new physics beyond the standard model. Since the charged lepton from top-quark decay is maximally correlated with the top-quark spin, it is common to measure the polarization from the distribution in the angle between the charged lepton and the top-quark directions. We propose a novel method based on the charged lepton energy fraction and illustrate the method with a detailed simulation of top-quark pairs produced in supersymmetric top squark pair production. We show that the lepton energy ratio distribution that we define is very sensitive to the top-quark polarization but insensitive to the precise measurement of the top-quark energy.

  10. Top-hat random fiber Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hongwei; Gbadebo, Adenowo; Turitsyna, Elena G

    2015-08-01

    We examined the possibility of using noise or pseudo-random variations of the refractive index in the design of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). We demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that top-hat FBGs may be designed and fabricated using this approach. The reflectivity of the fabricated top-hat FBG matches quite well with that of the designed one. PMID:26258365

  11. World average top-quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzinski, D.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes a talk given at the Top2008 Workshop at La Biodola, Isola d Elba, Italy. The status of the world average top-quark mass is discussed. Some comments about the challanges facing the experiments in order to further improve the precision are offered.

  12. Top Quark Pair Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Jason

    2005-05-17

    The measurement of the top quark pair production crosssection inproton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV is a test ofquantumchromodynamics and could potentially be sensitive to newphysics beyondthe standard model. I report on the latest t-tbarcross section resultsfrom the CDF and DZero experiments in various finalstate topologies whicharise from decays of top quark pairs.

  13. The Sakai Spinner: A Paperclip Top

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrao, Christian T.

    2014-01-01

    A challenge: Can you create a stable top from a single paper clip? Several interesting solutions to this problem were provided by Takao Sakai from Japan, the requirement of each being that the center of gravity be located on the vertical y-axis at the center of the top. In the simplest configuration, we see that there exists a single angle ?…

  14. Tools for top physics at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Harel, Amnon

    2008-07-01

    Top quark measurements rely on the jet energy calibration and often on b-quark identification. We discuss these and other tools and how they apply to top quark analyses at D0. In particular some of the nuances that result from D0's data driven approach to these issues are presented.

  15. Race to Top Draws out New Suitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The list of 61 finalists for the latest Race to the Top competition shows that the U.S. Department of Education was successful in enticing high-scoring applications from districts in rural America and in states that had not shared in the Race to the Top bounty before. But whether the ultimate winners, which will be announced this month, will be…

  16. Top 12 Web Resources for 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Lisa; Vodicka, Devin

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe some of the top websites recommended by colleagues for the Association of California School Administrators. The Top 12 for 2012 are: (1) Facebook (facebook.com); (2) Twitter (twitter.com); (3) Tungle (tungle.me); (4) FCMAT (fcmat.org); (5) YouSendIt (yousendit.com); (6) Slideshare (slideshare.net); (7) QR…

  17. Search for top quark at Fermilab Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Sliwa, K.; The CDF Collaboration

    1991-10-01

    The status of a search for the top quark with Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), based on a data sample recorded during the 1988--1989 run is presented. The plans for the next Fermilab Collider run in 1992--1993 and the prospects of discovering the top quark are discussed. 19 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. 49 CFR 236.779 - Plate, top.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plate, top. 236.779 Section 236.779 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.779 Plate, top....

  19. 49 CFR 236.779 - Plate, top.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plate, top. 236.779 Section 236.779 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.779 Plate, top....

  20. 49 CFR 236.779 - Plate, top.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plate, top. 236.779 Section 236.779 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.779 Plate, top....

  1. 49 CFR 236.779 - Plate, top.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plate, top. 236.779 Section 236.779 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.779 Plate, top....

  2. 49 CFR 236.779 - Plate, top.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plate, top. 236.779 Section 236.779 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.779 Plate, top....

  3. Review of Top Quark Physics Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kehoe, R.; Narain, M.; Kumar, A.

    2007-12-01

    As the heaviest known fundamental particle, the top quark has taken a central role in the study of fundamental interactions. Production of top quarks in pairs provides an important probe of strong interactions. The top quark mass is a key fundamental parameter which places a valuable constraint on the Higgs boson mass and electroweak symmetry breaking. Observations of the relative rates and kinematics of top quark final states constrain potential new physics. In many cases, the tests available with study of the top quark are both critical and unique. Large increases in data samples from the Fermilab Tevatron have been coupled with major improvements in experimental techniques to produce many new precision measurements of the top quark. The first direct evidence for electroweak production of top quarks has been obtained, with a resulting direct determination of V{sub tb}. Several of the properties of the top quark have been measured. Progress has also been made in obtaining improved limits on potential anomalous production and decay mechanisms. This review presents an overview of recent theoretical and experimental developments in this field. We also provide a brief discussion of the implications for further efforts.

  4. Pinch Experiments in a Table Top Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, Jose; Soto, Leopoldo; Tarifeno, Ariel

    2009-01-21

    The design and construction of a table top multipurpose capacitor bank of hundred of Joules and hundred of kiloAmperes conceived to be used in small scale Z-pinch experiments is reported. A recent result on a Z-pinch gas embedded discharge using hollow conical electrodes done in a similar table top generator is also presented.

  5. The Gender Gap in Top Corporate Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertrand, Marianne; Hallock, Kevin F.

    2001-01-01

    Women, about 2% of a sample of top executives, earned about 45% less than men. Three-fourths of the gap may be explained by women managing smaller companies and being less likely to be chair/president. Gender segregation or unequal promotion may play a role. Between 1992-1997, women nearly tripled their representation among top executives, mostly…

  6. TOP500 Supercomputers for June 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Meuer, Hans W.; Dongarra, Jack; Simon, Horst D.

    2002-06-20

    19th Edition of TOP500 List of World's Fastest Supercomputers Released MANNHEIM, Germany; KNOXVILLE, Tenn.;&BERKELEY, Calif. In what has become a much-anticipated event in the world of high-performance computing, the 19th edition of the TOP500 list of the worlds fastest supercomputers was released today (June 20, 2002). The recently installed Earth Simulator supercomputer at the Earth Simulator Center in Yokohama, Japan, is as expected the clear new number 1. Its performance of 35.86 Tflop/s (trillions of calculations per second) running the Linpack benchmark is almost five times higher than the performance of the now No.2 IBM ASCI White system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (7.2 Tflop/s). This powerful leap frogging to the top by a system so much faster than the previous top system is unparalleled in the history of the TOP500.

  7. Protein Identification Using Top-Down

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaowen; Sirotkin, Yakov; Shen, Yufeng; Anderson, Gordon A.; Tsai, Yi-Hsuan S.; Ting, Ying S.; Goodlett, David R.; Smith, Richard D.; Bafna, Vineet; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2012-06-01

    In the last two years, due to advances in protein separation and mass spectrometry, top-down mass spectrometry moved from analyzing single proteins to analyzing complex samples and identifying hundreds and even thousands of proteins. However, computational tools for database search of top-down spectra against protein databases are still in infancy. We describe MS-Align+, a fast algorithm for top-down protein identification based on spectral alignment that enables searches for unexpected post-translational modifications (PTMs). We also propose a method for evaluating statistical significance of top-down protein identifications and further benchmark MS-Align+ along with PIITA, ProSightPTM and SEQUEST, which were previously used for top-down MS/MS database searches. We demonstrate that MS-Align+ and PIITA significantly increase the number of identified proteins as compared to ProSightPTM and SEQUEST.

  8. D{O} top quark mass analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Strovink, M.

    1995-07-01

    Based on (44-48 pb{sup -1}) of lepton + jets data, we review D0`s initial analysis of the top quark mass. The result, M{sub top} = 199 {+-} 19/21 (stat.) {+-} 22 (syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, is insensitive to background normalization. The errors are based on ISAJET top Monte Carlo, with its more severe gluon radiation, and allow for ISAJET/HERWIG differences. Good progress is being made in reducing the systematic error. We present a new study based on two-dimensional distributions of reconstructed top quark vs. dijet mass. With 98.7% confidence we observe a peak in the top mass - dijet mass plane. The peak and its projections are similar both in shape and magnitude to expectations based on the decay sequence 1 {yields} bW, W {yields} jj.

  9. Measurements and searches with top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2008-08-01

    In 1995 the last missing member of the known families of quarks, the top quark, was discovered by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron, a proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab near Chicago. Until today, the Tevatron is the only place where top quarks can be produced. The determination of top quark production and properties is crucial to understand the Standard Model of particle physics and beyond. The most striking property of the top quark is its mass--of the order of the mass of a gold atom and close to the electroweak scale--making the top quark not only interesting in itself but also as a window to new physics. Due to the high mass, much higher than of any other known fermion, it is expected that the top quark plays an important role in electroweak symmetry breaking, which is the most prominent candidate to explain the mass of particles. In the Standard Model, electroweak symmetry breaking is induced by one Higgs field, producing one additional physical particle, the Higgs boson. Although various searches have been performed, for example at the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP), no evidence for the Higgs boson could yet be found in any experiment. At the Tevatron, multiple searches for the last missing particle of the Standard Model are ongoing with ever higher statistics and improved analysis techniques. The exclusion or verification of the Higgs boson can only be achieved by combining many techniques and many final states and production mechanisms. As part of this thesis, the search for Higgs bosons produced in association with a top quark pair (t$\\bar{t}$H) has been performed. This channel is especially interesting for the understanding of the coupling between Higgs and the top quark. Even though the Standard Model Higgs boson is an attractive candidate, there is no reason to believe that the electroweak symmetry breaking is induced by only one Higgs field. In many models more than one Higgs boson are expected to exist, opening even more

  10. Discovery of single top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Gillberg, Dag

    2009-04-01

    The top quark is by far the heaviest known fundamental particle with a mass nearing that of a gold atom. Because of this strikingly high mass, the top quark has several unique properties and might play an important role in electroweak symmetry breaking - the mechanism that gives all elementary particles mass. Creating top quarks requires access to very high energy collisions, and at present only the Tevatron collider at Fermilab is capable of reaching these energies. Until now, top quarks have only been observed produced in pairs via the strong interaction. At hadron colliders, it should also be possible to produce single top quarks via the electroweak interaction. Studies of single top quark production provide opportunities to measure the top quark spin, how top quarks mix with other quarks, and to look for new physics beyond the standard model. Because of these interesting properties, scientists have been looking for single top quarks for more than 15 years. This thesis presents the first discovery of single top quark production. An analysis is performed using 2.3 fb-1 of data recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at centre-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. Boosted decision trees are used to isolate the single top signal from background, and the single top cross section is measured to be σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.74-0.74+0.95 pb. Using the same analysis, a measurement of the amplitude of the CKM matrix element Vtb, governing how top and b quarks mix, is also performed. The measurement yields: |V{sub tb}|f1L| = 1.05 -0.12+0.13, where f1L is the left-handed Wtb coupling. The separation of signal from background is improved by combining the boosted decision trees with two other multivariate techniques. A new cross section measurement is performed, and the significance for the excess over the predicted background exceeds 5

  11. Study of the top reconstruction in top-partner events at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Michihisa

    2008-11-23

    In the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT), top-partners (T{sub -}) are produced in pairs at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Each top-partner decays into a top quark (t) and the lightest T-odd gauge partner A{sub H}. We demonstrate reconstruction of the tt-bar system decaying hadronically and measurement of the top-partner mass from the m{sub T2} distribution. A top quark from a T{sub -} decay is polarized, and we discuss the effect of this polarization on the decay distributions.

  12. THE TOP QUARK, QCD, AND NEW PHYSICS.

    SciTech Connect

    DAWSON,S.

    2002-06-01

    The role of the top quark in completing the Standard Model quark sector is reviewed, along with a discussion of production, decay, and theoretical restrictions on the top quark properties. Particular attention is paid to the top quark as a laboratory for perturbative QCD. As examples of the relevance of QCD corrections in the top quark sector, the calculation of e{sup +}e{sup -} + t{bar t} at next-to-leading-order QCD using the phase space slicing algorithm and the implications of a precision measurement of the top quark mass are discussed in detail. The associated production of a t{bar t} pair and a Higgs boson in either e{sup +}e{sup -} or hadronic collisions is presented at next-to-leading-order QCD and its importance for a measurement of the top quark Yulrawa coupling emphasized. Implications of the heavy top quark mass for model builders are briefly examined, with the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model and topcolor discussed as specific examples.

  13. The Top Quark, QCD, And New Physics.

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Dawson, S.

    2002-06-01

    The role of the top quark in completing the Standard Model quark sector is reviewed, along with a discussion of production, decay, and theoretical restrictions on the top quark properties. Particular attention is paid to the top quark as a laboratory for perturbative QCD. As examples of the relevance of QCD corrections in the top quark sector, the calculation of e{sup+}e{sup -}+ t{bar t} at next-to-leading-order QCD using the phase space slicing algorithm and the implications of a precision measurement of the top quark mass are discussed in detail. The associated production of a t{bar t} pair and a Higgs boson in either e{sup+}e{sup -} or hadronic collisions is presented at next-to-leading-order QCD and its importance for a measurement of the top quark Yulrawa coupling emphasized. Implications of the heavy top quark mass for model builders are briefly examined, with the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model and topcolor discussed as specific examples.

  14. Tevatron Top-Quark Combinations and World Top-Quark Mass Combination

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2014-11-04

    Almost 20 years after its discovery, the top quark is still an interesting particle, undergoing precise investigation of its properties. For many years, the Tevatron proton antiproton collider at Fermilab was the only place to study top quarks in detail, while with the recent start of the LHC proton proton collider a top quark factory has opened. An important ingredient for the full understanding of the top quark is the combination of measurements from the individual experiments. In particular, the Tevaton combinations of single top-quark cross sections, the ttbar production cross section, the W helicity in top-quark decays as well as the Tevatron and the world combination of the top-quark mass are discussed.

  15. Single Top Quark Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzani, Manfredi

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the most recent measurements of single top quark production performed by CDF and D0 collaborations in proton-antiproton collisions at Tevatron. Events are selected in the lepton+jets final state by CDF and D0 and in the missing transverse energy plus jets final state by CDF. The small single top signal in s-channel, t-channel and inclusive s+t channel is separated from the large background by using different multivariate techniques. We also present the most recent results on extraction of the CKM matrix element $|V_{tb}|$ from the single top quark cross section.

  16. Top quark properties from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Klute, Markus; /MIT, LNS

    2006-05-01

    This report describes latest measurements and studies of top quark properties from the Tevatron in Run II with an integrated luminosity of up to 750 pb{sup -1}. Due to its large mass of about 172 GeV/c{sup 2}, the top quark provides a unique environment for tests of the Standard Model and is believed to yield sensitivity to new physics beyond the Standard Model. With data samples of close to 1 fb{sup -1} the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron enter a new area of precision top quark measurements.

  17. Single top quark production at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Jabeen, S.; /Boston U.

    2008-07-01

    We present first evidence for the production of single top quarks at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. Using a 0.9 fb{sup -1} dataset, we apply a multivariate analysis to separate signal from background and measure cross section for single top quark production. We use the cross section measurement to directly determine the CKM matrix element that describes the Wtb coupling. We also present results of W0 and charged Higgs searches with the same final states as standard model single top quark production.

  18. Top quark mass measurement at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; /Harvard U.

    2004-12-01

    The authors report on the latest experimental measurements of the top quark mass by the CDF and D0 Collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron. They present a new top mass measurement using the t{bar t} events collected by the D0 Collaboration in Run I between 1994 and 1996. This result is combined with previous measurements to yield a new world top mass average. They also describe several preliminary results using up to 193 pb{sup -1} of t{bar t} events produced in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV during the Run II of the Tevatron.

  19. Precision Determination of the Top Quark Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Movilla Fernandez, Pedro A.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-05-01

    The CDF and D0 collaborations have updated their measurements of the mass of the top quark using proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV produced at the Tevatron. The uncertainties in each of the top-antitop decay channels have been reduced. The new Tevatron average for the mass of the top quark based on about 1 fb{sup -1} of data per experiment is 170.9 {+-} 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  20. Top Ten Technology Breakthroughs for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateman, Bill; Crystal, Jerry; Davidson, Hall; Holzberg, Carol S.; McIntire, Todd; McLester, Susan; Ohler, Jason; Rose, Ray; Shields, Jean; Warlick, David

    2001-01-01

    Contributors discuss the top ten technologies that allow for thinking in new and innovative ways about the concept of "school": virtual learning; wireless networking; collaboration tools; digital video; Application Service Providers; handheld devices; optical networking; videoconferencing; XML; and simulations. (AEF)

  1. Dark Decay of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye-Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. The top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6sigma deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t-->bW+Z's. This is the same as the dominant top quark decay (t-->bW) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. We discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.

  2. Wind Energy Program: Top 10 Program Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-18

    Brochure on the top accomplishments of the Wind Energy Program, including the development of large wind machines, small machines for the residential market, wind tunnel testing, computer codes for modeling wind systems, high definition wind maps, and successful collaborations.

  3. Top quark physics with ATLAS and CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Onofre, A.

    2009-12-17

    The potential of the ATLAS and CMS experiments for studying top quark physics at the LHC is reviewed. The measurements of the tt-bar production cross section and spin correlations, the top quark mass, its electric charge, the structure of the W tb vertex and the measurement of the W boson helicities, the sensitivity to anomalous couplings, top quark rare decays through Flavour Changing Neutral Currents and the single top quark production are discussed. The results shown use the fall Monte Carlo simulation of ATLAS and CMS and assume a center of mass energy of 14 TeV at the LHC. Integrated luminosities in the range between B(10 bp{sup -1}) and B(10 fb{sup -1}) are considered, depending on the physics observables under study.

  4. Top and higgs physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre Savard

    2002-12-23

    We present a summary of our experimental understanding of the top quark and discuss the significant improvements expected in Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We also discuss prospects for a Higgs boson discovery at the Tevatron.

  5. Review of recent top quark measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, A.P.; /UC, Riverside

    2004-11-01

    At the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab, a large number of top quarks have been produced in the ongoing run. The CDF and D0 collaborations have made first measurements of the t{bar t} cross section in several decay channels, and have measured the top quark mass. In addition, they have set new limits on the cross sections for single top quark production, and have started to measure some of the properties of the top quark via studies of its decays. This paper summarizes the status of these measurements and discusses where they are heading in the next few years. The paper is based on a talk I gave at the Rencontres du Vietnam in Hanoi, August 2004; the results have been updated to show the latest values and new measurements.

  6. Top Quark Physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Andreas W.

    2015-05-21

    An overview of recent top quark measurements using the full Run II data set of CDF or D0 at the Tevatron is presented. Results are complementary to the ones at the LHC. Recent measurements of the production cross section of top quarks in strong and electroweak production and of top quark production asymmetries are presented. The latter includes the measurement of the tt-bar production asymmetry by D0 in the dilepton decay channel. Within their uncertainties the results from all these measurements agree with their respective Standard Model expectation. Finally latest updates on measurements of the top quark mass are discussed, which at the time of the conference are the most precise determinations.

  7. Dark decay of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye -Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. Top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6 σ deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t → b W + Z's. This is the same as the dominant top quark decay (t → b W) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. In addition, we discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.

  8. Best of "Earth As Art" -- Top Five

    NASA Video Gallery

    Counting down the Top Five Earth As Art images, as voted on by the public. Landsat has been collecting data of the Earth's surface since 1972. Some of the images are visually striking, and they hav...

  9. High index top layer for multimaterial coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinlechner, Jessica; Martin, Iain W.

    2016-05-01

    For application in future cryogenically cooled gravitational wave detectors, the thermal noise of low absorbing mirror coatings has to be reduced. The development of low mechanical and optical loss materials is challenging, but thermal noise reduction can be significantly supported by using a multimaterial coating design. We analyze the possible improvement of the total (optical and mechanical) loss of a three-material based coating obtained by optimizing the properties of the top layer of the coating stack. A top-layer material with sufficiently high refractive index could have a significantly higher optical and mechanical loss than currently used tantala, while still enabling reduction of the total coating loss. Restrictions on possible top-layer material properties are made, and the option of a crystalline top layer is discussed.

  10. The Discovery of the Top Quark

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1995-12-01

    The top quark and the Higgs boson are the heaviest elementary particles predicted by the standard model. The four lightest quark flavours, the up, down, strange and charm quarks, were well-established by the mid-1970's. The discovery in 1977 of the {Tau} resonances, a new family of massive hadrons, required the introduction of the fifth quark flavour. Experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that this quark also has a heavier partner, the top quark.

  11. Tools for top physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Palencia, E.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    The authors describe here the different tools used for top physics analysis in the CDF Collaboration. In particular, they discuss how the jet energy scale, lepton identification, b tagging algorithms and the neural networks help to improve the signal to background ratio of the top sample in some cases and to reduce the dominant uncertainties in other. Results using each one of these tools are also presented.

  12. Single top quarks at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, A.P.; Belyaev, A.S.; Boos, E.E.

    1997-09-01

    We present a calculation of the single top quark cross section for proton-antiproton interactions with {radical}(s)=1.8TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We examine the effects of the top quark mass, parton distribution functions, QCD scale, and collision energy, on each of the component production mechanisms, and study the kinematic distributions for standard model electroweak production. At the upgraded Tevatron with {radical}(s)=2.0TeV and high luminosity, it will be possible to test the nature of the Wtb coupling using single top quark production. We estimate the sensitivity to measure the single top quark cross section, and thus to directly measure V{sub tb} and the top quark partial width. We show what happens to the V{sub tb} measurement when an anomalous (V+A) component is added to the Wtb coupling, and how the top quark polarization affects the kinematic distributions. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Jet substructures of boosted polarized top quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadono, Yoshio; Li, Hsiang-nan

    2014-06-01

    We study jet substructures of a boosted polarized top quark, which undergoes the semileptonic decay t→bℓν, in the perturbative QCD framework. The jet mass distribution (energy profile) is factorized into the convolution of a hard top-quark decay kernel with the bottom-quark jet function (jet energy function). Computing the hard kernel to the leading order in QCD and inputting the latter functions from the resummation formalism, we observe that the jet mass distribution is not sensitive to the helicity of the top quark, but the energy profile is: energy is accumulated faster within a left-hand top jet than within a right-hand one, a feature related to the V-A structure of weak interaction. It is pointed out that the energy profile is a simple and useful jet observable for helicity discrimination of a boosted top quark, which helps identification of physics beyond the standard model at the Large Hadron Collider. The extension of our analysis to other jet substructures, including those associated with a hadronically decaying polarized top quark, is proposed.

  14. Top Down Chemistry Versus Bottom up Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Takeshi; Witt, Adolf N.

    2016-06-01

    The idea of interstellar top down chemistry (TDC), in which molecules are produced from decomposition of larger molecules and dust in contrast to ordinary bottom up chemistry (BUC) in which molecules are produced synthetically from smaller molecules and atoms in the ISM, has been proposed in the chemistry of PAH and carbon chain molecules both for diffusea,c and dense cloudsb,d. A simple and natural idea, it must have occurred to many people and has been in the air for sometime. The validity of this hypothesis is apparent for diffuse clouds in view of the observed low abundance of small molecules and its rapid decrease with molecular size on the one hand and the high column densities of large carbon molecules demonstrated by the many intense diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) on the other. Recent identification of C60^+ as the carrier of 5 near infrared DIBs with a high column density of 2×1013 cm-2 by Maier and others confirms the TDC. This means that the large molecules and dust produced in the high density high temperature environment of circumstellar envelopes are sufficiently stable to survive decompositions due to stellar UV radiaiton, cosmic rays, C-shocks etc. for a long time (≥ 10^7 year) of their migration to diffuse clouds and seems to disagree with the consensus in the field of interstellar grains. The stability of molecules and aggregates in the diffuse interstellar medium will be discussed. Duley, W. W. 2006, Faraday Discuss. 133, 415 Zhen,J., Castellanos, P., Paardekooper, D. M., Linnartz, H., Tielens, A. G. G. M. 2014, ApJL, 797, L30 Huang, J., Oka, T. 2015, Mol. Phys. 113, 2159 Guzmán, V. V., Pety, J., Goicoechea, J. R., Gerin, M., Roueff, E., Gratier, P., Öberg, K. I. 2015, ApJL, 800, L33 L. Ziurys has sent us many papers beginning Ziurys, L. M. 2006, PNAS 103, 12274 indicating she had long been a proponent of the idea. Campbell, E. K., Holz, M., Maier, J. P., Gerlich, D., Walker, G. A. H., Bohlender, D, 2016, ApJ, in press Draine, B. T. 2003

  15. Measurement of top quark polarisation in t-channel single top quark production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cerminara, G.; D'Alfonso, M.; D'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; de Gruttola, M.; de Guio, F.; de Roeck, A.; de Visscher, S.; di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz Del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; de Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, R.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tsai, J. F.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. 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D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Gastler, D.; Lawson, P.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon de La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Paneva, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; MacNeill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; McColl, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Jung, A. 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L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; McGinn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-04-01

    A first measurement of the top quark spin asymmetry, sensitive to the top quark polarisation, in t-channel single top quark production is presented. It is based on a sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. A high-purity sample of t-channel single top quark events with an isolated muon is selected. Signal and background components are estimated using a fit to data. A differential cross section measurement, corrected for detector effects, of an angular observable sensitive to the top quark polarisation is performed. The differential distribution is used to extract a top quark spin asymmetry of 0.26 ± 0.03(stat) ± 0.10(syst), which is compatible with a p-value of 4.6% with the standard model prediction of 0.44. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Measurement of top quark polarisation in t-channel single top quark production

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-13

    Our first measurement of the top quark spin asymmetry, sensitive to the top quark polarisation, in t-channel single top quark production is presented. It is based on a sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. A high-purity sample of t-channel single top quark events with an isolated muon is selected. Signal and background components are estimated using a fit to data. Furthermore, a differential cross section measurement, corrected for detector effects, of an angular observable sensitive to the top quark polarisation is performed. The differential distribution is usedmore » to extract a top quark spin asymmetry of 0.26 ± 0.03 (stat) ± 0.10 (syst), which is compatible with a p-value of 4.6% with the standard model prediction of 0.44.« less

  17. Top Quark Properties in Little Higgs Models

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.F.; Perelstein, M.; Petriello, F.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-12-08

    Identifying the mechanism which breaks electroweak symmetry and generates fermion masses is one of the main physics goals for both the LHC and the ILC. Studies of the top quark have the potential to illuminate this issue; since it is the heaviest of the Standard Model (SM) fermions, the top is expected to couple strongly to the symmetry-breaking sector. Consequently, the structure of that sector can have significant, potentially observable effects on the properties of the top. for example, it is well known that the vector and axial t{bar t}Z form factors receive large corrections (of order 5-10%) in certain models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking [1]. At future colliders such as the LHC and the ILC, we will be able to pursue a program of precision top physics, similar to the program studying the Z at LEP and SLC. In this manuscript, they study the corrections to the top quark properties in ''Little Higgs'' models of electroweak symmetry breaking [2], and compare the expected deviations from the SM predictions with expected sensitivities of experiments at the LHC and the ILC. In the Little Higgs models, electroweak symmetry is driven by the radiative effects from the top sector, including the SM-like top and its heavy counterpart, a TeV-scale ''heavy top'' T. Probing this structure experimentally is quite difficult. While the LHC should be able to discover the T quark, its potential for studying its couplings is limited [3,4]. Direct production of the T will likely be beyond the kinematic reach of the ILC. However, we will show below that the corrections to the gauge couplings of the SM top, induced by its mixing with the T, will be observable at the ILC throughout the parameter range consistent with naturalness. Measuring these corrections will provide a unique window on the top sector of the Little Higgs. Many Little Higgs models have been proposed in the literature. We will consider two examples in this study, the ''Littlest Higgs'' model [5], and its

  18. Production and decay of heavy top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.P.

    1989-08-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that the top quark exists and has a mass between 50 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}. The decays of a top quark with a mass in this range are studied with emphasis placed on the mass region near the threshold for production of real W bosons. Topics discussed are: (1) possible enhancement of strange quark production when M{sub W} + m{sub s} < m{sub t} < M{sub W} + m{sub b}; (2) exclusive decays of T mesons to B and B{asterisk} mesons using the non-relativistic quark model; (3) polarization of intermediate W's in top quark decay as a source of information on the top quark mass. The production of heavy top quarks in an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider with a center-of-mass energy of 2 TeV is studied. The effective-boson approximation for photons, Z{sup 0}'s and W's is reviewed and an analogous approximation for interfaces between photons and Z{sup 0}'s is developed. The cross sections for top quark pair production from photon-photon, photon-Z{sup 0}, Z{sup 0}Z{sup 0}, and W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} fusion are calculated using the effective-boson approximation. Production of top quarks along with anti-bottom quarks via {gamma}W{sup +} and Z{sup 0}W{sup +} fusion is studied. An exact calculation of {gamma}e{sup +} {yields} {bar {nu}}t{bar b} is made and compared with the effective-W approximation. 31 refs., 46 figs.

  19. Heavy flavor production and top quark search at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    We review heavy flavor production at hadron colliders, with an eye towards the physics of the top quark. Motivation for existence of top, and current status of top search are reviewed. The physics of event simulation at hadron colliders is reviewed. We discuss characteristics of top quark events at p{bar p} colliders that may aid in distinguishing the top quark signal from Standard Model backgrounds, and illustrate various cuts which may be useful for top discovery. Top physics at hadron supercolliders is commented upon, as well as top quark mass measurement techniques. 22 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST): turbulence characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen-La Plante, Imai; Ma, Yongfeng; Nurowska, Katarzyna; Gerber, Hermann; Khelif, Djamal; Karpinska, Katarzyna; Kopec, Marta K.; Kumala, Wojciech; Malinowski, Szymon P.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence observed during the Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST) research campaign is analyzed. Using in-flight measurements of dynamic and thermodynamic variables at the interface between the stratocumulus cloud top and free troposphere, the cloud top region is classified into sublayers, and the thicknesses of these sublayers are estimated. The data are used to calculate turbulence characteristics, including the bulk Richardson number, mean-square velocity fluctuations, turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), TKE dissipation rate, and Corrsin, Ozmidov and Kolmogorov scales. A comparison of these properties among different sublayers indicates that the entrainment interfacial layer consists of two significantly different sublayers: the turbulent inversion sublayer (TISL) and the moist, yet hydrostatically stable, cloud top mixing sublayer (CTMSL). Both sublayers are marginally turbulent, i.e., the bulk Richardson number across the layers is critical. This means that turbulence is produced by shear and damped by buoyancy such that the sublayer thicknesses adapt to temperature and wind variations across them. Turbulence in both sublayers is anisotropic, with Corrsin and Ozmidov scales as small as ˜ 0.3 and ˜ 3 m in the TISL and CTMSL, respectively. These values are ˜ 60 and ˜ 15 times smaller than typical layer depths, indicating flattened large eddies and suggesting no direct mixing of cloud top and free-tropospheric air. Also, small scales of turbulence are different in sublayers as indicated by the corresponding values of Kolmogorov scales and buoyant and shear Reynolds numbers.

  1. Top Stars: An Opportunity for Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnison, S. M. P.

    2010-08-01

    Think you're a Top Star? Want to find out what it takes? Learn about NASA's Top Stars contest and how you can participate. Throughout its lifetime, the Hubble Space Telescope has inspired and promoted education. The final Hubble servicing mission in May of this year and the celebration of Hubble's 20th anniversary in 2010 are key mission milestones, and both enrich activities for the 2009 International Year of Astronomy. U.S. formal (K-12 and college) and informal educators are invited to submit their best examples of using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope for science, technology, engineering or mathematics education. Those selected as Top Stars will receive national recognition and awards. Participants will learn about the contest, the recognition and awards, and how to register and save their entries on the Top Stars Web site. Educators are allowed and encouraged to revise, improve and re-submit their entries up to the final deadline of January 2, 2010. The contest is open to individuals and teams of up to four people who are U.S. citizens and are at least 21 years old. NASA and Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) employees or their contractors are not eligible. IGES is conducting Top Stars with NASA funding and in cooperation with the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  2. Towards the Top with D0

    SciTech Connect

    Deliot, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    The plan of this manuscript follows my research path over the past 10 years: the muon identification and common analysis tools at DØ, the measurement of the inclusive production of W boson decaying into muon and top quark studies. In the first section, I describe my work about muon identification, certification of the standard muon identification criteria, measurement of the muon selection efficiency and about the development of common analysis format and tools. In the second section, I explain how these efficiency measurements can be used to measure the inclusive W boson production cross section in the muon channel. The W ! μν cross section measurement can be seen as a standard candle to establish several analysis pieces that have to be put in place to perform more complex measurements like top quark analyses. In the last section I introduce more extensively the top quark physics at the Tevatron and describe in more details the main analyses in the dilepton channel I was involved in: the measurement of the tt inclusive cross section in the dilepton channel as well as the ratio of cross sections, the measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel, the extraction of the mass from the tt cross section and the Tevatron top quark mass combination. Before concluding, I finish the section with the description of the latest results on the tt charge asymmetry both at the Tevatron and at the LHC.

  3. Top differential cross section measurements (Tevatron)

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Andreas W.

    2012-01-01

    Differential cross sections in the top quark sector measured at the Fermilab Tevatron collider are presented. CDF used 2.7 fb{sup -1} of data and measured the differential cross section as a function of the invariant mass of the t{bar t} system. The measurement shows good agreement with the standard model and furthermore is used to derive limits on the ratio {kappa}/M{sub Pl} for gravitons which decay to top quarks in the Randall-Sundrum model. D0 used 1.0 fb{sup -1} of data to measure the differential cross section as a function of the transverse momentum of the top-quark. The measurement shows a good agreement to the next-to-leading order perturbative QCD prediction and various other standard model predictions.

  4. Top B physics at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Gedalia, Oram; Isidori, Gino; Maltoni, Fabio; Perez, Gilad; Selvaggi, Michele; Soreq, Yotam

    2013-06-01

    In top-pair events where at least one of the tops decays semileptonically, the identification of the lepton charge allows us to tag not only the top quark charge but also that of the subsequent b quark. In cases where the b also decays semileptonically, the charge of the two leptons can be used to probe CP violation in heavy flavor mixing and decays. This strategy to measure CP violation is independent of those adopted so far in experiments, and can already constrain non standard model sources of CP violation with current and near future LHC data. To demonstrate the potential of this method we construct two CP asymmetries based on same-sign and opposite-sign leptons and estimate their sensitivities. This proposal opens a new window for doing precision measurements of CP violation in b and c quark physics via high p(T) processes at ATLAS and CMS.

  5. Top B physics at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Gedalia, Oram; Isidori, Gino; Maltoni, Fabio; Perez, Gilad; Selvaggi, Michele; Soreq, Yotam

    2013-06-01

    In top-pair events where at least one of the tops decays semileptonically, the identification of the lepton charge allows us to tag not only the top quark charge but also that of the subsequent b quark. In cases where the b also decays semileptonically, the charge of the two leptons can be used to probe CP violation in heavy flavor mixing and decays. This strategy to measure CP violation is independent of those adopted so far in experiments, and can already constrain non standard model sources of CP violation with current and near future LHC data. To demonstrate the potential of this method we construct two CP asymmetries based on same-sign and opposite-sign leptons and estimate their sensitivities. This proposal opens a new window for doing precision measurements of CP violation in b and c quark physics via high p(T) processes at ATLAS and CMS. PMID:25167484

  6. Experimental Study of Top Heat Mode Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashima, Masao; Kimura, Kenichiro; Utsumi, Yoichi; Kimura, Kenichi; Negishi, Kanji

    The purpose of this study is to develop the top heat mode thermosyphon that is very attractive means, for example, to accumulate directly the summer solar energy into the underground soil for the winter season. In this case, it can exclude the complex piping and mechanical pump to circulate the hot water absorbed the solar energy through the piping system buried in the soil layer. The several ideas concerning the top heat thermosyphon had been proposed, however, there were few reports on the definite experiments. The authors have carried out the experimental study of the top heat mode thermosyphon, with a simple lifting pipe, which could draw the working liquid from the under condenser to the upper evaporator section. The improvement of the main construction parts such as evaporator, lifting pipe, liquid reservoir trap and vapour nozzle have been performed in the present experiment in order to obtain the optimum operation range.

  7. Adiabatic Field-Free Alignment of Asymmetric Top Molecules with an Optical Centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenko, A.; Milner, V.

    2016-05-01

    We use an optical centrifuge to align asymmetric top SO2 molecules by adiabatically spinning their most polarizable O-O axis. The effective centrifugal potential in the rotating frame confines the sulfur atoms to the plane of the laser-induced rotation, leading to the planar molecular alignment that persists after the molecules are released from the centrifuge. The periodic appearance of the full three-dimensional alignment, typically observed only with linear and symmetric top molecules, is also detected. Together with strong in-plane centrifugal forces, which bend the molecules by up to 10 deg, permanent field-free alignment offers new ways of controlling molecules with laser light.

  8. Adiabatic field-free alignment of asymmetric top molecules with an optical centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Valery

    2016-05-01

    We use an optical centrifuge to align asymmetric top SO2 molecules by adiabatically spinning their most polarizable O-O axis. The effective centrifugal potential in the rotating frame confines sulfur atoms to the plane of the laser-induced rotation, leading to the planar molecular alignment which persists after the molecules are released from the centrifuge. Periodic appearance of the full three-dimensional alignment, typically observed only with linear and symmetric top molecules, is also detected. Together with strong in-plane centrifugal forces, which bend the molecules by up to 10 degrees, permanent field-free alignment offers new ways of controlling molecules with laser light.

  9. An Efficiency Comparison of MBA Programs: Top 10 versus Non-Top 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Maxwell K.; James, Marcia L.; Chao, Gary H.

    2009-01-01

    The authors compared the cohort group of the top-10 MBA programs in the United States with their lower-ranking counterparts on their value-added efficiency. The findings reveal that the top-10 MBA programs in the United States are associated with statistically higher average "technical and scale efficiency" and "scale efficiency", but not with a…

  10. Top2 and Sgs1-Top3 Act Redundantly to Ensure rDNA Replication Termination

    PubMed Central

    Fredsøe, Jacob; Nielsen, Ida; Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Bentsen, Iben Bach; Lisby, Michael; Bjergbaek, Lotte; Andersen, Anni H

    2015-01-01

    Faithful DNA replication with correct termination is essential for genome stability and transmission of genetic information. Here we have investigated the potential roles of Topoisomerase II (Top2) and the RecQ helicase Sgs1 during late stages of replication. We find that cells lacking Top2 and Sgs1 (or Top3) display two different characteristics during late S/G2 phase, checkpoint activation and accumulation of asymmetric X-structures, which are both independent of homologous recombination. Our data demonstrate that checkpoint activation is caused by a DNA structure formed at the strongest rDNA replication fork barrier (RFB) during replication termination, and consistently, checkpoint activation is dependent on the RFB binding protein, Fob1. In contrast, asymmetric X-structures are formed independent of Fob1 at less strong rDNA replication fork barriers. However, both checkpoint activation and formation of asymmetric X-structures are sensitive to conditions, which facilitate fork merging and progression of replication forks through replication fork barriers. Our data are consistent with a redundant role of Top2 and Sgs1 together with Top3 (Sgs1-Top3) in replication fork merging at rDNA barriers. At RFB either Top2 or Sgs1-Top3 is essential to prevent formation of a checkpoint activating DNA structure during termination, but at less strong rDNA barriers absence of the enzymes merely delays replication fork merging, causing an accumulation of asymmetric termination structures, which are solved over time. PMID:26630413

  11. Top-down vortices developed in a cylindrical annulus cooled on the top.

    PubMed

    Navarro, M C; Herrero, H

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we study the generation of top-down vortices by thermoconvective mechanisms in a cylindrical annulus nonhomogeneously cooled on the top. Assuming axisymmetry we study the structure of the vortices, characterized by a spiral downward motion, similar to that observed in tornadoes generated in supercell storms. PMID:23944599

  12. A measurement of the top quark's charge

    SciTech Connect

    Unalan, Zeynep Gunay

    2007-01-01

    The top quark was discovered in 1995 at the Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). One way to confirm if the observed top quark is really the top quark posited in the Standard Model (SM) is to measure its electric charge. In the Standard Model the top quark is the isospin partner of the bottom quark and is expected to have a charge of +2/3. However, an alternative 'exotic' model has been proposed with a fourth generation exotic quark that has the same characteristics, such as mass, as our observed top but with a charge of -4/3. This thesis presents the first CDF measurement of the top quark's charge via its decay products, a W boson and a bottom quark, using ~ 1 fb-1 of data. The data were collected by the CDF detector from proton anti-proton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at Fermilab. We classify events depending on the charges of the bottom quark and associated W boson and count the number of events which appear 'SM-like' or 'exotic-like' with a SM-like event decaying as t → W+b and an exotic event as t → W-b. We find the p-value under the Standard Model hypothesis to be 0.35 which is consistent with the Standard Model. We exclude the exotic quark hypothesis at an 81% confidence level, for which we have chosen a priori that the probability of incorrectly rejecting the SM would be 1%. The calculated Bayes Factor (BF) is 2 x Ln(BF)=8.54 which is interpreted as the data strongly favors the Standard Model over the exotic quark hypothesis.

  13. Total on-line purchasing system (TOPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, N.

    1995-11-01

    The Information Management Division (IMD) at LLNL is developing a new purchasing system for the Procurement Department. The first major development of this new system is called, {open_quotes}Total On-Line Purchasing System{close_quotes} (TOPS). TOPS will help speed up the requisitioning process by having requisitions electronically entered by requesters and electronically sent to buyers to be put on Purchase Orders. The new purchasing system will use Electronic Commerce (EC)/Electronic Data Interchange (EDI), to help increase transaction flows for shipping notices, RFQs, Quotes, Purchase Orders, and Invoices. ANSI X.12 is the EDI standard that this new EC will use.

  14. Single top quark production at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Schwienhorst, Reinhard; /Michigan State U.

    2011-09-01

    Updates of electroweak single top quark production measurements by the D0 collaboration are presented using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data from the Tevatron at Fermilab. Measurements of the t-channel, s-channel and combined single top quark production cross section are presented, including an updated lower limit on the CKM matrix element |V{sub tb}|. Also reported are results from searches for gluon-quark flavor-changing neutral currents and W' boson production.

  15. TOP500 Supercomputers for November 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Meuer, Hans W.; Dongarra, Jack; Simon, Horst D.

    2003-11-16

    22nd Edition of TOP500 List of World s Fastest Supercomputers Released MANNHEIM, Germany; KNOXVILLE, Tenn.; BERKELEY, Calif. In what has become a much-anticipated event in the world of high-performance computing, the 22nd edition of the TOP500 list of the worlds fastest supercomputers was released today (November 16, 2003). The Earth Simulator supercomputer retains the number one position with its Linpack benchmark performance of 35.86 Tflop/s (''teraflops'' or trillions of calculations per second). It was built by NEC and installed last year at the Earth Simulator Center in Yokohama, Japan.

  16. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, R.E.; Byrum, K.L.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.E.; LeCompte, T.; Nodulman, L.; Breccia, L.; Brunetti, R.; Deninno, M.; Fiori, I.; Mazzanti, P.; Behrends, S.; Bensinger, J.; Blocker, C.; Kirsch, L.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Bonushkin, Y.; Hauser, J.; Lindgren, M.; Amadon, A.; Berryhill, J.; Contreras, M.; Culbertson, R.; Frisch, H.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Hohlmann, M.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dittmann, J.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Khazins, D.; Kowald, W.; Oh, S.H.; Albrow, M.G.; Atac, M.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J.P.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Byon-Wagner, A.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cooper, J.; DeJongh, F.; Demina, R.; Derwent, P.F.; Elias, J.E.; Erdmann, W.; Flaugher, B.; Foster, G.W.; Freeman, J.; Geer, S.; Hahn, S.R.; Harris, R.M.; Incandela, J.; Jensen, H.; Joshi, U.; Kennedy, R.D.; Kephart, R.; Lammel, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Limon, P.; Lukens, P.; Maeshima, K.; Marriner, J.P.; Miao, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Nelson, C.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Patrick, J.; Klimenko, S.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Nomerotski, A.; Barone, M.; Bertolucci, S.; Cordelli, M.; DellAgnello, S.; Giromini, P.; Happacher, F.; Miscetti, S.; Parri, A.; Clark, A.G.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Kambara, H.; Baumann, T.; Franklin, M.; Gordon, A.; Hamilton, R.; Huth, J.; and others

    1998-03-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass using a sample of t{bar t} decays into an electron or a muon, a neutrino, and four jets. The data were collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}(s)=1.8 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 109 pb{sup {minus}1} . We measure the top quark mass to be 175.9{plus_minus}4.8(stat){plus_minus}4.9( syst) GeV /c{sup 2} . {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Top quark property measurements with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, M.; Atlas Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    This contribution covers recent results on the properties of the top quark as measured with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider, using data collected at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8TeV during 2011 and 2012. Results on the t bar{{t}} charge asymmetry and spin correlation, and on the mass of the top quark are discussed. The most recent results expand on the first ATLAS measurements with complementary analysis channels, new observables, and direct comparisons to new physics models. No significant deviations from Standard Model predictions have been found.

  18. Evidence for production of single top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Malyshev, V. L.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Abbott, B.; Gutierrez, P.; Hossain, S.; Jain, S.; Rominsky, M.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Strauss, M.; Abolins, M.; Benitez, J. A.; Brock, R.; Dyer, J.

    2008-07-01

    We present first evidence for the production of single top quarks in the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider. The standard model predicts that the electroweak interaction can produce a top quark together with an antibottom quark or light quark, without the antiparticle top-quark partner that is always produced from strong-coupling processes. Top quarks were first observed in pair production in 1995, and since then, single top-quark production has been searched for in ever larger data sets. In this analysis, we select events from a 0.9 fb{sup -1} data set that have an electron or muon and missing transverse energy from the decay of a W boson from the top-quark decay, and two, three, or four jets, with one or two of the jets identified as originating from a b hadron decay. The selected events are mostly backgrounds such as W+jets and tt events, which we separate from the expected signals using three multivariate analysis techniques: boosted decision trees, Bayesian neural networks, and matrix-element calculations. A binned likelihood fit of the signal cross section plus background to the data from the combination of the results from the three analysis methods gives a cross section for single top-quark production of {sigma}(pp{yields}tb+X,tqb+X)=4.7{+-}1.3 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 0.014%, corresponding to a 3.6 standard deviation significance. The measured cross section value is compatible at the 10% level with the standard model prediction for electroweak top-quark production. We use the cross section measurement to directly determine the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix element that describes the Wtb coupling and find |V{sub tb}f{sub 1}{sup L}|=1.31{sub -0.21}{sup +0.25}, where f{sub 1}{sup L} is a generic vector coupling. This model-independent measurement translates into 0.68<|V{sub tb}|{<=}1 at the 95% C.L. in the standard model.

  19. Top Quark Spin Correlations at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Head, Tim; /Manchester U.

    2010-07-01

    Recent measurements of the correlation between the spin of the top and the spin of the anti-top quark produced in proton anti-proton scattering at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 Tev by the CDF and D0 collaborations are discussed. using up to 4.3 fb{sup -1} of data taken with the CDF and D0 detectors the spin correlation parameter C, the degree to which the spins are correlated, is measured in dileptonic and semileptonic final states. The measurements are found to be in agreement with Standard Model predictions.

  20. Top and Electroweak Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bartos, P.

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we summarize the latest results of the top-quark mass and electroweak measurements from the Tevatron. Since the world combination of top-quark mass measurements was done, CDF and D0 experiments improved the precision of several results. Some of them reach the relative precition below 1% for a single measurement. From the electroweak results, we report on the WW and WZ production cross section, measurements of the weak mixing angle and indirect measurements of W boson mass. The Tevatron results of the weak mixing angle are still the most precise ones of hadron colliders.

  1. Thermionic Energy Conversion (TEC) topping thermoelectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Performance expectations for thermionic and thermoelectric energy conversion systems are reviewed. It is noted that internal radiation effects diminish thermoelectric figures of merit significantly at 1000 K and substantially at 2000 K; the effective thermal conductivity contribution of intrathermoelectric radiative dissipation increases with the third power of temperature. It is argued that a consideration of thermoelectric power generation with high temperature heat sources should include utilization of thermionic energy conversion (TEC) topping thermoelectrics. However TEC alone or TEC topping more efficient conversion systems like steam or gas turbines, combined cycles, or Stirling engines would be more desirable generally.

  2. Observation of Single Top Quark Production

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, Ann; Junk, Tom R.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The field of experimental particle physics has become more sophisticated over time, as fewer, larger experimental collaborations search for small signals in samples with large components of background. The search for and the observation of electroweak single top quark production by the CDF and D0 collaborations at Fermilab's Tevatron collider are an example of an elaborate effort to measure the rate of a very rare process in the presence of large backgrounds and to learn about the properties of the top quark's weak interaction. We present here the techniques used to make this groundbreaking measurement and the interpretation of the results in the context of the Standard Model.

  3. Evidence for production of single top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Michigan U.

    2008-03-01

    We present first evidence for the production of single top quarks in the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. The standard model predicts that the electroweak interaction can produce a top quark together with an antibottom quark or light quark, without the antiparticle top quark partner that is always produced from strong coupling processes. Top quarks were first observed in pair production in 1995, and since then, single top quark production has been searched for in ever larger datasets. In this analysis, we select events from a 0.9 fb{sup -1} dataset that have an electron or muon and missing transverse energy from the decay of a W boson from the top quark decay, and two, three, or four jets, with one or two of the jets identified as originating from a b hadron decay. The selected events are mostly backgrounds such as W+jets and t{bar t} events, which we separate from the expected signals using three multivariate analysis techniques: boosted decision trees, Bayesian neural networks, and matrix element calculations. A binned likelihood fit of the signal cross section plus background to the data from the combination of the results from the three analysis methods gives a cross section for single top quark production of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.7 {+-} 1.3 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 0.014%, corresponding to a 3.6 standard deviation significance. The measured cross section value is compatible at the 10% level with the standard model prediction for electroweak top quark production. We use the cross section measurement to directly determine the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix element that describes the Wtb coupling and find |V{sub tb}f{sub 1}{sup L}| = 1.31{sub -0.21}{sup +0.25}, where f{sub 1}{sup L} is a generic vector coupling. This model-independent measurement translates into 0.68 < |V{sub tb}| {le} 1 at the 95% C.L. in the standard model.

  4. Top tagging: a method for identifying boosted hadronically decaying top quarks.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, David E; Rehermann, Keith; Schwartz, Matthew D; Tweedie, Brock

    2008-10-01

    A method is introduced for distinguishing top jets (boosted, hadronically decaying top quarks) from light-quark and gluon jets using jet substructure. The procedure involves parsing the jet cluster to resolve its subjets and then imposing kinematic constraints. With this method, light-quark or gluon jets with p{T} approximately 1 TeV can be rejected with an efficiency of around 99% while retaining up to 40% of top jets. This reduces the dijet background to heavy tt[over ] resonances by a factor of approximately 10 000, thereby allowing resonance searches in tt[over ] to be extended into the all-hadronic channel. In addition, top tagging can be used in tt[over ] events when one of the top quarks decays semileptonically, in events with missing energy, and in studies of b-tagging efficiency at high p{T}.

  5. Studies of top quark properties and search for electroweak single top quark production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Mousumi; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    The top quark was discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron during the Run I operation. Since the start of the Tevatron Run II in 2001, both experiments have collected {approx}2 fb{sup -1} data samples, which are over twenty times larger than that used in the Run 1 discovery. This larger data sample allows more precise studies of top-quark properties; differences between observed top-quark properties and the Standard Model (SM) prediction may give hints to possible physics beyond the SM. Here we present the latest results on the measurements of top-quark properties and the search for electroweak (EW) single top quark production from the CDF and D0 collaborations. The integrated luminosity used for the measurements corresponds to about 1 fb{sup -1}.

  6. Designer nanoscale DNA assemblies programmed from the top down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veneziano, Rémi; Ratanalert, Sakul; Zhang, Kaiming; Zhang, Fei; Yan, Hao; Chiu, Wah; Bathe, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Scaffolded DNA origami is a versatile means of synthesizing complex molecular architectures. However, the approach is limited by the need to forward-design specific Watson-Crick base pairing manually for any given target structure. Here, we report a general, top-down strategy to design nearly arbitrary DNA architectures autonomously based only on target shape. Objects are represented as closed surfaces rendered as polyhedral networks of parallel DNA duplexes, which enables complete DNA scaffold routing with a spanning tree algorithm. The asymmetric polymerase chain reaction is applied to produce stable, monodisperse assemblies with custom scaffold length and sequence that are verified structurally in three dimensions to be high fidelity by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy. Their long-term stability in serum and low-salt buffer confirms their utility for biological as well as nonbiological applications.

  7. 14. TIP TOP MINE. TAILINGS LOCATED DIRECTLY WEST FROM TIP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. TIP TOP MINE. TAILINGS LOCATED DIRECTLY WEST FROM TIP TOP HOUSE. ID-31-C-12 WOODEN STRUCTURE IS VISIBLE IN TOP LEFT. CABLES VISIBLE LEFT AND CENTER OF TAILINGS. HOUSE IS JUST OVER APEX OF TAILINGS. CAMERA POINTED EAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  8. 49 CFR 178.812 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.812 Section 178.812... Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all IBC... preparation for the top lift test. (1) Metal, rigid plastic, and composite IBC design types must be loaded...

  9. 49 CFR 178.975 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.975 Section 178.975... Packagings § 178.975 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of... the side. (b) Special preparation for the top lift test. (1) Metal and rigid plastic Large...

  10. 49 CFR 178.975 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.975 Section 178.975... Packagings § 178.975 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of... the side. (b) Special preparation for the top lift test. (1) Metal and rigid plastic Large...

  11. 49 CFR 178.975 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.975 Section 178.975... Packagings § 178.975 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of... the side. (b) Special preparation for the top lift test. (1) Metal and rigid plastic Large...

  12. 49 CFR 178.812 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.812 Section 178.812... Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all IBC... preparation for the top lift test. (1) Metal, rigid plastic, and composite IBC design types must be loaded...

  13. 49 CFR 178.1050 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.1050 Section 178.1050... Containers § 178.1050 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification... for the top lift test. Flexible Bulk Container design types must be filled to six times the...

  14. 49 CFR 178.812 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.812 Section 178.812... Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all IBC... preparation for the top lift test. (1) Metal, rigid plastic, and composite IBC design types must be loaded...

  15. 5 CFR 1312.27 - Top secret control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Top secret control. 1312.27 Section 1312... Classified Information § 1312.27 Top secret control. The EOP Security Officer serves as the Top Secret... Top Secret material. The ATSCOs will be responsible for the accountability and custodianship of...

  16. 5 CFR 1312.27 - Top secret control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Top secret control. 1312.27 Section 1312... Classified Information § 1312.27 Top secret control. The EOP Security Officer serves as the Top Secret... Top Secret material. The ATSCOs will be responsible for the accountability and custodianship of...

  17. Editor's Journal: Poor Elijah's Almanack Top Ten.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Peter N.

    1998-01-01

    Reports on and responds to a list from the American Association of School Administrators detailing the "Top Ten Changes Affecting Students Since the 1960s." Argues that the list is part common sense, part nonsense, and part obvious. Concludes that there is almost nothing the schools can do about these problems because they are societal problems,…

  18. Top Down proteomics: Facts and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Catherman, Adam D.; Skinner, Owen S.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2014-03-21

    Highlights: • Top Down versus Bottom Up proteomics analysis. • Separations methods for Top Down proteomics. • Developments in mass spectrometry instrumentation and fragmentation. • Native mass spectrometry. - Abstract: The rise of the “Top Down” method in the field of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has ushered in a new age of promise and challenge for the characterization and identification of proteins. Injecting intact proteins into the mass spectrometer allows for better characterization of post-translational modifications and avoids several of the serious “inference” problems associated with peptide-based proteomics. However, successful implementation of a Top Down approach to endogenous or other biologically relevant samples often requires the use of one or more forms of separation prior to mass spectrometric analysis, which have only begun to mature for whole protein MS. Recent advances in instrumentation have been used in conjunction with new ion fragmentation using photons and electrons that allow for better (and often complete) protein characterization on cases simply not tractable even just a few years ago. Finally, the use of native electrospray mass spectrometry has shown great promise for the identification and characterization of whole protein complexes in the 100 kDa to 1 MDa regime, with prospects for complete compositional analysis for endogenous protein assemblies a viable goal over the coming few years.

  19. Race to Top Districts "Personalize" Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The 16 Race to the Top district winners, pushed by $400 million in federal grants that put a premium on personalized learning, are embarking on vastly different makeovers of the classroom experience--from districtwide approaches to a narrower blueprint focused on middle school math. Despite the divergent approaches, a review of the winning…

  20. Top-Ten IT Issues: 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agee, Anne Scrivener; Yang, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the top-ten IT-related issues in terms of strategic importance to the institution, as revealed by the tenth annual EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey. These IT-related issues include: (1) Funding IT; (2) Administrative/ERP Information Systems; (3) Security; (4) Infrastructure/Cyberinfrastructure; (5) Teaching and Learning with…

  1. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING [VAB] & TOPPING OFF CEREMONIES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. Kurt H. Debus, KSC's first director, adds his name to the thousands of signatures affixed to the 38-foot-long, four-ton steel beam used in the Vehicle Assembly Building ''topping off'' ceremonies held on April 14, 1965.

  2. Race to Top Round Two Heating Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2010-01-01

    With the second-round deadline for federal Race to the Top Fund grants less than six weeks away, states are rushing to raise the stakes on their education reform plans as they fight over the remaining $3.4 billion in prize money. But in doing so, states from Massachusetts to Colorado are tangling with their teachers' unions as they test how far…

  3. Multipurpose top for liquid helium Dewar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, R. S.; Anderholm, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Multipurpose top was fabricated for liquid helium Dewar flask which guards against flash vaporization of liquid helium and allows boiling temperature of liquid helium to be lowered by reduction of ambient pressure in Dewar flask. Device is rugged and simple, and does not require frequent calibrations or adjustments.

  4. Top Tips for Buying Telecommunication Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    Examines top regulatory issues and other unique issues resulting from this regulatory overlay when negotiating for corporate telecom services. Issues cover such topics as tariffs, rate negotiation, exclusivity provisions, revenue commitments, mid-term negotiations, service-level agreements, and dispute resolution. (GR)

  5. Top Four Trends in Student Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weathers, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The modern student information systems (SIS) is a powerful administrative tool with robust functionality. As such, it is essential that school and district administrators consider the top trends in modern student information systems before going forward with system upgrades or new purchases. These trends, described herein, are: (1) Support for…

  6. Top-Ten IT Issues, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grajek, Susan

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, "EDUCAUSE" appointed a research panel of IT leaders from nineteen representative member institutions to both identify and prioritize the top IT issues facing their institutions. In two focus group sessions in September and October 2011, the panel members were asked the question: "What is the single-biggest IT-related issue currently…

  7. America's Star Libraries: Top-Rated Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Keith Curry; Lyons, Ray

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service 2009, Round 2, identifies 258 "star" libraries. Created by Keith Curry Lance and Ray Lyons and based on 2007 data from the IMLS, it rates 7,268 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three stars. All included libraries,…

  8. Top 100 hospitals. Reaching for the clouds.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, J

    1996-12-01

    The nation's Top 100 hospitals combine razor's edge management with an ability to take a marketplace punch and maintain their balance sheet. And more often than not, they're found in markets highly influenced by managed care and for-profit healthcare companies.

  9. Hurdles Ahead in "Race to Top"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2009-01-01

    As states scramble to spend and report on millions of dollars of education stimulus funds already flowing their way, they face another daunting task if they want a shot at even more money: navigating the complex application process for $4 billion from the Race to the Top Fund. Merely filling out the award application will take each state 642…

  10. The Top 100 Bachelor's Degrees Conferred

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents this year's Top 100 institutions that conferred the most bachelor's degrees to students of color in academic year 2009-2010. It shows the total number of bachelor's degrees for a specific minority group or for total minorities, with subtotals for women and men in that ethnic group. The author also includes the prior year…

  11. The Top American Indian Degree Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Each year, "Diverse: Issues In Higher Education" publishes lists of the Top 100 producers of associate, bachelor's and graduate degrees awarded to minority students based on research conducted by Dr. Victor M.H. Borden, professor of educational leadership and policy studies at the Indiana University Bloomington. This year, Diverse staff continue…

  12. Neutrino masses from neutral top partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batell, Brian; McCullough, Matthew

    2015-10-01

    We present theories of "natural neutrinos" in which neutral fermionic top partner fields are simultaneously the right-handed neutrinos (RHN), linking seemingly disparate aspects of the Standard Model structure: (a) The RHN top partners are responsible for the observed small neutrino masses, (b) they help ameliorate the tuning in the weak scale and address the little hierarchy problem, and (c) the factor of 3 arising from Nc in the top-loop Higgs mass corrections is countered by a factor of 3 from the number of vectorlike generations of RHN. The RHN top partners may arise in pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone-Boson Higgs models such as the twin Higgs, as well as more general composite, little, and orbifold Higgs scenarios, and three simple example models are presented. This framework firmly predicts a TeV-scale seesaw, as the RHN masses are bounded to be below the TeV scale by naturalness. The generation of light neutrino masses relies on a collective breaking of the lepton number, allowing for comparatively large neutrino Yukawa couplings and a rich associated phenomenology. The structure of the neutrino mass mechanism realizes in certain limits the inverse or linear classes of seesaw. Natural neutrino models are testable at a variety of current and future experiments, particularly in tests of lepton universality, searches for lepton flavor violation, and precision electroweak and Higgs coupling measurements possible at high energy e+e- and hadron colliders.

  13. Top-Ten IT Issues, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingerman, Bret L.; Yang, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The eleventh annual EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey shows some very familiar themes among the top-ten IT issues of strategic importance to technology leaders in higher education. Indeed, all ten of the issues from the 2009 survey are back, albeit in a slightly different order. In addition, Strategic Planning returns as an issue of renewed…

  14. What Top Management Expects from the Communicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fegley, Robert L.

    Top corporate management requires communications departments that maintain credibility with the public by developing the following qualities: integrity established through consistent and honest messages; accuracy based on solid research; authority derived from an understanding of the subject and from drawing on appropriate expertise; a…

  15. Top-Ten IT Issues, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingerman, Bret L.; Yang, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The results of the twelfth annual EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey reflect the everyday balancing act that IT leaders need to perform. Many of the issues show the need for continued and thoughtful long-range planning, yet new issues have also risen quickly to the top, requiring nimbleness in both thought and act. Administered by the EDUCAUSE Current…

  16. Organic crop production's top research priority: Pestiphytology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pestiphytology is the study of pest plants, commonly referred to as weeds. In a recent national survey, weed research was designated as the top research priority by organic producers. Manual weed control is a costly practice that can quickly decrease return on investment, while the absence of weed...

  17. A Top Physicist Turns to Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollag, Burton

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how a top physicist took charge of reforming undergraduate science education at the University of British Columbia. Carl E. Wieman, the 2001 Nobel Prize winner in Physics, gave up his research career to devote himself to improving the way college science is taught. Wieman is heading up a $10.2 million science education…

  18. Building an information culture: the top team.

    PubMed

    Mordue, A

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a learning process, used by the NHS, which aims to improve the management of information in NHS organizations by enabling the top team to develop a more strategic view of information management and technology in line with the Management in the 1990s approach.

  19. Search for top quark at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    There is a vast theoretical and experimental support for idea that op quark as a weak isospin partner to b-quark should exist. Production cross section is steeply falling function of top quark mass. Therefore realistically at present only Tevatron p[anti p] collider at FNAL, with total energy 1.8 TeV in CMS system, still has a chance of top quark discovery. Dominant production mechanism for top quarks at Tevatron is pair production of t[anti t]. With almost 100% probability t ([anti t]) decays in mode t [yields] W[sup +]b. Distinct features of this decay provide very good signatures of top quark production which helps to reduce otherwise very high level of background. Based on simple combinatorial arguments one can show that W should decay in 1/9 cases into W [yields] l + [nu] where l stands for lepton (e,[mu],[tau]). Very clean signature represents case when both W's from t and [anti t] decay into e ([mu]) + [nu]. In this case experimental observation will be two isolated leptons characterized by large transverse momentum, large missing transverse energy E[sub T] and 2 b quark jets. Jets originated from b quarks can be quite frequently recognized by presence of secondary vertices associated with jets. Another feature of b-jets which can be used for their identification is frequent association of so called soft leptons with jets. Two experimental setups CDF and D0 are able to take advantage of Tevatron for top quark discovery. Recently CDF collaboration presented evidence for direct observation of t[anti t] production in 19.3 pb[sup [minus]1] of p[anti p] collisions at [radical](s) = 1.8TeV. Very brief account of these results is presented here.

  20. Recent Results of Top Quark Physics from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R. Y.

    2015-07-09

    Twenty years after its discovery in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab, the top quark still undergoes intensive studies at the Tevatron and the LHC at CERN. In this article, recent top quark physics results from CDF and D0 are reported. In particular, measurements of single top quark and double top quark production, the $t\\bar{t}$ forward-backward asymmetry and the top quark mass are discussed.

  1. 5. VIEW OF TIP TOP WITH FAR RIGHT SADDLE PROVIDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF TIP TOP WITH FAR RIGHT SADDLE PROVIDING ORIENTATION FOR THE GENERAL DIRECTION TO NOTTINGHAM. CAMERA POINTED SOUTH-SOUTHWEST. NORTH SIDE OF TIP TOP BUILDING IS VISIBLE. (RUN STRAIGHT EDGE FROM LOWER LEFT CORNER TO TOP CENTER OF PRINT; TIP TOP LOCATED LIGHT AREA) ONTARIO IS LOCATED BELOW AND RIGHT OF TIP TOP. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  2. Alligator clips to molecular dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopuk, Nicholas; Son, Kyung-Ah

    2008-09-01

    Techniques for fabricating nanospaced electrodes suitable for studying electron tunneling through metal-molecule-metal junctions are described. In one approach, top contacts are deposited/placed on a self-assembled monolayer or Langmuir-Blodgett film resting on a conducting substrate, the bottom contact. The molecular component serves as a permanent spacer that controls and limits the electrode separations. The top contact can be a thermally deposited metal film, liquid mercury drop, scanning probe tip, metallic wire or particle. Introduction of the top contact can greatly affect the electrical conductance of the intervening molecular film by chemical reaction, exerting pressure, or simply migrating through the organic layer. Alternatively, vacant nanogaps can be fabricated and the molecular component subsequently inserted. Strategies for constructing vacant nanogaps include mechanical break junction, electromigration, shadow mask lithography, focused ion beam deposition, chemical and electrochemical plating techniques, electron-beam lithography, and molecular and atomic rulers. The size of the nanogaps must be small enough to allow the molecule to connect both leads and large enough to keep the molecules in a relaxed and undistorted state. A significant advantage of using vacant nanogaps in the construction of metal-molecule-metal devices is that the junction can be characterized with and without the molecule in place. Any electrical artifacts introduced by the electrode fabrication process are more easily deconvoluted from the intrinsic properties of the molecule.

  3. PREFACE: 5th International Workshop on Top Quark Physics (TOP2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamanna, G.; Boisvert, V.; Cerrito, L.; Khan, A.; Moretti, S.; Owen, M.; Schwanenberger, C.

    2013-07-01

    The 5th International Workshop on Top Quark Physics (TOP 2012) took place in Winchester, UK, from the 16-21 September. It gathered students as well as people active in the top quark sector and provided a framework to highlight the newest results and matters related to top quark physics. Discovered in 1995, the top quark is the sixth and heaviest of all quarks, and it is the only one with a lifetime short enough to be observed 'naked'. This makes it an important testing ground in the search for new physics. In fact, the fact of its mass being so much larger than the other quarks, hints at its special role in the Higgs mechanism. For the same reason, in many models of New Physics, new heavy resonances are expected to couple mostly with top quarks. Even if no new particles are observed, the direct correlation between its angular momentum and that of its detectable decay products allows us to probe indirectly New Physics in action when top quarks are created. In this edition of the TOP conference series, for the first time, the agenda was equally balanced between 'traditional' measurements and the now vast number of searches for physics BSM in the top quark sector, thanks mostly to the amount of data collected at the LHC in its Run I. New results were presented by both the Tevatron and the LHC collaborations: improved ttbar and single top cross-section measurements, refined techniques to measure the top quark mass and a large number of results on properties such as spin correlation and W boson polarization in top quark decays were shown. More technical discussions on the experimental issues, both from the detector and the simulation side also took place, drawing together experimentalists and theorists. Reviews of the latest results on ttbar asymmetry both from CDF and D0 and from ATLAS and CMS were shown, and theorists active in the field made some interesting points on this hot topic. Additionally, results on the search for fourth generation fermions and new

  4. TOP500 Supercomputers for November 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Meuer, Hans W.; Dongarra, Jack; Simon, Horst D.

    2002-11-15

    20th Edition of TOP500 List of World's Fastest Supercomputers Released MANNHEIM, Germany; KNOXVILLE, Tenn.;&BERKELEY, Calif. In what has become a much-anticipated event in the world of high-performance computing, the 20th edition of the TOP500 list of the world's fastest supercomputers was released today (November 15, 2002). The Earth Simulator supercomputer installed earlier this year at the Earth Simulator Center in Yokohama, Japan, is with its Linpack benchmark performance of 35.86 Tflop/s (trillions of calculations per second) retains the number one position. The No.2 and No.3 positions are held by two new, identical ASCI Q systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (7.73Tflop/s each). These systems are built by Hewlett-Packard and based on the Alpha Server SC computer system.

  5. TOP500 Supercomputers for June 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Meuer, Hans W.; Dongarra, Jack; Simon, Horst D.

    2003-06-23

    21st Edition of TOP500 List of World's Fastest Supercomputers Released MANNHEIM, Germany; KNOXVILLE, Tenn.;&BERKELEY, Calif. In what has become a much-anticipated event in the world of high-performance computing, the 21st edition of the TOP500 list of the world's fastest supercomputers was released today (June 23, 2003). The Earth Simulator supercomputer built by NEC and installed last year at the Earth Simulator Center in Yokohama, Japan, with its Linpack benchmark performance of 35.86 Tflop/s (teraflops or trillions of calculations per second), retains the number one position. The number 2 position is held by the re-measured ASCI Q system at Los Alamos National Laboratory. With 13.88 Tflop/s, it is the second system ever to exceed the 10 Tflop/smark. ASCIQ was built by Hewlett-Packard and is based on the AlphaServerSC computer system.

  6. Top quark and electroweak results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Sandra Leone

    2003-11-04

    In 2001 the Tevatron run II began, after a five year period of significant upgrade of the accelerator itself and of the experiments CDF and D0. After a detector commissioning run, the CDF experiment is now taking high quality data with all subsystems functional. We report in this talk the first preliminary CDF results on top quark and W/Z boson properties, based on run II data. The top quark, discovered in 1995 at the Tevatron, has proven to be a very interesting particle. Its properties allow to perform stringent tests of the Standard Model (SM) and to search for new physics through a deviation from SM predictions. We give here some expectations of what Tevatron run II will ultimately provide to our understanding of matter.

  7. The heavy top quark and supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.J. |

    1996-05-08

    Three aspects of supersymmetric theories are discussed: electroweak symmetry breaking, the issues of flavor, and gauge unification. The heavy top quark plays an important, sometimes dominant, role in each case. Additional symmetries lead to extensions of the standard model which can provide an understanding for many of the outstanding problems of particle physics. A broken supersymmetric extension of spacetime allows electroweak symmetry breaking to follow from the dynamics of the heavy top quark; an extension of isospin provides a constrained framework for understanding the pattern of quark and lepton masses; and a grand unified extension of the standard model gauge group provides an elegant understanding of the gauge quantum numbers of the components of a generation. Experimental signatures for each of these additional symmetries are discussed.

  8. Kodiak seamount not flat-topped.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, E L; von Huene, R E

    1966-12-01

    Earlier surveys in the Aleutian Trench southeast of Kodiak Island, Alaska, indicated that Kodiak Seamount had a flat top and was a tablemount or guyot. This seamount is of special significance because it has been supposed that its surface was eroded at the same time as those of a line of guyots to the southeast. If so, its present position in the axis of the Aleutian Trench indicates that the line of guyots was formed before the trench. A two-part survey in 1965 showed that Kodiak Seamount is not flat-topped, and should be eliminated from the category of guyots. Reflection profiling records indicate that the seamount was formed before the adjacent sediments were deposited, and that the small trough, or moat, on the south side is a depositional feature probably formed by a scouring effect or by the acceleration of turbidity currents around the base of the mount.

  9. Kodiak seamount not flat-topped.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, E L; von Huene, R E

    1966-12-01

    Earlier surveys in the Aleutian Trench southeast of Kodiak Island, Alaska, indicated that Kodiak Seamount had a flat top and was a tablemount or guyot. This seamount is of special significance because it has been supposed that its surface was eroded at the same time as those of a line of guyots to the southeast. If so, its present position in the axis of the Aleutian Trench indicates that the line of guyots was formed before the trench. A two-part survey in 1965 showed that Kodiak Seamount is not flat-topped, and should be eliminated from the category of guyots. Reflection profiling records indicate that the seamount was formed before the adjacent sediments were deposited, and that the small trough, or moat, on the south side is a depositional feature probably formed by a scouring effect or by the acceleration of turbidity currents around the base of the mount. PMID:17770303

  10. Gallium arsenide phosphide top solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    McNeely, J.B.; Barnett, A.M.

    1986-04-15

    This patent describes a tandem solar cell having a silicon solar cell for a low energy gap bottom cell and a high energy gap top cell. The improvement which a gallium arsenide phosphide top solar cell which described here is a. a transparent gallium phosphide substrate; b. a first active semiconductor layer of GaAs/sub 1-Y/P/sub Y/ and of a first conductivity type overlying the substrate; c. a second active semiconductor layer of GaAs/sub 1-X/P/sub X/ and of a second conductivity type opposite the first conductivity type overlying and forming a photovoltaic junction therewith; d. a transparent first electrical contact in ohmic contact with the substrate; and e. a transparent second electrical contact in ohmic contact with the second active semiconductor layer.

  11. Platts top 250 global energy company rankings

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, T.; Leonard, M.

    2005-12-01

    Revenues and profits for many firms surged last year over previous years. The turnaround from last year's global survey is dramatic. Asset- and revenue-rich integrated oil and gas companies dominate the top rungs of the 2005 Platts Top 250 Global Energy Company Rankings. The following industry segments were analyzed: diversified utilities; exploration and production; electric utilities; gas utilities; integrated oil and gas companies; refining and marketing; independent power producers; coal and consumable fuel companies and storage and transfer companies; The total combined revenue for the coal and consumable fuels sector was $74.7 billion. Leaders in this sector were: Yanzhou Coal Mining Co., CONSOl Energy Inc., Peabody Energy Corp., PT Bumi Resources Tbk, Cameco Corp., and Arch Coal. 14 tabs.

  12. The heavy top quark and supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.J. |

    1997-01-01

    Three aspects of supersymmetric theories are discussed: electroweak symmetry breaking, the issues of flavor, and gauge unification. The heavy top quark plays an important, sometimes dominant, role in each case. Additional symmetries lead to extensions of the Standard Model which can provide an understanding for many of the outstanding problems of particle physics. A broken supersymmetric extension of spacetime allows electroweak symmetry breaking to follow from the dynamics of the heavy top quark; an extension of isospin provides a constrained framework for understanding the pattern of quark and lepton masses; and a grand unified extension of the Standard Model gauge group provides an elegant understanding of the gauge quantum numbers of the components of a generation. Experimental signatures for each of these additional symmetries are discussed.

  13. Entanglement entropy in top-down models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Peter A. R.; Taylor, Marika

    2016-08-01

    We explore holographic entanglement entropy in ten-dimensional supergravity solutions. It has been proposed that entanglement entropy can be computed in such top-down models using minimal surfaces which asymptotically wrap the compact part of the geometry. We show explicitly in a wide range of examples that the holographic entan-glement entropy thus computed agrees with the entanglement entropy computed using the Ryu-Takayanagi formula from the lower-dimensional Einstein metric obtained from reduc-tion over the compact space. Our examples include not only consistent truncations but also cases in which no consistent truncation exists and Kaluza-Klein holography is used to identify the lower-dimensional Einstein metric. We then give a general proof, based on the Lewkowycz-Maldacena approach, of the top-down entanglement entropy formula.

  14. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING [VAB] & TOPPING OFF CEREMONIES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. Kurt H. Debus, KSC's first director, makes a brief speech during the topping off ceremonies for the Vehicle Assembly Building held on April 14, 1965. In the foreground is the 38- foot-long, four-ton steel beam signed by thousands of KSC employees and construction workers. The beam was hoisted to the tope of the 525-foot-tall structure and put in place to complete the building's steel skeleton.

  15. Rare top quark decays in extended models

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2006-09-25

    Flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decays t {yields} H0 + c, t {yields} Z + c, and H0 {yields} t + c-bar are discussed in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions where FCNC decays may take place at tree-level and are only suppressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks, which is poorly constraint by current experimental values. The non-manifest case is also briefly discussed.

  16. Top physics at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Margaroli, Fabrizio; /Purdue U.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark has been discovered in 1995 at the CDF and DO experiments located in the Tevatron ring at the Fermilab laboratory. After more than a decade the Tevatron collider, with its center-of-mass energy collisions of 1.96 TeV, is still the only machine capable of producing such exceptionally heavy particle. Here I present a selection of the most recent CDF and DO measurements performed analyzing {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity.

  17. The Top 10 Lists of 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents lists of the top ten schools with most students, largest enrollment, and other categories for 2011 in the U.S. The school districts with most student for 2010-2011 are New York City with 1,043,886 followed by Los Angeles with 667,251, Chicago with 403,770 and down to the 10th spot Orange County (Fla.) with 175,986. The…

  18. Charm, beauty and top at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, O.; Geiser, A.; Lisovyi, M.

    2015-09-01

    Results on open charm and beauty production and on the search for top production in high-energy electron-proton collisions at HERA are reviewed. This includes a discussion of relevant theoretical aspects, a summary of the available measurements and measurement techniques, and their impact on improved understanding of QCD and its parameters, such as parton density functions and charm- and beauty-quark masses. The impact of these results on measurements at the LHC and elsewhere is also addressed.

  19. Race to Top Enters Home Stretch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele; Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2010-01-01

    When 16 finalists come to Washington next week to make their final pitches in the $4 billion Race to the Top competition, most can expect to go home empty-handed. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, in announcing the finalists last week, said that no more than $2 billion will be divided among "very few winners" when the awards are given out…

  20. Slow Pace for Race to Top Spending

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Almost two years into the federal Race to the Top program, states are spending their shares of the $4 billion prize at a snail's pace--a reflection of the challenges the 12 winners face as they try to get ambitious education improvement plans off the ground. Through the end of March, the 11 states and the District of Columbia had spent just 14…

  1. The myth of the top management team.

    PubMed

    Katzenbach, J R

    1997-01-01

    Companies all across the economic spectrum are making use of teams. They go by a variety of names and can be found at all levels. In fact, you are likely to find the group at the very top of an organization professing to be a team. But even in the best of companies, a so-called top team seldom functions as a real team. Real teams must follow a well-defined discipline to achieve their performance potential. And performance is the key issue--not the fostering of "team values" such as empowerment, sensitivity, or involvement. In recent years, the focus on performance was lost in many companies. Even today, CEOs and senior executives often see few gains in performance from their attempts to become more teamlike. Nevertheless, a team effort at the top can be essential to capturing the highest performance results possible--when the conditions are right. Good leadership requires differentiating between team and nonteam opportunities, and then acting accordingly. Three litmus tests must be passed for a team at the top to be effective. First, the team must shape collective work-products--these are tangible performance results that the group can achieve working together that surpass what the team members could have achieved working on their own. Second, the leadership role must shift, depending on the task at hand. And third, the team's members must be mutually accountable for the group's results. When these criteria can be met, senior executives should come together to achieve real team performance. When the criteria cannot be met, they should rely on the individual leadership skills that they have honed over the years.

  2. Tracking down hyper-boosted top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele

    2015-06-05

    The identification of hadronically decaying heavy states, such as vector bosons, the Higgs, or the top quark, produced with large transverse boosts has been and will continue to be a central focus of the jet physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At a future hadron collider working at an order-of-magnitude larger energy than the LHC, these heavy states would be easily produced with transverse boosts of several TeV. At these energies, their decay products will be separated by angular scales comparable to individual calorimeter cells, making the current jet substructure identification techniques for hadronic decay modes not directly employable. In addition, at the high energy and luminosity projected at a future hadron collider, there will be numerous sources for contamination including initial- and final-state radiation, underlying event, or pile-up which must be mitigated. We propose a simple strategy to tag such "hyper-boosted" objects that defines jets with radii that scale inversely proportional to their transverse boost and combines the standard calorimetric information with charged track-based observables. By means of a fast detector simulation, we apply it to top quark identification and demonstrate that our method efficiently discriminates hadronically decaying top quarks from light QCD jets up to transverse boosts of 20 TeV. Lastly, our results open the way to tagging heavy objects with energies in the multi-TeV range at present and future hadron colliders.

  3. TOP500 Sublist for November 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Meuer, Hans W.; Dongarra, Jack J.; Simon,Horst D.

    2001-11-09

    18th Edition of TOP500 List of World's Fastest Supercomputers Released MANNHEIM, GERMANY; KNOXVILLE, TENN.; BERKELEY, CALIF. In what has become a much-anticipated event in the world of high-performance computing, the 18th edition of the TOP500 list of the world's fastest supercomputers was released today (November 9, 2001). The latest edition of the twice-yearly ranking finds IBM as the leader in the field, with 32 percent in terms of installed systems and 37 percent in terms of total performance of all the installed systems. In a surprise move Hewlett-Packard captured the second place with 30 percent of the systems. Most of these systems are smaller in size and as a consequence HP's share of installed performance is smaller with 15 percent. This is still enough for second place in this category. SGI, Cray and Sun follow in the number of TOP500 systems with 41 (8 percent), 39 (8 percent), and 31 (6 percent) respectively. In the category of installed performance Cray Inc. keeps the third position with 11 percent ahead of SGI (8 percent) and Compaq (8 percent).

  4. Tracking down hyper-boosted top quarks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele

    2015-06-05

    The identification of hadronically decaying heavy states, such as vector bosons, the Higgs, or the top quark, produced with large transverse boosts has been and will continue to be a central focus of the jet physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At a future hadron collider working at an order-of-magnitude larger energy than the LHC, these heavy states would be easily produced with transverse boosts of several TeV. At these energies, their decay products will be separated by angular scales comparable to individual calorimeter cells, making the current jet substructure identification techniques for hadronic decay modes not directlymore » employable. In addition, at the high energy and luminosity projected at a future hadron collider, there will be numerous sources for contamination including initial- and final-state radiation, underlying event, or pile-up which must be mitigated. We propose a simple strategy to tag such "hyper-boosted" objects that defines jets with radii that scale inversely proportional to their transverse boost and combines the standard calorimetric information with charged track-based observables. By means of a fast detector simulation, we apply it to top quark identification and demonstrate that our method efficiently discriminates hadronically decaying top quarks from light QCD jets up to transverse boosts of 20 TeV. Lastly, our results open the way to tagging heavy objects with energies in the multi-TeV range at present and future hadron colliders.« less

  5. Tracking down hyper-boosted top quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The identification of hadronically decaying heavy states, such as vector bosons, the Higgs, or the top quark, produced with large transverse boosts has been and will continue to be a central focus of the jet physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At a future hadron collider working at an order-of-magnitude larger energy than the LHC, these heavy states would be easily produced with transverse boosts of several TeV. At these energies, their decay products will be separated by angular scales comparable to individual calorimeter cells, making the current jet substructure identification techniques for hadronic decay modes not directly employable. In addition, at the high energy and luminosity projected at a future hadron collider, there will be numerous sources for contamination including initial- and final-state radiation, underlying event, or pile-up which must be mitigated. We propose a simple strategy to tag such "hyper-boosted" objects that defines jets with radii that scale inversely proportional to their transverse boost and combines the standard calorimetric information with charged track-based observables. By means of a fast detector simulation, we apply it to top quark identification and demonstrate that our method efficiently discriminates hadronically decaying top quarks from light QCD jets up to transverse boosts of 20 TeV. Our results open the way to tagging heavy objects with energies in the multi-TeV range at present and future hadron colliders.

  6. Status of the DO top search

    SciTech Connect

    Li-Demarteau, Q.; DO Collaboration

    1994-09-01

    Preliminary new results on the top quark search with the DO experiment in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV for an integrated luminosity of 15.2 {plus_minus} 1.8 pb{sup {minus}1} are reported. In this new analysis, which is optimized for high mass top search, a total of seven candidate events in the electron and muon dilepton decay channels (t{bar t} {yields} e{mu}, ee and {mu}{mu}), single lepton decay channels (t{bar t} {yields} e + jets and t{bar t} {yields} {mu} + jets) without b tagging and single electron decay channel (t{bar t} {yields} e + jets) with b tagging have been observed. The estimated background is 4.7 {plus_minus} 1.0 events. If we assume the top quark has a mass of 180 GeV/c{sup 2}, a t{bar t} production cross section of 3.2 {plus_minus} 3.9 pb with upper limit of 13 pb at 95% C.L. is obtained.

  7. Observation of Single Top Quark Production

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Cecilia E.; /Illinois U., Chicago

    2009-09-01

    The author reports on the observation of electroweak production of single top quarks in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 Tev using 2.3 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using events containing an isolated electron or muon, missing transverse energy, two, three or four jets, with one or two of them identified as originating from the fragmentation of a b quark, the measured cross section for the process p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X is 3.94 {+-} 0.88 pb (for a top quark mass of 170 GeV). the probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 2.5 x 10{sup -7}, corresponding to a 5.0 standard deviation significance. Using the same dataset, the measured cross sections for the t- and the s-channel processes when determined simultaneously with no assumption on their relative production rate are 3.14{sub -0.80}{sup +0.94} pb and 1.05 {+-} 0.81 pb respectively, consistent with standard model expectations. The measured t-channel cross section has a significance of 4.8 standard deviations, representing the first evidence for the production of an individual single top process to be detected.

  8. Top quark physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio Sidoti

    2004-03-17

    After the successful Run I of the Tevatron (1992-1996),with the top quark discovery, both CDF and D0 experiments were extensively upgraded to meet the challenges of the Tevatron Run II collider. The energy of p{bar p} collisions at the Tevatron was increased from {radical}s = 1.8 TeV to {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. t{bar t} production cross section is expected to increase by a factor of {approx} 30%. Major upgrades in the Tevatron accelerator chain will increase the Run II instantaneous luminosity: the goal is to achieve L = 5 - 20 x 10{sup 31} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} while the highest luminosity reached up to now (September 2003) is 5.2 x 10{sup 31} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. In this paper we will present the top quark properties measured by both CDF and D0 with the first physics-quality data collected during the Run II (March 2002-January 2003). First we will review t{bar t} cross section measurements in the various decay channels; then top quark mass measurements will be presented.

  9. Dark decay of the top quark

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye -Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. Top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6 σ deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t → b W + Z's. This is the same as the dominant topmore » quark decay (t → b W) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. In addition, we discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.« less

  10. An informatic framework for decoding protein complexes by top-down mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Owen S.; Havugimana, Pierre C.; Haverland, Nicole A.; Fornelli, Luca; Early, Bryan P.; Greer, Joseph B.; Fellers, Ryan T.; Durbin, Kenneth R.; Do Vale, Luis H. F.; Melani, Rafael D.; Seckler, Henrique S.; Nelp, Micah T.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Horning, Stevan R.; Makarov, Alexander A.; LeDuc, Richard D.; Bandarian, Vahe; Compton, Philip D.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to map the human protein interactome have resulted in information about hundreds to thousands of multi-protein assemblies housed in public repositories, but the molecular characterization and stoichiometry of their protein subunits remains largely unknown. Here, we combined the CORUM and UniProt databases to create candidates for an error-tolerant search engine designed for hierarchical top-down analyses, identification, and scoring of multi-proteoform complexes by native mass spectrometry. PMID:26780093

  11. Measurements of top quark properties at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Margaroli, Fabrizio

    2011-05-01

    The discovery of the top quark in 1995 opened a whole new sector of investigation of the Standard Model; today top quark physics remains a key priority of the Tevatron program. Some of the measurements of top quark properties, for example its mass, will be a long-standing legacy. The recent evidence of an anomalously large charge asymmetry in top quark events suggests that new physics could couple preferably with top quarks. I will summarize this long chapter of particle physics history and discuss the road the top quark is highlighting for the LHC program.

  12. Humanism in nursing homes: the impact of top management.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G; Ferguson, Jamie C; Hughes, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    We provide a review of ways in which top managers of nursing homes can provide or impact the humanistic component of care provided in their facilities. We describe the nursing home top management team; the role of top managers in nursing homes; the role of top managers as leaders in the nursing home; the literature examining the impact of top managers in nursing homes; and, examine developments in the nursing home industry that are influencing (or could potentially influence) the humanistic components of care. We conclude with suggestions for top managers, nursing home owners, and policy makers to create more caring humanistic environments. Suggestions include resident-directed care initiatives and culture change.

  13. Magnetismo Molecular (Molecular Magentism)

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Mario S; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2010-07-01

    The new synthesis processes in chemistry open a new world of research, new and surprising materials never before found in nature can now be synthesized and, as a wonderful result, observed a series of physical phenomena never before imagined. Among these are many new materials the molecular magnets, the subject of this book and magnetic properties that are often reflections of the quantum behavior of these materials. Aside from the wonderful experience of exploring something new, the theoretical models that describe the behavior these magnetic materials are, in most cases, soluble analytically, which allows us to know in detail the physical mechanisms governing these materials. Still, the academic interest in parallel this subject, these materials have a number of properties that are promising to be used in technological devices, such as in computers quantum magnetic recording, magnetocaloric effect, spintronics and many other devices. This volume will journey through the world of molecular magnets, from the structural description of these materials to state of the art research.

  14. Extension of the measurement, assignment, and fit of the rotational spectrum of the two-top molecule methyl acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam; Kleiner, Isabelle; Shipman, Steven T.; Mae, Yoshiaki; Hirose, Kazue; Hatanaka, Shota; Kobayashi, Kaori

    2014-05-01

    New and previous spectroscopic data were recorded for the two-top molecule methyl acetate using five spectrometers in four different labs: a room temperature chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectrometer in the frequency range from 8.7 to 26.5 GHz, two molecular beam FTMW spectrometers (2-40 GHz), a free jet absorption Stark-modulated spectrometer (60-78 GHz), and a room temperature millimeter-wave spectrometer (44-68 GHz). Approximately 800 new lines with J up to 40 and K up to 16 were assigned. In total, 1603 lines were fitted with 34 parameters using an internal rotation Hamiltonian in the Rho Axis Method (RAM) and the program BELGI-Cs-2tops to standard deviations close to the experimental uncertainties. More precise determinations of the top-top interaction and the J, K dependent parameters were carried out.

  15. TopBP1 Interacts with BLM to Maintain Genome Stability but Is Dispensable for Preventing BLM Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Blackford, Andrew N.; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Schwab, Rebekka A.; Galanty, Yaron; Jackson, Stephen P.; Niedzwiedz, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Bloom syndrome helicase BLM and topoisomerase-IIβ-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) are key regulators of genome stability. It was recently proposed that BLM phosphorylation on Ser338 mediates its interaction with TopBP1, to protect BLM from ubiquitylation and degradation (Wang et al., 2013). Here, we show that the BLM-TopBP1 interaction does not involve Ser338 but instead requires BLM phosphorylation on Ser304. Furthermore, we establish that disrupting this interaction does not markedly affect BLM stability. However, BLM-TopBP1 binding is important for maintaining genome integrity, because in its absence cells display increased sister chromatid exchanges, replication origin firing and chromosomal aberrations. Therefore, the BLM-TopBP1 interaction maintains genome stability not by controlling BLM protein levels, but via another as-yet undetermined mechanism. Finally, we identify critical residues that mediate interactions between TopBP1 and MDC1, and between BLM and TOP3A/RMI1/RMI2. Taken together, our findings provide molecular insights into a key tumor suppressor and genome stability network. PMID:25794620

  16. 30. Elevator no. 3: top floor, rollers for southeast conveyor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Elevator no. 3: top floor, rollers for southeast conveyor belt flanked by top openings of grain bins, with tripper in background, facing northeast - Washburn Crosby Company Elevators No. 2 & 3, 900 & 1000 Second Avenue, South, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  17. 11. TIP TOP MINE. DETAIL OF TONGUE AND GROOVE INTERIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. TIP TOP MINE. DETAIL OF TONGUE AND GROOVE INTERIOR SIDING IN LIVING QUARTERS. CAMERA POINTED EAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  18. 2. TIP TOP MINE. NORTH AND EAST SIDE OF HOUSE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. TIP TOP MINE. NORTH AND EAST SIDE OF HOUSE. CAMERA POINTED SOUTH. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  19. 1. TIP TOP MINE. WEST SIDE OF STRUCTURE. CAMERA POINTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. TIP TOP MINE. WEST SIDE OF STRUCTURE. CAMERA POINTED EAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  20. 5. TIP TOP MINE. EAST SIDE OF STRUCTURE WITH COLLAPSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. TIP TOP MINE. EAST SIDE OF STRUCTURE WITH COLLAPSED ADIT. CAMERA POINTED WEST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  1. 6. TIP TOP MINE. DETAIL OF SIDING. SOUTHWEST CORNER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. TIP TOP MINE. DETAIL OF SIDING. SOUTHWEST CORNER OF STRUCTURE. CAMERA POINTED NORTHEAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  2. 3. TIP TOP MINE. SOUTH SIDE OF HOUSE. CAMERA POINTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. TIP TOP MINE. SOUTH SIDE OF HOUSE. CAMERA POINTED NORTH-NORTHWEST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  3. 19. LOOKING TOWARD THE TOP OF CARRIE FURNACE No. 3 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. LOOKING TOWARD THE TOP OF CARRIE FURNACE No. 3 WITH TOP OF SWING STOVE AND No 3 STOVES IN FOREGROUND. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  4. Compressed supersymmetry and natural neutralino dark matter from top squark-mediated annihilation to top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Stephen P.

    2007-06-01

    The parameters of the minimal supersymmetric standard model appear to require uncomfortably precise adjustment in order to reconcile the electroweak symmetry breaking scale with the lower mass limits on a neutral Higgs scalar boson. This problem can be significantly ameliorated in models with a running gluino mass parameter that is smaller than the wino mass near the scale of unification of gauge couplings. A compressed superpartner mass spectrum results; compared to models with unified gaugino masses, the ratios of the squark and gluino masses to the lightest superpartner mass are reduced. I argue that in this scenario the annihilation of binolike neutralino pairs to top-antitop quark pairs through top-squark exchange can most naturally play the crucial role in ensuring that the thermal relic dark matter density is not too large, with only a small role played by coannihilations. The lightest superpartner mass must then exceed the top-quark mass, and the lighter top squark cannot decay to a top quark. These conditions have important implications for collider searches.

  5. Top Quark Physics at a Polarized Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, S.

    1998-02-01

    Top quark pair production is presented at a polarized Muon Collider above the threshold region. The off-diagonal spin basis is the natural basis for this discussion as the top quark pairs are produced in an essentially unique spin configuration for 100% polarization. Modest polarization, say 30%, can lead to 90% of all top quark pair events being in one spin configuration. This will lead to sensitive tests on anomalous top quark couplings.

  6. Altmetric: Top 50 dental articles in 2014.

    PubMed

    Kolahi, J; Khazaei, S

    2016-06-10

    Introduction Altmetrics is a new and emerging scholarly tool that measures online attention surrounding journal articles. Altmetric data resources include: policy documents, news outlets, blogs, online reference managers (eg Mendeley and CiteULike), post-publication peer-review forums (eg PubPeer and Publons), social media (eg Twitter, Facebook, Weibo, Google(+), Pinterest, Reddit), Wikipedia, sites running Stack Exchange (Q&A), and reviews on F1000 and YouTube.Methods To identify the top 50 dental articles in 2014, PubMed was searched using the following query "("2014/1/1"[PDAT]:"2014/12/31"[PDAT]) and jsubsetd[text]" in December, 2015. Consequently, all PubMed records were extracted and sent to Altmetric LLP (London, UK) as a CSV file for examination. Data were analysed by Microsoft Office Excel 2010 using descriptive statistics and charts.Results Using PubMed searches,15,132 dental articles were found in 2014. The mean Altmetric score of 50 top dental articles in 2014 was 69.5 ± 73.3 (95% CI: -74.14 to 213.14). The British Dental Journal (48%) and Journal of Dental Research (16%) had the maximum number of top articles. Twitter (67.13%), Mendeley (15.89%) and news outlets (10.92%) were the most popular altmetric data resources.Discussion Altmetrics are intended to supplement bibliometrics, not replace them. Altmetrics is a fresh and emerging arena for the dental research community. We believe that dental clinical practitioners, research scientists, research directors and journal editors must pay more attention to altmetrics as a new and rapid tool to measure the social impact of scholarly articles.

  7. Top-down vertical itemset mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, Mohammad Karim; Ghods, Vahid

    2015-03-01

    Vertical itemset mining is an important frequent pattern mining problem with broad applications. It is challenging since one may need to examine a combinatorial explosive number of possible patterns of items of a dataset in a traditional horizontal algorithm. Since high dimensional datasets typically contain a large number of columns and a small number of rows, vertical itemset mining algorithms, which extract the frequent itemsets of dataset by producing all combination of rows ids, are a good alternative for horizontal algorithms in mining frequent itemsets from high dimensional dataset. Since a rowset can be simply produced from its subsets by adding a new row id to a sub rowset, many bottom up vertical itemset mining algorithms are designed and represented in the literature. However, bottom up vertical mining algorithms suffer from a main drawback. Bottom-up algorithms start the process of generating and testing of rowsets from the small rowsets and go on to the larger rowsets, whereas the small rowsets cannot produce a frequent itemsets because they contain less than minimum support threshold number of rows. In this paper, we described a new efficient vertical top down algorithm called VTD (Vertical Top Down) to conduct mining of frequent itemsets in high dimensional datasets. Our top down approach employed the minimum support threshold to prune the rowsets which any itemset could not be extracted from them. Several experiments on real bioinformatics datasets showed that VTD is orders of magnitude better than previous closed pattern mining algorithms. Our performance study showed that this algorithm outperformed substantially the best former algorithms.

  8. Altmetric: Top 50 dental articles in 2014.

    PubMed

    Kolahi, J; Khazaei, S

    2016-06-10

    Introduction Altmetrics is a new and emerging scholarly tool that measures online attention surrounding journal articles. Altmetric data resources include: policy documents, news outlets, blogs, online reference managers (eg Mendeley and CiteULike), post-publication peer-review forums (eg PubPeer and Publons), social media (eg Twitter, Facebook, Weibo, Google(+), Pinterest, Reddit), Wikipedia, sites running Stack Exchange (Q&A), and reviews on F1000 and YouTube.Methods To identify the top 50 dental articles in 2014, PubMed was searched using the following query "("2014/1/1"[PDAT]:"2014/12/31"[PDAT]) and jsubsetd[text]" in December, 2015. Consequently, all PubMed records were extracted and sent to Altmetric LLP (London, UK) as a CSV file for examination. Data were analysed by Microsoft Office Excel 2010 using descriptive statistics and charts.Results Using PubMed searches,15,132 dental articles were found in 2014. The mean Altmetric score of 50 top dental articles in 2014 was 69.5 ± 73.3 (95% CI: -74.14 to 213.14). The British Dental Journal (48%) and Journal of Dental Research (16%) had the maximum number of top articles. Twitter (67.13%), Mendeley (15.89%) and news outlets (10.92%) were the most popular altmetric data resources.Discussion Altmetrics are intended to supplement bibliometrics, not replace them. Altmetrics is a fresh and emerging arena for the dental research community. We believe that dental clinical practitioners, research scientists, research directors and journal editors must pay more attention to altmetrics as a new and rapid tool to measure the social impact of scholarly articles. PMID:27283563

  9. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING [VAB] & TOPPING OFF CEREMONIES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Hundreds of construction workers, community leaders, and NASA and contractor employees were present on April 14, 1965 for a ceremony marking off the ''topping off'' of the Vehicle Assembly Building. Visible in this photo are the three Launch umbilical Towers then being constructed from which to launch the giant Saturn V rocket which would hurl Americans to the Moon during Project Apollo. The LUTs were 446-feet tall. They were modified to support the Space Shuttle program following completion of Saturn/Apollo related programs in the mid 1970s.

  10. A top-face-sway electromagnetic micromotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jingqiu; Le, Zichun; Yao, Jinsong; Wu, Zhiyong; Jia, Hongguang; Wu, Yihui; Jia, Zhi; 1, Qiongying Lu; Xuan, Ming; Wang, Lijun

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, the structure of a top-face-sway electromagnetic micromotor and its principle, fabrication and performance are introduced. A combination of the electromagnetic actuating and the planetary reducing provides this micromotor an advantage of low rotational speed and high torque. In addition, since a flexible coupling absorbs the sway and only outputs rotation, it gives this micromotor a balanced output. The dimension of the micromotor is 5 mm. Its rotation speed has a range of 20 - 860 rpm, and its driving current is 300 mA. The output torque of the micromotor is measured to be 13.0 ?Nm.

  11. Dynamical generation of the top quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Marko Berislav

    2002-09-01

    I study new physics theories in which the observed mass of the heaviest elementary particle, the top quark, is a result of a dynamical mechanism at the subatomic level. The same mechanism needs to explain the transition of the effective physical description at the largest space-time scales to that at smaller scales. This large-scale description is characterized by non-zero masses for most of the elementary particles and the existence of the familiar electromagnetic interactions. The description at smaller space-time scales is characterized by the presence of a richer set of fundamental interactions, including weak and hypercharge interactions, as well as no masses for the particles. As a minimal consequence of this transition, particle theories commonly predict the existence of a still unobserved particle, called the Higgs, at the largest scales. New physics considered in this thesis includes the following: (1) Models with new fundamental interactions that select the top quark and give an exclusive role to its dynamical mass generation mechanism. I propose one such model, discuss current experimental constraints, and suggest future tests of this idea. (2) Models with new spin one-half particles, not sensitive to the weak interactions, that mix with ordinary particles, including the top quark. I discuss the phenomenology, i.e., analyze data from particle colliders, and set limits on the parameters of the models. (3) Models with new spin one-half particles, sensitive to the weak interactions, that mix with ordinary particles. I propose the model structure, discuss some of its phenomenology, and suggest further tests of this idea at linear particle accelerators. Finally, I analyze the connection between the Higgs mass (m H) and the space-time scale at which the above-mentioned transition occurs. Without introducing new physics at the smallest scales, I show that due to the very large top mass, the standard description with the Higgs particle fails at small scales

  12. Top Event Matrix Analysis Code System.

    2000-06-19

    Version 00 TEMAC is designed to permit the user to easily estimate risk and to perform sensitivity and uncertainty analyses with a Boolean expression such as produced by the SETS computer program. SETS produces a mathematical representation of a fault tree used to model system unavailability. In the terminology of the TEMAC program, such a mathematical representation is referred to as a top event. The analysis of risk involves the estimation of the magnitude ofmore » risk, the sensitivity of risk estimates to base event probabilities and initiating event frequencies, and the quantification of the uncertainty in the risk estimates.« less

  13. Cloud top remote sensing by airborne lidar.

    PubMed

    Spinhirne, J D; Hansen, M Z; Caudill, L O

    1982-05-01

    Observations of cloud top height, backscattering, and signal depolarization have been obtained by a lidar system operating onboard a high-altitude research aircraft. The transmitter for the cloud lidar system is a doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at 5 Hz. The system functions as a fully automated sensor under microprocessor control and operates from a nominal 19-km altitude. Measurements have been acquired over a wide variety of cloud cover in conjunction with passive visible and infrared measurements. Initial observation results are reported.

  14. 12. TIP TOP MINE. WOODEN STRUCTURE ASSOCIATED WITH CABLES IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. TIP TOP MINE. WOODEN STRUCTURE ASSOCIATED WITH CABLES IN ID-31-C-13 AND ID-31-C-14 LOCATED ON SLOPE JUST BELOW TIP TOP HOUSE. CAMERA IS POINTED NORTH-NORTHWEST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  15. Top Contributors to the School Psychology Literature: 1996-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Gabrielle A.; Davis, Kim S.; Zanger, Dinorah; Gerrard-Morris, Aimee; Robinson, Daniel H.

    2006-01-01

    S.G. Little (1997) reported the top contributors to the school psychology literature from 1987 to 1995. The present study represents a follow-up by examining the top contributors from 1996 to 2005. Similar to Little, a list of the top 50 contributors was developed using a point system that assigned more credit based on fewer coauthors and higher…

  16. Control in Highly Focused Top-Spinning. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkson, Gershon

    1998-01-01

    Three studies analyzed stimulus feedback and the concept of control with three children and two adults having autism. The first study explored feedback from spinning tops, while the second and third emphasized control of various stimuli including spinning tops. Results indicate that autistic individuals' common interest in spinning tops is…

  17. 29 CFR 1960.54 - Training of top management officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Training of top management officials. 1960.54 Section 1960... PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.54 Training of top management officials. Each agency shall provide top management officials with orientation and other learning experiences which will enable them...

  18. 29 CFR 1960.54 - Training of top management officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Training of top management officials. 1960.54 Section 1960... PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.54 Training of top management officials. Each agency shall provide top management officials with orientation and other learning experiences which will enable them...

  19. 49 CFR 229.71 - Clearance above top of rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Clearance above top of rail. 229.71 Section 229.71....71 Clearance above top of rail. No part or appliance of a locomotive except the wheels, flexible nonmetallic sand pipe extension tips, and trip cock arms may be less than 21/2 inches above the top of rail....

  20. 29 CFR 1960.54 - Training of top management officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Training of top management officials. 1960.54 Section 1960... PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.54 Training of top management officials. Each agency shall provide top management officials with orientation and other learning experiences which will enable them...

  1. 49 CFR 229.71 - Clearance above top of rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Clearance above top of rail. 229.71 Section 229.71....71 Clearance above top of rail. No part or appliance of a locomotive except the wheels, flexible nonmetallic sand pipe extension tips, and trip cock arms may be less than 21/2 inches above the top of rail....

  2. 29 CFR 1960.54 - Training of top management officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training of top management officials. 1960.54 Section 1960... PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.54 Training of top management officials. Each agency shall provide top management officials with orientation and other learning experiences which will enable them...

  3. 49 CFR 229.71 - Clearance above top of rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Clearance above top of rail. 229.71 Section 229.71....71 Clearance above top of rail. No part or appliance of a locomotive except the wheels, flexible nonmetallic sand pipe extension tips, and trip cock arms may be less than 21/2 inches above the top of rail....

  4. 29 CFR 1960.54 - Training of top management officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Training of top management officials. 1960.54 Section 1960... PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.54 Training of top management officials. Each agency shall provide top management officials with orientation and other learning experiences which will enable them...

  5. 49 CFR 229.71 - Clearance above top of rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Clearance above top of rail. 229.71 Section 229.71....71 Clearance above top of rail. No part or appliance of a locomotive except the wheels, flexible nonmetallic sand pipe extension tips, and trip cock arms may be less than 21/2 inches above the top of rail....

  6. It's about Time: The Literacy TopPics Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Swafford, Jeanne

    1997-01-01

    Examines the last five years of articles in this journal to show what topics were most often written about (the "Top Picks" or "TopPics"). Discusses these results and makes recommendations that deserve considerable attention in the future. Notes that integrated language arts was a perennial TopPic. (SR)

  7. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from the Top Group's Top Quark Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Top group studies the properties of the top quark, the heaviest known fundamental particle. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  8. Development of the TopSat camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenway, Paul; Tosh, Ian; Morris, Nigel

    2004-06-01

    The TopSat camera is a low cost remote sensing imager capable of producing 2.5 metre resolution panchromatic imagery, funded by the British National Space Centre's Mosaic programme. An engineering model development programme verified optical alignment techniques and crucially, demonstrated structural stability through vibration tests. As a result of this, the flight model camera has been assembled at the Space Science & Technology Department of CCLRC's Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, in preparation for launch in 2005. The camera has been designed to be compact and lightweight so that it may be flown on a low cost mini-satellite (~120kg launch mass). To achieve this, the camera utilises an off-axis three mirror anastigmatic (TMA) system, which has the advantages of excellent image quality over a wide field of view, combined with a compactness that makes its overall dimensions smaller than its focal length. Keeping the costs to a minimum has been a major design driver in the development of this camera. The camera is part of the TopSat mission, which is a collaboration between four UK organisations; RAL (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory), SSTL (Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd.), QinetiQ and Infoterra. Its objective is to demonstrate provision of rapid response high-resolution imagery to fixed and mobile ground stations using a low cost mini-satellite. This paper describes the opto-mechanical design, assembly and alignment techniques implemented and reports on the test results obtained to date.

  9. Top marine predators track Lagrangian coherent structures

    PubMed Central

    Tew Kai, Emilie; Rossi, Vincent; Sudre, Joel; Weimerskirch, Henri; Lopez, Cristobal; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Marsac, Francis; Garçon, Veronique

    2009-01-01

    Meso- and submesoscales (fronts, eddies, filaments) in surface ocean flow have a crucial influence on marine ecosystems. Their dynamics partly control the foraging behavior and the displacement of marine top predators (tuna, birds, turtles, and cetaceans). In this work we focus on the role of submesoscale structures in the Mozambique Channel in the distribution of a marine predator, the Great Frigatebird. Using a newly developed dynamic concept, the finite-size Lyapunov exponent (FSLE), we identified Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) present in the surface flow in the channel over a 2-month observation period (August and September 2003). By comparing seabird satellite positions with LCS locations, we demonstrate that frigatebirds track precisely these structures in the Mozambique Channel, providing the first evidence that a top predator is able to track these FSLE ridges to locate food patches. After comparing bird positions during long and short trips and different parts of these trips, we propose several hypotheses to understand how frigatebirds can follow these LCSs. The birds might use visual and/or olfactory cues and/or atmospheric current changes over the structures to move along these biologic corridors. The birds being often associated with tuna schools around foraging areas, a thorough comprehension of their foraging behavior and movement during the breeding season is crucial not only to seabird ecology but also to an appropriate ecosystemic approach to fisheries in the channel. PMID:19416811

  10. Measurement of the top quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Varnes, E.W.

    1997-12-31

    This dissertation describes the measurement of the top quark mass m{sub t} using events recorded during a 125 pb{sup -1} exposure of the D0 detector to {radical}s=1.8 TeV {anti p}p collisions. Six events consistent with the hypothesis t{anti t} {yields} bW{sup +}, {anti b}W{sup -} {yields} b{anti l}{nu}, {anti b}l{anti {nu}} form the dilepton sample. The kinematics of such events may be reconstructed for any assumed mt, and the likelihood of each such solution evaluated. A measurement of m{sub t} based on these relative solution likelihoods gives m{sub t} = 169.9 {+-} 14.8 (stat.) {+-} 3. 8 (syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. A 2C kinematic fit is performed on a sample of 77 events consistent with t{anti t} {yields} bW{sup +}, {anti b}W{sup -} {yields} b{anti l}{nu}, {anti b}q{anti q} , and this, in combination with an estimate on the likelihood that each event is top, yields m{sub t} = 173.3 {+-} 5.6 (stat.) {+-} 6.2 (syst.) GeV/c{sup 2} . A combination of these two measurements gives m{sub t} = 173.1 {+-} 5.2 (stat.) {+-} 5.7 (syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  11. Top-down control in contour grouping.

    PubMed

    Volberg, Gregor; Wutz, Andreas; Greenlee, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    Human observers tend to group oriented line segments into full contours if they follow the Gestalt rule of 'good continuation'. It is commonly assumed that contour grouping emerges automatically in early visual cortex. In contrast, recent work in animal models suggests that contour grouping requires learning and thus involves top-down control from higher brain structures. Here we explore mechanisms of top-down control in perceptual grouping by investigating synchronicity within EEG oscillations. Human participants saw two micro-Gabor arrays in a random order, with the task to indicate whether the first (S1) or the second stimulus (S2) contained a contour of collinearly aligned elements. Contour compared to non-contour S1 produced a larger posterior post-stimulus beta power (15-21 Hz). Contour S2 was associated with a pre-stimulus decrease in posterior alpha power (11-12 Hz) and in fronto-posterior theta (4-5 Hz) phase couplings, but not with a post-stimulus increase in beta power. The results indicate that subjects used prior knowledge from S1 processing for S2 contour grouping. Expanding previous work on theta oscillations, we propose that long-range theta synchrony shapes neural responses to perceptual groupings regulating lateral inhibition in early visual cortex.

  12. Spectra of Flat Top & nearby soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The first color panorama returned by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) after Mars Pathfinder's landing included several larger, gray rocks, bright red dust on a flat-topped rock and the ground between the rocks, and darker red soil exposed where Pathfinder's landing dislodged a small rock. The rock dubbed 'Flat Top' is at the low center of the images. The less red color and low reflectance of the rocks is consistent with the iron minerals found in igneous rocks, whereas the fine, bright drift has a spectrum indicative of a weathering product. The strength of the bend, or 'kink', in the spectrum is related to the abundance and particle size of specific crustalline, ferric weathering products. In the false color image, the blue areas have a weak kink and are relatively unweathered, whereas the red areas' strong kink indicates an abundance of ferric iron minerals.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  13. Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    2010-05-01

    Conventional reservoir simulation and modeling is a bottom-up approach. It starts with building a geological model of the reservoir that is populated with the best available petrophysical and geophysical information at the time of development. Engineering fluid flow principles are added and solved numerically so as to arrive at a dynamic reservoir model. The dynamic reservoir model is calibrated using the production history of multiple wells and the history matched model is used to strategize field development in order to improve recovery. Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Modeling approaches the reservoir simulation and modeling from an opposite angle by attempting to build a realization of the reservoir starting with the measured well production behavior (history). The production history is augmented by core, log, well test and seismic data in order to increase the accuracy of the Top-Down modeling technique. Although not intended as a substitute for the conventional reservoir simulation of large, complex fields, this novel approach to reservoir modeling can be used as an alternative (at a fraction of the cost) to conventional reservoir simulation and modeling in cases where performing conventional modeling is cost (and man-power) prohibitive. In cases where a conventional model of a reservoir already exists, Top-Down modeling should be considered as a compliment to, rather than a competition for the conventional technique, to provide an independent look at the data coming from the reservoir/wells for optimum development strategy and recovery enhancement. Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Modeling starts with well-known reservoir engineering techniques such as Decline Curve Analysis, Type Curve Matching, History Matching using single well numerical reservoir simulation, Volumetric Reserve Estimation and calculation of Recovery Factors for all the wells (individually) in the field. Using statistical techniques multiple Production Indicators (3, 6, and 9 months cum

  14. Top 10% Admissions in the Borderlands: Access and Success of Borderland Top Students at Texas Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodríguez, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on Texas Borderland students admitted through the Texas Top 10% admissions policy, which assumes that Top 10% students are college ready for any public university and provides Top 10% high school graduates automatic admission to any 4-year public university in Texas. Using descriptive and inferential statistics, results…

  15. Summary of Single top quark production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Schwienhorst, R.; CDF, on the

    2014-01-01

    The production of single-top quarks occurs via the weak interaction at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. Single top quark events are selected in the lepton+jets final state by CDF and D0 and in the missing transverse energy plus jets final state by CDF. Multivariate classifiers separate the s-channel and t-channel single-top signals from the large backgrounds. The combination of CDF and D0 results leads to the first observation of the s-channel mode of single top quark production. The t-channel and single top combined cross sections have also been measured.

  16. Searches for New Physics in Top Decays at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Pleier, Marc-Andre; /Brookhaven

    2011-08-01

    The Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab with its centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV allows for pair production of top quarks and the study of top quark decay properties. This report reflects the current status of measurements of the W boson helicity in top quark decays and the ratio of top quark branching fractions as well as searches for neutral current top quark decays and pair production of fourth generation t' quarks, performed by the D0 Collaboration utilising datasets of up to 5.4 fb{sup -1}.

  17. Molecular Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew J; Willets, Katherine A

    2016-06-12

    In this review, we survey recent advances in the field of molecular plasmonics beyond the traditional sensing modality. Molecular plasmonics is explored in the context of the complex interaction between plasmon resonances and molecules and the ability of molecules to support plasmons self-consistently. First, spectroscopic changes induced by the interaction between molecular and plasmonic resonances are discussed, followed by examples of how tuning molecular properties leads to active molecular plasmonic systems. Next, the role of the position and polarizability of a molecular adsorbate on surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals is examined experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we introduce recent research focused on using molecules as plasmonic materials. Each of these examples is intended to highlight the role of molecules as integral components in coupled molecule-plasmon systems, as well as to show the diversity of applications in molecular plasmonics.

  18. Molecular Plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew J.; Willets, Katherine A.

    2016-06-01

    In this review, we survey recent advances in the field of molecular plasmonics beyond the traditional sensing modality. Molecular plasmonics is explored in the context of the complex interaction between plasmon resonances and molecules and the ability of molecules to support plasmons self-consistently. First, spectroscopic changes induced by the interaction between molecular and plasmonic resonances are discussed, followed by examples of how tuning molecular properties leads to active molecular plasmonic systems. Next, the role of the position and polarizability of a molecular adsorbate on surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals is examined experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we introduce recent research focused on using molecules as plasmonic materials. Each of these examples is intended to highlight the role of molecules as integral components in coupled molecule-plasmon systems, as well as to show the diversity of applications in molecular plasmonics.

  19. The analysis of the market success of FDA approvals by probing top 100 bestselling drugs.

    PubMed

    Polanski, Jaroslaw; Bogocz, Jacek; Tkocz, Aleksandra

    2016-05-01

    Target-oriented drug discovery is the main research paradigm of contemporary drug discovery. In target-oriented approaches, we attempt to maximize in vitro drug potency by finding the optimal fit to the target. This can result in a higher molecular complexity, in particular, the higher molecular weight (MW) of the drugs. However, a comparison of the successful developments of pharmaceuticals with the general trends that can be observed in medicinal chemistry resulted in the conclusion that the so-called molecular obesity is an important reason for the attrition rate of drugs. When analyzing the list of top 100 drug bestsellers versus all of the FDA approvals, we discovered that on average lower-complexity (MW, ADMET score) drugs are winners of the top 100 list in terms of numbers but that, especially, up to some optimal MW value, a higher molecular complexity can pay off with higher incomes. This indicates that slim drugs are doing better but that fat drugs are bigger fishes to catch.

  20. Variations of (pseudo-)rotations and the Laplace-Beltrami operator on homogeneous spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brezov, D. S.; Mladenova, C. D.; Mladenov, I. M.

    2015-10-28

    In this paper we obtain the Lie derivatives of the scalar parameters in the generalized Euler decomposition with respect to arbitrary axes under left and right deck transformations. This problem can be directly related to the representation of the angular momentum in quantum mechanics. As a particular example, we calculate the angular momentum and the corresponding quantum hamiltonian in the standard Euler and Bryan representations. Similarly, in the hyperbolic case, the Laplace-Beltrami operator is retrieved for the Iwasawa decomposition. The case of two axes is considered as well.

  1. Variations of (pseudo-)rotations and the Laplace-Beltrami operator on homogeneous spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brezov, D. S.; Mladenova, C. D.; Mladenov, I. M.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we obtain the Lie derivatives of the scalar parameters in the generalized Euler decomposition with respect to arbitrary axes under left and right deck transformations. This problem can be directly related to the representation of the angular momentum in quantum mechanics. As a particular example, we calculate the angular momentum and the corresponding quantum hamiltonian in the standard Euler and Bryan representations. Similarly, in the hyperbolic case, the Laplace-Beltrami operator is retrieved for the Iwasawa decomposition. The case of two axes is considered as well.

  2. Alignment of asymetric-top molecules using multiple-pulse trains.

    SciTech Connect

    Pabst, S.; Santra, R.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. Erlangen-Nuremberg; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-06-07

    We theoretically analyze the effectiveness of multiple-pulse laser alignment methods for asymmetric-top molecules. As an example, we choose SO2 and investigate the alignment dynamics induced by two different sequences, each consisting of four identical laser pulses. Each sequence differs only in the time delay between the pulses. Equally spaced pulses matching the alignment revival of the symmetrized SO2 rotor model are exploited in the first sequence. The pulse separations in the second sequence are short compared to the rotation dynamics of the molecule and monotonically increase the degree of alignment until the maximum alignment is reached. We point out the significant differences between the alignment dynamics of SO2 treated as an asymmetric-top and a symmetric-top rotor, respectively. We also explain why the fast sequence of laser pulses creates considerably stronger one-dimensional molecular alignment for asymmetric-top molecules. In addition, we show that multiple-pulse trains with elliptically polarized pulses do not enhance one-dimensional alignment or create three-dimensional alignment.

  3. Alignment of asymmetric-top molecules using multiple-pulse trains

    SciTech Connect

    Pabst, Stefan; Santra, Robin

    2010-06-15

    We theoretically analyze the effectiveness of multiple-pulse laser alignment methods for asymmetric-top molecules. As an example, we choose SO{sub 2} and investigate the alignment dynamics induced by two different sequences, each consisting of four identical laser pulses. Each sequence differs only in the time delay between the pulses. Equally spaced pulses matching the alignment revival of the symmetrized SO{sub 2} rotor model are exploited in the first sequence. The pulse separations in the second sequence are short compared to the rotation dynamics of the molecule and monotonically increase the degree of alignment until the maximum alignment is reached. We point out the significant differences between the alignment dynamics of SO{sub 2} treated as an asymmetric-top and a symmetric-top rotor, respectively. We also explain why the fast sequence of laser pulses creates considerably stronger one-dimensional molecular alignment for asymmetric-top molecules. In addition, we show that multiple-pulse trains with elliptically polarized pulses do not enhance one-dimensional alignment or create three-dimensional alignment.

  4. Environmental assessment of curly top virus control in California. [Curly Top Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-15

    Curly top is a viral disease of sugarbeets, tomatoes, melons, peppers, beans, cucumbers, squash, pumpkins, spinach, vineseed and other commercially important crops, including ornamentals. Curly top not only infects commercial crops, but at times devastates backyard vegetable and flower gardens. The only known vector of curly top is Circulifer tenellus, commonly known as the beet leafhopper. Control of the beet leafhopper may take place at various locations throughout the San Joaquin Valley, Salinas Valley, Cuyama Valley, Antelope Valley of northern Los Angeles County, Riverside County and the Imperial Valley (See Maps in Appendix E''), including portions of Merced, Fresno, Kings. Kern, San Luis Obispo, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Riverside and Imperial Counties. The size of the control program is totally dependent on the location, size, nd distribution of the beet leafhopper population. In a year with a low population, only 80,000 acres in western Fresno, Kings, and Kern Counties may require treatment. In a drought year, the treatment required may increase to more than 200,000 acres and include some inter-coastal valleys of Monterey, San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties. Not all areas require treatment on an annual basis and at no time is the entire area subject to blanket treatment. The Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) was instrumental in supporting research which developed an antisera allowing the use of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay to determine the presence, on a percentage basis, of curly top virus. Thus, the amount of virus found in a given area lends weight to treatment priorities.

  5. Top Down Proteomics Reveals Mature Proteoforms Expressed in Subcellular Fractions of the Echinococcus granulosus Preadult Stage.

    PubMed

    Lorenzatto, Karina R; Kim, Kyunggon; Ntai, Ioanna; Paludo, Gabriela P; Camargo de Lima, Jeferson; Thomas, Paul M; Kelleher, Neil L; Ferreira, Henrique B

    2015-11-01

    Echinococcus granulosus is the causative agent of cystic hydatid disease, a neglected zoonosis responsible for high morbidity and mortality. Several molecular mechanisms underlying parasite biology remain poorly understood. Here, E. granulosus subcellular fractions were analyzed by top down and bottom up proteomics for protein identification and characterization of co-translational and post-translational modifications (CTMs and PTMs, respectively). Nuclear and cytosolic extracts of E. granulosus protoscoleces were fractionated by 10% GELFrEE and proteins under 30 kDa were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. By top down analysis, 186 proteins and 207 proteoforms were identified, of which 122 and 52 proteoforms were exclusively detected in nuclear and cytosolic fractions, respectively. CTMs were evident as 71% of the proteoforms had methionine excised and 47% were N-terminal acetylated. In addition, in silico internal acetylation prediction coupled with top down MS allowed the characterization of 9 proteins differentially acetylated, including histones. Bottom up analysis increased the overall number of identified proteins in nuclear and cytosolic fractions to 154 and 112, respectively. Overall, our results provided the first description of the low mass proteome of E. granulosus subcellular fractions and highlighted proteoforms with CTMs and PTMS whose characterization may lead to another level of understanding about molecular mechanisms controlling parasitic flatworm biology.

  6. Top partners searches and composite Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsedonskyi, Oleksii; Panico, Giuliano; Wulzer, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Colored fermionic partners of the top quark are well-known signatures of the Composite Higgs scenario and for this reason they have been and will be subject of an intensive experimental study at the LHC. Performing an assessment of the theoretical implications of this experimental effort is the goal of the present paper. We proceed by analyzing a set of simple benchmark models, characterized by simple two-dimensional parameter spaces where the results of the searches are conveniently visualized and their impact quantified. We only draw exclusion contours, in the hypothesis of no signal, but of course our formalism could equally well be used to report discoveries in a theoretically useful format.

  7. Observation of single top-quark production.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuplov, V; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-08-28

    We report observation of the electroweak production of single top quarks in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV based on 2.3 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using events containing an isolated electron or muon and missing transverse energy, together with jets originating from the fragmentation of b quarks, we measure a cross section of sigma(pp[over ]--> tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.94 + or - 0.88 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 2.5 x 10(-7), corresponding to a 5.0 standard deviation significance for the observation. PMID:19792787

  8. Who rises to the top? Early indicators.

    PubMed

    Kell, Harrison J; Lubinski, David; Benbow, Camilla P

    2013-05-01

    Youth identified before age 13 (N = 320) as having profound mathematical or verbal reasoning abilities (top 1 in 10,000) were tracked for nearly three decades. Their awards and creative accomplishments by age 38, in combination with specific details about their occupational responsibilities, illuminate the magnitude of their contribution and professional stature. Many have been entrusted with obligations and resources for making critical decisions about individual and organizational well-being. Their leadership positions in business, health care, law, the professoriate, and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) suggest that many are outstanding creators of modern culture, constituting a precious human-capital resource. Identifying truly profound human potential, and forecasting differential development within such populations, requires assessing multiple cognitive abilities and using atypical measurement procedures. This study illustrates how ultimate criteria may be aggregated and longitudinally sequenced to validate such measures. PMID:23531483

  9. System availability top-down apportionment method

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, M.J.; Maltese, J.G.; Sohmer, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    A top-down method for apportioning overall manufacturing facility availability among systems and subsystems is presented. Characteristics which influence equipment reliability are defined. Experts, using engineering judgement, score each characteristic for each equipment system whose availability design goal is to be established. Scores for each characteristic are combined into weighting factors. A mathematical model is derived which incorporates these weighting factors. This methodology establishes tradeoffs among facility systems: the method imposes high-availability requirements on those systems in which an incremental increase in availability is easier to attain, and lower requirements on those in which an increase in availability is more difficult and costly. An example application of the method is presented.

  10. Who rises to the top? Early indicators.

    PubMed

    Kell, Harrison J; Lubinski, David; Benbow, Camilla P

    2013-05-01

    Youth identified before age 13 (N = 320) as having profound mathematical or verbal reasoning abilities (top 1 in 10,000) were tracked for nearly three decades. Their awards and creative accomplishments by age 38, in combination with specific details about their occupational responsibilities, illuminate the magnitude of their contribution and professional stature. Many have been entrusted with obligations and resources for making critical decisions about individual and organizational well-being. Their leadership positions in business, health care, law, the professoriate, and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) suggest that many are outstanding creators of modern culture, constituting a precious human-capital resource. Identifying truly profound human potential, and forecasting differential development within such populations, requires assessing multiple cognitive abilities and using atypical measurement procedures. This study illustrates how ultimate criteria may be aggregated and longitudinally sequenced to validate such measures.

  11. Observation of single top at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Casal, Bruno; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2009-01-01

    We present observation of electroweak single top quark production using 3.2 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF experiment. Candidate events are selected for further classification by five parallel analysis techniques: one using a likelihood discriminant, one using a matrix-element discriminant, one using decision trees, one using a neural network, and one using a complementary dataset. The results of these analyses are combined in order to improve the expected sensitivity. The significance of the observed data is 5.0 standard deviations, and the expected sensitivity is in excess of 5.9 standard deviations. We also present the most current value of the CKM matrix element |V{sub tb}|.

  12. Platts top 250 global energy company rankings

    SciTech Connect

    2006-11-15

    The third annual survey of global energy companies measures companies' financial performance using four metrics: asset worth, revenues, profits and return on invested capital. The following industry segments were analysed: coal and consumable fuel companies; diversified utilities; exploration and production; electric utilities; gas utilities; integrated oil and gas companies; refining and marketing; independent power producers and storage and transfer companies. Integrated oil and gas companies (IOGs) captured nine out of the top ten spots while IPPS struggled in 2005 as the sector on a whole lost money. The exploration and production segment showed financial stability while gas utilities saw their financials climb. The Exxon Mobile Corp. continued its reign of the number one spot.

  13. The Great White Guppy: Top Predator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, G. M.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrogen isotopes are often used to trace the trophic level of members of an ecosystem. As part of a stable isotope biogeochemistry and forensics course at Purdue University, students are introduced to this concept by analyzing nitrogen isotopes in sea food purchased from local grocery stores. There is a systematic increase in 15N/14N ratios going from kelp to clams/shrimp, to sardines, to tuna and finally to shark. These enrichments demonstrate how nitrogen is enriched in biomass as predators consume prey. Some of the highest nitrogen isotope enrichments observed, however, are in the common guppy. We investigated a number of aquarium fish foods and find they typically have high nitrogen isotope ratios because they are made form fish meal that is produced primarily from the remains of predator fish such as tuna. From, a isotope perspective, the guppy is the top of the food chain, more ferocious than even the Great White shark.

  14. Observation of Single Top Quark Production

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan State U. /Northeastern U.

    2009-03-01

    We report first observation of the electroweak production of single top quarks in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV based on 2.3 fb{sup ?1} of data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using events containing an isolated electron or muon and missing transverse energy, together with jets originating from the fragmentation of b quarks, we measure a cross section of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.94 {+-} 0.88 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 2.5 x 10{sup ?7}, corresponding to a 5.0 standard deviation significance for the observation.

  15. Jet Dipolarity: Top Tagging with Color Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Anson; Jankowiak, Martin; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    A new jet observable, dipolarity, is introduced that can distinguish whether a pair of subjets arises from a color singlet source. This observable is incorporated into the HEPTopTagger and is shown to improve discrimination between top jets and QCD jets for moderate to high p{sub T}. The impressive resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors means that a typical QCD jet at the LHC deposits energy in {Omicron}(10-100) calorimeter cells. Such fine-grained calorimetry allows for jets to be studied in much greater detail than previously, with sophisticated versions of current techniques making it possible to measure more than just the bulk properties of jets (e.g. event jet multiplicities or jet masses). One goal of the LHC is to employ these techniques to extend the amount of information available from each jet, allowing for a broader probe of the properties of QCD. The past several years have seen significant progress in developing such jet substructure techniques. A number of general purpose tools have been developed, including: (i) top-tagging algorithms designed for use at both lower and higher p{sub T} as well as (ii) jet grooming techniques such as filtering, pruning, and trimming, which are designed to improve jet mass resolution. Jet substructure techniques have also been studied in the context of specific particle searches, where they have been shown to substantially extend the reach of traditional search techniques in a wide variety of scenarios, including for example boosted Higgses, neutral spin-one resonances, searches for supersymmetry, and many others. Despite these many successes, however, there is every reason to expect that there remains room for refinement of jet substructure techniques.

  16. Molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Tan, Weihong; Wang, Kemim; Drake, Timothy J

    2004-10-01

    This opinion covers the field of molecular beacons (MBs), in which nucleic acids are molecularly engineered to have unique functions for the investigation of biomolecules. Molecular beacons have been used in a variety of formats, and this review discusses four: first, in vitro RNA and DNA monitoring; second, biosensors and biochips based on MBs; third, real-time monitoring of genes and gene expression in living systems; and finally, the next generation of molecular beacons that will be highly useful for studies with proteins, molecular beacon aptamers. These unique applications have shown that MBs holds great potential in genomics and proteomics where real-time molecular recognition with high sensitivity and excellent specificity is critical.

  17. Identification of Leishmania donovani Topoisomerase 1 inhibitors via intuitive scaffold hopping and bioisosteric modification of known Top 1 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mamidala, Rajinikanth; Majumdar, Papiya; Jha, Kunal Kumar; Bathula, Chandramohan; Agarwal, Rahul; Chary, M. Thirumala; Mazumdar, H. K.; Munshi, Parthapratim; Sen, Subhabrata

    2016-01-01

    A library of arylidenefuropyridinediones was discovered as potent inhibitors of Leishmania donovani Topoisomerase 1 (LdTop1) where the active molecules displayed considerable inhibition with single digit micromolar EC50 values. This molecular library was designed via intuitive scaffold hopping and bioisosteric modification of known topoisomerase 1 inhibitors such as camptothecin, edotecarin and etc. The design was rationalized by molecular docking analysis of the compound prototype with human topoisomerase 1 (HTop1) and Leishmania donovani topoisomerase 1(LdTop1). The most active compound 4 displayed no cytotoxicity against normal mammalian COS7 cell line (~100 fold less inhibition at the EC50). Similar to camptothecin, 4 interacted with free LdTop1 as observed in the preincubation DNA relaxation inhibition experiment. It also displayed anti-protozoal activity against Leishmania donovani promastigote. Crystal structure investigation of 4 and its molecular modelling with LdTop1 revealed putative binding sites in the enzyme that could be harnessed to generate molecules with better potency. PMID:27221589

  18. Identification of Leishmania donovani Topoisomerase 1 inhibitors via intuitive scaffold hopping and bioisosteric modification of known Top 1 inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamidala, Rajinikanth; Majumdar, Papiya; Jha, Kunal Kumar; Bathula, Chandramohan; Agarwal, Rahul; Chary, M. Thirumala; Mazumdar, H. K.; Munshi, Parthapratim; Sen, Subhabrata

    2016-05-01

    A library of arylidenefuropyridinediones was discovered as potent inhibitors of Leishmania donovani Topoisomerase 1 (LdTop1) where the active molecules displayed considerable inhibition with single digit micromolar EC50 values. This molecular library was designed via intuitive scaffold hopping and bioisosteric modification of known topoisomerase 1 inhibitors such as camptothecin, edotecarin and etc. The design was rationalized by molecular docking analysis of the compound prototype with human topoisomerase 1 (HTop1) and Leishmania donovani topoisomerase 1(LdTop1). The most active compound 4 displayed no cytotoxicity against normal mammalian COS7 cell line (~100 fold less inhibition at the EC50). Similar to camptothecin, 4 interacted with free LdTop1 as observed in the preincubation DNA relaxation inhibition experiment. It also displayed anti-protozoal activity against Leishmania donovani promastigote. Crystal structure investigation of 4 and its molecular modelling with LdTop1 revealed putative binding sites in the enzyme that could be harnessed to generate molecules with better potency.

  19. TopBP1 contributes to the chemoresistance in non-small cell lung cancer through upregulation of p53

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yinxiang; Huo, Yanan; Yu, Xican; Liu, Rongrong; Zhang, Shufen; Zheng, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Xianning

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs is a major obstacle in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) therapy. The molecular determinants of NSCLC resistance to doxorubicin are unknown. In the present study, we investigated whether topoisomerase IIβ binding protein 1 (TopBP1) was involved in the chemoresistance to doxorubicin in NSCLC cancer. We found that p53-deficient lung cancer cells (NCI-H1299) displayed the greatest resistance to doxorubicin compared with NCI-H358, A549, and HCC827 cells with p53 expression. The expression of TopBP1 was significantly higher in NCI-H1299 cells than the other three tumor cell lines. In addition, TopBP1 knockdown with specific small interfering RNA in NCI-H1299 cells enhanced the doxorubicin chemosensitivity and decreased the expression of p53 in the presence of doxorubicin. After doxorubicin administration, co-immunoprecipitation assay showed that TopBP1 promoted the expression of p53 in NCI-H1299 cells. These results for the first time demonstrated that TopBP1 plays an important role in NSCLC chemoresistance via upregulation of p53. Therefore, inhibition of TopBP1, in combination with chemotherapy, may represent a novel strategy for the treatment of chemotherapy-resistant NSCLC. PMID:27729767

  20. GGsTOP increases migration of human periodontal ligament cells in vitro via reactive oxygen species pathway

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, YING; WANG, XIANG; LI, YING; MU, SEN; ZHOU, SHUANG; LIU, YI; ZHANG, BIN

    2016-01-01

    GGsTOP is a novel and selective inhibitor of gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), a cell-surface enzyme that has a key role in glutathione homeostasis and the maintenance of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS are essential for wound healing. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibition of GGT by GGsTOP in human periodontal ligament cells (hPLCs). The present study assessed GGT expression in mouse periodontal ligament tissues, GGT activity in hPLCs, and the potential physiological effect of GGsTOP on hPLC migration. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that GGT was widely expressed in mouse periodontal ligament tissue. Treatment with GGsTOP was associated with greater proliferation and migration of hPLCs, and higher levels of cellular ROS compared with untreated hPLCs. However, the increase in intracellular ROS was attenuated in hPLCs co-cultured with the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a precursor of glutathione. The higher ROS levels associated with GGsTOP treatment were in parallel with increases in the levels of type I collagen and alpha smooth muscle actin, which was inhibited in hPLCs co-cultured with NAC. Thus, GGsTOP may promote hPLC migration and participate in the maintenance of the periodontal ligament apparatus via the ROS pathway. PMID:27035100

  1. Molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, A.J.C.

    1988-08-01

    The basic methodology of equilibrium molecular dynamics is described. Examples from the literature are used to illustrate how molecular dynamics has been used to resolve theoretical controversies, provide data to test theories, and occasionally to discover new phenomena. The emphasis is on the application of molecular dynamics to an understanding of the microscopic physics underlying the transport properties of simple fluids. 98 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Complex decay chains of top and bottom squarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckel, Jonathan; Su, Shufang; Zhang, Huanian

    2015-07-01

    Current searches for the top squark mostly focus on the decay channels of or , leading to tt/bbWW + [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] final states for top squark pair production at the LHC. In supersymmetric scenarios with light gauginos other than the neutralino lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), different decay modes of the top squark could be dominant, which significantly weaken the current top squark search limits at the LHC. Additionally, new decay modes offer alternative discovery channels for top squark searches. In this paper, we study the top squark and bottom squark decay in the Bino-like LSP case with light Wino or Higgsino next-to-LSPs (NLSPs), and identify cases in which additional decay modes become dominant. We also perform a collider analysis for top squark pair production with mixed top squark decay final states of , leading to the bbbbjjℓ + [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] collider signature. The branching fraction for such decay varies between 25% and 50% for a top squark mass larger than 500 GeV with M 2 = M 1 + 150 GeV. At the 14 TeV LHC with 300 fb-1 integrated luminosity, the top squark can be excluded up to about 1040 GeV at the 95% C.L., or be discovered up to 940 GeV at 5 σ significance.

  3. Translational Control of TOP2A Influences Doxorubicin Efficacy▿

    PubMed Central

    Srikantan, Subramanya; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Lee, Eun Kyung; Tominaga, Kumiko; Subaran, Sarah S.; Kuwano, Yuki; Kulshrestha, Ritu; Panchakshari, Rohit; Kim, Hyeon Ho; Yang, Xiaoling; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Marasa, Bernard S.; Kim, Mihee M.; Wersto, Robert P.; Indig, Fred E.; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Gorospe, Myriam

    2011-01-01

    The cellular abundance of topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A) critically maintains DNA topology after replication and determines the efficacy of TOP2 inhibitors in chemotherapy. Here, we report that the RNA-binding protein HuR, commonly overexpressed in cancers, binds to the TOP2A 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR) and increases TOP2A translation. Reducing HuR levels triggered the recruitment of TOP2A transcripts to RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) components and to cytoplasmic processing bodies. Using a novel MS2-tagged RNA precipitation method, we identified microRNA miR-548c-3p as a mediator of these effects and further uncovered that the interaction of miR-548c-3p with the TOP2A 3′UTR repressed TOP2A translation by antagonizing the action of HuR. Lowering TOP2A by silencing HuR or by overexpressing miR-548c-3p selectively decreased DNA damage after treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin. In sum, HuR enhances TOP2A translation by competing with miR-548c-3p; their combined actions control TOP2A expression levels and determine the effectiveness of doxorubicin. PMID:21768308

  4. Top-down causation and emergence: some comments on mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, George F. R.

    2012-01-01

    Both bottom-up and top-down causation occur in the hierarchy of structure and causation. A key feature is multiple realizability of higher level functions, and consequent existence of equivalence classes of lower level variables that correspond to the same higher level state. Five essentially different classes of top-down influence can be identified, and their existence demonstrated by many real-world examples. They are: algorithmic top-down causation; top-down causation via non-adaptive information control, top-down causation via adaptive selection, top-down causation via adaptive information control and intelligent top-down causation (the effect of the human mind on the physical world). Through the mind, abstract entities such as mathematical structures have causal power. The causal slack enabling top-down action to take place lies in the structuring of the system so as to attain higher level functions; in the way the nature of lower level elements is changed by context, and in micro-indeterminism combined with adaptive selection. Understanding top-down causation can have important effects on society. Two cases will be mentioned: medical/healthcare issues, and education—in particular, teaching reading and writing. In both cases, an ongoing battle between bottom-up and top-down approaches has important consequences for society. PMID:23386967

  5. Adiabatic Field-Free Alignment of Asymmetric Top Molecules with an Optical Centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Korobenko, A; Milner, V

    2016-05-01

    We use an optical centrifuge to align asymmetric top SO_{2} molecules by adiabatically spinning their most polarizable O-O axis. The effective centrifugal potential in the rotating frame confines the sulfur atoms to the plane of the laser-induced rotation, leading to the planar molecular alignment that persists after the molecules are released from the centrifuge. The periodic appearance of the full three-dimensional alignment, typically observed only with linear and symmetric top molecules, is also detected. Together with strong in-plane centrifugal forces, which bend the molecules by up to 10 deg, permanent field-free alignment offers new ways of controlling molecules with laser light. PMID:27203318

  6. Molecular logic circuits.

    PubMed

    Balzani, Vincenzo; Credi, Alberto; Venturi, Margherita

    2003-01-13

    Miniaturization has been an essential ingredient in the outstanding progress of information technology over the past fifty years. The next, perhaps ultimate, limit of miniaturization is that of molecules, which are the smallest entities with definite size, shape, and properties. Recently, great effort has been devoted to design and investigate molecular-level systems that are capable of transferring, processing, and storing information in binary form. Some of these nanoscale devices can, in fact, perform logic operations of remarkable complexity. This research--although far from being transferred into technology--is attracting interest, as the nanometer realm seems to be out of reach for the "top-down" techniques currently available to microelectronics industry. Moreover, such studies introduce new concepts in the "old" field of chemistry and stimulate the ingenuity of researchers engaged in the "bottom-up" approach to nanotechnology.

  7. Molecular logic circuits.

    PubMed

    Balzani, Vincenzo; Credi, Alberto; Venturi, Margherita

    2003-01-13

    Miniaturization has been an essential ingredient in the outstanding progress of information technology over the past fifty years. The next, perhaps ultimate, limit of miniaturization is that of molecules, which are the smallest entities with definite size, shape, and properties. Recently, great effort has been devoted to design and investigate molecular-level systems that are capable of transferring, processing, and storing information in binary form. Some of these nanoscale devices can, in fact, perform logic operations of remarkable complexity. This research--although far from being transferred into technology--is attracting interest, as the nanometer realm seems to be out of reach for the "top-down" techniques currently available to microelectronics industry. Moreover, such studies introduce new concepts in the "old" field of chemistry and stimulate the ingenuity of researchers engaged in the "bottom-up" approach to nanotechnology. PMID:12596465

  8. Angular correlations in top quark decays in standard model extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Batebi, S.; Etesami, S. M.; Mohammadi-Najafabadi, M.

    2011-03-01

    The CMS Collaboration at the CERN LHC has searched for the t-channel single top quark production using the spin correlation of the t-channel. The signal extraction and cross section measurement rely on the angular distribution of the charged lepton in the top quark decays, the angle between the charged lepton momentum and top spin in the top rest frame. The behavior of the angular distribution is a distinct slope for the t-channel single top (signal) while it is flat for the backgrounds. In this Brief Report, we investigate the contributions which this spin correlation may receive from a two-Higgs doublet model, a top-color assisted technicolor (TC2) and the noncommutative extension of the standard model.

  9. Minority Talent Loss and the Texas Top 10% Law

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Sunny Xinchun; Sullivan, Teresa; Tienda, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine how knowledge about the Texas top 10% law influences college enrollment decisions of high achieving students minority and nonminority students. Data and Methods Using a representative survey of graduates from Texas public high schools in 2002, we compare self-reported and transcript-verified class rank and estimate probit models to assess the likelihood that top-ranked minority students know about the law. Results Family socioeconomic status largely explains why highly ranked black and Hispanic students know less about the top 10% law than comparable whites, but parents’ lack of fluency in English is a significant information barrier for college-bound, top 10% Hispanic students from predominantly minority high schools. Nearly one-fifth of college-oriented black and Hispanic top 10% seniors who did not know about the law failed to enroll anywhere. Conclusion Inadequate information about the top 10% law undermines enrollment of talented minorities in higher education. PMID:23293398

  10. Top-quark processes at NLO in production and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R.Keith

    2012-04-01

    We describe the implementation of top production and decay processes in the parton-level Monte Carlo program MCFM. By treating the top quark as being on-shell, we can factorize the amplitudes for top-pair production, s-channel single-top production, and t-channel single-top production into the product of an amplitude for production and an amplitude for decay. In this way we can retain all spin correlations. Both the production and the decay amplitudes are calculated consistently at next-to-leading order in alpha_s. The full dependence on the b-quark mass is also kept. Phenomenological results are presented for various kinematic distributions at the LHC and for the top quark forward-backward asymmetry at the Tevatron.

  11. Search for a heavy top t' to Wq in top events

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, David

    2009-10-01

    We present a search for a massive quark (t{prime}) decaying to Wq and thus mimicking the top quark decay signature in data collected by the CDF II detector corresponding to 2.8 fb{sup -1}. We use the reconstructed mass of the t{prime} quark and the scalar sum of the transverse energies in the event to discriminate possible new physics from Standard Model processes, and set limits on a standard 4th generation t{prime} quark.

  12. Molding of top skull in the treatment of Apert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weimin; Cui, Jie; Chen, Jianbin; Weiping, Shen

    2015-03-01

    Patients with Apert syndrome have bilateral coronal craniosynostosis, along with a distinguishing feature of their many deformity, called tower skull. Surgical correction of this deformity is the mainstay of treatment. We describe 3 patients molded top skull after front bone osteotomy orbital bar advancement. This successfully restricted growth of their top skull while allowing growth in other dimensions. Utilization of top-skull molding after cranial surgery shows promise of satisfaction in this setting.

  13. Top Quark Pair Production Cross Section at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2015-09-25

    The top quark, discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron proton antiproton collider at Fermilab, has undergone intense studies in the last 20 years. Currently, CDF and D0 converge on their measurements of top-antitop quark production cross sections using the full Tevatron data sample. In these proceedings, the latest results on inclusive and differential measurements of top-antitop quark production cross sections at the Tevatron are reported.

  14. Power, politics, and top management team characteristics: do they matter?

    PubMed

    Gerowitz, M B

    1998-01-01

    This study assesses the contributions of the leader power and top management team characteristics to perceived strategic capability. Low age heterogeneity and low tenure heterogeneity were found to have a positive association with perceived adaptability. High diversity in educational specialization was also found to be positively associated with adaptability. Top management perceptions of CEO power were, however, lower among high adaptors. Implications for leadership research, senior management recruitment, and the design of management development for top management teams are discussed.

  15. Molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, Jean François Desbiolles, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    How do we move? More precisely, what are the molecular mechanisms that can explain that our muscles, made of very small components can move at a osopic scale? To answer these questions we must introduce molecular motors. Those motors are proteins, or small protein assemblies that, in our cells, transform chemical energy into mechanical work. Then, like we could do for a oscopic motor, used in a car or in a fan, we are going to study the basic behavior of these molecular machines, present what are their energy sources, calculate their power, their yield. If molecular motors are crucial for our oscopic movements, we are going to see that they are also essential to cellular transport and that considering the activity of some enzymes as molecular motors bring some interesting new insights on their activity.

  16. Top-down characterization data on the speciation of the Candida albicans immunome in candidemia.

    PubMed

    Pitarch, Aida; Nombela, César; Gil, Concha

    2016-03-01

    The characterization of pathogen-specific antigenic proteins at the protein species level is crucial in the development and molecular optimization of novel immunodiagnostics, vaccines or immunotherapeutics for infectious diseases. The major requirements to achieve this molecular level are to obtain 100% sequence coverage and identify all post-translational modifications of each antigenic protein species. In this article, we show nearly complete sequence information for five discrete antigenic species of Candida albicans Tdh3 (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), which have been reported to be differentially recognized both among candidemia patients and between candidemia and control patients. A comprehensive description of the top-down immunoproteomic strategy used for seroprofiling at the C. albicans protein species level in candidemia as well as for the chemical characterization of this immunogenic protein (based on high-resolution 2-DE, Western blotting, peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry and de novo peptide sequencing) is also provided. The top-down characterization data on the speciation of the C. albicans immunome in candidemia presented here are related to our research article entitled "Seroprofiling at the Candida albicans protein species level unveils an accurate molecular discriminator for candidemia" (Pitarch et al., J. Proteomics, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2015.10.022). PMID:26862568

  17. Removing gaps in the exclusion of top squark parameter space.

    PubMed

    Czakon, Michal; Mitov, Alexander; Papucci, Michele; Ruderman, Joshua T; Weiler, Andreas

    2014-11-14

    Light stops are a hallmark of the most natural realizations of weak-scale supersymmetry. While stops have been extensively searched for, there remain open gaps around and below the top mass, due to similarities of stop and top signals with current statistics. We propose a new fast-track avenue to improve light stop searches for R-parity-conserving supersymmetry by comparing top cross section measurements to the theoretical prediction. Stop masses below ∼180  GeV can now be ruled out for a light neutralino. The possibility of a stop signal contaminating the top mass measurement is also briefly addressed.

  18. Getting to the top of Google: search engine optimization.

    PubMed

    Maley, Catherine; Baum, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Search engine optimization is the process of making your Web site appear at or near the top of popular search engines such as Google, Yahoo, and MSN. This is not done by luck or knowing someone working for the search engines but by understanding the process of how search engines select Web sites for placement on top or on the first page. This article will review the process and provide methods and techniques to use to have your site rated at the top or very near the top. PMID:20480779

  19. Interareal oscillatory synchronization in top-down neocortical processing.

    PubMed

    Bressler, Steven L; Richter, Craig G

    2015-04-01

    Top-down processing in the neocortex underlies important cognitive functions such as predictive coding and attentional set. We review evidence indicating that top-down neocortical processes are carried by interareal synchrony, particularly in the beta frequency band. We hypothesize that top-down neocortical signals in the beta band convey behavioral context to low-level sensory neurons. We further speculate that large-scale distributed networks, self-organized at the highest hierarchical levels, are the source of top-down signals in the neocortex. PMID:25217807

  20. TOP AND HIGGS PHYSICS AT THE HADRON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jabeen, Shabnam

    2013-10-20

    This review summarizes the recent results for top quark and Higgs boson measurements from experiments at Tevatron, a proton–antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of √ s =1 . 96 TeV, and the Large Hadron Collider, a proton–proton collider at a center- of-mass energy of √ s = 7 TeV. These results include the discovery of a Higgs-like boson and measurement of its various properties, and measurements in the top quark sector, e.g. top quark mass, spin, charge asymmetry and production of single top quark.

  1. Single top quark production and Vtb at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Schwienhorst, Reinhard; /Michigan State U.

    2010-09-01

    Single top quark production via the electroweak interaction was observed by the D0 and CDF collaborations at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab. Multivariate analysis techniques are employed to extract the small single top quark signal. The combined Tevatron cross section is 2.76{sub -0.47}{sup +0.58} pb. This corresponds to a lower limit on the CKM matrix element |V{sub tb}| of 0.77. Also reported are measurements of the t-channel cross section, the top quark polarization in single top quark events, and limits on gluon-quark flavor-changing neutral currents and W{prime} boson production.

  2. Studies of single top quark production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Breese; /Mississippi U.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present several measurements of single top quark production from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron. The various analyses utilize integrated luminosity ranging from 2.1 to 4.8 fb{sup -1}. The results include the observation of single top production with a combined cross section of 2.76{sub -0.47}{sup +0.58} pb for a top quark mass of 170 GeV/c{sup 2}, as well as measurements of top quark polarization and first evidence for t-channel production.

  3. Interareal oscillatory synchronization in top-down neocortical processing.

    PubMed

    Bressler, Steven L; Richter, Craig G

    2015-04-01

    Top-down processing in the neocortex underlies important cognitive functions such as predictive coding and attentional set. We review evidence indicating that top-down neocortical processes are carried by interareal synchrony, particularly in the beta frequency band. We hypothesize that top-down neocortical signals in the beta band convey behavioral context to low-level sensory neurons. We further speculate that large-scale distributed networks, self-organized at the highest hierarchical levels, are the source of top-down signals in the neocortex.

  4. Community Evolution in International Migration Top1 Networks.

    PubMed

    Peres, Mihaela; Xu, Helian; Wu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Focusing on each country's topmost destination/origin migration relation with other countries, this study builds top1 destination networks and top1 origin networks in order to understand their skeletal construction and community dynamics. Each top1 network covers approximately 50% of the complete migrant network stock for each decade between 1960 and 2000. We investigate the community structure by implementing the Girvan-Newman algorithm and compare the number of components and communities to illustrate their differences. We find that (i) both top1 networks (origin and destination) exhibited communities with a clear structure and a surprising evolution, although 80% edges persist between each decade; (ii) top1 destination networks focused on developed countries exhibiting shorter paths and preferring more advance countries, while top1 origin networks focused both on developed as well as more substantial developing nations that presented a longer path and more stable groups; (iii) only few countries have a decisive influence on community evolution of both top1 networks. USA took the leading position as a destination country in top1 destination networks, while China and India were the main Asian emigration countries in top1 origin networks; European countries and the Russian Federation played an important role in both. PMID:26859406

  5. Top quark mass spectrum from flavor-changing processes

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, C.H. . Dept. of Physics Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1990-09-01

    The input from flavor-changing processes is reviewed and results of several analyses are presented on the top quark mass spectrum without recourse to the neutral-current data. A top quark mass in the range 135 {plus minus} 25 GeV is much preferred, but a very massive top quark above 300 GeV can not be ruled out. Comments are made about the future use of the inclusive decay B {yields} {gamma} + X{sub S=1} for constraining the top quark mass. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Community Evolution in International Migration Top1 Networks.

    PubMed

    Peres, Mihaela; Xu, Helian; Wu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Focusing on each country's topmost destination/origin migration relation with other countries, this study builds top1 destination networks and top1 origin networks in order to understand their skeletal construction and community dynamics. Each top1 network covers approximately 50% of the complete migrant network stock for each decade between 1960 and 2000. We investigate the community structure by implementing the Girvan-Newman algorithm and compare the number of components and communities to illustrate their differences. We find that (i) both top1 networks (origin and destination) exhibited communities with a clear structure and a surprising evolution, although 80% edges persist between each decade; (ii) top1 destination networks focused on developed countries exhibiting shorter paths and preferring more advance countries, while top1 origin networks focused both on developed as well as more substantial developing nations that presented a longer path and more stable groups; (iii) only few countries have a decisive influence on community evolution of both top1 networks. USA took the leading position as a destination country in top1 destination networks, while China and India were the main Asian emigration countries in top1 origin networks; European countries and the Russian Federation played an important role in both.

  7. Recent Results on Top-Quark Physics at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Kenneth

    2015-10-23

    We present the most recent measurements on top-quark physics obtained with Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ collisions recorded by the D0 experiment at $\\sqrt{s}= 1.96$ TeV. The full Run II data set of 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ is analyzed. Both lepton+jets and dilepton channels of top-quark pair production are used to measure the differential and inclusive cross sections, the forward-backward asymmetries, the top-quark mass, the spin correlations, and the top-quark polarization.

  8. Observations of Overshooting Convective Tops and Dynamical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Halverson, Jeffrey; Fitzgerald, Mike; Dominquez, Rose; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Convective tops overshooting the tropopause have been suggested in the literature to play an important role in modifying the tropical tropopause. The structure of thunderstorm tops overshooting the tropopause have been difficult to measure due to the intensity of the convection and aircraft safety. This paper presents remote observations of overshooting convective tops with the high-altitude ER-2 aircraft during several of the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) and (Convection and Moisture Experiment) CAMEX campaigns. The ER-2 was instrumented with the down-looking ER-2 Doppler Radar (EDOP), a new dropsonde system (ER-2 High Altitude Dropsonde, EHAD), and an IR radiometer (Modis Airborne Simulator, MAS). Measurements were collected in Florida and Amazonia (Brazil). In this study, we utilize the radar cloud top information and cloud top infrared temperatures to document the amount of overshoot and temperature difference relative to the soundings provided by dropsondes and conventional upsondes. The radar measurements provide the details of the updraft structure near cloud top, and it is found that tops of stronger convective cells can overshoot by 1-2 km and with temperatures 5C colder than the tropopause minimum temperature. The negatively buoyant cloud tops are also evidenced in the Doppler measurements by strong subsiding flow along the sides of the convective tops . These findings support some of the conceptual and modeling studies of deep convection penetrating the tropopause.

  9. Community Evolution in International Migration Top1 Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Helian

    2016-01-01

    Focusing on each country’s topmost destination/origin migration relation with other countries, this study builds top1 destination networks and top1 origin networks in order to understand their skeletal construction and community dynamics. Each top1 network covers approximately 50% of the complete migrant network stock for each decade between 1960 and 2000. We investigate the community structure by implementing the Girvan-Newman algorithm and compare the number of components and communities to illustrate their differences. We find that (i) both top1 networks (origin and destination) exhibited communities with a clear structure and a surprising evolution, although 80% edges persist between each decade; (ii) top1 destination networks focused on developed countries exhibiting shorter paths and preferring more advance countries, while top1 origin networks focused both on developed as well as more substantial developing nations that presented a longer path and more stable groups; (iii) only few countries have a decisive influence on community evolution of both top1 networks. USA took the leading position as a destination country in top1 destination networks, while China and India were the main Asian emigration countries in top1 origin networks; European countries and the Russian Federation played an important role in both. PMID:26859406

  10. New type of hill-top inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barvinsky, A. O.; Kamenshchik, A. Yu.; Nesterov, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    We suggest a new type of hill-top inflation originating from the initial conditions in the form of the microcanonical density matrix for the cosmological model with a large number of quantum fields conformally coupled to gravity. Initial conditions for inflation are set up by cosmological instantons describing underbarrier oscillations in the vicinity of the inflaton potential maximum. These periodic oscillations of the inflaton field and cosmological scale factor are obtained within the approximation of two coupled oscillators subject to the slow roll regime in the Euclidean time. This regime is characterized by rapid oscillations of the scale factor on the background of a slowly varying inflaton, which guarantees smallness of slow roll parameters epsilon and η of the following inflation stage. A hill-like shape of the inflaton potential is shown to be generated by logarithmic loop corrections to the tree-level asymptotically shift-invariant potential in the non-minimal Higgs inflation model and R2-gravity. The solution to the problem of hierarchy between the Planckian scale and the inflation scale is discussed within the concept of conformal higher spin fields, which also suggests the mechanism bringing the model below the gravitational cutoff and, thus, protecting it from large graviton loop corrections.

  11. Improving the aerodynamics of top fuel dragsters

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, R.C.; Kohlman, D.L.; Kenner, M.T.

    1998-07-01

    The standard drag race is a straight ahead quarter mile race from a standing stop. As engine technology has improved, the speeds attained at the end of the quarter mile have increased. As the speed has increased, the importance of aerodynamic effects on the dragster has also increased. Lift and drag are the two primary aerodynamic effects. Lift is produced vertically downward to increase the normal force on the rear wheels, thereby increasing the ability to transmit energy from the engine through the wheels to the racetrack. Drag is an unwanted aerodynamic effect. Drag is produced by viscous interaction between the dragster and the air, by separation causing profile drag, and as a result of the lift being produced. This paper addresses the mechanisms of lift and drag production by a high speed dragster and proposes some design changes that can decrease the drag while maintaining the necessary negative lift. Preliminary wind tunnel tests on dragster models confirm that reductions in drag can be achieved. The effects of these changes on the elapsed time and final speed are estimated using a computer simulation of a quarter mile drag race. The simulation predicts a decrease in elapsed time of almost 0.1 seconds and an increase in top speed of approximately 10 miles per hour.

  12. Beam uniformity of flat top lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chao; Cramer, Larry; Danielson, Don; Norby, James

    2015-03-01

    Many beams that output from standard commercial lasers are multi-mode, with each mode having a different shape and width. They show an overall non-homogeneous energy distribution across the spot size. There may be satellite structures, halos and other deviations from beam uniformity. However, many scientific, industrial and medical applications require flat top spatial energy distribution, high uniformity in the plateau region, and complete absence of hot spots. Reliable standard methods for the evaluation of beam quality are of great importance. Standard methods are required for correct characterization of the laser for its intended application and for tight quality control in laser manufacturing. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has published standard procedures and definitions for this purpose. These procedures have not been widely adopted by commercial laser manufacturers. This is due to the fact that they are unreliable because an unrepresentative single-pixel value can seriously distort the result. We hereby propose a metric of beam uniformity, a way of beam profile visualization, procedures to automatically detect hot spots and beam structures, and application examples in our high energy laser production.

  13. Carbon tax becomes top priority again

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-23

    The European Commission's (Brussels) carbon tax proposal is the top priority for the Danish government's presidency of the European Community, which runs for six months, from Jan. 1, 1993. European economic and finance ministers reviewed progress made by the commission's working group last week. Details still being worked out include the condition that other major countries belonging to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development should implement similar measures to curtail emissions of carbon dioxide before the EC imposes its own levy. Exemptions to the proposed tax are still being worked out, but are expected to include energy-intensive industries such as the chemicals sector. The commission is also studying how the tax will be applied and the EC's role in imposing tax regulations on member states. Spain, Portugal, and Greece oppose the carbon tax plan. But the commission believes these countries would likely lend their support if they could get help to develop strategies to tackle carbon dioxide emissions. The commission is confident the details can be worked out by mid-1993.

  14. New type of hill-top inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Barvinsky, A.O.; Nesterov, D.V.; Kamenshchik, A.Yu. E-mail: Alexander.Kamenshchik@bo.infn.it

    2016-01-01

    We suggest a new type of hill-top inflation originating from the initial conditions in the form of the microcanonical density matrix for the cosmological model with a large number of quantum fields conformally coupled to gravity. Initial conditions for inflation are set up by cosmological instantons describing underbarrier oscillations in the vicinity of the inflaton potential maximum. These periodic oscillations of the inflaton field and cosmological scale factor are obtained within the approximation of two coupled oscillators subject to the slow roll regime in the Euclidean time. This regime is characterized by rapid oscillations of the scale factor on the background of a slowly varying inflaton, which guarantees smallness of slow roll parameters ε and η of the following inflation stage. A hill-like shape of the inflaton potential is shown to be generated by logarithmic loop corrections to the tree-level asymptotically shift-invariant potential in the non-minimal Higgs inflation model and R{sup 2}-gravity. The solution to the problem of hierarchy between the Planckian scale and the inflation scale is discussed within the concept of conformal higher spin fields, which also suggests the mechanism bringing the model below the gravitational cutoff and, thus, protecting it from large graviton loop corrections.

  15. Over the top: Experiment and the testing of hypotheses in the search for the top quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, Kent Wade

    1998-07-01

    This study presents a historical account of experiments, performed by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) collaboration, which led to the discovery of the top quark, and a discussion of philosophical issues raised by that episode. The historical discussion is based on published and unpublished documents and oral history interviews, and is presented in two parts: First, the formation of the collaboration and construction of the detector are described. The activities of the collaborators during the period of detector construction are described in terms of the development of resources for a general experimental programme. Second, the development of the means of analyzing the data for the top quark search is described, particularly aspects of the analysis that were disputed. The hypothesis that collaboration researchers have come to regard the social process of resolving disputes as a matter of methodological importance is suggested. The philosophical discussion of the experiment employs the hierarchy of models approach of Patrick Suppes and Deborah Mayo in order to examine the logic of hypothesis testing and draw some conclusions regarding the nature of scientific evidence. In an extension of an argument presented by Peter Achinstein, the account of hypothesis testing given by hypothetico-deductivist philosophers such as Karl Popper and R. B. Braithwaite is examined in light of the reasoning employed in the top search, and is found wanting. The prediction based on the hypothesis being tested in the top search is found to have been inferred inductively from the experimental data. Finally, a discussion is presented of tuning on the signal, a form of bias in the testing of hypotheses. The proscription of this form of bias resembles John Worrall's requirement of use novelty, but is shown instead to serve the aim of devising a test of the hypothesis that is severe, in the sense articulated by Deborah Mayo. It is shown that the evaluation of evidence claims, as it

  16. Molecular Descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consonni, Viviana; Todeschini, Roberto

    In the last decades, several scientific researches have been focused on studying how to encompass and convert - by a theoretical pathway - the information encoded in the molecular structure into one or more numbers used to establish quantitative relationships between structures and properties, biological activities, or other experimental properties. Molecular descriptors are formally mathematical representations of a molecule obtained by a well-specified algorithm applied to a defined molecular representation or a well-specified experimental procedure. They play a fundamental role in chemistry, pharmaceutical sciences, environmental protection policy, toxicology, ecotoxicology, health research, and quality control. Evidence of the interest of the scientific community in the molecular descriptors is provided by the huge number of descriptors proposed up today: more than 5000 descriptors derived from different theories and approaches are defined in the literature and most of them can be calculated by means of dedicated software applications. Molecular descriptors are of outstanding importance in the research fields of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) and quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPRs), where they are the independent chemical information used to predict the properties of interest. Along with the definition of appropriate molecular descriptors, the molecular structure representation and the mathematical tools for deriving and assessing models are other fundamental components of the QSAR/QSPR approach. The remarkable progress during the last few years in chemometrics and chemoinformatics has led to new strategies for finding mathematical meaningful relationships between the molecular structure and biological activities, physico-chemical, toxicological, and environmental properties of chemicals. Different approaches for deriving molecular descriptors here reviewed and some of the most relevant descriptors are presented in

  17. Molecular Haeckel.

    PubMed

    Elinson, Richard P; Kezmoh, Lorren

    2010-07-01

    More than a century ago, Ernst Haeckel created embryo drawings to illustrate the morphological similarity of vertebrate early embryos. These drawings have been both widely presented and frequently criticized. At the same time that the idea of morphological similarity was recently attacked, there has been a growing realization of molecular similarities in the development of tissues and organs. We have surveyed genes expressed in vertebrate embryos, and we have used them to construct drawings that we call Molecular Haeckels. The Molecular Haeckels emphasize that, based on gene expression, there is a greater similarity among vertebrate embryos than even Haeckel might have imagined. PMID:20549737

  18. Toward the atomic structure of the nuclear pore complex: when top down meets bottom up.

    PubMed

    Hoelz, André; Glavy, Joseph S; Beck, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Elucidating the structure of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a prerequisite for understanding the molecular mechanism of nucleocytoplasmic transport. However, owing to its sheer size and flexibility, the NPC is unapproachable by classical structure determination techniques and requires a joint effort of complementary methods. Whereas bottom-up approaches rely on biochemical interaction studies and crystal-structure determination of NPC components, top-down approaches attempt to determine the structure of the intact NPC in situ. Recently, both approaches have converged, thereby bridging the resolution gap from the higher-order scaffold structure to near-atomic resolution and opening the door for structure-guided experimental interrogations of NPC function.

  19. Top surface imaging process and materials development for 193 nm and extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, V.; Hutchinson, J.; Holl, S.; Langston, J.; Henderson, C.; Wheeler, D.R.; Cardinale, G.; OConnell, D.; Goldsmith, J.; Bohland, J.; Taylor, G.; Sinta, R.

    1998-11-01

    The maturity and acceptance of top surface imaging (TSI) technology have been hampered by several factors including inadequate resist sensitivity and line edge roughness. We have found that the use of a chemically amplified resist can improve the sensitivity in these systems by 1.5{endash} 2{times} without compromising the line edge roughness. In addition, we have shown improved line edge roughness by increasing the molecular weight of the polymeric resin in the resist. Using these materials approaches, we have been able to show excellent resolution images with the TSI process for both 193 nm and extreme ultraviolet (13.4 nm) patterning. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  20. Nanoparticles for Imaging: Top or Flop?

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Marianne E.; Grimm, Jan; Lammers, Twan

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles are frequently suggested as diagnostic agents. However, except for iron oxide nanoparticles, diagnostic nanoparticles have been barely incorporated into clinical use so far. This is predominantly due to difficulties in achieving acceptable pharmacokinetic properties and reproducible particle uniformity as well as to concerns about toxicity, biodegradation, and elimination. Reasonable indications for the clinical utilization of nanoparticles should consider their biologic behavior. For example, many nanoparticles are taken up by macrophages and accumulate in macrophage-rich tissues. Thus, they can be used to provide contrast in liver, spleen, lymph nodes, and inflammatory lesions (eg, atherosclerotic plaques). Furthermore, cells can be efficiently labeled with nanoparticles, enabling the localization of implanted (stem) cells and tissue-engineered grafts as well as in vivo migration studies of cells. The potential of using nanoparticles for molecular imaging is compromised because their pharmacokinetic properties are difficult to control. Ideal targets for nanoparticles are localized on the endothelial luminal surface, whereas targeted nanoparticle delivery to extravascular structures is often limited and difficult to separate from an underlying enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. The majority of clinically used nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems are based on the EPR effect, and, for their more personalized use, imaging markers can be incorporated to monitor biodistribution, target site accumulation, drug release, and treatment efficacy. In conclusion, although nanoparticles are not always the right choice for molecular imaging (because smaller or larger molecules might provide more specific information), there are other diagnostic and theranostic applications for which nanoparticles hold substantial clinical potential. PMID:25247562

  1. Potential of a cytomics top-down strategy for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Tárnok, A; Pierzchalski, A; Valet, G

    2010-01-01

    It takes about 10 to 15 years and roughly 800 mln $ to bring a new drug to the market. Only 10% of drug molecules entering clinical trials succeed and only 3 out of 10 drugs generate enough profit to pay back for the investment. Drug targets may be searched by hypothesis driven modeling of molecular networks within and between cells by systems biology. However, there is the potential to simplify the search for new drugs and drug targets by an initial top-down cytomics phase. The cytomics approach i) requires no detailed a-priori knowledge on mechanisms of drug activity or complex diseases, ii) is hypothesis driven for the investigated parameters (genome, transcriptome, proteome, metabolome a.o.) and iii) is hypothesis-free for data analysis. Moreover it iv) carries the potential to uncover unknown molecular interrelations as a prerequisite for later new hypothesis driven modeling and research strategies. A set of discriminatory parameter patterns (molecular hotspots) describing the cellular model (mechanism of drug action) can be identified by differential molecular cell phenotyping. Hereby, the immediate modeling of existing complexities by bottom-up oriented systems biology is avoided. The review focuses on the fast technological developments of molecular single cell analysis in recent years. They comprise a multitude of sensitive new molecular markers as well as various new image and flow cytometric high-content screening methods as facilitators of the cytomics concept. New bioinformatic tools enable the extraction of relevant molecular hotspots in description of cellular models, being required for the subsequent molecular reverse engineering phase by systems biology.

  2. The new deal at the top.

    PubMed

    Doz, Yves L; Kosonen, Mikko

    2007-06-01

    What makes a company strategically agile--able to alter its strategies and business models rapidly in response to major changes in its market space, and to do so repeatedly without major trauma? Three years of in-depth case research on a dozen large companies worldwide showed the authors that one key factor is a new leadership model at the top. Senior executives at agile companies assume collective rather than individual responsibility for results. They build interdependencies among units and divisions, motivating themselves to engage with one another, and carefully manage their dealings to promote collaboration that is frequent, intense, informal, open, and focused on shared issues and the long term. Challenges to conventional thinking are encouraged. This is the new deal, and it's not easy to strike, because it requires executives to act in ways that are far from comfortable. After all, the corporate ladder at most firms favors independent types with a deep need for power and autonomy. At executive meetings, disagreement is suppressed or expressed passive-aggressively, eroding any real sense of belonging to a team. Switching to the new deal almost always requires a huge shift in the company's culture, values, and norms of interaction. The authors describe three approaches to making the shift: Executives can be given formal responsibility not for a business unit but for different stages in the company's value chain. This worked well for SAP, which has a relatively focused business portfolio. When a company's portfolio is less uniform, like Nokia's, business and functional units can be organized to crisscross on a matrix. And when a company is widely diverse, like easyGroup, it can emphasize the learning opportunities that units with common business models may share. PMID:17580652

  3. The new deal at the top.

    PubMed

    Doz, Yves L; Kosonen, Mikko

    2007-06-01

    What makes a company strategically agile--able to alter its strategies and business models rapidly in response to major changes in its market space, and to do so repeatedly without major trauma? Three years of in-depth case research on a dozen large companies worldwide showed the authors that one key factor is a new leadership model at the top. Senior executives at agile companies assume collective rather than individual responsibility for results. They build interdependencies among units and divisions, motivating themselves to engage with one another, and carefully manage their dealings to promote collaboration that is frequent, intense, informal, open, and focused on shared issues and the long term. Challenges to conventional thinking are encouraged. This is the new deal, and it's not easy to strike, because it requires executives to act in ways that are far from comfortable. After all, the corporate ladder at most firms favors independent types with a deep need for power and autonomy. At executive meetings, disagreement is suppressed or expressed passive-aggressively, eroding any real sense of belonging to a team. Switching to the new deal almost always requires a huge shift in the company's culture, values, and norms of interaction. The authors describe three approaches to making the shift: Executives can be given formal responsibility not for a business unit but for different stages in the company's value chain. This worked well for SAP, which has a relatively focused business portfolio. When a company's portfolio is less uniform, like Nokia's, business and functional units can be organized to crisscross on a matrix. And when a company is widely diverse, like easyGroup, it can emphasize the learning opportunities that units with common business models may share.

  4. Molecular Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Hyonmin; Deirmengian, Carl A.; Hickok, Noreen J.; Morrison, Tiffany N.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2015-01-01

    Orthopaedic infections are complex conditions that require immediate diagnosis and accurate identification of the causative organisms to facilitate appropriate management. Conventional methodologies for diagnosis of these infections sometimes lack accuracy or sufficient rapidity. Current molecular diagnostics are an emerging area of bench-to-bedside research in orthopaedic infections. Examples of promising molecular diagnostics include measurement of a specific biomarker in the synovial fluid, polymerase chain reaction–based detection of bacterial genes, and metabolomic determination of responses to orthopaedic infection. PMID:25808967

  5. 27. VIEW FROM TOP OF SPILLWAY GATE STRUCTURE, LOOKING ACROSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW FROM TOP OF SPILLWAY GATE STRUCTURE, LOOKING ACROSS TOP OF DAM TOWARDS LEFT ABUTMENT. NOTE PUMPCRETE PIPELINE OF CATWALK WHICH IS USED TO DELIVER CONCRETE TO INCOMPLETE ARCHES ON LEFT SIDE. January 1, 1939 - Bartlett Dam, Verde River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  6. QCD and Top-Quark Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, Marek; /Rochester U.

    2006-10-01

    Selected recent QCD and top-quark results from the Tevatron are reviewed, aiming to illustrate progression from basic studies of QCD processes to verification of perturbative calculations and Monte Carlo simulation tools, and to their applications in more novel and complex cases, like top-quark studies and searches for new physics.

  7. BB: Half Section; Top of Engine; Valve Gear Detail; CC: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    B-B: Half Section; Top of Engine; Valve Gear Detail; C-C: Top of Condenser; D-D: Condenser Interior; Air Pump Piston; Air Pump Lever; Water Pump - Steamboat COLUMBUS, Submerged south-southeast of Point Lookout, Scotland, St. Mary's County, MD

  8. Top Ten List for Choosing to Become a Mentor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Shelly

    2004-01-01

    In true David Letterman style, this article presents a Top Ten List for why and how it's important to get to know the beginning teacher next door or just down the hall and listen for call signals. What follows is the Top Ten List for becoming a mentor: (1) establish reciprocal collaboration through trust; (2) offer a shoulder of support; (3) share…

  9. Teachers Pick the Top 50 Kids Books Ever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the top 25 best picture and chapter books according to a survey of more than 200 teachers, children's authors, and children's literature experts. Included in the top 10 picture books are: (1) "Where the Wild Things Are" by Maurice Sendak (HarperCollins); (2) "The Very Hungry Caterpillar" by Eric Carle (Penguin); (3) "The…

  10. Top-Down Influence in Young Children's Linguistic Ambiguity Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabagliati, Hugh; Pylkkanen, Liina; Marcus, Gary F.

    2013-01-01

    Language is rife with ambiguity. Do children and adults meet this challenge in similar ways? Recent work suggests that while adults resolve syntactic ambiguities by integrating a variety of cues, children are less sensitive to top-down evidence. We test whether this top-down insensitivity is specific to syntax or a general feature of children's…

  11. 10. TIP TOP MINE. INTERIOR VIEW OF LIVING QUARTERS WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. TIP TOP MINE. INTERIOR VIEW OF LIVING QUARTERS WITH CLOSET/HANGER AND VIEW INTO ORE ROOM. RAIL IS VISIBLE JUST THROUGH DOOR WAY. CAMERA POINTED NORTH-NORTHWEST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  12. 38. View from top of Brooklyn Tower showing man walking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. View from top of Brooklyn Tower showing man walking up main cable, stay cables radiating from top of tower and tower cornice. Jet Lowe, photographer, 1982. - Brooklyn Bridge, Spanning East River between Park Row, Manhattan and Sands Street, Brooklyn, New York County, NY

  13. Selective Comprehensives: The Social Composition of Top Comprehensive Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton Trust, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This study looks at publicly available data on the proportion of pupils eligible and claiming for free school meals (FSM) in the top 500 comprehensive state schools and at how representative they are of their localities and of their school type. We have looked at the top 500 when measured by five good GCSEs including English and Maths and at the…

  14. 8. Comparison of construction of bottom and top chords and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Comparison of construction of bottom and top chords and pin connections, bottom chord second panel point, top chords showing third panel point. - Bridge No. 2.4, Spanning Boiling Fork Creek at Railroad Milepost JC-2.4, Decherd, Franklin County, TN

  15. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Advanced Framing Systems and Packages

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research showing advanced 2x6, 24-inch on-center framing, single top plates, open headers, and 2-stud corners reduced board feet of lumber by more than 1,000 feet, cut energy use by 13%, and cut material and labor costs by more than $1,000 on a typical home.

  16. Higher Education's Top-Ten Strategic Technologies for 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grajek, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The annual "EDUCAUSE" top-ten IT issues in higher education receives a great deal of interest and attention. IT and higher education leaders use it to calibrate their IT-related activities and inform their strategic planning. This year "EDUCAUSE" is introducing a complementary list: the top-ten strategic technologies in higher…

  17. 75 FR 4463 - Race to the Top Fund

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ... Education 34 CFR Subtitle B, Chapter II Race to the Top Fund; Final Rule and Notice #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75 , No. 17 / Wednesday, January 27, 2010 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Subtitle B, Chapter II RIN 1810-AB07 Race to the Top Fund AGENCY: Department of...

  18. 76 FR 23487 - Race to the Top Fund

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... for the Race to the Top Fund in the Federal Register (75 FR 16668). The interim final requirements... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Subtitle B, Chapter II RIN 1810-AB10 Race to the Top Fund ACTION: Final requirements. SUMMARY:...

  19. 63. CANAL BOAT IN CRADLE AT TOP OF PLANE. TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. CANAL BOAT IN CRADLE AT TOP OF PLANE. TO PASS OVER THE SUMMIT (THE HUMP OF LAND AT THE TOP OF PLANE TO HOLD BACK THE WATER AT THAT LEVEL), THE BOATS HAVE SEEN HINGED AND TWO CRADLES ARE USED TO CARRY THE BOAT UP THE PLANE. - Morris Canal, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  20. 3. ONTARIO MINE. ADIT ENTRANCE WITH TIN ROOF. TIP TOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. ONTARIO MINE. ADIT ENTRANCE WITH TIN ROOF. TIP TOP IS LOCATED IN LINE WITH 'Y' BRANCH AND THE TAILING PILE FOR TIP TOP IS VISIBLE JUST TO RIGHT OF IT. CAMERA POINTED SOUTH-SOUTHEAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Ontario Mine, Northwest side of Florida Mountain, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  1. 9. TIP TOP MINE. INTERIOR VIEW OF LIVING QUARTER WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. TIP TOP MINE. INTERIOR VIEW OF LIVING QUARTER WITH STOVE PIPE AND DRAIN SETUP VISIBLE. CAMERA IS POINTED WEST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  2. 4. TIP TOP MINE. VIEW FROM WASTE ROCK ABOVE WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. TIP TOP MINE. VIEW FROM WASTE ROCK ABOVE WITH WOOD REMAINS OF POSSIBLE ADIT IN LOWER LEFT. CAMERA POINTED WEST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  3. 7. TIP TOP MINE. DETAIL OF RAIL TRACKS LEADING INTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. TIP TOP MINE. DETAIL OF RAIL TRACKS LEADING INTO HOUSE TOWARDS COLLAPSED REAR OF BUILDING. DOOR HINGES VISIBLE AND CEILING SUPPORT IN ID-31-C-10 VISIBLE. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  4. 5 CFR 1312.27 - Top secret control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., DOWNGRADING, DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Control and Accountability of Classified Information § 1312.27 Top secret control. The EOP Security Officer serves as the Top Secret Control Officer (TSCO) for OMB. He will be assisted by the Alternate TSCOs in each division/office...

  5. 5 CFR 1312.27 - Top secret control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., DOWNGRADING, DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Control and Accountability of Classified Information § 1312.27 Top secret control. The EOP Security Officer serves as the Top Secret Control Officer (TSCO) for OMB. He will be assisted by the Alternate TSCOs in each division/office...

  6. Determination of Top Quark charge in CDF experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bednar, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with the problematic of top quark charge measurement in CDF experiment at Fermilab. The goal is to determine if the top quark observed on Tevatron experiments is the Standard Model particle with the predicted charge 2/3 or it is some exotic 4th generation quark with the charge of -4/3 as suggested by some alternative theories.

  7. Safety Hazards Posed by Ceramic-Top Hotplates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Forest, Peter; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory explosion involving 30 percent hydrogen peroxide being heated on a ceramic-top hotplate. Gives three safety suggestions: peroxides should be treated as potential explosion hazards; alternatives to the ceramic-top hotplate for these reactions should be considered; and lab workers should be prepared for the worst possible…

  8. 7. VIEW OF TRICOMPOSITE ROOF STRUCTURE. TOP CHORDS ARE TIMBER. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF TRICOMPOSITE ROOF STRUCTURE. TOP CHORDS ARE TIMBER. TENSION RODS (THIN METAL RODS EXTENDING DIAGONALLY FROM THE HORIZONTAL TIMBER BRACE) ARE WROUGHT IRON. SOLID CRUCIFORM SHAPED COMPRESSION MEMBERS EXTENDING DOWNWARD FROM THE TIMBER TOP CHORD ARE MADE OF CAST IRON - North Central Railroad, Baltimore Freight House, Guilford & Centre Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  9. Race to Top Promises Come Home to Roost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Grant recipients risk losing millions of dollars in Race to the Top money if they fail to live up to their promises, federal education officials make clear. By threatening to revoke Hawaii's $75 million Race to the Top award for failing to make "adequate progress" on key milestones of its education reform plan, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne…

  10. Slow Manifold and Hannay Angle in the Spinning Top

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, M. V.; Shukla, P.

    2011-01-01

    The spin of a top can be regarded as a fast variable, coupled to the motion of the axis which is slow. In pure precession, the rotation of the axis round a cone (without nutation), can be considered as the result of a reaction from the fast spin. The resulting restriction of the total state space of the top is an illustrative example, at…

  11. Vertical Variation of Ice Particle Size in Convective Cloud Tops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Fridlind, Ann M.; Cairns, Brian; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Yorks, John E.

    2016-01-01

    A novel technique is used to estimate derivatives of ice effective radius with respect to height near convective cloud tops (dr(sub e)/dz) from airborne shortwave reflectance measurements and lidar. Values of dr(sub e)/dz are about -6 micrometer/km for cloud tops below the homogeneous freezing level, increasing to near 0 micrometer/km above the estimated level of neutral buoyancy. Retrieved dr(sub e)/dz compares well with previously documented remote sensing and in situ estimates. Effective radii decrease with increasing cloud top height, while cloud top extinction increases. This is consistent with weaker size sorting in high, dense cloud tops above the level of neutral buoyancy where fewer large particles are present and with stronger size sorting in lower cloud tops that are less dense. The results also confirm that cloud top trends of effective radius can generally be used as surrogates for trends with height within convective cloud tops. These results provide valuable observational targets for model evaluation.

  12. Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST): turbulent mixing across capping inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, S. P.; Gerber, H.; Jen-LaPlante, I.; Kopec, M. K.; Kumala, W.; Nurowska, K.; Chuang, P. Y.; Khelif, D.; Haman, K. E.

    2013-06-01

    High spatial resolution measurements of temperature and liquid water content, accompanied by moderate resolution measurements of humidity and turbulence, collected during the Physics of Stratocumulus Top experiment are analyzed. Two thermodynamically, meteorologically and even optically different cases are investigated. An algorithmic division of the cloud top region into layers is proposed. Analysis of dynamic stability across these layers leads to the conclusion that the inversion capping the cloud and the cloud top region are turbulent due to the wind shear, which is strong enough to compensate for high static stability of the inversion. The thickness of this mixing layer adapts to wind and temperature jumps such that the gradient Richardson number stays close to its critical value. Turbulent mixing governs transport across the inversion, but the consequences of this mixing depend on the thermodynamic properties of cloud top and free troposphere. The effects of buoyancy-sorting of the mixed parcels in the cloud top region are different in conditions that permit or prevent cloud top entrainment instability. Removal of negatively buoyant air from the cloud top is observed in the first case, while buildup of the diluted cloud top layer is observed in the second one.

  13. Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST): turbulent mixing across capping inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, S. P.; Gerber, H.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Kopec, M. K.; Kumala, W.; Nurowska, K.; Chuang, P. Y.; Khelif, D.; Haman, K. E.

    2013-12-01

    High spatial resolution measurements of temperature and liquid water content, accompanied by moderate-resolution measurements of humidity and turbulence, collected during the Physics of Stratocumulus Top experiment are analyzed. Two thermodynamically, meteorologically and even optically different cases are investigated. An algorithmic division of the cloud-top region into layers is proposed. Analysis of dynamic stability across these layers leads to the conclusion that the inversion capping the cloud and the cloud-top region is turbulent due to the wind shear, which is strong enough to overcome the high static stability of the inversion. The thickness of this mixing layer adapts to wind and temperature jumps such that the gradient Richardson number stays close to its critical value. Turbulent mixing governs transport across the inversion, but the consequences of this mixing depend on the thermodynamic properties of cloud top and free troposphere. The effects of buoyancy sorting of the mixed parcels in the cloud-top region are different in conditions that permit or prevent cloud-top entrainment instability. Removal of negatively buoyant air from the cloud top is observed in the first case, while buildup of the diluted cloud-top layer is observed in the second one.

  14. Identification of Topping Responsive Proteins in Tobacco Roots

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei; Zhang, Huizhen; Wang, Shaoxin; Xiao, Wanfu; Ding, Chao; Liu, Weiqun; Guo, Hongxiang

    2016-01-01

    The process of topping elicits many responses in the tobacco plant, including an increase in nicotine biosynthesis, and the secondary growth of roots. Some topping responsive miRNAs and genes have been identified in our previous study, but the mechanism of the tobacco response to topping has not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, topping responsive proteins isolated from tobacco roots were screened using two-dimensional electrophoresis. Of the proteins identified, calreticulin and auxin-responsive protein indole acetic acid (IAA9) were involved in the secondary growth of roots; leucine-rich repeat disease resistance, heat shock protein 70, and farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase 1 were involved in the wounding stress response; and F-box protein played an important role in promoting the ability of nicotine synthesis after topping. In addition, we identified five tobacco bHLH proteins (NtbHLH, NtMYC1a, NtMYC1b, NtMYC2a, and NtMYC2b) related to nicotine biosynthesis. NtMYC2 was suggested to be the main positive transcription factor, with NtbHLH protein being a negative regulator in the jasmonic acid (JA)-mediated activation of nicotine biosynthesis after topping. Tobacco topping activates a comprehensive range of biological processes involving the IAA and JA signaling pathways, and the identification of proteins involved in these processes will improve our understanding of the topping response. PMID:27200055

  15. 26. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE OF TOP FLOOR OF MILL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE OF TOP FLOOR OF MILL, ABOVE ORE BIN, LOOKING WEST FROM TOP OF STAIRWAY IN CA-290-25. THE PIPE AT CENTER WAS USED TO SPREAD CRUSHED ORE COMING FROM THE JAW CRUSHER EVENLY TO ALL AREA OF THE ORE BIN BELOW. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  16. Desk Top Graffiti in an English High School Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanfiorenzo, Norberto R.

    Psychologists and sociologists recognize the importance of graffiti, yet there is a lack of information on the content of high school desk top graffiti. To study desk top graffiti, a 9th and 10th grade English classroom located in an inner city high school in the southeastern United States was found in which graffiti was written on nearly 90% of…

  17. Delaware Pushes to Meet Race to Top Promises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on how Delaware pushes to meet Race to the Top promises. The Delcastle Technical High School teachers are on the front lines of the push to deliver on promises that last year won Delaware, 10 other states, and the District of Columbia shares of the Race to the Top pie, the $4 billion competition that is driving much of the…

  18. Table Top Tennis: A Vehicle for Teaching Sportspersonship and Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwager, Susan; Stylianou, Michalis

    2012-01-01

    Table top tennis is a game that can be played in the classroom or lunchroom when the gymnasium is unavailable. It is a good activity for developing sportspersonship and responsibility in students in grades four and up. This article provides a description of table top tennis, including basic rules and strategies; an explanation of how it can…

  19. Top-Down Management: An Effective Tool in Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Yau; Beverton, Sue

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the strengths and weaknesses of top-down management in a university that has embraced globalisation with a strong market-led ethos and to suggest the ways in which adjustments might be made to top-down management processes. Design/methodology/approach: The paper examines the strengths and weaknesses…

  20. Signatures of top flavour-changing dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hondt, Jorgen; Mariotti, Alberto; Mawatari, Kentarou; Moortgat, Seth; Tziveloglou, Pantelis; Van Onsem, Gerrit

    2016-03-01

    We develop the phenomenology of scenarios in which a dark matter candidate interacts with a top quark through flavour-changing couplings, employing a simplified dark matter model with an s-channel vector-like mediator. We study in detail the top-charm flavour-changing interaction, by investigating the single top plus large missing energy signature at the LHC as well as constraints from the relic density and direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments. We present strategies to distinguish between the top-charm and top-up flavour-changing models by taking advantage of the lepton charge asymmetry as well as by using charm-tagging techniques on an extra jet. We also show the complementarity between the LHC and canonical dark matter experiments in exploring the viable parameter space of the models.

  1. Measurements of the top quark mass at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Oleg; /Gottingen U., II. Phys. Inst.

    2012-04-01

    The mass of the top quark (m{sub top}) is a fundamental parameter of the standard model (SM). Currently, its most precise measurements are performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We review the most recent of those measurements, performed on data samples of up to 8.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The Tevatron combination using up to 5.8 fb{sup -1} of data results in a preliminary world average top quark mass of m{sub top} = 173.2 {+-} 0.9 GeV. This corresponds to a relative precision of about 0.54%. We conclude with an outlook of anticipated precision the final measurement of m{sub top} at the Tevatron.

  2. Measurements of the Top Quark at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Cerrito, Lucio

    2007-01-01

    The authors present recent preliminary measurements of the top-antitop pair production cross section and determinations of the top quark pole mass, performed using the data collected by the CDF and D0 Collaborations at the Tevatron Collider. In the lepton plus jets final state, with semileptonic B decay, the pair production cross section has now been measured at CDF using {approx} 760 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. A measurement of the production cross section has also been made with {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of data in the all-jets final state by the CDF Collaboration. The mass of the top quark has now been measured using {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of collision data using all decay channels of the top quark pair, yielding the most precise measurements of the top mass to date.

  3. AlGaAs top solar cell for mechanical attachment in a multi-junction tandem concentrator solar cell stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinetta, L. C.; Hannon, M. H.; Cummings, J. R.; Mcneeley, J. B.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1990-01-01

    Free-standing, transparent, tunable bandgap AlxGa1-xAs top solar cells have been fabricated for mechanical attachment in a four terminal tandem stack solar cell. Evaluation of the device results has demonstrated 1.80 eV top solar cells with efficiencies of 18 percent (100 X, and AM0) which would yield stack efficiencies of 31 percent (100 X, AM0) with a silicon bottom cell. When fully developed, the AlxGa1-xAs/Si mechanically-stacked two-junction solar cell concentrator system can provide efficiencies of 36 percent (AM0, 100 X). AlxGa1-xAs top solar cells with bandgaps from 1.66 eV to 2.08 eV have been fabricated. Liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) growth techniques have been used and LPE has been found to yield superior AlxGa1-xAs material when compared to molecular beam epitaxy and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. It is projected that stack assembly technology will be readily applicable to any mechanically stacked multijunction (MSMJ) system. Development of a wide bandgap top solar cell is the only feasible method for obtaining stack efficiencies greater than 40 percent at AM0. System efficiencies of greater than 40 percent can be realized when the AlGaAs top solar cell is used in a three solar cell mechanical stack.

  4. Intact protein separation by chromatographic and/or electrophoretic techniques for top-down proteomics.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; Foglia, Patrizia; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2011-12-01

    Mass spectrometry used in combination with a wide variety of separation methods is the principal methodology for proteomics. In bottom-up approach, proteins are cleaved with a specific proteolytic enzyme, followed by peptide separation and MS identification. In top-down approach intact proteins are introduced into the mass spectrometer. The ions generated by electrospray ionization are then subjected to gas-phase separation, fragmentation, fragment separation, and automated interpretation of mass spectrometric and chromatographic data yielding both the molecular weight of the intact protein and the protein fragmentation pattern. This approach requires high accuracy mass measurement analysers capable of separating the multi-charged isotopic cluster of proteins, such as hybrid ion trap-Fourier transform instruments (LTQ-FTICR, LTQ-Orbitrap). Front-end separation technologies tailored for proteins are of primary importance to implement top-down proteomics. This review intends to provide the state of art of protein chromatographic and electrophoretic separation methods suitable for MS coupling, and to illustrate both monodimensional and multidimensional approaches used for LC-MS top-down proteomics. In addition, some recent progresses in protein chromatography that may provide an alternative to those currently employed are also discussed.

  5. Elk, sagebrush, and saprotrophs: indirect top-down control on microbial community composition and function.

    PubMed

    Peschel, Anna R; Zak, Donald R; Cline, Lauren C; Freedman, Zachary

    2015-09-01

    Saprotrophic microbial communities in soil are primarily structured by the availability of growth-limiting resources (i.e., plant detritus), a bottom-up ecological force. However, foraging by native ungulates can alter plant community composition and the nature of detritus entering soil, plausibly exerting an indirect, top-down ecological force that shapes both the composition and function of soil microbial communities. To test this idea, we used physiological assays and molecular approaches to quantify microbial community composition and function inside and outside of replicate, long-term (60-80 yr) winter-foraging exclosures in sagebrush steppe of Wyoming, USA. Winter foraging exclusion substantially increased shrub biomass (2146 g/m2 vs. 87 g/m2), which, in turn, increased the abundance of bacterial and fungal genes with lignocellulolytic function; microbial respiration (+50%) and net N mineralization (+70%) also were greater in the absence of winter foraging. Our results reveal that winter foraging by native, migratory ungulates in sagebrush steppe exerts an indirect, top-down ecological force that shapes the composition and function of soil microbial communities. Because approximately 25% of the Earth's land surface is influenced by grazing animals, this indirect top-down ecological force could function to broadly shape the community membership and physiological capacity of saprotrophic microbial communities in shrub steppe. PMID:26594696

  6. Molecular fountain.

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-09-01

    A molecular fountain directs slowly moving molecules against gravity to further slow them to translational energies that they can be trapped and studied. If the molecules are initially slow enough they will return some time later to the position from which they were launched. Because this round trip time can be on the order of a second a single molecule can be observed for times sufficient to perform Hz level spectroscopy. The goal of this LDRD proposal was to construct a novel Molecular Fountain apparatus capable of producing dilute samples of molecules at near zero temperatures in well-defined user-selectable, quantum states. The slowly moving molecules used in this research are produced by the previously developed Kinematic Cooling technique, which uses a crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus to generate single rotational level molecular samples moving slowly in the laboratory reference frame. The Kinematic Cooling technique produces cold molecules from a supersonic molecular beam via single collisions with a supersonic atomic beam. A single collision of an atom with a molecule occurring at the correct energy and relative velocity can cause a small fraction of the molecules to move very slowly vertically against gravity in the laboratory. These slowly moving molecules are captured by an electrostatic hexapole guiding field that both orients and focuses the molecules. The molecules are focused into the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and are ionized by laser radiation. The new molecular fountain apparatus was built utilizing a new design for molecular beam apparatus that has allowed us to miniaturize the apparatus. This new design minimizes the volumes and surface area of the machine allowing smaller pumps to maintain the necessary background pressures needed for these experiments.

  7. Terascale Optimal PDE Simulations (TOPS) Center

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Olof B. Widlund

    2007-07-09

    .g., illustrated in [24, 25, 26]. This work is based on [29, 31]. Our work over these five and half years has, in our opinion, helped advance the knowledge of domain decomposition methods significantly. We see these methods as providing valuable alternatives to other iterative methods, in particular, those based on multi-grid. In our opinion, our accomplishments also match the goals of the TOPS project quite closely.

  8. Search for the associate production of Higgs bosons with top anti-top pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, James Paul

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes the search for the associated production of a Higgs boson with top anti-top pairs in proton anti-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data used were collected by the D0 detector during the RunII data taking period which ran from 2001 to 2011 at the Tevatron Collider located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (or Fermilab). Distributions of theHT variable separated into 3 jet, 5 b-tagging and 2 lepton categories were used as inputs to a modified frequentist limit setting procedure, which was in turn used to search for the t$\\bar{t}$H process with H→b$\\bar{b}$. Since this process was not observed, limits were set on the cross section times branching ratio σ(t$\\bar{t}$H) BR(H → b$\\bar{b}$) , with an expected (observed) limit of 24.7 (74.3) measured for a Higgs mass value of 125 GeV.

  9. Electrical Discharges in the Overshooting Tops of Five Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGorman, D. R.; Elliott, M.

    2013-12-01

    Individual electrical discharges detected by VHF Lightning Mapping Arrays (LMAs) in the overshooting tops of strong storms typically occur continually at rates of roughly 1 - 10 per second and do not appear to cluster systematically in time or space as flashes. This study analyzed discharges relative to S-band polarimetric radar data and to GOES infrared imagery in the overshooting tops of five storms ranging from moderately strong multicell storms to supercell storms. Although the density of VHF sources in overshooting tops was much less than the maximum densities below the level of neutral bouyancy, the overshooting top typically contained a secondary maximum of density. The onset of discharges in an overshooting top corresponded to an increase in the maximum magnitude and height of reflectivity as the top substantially penetrated the level of neutral bouyancy. Once the discharges began, most were within reflectivities of at least 18 dBZ and formed a dome having geometry similar to that of the dome in reflectivity. Discharges persisted for approximately as long as the reflectivity dome persisted and could last anywhere from a few minutes for short-lived overshooting tops to a few hours for cases with an overlapping series of overshooting tops produced by a succession of updraft pulses. The 99.99th percentile in the height of VHF sources was well correlated (correlation coefficient of at least 0.8) with the height of 18 and 30 dBZ, and the timing of variations in height of these parameters agreed well. We suggest the discharges are caused by turbulent cells bringing negative screening layer charge close to positive charge in the updraft core. The onset of discharges in an overshooting top preceded the detection of overshooting tops in satellite imagery. The poorer performance probably was the result of the poorer spatiotemporal resolution of infrared cloud-top imagery in the present GOES constellation. Severe weather was either imminent or occurring when

  10. Top predators negate the effect of mesopredators on prey physiology.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Maria M; Killen, Shaun S; Nadler, Lauren E; White, James R; McCormick, Mark I

    2016-07-01

    Predation theory and empirical evidence suggest that top predators benefit the survival of resource prey through the suppression of mesopredators. However, whether such behavioural suppression can also affect the physiology of resource prey has yet to be examined. Using a three-tier reef fish food web and intermittent-flow respirometry, our study examined changes in the metabolic rate of resource prey exposed to combinations of mesopredator and top predator cues. Under experimental conditions, the mesopredator (dottyback, Pseudochromis fuscus) continuously foraged and attacked resource prey (juveniles of the damselfish Pomacentrus amboinensis) triggering an increase in prey O2 uptake by 38 ± 12·9% (mean ± SE). The visual stimulus of a top predator (coral trout, Plectropomus leopardus) restricted the foraging activity of the mesopredator, indirectly allowing resource prey to minimize stress and maintain routine O2 uptake. Although not as strong as the effect of the top predator, the sight of a large non-predator species (thicklip wrasse, Hemigymnus melapterus) also reduced the impact of the mesopredator on prey metabolic rate. We conclude that lower trophic-level species can benefit physiologically from the presence of top predators through the behavioural suppression that top predators impose on mesopredators. By minimizing the energy spent on mesopredator avoidance and the associated stress response to mesopredator attacks, prey may be able to invest more energy in foraging and growth, highlighting the importance of the indirect, non-consumptive effects of top predators in marine food webs. PMID:27113316

  11. Report on the Radar/PIREP Cloud Top Discrepancy Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Mark M.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Applied Meteorology Unit's (AMU) investigation of inconsistencies between pilot reported cloud top heights and weather radar indicated echo top heights (assumed to be cloud tops) as identified by the 45 Weather Squadron (45WS). The objective for this study is to document and understand the differences in echo top characteristics as displayed on both the WSR-88D and WSR-74C radars and cloud top heights reported by the contract weather aircraft in support of space launch operations at Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), Florida. These inconsistencies are of operational concern since various Launch Commit Criteria (LCC) and Flight Rules (FR) in part describe safe and unsafe conditions as a function of cloud thickness. Some background radar information was presented. Scan strategies for the WSR-74C and WSR-88D were reviewed along with a description of normal radar beam propagation influenced by the Effective Earth Radius Model. Atmospheric conditions prior to and leading up to both launch operations were detailed. Through the analysis of rawinsonde and radar data, atmospheric refraction or bending of the radar beam was identified as the cause of the discrepancies between reported cloud top heights by the contract weather aircraft and those as identified by both radars. The atmospheric refraction caused the radar beam to be further bent toward the Earth than normal. This radar beam bending causes the radar target to be displayed erroneously, with higher cloud top heights and a very blocky or skewed appearance.

  12. Defining the Entrainment Zone in Stratocumulus-topped Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Zhou, M.; Kalogiros, J. A.; Lenschow, D. H.; Dai, C.; Wang, S.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of an entrainment zone near the top of the stratocumulus-topped boundary layers has been identified by many early studies. However, the definition of the entrainment zone was rather vague. We have examined the fine vertical variations of cloud liquid water content, wind, temperature and humidity near the stratocumulus top and developed a new method to identify the entrainment zone objectively. Aircraft measurements from various field projects in stratocumulus-topped boundary layers are used, taking advantage of the fast sampling capability of many of the aircraft sensors. Because of the inhomogeneous mixing of two air masses with distinctively different thermodynamic properties, the magnitude of temperature perturbations within the entrainment zone is significantly larger than those above or below. This characteristics is used to define the upper and lower boundaries of the entrainment zone using a wavelet spectra analyses. The definition of the entrainment zone is further evaluated by the presence of a linear mixing line through mixing line analyses. Various other interfaces at the cloud top are also examined, including the cloud interface, temperature interface (inversion), and moisture interface. The heights of these interfaces are examined relative to the height of the entrainment zone. This study also systematically revealed the presence of turbulence above the local cloud top and/or above the entrainment zone. Wind shear near the cloud top is one possible source that generated local turbulence. Other potential sources of turbulence will also be discussed.

  13. Molecular Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, Michael

    The prospects of using organic materials in electronics and optoelectronics applications have attracted scientists and technologists since the 1970s. This field has become known as molecular electronics. Some successes have already been achieved, for example the liquid-crystal display. Other products such as organic light-emitting displays, chemical sensors and plastic transistors are developing fast. There is also a keen interest in exploiting technologies at the molecular scale that might eventually replace silicon devices. This chapter provides some of the background physics and chemistry to the interdisciplinary subject of molecular electronics. A review of some of the possible application areas for organic materials is presented and some speculation is provided regarding future directions.

  14. Top quark production and properties at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Fiedler, Frank; /Munich U.

    2005-06-01

    The precise measurement of top quark production and properties is one of the primary goals of the Tevatron during Run II. The total t{bar t} production cross-section has been measured in a large variety of decay channels and using different selection criteria. Results from differential cross-section measurements and searches for new physics in t{bar t} production and top quark decays are available. Electroweak production of single top quarks has been searched for. The results from all these analyses, using typically 200 pb{sup -1} of data, are presented.

  15. Constraints on anomalous top quark couplings at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1996-09-01

    Measurements of distributions associated with the pair production of top quarks at the LHC can be used to constrain (or observe) the anomalous chromomagnetic dipole moment(k) of the top. For example, using either the tt(bar) invariant mass or the Pt distribution of top we find that sensitivities to ; k; of order 0.05 are obtainable with 100 /fb of integrated luminosity. This is similar in magnitude to what can be obtained at a 500 GeV NLC with an integrated luminosity of 50 /fb through an examination of the e(+)e(-) right arrow tt(bar)g process.

  16. Top: Latest results from the Tevatron - Cross section and mass

    SciTech Connect

    M. Coca

    2003-09-02

    The Tevatron is presently the world's only source of top quark production. This presentation summarizes the latest Run II results on top physics obtained by the CDF and D0 collaborations, using data taken until mid-January 2003. The first cross section measurements at 1.96 TeV in dilepton and lepton+jets channels agree with the NLO (Next-to-Leading-Order) theoretical predictions. Two top mass measurements, one by CDF using Run II data and another by D0 using an improved technique anticipate the improvements to come in the near future.

  17. Top quark and Electroweak measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Cerrito, L.

    2010-10-01

    We present recent preliminary measurements at the Tevatron of t{bar t} and single top production cross section, top quark mass and width, top pair spin correlations and forward-backward asymmetry. In the electroweak sector, we present the Tevatron average of the W boson width, and preliminary measurements of the W and Z forward-backward asymmetries and WZ, ZZ diboson production cross sections. All measurements are based on larger amount of collision data than previously used and are in agreement with the standard model.

  18. Top properties and rare decays from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Quadt, Arnulf; /Bonn U. /Rochester U.

    2005-09-01

    The top quark is the most recently discovered quark. Relatively little is known about its properties so far. Due to its very large mass of about 175 GeV/c{sup 2}, the top quark behaves differently from all other quarks and provides a unique environment for tests of the Standard Model. Furthermore, it is believed to yield sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model. This report discusses the latest measurements and studies of top quark properties and rare decays from the Tevatron in Run II.

  19. The heavy Top Quark Partner in Little Higgs Models

    SciTech Connect

    Larios, F.; Perez, M. A.; Penunuri, F.

    2008-07-02

    Little Higgs models provide a natural explanation for the lightness of the Higgs mass. Through the mechanism of collective symmetry breaking, one loop quadratic divergent contributions to the Higgs mass are avoided. In these models a heavy partner of the Top quark appears as required to cancel out the Top's loop contribution. This heavy Top could be produced at the LHC mainly in the single mode. Because of flavor mixing a large FCNC gtT coupling can be generated at one loop that could boost the single T production mode through gg fusion.

  20. Observation of $t$-channel electroweak top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle, with a mass of 172.0+0.9-1.3GeV. This is nearly twice the mass of the second heaviest known particle, the Z boson, and roughly the mass of a gold atom. Because of its unusually large mass, studying the top quark may provide insight into the Higgs mechanism and other beyond the standard model physics. Only two accelerators in the world are powerful enough to produce top quarks. The Tevatron, which first accelerated protons in 1983, has produced almost 400,000 top quarks, roughly half at each of its two detectors: DO and CDF. The LHC is a much newer accelerator which currently has accumulated about 0.5% as much data as the Tevatron. However, when running at full luminosity, the LHC is capable of producing a top quark about once every second and will quickly surpass the Tevatron as the leading producer of top quarks. This analysis uses data from the DØ detector at the Tevatron, which are described in chapter 3. Top quarks are produced most often in pairs of top and anti-top quarks through an interaction of the strong force. This production mode was first observed in 1995 at the Tevatron. However, top quarks can also be produced though an electroweak interaction, which produces just one top quark. This production mode was first observed at the Tevatron in 2008. Single top quark production can occur in different channels. In this analysis, a measurement of the cross section of the t-channel production mode is performed. This measurement uses 5.4 fb-1 of data and uses the technique of boosted decision trees in order to separate signal from background events. The t-channel cross section is measured to be: σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tqb + X) = 3.03+0.78-0.66 pb (0.0.1). Additional cross section measurements were also performed for the s-channel as well as the s + t-channel. The measurement of each one of these three cross sections was repeated three times using

  1. Measurement of the top quark mass at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Protopopescu, S.; D0 Collaboration

    1996-12-31

    The mass of the top quark is measured using a sample of 93 lepton + 4 or more jets events collected with the D0 detector at the FNAL Tevatron collider. The authors find the top quark mass is 169 {+-} 8(stat.) {+-} 8(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The analysis assumes that top quarks are produced as t{anti t} pairs that decay to W bosons and b quarks. The final states result when one W decays to e{nu} or {mu}{nu} and the other W to q{anti q}. More than four jets may be present because of final and initial state radiation.

  2. The CDF top search in the multijet decay mode

    SciTech Connect

    Denby, B.; CDF Collaboration

    1994-01-01

    A status report on the CDF top search in the multijet channel is given. After topological cuts and the requirement of a secondary vertex in the silicon microvertex detector, about 120 events remain (21.4 pb{sup {minus}1}), in which the signal to background ratio (for a nominal top mass of 160 GeV) is estimated to be 1/10. With further improvements it should be possible to improve this ratio to 1/1 while retaining good efficiency for top, which will make the multijet channel an important cross check for the leptonic modes.

  3. Measurements of top quark production and properties at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bartos, P.

    2014-09-15

    In this letter, we summarize the latest results of the top-quark production and properties at the Tevatron. We do not include results of the top-quark mass and single top-quark production as they were presented in separate talks. The results of the measurements are mostly consistent with the standard-model predictions. However, by looking at the production asymmetry measured by CDF, one can see a discrepancy in both, $t\\bar{t}$ inclusive and lepton-based measurements. D\\O\\ results of production asymmetry are compatible with the standard-model predictions as well as with the CDF results.

  4. Ranking benchmarks of top 100 players in men's professional tennis.

    PubMed

    Reid, Machar; Morris, Craig

    2013-01-01

    In men's professional tennis, players aspire to hold the top ranking position. On the way to the top spot, reaching the top 100 can be seen as a significant career milestone. National Federations undertake extensive efforts to assist their players to reach the top 100. However, objective data considering reasonable ranking yardsticks for top 100 success in men's professional tennis are lacking. Therefore, it is difficult for National Federations and those involved in player development to give empirical programming advice to young players. By taking a closer look at the ranking history of professional male tennis players, this article tries to provide those involved in player development a more objective basis for decision-making. The 100 names, countries, birthdates and ranking histories of the top 100 players listed in the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) at 31 December 2009 were recorded from websites in the public domain. Descriptive statistics were reported for the ranking milestones of interest. Results confirmed the merits of the International Tennis Federation's junior tour with 91% of the top 100 professionals earning a junior ranking, the mean peak of which was 94.1, s=148.9. On average, top 100 professionals achieved their best junior rankings and earned their first ATP point at similar ages, suggesting that players compete on both the junior and professional tours during their transition. Once professionally ranked, players took an average 4.5, s=2.1 years to reach the ATP top 100 at the mean age of 21.5, s=2.6 years, which contrasts with the mean current age of the top 100 of 26.8, s=3.2. The best professional rankings of players born in 1982 or earlier were positively related to the ages at which players earned their first ATP point and then entered the top 100, suggesting that the ages associated with these ranking milestones may have some forecasting potential. Future work should focus on the change in top 100 demographics over time as well

  5. Power in top management teams: dimensions, measurement, and validation.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, S

    1992-08-01

    Top managers' power plays a key role in strategic decision making. However, although numerous scholars have recognized its importance, very few have attempted to measure the phenomenon. In this article, I present a set of dimensions measuring top managers' power and suggest a measurement methodology to facilitate empirical inquiry. Data from a group of 1,763 top managers in three industries were used to assess the validity and reliability of the power dimensions in three studies. Results demonstrate strong support for the proposed power dimensions.

  6. Mountain-Top-to-Mountain-Top Optical Link Demonstration. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, A.; Wright, M. W.

    2002-01-01

    A mountain-top-to-mountain-top optical link was demonstrated between JPL's Table Mountain Facility (TMF), Wrightwood, California, and Strawberry Peak (SP), Lake Arrowhead, California, during the months of June, August, and September of 2000. The bidirectional laser link was nearly horizontal at an altitude of 2 km and spanned a range of 46.8 km. The 780-nm beacon laser transmitted from TMF comprised eight co-propagating mutually incoherent laser beams. The normalized variance or scintillation index (SI) of the individual beacon lasers measured by recording the signal received through 8.50-cm-diameter spotting telescopes on three different nights (June 28-30, 2000) was 1.05 +/- 0.2, 1.76 +/- 0.6, and 0.96 +/- 0.24, respectively. These measurements agreed with values predicted by a heuristic model. The SI of the signal received at SP was found to decrease progressively with an increasing number of beams, and a factor of 3 to 3.5 reduction was achieved for all eight beams. The beam divergence determined by mapping out the point spread function of a few of the individual laser footprints received at SP was 85 to 150 microrad, compared to a design goal of 120 microrad. The 852-nm communications laser beam received at TMF through a 60-cm-diameter telescope on the nights of August 4 and September 14 and 15, 2000, yielded SI values of 0.23 +/- 0.04, 0.32 +/- 0.01, and 0.49 +/- 0.18, respectively, where the reduction was attributed to aperture averaging. The probability distribution functions of the received signal at either end, mitigated by multi-beam averaging in one direction and by aperture averaging in the other direction, displayed lognormal behavior. Consequently, the measured fade statistics showed good agreement with a lognormal model.

  7. Factors affecting the top ring oil film thickness at top center

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation into factors influencing top-ring oil film thickness at TDC, in a diesel engine, was carried out using capacitance probes and surface thermocouples installed in the liner. The instrumentation proved both robust and sensitive. The capacitance gauges were capable of measuring the oil film thicknesses required, on the order of several {mu}m, and also detected breakdown of the oil film and metal-to-metal contact. Significant, consistent differences in the film thickness around the cylinder were detected. The thermocouples showed that for this engine, the top ring unexpectedly cools the wall for a short time near TDC. Generally, the thermocouple data was more repeatable than the film thickness measurements, but did not seem to provide as much insight into the oil film phenomena. Because of lack of reproducibility, two different data acquisition techniques were used. Acquiring consecutive cycles, for a short period of time, provided a high resolution snapshot of the process, however, this was not sufficient to characterize it. Taking non-consecutive cycles, over a longer period of time, provided much more knowledge about the long term trends in the data. Changes in oil and operating parameters of large enough magnitude were detectable. For example: (1) the compression stroke always showed a thinner film than the exhaust stroke, and (2) when the cylinder walls were wet by fuel, the film thickness dropped dramatically. The effect of the mechanical condition of the engine was found to be very significant; an under-sized piston was fund to cause much metal-to-metal contact between the ring and liner, whereas a properly fitted piston showed practically none.

  8. Molecular gastronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This, Hervé

    2005-01-01

    For centuries, cooks have been applying recipes without looking for the mechanisms of the culinary transformations. A scientific discipline that explores these changes from raw ingredients to eating the final dish, is developing into its own field, termed molecular gastronomy. Here, one of the founders of the discipline discusses its aims and importance.

  9. Direct measurement of the top quark charge at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, U.; Buice, M.; Orr, Lynne H.

    2001-11-01

    We consider photon radiation in t¯t events at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) as a tool to measure the electric charge of the top quark. We analyze the contributions of t¯tγ production and radiative top quark decays to pp(-)-->γl+/-νb¯bjj, assuming that both b quarks are tagged. With 20 fb-1 at the Tevatron, the possibility that the ``top quark'' discovered in run I is actually an exotic charge -4/3 quark can be ruled out at the ~95% confidence level. At the CERN LHC, it will be possible to determine the charge of the top quark with an accuracy of about 10%.

  10. 4. CLOSEUP OF REAR STEPPED PARAPET GABLE SHOWING TOP CURVILINEAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. CLOSE-UP OF REAR STEPPED PARAPET GABLE SHOWING TOP CURVILINEAR GABLE AND ROUGH STUCCO FINISH. VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Control Station, Operations Building No. 1, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  11. 5. TOP OF ARCH AND VIADUCT. NOTE THAT STONES OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. TOP OF ARCH AND VIADUCT. NOTE THAT STONES OF ARCH HAVE BEEN DRAFTED FINISH AROUND THE EDGE) AND THE KEYSTONE HAS BEEN ROUGHLY POINTED. - Valley Railroad, Folly Mills Creek Viaduct, Interstate 81, Staunton, Staunton, VA

  12. View from top of building 680 looking down river toward ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from top of building 680 looking down river toward Carquinez Straits and bridge, showing building 742 on left; camera facing south. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, East of Nave Drive, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  13. Searches for New Physics in Top Events at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, A.W.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01

    Recent results of searches for new physics in top events at the Tevatron are presented. In case of CDF three searches are discussed using 6 to 8.7 fb{sup -1} of data, with the latter being the final CDF data sample available for this kind of analysis. CDF carried out a search for Top + jet resonance production, dark matter production in association with single top and boosted tops. No signs of new physics are observed and instead upper limits are derived. D0 used 5.3 fb{sup -1} of data and searched for a narrow resonance in t{bar t} production and a time dependent t{bar t} cross section, which would reveal a violation of Lorentz invariance. However, no signs for deviations from standard model are seen and instead upper limits for non-standard model contributions are calculated.

  14. And the Top Honor Goes to Voc Ed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hettinger, James

    1998-01-01

    Ray Chelewski is the first vocational-technical educator to win Walt Disney's top teaching honor. Chelewski is an agriculture teacher at the Presque Isle Regional Technology Center in northeast Maine. (JOW)

  15. DETAIL OF THE GROOVED RIM ON TOP FACE OF CHAMBER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE GROOVED RIM ON TOP FACE OF CHAMBER SHELL, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  16. INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L FROM TOP LEVEL OF ACCESS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L FROM TOP LEVEL OF ACCESS PLATFORMS, FACING WEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  17. 29. Elevator no. 3: top floor, conveyor belt rollers for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Elevator no. 3: top floor, conveyor belt rollers for belt to gangway (in background) connecting with elevator no. 2, facing northwest - Washburn Crosby Company Elevators No. 2 & 3, 900 & 1000 Second Avenue, South, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  18. 16. DETAIL, CLOSEUP OF DECORATIVE PANEL, TOP FLOOR (4 x ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL, CLOSE-UP OF DECORATIVE PANEL, TOP FLOOR (4 x 5 NEGATIVE) - U.S. General Services Administration, Central Heating Plant, C & D Streets between Twelfth & Thirteenth Streets Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. 15. DETAIL, DECORATIVE PANEL, ABOVE TOP FLOOR, WEST ELEVATION (4 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL, DECORATIVE PANEL, ABOVE TOP FLOOR, WEST ELEVATION (4 x 5 NEGATIVE) - U.S. General Services Administration, Central Heating Plant, C & D Streets between Twelfth & Thirteenth Streets Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  20. 39. View looking down on torch and flame from top ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. View looking down on torch and flame from top of scaffolding; ventilator cap has been removed from flame prior to removal of torch on July 4, 1984. July 1984. - Statue of Liberty, Liberty Island, Manhattan, New York County, NY