Science.gov

Sample records for psychiatric day hospital

  1. [Psychiatric and psychosomatic day hospitals in Austria].

    PubMed

    Evans, Janet; Dummer, Verena; Kinzl, Johann

    2016-12-01

    This paper on psychiatric and psychosomatic day hospitals in Austria first looks at the overall situation of Austrian day clinics then, in a second step, compares psychiatric and psychosomatic day hospitals. For this purpose, a questionnaire was developed and sent to all psychiatric and psychosomatic day hospitals in Austria. The first part consisted of closed questions and was used to gather and evaluate the categories: general conditions for treatment in day hospitals, tasks of day hospitals, therapeutic paradigms, indication and contraindication, diagnostics, day hospital organisation, interdisciplinary cooperation and the offering in day hospitals. The second section consisted of open questions which were used to gather and evaluate active factors, difficulties, specifics and requests for future treatment in day hospitals. The results show that there is a trend towards more day hospitals. Psychosomatic day hospitals are a rather new phenomenon. Furthermore, the distinction between psychiatric and psychosomatic day hospitals is important in order to offer patients distinguishable treatment options in future. The results show that psychiatric and psychosomatic day hospitals both have a strong focus on psychotherapy and both fulfill the active factors for psychotherapy by Grawe.

  2. Rehabilitation Needs of Chronic Female Inpatients Attending Day-care in a Tertiary Care Psychiatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Waghmare, Avinash; Sherine, Linda; Sivakumar, Thanapal; Kumar, C. Naveen; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Female patients hospitalized for a long duration in psychiatric hospitals are a special population with unique needs. Aims and Objectives: To assess rehabilitation needs of chronic female inpatients attending psychiatric rehabilitation services in a tertiary care psychiatric hospital. Materials and Methods: Rehabilitation needs of nine chronic female inpatients were assessed with an interview schedule developed by expert consensus. The needs were elicited from the patients. Perspectives of nursing staff, vocational instructors, and treating psychiatrists were also sought. Results and Conclusion: Most patients expressed the need for more incentives for working in day-care, variety in food and grooming items. The nursing staff felt many patients could be placed outside, and the family members should come more frequently to meet them. Vocational instructors felt that patients need more incentives, variety in food and work. Treating psychiatrists said that major barriers in discharging and placing them were nonavailability or poor involvement of family members. Services like supported housing, supported education and supported employment are necessary to cater to their complex needs. PMID:27011400

  3. Education for Life: Assessment of the Role of a Recreational Programme in the Rehabilitation of Day Patients in a Psychiatric Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Robert

    1984-01-01

    With a working definition of rehabilitation, the author assesses the therapeutic recreation program at a psychiatric hospital to determine whether it enabled psychiatric day patients to overcome social disabilities and make a full return to community life. (SK)

  4. Institutional therapeutic alliance and its relationship with outcomes in a psychiatric day hospital program.

    PubMed

    Pulido, Ricardo; Monari, Marco; Rossi, Nicolino

    2008-10-01

    The article shows the results of a longitudinal study aimed to explore the institutional therapeutic alliance (ITA) that is the alliance formed by a patient and all the therapeutic staff. Fifty five patients who have psychiatric disorders in partial hospitalization were evaluated at admission (global functional level, social support, symptomatic condition, and treatment expectancies), at discharge, and after 3 months. ITA was assessed after 1 week of treatment and at discharge, from patient's and staff's perspectives. Preliminary findings suggest that the ITA represents a specific phenomenon different from the classical therapeutic alliance (patienttherapist), which would be particularly relevant for the treatment of patients who are severely disturbed.

  5. Service dogs, psychiatric hospitalization, and the ADA.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Russ S; Thomas, Kelly Jones; Leong, Stephanie L; Ragukonis, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A service dog is defined as "any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability." Some psychiatric patients may depend on a service dog for day-to-day functioning. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) established certain rights and responsibilities for individuals with disabilities and health care providers. Psychiatric hospitalization of a patient with a service dog may pose a problem and involves balancing the requirement to provide safe and appropriate psychiatric care with the rights of individuals with disabilities. This Open Forum examines issues that arise in such circumstances, reviews the literature, and provides a foundation for the development of policies and procedures.

  6. A CBT Approach to Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Kim J.

    2005-01-01

    During a psychiatric hospitalization of 5 to 10 days, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) strategies can be used for the management of inpatients and to support the transition to outpatient treatment. This format was chosen after several years of frustration dealing with crisis inpatient care. The use of CBT is well known, and it seemed that an…

  7. Antidepressant adherence after psychiatric hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Zivin, Kara; Ganoczy, Dara; Pfeiffer, Paul N.; Miller, Erin M.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    Objective Depressed patients discharged from psychiatric hospitalizations face increased risks for adverse outcomes including suicide, yet antidepressant adherence rates during this high-risk period are unknown. Using Veterans Affairs (VA) data, we assessed antidepressant adherence and predictors of poor adherence among depressed veterans following psychiatric hospitalization. Method We identified VA patients nationwide with depressive disorders who had a psychiatric hospitalization between April 1, 1999 and September 30, 2003, received antidepressant medication, and had an outpatient appointment following discharge. We calculated medication possession ratios (MPRs), a measure of medication adherence, within three and six months following discharge. We assessed patient factors associated with having lower levels of adherence (MPRs <0.8) after discharge. Results 20,931 and 23,182 patients met criteria for three and six month MPRs. The mean three month MPR was 0.79 (s.d.=0.37). The mean six month MPR was 0.66 (s.d.=0.40). Patients with poorer adherence were male, younger, non-white, and had a substance abuse disorder, but were less likely to have PTSD or other anxiety disorders. Conclusion Poor antidepressant adherence is common among depressed patients after psychiatric hospitalization. Efforts to improve adherence at this time may be critical in improving the outcomes of these high-risk patients. PMID:19609666

  8. Inpatient Suicide in a Chinese Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jie; Ran, Mao-Sheng; Hao, Yuantao; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Guo, Yangbo; Su, Jinghua; Lu, Huixian

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the risk factors for suicide among psychiatric inpatients in China. In this study we identified the risk factors of suicide among psychiatric inpatients at Guangzhou Psychiatric Hospital. All psychiatric inpatients who died by suicide during the 1956-2005 period were included in this study. Using a case-control design, 64…

  9. Psychiatric Hospitalization after Deliberate Self-Poisoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Gregory L.; Safranko, Ivan; Lewin, Terry J.; Whyte, Ian M.; Bryant, Jennifer L.

    2006-01-01

    The decision for psychiatric hospitalization after deliberate self-poisoning (DSP) is not well understood. This study, a longitudinal cohort study of 3,148 consecutive DSP patients found 920 (29.2%) subjects were referred for psychiatric hospitalization, 576 (18.3%) on involuntary basis. A logistic regression analysis showed increased risk for:…

  10. Quality Assurance in a Children's Psychiatric Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baggish, Rosemary C.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Examined the use of short-term isolation (STI) in a children's psychiatric hospital. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals quality assurance mode was used. Studied the quality use of STI and its documentation. Data gathered served as the basis for recommendations that led to planned, informed program changes. (Author)

  11. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of the 90 days spent in the general hospital. (3) An individual was admitted to a general hospital... initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a psychiatric... participating in Medicare as a psychiatric hospital on the individual's first day of entitlement. (3)...

  12. Child psychiatric hospitalization: the last resort.

    PubMed

    Scharer, Kathleen; Jones, Debbie Singleton

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how parents manage the experience of hospitalizing their school-aged child in a psychiatric unit. Grounded theory methodology was used. Thirty-eight parents participated. Data were collected by interviews. Analysis was done using the constant comparative method. The basic social problem identified was the escalating behavior of the child. The child's behavior included self-injurious behavior or violence toward others. The core concept was "hospitalization, the last resort." Parents' management of the experience varied based on many factors including whether this was the child's first psychiatric hospitalization, the distance from the hospital to their home, their trust of staff members, sources of support, and their definition of the situation.

  13. The Psychiatric Aide in State Mental Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Manpower Studies Unit.

    Benchmark data essential to further study and action were obtained in 1963 from personnel records and interviews with representative samples of aides and nurses. Some findings were: (1) State and county mental hospitals employed approximately 96,000 psychiatric aides with eight states acccounting for one-half, (2) Although there were wide…

  14. Lunar phases and psychiatric hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Gorvin, J J; Roberts, M S

    1994-12-01

    To assess the lunar hypothesis as predictive of mental health emergencies and antisocial behavior, the relation of the lunar hypothesis and the occurrence of psychiatric hospital admissions of developmentally disabled adults was examined. The full moon phase of the lunar cycle did not explain a higher rate of hospital admission and accounted for only .007% of the variance. A critique of the methodology in prior research led to the suggestion that more immediate stressors and environmental factors are more plausible contributing factors to hospital admission.

  15. Predicting hospital aggression in secure psychiatric care

    PubMed Central

    Priday, Lee J.; Ireland, Carol A.; Chu, Simon; Kilcoyne, Jennifer; Mulligan, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Background Risk assessment instruments have become a preferred means for predicting future aggression, claiming to predict long-term aggression risk. Aims To investigate the predictive value over 12 months and 4 years of two commonly applied instruments (Historical, Clinical and Risk Management - 20 (HCR-20) and Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG)). Method Participants were adult male psychiatric patients detained in a high secure hospital. All had a diagnosis of personality disorder. The focus was on aggression in hospital. Results The actuarial risk assessment (VRAG) was generally performing better than the structured risk assessment (HCR-20), although neither approach performed particularly well overall. Any value in their predictive potential appeared focused on the longer time period under study (4 years) and was specific to certain types of aggression. Conclusions The value of these instruments for assessing aggression in hospital among patients with personality disorder in a high secure psychiatric setting is considered. Declaration of interest J.L.I., C.A.M. and J.K. are employed by the trust where the data were collected. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703760

  16. [The psychiatric hospital circuit: the trajectories of young people prior to psychiatric hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Scisleski, Andrea Cristina Coelho; Maraschin, Cleci; Silva, Rosane Neves da

    2008-02-01

    This article analyzes psychiatric hospitalization of young patients from a contemporary social-subjective (rather than a psychopathological) perspective, following the trajectory of these youth prior to their admission. The study was conducted at the Center for Comprehensive Psychosocial Care for Children and Adolescents, São Pedro Psychiatric Hospital, in the city of Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Recurrent traits in the trajectory of these youth expressed how the health care network functioned with them prior to their hospitalization, with a consistent pattern of socioeconomic deprivation, low schooling, and drug use. Another key aspect was the role of the court system in referring them for hospitalization, adhering to a kind of logic that punished both the youth and the services and paradoxically formed a strategy for access to health services.

  17. Cost effectiveness of day and inpatient psychiatric treatment: results of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Creed, F.; Mbaya, P.; Lancashire, S.; Tomenson, B.; Williams, B.; Holme, S.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare direct and indirect costs of day and inpatient treatment of acute psychiatric illness. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial with outcome and costs assessed over 12 months after the date of admission. SETTING: Teaching hospital in an inner city area. SUBJECTS: 179 patients with acute psychiatric illness referred for admission who were suitable for random allocation to day hospital or inpatient treatment. 77 (43%) patients had schizophrenia. INTERVENTIONS: Routine inpatient or day hospital treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Direct and indirect costs over 12 months, clinical symptoms, social functioning, and burden on relatives over the follow up period. RESULTS: Clinical and social outcomes were similar at 12 months, except that inpatients improved significantly faster than day patients and burden on relatives was significantly less in the day hospital group at one year. Median direct costs to the hospital were 1923 pounds (95% confidence interval 750 pounds to 3174 pounds) per patient less for day hospital treatment than inpatient treatment. Indirect costs were greater for day patients; when these were included, overall day hospital treatment was 2165 pounds cheaper than inpatient treatment (95% confidence interval of median difference 737 pounds to 3593 pounds). Including costs to informants when appropriate meant that day hospital treatment was 1994 pounds per patient cheaper (95% confidence interval 600 pounds to 3543 pounds). CONCLUSIONS: Day patient treatment is cheaper for the 30-40% of potential admissions that can be treated in this way. Carers of day hospital patients may bear additional costs. Carers of all patients with acute psychiatric illness are often themselves severely distressed at the time of admission, but day hospital treatment leads to less burden on carers in the long term. PMID:9161310

  18. The dynamics of psychiatric bed use in general hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Eric P; Goldman, Howard H

    2014-01-01

    This study examines general hospitals' adjustments in psychiatric bed utilization practices in response to increases in psychiatric inpatient admissions. Using panel data from 439 hospitals, monthly observations (N=7831) between 2007 and 2010 on psychiatric admissions, psychiatric bed occupancy rates, and average length-of-stay were created for psychiatric inpatients. In fixed-effects regressions, an increase in psychiatric admissions was associated with an increase in the probability of psychiatric bed use exceeding 100% occupancy and with a reduction of mean length-of-stay. These results were confirmed in instrumental variables models. General hospitals may dynamically adjust bed utilization practices in response to changing psychiatric bed needs. An implication of this dynamic adjustment model is that bed shortages are likely to be local, transitory events. PMID:24756929

  19. The dynamics of psychiatric bed use in general hospitals.

    PubMed

    Slade, Eric P; Goldman, Howard H

    2015-03-01

    This study examines general hospitals' adjustments in psychiatric bed utilization practices in response to increases in psychiatric inpatient admissions. Using panel data from 439 hospitals, monthly observations (N = 7,831) between 2007 and 2010 on psychiatric admissions, psychiatric bed occupancy rates, and average length-of-stay were created for psychiatric inpatients. In fixed-effects regressions, an increase in psychiatric admissions was associated with an increase in the probability of psychiatric bed use exceeding 100 % occupancy and with a reduction of mean length-of-stay. These results were confirmed in instrumental variables models. General hospitals may dynamically adjust bed utilization practices in response to changing psychiatric bed needs. An implication of this dynamic adjustment model is that bed shortages are likely to be local, transitory events.

  20. Predicting Length of Psychiatric Hospital Stay in Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leininger, Michele; Stephenson, Laura A.

    Length of stay in psychiatric inpatient units has received increasing attention with the external pressures for treatment cost-effectiveness and evidence that longer hospital stays do not appear to have significant advantages over shorter hospital stays. This study examined the relationship between length of psychiatric hospital stay and…

  1. Comorbidity and Pattern of Substance Use in Hospitalized Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sepehrmanesh, Zahra; Ahmadvand, Afshin; Moraveji, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Substance use in patients with psychiatric disorder is an every-day seen. Detection of this comorbidity can significantly affect the treatment of these disorders, as well as substance use. Objectives: This study has been conducted to determine the prevalence and pattern of substance use in hospitalized psychiatric patients. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 210 hospitalized psychiatric patients were selected by simple randomization from all records of hospitalized patients. The instrument of gathering data was a demographic checklist including age, gender, marital status, education, type of disorder and substance abuse and duration of psychiatric disorder. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 16 using Fisher exact and Chi square tests. Results: The mean age of patients was 37.9 years. Most of the patients were male, married and unemployed. The Prevalence of substance use was 36.7%. The most prevalent pattern of substance use was opium, opioid, methamphetamines and other substances (poly substance). The prevalence of substance use in patients with mood disorders was more than the other disorders and the most prevalent substance use in these patients was opium and opioid. Poly substance use was the most prevalent pattern of use (80 %) in psychotic and mood disorders due to substance. Significant difference was seen between genders, marital status, occupation, duration of illness and frequency of substance use (P < 0.05 ), however no significant difference was seen between educational levels, age and substance use. Conclusions: The patients with mood disorders had the highest comorbidity with substance use and concurrent use of poly substance was the most prevalent pattern of use in these patients. Therefore, successful treatment of psychiatric disorders and substance use needs multimodal and more serious interventions. Regarding to the pattern of poly substance use in these patients, careful screening should be performed at admission

  2. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days... Hospital Insurance Benefits § 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a...

  3. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days... Hospital Insurance Benefits § 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a...

  4. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days... Hospital Insurance Benefits § 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a...

  5. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days... Hospital Insurance Benefits § 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a...

  6. Psychiatric hospitalizations in a cohort of Danish polio patients.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Nete Munk; Rostgaard, Klaus; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Askgaard, Dorthe; Skinhøj, Peter; Aaby, Peter

    2007-02-01

    Although previous polio infection remains a considerable cause of long-term morbidity worldwide, few studies have examined the psychiatric consequences of poliomyelitis. The authors followed 4,660 polio patients hospitalized at the primary infectious disease hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark, between 1922 and 1954 as well as 19,017 age- and gender-matched Danes for psychiatric hospitalizations from January 1, 1977, to December 31, 1993. Incidence rates of all psychiatric disorders combined and of separate diagnostic groups of psychiatric diseases in the two cohorts were compared, yielding the incidence rate ratio, a measure of relative risk. Overall, polio patients had a 40% increased risk of being hospitalized for a psychiatric disorder (incidence rate ratio = 1.43, 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 1.66). Apparently, the overall increased risk of psychiatric hospitalizations could not be confined to specific groups of psychiatric disorders but seemed to be explained by slightly increased risks of several different disorders, especially milder psychiatric disorders. Finally, psychiatric morbidity did not differ between paralytic and nonparalytic polio patients. History of hospitalization for polio might be associated with subsequent risk of hospitalization for psychiatric disorders. The underlying mechanism for this association remains uncertain.

  7. [Solitary confinement as risk factor for psychiatric hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Volkart, R; Rothenfluh, T; Kobelt, W; Dittrich, A; Ernst, K

    1983-01-01

    The subjects of this study are prisoners who were hospitalized from custody in a psychiatric clinic. All of such patients of one psychiatric clinic during the period from 1976 till 1978 were compared with a random sample of other psychiatric patients using case reports and other data. Differences were found concerning social, personal, psychiatric, and criminal history as well as psychopathological state and diagnosis. Compared to the complete population of prisoners of the area, prisoners from solitary confinement (mostly remanding custody) were overrepresented. Other risk factors for psychiatric hospitalization of prisoners are described. The results are discussed from prophylactic, therapeutic, and humanitarian points of view.

  8. Elements of Successful School Reentry after Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Elysia V.; Welfare, Laura E.; Williams, Amy M.

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric hospitalization is an intensive intervention designed to stabilize adolescents who are experiencing an acute mental health crisis. Reintegrating to school after discharge from psychiatric hospitalization can be overwhelming for many adolescents (E. V. Clemens, L. E. Welfare, & A. M. Williams, 2010). The authors used a consensual…

  9. Psychiatric nurses' satisfaction: the effects of closure of a hospital.

    PubMed

    Sammut, R G

    1997-07-01

    A survey by questionnaire was carried out to examine the level of nursing staff satisfaction with the acute psychiatric services. Comparisons were made between views of older psychiatric hospitals and newer district general hospital units, and before and after the closure of Friern Barnet Hospital, London, England when the service was reorganized to include fewer beds. The importance of nurses having their say is emphasized, and areas in which improvements can be made are suggested.

  10. Impact of Patients’ Psychiatric Hospitalization on Caregivers: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Bridget Elizabeth; Faulkner, Madelaine; Doyle, Otima; Daniel, Stephanie S; Goldston, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article was to systematically review literature on the impact of patients’ psychiatric hospitalizations on caregivers. Implications for practice and research are presented. Methods A systematic search of Web of Knowledge, PsychInfo, and Medline (PubMed) was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published before August 31, 2013. Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed method studies were included if they focused on caregiver outcomes and contained data collected directly from caregivers of patients who had been psychiatrically hospitalized. Results Twenty-nine articles met the inclusion criteria. Caregivers are heterogeneous in their reaction to the psychiatric hospitalization; however, many report distress. Caregivers also often report that they experience stigma, disruptions in daily life, worse physical health, economic strain, and changes in relationships following hospitalization. Negative reactions to the hospitalization may decrease over time, but can remain elevated when compared to the general population. Nonetheless, many caregivers also experience positive changes as a result of the hospitalization. The reaction of caregivers may be influenced by the severity of the patient’s psychiatric problems as well as the caregiver’s demographics and style of coping. Conclusions Caregivers experience a range of reactions to the psychiatric hospitalizations and providing caregivers with psychoeducation on their possible reaction as well as techniques to assist them may improve clinical outcomes for patients. Future research is needed to understand the heterogeneity in caregiver’s reactions to the patient’s psychiatric hospitalization. PMID:25686810

  11. [Psychiatric Hospital San Juan de Dios. One hundred years later].

    PubMed

    Cocula-León, Horacio

    2014-01-01

    Mental health and psychiatric diseases have always attracted people's and health authorities' attention due to its magical approach, the lack of knowledge that surrounds them, and, at the same time, the religious fear they provoke. Both have played an important role in the history of humanity, of public health politics, and of physicians. The places where psychiatric patients were treated are of historical interest, because through the historical knowledge we can identify an approach from the science and the health policies that prevailed in each age. At the beginning of the 20th century, it was developed in México a new model of hospital care attention to psychiatric patients. La Casa de Salud San Juan de Dios para Pacientes Alienados is an example; the concept "alienated patients" suggests a social and cultural perspective. This paper presents a chronological type description of one of the major institutions involved in mental health care in México. Similarly, it shows a review of the events that affected the religious order San Juan de Dios from 1901 to 2012, when the hospitaller order was reinstated in México and established the Casa de Salud San Juan de Dios para Pacientes Alienados in the town of Zapopan, Jalisco, institution that exists up to the present day and keeps participating in the mental health care in the state of Jalisco, with the current name of Servicios de Salud San Juan de Dios.

  12. Psychiatric Hospitalization among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, David S.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined predictors of psychiatric hospitalization among children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Data were collected from 760 caregivers of children with ASD. Cox regression was used to determine factors associated with hospitalization. Almost 11% were hospitalized. Youth in single parent homes were more likely to be hospitalized…

  13. Improving Psychiatric Hospital Care for Pediatric Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Gabriels, Robin L.; Agnew, John A.; Beresford, Carol; Morrow, Mary Ann; Mesibov, Gary; Wamboldt, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and/or intellectual disabilities (ID) are at greater risk for psychiatric hospitalization compared to children with other disorders. However, general psychiatric hospital environments are not adapted for the unique learning styles, needs, and abilities of this population, and there are few specialized hospital-based psychiatric care programs in the United States. This paper compares patient outcomes from a specialized psychiatric hospital program developed for pediatric patients with an ASD and/or ID to prior outcomes of this patient population in a general psychiatric program at a children's hospital. Record review data indicate improved outcomes for patients in the specialized program of reduced recidivism rates (12% versus 33%) and decreased average lengths of inpatient stay (as short as 26 days versus 45 days). Available data from a subset of patients (n = 43) in the specialized program showed a decrease in irritability and hyperactivity behaviors from admission to discharge and that 35 previously undetected ASD diagnoses were made. Results from this preliminary study support specialized psychiatric care practices with this population to positively impact their health care outcomes. PMID:22934179

  14. Sociodemographic and Clinical Characteristics of Psychiatric Inpatients Hospitalized Involuntarily and Voluntarily in a Mental Health Hospital

    PubMed Central

    GÜLTEKİN, Bülent Kadri; ÇELİK, Seda; TİHAN, Aysu; BEŞKARDEŞ, Ali Fuat; SEZER, Umut

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we aimed to investigate and compare the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of psychiatric inpatients hospitalized involuntarily and voluntarily. To our knowledge, there is no study analyzing involuntary psychiatric hospitalization in our country. Method In this retrospective study, we included a total of 504 patients who were involuntarily or voluntarily hospitalized in Bolu Izzet Baysal Mental Health Hospital between 1st of May and 31st October 2010. The data were obtained from the hospital records. Result In the 6-month period, 13.1% of 504 inpatients were hospitalized involuntarily. The number of male patients who were involuntarily hospitalized was higher than the number of female patients. Most of the patients in the involuntary hospitalized group were graduates of primary school, were not married and were not working at the time of hospitalization. Schizophrenia was the most common diagnosis in the involuntarily hospitalized psychiatric patients and these patients needed longer stay in the hospital. The next hospitalization of the involuntarily hospitalized patients was mostly involuntary. Conclusion Most of the involuntarily hospitalized psychiatric inpatients were male, were not working and had the diagnosis of schizophrenia. These general psychiatric risk factors were more important in involuntary hospitalization compared to voluntary hospitalization. We concluded that the high prevalence of involuntary hospitalizations deserved further studies.

  15. Correlates of nicotine withdrawal severity in smokers during a smoke-free psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Soyster, Peter; Anzai, Nicole E; Fromont, Sebastien C; Prochaska, Judith J

    2016-11-01

    Psychiatric hospitals are increasingly adopting smoke-free policies. Tobacco use is common among persons with mental illness, and nicotine withdrawal (NW), which includes symptoms of depression, anxiety, anger/irritability, and sleep disturbance, may confound psychiatric assessment and treatment in the inpatient setting. This study aimed to characterize NW and correlates of NW severity in a sample of smokers hospitalized for treatment of mental illness in California. Participants (N=754) were enrolled between 2009 and 2013, and averaged 17 (SD=10) cigarettes/day prior to hospitalization. Though most (70%) received nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) during hospitalization, a majority (65%) reported experiencing moderate to severe NW. In a general linear regression model, NW symptoms were more severe for women, African American patients, and polysubstance abusers. Though invariant by psychiatric diagnostic category, greater NW was associated with more severe overall psychopathology and greater cigarette dependence. The full model explained 46% of the total variation in NW symptom severity (F [19, 470]=23.03 p<0.001). A minority of participants (13%) refused NRT during hospitalization. Those who refused NRT reported milder cigarette dependence and stated no prior use of NRT. Among smokers hospitalized for mental illness, NW severity appears multidetermined, related to cigarette dependence, demographic variables, psychiatric symptom severity, and other substance use. Assessment and treatment of NW in the psychiatric hospital is clinically warranted and with extra attention to groups that may be more vulnerable or naïve to cessation pharmacotherapy.

  16. Prevalence and Correlates of Autism in a State Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, David S.; Lawer, Lindsay J.; Branch, Kira; Brodkin, Edward S.; Healey, Kristin; Witalec, Robert; Johnson, Donielle N.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2012-01-01

    This study estimated the ASD prevalence in a psychiatric hospital and evaluated the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) combined with other information for differential diagnosis. Chart review, SRS and clinical interviews were collected for 141 patients at one hospital. Diagnosis was determined at case conference. Receiver operating characteristic…

  17. Characteristics and staff resources of child and adolescent psychiatric hospital wards in Finland.

    PubMed

    Ellilä, H; Sourander, A; Välimäki, M; Piha, J

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study is to describe structural characteristics and staff resources of child psychiatric and adolescent psychiatric hospital wards in Finland. The target group of the survey consisted of 69 child and adolescent psychiatric hospital units in Finland. Information was obtained from 64 units (93%). Most of the wards were based on 24-h-a-day provision. There were only 7-day-treatment programmes including two family wards. When compared internationally, the numbers of units, beds and staff levels were high in Finland, with all members of staff qualified. The nurse-patient ratio and psychiatrist resources were rather satisfactory. However, in many units there was a lack of psychologists, social workers and occupational therapists. General recommendations and guidelines for staff resources in child and adolescent hospital treatment wards are warranted.

  18. Employing behavioral methods to improve the context of care within a public psychiatric hospital: enhancing psychosocial programming.

    PubMed

    Donat, Dennis C

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews efforts, grounded in principles of behavioral science, to improve the "goodness of fit" between the needs of psychiatrically impaired individuals and the array of day program classes offered in a public psychiatric hospital. The relevance of behavioral science and technology for planning and implementing such change in resource-challenged organizations is discussed.

  19. [Vicissitudes of hospitalization and emergency in a Prison Psychiatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Ohman, Luis; Alberio, Germán; Bertone, Matías; Márquez, Edgardo

    2011-01-01

    This paper evaluates the Reform of the Psychiatrist Central Ward for Men (Unit 20 of the Federal Prison System). The aim is to study the process of adopting a new paradigm for medically assisting psychiatric prisoner-patients and its consequences. It concludes that the medical condition of a psychiatric prisoner should be clarified and referred to the Department of Forensic Medicine by a Criminal Court straightaway, and that the Department of Forensic Medicine should act more promptly. It also suggests the relative reduction in working hours of both teams.

  20. Examining Outcomes of Acute Psychiatric Hospitalization among Children

    PubMed Central

    Tharayil, Priya R.; Sigrid, James; Morgan, Ronald; Freeman, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Within the past two decades, few studies have examined outcomes of acute psychiatric hospitalization among children, demonstrating change in emotional and behavioral functioning. A secondary analysis of pre-test/post-test data collected on 36 children was conducted, using the Target Symptom Rating (TSR). The TSR is a 13-item measure with two subscales – Emotional Problems and Behavioral Problems and was designed for evaluation of outcome among children and adolescents in acute inpatient psychiatric settings. Results of this study, its limitations, and the barriers encountered in the implementation of the TSR scale as part of routine clinical practice are discussed. PMID:23946699

  1. [Introducing computer units into the reception office as part of the Vrapce Psychiatric Hospital Information System].

    PubMed

    Majdancić, Zeljko; Jukić, Vlado; Bojić, Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    Computerized medical record has become a necessity today, because of both the amount of present-day medical data and the need of better handling and processing them. In more than 120 years of the Vrapce Psychiatric Hospital existence, the most important changes in the working concept of the reception office took place when computer technology was introduced into the routine use. The reception office of the Hospital is the vital place where administrative activities intersect with medical care for a patient presenting to the Hospital. The importance of this segment of the Hospital is emphasized by the fact that the reception office is in function and at patients' disposition round-the-clock, for 365 days a year, with great frequency of patients. The shift from the established way of registering medical data on patient admission in handwriting or, later, typescript, to computer recording was a challenging and demanding task (from the aspects of hardware, software, network, education) for the development team as well as for the physicians because it has changed the concept (logic of the working process) of previous way of collecting the data from the patient (history, status, diagnostic procedures, therapy, etc.). The success in the development and implementation of this project and the confirmation of its usefulness during the four-year practice at Vrapce Psychiatric Hospital are best illustrated by the fact that other psychiatric hospitals in Croatia have already introduced or are introducing it in their daily practice.

  2. [The psychiatric emergency in the general hospital: an analysis of the indications for hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Lozano, M; O'Neill, A; Jorda, L; Vázquez, A

    1992-01-01

    The following is a study of psychiatric emergencies in a General Hospital in Madrid (Spain). The Psychiatric Emergency Service of the Ramón y Cajal Hospital in Madrid received a total of 3,693 patients in 1988. This was 3.4% of patients seen in the General Emergency Service. The study is based on an analysis of the variables that influence a recommendation of hospitalization and their statistical significance. Hospitalization was recommended more frequently in males and those with diagnoses of depression, alcoholism and schizophrenic or paranoid disorders.

  3. End-of-life care in a psychiatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, Lauren Z.; Denton, David; Minton, Ollie

    2016-01-01

    Since the Liverpool Care Pathway has been withdrawn in the UK, clinicians supporting the palliative needs of patients have faced further challenges, particularly for patients with dementia who are unable to go to a hospice owing to challenging behaviours. It is becoming more important for different services to provide long-term palliative care for patients with dementia. Mental health trusts should construct end-of-life care policies and train staff members accordingly. Through collaborative working, dying patients may be kept where they are best suited. We present the case study of a patient who received end-of-life care at a psychiatric hospital in the UK. We aim to demonstrate how effective end-of-life care might be provided in a psychiatric hospital, in accordance with recent new palliative care guidelines, and highlight potential barriers. PMID:27280036

  4. Nurse-police coalition: improves safety in acute psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Allen, Diane E; Harris, Frank N; de Nesnera, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Although police officers protect and secure the safety of citizens everywhere, nurses are the primary guardians of patient safety within the treatment milieu. At New Hampshire Hospital, both nurses and police officers share ownership of this responsibility, depending on the needs that arise specific to each profession. Psychiatric nurses take pride in their ability to de-escalate agitated and potentially aggressive patients; however, times arise when the best efforts of nurses fail, or when a situation requires intervention from police officers. Nurses and police officers at New Hampshire Hospital have worked together for many years to develop a trusting, respectful alliance. This coalition has resulted in a safe, clear, orderly process for transfer of authority from nurses to police during violent, clinically unmanageable psychiatric emergencies. Nurses and police officers work collaboratively toward the common goal of ensuring safety for patients and staff, while also acknowledging the unique strengths of each profession.

  5. [Cost analysis of psychiatric health care at the University Hospital of Fann (Senegal)].

    PubMed

    Wone, I; Gueye, A S; Ndiaye, P; Toure, K; Tal-Dia, A; Sall, F L; Diallo, I; Gueye, M

    2001-01-01

    In the current senegalese context, marked by a political will of autonomisation of health services, is proves very important to study the costs of the services provided in hospitals. Our study, which consists in a retrospective analysis of accounting archives of the psychiatric department of Fann Hospital during the year 1998, had the following objectives: determine the costs related to the functioning of the service of psychiatry, according to the source of financing, determine the average cost of the main services provided by the psychiatric department, analyze the recovery of the cost of these services. The operating costs of the psychiatric department came to 86.824.477 FCFA in 1998. 88% of the total amount were brought by the State and the remaining 12% came from community participation. The average cost of hospitalization in Clinique Moussa Diop was 91.398 F CFA. For the former patients the visit cost 6.664 F CFA; for the outpatients the price was 12,886 F CFA. The average cost of a child psychiatric visit was 8.140 F CFA and 28 days of hospitalization in the same service cost 354.825 F CFA. The share supported by the community participation is in general largely covered by the current fees in spite of the high cost of these services.

  6. [Characteristics of patient aggression in a psychiatric hospital in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Schuwey-Hayoz, Aline; Needham, Ian

    2006-09-01

    Characteristics of patient aggression in a psychiatric hospital in Switzerland Patient aggression in psychiatry is a prominent problem for all concerned. In this prospective survey we registered and analysed all violent incidents of patients in a cantonal psychiatric hospital in Switzerland in order to determine the characteristics of aggression. The Staff Observation Aggression Scale Revised (SOAS-R) was utilised. During the study period 815 patients were admitted to the hospital. 71 (63.4%) of the 110 violent incidents were perpetrated by male patients. The majority of aggressive incidents were perpetrated in the vicinity of the rooms of the patients and were triggered mainly by the refusal to adhere to the demands of the patient or by patients' use of toxic substances. The most frequent type of aggression was of a verbally aggressive nature and the principal target was nursing personnel who felt threatened in most of the cases. In order to terminate the aggression the most predominant measure was communication with the patient and coercive measures. This study demonstrates clearly that aggression concerns psychiatric nursing personnel and points to the recommendation to reinforce measures of security and to predictive measures to ameliorate the management of aggression.

  7. A survey of the necessity of the hospitalization day in an Italian teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Apolone, G; Alfieri, V; Braga, A; Caimi, V; Cestari, C; Crespi, V; Crosti, P F; De Filippi, F; Gelosa, M; Lanzi, E

    1991-01-01

    To assess the extent of inappropriate hospital use in an adult in-patients population we used a modified version of the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (A.E.P.) to evaluate retrospectively a cross-section of 273 patient-days in a large teaching hospital in the Greater Milan area. Overall, 41% were judged to represent inappropriate hospital use on the basis of the protocol's criteria. The rate of inappropriate hospital use was significantly associated with admitting specialty, ranging from 12% for surgery, to 20% for cardiology and to about 60% in psychiatric, geriatrics and neurology departments (p less than 0.01). Hospital days of patients with longer stays were more frequently inappropriate: a statistically significant trend of inappropriateness emerged ranging from 30% among patients with total length of stay (LOS) of 1-10 days to 60% among those with LOS greater than 30 days (p less than 0.01). This study confirms that there is a substantial rate of unnecessary use of hospitals but that such inappropriateness does not seem in most cases to be easily modifiable through "simple" organizational changes.

  8. 28 CFR 549.45 - Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... facility for psychiatric care or treatment. 549.45 Section 549.45 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.45 Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. (a) Hospitalization...

  9. 28 CFR 549.45 - Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facility for psychiatric care or treatment. 549.45 Section 549.45 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.45 Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. (a) Hospitalization...

  10. The Use of Physical Restraint in Norwegian Adult Psychiatric Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Background. The use of coercion within the psychiatric services is problematic and raises a range of ethical, legal, and clinical questions. “Physical restraint” is an emergency procedure used in psychiatric hospitals to control patients that pose an imminent physical danger. We wished to review the literature published in scientific peer-reviewed journals describing studies on the use of physical restraint in Norway, in order to identify the current state of knowledge and directions for future research. Design. The databases PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for studies relating to physical restraint (including holding) in Norwegian psychiatric hospitals, supplemented with hand searches. Results. 28 studies were included. Most of the studies were on rates of restraint, but there were also some studies on perceptions of patients and staff, case studies, and ethnographic studies. There was only one intervention study. There are differences in use between wards and institutions, which in part may be explained by differences in patient populations. Staff appear to be less negative to the use of restraint than patients. Conclusions. The studies that were identified were primarily concerned with rates of use and with patients' and staff's perspectives. More interventional studies are needed to move the field forward. PMID:26682211

  11. [Suicide in psychiatric hospitals : Results, risk factors and therapeutic measures].

    PubMed

    Wolfersdorf, M; Vogel, R; Vogl, R; Grebner, M; Keller, F; Purucker, M; Wurst, F M

    2016-05-01

    Suicide prevention is a core responsibility of psychiatry and psychotherapy. Periods of change in psychiatric inpatient treatment concepts are usually also accompanied by an increase in psychopathological behavior and with increased suicide rates in psychiatric hospitals, as seen in the 1970s and 1980s in Germany. That this represented a real increase of inpatient suicides during those years was confirmed and subsequently the number and rate of inpatient suicides has decreased from approximately 280 out of 100,000 admissions of patients in 1980 to approximately 50 in 2014. Death can also occur in psychiatric hospitals and an absolute prevention is not possible even under optimal conditions of therapy and nursing, communication and security. The suicide rate has clearly decreased over the last two decades in relation to admissions. The group of young male schizophrenic patients newly identified as having a high clinical suicide risk has decreased among the suicide victims whereas the percentage of severely depressed patients with delusions has increased. This reduction could be associated with the comprehensive improvements in educational and training programs in the field of suicide and suicide prevention, objectification of coping methods, development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, improvements in therapy and relationship possibilities and a general reduction in the number of suicides in Germany.

  12. Characteristics of psychiatric hospitalizations with multiple mechanical restraint episodes versus hospitalization with a single mechanical restraint episode.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Parra, Jose; Guzik, Justyna; Garcia-Sanchez, Juan A; Pino-Benitez, Isabel; Aguilera-Serrano, Carlos; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermin

    2016-10-30

    We investigated the characteristics of multiple episodes of mechanical restraint versus a single episode in a psychiatric ward of a public general hospital. The following characteristics were associated with multiple restraints: young age, length of hospital stay, not being readmitted within 30 days from previous discharge, and admission in the previous year before the implementation of an intervention program to reduce mechanical restraint. The study suggests that both organizational factors and patients' disturbed behaviour are associated with the risk of being mechanically restrained several times.

  13. Clinical outcomes and mortality associated with weekend admission to psychiatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rashmi; Chesney, Edward; Cullen, Alexis E.; Tulloch, Alex D.; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; McGuire, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies indicate that risk of mortality is higher for patients admitted to acute hospitals at the weekend. However, less is known about clinical outcomes among patients admitted to psychiatric hospitals. Aims To investigate whether weekend admission to a psychiatric hospital is associated with worse clinical outcomes. Method Data were obtained from 45 264 consecutive psychiatric hospital admissions. The association of weekend admission with in-patient mortality, duration of hospital admission and risk of readmission was investigated using multivariable regression analyses. Secondary analyses were performed to investigate the distribution of admissions, discharges, in-patient mortality, episodes of seclusion and violent incidents on different days of the week. Results There were 7303 weekend admissions (16.1%). Patients who were aged between 26 and 35 years, female or from a minority ethnic group were more likely to be admitted at the weekend. Patients admitted at the weekend were more likely to present via acute hospital services, other psychiatric hospitals and the criminal justice system than to be admitted directly from their own home. Weekend admission was associated with a shorter duration of admission (B coefficient −21.1 days, 95% CI −24.6 to −17.6, P<0.001) and an increased risk of readmission in the 12 months following index admission (incidence rate ratio 1.13, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.18, P<0.001), but in-patient mortality (odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.23, P = 0.30) was not greater than for weekday admission. Fewer episodes of seclusion occurred at the weekend but there was no significant variation in deaths during hospital admission or violent incidents on different days of the week. Conclusions Being admitted at the weekend was not associated with an increased risk of in-patient mortality. However, patients admitted at the weekend had shorter admissions and were more likely to be readmitted, suggesting that they may represent a

  14. Physician Prescribing Practices of Vitamin D in a Psychiatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Trigoboff, Eileen; Opler, Lewis; Demler, Tammie Lee

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D supplementation has become an increasingly popular prescribing practice, despite our limited knowledge of both the definition and degree of deficiency as well as the expected benefits or risks of exogenous administration. Many of the hypothesized benefits of vitamin D supplementation include a variety of improvements in mental health; however, these claims are not consistently or robustly supported by current research. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of what is currently known about vitamin D deficiency and about outcomes of supplementation as well as a summary of the data relative to prescribing practices for inpatients in an urban psychiatric hospital. PMID:27803841

  15. Producing Marat/Sade: theater in a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Brookes, J M

    1975-07-01

    When a drama group in a small private psychiatric hospital decided to present Marat/Sade, a play about inmates in an insane asylum, some patients and many staff members reacted negatively. However, the drama group carried out its usual rehearsal activities, including improvisations, theater games, and exercises to work out characters' backgrounds, motivations, and feelings. The set and costumes were designed through elaborate improvisations during rehearsals. The group had to overcome various problems in producing the play, but they were no worse than those encountered in previous productions. The director believes that a hospital theater must have the same high standards as a good theater in any setting and that patients' drama groups can handle any aspect of theater.

  16. Robert Schumann in the psychiatric hospital at Endenich.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Robert Schumann (1810-1856) spent the last two-and-a-half years of his life in the private psychiatric hospital in Endenich. His medical records emerged in 1991 and were published by B. R. Appel in 2006. Daily entries document the treatment typical at that time for what was at first considered to be "melancholy with delusions": Shielding from stimuli, physical procedures, and a dietary regimen. The feared, actual diagnosis, a "general (incomplete) paralysis," becomes a certainty in the course of the paranoid-hallucinatory symptoms with cerebro-organic characteristics and agitated states, differences in pupil size, and increasing speech disturbances. In the medicine of the time, syphilis is just emerging as the suspected cause, and the term "progressive paralysis" is coined as typical for the course. Proof of the Treponema pallidum infection and the serologic reaction is not obtained until 1906. People close to Robert, in particular his wife Clara and the circle of friends around Brahms and Joachim, cared intensively for him and suffered under the therapeutic isolation. The medical records and illness-related letters contradict the theory that Schumann was disposed of by being put into the psychiatric hospital; they show the concern of all during the unfavorable illness course.

  17. Bedding, not boarding. Psychiatric patients boarded in hospital EDs create crisis for patient care and hospital finances.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Beth

    2013-11-18

    As the supply of psychiatric beds dwindles, hospitals are devising innovative ways handle psych patients who come through the emergency department. Some collaborate with other hospitals, use separate pysch EDs or refer patients to residential treatment centers.

  18. Relationships between in-hospital and 30-day standardized hospital mortality: implications for profiling hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, G. E.; Baker, D. W.; Norris, D. G.; Way, L. E.; Harper, D. L.; Snow, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship of in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates and the association between in-hospital mortality and hospital discharge practices. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: A secondary analysis of data for 13,834 patients with congestive heart failure who were admitted to 30 hospitals in northeast Ohio in 1992-1994. DESIGN: A retrospective cohort study was conducted. DATA COLLECTION: Demographic and clinical data were collected from patients' medical records and were used to develop multivariable models that estimated the risk of in-hospital and 30-day (post-admission) mortality. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for in-hospital and 30-day mortality were determined by dividing observed death rates by predicted death rates. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In-hospital SMRs ranged from 0.54 to 1.42, and six hospitals were classified as statistical outliers (p <.05); 30-day SMRs ranged from 0.63 to 1.73, and seven hospitals were outliers. Although the correlation between in-hospital SMRs and 30-day SMRs was substantial (R = 0.78, p < .001), outlier status changed for seven of the 30 hospitals. Nonetheless, changes in outlier status reflected relatively small differences between in-hospital and 30-day SMRs. Rates of discharge to nursing homes or other inpatient facilities varied from 5.4 percent to 34.2 percent across hospitals. However, relationships between discharge rates to such facilities and in-hospital SMRs (R = 0.08; p = .65) and early post-discharge mortality rates (R = 0.23; p = .21) were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: SMRs based on in-hospital and 30-day mortality were relatively similar, although classification of hospitals as statistical outliers often differed. However, there was no evidence that in-hospital SMRs were biased by differences in post-discharge mortality or discharge practices. PMID:10737447

  19. [Emergency Psychiatric Service in general hospitals: a retrospective study].

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Fernando Sérgio Pereira; da Silva, Cezar Augusto Ferreira; Oliveira, Eliany Nazaré

    2010-09-01

    The Emergency Psychiatric Service in General Hospitals (SEPHG, acronym in Portuguese) is a service included in the psychiatric reform movement. The purpose of the present study was to characterize patients with psychological distress treated at the Dr. Estevam SEPHG, located in Sobral, Cear state. This exploratory study was performed using documental analyses with a quantitative approach, and involved 191 clients treated at the referred SEPHG from January to December 2007. Data collection was performed using a client register book, which contained information obtained from the patients' medical record. There was a predominance of male patients (70.15%), aged 30-49 years (48.71%) and single (74.86%). Most patients were from the city of Sobral (69.64%). In 42.40% of cases, the diagnosis was of alcohol use/abuse. Most clients (66.50%) sought the service voluntarily. After being evaluated at the SEPHG, 43.45% of patients were referred to the local Center for Psychosocial Care-Alcohol and other Drugs. The results emphasize the importance of mental health.

  20. Highly Aggressive Women in a Forensic Psychiatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Beck, Niels C; Hammer, Joseph H; Robbins, Sharon; Tubbesing, Tara; Menditto, Anthony; Pardee, Alicia

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we compared three groups of women admitted to a public forensic inpatient facility over the course of a two-year period. Detailed and systematic examination of social and psychiatric histories revealed that the group with the most persistent levels of aggression differed from the other two groups with respect to frequency of self-harming behavior, intellectual impairment, hypothyroidism, a childhood diagnosis of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and age of onset of psychiatric and behavioral symptoms. The high-aggression group also had the highest rate of childhood physical and sexual abuse, but the difference between that group and the two lower aggression groups did not achieve statistical significance. From the standpoint of childhood adversity, 94 percent of those in the high-aggression group had been placed outside of the original home by age 11. Eighty-nine percent were intellectually impaired. At admission, physical examinations revealed that 50 percent had a history of hypothyroidism and two-thirds were obese. Before admission, most had manifested severe aggression and emotional dysregulation, as evinced by high levels of self-harm, suicide attempts, and aggressive behavior in previous institutional settings that was both frequent and intense. Patients who share these characteristics are currently placed on a ward at the hospital with a milieu and individual therapy programs that are based on a dialectical behavior therapy approach that targets key symptoms of emotional and behavioral dysregulation.

  1. Tough Transitions: Mental Health Care Professionals' Perception of the Psychiatric Hospital to School Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Elysia V.; Welfare, Laura E.; Williams, Amy M.

    2010-01-01

    Psychiatric reasons are among the most common causes of hospitalization for adolescents. A Consensual Qualitative Research approach was used to explore mental health professionals' perceptions of the needs of adolescents as they transition from psychiatric hospital to school. Academic, social, and emotional domains emerged as important areas of…

  2. [The practice guideline 'Consultation psychiatry' of the Dutch Psychiatric Association for psychiatric consultations in primary care and the hospital].

    PubMed

    Leentjens, A F G; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C M; Boenink, A D; van Everdingen, J J E

    2008-08-30

    Psychiatric consultation in primary care as well as in the hospital is both effective and cost-effective if certain procedures are followed. With the professional guideline 'Consultation psychiatry', the Dutch Psychiatric Association aims at setting a standard for psychiatric consultations in non-psychiatric settings. In general practice, the psychiatric consultation is preferably embedded in 'collaborative care', an integrated care model including the general practitioner and a case manager (usually a nurse), with the consultant psychiatrist being regularly available for clearly defined indications. The psychiatrist should see the patient himself or herself, establish a diagnosis and treatment plan, and provide the general practitioner and the patient with a so-called 'consultation letter', which is then discussed with both. In a general hospital, systematic screening of patients at risk of psychiatric comorbidity can be organised. Early detection of complex patients can further improve the effectiveness of psychiatric consultation. Follow-up contacts and investing in liaison contacts improve adherence to the advice provided.

  3. Psychopathology of the General Population Referred by Primary Care Physicians for Urgent Assessment in Psychiatric Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    McLenan, Judith; Lazzari, Carlo; McMillan, Gail; Mackie, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the type, severity and progression of psychiatric pathologies in a sample of 372 outpatients (age range 18–65 years) referred by their primary general practitioners (GPs) to an Urgent Referral Team (URT) based in a psychiatric hospital in Aberdeen, Scotland. This team offers immediate appointments (1- to 7-day delays) for rapid assessments and early interventions to the outpatients referred by their primary family doctors. Method: One-sample t-test and z statistic were used for data analysis. From the total population, a convenience sample of 40 people was selected and assessed to evaluate whether follow-up appointments after the first visit could reduce the severity of suicidal ideation, depression and anxiety in the outpatients seen by the URT. A two-sample t-test and a Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to assess the variations in the scores during the follow-up visits. Results: We found a statistically significant prevalence of depressive disorders, comorbid with anxiety at first presentation in people who were females, white, never married, living with a partner, not studying and not in paid employment. The common presentation of borderline personality disorder and dysthymia in this population underscores its vulnerability to major socioeconomic challenges. Conclusion: The data confirmed the impact that primary care cooperation with psychiatric hospitals can have on the psychiatric system, and as a reflection, on the population’s mental health and well-being. In fact, active cooperation and early diagnosis and intervention will help detect cases at risk in the general population and reduce admissions into hospitals. PMID:28050179

  4. 28 CFR 549.44 - Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric medication. 549.44... MEDICAL SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.44 Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric medication....

  5. 28 CFR 549.44 - Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric medication. 549.44... MEDICAL SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.44 Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric medication....

  6. 28 CFR 549.44 - Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric medication. 549.44... MEDICAL SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.44 Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric medication....

  7. Characteristics of methylphenidate dependence syndrome in psychiatric hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Shigeru; Wada, Kiyoshi

    2006-04-01

    The characteristics of methylphenidate (MPD) cases reported in a nationwide mental hospital survey on substance-related psychiatric disorders are studied compared to methamphetamine cases. Although the two groups did not differ in terms of age and sex, the MPD group revealed longer educational histories and lower antisocial traits. About half of the MPD group had a history of methamphetamine use and 30% had used the substance as the initial substance of abuse. They exhibited a general tendency toward multiple substance use. These results indicate that a significant number of MPD cases exist who used MPD as a substance alternative to methamphetamine and also suggest that they may potentially have a tendency to develop abuse or dependence. The MPD cases most likely had a psychiatric diagnosis of "Dependence syndrome (F15.2)," according to the ICD-10 guidelines. The SDS scores also indicated a more severe dependence syndrome, particularly psychological dependence, which they may possibly develop more quickly. An abundance of information for MPD abusers to utilize is available through the internet, including the pharmacological properties, such as increased sensation or elation through MPD intake and how and where to easily acquire the substance. They may even forge a prescription to obtain MPD. This behavior can be recognized as "substance-seeking behavior" in behavioral pharmacology terms, accompanied by craving based on psychological dependence on the substance, and can be very difficult to control. Little evidence exists regarding the effectiveness and necessity of MPD as a treatment for depression, and thus MPD prescriptions must be carefully considered by psychiatrists or physicians. The application of MPD as an antidepressant in the health insurance system must be re-examined as well.

  8. [Psychiatric occupational therapy practice in Shinshu University Hospital--collaboration with psychiatrist].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Fukushmima, Sachie; Kawano, Koujiro; Ohnishi, Ayumi; Ogiwara, Tomomi; Hagiwara, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Toru; Washizuka, Shinsuke; Amano, Naoji

    2011-01-01

    This report describes psychiatric occupational therapy practice and collaboration between occupational therapists and psychiatrists at Shinshu University Hospital. Collaboration with psychiatrists enables us to provide the following occupational therapy programs. (1) Individual occupational therapy approaches for patients at the early recovery stage in the psychiatric ward. (2) Psychoeducational interventions by a multi-disciplinary team (MDs, nurses, OTRs, PSWs, CPs). (3) Occupational therapy approaches used in combination with m-ECT for severe psychiatric disorders. (4) Recovery support programs for psychiatric outpatients. It is suggested that occupational therapists should collaborate with psychiatrists in order to facilitate rehabilitation services for people with psychiatric disorders.

  9. Psychiatric liaison consultations of patients without psychiatric illness in a general hospital in Germany: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Fißler, Maria; Quante, Arnim

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the utilization of consultation-liaison psychiatric (CLP) service among nonpsychiatric patients in a general hospital. A retrospective analysis was conducted on all patients seen by the CLP in 2013. In 66 (5.9 %) of these 1112 consultations, no psychiatric diagnosis could be identified. These cases were analyzed by department of referral, assumed psychiatric symptoms, consensus with the symptoms found by the CLP, and recommended procedures. Assumed depressive symptoms, suicidal ideations and "difficult" behavior were the predominant reasons for CLP referrals. As the results suggest, CLP service was mostly "overprovided" because of uncertainty about the working areas of psychiatrists or overestimation of the severity of symptoms. These findings emphasize the importance to develop more precise guidelines for CLP services and that it could be worth striving for a more profound psychiatric training for nonpsychiatric physicians to achieve an optimal treatment for patients.

  10. Understanding readmission to psychiatric hospital in Australia from the service users' perspective: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Duhig, Michael; Gunasekara, Imani; Patterson, Sue

    2017-01-01

    Inpatient care is integral to balanced mental health systems, contributing to containment of risk associated with psychiatric crises and affording opportunities for treatment. However, psychiatric wards are not always safe and service users are often dissatisfied with the experience. Hence, and because inpatient care is the most costly component of mental health systems, minimising duration of admission and reducing risk of readmission are clinical and strategic priorities internationally. With (primarily quantitative) research to date focused on explaining readmission in terms of characteristics of individuals and services, understanding of the 'revolving door phenomenon' remains limited. Considering verstehen critical to addressing this messy problem, we examined readmission from the service users' perspective. Using grounded theory techniques, we inductively analysed data from interviews with 13 people readmitted to inpatient care within 28 days of discharge. Participants, including eight men, were recruited in 2013 from three psychiatric wards at a metropolitan hospital in Australia. Analysis supported description of readmission as a process, fundamentally related to insufficiency of internal, interpersonal and/or environmental resources to maintain community tenure. For the people in this study, admission to hospital was either the default coping mechanism or the culmination of counter-productive attempts to manage stressful circumstances. Readmission can appropriately be understood as one representation of a fundamental social malaise and the struggle of some people to survive in an apparently inhospitable world. The findings indicate that neither locating the 'problem of readmission' within an individual and promoting self-governance/self-control/self-regulation, nor identifying failures of specific services or sectors are likely to support the economic and ethical imperative of reducing psychiatric admissions. The findings of the study and limitations

  11. Architectural design of a secure forensic state psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Dvoskin, Joel A; Radomski, Steven J; Bennett, Charles; Olin, Jonathan A; Hawkins, Robert L; Dotson, Linda A; Drewnicky, Irene N

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the architectural design of a secure forensic state psychiatric hospital. The project combined input from staff at all levels of the client organization, outside consultants, and a team of experienced architects. The design team was able to create a design that maximized patient dignity and privacy on one hand, and the ability of staff to observe all patient activity on the other. The design centers around 24-bed units, broken into smaller living wings of eight beds each. Each eight-bed living wing has its own private bathrooms (two) and showers (two), as well as a small living area solely reserved for these eight patients and their guests. An indoor-outdoor dayroom allows patients to go outside whenever they choose, while allowing staff to continue observing them. The heart of the facility is a large treatment mall, designed to foster the acquisition of social, emotional, cognitive, and behavioral skills that will help patients to safely return to their communities.

  12. Smoking bans in secure psychiatric hospitals and prisons.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Danny H; Rees, Megan A

    2014-09-01

    The proposal of complete smoking bans in closed institutions, such as prisons and psychiatric hospitals, creates a tension between individual "rights" and the health of all members of that community. Smokers in closed institutions generally smoke more, suffer more health consequences and are less likely to quit than smokers in other settings. Complete smoking bans do not cause an increase in behavioural problems, nor do bans cause worsening of mental illness or quality of life. Although infrequently tested, the responsibility of public institutions to protect others from second-hand smoke has usually outweighed any individual "right to smoke" in legal judgments. A substantial cultural shift may be required from considering smoking a "rare pleasure" during detention to the realisation that smoking is the most significant reversible health risk factor for this population. The implementation of complete smoking bans in closed institutions is challenging and requires careful and proactive planning by staff. As complete smoking bans are being considered in many institutions and jurisdictions, this column presents a review of the evidence base and ethical issues involved.

  13. Daily weather variables and affective disorder admissions to psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have reported that admission rates in patients with affective disorders are subject to seasonal variation. Notwithstanding, there has been limited evaluation of the degree to which changeable daily meteorological patterns influence affective disorder admission rates. A handful of small studies have alluded to a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (heat waves in particular), wind direction and sunshine. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test, ARIMA and time-series regression analyses to examine whether daily meteorological variables--namely wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, hours of sunshine, sunlight radiation and temperature--influence admission rates for mania and depression across 12 regions in Ireland over a 31-year period. Although we found some very weak but interesting trends for barometric pressure in relation to mania admissions, daily meteorological patterns did not appear to affect hospital admissions overall for mania or depression. Our results do not support the small number of papers to date that suggest a link between daily meteorological variables and affective disorder admissions. Further study is needed.

  14. Daily weather variables and affective disorder admissions to psychiatric hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have reported that admission rates in patients with affective disorders are subject to seasonal variation. Notwithstanding, there has been limited evaluation of the degree to which changeable daily meteorological patterns influence affective disorder admission rates. A handful of small studies have alluded to a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (heat waves in particular), wind direction and sunshine. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test, ARIMA and time-series regression analyses to examine whether daily meteorological variables—namely wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, hours of sunshine, sunlight radiation and temperature—influence admission rates for mania and depression across 12 regions in Ireland over a 31-year period. Although we found some very weak but interesting trends for barometric pressure in relation to mania admissions, daily meteorological patterns did not appear to affect hospital admissions overall for mania or depression. Our results do not support the small number of papers to date that suggest a link between daily meteorological variables and affective disorder admissions. Further study is needed.

  15. Defining the Needs of Patients with Intellectual Disabilities in the High Security Psychiatric Hospitals in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, S. D.; Dolan, M.; Johnston, S.; Middleton, H.; Harty, M. A.; Carlisle, J.; Thornicroft, G.; Appleby, L.; Jones, P.

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that a substantial proportion of the patients with intellectual disabilities (ID) in the high security psychiatric hospitals (HSPHs) should be transferred to more appropriate services to cater for their specific needs in the longer term. The individual and placement needs of high secure psychiatric patients detained…

  16. Educational Functioning and Self-Esteem of Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bley, Georganne R.; And Others

    A topic of much national concern is the mental health of youth. Adolescents often enter psychiatric treatment with poor school performance, having attended numerous schools, and have very negative attitudes toward the school environment. In order to facilitate more effective psychiatric functioning, this study sought to learn more about two groups…

  17. Transitioning Children from Psychiatric Hospitals to Schools: The Role of the Special Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Joan B.; Savina, Elena A.

    2010-01-01

    Over a quarter of a million U.S. students each year reside for a period of time in a psychiatric inpatient hospital setting to receive mental health treatment. Following inpatient treatment, most children are transitioned from the hospital into a regular school setting. Little is known about how these transitions are managed by hospital or school…

  18. 42 CFR 482.60 - Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... Psychiatric hospital must— (a) Be primarily engaged in providing, by or under the supervision of a doctor of...; (c) Maintain clinical records on all patients, including records sufficient to permit CMS...

  19. 42 CFR 482.60 - Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Psychiatric hospital must— (a) Be primarily engaged in providing, by or under the supervision of a doctor of...; (c) Maintain clinical records on all patients, including records sufficient to permit CMS...

  20. 42 CFR 482.60 - Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Psychiatric hospital must— (a) Be primarily engaged in providing, by or under the supervision of a doctor of...; (c) Maintain clinical records on all patients, including records sufficient to permit CMS...

  1. 42 CFR 482.60 - Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Psychiatric hospital must— (a) Be primarily engaged in providing, by or under the supervision of a doctor of...; (c) Maintain clinical records on all patients, including records sufficient to permit CMS...

  2. 42 CFR 482.60 - Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... Psychiatric hospital must— (a) Be primarily engaged in providing, by or under the supervision of a doctor of...; (c) Maintain clinical records on all patients, including records sufficient to permit CMS...

  3. Increasing hospital-community contact through a theater program in a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D; Munich, R L

    1975-07-01

    In 1973 the activities therapy department at the Yale Psychiatric Institute began to organize and present plays before public audiences to help increase contact between patients and community members. Both patients and staff were anxious about opening the performances to the public; however, the first two plays were quite successful, and no serious disruptions occurred. When a third play was in rehearsal, the cast decided that it should be performed outside the hospital. the primary purpose of rehearsals, as well as separate weekly meetings with the director, was to provide a group identity that help the cast deal with their fears and anxieties. The outside performance, at a state hospital a hundred miles away, was well received and gave the cast a sense of achievement and increased self-esteem.

  4. The Role of Psychiatric Emergency Services in Aiding Community Alternatives to Hospitalization in an Inner-City Population

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Carl C.

    1978-01-01

    In the proper political/economic environment, Crisis Intervention Programs can reduce the recidivism rate of patients who suffer from recurrent intermittent acute psychotic episodes. The author seeks to outline such a program and demonstrate its effectiveness in providing an alternative to brief hospitalization. It is believed that this form of management of the psychiatric emergency aids the practice of community psychiatry and supports the use of day treatment facilities, outpatient clinics, emergency housing, family therapy, and other community support systems. PMID:731721

  5. A Community Day Care Programme for Psychiatric Patients: The Role of Occupational Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pradad, Akanksha; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the need for and role of occupational therapy in the organization and functioning of a community day care center for psychiatric patients in India. The occupational therapy program involves client evaluation, determination of therapeutic activities, physical exercise, recreational activities, group sessions, family involvement,…

  6. Restless leg syndrome in hospitalized psychiatric patients in Lebanon: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Talih, Farid; Ajaltouni, Jean; Kobeissy, Firas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To characterize and describe the prevalence of restless leg syndrome (RLS) in hospitalized psychiatric patients and to investigate the correlations between patient profile and RLS. Methods Demographic information, psychiatric diagnoses, psychotropic medication use, and history of substance use were collected from hospitalized psychiatric patients at the American University of Beirut Medical Center; Beirut, Lebanon. A validated questionnaire to evaluate RLS symptomatology was also administered to 126 participants who agreed to participate, as well as questionnaires for insomnia, depression, and anxiety symptoms. Statistical analysis was conducted to detect the prevalence of RLS among the participants and to examine correlations with RLS in a hospitalized psychiatric population. Results Out of the 126 participants who completed the survey, RLS was detected in 18% of the participants. Of interest, RLS was also found to be associated with higher depressive symptomatology, suicidal ideation, and working night shifts. PMID:27785035

  7. 42 CFR 482.62 - Condition of participation: Special staff requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... psychiatric nursing services must be a registered nurse who has a master's degree in psychiatric or mental... staffing pattern must insure the availability of a registered professional nurse 24 hours each day. There must be adequate numbers of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and mental health workers...

  8. 42 CFR 482.62 - Condition of participation: Special staff requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... psychiatric nursing services must be a registered nurse who has a master's degree in psychiatric or mental... staffing pattern must insure the availability of a registered professional nurse 24 hours each day. There must be adequate numbers of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and mental health workers...

  9. 42 CFR 482.62 - Condition of participation: Special staff requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... psychiatric nursing services must be a registered nurse who has a master's degree in psychiatric or mental... staffing pattern must insure the availability of a registered professional nurse 24 hours each day. There must be adequate numbers of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and mental health workers...

  10. 42 CFR 482.62 - Condition of participation: Special staff requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... psychiatric nursing services must be a registered nurse who has a master's degree in psychiatric or mental... staffing pattern must insure the availability of a registered professional nurse 24 hours each day. There must be adequate numbers of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and mental health workers...

  11. 42 CFR 482.62 - Condition of participation: Special staff requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... psychiatric nursing services must be a registered nurse who has a master's degree in psychiatric or mental... staffing pattern must insure the availability of a registered professional nurse 24 hours each day. There must be adequate numbers of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and mental health workers...

  12. The Use of Movies to Facilitate Family Engagement in Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, David

    2007-01-01

    Studies indicate that the impact of family involvement may be the most important predictor of successful psychiatric hospitalization of adolescents. Yet the ability to engage both an adolescent and his or her family in family therapy in the context of what is often an involuntary hospitalization is a major challenge. A number of promising…

  13. [Reasons for Hospital Treatment of Psychiatric Patients before and after the Opening of a Satellite Ward].

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, R P; Schmidt-Michel, P O

    2002-04-01

    A satellite ward is a psychiatric ward at a general hospital settled within the catchment area that is administered by a psychiatric hospital. The objective of the satellite model is to approach community treatment on the one hand and somatic medicine on the other hand, consequently diminishing the threshold for hospital treatment. This study investigated whether the diagnostic, psychopathologic and social reasons for admissions changed from this catchment area due to the lower threshold of a satellite ward. The results were controlled with another catchment area's admissions to the 30 km distant psychiatric hospital. The opening of the satellite ward was followed by an 81 % increase of admissions. In particular, admissions of patients with neuroses and personality disorders were more frequent. There was no change of the severity code of psychopathology at admission. From the catchment area of the satellite ward less patients were admitted involuntarily whereas more admissions happened due to social reasons and after patients' own decision.

  14. Validation of the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS) with Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenson, Lance P.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Hollander, Beth L. G.; Dyl, Jennifer; Rizzo, Christie J.; Steinley, Douglas L.; Spirito, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the concurrent validity of the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS) for adolescent inpatients aged 12 to 18. The results reveal moderate agreement between ChIPS diagnoses and Schedule for Affective Disorder sand Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime version diagnoses.

  15. A 35-month prospective study on onset of scabies in a psychiatric hospital: discussion on patient transfer and incubation period.

    PubMed

    Makigami, Kuniko; Ohtaki, Noriko; Yasumura, Seiji

    2012-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the risk factors of scabies introduction into a hospital. We addressed the following question: Do patients transferred from other institutions pose a higher risk than patients from the community? From July 2003 to May 2006, a trained physician surveyed the inpatients and staff of a psychiatric hospital (six wards, 300 beds) on a monthly basis. During the study period, specific infection control measures beyond standard precautions, such as prophylactic treatment, were not adopted. There were 333 newly-admitted patients during the study period and among them, 122 were transferred from other institutions. Seven patients were diagnosed with scabies. Two of these patients were infected while in the hospital (secondary infection), thus the number of introduced scabies cases (index cases) was five. Four of the index cases were transferred from other institutions (three from psychiatric hospitals and one from a nursing home). The source of infection for one index case was unexplained. The rate of scabies infection among transferred patients was 3.3% while the infection rate among patients from the community was 0.5%. Therefore, transferred patients pose a higher risk than those from the community. The average time from admission to diagnosis of scabies was 141 days (range 34-313 days). The hospital personnel checked the skin condition of all patients at admission and none of the four patients showed symptoms of scabies.

  16. Mortality, Rehospitalisation and Violent Crime in Forensic Psychiatric Patients Discharged from Hospital: Rates and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Seena; Wolf, Achim; Fimińska, Zuzanna; Larsson, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine rates and risk factors for adverse outcomes in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric services. Method We conducted a historical cohort study of all 6,520 psychiatric patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals between 1973 and 2009 in Sweden. We calculated hazard ratios for mortality, rehospitalisation, and violent crime using Cox regression to investigate the effect of different psychiatric diagnoses and two comorbidities (personality or substance use disorder) on outcomes. Results Over mean follow-up of 15.6 years, 30% of patients died (n = 1,949) after discharge with an average age at death of 52 years. Over two-thirds were rehospitalised (n = 4,472, 69%), and 40% violently offended after discharge (n = 2,613) with a mean time to violent crime of 4.2 years. The association between psychiatric diagnosis and outcome varied—substance use disorder as a primary diagnosis was associated with highest risk of mortality and rehospitalisation, and personality disorder was linked with the highest risk of violent offending. Furthermore comorbid substance use disorder typically increased risk of adverse outcomes. Conclusion Violent offending, premature mortality and rehospitalisation are prevalent in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals. Individualised treatment plans for such patients should take into account primary and comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. PMID:27196309

  17. Reducing contraband in a psychiatric hospital through the use of a metal detector.

    PubMed

    Rustin, Terry A

    2007-05-01

    A private, free-standing, nonprofit psychiatric hospital installed a metal detector and a screening procedure to prevent weapons and other proscribed items from being carried into the hospital by visitors. A wide variety of metal objects was discovered, including knives, ammunition, and hand tools. Visitors did not object to the procedure. As an unexpected benefit of the screening, unauthorized smoking in the hospital decreased.

  18. Impact of the Syrian Crisis on the Hospitalization of Syrians in a Psychiatric Setting.

    PubMed

    Lama, Souaiby; François, Kazour; Marwan, Zoghbi; Sami, Richa

    2016-01-01

    Determine the impact of the Syrian crisis on the hospitalization of Syrians in a psychiatric setting. All Syrians admitted to a psychiatric hospital in Lebanon between the 1st of January 2009 and the 31st of December 2013 were included. Number of admissions, psychiatric disorders and demographic and clinical data relative to patients were compared between those admitted before and after the crisis. 44 patients were admitted before the crisis and 106 after it. The distribution of diagnosis varied significantly after the crisis (p = 0.056) with the majority of patients being admitted for schizophrenia (37.7 %). The prevalence of suicidal ideation was higher after the crisis (p = 0.03) but suicidal attempts, need for electroconvulsive therapy and length of hospitalization did not differ significantly between both groups. Clinicians should be aware of the possible burden of mental illness in Syrians after the beginning of the Syrian crisis.

  19. Psychiatric morbidity of overseas patients in inner London: A hospital based study

    PubMed Central

    Carranza, Fredy J; Parshall, Alice M

    2005-01-01

    Background Evaluation of the referral, admission, treatment, and outcome of overseas patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital in central London. Ethical, legal and economic implications, and the involvement of consulates in the admission process, are discussed. Method Assessment and review of overseas patients admitted between 1 January 1999 and 31 December 1999. Non-parametric statistical tests were used, and relevant outcomes described. Results 19% of admissions were overseas patients. Mean age was 38 years. 90% were unattached; 84% were white, 71% from European countries. 45% spoke fluent English. Differences in socio-economic status between home country and England were found. 74% were unwell on arrival; 65% travelled to England as tourists. 65% of admissions came via the police. 32% had been ill for more than one year before admission; 68% had psychiatric history. 77% were admitted and 48% discharged under section of the Mental Health Act. 74% had psychotic disorders, all of them with positive symptoms. 55% showed little to moderate improvement in mental state; 10% were on Enhanced Care Programme Approach. Relatives of 48% of patients were contacted. The Hospital repatriated 52% of patients; the Mental Health Team followed up 13% of those discharged. The average length of admission was 43.4 days (range 1–365). Total cost of admissions was GBP350, 600 ($577, 490); average individual cost was GBP11, 116 (range GBP200-81, 000). Conclusions Mentally ill overseas individuals are a vulnerable group that need recognition by health organisations to adapt current practice to better serve their needs. The involvement of consulates needs further evaluation. PMID:15845140

  20. The Jewish psychiatric hospital, Zofiówka, in Otwock, Poland.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Mary V

    2015-03-01

    The T4 euthanasia programme within Nazi Germany has been well researched, but much less is known about the extermination of psychiatric patients in Nazi-occupied territories during the same period. In Poland 20,000 mentally ill patients were deliberately killed during the German occupation. This paper traces the history of one psychiatric hospital, Zofiówka, in Otwock, south-east of Warsaw. The hospital once served the Jewish population of Poland and was the largest, most prestigious neuropsychiatric centre in the country. It is now in ruins and said to be haunted by ghosts.

  1. Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder at Psychiatric Discharge Predict General Hospital Admission for Self-Harm.

    PubMed

    Mellesdal, Liv; Gjestad, Rolf; Johnsen, Erik; Jørgensen, Hugo A; Oedegaard, Ketil J; Kroken, Rune A; Mehlum, Lars

    2015-12-01

    We investigated whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was predictor of suicidal behavior even when adjusting for comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and other salient risk factors. To study this, we randomly selected 308 patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital because of suicide risk. Baseline interviews were performed within the first days of the stay. Information concerning the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals over the subsequent 6 months was retrieved through linkage with the regional hospital registers. A censored regression analysis of hospital admissions for self-harm indicated significant associations with both PTSD (β = .21, p < .001) and BPD (β = .27, p < .001). A structural model comprising two latent BPD factors, dysregulation and relationship problems, as well as PTSD and several other variables, demonstrated that PTSD was an important predictor of the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals(B = 1.52, p < .01). Dysregulation predicted self-harm directly (B = 0.28, p < .05), and also through PTSD [corrected]. These results suggested that PTSD and related dysregulation problems could be important treatment targets for a reduction in the risk of severe self-harm in high-risk psychiatric patients.

  2. [Fates at the psychiatric hospital of Klagenfurt during National Socialism].

    PubMed

    Oberlerchner, Herwig; Stromberger, Helge

    2013-01-01

    In this article the fate of Mr. B. is described as an example for the fate of hundreds of mentally ill patients of the "Landes-Irrenanstalt of Klagenfurt", murdered during the era of National Socialism. This extraordinary fate marks two outstanding aspects of history of medicine, the treatment of syphilis with malaria and the organised mass murder of mentally ill people during the cynic era of National Socialism. Beyond this historical perspective reconstructive biographical work together with relatives is presented as a proactive duty of psychiatric institutions.

  3. Time of the year and absconding from a psychiatric hospital in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akleema; Maharajh, Hari D

    2003-01-01

    Personal characteristics of patients and environmental factors at psychiatric hospitals have been identified as predictors of absconding. This study seeks to establish a relationship between time of the year and absconding. All characteristics of absconders were analysed over a two-year period using hospital records (N= 104). Public holidays and lunar phases were obtained through almanacs for each year; and school vacation period was determined by reference to a school academic calendar. Friday was the most popular day of the week for absconding, males tend to escape more on the weekends compared to females, females tend to escape more during the wet season, and Christmas was the most popular holiday season for absconding to take place. The full moon phase had the largest percentage of absconding when compared to other phases. Recommendations are that the system of patient care should be client driven at all times and greater supervision of patients is needed on weekends, vacation periods and during the full moon phase.

  4. HIV RELATED ADMISSIONS IN A PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL A FIVE YEAR PROFILE

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, P.S.; Krishna, V.A.S.; Ravi, V.; Desai, A.; Puttaram, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recent reports have indicated an increasing prevalence of HIV infection in the mentally ill. Reports have also emphasised the etiological role of HIV infection in psychiatric illness. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and risk profile of psychiatric inpatients found seropositive for HIV infection. All psychiatric inpatients from a psychiatric hospital who tested positive for HI V infection over a five year period were assessed. The assessments included a detailed clinical history, psychiatric assessment and risk behaviour evaluation. Of the 2283 psychiatric patients tested, 51 were found to be seropositive. 43 patients were included in the study. 30 (69.7%) had a diagnosis of alcohol dependence, of which, 11 patients had comorbid psychiatnc diagnosis in the form of affective disorders (23%) and psychosis (14%). Personality disorders were seen in 9 patients. In 19% the clinical manifestation was considered to be etiologically related to HIV infection. The predominant risk behaviour was in the form of multiple partner heterosexual contacts. In several patients the risk behaviour had occurred during an episode of mental illness or under the influence of alcohol. The study demonstrates the importance of detecting and describing HIV infection and its manifestation among psychiatric patients. PMID:21430804

  5. Hospitalization due to drug use did not change after a decade of the Psychiatric Reform

    PubMed Central

    Balbinot, Alexandre Dido; Horta, Rogério Lessa; da Costa, Juvenal Soares Dias; Araújo, Renata Brasil; Poletto, Simone; Teixeira, Marina Bressaneli

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To investigate whether the psychiatric hospitalization rates due to use of psychoactive substances and average time of hospitalization suffered any changes after the first decade of effective implementation of the psychiatric reform in Brazil. METHODS This article examines the evolution of hospitalizations due to disorders arising from the use of alcohol or other substances in the state of Santa Catarina, Southern Brazil, from 2000 to 2012. This is an ecological, time-series study, which uses data from admissions obtained by the Informatics Service of the Brazilian Unified Health System. Hospitalization rates by 100,000 inhabitants and average time of occupancy of beds were estimated. Coefficients of variation of these rates were estimated by Poisson Regression. RESULTS The total and male hospitalization rates did not vary (p = 0.056 and p = 0.244, respectively). We observed an increase of 3.0% for the female sex (p = 0.049). We did not observe any significant variation for occupancy time of beds. CONCLUSIONS The deployment of services triggered by the Brazilian psychiatric reform was not accompanied by a reduction of hospitalization rates or mean occupancy time of hospitalized patients during this first decade of implementation of the reform. PMID:27253902

  6. Neglected disease in mentally ill patients: Major tuberculosis outbreak in a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Zmak, Ljiljana; Obrovac, Mihaela; Lovric, Zvjezdana; Jankovic Makek, Mateja; Katalinic Jankovic, Vera

    2017-04-01

    As tuberculosis incidence decreases, the possibility of overlooking the disease increases, especially in vulnerable populations. We describe here a major tuberculosis outbreak among mentally ill patients in Croatia, focusing on 1 regional hospital where most patients were hospitalized. The outbreak emphasizes the vulnerability of mentally ill patients to tuberculosis infection and the complexity of infection control measures in psychiatric institutions. The awareness of tuberculosis in these settings should be maintained to interrupt prolonged exposure and avoid unnecessary infection.

  7. How does active substance use at psychiatric admission impact suicide risk and hospital length-of-stay?

    PubMed

    Miller, Keith A; Hitschfeld, Mario J; Lineberry, Timothy W; Palmer, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    Despite their high prevalence, little is known about the effects of substance use disorders and active substance use on the suicide risk or length-of-stay of psychiatric inpatients. This study examines the relationship between active substance use at the time of psychiatric hospitalization and changes in suicide risk measures and length-of-stay. Admission and discharge ratings on the Suicide Status Form-II-R, diagnoses, and toxicology data from 2,333 unique psychiatric inpatients were examined. Data for patients using alcohol, tetrahydrocannabinol, methamphetamines, cocaine, benzodiazepines, opiates, barbiturates, phencyclidine, and multiple substances on admission were compared with data from 1,426 admissions without substance use. Patients with substance use by toxicology on admission had a 0.9 day shorter length-of-stay compared to toxicology-negative patients. During initial nurse evaluation on the inpatient unit, these patients reported lower suicide measures (i.e., suicidal ideation frequency, overall suicide risk, and wish-to-die). No significant between-group differences were seen at discharge. Patients admitted with a substance use disorder diagnosis had a 1.0 day shorter length-of-stay than those without, while those with a substance use disorder diagnosis and positive toxicology reported the lowest measures of suicidality on admission. These results remained independent of psychiatric diagnosis. For acute psychiatric inpatients, suicide risk is higher and length-of-stay is longer in patients with substance use disorders who are NOT acutely intoxicated compared with patients without a substance use disorder. Toxicology-positive patients are less suicidal on admission and improve faster than their toxicology-negative counterparts. This study gives support to the clinical observation that acutely intoxicated patients may stabilize quickly with regard to suicidal urges and need for inpatient care.

  8. Assaultive Behavior in State Psychiatric Hospitals: Differences Between Forensic and Nonforensic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linhorst, Donald M.; Scott, Lisa Parker

    2004-01-01

    Forensic patients are occupying an increasingly large number of beds in state psychiatric hospitals. The presence of these mentally ill offenders has raised concerns about the risk they present to nonforensic patients. This study compared the rate of assaults and factors associated with assaultive behavior among 308 nonforensic patients and two…

  9. [How the Feast of Corpus Christi at the psychiatric hospital of Sarthe became a historical event].

    PubMed

    Guillemain, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    Can the historian, passionate about archives, build a historical narrative based mainly on the memories of nurses? Could the caregivers, who are themselves players in the history of psychiatry write it? When the former hears the individual accounts of the latter, history is written. The history of the Feast of Corpus Christi at the psychiatric hospital of Le Mans.

  10. A Functional Model of Quality Assurance for Psychiatric Hospitals and Corresponding Staffing Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamis-Gould, Edna; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A model for quality assurance (QA) in psychiatric hospitals is described. Its functions (general QA, utilization review, clinical records, evaluation, management information systems, risk management, and infection control), subfunctions, and corresponding staffing requirements are reviewed. This model was designed to foster standardization in QA…

  11. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.61 Section 482.61 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS...

  12. Nurses' information retrieval skills in psychiatric hospitals - are the requirements for evidence-based practice fulfilled?

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Marita; Välimäki, Maritta; Hätönen, Heli

    2010-01-01

    Nursing professionals have long recognized the importance to practice of research and the value of research evidence. Nurses still do not use research findings in practice. The purpose of this paper was to describe nurses' skills in using literature databases and the Internet in psychiatric hospitals and associations of nurses' gender, age, and job position with their information retrieval skills. The study was carried out in 2004 among nursing staff (N=183) on nine acute psychiatric wards in two psychiatric hospitals in Finland (n=180, response rate 98%). The Finnish version of the European Computer Driving Licence test (ECDL) was used as a data collection instrument. The study showed that there were clear deficits in information retrieval skills among nurses working in psychiatric hospitals. Thus, nurses' competence does not support the realization of evidence-based practice in the hospitals. Therefore, it is important to increase nurses' information retrieval skills by tailoring continuing education modules. It would be also advisable to develop centralized systems for the internal dissemination of research findings for the use of nursing staff.

  13. Enquiry about the Needs of Children Whose Mothers Are Admitted to Psychiatric Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manderson, J.; McCune, N.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess whether children's needs are taken into consideration in female patients who are admitted to an adult psychiatric hospital. A retrospective case note audit of 100 female inpatients aged between 18 and 55 years over a 6-month period were randomly selected. The medical and nursing case notes of patients with…

  14. Working Models of Attachment in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents: Relation to Psychopathology and Personality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstein, Diana S.; Horowitz, Harvey A.

    This study examined the role of attachment in adolescent psychopathology among psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents. Subjects consisted of 60 adolescents and 27 of their mothers. Measures included the Adult Attachment Interview classification for both the adolescents and their mothers, and a battery of diagnostic and personality assessment of…

  15. Mothers with Severe Psychiatric Illness and Their Newborns: A Hospital-Based Model of Perinatal Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almeida, Ana; Merminod, Gaelle, Schechter, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    Women with severe psychiatric illness face numerous risks and challenges during pregnancy and as parents. Mental health professionals can help these mothers and their infants by supporting the attachment relationship and by providing the external supports that are necessary for successful parenting. The authors describe a hospital-based…

  16. White Matter Hyperintensities and Their Associations with Suicidality in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Stefan; Noam, Gil G.; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Kwon, Bae J.; Clark, Megan A.; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Increasingly, researchers and clinicians are recognizing that there may be biological markers associated with increased risk of suicide. The objective of this study was to compare white matter hyperintensities in psychiatrically hospitalized children and youth with and without a history of suicide attempt while controlling for other…

  17. Racial Disparities in Mental Health Outcomes after Psychiatric Hospital Discharge among Individuals with Severe Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eack, Shaun M.; Newhill, Christina E.

    2012-01-01

    Racial disparities in mental health outcomes have been widely documented in noninstitutionalized community psychiatric samples, but few studies have specifically examined the effects of race among individuals with the most severe mental illnesses. A sample of 925 individuals hospitalized for severe mental illness was followed for a year after…

  18. Risk Factors for Psychiatric Hospital Admission for Participants in California's Full-Service Partnership Program.

    PubMed

    Penkunas, Michael J; Hahn-Smith, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the demographic and clinical predictors of psychiatric hospitalization during the first 2 years of treatment for adults participating in the full-service partnership (FSP) program, based on Assertive Community Treatment, in a large county in northern California. Clinical and demographic characteristics, data on prior hospitalizations, length of enrollment, and living situation for 328 FSP participants were collected from the county's internal billing system and the California Department of Health Care Services. In univariate models, the probability of hospitalization varied by diagnosis, age, and hospitalization history. In the multivariate model, younger age and frequent hospitalization prior to enrollment predicted hospitalization during enrollment. Findings support prior research on hospital recidivism and may be beneficial in refining future strategies for meeting the needs of adults with serious mental illness.

  19. [Enrichment of the functions of the psychiatric department in a general hospital and collaboration within the area].

    PubMed

    Koishikawa, Hiraki; Ookami, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disease has been included in the five main diseases, and a medical care plan is required. In it, there are many problems, for example, physical complications and which general hospital should chiefly deal with it. Here, we present a way to cope with these problems on the basis of achievements in the psychiatric department of Kameda General Hospital. Specifically, we would like to assert that creating a consultation-liaison team and enriching the section of clinical psychiatry are very important and effective. The activities of the consultation-liaison team, created to address various issues after establishing a psychiatric ward, have led to the possibility of a psychiatric department in a general hospital. Experience to date indicates that, in the context of a general hospital with a psychiatric inpatient unit, the existence of a multidisciplinary liaison team working across departmental boundaries is crucial to determining and managing the treatment of patients with psychiatric emergencies, as well as patients with psychiatric issues and physical complications. Additionally, in order to increase the effectiveness of the hospital liaison team, it is critical to realize seamless, prompt collaboration with facilities outside the hospital. In this respect, the role of a patient care coordinator is expected to become increasingly important. Additionally, enriching and guarding activities of clinical psychologists have contributed to the growth of psychiatric departments in general hospitals and proved to be effective in combination with activities of the consultation-liaison team.

  20. Relationship between aggression, interpersonal style, and therapeutic alliance during short-term psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Amy; Daffern, Michael; Foley, Fiona

    2012-02-01

    Aggression during psychiatric hospitalization is frequent, problematic, and a major challenge for nurses and mental health services more generally. The strength of the therapeutic alliance between nursing staff and patients has been posited as an important protective factor that can limit the likelihood of aggression. This study examined the relationship between interpersonal style, perceived coercion, and psychiatric symptoms on the therapeutic alliance between patients and staff, and how each, in turn, is related to aggression. Participants in this study were 79 patients admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital. Each participant was interviewed to determine perceived coercion, symptoms of psychiatric illness, interpersonal style, and therapeutic alliance. Incidents of aggression were recorded at discharge through a review of incident forms, file review, and interviews with unit nursing staff. The results showed that a hostile-dominant interpersonal style and symptoms of paranoia predicted poor therapeutic alliance, contributing 14% of the variance in therapeutic alliance scores. A dominant interpersonal style predicted aggression towards staff. Therapeutic alliance, perceived coercion, and symptoms of psychiatric illness did not predict aggression. Implications for engagement in treatment and the prevention of aggression are discussed.

  1. [Prevention of tuberculosis in patients in psychiatric hospitals].

    PubMed

    Fisher, Iu Ia; Sheĭnman, V L; Gutorova, V A

    1991-01-01

    Mental hospital patients are at high risk of tuberculosis reactivation, especially those with posttuberculous changes in the lungs and progressive severe schizophrenia. Outbreaks of tuberculosis are 2.5 times more frequent in them than in alcohol abusers and other mental patients. In subjects with posttuberculous changes on the lungs preventive chemotherapy can cause a 6-fold decrease in the likelihood of process reactivation.

  2. Psychiatric Disorders in Children and Adolescents Attending Pediatric Out Patient Departments of Tertiary Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Jesmin, Akhter; Rahman, Khan Muhammad Zillur; Muntasir, Maruf Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Psychiatric disorders are increasingly recognized among children and adolescents in Bangladesh. Psychiatric disorders are more common in children with chronic and acute pediatric disorders. Our study was designed to determine the psychiatric disorders among children and adolescents attending pediatric outpatient departments of tertiary care hospitals. Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out from July 2012 to February 2013 in pediatric outpatient departments of three prime tertiary level hospitals of Dhaka, Bangladesh. A purposive sampling technique was used. A total of 240 male and female children aged 5 to 16 years old were included in the study. We used a semi-structured questionnaire to obtain sociodemographic and other relevant clinical information about the children and their families from their parents or caregivers and a validated parent version of the Bangla Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) for measuring psychopathology. Results The mean age of the children was 9.0± 2.6 years. The majority (71%) of children were in the 5–10 year age group. The male/female ratio was 1.2:1. Among the respondents, 18% were found to have a psychiatric disorder. Behavioral disorders, emotional disorders, and developmental disorders were found in 9.0%, 15.0% and 0.4% respectively. Hyperkinetic disorder was the single most frequent (5.0%) psychiatric disorder. Conclusions A significant number of children were found to have psychiatric disorders. Our study indicates the importance of identification and subsequent management of psychiatric conditions among the pediatric population. PMID:27403237

  3. Costs of day hospital and community residential chemical dependency treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Zavala, Silvana K.; Parthasarathy, Sujaya; Witbrodt, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that expensive hospital-based inpatient chemical dependency programs do not deliver outcomes that are superior to less costly day hospital programs, but patient placement criteria developed by the Addiction Society of Medicine (ASAM) nonetheless have identified a need for low-intensity residential treatment for patients with higher levels of severity. Community-based residential programs may represent a low-cost inpatient alternative that satisfies the ASAM criteria, but research is lacking in this area. A recent clinical trial has found similar outcomes at social model residential treatment and clinically-oriented day hospital programs, but did not report on the costs associated with treatment in that study. Aims This paper addresses whether the similar outcomes in the recent trial were delivered with comparable costs. It also studies costs separately for men and women, and for Whites and non-Whites, subgroups not included or identified in prior cost effectiveness work. Method This paper reports on clients who participated in a randomized trial conducted in three metropolitan areas served by a large pre-paid health plan. Clients were eligible if they met the first five dimensions of the ASAM criteria for low-intensity residential treatment and had not been mandated to residential treatment due to dangerous home environment (the sixth ASAM dimension). The five day hospital programs included here are typical of mainstream private chemical dependency programs that were developed as an alternative to inpatient treatment. The seven residential programs are typical of those historically developed by members of alcohol mutual-help programs. Cost data for the study sites were collected using the Drug Abuse Treatment Cost Analysis Program (DATCAP) which produces estimates of average costs per week per client treated at a particular treatment program. Lengths of stay were derived from program records. Costs per episode for each study subject

  4. [Delayed diagnosis in a patient with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a psychiatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Roest, S; Mestdagh, I; de Grave, C; Pals, P

    2016-01-01

    A 51-year-old female teacher of dance was referred to the diagnostic unit of our psychiatric hospital with symptoms of anxiety and depression. The clinical image was suggestive of organic pathology, but this could not be determined with certainty until a late stage. We discuss the course of the patient's illness. Her symptoms appeared to be psychiatric and closely resembled those of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We comment on some of the signs that could have led to an earlier diagnosis and we discuss the tools that are needed.

  5. [Public music concerts in a psychiatric hospital: effects on public opinion and as therapy for patients].

    PubMed

    Takasaka, Y; Yokota, O; Tanioka, T; Nagata, K; Yasuoka, K; Toda, H

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the effects of music therapy concerts, which were held 60 times over a four year period, 1992 to 1996, in Geiyo Psychiatric Hospital, Kochi Prefecture and found that; 1) Musicians who performed at the concerts were not only from Kochi prefecture but also from other prefectures (10 times) and from four foreign countries (7 times). 2) Live concerts in a small hall had a positive influence on patients and drew the patient's attention and interest away from their hallucinations and delusions to the real world. Moreover, the concerts provided the patients with chances to acquire social graces such as being well-groomed. 3) Explanations by the musicians, interviews with the musicians and the seasonal choruses accompanied by the musicians were helpful to give the patients motives for recovering communication skills and to interact with society. 4) Inquiries to the patients about the concerts indicated discrepancies between the poor observed estimations during the concerts (83.3%) and the good subjective impressions expressed by the patients (82.0%), suggesting that the patients were not good at expressing their internal emotions through facial expressions or attitudes. 5) Many citizens including children came to the concerts and/or gave aid to the hospital because the concerts were open to the public and we suggest that this contributed to improving the general publics' image of psychiatric hospitals. Questionnaires revealed that 90% of people in a control group had a bad image of psychiatric hospitals in Japan, but only 32% of the members of the general public who attended our concerts had a bad image of psychiatric hospitals. In addition, the revolving ratio of the hospital beds rose from 0.4 to 1.2 over the four years, which also suggests a beneficial effect on the patients.

  6. Is locating acute wards in the general hospital an essential element in psychiatric reform? The U.K. experience.

    PubMed

    Totman, Jonathan; Mann, Farhana; Johnson, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    Locating psychiatric wards in general hospitals has long been seen in many countries as a key element in the reform of services to promote community integration of the mentally ill. In the U.K., however, this is no longer a policy priority, and the recent trend has been towards small freestanding inpatient units, located either within the communities they serve, or on general hospital sites, but separate from the main building. Whether locating the psychiatric wards in the general hospital is essential to psychiatric reform has been little discussed, and we can find no relevant evidence. Perceived strengths of general hospital psychiatric wards are in normalisation of mental health problems, accessibility to local communities, better availability of physical health care resources, and integration of psychiatry with the rest of the medical profession, which may faclilitate recruitment. However, difficulties seem to have been encountered in establishing well-designed psychiatric wards with access to open space in general hospitals. Also, physical proximity may not be enough to achieve the desired reduction in stigma, and complaints from the general hospital may sometimes result in undue restrictions on psychiatric ward patients. There are strong arguments both for and against locating psychiatric wards in general hospitals: an empirical evidence base would be helpful to inform important decisions about the best setting for wards.

  7. [Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa Patients in General Hospitals with Psychiatric Wards Current Situation and Establishment of a Treatment System].

    PubMed

    Wada, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) exhibit physical and psychiatric symptoms, in addition to their behavioral problems, and often require admission to a general hospital with a psychiatric ward. There are only a few general hospitals with psychiatric wards available, and patients with AN tend to be concentrated in a small number of such institutions. Thus, it is difficult to provide adequate support for the treatment of patients with AN. In Kyoto, the number of general hospitals with a psychiatric ward is small. Patients with AN tend to be treated at the two university hospitals. However, our University Hospital cannot accept all patients with AN, especially the emergency admissions. Therefore, with respect to the inpatient treatment of AN, we established a cooperation agreement with other psychiatric hospitals. We are planning to divide the inpatient treatment of AN between our university hospital and other psychiatric hospitals, depending on the stage of AN and the severity of the patients' physical condition. With respect to the treatment of AN, it is necessary to establish a treatment system with each hospital playing a role.

  8. [Organisation of the haemato-oncology day hospital].

    PubMed

    Bernard, Marguerite; Gohier, Amélie; Laroche, Amandine; Trivino, Béatrice; Granjard-Goy, Florence

    2015-01-01

    A haematology day hospital service comprises numerous professionals, enabling a wide diversity of care procedures to be carried out. The child has specific needs to which the team attempts to respond within a few hours. The care management is global and personalised.

  9. Emotional reactions to involuntary psychiatric hospitalization and stigma-related stress among people with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Rüsch, Nicolas; Müller, Mario; Lay, Barbara; Corrigan, Patrick W; Zahn, Roland; Schönenberger, Thekla; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Blank, Christina; Rössler, Wulf

    2014-02-01

    Compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient treatment can be experienced as disempowering and stigmatizing by people with serious mental illness. However, quantitative studies of stigma-related emotional and cognitive reactions to involuntary hospitalization and their impact on people with mental illness are scarce. Among 186 individuals with serious mental illness and a history of recent involuntary hospitalization, shame and self-contempt as emotional reactions to involuntary hospitalization, the cognitive appraisal of stigma as a stressor, self-stigma, empowerment as well as quality of life and self-esteem were assessed by self-report. Psychiatric symptoms were rated by the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. In multiple linear regressions, more self-stigma was predicted independently by higher levels of shame, self-contempt and stigma stress. A greater sense of empowerment was related to lower levels of stigma stress and self-contempt. These findings remained significant after controlling for psychiatric symptoms, diagnosis, age, gender and the number of lifetime involuntary hospitalizations. Increased self-stigma and reduced empowerment in turn predicted poorer quality of life and reduced self-esteem. The negative effect of emotional reactions and stigma stress on quality of life and self-esteem was largely mediated by increased self-stigma and reduced empowerment. Shame and self-contempt as reactions to involuntary hospitalization as well as stigma stress may lead to self-stigma, reduced empowerment and poor quality of life. Emotional and cognitive reactions to coercion may determine its impact more than the quantity of coercive experiences. Interventions to reduce the negative effects of compulsory admissions should address emotional reactions and stigma as a stressor.

  10. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Mortality among Veterans Hospitalized for Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Banta, Jim E.; Andersen, Ronald M.; Young, Alexander S.; Kominski, Gerald; Cunningham, William E.

    2011-01-01

    A Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization approach was used to examine the impact of comorbid mental illness on mortality of veterans admitted to Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in fiscal year 2001 with a primary diagnosis of congestive heart failure (n= 15,497). Thirty percent had a psychiatric diagnosis, 4.7% died during the index hospitalization and 11.5% died during the year following discharge. Among those with mental illness, 23.6% had multiple psychiatric disorders. Multivariable logistic regression models found dementia to be positively associated with inpatient mortality. Depression alone (excluding other psychiatric disorders) was positively associated with one-year mortality. Primary care visits were associated with a reduced likelihood of both inpatient and one-year mortality. Excepting dementia, VA patients with a mental illness had comparable or higher levels of primary care visits than those having no mental illness. Patients with multiple psychiatric disorders had more outpatient care than those with one psychiatric disorder. PMID:20968262

  11. Prevalence of periodontal disease among inpatients in a psychiatric hospital in India.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Ajithkrishnan Champettil; Iyer, Ramya Radhakrishnan; Kalantharakath, Thanveer

    2012-01-01

    This paper assessed the periodontal status of inpatients at Government Mental Hospital, Vadodara, India, and studied the possible relationship between periodontal status and age, length of hospitalization, type of mental illness, and medication and tobacco use. Information about psychiatric diagnosis, length of hospitalization, and prescribed medication was obtained from hospital records. We interviewed 165 inpatients and recorded their chief dental complaints (if any) and relevant histories. Periodontal status was assessed using the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Descriptive statistics, nonparametric tests, and multiple logistic regression analyses were used. The most prevalent periodontal condition was shallow pockets (47.27%). Some subjects (10.3%) had loss of attachment (LOA) of 9-11 mm. Age and length of hospitalization were significantly associated with periodontal status. Multiple logistic regression revealed that only age was significantly associated with periodontal pockets. Male gender, age, and tobacco-related habits were significantly associated with LOA of more than 0-3 mm.

  12. Self-Determination Theory and Outpatient Follow-Up After Psychiatric Hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Sripada, Rebecca K; Bowersox, Nicholas W; Ganoczy, Dara; Valenstein, Marcia; Pfeiffer, Paul N

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether the constructs of self-determination theory-autonomy, competence, and relatedness-are associated with adherence to outpatient follow-up appointments after psychiatric hospitalization. 242 individuals discharged from inpatient psychiatric treatment within the Veterans Health Administration completed surveys assessing self-determination theory constructs as well as measures of depression and barriers to treatment. Medical records were used to count the number of mental health visits and no-shows in the 14 weeks following discharge. Logistic regression models assessed the association between survey items assessing theory constructs and attendance at mental healthcare visits. In multivariate models, none of the self-determination theory factors predicted outpatient follow-up attendance. The constructs of self-determination theory as measured by a single self-report survey may not reliably predict adherence to post-hospital care. Need factors such as depression may be more strongly predictive of treatment adherence.

  13. A preliminary study of Patient Dignity Inventory validation among patients hospitalized in an acute psychiatric ward

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Cabri, Giulio; Carretti, Eleonora; Galli, Giacomo; Giambalvo, Nina; Rioli, Giulia; Saraceni, Serena; Spiga, Giulia; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Ferri, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the perception of dignity among patients hospitalized in a psychiatric setting using the Patient Dignity Inventory (PDI), which had been first validated in oncologic field among terminally ill patients. Patients and methods After having modified two items, we administered the Italian version of PDI to all patients hospitalized in a public psychiatric ward (Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment of a northern Italian town), who provided their consent and completed it at discharge, from October 21, 2015 to May 31, 2016. We excluded minors and patients with moderate/severe dementia, with poor knowledge of Italian language, who completed PDI in previous hospitalizations and/or were hospitalized for <72 hours. We collected the demographic and clinical variables of our sample (n=135). We statistically analyzed PDI scores, performing Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and principal factor analysis, followed by orthogonal and oblique rotation. We concomitantly administered to our sample other scales (Hamilton Rating Scales for Depression and Anxiety, Global Assessment of Functioning and Health of the Nation Outcome Scales) to analyze the PDI concurrent validity. Results With a response rate of 93%, we obtained a mean PDI score of 48.27 (±19.59 SD) with excellent internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient =0.93). The factorial analysis showed the following three factors with eigenvalue >1 (Kaiser’s criterion), which explained >80% of total variance with good internal consistency: 1) “Loss of self-identity and social role”, 2) “Anxiety and uncertainty for future” and 3) “Loss of personal autonomy”. The PDI and the three-factor scores were statistically significantly positively correlated with the Hamilton Scales for Depression and Anxiety but not with other scale scores. Conclusion Our preliminary research suggests that PDI can be a reliable tool to assess patients’ dignity perception in a psychiatric setting, until now

  14. Effectiveness of a Psychosocial Intervention Model for Persons with Chronic Psychiatric Disorders in Long-Term Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbaz-Haddad, Merav; Savaya, Riki

    2011-01-01

    The article describes a psychosocial model of intervention with psychiatric patients in long-term hospitalization in a psychiatric ward in Israel and reports the findings of the evaluation conducted of its effectiveness. The model was aimed at maintaining or improving the patients' functioning in four main areas: personal hygiene, environmental…

  15. Using Claims Data to Generate Clinical Flags Predicting Short-term Risk of Continued Psychiatric Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Bradley D.; Pangilinan, Maria; Sorbero, Mark J; Marcus, Sue; Donahue, Sheila; Xu, Yan; Smith, Thomas E; Essock, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Objective As health information technology advances, efforts to use administrative data to inform real-time treatment planning for individuals are increasing, despite few empirical studies demonstrating that such administrative data predict subsequent clinical events. Medicaid claims for individuals with frequent psychiatric hospitalizations were examined to test how well patterns of service use predict subsequent high short-term risk of continued psychiatric hospitalizations. Methods Medicaid claims files from New York and Pennsylvania were used to identify Medicaid recipients aged 18-64 with two or more inpatient psychiatric admissions during a target year ending March 31, 2009. Definitions from a quality-improvement initiative were used to identify patterns of inpatient and outpatient service use and prescription fills suggestive of clinical concerns. Generalized estimating equations and Markov models were applied to examine claims through March, 2011, to see what patterns of service use were sufficiently predictive of additional hospitalizations to be clinically useful. Results 11,801 unique individuals in New York and 1,859 in Pennsylvania identified met the cohort definition. In both Pennsylvania and New York, multiple recent hospitalizations, but not failure to use outpatient services or failure to fill medication prescriptions, were significant predictors of high risk of continued frequent hospitalizations, with odds ratios greater than 4.0. Conclusions Administrative data can be used to identify individuals at high risk of continued frequent hospitalizations. Such information could be used by payers and system administrators to authorize special services (e.g., mobile outreach) for such individuals as part of efforts to promote service engagement and prevent rapid rehospitalizations. PMID:25022360

  16. Treatment satisfaction and recovery in Saami and Norwegian patients following psychiatric hospital treatment: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sørlie, Tore; Nergård, Jens-Ivar

    2005-06-01

    Treatment, treatment satisfaction and recovery in Saami and Norwegian patients treated in a psychiatric hospital were compared. Although half of the Saami patients preferred to speak Saami with their therapists, only one patient did. The extensive use of traditional helpers was only partly recognized. Despite no differences in type and amount of treatment or symptom-change during the hospital stay, the Saami patients showed less satisfaction with all investigated treatment parameters including contact with staff, treatment alliance, information and global treatment satisfaction. There was less agreement between the ratings of the therapists and the Saami patients. Suggestions for improvements are made.

  17. Length of psychiatric hospitalization is correlated with CYP2D6 functional status in inpatients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ruaño, Gualberto; Szarek, Bonnie L; Villagra, David; Gorowski, Krystyna; Kocherla, Mohan; Seip, Richard L; Goethe, John W; Schwartz, Harold I

    2016-01-01

    Aim This study aimed to determine the effect of the CYP2D6 genotype on the length of hospitalization stay for patients treated for major depressive disorder. Methods A total of 149 inpatients with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder at the Institute of Living, Hartford Hospital (CT, USA), were genotyped to detect altered alleles in the CYP2D6 gene. Prospectively defined drug metabolism indices (metabolic reserve, metabolic alteration and allele alteration) were determined quantitatively and assessed for their relationship to length of hospitalization stay. Results Hospital stay was significantly longer in deficient CYP2D6 metabolizers (metabolic reserve <2) compared with functional or suprafunctional metabolizers (metabolic reserve ≥2; 7.8 vs 5.7 days, respectively; p = 0.002). Conclusion CYP2D6 enzymatic functional status significantly affected length of hospital stay, perhaps due to reduced efficacy or increased side effects of the medications metabolized by the CYP2D6 isoenzyme. Functional scoring of CYP2D6 alleles may have a substantial impact on the quality of care, patient satisfaction and the economics of psychiatric treatment. PMID:23734807

  18. Periodontal Health among Non-Hospitalized Chronic Psychiatric Patients in Mangaluru City-India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rashmi; Kota, Keshava Pai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A substantial section of society constituting the mentally ill and psychiatric patients deserve special attention. Evidence has suggested that psychological factors have contributed to an increase in the susceptibility to periodontal disease. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate the gingival and periodontal health of chronically non-hospitalized psychiatric patients in Mangaluru city, India. Materials and Methods Forty one psychiatric patients having chronic psychiatric illness and on neuroleptic medications for a minimum of 2 years were included in the study. The control group consisted of 41 healthy dental patients who were selected to match the study group by age and gender, and for both groups 20 teeth excluding the third molars should be present. Demographic characteristics, dental examination including gingival index and periodontal health according to the community periodontal index were recorded for each patient in both the groups. Results In the psychiatric patient group (Group A) 47.1% subjects were suffering from schizophrenia and 17.6% subjects were having mood disorder. Gingivitis varied from mild to severe among the patients of both the groups. Bleeding on probing (CPI 1) was recorded in 23.5% in Group A and 14.6% in Group B. Dental calculus (CPI 2) in 38.2% in Group A and 58.5% in Group B of the subjects, 20.6% with at least one 4mm to 5mm pocket (CPI 3), and 17.6% with at least one 6mm pocket (CPI 4). Conclusion The present study underlines a considerable need for prevention and treatment of periodontal disease among chronic psychiatric patients in Mangaluru city. Every effort should be made to increase the awareness of this cohort regarding the importance of oral hygiene practices and on the early diagnosis of periodontal problems. PMID:27656561

  19. [Closing forensic psychiatric hospitals in Italy: a new deal for mental health care?].

    PubMed

    Casacchia, Massimo; Malavolta, Maurizio; Bianchini, Valeria; Giusti, Laura; Di Michele, Vittorio; Giosuè, Patricia; Ruggeri, Mirella; Biondi, Massimo; Roncone, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The date of March 31, 2015, following the Law 81/2014, has marked a historical transition with the final closure of the six forensic psychiatric hospitals in Italy. This law identifies a new pathway of care that involves small-scale high therapeutic profile facilities (Residenze per la Esecuzione della Misura di Sicurezza, REMS) instead of the old forensic psychiatric hospitals. The Law promotes a new recovery-oriented rehabilitation approach for the persons with mental disorders who committed a criminal offence, but lack criminal responsibility and deemed as socially dangerous. After a brief description of what happens abroad, this article highlights the positive aspects of the law that, as a whole, has to be considered innovative and unavoidable. The main debated problems are also reviewed, including the lack of changes to the Criminal Code; the improper equation between insanity and mental illness and social dangerousness; the evaluation of "socially dangerousness", based solely on "subjective qualities" of the person, assessed out of his/her context, without paying attention to family and social conditions suitable for discharge; the expensive implementation of the REMS, mainly based on security policies and less on care and rehabilitation, the delay in their construction, and the search for residential alternatives structures; the uncertain boundaries of professional responsibility. Finally, several actions are suggested that can support the implementation of the law: information programs addressed to the general population; training activities for mental health professionals; systematic monitoring and evaluation of the outcomes of the care provided to the forensic psychiatric population; implementation of Agreement Protocols and a better cooperation with the judiciary. Scientific societies dealing with psychosocial rehabilitation need to be involved in such issues relating to the identification of the best care and rehabilitation pathways, which should be

  20. [How should be a psychiatric hospital to take in and utilize the psycho-social approaches in Japan? -- From the view point of psychiatry, medical model, medical system and economical management system].

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Kohei; Horikawa, Yuriko

    2012-01-01

    The author developed argument that a cause of the present condition of our country, in which psycho-social approaches have not fully spread though its clinical efficacy has been well recognized, is in the medical institution side. Because, our psychiatric reforms over 17 years, that reduced the average duration of hospitalization from about 2156 days to 61 days, has attained by deployment of various psycho-social approaches based on "therapeutic community model" and "psychodynamic team treatment". Furthermore, it has done by the affinity, continuity and complementarities of "psychodynamic team treatment" and psychosocial approaches with following special features. That is, since psycho-social approaches is 1. techniques to acquire the social life skill and to prevent re-hospitalization, 2. the group psychotherapy by facilitating the patient's mutual help capability, 3. based on "acceptance of the disease" by "noticing the diagnosis". Even if the therapeutic orientation or assumption of the psychiatric hospital does not comprehend above all of 1-3, it is important whether it is in the same direction or not. In other words, it is the issue of the medical-economical-management system, medical model and also the kind of psychiatry that is the source of them. Our hospital is for short term hospitalization and in focus on the outpatient treatment with "psychodynamic team treatment" based on "therapeutic community model". That is why our hospital has a potential advantage to take in and utilize the psycho-social approaches. On the other hand, there is the same reason why it is difficult for the traditional psychiatric hospital for long term hospitalization with higher hierarchical "physical medicine model" based on the descriptive psychiatry. The further problem is that both psychiatric hospital staff and psycho-social therapists do not realize it. The most important issue for us is having the recognition and exploring the method not to adapt to a psychiatric hospital but

  1. Qualitative study on the placement of Huntington disease patients in a psychiatric hospital: perceptions of Maltese nurses.

    PubMed

    Scerri, Josianne; Cassar, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Individuals with adult or juvenile Huntington disease can be cared for within psychiatric hospitals. In this paper, nurses' perceptions about the appropriateness of a psychiatric setting for these patients were explored. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 10 Maltese nurses involved in the care of these individuals. Their responses were analyzed using thematic analysis. Three main themes were identified from this study: (i) Huntington disease is not a mental illness; (ii) the lack of specialized staff and equipment within a psychiatric setting; and (iii) a need for alternative care options. The findings provide an insight into the perceptions of nurses, as they play a key role in the care and management of individuals with Huntington disease in a psychiatric setting. The findings demonstrated the need to provide alternative residential options in the community, and to improve the care and support provided both within psychiatric hospitals and the community through staff education and the provision of necessary facilities and equipment.

  2. Analysis of Cost Avoidance From Pharmacy Students' Clinical Interventions at a Psychiatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Austin R.; Elliott, Ellie; Hieber, Robin; Sommi, Roger W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To analyze the cost avoidance resulting from clinical interventions made by pharmacy students completing an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) at a psychiatric hospital. Methods A retrospective database review of documented clinical interventions by pharmacy students was conducted to classify interventions by type and significance. Interventions were assigned a cost avoidance value determined by an evaluation of the literature. Results Three hundred-twenty interventions were documented by 15 pharmacy students during the 1-year study period. The majority of interventions were related to psychiatric medication classes and most (n = 197; 61.6%) were classified as being of moderate significance. The most common interventions included patient education (13.1%), order clarification (11.6%), therapeutic dosing adjustments (10.9%), and laboratory order monitoring (8.8%). The estimated cost avoidance from all interventions made by pharmacy students was approximately $23,000. Conclusions Pharmacy students completing APPEs at a psychiatric hospital contributed to a variety of significant clinical interventions and provided considerable cost avoidance value to the institution. PMID:21451760

  3. Adoption of an Internet-based patient education programme in psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Anttila, M; Välimäki, M; Koivunen, M; Luukkaala, T; Kaila, M; Pitkänen, A; Kontio, R

    2011-12-01

    Internet-based patient support systems are widely assumed to predict a future trend in patient education. Coherent information is still lacking on how patient education is adopted in psychiatric hospitals and how information technology is used in it. Our aim was to describe nurses' adoption of an Internet-based patient education programme and the variables explaining it. The study was based on Rogers' model of the diffusion of innovation. The Internet-based patient education sessions were carried out by nurses on nine acute psychiatric inpatient wards in two Finnish hospitals. They were evaluated with reports and analysed statistically. Out of 100 nurses, 83 adopted the programme during the study period. The nurses fell into Rogers' groups, late majority (72%), laggards (17%), early majority (7%), early adopters (3%) and innovators (1%). Three groups were formed according to their activity: laggards, late majority, adopters (including early majority, early adopters, innovators). There was a statistical difference between the nurses' programme adoption between the two hospitals (P= 0.045): more laggards (65% vs. 35%) and adopters (73% vs. 27%) in the same hospital. The findings help to provide insight into the contexts and settings when adopting information technology programmes in the area of mental health care.

  4. Childhood predictors of later psychiatric hospital treatment: findings from the Finnish 1981 birth cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gyllenberg, David; Sourander, Andre; Niemelä, Solja; Helenius, Hans; Sillanmäki, Lauri; Piha, Jorma; Kumpulainen, Kirsti; Tamminen, Tuula; Moilanen, Irma; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2010-11-01

    Psychiatric hospital treatment (PHT) is expensive and indicates a severe disorder. Investigation of the early identification of this small patient group has though been hindered by small samples or unsatisfactory assessment in childhood. The present study aims to study the predictive association between psychopathology at age 8 using multi-informant assessment and later PHT. A nationwide birth cohort of Finnish children (n = 5,346) was assessed at age 8 to obtain information about psychopathology using the Rutter parent and teacher reports and self-reports of depressive symptoms. The main outcome was admission to any hospital with a primary diagnosis of any psychiatric disorder according to the Finnish National Hospital Discharge Register between age 13 and 24. Between age 13 and 24, 6.2% of the males and 4.1% of the females had been admitted for PHT. Among males, PHT was independently predicted by non-intact family and adult reports of conduct and of emotional symptoms, while among females by self-reported depressive symptoms. However, the combination of conduct and emotional problems was the strongest predictor for PHT in both sexes. Admission due to psychosis among males was associated with childhood conduct, attention, and emotional problems, but with emotional problems among females. Psychopathology at age 8 can be seen as a long-lasting increased risk of severe psychiatric disorders requiring hospital treatment in adolescence or early adulthood. Attention should be paid to self-reports among females and of comorbid conduct and emotional problems in both sexes in the early identification of this patient group.

  5. Factors associated with vitamin D status of low-income, hospitalized psychiatric patients: results of a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Bazzano, Alessandra N; Littrell, Lisa; Lambert, Stephen; Roi, Cody

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent evidence has indicated a potential role of vitamin D3 in a range of neuropsychiatric outcomes, as well as on cognitive function, but conflicting data have left that role uncertain. Understanding potential associations of vitamin D status with psychiatric illness will allow clinicians to better assess therapeutic options. Few studies have examined vitamin D status among a racially diverse group of psychiatric patients who have been hospitalized, and none has done so in the southern US where socioeconomic inequality is high. Methods In this retrospective study, medical records from 113 patients hospitalized for psychiatric illness were retrieved and analyzed. Vitamin D status in this population was estimated, along with any patterns of association between deficiency and risk factors. Results The vast majority of patients hospitalized for psychiatric illness in this biracial, low-income sample had either insufficient or deficient vitamin D levels. African-American patients had lower levels of vitamin D than Caucasian patients. Discussion Our findings demonstrate that hospitalized psychiatric patients are at increased risk for vitamin D deficiency and in particular low-income, African-American populations. These results suggest that vitamin D should be assessed and therapy considered at the initiation of psychiatric hospitalizations. PMID:27895486

  6. PCL-R psychopathy predicts disruptive behavior among male offenders in a Dutch forensic psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Martín; De Ruiter, Corine; Nijman, Henk

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between psychopathy, according to the Dutch language version of Hare's Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R), and various types of disruptive behavior during inpatient forensic psychiatric treatment is investigated. Ninety-two male participants were administered the PCL-R following admission to an inpatient forensic hospital. From daily hospital information bulletins, incidents of verbal abuse, verbal threat, physical violence, and violation of hospital rules were derived. Also, the number of seclusion episodes was recorded. As expected, significant correlations were found between PCL-R scores and verbal abuse, verbal threat, violation of rules, total number of incidents, and frequency of seclusion. Psychopaths (PCL-R > or = 30) were significantly more often involved in incidents than nonpsychopaths. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the PCL-R Factor 2 score in particular contributed uniquely to the prediction of the total number of incidents. The findings are discussed in terms of their clinical implications.

  7. Utility of an integrated electronic suicide alert system in a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Madan, Alok; Mahoney, Jane; Allen, Jon G; Ellis, Thomas; Hardesty, Susan; Oldham, John M; Fowler, J Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Management of suicide-related behaviors in a hospital is challenging. This article (1) describes integration of an electronic suicide risk notification system to improve assessment of psychiatric inpatients, (2) details the manner in which these alerts complement standard of care, and (3) provides support of using aggregate data to inform administrative decision-making. Complementing routine clinical care and under the supervision of an assessment coordinator, adult inpatients at a specialty psychiatric hospital complete a computerized battery of outcome assessments throughout the course of their hospitalization. A critical-item response notification system for suicide-related behaviors was implemented within the larger, assessment architecture, sending an alert e-mail to unit staff if patients endorsed suicidal ideation on any 1 of 6 critical items. Analysis of aggregate data over a 19-month period reveal a linear trend of increasing rate of suicide alerts from October 2012 to April 2013 (Phase A) with a stabilization at the heightened level from July 2013 to April 2014 (Phase B), R = 0.697, P = .007. Findings suggest that more nuanced training in the management of suicide-related behavior may be necessary and that traditional approaches to staffing may need to accommodate patient acuity. The communication innovation of this system is in line with the Joint Commission's emphasis on designing and implementing patient-centered systems that enhance quality of care, including improved safety.

  8. Needs of Caregivers of Elderly Attending Day Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Boxall, Jan; McKercher, Grant

    1990-01-01

    A mailed questionnaire was used to assess the time demands and relative stress burden of tasks performed by caregivers to patients attending a geriatric day hospital. Eighty per cent (43 of 54) of the questionnaires were completed. Most (84%) of caregivers were women, and 38% were older than 65 years of age. Fifty-three per cent of care receivers were women; 54% were 80 years of age or older. Most care receivers were related to the caregiver, and 84% lived with them. Activities causing the most stress to caregivers were bathing, bladder control, walking about the home, and travelling outside the home. A significant number of caregivers did not have access to alternate caregivers for relief during the day (18%) or night (26%), or for a weekend (28%) or a week (40%). Sixty-eight per cent of caregivers felt some mental strain as a result of their caregiver role. PMID:21249102

  9. Justice at work and psychiatric morbidity among the personnel of an Italian hospital.

    PubMed

    Gigantesco, Antonella

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the association between justice in the workplace (and other psychosocial factors) and mental health among healthcare professionals. It was conducted in a sample of hospital employees in Italy. The prevalence of mental disorders was assessed and the relationships between having a disorder and the level of perceived justice, job control and effort-reward imbalance were investigated. Psychiatric morbidity among professionals with higher perceived justice were 0.3-0.9 times lower than those among those with lower perceived justice. This finding suggests that improving fairness at work does matter for disease prevention and mental health promotion policy.

  10. [Core principles for the regulation of placement subject to public law in psychiatric hospitals - with explanations].

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    While the provisions of the highest courts concerning the involuntary commitment and treatment in psychiatric hospitals of people unable to give their consent are being implemented, in many federal states corresponding adjustments to the rules governing involuntary commitment in accordance with the mental health laws and laws on involuntary commitment are still pending. In states where new regulations do exist, legal experts express doubts that they conform to the Constitution and the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The DGPPN has formulated key parameters for involuntary commitment from a clinical perspective, which should be taken into account in the new regulations of the individual federal states.

  11. EXPERIENCES OF PSYCHIATRIC CONSULTATION SERVICE IN TWO COALFIELD HOSPITALS OF BIHAR

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, L.N.; Khanna, R.; Chatterjee, S.

    1990-01-01

    SUMMARY The Central Institute of Psychiatry provides extension consultation services at two coalfield hospitals of Bihar, representing the intermediate and central level of health care delivery system. Analysis of data covering a period of one year, from September 1988 to August 1989, revealed significant differences in the utilization pattern of the two centres. The differences relate to the proportion of population observed, their demographic characteristics, diagnostic break-up, and follow-up pattern. The provision of psychiatric extension services at the intermediate level is recommended. PMID:21927441

  12. Psychiatric Morbidity and Correlates in Postpartum Women in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Narendra; Nagaraj, Anil Kumar Mysore; Koudike, Umashree; Majgi, Sumanth Mallikarjuna

    2016-01-01

    Background: A range of psychological disorders occur in women in the postpartum period apart from the traditional blues, postpartum depression and psychosis. These include obsession of infanticide, PTSD, morbid preoccupations regarding child birth and disorders of mother-infant relationships, though they are under emphasized. Methods: it is a cross-sectional study conducted in the tertiary maternity care hospital. A total of 152 study subjects were interviewed on MINI (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Inventory) and GAF (Global Assessment of Functioning) within 2 weeks after delivery. Results: The psychiatric morbidity was seen in 67 (44%) of the study subjects. About 26% of subjects had Depressive disorder NOS. Obsessive harm to the child, Panic disorder, Social phobia were the other disorders identified. There were no cases of Mania, Bipolar disorder, psychosis, post traumatic stress disorder or substance use disorder diagnosed across the sample. The Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) score averaged 87.8. Statistically significant association was seen to be present between psychiatric illness and number of previous still births and dead children before this delivery (P = 0.045). Conclusions: The study reveals that psychiatric co-morbidity is very common in the postpartum period and can be detected as early as first week after delivery. Social phobia identified as a common association is a new finding and needs further replication. It needs a larger sample with a prospective assessment to generalize the findings of our study. PMID:27570341

  13. A Qualitative Analysis Exploring Explanatory Models of Aggression and Violence in a Small Cohort of Rural Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents, Their Parents, and Selected Hospital Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Daniel C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the etiology and cultural underpinnings of adolescent violence as collective case study analysis of three inter-related groups: psychiatrically hospitalized rural adolescents, their parent/guardian, and various hospital staff. Violence among adolescents is a serious societal issue that has had varying…

  14. Assaultive behavior in state psychiatric hospitals: differences between forensic and nonforensic patients.

    PubMed

    Linhorst, Donald M; Scott, Lisa Parker

    2004-08-01

    Forensic patients are occupying an increasingly large number of beds in state psychiatric hospitals. The presence of these mentally ill offenders has raised concerns about the risk they present to nonforensic patients. This study compared the rate of assaults and factors associated with assaultive behavior among 308 nonforensic patients and two groups of forensic patients including 469 patients found not guilty by reason of insanity and 76 pretrial patients. Consistent with other studies, nonforensic patients had higher rates of assaults than either group of forensic patients. However, being a forensic patient did not affect the odds of assault when controlling for the effects of demographic and clinical variables in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Factors associated with assaults in each of the three patient groups were identified using multivariate analyses. Implications are presented for treatment of assaultive behavior, mixing of forensic and nonforensic patients within state hospitals, forensic release policies, and future research.

  15. Distinctiveness of management in a university psychiatric hospital as a public health institution.

    PubMed

    Koncina, Miroslav

    2008-06-01

    The distinctiveness of management of a university psychiatric hospital which has the status of a public health institution is manifested in the following ways: * Distinctive features and characteristics of managing service provider organizations compared to those whose operational results involve tangible products; * Distinctive features of management which originate from its role as a regional hospital and a tertiary research and educational institution in the field of psychiatry, with special importance for the Republic of Slovenia as a whole; * Distinctive features of management that are defined by the social and legal framework of operation of public health institutions and their special social mission. This paper therefore discusses the specific theoretical and practical findings regarding management of service provider organizations from the viewpoint of their social mission and significance, as well as their legal organization, internal structure and values.

  16. Recycling former psychiatric hospitals in New Zealand: echoes of deinstitutionalisation and restructuring.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Alun E; Kearns, Robin A; Moon, Graham

    2009-03-01

    This paper addresses a gap in the understanding of the geography of deinstitutionalisation: the fate of closed asylums. We contend that the closure process was an exercise in both deinstitutionalisation and welfare state restructuring, and examine discourses surrounding the re-use of two former psychiatric hospitals in New Zealand-Seaview in Hokitika and Kingseat near Auckland. Drawing on an analysis of media coverage and field observation, we consider former asylums as sites of celebrity. We find the shadow of stigma to be prominent, manifested directly in suggestions that the former hospitals be used as prisons and in the partial redevelopment of one as a 'horror theme park'. Indirectly, we see stigma reflected in the physical deterioration of the asylums prior to closure. While this stigmatising is attributable in the first instance to deinstitutionalisation, the evidence suggests strongly that it was co-opted and exploited by the forces of restructuring.

  17. Developing pharmacy applications using a microcomputer relational database in a long-term care psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Salek, W

    1989-03-01

    The database applications developed with a microcomputer for a 1000 bed long-term care forensic psychiatric care hospital are described. The implementation of a microcomputer system was instituted as an interim measure prior to the development of a hospital wide minicomputer system. Primary emphasis was placed on increasing the efficiency of professional staff while enhancing clinical therapeutic monitoring. The system operates on an IBM-AT with 30 megabyte hard disk drive and an Epson FX-100 dot matrix printer. A relational database manager, Team-Up, was utilized in the development of applications that included census maintenance, scheduled drug inventory, drug regimen review, drug utilization protocols and a skilled nursing unit dose patient profile. Other ancillary functions included generation of stock labels, a literature abstract database and an on-line policy and procedure manual. Advantages of the system include an increase in staff productivity through the use of information that is readily attainable from the patient database. Possible disadvantages are the programming and hardware limitations imposed by a microcomputer system. Long term care psychiatric facilities may be able to enhance staff efficiency by computerizing existing manual systems. Because of the diverse and specialized requirements of long term care facilities, a microcomputer used in conjunction with a programmable relational database can be easily customized to fulfill this need.

  18. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of the patient for medical treatment or medically required inpatient diagnostic study; or (ii) Special or unusual services for cost outlier cases (under the prospective payment system set forth in... hospitalization if the physician finds that the patient could receive proper treatment in a SNF but no bed...

  19. Music listening preferences and preadmission dysfunctional psychosocial behaviors of adolescents hospitalized on an in-patient psychiatric unit.

    PubMed

    Weidinger, C K; Demi, A S

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between music listening preferences and preadmission, dysfunctional psychosocial behaviors (PDPB) of 60 adolescents who were hospitalized on an in-patient psychiatric unit. Findings were that hospitalized adolescents who primarily listened to music with negative lyrics/themes had a history of more PDPB than hospitalized adolescents who primarily listened to music that did not contain negative lyrics/themes; and hospitalized adolescents who primarily listened to heavy metal music had a history of more PDPB than hospitalized adolescents who primarily listened to other types of music.

  20. Deliberate Self-harm seen in a Government Licensed Private Psychiatric Hospital and Institute

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaram, Vaithiyam Devendran; Aravind, Vaithiyam Krishnaram; Vimala, A. Rupavathy

    2016-01-01

    Majority of the published studies on suicide deal with identifying the sociodemographic and psychosocial aspects of suicide attempters and those who have completed suicide or to identify the characteristic differences between the two groups. There are very few studies focusing mainly or only on deliberate self harm. Most of these are hospital based studies or in a setting of general hospital psychiatry units. The present study is from Ram Psychiatry Hospital and Institute, a government licensed private psychiatric institute at Madurai, Tamil Nadu. It is a prospective study of individuals with self harm behavior mostly without the intention to kill, attending the psychiatry outpatient department of the hospital for the period of one year (January to December 2014) a total number of 140 cases are registered. Sociodemographic, clinical profiles with Axis I or Axis II diagnosis or otherwise, and the initiating or precipitating cause or mode of self-injury or self-harm are studied. The results are presented and discussed. PMID:27114626

  1. Psychiatric Hospital Bed Numbers and Prison Population Sizes in 26 European Countries: A Critical Reconsideration of the Penrose Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Blüml, Victor; Waldhör, Thomas; Kapusta, Nestor D.; Vyssoki, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, there has been a revived interest in the validity of the Penrose hypothesis, which was originally postulated over 75 years ago. It suggests an inverse relationship between the numbers of psychiatric hospital beds and the sizes of prison population. This study aims to investigate the association between psychiatric hospital beds and prison populations in a large sample of 26 European countries between 1993 and 2011. Methods The association between prison population sizes and numbers of psychiatric hospital beds was assessed by means of Spearman correlations and modeled by a mixed random coefficient regression model. Socioeconomic variables were considered as covariates. Data were retrieved from Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union. Outcomes Mean Spearman correlation coefficients between psychiatric beds and prison population showed a significant negative association (-0.35; p = <0.01). However, in the mixed regression model including socioeconomic covariates there were no significant fixed parameter estimates. Meanwhile, the covariance estimates for the random coefficients psychiatric beds (σ2 = 0.75, p = <0.01) and year (σ2 = 0.0007, p = 0.03) yielded significant results. Interpretation These findings do not support the general validity of the Penrose hypothesis. Notably, the results of the mixed-model show a significant variation in the magnitude and direction of the association of psychiatric hospital bed numbers and the prison population sizes between countries. In this sense, our results challenge the prevalent opinion that a reduction of psychiatric beds subsequently leads to increasing incarcerations. These findings also work against the potential stigmatization of individuals suffering from mental disorders as criminals, which could be an unintentional byproduct of the Penrose hypothesis. PMID:26529102

  2. A Geriatric Day Hospital: Who Improves the Most?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desrosiers, Johanne; Hebert, Rejean; Payette, Helene; Roy, Pierre-Michel; Tousignant, Michel; Cote, Sylvie; Trottier, Lise

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the changes in some bio-psychosocial variables (functional independence, nutritional risk, pain, balance and walking, grip strength, general well-being, psychiatric profile, perception of social support, leisure satisfaction, and caregivers' feeling of burden) in four categories of clients during their program at a geriatric…

  3. Is it relevant to screen young women hospitalized in psychiatric department for neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE)?

    PubMed Central

    Audemard-Verger, Alexandra; Comby, Elizabeth; Nathou, Clément; Sultan, Audrey; Frémont, Mathieu; Baldolli, Aurélie; Trumier, Louis Simon; Marzloff, Vincent; Le Mauff, Brigitte; Manuzak, Jennifer; Dollfus, Sonia; Bienvenu, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract On the basis that diagnosis of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is sometimes difficult and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can present with isolated psychiatric symptoms, we initiated a survey in a psychiatric department to screen for NPSLE in young female inpatients. We prospectively studied consecutive young female patients referred to the department of psychiatry. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), and antiextractable soluble nuclear antigens (ENA) in the serum of patients were screened. In case of positive anti-DNA or anti-ENA, the patient was referred to the department of internal medicine. One hundred patients were enrolled, mean age 33.1 ± 8.4 years. Most patients presented underlying psychiatric disorders: depression (46%), schizophrenia (13%), anxiety disorder (6%), and personality disorder (10%). A quarter of the cohort did not display underlying psychiatric disorders before hospitalization. Positive ANA ≥1:160 were found in 32 of the 100 patients tested (32%). No patients presented anti-DNA antibodies. One patient had positive anti-sjogrën's syndrome related antigen A (SSA), but did not present any features of SLE or Sjögren syndrome. Thus, systematic screening of SLE is not relevant in young women hospitalized in psychiatric department. However, clinicians should keep in mind that SLE can present with pure psychiatric symptoms. PMID:27893665

  4. Risk Factors of Acute Behavioral Regression in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Périsse, Didier; Amiet, Claire; Consoli, Angèle; Thorel, Marie-Vincente; Gourfinkel-An, Isabelle; Bodeau, Nicolas; Guinchat, Vincent; Barthélémy, Catherine; Cohen, David

    2010-01-01

    Aim: During adolescence, some individuals with autism engage in severe disruptive behaviors, such as violence, agitation, tantrums, or self-injurious behaviors. We aimed to assess risk factors associated with very acute states and regression in adolescents with autism in an inpatient population. Method: Between 2001 and 2005, we reviewed the charts of all adolescents with autism (N=29, mean age=14.8 years, 79% male) hospitalized for severe disruptive behaviors in a psychiatric intensive care unit. We systematically collected data describing socio-demographic characteristics, clinical variables (severity, presence of language, cognitive level), associated organic conditions, etiologic diagnosis of the episode, and treatments. Results: All patients exhibited severe autistic symptoms and intellectual disability, and two-thirds had no functional verbal language. Fifteen subjects exhibited epilepsy, including three cases in which epilepsy was unknown before the acute episode. For six (21%) of the subjects, uncontrolled seizures were considered the main cause of the disruptive behaviors. Other suspected risk factors associated with disruptive behavior disorders included adjustment disorder (N=7), lack of adequate therapeutic or educational management (N=6), depression (N=2), catatonia (N=2), and painful comorbid organic conditions (N=3). Conclusion: Disruptive behaviors among adolescents with autism may stem from diverse risk factors, including environmental problems, comorbid acute psychiatric conditions, or somatic diseases such as epilepsy. The management of these behavioral changes requires a multidisciplinary functional approach. PMID:20467546

  5. A 5-year retrospective study of demographic, anamnestic, and clinical factors related to psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescent patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Cimino, Nina; Di Pietro, Elena; Pollutri, Gabriella; Neviani, Vittoria; Ferri, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychiatric emergencies of children and adolescents have greatly increased during the last years, but this phenomenon has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between acute psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescents and selected variables to highlight risk factors for psychiatric emergencies. Methods This retrospective research was conducted in the acute psychiatric public ward, Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment (SPDT), and in the residential facility for adolescents, “The Medlar”, located in Modena. The sample was constituted by all adolescent patients (n=101, age range 14–18) who had acute hospitalizations (n=140) in SPDT and had been successively transferred to “The Medlar” (n=83), from February 2, 2010 to January 31, 2015. From clinical charts, we extracted demographic and anamnestic characteristics of patients and clinical variables related to hospitalizations. Data were statistically analyzed. Results Sixty-one percent of our patients lived with one divorced parent, with adoptive or immigrant family, or in institutions; 51% had experienced stressful events during childhood; 81% had a normal intellective level, but only 6% presented regular school performance. Parental psychiatric illness was negatively related, in a statistically significantly way, with onset age of adolescent mental disorders (coefficient −2.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −3.53 to 1.01, P<0.001, single linear regression; odds ratio: 4.39, 95% CI: 1.43–13.47, P<0.010, single logistic regression). The most frequent reasons for admission were aggressive behavior in males and suicide risk in females (P=0.002). The most frequent psychiatric diagnosis at SPDT discharge was “conduct disorder”, more frequent in males, followed by “adjustment disorder”, more frequent in females (P=0.001). In SPDT, the adolescent hospitalizations progressively increased fivefold at the end of the observation period

  6. Study of dropouts from a psychiatric clinic of a general hospital.

    PubMed

    Gill, H P; Singh, G; Sharma, K C

    1990-04-01

    During the study period of three months, out of 425 patients attending the psychiatric clinic of a general hospital, for the first time, 165 (38.8%) did not complete the treatment as prescribed by the doctors and were considered as dropouts. They were contacted at their homes to find out the reasons of the dropping out, were compared with patients, who completed the treatment fully on socio-demographic variables and attitude towards treatment. Dropouts significantly differed from treatment acceptors regarding their income, place of domicile and occupation. Maximum number of patients (59.9%) dropped out after the first visit. Dropouts were the maximum among epileptics, and minimum among the mentally retarded patients. Dropouts were dissatisfied with their experience at the clinic as treatment advised was not of their choice, and they feared bad side effects from ECT and drugs. Long distance of residence from clinic was an important reason for dropping out, besides social and economic reasons.

  7. Investigation of Seclusion in one of the Psychiatric Wards in Razi Teaching Hospital of Tabriz.

    PubMed

    Vahidi, Maryam; Hosseinzadeh, Mina

    2014-12-01

    Seclusion is one of the methods in controlling violent behavior of inpatients in psychiatric wards. In current descriptive analytic study, data collection instrument included the seclusion list of inpatients by considering individual, social and clinical characteristics in one of the psychiatry wards In the Razi teaching hospital of Tabriz in the first six months of 2012. Among 264 admitted patients, 24 patients (9.1%) had been secluded and a total of 29 isolated incidents were recorded. Most of secluded incidents occurred on weekdays (75.9%), first week of inpatient (87.7%), and during the evening shifts (48.3%). The results obtained in this study demonstrate that in 55.2% cases, the duration of isolation was two hours and the most common cause of seclusion was aggressive behaviors. Most of secluded patients (66.7%) were diagnosed with mood disorders.

  8. Long-Term Survival of Patients Receiving Artificial Nutrition in Japanese Psychiatric Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Keiichi; Yamashita, Ryuko; Kondo, Keiko; Takayama, Keiko; Yokota, Osamu; Sato, Yoshiki; Kawai, Mitsumasa; Ishizu, Hideki; Nakashima, Tadao; Hayashi, Hideki; Nakata, Kenji; Asaba, Hiroyuki; Kadota, Koichi; Tanaka, Kazuyoshi; Morisada, Yumi; Oshima, Etsuko; Terada, Seishi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Most patients with dementia suffer from dysphagia in the terminal stage of the disease. In Japan, most elderly patients with dysphagia receive either tube feeding or total parenteral nutrition. Methods In this study, we investigated the factors determining longer survival with artificial nutrition. Various clinical characteristics of 168 inpatients receiving artificial nutrition without oral intake in psychiatric hospitals in Okayama Prefecture, Japan, were evaluated. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the duration of artificial nutrition was associated with a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube, diagnosis of mental disorder, low MMSE score, and absence of decubitus. Conclusion Patients with mental disorders survived longer than those with dementia diseases on artificial nutrition. A PEG tube and good nutrition seem to be important for long-term survival. PMID:27843445

  9. Clinico-Epidemiological Profile of Psychiatric Disorders Among Children in a Tertiary Care Hospital of Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Subba, Sonu Hangma; Guha, Arunav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction According to the World Health Organization (WHO), mental health disorders are one of the leading causes of disability worldwide and it is as common in children. Anywhere between one to three children may be suffering from psychiatric disorders at any point in time. Aim This study intended to find the pattern of psychiatric disorders and associated sociodemographic factors among children attending the psychiatric department in a tertiary care hospital in Southern India. Materials and Methods An analysis was conducted of patients who attended the psychiatric clinic from April 2012 to March 2013. Disorders were classified according to International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition (ICD-10) criteria. Data obtained was analysed by SPSS 11.5 version. Chi-square test was used to see association and p<0.05 was taken as significant. Results The mean age of the children was 10.9 years (SD=4.3). Predominance of males was noticed. It was seen that the male children, mostly suffered from Pervasive and specific developmental disorders (n=105; 31.1%). While in the female children, a prominence of anxiety, dissociative, stress-related, somatoform and other non-psychotic mental disorders was seen (n=52; 27.1%). Co-morbidity of psychiatric disorders was seen with intellectual disability and a seasonal predominance of psychiatric disorders was seen during autumn. Conclusion Children presenting with psychiatric disorders in the hospital showed a wide age range and among them, males outnumbered females. Psychiatric disorders showed seasonal variation and the types of disorder varied significantly with age, gender and religion. PMID:27134978

  10. Disparities in treatment of people with mental disorder in non-psychiatric hospitals: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mather, Brad; Roche, Michael; Duffield, Christine

    2014-04-01

    People with mental disorder experience a heavy burden of physical ill-health. This, alongside structural health-system changes, means more people with mental disorder are being cared for in non-psychiatric hospitals. This article reports on 32 studies that have investigated the care and outcomes of people with comorbid mental and physical health problems in non-psychiatric hospitals. Prevalence of mental disorder ranged between 4%-46%, and rates of psychiatric referral was 2%-10%. The receipt of invasive cardiac procedures was markedly reduced for those with mental disorder. Likelihood of experiencing an adverse event, post-operative complication or increased length of stay was also elevated for those with mental disorder.

  11. Screen Time on School Days and Risks for Psychiatric Symptoms and Self-Harm in Mainland Chinese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingli; Ming, Qingsen; Yi, Jinyao; Wang, Xiang; Yao, Shuqiao

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate associations of television and of video game or non-educational computer use (VG/CU) exposure volumes in a typical school day with psychiatric symptoms and suicidal ideation/self-injurious behavior (self-harm), in mainland Chinese adolescents. Methods: Secondary school pupils (N = 13,659; mean age: 15.18 ± 1.89) from 10 urban areas sampled from different regions of mainland China were recruited. The subjects were divided into the following four screen exposure volume groups for television and VG/CU respectively based on a self-administered questionnaire: 0 h/day, >0 to ≤1 h/day, >1 to ≤2 h/day, and >2 h/day. Demographic and psychiatric symptoms were recorded for each respondent. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for several types of psychological problems and self-harm were calculated. Results: More than 2 h per school day television watching was associated with higher risk of depression in both boys (OR = 1.33, 95%CI: 1.02–1.73) and girls (OR = 1.62, 95%CI: 1.19–2.21), of anxiety in boys (OR = 1.43, 95%CI: 1.05–1.95), of general emotional, behavioral, and social problems (GEBSPs; OR = 1.55, 95%CI: 1.01–2.39), and of oppositional defiant problems (OR = 1.65, 95% CI: 1.09–2.50) in girls, compared with no television exposure. Conversely, television exposure of no more than 1 h per school day was associated with lower self-harm risk in boys (OR = 0.81, 95%CI: 0.67–0.99) compared with no television exposure. High school day VG/CU time (>2 h) compared with no VG/CU were associated with higher risks of anxiety (OR = 1.40, 95%CI: 1.06–1.86) and of attention deficit/hyperactivity problems (ADHPs; OR = 1.56, 95%CI: 1.02–2.38) in boys. And any school day VG/CU exposure was associated with higher risks of self-harm and all other psychiatric problems in boys and all psychiatric problems (including anxiety and ADHPs) in girls (ORs, 1.44–3.69), compared to no VG/CU exposure. Conclusion: For secondary school

  12. Predicting discharge in forensic psychiatry: the legal and psychosocial factors associated with long and short stays in forensic psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ross, Thomas; Querengässer, Jan; Fontao, María Isabel; Hoffmann, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    In Germany, both the number of patients treated in forensic psychiatric hospitals and the average inpatient treatment period have been increasing for over thirty years. Biographical and clinical factors, e.g., the number of prior offences, type of offence, and psychiatric diagnosis, count among the factors that influence the treatment duration and the likelihood of discharge. The aims of the current study were threefold: (1) to provide an estimate of the German forensic psychiatric patient population with a low likelihood of discharge, (2) to replicate a set of personal variables that predict a relatively high, as opposed to a low, likelihood of discharge from forensic psychiatric hospitals, and (3) to describe a group of other factors that are likely to add to the existing body of knowledge. Based on a sample of 899 patients, we applied a battery of primarily biographical and other personal variables to two subgroups of patients. The first subgroup of patients had been treated in a forensic psychiatric hospital according to section 63 of the German legal code for at least ten years (long-stay patients, n=137), whereas the second subgroup had been released after a maximum treatment period of four years (short-stay patients, n=67). The resulting logistic regression model had a high goodness of fit, with more than 85% of the patients correctly classified into the groups. In accordance with earlier studies, we found a series of personal variables, including age at first admission and type of offence, to be predictive of a short or long-stay. Other findings, such as the high number of immigrants among the short-stay patients and the significance of a patient's work time before admission to a forensic psychiatric hospital, are more clearly represented than has been observed in previous research.

  13. Predictors of valued everyday occupations, empowerment and satisfaction in day centres: implications for services for persons with psychiatric disabilities.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Mona; Sandlund, Mikael

    2014-09-01

    This study addresses predictors of occupational value, empowerment and satisfaction with the rehabilitation received in day centres for people with psychiatric disabilities. These outcomes represent varying aspects of relevance for the day centre context and together create a manifold outcome picture. This was a longitudinal study with approval from the regional research vetting board. Self-report instruments were used, and the investigated predictors motivation for going to the day centre, occupational engagement, socio-demographic factors and self-reported diagnosis. Attendees (N = 108) at 8 day centres participated and filled in self-report questionnaires regarding the predictor and outcome variables. A baseline measurement and a 14-month follow-up composed the data. Occupational engagement at baseline could predict all three outcomes at the follow-up. Motivation for the day centre activities and not preferring work before attending the day centre were positive for satisfaction with the day centre. A low participation rate, although comparable with previous studies on the target group, was a limitation of this study. To conclude, both occupational engagement and motivation are factors that can be stimulated by the staff in day centres. Actions for how to accomplish that, and thereby also more positive outcomes of the day centre services, are proposed, such as a system of freedom of choice among day centres, and between day centres and supported employment.

  14. The Contribution of Children's Temperamental Fear and Effortful Control to Restraint and Seclusion during Inpatient Treatment in a Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgett, David J.; Valentino, Kristin; Hayden, Lisa C.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined temperament characteristics as risk factors for restraint and seclusion (R/S) events in psychiatrically hospitalized youth, extending work that has sought to identify R/S risk factors and research examining temperament-behavior problem associations that has largely relied upon community samples. It was anticipated that…

  15. Brief Report: Understanding Crisis Behaviors in Hospitalized Psychiatric Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder--Iceberg Assessment Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Kate H.; Barnes, Julia C.; Young, Nicholas D.; Gabriels, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    Children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at risk for emotional dysregulation and behavior problems that can escalate to levels requiring psychiatric hospitalization. Evaluating the etiology of such behaviors can be challenging for health care providers, as individuals with ASD can have difficulty self-reporting concerns.…

  16. Family Assessment/Treatment/Evaluation Methods Integrated for Helping Teen Suicide Attempters/Families in Short Term Psychiatric Hospitalization Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Suzanne

    The assessment process can be integrated with treatment and evaluation for helping teenage suicide attempters and families in short term psychiatric hospitalization programs. The method is an extremely efficient way for the therapist to work within a given time constraint. During family assessment sufficient information can be gathered to…

  17. Patient outcomes following discharge from secure psychiatric hospitals: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Seena; Fimińska, Zuzanna; Cocks, Christopher; Coid, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Background Secure hospitals are a high-cost, low-volume service consuming around a fifth of the overall mental health budget in England and Wales. Aims A systematic review and meta-analysis of adverse outcomes after discharge along with a comparison with rates in other clinical and forensic groups in order to inform public health and policy. Method We searched for primary studies that followed patients discharged from a secure hospital, and reported mortality, readmissions or reconvictions. We determined crude rates for all adverse outcomes. Results In total, 35 studies from 10 countries were included, involving 12 056 patients out of which 53% were violent offenders. The crude death rate for all-cause mortality was 1538 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 1175–1901). For suicide, the crude death rate was 325 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 235–415). The readmission rate was 7208 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 5916–8500). Crude reoffending rates were 4484 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 3679–5287), with lower rates in more recent studies. Conclusions There is some evidence that patients discharged from forensic psychiatric services have lower offending outcomes than many comparative groups. Services could consider improving interventions aimed at reducing premature mortality, particularly suicide, in discharged patients. PMID:26729842

  18. Inpatient Suicide in a Psychiatric Hospital: A Nested Case–control Study

    PubMed Central

    Khanra, Sourav; Mahintamani, Tathagata; Bose, Swarnali; Khess, Christoday Raja Jayant; Umesh, Shreekantiah; Ram, Daya

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Risk factors for inpatient suicide are different from those in the general population. We examined sociodemographic and clinical variables of patients who committed suicide as an inpatient in a psychiatric hospital in India. Methods: Matched retrospective nested case–control design was adopted. Ten patients who died by suicide as inpatients between 2000 and 2013 were included, along with fifty controls, matched with respect to age, sex, diagnosis, and period of admission. Results: Suicide completers were mostly unskilled in occupation (P = 0.03), had a history of past suicide attempts (P < 0.001), shorter duration of hospital stay (P = 0.001), poorer improvement on psychopathology (P = 0.02), and were having more suicidal ideation (P = 0.02). Significantly more completers were receiving antidepressants (P = 0.04). Conclusion: This study adds to the existing sparse literature on inpatient suicides from Asia. Strength of the study was close matching between case and controls and blindedness. Limitations were retrospective design, and variations in prescription behavior and treatment decisions. PMID:28031595

  19. Psychiatric symptoms and psychosocial functioning among hospital personnel during the Gaza War: a repeated cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ezra, Menachem; Palgi, Yuval; Wolf, Jonathan Jacob; Shrira, Amit

    2011-10-30

    Studies of mental health among hospital personnel during armed conflict are scarce and usually include single time point investigations without a comparison group. The authors compared the psychiatric symptoms and psychosocial functioning of exposed and unexposed hospital personnel at two time points. The research was conducted during 2009 and included a survey of two random samples of hospital personnel (physicians and nurses), one collected during the Gaza War and the other 6 months later. Each sample included hospital personnel who were exposed to war-related stress and others who were not (Study 1: n=67 and 74 for exposed and unexposed, respectively; Study 2: n=57 and 50 for exposed and unexposed, respectively). Levels of psychiatric symptoms and psychosocial functioning were measured. Compared to unexposed hospital personnel, exposed hospital personnel had a significantly higher level of post-traumatic symptoms during the Gaza War and 6 months later. In addition, during the Gaza War, exposed hospital personnel had a significantly higher level of depressive symptoms. However, in the second study, depressive symptoms were similar to those found in the unexposed group. These findings may suggest that war-related stress is associated with post-traumatic symptoms among hospital personnel even 6 months after exposure.

  20. A critical black feminist ethnography of treatment for women with co-occurring disorders in the psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Creswell, Laryssa M

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of women diagnosed with co-occurring disorders on the treatments provided by a state psychiatric hospital so that appropriate recommendations for changes in treatment may be made. Critical ethnography was used and the data was viewed through the lens of intersectionality from the black feminist perspective. Seven women hospitalized in one psychiatric hospital in the Mid-Atlantic region participated in the study. Data was collected via semistructured interviews, Consumer Perceptions of Care survey, researcher's observations, and archival data. Three major findings emerged: (1) Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) was identified as a beneficial treatment, (2) a lack of trust in the system and people in the system, and (3) housing or homelessness was perceived as a barrier. Based on the results of this study, it is recommended clinicians, administrators, and policy makers listen closely to individuals receiving treatment to make decisions regarding treatment accordingly.

  1. An analysis of the costs and benefits of two strategies to decrease length of stay in children's psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, L H; Petti, R D

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We analyze the costs and benefits of two strategies-intensive home-based services and increased remuneration for providers of community-based placements--to decrease excessive length of stay in a children's psychiatric hospital. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING. Clinical, demographic, and financial data were collected retrospectively on all children discharged during 1987 through 1989 from the state children's psychiatric hospital that serves Wayne County, Michigan. Characteristics of the discharged children were similar to those reported in other studies of intensive home-based services. STUDY DESIGN. A sample of 22 children was used for a simulation analysis. Excessive length of stay was defined as the duration of hospitalization after readiness for discharge and associated planning were indicated in the record. For the simulated analysis of the intensive home-based program, costs included estimated charges for the program and charges for the children hospitalized due to failure of the intervention. For analysis of the increased remuneration strategy, costs included charges for the out-of-home placement and charges for hospitalization. For both strategies benefits were defined as averted hospitalization charges. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS. Charts of the discharged children were reviewed and 21 clinical, demographic, and financial variables were extracted. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Analysis of costs and benefits of intensive home-based services produced a favorable cost-benefit ratio of .47. Analysis of the strategy to increase remuneration for providers of community-based placements resulted in a cost-benefit ratio of 1, indicating no financial savings. CONCLUSIONS. Intensive home-based services represent an efficient strategy to decrease excessive length of stay for children in psychiatric hospitals by averting hospitalization altogether. Although increased remuneration to providers of community-based placements in order to increase the supply of

  2. Teaching literacy and mathematics skills to adult psychiatric inpatients: an evaluation of the adult literacy program at Hawaii State Hospital.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Todd N; Meyer, Kim A; Samarasinghe, Roshani

    2005-01-01

    The Adult Literacy Program at Hawaii State Hospital utilized techniques drawn from the Morningside Model of Generative Instruction. In a study involving psychiatric inpatients, participants were taught reading, mathematics, or both over a 6- to 8-month time span. Using the Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery-Revised, it was determined that nearly half of the participants demonstrated academic gains during the study period. Further, a behavioral observation system indicated that participants were on-task 80% of the observation time and staff engaged in positive interactions nearly 20% of the observation time. This study is the first of its kind to document any efficacy for academic instruction with a psychiatric inpatient population.

  3. Seroprevalence of selected viral, bacterial and parasitic infections among inpatients of a public psychiatric hospital of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Arreola-Valenzuela, Miguel Angel; Rodríguez-Briones, Alfredo; Alanís-Quiñones, Olga Patricia; Estrada-Martínez, Sergio; Luevanos-Becerra, Carlos; Martínez-Saenz, Luis Felipe; Martínez-García, Sergio Arturo; Ramírez-Valles, Eda Guadalupe; Ibarra-Torres, Isaac; González-Verdín, Cesar Arnulfo

    2008-01-01

    We sought to determine the frequency of serological markers of selected infections in a population of psychiatric patients in Durango City, Mexico, and to determine whether there are any epidemiological characteristics of the subjects associated with the infections. One hundred and five inpatients of a public psychiatric hospital of Durango were examined for HBsAg, anti-HCV antibodies, anti-HIV antibodies, anti-Brucella antibodies, rapid plasma reagin and anti-Cysticercus antibodies by commercially available assays. Anti-Cysticercus antibodies were confirmed by Western blot and HBsAg by neutralization assay. Epidemiological data from each participant were also obtained. Seroprevalences of HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV, anti-Brucella, rapid plasma reagin and anti-Cysticercus antibodies found were 0.0%, 4.8%, 0.9%, 0.0%, 1.9%, and 0.9%, respectively. Overall, 9 (8.6%) inpatients showed seropositivity to any infection marker. We concluded that our psychiatric inpatients have serological evidence of a number of infections. HCV is an important pathogen among our psychiatric inpatients. Health care strategies for prevention and control of infections in Mexican psychiatric patients should be considered.

  4. Measuring hospital mortality rates: are 30-day data enough? Ischemic Heart Disease Patient Outcomes Research Team.

    PubMed Central

    Garnick, D W; DeLong, E R; Luft, H S

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We compare 30-day and 180-day postadmission hospital mortality rates for all Medicare patients and those in three categories of cardiac care: coronary artery bypass graft surgery, acute myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. DATA SOURCES/COLLECTION. Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) hospital mortality data for FY 1989. STUDY DESIGN. Using hospital level public use files of actual and predicted mortality at 30 and 180 days, we constructed residual mortality measures for each hospital. We ranked hospitals and used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to compare 0-30, 31-180, and 0-180-day postadmission mortality. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. For the admissions we studied, we found a broad range of hospital performance when we ranked hospitals using the 30-day data; some hospitals had much lower than predicted 30-day mortality rates, while others had much higher than predicted mortality rates. Data from the time period 31-180 days postadmission yield results that corroborate the 0-30 day postadmission data. Moreover, we found evidence that hospital performance on one condition is related to performance on the other conditions, but that the correlation is much weaker in the 31-180-day interval than in the 0-30-day period. Using ROC curves, we found that the 30-day data discriminated the top and bottom fifths of the 180-day data extremely well, especially for AMI outcomes. CONCLUSIONS. Using data on cumulative hospital mortality from 180 days postadmission does not yield a different perspective from using data from 30 days postadmission for the conditions we studied. PMID:7860319

  5. Social-Cognitive Moderators of the Relationship between Peer Victimization and Suicidal Ideation among Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Jennifer; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Becker, Sara; Seaboyer, Lourah; Rizzo, Christie; Lichtenstein, David; Spirito, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Peer victimization among children and adolescents is a major public health concern, given its widespread individual and societal ramifications. Victims of peer aggression often face significant levels of psychological distress and social difficulties, such as depression, suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and social rejection. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether cognitive distortions and perceptions of social support moderate the association between peer victimization and suicidal thoughts among psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents. Participants included 183 psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents (ages 13–18). In multiple regression analyses that controlled for gender, social and cognitive factors served as significant resources factors. Cognitive factors also moderated the relationship between peer victimization and suicidal ideation. PMID:25125940

  6. Brief Report: Understanding Crisis Behaviors in Hospitalized Psychiatric Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder--Iceberg Assessment Interview.

    PubMed

    Stark, Kate H; Barnes, Julia C; Young, Nicholas D; Gabriels, Robin L

    2015-11-01

    Children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at risk for emotional dysregulation and behavior problems that can escalate to levels requiring psychiatric hospitalization. Evaluating the etiology of such behaviors can be challenging for health care providers, as individuals with ASD can have difficulty self-reporting concerns. This brief report introduces the Iceberg Assessment Interview (IAI), a tool to organize and elucidate the assessment of issues potentially underlying problem behaviors. A summary of IAIs from a chart review of patients ages 5-18 with ASD (n = 23) admitted to a specialized psychiatric hospital unit illustrates the clinical utility of this tool. Summarized IAI data includes presenting crisis behaviors, caregiver-perceived environmental conditions, and underlying psychosocial and medical problems.

  7. Spaces for smoking in a psychiatric hospital: social capital, resistance to control, and significance for 'therapeutic landscapes'.

    PubMed

    Wood, Victoria J; Curtis, Sarah E; Gesler, Wil; Spencer, Ian H; Close, Helen J; Mason, James M; Reilly, Joe G

    2013-11-01

    This paper reports on research framed by theories of therapeutic landscapes and the ways that the social, physical and symbolic dimensions of landscapes relate to wellbeing and healing. We focus especially on the question of how attributes of therapeutic landscapes are constructed in different ways according to the variable perspectives of individuals and groups. Through an ethnographic case study in a psychiatric hospital in the North of England we explore the perceived significance for wellbeing of 'smoking spaces' (where tobacco smoking is practiced in ways that may, or may not be officially sanctioned). We interpret our findings in light of literature on how smoking spaces are linked to the socio-geographical power relations that determine how smoking is organised within the hospital and how this is understood by different groups using the hospital building. We draw on qualitative research findings from discussion groups, observations, and interviews with patients, carers and staff. These focused on their views about the building design and setting of the new psychiatric hospital in relation to their wellbeing, and issues relating to smoking spaces emerged as important for many participants. Creating and managing smoking spaces as a public health measure in psychiatric hospitals is shown to be a controversial issue involving conflicting aims for health and wellbeing of patients and staff. Our findings indicate that although from a physical health perspective, smoking is detrimental, the spaces in which patients and staff smoke have social and psychological significance, providing a forum for the creation of social capital and resistance to institutional control. While the findings relate to one case study setting, the paper illustrates issues of wider relevance and contributes to an international literature concerning the tensions between perceived psychological and psychosocial benefits of smoking vs. physical harm that smoking is likely to cause. We consider

  8. Day Hospital and Residential Addiction Treatment: Randomized and Nonrandomized Managed Care Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witbrodt, Jane; Bond, Jason; Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Weisner, Constance; Jaeger, Gary; Pating, David; Moore, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Male and female managed care clients randomized to day hospital (n=154) or community residential treatment (n=139) were compared on substance use outcomes at 6 and 12 months. To address possible bias in naturalistic studies, outcomes were also examined for clients who self-selected day hospital (n=321) and for clients excluded from randomization…

  9. The contribution of children's temperamental fear and effortful control to restraint and seclusion during inpatient treatment in a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Bridgett, David J; Valentino, Kristin; Hayden, Lisa C

    2012-12-01

    The current study examined temperament characteristics as risk factors for restraint and seclusion (R/S) events in psychiatrically hospitalized youth, extending work that has sought to identify R/S risk factors and research examining temperament-behavior problem associations that has largely relied upon community samples. It was anticipated that children with poor effortful control (EC) and greater frustration would have more instances of R/S during psychiatric hospitalization. The contribution of children's fearfulness to R/S was also examined. A measure of temperament was completed by youths' clinicians and youths (n = 52) completed objective measures of EC. The frequency of R/S events for each participant was obtained from hospital records. After controlling for R/S risk factors, lower EC and higher fearfulness predicted increased R/S occurrences during the first 2 weeks of hospitalization and over the course of children's entire hospitalization. These findings indicate that temperament should potentially be considered in individualized treatment plans targeting the prevention and/or reduction of R/S. Additional implications of the findings are also discussed.

  10. Risk factors of scabies in psychiatric and long-term care hospitals: a nationwide mail-in survey in Japan.

    PubMed

    Makigami, Kuniko; Ohtaki, Noriko; Ishii, Norihisa; Yasumura, Seiji

    2009-09-01

    Despite the commonness of scabies in Japanese institutional settings, the nationwide prevalence of scabies has not been elucidated. This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of scabies and control measures in Japanese hospitals. A questionnaire on scabies epidemiology (e.g. number of patients and onsets of outbreak) and preventive measures were sent to psychiatric hospitals and long-term care hospitals nationwide (n = 1795) in January 2005. Seven hundred and forty-one hospitals responded (41.3%). Three hundred and thirty-three (44.9%) respondent hospitals had one or more scabies cases in 2004. Among 159 hospitals that had experienced scabies outbreak, only 32 of them reported cases of crusted scabies. Multivariate regression analysis showed that hospitals had a greater number of beds, and that acute- and long-term care wards were more likely to experience scabies onsets. Hospitals that compiled their infection control manuals on scabies, treated suspicious patients with scabicides without confirmed diagnosis, and performed skin checkup of inpatients were more likely to experience scabies cases. Infection control personnel should be aware that unrecognized crusted scabies can cause outbreaks. Higher patient turnover is a risk factor for scabies introduction into a hospital. Preventive measures against scabies, such as patient screening at admission and treating all suspicious patients without confirmed diagnosis, were not effective to avoid scabies introduction.

  11. Acute Interventions and Referral of Patients With Bipolar Disorder by the Psychiatric Consultation Liaison Service in a General Hospital in Germany: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the population of bipolar patients in a general hospital in Germany who required treatment by a consultant psychiatrist. Method: A retrospective analysis was conducted of the clinical records of 47 patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder (DSM-IV-TR criteria) who were treated by a consultant psychiatrist between 2009 and 2012 in one of the general hospitals of Charité Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany. We investigated the sections of the hospital that requested psychiatric consultations for bipolar patients, the status of these patients, and their primary cause of treatment, as well as the intervention (including pharmacotherapy) recommended by the consultant psychiatrist. Results: For more than half of the patients, their psychiatric illness was either directly or indirectly the reason they presented to the hospital. The remaining bipolar patients were treated for various somatic illnesses unrelated to their bipolar disorder throughout the hospital, with a relative overrepresentation of patients in the neurology department. More than half of the patients were referred to a psychiatric hospital by the consultant psychiatrist. Benzodiazepines were the most commonly administered drugs for acute pharmacologic intervention. Conclusions: Psychiatric consultations are not frequently requested for bipolar patients compared to those with other psychiatric disorders. However, more than half of the bipolar patients needed further psychiatric treatment in a psychiatric hospital. This finding emphasizes the importance of psychiatric consultations in a general hospital for bipolar patients. The administration of benzodiazepines as an acute treatment seems to be the standard pharmacologic procedure, not a specific pharmacotherapy like mood stabilizers. PMID:25133062

  12. Hospital Liquid Diet Evaluation, Two-Day Menu

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    beverages, milkshakes, hot chocolate , and milk. During peacetime, the products are designed for dental surgery and jaw injury patients who require an...cauliflower, and chocolate peppermint pudding; for dinner, chili, macaroni and cheese, corn, and vanilla pudding. A complete description of the two-day...meal nutritional supplements (milkshakes) have been developed at Natick. These are available in six different flavors: vanilla, chocolate , strawberry

  13. A worldwide assessment of the frequency of suicide, suicide attempts, or psychiatric hospitalization after predictive testing for Huntington disease.

    PubMed Central

    Almqvist, E W; Bloch, M; Brinkman, R; Craufurd, D; Hayden, M R

    1999-01-01

    Prior to the implementation of predictive-testing programs for Huntington disease (HD), significant concern was raised concerning the likelihood of catastrophic events (CEs), particularly in those persons receiving an increased-risk result. We have investigated the frequency of CEs-that is, suicide, suicide attempt, and psychiatric hospitalization-after an HD predictive-testing result, through questionnaires sent to predictive-testing centers worldwide. A total of 44 persons (0.97%) in a cohort of 4,527 test participants had a CE: 5 successful suicides, 21 suicide attempts, and 18 hospitalizations for psychiatric reasons. All persons committing suicide had signs of HD, whereas 11 (52.4%) of 21 persons attempting suicide and 8 (44.4%) of 18 who had a psychiatric hospitalization were symptomatic. A total of 11 (84.6%) of 13 asymptomatic persons who experienced a CE during the first year after HD predictive testing received an increased-risk result. Factors associated with an increased risk of a CE included (a) a psychiatric history

  14. Hospital Value-Based Purchasing And 30-Day Readmissions: Are Hospitals Ready?

    PubMed

    Haley, D Rob; Zhao, Mei; Spaulding, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between a hospital's Total Performance Score (TPS) and unplanned readmissions, a multivariate linear regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between hospital TPS and readmission rates for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), and pneumonia (PN). Hospital TPS was significantly and inversely related to AMI, HF, and PN readmission rates. The higher the hospital TPS, the lower the readmission rates for patients with AMI, HF, and PN. Hospitals with higher Medicare and Medicaid patients had higher readmission rates for all three conditions. The TPS methodology will likely evolve to include additional measures or dimensions to assess hospital quality and payment. Policymakers and hospital administrators should consider other structure elements and process measures to assess and improve patient safety and quality.

  15. 30-Day Survival Probabilities as a Quality Indicator for Norwegian Hospitals: Data Management and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Sahar; Lindman, Anja Schou; Kristoffersen, Doris Tove; Tomic, Oliver; Helgeland, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Background The Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services (NOKC) reports 30-day survival as a quality indicator for Norwegian hospitals. The indicators have been published annually since 2011 on the website of the Norwegian Directorate of Health (www.helsenorge.no), as part of the Norwegian Quality Indicator System authorized by the Ministry of Health. Openness regarding calculation of quality indicators is important, as it provides the opportunity to critically review and discuss the method. The purpose of this article is to describe the data collection, data pre-processing, and data analyses, as carried out by NOKC, for the calculation of 30-day risk-adjusted survival probability as a quality indicator. Methods and Findings Three diagnosis-specific 30-day survival indicators (first time acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke and hip fracture) are estimated based on all-cause deaths, occurring in-hospital or out-of-hospital, within 30 days counting from the first day of hospitalization. Furthermore, a hospital-wide (i.e. overall) 30-day survival indicator is calculated. Patient administrative data from all Norwegian hospitals and information from the Norwegian Population Register are retrieved annually, and linked to datasets for previous years. The outcome (alive/death within 30 days) is attributed to every hospital by the fraction of time spent in each hospital. A logistic regression followed by a hierarchical Bayesian analysis is used for the estimation of risk-adjusted survival probabilities. A multiple testing procedure with a false discovery rate of 5% is used to identify hospitals, hospital trusts and regional health authorities with significantly higher/lower survival than the reference. In addition, estimated risk-adjusted survival probabilities are published per hospital, hospital trust and regional health authority. The variation in risk-adjusted survival probabilities across hospitals for AMI shows a decreasing trend over time: estimated

  16. Effects of serotonin reuptake inhibitors on aggressive behavior in psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents: results of an open trial.

    PubMed

    Constantino, J N; Liberman, M; Kincaid, M

    1997-01-01

    Low concentrations of the neurotransmitter serotonin and its 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid metabolite in the central nervous system have been associated with increased aggressive behavior in animals and humans. Controlled clinical trials of serotonin agonists in depressed adults have suggested that aggressive behavior is less likely during treatment with these medications than with placebo, but there have been no previous studies of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and aggression in children. We prospectively followed the course of aggressive behavior in 19 psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents (not selected for aggressiveness) who received open clinical trials of fluoxetine, paroxetine, or sertraline. The patients received standard doses (equivalent to fluoxetine 10-40 mg daily) for a minimum of 5 weeks. The starting dose was 15 +/- 5 mg, and dosages were raised at a mean rate of 5 mg every 4 days up to a mean dose of 25 +/- 10 mg daily. Results from trials of the three SSRIs were clustered because the sample sizes were not sufficient for separate analyses. Overall, there were no statistically meaningful improvements in the level of aggressive behavior, as measured on a modified version of the Overt Aggression Scale, over the course of these patients' SSRI trials. Symptoms of physical aggression toward others or self were manifest in 12 of the 19 patients while on SSRIs. Of the 19 patients, 13 were assessed both on and off SSRIs: verbal aggression (p = 0.04), physical aggression toward objects (p = 0.05), and physical aggression toward self (p < 0.02) occurred significantly more frequently on SSRIs than off; no increase was observed in physical aggression toward others. Patients with the highest baseline aggressivity scores did not show greater improvement during SSRI treatment. Further research is warranted, particularly to explore whether SSRIs may have therapeutic effects on aggression at higher (or lower) doses than were administered in this

  17. Prevalence and Predictors of Domestic-Violence towards Wives by their Psychiatric Hospitalized Husbands

    PubMed Central

    Sahraian, Ali; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Hashemi, Seyed Hamzeh; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Ahmadzadeh, Laaya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Violence imposed on wives by their inpatient psychiatric husbands has not been studied yet. The current study surveyed the rates and predictors of violence committed by inpatient psychiatric husbands towards their wives. Methods: A convenient sample of wives of 209 married male psychiatric inpatients completed a self-reported questionnaire. They were asked about physical, emotional, social and economic abuse. Results: More than 80% of the husbands socially abused their wives; 73.0% of the wives had been regularly beaten by their husbands; the rate for humiliation was 77.2%; and only 14.1% of the wives reported that their sexual relationship with their husbands is with desire. Conclusion There is a dramatic high rate of different types of abuse toward wives by their inpatient psychiatric husbands. They are commonly victimized by their husbands. Moreover, different types of violence always co-occur. Future studies should consider this important issue which is unfortunately an ignored research area. PMID:27006668

  18. Prevalence of Psychiatric Morbidity in Females amongst Infertile Couples- A Hospital Based Report

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Pragati; Goyal, Lajya Devi; Kaur, Gurmeet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Infertility leads to significant stress among couple and the reaction to infertility differs among males and females. Aim To know the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in infertile couples and compare the prevalence of various psychiatric disorders among husband and wife. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 50 couples diagnosed with infertility from outdoor clinics. Both male and female partner of couple were interviewed for detailed history and clinical examination was done. General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) was applied to detect any psychological strain in couples and in those with illness, final diagnosis were made on the basis of DSM -IV (TR). The data thus generated was subjected to appropriate Statistical Analysis. Results Out of the 50 couples, 54% of females had psychiatric morbidity. The most common diagnosis amongst the female participants was MDD (Major Depressive Disorder) (18%), whereas the second most common diagnosis was GAD (Generalized Anxiety Disorder) (16%). Psychiatric morbidity was found in only 26% of males suffering with Adjustment Disorder being most common diagnosis (8%) and Dysthymia and MDD as the second most common diagnosis (6% each). Majority of patients having psychiatric morbidity were from age group 20-29 years. The difference between females and male counterparts was statistically significant. Conclusion Psychiatric morbidity was higher among female partners than male partners. The difference was statistically significant and the situation needs further workup. PMID:27630933

  19. Psychiatric morbidity in outpatients of gynecological oncology clinic in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mendonsa, Rohan Dilip; Appaya, Prakash

    2010-01-01

    Background: Psychiatric morbidity in gynecological oncology patients is relatively less studied. Aims: This cross-sectional observational study was undertaken to assess the common psychiatric disorders in women who consult the gynecological oncology outpatients’ department. Materials and methods: We assessed a total of 101 outpatients who were recruited by convenience method of sampling. The main outcome measures were PRIME-MD PHQ diagnoses, gynecological and sociodemographic profiles. Results: Psychiatric disorders as detected by PRIME –MD PHQ were diagnosed in 44% of the patients. Mood disorders were most common. Major depression was present in 25.7% of patients. Anxiety disorders were diagnosed in 16.8% of the patients. Among 44 patients with a psychiatric diagnosis only one patient was on psychiatric treatment. Major depression was much more common (34.4%) in cancer patients than in women with benign conditions (16.6%). Conclusion: The findings of our study reveal a high rate of psychiatric morbidity in the gynecological oncology outpatients. PMID:21267366

  20. Dating violence victimization, dispositional aggression, and nonsuicidal self-injury among psychiatrically hospitalized male and female adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Christie J; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Swenson, Lance; Hower, Heather M; Wolff, Jennifer; Spirito, Anthony

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the current study was to characterize the association between dating violence victimization and dispositional aggression in predicting nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among psychiatrically hospitalized male and female adolescents. One hundred fifty-five adolescents (ages 13-17) and their parents completed the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children clinical interview to assess NSSI and child abuse; adolescents completed self-report measures of aggression and dating violence victimization (verbal, physical, and sexual). Dating violence victimization and NSSI were found to be highly prevalent among both males and females in this psychiatric inpatient sample. Two moderational models were supported, wherein dating violence was associated with NSSI in the context of elevated trait anger in males and indirect aggression in females. Findings suggest that helping victims of dating violence acquire skills to address certain forms of dispositional aggression may attenuate NSSI.

  1. [Patients with schizophrenia in forensic-psychiatric hospitals (section 63 German Penal Code) in North Rhine-Westphalia].

    PubMed

    Kutscher, S; Schiffer, B; Seifert, D

    2009-02-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the development of the number of patients with schizophrenia in detention (section 63 German Penal Code) in North Rhine-Westphalia and the characterization of these patients. Patients with schizophrenia are examined, by using a standardized questionnaire answered by the attending psychiatrist or psychologist (n = 531). During the last 12 years the number of patients with schizophrenia in forensic-psychiatric hospitals has increased three times, whereas the number of patients with other diagnoses heightened only twofold. The patients with schizophrenia showed high rates of psychiatric comorbidities (substance disorders 73.9 %, personality disorders 17.2 %), previous inpatient treatments (78.3 % with a mean of 7.5 stays) and previous convictions (63.4 %). Almost half of these convictions (46.6 %) were violent offences (e. g. assault, homicide). Possible explanations for this development are discussed.

  2. The relationship between executive functions and capacity to consent to treatment in acute psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Mandarelli, Gabriele; Parmigiani, Giovanna; Tarsitani, Lorenzo; Frati, Paola; Biondi, Massimo; Ferracuti, Stefano

    2012-12-01

    Despite the acknowledged influence of cognition on patients' capacity to consent to treatment, the specific neuropsychological domains involved remain elusive, as does the role of executive functions. We investigated possible associations between executive functions and decisional capacity in a sample of acute psychiatric inpatients. Patients were recruited and evaluated through the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Treatment (MacCAT-T), the 24-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Patients with poor executive functioning performed worse in MacCAT understanding, appreciation, and expression of a choice, compared with good performers. These findings point to the importance of cognition in decisional capacity processes. In addition, the strong association found between learning abilities and informed consent decision-making provide empirical evidence indicating possible cognitive enhancement strategies that may improve psychiatric patients' competency.

  3. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  4. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  5. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  6. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  7. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  8. The current state of physical activity and exercise programs in German-speaking, Swiss psychiatric hospitals: results from a brief online survey

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Serge; Colledge, Flora; Beeler, Nadja; Pühse, Uwe; Kalak, Nadeem; Sadeghi Bahmani, Dena; Mikoteit, Thorsten; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Gerber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity and exercise programs (PAEPs) are an important factor in increasing and maintaining physical and mental health. This holds particularly true for patients with psychiatric disorders undergoing treatment in a psychiatric hospital. To understand whether the benefits reported in the literature are mirrored in current treatment modalities, the aim of the present study was to assess the current state of PAEPs in psychiatric hospitals in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. Methods All psychiatric hospitals (N=55) in the German-speaking part of Switzerland were contacted in spring 2014. Staff responsible for PAEPs were asked to complete an online questionnaire covering questions related to PAEPs such as type, frequency, staff training, treatment rationale, importance of PAEPs within the treatment strategy, and possible avenues to increase PAEPs. Results Staff members of 48 different psychiatric hospitals completed the survey. Hospitals provided the following therapeutic treatments: relaxation techniques (100%), sports therapy (97%), activity-related psychotherapeutic interventions (95%), physiotherapy (85%), body therapies (59%), far-east techniques (57%), and hippotherapy (22%). Frequencies ranged from once/week to five times/week. Approximately 25% of patients participated in the PAEPs. Interventions were offered irrespective of psychiatric disorders. PAEP providers wanted and needed more vocational training. Conclusion All participating psychiatric hospitals offer a broad variety of PAEPs in their treatment curricula. However, the majority of inpatients do not participate in PAEPs. Furthermore, those who do participate cannot continue to do so following discharge. PAEP providers need specific extended vocational trainings and believe that the potential of PA should be improved. PMID:27350748

  9. 28 CFR 549.45 - Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... available, the institution mental health division administrator must appoint a qualified staff... mental health division administrator. The inmate's appeal, which may be handwritten, must be submitted... facility for psychiatric care or treatment. 549.45 Section 549.45 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF...

  10. Predictors of medication compliance after hospital discharge in adolescent psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, A; Horan, W; Borgaro, S R; Stokes, J M; Pogge, D L; Harvey, P D

    1998-01-01

    Failure in medication compliance in adult psychiatric patients is often found to be due to side effects or associated with unawareness of illness. Little research has been conducted on medication compliance in adolescent psychiatric patients. In this study, 97 adolescent psychiatric patients, including 46 with substance abuse, were followed up an average of 14 months after their discharge from inpatient psychiatric care. Compliance with prescribed medications was examined and the association between several potential predictors and compliance was examined. The overall rate of medication compliance was only 38% at 14-month follow-up, whereas the rate of patients stopping their medications because of side effects was only 23%. Significant predictors of compliance failures were general noncompliance with the discharge plan, followed by postdischarge substance abuse. Side effects did not contribute any additional variance when these factors were considered. These data suggest that medication compliance may be adversely impacted by general tendencies toward noncompliance with treatment, which may be mediated by several possible factors. Interventions to increase awareness of the need for psychotropic medications as well as careful monitoring for substance abuse relapse in this population are suggested.

  11. PCL-R Psychopathy Predicts Disruptive Behavior Among Male Offenders in a Dutch Forensic Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrand, Martin; De Ruiter, Corine; Nijman, Henk

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between psychopathy, according to the Dutch language version of Hare's Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R), and various types of disruptive behavior during inpatient forensic psychiatric treatment is investigated. Ninety-two male participants were administered the PCL-R following admission to an inpatient forensic…

  12. Emergency Psychiatric Services for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities: Perspectives of Hospital Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsky, Yona; Gracey, Carolyn; Gelfand, Sara

    2008-01-01

    Strains on the mainstream mental health system can result in inaccessible services that force individuals with intellectual disabilities into the emergency room (ER) when in psychiatric crisis. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical and systemic issues surrounding emergency psychiatry services for people with intellectual disabilities,…

  13. Opinions about Treatment Modalities among Patients Involuntarily Committed to a Forensic Psychiatric Hospital in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Vuorio, Osmo; Koivisto, Hanna; Paavola, Paula; Hakola, Panu

    2004-01-01

    Patient satisfaction studies concerning various treatment modalities are few among involuntary forensic psychiatric treatment. They indicate general satisfaction with medication, interactive treatment and occupational therapy but dissatisfaction with lack of privacy, insufficiently explained rules and inadequately explained reasons of seclusion.…

  14. Associations of day-to-day temperature change and diurnal temperature range with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-01-01

    Background Although the impacts of temperature on mortality and morbidity have been documented, few studies have investigated whether day-to-day temperature change and diurnal temperature range (DTR) are independent risk factors for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Design This was a prospective, population-based, observational study. Methods We obtained all OHCA data from 2005-2013 from six major prefectures in Japan: Hokkaido, Tokyo, Kanagawa, Aichi, Kyoto, and Osaka. We used a quasi-Poisson regression analysis with a distributed-lag non-linear model to assess the associations of day-to-day temperature change and DTR with OHCA for each prefecture. Results In total, 271,698 OHCAs of presumed cardiac origin were reported during the study period. There was a significant increase in the risk of OHCA associated with cold temperature in five prefectures, with relative risks (RRs) ranging from 1.298 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.022-1.649) in Hokkaido to 3.893 (95% CI 1.713-8.845) in Kyoto. DTR was adversely associated with OHCA on hot days in Aichi (RR 1.158; 95% CI 1.028-1.304) and on cold days in Tokyo (RR 1.030; 95% CI 1.000-1.060), Kanagawa (RR 1.042; 95% CI 1.005-1.082), Kyoto (RR 1.060; 95% CI 1.001-1.122), and Osaka (RR 1.050; 95% CI 1.014-1.088), whereas there was no significant association between day-to-day temperature change and OHCA. Conclusion We found that associations between day-to-day temperature change and DTR and OHCA were generally small compared with the association with mean temperature. Our findings suggest that preventative measures for temperature-related OHCA may be more effective when focused on mean temperature and DTR.

  15. Suicidal Ideation of Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents has One-Year Predictive Validity for Suicide Attempts in Girls Only

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qingmei; Czyz, Ewa K.; Kerr, David C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Clinicians commonly incorporate adolescents’ self-reported suicidal ideation into formulations regarding adolescents’ risk for suicide. Data are limited, however, regarding the extent to which adolescent boys’ and girls’ reports of suicidal ideation have clinically significant predictive validity in terms of subsequent suicidal behavior. This study examined psychiatrically hospitalized adolescent boys’ and girls’ self-reported suicidal ideation as a predictor of suicide attempts during the first year following hospitalization. A total of 354 adolescents (97 boys; 257 girls; ages 13–17 years) hospitalized for acute suicide risk were evaluated at the time of hospitalization as well as 3, 6, and 12 months later. Study measures included the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire-Junior, Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, Children’s Depression Rating Scale-Revised, Beck Hopelessness Scale, Youth Self-Report, and Personal Experiences Screen Questionnaire. The main study outcome was presence and number of suicide attempt(s) in the year after hospitalization, measured by the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children. Results indicated a significant interaction between suicidal ideation, assessed during first week of hospitalization, and gender for the prediction of subsequent suicide attempts. Suicidal ideation was a significant predictor of subsequent suicide attempts for girls, but not boys. Baseline history of multiple suicide attempts was a significant predictor of subsequent suicide attempts across genders. Results support the importance of empirically validating suicide risk assessment strategies separately for adolescent boys and girls. Among adolescent boys who have been hospitalized due to acute suicide risk, low levels of self-reported suicidal ideation may not be indicative of low risk for suicidal behavior following hospitalization. PMID:23996157

  16. Behavioral activation and inhibition system's role in predicting addictive behaviors of patients with bipolar disorder of Roozbeh Psychiatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Moslem; Sadeghi, Hasan; Pirani, Zabih; Vatandoust, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, prevalence of addictive behaviors among bipolar patients is considered to be a serious health threat by the World Health Organization. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of behavioral activation and inhibition systems in predicting addictive behaviors of male patients with bipolar disorder at the Roozbeh Psychiatric Hospital. Materials and Methods: The research method used in this study is correlation. The study population consisted of 80 male patients with bipolar disorder referring to the psychiatrics clinics of Tehran city in 2014 who were referred to the Roozbeh Psychiatric Hospital. To collect data, the international and comprehensive inventory diagnostic interview, behavioral activation and inhibition systems scale, and addictive behaviors scale were used. Results: The results showed that there is a positive and significant relationship between behavioral activation systems and addictive behaviors (addictive eating, alcohol addiction, television addiction, cigarette addiction, mobile addiction, etc.). In addition, correlation between behavioral inhibition systems and addictive behaviors (addictive eating, alcohol addiction, TV addiction, cigarette addiction, mobile addiction) is significantly negative. Finally, regression analysis showed that behavioral activation and inhibition systems could significantly predict 47% of addictive behaviors in patients with bipolar disorder. Conclusions: It can be said that the patients with bipolar disorder use substance and addictive behaviors for enjoyment and as pleasure stimulants; they also use substances to suppress unpleasant stimulants and negative emotions. These results indicate that behavioral activation and inhibition systems have an important role in the incidence and exacerbation of addictive behaviors. Therefore, preventive interventions in this direction seem to be necessary. PMID:28194203

  17. Cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation treatment initiated during psychiatric hospitalization: analysis from a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Paul G.; Wong, Wynnie; Jeffers, Abra; Hall, Sharon M.; Prochaska, Judith J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We examined the cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation treatment for psychiatric inpatients. Method Smokers, regardless of intention to quit, were recruited during psychiatric hospitalization and randomized to receive stage-based smoking cessation services or usual aftercare. Smoking cessation services, quality of life, and biochemically-verified abstinence from cigarettes were assessed during 18-months of follow-up. Trial findings were combined with literature on changes in smoking status and the age and gender adjusted effect of smoking on health care cost, mortality, and quality of life in a Markov model of cost-effectiveness during a lifetime horizon. Results Among 223 smokers randomized between 2006 and 2008, the mean cost of smoking cessation services was $189 in the experimental treatment group and $37 in the usual care condition (p < 0.001). At the end of follow-up, 18.75% of the experimental group was abstinent from cigarettes, compared to 6.80% abstinence in the usual care group (p <0.05). The model projected that the intervention added $43 in lifetime cost and generated 0.101 additional Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs), an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $428 per QALY. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis found the experimental intervention was cost-effective against the acceptance criteria of $50,000/QALY in 99.0% of the replicates. Conclusions A cessation intervention for smokers identified in psychiatric hospitalization did not result in higher mental health care costs in the short-run and was highly cost-effective over the long-term. The stage-based intervention was a feasible and cost-effective way of addressing the high smoking prevalence in persons with serious mental illness. PMID:26528651

  18. Reducing unnecessary hospital days to improve quality of care through physician accountability: a cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over 20% of hospital bed use is inappropriate, implying a waste of resources and the increase of patient iatrogenic risk. Methods This is a cluster, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial, carried out in a large University Hospital of Northern Italy, aiming to evaluate the effect of a strategy to reduce unnecessary hospital days. The primary outcome was the percentage of patient-days compatible with discharge. Among secondary objectives, to describe the strategy’s effect in the long-term, as well as on hospital readmissions, considered to be a marker of the quality of hospital care. The 12 medical wards with the longest length of stay participated. Effectiveness was measured at the individual level on 3498 eligible patients during monthly index days. Patients admitted or discharged on index days, or with stay >90 days, were excluded. All ward staff was blinded to the index days, while staff in the control arm and data analysts were blinded to the trial’s objectives and interventions. The strategy comprised the distribution to physicians of the list of their patients whose hospital stay was compatible with discharge according to a validated Delay Tool, and of physician length of stay profiles, followed by audits managed autonomously by the physicians of the ward. Results During the 12 months of data collection, over 50% of patient-days were judged to be compatible with discharge. Delays were mainly due to problems with activities under medical staff control. Multivariate analysis considering clustering showed that the strategy reduced patient-days compatible with discharge by 16% in the intervention vs control group, (OR=0.841; 95% CI, 0.735 to 0.963; P=0.012). Follow-up at 1 year did not yield a statistically significant difference between the percentages of patient-days judged to be compatible with discharge between the two arms (OR=0.818; 95% CI, 0.476 to 1.405; P=0.47). There was no significant difference in 30-day readmission and mortality rates

  19. Impact of a mandatory behavioral consultation on seclusion/restraint utilization in a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Donat, D C

    1998-03-01

    Despite demonstrations of the utility and cost effectiveness of behavioral methods for improving care for people with psychiatric impairments, they are seldom employed effectively in inpatient settings. This study evaluated the impact of an administrative procedure to effect a behavioral consultation for cases of high seclusion/restraint utilization. Seclusion/restraint use for the 53 cases was reviewed for a time period of 6 months before and 6 months after development of a behavioral treatment plan resulting from this procedure. The data revealed a 62% reduction in seclusion/restraint use after development of an approved plan. There was also a reversal in serial trend from increasing use during the months prior to plan development to decreasing use during months after plan development. The procedure is described and implications of the results for clinicians and administrators of psychiatric inpatient programs are discussed.

  20. Extensive antibiotic prescription rate among hospitalized patients in Uganda: but with frequent missed-dose days

    PubMed Central

    Kiguba, Ronald; Karamagi, Charles; Bird, Sheila M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe the patterns of systemic antibiotic use and missed-dose days and detail the prescription, dispensing and administration of frequently used hospital-initiated antibiotics among Ugandan inpatients. Methods This was a prospective cohort of consented adult inpatients admitted on the medical and gynaecological wards of the 1790 bed Mulago National Referral Hospital. Results Overall, 79% (603/762; 95% CI: 76%–82%) of inpatients received at least one antibiotic during hospitalization while 39% (300/762; 95% CI: 36%–43%) had used at least one antibiotic in the 4 weeks pre-admission; 1985 antibiotic DDDs, half administered parenterally, were consumed in 3741 inpatient-days. Two-fifths of inpatients who received at least one of the five frequently used hospital-initiated antibiotics (ceftriaxone, metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, amoxicillin and azithromycin) missed at least one antibiotic dose-day (44%, 243/558). The per-day risk of missed antibiotic administration was greatest on day 1: ceftriaxone (36%, 143/398), metronidazole (27%, 67/245), ciprofloxacin (34%, 39/114) and all inpatients who missed at least one dose-day of prescribed amoxicillin and azithromycin. Most patients received fewer doses than were prescribed: ceftriaxone (74%, 273/371), ciprofloxacin (90%, 94/105) and metronidazole (97%, 222/230). Of prescribed doses, only 62% of ceftriaxone doses (1178/1895), 35% of ciprofloxacin doses (396/1130) and 27% of metronidazole doses (1043/3862) were administered. Seven percent (13/188) of patients on intravenous metronidazole and 6% (5/87) on intravenous ciprofloxacin switched to oral route. Conclusions High rates of antibiotic use both pre-admission and during hospitalization were observed, with low parenteral/oral switch of hospital-initiated antibiotics. Underadministration of prescribed antibiotics was common, especially on the day of prescription, risking loss of efficacy and antibiotic resistance. PMID:26945712

  1. [Practical study for seminar program certified by Japanese Society of Hospital Pharmacists for Clinical Psychiatric Pharmacists organized by Chiba Society of Hospital Pharmacists, and investigation of participants' background and issues for taking board certified psychiatric pharmacy specialists and board certified pharmacists in psychiatric pharmacy certifications using questionnaires].

    PubMed

    Tsukiji, Mariko; Furuyama, Hikaru; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Ishida, Keiko; Matsuda, Kimiko; Fukuda, Keiko; Shimizu, Hideyuki

    2010-09-01

    Recently, certification systems for Board-Certified Psychiatric Pharmacy Specialists (BCPPS) and Board-Certified Pharmacists in Psychiatric Pharmacy (BCPPP) were established by the Japanese Society of Hospital Pharmacists (JSHP) in 2008, to meet the increasing needs for specialists in psychiatric pharmacy. However, there was no report on the background and opinion of pharmacists who have intention to take the BCPPS or BCPPP and/or seminar programs for BCPPS or BCPPP. The Chiba Society of Hospital Pharmacists has started to provide a seminar program certified by the JSHP to study psychiatry for pharmacists and also investigated the participants' background, demand for the program, and issues in taking the BCPPS or BCPPP using questionnaires. We found that many participants wanted lectures to obtain information on issues they face in routine work as well as for certification testing. For many participants, satisfying the requirements for applying for the BCPPS or BCPPP was one of the most important issues in receiving the qualifications. We found that over 40% of participants working at community pharmacies intended to take the BCPPS or BCPPP, although working experience at a community pharmacy does not entitle them to apply for the BCPPS or BCPPP. The intention of community pharmacists indicates that discussion of the requirements for BCPPS or BCPPP certification systems is necessary to improve psychiatric community care. We will plan a practical seminar program with feedback from this investigation.

  2. Utility of models to predict 28-day or 30-day unplanned hospital readmissions: an updated systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huaqiong; Della, Phillip R; Roberts, Pamela; Goh, Louise; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S

    2016-01-01

    Objective To update previous systematic review of predictive models for 28-day or 30-day unplanned hospital readmissions. Design Systematic review. Setting/data source CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE from 2011 to 2015. Participants All studies of 28-day and 30-day readmission predictive model. Outcome measures Characteristics of the included studies, performance of the identified predictive models and key predictive variables included in the models. Results Of 7310 records, a total of 60 studies with 73 unique predictive models met the inclusion criteria. The utilisation outcome of the models included all-cause readmissions, cardiovascular disease including pneumonia, medical conditions, surgical conditions and mental health condition-related readmissions. Overall, a wide-range C-statistic was reported in 56/60 studies (0.21–0.88). 11 of 13 predictive models for medical condition-related readmissions were found to have consistent moderate discrimination ability (C-statistic ≥0.7). Only two models were designed for the potentially preventable/avoidable readmissions and had C-statistic >0.8. The variables ‘comorbidities’, ‘length of stay’ and ‘previous admissions’ were frequently cited across 73 models. The variables ‘laboratory tests’ and ‘medication’ had more weight in the models for cardiovascular disease and medical condition-related readmissions. Conclusions The predictive models which focused on general medical condition-related unplanned hospital readmissions reported moderate discriminative ability. Two models for potentially preventable/avoidable readmissions showed high discriminative ability. This updated systematic review, however, found inconsistent performance across the included unique 73 risk predictive models. It is critical to define clearly the utilisation outcomes and the type of accessible data source before the selection of the predictive model. Rigorous validation of the predictive models with moderate-to-high discriminative

  3. [From the actual foreign experience in organization of functioning of day-hospital for children].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with the issues of organization of functioning of day-hospital for children in particular foreign countries. The hospitals and medical centers of USA and Canada exemplify the positive experience of curative, rehabilitative and psychological care to children in daytime. The demand for effective medical service of this type by children and their parents is noted. The possibility of using this experience in Russian health care is discussed.

  4. Acute Psychiatric Hospital Admissions of Adults and Elderly Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pary, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    Examination of the records of 240 inpatients with mental retardation and 7 with autism discharged from a university hospital indicated that elderly adults had more medical problems than did adults, more elderly adults were transferred to a state hospital, and the most common diagnosis in both adults and elderly adults was chronic schizophrenia,…

  5. Predicting U.S. Army suicides after hospitalizations with psychiatric diagnoses in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Warner, LTC Christopher H.; Ivany, LTC Christopher; Petukhova, Maria V.; Rose, Sherri; Bromet, Evelyn J.; Brown, LTC Millard; Cai, Tianxi; Colpe, Lisa J.; Cox, Kenneth L.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Gruber, Michael J.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Lewandowski-Romps, Lisa; Li, Junlong; Millikan-Bell, Amy M.; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Rosellini, Anthony J.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Stein, Murray B.; Wessely, Simon; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Ursano, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The U.S. Army experienced a sharp rise in suicides beginning in 2004. Administrative data show that among those at highest risk are soldiers in the 12 months after inpatient treatment of a psychiatric disorder. OBJECTIVE To develop an actuarial risk algorithm predicting suicide in the 12 months after US Army soldier inpatient treatment of a psychiatric disorder to target expanded post-hospital care. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS There were 53,769 hospitalizations of active duty soldiers in 2004–2009 with ICD-9-CM psychiatric admission diagnoses. Administrative data available prior to hospital discharge abstracted from a wide range of data systems (socio81 demographic, Army career, criminal justice, medical/pharmacy) were used to predict suicides in the subsequent 12 months using machine learning methods (regression trees, penalized regressions) designed to evaluate cross-validated linear, nonlinear, and interactive predictive associations. MAIN OUTCOME Suicides of soldiers hospitalized with psychiatric disorders in the 12 months after hospital discharge. RESULTS 68 soldiers died by suicide within 12 months of hospital discharge (12.0% of all Army suicides), equivalent to 263.9 suicides/100,000 person-years compared to 18.5 suicides/100,000 person-years in the total Army. Strongest predictors included socio-demographics (male, late age of enlistment), criminal offenses (verbal violence, weapons possession), prior suicidality, aspects of prior psychiatric inpatient and outpatient treatment, and disorders diagnosed during the focal hospitalizations. 52.9% of post-hospital suicides occurred after the 5% of hospitalizations with highest predicted suicide risk (3,824.1 suicides/100,000 person years). These highest-risk hospitalizations also accounted for significantly elevated proportions of several other adverse post-hospital outcomes (unintentional injury deaths, suicide attempts, re-hospitalizations). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The high concentration

  6. Work engagement supports nurse workforce stability and quality of care: nursing team-level analysis in psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Van Bogaert, P; Wouters, K; Willems, R; Mondelaers, M; Clarke, S

    2013-10-01

    Research in healthcare settings reveals important links between work environment factors, burnout and organizational outcomes. Recently, research focuses on work engagement, the opposite (positive) pole from burnout. The current study investigated the relationship of nurse practice environment aspects and work engagement (vigour, dedication and absorption) to job outcomes and nurse-reported quality of care variables within teams using a multilevel design in psychiatric inpatient settings. Validated survey instruments were used in a cross-sectional design. Team-level analyses were performed with staff members (n = 357) from 32 clinical units in two psychiatric hospitals in Belgium. Favourable nurse practice environment aspects were associated with work engagement dimensions, and in turn work engagement was associated with job satisfaction, intention to stay in the profession and favourable nurse-reported quality of care variables. The strongest multivariate models suggested that dedication predicted positive job outcomes whereas nurse management predicted perceptions of quality of care. In addition, reports of quality of care by the interdisciplinary team were predicted by dedication, absorption, nurse-physician relations and nurse management. The study findings suggest that differences in vigour, dedication and absorption across teams associated with practice environment characteristics impact nurse job satisfaction, intention to stay and perceptions of quality of care.

  7. Analysis of outcome variables of a token economy system in a state psychiatric hospital: a program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Comaty, J E; Stasio, M; Advokat, C

    2001-01-01

    This study describes the outcome of a token economy treatment applied to 2 distinct patient populations on the same unit of a state psychiatric hospital: individuals with a dual diagnosis of mental retardation and a DSM-IV Axis I diagnosis of either (a) a severe behavior disorder (BD) or (b) a serious and persistent psychiatric disorder (PD). Results showed that patients in the PD group were more likely to complete the treatment (17/20) than those in the BD group (17/31) who were more likely to be terminated from the program (14/31). Individuals who did not complete the program were distinguished early, within the first 3 weeks of treatment. These noncompleters received significantly more fines and earned significantly fewer tokens than those who completed the program. At an average of 2.7 years post-discharge, there was no difference in the proportion of PD (12/16) and BD completers (9/11) and BD noncompleters (3/7) remaining in the community. These data show that diverse populations of patients can be treated within the same token economy program, thereby improving cost effectiveness. Future research should be directed toward characterizing those patients (e.g., BD) less likely to succeed when they enter treatment, and determining if modifications in the program can improve that outcome.

  8. Assessing the diagnostic validity of a structured psychiatric interview in a first-admission hospital sample

    PubMed Central

    NORDGAARD, JULIE; REVSBECH, RASMUS; SÆBYE, DITTE; PARNAS, JOSEF

    2012-01-01

    The use of structured psychiatric interviews performed by non-clinicians is frequent for research purposes and is becoming increasingly common in clini-cal practice. The validity of such interviews has rarely been evaluated empirically. In this study of a sample of 100 diagnostically heterogeneous, first-admitted inpatients, the results of an assessment with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID), yielding a DSM-IV diagnosis and performed by a trained non-clinician, were compared with a consensus lifetime best diagnostic estimate (DSM-IV) by two experienced research clinicians, based on multiple sources of information, which included videotaped comprehensive semi-structured narrative interviews. The overall kappa agreement was 0.18. The sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of schizophrenia by SCID were 19% and 100%, respectively. It is concluded that structured interviews performed by non-clinicians are not recommendable for clinical work and should only be used in research with certain precautions. It is suggested that a revival of systematic theoretical and practical training in psychopathology is an obvious way forward in order to improve the validity and therapeutic utility of psychiatric diagnosis. PMID:23024678

  9. [Ultima ratio of the applied security measures in placing perpetrators in a psychiatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Hajdukiewicz, Danuta

    2006-01-01

    The meaning of articles on the main security measures concerned with placing the convict in a closed psychiatric unit is studied. Articles 93 & 94 section 1 of the penal code limit their application only as final measures--the ultima ratio. Art. 93 of the penal code pertains to the perpetrator of illegal actions in connection to their psychiatric illness, mental retardation, alcohol or other related substance addiction, along with a risk of the crime being committed once again, only when it will prevent the person from repeating the crime. The issues that need be considered are the following: psychic state of the perpetrator along with prediction of the risk of him repeating the act, but the liability evaluation and the degree of probability do not play any vital role. This is probably due to the fact that the measure described in art. 96 of the penal code has a limited time span (it cannot be any shorter than 3 months and longer than 2 years) and what is more; it can be applied instead of the punishment. Art. 94 section 1 of the penal code requires very precise evaluation of the risk of repetition in each case of a non-liable perpetrator guilty of conducting crime of serious social damage. This measure is not limited in time span, because it depends on the psychic state of the person under its influence. Henceforth it is considered as more restrictive.

  10. Stigma, Social Structure, and the Biomedical Framework: Exploring the Stigma Experiences of Inpatient Service Users in Two Belgian Psychiatric Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sercu, Charlotte; Bracke, Piet

    2016-05-31

    The study discusses the stigma experiences of service users in mental health care, within the debate on the role of the biomedical framework for mental health care and power relations in society. Interview data of inpatient users (n = 42) and care providers (n = 43) from two Belgian psychiatric hospitals were analyzed using a constructivist grounded theory approach: Findings offer insight into how stigma experiences are affected by social structure. Stigma seemed to be related to the relation between care providers and service users their social position. The concept "mental health literacy" is used to frame this finding. In paying attention to the specific cultural and normative context, which influences the relationship between mental health literacy and stigma, it is further possible to cast some light on the meaning of the biomedical model for the construction and maintenance of power relations in mental health care and broader society.

  11. Half of 30-Day Hospital Readmissions Among HIV-Infected Patients Are Potentially Preventable

    PubMed Central

    Kitchell, Ellen; Etherton, Sarah Shelby; Duarte, Piper; Halm, Ethan A.; Jain, Mamta K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thirty-day readmission rates, a widely utilized quality metric, are high among HIV-infected individuals. However, it is unknown how many 30-day readmissions are preventable, especially in HIV patients, who have been excluded from prior potentially preventable readmission analyses. We used electronic medical records to identify all readmissions within 30 days of discharge among HIV patients hospitalized at a large urban safety net hospital in 2011. Two independent reviewers assessed whether readmissions were potentially preventable using both published criteria and detailed chart review, how readmissions might have been prevented, and the phase of care deemed suboptimal (inpatient care, discharge planning, post-discharge). Of 1137 index admissions, 213 (19%) resulted in 30-day readmissions. These admissions occurred among 930 unique HIV patients, with 130 individuals (14%) experiencing 30-day readmissions. Of these 130, about half were determined to be potentially preventable using published criteria (53%) or implicit chart review (48%). Not taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) greatly increased the odds of a preventable readmission (OR 5.9, CI:2.4–14.8). Most of the preventable causes of readmission were attributed to suboptimal care during the index hospitalization. Half of 30-day readmission in HIV patients are potentially preventable. Increased focus on early ART initiation, adherence counseling, management of chronic conditions, and appropriate timing of discharge may help reduce readmissions in this vulnerable population. PMID:26154066

  12. Patient safety culture in two Finnish state-run forensic psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kuosmanen, Anssi; Tiihonen, Jari; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Eronen, Markku; Turunen, Hannele

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture refers to the way patient safety is regarded and implemented within an organization and the structures and procedures in place to support this. The aim of this study was to evaluate patient safety culture, identify areas for improvement, and establish a baseline for improving state hospitals in Finland. Cross-sectional design data were collected from two state-run forensic hospitals in Finland using an anonymous, Web-based survey targeted to hospital staff based on the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire. The response rate was 43% (n = 283). The overall patient safety level was rated as excellent or very good by 58% of respondents. The highest positive grade was for "teamwork within units" (72%). The lowest rating was for "nonpunitive response to errors" (26% positive). Good opportunities for supplementary education had a statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) effect on 9 of 12 Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture dimensions. Statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) differences in patient safety culture were also found in the staff's educational background, manager status, and between the two hospitals. These findings suggest there are a number of patient safety problems related to cultural dimensions. Supplementary education was shown to be a highly significant factor in transforming patient safety culture and should therefore be taken into account alongside sufficient resources.

  13. Two iniencephaly cases born the same day in the same hospital of Cali, Colombia. Iniencephaly cluster?

    PubMed Central

    Saldarriaga, Wilmar; Isaza De Lourido, Carolina; Ruiz Murcia, Fabian Andres

    2014-01-01

    Two patients with short and hyperextended neck, cervical meningocele and other birth defects, were born the same day at the same hospital, both died. The autopsy report and X-rays show iniencephaly's classic findings. Revision of clinical histories did not show consanguinity between the parents, or exposure to environmental factors. PMID:24810450

  14. The effects of daily weather variables on psychosis admissions to psychiatric hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2013-07-01

    Several studies have noted seasonal variations in admission rates of patients with psychotic illnesses. However, the changeable daily meteorological patterns within seasons have never been examined in any great depth in the context of admission rates. A handful of small studies have posed interesting questions regarding a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (especially heat waves) and sunshine. In this study, we used simple non-parametric testing and more complex ARIMA and time-series regression analysis to examine whether daily meteorological patterns (wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, sunshine, sunlight and temperature) exert an influence on admission rates for psychotic disorders across 12 regions in Ireland. Although there were some weak but interesting trends for temperature, barometric pressure and sunshine, the meteorological patterns ultimately did not exert a clinically significant influence over admissions for psychosis. Further analysis is needed.

  15. The effects of daily weather variables on psychosis admissions to psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2013-07-01

    Several studies have noted seasonal variations in admission rates of patients with psychotic illnesses. However, the changeable daily meteorological patterns within seasons have never been examined in any great depth in the context of admission rates. A handful of small studies have posed interesting questions regarding a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (especially heat waves) and sunshine. In this study, we used simple non-parametric testing and more complex ARIMA and time-series regression analysis to examine whether daily meteorological patterns (wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, sunshine, sunlight and temperature) exert an influence on admission rates for psychotic disorders across 12 regions in Ireland. Although there were some weak but interesting trends for temperature, barometric pressure and sunshine, the meteorological patterns ultimately did not exert a clinically significant influence over admissions for psychosis. Further analysis is needed.

  16. The shift of psychiatric inpatient care from hospitals to jails and prisons.

    PubMed

    Lamb, H Richard; Weinberger, Linda E

    2005-01-01

    Far-reaching structural changes have been made in the mental health system. Many severely mentally ill persons who come to the attention of law enforcement now receive their inpatient treatment in jails and prisons, at least in part, because of a dramatic reduction of psychiatric inpatient beds. While more high-quality community treatment, such as intensive case management and assertive community treatment, is needed, the authors believe that for many, 24-hour structured care is needed in the mental health system for various lengths of time to decrease criminalization. Another central theme of this article is that when a mentally ill individual is arrested, that person now has a computerized criminal record, which is easily accessed by the police and the courts in subsequent encounters. This may influence their decisions and reinforce the tendency to choose the criminal justice system over the mental health system.

  17. Neurasthenia, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and the Medicalization of Worry in a Vietnamese Psychiatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tran, Allen L

    2016-04-26

    This article examines two forms of the medicalization of worry in an outpatient psychiatric clinic in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Biomedical psychiatrists understand patients' symptoms as manifestations of the excessive worry associated with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Drawing on an ethnopsychology of emotion that reflects increasingly popular models of neoliberal selfhood, these psychiatrists encourage patients to frame psychic distress in terms of private feelings to address the conditions in their lives that lead to chronic anxiety. However, most patients attribute their symptoms to neurasthenia instead of GAD. Differences between doctors' and patients' explanatory models are not just rooted in their understandings of illness but also in their respective conceptualizations of worry in terms of emotion and sentiment. Patients with neurasthenia reject doctors' attempts to psychologize distress and maintain a model of worry that supports a sense of moral selfhood based on notions of obligation and sacrifice.

  18. The psychiatric hospital and its place in a mental health service

    PubMed Central

    Tooth, Geoffrey

    1958-01-01

    Modern methods of treatment of mental disease enable the average length of stay in hospital to be drastically reduced. The former overcrowding is therefore disappearing; in fact, it should be possible to contemplate a reduction in the size of the hospitals, particularly if new admissions are kept to a minimum by the provision of efficient out-patient clinics and of adequate geriatric and domiciliary nursing services. Taking recent trends in England and Wales as his starting point, the author outlines ways in which a modern mental health service might be built up around existing facilities under a variety of conditions. He advocates that, as far as possible, the treatment of mental disease should be integrated into general medicine, and emphasises the need for close co-operation between psychiatrists, family doctors, and the staff of general hospitals. PMID:13585081

  19. Social Connectedness and One-Year Trajectories among Suicidal Adolescents Following Psychiatric Hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Czyz, Ewa K.; Liu, Zhuqing; King, Cheryl A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study examined the extent to which post-hospitalization change in connectedness with family, peers, and non-family adults predicted suicide attempts, severity of suicidal ideation, and depressive symptoms across a 12-month follow-up period among inpatient suicidal adolescents. Method Participants were 338 inpatient suicidal adolescents, ages 13-17, who were assessed at three, six, and 12 months post hospitalization. General liner models were fitted for depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation outcomes, and logistic regression was used for the dichotomous suicide attempt outcome. The moderating effects of gender and multiple attempt history were examined. Results Adolescents who reported greater improvements in peer connectedness were half as likely to attempt suicide during the 12-month period. Improved peer connectedness was also associated with less severe depressive symptoms for all adolescents and with less severe suicidal ideation for females, but only at the three-month assessment time point. Improved family connectedness was related to less severe depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation across the entire year; for suicidal ideation, this protective effect was limited to non-multiple suicide attempters. Change in connectedness with non-family adults was not a significant predictor of any outcome when changes in family and peer connectedness were taken into account. Conclusions These results pointing to improved post-hospitalization connectedness being linked to improved outcomes following hospitalization have important treatment and prevention implications given inpatient suicidal adolescents’ vulnerability to suicidal behavior. PMID:22417194

  20. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) The reasons for either— (i) Hospitalization of the patient for inpatient medical treatment or medically required inpatient diagnostic study; or (ii) Special or unusual services for cost outlier cases... treatment in a SNF but no bed is available in a participating SNF. (2) If this is the basis for...

  1. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) The reasons for either— (i) Hospitalization of the patient for inpatient medical treatment or medically required inpatient diagnostic study; or (ii) Special or unusual services for cost outlier cases... treatment in a SNF but no bed is available in a participating SNF. (2) If this is the basis for...

  2. Effects of hospital closure on mortality rates of the over-65 long-stay psychiatric population.

    PubMed

    Jackson, G A; Whyte, J

    1998-12-01

    The closure of this 100-year-old hospital has allowed us to look at the effect on mortality of moving the whole over-65 long-stay population to other settings. Our results confirm that there is a slight excess of deaths during and immediately after these moves, but that there is no longer-term effect on mortality rates.

  3. Personality Change as a Function of Voluteer Experience in a Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Mark; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Members of an undergraduate course in psychology (n equals 416) were tested for moral tolerance and self acceptance before and after course completion. Sixteen students did concurrent hospital work. The volunteer experience did not significantly affect moral tolerance scores, but did result in greater self acceptance scores. (Author/CJ)

  4. Buspirone treatment of psychiatrically hospitalized prepubertal children with symptoms of anxiety and moderately severe aggression.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, C R; Jiang, H; Domeshek, L J

    1997-01-01

    Open-label buspirone was studied in 25 prepubertal psychiatric inpatients (age 8.0 +/- 1.8 years, 76% boys) presenting with anxiety symptoms and moderately aggressive behavior. Patients with severe aggression, requiring rapid treatment with mood stabilizers or neuroleptics, were excluded. A 3-week titration (maximum 50 mg daily) preceded a 6-week maintenance phase at optimal dose. Buspirone was discontinued in 6 children (25%): 4 developed increased aggression and agitation, and 2 developed euphoric mania. For the 19 patients who completed the study, mean optimal dose was 28 mg daily. Among completers, depressive symptoms were reduced 52% by Week 6 on Children's Depression Inventory (p < or = 0.001). Decreased aggressivity was reflected in a 29% reduction on Measure of Aggression, Violence, and Rage in Children [MAVRIC] ratings (p < or = 0.02) and in 86% less time in seclusion or physical restraints (p < or = 0.02). Clinical Global Assessment scores improved (CGAS 41 vs. 54, p < or = 0.01). Only 3 children improved sufficiently to continue buspirone after the study. Residual aggressivity and global functioning remained problematic. Buspirone may pose behavioral risks in treating moderate aggressivity in 24% of children with anxiety; in the others, the therapeutic effects on aggression, anxiety, and depression were limited but significant.

  5. Cognitive and Social Factors Associated with NSSI and Suicide Attempts in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Jennifer; Frazier, Elisabeth A.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Burke, Taylor; Sloan, Emma; Spirito, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Although non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide attempts (SA) frequently co-occur among youth, there is increasing evidence that both the risk factors and the phenomenology of the behaviors are distinct. This study examined how individuals who engage in NSSI only, individuals who attempt suicide only, and those who have histories of both NSSI and at least one suicide attempt may differ in terms of cognitions and perceived social support. Participants were 185 adolescents (78.1% female) between the ages of 13 and 18 recruited from a psychiatric inpatient facility in the northeastern United States. One hundred forty-eight teens were identified with a history of self-injurious behavior and divided into three groups: NSSI only (n=45), SA only (n=24) or both NSSI and SA (NSSI+SA; n=79). Analyses showed that the NSSI+SA group exhibited more cognitive errors, negative self-statements, and negative views of self, world, and future, as well as less perceived familial support than either the NSSI or SA only groups. There were no differences between groups on perceived support from teachers or peers. No significant demographic or diagnostic differences were found between the NSSI and SA groups. Limitations and clinical implications of the current research are discussed. PMID:23588400

  6. SUICIDAL IDEATORS IN THE PSYCHIATRIC FACILITY OF A GENERAL HOSPITAL - A PSYCHODEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE

    PubMed Central

    Unni, Sadanandan K.E.; Mani, Annie J.

    1996-01-01

    As a part of the basis for planning of prevention of suicide and suicide attempt, 154 suicidal ideators registered between 1988 and 1991, were recruited for an analysis of their psychiatric morbidity pattern. 59.74% had depression. The representation of substance abuse disorder and psychoses were 9.74% each 7.14% had neurotic disorders. 9.09% had bipolar affective disorder and 0.65% had normal mental status. 40% of the sample were housewives. Majority of them were between the age group of 16 and45years, having an educational status below 10th Standard The four year follow up findings showed that 8 of the sample completed suicide, of which four were suffering from psychosis. Repeaters suffered from disociation disorder. 15 of the depressives had resistant depression with nonremittent suicidal ideas. Psychotic patients and patients with somatic complaints were not free communicators of their suicidal idea. Implication of the results in the cunicalmanagement and further research on these patients are discussed. PMID:21584150

  7. Cognitive and social factors associated with NSSI and suicide attempts in psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Jennifer; Frazier, Elisabeth A; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Burke, Taylor; Sloan, Emma; Spirito, Anthony

    2013-08-01

    Although non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide attempts (SA) frequently co-occur among youth, there is increasing evidence that both the risk factors and the phenomenology of the behaviors are distinct. This study examined how individuals who engage in NSSI only, individuals who attempt suicide only, and those who have histories of both NSSI and at least one suicide attempt may differ in terms of cognitions and perceived social support. Participants were 185 adolescents (78.1 % female) between the ages of 13 and 18 recruited from a psychiatric inpatient facility in the northeastern United States. One hundred forty-eight teens were identified with a history of self-injurious behavior and divided into three groups: NSSI only (n = 45), SA only (n = 24) or both NSSI and SA (NSSI+SA; n = 79). Analyses showed that the NSSI+SA group exhibited more cognitive errors, negative self-statements, and negative views of self, world, and future, as well as less perceived familial support than either the NSSI or SA only groups. There were no differences between groups on perceived support from teachers or peers. No significant demographic or diagnostic differences were found between the NSSI and SA groups. Limitations and clinical implications of the current research are discussed.

  8. Psychosocial functioning of individuals with schizophrenia in community housing facilities and the psychiatric hospital in Zurich.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Matthias; Briner, David; Kawohl, Wolfram; Seifritz, Erich; Baumgartner-Nietlisbach, Gabriela

    2015-12-15

    Individuals with severe mental illness frequently have difficulties in obtaining and maintaining adequate accommodation. If they are not willing or able to adapt to requirements of traditional supported housing institutions they may live in sheltered and emergency accommodation. Adequate mental health services are rarely available in these facilities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate mental health, functional and social status of individuals living in community sheltered housing facilities. A cross-sectional survey of n=338 individuals in sheltered housing compared to a sample of patients at intake in acute inpatient psychiatry (n=619) concerning clinical and social variables was carried out in the catchment area of Zurich. Matched subsamples of individuals with schizophrenia (n=168) were compared concerning functioning and impairments on the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS). Individuals with schizophrenia in sheltered housing (25% of the residents) have significantly more problems concerning substance use, physical illness, psychopathological symptoms other than psychosis and depression, and relationships, daily activities and occupation than patients with schizophrenia at intake on an acute psychiatric ward. Community sheltered accommodation although conceptualized to prevent homelessness in the general population de facto serve as housing facilities for individuals with schizophrenia and other severe mental illness.

  9. The Development of Psychiatric Services Providing an Alternative to Full-Time Hospitalization Is Associated with Shorter Length of Stay in French Public Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Gandré, Coralie; Gervaix, Jeanne; Thillard, Julien; Macé, Jean-Marc; Roelandt, Jean-Luc; Chevreul, Karine

    2017-01-01

    International recommendations for mental health care have advocated for a reduction in the length of stay (LOS) in full-time hospitalization and the development of alternatives to full-time hospitalizations (AFTH) could facilitate alignment with those recommendations. Our objective was therefore to assess whether the development of AFTH in French psychiatric sectors was associated with a reduction in the LOS in full-time hospitalization. Using data from the French national discharge database of psychiatric care, we computed the LOS of patients admitted for full-time hospitalization. The level of development of AFTH was estimated by the share of human resources allocated to those alternatives in the hospital enrolling the staff of each sector. Multi-level modelling was carried out to adjust the analysis on other factors potentially associated with the LOS (patients’, psychiatric sectors’ and environmental characteristics). We observed considerable variations in the LOS between sectors. Although the majority of these variations resulted from patients’ characteristics, a significant negative association was found between the LOS and the development of AFTH, after adjusting for other factors. Our results provide first evidence of the impact of the development of AFTH on mental health care and will provide a lever for policy makers to further develop these alternatives. PMID:28335580

  10. Psychiatric hospitalizations for affective disorders in Warsaw, Poland: Effect of season and intensity of sunlight.

    PubMed

    Dominiak, Monika; Swiecicki, Lukasz; Rybakowski, Janusz

    2015-09-30

    The purpose of this study was to assess any associations between the number of hospitalizations for affective disorders, seasons of the year and the intensity of sunlight in Poland, a country with a very changeable climate and significant seasonal fluctuations. We analyzed 2837 admissions with affective disorders hospitalized in the Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology in Warsaw, between 2002 and 2010 (mania, n=380, mixed episode, n=131, bipolar depression, n=736, recurrent depression, n=681, single depressive episode, n=909). For each diagnostic group admission time series were created and categorized into subgroups according to sex and age, and these were analyzed by means of the Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) method. Regression models and correlations were used to assess the influence of the intensity of sunlight on the number of hospitalizations. Most mania admissions were noted in spring/summer months and in midwinter, mixed episode-late spring and winter, and depression (bipolar, recurrent and single depressive episode)-spring and autumn months. The association between frequency of admissions and monthly hours of sunshine was observed in some age and sex subgroups of patients with bipolar disorder and single depressive episode. The results support the seasonality of admissions of patients with affective disorders.

  11. Gender Differences in the Relationship Between Physical Activity and Smoking Among Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Erika Litvin; Abrantes, Ana M; Fokas, Kathryn F; Ramsey, Susan E; Brown, Richard A

    2012-12-01

    Physical activity has been identified as a protective factor with regard to tobacco use, such that physically active adolescents are less likely to initiate smoking, and smokers are less physically active than non-smokers. These findings, along with the well-documented benefits of exercise on mood and well-being in adults, have stimulated interest in exercise-based smoking cessation interventions. However, little research has explored the relationship between physical activity and smoking characteristics within adolescent smokers. Also, gender differences in adolescents' motives for smoking and exercise may have implications for intervention development, especially in clinical populations. The current study explored the relationship between physical activity and smoking in a sample of adolescent smokers (N = 191) and non-smokers (N = 48) receiving inpatient psychiatric treatment (61% female, mean age 15.3 years). Results indicated that smokers were less likely to be physically active than non-smokers. Additionally, there was a consistent pattern of gender differences in the relationship between smoking and physical activity within smokers. Specifically, physically active male smokers were less nicotine dependent and less prone to withdrawal, and had a trend toward greater motivation to quit, than their non-active counterparts. In contrast, physically active female smokers did not differ in dependence or withdrawal and were less motivated to quit than non-active female smokers. Taken together, these results suggest that within clinical populations of adolescent females, smoking and exercise may be used jointly as weight control strategies. Exercise-based interventions for smoking cessation for adolescent females, especially clinical populations, should address weight and body image concerns.

  12. Suicidality and hospitalization as cause and outcome of pediatric psychiatric emergency room visits.

    PubMed

    Grudnikoff, Eugene; Soto, Erin Callahan; Frederickson, Anne; Birnbaum, Michael L; Saito, Ema; Dicker, Robert; Kane, John M; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors of suicidality in youth presenting to a pediatric psychiatric emergency room service (PPERS). To this end, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of youth aged <18 years consecutively assessed by a PPERS 01.01.2002-12.31.2002, using a 12-page semi-structured institutional evaluation form and the Columbia Classification Algorithm for Suicide Assessment. Multivariate regression analyses were conducted to identify correlates of suicidal thoughts and attempts/preparation and their relationship to outpatient/inpatient disposition. Of 1,062 youth, 265 (25.0%) presented with suicidal ideation (16.2%) or attempt/preparation (8.8%). Suicidal ideation was associated with female sex, depression, adjustment disorder, absent referral by family/friend/self, school referral, precipitant of peer conflict, and no antipsychotic treatment (p < 0.0001). Suicidal attempt/preparation was associated with female sex, depression, lower GAF score, past suicide attempt, precipitant of peer conflict, and no stimulant treatment (p < 0.0001). Compared to suicidal attempt/preparation, suicidal ideation was associated with school referral, and higher GAF score (p < 0.0001). Of the 265 patients with suicidality, 58.5% were discharged home (ideation = 72.1% vs. attempt/preparation = 33.7%, p < 0.0001). In patients with suicidal ideation, outpatient disposition was associated with higher GAF score, school referral, and adjustment disorder (p < 0.0001). In patients with suicidal attempt/preparation, outpatient disposition was associated with higher GAF score, lower acuity rating, and school referral (p < 0.0001). Suicidality is common among PPERS evaluations. Higher GAF score and school referral distinguished suicidal ideation from suicidal attempt/preparation and was associated with outpatient disposition in both presentations. Increased education of referral sources and establishment of different non-PPERS evaluation systems may improve

  13. The Day-Hospital of the University Hospital, Bobo Dioulasso: An Example of Optimized HIV Management in Southern Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Chas, Julie; Hema, Arsène; Slama, Laurence; Kabore, Nongondo Firmin; Lescure, François-Xavier; Fontaine, Camille; Pialoux, Gilles; Sawadogo, Adrien

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the epidemiological evolution of patients with HIV (PtHIV), between 2002 and 2012, in a day-hospital that became an HIV reference centre for south-west Burkina Faso. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective study of PtHIV followed in the Bobo Dioulasso university hospital since 2002. The study was based on clinical data recorded using ESOPE software and analysed using Excel and SAS. Results A total of 7320 patients have been treated at the centre since 2002; the active file of patients increased from 147 in 2002 to 3684 patients in 2012. Mean age was stable at 38.4 years and the majority were female (71%). The delay to initiation of antiretroviral (ARV) treatment after HIV diagnosis decreased from 12.9 months in 2002 to 7.2 months in 2012. The percentage of PtHIV lost to follow-up, untreated for HIV and deaths all decreased after 2005. Voluntary anonymous screening and/or an evocative clinical picture were the main reasons for HIV diagnosis, usually at a late stage (41.1% at WHO stage 3). Virological success increased due to a decrease in time to initiation of ARV treatment and an increase in percentage of patients treated (90.5% in 2012, mainly with 1st line drugs). However, there was also a slight increase in the rate of therapeutic failures and the percentage of patients who progressed to 2nd or 3rd line-ARVs. Conclusion Our day-hospital is a good example of the implementation of a specialist centre for the management of PtHIV in a resource-limited country (Burkina Faso). PMID:25970181

  14. [Mental health of college students: experience of the university psychiatric outpatient clinic of Hospital de São João].

    PubMed

    Silveira, Celeste; Norton, Andreia; Brandão, Isabel; Roma-Torres, António

    2011-12-01

    The mental health of college students has been raising major awareness, due to the increased prevalence and severity of psychiatric disorders in this population. Higher education is associated with significant stressors that contribute to the development of mental health disturbances, and most college students are in the high-risk age group for the emergence of symptoms of major psychiatric disorders. Early diagnosis and treatment of these disorders in college students are important areas of effort, since they pose a high impact at the educational, economic, and social levels. Thus, specifically planned mental health services play a major role in the management of this population, should be specialized and have easy accessibility. The purpose of this study is to describe and characterize the College Students' psychiatric outpatient clinic of the Department of Psychiatry, Hospital de São João.

  15. [Physical activities, psychiatric care and mental health].

    PubMed

    Davanture, Olivier

    2014-02-01

    At Ville-Evrard psychiatric hospital, sports activities are used as one of several therapeutic tools. The day-long multi-sport sessions, led notably by a nurse, form part of the care programme. Sport not only enables the patients to exert themselves, it is above all a form of therapeutic mediation which encourages verbal and non-verbal communication.

  16. What happens when 55% of acute psychiatric beds are closed in six days: an unexpected naturalistic observational study

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Matt; Mitchell, Anji; Parkin, Lindsay; Confue, Phil; Shankar, Rohit; Wilson-James, Diane; Marshall, Mike; Edgecombe, Maria; Keaney, Bernie; Gill, Kiran; Harrison, Juliet

    2016-01-01

    Objective The sudden closure of 30 out of 54 acute psychiatric beds in Cornwall presented a stressful challenge to staff but also a natural experiment on how a service dealt with this situation. We aimed to evaluate the outcomes of patients needing to leave the closed ward, how bed occupancy rates were affected and the impact on admission rates. Design A service evaluation of the impact of the ward closure. Setting A comprehensive secondary NHS mental health service in Cornwall serving 550,000 population. Main outcome measures The destination of the patients needing to leave the acute unit, the effect of the closure on bed occupancy, admission rates and serious untoward incidents. Results Of 26 patients needing to be moved from the acute ward, only 10 needed an acute psychiatric bed. None of the seven patients who had been on the ward longer than nine weeks needed an acute unit. Admission rates fell over the subsequent three months. There was no increase in serious incidents due to the closure. Conclusions This naturalistic event suggests that many patients on acute units could be cared for elsewhere, especially recovery/rehabilitation care environments, if political and financial urgency is present. Admission rates are responsive to the pressure on beds. PMID:27757241

  17. Implications for the prevention of aggressive behavior within psychiatric hospitals drawn from interpersonal communication theory.

    PubMed

    Daffern, Michael; Day, Andrew; Cookson, Amy

    2012-05-01

    Although interpersonal style is a defining feature of personality and personality disorder and is commonly identified as an important influence on aggressive behavior, treatment completion, and the development of an effective therapeutic alliance, it is rarely considered in practice guidelines for preventing, engaging, and managing patients at risk of aggression. In this article, the authors consider three potential applications of interpersonal theory to the care and management of patients at risk of aggression during hospitalization: (a) preventing aggression through theoretically grounded limit setting and de-escalation techniques, (b) developing and using interventions to alter problematic interpersonal styles, and (c) understanding therapeutic ruptures and difficulties establishing a therapeutic alliance. Interpersonal theory is proposed to offer a unifying framework that may assist development of intervention and management strategies that can help to reduce the occurrence of aggression in institutional settings.

  18. The HOSPITAL score and LACE index as predictors of 30 day readmission in a retrospective study at a university-affiliated community hospital

    PubMed Central

    Hudali, Tamer

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Hospital readmissions are common, expensive, and a key target of the Medicare Value Based Purchasing (VBP) program. Validated risk assessment tools such as the HOSPITAL score and LACE index have been developed to identify patients at high risk of hospital readmission so they can be targeted for interventions aimed at reducing the rate of readmission. This study aims to evaluate the utility of HOSPITAL score and LACE index for predicting hospital readmission within 30 days in a moderate-sized university affiliated hospital in the midwestern United States. Materials and Methods All adult medical patients who underwent one or more ICD-10 defined procedures discharged from the SIU-SOM Hospitalist service from Memorial Medical Center (MMC) from October 15, 2015 to March 16, 2016, were studied retrospectively to determine if the HOSPITAL score and LACE index were a significant predictors of hospital readmission within 30 days. Results During the study period, 463 discharges were recorded for the hospitalist service. The analysis includes data for the 432 discharges. Patients who died during the hospital stay, were transferred to another hospital, or left against medical advice were excluded. Of these patients, 35 (8%) were readmitted to the same hospital within 30 days. A receiver operating characteristic evaluation of the HOSPITAL score for this patient population shows a C statistic of 0.75 (95% CI [0.67–0.83]), indicating good discrimination for hospital readmission. The Brier score for the HOSPITAL score in this setting was 0.069, indicating good overall performance. The Hosmer–Lemeshow goodness of fit test shows a χ2 value of 3.71 with a p value of 0.59. A receiver operating characteristic evaluation of the LACE index for this patient population shows a C statistic of 0.58 (95% CI [0.48–0.68]), indicating poor discrimination for hospital readmission. The Brier score for the LACE index in this setting was 0.082, indicating good overall performance

  19. Impact of Inpatient Versus Outpatient Total Joint Arthroplasty on 30-Day Hospital Readmission Rates and Unplanned Episodes of Care.

    PubMed

    Springer, Bryan D; Odum, Susan M; Vegari, David N; Mokris, Jeffrey G; Beaver, Walter B

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a study comparing 30-day readmission rates between patients undergoing outpatient versus inpatient total hip (THA) and knee (TKA) arthroplasty. A retrospective review of 137 patients undergoing outpatient total joint arthroplasty (TJA) and 106 patients undergoing inpatient (minimum 2-day hospital stay) TJA was conducted. Unplanned hospital readmissions and unplanned episodes of care were recorded. All patients completed a telephone survey. Seven inpatients and 16 outpatients required hospital readmission or an unplanned episode of care following hospital discharge. Readmission rates were higher for TKA than THA. The authors found no statistical differences in 30-day readmission or unplanned care episodes.

  20. [Recruitment and selection of human resources in a psychiatric hospital at a municipality of São Paulo].

    PubMed

    Mazon, L; Trevizan, M A

    2000-08-01

    This paper aims at disseminating the experience of recruiting and selecting human resources in a psychiatric hospital in the city of Ribeirão Preto, a philanthropic institution with one hundred and four beds that assists pharmaco-dependent patients with mental problems. It presently has eighty-four employees and a high staff turnover in different sectors. As trainees, we realized that the high turnover impaieds the development of activities at the organization as well as prevented a better care delivery to clients. Therefore, we were invited to integrate a team that was made responsible for the recruitment and selection of human resources for this institution. After these procedures and the respective follow-up by those in charge of different sectors, our purpose is to reduce the turnover, implement larger institutional engagement and more synchrony among employees, reduce expenses and bureaucratic activities related to hiring and laying off personnel, reduce operational work and implementing more assisting activities in terms of planning, orientation, execution and evaluation.

  1. Short Hospitalization system: a new way of interpreting day surgery care.

    PubMed

    Rago, Rocco; Franceschini, Francesca; Tomassini, Carlo R

    2016-01-01

    Today's poorer income on the one hand and the more and more unbearable costs on the other, call for solutions to maintain public health through proper and collective care. We need to think of a new dimension of health, to found a modern and innovative approach, which can combine the respect of healthcare rights with the optimization of resources. Worldwide, franchises serving millions of people every year succeed in limiting operating costs and still offer a service and a quality equal to single businesses. Let's imagine every single Day Surgery Unit (DSU), within its own hospital, as a single trade: starting a process of centralized management and subsequent affiliation with other DSUs, they would increase their healthcare offer by means of solid organization, efficiency and foresight that with a strong focus on innovation and continuous updating, thus increasing its range of consumers and containing management costs. The Short Hospitalization System (SHS) is the proposed project, which is not only a type of hospitalization which is different from the ordinary, but also an innovative clinical-organizational model, with an important economic impact, where the management and maximization of the different hospital flows (care, professional, logistical, information), as well as the ability to implement strategies to anticipate them are crucial. The expected benefits are both clinically and socially relevant. Among them: 1) best practice build up; 2) lower impact on daily habits and increased patient satisfaction; 3) reduction of social and health expenditure.

  2. Factors Affecting the Agreement Between Emergency Psychiatrists and General Practitioners Regarding Involuntary Psychiatric Hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Pierre Alexis; Duhamel, Alain; Behal, Hélène; Zouitina-Lietaert, Nadia; Duthilleul, Julie; Marquette, Louise; Ducrocq, François; Vaiva, Guillaume; Rolland, Benjamin

    2016-06-21

    Important discrepancies exist between physicians in deciding when to perform involuntary hospitalization measures (IHMs). The factors underlying these differences are poorly known.We conducted a two-year single-center retrospective study in France on patients who were referred to the emergency department (ED) with an IHM certificate written by a private-practice General Practitioner (GP). For each consultation, the official IHM motive was categorized into four groups: Suicide; Psychosis, Mania, or Melancholia (PMM); Agitation; and Other. The alcohol status of the patient was also noted. The factors underlying the ED psychiatrists' confirmation of the use of IHMs were determined using a logistic regression model. One hundred eighty-nine cases were found (165 patients; 44.2 ± 16 years, 41.3% women). The ED psychiatrists confirmed the use of IHMs in 123 instances (65.1% agreement rate). Multivariate analyses found that IHM disagreement was significantly associated with patient alcohol status and the reason for referral. Specifically, there was an increased risk of IHM disagreement when the patient had an alcohol-positive status (OR = 15.80; 95% CI [6.45-38.67]; p < 0.0001) and when the motive for IHM was "agitation" compared with "suicide" (OR = 11.44; 95% CI[3.38-38.78]; p < 0.0001). These findings reflect significant disparities between GPs and ED psychiatrists regarding the decision to proceed to an IHM.

  3. Social connectedness and one-year trajectories among suicidal adolescents following psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Czyz, Ewa K; Liu, Zhuqing; King, Cheryl A

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which posthospitalization change in connectedness with family, peers, and nonfamily adults predicted suicide attempts, severity of suicidal ideation, and depressive symptoms across a 12-month follow-up period among inpatient suicidal adolescents. Participants were 338 inpatient suicidal adolescents, ages 13 to 17, who were assessed at 3, 6, and 12 months posthospitalization. General liner models were fitted for depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation outcomes, and logistic regression was used for the dichotomous suicide attempt outcome. The moderating effects of gender and multiple attempt history were examined. Adolescents who reported greater improvements in peer connectedness were half as likely to attempt suicide during the 12-month period. Improved peer connectedness was also associated with less severe depressive symptoms for all adolescents and with less severe suicidal ideation for female individuals, but only at the 3-month assessment time point. Improved family connectedness was related to less severe depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation across the entire year; for suicidal ideation, this protective effect was limited to nonmultiple suicide attempters. Change in connectedness with nonfamily adults was not a significant predictor of any outcome when changes in family and peer connectedness were taken into account. These results pointing to improved posthospitalization connectedness being linked to improved outcomes following hospitalization have important treatment and prevention implications given inpatient suicidal adolescents' vulnerability to suicidal behavior.

  4. Barriers and Challenges in Seeking Psychiatric Intervention in a General Hospital, by the Collaborative Child Response Unit, (A Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Handling Child Abuse) A Qualitative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Subramaniyan, Vyjayanthi Kanugodu Srinivasa; Mital, Anukant; Rao, Chandrika; Chandra, Girish

    2017-01-01

    Child abuse is a serious criminal act against children in our country and punishable according to protection of children from sexual offenses act 2012. No one agency has the ability to respond completely to the abuse. Hence a multidisciplinary team approach was developed in India. Aim is to narrate the collaborative effort among the multiple disciplines in a general hospital to deliver child protection services and explore the barriers to integrate psychiatric services.

  5. A Day-Hospital Approach to Treatment of Pediatric Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Initial Functional Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Deirdre E.; Carpino, Elizabeth A.; Chiang, Gloria; Condon, Marianne; Firn, Emily; Gaughan, Veronica J.; Hogan, Melinda, P.T.; Leslie, David S.; Olson, Katie, P.T.; Sager, Susan; Sethna, Navil; Simons, Laura E.; Zurakowski, David; Berde, Charles B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine clinical outcomes of an interdisciplinary day hospital treatment program (comprised of physical, occupational, and cognitive-behavioral therapies with medical and nursing services) for pediatric complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Methods The study is a longitudinal case series of consecutive patients treated in a day hospital pediatric pain rehabilitation program. Participants were 56 children and adolescents ages 8–18 years (median = 14 years) with CRPS spectrum conditions who failed to progress sufficiently with a previous outpatient and/or inpatient treatments. Patients participated in daily physical therapy, occupational therapy and psychological treatment and received nursing and medical care as necessary. The model places equal emphasis on physical and cognitive-behavioral approaches to pain management. Median duration of stay was 3 weeks. Outcome measures included assessments of physical, occupational, and psychological functioning at program admission, discharge, and at post-treatment follow-up at a median of 10 months post-discharge. Scores at discharge and follow-up were compared with measures on admission by Wilcoxon tests, paired t tests, or ANOVA as appropriate, with corrections for multiple comparisons. Results Outcomes demonstrate clinically and statistically significant improvements from admission to discharge in pain intensity (p<0.001), functional disability (p<0.001), subjective report of limb function (p<0.001), timed running (p<0.001) occupational performance (p<0.001), medication use (p<0.01), use of assistive devices (p<0.001), and emotional functioning (anxiety, p<0.001; depression, p<0.01). Functional gains were maintained or further improved at follow-up. Discussion A day-hospital interdisciplinary rehabilitation approach appears effective in reducing disability and improving physical and emotional functioning and occupational performance among children and adolescents with complex regional pain syndromes that

  6. Causes of Death in an Acute Psychiatric Inpatient Unit of a Portuguese General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Sofia; Sequeira, Márcia; Castro, Sara; Manso, Rita; Klut Câmara, Catarina; Trancas, Bruno; Borja-Santos, Nuno; Maia, Teresa

    2016-08-01

    Introdução: Os doentes afectos de patologia psiquiátrica apresentam maior risco de morte, tanto por causas naturais como não naturais. Este estudo avalia as causas de morte de todos os doentes de uma unidade de internamento de agudos de Psiquiatria num hospital geral em Portugal, ao longo de dezasseis anos (de 1998 a 2013). Material e Métodos: Vinte e um doentes morreram na unidade de internamento de doentes agudos entre 1998 e 2013 (média 1,3 por ano). As características demográficas, os diagnósticos médicos e psiquiátricos foram recolhidos através de um estudo retrospectivo que consistiu na análise dos processos clínicos da amostra selecionada. Os doentes transferidos para outras enfermarias durante o internamento não foram incluídos no estudo. Resultados: As doenças do sistema circulatório foram as causas de morte mais prevalentes, ocorrendo em 2/3 dos doentes, incluindo embolismo pulmonar (n = 6), acidente vascular cerebral (n = 3), arritmia cardíaca (n = 2), enfarte agudo do miocárdio (n = 1), rutura de aneurisma da aorta abdominal (n = 1) e insuficiência cardíaca (n = 1). Dois doentes morreram de pneumonia e em quatro casos a causa de morte foi indeterminada. Apenas um caso de suicídio foi registado. Discussão: As doenças do aparelho circulatório foram as causas de morte mais frequentes nesta unidade de agudos. O suicídio em doentes internados, apesar de constituir um evento raro, é uma realidade que comporta consequências complexas para os profissionais de saúde, familiares e restantes doentes, devendo permanecer como foco de prevenção continuada. Conclusão: Os estudos de mortalidade são importantes para determinar a qualidade dos cuidados de saúde e criar recomendações para medidas preventivas.

  7. [The day-to-day routine in hospitals--standards and conflicts, based on the example of the Rothschild spital in Vienna around the year 1900].

    PubMed

    Malleier, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    The juxtaposition of official regulations and letters of complaint from Vienna's Rothschild Hospital shows, beyond the rhetoric and euphemisms of hospital reports, how lively and diverse day-to-day life was in a Jewish hospital around the year 1900. The letters of complaint query the official hospital rules and show that ideal and reality did not always coincide. Often, religious questions were at the root of the critique--such as doubts as to whether kosher dietary laws were adhered to--or conflicts between the agents involved, be they individuals or groups, patients, nurses, physicians or administrative staff. As part of this process, power structures, social hierarchies, patient rights and gender issues were called into question and renegotiated.

  8. [Prospective assessment of children with pervasive developmental disorder after 2 years of day-hospital treatment].

    PubMed

    Poinso, F; Dubois, B; Chatel, C; Viellard, M; Bastard-Rosset, D; Girardot, A-M; Grandgeorge, P; De Martino, S; Sokolowsky, M; Salle-Collemiche, X; Da Fonseca, D

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of children with pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) has not been systematically assessed in French day-care units. In this prospective study, 11 children with a diagnosis of PDD were followed up for 2years in a day-care unit in the Marseille university hospital. The treatment they received is based on an initial assessment by the "Centre Ressources Autisme" (CRA PACA) and further included a continued observation of the child and an assessment of the child's abilities and needs. This treatment used various therapeutic approaches 10h weekly and also included parental counseling and coordinated work with schools. Treatment in our day-care unit can be categorized as eclectic, non-intensive therapy. It is based on methods such as TEACCH (Treatment and Education of Autistic and related Communication handicapped Children), Floor Time Play, speech and language therapy, developmental therapy, and psychotherapy. International studies on intensive behavioral therapies suggest that this treatment is superior to non-behavioral and/or non-intensive treatment. They suggest its efficiency is due both to the nature of the treatment (behavioral) and to its intensity (more than 25h a week). In this study, the CRA diagnosed children using the ADI and ADOS. The 11 children (mean age, 3years 5months) were tested twice, with the Vineland and CARS scales. The first assessment was on admission to the day hospital and the second was 2years later. The results showed developmental progress with a mean increase of 13.5 months at the Vineland Scale, and a decrease of the autism severity score on the CARS. The treatment presented here proves to be efficient; if compared to similar results in international studies, we obtained better results than their eclectic intensive or non-intensive treatment comparison group.

  9. Efficacy of treatment for hyperglycemic crisis in elderly diabetic patients in a day hospital

    PubMed Central

    Benaiges, D; Chillarón, JJ; Carrera, MJ; Cots, F; Puig de Dou, J; Corominas, E; Pedro-Botet, J; Flores-Le Roux, JA; Claret, C; Goday, A; Cano, JF

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to compare the costs of day hospital (DH) care for hyperglycemic crisis in elderly diabetic patients with those of conventional hospitalization (CH). Secondary objectives were to compare these two clinical scenarios in terms of glycemic control, number of emergency and outpatient visits, readmissions, hypoglycemic episodes, and nosocomial morbidity. Methods The study population comprised diabetic patients aged >74 years consecutively admitted to a tertiary teaching hospital in Spain for hyperglycemic crisis (sustained hyperglycemia [>300 mg/dL] for at least 3 days with or without ketosis). The patients were assigned to DH or CH care according to time of admission and were followed for 6 months after discharge. Exclusion criteria were ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar crisis, hemodynamic instability, severe intercurrent illness, social deprivation, or Katz index >D. Results Sixty-four diabetic patients on DH care and 36 on CH care were included, with no differences in baseline characteristics. The average cost per patient was 1,345.1±793.6 € in the DH group and 2,212.4±982.5 € in the CH group (P<0.001). There were no differences in number of subjects with mild hypoglycemia during follow-up (45.3% DH versus 33.3% CH, P=0.24), nor in the percentage of patients achieving a glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) <8% (67.2% DH versus 58.3% CH, P=0.375). Readmissions for hyperglycemic crisis and pressure ulcer rates were significantly higher in the CH group. Conclusion DH care for hyperglycemic crises is more cost-effective than CH care, with a net saving of 1,418.4 € per case, lower number of readmissions and pressure ulcer rates, and similar short-term glycemic control and hypoglycemia rates. PMID:24868152

  10. An Approach to the Teaching of Psychiatric Nursing in Diploma and Associate Degree Programs: Workshop Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National League for Nursing, New York, NY. Mental Health and Psychiatric Nursing Advisory Service.

    This workshop was the third and final phase of a project to determine what goals, methods, content, and learning experiences in psychiatric-mental health nursing should be included in diploma and associate degree education for nursing in light of present day trends in psychiatric care. The project indicates that the hospital is no longer the focal…

  11. The ecological relationship between deprivation, social isolation and rates of hospital admission for acute psychiatric care: a comparison of London and New York City.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Sarah; Copeland, Alison; Fagg, James; Congdon, Peter; Almog, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Justine

    2006-03-01

    We report on comparative analyses of small area variation in rates of acute hospital admissions for psychiatric conditions in Greater London around the year 1998 and in New York City (NYC) in 2000. Based on a theoretical model of the factors likely to influence psychiatric admission rates, and using data from the most recent population censuses and other sources, we examine the association with area indicators designed to measure access to hospital beds, socio-economic deprivation, social fragmentation and ethnic/racial composition. We report results on admissions for men and women aged 15-64 for all psychiatric conditions (excluding self-harm), drug-related substance abuse/addiction, schizophrenia and affective disorders. The units of analysis in NYC were 165 five-digit Zip Code Areas and, in London, 760 electoral wards as defined in 1998. The analysis controls for age and sex composition and, as a proxy for access to care, spatial proximity to hospitals with psychiatric beds. Poisson regression modeling incorporating random effects was used to control for both overdispersion in the counts of admissions and for the effects of spatial autocorrelation. The results for NYC and London showed that local admission rates for all types of condition were positively and significantly associated with deprivation and the association is independent of demographic composition or 'access' to beds. In NYC, social fragmentation showed a significant association with admissions due to affective disorders and schizophrenia, and for drug dependency among females. Racial minority concentration was significantly and positively associated with admissions for schizophrenia. In London, social fragmentation was associated positively with admissions for men and women due to schizophrenia and affective disorders. The variable measuring racial/ethnic minority concentration for London wards showed a negative association with admission rates for drug dependency and for affective disorders. We

  12. Barriers and Challenges in Seeking Psychiatric Intervention in a General Hospital, by the Collaborative Child Response Unit, (A Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Handling Child Abuse) A Qualitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniyan, Vyjayanthi Kanugodu Srinivasa; Mital, Anukant; Rao, Chandrika; Chandra, Girish

    2017-01-01

    Child abuse is a serious criminal act against children in our country and punishable according to protection of children from sexual offenses act 2012. No one agency has the ability to respond completely to the abuse. Hence a multidisciplinary team approach was developed in India. Aim is to narrate the collaborative effort among the multiple disciplines in a general hospital to deliver child protection services and explore the barriers to integrate psychiatric services. Methodology: Members of the team were recruited from different disciplines and trained by experts. A mission statement, protocol to assess the victims and provide treatment was formulated as an algorithm. The barriers to psychiatric treatment among the stakeholders were analyzed using framework method of qualitative analysis. Results (After 20 months) the unit received 27 referrals in 20 months, 24 females, and 3 males. Age of the victims was between 8 months and 17 years. Two cases found to be physically abused. Penetrative sexual abuse was found in 23 cases, pregnant victims were 4. Most referrals were by police, trafficking found in 6 cases. Discussion: It was possible to provide multidisciplinary care to the victims and families. Recurrent themes of barriers to psychiatric treatment were stigma, victim blaming; focus on termination of pregnancy, minimization of abuse in males by stakeholders. Conclusion is collaboration needs more effort to integrate psychiatric services but can minimize the reduplication of services. PMID:28250553

  13. [Discharge reports to the patients as a contribution to a person-centred therapy--concept and pilot study in a psychiatric day clinic].

    PubMed

    von Schönfeld, Carl-Ernst; Roos-Pfeiffer, Wolfgang; Driessen, Martin

    2003-03-01

    We present the concept of an extended documentation of psychiatric-psychotherapeutic treatment with the patients being in the center of information. Apart from a short treatment report for the outpatient therapist, we write a detailed letter to the patients themselves including informations and backgrounds of their psychiatric and medical history, psychopathological findings, diagnose(s), course of the current treatment and recommendations for the future. This procedure is in agreement with the tradition of psycho-educative approaches and self-management concepts. It intends to support patients to be self-conscious and responsible partners during and after the treatment process. We performed a pilot study for a predominantly descriptive evaluation of the concept in the day clinic setting. A standardized questionnaire in 30 previously treated patients and three case studies yielded a high acceptance and positive appraisal of the received letters with a substantial subjective impact for coping with the disorder and a positive option for dealing with family members and friends.

  14. Comparison of 60-day mortality in hospitalized heart failure patients with versus without hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Payvar, Saeed; Orlandi, Cesare; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Elkayam, Uri; Ouyang, John; Casscells, S Ward; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2006-12-01

    The use of aggressive treatments and the modification of current treatment in patients with heart failure (HF) relies heavily on the assessment of disease severity using prognostic markers. However, many such markers are unavailable in routine clinical practice, and others have little prognostic value. This study tested the hypothesis that low body temperature could predict short-term survival after discharge in patients hospitalized for HF. Data from the Acute and Chronic Therapeutic Impact of a Vasopressin Antagonist in Congestive Heart Failure (ACTIV in CHF) trial, which randomized 319 patients hospitalized for HF to receive placebo or tolvaptan, were retrospectively analyzed. Hypothermia was defined a priori as an oral body temperature <35.8 degrees C at randomization. Cox regression was used to analyze survival within a 60-day follow-up period. Hypothermia was observed in 32 patients (10%). Mortality rates at 60 days after discharge were 6.3% (20 of 319) overall, 9.4% (3 of 32) in hypothermic patients, and 5.9% (17 of 287) in nonhypothermic patients. Hypothermia was a strong multivariate predictor of mortality; hypothermic patients were 3.9 times more likely to die within 60 days than nonhypothermic patients (95% confidence interval 1.002 to 15.16, p = 0.0497) after adjustment for treatment group, age, and other confounders. Hypothermia was associated with such indicators of low cardiac output as an elevated blood urea nitrogen/creatinine ratio, narrow pulse pressure, and a reduced ejection fraction. In conclusion, hypothermia appears to be a strong predictor of mortality in patients with HF.

  15. [Adverse perinatal and infant outcomes among children born to mothers with major mental disorders in a psychiatric hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscila Krauss; Vieira, Cláudia Lima; Santos, Jacqueline Fernandes de Cintra; Lima, Lúcia Abelha; Legay, Letícia Fortes; Lovisi, Giovanni Marcos

    2014-08-01

    Adverse perinatal and infant outcomes are the leading causes of infant morbidity and mortality in developing countries like Brazil. Among the risk factors are maternal mental disorders. A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted based on passive follow-up using probabilistic record linkage to estimate the prevalence of adverse perinatal and infant outcomes in children of women admitted to a public psychiatric hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and who gave birth from 1999 to 2009. Prevalence rates were: low birth weight (27.6%), prematurity (17.4%), malformations (2.5%), stillbirths (4.8%), and neonatal deaths (3.7%). Associated factors were deficient prenatal care, schizophrenia, and low income. The results corroborate the high prevalence of adverse perinatal and infant outcomes in mothers with major mental disorders, and that screening of psychiatric symptoms and specialized care by mental health professionals are essential throughout prenatal and postpartum care.

  16. [Patients' experiences and picture processes during the art therapy in a psychosomatic day hospital].

    PubMed

    Oster, Jörg; Poetsch, Stephanie; Danner-Weinberger, Alexandra; von Wietersheim, Jörn

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was the examination of the experiences of patients participating in an art therapy during a psychosomatic day hospital. The data basis were 15 transliterated interviews from the end of the treatment, conducted with a presentation of the pictures painted in the art therapy sessions, as well as the digitised pictures. The evaluation was done with a qualitative analysis of the interviews and an analysis of the pictures, using a specially-developed category system. In the art therapy, most part of the pa-tients dealt with own conflicts. Nearly all pa-tients benefitted from the art therapy and indicated an improvement of their feeling. The picture processes are different; at the beginning, wishes and familiar techniques dominated. Pictures of turning points differed in their dimensions. The art therapy was seen as a part of the complete treatment in which several therapies assembled. The final interviews were experienced as helpful for further reflections.

  17. Impact of hierarchies of clinical codes on predicting future days in hospital.

    PubMed

    Yang Xie; Neubauer, Sandra; Schreier, Gunter; Redmond, Stephen J; Lovell, Nigel H

    2015-01-01

    Health insurance claims contain valuable information for predicting the future health of a population. Nowadays, with many mature machine learning algorithms, models can be implemented to predict future medical costs and hospitalizations. However, it is well-known that the way in which the data are represented significantly affects the performance of machine learning algorithms. In health insurance claims, key clinical information mainly comes from the associated clinical codes, such as diagnosis codes and procedure codes, which are hierarchically structured. In this study, it is investigated whether the hierarchies of such clinical codes can be utilized to improve predictive performance in the context of predicting future days in hospital. Empirical investigations were done on data sets of different sizes, considering that the frequency of the appearance of lower-level (more specific) clinical codes could vary significantly in populations of different sizes. The use of bagged trees with feature sets that include only basic demographic features, low-level, medium-level, high-level clinical codes, and a full feature set were compared. The main finding from this study is that different hierarchies of clinical codes do not have a significant impact on the predictive power. Some other findings include: 1) Sample size greatly affects the predictive outcome (more observations result in more stable and more accurate outcomes); 2) Combined use of enriched demographic features and clinical features give better performance as compared to using them separately.

  18. Analysis of Time-of-Day Energy Demand and Supply in University and Hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, Yoichi

    The aim of this study was to estimate the time-of-day energy demand in University of Yamanashi. Our University consisted of Kofu campus (Faculty of Education & Human Sciences and Faculty of Engineering) and Faculty of Medicine campus (Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital). The energy data of 4 facilities were classified into hot water, heating, cooling and electric power demands based on electric power consumptions, city gas and heavy oil from 1996 to 2005. For 10 years, primary energy increased 1.2 times in the whole of the university. The amount of electric power consumption was 63% in the fuel classification. The amount of electric power consumption of faculty reacted to the change in temperature greatly. In 2005, it was found that thermoelectric-ratios for 4 facilities, i.e. Education, Engineering, Medicine and Hospital were 2.3, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.7 respectively. These data are very useful for the energy saving and energy management of university.

  19. Effect of Hospital Use of Oral Nutritional Supplementation on Length of Stay, Hospital Cost, and 30-Day Readmissions Among Medicare Patients With COPD

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Julia Thornton; Linthicum, Mark T.; Hegazi, Refaat A.; Partridge, Jamie S.; LaVallee, Chris; Lakdawalla, Darius N.; Wischmeyer, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: COPD is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Patients with COPD are at a high risk of nutritional deficiency, which is associated with declines in respiratory function, lean body mass and strength, and immune function. Although oral nutritional supplementation (ONS) has been associated with improvements in some of these domains, the impact of hospital ONS on readmission risk, length of stay (LOS), and cost among hospitalized patients is unknown. METHODS: Using the Premier Research Database, we first identified Medicare patients aged ≥ 65 years hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of COPD. We then identified hospitalizations in which ONS was provided, and used propensity-score matching to compare LOS, hospitalization cost, and 30-day readmission rates in a one-to-one matched sample of ONS and non-ONS hospitalizations. To further address selection bias among patients prescribed ONS, we also used instrumental variables analysis to study the association of ONS with study outcomes. Model covariates included patient and provider characteristics and a time trend. RESULTS: Out of 10,322 ONS hospitalizations and 368,097 non-ONS hospitalizations, a one-to-one matched sample was created (N = 14,326). In unadjusted comparisons in the matched sample, ONS use was associated with longer LOS (8.7 days vs 6.9 days, P < .0001), higher hospitalization cost ($14,223 vs $9,340, P < .0001), and lower readmission rates (24.8% vs 26.6%, P = .0116). However, in instrumental variables analysis, ONS use was associated with a 1.9-day (21.5%) decrease in LOS, from 8.8 to 6.9 days (P < .01); a hospitalization cost reduction of $1,570 (12.5%), from $12,523 to $10,953 (P < .01); and a 13.1% decrease in probability of 30-day readmission, from 0.34 to 0.29 (P < .01). CONCLUSIONS: ONS may be associated with reduced LOS, hospitalization cost, and readmission risk in hospitalized Medicare patients with COPD. PMID:25357165

  20. Medicare Program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system changes and FY2011 rates; provider agreements and supplier approvals; and hospital conditions of participation for rehabilitation and respiratory care services; Medicaid program: accreditation for providers of inpatient psychiatric services. Final rules and interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2010-08-16

    : We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and other legislation. In addition, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the rates for Medicare acute care hospital inpatient services for operating costs and capital-related costs. We also are setting forth the update to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. We are updating the payment policy and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and setting forth the changes to the payment rates, factors, and other payment rate policies under the LTCH PPS. In addition, we are finalizing the provisions of the August 27, 2009 interim final rule that implemented statutory provisions relating to payments to LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities and increases in beds in existing LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities under the LTCH PPS. We are making changes affecting the: Medicare conditions of participation for hospitals relating to the types of practitioners who may provide rehabilitation services and respiratory care services; and determination of the effective date of provider agreements and supplier approvals under Medicare. We are also setting forth provisions that offer psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs increased flexibility in obtaining accreditation to participate in the Medicaid program. Psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs will have the choice of undergoing a State survey or of obtaining accreditation from a national accrediting organization whose hospital accreditation

  1. Early inpatient calculation of laboratory-based 30-day readmission risk scores empowers clinical risk modification during index hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Horne, Benjamin D; Budge, Deborah; Masica, Andrew L; Savitz, Lucy A; Benuzillo, José; Cantu, Gabriela; Bradshaw, Alejandra; McCubrey, Raymond O; Bair, Tami L; Roberts, Colleen A; Rasmusson, Kismet D; Alharethi, Rami; Kfoury, Abdallah G; James, Brent C; Lappé, Donald L

    2017-03-01

    Improving 30-day readmission continues to be problematic for most hospitals. This study reports the creation and validation of sex-specific inpatient (i) heart failure (HF) risk scores using electronic data from the beginning of inpatient care for effective and efficient prediction of 30-day readmission risk.

  2. Hypotension During Hospitalization for Acute Heart Failure Is Independently Associated With 30-Day Mortality: Findings from ASCEND-HF

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priyesh A.; Heizer, Gretchen; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Schulte, Phillip J.; Dickstein, Kenneth; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Armstrong, Paul W.; Hasselblad, Vic; Mills, Roger M.; McMurray, John J.; Starling, Randall C.; Wilson Tang, W. H.; Califf, Robert M.; Hernandez, Adrian F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Outcomes associated with episodes of hypotension while hospitalized are not well understood. Methods and Results Using data from ASCEND-HF, we assessed factors associated with inhospital hypotension and subsequent 30-day outcomes. Patients were classified as having symptomatic or asymptomatic hypotension. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with in-hospital hypotension, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between hypotension and 30-day outcomes. We also tested for treatment interaction with nesiritide on 30-day outcomes and the association between inhospital hypotension and renal function at hospital discharge. Overall, 1555/7141 (21.8%) patients had an episode of hypotension, of which 73.1% were asymptomatic and 26.9% were symptomatic. Factors strongly associated with in-hospital hypotension included randomization to nesiritide (odds ratio [OR] 1.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.76–2.23; p<0.001), chronic metolazone therapy (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.17–2.60; p<0.001), and baseline orthopnea (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.13–1.52; p=0.001) or S3 gallop (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.06–1.40; p=0.006). In-hospital hypotension was associated with increased hazards of 30-day mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 2.03, 95% CI 1.57–2.61; p<0.001), 30-day heart failure (HF) hospitalization or mortality (HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.34–1.86; p<0.001), and 30-day all-cause hospitalization or mortality (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.22–1.61; p<0.001). Nesiritide had no interaction on the relationship between hypotension and 30-day outcomes (interaction p=0.874 for death, p=0.908 for death/HF hospitalization, p=0.238 death/all-cause hospitalization). Conclusions Hypotension while hospitalized for acute decompensated HF is an independent risk factor for adverse 30-day outcomes, and its occurrence highlights the need for modified treatment strategies. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT

  3. Prevalence of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity among Children Attending Outpatient Clinic in Psychiatric Teaching Hospital in Erbil City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakir, Lana Nabeel; Sulaiman, Karwan Hawez

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is one of the common psychiatric disorder in childhood and it affects on children socially and academically. The aim of this study is to find out the prevalence of Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder among the studied population, describe its association with certain…

  4. Psychiatric In-Patients Away from Home: Accounts by People with Intellectual Disabilities in Specialist Hospitals outside Their Home Localities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinn, Deborah; Hall, Ian; Ali, Afia; Hassell, Holly; Patkas, Iannis

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study reflects a growing concern with the placement of people with intellectual disabilities and complex mental health problems in out of area placements at a distance from their families and communities. Materials and methods: We interviewed service users (n = 17) living in out of area in-patient psychiatric units using a…

  5. Job Stress and Self-Efficacy among Psychiatric Nursing Working in Mental Health Hospitals at Cairo, Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Rania. A.

    2016-01-01

    Nursing stress is considered a problem that affects the practice worldwide. Job stress is a harmful response physically and emotionally when the nurses' skills, resources, and needs could not fulfill the requirement of the job. This study was aimed to assess job stress and self-efficacy among psychiatric nursing working in mental health hospitals…

  6. Day Hospital Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa: A 12-Month Follow-up Study.

    PubMed

    Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Marzola, Enrica; De-Bacco, Carlotta; Buzzichelli, Sara; Brustolin, Annalisa; Campisi, Stefania; Amianto, Federico; Migliaretti, Giuseppe; Fassino, Secondo

    2015-09-01

    Day hospitals (DHs) represent a treatment option for anorexia nervosa (AN), a mental disorder that is difficult to treat and has no evidence-based treatments available. We aimed to determine the effectiveness of a DH treatment that was specifically focused on the emotions of severe AN patients. Body mass index and eating psychopathology were the primary outcome measures. Fifty-six adult patients with AN were assessed upon admission, at the end of treatment (EOT) and at a 12-month follow-up evaluation (T18) using Eating Disorders Inventory-2, Beck Depression Inventory, Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety and Brief Social Phobia Scale. All participants received a multidisciplinary treatment programme that focused on psychodynamic psychotherapy. Seventy-eight per cent of participants reported positive outcomes at EOT and 68% at T18. Moreover, 82.1% and 65.4% of long-standing patients showed positive outcomes at EOT and T18, respectively. All measures of psychopathology were significantly improved at EOT and were maintained at follow-up. Our DH was effective at treating severe AN patients; however, further investigations of the processes of change are warranted.

  7. Evaluation of a radio based ADL interaction recognition system in a day hospital for old age psychiatry with healthy probands.

    PubMed

    Neuhaeuser, J; Diehl-Schmid, J; Lueth, T C

    2011-01-01

    In this contribution the evaluation of a system called "Eventlogger" is presented, which is installed in a day hospital for old age psychiatry. The Eventlogger is a radio based module with an adjustable communication range, able to recognize interaction of the user with objects or with other people. It is intended to function as a monitoring tool for the users' activities. Due to the demographic change monitoring systems for elderly people become more important. In this paper the "simple activities of daily living" (sADL) is introduced as well as the evaluation for the recognition of sADL in a day hospital for old age psychiatry with healthy probands is presented. Together with the first approaches of post processing for better results it is shown that the system is now ready to be used with patients of the day hospital for old age psychiatry.

  8. An estimate of the cost of administering intravenous biological agents in Spanish day hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Nolla, Joan Miquel; Martín, Esperanza; Llamas, Pilar; Manero, Javier; Rodríguez de la Serna, Arturo; Fernández-Miera, Manuel Francisco; Rodríguez, Mercedes; López, José Manuel; Ivanova, Alexandra; Aragón, Belén

    2017-01-01

    Objective To estimate the unit costs of administering intravenous (IV) biological agents in day hospitals (DHs) in the Spanish National Health System. Patients and methods Data were obtained from 188 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, collected from nine DHs, receiving one of the following IV therapies: infliximab (n=48), rituximab (n=38), abatacept (n=41), or tocilizumab (n=61). The fieldwork was carried out between March 2013 and March 2014. The following three groups of costs were considered: 1) structural costs, 2) material costs, and 3) staff costs. Staff costs were considered a fixed cost and were estimated according to the DH theoretical level of activity, which includes, as well as personal care of each patient, the DH general activities (complete imputation method, CIM). In addition, an alternative calculation was performed, in which the staff costs were considered a variable cost imputed according to the time spent on direct care (partial imputation method, PIM). All costs were expressed in euros for the reference year 2014. Results The average total cost was €146.12 per infusion (standard deviation [SD] ±87.11; CIM) and €29.70 per infusion (SD ±11.42; PIM). The structure-related costs per infusion varied between €2.23 and €62.35 per patient and DH; the cost of consumables oscillated between €3.48 and €20.34 per patient and DH. In terms of the care process, the average difference between the shortest and the longest time taken by different hospitals to administer an IV biological therapy was 113 minutes. Conclusion The average total cost of infusion was less than that normally used in models of economic evaluation coming from secondary sources. This cost is even less when the staff costs are imputed according to the PIM. A high degree of variability was observed between different DHs in the cost of the consumables, in the structure-related costs, and in those of the care process. PMID:28356746

  9. The Claybury Community Psychiatric Nurse Stress Study: is it more stressful to work in hospital or the community?

    PubMed

    Fagin, L; Brown, D; Bartlett, H; Leary, J; Carson, J

    1995-08-01

    The Claybury community psychiatric nurse (CPN) stress study collected data on stress levels in 250 CPNs and 323 ward-based psychiatric nurses (WBPN) in the North East Thames region. Four out of 10 CPNs were found to be experiencing high levels of psychological distress on GHQ scores. Whilst both CPNs and WBPNs scored highly on scores of occupational burnout, especially on emotional exhaustion scores, WBPNs scored worse on emotional detachment from their patients and were achieving less personal fulfilment from their work. Both groups of nurses were more satisfied with direct patient clinical work than with their employment conditions, particularly their working environments and, for CPNs, their relationships with their managers. The different patterns of coping skills are explored and discussed for both groups of nurses, especially the use of social support, time management and organization of tasks. The study concludes that whilst major changes are occurring in the psychiatric arena for both groups of nurses, stress is reaping its toll on mental health nurses, in terms of higher absence rates, lower self-esteem and personal unfulfilment. This could not only affect the quality of patient care but also future career prospects for nurses. The study invites serious consideration of introducing stress-reducing measures in the work-place as well as further research into specific stressors for different groups of nurses.

  10. The ambivalent chaplain: negotiating structural and ideological difference on the margins of modern-day hospital medicine.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Frances

    2006-01-01

    The chaplain experience in modern-day hospital medicine is largely one of marginalization. It is not, however, an experience without agency. Working within the constraints of difference, chaplains learn how to negotiate on the margins of medicine. This starts with learning the language of hospital medicine, learning to skillfully see, speak, and move in ways that minimize difference. Successes in socialization and acclimation do not, however, guarantee the chaplain a place in the hospital, where chaplains encounter both structural marginalization (resulting from inequalities in power and hierarchy) and ideological marginalization (resulting from inequalities in accepted forms of knowledge and practice). Using the theories of Michel Foucault (1973) and Byron Good (1994), I examine how chaplains negotiate structural and ideological marginality, at times embracing their connection to medicine (downplaying their connection to the institution of religion) and at other times embracing their connection to religion and religious practices. The result is an ambivalent chaplain who strategically embraces one or the other paradigm in order to survive. Using data gathered during a 12-month ethnography of chaplain interns at a university teaching hospital, this article examines the structural and ideological differences between science and religion through the modern-day practice of hospital chaplains. It both introduces readers to the modern-day chaplain, a healer largely absent in ethnography, and adds a renewed perspective to a long-standing body of literature on the relationship between structure and agency, and science and religion.

  11. When the safe place does not protect: reports of victimisation and adverse experiences in psychiatric institutions.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Mesquita, Cristina; da Costa Maia, Ângela

    2016-12-01

    Psychiatric patients report higher levels of victimisation and are at risk for further victimisation in different contexts, such as psychiatric institutions. Studies in this field tend to focus on hospital staff as victims, experiencing classic forms of victimisation (e.g. physical assault, threats, verbal abuse), through qualitative studies. This is a quantitative retrospective study that aims to know the occurrence of psychiatric victimisation and other adverse experiences in Portuguese psychiatric patients. Ninety-five psychiatric patients, between 20 and 79 years old (M - 45.18, SD - 13.06), with a history of psychiatric hospitalisation answered the Experiences in Psychiatric Institution Inventory. Participants were recruited in four psychiatric hospitals. Inpatients were approached during their hospitalisation; outpatients were approached in scheduled appointment days. Only 23 (24.2%) participants reported no victimisation. Total Experiences of Self varied from 0 to 7 (M - 1.75, SD - 1.72), Total Witnessed Experiences varied from 0 to 7 (M - 1.17, SD - 1.64), and Total Global Experiences varied from 0 to 14 (M - 2.92, SD - 3.01). These results show that victimisation and adverse experiences in psychiatric contexts are frequent and go beyond classic forms of victimisation. A deeper knowledge of these experiences and their impact in the mental health of psychiatric patients may promote quality of care provided and lead to more effective treatments, thus reducing the number and length of hospitalisations, and the financial burden for public health services.

  12. Predicting 30-Day Readmissions in an Asian Population: Building a Predictive Model by Incorporating Markers of Hospitalization Severity

    PubMed Central

    Low, Lian Leng; Liu, Nan; Wang, Sijia; Thumboo, Julian; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Lee, Kheng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Background To reduce readmissions, it may be cost-effective to consider risk stratification, with targeting intervention programs to patients at high risk of readmissions. In this study, we aimed to derive and validate a prediction model including several novel markers of hospitalization severity, and compare the model with the LACE index (Length of stay, Acuity of admission, Charlson comorbidity index, Emergency department visits in past 6 months), an established risk stratification tool. Method This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients ≥ 21 years of age, who were admitted to a tertiary hospital in Singapore from January 1, 2013 through May 31, 2015. Data were extracted from the hospital’s electronic health records. The outcome was defined as unplanned readmissions within 30 days of discharge from the index hospitalization. Candidate predictive variables were broadly grouped into five categories: Patient demographics, social determinants of health, past healthcare utilization, medical comorbidities, and markers of hospitalization severity. Multivariable logistic regression was used to predict the outcome, and receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to compare our model with the LACE index. Results 74,102 cases were enrolled for analysis. Of these, 11,492 patient cases (15.5%) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge. A total of fifteen predictive variables were strongly associated with the risk of 30-day readmissions, including number of emergency department visits in the past 6 months, Charlson Comorbidity Index, markers of hospitalization severity such as ‘requiring inpatient dialysis during index admission, and ‘treatment with intravenous furosemide 40 milligrams or more’ during index admission. Our predictive model outperformed the LACE index by achieving larger area under the curve values: 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.77–0.79) versus 0.70 (95% CI: 0.69–0.71). Conclusion Several factors are important for

  13. Integrated Educational and Mental Health Services within a Day Treatment Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Greta; Radka, Dale F.

    This paper discusses the integration of educational and mental health services for children and adolescents within a psychiatric day treatment setting at the Bradley School housed in a private psychiatric hospital affiliated with Brown University in Rhode Island. A full range of mental health services are used, and therapies are delivered in the…

  14. The Day Reagan Was Shot: How a University Hospital PR Staff Handled the Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Emily R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The experiences of George Washington University Hospital's public relations staff when it handled the crisis of the shooting of President Reagan is described. Security, choice of a spokesperson, relations with the news media, dealing with VIPs, etc., are discussed. (MLW)

  15. The ward atmosphere of single-sex wards in a maximum-security forensic psychiatric hospital in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Brunt, David

    2008-03-01

    This exploratory study investigated the ward atmosphere of single-sex wards in a forensic psychiatric context in the light of Moos' conceptualization of the treatment setting. The wards for female patients bore similarities to Relationship-Oriented and Insight-Oriented programmes and had a generally positive ward atmosphere. On the other hand the wards for male patients did not resemble any treatment programme and had a more mixed diagnosis profile than those for female patients. Comparisons of the two types of wards are made and implications of the findings in terms of the overriding principle of normalization are discussed.

  16. Predictors of 30-Day Mortality and 90-Day Functional Recovery after Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage : Hospital Based Multivariate Analysis in 585 Patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to identify independent predictors of mortality and functional recovery in patients with primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH) and to improve functional outcome in these patients. Methods Data were collected retrospectively on 585 patients with supratentorial PICH admitted to the Stroke Unit at our hospital between 1st January 2004 and the 31st July 2008. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, the associations between all selected variables and 30-day mortality and 90-day functional recoveries after PICH was evaluated. Results Ninety-day functional recovery was achieved in 29.1% of the 585 patients and 30-day mortality in 15.9%. Age (OR=7.384, p=0.000), limb weakness (OR=6.927, p=0.000), and hematoma volume (OR=5.293, p=0.000) were found to be powerful predictors of 90-day functional recovery. Furthermore, initial consciousness (OR=3.013, p=0.014) hematoma location (lobar, OR=2.653, p=0.003), ventricular extension of blood (OR=2.077, p=0.013), leukocytosis (OR=2.048, p=0.008), alcohol intake (drinker, OR=1.927, p=0.023), and increased serum aminotransferase (OR=1.892, p=0.035) were found to be independent predictors of 90-day functional recovery after PICH. On the other hand, a pupillary abnormality (OR=4.532, p=0.000) and initial unconsciousness (OR=3.362, p=0.000) were found to be independent predictors of 30-day mortality after PICH. Conclusion The predictors of mortality and functional recovery after PICH identified during this analysis may assist during clinical decision-making, when advising patients or family members about the prognosis of PICH and when planning intervention trials. PMID:19609417

  17. [Psychiatric nursing at the Hospital Saint-Jean-de-Dieu School of Nursing: striking a balance between the spiritual and the technical sides].

    PubMed

    Thifault, Marie-Claude

    2010-01-01

    The art of taking care of the insane developed and solidified at the Hospital Saint-Jean-de-Dieu after a School of Nurses was created there in 1912. Founded by the Sisters of Providence, this new school participated in the transformation of the asylum into a regular hospital. The archives of the Sisters of Providence and the monthly magazine La garde-malade canadienne-française allow us to analyze the discourse of nursing leaders, which was based on the importance of professional training. Scientific discoveries and new technologies were at the heart of the care process at Saint-Jean-de-Dieu, where students were introduced to a technical, as well as a spiritual, education. This article first considers the marginal status of psychiatric nursing training within the larger nurses' professionalization movement. In a second step, it describes the socio-religious context between 1912 and 1962 within which the School of Nurses of the Hospital Saint-Jean-de-Dieu evolved.

  18. The health of irregular and illegal immigrants: analysis of day-hospital admissions in a department of migration medicine.

    PubMed

    Affronti, Mario; Affronti, Andrea; Pagano, Salvatore; Soresi, Maurizio; Giannitrapani, Lydia; Valenti, Miriam; La Spada, Emanuele; Montalto, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    It is difficult to trace full details of the path which irregular or illegal immigrants follow when seeking assistance in the network of the various hospital departments and health structures. The aim of this work was to analyze the health needs of immigrant people by reviewing the types of treatment given to them in the day-hospital of our Department of Migration Medicine. Our study analyzed day-hospital admissions between 2003 and 2009. The patient charts used for managing day-hospital activity were adopted in 2002 in conformity with the "OSI project". From these it is possible to draw up a scale picture of the distribution of each pathology in the immigrant population. The sample population consisted of 1,758 subjects, representing 7.4% of potential users. More than half came from Africa, followed by Asia, and then Europe. Gastroenterological diseases ranked first, with dyspeptic syndromes most frequently diagnosed. Infections and parasitic diseases ranked second, and the most frequent diagnoses were sexually transmitted diseases. Third were diseases of the genitourinary system. Metabolic disorders ranked fourth, among them, more than half of the cases were of diabetes mellitus, in patients from south-east Asia. Diseases of the circulatory system were sixth, with hypertension the most frequent pathology. Our data confirm a marked persistence of the phenomenon known as the "healthy immigrant effect" in these types of patients, as well as the prominent role played by "social determinants" in conditioning the health of immigrants, particularly in the case of some infectious diseases.

  19. Family influence and psychiatric care: Physical treatments in Devon mental hospitals, c. 1920 to the 1970s☆

    PubMed Central

    Baur, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    ‘What is it that appears to make the mentally ill so vulnerable to therapeutic experimentation?’1 One commentator wrote in the 1990s, regarding mental hospitals as repressive, coercive and custodial institutions where medical staff subjected patients to orgies of experimentation. A careful study of surviving documents of the Devon County Lunatic Asylum (DCLA), however, paints a different picture. Rather than medical staff, patients’ relatives and the wider community exercised a considerable influence over a patient's hospital admission and discharge, rendering the therapeutic regime in the middle of the 20th century the result of intense negotiations between the hospital and third parties. PMID:23876990

  20. Filmless in 60 days: the impact of picture archiving and communications systems within a large urban hospital.

    PubMed

    Hayt, D B; Alexander, S; Drakakis, J; Berdebes, N

    2001-06-01

    Many large urban hospitals converting to filmless radiography use a phased approach for digital imaging implementation. In fact, this strategy often is recommended by picture archival communication systems (PACS) experts and vendors alike for large, busy hospitals installing PACS in existing physical facilities. The concern is that comprehensive conversion from film-based to digital imaging may be too overwhelming an adjustment in operations for a medical staff to effectively handle without serious disruption of workflow for patient treatment and care. Elmhurst Hospital Center is a 543-bed hospital located in the Borough of Queens in New York City. Owned by the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation, this municipal teaching hospital provides services to a patient mix that is 38% indigent with no insurance, 50% covered by Medicaid or Medicare, and 12% affiliated with HMOs. Most inpatients are admitted through the emergency department. Forty-five percent of all radiology procedures conducted are for emergency patients. Historically, up to 25% of all diagnostic imaging examinations were never reported formally by radiologists. Report turnaround time for the remaining 75% was unacceptable, with only 3% of all imaging examinations reported within a 12-hour period in 1996. Both situations existed in great part because physicians and residents who felt they needed access to films simply took them. Many were never located or returned days after they were taken. In 1998, Elmhurst Hospital Center replaced its RIS and added voice recognition dictation capabilities in January 1999. A hospitalwide PACS was deployed 10 months later. With the exception of mammography, the hospital converted to filmless radiography within 60 days. The critical objectives to maintain control of films and radically improve the reporting process were achieved immediately. Over 99% of all examinations now are formally reviewed and reported. Only 7% of all reports take 1 or more days to

  1. Long-acting bronchodilators with or without inhaled corticosteroids and 30-day readmission in patients hospitalized for COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bishwakarma, Raju; Zhang, Wei; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Sharma, Gulshan

    2017-01-01

    Background The ability of a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) and long-acting beta 2 agonists (LABAs; long-acting bronchodilators, LABDs) with or without inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) to reduce early readmission in hospitalized patients with COPD is unknown. Methods We studied a 5% sample of Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in Medicare parts A, B and D and hospitalized for COPD in 2011. We examined prescriptions filled for LABDs with or without ICSs (LABDs±ICSs) within 90 days prior to and 30 days after hospitalization. Primary outcome was the 30-day readmission rate between “users” and “nonusers” of LABDs±ICSs. Propensity score matching and sensitivity analysis were performed by limiting analysis to patients hospitalized for acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD). Among 6,066 patients hospitalized for COPD, 3,747 (61.8%) used LABDs±ICSs during the specified period. The “user” and “nonuser” groups had similar rates of all-cause emergency room (ER) visits and readmissions within 30 days of discharge date (22.4% vs 20.7%, P-value 0.11; 18.0% vs 17.8%, P-value 0.85, respectively). However, the “users” had higher rates of COPD-related ER visits (5.3% vs 3.4%, P-value 0.0006), higher adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.47 (95% CI, 1.11–1.93) and readmission (7.8% vs 5.0%, P-value <0.0001 and aOR 1.48 [95% CI, 1.18–1.86]) than “nonusers”. After propensity score matching, the aOR of COPD-related ER visits was 1.45 (95% CI, 1.07–1.96) and that of readmission was 1.34 (95% CI, 1.04–1.73). The results were similar when restricted to patients hospitalized for AECOPD. Conclusion Use of LABDs±ICSs did not reduce 30-day readmissions in patients hospitalized for COPD. PMID:28203071

  2. Diversity and Adaptation of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Genotypes Circulating in Two Distinct Communities: Public Hospital and Day Care Center

    PubMed Central

    Gardinassi, Luiz Gustavo Araujo; Simas, Paulo Vitor Marques; Gomes, Deriane Elias; do Bonfim, Caroline Measso; Nogueira, Felipe Cavassan; Garcia, Gustavo Rocha; Carareto, Claudia Márcia Aparecida; Rahal, Paula; de Souza, Fátima Pereira

    2012-01-01

    HRSV is one of the most important pathogens causing acute respiratory tract diseases as bronchiolitis and pneumonia among infants. HRSV was isolated from two distinct communities, a public day care center and a public hospital in São José do Rio Preto – SP, Brazil. We obtained partial sequences from G gene that were used on phylogenetic and selection pressure analysis. HRSV accounted for 29% of respiratory infections in hospitalized children and 7.7% in day care center children. On phylogenetic analysis of 60 HRSV strains, 48 (80%) clustered within or adjacent to the GA1 genotype; GA5, NA1, NA2, BA-IV and SAB1 were also observed. SJRP GA1 strains presented variations among deduced amino acids composition and lost the potential O-glycosilation site at amino acid position 295, nevertheless this resulted in an insertion of two potential O-glycosilation sites at positions 296 and 297. Furthermore, a potential O-glycosilation site insertion, at position 293, was only observed for hospital strains. Using SLAC and MEME methods, only amino acid 274 was identified to be under positive selection. This is the first report on HRSV circulation and genotypes classification derived from a day care center community in Brazil. PMID:23202489

  3. International study on antidepressant prescription pattern at 20 teaching hospitals and major psychiatric institutions in East Asia: Analysis of 1898 cases from China, Japan, Korea, Singapore and Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naoki; Chong, Mian-Yoon; Tan, Chay Hoon; Nagai, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Mariko; Lee, Min-Soo; Fujii, Senta; Yang, Shu-Yu; Si, Tainmei; Sim, Kang; Wei, Hao; Ling, He Yan; Nishimura, Ryoji; Kawaguchi, Yoshichika; Edwards, Glen; Sartorius, Norman; Shinfuku, Naotaka

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to review the prescription patterns of antidepressants in different countries in East Asia. The survey was conducted in China, Japan, Korea, Singapore and Taiwan from October 2003 to March 2004 using the unified research protocol and questionnaire. Twenty teaching hospitals and major psychiatric hospitals participated and a total of 1898 patients receiving antidepressants were analyzed. The survey provided a number of interesting characteristics on the prescription patterns of antidepressant in East Asia. Out of 56 antidepressants listed in the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification (ATC) index by the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center for Drug Statistics Methodology (Oslo), only 26 antidepressants were prescribed in participating countries in East Asia. On average 38.4% of prescriptions of antidepressants were for patients with diagnoses other than depressive disorders. The availability and commonly prescribed antidepressants varied greatly by country. The selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRI) and other newer antidepressants were prescribed in approximately 77.0% of all cases. At the time of the survey, only two SSRI medications were available in Japan. However, five types of SSRI were available and were often prescribed in Korea.

  4. [The reform of psychiatric care in Poland--2001].

    PubMed

    Puzyński, Stanisław; Langiewicz, Wanda; Pietrzykowska, Bozena

    2002-01-01

    Both positive and negative effects of the reform of the health care financing system are noted. Low prices offered by Sickness Funds for particular services (a bed-day, a visit) should be regarded as a negative effect of the reform. Particularly insufficient were the prices of services in some specialised psychiatric wards and in outpatient clinics. Prices in many community-based psychiatric facilities were also considerably underestimated. Undoubtedly, the reform has led to positive changes in the organization of inpatient care. These changes include: further reduction of beds in large hospitals organisational structure as well as a marked increase in the number of psychiatric wards at general hospitals, which should be the key units of psychiatric inpatient care. Increase in the number of day hospitals is another positive effect of the reform. The programme of psychiatric care transformation is presented mostly in the Mental Health Programme. The main goal of this programme is to ensure appropriate care for the mentally disordered people, namely comprehensive and accessible health care as well as other forms of help and and support necessary for living in family and in society. This goal will be accomplished by health care and other forms of help mentioned in the Mental Health Act and in the Social Help Act. Community-based model of psychiatric care is the key element of this system. Also, the Programme states desired accessibility rates for staff, number of beds and number of particular forms of psychiatric and alcohol treatment care. Separate rates for adult and children/youth population have been elaborated.

  5. Prognoses of seriously ill hospitalized patients on the days before death: implications for patient care and public policy.

    PubMed

    Lynn, J; Harrell, F; Cohn, F; Wagner, D; Connors, A F

    1997-02-01

    Troubling aspects of the experiences of patients at the ends of their lives have fueled interest in special benefits or privileges for this group. There is a presumption that being "at the end of life" is discernible. This study examines this presumption using data from two previously collected databases: the Study to Understand Prognoses and Preferences for Outcomes and Risks of Treatments (SUPPORT) and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III (APACHE III). Both studies generated multivariable estimates of survival prognosis for hospitalized patients. SUPPORT included 9,105 patients with one of nine serious illnesses in five hospitals over 4 yrs, of whom 2,360 died in the hospital and 4,537 died within 180 days of entry into the study. The APACHE III database describes 2,750 deaths in 16,622 ICU patients in 40 hospitals. The relationship of median estimates with time to death were examined for each source of data, for different diseases, and for ICU settings of care. In SUPPORT, the median predicted chance of survival for 2 months on the day before actual death was .17 (interquartile range, .02-.40) and was .51 (.31-.66) 1 wk before death. Median prognoses varied substantially among diseases: the median for congestive heart failure patients was a .62 chance of living 2 months on the day before death, while lung cancer had only a .17 chance and coma patients only an .11 chance. Median prognostication estimates were not much different when given by physicians and were only a little more pessimistic in APACHE (median estimate for hospital survival on the day before death was .14 and 7 days before was .45). To make plans about care and to optimally support most dying persons and families, conversations must occur while the patient still has a considerable chance of surviving the current episode of illness. Using statistical estimates of prognosis to designate a category of "terminally ill" patients for public policy purposes is unavoidably arbitrary

  6. Hospital Nursing and 30-Day Readmissions among Medicare Patients with Heart Failure, Acute Myocardial Infarction, and Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Ma, Chenjuan

    2013-01-01

    Background Provisions of the Affordable Care Act that increase hospitals’ financial accountability for preventable readmissions have heightened interest in identifying system-level interventions to reduce readmissions. Objectives To determine the relationship between hospital nursing; i.e. nurse work environment, nurse staffing levels, and nurse education, and 30-day readmissions among Medicare patients with heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, and pneumonia. Method and Design Analysis of linked data from California, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania that included information on the organization of hospital nursing (i.e., work environment, patient-to-nurse ratios, and proportion of nurses holding a BSN degree) from a survey of nurses, as well as patient discharge data, and American Hospital Association Annual Survey data. Robust logistic regression was used to estimate the relationship between nursing factors and 30-day readmission. Results Nearly one-quarter of heart failure index admissions (23.3% [n=39,954]); 19.1% (n=12,131) of myocardial infarction admissions; and 17.8% (n=25,169) of pneumonia admissions were readmitted within 30-days. Each additional patient per nurse in the average nurse’s workload was associated with a 7% higher odds of readmission for heart failure (OR=1.07, [1.05–1.09]), 6% for pneumonia patients (OR=1.06, [1.03–1.09]), and 9% for myocardial infarction patients (OR=1.09, [1.05–1.13]). Care in a hospital with a good versus poor work environment was associated with odds of readmission that were 7% lower for heart failure (OR = 0.93, [0.89–0.97]); 6% lower for myocardial infarction (OR = 0.94, [0.88–0.98]); and 10% lower for pneumonia (OR = 0.90, [0.85–0.96]) patients. Conclusions Improving nurses’ work environments and staffing may be effective interventions for preventing readmissions. PMID:23151591

  7. Violent psychiatric patients: a study.

    PubMed

    Kermani, E J

    1981-04-01

    In a study of fifty-three violent psychiatric patients in a psychiatric hospital setting, it was found that there are two distinct major groups of violent patients--one of patients with a long history of antisocial behavior who are often chronically homicidal and suicidal, and another of patients who neither have a history of destructive behavior nor exhibit homicidal or suicidal tendencies. The latter become acutely assaultive only during the course of psychiatric illness. The personality traits and background associated with these two groups offer additional contrasts. Each group presents different problems and, of major importance to the psychiatric practioner, each group requires different management.

  8. Correlates of nicotine withdrawal severity in smokers during a smoke-free psychiatric hospitalization☆

    PubMed Central

    Soyster, Peter; Anzai, Nicole E.; Fromont, Sebastien C.; Prochaska, Judith J.

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric hospitals are increasingly adopting smoke-free policies. Tobacco use is common among persons with mental illness, and nicotine withdrawal (NW), which includes symptoms of depression, anxiety, anger/irritability, and sleep disturbance, may confound psychiatric assessment and treatment in the inpatient setting. This study aimed to characterize NW and correlates of NW severity in a sample of smokers hospitalized for treatment of mental illness in California. Participants (N = 754) were enrolled between 2009 and 2013, and averaged 17 (SD = 10) cigarettes/day prior to hospitalization. Though most (70%) received nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) during hospitalization, a majority (65%) reported experiencing moderate to severe NW. In a general linear regression model, NW symptoms were more severe for women, African American patients, and polysubstance abusers. Though invariant by psychiatric diagnostic category, greater NW was associated with more severe overall psychopathology and greater cigarette dependence. The full model explained 46% of the total variation in NW symptom severity (F [19, 470] = 23.03 p < 0.001). A minority of participants (13%) refused NRT during hospitalization. Those who refused NRT reported milder cigarette dependence and stated no prior use of NRT. Among smokers hospitalized for mental illness, NW severity appears multidetermined, related to cigarette dependence, demographic variables, psychiatric symptom severity, and other substance use. Assessment and treatment of NW in the psychiatric hospital is clinically warranted and with extra attention to groups that may be more vulnerable or naïve to cessation pharmacotherapy. PMID:26892910

  9. Psychiatric diagnosis, psychiatric power and psychiatric abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Szasz, T

    1994-01-01

    Psychiatric abuse, such as we usually associate with practices in the former Soviet Union, is related not to the misuse of psychiatric diagnoses, but to the political power intrinsic to the social role of the psychiatrist in totalitarian and democratic societies alike. Some reflections are offered on the modern, therapeutic state's proclivity to treat adults as patients rather than citizens, disjoin rights from responsibilities, and thus corrupt the language of political-philosophical discourse. PMID:7996558

  10. Community Level Association between Home Health and Nursing Home Performance on Quality and Hospital 30-day Readmissions for Medicare Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Pandolfi, Michelle M; Fine, Jonathan; Metersky, Mark L; Wang, Changqin; Ho, Shih-Yieh; Galusha, Deron; Nuti, Sudhakar V; Murugiah, Karthik; Spenard, Ann; Elwell, Timothy; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2016-11-01

    We evaluated whether community-level home health agencies and nursing home performance is associated with community-level hospital 30-day all-cause risk-standardized readmission rates for Medicare patients used data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service from 2010 to 2012. Our final sample included 2,855 communities that covered 4,140 hospitals with 6,751,713 patients, 13,060 nursing homes with 1,250,648 residents, and 7,613 home health agencies providing services to 35,660 zipcodes. Based on a mixed effect model, we found that increasing nursing home performance by one star for all of its 4 measures and home health performance by 10 points for all of its 6 measures is associated with decreases of 0.25% (95% CI 0.17-0.34) and 0.60% (95% CI 0.33-0.83), respectively, in community-level risk-standardized readmission rates.

  11. Hospital cuts length of stay for babies in the NICU by four days.

    PubMed

    2015-04-01

    An initiative in which the entire treatment team focuses on moving premature babies through the continuum has resulted in a drop of foul days in the average length of stay at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The treatment team has daily rounds on every patient and a multidisciplinary early discharge team assesses every patientat the bedside to determine who is ready to go home and what is holding up the discharge, and to take action to move things along. The bedside nurses assess the babies several times a day for feeding readiness and to determine if they are ready to move along in the clinical protocol. The team gets parents involved in daily care and gives them hands-on experience so they won't be nervous about caring for the child at home.

  12. Classifying emergency 30-day readmissions in England using routine hospital data 2004–2010: what is the scope for reduction?

    PubMed Central

    Blunt, Ian; Bardsley, Martin; Grove, Amy; Clarke, Aileen

    2015-01-01

    Background Many health systems across the globe have introduced arrangements to deny payment for patients readmitted to hospital as an emergency. The purpose of this study was to develop an exploratory categorisation based on likely causes of readmission, and then to assess the prevalence of these different types. Methods Retrospective analysis of 82 million routinely collected National Health Service hospital records in England (2004–2010) was undertaken using anonymised linkage of records at person-level. Numbers of 30-day readmissions were calculated. Exploratory categorisation of readmissions was applied using simple rules relating to International Classification of Diseases (ICD) diagnostic codes for both admission and readmission. Results There were 5 804 472 emergency 30-day readmissions over a 6-year period, equivalent to 7.0% of hospital discharges. Readmissions were grouped into hierarchically exclusive categories: potentially preventable readmission (1 739 519 (30.0% of readmissions)); anticipated but unpredictable readmission (patients with chronic disease or likely to need long-term care; 1 141 987 (19.7%)); preference-related readmission (53 718 (0.9%)); artefact of data collection (16 062 (0.3%)); readmission as a result of accident, coincidence or related to a different body system (1 101 818 (19.0%)); broadly related readmission (readmission related to the same body system (1 751 368 (30.2%)). Conclusions In this exploratory categorisation, a large minority of emergency readmissions (eg, those that are potentially preventable or due to data artefacts) fell into groups potentially amenable to immediate reduction. For other categories, a hospital's ability to reduce emergency readmission is less clear. Reduction strategies and payment incentives must be carefully tailored to achieve stated aims. PMID:24668396

  13. ["Should the staff's attitude towards the patients remain unchanged, I will not guarantee anything." Protest masculinity and coping of "rebellious patients" at the Heidelberg University Psychiatric Hospital on the eve of deinstitutionalization].

    PubMed

    Schwamm, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the illness experiences of male patients from the Heidelberg University Psychiatric Hospital during the protests against Psychiatry in the year 1973. Protest is one of the most important expressions of masculinity in socially disadvantaged men, such as men with mental disorders. The analysis of 100 medical records shows that some patients tried to construct themselves as men in a way that was explicitly motivated by antipsychiatric ideas: They questioned psychiatric authority, behaved "sexually inappropriate", or used drugs. On the eve of psychiatric reform in West Germany those patients were well aware that the alternative--complying with the treatment--would put them at considerable risk. In addition to the usual inference of hegemonic or normative masculinities as risk-factors, the behavior of those ,,rebellious patients" has to be interpreted as individual coping strategies.

  14. Waiving the Three-Day Rule: Admissions and Length-of-Stay at Hospitals and Skilled Nursing Facilities did not Increase

    PubMed Central

    Grebla, Regina C.; Keohane, Laura; Lee, Yoojin; Lipsitz, Lewis A.; Rahman, Momotazur; Trivedl, Amal N.

    2015-01-01

    The traditional Medicare program requires an enrollee to have a hospital stay of at least three consecutive calendar days to qualify for coverage of subsequent postacute care in a skilled nursing facility. This long-standing policy, implemented to discourage premature discharges from hospitals, might now be inappropriately lengthening hospital stays for patients who could be transferred sooner. To assess the implications of eliminating the three-day qualifying stay requirement, we compared hospital and postacute skilled nursing facility utilization among Medicare Advantage enrollees in matched plans that did or did not eliminate that requirement in 2006–10. Among hospitalized enrollees with a skilled nursing facility admission, the mean hospital length-of-stay declined from 6.9 days to 6.7 days for those no longer subject to the qualifying stay but increased from 6.1 to 6.6 days among those still subject to it, for a net decline of 0.7 day when the three-day stay requirement was eliminated. The elimination was not associated with more hospital or skilled nursing facility admissions or with longer lengths-of-stay in a skilled nursing facility. These findings suggest that eliminating the three-day stay requirement conferred savings on Medicare Advantage plans and that study of the requirement in traditional Medicare plans is warranted. PMID:26240246

  15. Waiving the three-day rule: admissions and length-of-stay at hospitals and skilled nursing facilities did not increase.

    PubMed

    Grebla, Regina C; Keohane, Laura; Lee, Yoojin; Lipsitz, Lewis A; Rahman, Momotazur; Trivedi, Amal N

    2015-08-01

    The traditional Medicare program requires an enrollee to have a hospital stay of at least three consecutive calendar days to qualify for coverage of subsequent postacute care in a skilled nursing facility. This long-standing policy, implemented to discourage premature discharges from hospitals, might now be inappropriately lengthening hospital stays for patients who could be transferred sooner. To assess the implications of eliminating the three-day qualifying stay requirement, we compared hospital and postacute skilled nursing facility utilization among Medicare Advantage enrollees in matched plans that did or did not eliminate that requirement in 2006-10. Among hospitalized enrollees with a skilled nursing facility admission, the mean hospital length-of-stay declined from 6.9 days to 6.7 days for those no longer subject to the qualifying stay but increased from 6.1 to 6.6 days among those still subject to it, for a net decline of 0.7 day when the three-day stay requirement was eliminated. The elimination was not associated with more hospital or skilled nursing facility admissions or with longer lengths-of-stay in a skilled nursing facility. These findings suggest that eliminating the three-day stay requirement conferred savings on Medicare Advantage plans and that study of the requirement in traditional Medicare plans is warranted.

  16. Hospital length of stay in the first 100 days after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute leukemia in remission: comparison among alternative graft sources.

    PubMed

    Ballen, Karen K; Joffe, Steven; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Akpek, Görgün; Dandoy, Christopher; Frangoul, Haydar A; Freytes, César O; Khera, Nandita; Lazarus, Hillard M; LeMaistre, Charles F; Mehta, Paulette; Parsons, Susan K; Szwajcer, David; Ustun, Celalettin; Wood, William A; Majhail, Navneet S

    2014-11-01

    Several studies have shown comparable survival outcomes with different graft sources, but the relative resource needs of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) by graft source have not been well studied. We compared total hospital length of stay in the first 100 days after HCT in 1577 patients with acute leukemia in remission who underwent HCT with an umbilical cord blood (UCB), matched unrelated donor (MUD), or mismatched unrelated donor (MMUD) graft between 2008 and 2011. To ensure a relatively homogenous study population, the analysis was limited to patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first or second complete remission who underwent HCT in the United States. To account for early deaths, we compared the number of days alive and out of the hospital in the first 100 days post-transplantation. For children who received myeloablative conditioning, the median time alive and out of the hospital in the first 100 days was 50 days for single UCB recipients, 54 days for double UCB recipients, and 60 days for MUD bone marrow (BM) recipients. In multivariate analysis, use of UCB was significantly associated with fewer days alive and out of the hospital compared with MUD BM. For adults who received myeloablative conditioning, the median time alive and out of the hospital in first 100 days was 52 days for single UCB recipients, 55 days for double UCB recipients, 69 days for MUD BM recipients, 75 days for MUD peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) recipients, 63 days for MMUD BM recipients, and 67 days for MMUD PBSC recipients. In multivariate analysis, UCB and MMUD BM recipients had fewer days alive and out of the hospital compared with recipients of other graft sources. For adults who received a reduced-intensity preparative regimen, the median time alive and out of the hospital during the first 100 days was 65 days for single UCB recipients, 63 days for double UCB recipients, 79 days for MUD PBSC recipients, and 79 days for MMUD PBSC

  17. [University professors in the Soviet Occupation Zone and the German Democratic Republic up to 1961: Academic alternation of generations at university psychiatric hospitals].

    PubMed

    Kumbier, E; Haack, K

    2015-05-01

    After WWII a politically guided staffing policy foresaw an exchange program for professors from the Soviet Occupation Zone and the German Democratic Republic (GDR). In the field of medicine this initiative was not successful. With respect to university psychiatric/neurological hospitals this experiment failed as a result of a shortage of personnel due to the consequences of war, denazification and people migrating into western occupation zones. Criteria for politically selecting promising young talent which had been propagated by the Socialist Unity Party of Germany (Sozialistische Einheitspartei Deutschlands, SED) were thus not relevant in academic medicine until 1961; however, the communist rulers had great interest in bringing professional and academic resources up to date. Politically implicated representatives in the field were also included in this process. At the forefront was the interest in functioning medical care and education in order to be able to train much needed health professionals. At the end of the 1950s a new generation of professors was established at the university hospitals. This generation rotation demonstrated the politically intended replacement of the "old" professor generation and the transition to a new GDR generation that had been trained after 1945. This second generation of professors inherited vacant professorships and defined and shaped research and academia until the end of the GDR much more than the previous generation had and also more than the one that followed. The generation of professors continued to feel a strong affiliation with their academic teachers and consequently continued their tradition in the sense of a school, for the most part independent of political circumstances.

  18. The TAPS Project 41: homes for life? Residential stability five years after hospital discharge. Team for the Assessment of Psychiatric Services.

    PubMed

    Trieman, N; Smith, H E; Kendal, R; Leff, J

    1998-08-01

    This paper describes pathways followed by 567 long-stay patients who were resettled into the community, as part of a program to close two psychiatric hospitals in London and replace them with community-based services. Sixty-one percent of the former patients remained in their original placement--mostly group homes--over the five-year follow-up. Transition from one house to another mostly took a direct course, with only 27 patients changing houses by way of long intermediate hospitalisation. Change of residence was at the same level of support, with only a slight trend towards less supervised facilities. Ten patients could not be traced and have possibly become homeless. Only 3 patients were in prison during the five-year follow-up. More than a third of the sample were readmitted at least once during that period. It is concluded that community residences established under the resettlement program served as relatively stable homes for the majority of patients.

  19. Psychiatric Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Bayrakal, Sadi

    1972-01-01

    Dr. Bayrakal believes that the time has come for the family physician to deal with minor psychiatric disturbances in his office as well as psychiatric emergencies in the emergency department. The newly emerging medico-social philosophy of both the federal and provincial governments, he says, is giving greater responsibility and authority to the family physician in every area of medicine, including psychiatry. The author discusses major psychiatric emergencies (suicide, suicidal attempt, homicide, social scandal, as well as other psychiatric emergencies) on the ward including adolescent psychiatry. (The descriptions and treatment procedures are given on a concrete clinical level without theoretical overload.) In the family physician's work, psychological understanding is of profound importance. Giving him the added scope of psychiatric consideration to see the patient in bio-psycho-social totality will enable him to practice a more humanized form of medicine. PMID:20468779

  20. A Neurologist's Hard Day's Work: Impact of Inpatient Neurology Consultation in a Tertiary Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Helena; Monteiro, Ana; Gomes, Tiago; Grilo, Miguel; Carvalho, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Introdução: A consulta de neurologia realizada a doentes hospitalizados sob a responsabilidade de outras especialidades é um trabalho exigente mas muitas vezes sub-valorizado e pouco documentado. Este estudo pretendeu avaliar o impacto das consultas internas de neurologia num hospital português e, consequentemente, a performance do nosso Serviço no que diz respeito a esta matéria. Material e Métodos: Foi conduzido um estudo retrospetivo durante o ano de 2013 através da revisão de dados clínicos e demográficos. Resultados: Ao longo de um ano, os neurologistas no nosso Serviço avaliaram 632 doentes internados. As principais razões para o pedido de consulta foram a alteração do estado mental/comportamental, défice neurológico focal e crises epiléticas. Os pedidos de avaliação provieram principalmente de serviços médicos mas também de Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos e Intermédios. Os neurologistas sugeriram investigação adicional em cerca de 50% dos doentes; alterações terapêuticas foram efetuadas numa proporção semelhante de doentes. No final da consulta foi possível estabelecer um novo diagnóstico em 63% dos casos, sendo os mais frequentes manifestação neurológica de doenças sistémicas, epilepsia e doença vascular cerebral. Tal intervenção teve impacto no cuidado de 68% dos doentes. Discussão e Conclusão: Diferentes estudos na literatura suportam os nossos achados, enfatizando que esta atividade tem benefícios diretos no tratamento dos doentes e que é custo-efetiva. Os nossos resultados sugerem que a atividade de consultadoria interna da Neurologia resulta em intervenções úteis para a gestão clínica dos doentes internados.

  1. Goal attainment scaling in a geriatric day hospital. Team and program benefits.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D. J.; Oakey, S.; Almdahl, S.; Davoren, B.

    1999-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: The Geriatric Day Program (GDP) of the Capital Health Region in Victoria, BC, is concerned with effective team processes, accountability for health service outcomes, and improving the quality of programs. The GDP identified a need to improve its interdisciplinary processes and generate useful patient outcome data. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To determine whether Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) could be introduced to facilitate interdisciplinary processes and to generate useful health outcome data. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: The GAS procedures were incorporated into clinical routines based on published guidelines. The authors determined GAS outcome scores for patients who completed the program and developed outcome scores for specific geriatric problem areas requiring intervention. Outcome scores were made available to the clinical care team and to program managers for continuous quality improvement purposes. CONCLUSIONS: The GAS process was successfully implemented and was acceptable to clinicians and managers at the GDP. Team processes were thought to be improved by focusing on patient goals in a structured way. The GAS provided data on both patient outcomes and outcomes of interventions in specific problem areas. Accountability for patient care increased. Goal Attainment Scaling provided indicators of care for which clinicians could develop program quality improvements. PMID:10216794

  2. Psychiatric response to the Clapham rail crash.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, T P; Hollins, S C

    1991-01-01

    The psychiatric response to the Clapham rail crash is described. The psychiatric input was short term, dealing with the 38 inpatients and over 200 hospital staff involved in the response. The need to evolve a compact, responsive team structure is noted. The value of a proactive approach and provision of psychological debriefing is defended. Incorporation of components of the psychiatric response into the Hospital's major incident plan is reported. PMID:1994007

  3. THREE DAY CRISIS RESOLUTION UNIT

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Stephen E.; Ananth, Jambur; Bajwa-Goldsmith, Balbir; Stuller, Sue; Lewis, Cathy; Miller, Milton; Hoel, Noreen; Fernandez, Louise

    1985-01-01

    SUMMARY This paper describes a three day crisis resolution unit within the confines of the psychiatric emergency service of a general hospital. It utilizes a crisis model of acute intervention, time limited psychotherapeutic approach combined with family therapy, and psychotropic medications when indicated. 136 consecutive admissions were reviewed, 49% were discharged within 72 hours, and 51 % required further hospitalization. 77% of the patient's discharged had involved families (significant others) in the treatment process,-in comparison with only 28 % family involvement with those patients who needed further hospitalization. This may be even more significant for psychotic patients who were discharged (14/18 family involvement) versus those who needed long hospitalization (13/50 Family involvement). PMID:21927122

  4. The effect of funding policy on day of week admissions and discharges in hospitals: the cases of Austria and Canada.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Kevin J; Rauner, Marion S; Schaffhauser-Linzatti, Michaela Maria; Yap, Richard

    2003-03-01

    This paper compares two different funding policies for inpatients, the case-based approach in Austria versus the global budgeting approach in Canada. It examines the impact of these funding policies on length of stay of inpatients as one key measure of health outcome. In our study, six major clinical categories for inpatients are selected in which the day of the week for admission is matched to the particular day of the week of discharge for each individual case. The strategic statistical analysis proves that funding policies have a significant impact on the expected length of stay of inpatients. For all six clinical categories, Austrian inpatients stayed longer in hospitals compared to Canadian inpatients. Moreover, inpatients were not admitted and discharged equally throughout the week. We also statistically prove for certain clinical categories that more inpatients are discharged on certain days such as Mondays or Fridays depending on the funding policy. Our study is unique in the literature and our conclusions indicate that, with the right incentives in place, the length of stay can be decreased and discharge anomalies can be eliminated, which ultimately leads to a decrease in healthcare expenditures and an increase in healthcare effectiveness.

  5. College Student Utilization of a Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Sharon L.; Kader, Mahrin; Haggerty, Melinda Z.; Bakhai, Yogesh D.; Warren, Calvert G.

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to identify college students at risk for experiencing a mental health crisis that warranted a psychiatric evaluation at a hospital and/or a psychiatric hospitalization. A retrospective chart review of college students evaluated at a comprehensive psychiatric emergency program during a 1-year period was conducted. Demographic…

  6. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... Hospitals Medical, Psychiatric, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review § 456.170 Medical, psychiatric... beneficiary's need for care in the hospital; and appropriate professional personnel must make a...

  7. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... Hospitals Medical, Psychiatric, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review § 456.170 Medical, psychiatric... beneficiary's need for care in the hospital; and appropriate professional personnel must make a...

  8. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... Hospitals Medical, Psychiatric, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review § 456.170 Medical, psychiatric... beneficiary's need for care in the hospital; and appropriate professional personnel must make a...

  9. Geriatric day hospital: opportunity or threat? A qualitative exploratory study of the referral behaviour of Belgian general practitioners

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In order to address the challenges of an ageing population the Belgian government decided to allocate resources to the creation of geriatric day hospitals (GDHs). Although GDHs are meant to be a strategy to support general practitioners (GPs) caring for the frail elderly, few Belgian GPs seem to refer to a GDH. This study aims to explore the barriers and facilitating factors of GPs' referral to GDHs. Methods A qualitative study using focus group discussions (FGDs) was conducted. Fifteen FGDs were organized in the different Belgian regions (Flanders, Wallonia, Brussels). Results Contextual factors such as the unsatisfactory cooperation between hospital and GPs and organizational barriers such as the lack of communication on referral procedures between hospital and primary health care (PHC) were identified. Lack of basic knowledge about the concept or the local organization of GDH seemed to be a problem. Unclear task descriptions, responsibilities and activities of a GDH formed prominent points of discussion in all FGDs. Nevertheless a lot of possible advantages and disadvantages of GDHs for the patient and for the GP were mentioned. Conclusions In the case of poor referral to GDHs, focusing on improving overall collaboration between primary and secondary health care is essential. This can be achieved by actively delivering adequate information, permanent communication and more involvement of PHC in the organization and functioning of GDHs. The absence of a transparent health care system with delineated role definitions, seems to hinder the integration of new initiatives like GDHs in the care process. Strategies to enhance referral to GDHs should use a comprehensive approach. PMID:20619001

  10. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... psychiatric facilities. (a) Requirements for certification and recertification: General considerations... other hospitals because the care furnished in inpatient psychiatric facilities is often purely...

  11. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... psychiatric facilities. (a) Requirements for certification and recertification: General considerations... other hospitals because the care furnished in inpatient psychiatric facilities is often purely...

  12. Lunar phase and psychiatric illness in goa.

    PubMed

    Parmeshwaran, R; Patel, V; Fernandes, J M

    1999-01-01

    There has been considerable research on the influence of the lunar cycle on mental illness with conflicting findings. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between full moon (FM), new moon (NM), and other moon (OM) days and the frequency of specific psychiatric disorders in patients seen at a tertiary psychiatric hospital in Goa and to examine relationships with eclipses. Analysis of all new patients in two calendar years (1997 & 1993) was carried out. Diagnoses of interest were : Non affective psychoses; depression; and mania. The numbers of new patients seen at the OPD of the Institute of Psychiatry & Human Behaviour, Goa, with these diagnoses were compared between FM, NM and OM days. Numbers of patients with these diagnoses on eclipse days (lunar/solar) were also examined. A significant trend was observed for greater numbers of patients with non-affective psychoses on FM days, but no pattern was observed for mania or depression. The excess of non-affective psychoses was more marked on days of a visible lunar eclipse. A relationship between FM and non-affective psychoses has been demonstrated. Its implications for further research and the potential mechanism to explain these findings are discussed.

  13. Low serum albumin and total lymphocyte count as predictors of 30 day hospital readmission in patients 65 years of age or older.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Hospital readmission within 30 days of discharge is a target for health care cost savings through the medicare Value Based Purchasing initiative. Because of this focus, hospitals and health systems are investing considerable resources into the identification of patients at risk of hospital readmission and designing interventions to reduce the rate of hospital readmission. Malnutrition is a known risk factor for hospital readmission. Materials and Methods. All medical patients 65 years of age or older discharged from Memorial Medical Center from January 1, 2012 to March 31, 2012 who had a determination of serum albumin level and total lymphocyte count on hospital admission were studied retrospectively. Admission serum albumin levels and total lymphocyte counts were used to classify the nutritional status of all patients in the study. Patients with a serum albumin less than 3.5 grams/dL and/or a TLC less than 1,500 cells per mm3 were classified as having protein energy malnutrition. The primary outcome investigated in this study was hospital readmission for any reason within 30 days of discharge. Results. The study population included 1,683 hospital discharges with an average age of 79 years. The majority of the patients were female (55.9%) and had a DRG weight of 1.22 (0.68). 219 patients (13%) were readmitted within 30 days of hospital discharge. Protein energy malnutrition was common in this population. Low albumin was found in 973 (58%) patients and a low TLC was found in 1,152 (68%) patients. Low albumin and low TLC was found in 709 (42%) of patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis shows any laboratory evidence of PEM is a significant (p < 0.001) predictor of hospital readmission. Low serum albumin (p < 0.001) and TLC (p = 0.018) show similar trends. Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis showed low serum albumin (Hazard Ratio 3.27, 95% CI [2.30-4.63]) and higher DRG weight (Hazard Ratio 1.19, 95% CI [1.03-1.38]) to be significant independent

  14. Low serum albumin and total lymphocyte count as predictors of 30 day hospital readmission in patients 65 years of age or older

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Hospital readmission within 30 days of discharge is a target for health care cost savings through the medicare Value Based Purchasing initiative. Because of this focus, hospitals and health systems are investing considerable resources into the identification of patients at risk of hospital readmission and designing interventions to reduce the rate of hospital readmission. Malnutrition is a known risk factor for hospital readmission. Materials and Methods. All medical patients 65 years of age or older discharged from Memorial Medical Center from January 1, 2012 to March 31, 2012 who had a determination of serum albumin level and total lymphocyte count on hospital admission were studied retrospectively. Admission serum albumin levels and total lymphocyte counts were used to classify the nutritional status of all patients in the study. Patients with a serum albumin less than 3.5 grams/dL and/or a TLC less than 1,500 cells per mm3 were classified as having protein energy malnutrition. The primary outcome investigated in this study was hospital readmission for any reason within 30 days of discharge. Results. The study population included 1,683 hospital discharges with an average age of 79 years. The majority of the patients were female (55.9%) and had a DRG weight of 1.22 (0.68). 219 patients (13%) were readmitted within 30 days of hospital discharge. Protein energy malnutrition was common in this population. Low albumin was found in 973 (58%) patients and a low TLC was found in 1,152 (68%) patients. Low albumin and low TLC was found in 709 (42%) of patients. Kaplan–Meier analysis shows any laboratory evidence of PEM is a significant (p < 0.001) predictor of hospital readmission. Low serum albumin (p < 0.001) and TLC (p = 0.018) show similar trends. Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis showed low serum albumin (Hazard Ratio 3.27, 95% CI [2.30–4.63]) and higher DRG weight (Hazard Ratio 1.19, 95% CI [1.03–1.38]) to be significant independent

  15. Motivational Interviewing to Reduce Substance Use in Adolescents with Psychiatric Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Richard A.; Abrantes, Ana M.; Minami, Haruka; Prince, Mark A.; Bloom, Erika Litvin; Apodaca, Timothy R.; Strong, David R.; Picotte, Dawn M.; Monti, Peter M.; MacPherson, Laura; Matsko, Stephen V.; Hunt, Jeffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    Substance use among adolescents with one or more psychiatric disorders is a significant public health concern. In this study, 151 psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents, ages 13-17 with comorbid psychiatric and substance use disorders, were randomized to a two-session Motivational Interviewing intervention to reduce substance use plus treatment as usual (MI) vs. treatment as usual only (TAU). Results indicated that the MI group had a longer latency to first use of any substance following hospital discharge relative to TAU (36 days versus 11 days). Adolescents who received MI also reported less total use of substances and less use of marijuana during the first 6 months post-discharge, although this effect was not significant across 12 months. Finally, MI was associated with a significant reduction in rule-breaking behaviors at 6-month follow-up. Future directions are discussed, including means of extending effects beyond 6 months and dissemination of the intervention to community-based settings. PMID:26362000

  16. Implementing a Music Therapy Program at a New 72-Hour Acute Psychiatric Admissions Unit: A Case Study of a Patient Who Was Malingering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Because of the relatively poor treatment available, the high financial costs of hospitalization, multiple and complex issues of persons with severe mental illnesses, and advancements in pharmacotherapy, psychiatric patients are often only hospitalized for a few days before they are discharged. Thus, brief psychosocial interventions for persons who…

  17. [A "people dump": marks of suffering and transformations at the former Hospital Colônia Sant'Ana and in psychiatric care in Santa Catarina, 1970-1996].

    PubMed

    Borges, Viviane Trindade

    2013-10-01

    The article explores transformations to psychiatric care in Santa Catarina starting in the 1970s, when the state's longtime asylum, Hospital Colônia Sant'Ana, reached the height of overcrowding. To this end, along with other sources, it analyzes interviews that had been conducted with professionals who worked at the hospital in that era, sourced from the facility's Center for Documentation and Research. The goal was to problematize these testimonies, examining the texture of the accounts and approaching them as memories that weave a history of the hospital through recollections marked by suffering. Within this proposed framework, suffering is understood as a historical event that can give rise to new social arrangements.

  18. Psychiatric home care: a new tool for crisis intervention.

    PubMed

    Spiro, A H

    1994-03-01

    The cost of psychiatric care has been rapidly increasing in recent years. Between 1984 and 1987, there was a 46 percent increase in psychiatric hospitals beds and a 60 percent increase in psychiatric units in general hospitals. This reflected a recognition by many health care systems that psychiatric patients were a good source of revenue. With this push toward more and more inpatient programs, crucial aspects of psychiatric care were left behind. Specifically, the limitations of inpatient therapy have not been recognized. Within the past five years, a new program has been developed and pioneered to use home care to prevent psychiatric hospitalizations and to also prevent the difficult transitions for psychiatric patients. Over a two-year period, this program was studied for its impact on the quality and cost of psychiatric care.

  19. Development, Validation and Deployment of a Real Time 30 Day Hospital Readmission Risk Assessment Tool in the Maine Healthcare Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shiying; Wang, Yue; Jin, Bo; Shin, Andrew Young; Zhu, Chunqing; Huang, Min; Zheng, Le; Luo, Jin; Hu, Zhongkai; Fu, Changlin; Dai, Dorothy; Wang, Yicheng; Culver, Devore S.; Alfreds, Shaun T.; Rogow, Todd; Stearns, Frank; Sylvester, Karl G.; Widen, Eric; Ling, Xuefeng B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Identifying patients at risk of a 30-day readmission can help providers design interventions, and provide targeted care to improve clinical effectiveness. This study developed a risk model to predict a 30-day inpatient hospital readmission for patients in Maine, across all payers, all diseases and all demographic groups. Methods Our objective was to develop a model to determine the risk for inpatient hospital readmission within 30 days post discharge. All patients within the Maine Health Information Exchange (HIE) system were included. The model was retrospectively developed on inpatient encounters between January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012 from 24 randomly chosen hospitals, and then prospectively validated on inpatient encounters from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013 using all HIE patients. Results A risk assessment tool partitioned the entire HIE population into subgroups that corresponded to probability of hospital readmission as determined by a corresponding positive predictive value (PPV). An overall model c-statistic of 0.72 was achieved. The total 30-day readmission rates in low (score of 0–30), intermediate (score of 30–70) and high (score of 70–100) risk groupings were 8.67%, 24.10% and 74.10%, respectively. A time to event analysis revealed the higher risk groups readmitted to a hospital earlier than the lower risk groups. Six high-risk patient subgroup patterns were revealed through unsupervised clustering. Our model was successfully integrated into the statewide HIE to identify patient readmission risk upon admission and daily during hospitalization or for 30 days subsequently, providing daily risk score updates. Conclusions The risk model was validated as an effective tool for predicting 30-day readmissions for patients across all payer, disease and demographic groups within the Maine HIE. Exposing the key clinical, demographic and utilization profiles driving each patient’s risk of readmission score may be useful to providers

  20. Psychiatric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, S V

    1986-09-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common in medical inpatient and outpatient populations. As a result, internists commonly are the first to see psychiatric emergencies. As with all medical problems, a good history, including a collateral history from relatives and friends, physical and mental status examination, and appropriate laboratory tests help establish a preliminary diagnosis and treatment plan. Patients with suicidal ideation usually have multiple stressors in the environment and/or a psychiatric disorder (i.e., a major affective disorder, dysthymic disorder, anxiety or panic disorder, psychotic disorder, alcohol or drug abuse, a personality disorder, and/or an adjustment disorder). Of all patients who commit suicide, 70% have a major depressive disorder, schizophrenia, psychotic organic mental disorder, alcoholism, drug abuse, and borderline personality disorder. Patients who are at great risk have minimal supports, a history of previous suicide attempts, a plan with high lethality, hopelessness, psychosis, paranoia, and/or command self-destructive hallucinations. Treatment is directed toward placing the patient in a protected environment and providing psychotropic medication and/or psychotherapy for the underlying psychiatric problem. Other psychiatric emergencies include psychotic and violent patients. Psychotic disorders fall into two categories etiologically: those that have an identifiable organic factor causing the psychosis and those that have an underlying psychiatric disorder. Initially, it is essential to rule out organic pathology that is life-threatening or could cause irreversible brain damage. After such organic causes are ruled out, neuroleptic medication is indicated. If the patient is not agitated or combative, he or she may be placed on oral divided doses of neuroleptics in the antipsychotic range. Patients who are agitated or psychotic need rapid tranquilization with an intramuscular neuroleptic every half hour to 1 hour until the agitation and

  1. Teaching Creative Writing in a Psychiatric Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, Simone N.

    This paper reports the results of creative writing workshops in various psychiatric hospitals that have demonstrated that individuals in psychiatric settings have particular needs, affinities, and receptivities to the means of self-expression and communication available through creative writing. The purgative effect of Emily Dickinson's poetry and…

  2. The role of everyday emotion regulation on pain in hospitalized elderly: insights from a prospective within-day assessment.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Catherine; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne; Dubé, Laurette

    2005-06-01

    Pain management is still an unresolved issue among the general elderly patient population in institutions. It is proposed that everyday emotion regulation (i.e. self-supporting maintenance or change in positive and negative emotions) performed by hospitalized elderly can help reduce pain intensity. This argument is based on (1) robust evidence in life span research of elderly's high ability for emotion regulation in the midst of everyday life and (2) experimental evidence from pain research that simple strategies to regulate emotions impact pain intensity. A prospective within-day study was designed to (1) empirically trace the occurrence of emotion regulation over specific sampling episodes, (2) assess the impact of this regulation on end-of-episode pain intensity, and (3) consider the effects of socio-demographic, psychological, and clinical factors on emotion regulation and its relationship to pain intensity. Thirty patients (mean age 78.8) of a geriatric facility provided ratings of emotional states and pain intensity. Emotion regulation was defined as maintenance/recovery of desirable emotional states and computed for individual emotions (positive feelings, anger, anxiety, and mild depressed feelings) and globally to reflect the number of emotions successfully regulated. Multilevel analyses found emotion regulation to be prospectively related to pain intensity, for both global and anxiety regulation. While this relationship held across the sample, lower emotion regulation was found for old-old (vs. young-old), males (vs. females), and patients living alone (vs. with others). Results suggest the possibility that promoting emotion regulation as self-management strategy could contribute to cost-effective pain management in general or targeted elderly populations.

  3. An investigation of quality improvement initiatives in decreasing the rate of avoidable 30-day, skilled nursing facility-to-hospital readmissions: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mileski, Michael; Topinka, Joseph Baar; Lee, Kimberly; Brooks, Matthew; McNeil, Christopher; Jackson, Jenna

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The main objective was to investigate the applicability and effectiveness of quality improvement initiatives in decreasing the rate of avoidable 30-day, skilled nursing facility (SNF)-to-hospital readmissions. Problem The rate of rehospitalizations from SNF within 30 days of original discharge has increased within the last decade. Setting The research team participants conducted a literature review via Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature and PubMed to collect data about quality improvement implemented in SNFs. Results The most common facilitator was the incorporation of specialized staff. The most cited barriers were quality improvement tracking and implementation. Conclusion These strategy examples can be useful to acute care hospitals attempting to lower bounce back from subacute care providers and long-term care facilities seeking quality improvement initiatives to reduce hospital readmissions. PMID:28182162

  4. Cohesion to the Group and Its Association with Attendance and Early Treatment Response in an Adult Day-Hospital Program for Eating Disorders: A Preliminary Clinical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crino, Natalie; Djokvucic, Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Treatment outcome studies demonstrate that day-hospital programs are effective in the treatment of eating disorders. Few descriptions are available on the specifics of treatment, particularly the process of therapy. The group therapy modality is thought to provide important therapeutic benefits. The present study aimed to examine the association…

  5. A SHOCKING REQUIREMENT IN THE LAW ON NEGLIGENCE LIABILITY FOR PSYCHIATRIC ILLNESS: LIVERPOOL WOMEN'S HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST V RONAYNE [2015] EWCA CIV 588.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Andrew S; Burrows, John H

    2016-01-01

    The Ronayne case concerned a husband who suffered a psychiatric illness, described as an adjustment disorder, in seeing the condition of his wife who was the primary victim of admitted medical negligence. His claim for compensation, as a 'secondary victim', failed because he could not satisfy the legal requirement that there must be a sudden shocking event. This commentary criticises that requirement which appears to make no medical sense.

  6. Days spent in acute care hospitals at the end of life of cancer patients in four Swiss cantons: a retrospective database study (SAKK 89/09).

    PubMed

    Matter-Walstra, K W; Achermann, R; Rapold, R; Klingbiel, D; Bordoni, A; Dehler, S; Konzelmann, I; Mousavi, M; Clough-Gorr, K M; Szucs, T; Schwenkglenks, M; Pestalozzi, B C

    2016-02-09

    Number of days spent in acute hospitals (DAH) at the end of life is regarded as an important care quality indicator for cancer patients. We analysed DAH during 90 days prior to death in patients from four Swiss cantons. Claims data from an insurance provider with about 20% market share and patient record review identified 2086 patients as dying of cancer. We calculated total DAH per patient. Multivariable generalised linear modelling served to evaluate potential explanatory variables. Mean DAH was 26 days. In the multivariable model, using complementary and alternative medicine (DAH = 33.9; +8.8 days compared to non-users) and canton of residence (for patient receiving anti-cancer therapy, Zürich DAH = 22.8 versus Basel DAH = 31.4; for other patients, Valais DAH = 22.7 versus Ticino DAH = 33.7) had the strongest influence. Age at death and days spent in other institutions were additional significant predictors. DAH during the last 90 days of life of cancer patients from four Swiss cantons is high compared to most other countries. Several factors influence DAH. Resulting differences are likely to have financial impact, as DAH is a major cost driver for end-of-life care. Whether they are supply- or demand-driven and whether patients would prefer fewer days in hospital remains to be established.

  7. Psychiatric pharmacogenomics in pediatric psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Wall, Christopher A; Croarkin, Paul E; Swintak, Cosima; Koplin, Brett A

    2012-10-01

    This article provides an overview of where psychiatric pharmacogenomic testing stands as an emerging clinical tool in modern psychotropic prescribing practice, specifically in the pediatric population. This practical discussion is organized around the state of psychiatric pharmacogenomics research when choosing psychopharmacologic interventions in the most commonly encountered mental illnesses in youth. As with the rest of the topics on psychopharmacology for children and adolescents in this publication, a clinical vignette is presented, this one highlighting a clinical case of a 16 year old genotyped during hospitalization for recalcitrant depression.

  8. Caffeine consumption in a long-term psychiatric hospital: Tobacco smoking may explain in large part the apparent association between schizophrenia and caffeine use.

    PubMed

    Arrojo-Romero, Manuel; Armas Barbazán, Carmen; López-Moriñigo, Javier D; Ramos-Ríos, Ramón; Gurpegui, Manuel; Martínez-Ortega, José M; Jurado, Dolores; Diaz, Francisco J; de Leon, Jose

    2015-05-01

    This study further explores the association between schizophrenia and caffeine use by combining two prior published Spanish samples (250 schizophrenia outpatients and 290 controls from the general population) with two Spanish long-term inpatient samples from the same hospital (145 with schizophrenia and 64 with other severe mental illnesses). The specific aims were to establish whether or not, after controlling for confounders including tobacco smoking, the association between schizophrenia and caffeine is consistent across schizophrenia samples and across different definitions of caffeine use. The frequency of caffeine use in schizophrenia inpatients was not significantly higher than that in non-schizophrenia inpatients (77%, 111/145 vs. 75%, 48/64) or controls but was significantly higher than in schizophrenia outpatients. The frequency of high caffeine users among caffeine users in schizophrenia inpatients was not significantly higher than in non-schizophrenia inpatients (45%, 50/111 vs. 52%, 25/48) or controls, but was significantly lower than in schizophrenia outpatients. Smoking was significantly associated with caffeine use across all samples and definitions. Between 2 and 3% of schizophrenia inpatients, schizophrenia outpatients and non-schizophrenia inpatients showed caffeinism (>700 mg/day in smokers). Several of these smoking patients with caffeinism were also taking other inducers, particularly omeprazole. The lack of consistent association between schizophrenia and caffeine use is surprising when compared with the very consistent association between tobacco smoking and caffeine use across all of our analyses (use and high use in users) and all our samples. The confounding effects of tobacco smoking may explain in large part the apparent association between schizophrenia and caffeine use.

  9. Regional Correlates of Psychiatric Inpatient Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ala-Nikkola, Taina; Pirkola, Sami; Kaila, Minna; Saarni, Samuli I.; Joffe, Grigori; Kontio, Raija; Oranta, Olli; Sadeniemi, Minna; Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Current reforms of mental health and substance abuse services (MHS) emphasize community-based care and the downsizing of psychiatric hospitals. Reductions in acute and semi-acute hospital beds are achieved through shortened stays or by avoiding hospitalization. Understanding the factors that drive the current inpatient treatment provision is essential. We investigated how the MHS service structure (diversity of services and balance of personnel resources) and indicators of service need (mental health index, education, single household, and alcohol sales) correlated with acute and semi-acute inpatient treatment provision. The European Service Mapping Schedule-Revised (ESMS-R) tool was used to classify the adult MHS structure in southern Finland (population 1.8 million, 18+ years). The diversity of MHS in terms of range of outpatient and day care services or the overall personnel resourcing in inpatient or outpatient services was not associated with the inpatient treatment provision. In the univariate analyses, sold alcohol was associated with the inpatient treatment provision, while in the multivariate modeling, only a general index for mental health needs was associated with greater hospitalization. In the dehospitalization process, direct resource re-allocation and substituting of inpatient treatment with outpatient care per se is likely insufficient, since inpatient treatment is linked to contextual factors in the population and the health care system. Mental health services reforms require both strategic planning of service system as a whole and detailed understanding of effects of societal components. PMID:27929403

  10. [Authority in the psychiatric clinic].

    PubMed

    Laemmel, K

    1983-01-01

    Although considerable progress was made as far as therapy and individual rights of the patients are concerned today the psychiatric hospital is more than ever the butt of open citicism. One of the reasons for that is the odium of involuntarity and authority surrounding it. It is based on the ill-fame and dubious reputation of the nineteenth century "asylum". The problem of authority concerns today's hospitals as much as ever. How the hospital is run depends naturally in the first place on the personality of it's director his views on authority, as much as on his understanding and ability to handle the intensive dynamic processes in the institution. Recognizing the boundaries of his actual knowledge and training, his "authoritative authority", makes him wisely limit his goals and activities. Power or "authoritarian authority" must be employed with restraint and moderation but without hesitancy when necessary. The clinic represents for the patient a total milieu. It's therapeutic effect relies a great deal on the regulatory influence of the daily routine based on the authority of the treatment team. Jones' ideas of the "Therapeutic Community" have only limited value for today's psychiatric hospital. Even less significant contributions have been made by the antipsychiatric movement or the Marxist-inspired reformers of the last decades. Only that is therapeutic which in the final analysis helps the patient to cope successfully with reality. Even today the use of involuntary measures-seclusion and medication etc. remain a necessary tool for the treatment of some patients. As every institution is always part of a public or private structure, it's authority is always bridled by these. Ethical clinical psychiatry requires an ethical political state, if it is not to become it's henchman. Even in democratic countries problems may arise around involuntary hospitalization, the care of psychiatrically ill criminals or the legalities around medicating the uncooperative psychotic

  11. Joint crisis plans and psychiatric advance directives in German psychiatric practice.

    PubMed

    Radenbach, Katrin; Falkai, Peter; Weber-Reich, Traudel; Simon, Alfred

    2014-05-01

    This study explores the attitude of German psychiatrists in leading positions towards joint crisis plans and psychiatric advance directives. This topic was examined by contacting 473 medical directors of German psychiatric hospitals and departments. They were asked to complete a questionnaire developed by us. That form contained questions about the incidence and acceptance of joint crisis plans and psychiatric advance directives and previous experiences with them. 108 medical directors of psychiatric hospitals and departments responded (response rate: 22.8%). Their answers demonstrate that in their hospitals these documents are rarely used. Among the respondents, joint crisis plans are more accepted than psychiatric advance directives. There is a certain uncertainty when dealing with these instruments. Our main conclusion is that German psychiatry needs an intensified discussion on the use of instruments for patients to constitute procedures for future critical psychiatric events. For this purpose it will be helpful to collect more empirical data. Furthermore, the proposal of joint crisis plans in psychiatric hospitals and departments should be discussed as well as the possibility of consulting an expert during the preparation of a psychiatric advance directive.

  12. [Personality disorders and "psychopathy" in sex offenders imprisoned in forensic-psychiatric hospitals--SKID-II- and PCL-R-results in patients with impulse control disorder and paraphilia].

    PubMed

    Borchard, Bernd; Gnoth, Annika; Schulz, Wolfgang

    2003-04-01

    In order to clarify differential-diagnostic questions 47 mentally ill sex offenders (with impulse control disorder and paraphilia) were assessed with regard to comorbidity of personality disorders and "psychopathy". For this examination the SKID-II for personality disorders and the Psychopathy Checklist (PCL-R) were used. 72 % of the sex offenders showed at least one personality disorder. The highest prevalence was found for cluster-B disorders, first of all the antisocial personality disorder. Using a PCL-R cut off score of 25 (for Europe) 10 of the 47 subjects (21 %) were diagnosed as "psychopaths", whereas being a "psychopath" is associated with a number of different personality disorders. The importance of structured diagnostic with regard to comorbidity of personality disorders in sex offenders imprisoned in maximum security psychiatric hospitals is stressed, and furthermore there is evidence that the PCL-R is a valid instrument for prognosis, but not a psychological-psychiatric instrument for the assessment of personality disorders.

  13. [Fragments of history in psychiatric care Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil].

    PubMed

    de Miranda, Francisco Arnoldo Nunes; Santos, Raionara Cristina de Araújo; de Azevedo, Dulcian Medeiros; Fernandes, Rafaella Leite; Costa, Tarciana Sampaio

    2010-09-01

    This article aims to rescue aspects of the performing therapeutic of the Day Hospital (HD) Dr Elger Nunes, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, during its term, and analyze the results regarding to the number of patients assisted from 1996 to 2004. This is an empirical, descriptive and exploratory study, ex post facto with a quantitative approach, carried out through the analysis of the records of 910 people attended in the hospital. The data was submitted to the informational resource software Microsoft Excel and converted into diagrams. The results show a greater accessibility to this treatment modality, decreasing in hospitalization-time length and improving hospital discharge conditions for users, with reduction in number of patients who interrupted treatment. It focus on the importance of the Day Hospital in the process of psychiatric reform, with care grounded on the use of the humanized therapeutic practices, and still not losing the bond with family and society.

  14. Is Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests Worse During Days of National Academic Meetings in Japan? A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Matsuyama, Tasuku; Hatakeyama, Toshihiro; Shimamoto, Tomonari; Izawa, Junichi; Nishiyama, Chika; Iwami, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Background Outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) might be worse during academic meetings because many medical professionals attend them. Methods This nationwide population-based observation of all consecutively enrolled Japanese adult OHCA patients with resuscitation attempts from 2005 to 2012. The primary outcome was 1-month survival with a neurologically favorable outcome. Calendar days at three national meetings (Japanese Society of Intensive Care Medicine, Japanese Association for Acute Medicine, and Japanese Circulation Society) were obtained for each year during the study period, because medical professionals who belong to these academic societies play an important role in treating OHCA patients after hospital admission, and we identified two groups: the exposure group included OHCAs that occurred on meeting days, and the control group included OHCAs that occurred on the same days of the week 1 week before and after meetings. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for confounding variables. Results A total of 20 143 OHCAs that occurred during meeting days and 38 860 OHCAs that occurred during non-meeting days were eligible for our analyses. The proportion of patients with favorable neurologic outcomes after whole arrests did not differ during meeting and non-meeting days (1.6% [324/20 143] vs 1.5% [596/38 855]; adjusted odds ratio 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.88–1.19). Regarding bystander-witnessed ventricular fibrillation arrests of cardiac origin, the proportion of patients with favorable neurologic outcomes also did not differ between the groups. Conclusions In this population, there were no significant differences in outcomes after OHCAs that occurred during national meetings of professional organizations related to OHCA care and those that occurred during non-meeting days. PMID:26639754

  15. Present-Day Hospital Readmissions after Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation: A Large Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Ruben E.; Singh, Steve K.; Hoang, Dale T.; Ali, Syed W.; Elayda, MacArthur A.; Mallidi, Hari R.; Frazier, O.H.

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy improves survival, hemodynamic status, and end-organ perfusion in patients with refractory advanced heart failure. Hospital readmission is an important measure of the intensity of LVAD support care. We analyzed readmissions of 148 patients (mean age, 53.6 ± 12.7 yr; 83% male) who received a HeartMate II LVAD from April 2008 through June 2012. The patients had severe heart failure; 60.1% were in Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support class 1 or 2. All patients were observed for at least 12 months, and readmissions were classified as planned or unplanned. Descriptive and multivariate regression analyses were used to identify predictors of unplanned readmission. Twenty-seven patients (18.2%) had no readmissions or 69 planned readmissions, and 121 patients (81.8%) had 460 unplanned readmissions. The LVAD-related readmissions were for bleeding, thrombosis, and anticoagulation (n=103; 49.1%), pump-related infections (n=60; 28.6%), and neurologic events (n=28; 13.3%). The readmission rate was 2.1 per patient-year. Unplanned readmissions were for comorbidities and underlying cardiac disease (54.3%) or LVAD-related causes (45.7%). In the unplanned-readmission rate, there was no significant difference between bridge-to-transplantation and destination-therapy patients. Unplanned readmissions were associated with diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR]=3.3; P=0.04) and with shorter mileage from residence to hospital (OR=0.998; P=0.046). Unplanned admissions for LVAD-related sequelae and ongoing comorbidities were common. Diabetes mellitus and shorter distance from residence to hospital were significant predictors of readmission. We project that improved management of comorbidities and of anticoagulation therapy will reduce unplanned readmissions of LVAD patients in the future. PMID:26504434

  16. Critical Behaviors in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing. Volume 2: Behavior of Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Angeline Marchese; And Others

    Part of a three-volume document, this volume is concerned with providing source data about the activities of mental health nursing personnel as these activities relate to patient care, and contains abstracts of more than 4,000 critical behaviors of psychiatric nurses in 50 psychiatric hospitals, general hospitals with psychiatric units, and…

  17. Critical Behaviors in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing. Volume 3: Behavior of Attendants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Angeline Marchese; And Others

    Part of a three-volume document, this volume is concerned with providing source data about the activities of mental health nursing personnel as the activities relate to patient care and contains abstracts of more than 4,000 critical behaviors of psychiatric attendants in 50 psychiatric hospitals, general hospitals with psychiatric units, and…

  18. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Certification and Plan Requirements § 424.14 Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric... requirements differ from those for other hospitals because the care furnished in psychiatric hospitals is...

  19. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... psychiatric facilities. (a) Content of certification and recertification: General considerations. The content requirements differ from those for other hospitals because the care furnished in psychiatric hospitals is...

  20. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Certification and Plan Requirements § 424.14 Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric... requirements differ from those for other hospitals because the care furnished in psychiatric hospitals is...

  1. Safety and Traceability in Patient Healthcare through the Integration of RFID Technology for Intravenous Mixtures in the Prescription-Validation-Elaboration-Dispensation-Administration Circuit to Day Hospital Patients

    PubMed Central

    Martínez Pérez, María; Vázquez González, Guillermo; Dafonte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the integration of the RFID technology with the aim of ensuring the traceability of patients and minimization of adverse events during the process of prescription-validation-elaboration-dispensation-administration of medication by means of the implementation of various passive and active WIFI RFID systems in the Pharmacy and Day Hospital services of the Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruña. Obtaining patient traceability and using the patient/drug binomial during this process allows us to minimize the occurrence of adverse events. The key points in this work are the unmistakably unique identification and accurate real time location of the controlled items (patients and medication). RFID technology has proved to be invaluable in assisting with the everyday clinical practice of a hospital, and has been successfully implemented in this environment and others. In services such as the day hospital, the implementation of said technology is further justified by the high costs of the service and the high risk to the patient. PMID:27483269

  2. Safety and Traceability in Patient Healthcare through the Integration of RFID Technology for Intravenous Mixtures in the Prescription-Validation-Elaboration-Dispensation-Administration Circuit to Day Hospital Patients.

    PubMed

    Martínez Pérez, María; Vázquez González, Guillermo; Dafonte, Carlos

    2016-07-28

    This work presents the integration of the RFID technology with the aim of ensuring the traceability of patients and minimization of adverse events during the process of prescription-validation-elaboration-dispensation-administration of medication by means of the implementation of various passive and active WIFI RFID systems in the Pharmacy and Day Hospital services of the Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruña. Obtaining patient traceability and using the patient/drug binomial during this process allows us to minimize the occurrence of adverse events. The key points in this work are the unmistakably unique identification and accurate real time location of the controlled items (patients and medication). RFID technology has proved to be invaluable in assisting with the everyday clinical practice of a hospital, and has been successfully implemented in this environment and others. In services such as the day hospital, the implementation of said technology is further justified by the high costs of the service and the high risk to the patient.

  3. Tracing patients from acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed Central

    Double, D; MacPherson, R; Wong, T

    1993-01-01

    A random sample of those admitted to acute psychiatric wards in Sheffield in 1985 was traced to establish whether or not the patients were homeless 5 years later. Contrary to expectations none were found to be homeless. Although the proportion of mentally ill amongst the homeless may be significantly high, the number discharged from psychiatric hospital, at least in Sheffield, living consistently 'on the streets' or staying regularly in night shelters seems small as a proportion of all discharges. PMID:8410893

  4. Promotion of Cholera Awareness Among Households of Cholera Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Cholera-Hospital-Based-Intervention-for-7 Days (CHoBI7) Intervention.

    PubMed

    Saif-Ur-Rahman, K M; Parvin, Tahmina; Bhuyian, Sazzadul Islam; Zohura, Fatema; Begum, Farzana; Rashid, Mahamud-Ur; Biswas, Shwapon Kumar; Sack, David; Sack, R Bradley; Monira, Shirajum; Alam, Munirul; Shaly, Nusrat Jahan; George, Christine Marie

    2016-12-07

    Previous studies have demonstrated that household contacts of cholera patients are highly susceptible to cholera infections for a 7-day period after the presentation of the index patient in the hospital. However, there is no standard of care to prevent cholera transmission in this high-risk population. Furthermore, there is limited information available on awareness of cholera transmission and prevention among cholera patients and their household contacts. To initiate a standard of care for this high-risk population, we developed the Cholera-Hospital-Based-Intervention-for-7-Days (CHoBI7), which delivers a handwashing with soap and water treatment intervention to household contacts during the time they spend with the admitted cholera patient in the hospital and reinforces these messages through home visits. To test CHoBI7, we conducted a randomized controlled trial among 302 intervention cholera patient household members and 302 control cholera patient household members in Dhaka, Bangladesh. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of the CHoBI7 intervention in increasing awareness of cholera transmission and prevention, and the key times for handwashing with soap. We observed a significant increase in cholera knowledge score in the intervention arm compared with the control arm at both the 1-week follow-up {score coefficient = 2.34 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.96, 2.71)} and 6 to 12-month follow-up period (score coefficient = 1.59 [95% CI = 1.05, 2.13]). This 1-week hospital- and home-based intervention led to a significant increase in knowledge of cholera transmission and prevention which was sustained 6 to 12 months post-intervention. These findings suggest that the CHoBI7 intervention presents a promising approach to increase cholera awareness among this high-risk population.

  5. The impact of shift work on the psychological and physical health of nurses in a general hospital: a comparison between rotating night shifts and day shifts

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Paola; Guadi, Matteo; Marcheselli, Luigi; Balduzzi, Sara; Magnani, Daniela; Di Lorenzo, Rosaria

    2016-01-01

    Background Shift work is considered necessary to ensure continuity of care in hospitals and residential facilities. In particular, the night shift is one of the most frequent reasons for the disruption of circadian rhythms, causing significant alterations of sleep and biological functions that can affect physical and psychological well-being and negatively impact work performance. Objectives The aim of this study was to highlight if shift work with nights, as compared with day work only, is associated with risk factors predisposing nurses to poorer health conditions and lower job satisfaction. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted from June 1, 2015 to July 31, 2015 in 17 wards of a general hospital and a residential facility of a northern Italian city. This study involved 213 nurses working in rotating night shifts and 65 in day shifts. The instrument used for data collection was the “Standard Shift Work Index,” validated in Italian. Data were statistically analyzed. Results The response rate was 86%. The nurses engaged in rotating night shifts were statistically significantly younger, more frequently single, and had Bachelors and Masters degrees in nursing. They reported the lowest mean score in the items of job satisfaction, quality and quantity of sleep, with more frequent chronic fatigue, psychological, and cardiovascular symptoms in comparison with the day shift workers, in a statistically significant way. Conclusion Our results suggest that nurses with rotating night schedule need special attention due to the higher risk for both job dissatisfaction and undesirable health effects. PMID:27695372

  6. Psychiatric Thoughts in Ancient India*

    PubMed Central

    Abhyankar, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    A review of the literature regarding psychiatric thoughts in ancient India is attempted. Besides interesting reading, many of the concepts are still relevant and can be used in day-to-day practice especially towards healthy and happy living. Certain concepts are surprisingly contemporary and valid today. They can be used in psychotherapy and counselling and for promoting mental health. However, the description and classification of mental illness is not in tune with modern psychiatry. PMID:25838724

  7. A Protocolised Once a Day Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) Measurement Is an Appropriate Screening Tool for Major Adverse Events in a General Hospital Population

    PubMed Central

    Ludikhuize, Jeroen; Kramer, Mark H. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) was developed to timely recognise clinically deteriorating hospitalised patients. However, the ability of the MEWS in predicting serious adverse events (SAEs) in a general hospital population has not been examined prospectively. The aims were to (1) analyse protocol adherence to a MEWS protocol in a real-life setting and (2) to determine the predictive value of protocolised daily MEWS measurement on SAEs: death, cardiac arrests, ICU-admissions and readmissions. Methods All adult patients admitted to 6 hospital wards in October and November 2015 were included. MEWS were checked each morning by the research team. For each critical score (MEWS ≥ 3), the clinical staff was inquired about the actions performed. 30-day follow-up for SAEs was performed to compare between patients with and without a critical score. Results 1053 patients with 3673 vital parameter measurements were included, 200 (19.0%) had a critical score. The protocol adherence was 89.0%. 18.2% of MEWS were calculated wrongly. Patients with critical scores had significant higher rates of unplanned ICU admissions [7.0% vs 1.3%, p < 0.001], in-hospital mortality [6.0% vs 0.8%, p < 0.001], 30-day readmission rates [18.6% vs 10.8%, p < 0.05], and a longer length of stay [15.65 (SD: 15.7 days) vs 6.09 (SD: 6.9), p < 0.001]. Specificity of MEWS related to composite adverse events was 83% with a negative predicting value of 98.1%. Conclusions Protocol adherence was high, even though one-third of the critical scores were calculated wrongly. Patients with a MEWS ≥ 3 experienced significantly more adverse events. The negative predictive value of early morning MEWS < 3 was 98.1%, indicating the reliability of this score as a screening tool. PMID:27494719

  8. Adding Laboratory Data to Hospital Claims Data to Improve Risk Adjustment of Inpatient/30-Day Postdischarge Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pine, Michael; Fry, Donald E; Hannan, Edward L; Naessens, James M; Whitman, Kay; Reband, Agnes; Qian, Feng; Schindler, Joseph; Sonneborn, Mark; Roland, Jaclyn; Hyde, Linda; Dennison, Barbara A

    Numerical laboratory data at admission have been proposed for enhancement of inpatient predictive modeling from administrative claims. In this study, predictive models for inpatient/30-day postdischarge mortality and for risk-adjusted prolonged length of stay, as a surrogate for severe inpatient complications of care, were designed with administrative data only and with administrative data plus numerical laboratory variables. A comparison of resulting inpatient models for acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, coronary artery bypass grafting, and percutaneous cardiac interventions demonstrated improved discrimination and calibration with administrative data plus laboratory values compared to administrative data only for both mortality and prolonged length of stay. Improved goodness of fit was most apparent in acute myocardial infarction and percutaneous cardiac intervention. The emergence of electronic medical records should make the addition of laboratory variables to administrative data an efficient and practical method to clinically enhance predictive modeling of inpatient outcomes of care.

  9. A Study of the Most Cost Effective Method of Providing Short Term Inpatient Psychiatric Care in the Washington, DC Catchment Area

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    where care was provided to include the average length of stay for the short term psychiatric patient, total cost per hospital encounter as well as...for short term inpatient psychiatric care. This figure multiplied by the average length of stay and the projected number of CNA renders a range for...in FY 1983 estimates that the average length of stay (ALOS) in days is 54.2.15 This ALOS is elevated to 58 days when the Washington, D.C. catchment

  10. Velocity during Strength and Power Training of the Ankle Plantar and Dorsiflexor Muscles in Older Patients Attending Day Hospital Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Pavithra; Porter, Michelle M

    2015-01-01

    Power training has been proposed as a more effective type of resistance training for older adults for functional performance. It is not yet known whether older adults respond appropriately to instructions for power versus strength training. The purpose of this study was to determine the velocity during strength and power training, with elastic resistance bands, in older adults attending a geriatric rehabilitation day program. It was hypothesized that power training would be faster than strength training, but that there would be large interindividual differences. Nine older patients (70 to 86 years) performed power and strength training of the ankle dorsiflexor and plantar flexor muscles using elastic resistance bands. Training sessions were filmed to assess the velocity of training. Power training occurred at faster velocities as compared to strength training (P < 0.01) for both muscle groups. However, a wide variation was observed between participants in the training velocities. Older adults attending geriatric rehabilitation do have the potential to develop faster contractions during power training as compared to strength training. Nevertheless, the actual velocities achieved differed between individuals. This could explain some of the mixed findings of studies on power training. Hence, researchers should monitor velocity when comparing different types of resistance training.

  11. Substance use and response to psychiatric treatment in methadone-treated outpatients with comorbid psychiatric disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kidorf, Michael; King, Van L.; Peirce, Jessica; Gandotra, Neeraj; Ghazarian, Sharon; Brooner, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    The psychiatric care of opioid users receiving agonist therapies is often complicated by high rates of illicit drug use (Brooner et al., 2013). The present study evaluates if illicit drug use (i.e., opioids, cocaine, sedatives) detected at the start of psychiatric care affects treatment response. Methadone maintenance patients (n = 125) with at least one current psychiatric disorder completed a 3-month randomized clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of financial incentives on attendance to on-site integrated substance abuse and psychiatric services (Kidorf et al., 2013). The present study re-analyzes the data set by grouping participants into one of two conditions based on the 4-week baseline observation: 1) no illicit drug use (Baseline Negative; n = 50), or 2) any illicit drug use (Baseline Positive; n = 75). All participants received a similar schedule of psychiatric services, and had good access to prescribed psychiatric medications. The Global Severity Index (GSI) of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-Revised was administered monthly to evaluate changes in psychiatric distress. Results showed that while both conditions evidenced similar utilization of on-site psychiatric services, Baseline Negative participants remained in treatment somewhat longer (80.7 vs. 74.8 days, p = .04) and demonstrated greater reductions in GSI scores than Baseline Positive participants at Month 3 (p = .004). These results have implications for interpreting previous studies that have shown inconsistent efficacy of pharmacotherapy and other psychiatric treatments, and for providing clinical care for patients with co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders. PMID:25468006

  12. [A university department as a psychiatric service centre for children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Remschmidt, Helmut; Walter, Reinhard; Theisen, Frank; Ulbrich, Rainer; Martin, Matthias

    2006-11-01

    The article reports on a system of care for psychiatrically ill children and adolescents that has been designed, established and expanded since 1980 by a university department in a rural region. The department is responsible for the mental health care of three counties with altogether 807 000 inhabitants. The development of this system of care was due in great part to the model program of the German Federal Government for the reform of mental health care that comprised 14 model regions, out of which the region of Marburg and its surrounding counties was the only one with a focus on the situation of psychiatrically ill children and adolescents. With the aid of this model program, a comprehensive evaluation of existing psychiatric services was carried out and at the same time, new services for this clientele were established such as a mobile child and adolescent psychiatric service and a day hospital. A particular focus was laid on the development of a complete network of psychiatric services with manifold, and over the years well proven, cooperation measures. Finally, the quality of mental health care was significantly increased by a continuous evaluation of services and the implementation of two institutes for psychotherapeutic training. Several research initiatives in the field of social psychiatry have contributed to this amelioration and at the same time, to a successful integration of mental health care and research.

  13. No effect of lunar cycle on psychiatric admissions or emergency evaluations.

    PubMed

    McLay, Robert N; Daylo, Amado A; Hammer, Paul S

    2006-12-01

    It is a popularly held belief that psychiatric behavior worsens during a full moon. Research in this area has yielded mixed results. Records from Naval Medical Center San Diego for 1993-2001 were examined to see whether there were higher rates of psychiatric admission associated with particular phases of the moon. Records from 8,473 admissions revealed that there were no more admission on days with a full moon, a new moon, any quarter of the moon, a waxing moon, or a waning moon. This held true for psychiatric patients as a whole, as well as for individuals with particular diagnoses, such as those with a mood disorder or psychotic disorder. Records from 1,909 emergency psychiatric evaluations that occurred between 2002 and 2003 were also examined to see whether a higher percentage of patients might present, but not require hospitalization, during a particular phase of the moon. Once again, no significant effect was found. In summary, lunar phase was not associated in any significant way with psychiatric admissions or emergency presentation.

  14. Variation between Hospitals with Regard to Diagnostic Practice, Coding Accuracy, and Case-Mix. A Retrospective Validation Study of Administrative Data versus Medical Records for Estimating 30-Day Mortality after Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kristoffersen, Doris Tove; Skyrud, Katrine Damgaard; Lindman, Anja Schou

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of patient administrative data (PAS) for calculating 30-day mortality after hip fracture as a quality indicator, by a retrospective study of medical records. Methods We used PAS data from all Norwegian hospitals (2005–2009), merged with vital status from the National Registry, to calculate 30-day case-mix adjusted mortality for each hospital (n = 51). We used stratified sampling to establish a representative sample of both hospitals and cases. The hospitals were stratified according to high, low and medium mortality of which 4, 3, and 5 hospitals were sampled, respectively. Within hospitals, cases were sampled stratified according to year of admission, age, length of stay, and vital 30-day status (alive/dead). The final study sample included 1043 cases from 11 hospitals. Clinical information was abstracted from the medical records. Diagnostic and clinical information from the medical records and PAS were used to define definite and probable hip fracture. We used logistic regression analysis in order to estimate systematic between-hospital variation in unmeasured confounding. Finally, to study the consequences of unmeasured confounding for identifying mortality outlier hospitals, a sensitivity analysis was performed. Results The estimated overall positive predictive value was 95.9% for definite and 99.7% for definite or probable hip fracture, with no statistically significant differences between hospitals. The standard deviation of the additional, systematic hospital bias in mortality estimates was 0.044 on the logistic scale. The effect of unmeasured confounding on outlier detection was small to moderate, noticeable only for large hospital volumes. Conclusions This study showed that PAS data are adequate for identifying cases of hip fracture, and the effect of unmeasured case mix variation was small. In conclusion, PAS data are adequate for calculating 30-day mortality after hip-fracture as a quality

  15. Approaches to substance abuse in Cuba: Ricardo A. González MD PhD DrSc. Psychiatrist and consulting professor, Eduardo B. Ordaz Psychiatric Hospital, Havana. Interviewed by Christina Mills.

    PubMed

    González, Ricardo

    2013-10-01

    For over 40 years, he has done one of the most difficult jobs in medicine; 4000 of his patients are among those many might write off as "lost causes." Yet he radiates optimism, his stories and experience reflecting a belief in the human potential to change and grow and a vocation to help his patients do so. Now an internationally recognized expert on addictions, in 1976 Dr González founded Cuba's first patient service for substance abuse at the Eduardo B. Ordaz Psychiatric Hospital in Havana, a program he directed until last year. It is now the national reference center for another 17 such programs, two more in Havana and one in every other Cuban province. In addition, it serves as a model for treatment centers catering to international patients (undoubtedly the most well known among them Diego Maradona, the Argentine soccer star): two in Holguin Province and one in Santiago Province, with another being developed at Las Praderas International Health Center in Havana. Dr González's 25 books on psychiatry, medical ethics and addictions attest to a prolific career in research and practice. Today, he continues to work "from retirement" as consulting professor and psychiatrist in the addiction service he founded, and also chairs Cuba's National Medical Ethics Commission. In this interview, Dr González shares insights from his years of experience addressing substance abuse, as well as on repercussions and management of such conditions in Cuba.

  16. Psychiatrists and psychiatric rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Torrey, William C; Green, Ronald L; Drake, Robert E

    2005-05-01

    Interventions that focus directly on functional impairments related to mental illnesses are termed psychiatric rehabilitation. Research demonstrates that rehabilitation services are increasingly able to help adults with psychiatric disabilities achieve the functional outcomes they desire, particularly in the areas of housing and employment. To support the community lives of adults with severe mental illnesses, psychiatrists must stay current with advances in this field and know how to integrate psychiatric rehabilitation with other interventions. This article reviews the concept of psychiatric rehabilitation, current approaches in the field, the psychiatrist's role in these services, and implications for psychiatric training and continuing education.

  17. Chromosomal abnormalities in a psychiatric population

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, K.E.; Lubetsky, M.J.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W.

    1995-02-27

    Over a 3.5 year period of time, 345 patients hospitalized for psychiatric problems were evaluated cytogenetically. The patient population included 76% males and 94% children with a mean age of 12 years. The criteria for testing was an undiagnosed etiology for mental retardation and/or autism. Cytogenetic studies identified 11, or 3%, with abnormal karyotypes, including 4 fragile X positive individuals (2 males, 2 females), and 8 with chromosomal aneuploidy, rearrangements, or deletions. While individuals with chromosomal abnormalities do not demonstrate specific behavioral, psychiatric, or developmental problems relative to other psychiatric patients, our results demonstrate the need for an increased awareness to order chromosomal analysis and fragile X testing in those individuals who have combinations of behavioral/psychiatric, learning, communication, or cognitive disturbance. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Role of cannabis in psychiatric disturbance.

    PubMed

    Knight, F

    1976-01-01

    Clinical observation suggests that cannabis is implicated in some types of psychiatric disturbance. A record of admissions to two urban and four rural hospitals in Jamaica is examined along with details of individual cases. One-third of male admissions to the psychiatric hospital have used cannabis. Of 74 males admitted to another psychiatric service over a 12-month period, 29 had used cannabis. Ten of these patients were diagnosed as "ganja psychosis," and four others were classified as "marijuana-modified mania." At another psychiatric service, 54 of 223 admissions (24.2%) for functional psychosis presented with cannabis usage as a comtributory factor. These 54 patients included 14 and seven cases of hypomanic and depressive reactions, respectively. At three other rural general hospitals, psychiatric admissions for psychosis showed 11 of 51, seven of 18, and 39 of 75 patients, respectively, in whom cannabis was considered directly responsible. These findings lend support to the idea of causation of illness or modification of existing illness. The negative findings of controlled studies in the same country are not inconsistent. A suggested classification for adverse reactions to cannabis offered by one author is recommended, because it is in accord with common local clinical experience.

  19. [Social psychiatric service as a cornerstone of psychiatric community care].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, P; Tiggemann, H G

    1991-12-01

    Psychiatric care has gradually been shifting in Germany from its original inpatient basis to outpatient and complementary treatment. This shift of emphasis resulted in a transfer of psychiatry-political responsibility to communal bodies and hence also to communal public health services. Sociopsychiatric service ranks high in communal psychiatric care setups, since it promotes cooperation and helps to coordinate efforts in individual cases in respect of focal points on which such care is centered. For the future, an expert commission has suggested that the various institutions actively engaged in community psychiatric care should team up in each region. This applies in particular to mobile services visiting the patients in their homes, and to the offices providing contracts to sociopsychiatric services of public health offices. Despite positive outlooks there are also quite a few negative aspects of present-day practice. One of them is poor definition of tasks and functions of communal sociopsychiatric services, whereas another one are the unsatisfactory quantitative and qualitative means at their disposal. It is also too often overlooked that psychiatric patients and disabled persons are entitled to compensation insurance payments to promote their rehabilitation, as provided for by individual legislation in the various German laender. To tap these sources sufficiently well, sociopsychiatric services must be better equipped in every respect. The professional competence of social workers and physicians, as well as of the relevant staff, must be safeguarded by continuing education and specialist training measures.

  20. Reducing Psychiatric Inpatient Violence through Solution-Focused Group Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxman, Elaine B.; Chambliss, Catherine

    Violent behaviors increasingly provide the basis for psychiatric hospitalization. This study targeted a group of high-risk psychiatric inpatients with a recent history of violence. A solution-focused treatment approach was used in conducting two ongoing weekly therapy groups. Patients were encouraged to reflect upon occasions where they…

  1. PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS AND SLEEP

    PubMed Central

    Krystal, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Psychiatric disorders and sleep are related in important ways. In contrast to the longstanding view of this relationship which viewed sleep problems as symptoms of psychiatric disorders, there is growing experimental evidence that the relationship between psychiatric disorders and sleep is complex and includes bi-directional causation. In this article we provide the evidence that supports this point of view, reviewing the data on the sleep disturbances seen in patients with psychiatric disorders but also reviewing the data on the impact of sleep disturbances on psychiatric conditions. Although much has been learned about the psychiatric disorders-sleep relationship, additional research is needed to better understand these relationships. This work promises to improve our ability to understand both of these phenomena and to allow us to better treat the many patients with sleep disorders and with psychiatric disorders. PMID:23099143

  2. Negative Rumor: Contagion of a Psychiatric Department

    PubMed Central

    McEwan, Stephanie; Bota, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few decades, a sizable body of literature on the effects of rumors and gossip has emerged. Addressing rumors in the workplace is an important subject, as rumors have a direct impact on the quality of the work environment and also on the productivity and creativity of the employees. To date, little has been written on the effect of rumors and gossip in psychiatric hospitals. This article presents case vignettes of rumors spread in psychiatric hospitals and the impact on team cohesion and morale among the staff implicated in these, too often, neglected occurrences. Dynamic aspects with particular focus on rumors in psychiatric units and suggestions for remedy and treatment are presented. PMID:25133051

  3. Differences in Epidemiological and Molecular Characteristics of Nasal Colonization with Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA-MRSA) in Children from a University Hospital and Day Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Erika A.; Correa, Margarita M.; Ospina, Sigifredo; Atehortúa, Santiago L.; Jiménez, J. Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical significance of Staphylococcus aureus colonization has been demonstrated in hospital settings; however, studies in the community have shown contrasting results regarding the relevance of colonization in infection by community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). In Colombia there are few studies on S. aureus colonization. The aim of this study was to determine the molecular and epidemiological characteristics of nasal colonization by S. aureus (MSSA-MRSA) in children from a university hospital and day care centers (DCCs) of Medellin, Colombia. Methods An observational cross-sectional study was conducted in 400 children (200 in each setting), aged 0 months to 5 years, during 2011. Samples were collected from each nostril and epidemiological information was obtained from the parents. Genotypic analysis included spa typing, PFGE, MLST, SCCmec typing, detection of genes for virulence factors and agr groups. Results Frequency of S. aureus colonization was 39.8% (n = 159) (hospital 44.5% and DCCs 35.0%) and by MRSA, 5.3% (n = 21) (hospital 7.0% and DCCs 3.5%). Most S. aureus colonized children were older than two years (p = 0.005), the majority of them boys (59.1%), shared a bedroom with a large number of people (p = 0.028), with history of β-Lactamase inhibitors usage (p = 0.020). MSSA strains presented the greatest genotypic diversity with 15 clonal complexes (CC). MRSA isolates presented 6 CC, most of them (47.6%) belonged to CC8-SCCmec IVc and were genetically related to previously reported infectious MRSA strains. Conclusion Differences in epidemiological and molecular characteristics between populations may be useful for the understanding of S. aureus nasal colonization dynamics and for the design of strategies to prevent S. aureus infection and dissemination. The finding of colonizing MRSA with similar molecular characteristics of those causing infection demonstrates the dissemination capacity of S. aureus and the risk of infection

  4. Use of Inpatient Psychiatric Services by Children and Youth under Age 18, United States, 1980. Mental Health Statistical Note No. 175.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milazzo-Sayre, Laura J.; And Others

    The report examines data from three sample surveys of admissions during 1980 to the inpatient psychiatric services of state and mental hospitals and private psychiatric hospitals and the separate inpatient psychiatric services of non-federal general hospitals. Findings revealed that an estimated 81,532 persons under 18 years were admitted to…

  5. Catatonia in Neurologic and Psychiatric Patients at a Tertiary Neurological Center.

    PubMed

    Espinola-Nadurille, Mariana; Ramirez-Bermudez, Jesus; Fricchione, Gregory L; Ojeda-Lopez, M Carmen; Perez-González, Andres F; Aguilar-Venegas, Luis C

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the prevalence, phenomenology, treatment, and outcome of neurological patients and psychiatric patients with catatonia at a tertiary neurological center. Clinical variables included nosological diagnoses and complications. Admission length and days with catatonia were used as outcome measures. Of 2,044 patients who were evaluated prospectively, 68 (3.32%) had catatonia, 42 (61.7%) were neurological patients, 19 (27.9%) were psychiatric patients, and 7 (10.2%) had drug-related diagnoses. Of all patients, the ratio of neurological to psychiatric patients was 3:1. Encephalitis was the most common diagnosis (N=26 [38.2%]), followed by schizophrenia (N=12 [17.6%]). Psychiatric patients exhibited a stuporous type of catatonia (15 [83.3%] versus 14 [33.3%], p>0.001), whereas neurological patients exhibited a mixed form of catatonia (25 [59.5%] versus 1 [5.6], p<0.001). Neurological patients had more complications, longer hospitalizations, and more days with catatonia. A total of 56 patients (82.3%) received lorazepam, and 14 patients (20.5%) underwent ECT. Second- and third-line treatments included amantadine, bromocriptine, and levodopa. Catatonia is a prevalent syndrome that can remit with proper and opportune treatment.

  6. The development of a psychiatric rehabilitation service: a two year pilot project.

    PubMed

    Moss, E; Davidson, S

    1980-01-01

    In the history of psychiatry, one can discern conflicting trends with regard to hospitalization of people suffering from severe mental disturbances. From the beginning of the 19th century, the standard method for dealing with such people has been to take them away from their homes and work and put them in hospitals. However, since the discovery of antipsychotic drugs in the 1950's, there has developed a new movement to treat mentally disturbed people in their communities, either avoiding hospitalization altogether, or at least greatly shortening it. In many hospitals there has been a synthesis of these two trends, reflected in an upgrading of the importance of the rehabilitation function. In Shalvata Psychiatric Center, a medium-sized psychiatric hospital in Hod Hasharon, Israel, a two-year pilot project to introduce a centralized Rehabilitation Service was recently completed. The present Rehabilitation Service is based on the rehabilitation/activity therapy model in which the hospital is conceptualized as a setting in which patients may develop or recover social and vocational skills needed to function adequately in the community. It has drawn on existing, motivated staff from all mental health professions represented at the hospital, and works closely with all in-hospital wards and the day hospital. The authors discuss six areas of vocational and social rehabilitation with which the Rehabilitation Service has attempted to deal: 1. activity therapy/rehabilitation groups, 2. vocational guidance unit, 3. after-care therapeutic social club, 4. in-hospital rehabilitation consultation, 5. liaison activities with community-based facilities, 6. job placement.

  7. Sustained Uptake of a Hospital-Based Handwashing with Soap and Water Treatment Intervention (Cholera-Hospital-Based Intervention for 7 Days [CHoBI7]): A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    George, Christine Marie; Jung, Danielle S.; Saif-Ur-Rahman, K. M.; Monira, Shirajum; Sack, David A.; Rashid, Mahamud-ur; Mahmud, Md. Toslim; Mustafiz, Munshi; Rahman, Zillur; Bhuyian, Sazzadul Islam; Winch, Peter J.; Leontsini, Elli; Perin, Jamie; Begum, Farzana; Zohura, Fatema; Biswas, Shwapon; Parvin, Tahmina; Bradley Sack, R.; Alam, Munirul

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children under 5 years of age globally. The time patients and caregivers spend at a health facility for severe diarrhea presents the opportunity to deliver water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) interventions. We recently developed Cholera-Hospital-Based Intervention for 7 days (CHoBI7), a 1-week hospital-based handwashing with soap and water treatment intervention, for household members of cholera patients. To investigate if this intervention could lead to sustained WASH practices, we conducted a follow-up evaluation of 196 intervention household members and 205 control household members enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of the CHoBI7 intervention 6 to 12 months post-intervention. Compared with the control arm, the intervention arm had four times higher odds of household members' handwashing with soap at a key time during 5-hour structured observation (odds ratio [OR]: 4.71, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.61, 8.49) (18% versus 50%) and a 41% reduction in households in the World Health Organization very high-risk category for stored drinking water (OR: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.15, 0.96) (58% versus 34%) 6 to 12 months post-intervention. Furthemore, 71% of observed handwashing with soap events in the intervention arm involved the preparation and use of soapy water, which was promoted during the intervention, compared to 9% of control households. These findings demonstrate that the hospital-based CHoBI7 intervention can lead to significant increases in handwashing with soap practices and improved stored drinking water quality 6 to 12 months post-intervention. PMID:26728766

  8. Sustained Uptake of a Hospital-Based Handwashing with Soap and Water Treatment Intervention (Cholera-Hospital-Based Intervention for 7 Days [CHoBI7]): A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    George, Christine Marie; Jung, Danielle S; Saif-Ur-Rahman, K M; Monira, Shirajum; Sack, David A; Mahamud-ur Rashid; Mahmud, Md Toslim; Mustafiz, Munshi; Rahman, Zillur; Bhuyian, Sazzadul Islam; Winch, Peter J; Leontsini, Elli; Perin, Jamie; Begum, Farzana; Zohura, Fatema; Biswas, Shwapon; Parvin, Tahmina; Sack, R Bradley; Alam, Munirul

    2016-02-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children under 5 years of age globally. The time patients and caregivers spend at a health facility for severe diarrhea presents the opportunity to deliver water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) interventions. We recently developed Cholera-Hospital-Based Intervention for 7 days (CHoBI7), a 1-week hospital-based handwashing with soap and water treatment intervention, for household members of cholera patients. To investigate if this intervention could lead to sustained WASH practices, we conducted a follow-up evaluation of 196 intervention household members and 205 control household members enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of the CHoBI7 intervention 6 to 12 months post-intervention. Compared with the control arm, the intervention arm had four times higher odds of household members' handwashing with soap at a key time during 5-hour structured observation (odds ratio [OR]: 4.71, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.61, 8.49) (18% versus 50%) and a 41% reduction in households in the World Health Organization very high-risk category for stored drinking water (OR: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.15, 0.96) (58% versus 34%) 6 to 12 months post-intervention. Furthemore, 71% of observed handwashing with soap events in the intervention arm involved the preparation and use of soapy water, which was promoted during the intervention, compared to 9% of control households. These findings demonstrate that the hospital-based CHoBI7 intervention can lead to significant increases in handwashing with soap practices and improved stored drinking water quality 6 to 12 months post-intervention.

  9. Incidence and risk factors of workplace violence on psychiatric staff

    PubMed Central

    Ridenour, Marilyn; Lanza, Marilyn; Hendricks, Scott; Hartley, Dan; Rierdan, Jill; Zeiss, Robert; Amandus, Harlan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND A study by Hesketh et al. found that 20% of psychiatric nurses were physically assaulted, 43% were threatened with physical assault, and 55% were verbally assaulted at least once during the equivalent of a single work week. From 2005 through 2009, the U.S. Department of Justice reported that mental health occupations had the second highest average annual rate of workplace violence, 21 violent crimes per 1,000 employed persons aged 16 or older. OBJECTIVE An evaluation of risk factors associated with patient aggression towards nursing staff at eight locked psychiatric units. PARTICIPANTS Two-hundred eighty-four nurses in eight acute locked psychiatric units of the Veterans Health Administration throughout the United States between September 2007 and September 2010. METHODS Rates were calculated by dividing the number of incidents by the total number of hours worked by all nurses, then multiplying by 40 (units of incidents per nurse per 40-hour work week). Risk factors associated with these rates were analyzed using generalized estimating equations with a Poisson model. RESULTS Combining the data across all hospitals and weeks, the overall rate was 0.60 for verbal aggression incidents and 0.19 for physical aggression, per nurse per week. For physical incidents, the evening shift (3 pm – 11 pm) demonstrated a significantly higher rate of aggression than the day shift (7 am – 3 pm). Weeks that had a case-mix with a higher percentage of patients with personality disorders were significantly associated with a higher risk of verbal and physical aggression. CONCLUSION Healthcare workers in psychiatric settings are at high risk for aggression from patients. PMID:24894691

  10. Remote Psychiatric and Psychological Services via the Communications Technology Satellite (CTS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covvey, H. Dominic; And Others

    To provide remote psychiatric services to a population in Moose Factory, Ontario, via satellite, digital data links will be used to provide 24-hour access to the psychiatric medical file system and the psychiatric patient register at University Hospital, London, Ontario, and to permit scoring and interpretation of standard psychological tests. The…

  11. Psychiatric morbidity in prisoners

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sandeep Kumar; Singh, Paramjit; Gargi, Parshotam D.; Goyal, Samta; Garg, Aseem

    2011-01-01

    Context: The prevalence of psychiatric illness in correctional settings is significantly elevated, with higher than community rates reported for most mental disorders. Aims: (1) To examine the socio-demographic profile of convicted prisoners. (2) To evaluate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in convicted prisoners. Materials and Methods: 500 convicts were assessed for psychiatric morbidity with the help of (a) Socio-demographic proforma, (b) Pareek Udai and Trivedi G's socio-economic status scale (rural) (household schedule), (c) Kuppuswamy's economic status scale (urban) and (d) Present State Examination (PSE). Results: 23.8% of the convicted prisoners were suffering from psychiatric illness excluding substance abuse. 56.4% of the prisoners had history of substance abuse / dependence prior to incarceration. Conclusions: The results suggest that a substantial burden of psychiatric morbidity exists in the prison population of India and the burden of psychiatric illness in this vulnerable and marginalized population poses a serious challenge to psychiatrists. PMID:22135446

  12. [The matter: No psychiatrization].

    PubMed

    Pisa, Hugo

    2015-09-01

    Anxiety, sadness, worries, fears, irritability, fatigue, tedium, are situations that life confront us with. They don't qualify as psychiatric disorders, but nevertheless they are treated as though. We refer to the psychiatrization of daily life. The aim of this article is to prevent such psychiatrization. To support this assertion, we are going to develop different aspects tending to explain the origins of the patient's demands and the answers given by the psychiatrist. A critical reflection of our practice is proposed.

  13. [Inhalant abusers and psychiatric symptoms].

    PubMed

    Okudaira, K; Yabana, T; Takahashi, H; Iizuka, H; Nakajima, K; Saito, A

    1996-01-01

    There are different opinions about the cause of chronic psychiatric symptoms observed in drug abusers between Japanese and foreign psychiatrists. The Japanese seem to recognize the chronic psychosis as the result of drug abuse. In the other hand, foreigners diagnose these cases as dual diagnosis of drug abuse and psychosis. Authors studied the problem in this research. One of the authors has examined 120 inhalant abusers of all, in- and out-patients in Kanagawa Prefectural Center of Psychiatry, Serigaya Hospital from 1991 to 1995. These patients were classified into three groups: psychosis group (23 patients), dependence group (51 patients) and abuse group (46 patients) according to their clinical courses and psychiatric symptoms. The psychosis group consists of patients who showed psychiatric symptoms such as hallucination, delusion and thought disturbance for long time after detoxification. The dependence group contains patients whose inhalant dependence was severe and met DSM-4 Diagnostic Criteria for Substance Dependence, but manifested no chronic psychiatric symptoms after detoxification. The patients belonging to abuse group were at the earlier stages of inhalant abuse and had no chronic psychiatric symptoms. The average age of the first inhalant abuse was 14.7 years old in the psychosis group, 14.8 years in the dependence group and 14.7 years in the abuse group. The average years of abuse was 9.0 years in the psychosis group, and 8.5 years in the dependence group. There was little difference between these two groups. The psychosis patients manifested chronic symptoms 5.7 years on average after the first abuse of inhalants. About one forth (26.1%) of the psychosis patients and only 5.9% of the dependence patients had family history of schizophrenia. The difference was statistically significant. These results suggest that chronic psychiatric symptoms are caused not only by inhalant abuse, but also by the genetic factors of psychosis of each patient. There have

  14. Perceived Dangerousness as Related to Psychiatric Symptoms and Psychiatric Service Use – a Vignette Based Representative Population Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sowislo, Julia F.; Gonet-Wirz, Franca; Borgwardt, Stefan; Lang, Undine E.; Huber, Christian G.

    2017-01-01

    Perceptions of dangerousness are an influential component of mental health stigma and can be driven by the display of psychiatric symptoms and the use of psychiatric service institutions. Yet, no previous study compared symptoms and service use associated perceptions of dangerousness. Therefore, we conducted a representative survey (N = 2,207) in the canton of Basel-Stadt, Switzerland. Participants were asked to answer the perceived dangerousness scale with respect to a vignette that either depicted psychiatric symptoms of a fictitious character or a psychiatric service institution the fictitious character had been admitted to. Between the vignettes, type of symptoms, type of psychiatric service, dangerousness, and gender were systematically varied. Perceived dangerousness was significantly lower as related to psychiatric service use than related to psychiatric symptoms. Overall, symptoms of alcohol dependency, behavior endangering others, and male gender of the fictitious character tend to increase perceived dangerousness. Furthermore, being hospitalized in a psychiatric unit at a general hospital or the rater being familiar with psychiatric services tends to decrease perceived dangerousness. Effective anti-stigma initiatives should integrate education about dangerousness as well as methods to increase familiarity with psychiatry. Additionally, an integration of modern psychiatry in somato-medical care institutions might decrease stigmatization. PMID:28367993

  15. Psychiatric symptoms, social disablement and illness behaviour.

    PubMed

    Hurry, J; Bebbington, P E; Tennant, C

    1987-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the relationship between social performance and the use of medical services, and to what extent this is independent of clinical disorder. In a sample of adults living in Camberwell, South London, social disability and clinical disorder were both predictive of service use. Those subjects who were admitted to psychiatric day-patient or inpatient facilities were found to show the highest levels of both types of impairment, followed by psychiatric outpatients. People who had seen their general practitioner because of their 'nerves' were less impaired than those in touch with the specialist psychiatric services but had significantly poorer social performance and a higher level of clinical disorder than people not in contact with medical services at all. When the severity of clinical disorder was controlled, however, levels of social performance no longer discriminated between the different groups of service users, except that psychiatric outpatients remained significantly more socially disabled than the general practice group.

  16. Patient rights and law: tobacco smoking in psychiatric wards and the Israeli Prevention of Smoking Act.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Ilya; Kigli-Shemesh, Ronit; Tabak, Nili; Abramowitz, Moshe Z; Margolin, Jacob

    2004-09-01

    In August 2001, the Israeli Ministry of Health issued its Limitation of Smoking in Public Places Order, categorically forbidding smoking in hospitals. This forced the mental health system to cope with the issue of smoking inside psychiatric hospitals. The main problem was smoking by compulsorily hospitalized psychiatric patients in closed wards. An attempt by a psychiatric hospital to implement the tobacco smoking restraint instruction by banning the sale of cigarettes inside the hospital led to the development of a black market and cases of patient exploitation in return for cigarettes. This article surveys the literature dealing with smoking among psychiatric patients, the role of smoking in patients and the moral dilemmas of taking steps to prevent smoking in psychiatric hospitals. It addresses the need for public discussion on professional caregivers' dilemmas between their commitment to uphold the law and their duty to act as advocates for their patients' rights and welfare.

  17. [The nurse's work in psychiatric emergencies].

    PubMed

    Balanger, Vincent; Calas, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Emergency psychiatric situations represent at least 10% of all admissions in general emergency departments in hospitals. The CPOA, the psychiatric orientation and consultation centre, is one of the main units in Paris which deals with crises. The specificities of its practice make it a benchmark centre both in terms of its clinical expertise as well as its care network. However, despite all the ensuing practices and knowledge, containing anxiety is not self-evident and requires readjustments and questioning to preserve the status of the person providing the care.

  18. Effectiveness of a single day induction programme in changing medical students’ attitudes towards the speciality of forensic psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Ann; Guliani, Joshana; Johns, Francesca; McCartney, Emily; Smith, E Naomi; Ross, Callum C; Sengupta, Samrat; Das, Mrigendra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a day visit in changing attitudes towards a high-security forensic psychiatric hospital, with regard to the current recruitment difficulties in psychiatry. Methods: Broadmoor Hospital, a UK high-security psychiatric hospital, runs day visits for medical students, led by doctors. At the beginning and the end of the day students wrote their responses to the question, ‘What do you think of Broadmoor?’ Attitudes and themes were identified, and their prevalence was analysed. Results: The responses of 296 students were initially analysed; however, 19 responses had to be excluded because they were illegible or incomplete. Before the visit, 15 responses were rated as positive, 169 neutral and 93 negative. After the visit, 205 responses were positive, 69 neutral and three negative. The themes that changed markedly following the visit were those indicating a change to favourable attitude. Conclusions: A single day visit was shown to be effective in altering the attitudes of medical students towards forensic psychiatry within a high-security psychiatric hospital. PMID:27683656

  19. Criterion-referenced evaluation of day one clinical competencies of veterinary students: VOLES-the VMTH (Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital) Online Evaluation System.

    PubMed

    Zeck, Steven; Wall, Judy A; Smith, Bradford P; Wilson, W David; Walsh, Donal A

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an extensive online criterion-referenced evaluation system for the assessment of veterinary students' achievement during their final year's Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (or equivalent) clinical education. Data are reported for the 2001 to 2009 University of California at Davis veterinary graduates, for a total of more than 1,100 students. These criterion-referenced evaluations extensively document the level of clinical skills attained and demonstrated during the individual clinical rotations that comprise the fourth-year curriculum. On average, in each of the 17,500 clinical rotations undertaken during this time period, student performance was assessed in at least 11 separate areas of skills, knowledge, and professional attributes. This provided more than 200,000 criterion-referenced judgments of the individual clinical attributes of graduates over nine years. The system is based on a previously detailed and validated definition of the skills, knowledge, and professional attributes that students should have demonstrated before graduation. The extensive database that this system has provided has established that this system, termed VOLES (VMTH [Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital] On-Line Evaluation System), is an effective tool to assess the clinical capabilities of veterinary students and their achievement of the "Day One" skills required for entering clinical practice. These expected proficiencies are balanced according to the differing expectations that each area of veterinary clinical practice demands.

  20. Psychiatric Advance Directives: Getting Started

    MedlinePlus

    ... More... Home Getting Started National Resource Center on Psychiatric Advance Directives - Getting Started Getting Started Psychiatric advance directives (PADs) are relatively new legal instruments ...

  1. Substance Abusers in an Acute Psychiatric Facility: A Diagnostic and Logistic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Berg, John E.; Restan, Asbjørn

    2013-01-01

    Acute resident psychiatric facilities in Norway usually get their patients after referral from a medical doctor. Acute psychiatric wards are the only places accepting persons in need of emergency hospitalisation when emergency units in somatic hospitals do not accept the patient. Resident patients at one random chosen day were scrutinized in an acute psychiatric facility with 36 beds serving a catchment area of 165 000. Twenty-five patients were resident in the facility at that particular day. Eight of 25 resident patients (32.0%) in the acute wards were referred for a substance-induced psychosis (SIP). Another patient may also have had a SIP, but the differential diagnostic work was not finished. A main primary diagnosis of substance use was given in the medical reports in only 12.9% of patients during the last year. Given that the chosen day was representative of the year, a majority of patients with substance abuse problems were given other diagnoses. There seems to be a reluctance to declare the primary reason for an acute stay in a third of resident stays. Lack of specialized emergency detoxification facilities may have contributed to the results. PMID:23738222

  2. [Emil Kraepelin and psychiatric science in Rio de Janeiro, 1903-1933].

    PubMed

    Facchinetti, Cristiana; Muñoz, Pedro Felipe Neves de

    2013-03-01

    The article addresses the penetration of German psychiatric science in early twentieth-century Brazil. More specifically, it explores how the theory and practices of Emil Kraepelin were absorbed by both Juliano Moreira, director of the National Hospital for the Insane (Hospício Nacional de Alienados) and of the agency for Assistance to the Insane (Assistência a Alienados) in the Federal District (Rio de Janeiro), and also by the circle of physicians with close ties to Moreira from 1903 to 1933. It discusses the ways in which Kraepelin's work was adopted, taking into account the day's medical-mental repertoire, the political and scientific context, and the controversies within the Brazilian psychiatric field. Lastly, the study analyzes these choices based on the prevailing relations between Brazilian and German psychiatry back then.

  3. The influence of institutional characteristics on length of stay for psychiatric patients: a national database study in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Chung, Woojin; Cho, Woo Hyun; Yoon, Chung Won

    2009-03-01

    The institutionalization of psychiatric patients has put a tremendous burden on many societies, but few studies have examined the effects of institutional characteristics on patient length of stay (LOS). This paper investigated the association between institutional characteristics and LOS for 160,517 psychiatric patients in South Korea by applying a two-level modeling technique to administrative claims databases covering the entire patient population. Patient LOS, expressed in terms of days, was analyzed by taking account of institutional type, ownership, location, inpatient capacity, staffing, and patient demographics. The characteristics of inpatients were used as control variables and consisted of gender, age, sub-diagnosis, and the type of national health security program. The main findings of this study are: (1) patient LOS was 69% longer at psychiatric hospitals than at tertiary-care hospitals; (2) neither location nor inpatient capacity was associated with LOS; (3) larger staffs reduced LOS; and (4), LOS increased with a higher proportion of male inpatients, inpatients > or =65 years old, or inpatients diagnosed with organic or schizophrenic disorders, possibly through contextual effects. The results of this study suggest that researchers and policy makers could improve their assessment of psychiatric patient LOS and its association with health outcome by taking into account institutional characteristics and using multi-level analyses.

  4. Prospective survey to study factors which could influence same-day discharge after elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a tertiary care hospital of a developing country.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Samina; Ahmed, Aliya; Hoda, Muhammad Qamarul; Sohaib, Muhammad; Zia-Ur-Rehman

    2016-12-01

    All laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) patients in our hospital setting are admitted overnight. This article assesses the contribution of factors like postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), postoperative pain and surgical complications to overnight stay after elective LC. This 1-year observational study included patients having normal liver functions undergoing elective LC before 1400 h. The collected data included patient demographics, co-morbidities, PONV, pain scores, complications, surgical time, anesthesia technique, use of prophylactic antiemetics, analgesics, patient satisfaction and desire to have this surgery as day case or in-patient procedure. From 930 LC done per annum, 45.2 % (430/950) patients were included in this study. Prophylactic antiemetic was given in 91.6 %, intraoperative narcotics in 94.2 % patients and multimodal analgesia in 85.3 %. The mean pain score in the recovery and ward was maintained to <4. In the ward, 99.1 % patients were able to start oral fluids after 6 h and were started on oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and paracetamol, and none required parental opioid. The PONV score of more than 2 was observed in only 3.2 % of patients in the ward requiring parenteral antiemetic. Surgical complications in the form of bleeding, visceral injury and bile duct leak were observed in 2 % of patients, which was treated intra-operatively. Satisfaction was observed in 99.3 % and desire to stay overnight in 87.4 % of patients. Factors like postoperative pain, PONV and surgical complications were well managed and were not associated with significant morbidity to justify routine overnight admission. However, majority of the patients desired to stay overnight, which could be improved by counseling and education.

  5. Teaching Scholarly Activity in Psychiatric Training: Years 6 and 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zisook, Sidney; Boland, Robert; Cowley, Deborah; Cyr, Rebecca L.; Pato, Michele T.; Thrall, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To address nationally recognized needs for increased numbers of psychiatric clinician-scholars and physician-scientists, the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training (AADPRT) has provided a series of full-day conferences of psychiatry residency training directors designed to increase their competence in…

  6. 42 CFR 412.27 - Excluded psychiatric units: Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... psychiatric nursing services must be a registered nurse who has a master's degree in psychiatric or mental...) The staffing pattern must ensure the availability of a registered nurse 24 hours each day. There must be adequate numbers of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and mental health workers...

  7. 42 CFR 412.27 - Excluded psychiatric units: Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... psychiatric nursing services must be a registered nurse who has a master's degree in psychiatric or mental...) The staffing pattern must ensure the availability of a registered nurse 24 hours each day. There must be adequate numbers of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and mental health workers...

  8. 42 CFR 412.27 - Excluded psychiatric units: Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... psychiatric nursing services must be a registered nurse who has a master's degree in psychiatric or mental...) The staffing pattern must ensure the availability of a registered nurse 24 hours each day. There must be adequate numbers of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and mental health workers...

  9. 42 CFR 412.27 - Excluded psychiatric units: Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... psychiatric nursing services must be a registered nurse who has a master's degree in psychiatric or mental...) The staffing pattern must ensure the availability of a registered nurse 24 hours each day. There must be adequate numbers of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and mental health workers...

  10. American Psychiatric Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foundation APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Sign In Join General Residents and Fellows Medical Students International close menu Psychiatrists Education Practice Cultural Competency Awards & Leadership Opportunities Advocacy & APAPAC Meetings ...

  11. Psychiatric liability: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1998-07-01

    Psychiatric health care providers' liability extends from clinical cases--medication errors, misdiagnosis, etc.--to particular issues unique to the mental health setting. Part 1 discusses lawsuits common to this setting.

  12. Psychiatric liability: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1998-08-01

    Psychiatric health care providers' liability extends from clinical cases--medication errors, misdiagnosis, etc.--to particular issues unique to the mental health care setting. Part 2 continues discussion begun in the July issue of lawsuits common to this setting.

  13. Neuroinflammation and psychiatric illness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence support the pathogenic role of neuroinflammation in psychiatric illness. While systemic autoimmune diseases are well-documented causes of neuropsychiatric disorders, synaptic autoimmune encephalitides with psychotic symptoms often go under-recognized. Parallel to the link between psychiatric symptoms and autoimmunity in autoimmune diseases, neuroimmunological abnormalities occur in classical psychiatric disorders (for example, major depressive, bipolar, schizophrenia, and obsessive-compulsive disorders). Investigations into the pathophysiology of these conditions traditionally stressed dysregulation of the glutamatergic and monoaminergic systems, but the mechanisms causing these neurotransmitter abnormalities remained elusive. We review the link between autoimmunity and neuropsychiatric disorders, and the human and experimental evidence supporting the pathogenic role of neuroinflammation in selected classical psychiatric disorders. Understanding how psychosocial, genetic, immunological and neurotransmitter systems interact can reveal pathogenic clues and help target new preventive and symptomatic therapies. PMID:23547920

  14. [THE MATTER: NO PSYCHIATRIZATION].

    PubMed

    Pisa, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety, sadness, worries, fears, irritability, fatigue, tedium, are situations that life confront us with. They don't qualify as psy- chiatric disorders, but nevertheless they are treated as though. We refer to the psychiatrization of daily life. The aim of this article is to prevent such psychiatrization. To support this assertion, we are going to develop different aspects tending to explain the origins of the patient's demands and the answers given by the psychiatrist. A critical reflection of our practice is proposed.

  15. Psychiatric disorders and sleep issues.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Eliza L

    2014-09-01

    Sleep issues are common in people with psychiatric disorders, and the interaction is complex. Sleep disorders, particularly insomnia, can precede and predispose to psychiatric disorders, can be comorbid with and exacerbate psychiatric disorders, and can occur as part of psychiatric disorders. Sleep disorders can mimic psychiatric disorders or result from medication given for psychiatric disorders. Impairment of sleep and of mental health may be different manifestations of the same underlying neurobiological processes. For the primary care physician, key tools include recognition of potential sleep effects of psychiatric medications and familiarity with treatment approaches for insomnia in depression and anxiety.

  16. Day to Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurecki, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    A clean, healthy and safe school provides students, faculty and staff with an environment conducive to learning and working. However, budget and staff reductions can lead to substandard cleaning practices and unsanitary conditions. Some school facility managers have been making the switch to a day-schedule to reduce security and energy costs, and…

  17. Psychiatric morbidity in prisoners

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Daria, Usha

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prisoners are having high percentage of psychiatric disorders. Majority of studies done so far on prisoners are from Western countries and very limited studies from India. Aim: Study socio-demographic profile of prisoners of a central jail and to find out current prevalence of psychiatric disorders in them. Materials and Methods: 118 prisoners were selected by random sampling and interviewed to obtain socio-demographic data and assessed on Indian Psychiatric Interview Schedule (IPIS) with additional required questions to diagnose psychiatric disorders in prisoners. Results: Mean age of prisoners was 33.7 years with 97.5% males, 57.6% from rural areas and 65.3% were married. Average education in studied years was 6.6 years and 50.8% were unskilled workers. 47.4% were murderers while 20.3% of drugs related crimes. 47.5% were convicted and history of criminal behavior in family was in 32.2% prisoners. Current prevalence of psychiatric disorders was 33%. Psychotic, depressive, and anxiety disorders were seen in 6.7%, 16.1%, and 8.5% prisoners respectively. 58.8% had history of drug abuse/dependence prior to imprisonment. Conclusion: One prison of Hadoti region of Rajasthan is full of people with mental-health problems who collectively generate significant levels of unmet psychiatric treatment need. Prisons are detrimental to mental-health. Beginning of reforms is the immediate need. PMID:24459308

  18. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... national accreditation program for hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; transplant centers, except for kidney transplant centers; SNFs; HHAs; ASCs; RHCs; CORFs; hospices; religious nonmedical health care...

  19. [Cerebral hydatic cyst and psychiatric disorders. Two cases].

    PubMed

    Asri, F; Tazi, I; Maaroufi, K; El Moudden, A; Ghannane, H; Ait Benali, S

    2007-01-01

    unconscious of his disorders. The patient has first been put under classical neuroleptic 9 mg/day of Haloperidol and 200 mg/day of chlorpromazine. The diagnosis of schizophrenia has been kept according to criteria of DSM IV. The PANSS (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale) was to 137 (score on a positive scale was to 34, score on a negative scale was to 35 and the general psychopathologie scale was to 58). One week after his hospitalization, he developed headache with subconfusion, a cerebral scanning has been made in emergency and showed a voluminous cyst in oval foramen compressing the mesencephalon strongly. The cyst was well limited, hypodense, not taking the contrast, and without intracerebral oedema, the diagnosis of cerebral hydatic cyst has been made. The complementary exploration didn't show any other localizations, and biologic exam results didn't show any particular anomalies. The patient has been operated in neurosurgery. The immediate evolution was favorable with disappearance of confusion and absence of complications. The patient was lost of view. Six months after, the patient has been readmitted to the psychiatric emergency. He dropped his neuroleptic treatment. He was aggressive, raving, hallucinated and depersonalized. The global score to the PANSS was 63. He has been put back under neuroleptics. Three weeks after improvement and passage of the PANSS to 30, the patient went out. We couldn't have a cerebral scanner of control because the patient had no medical assurance and no money for cerebral scanner. Case 2 - Patient aged of 53 years, father of four children, uneducated, native and resident of Marrakech, confectioner as profession. He is in contact with dogs since 12 years. He has been brought to the psychiatric emergencies by his family after an agitation. The history of his illness seemed to go back at eight months ago, by the progressive apparition of an instability, sleep disorders, hostility, associated with an emotional lability. To the interview he

  20. Red Flags: Clinical Signs for Identifying Autoimmune Encephalitis in Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Herken, Julia; Prüss, Harald

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune mechanisms causing diverse psychiatric symptoms are increasingly recognized and brought about a paradigm shift in neuropsychiatry. Identification of underlying antibodies against neuronal ion channels or receptors led to the speculation that a number of patients go misdiagnosed with a primary psychiatric disease. However, there is no clear consensus which clinical signs in psychiatric patients should prompt further investigations including measurement of anti-neuronal autoantibodies. We therefore aimed to analyze the presenting symptoms in patients with autoimmune encephalitis and the time between symptom onset and initiation of antibody diagnostics. For this, we recruited 100 patients from the Charité Center for Autoimmune Encephalitis between May and October 2016, including all types of autoimmune encephalitides. Psychiatric abnormalities were the most common clinical symptoms and were the presenting sign in 60%. One-third of patients were initially hospitalized in a psychiatric ward. All patients positive for antibodies against the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor showed behavioral changes, hallucinations, memory deficits, catatonia, or delusions. Patients positive for antibodies against other cell surface or intracellular antigens were often hospitalized with a psychosomatic diagnosis. The time between occurrence of first symptoms and antibody testing was often alarmingly prolonged. In patients with symptom onset between 2013 and 2016, the mean delay was 74 days, in cases diagnosed between 2007 and 2012 even 483 days, suggesting though that increased awareness of this novel disease group helped to expedite proper diagnosis and treatment. By analyzing the medical records in detail, we identified clinical signs that may help to assist in earlier diagnosis, including seizures, catatonia, autonomic instability, or hyperkinesia. Indeed, reanalyzing the whole cohort using these “red flags” led to a 58% reduction of time between symptom onset and

  1. [Recurrent psychiatric manifestations during malaria prevention with mefloquine. A case report].

    PubMed

    Rodor, F; Bianchi, G; Grignon, S; Samuelian, J C; Jouglard, J

    1990-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 22 years old woman without psychiatric antecedent who started a prophylaxis with mefloquine for a journey in a chloroquino resistant area. The first tablet induced an acute psychiatric syndrome which lasted five days; the second tablet induced the recidive of the psychiatric data and a suicide attempt by drowning.

  2. How a stressed local public system copes with people in psychiatric crisis.

    PubMed

    Wells, Rebecca; La, Elizabeth Holdsworth; Morrissey, Joseph; Hall, Marissa; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Blouin, Rachel

    2013-06-01

    In order to bolster the public mental health safety net, we must first understand how these systems function on a day-to-day basis. This study explored how individual attributes and organizational interdependencies within one predominantly urban US county affected responses to individuals' needs during psychiatric crises. We interviewed clinicians and managers within the crisis response network about people at immediate risk of psychiatric hospitalization, what had happened to them during their crises, and factors affecting services provided (N = 94 individuals and 9 agencies). Social network diagrams depicted patterns of referrals between agencies. Iterative coding of interview transcripts was used to contextualize the social network findings. Often, agencies saw crises through to resolution. However, providers also limited the types of people they served, leaving many people in crisis in limbo. This study illustrates how attributes of individuals with mental illness, service providers and their interactions, and state and federal policies intersect to shape the trajectories of individuals during psychiatric crises. Understanding both the structures of current local systems and their contexts may support continued evolution toward a more humane and robust safety net for some of our society's most vulnerable members.

  3. Depression and sexual desire: an exploratory study in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Mário; Azevedo, Leandra Pinheiro; Gouveia, José Luís

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to study the relation between depression and its effect on the sexual desire in psychiatric patients. The sample comprised 89 patients from the Psychiatric and Mental Health Department of Alto Ave's Hospital Center, Entidade Publica Empresarial. The obtained results in this exploratory study revealed that depressive symptomatology severity is directly related with sexual desire. Variables gender, age, and working status, as well as, sociocultural levels indicated important and significant differences between patients.

  4. [Dual diagnosis in psychiatric inpatients: prevalence and general characteristics].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Jiménez, Roberto; Aragüés, María; Jiménez-Arriero, Miguel Angel; Ponce, Guillermo; Muñoz, Antonio; Bagney, Alexandra; Hoenicka, Janet; Palomo, Tomás

    2008-06-01

    Comorbidity between a substance use disorder (SUD) and another psychiatric disorder is known as dual diagnosis. It is of great relevance due to its important clinical consequences and costs of care. There are practically no published studies on dual diagnosis prevalence in patients admitted to psychiatric hospitalization units in general hospitals (PHUGH) in our country. The objectives were to estimate the prevalence of dual diagnosis in psychiatric inpatients admitted consecutively to a Psychiatric Hospitalization Unit (Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain) in one year, to compare clinical and sociodemographic variables between the dual diagnosis group (DD group) and the group with a psychiatric disorder but no SUD (PD group), and to study the types of substances used. This is a retrospective study, based on the review of the clinical charts of the 257 patients admitted to this PHUGH in one year. The results showed that, excluding nicotine dependence, 24.9% of our inpatients had a SUD as well as another psychiatric disorder. A statistically significant predominance of men was found in the DD group, as well as a younger age at the time of the study, at the beginning of their psychiatric attention and on their first psychiatric admission, and they had received diagnoses of schizophrenia or related psychoses more often than the PD group, who had mostly affective disorders. The substances most frequently used in the DD group were alcohol (78.1%), cannabis (62.5%), and cocaine (51.6%). Due to the high prevalence and repercussions of dual diagnosis, it would be advisable to have specialized therapeutic programs for its treatment.

  5. The relationships among work stress, resourcefulness, and depression level in psychiatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu Mi; Lai, Chien Yu; Chang, Yong-Yuan; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Yu, Ching-Yun

    2015-02-01

    Psychiatric nurses are exposed to highly stressful work environments that can lead to depression over time. This study aimed to explore the relationships among work stress, resourcefulness, and depression levels of psychiatric nurses. A cross-sectional design with randomized sampling was used; 154 psychiatric nurses were recruited from six medical centers in Taiwan. Psychiatric nurses' work stress was found positively correlated with their depression level, and negatively related to resourcefulness. Work stress significantly predicted depression level. These results suggest that the hospital administrative units may develop training courses about resourcefulness skills to reduce psychiatric nurses' work stress, and improve their mental health.

  6. Measurement of Psychiatric Treatment Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Sajatovic, Martha; Velligan, Dawn; Weiden, Peter J.; Valenstein, Marcia; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nonadherence to medications for mental disorders substantially limits treatment effectiveness and results in higher rates of relapse, hospitalization, and disability. Accurate measurement of medication adherence is important not only in adherence research, but also in clinical trials in which medications are being evaluated, and in clinical practice where failure to detect nonadherence results in premature medication changes, unnecessary polypharmacy, and greater likelihoods of functional deteriorations and hospitalizations. This is a review of psychiatric treatment adherence methods and measures arising from a meeting on “Methodological Challenges in Psychiatric Treatment Adherence Research” held on September 27-28, 2007 in Bethesda, MD and organized by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Methods This paper reviews the range of modalities currently available for assessing adherence behavior including pill counts, pharmacy records, technology-assisted monitoring, biological assays, and a range of self-report and interviewer-rated scales. Measures of adherence attitudes are also reviewed. Results Each of the adherence measures described are imperfect estimates of actual medication ingestion but each provides informative estimates of adherence or the attitudinal factors associated with adherence. Measure selection depends on a range of factors including the patient sample, the context in which the measure is being used, and the clinical outcomes expected from various levels of nonadherence. The use of multiple measures of adherence is encouraged to balance the limitations of individual measures. Conclusion While adherence assessment has become increasingly sophisticated in recent years there remains a need for refinement and expansion on currently available methods and measures. PMID:21109048

  7. Psychiatric disorders prior to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Goldacre, Raph; Talbot, Kevin; Goldacre, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    It is recognized that neuropsychiatric conditions are overrepresented in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patient kindreds and psychiatric symptoms may precede the onset of motor symptoms. Using a hospital record linkage database, hospitalization with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, or anxiety was significantly associated with a first diagnosis of ALS within the following year. This is likely to specifically reflect the clinicopathological overlap of ALS with frontotemporal dementia. A diagnosis of depression was significantly associated with a first record of ALS ≥5 years later, in keeping with growing evidence for major depressive disorder as an early marker of cerebral neurodegeneration. Ann Neurol 2016;80:935–938 PMID:27761925

  8. Fiscally challenged. Psychiatric industry's hope is in consolidation, focusing services.

    PubMed

    Saphir, A

    2000-03-27

    Psychiatric hospitals are closing in droves. Last year alone, at least 75 were shuttered, up sharply from the previous year. And psych hospitals collectively lost $254 million in 1998. To reverse the sector's fortunes, providers are focusing on consolidation and specialty services. "Mental health isn't glamorous," says David Moulthrop (left), CEO of a Wisconsin psych hospital. "But there is a future, though the pie has shrunk."

  9. Fitness to Drive of Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    De las Cuevas, Carlos; Sanz, Emilio J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Driving a motor vehicle could be central to the functional autonomy of patients with psychiatric illnesses. For patients, a driver's license could mean independence, the ability to care for themselves, and the freedom to travel when they wish. However, both psychiatric disorders and psychiatric drug treatments can produce changes in perception, information processing and integration, and psychomotor activity that can disturb and/or interfere with the ability to drive safely. Objective: To assess the fitness to drive of psychiatric outpatients in a sample representative of current clinical practice. Method: Cognitive functioning and psychomotor performance of 208 consecutive psychiatric outpatients treated in a community mental health center in the Canary Islands (Spain) were assessed in different clinical situations. The LNDETER 100 battery, an electronic assessment unit–based measurement that consists of 5 screenbased tests, was used to assess concentrated attention and resistance to monotony, multiple discriminative reactions and their correctness, anticipation of speed, bimanual coordination, and the decision making process and tendency to assume risk. The study was conducted from July 2007 to September 2007. Results: Of 208 patients, only 33 had scores compatible with the requirements of a driver's license, and 84% failed at least 1 of the required tests. Of patients with a driver's license who drive almost every day, 79.5% registered scores that would not allow obtaining or renewal of the license. None of the driving patients studied notified the traffic authorities that they had a psychiatric condition that may affect safe driving. No patient stopped driving, although 10% of them recognized that their ability to drive was somehow damaged. Conclusion: Guidance on how best to formulate and deliver recommendations on driving fitness in stable psychiatric patients is lacking and much needed. PMID:19158977

  10. Abortion and psychiatric practice.

    PubMed

    Stotland, Nada L

    2003-03-01

    The subject of abortion is fraught with politics, emotions, and misinformation. A widespread practice reaching far back in history, abortion is again in the news. Psychiatry sits at the intersection of the religious, ethical, psychological, sociological, medical, and legal facets of the abortion issue. Although the religions that forbid abortion are more prominent in the media, many religions have more liberal approaches. While the basic right to abortion has been upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court, several limitations have been permitted, including parental notification or consent (with the possibility of judicial bypass) for minors, waiting periods, and mandatory provision of certain, sometimes biased, information. Before the Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion in 1973, many women were maimed or killed by illegal abortions, and psychiatrists were sometimes asked to certify that abortions were justified on psychiatric grounds. Currently, there are active attempts to convince the public and women considering abortion that abortion frequently has negative psychiatric consequences. This assertion is not borne out by the literature: the vast majority of women tolerate abortion without psychiatric sequelae. The psychiatric outcome of abortion is best when patients are able to make autonomous, supported decisions. Psychiatrists need to know the medical and psychiatric facts about abortion. Psychiatrists can then help patients prevent unwanted pregnancies, make informed decisions consonant with their own values and circumstances when they become pregnant, and find appropriate social and medical resources whatever their decisions may be.

  11. Nutraceuticals in psychiatric practice.

    PubMed

    Chiappedi, Matteo; de Vincenzi, Silvia; Bejor, Maurizio

    2012-08-01

    Nutraceuticals can be defined as food components or active principles present in aliments which have positive effects for health and quality of life, including preventing or treating disorders. Herbal and "natural" food supplements are increasingly used to treat different psychiatric disorders, often as "self-prescribed" therapies. With factors such as chronic illness, poor health, emotional distress, and quality of life influencing the desire for complementary medicine, patients with comorbid medical and psychiatric problems seem likely to turn to this approach. We reviewed the most commonly used herbal and dietary supplements for which a certain efficacy on psychiatric symptoms or disorders has been claimed, checking current Pubmed-indexed literature (the most important being St. John's wort, Omega-3 fatty acids, valerian, Kava, Ginkgo, folate, B vitamins, S-Adenosylmethionine, inositol, alfa-lactoalbumin and passionflower). There is evidence of efficacy for some of these herbs an supplements, proved also by Cochrane's meta-analysis. However many different areas (including efficacy, tolerability, optimal dosing, adequate shelf life, drug and non-pharmacological interactions) need to be thoroughly studied; moreover political decisions need to be scientifically guided in order to best serve psychiatric patients' interests and to prevent using of expensive and sometimes un-useful therapies. This implies that a scientific strategy is needed to rule out any third-part economical interest which could in any way influence therapeutic choices. The article presents some promising patents on nutraceuticals in psychiatric practice.

  12. Narcissism and relational representations among psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Kealy, David; Ogrodniczuk, John S; Joyce, Anthony S; Steinberg, Paul I; Piper, William E

    2015-06-01

    Pathological narcissism is associated with maladaptive interpersonal behavior, although less is known regarding the internal relational representations of narcissistic patients. The authors examined the relationship between pathological narcissism and two constructs that reflect internal representations of relational patterns: quality of object relations and attachment style. Patients attending a psychiatric day treatment program (N = 218) completed measures of narcissism, general psychiatric distress, and attachment style in terms of attachment avoidance and anxiety. A semistructured interview was used to assess quality of object relations. Multiple regression analysis was conducted, controlling for general psychiatric distress. Pathological narcissism was associated with anxious attachment, but not with avoidant attachment. Narcissism was also associated with lower levels of quality of object relations. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of internal representations of self-other relations.

  13. A day in the life of a public psychiatry fellow.

    PubMed

    Shoyinka, Sosunmolu O; Barber, Mary E; Ranz, Jules

    2011-12-01

    Now in its 29th year, the Public Psychiatry Fellowship of the New York Psychiatric Institute at Columbia Medical Center selects 10 fellows per year for its 1-year program (1). This award-winning fellowship trains future leaders for the public mental health sector. The curriculum (2) employs a combination of a didactic seminar series, management-problem-focused presentations by guest speakers, field trips, and supervision by fellowship faculty to instill the values and skills required for practice and leadership in the public sector. Fellows utilize the framework of the academic curriculum to carry out a series of presentations throughout the year that allow them to organize, implement and evaluate concepts that they learn during the year. The following account, written from bird's eye view, details one fellow's day at his field placement in a State Hospital outpatient clinic setting, with the aim of illustrating how the concepts taught by the fellowship find application in day to day practice.

  14. Same Day Discharge versus Overnight Stay in the Hospital following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Bundhun, Pravesh Kumar; Soogund, Mohammad Zafooruddin Sani; Huang, Wei-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Background New research in interventional cardiology has shown the demand for percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) to have increased tremendously. Effective treatment with a lower hospital cost has been the aim of several PCI capable centers. This study aimed to compare the adverse clinical outcomes associated with same day discharge versus overnight stay in the hospital following PCI in a population of randomized patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods The National Library of Medicine (MEDLINE/PubMed), the Cochrane Registry of Randomized Controlled Trials and EMBASE databases were searched (from March to June 2016) for randomized trials comparing same-day discharge versus overnight stay in the hospital following PCI. Main endpoints in this analysis included adverse cardiovascular outcomes observed during a 30-day period. Statistical analysis was carried out by the RevMan 5.3 software whereby odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with respect to a fixed or a random effects model. Results Eight randomized trials with a total number of 3081 patients (1598 patients who were discharged on the same day and 1483 patients who stayed overnight in the hospital) were included. Results of this analysis showed that mortality, myocardial infarction (MI) and major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) were not significantly different between same day discharge versus overnight stay following PCI with OR: 0.22, 95% CI: 0.04–1.35; P = 0.10, OR: 0.68, 95% CI: 0.33–1.41; P = 0.30 and OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.20–1.02; P = 0.06 respectively. Blood transfusion and re-hospitalization were also not significantly different between these two groups with OR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.13–3.21; P = 0.59 and OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 0.88–2.65; P = 0.13 respectively. Similarly, any adverse event, major bleeding and repeated revascularization were also not significantly different between these two groups of patients with stable CAD, with OR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0

  15. Post-operative delirium is an independent predictor of 30-day hospital readmission after spine surgery in the elderly (≥65years old): A study of 453 consecutive elderly spine surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Wang, Timothy Y; Back, Adam G; Lydon, Emily; Reddy, Gireesh B; Karikari, Isaac O; Gottfried, Oren N

    2017-03-02

    In the last decade, costs of U.S. healthcare expenditures have been soaring, with billions of dollars spent on hospital readmissions. Identifying causes and risk factors can reduce soaring readmission rates and help lower healthcare costs. The aim of this is to determine if post-operative delirium in the elderly is an independent risk factor for 30-day hospital readmission after spine surgery. The medical records of 453 consecutive elderly (≥65years old) patients undergoing spine surgery at Duke University Medical Center from 2008 to 2010 were reviewed. We identified 17 (3.75%) patients who experienced post-operative delirium according to DSM-V criteria. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and post-operative complication rates were collected for each patient. Elderly patients experiencing post-operative delirium had an increased length of hospital stay (10.47days vs. 5.70days, p=0.009). Complication rates were similar between the cohorts with the post-operative delirium patients having increased UTI and superficial surgical site infections. In total, 12.14% of patients were re-admitted within 30-days of discharge, with post-operative delirium patients experiencing approximately a 4-fold increase in 30-day readmission rates (Delirium: 41.18% vs. No Delirium: 11.01%, p=0.002). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, post-operative delirium is an independent predictor of 30-day readmission after spine surgery in the elderly (p=0.03). Elderly patients experiencing post-operative delirium after spine surgery is an independent risk factor for unplanned readmission within 30-days of discharge. Preventable measures and early awareness of post-operative delirium in the elderly may help reduce readmission rates.

  16. Psychiatric rehabilitation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Rössler, W; Drake, R E

    2017-01-19

    To describe the core elements of modern psychiatric rehabilitation. Based on selected examples we describe the discussion about values in mental health care with focus on Europe. We present outcome data from studies, which have tried to implement care structures based on this value discussion. In the second half of the 20th century, mental health care in all European and other high-income countries changed conceptually and structurally. Deinstitutionalisation reduced the number of psychiatric beds and transferred priority to outpatient care and community-based services, but community mental health programs developed differently across and within these countries. High-income countries in Europe continued to invest in costly traditional services that were neither evidence-based nor person-centered by emphasising inpatient services, sheltered group homes and sheltered workshops. We argue that evidence-based, person-centred, recovery-oriented psychiatric rehabilitation offers a parsimonious solution to developing a consensus plan for community-based care in Europe. The challenges to scaling up effective psychiatric rehabilitation services in high-income countries are not primarily a lack of resources, but rather a lack of political will and inefficient use and dysfunctional allocation of resources.

  17. Cannabis and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Loga, Slobodan; Loga-Zec, Svjetlana; Spremo, Mira

    2010-06-01

    There are connection between use of cannabis and many psychiatric disturbances in adolescents, especially "cannabis psychosis", depression, panic attacks and suicide. Negative effects could occur either as a result of a specific pharmacological effect of cannabis, or as the result of stressful experiences during the intoxication of cannabis in young people. Potentially is very dangerous high frequency suicidal ideation among cannabis users.

  18. Immigration, moving house and psychiatric admissions.

    PubMed

    Johansson, L M; Sundquist, J; Johansson, S E; Bergman, B

    1998-08-01

    This study was designed to elucidate psychiatric admission rates for native Swedes and foreign-born individuals during the period 1991-1994, when Sweden had a great influx of refugees. During the same period, and even earlier, psychiatric in-patient care had been reduced. Tests of differences between Swedes and foreign-born individuals in first psychiatric admission rates were performed using Poisson regressions, and the risk of a readmission was assessed using a proportional hazard model. Foreign-born individuals and native Swedes, both males and females, showed a similar admission pattern with regard to the number of admissions. Foreign-born males under 55 years of age and foreign-born females under 35 years of age had significantly higher admission rates than native Swedes. In total, native Swedes, both males and females, were hospitalized for a significantly longer period than the foreign-born subjects. About 43% of the patients were readmitted. The risk of a readmission was significantly increased among those with a high rate of internal migration. The high admission rates for young foreign-born individuals might be explained by a high incidence of mental illness owing to the trauma of being violently forced to migrate, acculturation difficulties, or unsatisfactory social circumstances such as high unemployment. The shorter hospitalization time could be due to undertreatment or less serious mental illness.

  19. The temporal fluctuations and characteristics of psychiatric inpatient admissions in Ireland: data from the HRB's National Psychiatric In-Patient Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Walsh, D; Daly, A

    2016-11-01

    This paper examines trends in psychiatric inpatient admissions from the 1960s to 2014 and uses data from the National Psychiatric Inpatient Reporting System (NPIRS) to review these trends. In the 1960s the Department of Health began an annual system of reporting on the activities in Irish psychiatric units and hospitals on foot of the recommendations of the Commission of Inquiry on Mental Illness. The National Psychiatric Inpatient Reporting System (NPIRS) was established shortly thereafter and this paper discusses the data from this database contained in these annual activity reports over the last 50 years.

  20. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reighley, Joan

    A description is provided of a course, "Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing," designed to teach students at Level 3 of a two-year college nursing program about the role of the nurse in a psychiatric setting and about concepts of mental health and psychiatric disorders, using both classroom and clinical instruction. The first section of the course…

  1. The periodicities in and biometeorological relationships with bed occupancy of an acute psychiatric ward in Antwerp, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, M.; de Meyer, F.; Peeters, D.; Meltzer, H.; Schotte, C.; Scharpe, S.; Cosyns, P.

    1993-06-01

    Recently, some investigators have established a seasonal pattern in normal human psychology, physiology and behaviour, and in the incidence of psychiatric psychopathology. In an attempt to elucidate the chronopsy and meteotropism in the latter, we have examined the chronograms of, and the biometeorological relationships to bed occupancy of the psychiatric ward of the Antwerp University Hospital during three consecutive calendar years (1987 1989). Weather data for the vicinity were provided by a local meteorological station and comprise mean atmospheric pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and minutes of sunlight and precipitation/day. The number of psychiatric beds occupied during the study period exhibited a significant seasonal variation. Peaks in bed occupancy were observed in March and November, with lows in August. An important part of the variability in the number of beds occupied could be explained by the composite effects of weather variables of the preceding weeks. Our results suggest that short-term fluctuations in atmospheric activity may dictate some of the periodicities in psychiatric psychopathology.

  2. The Spectrum of Psychiatric Pathology in a Patient with Genetically Verified Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alkabie, Samir; Singh, Daljinder; Hernandez, Amy; Dumenigo, Rhaisa

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric and behavioral disturbances are common in Huntington's disease (HD) and contribute significantly to its morbidity and mortality. We herein present the case of a 43-year-old woman with genetically verified HD, whose deteriorating psychiatric condition necessitated multiple inpatient psychiatric hospitalizations and featured a clinical spectrum of neuropsychiatric disturbances classically associated with HD. This paper reviews the literature concerning Huntington's psychopathology and provides an illustrative case example of its clinical nature. PMID:26451266

  3. [A case-report on catatonia: a prevalent but under-recognised psychiatric illness].

    PubMed

    Honings, S T H; Arts, B M G; van Os, J

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 63-year-old female patient with schizoaffective disorder who spent more than two months in two different psychiatric wards because of an unrecognised psychiatric illness. Ultimately, the patient was referred to the psychiatric ward of the university hospital where she was treated for catatonia with electroconvulsive therapy (ect). Three treatments with ect led to a full recovery of the patient.

  4. Symptom, Family, and Service Predictors of Children’s Psychiatric Rehospitalization Within One Year of Discharge

    PubMed Central

    BLADER, JOSEPH C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate predictors of readmission to inpatient psychiatric treatment for children aged 5 to 12 discharged from acute-care hospitalization. Method One hundred nine children were followed for 1 year after discharge from inpatient care. Time to rehospitalization was the outcome of interest. Predictors of readmission, examined via the Cox proportional hazards model, were symptom and family factors assessed at admission, aspects of psychiatric treatment, and demographic variables. Results The Kaplan-Meier rehospitalization risk within 1 year of discharge, taking into account known readmissions and censored observations, was 0.37. Most readmissions (81%) occurred within 90 days of discharge. Four variables contributed simultaneously to predicting readmission risk. More severe conduct problems, harsh parental discipline, and disengaged parent–child relations conferred a higher risk for rehospitalization; these risks were attenuated when parents disclosed higher stress in their parenting roles. Conclusions Findings showed that psychiatric rehospitalization of children is common, most likely in the trimester after discharge, and highly related to both child symptoms and family factors measurable at admission. Results suggest that efforts to improve postdischarge outcomes of children should target the initial period following inpatient care, address vigorously the complex treatment needs of those with severe conduct problems, and aim to improve parent–child relations. PMID:15187804

  5. Adolescents and Dual Diagnosis in a Psychiatric Emergency Service.

    PubMed

    Matali, José Luis; Andión, Oscar; Pardo, Marta; Iniesta, Raquel; Serrano, Eduard; San, Luis

    2016-03-02

    In recent years, both the prevalence of drug use and related child and adolescent psychiatric emergencies have risen sharply. There are few studies about the impact on child and adolescent emergency services. This study has a twofold aim. The first is to describe the prevalence of substance use disorders, mental disorders and dual diagnosis (substance use problems plus mental disorder) in adolescents in psychiatric emergency service. The second is to analyze clinical and healthcare differences between patients with dual diagnosis and patients with a mental disorder without substance use disorder.We retrospectively reviewed 4012 discharge forms for emergencies treated at the psychiatric emergency department during the period 2007-2009. We obtained a sample of 1795 visits. This sample was divided into two groups: the dual diagnosis group (n = 477) and the psychiatric disorder group (n = 1318).The dual diagnosis group accounted for 26.5% of psychiatric emergencies analyzed. Compared to the psychiatric disorder group,the dual diagnosis group had significantly more conduct disorders, social problems, involuntariness in the visit, less hospital admissions and less connection with the healthcare network.Adolescents with a dual diagnosis account for a high percentage of visits at child and adolescent psychiatric emergency services. This patient group requires specialized care both at emergency services and in specific units. Accordingly, these units should play a triple role when handling dual diagnosis: detection, brief treatment and referral to a specialised unit.

  6. Shrinking inpatient psychiatric capacity: cause for celebration or concern?

    PubMed

    Salinsky, Eileen; Loftis, Christopher

    2007-08-01

    This issue brief examines reported capacity constraints in inpatient psychiatric services and describes how these services fit within the continuum of care for mental health treatment. The paper summarizes the type and range of acute care services used to intervene in mental health crises, including both traditional hospital-based services and alternative crisis interventions, such as mobile response teams. It reviews historical trends in the supply of inpatient psychiatric beds and explores the anticipated influence of prospective payment for inpatient psychiatric services under Medicare. The paper also considers other forces that may affect the need for and supply of acute mental health services, including key factors that could improve the quality and efficiency of inpatient psychiatric care.

  7. The Nursing Students' Experience of Psychiatric Practice in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Song, Eunju

    2015-10-01

    In 1995, South Korea passed the Mental Health Act, and since this time it has developed many mental health policies and facilities. The aim of this study is to understand and explore the experience of nursing students in the changed psychiatric practice environment since 1995. The present study is a qualitative thematic analysis. Interviews were conducted with 11 third and fourth grade nursing students who had experienced psychiatric practice in South Korea. A thematic analysis of 11 in-depth student interviews identified three themes: 'orientation before psychiatric practice', 'facing the mental hospital', and 'change and choice'. After practicing, nursing students developed positive attitude regarding psychiatry. Educators will have to focus more on education and support in order for the students to maintain positive attitude throughout their experience. The research herein shows that the role of the educators and psychiatric nurses is extremely important for nursing students in the elimination of a negative attitude towards psychiatry.

  8. Workplace Literacy for Psychiatric Health Care Workers. Final Performance Report [and] External Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perin, Dolores; And Others

    This report documents the Workplace Literacy for Psychiatric Health Care Workers project, a partnership between a labor union and the City University of New York through which workplace literacy instruction was provided to mental hygiene therapy aides (MHTAs) employed in five state-operated psychiatric hospitals in New York City. Among the…

  9. Prospective Analysis of Psychiatric Risk Factors in Marines Sent to War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-13

    total) Panic disorder Generalized anxiety disorder Obsessive - compulsive disorder Phobias Acute stress Posttraumatic stress disorder Anxiety, not...subsequent mental health outcomes. During the observation period, 6.8% of the sample were diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder . The strongest predictors of...postdeployment psychiatric disorders were, in order of importance, low paygrade, hospitalization during deployment, low education, preservice smoking

  10. Stability of Diagnosis: A 20-Year Retrospective Cohort Study of Israeli Psychiatric Adolescent Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valevski, Avi; Ratzoni, Gideon; Sever, Jonathan; Apter, Alan; Zalsman, Gil; Shiloh, Roni; Weizman, Abraham; Tyano, Sam

    2001-01-01

    Outcome according to diagnosis and stability of diagnosis were investigated in a follow-back study, with a duration of 15-19 years, of 351 adolescents with various psychiatric disorders hospitalized in a closed psychiatric ward. Findings indicated that transient adolescent psychosis is associated with a relatively good prognosis and should…

  11. 75 FR 23105 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System Payment-Update for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ...This notice updates the payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient psychiatric hospital services provided by inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs). These changes are applicable to IPF discharges occurring during the rate year beginning July 1, 2010 through June 30, 2011. We are also responding to comments on the IPF PPS teaching adjustment and the market......

  12. Traditional Healing Practices Sought by Muslim Psychiatric Patients in Lahore, Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farooqi, Yasmin Nilofer

    2006-01-01

    This research explored the type of traditional healing practices sought by Muslim psychiatric patients treated at public hospitals of Lahore city, Pakistan. The sample comprised 87 adult psychiatric patients (38% male and 62% female). The patients self-reported on the Case History Interview Schedule that they had sought diverse traditional healing…

  13. Psychiatric Aspects of Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, S.K.; Pant, V.L.N.

    1985-01-01

    SUMMARY This report pertains to the psychiatric problems in renal transplant recipients and its socio-demographic correlations. 50 male recipient subjects with a post-transplant period ranging from six months to six years were evaluated through tape recorded interviews to study their pre and post-operative emotional reactions. A psychiatric examination was performed by two psychiatrists and a diagnosis given wherever necessary. On examination 46% of cases had identifiable psychiatric problems, mainly Anxiety Neurosis (18%), Depressive Neurosis (18%), Adjustment Reactions (10%). Non-organic (Psychogenic) pain, excessive somatic concern and personality changes were also noticed in some. The psychiatric illness was significantly more amongst unmarried (P < .05) and higher education group (P < .02). Other variables had no significant correlation with the psychiatric illness. None had psychoses or a major depressive disorder. Thus, psychiatric problems are present in particular groups of transplant recipients and are usually neurotic in nature and would require psychiatric help regarding these. PMID:21927072

  14. Adolescent Dress, Part I: Dress and Body Markings of Psychiatric Outpatients and Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelman, John D.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Investigated dress and body markings of 100 hospitalized and never-hospitalized adolescent psychiatric patients using in-depth interviews. Found that hospitalized patients had higher incidence of self-scarring, but other individual expressions of appearance did not differentiate two groups. Suggests that dress and appearance observations,…

  15. Gender and Disorder Specific Criminal Career Profiles in Former Adolescent Psychiatric In-Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjelsberg, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    A Norwegian nation-wide sample of 1087 former adolescent psychiatric in-patients, 584 males and 503 females, were followed up 15-33 years after first hospitalization. On the basis of detailed hospital records from index hospitalization all were rediagnosed according to DSM-IV. The patient list was linked to the national criminal register and the…

  16. Culture and psychiatric diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2013-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, neurobiologists and anthropologists have criticized the rigidity of its diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations, as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis - composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress - as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. This chapter surveys these recommendations to demonstrate how culture and context interact with psychiatric diagnosis at multiple levels. A greater appreciation of the interplay between culture, context, and biology can help clinicians improve diagnostic and treatment planning.

  17. The Effects of Data Sources, Cohort Selection, and Outcome Definition on a Predictive Model of Risk of Thirty-Day Hospital Readmissions

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Colin; Hripcsak, George

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospital readmission risk prediction remains a motivated area of investigation and operations in light of the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program through CMS. Multiple models of risk have been reported with variable discriminatory performances, and it remains unclear how design factors affect performance. Objectives To study the effects of varying three factors of model development in the prediction of risk based on health record data: 1) Reason for readmission (primary readmission diagnosis); 2) Available data and data types (e.g. visit history, laboratory results, etc); 3) Cohort selection. Methods Regularized regression (LASSO) to generate predictions of readmissions risk using prevalence sampling. Support Vector Machine (SVM) used for comparison in cohort selection testing. Calibration by model refitting to outcome prevalence. Results Predicting readmission risk across multiple reasons for readmission resulted in ROC areas ranging from 0.92 for readmission for congestive heart failure to 0.71 for syncope and 0.68 for all-cause readmission. Visit history and laboratory tests contributed the most predictive value; contributions varied by readmission diagnosis. Cohort definition affected performance for both parametric and nonparametric algorithms. Compared to all patients, limiting the cohort to patients whose index admission and readmission diagnoses matched resulted in a decrease in average ROC from 0.78 to 0.55 (difference in ROC 0.23, p value 0.01). Calibration plots demonstrate good calibration with low mean squared error. Conclusion Targeting reason for readmission in risk prediction impacted discriminatory performance. In general, laboratory data and visit history data contributed the most to prediction; data source contributions varied by reason for readmission. Cohort selection had a large impact on model performance, and these results demonstrate the difficulty of comparing results across different studies of predictive risk modeling

  18. 78 FR 46733 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System-Update for Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ...This notice updates the prospective payment rates for Medicare inpatient hospital services provided by inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs). These changes are applicable to IPF discharges occurring during the fiscal year (FY) beginning October 1, 2013 through September 30,...

  19. 77 FR 47223 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System-Update for Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ...This notice updates the prospective payment rates for Medicare inpatient hospital services provided by inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs). These changes are applicable to IPF discharges occurring during the fiscal year (FY) beginning October 1, 2012 through September 30,...

  20. Comorbidity of Psychiatric and Personality Disorders in First Suicide Attempters

    PubMed Central

    Rao, K. Nagaraja; Kulkarni, Ranganath R.; Begum, Shamshad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Attempted suicide is a common clinical problem in a general hospital setting. It has a serious clinical and socio-economical impact too. Aims: To study the psychosocial, psychiatric, and personality profile of the first suicide attempters in a general hospital. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional, hospital-based, descriptive study. Materials and Methods: All the consecutive cases of first suicide attempt (n=100) treated in a general hospital were studied to know the clinical profile. Variables related to socio-demographic characteristics, family background, suicide characteristics, psychiatric morbidity, and comorbidity were analyzed. Risk-Rescue rating was applied to know the medical seriousness of the suicide attempt. Presumptive stressful life event scale was utilized to calculate life events score. Structured clinical interview (MINI Plus) and semi-structured clinical interview (IPDE) were used for axis-I and axis-II (personality) diagnoses. The results were analyzed using appropriate statistical measures. Results: Family history of psychiatric illnesses (31%) and suicide (11%) were noted. Insecticides and pesticides were the most common agents (71%) employed to attempt suicide. Interpersonal difficulties (46%) were the most frequent stressor. Overall medical seriousness of the suicide attempt was of moderate lethality. 93% of the suicide attempters had at least one axis-I and/or axis-II psychiatric disorder. Most common diagnostic categories were mood disorders, adjustment disorders, and substance-related disorders, with axis-I disorders (89%), personality disorders (52%), and comorbidity of psychiatric disorders (51.6%). Conclusion: Individuals who made first suicide attempt were young adults, had lower educational achievement; overall seriousness of the suicide attempt was of moderate lethality, high prevalence of psychiatric morbidity, personality disorders, and comorbidity, and had sought medical help from general practitioners. PMID:23833346

  1. A Study to Determine the Feasibility of Establishing a Same-Day Surgery Program at General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-23

    grows stronger every year as advancing technology allows more procedures to be performed safely in this modality. For example, lasers and faster...diagnostic laparoscopy - laser - cone biopsy - laparoscopic surgery 0 0 c C) m 0 0 m z APPENDIX H m z .I, TOP 30 SUGGESTED SAME-DAY SURGERIES -Dm z BY HIGHEST...OTHER BIOPSY OF BREAST 75 Z 3 2830 TONSILLECTOMY WITH ADENOIDECTOMY 67 4 5421 LAPAROSCOPY 64 5 1359 OTHER EXTRACAPSULAR EXTRACTION OF LENS 54 6 5300

  2. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456.170 Section 456.170 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND..., and social evaluations. (a) Before admission to a mental hospital or before authorization for...

  3. Brief Report: Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Pregnant Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitsuhiro, Sandro Sendin; Chalem, Elisa; Barros, Marina Carvalho Moraes; Guinsburg, Ruth; Laranjeira, Ronaldo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence of ICD-10 psychiatric disorders in a population of pregnant teenage women from a Brazilian public hospital. Method: 1000 pregnant teenage women were evaluated using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, a structured interview which establishes diagnoses according to the International Classification…

  4. Histories of Child Maltreatment and Psychiatric Disorder in Pregnant Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Elisa; Zoccolillo, Mark; Paquette, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The study investigated histories of child maltreatment and psychiatric disorder in a high-risk sample of pregnant adolescents. Method: Cross-sectional data were obtained for 252 pregnant adolescents from high school, hospital, and group home settings in Montreal (Canada). Adolescents completed a child maltreatment questionnaire and a…

  5. Burden and Stress among Psychiatry Residents and Psychiatric Healthcare Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Ishara, Sergio; Bandeira, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared the levels of job burden and stress in psychiatry residents with those of other healthcare professionals at inpatient and outpatient psychiatric hospitals in a medium-sized Brazilian city. Method: In this study, the levels of job burden and stress of 136 healthcare workers and 36 psychiatry residents from six various…

  6. DISPO Advisor: Expert System for Psychiatric Disposition

    PubMed Central

    Barta, Patrick; Barta, Wendy

    1988-01-01

    An expert system was designed to assist psychiatric residents at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. This microcomputer based decision support system helps residents find the proper disposition for patients who come to the emergency room. The system uses an inexpensive, commercially available expert system shell, VP-EXPERT by Paperback Software, to match patients with inpatient and outpatient resources appropriate to their needs. The inference engine uses both forward and backward chaining, and interfaces with data stored in DBase III files. The system is currently in daily use by residents.

  7. Liver Illness and Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, Paul; Debette-Gratien, Marilyne; Girard, Murielle; Jacques, Jérémie; Nubukpo, Philippe; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Patients with psychiatric disorders are usually more exposed to multiple somatic illnesses, including liver diseases. Specific links are established between psychiatric disorders and alcohol hepatitis, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C in the population as a whole, and specifically in drug abusers. Metabolic syndrome criteria, and associated steatosis or non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH) are frequent in patients with chronic psychiatric disorders under psychotropic drugs, and should be screened. Some psychiatric medications, such as neuroleptics, mood stabilizers, and a few antidepressants, are often associated with drug-induced liver injury (DILI). In patients with advanced chronic liver diseases, the prescription of some specific psychiatric treatments should be avoided. Psychiatric disorders can be a limiting factor in the decision-making and following up for liver transplantation. PMID:28123443

  8. [Psychiatric assessment in civil law questions].

    PubMed

    Nedopil, N

    2009-05-01

    Psychiatric reports in German civil law cases are required if questions are raised of legal capacity, capacity to express a testamentary will, ability to sue or be sued, capacity to marry, ability of mentally disordered patients to consent to treatment, and when custody or hospital orders of these patients is considered or compensation is due for mental disorders resulting from accidents. Many reports must decide whether the ability to decide using sound reason or motives is or was impaired by a mental disorder. This capability is attributed to every adult person; only if incapability is claimed must it be proven by psychiatric assessment. As in most psychiatric court reports, such assessments must be structured in several steps. First a clinical diagnosis has to be established which must then be translated into legal terminology. After this has been accomplished, the psychiatrist must describe the functional impairments caused by the disorder and define the probability with which these impairments might affect the legal act in question. Most reports are prepared in the context of custody law, which centers on helping those patients who, due to a mental disorder, cannot manage their own legal matters.

  9. Deep brain stimulation for psychiatric disorders: where we are now.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Daniel R; Ozpinar, Alp; Raslan, Ahmed M; Ko, Andrew L

    2015-06-01

    Fossil records showing trephination in the Stone Age provide evidence that humans have sought to influence the mind through physical means since before the historical record. Attempts to treat psychiatric disease via neurosurgical means in the 20th century provided some intriguing initial results. However, the indiscriminate application of these treatments, lack of rigorous evaluation of the results, and the side effects of ablative, irreversible procedures resulted in a backlash against brain surgery for psychiatric disorders that continues to this day. With the advent of psychotropic medications, interest in invasive procedures for organic brain disease waned. Diagnosis and classification of psychiatric diseases has improved, due to a better understanding of psychiatric patho-physiology and the development of disease and treatment biomarkers. Meanwhile, a significant percentage of patients remain refractory to multiple modes of treatment, and psychiatric disease remains the number one cause of disability in the world. These data, along with the safe and efficacious application of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for movement disorders, in principle a reversible process, is rekindling interest in the surgical treatment of psychiatric disorders with stimulation of deep brain sites involved in emotional and behavioral circuitry. This review presents a brief history of psychosurgery and summarizes the development of DBS for psychiatric disease, reviewing the available evidence for the current application of DBS for disorders of the mind.

  10. An analysis of paramilitary referrals to psychiatric services at a tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rohit; Mina, Shaily; Deshpande, Smita N.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is a dearth of specialized mental health services for Indian paramilitary service personnel. Those requiring psychiatric evaluation are referred to government psychiatric services often with minimal information. Hence, major diagnostic and decision making relies on the psychiatrist's clinical evaluation and judgment. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate the paramilitary referrals to psychiatric services at a tertiary care referral center. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart analysis of all consecutive referrals by various Indian paramilitary services to a tertiary care hospital (2008-2010) was carried out. Results: Among the sample of 18 referrals, all were males (mean age: 37 years ± standard deviation (SD) =7.79). Various reasons for referral included: Evaluation of fitness for duty (83.3%), fitness to handle firearms (16.7%), and for disability certification (5.6%). There were no informants at all in 22.2%, and family members were available in only 11.1%. Hence, most referrals were admitted to the psychiatry ward for observation for various lengths of time. The mean duration of assessment (outpatient and inpatient) was 17.89 days (SD = 20.74) and final reported diagnoses were schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder in 16.7, 11.1, and 11.1%, respectively. There was concurrent history of alcohol and nicotine dependence (40%). A large group (40%) was diagnosed not to suffer from a major mental illness, while a firm and final diagnosis could not be arrived at in 16.7% subjects. Only one subject was given the fitness to handle firearms, fitness for duty was refused in three (16.7%) subjects, and one subject was referred to neurology after being diagnosed as a case of seizure disorder. Conclusion: There is an urgent need for intensive training both to paramilitary physicians as well as to general hospital psychiatrists regarding proper assessment of paramilitary personnel, as there are frequent chances of the

  11. Psychiatric illness in inpatients with neurological disorders: patients' views on discussion of emotional problems with neurologists.

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, K W; Goldberg, D P

    1984-01-01

    The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in inpatients with neurological disorders and the extent to which it is detected by neurologists were measured by using a two stage model of psychiatric assessment and from information recorded in the patients' medical notes. The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was estimated as 39%, of which 72% was unrecognised by the neurologists. Only a minority of patients with an uncertain physical diagnosis had a psychiatric illness, showing the error in assuming that a patient's physical symptoms arise from a psychological disturbance if an organic aetiology cannot be determined. When the patients were interviewed on their discharge from hospital they were divided on whether they had wished to discuss their mood with neurologists while they were in hospital. The reasons that they gave suggested that interactions between patients and doctors and the lack of ward facilities for private consultations with doctors are important determinants of hidden psychiatric morbidity in medical inpatients. PMID:6434026

  12. Psychiatric rehabilitation interventions: a review.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Marianne; Anthony, William A

    2010-01-01

    Psychiatric rehabilitation has become accepted by the mental health field as a legitimate field of study and practice. Over the last several decades various psychiatric rehabilitation programme models and procedures have been developed, evaluated and disseminated. At the same time the process of psychiatric rehabilitation has been specified and its underlying values and practitioner technology articulated. This review describes the psychiatric rehabilitation process and in so doing differentiates psychosocial interventions that can be classified as psychiatric rehabilitation interventions from other psychosocial interventions. Furthermore, the major psychiatric rehabilitation interventions are examined within a framework of the psychiatric rehabilitation process with a review of their evidence. The review concludes that psychiatric rehabilitation interventions are currently a mixture of evidence-based practices, promising practices and emerging methods that can be effectively tied together using the psychiatric rehabilitation process framework of helping individuals with serious mental illnesses choose, get and keep valued roles, and together with complementary treatment orientated psychosocial interventions, provide a broad strategy for facilitating recovery.

  13. Psychiatric evidence in extenuation: assessment and testimony in homicide defendants.

    PubMed

    Zabow, T

    1989-01-01

    The role of psychiatric evaluation and testimony on 202 cases demonstrates the participation of mental health experts in the legal process. The majority of these cases fall outside the mental abnormal groupings of 'incompetent to stand trial' or 'criminal insane'. A finding of diminished responsibility on account of mental illness provides for a finding of extenuating circumstances on account of mental illness. The numerous factors and categories influencing the defendant's behaviour are specific to each, requiring presentation for the court's discretion as to significance of psychiatric factors in extenuation of sentence. The population studies as representative of psychiatric extenuation are a personal consecutive sample of court referrals for formal evaluation undertaken in a psychiatric hospital unit. Reasons for referral all include possible psychiatric disorder. One third of referrals were accused of killing a family member. Alcohol and drugs were contributory to the behaviour in 50 per cent of cases. The contributions of witchcraft and history of head injury to the sample are evident in subgroupings. The value of psychiatric contribution to the courts is discussed in relation to South African legal process and clinical experiences.

  14. The Effects of Sociodemographic Factors on Psychiatric Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal Rye; Eun, Hun-Jeong; Yoo, Tai P.; Yun, Youngmi; Wood, Christopher; Kase, Michael; Park, Jong-Il

    2012-01-01

    Objective Several studies have reported that ethnic differences influence psychiatric diagnoses. Some previous studies reported that African Americans and Hispanics are diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders more frequently than Caucasians, and that Caucasians are more likely to be diagnosed with affective disorders than other ethnic groups. We sought to identify associations between sociodemographic factors and psychiatric diagnosis. Methods We retrospectively examined the medical records of all psychiatric inpatients (ages over 18 years) treated at Kern county mental hospital (n=2,051) between July 2003 and March 2007 for demographic, clinical information, and discharge diagnoses. Results African American and Hispanic males were more frequently diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders than Caucasians, whereas Caucasian females were more frequently diagnosed with affective disorders than females in the other ethnic groups, suggesting that patient ethnicity and gender may influence clinical diagnoses. Demographic variables, that is, a lower education, failure of marriage, homelessness, and low quality insurance, were found to be significantly associated with a diagnosis of schizophrenia spectrum disorders after adjusting for clinical variables. And, the presence of a family psychiatric history, failure of marriage, not-homelessness, and quality insurance were found to be associated with a diagnosis of affective disorders. Conclusion Our results show that these demographic factors, including ethnicity, have effects on diagnoses in psychiatric inpatients. Furthermore, these variables may help prediction of psychiatric diagnoses. PMID:22993517

  15. Experiencing Seclusion in a Forensic Psychiatric Setting: A Phenomenological Study.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Dave; Murray, Stuart J; Knack, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    In hospital settings, and especially in forensic psychiatric ones, restlessness, aggression, and even violence are familiar issues to healthcare workers. Under these circumstances, the need for restrictive measures (seclusion, mechanical/chemical restraints) is sometimes needed. Although such measures should be considered as exceptional interventions, they continue to be widespread in general, psychiatric, and forensic psychiatric settings. Although there is a great deal of literature on a myriad of issues associated with the use of seclusion, very little research has focused on the lived experience of the seclusion room in forensic psychiatric settings, whether from the patient's perspective or from the perspective of nursing staff responsible for these patients. Such an examination could help ameliorate the experience of secluded forensic psychiatric patients while informing nursing staff about the impacts of seclusion. This article reports the results of a federally funded qualitative, phenomenological research study conducted in a Canadian forensic psychiatric environment. Our results show that the "structure of place" matters for both patients who experience seclusion and nursing staff who work therapeutically in these settings. "Place" is irreducible to the physical "space" in which bodies find themselves; this study of place took into consideration the ways the lived body experiences seclusion and interrelates with others. Although there can be no doubt that many patients who experience seclusion are oftentimes objectively at risk, with a heightened potential to self-harm and to harm other inpatients and nursing staff as well, as our study participants attested, the bodies secluded in this space are not "objects."

  16. A Tobacco Reconceptualization in Psychiatry (TRIP): Towards the Development of Tobacco-Free Psychiatric Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Taryn G.; Weinberger, Andrea H.; Vessicchio, Jennifer C.; Mancuso, Vincenza; Cushing, Sandra J.; Pett, Michael; Kitchen, Kate; Selby, Peter; George, Tony P.

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco dependence is the leading cause of death in persons with psychiatric and substance use disorders. This has lead to interest in the development of pharmacological and behavioral treatments for tobacco dependence in this subset of smokers. However, there has been little attention paid to the development of tobacco-free environments in psychiatric institutions despite the creation of smoke-free psychiatric hospitals mandated by the Joint Commission for Accreditation of Health Organizations (JCAHO) in 1992. This review article addresses the reasons why tobacco should be excluded from psychiatric and addictions treatment settings, and strategies that can be employed to initiate and maintain tobacco-free psychiatric settings. Finally, questions for further research in this field are delineated. This Tobacco Reconceptualization in Psychiatry (TRIP) is long overdue, given the clear and compelling benefits of tobacco-free environments in psychiatric institutions. PMID:20653636

  17. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care through psycho-education and crisis focused monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The high number of involuntary placements of people with mental disorders in Switzerland and other European countries constitutes a major public health issue. In view of the ethical and personal relevance of compulsory admission for the patients concerned and given the far-reaching effects in terms of health care costs, innovative interventions to improve the current situation are much needed. A number of promising approaches to prevent involuntary placements have been proposed that target continuity of care by increasing self-management skills of patients. However, the effectiveness of such interventions in terms of more robust criteria (e.g., admission rates) has not been sufficiently analysed in larger study samples. The current study aims to evaluate an intervention programme for patients at high risk of compulsory admission to psychiatric hospitals. Effectiveness will be assessed in terms of a reduced number of psychiatric hospitalisations and days of inpatient care in connection with involuntary psychiatric admissions as well as in terms of cost-containment in inpatient mental health care. The intervention furthermore intends to reduce the degree of patients’ perceived coercion and to increase patient satisfaction, their quality of life and empowerment. Methods/Design This paper describes the design of a randomised controlled intervention study conducted currently at four psychiatric hospitals in the Canton of Zurich. The intervention programme consists of individualised psycho-education focusing on behaviours prior to and during illness-related crisis, the distribution of a crisis card and, after inpatient admission, a 24-month preventive monitoring of individual risk factors for compulsory re-admission to hospital. All measures are provided by a mental health care worker who maintains permanent contact to the patient over the course of the study. In order to prove its effectiveness the intervention programme will be compared with standard care

  18. Workplace violence prevention programs in psychiatric units and facilities.

    PubMed

    Peek-Asa, Corinne; Casteel, Carri; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Nocera, Maryalice; Goldmacher, Suzi; Ohagan, Emily; Blando, James; Valiante, David; Gillen, Marion; Harrison, Robert

    2009-04-01

    Psychiatric health care providers have high rates of workplace violence victimization, yet little is known about the strategies used by facilities to reduce violence. This study compared workplace violence prevention (WVP) programs in psychiatric units and facilities in California and New Jersey. Information was collected through interviews, a facility walk-through, and a review of written policies and training material. A similar proportion of hospitals in both states had WVP training programs. A higher proportion of hospitals in California had written WVP policies, and a higher proportion of New Jersey hospitals had implemented environmental and security modifications to reduce violence. Legislation is one of many potential approaches to increase workplace violence prevention programs in health care settings.

  19. Joint geriatric and psychiatric wards: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    George, Jim; Adamson, John; Woodford, Henry

    2011-09-01

    Joint geriatric/psychiatric wards are a potential solution to improving care of older patients with both psychiatric and medical illnesses in acute hospitals. A literature search using Medline, PsycINFO, Embase and CINAHL between 1980 and 2010 was carried out for information about joint wards for older people. Thirteen relevant papers were identified. These wards share common characteristics and there is evidence that they may reduce length of stay and be cost-effective, but there are no high-quality randomised controlled trials. Further research is needed, particularly regarding cost-effectiveness.

  20. [Psychiatric reform 25 years after the General Law of Health].

    PubMed

    Desviat, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    The paper analyzes the situation of the psychiatric reform 25 years of the General Health Law. The author wonders what has been done and what has been left undone, on the degree of implementation of the Community model that adopts the law and its future sustainability. It highlights, among the strengths, the loss of hegemony of the psychiatric hospital and the great development of alternative resources, and seeks to explain the reason for the inadequacies of care, policy and training, as well as threats: the changes in the management of social and health services, increased privatization of services, the theoretical impoverishment and changing demands of the population.

  1. 42 CFR 412.404 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. 412.404 Section 412.404 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.404 Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. (a) General requirements. (1)...

  2. 42 CFR 412.404 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. 412.404 Section 412.404 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.404 Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. (a) General requirements. (1)...

  3. 42 CFR 412.404 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. 412.404 Section 412.404 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.404 Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. (a) General requirements. (1)...

  4. 42 CFR 412.404 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. 412.404 Section 412.404 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.404 Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. (a) General requirements. (1)...

  5. 42 CFR 412.404 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. 412.404 Section 412.404 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.404 Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. (a) General requirements. (1)...

  6. Psychiatric Boarding in Washington State and the Inadequacy of Mental Health Resources.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Joseph D

    2015-06-01

    Psychiatric boarding is a term derived from emergency medicine that describes the holding of patients deemed in need of hospitalization in emergency departments for extended periods because psychiatric beds are not available. Such boarding has occurred for many years in the shadows of mental health care as both inpatient beds and community services have decreased. This article focuses on a 2014 Washington State Supreme Court decision that examined the interpretation of certain sections of the Washington state civil commitment statute that had been used to justify the extended boarding of detained psychiatric patients in general hospital emergency departments. The impact of this decision on the state of Washington should be significant and could spark a national debate about the negative impacts of psychiatric boarding on patients and on the nation's general hospital emergency services.

  7. New Frontiers in Psychiatric Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuzessery, Zoltan, Ed.

    The second annual educational workshop concerned utilization of psychiatric technicians for technical service to allied professions. Manuscripts are included for the following presentations: (1) "Brief History of Colorado Psychiatric Technicians Association" by Francis L. Hedges, (2) "Hominology--The Approach to the Whole Man"…

  8. The Psychiatric Disorders of Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Charles R.; Lucas, Alexander R.

    A general textbook on the psychiatric disorders of childhood, the book is intended to be an introductory text for students and practitioners working with children (such as psychiatric and pediatric residents and psychologists, teachers, medical students). The genesis of mental illness is discussed in terms of the contributions of heredity and the…

  9. College Students with Psychiatric Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Delar K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on college students with psychiatric disabilities. It defines and discusses various psychiatric conditions such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and personality disorders. It concludes with accommodations that a college professor can make to help these students succeed in higher education. (Contains 1…

  10. Gene therapy for psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Yaroslav; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy has become of increasing interest in clinical neurosurgery with the completion of numerous clinical trials for Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, and pediatric genetic disorders. With improved understanding of the dysfunctional circuitry mediating various psychiatric disorders, deep brain stimulation for refractory psychiatric diseases is being increasingly explored in human patients. These factors are likely to facilitate development of gene therapy for psychiatric diseases. Because delivery of gene therapy agents would require the same surgical techniques currently being employed for deep brain stimulation, neurosurgeons are likely to lead the development of this field, as has occurred in other areas of clinical gene therapy for neurologic disorders. We review the current state of gene therapy for psychiatric disorders and focus specifically on particular areas of promising research that may translate into human trials for depression, drug addiction, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and schizophrenia. Issues that are relatively unique to psychiatric gene therapy are also discussed.

  11. Exorcism: a psychiatric viewpoint.

    PubMed Central

    Trethowan, W. H.

    1976-01-01

    Doctors, for several reasons, should be concerned with exorcism is the view of Professor Trethowan, who in this paper, looks at the main features of exorcism as practised in the middle ages and now appearing in the modern world, as was seen in the recent Ossett case in Britain. He examines in some detail the nature of supposed demoniacal possession and describes its symptoms and signs. He also touches on the social, as opposed to the religious, background in which demoniacal possession flourished (not lacking in the world today), so leading to an examination of the psychodynamic aspects of demoniacal possession and the question of absolute evil. Finally he compares the techniques of exorcism and of modern psychiatric practice. PMID:966260

  12. Handedness in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Fleminger, J J; Dalton, R; Standage, K F

    1977-11-01

    Eight hundred psychiatric patients and eight hundred controls completed a handedness preference questionnaire. There was no significant difference in handedness between the two samples, but, contrary to some previous reports, excess of sinistrality was not associated with male sex. The distribution of handedness was similar in neurotics and controls, but among psychotics in general there was a higher proportion of fully right-handed subjects. Among schizophrenics there was a significantly higher proportion of left-handed writers among males than females. There were relatively few left-handed writers of either sex among patients with affective psychosis. Female patients with personality disorders had a significantly higher proportion of mixed handedness than controls. The findings are considered in relation to suggestions that functional psychoses may be associated with asymmetrical cerebral dysfunction, and that poorly lateralized function may be related to anomalous psychological development.

  13. Dinosaur Day!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Sandra; Baptiste, H. Prentice

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they capitalized on their first-grade students' love of dinosaurs by hosting a fun-filled Dinosaur Day in their classroom. On Dinosaur Day, students rotated through four dinosaur-related learning stations that integrated science content with art, language arts, math, and history in a fun and time-efficient…

  14. CEMI Days

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    CEMI Days are an important channel of engagement between DOE and the manufacturing industry to identify challenges and opportunities for increasing U.S. manufacturing competitiveness. CEMI Days that are held at manufacturing companies’ facilities can include tours of R&D operations or other points of interest determined by the host company.

  15. Hospice referral after inpatient psychiatric treatment of individuals with advanced dementia from a nursing home.

    PubMed

    Epstein-Lubow, Gary; Fulton, Ana Tuya; Marino, Louis J; Teno, Joan

    2015-06-01

    This report addresses the discharge disposition following inpatient psychiatric treatment for advanced dementia. The total population included 685 305 Medicare fee-for-service decedents with advanced cognitive and functional impairment, with a mean age of 85.9 years who had resided in a nursing home. In the last 90 days of life, 1027 (0.15%) persons received inpatient psychiatry treatment just prior to the place of care where the individual died. Discharge dispositions included 132 (12.9%) persons to a medical hospital, 728 (70.9%) to nursing home without hospice services, 73 (7.1%) to hospice services in a nursing home, 32 (3.1%) to home without hospice services, and 16 (1.6%) to hospice services at home. Overall, the rate of referral to hospice services for advanced dementia was relatively low.

  16. Cutaneous factitia in elderly patients: alarm signal for psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chiriac, Anca; Foia, Liliana; Birsan, Cristina; Goriuc, Ancuta; Solovan, Caius

    2014-01-01

    Background The factitious disorders, more commonly known in daily practice as pathomimia, are expressed in dermatology units by skin lesions induced voluntarily by the patient, in order to draw attention of the medical staff and/or the family members. The disorder is often challenging to diagnose and even more difficult to document in front of the patient or relatives. It represents a challenge for the physician, and any attempt at treatment may be followed by recurrence of the self-mutilation. This paper describes two cases of pathomimia diagnosed by dermatologists and treated in a psychiatry unit, highlighting the importance of collaboration in these situations. Patients and methods Two case reports, describing old female patients with pathomimia, hospitalized in a department of dermatology for bizarre skin lesions. Results The first case was a 77-year-old female with unknown psychiatric problems and atrophic skin lesions on the face, self-induced for many months, with multiple hospitalizations in dermatology units, with no response to different therapeutic patterns, and full recovery after psychiatric treatment for a major depressive syndrome. The second case was a 61-year-old female patient with disseminated atrophic scars on the face, trunk, and limbs. She raised our interest because of possible psychiatric issues, as she had attempted to commit suicide. The prescription of antidepressants led to a significant clinical improvement. Conclusion These cases indicate that a real psychiatric disease may be recorded in patients suffering from pathomimia. Therefore, complete psychiatric evaluation in order to choose the proper therapy is mandatory for all these cases. Dermatologists and all physicians who take care of old patients must recognize the disorder in order to provide optimum care for this chronic condition. We emphasize therefore the importance of psychiatric evaluation and treatment to avoid the major risk of suicide. Skin lesions must be regarded as an

  17. Is treatment in a day hospital step-down program superior to outpatient individual psychotherapy for patients with personality disorders? 36 months follow-up of a randomized clinical trial comparing different treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Gullestad, Frida Slagstad; Wilberg, Theresa; Klungsøyr, Ole; Johansen, Merete Selsbakk; Urnes, Oyvind; Karterud, Sigmund

    2012-01-01

    Despite increasing interest in the development of effective treatments for patients with PDs, there is still no consensus about the optimal treatment setting for this group of patients. This study reports the 36 months follow-up of the Ullevål Personality Project (UPP) (n=113), a randomized clinical trial comparing two treatment modalities for patients with PDs: an intensive long-term step-down treatment program, consisting of short-term day hospital treatment followed by combined group and individual psychotherapy organized in a hospital setting, with "ordinary" outpatient individual psychotherapy in private practice for patients with moderate to severe PDs. Patients in both treatment groups showed improvements in several clinical measures after 36 months. However, contrary to our expectations, patients in the outpatient treatment setting improved significantly more. Possible explanations for this surprising finding are discussed. The study cannot exclude the possibility that treatment aspects other than differences in modalities could explain some of the differential effectiveness (e.g. differences between therapists).

  18. The impact of psychiatric comorbidity on Medicare reimbursement for inpatient medical care.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J; Daly, J; Golinger, R C

    1994-01-01

    Funding for psychiatric consultation-liaison (C-L) services has been a difficult problem. It has been suggested that the identification of psychiatric co-morbidities in Medicare patients on medical services could generate incremental hospital revenue by moving patients from a lower to a higher paying Diagnostic Related Group (DRG). This increased revenue could be used as a means of supporting the psychiatric C-L service. This study documents the financial impact of screening for and documenting psychiatric co-morbidities on a general acute medical service. We clinically assessed 100 consecutive Medicare admissions and found 25 psychiatric co-morbidities in 20 patients. In only one case did the psychiatric diagnosis result in moving the case to a higher DRG. However, the need for psychiatric consultation remains evident as there was significant lack of recognition and documentation of the psychiatric diagnoses by the medical team. The authors discuss both the financial and clinical implications of screening medical inpatients for psychiatric co-morbidities and propose directions for further studies in this area.

  19. Validity of Childhood Autism in the Danish Psychiatric Central Register: Findings from a Cohort Sample Born 1990-1999

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauritsen, Marlene B.; Jorgensen, Meta; Madsen, Kreesten M.; Lemcke, Sanne; Toft, Susanne; Grove, Jakob; Schendel, Diana E.; Thorsen, Poul

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of the diagnosis of childhood autism in the Danish Psychiatric Central Register (DPCR) by reviewing medical records from 499 of 504 total children with childhood autism born 1990-1999. Based on review of abstracted behaviors recorded in case records from child psychiatric hospitals, case status…

  20. Clay and Anxiety Reduction: A One-Group, Pretest/Posttest Design with Patients on a Psychiatric Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimport, Elizabeth R.; Hartzell, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Little research exists on using clay as an anxiety-reducing intervention with patients in psychiatric hospitals. This article reports on a study that used a one-group, pretest/posttest design with 49 adults in a psychiatric facility who created a clay pinch pot. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was used as a pre- and posttest measure.…