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Sample records for psychiatric medical record

  1. 32 CFR 1701.13 - Special procedures for medical/psychiatric/psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .../psychological records. 1701.13 Section 1701.13 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense... procedures for medical/psychiatric/psychological records. Current and former ODNI employees, including... access to their medical, psychiatric or psychological testing records by writing to: Information...

  2. 32 CFR 1701.13 - Special procedures for medical/psychiatric/psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .../psychological records. 1701.13 Section 1701.13 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense... procedures for medical/psychiatric/psychological records. Current and former ODNI employees, including... access to their medical, psychiatric or psychological testing records by writing to: Information...

  3. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Medical records must stress the psychiatric components of the record, including history of findings and... record of mental status; (4) Note the onset of illness and the circumstances leading to admission;...

  4. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Medical records must stress the psychiatric components of the record, including history of findings and... record of mental status; (4) Note the onset of illness and the circumstances leading to admission;...

  5. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Medical records must stress the psychiatric components of the record, including history of findings and... record of mental status; (4) Note the onset of illness and the circumstances leading to admission;...

  6. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... Medical records must stress the psychiatric components of the record, including history of findings and... record of mental status; (4) Note the onset of illness and the circumstances leading to admission;...

  7. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.61 Section 482.61 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS Requirements for Specialty Hospitals § 482.61 Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals. The medical records maintained by a...

  8. [Psychiatric advance directives--medical models into psychiatric medicine].

    PubMed

    Mautner, Sigal; Lachman, Max; Kaplan, Zeev; Shalev, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Since the year 2005, in the field of general medicine, the legislature in Israel determined ways to implement medically advanced directives according to the power of the law. Different states in the world had implemented parallel legislation for patients who suffer from mental illness. Psychiatric Advance Directives is a legitimate document which is valid in Australia, New Zealand, Scotland, England and in 25 countries in the U.S.A. Psychiatric advance directives (PAD's) allow competent persons, through advance instructions, to state their preferences for future mental health treatment in the event of an incapacitating psychiatric crisis. Self Determination Theory, Self Care and Autonomy are dominant supportive approaches in the creation of Psychiatric Advance Directives. Research conducted on psychiatric advance directives shows positive potential benefits for mental health clients, therapists and psychiatrists. More research in that area must be conducted. Psychiatric advance directives are currently developed and implemented with the cooperation of the Tauber Foundation and the Beer Sheva Mental Health Center. This is the first step in learning of effective ways to use this intervention in Israel and change perceptions toward a positive connection between medical efficiency and client preferences.

  9. An annotated bibliography of psychiatric medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Anzia, D J; La Puma, J

    1991-03-01

    We offer an annotated bibliography of psychiatric medical ethics that we hope will be useful for psychiatrists and other mental health professionals who are interested in the moral dimensions of psychiatric care. We present the educational and clinical rationale for the bibliography, ways to use the bibliography, and the bibliography itself. Using the American Psychiatric Association's Principles of Medical Ethics With Annotations Especially Applicable to Psychiatry as a principled framework, we selected references based primarily on educational and clinical relevance for physicians. We include both empirical and conceptual analyses of the ethical issues seen daily in the office, clinic, hospital, nursing home, and in society at large.

  10. Unrecognized medical emergencies admitted to psychiatric units.

    PubMed

    Reeves, R R; Pendarvis, E J; Kimble, R

    2000-07-01

    Alteration of mental status secondary to medical illness may occasionally be incorrectly attributed to a psychiatric problem. The cases of 64 patients with unrecognized medical emergencies inappropriately admitted to psychiatric units from emergency departments were reviewed to determine the cause of the misdiagnoses. Medical diagnoses most often missed included severe intoxication with alcohol or other illicit substance (34.4%), drug or alcohol withdrawal or delirium tremens (12.5%), and prescription drug overdose (12.5%). In none of the cases (0%) was an appropriate mental status examination performed. Other common causes of misdiagnosis included inadequate physical examination (43.8%), failure to obtain indicated laboratory studies (34.4%), and failure to obtain available history (34.4%). A systematic approach is required for patients with altered mental status, including those with psychiatric presentations.

  11. Should psychiatric patients be granted access to their hospital records?

    PubMed

    Sergeant, H

    1986-12-01

    Beginning in September 1987, the British public will have the right to consult their computerized medical records and by extension, it is expected, noncomputerized ones as well. The author analyzed the case notes of 100 consecutive patients admitted under his care to a psychiatric day hospital. He classified material likely to affect patients adversely as puzzling or unintelligible, alarming, apparently insulting or objectionable, or sensitive information from or about others. Sergeant rejects proposals to omit sensitive material, to keep secret notes, or to grant access only to some psychiatric patients or to deny access to psychiatric patients as a class. Maintaining that there is no dividing line between somatic and psychological medicine, he concludes that access to personal health data for all patients should be limited to the disclosure of bare administrative details. Further information should be supplied within the traditional medical consultation.

  12. The accuracy of psychiatric medication advertisements in medical journals.

    PubMed

    Spielmans, Glen I; Thielges, Shelly A; Dent, Amy L; Greenberg, Roger P

    2008-04-01

    Psychiatric medications are frequently advertised in medical journals, yet no study has addressed the veracity of claims made in these advertisements. The present study examined the accuracy of 69 medical journal advertisements for psychiatric medications and the availability of sources cited in these advertisements. Just over half of claims made in advertisements (50.2%) provided no attainable source that could be used to check the veracity of the claim. When sources were attained, they supported the cited claims 65% of the time (95% CI: 61.0-69.1). Claims regarding the efficacy of medications were only supported by obtained cited sources on 53.2% of occasions (95% CI: 46.2-60.2). Attempts to obtain cited data on file from sponsoring drug companies were rarely successful. Given the relatively poor empirical substantiation of claims made in medical journal psychiatric drug advertisements and that most claims provided no attainable sources, increased regulation of such advertising is warranted. PMID:18414120

  13. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456..., psychiatric, and social evaluations. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a beneficiary under age 21, the medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations required by §§ 456.170, and 456.370...

  14. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456..., psychiatric, and social evaluations. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a beneficiary under age 21, the medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations required by §§ 456.170, and 456.370...

  15. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456..., psychiatric, and social evaluations. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a beneficiary under age 21, the medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations required by §§ 456.170, and 456.370...

  16. Concurrent Medical and Psychiatric Disorders among Schizophrenic and Neurotic Outpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lima, Bruno R.; Pai, Shaila

    Although the occurrence of medical illnesses in psychiatric patients is quite high, medical illnesses manifested by psychiatric symptoms are often overlooked. The higher mortality rates among psychiatric patients when compared to the general population may be a reflection of neglect or inadequate treatment of the psychiatric patients' medical…

  17. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456..., psychiatric, and social evaluations. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a recipient under age 21, the medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations required by §§ 456.170, and 456.370...

  18. Asperger Syndrome: Associated Psychiatric and Medical Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaziuddin, Mohammad

    2002-01-01

    This article explores the association of medical and psychiatric conditions with Asperger syndrome, based mainly on publications from the last two decades. It examines comorbidity of Asperger syndrome with mood disorders, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, tic disorders, violence and aggression,…

  19. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... Hospitals Medical, Psychiatric, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review § 456.170 Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. (a) Before admission to a mental hospital or before authorization for...

  20. 28 CFR 549.42 - Use of psychiatric medications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of psychiatric medications. 549.42 Section 549.42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.42 Use of psychiatric medications....

  1. 28 CFR 549.42 - Use of psychiatric medications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of psychiatric medications. 549.42 Section 549.42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.42 Use of psychiatric medications....

  2. 28 CFR 549.42 - Use of psychiatric medications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of psychiatric medications. 549.42 Section 549.42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.42 Use of psychiatric medications....

  3. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... Hospitals Medical, Psychiatric, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review § 456.170 Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. (a) Before admission to a mental hospital or before authorization for...

  4. What is Wrong With the Current Psychiatric Medication?

    PubMed Central

    Kubacki, Andrew

    1973-01-01

    Some common aspects of the misuse of psychotropic drugs are discussed against the background of disparate development of psychiatric and medical sciences. Particular attention is granted the anxiolytic agents, antidepressants, and neuroleptic drugs, and the related psychiatric conditions are considered correspondingly. Popular errors in applying psychiatric medication are thus discussed with their adverse consequences. PMID:20469001

  5. Your Medical Records

    MedlinePlus

    ... to get records for non-emergency situations (like switching to a new doctor), it's best to give ... Your Medical Care Health Insurance Basics Finding Low-Cost Medical Care Health Insurance: Cracking the Code Questions ...

  6. Medical records seized.

    PubMed

    1998-04-17

    Police in San Jose, CA, seized medical records at a medical marijuana clinic to see if doctors recommended use of the drug. The seizure at Santa Clara County Medical Cannabis Center raised concerns among physicians, who fear their medical licenses may be revoked. Patients were equally concerned that their confidentiality could be compromised. Police said if doctors refuse to confirm that they have recommended marijuana to a patient, the patient will be asked to sign a release. If the patient refuses, other corroboration will be sought. California voters legalized the medical use of marijuana in 1996; however, Federal and State officials continue to try to block implementation of the law.

  7. Access to Medical Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Nancy

    Although confidentiality with regard to medical records is supposedly protected by the American Medical Associaton's principles of Ethics and the physician-patient privilege, there are a number of laws that require a physician to release patient information to public authorities without the patient's consent. These exceptions include birth and…

  8. 28 CFR 551.114 - Medical, psychiatric and psychological.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Pretrial Inmates § 551.114 Medical, psychiatric and psychological. (a) Staff shall... medication the pretrial inmate receives which may alter the inmate's courtroom behavior. (c) In event...

  9. 28 CFR 551.114 - Medical, psychiatric and psychological.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Pretrial Inmates § 551.114 Medical, psychiatric and psychological. (a) Staff shall... medication the pretrial inmate receives which may alter the inmate's courtroom behavior. (c) In event...

  10. 28 CFR 551.114 - Medical, psychiatric and psychological.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Pretrial Inmates § 551.114 Medical, psychiatric and psychological. (a) Staff shall... medication the pretrial inmate receives which may alter the inmate's courtroom behavior. (c) In event...

  11. 28 CFR 551.114 - Medical, psychiatric and psychological.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Pretrial Inmates § 551.114 Medical, psychiatric and psychological. (a) Staff shall... medication the pretrial inmate receives which may alter the inmate's courtroom behavior. (c) In event...

  12. 28 CFR 551.114 - Medical, psychiatric and psychological.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Pretrial Inmates § 551.114 Medical, psychiatric and psychological. (a) Staff shall... medication the pretrial inmate receives which may alter the inmate's courtroom behavior. (c) In event...

  13. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Services for Individuals Under Age 21: Admission and Plan of Care Requirements § 456.482 Medical... under age 21, the medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations required by §§ 456.170, and 456.370...

  14. [The occupational health of medical personnel of psychiatric institutions].

    PubMed

    Ruzhenskaia, E V

    2013-01-01

    The article considers the issues of self-assessment of occupational health by medical personnel of psychiatric service. The main issues and areas of occupation health disorders are identified. The main directions of disorders prevention are presented.

  15. Developing psychiatric competence during medical education and internship: contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Høifødt, Tordis Sørensen; Olstad, Reidun; Sexton, Hal

    2007-11-01

    The study describes the learning process in psychiatry of medical students through their clerkship and internship, It focused upon the development of students' attitudes to psychiatry, subjective psychiatric competence and self-confidence. The relationships between the participants' background, aspects of the learning environment, their attitudes to psychiatry, psychiatric competence and psychiatric self-confidence were explored in order to develop an empirical model of the learning process.The participants were medical students at the University of Tromsoe, Norway. The study was prospective and based on students' self-reports, Structural panel modelling and growth curve analyses were used to explore the complex interactions between the variables over time and to create a model of the learning processes. The medical students significantly increased their subjective competence and psychiatric self-confidence during their clerkship in psychiatry and maintained them during their internship. Previous psychiatric experience, attitudes towards psychiatry and current psychiatric experience contributed to subjective psychiatric competence, Competence in turn had a positive effect on self-confidence. Interestingly, those with greater subjective competence also appeared to have more psychiatric experience during their internship. An empirical model of the important aspects of the learning process was developed.

  16. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... medical findings; (3) Medical history; (4) Mental and physical functional capacity; (5) Prognoses; and (6... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456.170 Section 456.170 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  17. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... medical findings; (3) Medical history; (4) Mental and physical functional capacity; (5) Prognoses; and (6... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456.170 Section 456.170 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  18. Medical records and record-keeping standards.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Iain; Ram, Mala Bridgelal; Croft, Giles P; Williams, John G

    2007-08-01

    The structure of medical records becomes ever more critical with the advent of electronic records. The Health Informatics Unit (HIU) of the Royal College of Physicians has two work streams in this area. The Records Standards programme is developing generic standards for all entries into medical notes and standards for the content of admission, handover and discharge records. The Information Laboratory (iLab) focuses on hospital episode statistics and their use for monitoring clinician performance. Clinician endorsement of the work is achieved through extensive consultations. Generic medical record-keeping standards are now available. PMID:17882846

  19. Diagnosis and Medication Overload? A Nurse Review of the Psychiatric Histories of Older Youth in Treatment Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narendorf, Sarah Carter; Bertram, Julie; McMillen, J. Curtis

    2011-01-01

    Prior research has raised concern about the appropriateness of psychotropic medication use and the validity of psychiatric diagnosing for youth in child welfare but has lacked in-depth case information. This study reports results from a psychiatric nurse review conducted with eight youth entering a foster care intervention using case records and…

  20. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456.170 Section 456.170 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control:...

  1. Medicalizing melancholia: exploring profiles of psychiatric professionalization.

    PubMed

    Misbach, Judith; Stam, Henderikus J

    2006-01-01

    The nineteenth century was the site of radical changes in understanding mental illness. The professionalization of psychiatry consisted primarily of the discipline's aspiration to the status of an expert medical subspecialty. While all forms of insanity were eventually reframed in medical terms, melancholia--for moral and nosological reasons--assumed a special role that made it an ideal diagnosis for conceptual reframing. Our analysis of the journal literature of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in North America and Germany traces several ways in which melancholia was medicalized. As the care for the insane shifted into the professional realm of physicians and medical terminology came to replace prior descriptors of mental illness, melancholia was replaced by depression. In addition, the process of delineating affective pathology assumed a distinctly medical flavor. Finally, melancholia was firmly medicalized when its boundaries blurred with neurasthenia. Differences in how ordinary affective terms became medicalized in German and North American psychiatry illustrate the importance of local historical approaches.

  2. PSYCHIATRIC MORBIDITY AMONG PATIENTS ATTENDING MEDICAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT

    PubMed Central

    Bagadia, V.N.; Ayyar, K.S.; Lakdawala, P.D.; Sheth, S.M.; Acharya, V.N.; Pradhan, P.V.

    1986-01-01

    SUMMARY Patients attending the General Medical Out-patient department of a public hospital were selected randomly and screened by a physician and a psychiatrist independently. The data on 258 patients reveal an overall psychiatric morbidity of 36% consisting of 24% pure psychiatric illnesses and 12% with associated organic problems. Females are found to be suffering from psychiatric illnesses to a statistically significantly greater extent as compared to males. Symptoms related to the head and the central nervous system, psychological symptoms and sleep disturbances are significantly more in the psychiatrically ill group. Functional patients have on an average more presenting complaints as compared to the “organic” i.e. physically ill patient (2.73 against 1.96). Other relevant findings are discussed in comparison with other studies. PMID:21927159

  3. Pro re nata medication for psychiatric inpatients: time to act.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Michael F; Whiteford, Harvey A

    2008-07-01

    Pro re nata (PRN; 'as needed') medication is an archetypal mainstay for managing acute psychiatric inpatient symptoms and behaviours. Psychiatric and mental health nursing practices have circumnavigated the development of a uniform medical-ethical standard for the administration of PRN psychotropic medication. This paper examines the evidence for administration of PRN psychotropic medications and, in the context of evidence-based best practice, current mental health policy and professional ethics, proposes a standardized Australian PRN administration protocol. The procedures and circumstances leading to a nurse administering psychotropic PRN medication are divided into five simple steps, namely (i) medical prescription; (ii) nurse evaluation of patient indications for an intervention; (iii) nurse consideration of therapeutic options; (iv) obtaining patient informed consent; and (v) documentation of outcomes of PRN administration. The literature associated with each step is reviewed, along with national and international professional ethics, guidelines and patient rights documents pertaining to the care of mental health patients. Recommendations for best-practise care are discussed for each step. There is a lacuna of published evidence supporting the use of PRN medications in psychiatric inpatients. Yet there is published evidence that PRN medications are associated with increased risks of morbidity, inappropriate use, may result in above-recommended dosages or polypharmacy, and complicate the assessment of efficacy of regular scheduled medicines. Alternative non-pharmacological treatment options to PRN medication are effective and associated with fewer side-effects. There are no national explicit standards, operational criteria or quality assurance for the use of PRN medication in inpatient psychiatric units. Contemporary PRN practices are largely unregulated and driven by essentially anecdotal evidence, leaving the clinicians and the service open to claims of poor

  4. Profiling psychotropic discharge medication from a children's psychiatric ward.

    PubMed

    Akram, Gazala

    2015-10-01

    Background Community prescribing of medication to treat psychiatric illness in children is increasing. However, details about medication prescribed at discharge from psychiatric inpatient services for children are scarce. Objectives Characterise the nature of psychotropic medication prescribed on discharge from a children's psychiatric ward over a 15-year period. Method Retrospective analysis of discharge summary letters of all discharges occurring between Jan 1997 to Dec 2012. Results 234 children (152 males and 82 females) were discharged with 117 (50%) prescribed psychotropic medication at discharge. 133 medicines were prescribed (stimulants n = 49, antipsychotics n = 31, antidepressants n = 22, mood stabilisers n = 1, other ADHD medication n = 11, melatonin n = 10, benzodiazepines n = 7, other n = 2). Risperidone was the most popular antipsychotic at a mean daily dose of 1 mg (range 0.25-4 mg). Fifty per cent were given an unlicensed medicine or a licensed drug was used in an unlicensed manner, of which risperidone was the most common (n = 14). Sleep disturbance and tics were most often treated using unlicensed/off label medication (n = 10). Conclusion Psychotropic medication is routinely used in inpatient children's services, with the majority of use confined to stimulants and atypical antipsychotics. Much of the antipsychotic use is for unlicensed indications or at unlicensed doses. PMID:25893488

  5. Selection Factors among International Medical Graduates and Psychiatric Residency Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiroma, Paulo R.; Alarcon, Renato D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors examine the association between the selection factors used in a psychiatric residency program and subsequent clinical and academic performance among international medical graduate (IMG) candidates. Methods: The authors completed a retrospective review of application files and residency evaluations of 50 IMG residents who…

  6. Occurrence of Medical Concerns in Psychiatric Outpatients with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azimi, Kousha; Modi, Miti; Hurlbut, Janice; Lunsky, Yona

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that adults with both intellectual disabilities (ID) and psychiatric disorders are at increased risk for physical health problems, few studies have described their medical concerns specifically. This study reports on the rates of physical health issues and completion of recommended health screenings among 78 adult outpatients with…

  7. Developing Psychiatric Competence during Medical Education and Internship: Contributing Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoifodt, Tordis Sorensen; Olstad, Reidun; Sexton, Hal

    2007-01-01

    The study describes the learning process in psychiatry of medical students through their clerkship and internship, It focused upon the development of students' attitudes to psychiatry, subjective psychiatric competence and self-confidence. The relationships between the participants' background, aspects of the learning environment, their attitudes…

  8. Medical expansionism: some implications for psychiatric nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Barker, P; Baldwin, S; Ulas, M

    1989-06-01

    The paper discusses how health care models in general have been influenced by the authors' concept of 'medical expansionism'. Emphasis is given to addressing the impact of medical theory and practice on models of psychiatric nursing. The initial section discusses the concepts of medicalisation and medical imperialism, offering general health definitions and examination of mental health problems in more detail. From this analysis a definition is presented of a medical model in psychiatry. The effects of this model of health care on the future development of nursing models in psychiatry is discussed.

  9. Tracking medication information across medical records

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Rocks, Krupa; Jahanshad, Neda; Frias-Martinez, Enrique; Andrada, Lewellyn P.; Bui, Alex A.T.

    2009-01-01

    A patient’s electronic medical record can consist of a large number of reports, especially for an elderly patient or for one affected by a chronic disease. It can thus be cumbersome for a physician to go through all of the reports to understand the patient’s complete medical history. This paper describes work in progress towards tracking medications and their dosages through the course of a patient’s medical history. 923 reports associated with 11 patients were obtained from a university hospital. Drug names were identified using a dictionary look-up approach. Dosages corresponding to these drugs were determined using regular expressions. The state of a drug (ON, OFF), which determines whether or not the drug was being taken, was identified using a support vector machine with features based on expert knowledge. Results were promising: prec. ≈ recall ≈ 87%. The output is a timeline display of the drugs which the patient has been taking. PMID:20351862

  10. A prevalence study of bestiality (zoophilia) in psychiatric in-patients, medical in-patients, and psychiatric staff.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, W A; Freinhar, J P

    1991-01-01

    The prevalence of bestiality (both actual sexual contacts and sexual fantasy) was investigated in an experimental group (psychiatric in-patients) and two control populations (medical in-patients and psychiatric staff). Psychiatric patients were found to have a statistically significant higher prevalence rate (55%) of bestiality than the control groups (10% and 15% respectively). Implications of these findings are discussed. It is recommended that due to the obvious prevalence of this condition, questions exploring this previously ignored topic should be routinely included in the psychiatric interview.

  11. [Challenges for the future of psychiatry and psychiatric medical care].

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the prolonged economic recession and global financial crisis, the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 2011 has caused great fear and devastation in Japan. In the midst of these, Japanese people have felt to lose the traditional values and common sense they used to share, and it has become necessary to build a new consciousness. Engaged in psychiatry and psychiatric care under these circumstances, we have to analyze the challenges we face and to brainstorm on appropriate prescriptions that can be applied to solve the problems. Five points in particular were brought up: [1] The persistently high number of suicides. [2] The increase in depression and overflowing numbers of patients visiting clinics and outpatient departments at hospitals. [3] The absolute shortage of child psychiatrists. [4] Little progress with the transition from hospitalization-centered to community-centered medical care. [5] The disappearance of beds for psychiatry patients from general hospitals. The situations surrounding these five issues were briefly analyzed and problems were pointed out. The following are five problems that psychiatry is facing: 1) A lack of large clinical trials compared to the rest of the world. 2) The drug lag and handling of global trials. 3) The lack of staff involved in education and research (in the field of psychiatry). 4) Following the DSM diagnostic criteria dogmatically, without differentiating therapeutics. 5) Other medical departments, the industry, patients, and their families are demanding objective diagnostic techniques. After analyzing the problems, and discussing to some extent what kind of prescription may be considered to solve the problems, I gave my opinion. (1) The first problem is the deep-rooted prejudice and discrimination against psychiatric disorders that continue to be present among Japanese people. The second problem is the government's policy of low remuneration (fees) for psychiatric services. The third problem, symbolic of the

  12. 42 CFR 460.210 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical records. 460.210 Section 460.210 Public...) Data Collection, Record Maintenance, and Reporting § 460.210 Medical records. (a) Maintenance of medical records. (1) A PACE organization must maintain a single, comprehensive medical record for...

  13. 42 CFR 460.210 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical records. 460.210 Section 460.210 Public...) Data Collection, Record Maintenance, and Reporting § 460.210 Medical records. (a) Maintenance of medical records. (1) A PACE organization must maintain a single, comprehensive medical record for...

  14. 42 CFR 460.210 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical records. 460.210 Section 460.210 Public...) Data Collection, Record Maintenance, and Reporting § 460.210 Medical records. (a) Maintenance of medical records. (1) A PACE organization must maintain a single, comprehensive medical record for...

  15. 42 CFR 460.210 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical records. 460.210 Section 460.210 Public...) Data Collection, Record Maintenance, and Reporting § 460.210 Medical records. (a) Maintenance of medical records. (1) A PACE organization must maintain a single, comprehensive medical record for...

  16. Iowa record-linkage study: death rates in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Black, D W

    1998-09-01

    The Iowa record-linkage study was developed to investigate death rates in psychiatric patients, and involved computer matching of death certificates with a roster of patients. A list of all patients admitted to our hospital from 1972 through 1981 was obtained and after removing duplicate entries the list was pared to 5412 names. The record included multiple identifiers (e.g., name, gender, date-of-birth, hospital number). This information was then linked by computer with all Iowa death certificates for the same period; a total of 331 deaths were identified. Patients were assigned to a single psychiatric diagnostic category based on a computer program that reviewed each patient's clinical diagnoses and picked the one with the highest priority in a hierarchy we had created. Age and sex adjusted mortality tables were constructed, allowing us to compute expected numbers of deaths. Relative risk for premature death was greatest among women, and those under 20 years. Risk was associated with all psychiatric diagnoses and was significantly higher among patients of either gender with an organic mental disorder or schizophrenia; women with acute schizophrenia, depressive neuroses, alcoholism, drug abuse, and psychophysiological disorders; and men with neuroses. Death from natural causes, especially from heart disease, was significantly excessive among women, while death from accidents and suicides was excessive for both men and women. The overall SMR was 1.65 (P < 0.001). Most importantly, we found that the greatest excess of mortality occurred within the first 2 years following hospital discharge. Thus, we were able to demonstrate that risk of mortality in general, and of suicide specifically, differed according to age, gender, diagnosis, and portion of the follow-up. We have subsequently used this method to investigate specific risk factors associated with mortality in mood disorders, schizophrenia, and antisocial personality disorder. Findings from these studies are

  17. Patients Discharged Against Medical Advice from a Psychiatric Hospital in Iran: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhmoonesi, Fatemeh; Khademloo, Mohammad; Pazhuheshgar, Samaneh

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Self- discharged patients are at high risk for readmission and ultimately higher cost for care. We intended to find the proportion of patients who leave hospital against medical advice and explore some of their characteristics. Methods: This prospective study of discharge against medical advice was conducted in psychiatric wards of Zare hospital in Iran, 2011. A psychologist recorded some information on a checklist based on the documented information about the patient who wanted to leave against medical advice. The psychologist interviewed these patients and recorded the reasons for discharge against medical advice. Descriptive statistics were calculated for the variables. Results: The rate of premature discharge was 34.4%. Compared to patients with regular discharges, patients with premature discharge were significantly more likely to be male, self-employed, to have co morbid substance abuse and first admission and positive family history of psychiatric disorder. Disappearance of symptoms was the most frequent reason for premature discharge. Conclusion: The 34.4% rate of premature discharge observed in our study is higher than rate reported in other studies. One possible explanation is our teaching hospital serves a low-income urban area and most patients had low socioeconomic status. Further studies are needed to compare teaching and non-teaching hospital about the rate of premature discharge and the reasons of patients who want to leave against medical advice. PMID:24762365

  18. Receipt of clinical preventive medical services among psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Carney, Caroline P; Allen, Jeff; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2002-08-01

    A total of 267 patients who were receiving care for psychiatric and substance use disorders at a university medical center completed a self-report instrument assessing their previous receipt of clinical preventive services. High rates of mammography and Pap tests within the past year were observed (76 and 77 percent). Rates of immunization (hepatitis B and tetanus vaccines) varied from 11 percent to 78 percent. Rates of preventive counseling for sexual practices, diet, and avoidance of alcohol were lower than 25 percent in all groups. Only 6 percent of all patients reported having been screened for gun ownership, despite the high risk of suicide among gun owners.

  19. Behavioral health electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Ted; Barrows, Erik

    2008-03-01

    The electronic medical record (EMR) will be an important part of the future of medical practice. Behavioral health treatment demands certain additions to the capabilities of a standard general medical EMR. The current focus on the quality management and financial aspects of the EMR are only initial examples of what this tool can do. It is important for behavioral health practitioners to understand that they must embrace this innovation and mold it into a product that serves their needs and the needs of their patients. An efficient and effective EMR will greatly assist the overall clinical enterprise in a number of important areas. PMID:18295041

  20. Communication Profiles of Psychiatric Residents and Attending Physicians in Medication-Management Appointments: A Quantitative Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Enrico G.; Pincus, Harold A.; Wieland, Melissa; Roter, Debra; Larson, Susan; Houck, Patricia; Reynolds, Charles F.; Cruz, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors quantitatively examined differences in psychiatric residents' and attending physicians' communication profiles and voice tones. Methods: Audiotaped recordings of 49 resident-patient and 35 attending-patient medication-management appointments at four ambulatory sites were analyzed with the Roter Interaction Analysis System…

  1. 32 CFR 321.6 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Medical records. 321.6 Section 321.6 National... DEFENSE SECURITY SERVICE PRIVACY PROGRAM § 321.6 Medical records. General. Medical records that are part... upon the individual's physical or mental health, the medical record in question will be released...

  2. 32 CFR 321.6 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Medical records. 321.6 Section 321.6 National... DEFENSE SECURITY SERVICE PRIVACY PROGRAM § 321.6 Medical records. General. Medical records that are part... upon the individual's physical or mental health, the medical record in question will be released...

  3. 32 CFR 321.6 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Medical records. 321.6 Section 321.6 National... DEFENSE SECURITY SERVICE PRIVACY PROGRAM § 321.6 Medical records. General. Medical records that are part... upon the individual's physical or mental health, the medical record in question will be released...

  4. 32 CFR 321.6 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Medical records. 321.6 Section 321.6 National... DEFENSE SECURITY SERVICE PRIVACY PROGRAM § 321.6 Medical records. General. Medical records that are part... upon the individual's physical or mental health, the medical record in question will be released...

  5. From medicalization to hybridization: a postcolonial discourse for psychiatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, P E

    2001-04-01

    I begin with an Orwellian dilemma [Orwell G. (1968) The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell, Vol. 1, p. 239. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, New York]: do I 'shoot the elephant' (by writing the abstract) to impress the editor? Or, with the courage of my postmodern convictions, do I lay down my rifle and disregard such suppressive editorial instructions? Bang! My words strafe the paper and the elephant is dead. How difficult it is to stay standing against the powerful currents of the dominant tradition. How easy it is to disavow the inequalities and injustices of that tradition when your livelihood (and your ego) depends upon it. So goes the theme of my paper, that, despite the clarion calls of the illustrious minority to reject the patriarchal model of medical psychiatry, psychiatric nurses continue to be propelled by the twin engines of illness and diagnosis. Yet as soon as psychiatry encounters the 'other' it becomes, in Homi K. Bhabha's words, 'hybridized': a pregnant pause created from the seeds of two different cultures. In this sense, every psychiatric moment becomes a golden opportunity for the psychiatric nurse to abdicate her role as medical factotum. Freed from these contractual obligations, she can join the 'other' and share in his experiences, sustaining rather than negating him within a truly therapeutic alliance. In similar fashion, this article has become a mixture of rhetorical fluidity and structured reality: a hybridized compromise which acknowledges the journal's publication boundaries yet still revels, at times, in the freedom of an open and lyrical text.

  6. [Theo van Gogh's medical record].

    PubMed

    Voskuil, P H

    1992-09-01

    In the final months of his life Theo van Gogh was admitted to the 'Geneeskundig Gesticht voor Krankzinnigen te Utrecht'. In November 1990 from the archives of the Willem Arntsz Huis, psychiatric centre in Utrecht, the medical files from this period were made available and a transcription was made by Han van Crimpen and Sjraar van Heugten, scientific collaborators of the Van Gogh Museum. From these data it is acceptable to conclude that Theo van Gogh had dementia paralytica and suffered a fast deterioration of his situation in these last few months. It is, however, probable that at least as early as 1886 Theo showed the first symptoms of this disease when he was in Paris, and that he was treated for this reason by dr. Rivet and dr. Gruby. There are insufficient indications that in Vincent van Gogh's case the same diagnosis can be put forward. It is most probable that during Vincent's visit to Theo in Paris in July 1890 in Theo's case symptoms of his medical deterioration were to be seen and this may have influenced the considerations finally leading to Vincent van Gogh's suicide.

  7. Nonpsychiatric Medication Interventions Initiated by a Postgraduate Year 2 Psychiatric Pharmacy Resident in a Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Studies have demonstrated the benefits of incorporating comprehensive medication management into primary care, but no study describes the types of nonpsychiatric medication–related interventions provided by a psychiatric pharmacist while providing comprehensive medication management. Method: A chart review of Center for Community Health patients enrolled in the University of Southern California Psychiatric Pharmacy Clinic, Los Angeles, between July 1, 2013, and January 10, 2014, was conducted. Progress notes were reviewed to collect medication recommendations and interventions. The number and types of interventions were compared between groups based on substance abuse history, comorbid medical conditions, number of psychiatric diagnoses, and number of medications. An anonymous survey was distributed to primary care providers (PCPs) regarding perceptions and attitudes toward a postgraduate year 2 psychiatric pharmacy resident’s interventions pertaining to nonpsychiatric medications. Results: 177 nonpsychiatric medication interventions were documented. Fifty interventions required PCP approval, and 45% of those were accepted. Having a diagnosis of diabetes (P < .0001), hypertension (P < .0001), gastroesophageal reflux disease (P < .0001), ≥ 9 medications (P < .0001), or ≥ 5 medical diagnoses (P < .0001) were all associated with an increased mean number of interventions. Of the PCPs, 66% viewed the psychiatric pharmacist as a resource for addressing medical interventions by providing drug information. The PCPs were agreeable to having a psychiatric pharmacist provide drug information and monitor the patient but reported mixed opinions on whether a psychiatric pharmacist should comanage nonpsychiatric conditions. Conclusions: Psychiatric pharmacists can successfully collaborate with PCPs in primary care clinics to provide comprehensive medication management that optimizes pharmacotherapy for patients with medical and psychiatric conditions. Continued

  8. Narrative strategies in medical discourse: constructing the psychiatric 'case' in a non-western setting.

    PubMed

    Coker, Elizabeth M

    2003-09-01

    The organizing goal of the present study was to analyze and understand the 'discursive presentation' of the Egyptian psychiatric patient through the texts, or narratives, contained within the patient medical charts. It is argued that the medical record, as a written document blending overt medical imperatives with more unexamined cultural assumptions about self-hood and abnormality, is an unusually rich source of discursive data concerning the 'cultural negotiations' implicit in the construction of the patient according to the two (often competing) world views represented by western biomedicine and traditional Egyptian culture. Psychiatry in Egypt is much more than a 'foreign transplant'; to assume this is to deny the culturally constructed nature of western biomedicine and psychiatry, which have their roots in historical and cultural notions of self, society, the individual, and normality versus abnormality (Transcultural Psychiat. 35(3) (1998) 352). Egyptian psychiatry is the product of an ongoing active blending of two very different conceptualizations of these issues.

  9. Narrative strategies in medical discourse: constructing the psychiatric 'case' in a non-western setting.

    PubMed

    Coker, Elizabeth M

    2003-09-01

    The organizing goal of the present study was to analyze and understand the 'discursive presentation' of the Egyptian psychiatric patient through the texts, or narratives, contained within the patient medical charts. It is argued that the medical record, as a written document blending overt medical imperatives with more unexamined cultural assumptions about self-hood and abnormality, is an unusually rich source of discursive data concerning the 'cultural negotiations' implicit in the construction of the patient according to the two (often competing) world views represented by western biomedicine and traditional Egyptian culture. Psychiatry in Egypt is much more than a 'foreign transplant'; to assume this is to deny the culturally constructed nature of western biomedicine and psychiatry, which have their roots in historical and cultural notions of self, society, the individual, and normality versus abnormality (Transcultural Psychiat. 35(3) (1998) 352). Egyptian psychiatry is the product of an ongoing active blending of two very different conceptualizations of these issues. PMID:12850115

  10. Psychiatric Diagnosis and Concomitant Medical Treatment for 1st and 2nd Grade Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell-Swanson, La Vonne; Frankenberger, William; Ley, Katie; Bowman, Krista

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the proportion of children in 1st and 2nd grade classes who were currently prescribed medication for psychotropic disorders. The study also examined the attitudes of 1st and 2nd grade teachers toward diagnosis of psychiatric disorders and use of psychiatric medication to treat children. Results of the current study indicate…

  11. 5 CFR 1830.3 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Medical records. 1830.3 Section 1830.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF SPECIAL COUNSEL PRIVACY § 1830.3 Medical records. When a request for access involves medical records that are not otherwise exempt from disclosure, the requesting individual may...

  12. 5 CFR 1830.3 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Medical records. 1830.3 Section 1830.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF SPECIAL COUNSEL PRIVACY § 1830.3 Medical records. When a request for access involves medical records that are not otherwise exempt from disclosure, the requesting individual may...

  13. 32 CFR 701.122 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Medical records. 701.122 Section 701.122... THE NAVY DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC DON Privacy Program § 701.122 Medical records. (a) Health... requirements of DOD 6025.18-R. (b) Disclosure. DON activities shall disclose medical records to the...

  14. 5 CFR 1830.3 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Medical records. 1830.3 Section 1830.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF SPECIAL COUNSEL PRIVACY § 1830.3 Medical records. When a request for access involves medical records that are not otherwise exempt from disclosure, the requesting individual may...

  15. 32 CFR 701.122 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Medical records. 701.122 Section 701.122... THE NAVY DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC DON Privacy Program § 701.122 Medical records. (a) Health... requirements of DOD 6025.18-R. (b) Disclosure. DON activities shall disclose medical records to the...

  16. 5 CFR 1830.3 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Medical records. 1830.3 Section 1830.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF SPECIAL COUNSEL PRIVACY § 1830.3 Medical records. When a request for access involves medical records that are not otherwise exempt from disclosure, the requesting individual may...

  17. 42 CFR 460.210 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... medical records. (1) A PACE organization must maintain a single, comprehensive medical record for each.... (7) Reports of contact with informal support (for example, caregiver, legal guardian, or next of kin... disclosure of personal information. (c) Transfer of medical records. The organization must promptly...

  18. 5 CFR 1830.3 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Medical records. 1830.3 Section 1830.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF SPECIAL COUNSEL PRIVACY § 1830.3 Medical records. When a request for access involves medical records that are not otherwise exempt from disclosure, the requesting individual may...

  19. Down the Rabbit Hole: Emergency Department Medical Clearance of Patients with Psychiatric or Behavioral Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Veronica; Siever, Kaylin; Matorin, Anu; Moukaddam, Nidal

    2015-11-01

    Patients presenting with behavior or psychiatric complaints may have an underlying medical disorder causing or worsening their symptoms. Misdiagnosing a medical illness as psychiatric can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. A thorough history and physical examination, including mental status, are important to identify these causes and guide further testing. Laboratory and ancillary testing should be guided by what is indicated based on clinical assessment. Certain patient populations and signs and symptoms have a higher association with organic causes of behavioral complaints. Many medical problems can present with or exacerbate psychiatric symptoms, and a thorough medical assessment is imperative.

  20. The impact of psychiatric comorbidity on Medicare reimbursement for inpatient medical care.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J; Daly, J; Golinger, R C

    1994-01-01

    Funding for psychiatric consultation-liaison (C-L) services has been a difficult problem. It has been suggested that the identification of psychiatric co-morbidities in Medicare patients on medical services could generate incremental hospital revenue by moving patients from a lower to a higher paying Diagnostic Related Group (DRG). This increased revenue could be used as a means of supporting the psychiatric C-L service. This study documents the financial impact of screening for and documenting psychiatric co-morbidities on a general acute medical service. We clinically assessed 100 consecutive Medicare admissions and found 25 psychiatric co-morbidities in 20 patients. In only one case did the psychiatric diagnosis result in moving the case to a higher DRG. However, the need for psychiatric consultation remains evident as there was significant lack of recognition and documentation of the psychiatric diagnoses by the medical team. The authors discuss both the financial and clinical implications of screening medical inpatients for psychiatric co-morbidities and propose directions for further studies in this area.

  1. The impact of psychiatric comorbidity on Medicare reimbursement for inpatient medical care.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J; Daly, J; Golinger, R C

    1994-01-01

    Funding for psychiatric consultation-liaison (C-L) services has been a difficult problem. It has been suggested that the identification of psychiatric co-morbidities in Medicare patients on medical services could generate incremental hospital revenue by moving patients from a lower to a higher paying Diagnostic Related Group (DRG). This increased revenue could be used as a means of supporting the psychiatric C-L service. This study documents the financial impact of screening for and documenting psychiatric co-morbidities on a general acute medical service. We clinically assessed 100 consecutive Medicare admissions and found 25 psychiatric co-morbidities in 20 patients. In only one case did the psychiatric diagnosis result in moving the case to a higher DRG. However, the need for psychiatric consultation remains evident as there was significant lack of recognition and documentation of the psychiatric diagnoses by the medical team. The authors discuss both the financial and clinical implications of screening medical inpatients for psychiatric co-morbidities and propose directions for further studies in this area. PMID:8039679

  2. Sexual Health Competence of International Medical Graduate Psychiatric Residents in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sciolla, Andres; Ziajko, Lauretta A.; Salguero, Mario L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Currently in the United States, more than one in three psychiatric residents are international medical graduates (IMGs). In light of forecasts of physician shortages, this proportion is likely to continue growing. Although central to psychiatric care, sexual health competence levels of IMGs may be lower than those of U.S. graduates.…

  3. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Medication Use in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Tara R.; Viskochil, Joseph; Farley, Megan; Coon, Hilary; McMahon, William M.; Morgan, Jubel; Bilder, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate comorbid psychiatric disorders and psychotropic medication use among adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) ascertained as children during a 1980's statewide Utah autism prevalence study (n = 129). Seventy-three individuals (56.6%) met criteria for a current psychiatric disorder; 89…

  4. Virtual Reality, Telemedicine, Web and Data Processing Innovations in Medical and Psychiatric Education and Clinical Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilty, Donald M.; Alverson, Dale C.; Alpert, Jonathan E.; Tong, Lowell; Sagduyu, Kemal; Boland, Robert J.; Mostaghimi, Arash; Leamon, Martin L.; Fidler, Don; Yellowlees, Peter M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article highlights technology innovations in psychiatric and medical education, including applications from other fields. Method: The authors review the literature and poll educators and informatics faculty for novel programs relevant to psychiatric education. Results: The introduction of new technologies requires skill at…

  5. 14 CFR 67.413 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Medical records. 67.413 Section 67.413 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Certification Procedures § 67.413 Medical records. (a) Whenever...

  6. 22 CFR 505.6 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical records. 505.6 Section 505.6 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS PRIVACY ACT REGULATION § 505.6 Medical records. If, in the judgment of the Agency, the release of medical information to you could have an adverse effect, the...

  7. 14 CFR 67.413 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Medical records. 67.413 Section 67.413 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Certification Procedures § 67.413 Medical records. (a) Whenever...

  8. 14 CFR 67.413 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Medical records. 67.413 Section 67.413 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Certification Procedures § 67.413 Medical records. (a) Whenever...

  9. 14 CFR 67.413 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Medical records. 67.413 Section 67.413 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Certification Procedures § 67.413 Medical records. (a) Whenever...

  10. 22 CFR 505.6 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Medical records. 505.6 Section 505.6 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS PRIVACY ACT REGULATION § 505.6 Medical records. If, in the judgment of the Agency, the release of medical information to you could have an adverse effect, the...

  11. 22 CFR 505.6 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Medical records. 505.6 Section 505.6 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS PRIVACY ACT REGULATION § 505.6 Medical records. If, in the judgment of the Agency, the release of medical information to you could have an adverse effect, the...

  12. 22 CFR 505.6 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Medical records. 505.6 Section 505.6 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS PRIVACY ACT REGULATION § 505.6 Medical records. If, in the judgment of the Agency, the release of medical information to you could have an adverse effect, the...

  13. 22 CFR 505.6 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Medical records. 505.6 Section 505.6 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS PRIVACY ACT REGULATION § 505.6 Medical records. If, in the judgment of the Agency, the release of medical information to you could have an adverse effect, the...

  14. 21 CFR 21.33 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical records. 21.33 Section 21.33 Food and... PRIVACY Requirements for Specific Categories of Records § 21.33 Medical records. (a) In general, an... in lieu of the procedures in paragraph (b)(1), that are not inconsistent with § 21.41(f)....

  15. 21 CFR 21.33 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical records. 21.33 Section 21.33 Food and... PRIVACY Requirements for Specific Categories of Records § 21.33 Medical records. (a) In general, an... in lieu of the procedures in paragraph (b)(1), that are not inconsistent with § 21.41(f)....

  16. 21 CFR 21.33 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical records. 21.33 Section 21.33 Food and... PRIVACY Requirements for Specific Categories of Records § 21.33 Medical records. (a) In general, an... in lieu of the procedures in paragraph (b)(1), that are not inconsistent with § 21.41(f)....

  17. 21 CFR 21.33 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical records. 21.33 Section 21.33 Food and... PRIVACY Requirements for Specific Categories of Records § 21.33 Medical records. (a) In general, an... in lieu of the procedures in paragraph (b)(1), that are not inconsistent with § 21.41(f)....

  18. 21 CFR 21.33 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical records. 21.33 Section 21.33 Food and... PRIVACY Requirements for Specific Categories of Records § 21.33 Medical records. (a) In general, an... in lieu of the procedures in paragraph (b)(1), that are not inconsistent with § 21.41(f)....

  19. The Psychoactive Effects of Psychiatric Medication: The Elephant in the Room

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, David; Porter, Sally

    2013-01-01

    The psychoactive effects of psychiatric medications have been obscured by the presumption that these medications have disease-specific actions. Exploiting the parallels with the psychoactive effects and uses of recreational substances helps to highlight the psychoactive properties of psychiatric medications and their impact on people with psychiatric problems. We discuss how psychoactive effects produced by different drugs prescribed in psychiatric practice might modify various disturbing and distressing symptoms, and we also consider the costs of these psychoactive effects on the mental well-being of the user. We examine the issue of dependence, and the need for support for people wishing to withdraw from psychiatric medication. We consider how the reality of psychoactive effects undermines the idea that psychiatric drugs work by targeting underlying disease processes, since psychoactive effects can themselves directly modify mental and behavioral symptoms and thus affect the results of placebo-controlled trials. These effects and their impact also raise questions about the validity and importance of modern diagnosis systems. Extensive research is needed to clarify the range of acute and longer-term mental, behavioral, and physical effects induced by psychiatric drugs, both during and after consumption and withdrawal, to enable users and prescribers to exploit their psychoactive effects judiciously in a safe and more informed manner. PMID:24592667

  20. Implementation of electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Greiver, Michelle; Barnsley, Jan; Glazier, Richard H.; Moineddin, Rahim; Harvey, Bart J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To apply the diffusion-of-innovations theory to the examination of factors that are perceived by family physicians as influencing the implementation of electronic medical records (EMRs). Design Qualitative study with 2 focus groups 18 months after EMR implementation; participants also took part in a concurrent quantitative study examining EMR implementation and preventive services. Setting Toronto, Ont. Participants Twelve community-based family physicians. Methods We employed a semistructured interview guide. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim; 2 researchers independently categorized and coded the transcripts and then met to compare and contrast their findings, category mapping, and interpretations. Findings were then mapped to an existing theoretical framework. Main findings Multiple barriers to EMR implementation were described. These included lack of relative advantage for many processes, high complexity of the system, low compatibility with physician needs and past experiences, difficulty with adaptation of the EMR to the organization and adaptation of the organization to the EMR, and lack of organizational slack. Positive factors were the presence of a champion and relative advantages for some processes. Conclusion Early EMR implementation experience is consistent with theoretical concepts associated with implementation of innovations. A problematic implementation process helps to explain, at least in part, the lack of improvement in preventive services in our quantitative results. PMID:21998247

  1. [Patients' access to their medical records].

    PubMed

    Laranjo, Liliana; Neves, Ana Luisa; Villanueva, Tiago; Cruz, Jorge; Brito de Sá, Armando; Sakellarides, Constantitno

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, the medical record was seen exclusively as being the property of health institutions and doctors. Its great technical and scientific components, as well as the personal characteristics attributed by each doctor, have been the reasons appointed for that control. However, nowadays throughout the world that paradigm has been changing. In Portugal, since 2007 patients are allowed full and direct access to their medical records. Nevertheless, the Deontological Code of the Portuguese Medical Association (2009) explicitly states that patients' access to their medical records should have a doctor as intermediary and that the records are each physician's intellectual property. Furthermore, several doctors and health institutions, receiving requests from patients to access their medical records, end up requesting the legal opinion of the Commission for access to administrative documents. Each and every time, that opinion goes in line with the notion of full and direct patient access. Sharing medical records with patients seems crucial and inevitable in the current patient-centred care model, having the potential to improve patient empowerment, health literacy, autonomy, self-efficacy and satisfaction with care. With the recent technological developments and the fast dissemination of Personal Health Records, it is foreseeable that a growing number of patients will want to access their medical records. Therefore, promoting awareness on this topic is essential, in order to allow an informed debate between all the stakeholders.

  2. Chronic medical conditions among jail detainees in residential psychiatric treatment: a latent class analysis.

    PubMed

    Swartz, James A

    2011-08-01

    Studies of incarcerates with serious mental illnesses have found elevated rates of chronic medical conditions such as asthma and diabetes, and of infectious diseases such as tuberculosis compared with general population rates. This study explored the pattern of chronic medical conditions in a sample of adult detainees in psychiatric treatment in a large urban jail to develop a clinical profile encompassing the full range of medical conditions. A total of 431 male and female detainees were sampled with certainty from admissions to a residential psychiatric treatment program (overall recruitment rate = 67%). Interviews used the World Mental Health version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview to assess psychiatric and substance use disorders per DSM-IV criteria and chronic medical conditions. Latent class analysis was conducted using 17 medical conditions as class indicators, yielding a 3-class model composed of: a latent class with a high to intermediate probability of multiple medical conditions (HMC; 12.5% of the sample); an intermediate class with a lower probability of having a smaller number of medical conditions (MMC; 43.2%); and a class with a low probability of any medical condition (44.3%). Those in the HMC class were more likely to report respiratory problems, severe headaches, musculoskeletal pain, hypertension, and arthritis, have greater functional impairment, and have a higher number of co-occurring psychiatric disorders. Being older (50+ years) and female were associated with higher odds of being in the HMC or MMC classes. The policy implications for providing medical care to incarcerates with complex mixtures of medical conditions and psychiatric disorders are considered.

  3. Chronic medical conditions among jail detainees in residential psychiatric treatment: a latent class analysis.

    PubMed

    Swartz, James A

    2011-08-01

    Studies of incarcerates with serious mental illnesses have found elevated rates of chronic medical conditions such as asthma and diabetes, and of infectious diseases such as tuberculosis compared with general population rates. This study explored the pattern of chronic medical conditions in a sample of adult detainees in psychiatric treatment in a large urban jail to develop a clinical profile encompassing the full range of medical conditions. A total of 431 male and female detainees were sampled with certainty from admissions to a residential psychiatric treatment program (overall recruitment rate = 67%). Interviews used the World Mental Health version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview to assess psychiatric and substance use disorders per DSM-IV criteria and chronic medical conditions. Latent class analysis was conducted using 17 medical conditions as class indicators, yielding a 3-class model composed of: a latent class with a high to intermediate probability of multiple medical conditions (HMC; 12.5% of the sample); an intermediate class with a lower probability of having a smaller number of medical conditions (MMC; 43.2%); and a class with a low probability of any medical condition (44.3%). Those in the HMC class were more likely to report respiratory problems, severe headaches, musculoskeletal pain, hypertension, and arthritis, have greater functional impairment, and have a higher number of co-occurring psychiatric disorders. Being older (50+ years) and female were associated with higher odds of being in the HMC or MMC classes. The policy implications for providing medical care to incarcerates with complex mixtures of medical conditions and psychiatric disorders are considered. PMID:21394659

  4. Automation of the Problem Oriented Medical Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schall, D. W.

    1971-01-01

    An improved ambulatory care delivery system developed for the Navy is examined. The system is centered around the concepts of problem oriented medical records and expanded use of paramedical personnel.

  5. 32 CFR 321.6 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subject to which they pertain. However, if it is determined that such access could have an adverse effect upon the individual's physical or mental health, the medical record in question will be released...

  6. Ethics of medical records and professional communications.

    PubMed

    Recupero, Patricia R

    2008-01-01

    In child and adolescent psychiatry, medical records and professional communications raise important ethical concerns for the treating or consulting clinician. Although a distinction may be drawn between internal records (eg, medical records and psychotherapy notes) and external communications (eg, consultation reports and correspondence with pediatricians), several ethical principles apply to both types of documentation; however, specific considerations may vary, depending upon the context in which the records or communications were produced. Special care is due with regard to thoroughness and honesty, collaboration and cooperation, autonomy and dignity of the patient, confidentiality of the patient and family members, maintaining objectivity and neutrality, electronic communications media, and professional activities (eg, political advocacy). This article reviews relevant ethical concerns for child and adolescent psychiatrists with respect to medical records and professional communications, drawing heavily from forensic and legal sources, and offers additional recommendations for further reading for clarification and direction on ethical dilemmas.

  7. Linking medical records to an expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naeymi-Rad, Frank; Trace, David; Desouzaalmeida, Fabio

    1991-01-01

    This presentation will be done using the IMR-Entry (Intelligent Medical Record Entry) system. IMR-Entry is a software program developed as a front-end to our diagnostic consultant software MEDAS (Medical Emergency Decision Assistance System). MEDAS (the Medical Emergency Diagnostic Assistance System) is a diagnostic consultant system using a multimembership Bayesian design for its inference engine and relational database technology for its knowledge base maintenance. Research on MEDAS began at the University of Southern California and the Institute of Critical Care in the mid 1970's with support from NASA and NSF. The MEDAS project moved to Chicago in 1982; its current progress is due to collaboration between Illinois Institute of Technology, The Chicago Medical School, Lake Forest College and NASA at KSC. Since the purpose of an expert system is to derive a hypothesis, its communication vocabulary is limited to features used by its knowledge base. The development of a comprehensive problem based medical record entry system which could handshake with an expert system while creating an electronic medical record at the same time was studied. IMR-E is a computer based patient record that serves as a front end to the expert system MEDAS. IMR-E is a graphically oriented comprehensive medical record. The programs major components are demonstrated.

  8. 38 CFR 17.905 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Medical records. 17.905 Section 17.905 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Health Care Benefits for Certain Children of Vietnam Veterans-Spina Bifida and Covered Birth Defects § 17.905...

  9. 38 CFR 17.905 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Medical records. 17.905 Section 17.905 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Health Care Benefits for Certain Children of Vietnam Veterans and Veterans with Covered Service in Korea-Spina...

  10. 38 CFR 17.905 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Medical records. 17.905 Section 17.905 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Health Care Benefits for Certain Children of Vietnam Veterans and Veterans with Covered Service in Korea-Spina...

  11. 38 CFR 17.905 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Medical records. 17.905 Section 17.905 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Health Care Benefits for Certain Children of Vietnam Veterans and Veterans with Covered Service in Korea-Spina...

  12. 38 CFR 17.905 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Medical records. 17.905 Section 17.905 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Health Care Benefits for Certain Children of Vietnam Veterans and Veterans with Covered Service in Korea-Spina...

  13. 32 CFR 701.122 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... have an adverse effect on the mental or physical health of the individual. Normally, this determination... practitioner. If it is medically indicated that access could have an adverse mental or physical effect on the... located may afford special protection to certain medical records (e.g., drug and alcohol abuse...

  14. Electronic medical record: Time to migrate?

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Neeti; Singh, Ritesh

    2012-01-01

    Gone are the days when records of patients were kept in paper format. Majority of things going digital, it is inevitable that hospitals will adopt electronic medical record in near future. It is simple, reliable and cost effective in long term. PMID:23293762

  15. Electronic medical record: Time to migrate?

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Neeti; Singh, Ritesh

    2012-10-01

    Gone are the days when records of patients were kept in paper format. Majority of things going digital, it is inevitable that hospitals will adopt electronic medical record in near future. It is simple, reliable and cost effective in long term.

  16. Race Disparities in Psychiatric Rates in Emergency Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunen, Seth; Niederhauser, Ronda; Smith, Patrick O.; Morris, Jerry A.; Marx, Brian D.

    2005-01-01

    Psychiatric diagnoses based on the International Classification of Diseases--Ninth Revision were examined in the medical discharge records of 33,000 emergency department (ED) patients to determine if (a) psychiatric disorders were underdiagnosed, (b) there were race and gender disparities in psychiatric rates, and (c) psychiatric rates varied as a…

  17. 3 Steps to Building a Personal Medical Record

    MedlinePlus

    ... Building a Personal Medical Record Print to PDF 3 Steps to Building a Personal Medical Record August ... forms or make phone calls for you. Step 3. Organizing and storing your personal medical record There ...

  18. Virtual medical scribes: making electronic medical records work for you.

    PubMed

    Brady, Kevin; Shariff, Afser

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing buzz around the term "medical scribe" in healthcare today. Medical scribes help meet the growing electronic medical record (EMR) data entry challenge healthcare providers face. Medical scribes reduce providers' paperwork burden, increase a medical practice's net margins, and reduce stress levels for doctors and their staff. They do this by charting patient encounters in real-time during patient examinations, thus reducing significantly the data entry workload that EMRs place on providers. Medical scribes can work onsite or offsite from a HIPAA-secure location, the latter being known as "virtual medical scribes." This article explores the uses and benefits of scribes to give you the background to employ them effectively in your clinic or hospital.

  19. Privacy, confidentiality, and electronic medical records.

    PubMed Central

    Barrows, R C; Clayton, P D

    1996-01-01

    The enhanced availability of health information in an electronic format is strategic for industry-wide efforts to improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care, yet it brings a concomitant concern of greater risk for loss of privacy among health care participants. The authors review the conflicting goals of accessibility and security for electronic medical records and discuss nontechnical and technical aspects that constitute a reasonable security solution. It is argued that with guiding policy and current technology, an electronic medical record may offer better security than a traditional paper record. PMID:8653450

  20. Factors involved in making decisions to prescribe medications for psychiatric disorders by psychiatrists: a survey study.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Somasundaram; Sajbel, Terrie A; Hartman, Timothy J

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study is to understand psychiatrist's decisions to prescribe psychiatric medications. A survey questionnaire was prepared consisting of 15 factors. Each factor had a five-point Likert scale, rating the importance of each factor in making decisions to prescribe medications. Twenty-six psychiatrists at a state psychiatric hospital completed the questionnaire. The data analysis involved the frequencies of responses for each factor being compared using Chi square goodness-of-fit tests with null hypothesis that the response distribution will be centered around average score of three on the Likert scale. All the participants rated patient's symptom, severity, and diagnosis as the most important. This was followed by the patient's past experience with medications, then medication side effects, concurrent physical health problems, and medication interactions. Psychiatrist's experience with medications rated as more important than evidence from clinical trials. Finally, psychiatrists integrate evidence from research findings with personal experience, patient preferences, and clinical context in making decisions in prescribing medications for psychiatric disorders.

  1. Private Medical Record Linkage with Approximate Matching

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Elizabeth; Xue, Yuan; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Malin, Bradley

    2010-01-01

    Federal regulations require patient data to be shared for reuse in a de-identified manner. However, disparate providers often share data on overlapping populations, such that a patient’s record may be duplicated or fragmented in the de-identified repository. To perform unbiased statistical analysis in a de-identified setting, it is crucial to integrate records that correspond to the same patient. Private record linkage techniques have been developed, but most methods are based on encryption and preclude the ability to determine similarity, decreasing the accuracy of record linkage. The goal of this research is to integrate a private string comparison method that uses Bloom filters to provide an approximate match, with a medical record linkage algorithm. We evaluate the approach with 100,000 patients’ identifiers and demographics from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center. We demonstrate that the private approximation method achieves sensitivity that is, on average, 3% higher than previous methods. PMID:21346965

  2. The Right of Psychiatric Patients to Refuse Medication: Where Should Social Workers Stand?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Kia J.

    1993-01-01

    Addresses differences among competence, commitment, and mental illness; the right to privacy; and the prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment. Reviews professional motivations in relation to both sides of controversy over rights of psychiatric patients to refuse medication. Presents position for social work profession that stands for…

  3. Adolescent Attitudes toward Psychiatric Medication: The Utility of the Drug Attitude Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Lisa; Floersch, Jerry; Findling, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Despite the effectiveness of psychotropic treatment for alleviating symptoms of psychiatric disorders, youth adherence to psychotropic medication regimens is low. Adolescent adherence rates range from 10-80% (Swanson, 2003; Cromer & Tarnowski, 1989; Lloyd et al., 1998; Brown, Borden, and Clingerman, 1985; Sleator, 1985) depending on…

  4. Antipsychotic Medication Prescription Patterns in Adults with Developmental Disabilities Who Have Experienced Psychiatric Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsky, Yona; Elserafi, Jonny

    2012-01-01

    Antipsychotic medication rates are high in adults with developmental disability. This study considered rates of antipsychotic use in 743 adults with developmental disability who had experienced a psychiatric crisis. Nearly half (49%) of these adults were prescribed antipsychotics. Polypharmacy was common with 22% of those prescribed antipsychotics…

  5. Examining the Impact of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Comorbidity on the Medical Lethality of Adolescent "Suicide Attempts"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mc Manama O'Brien, Kimberly H.; Berzin, Stephanie C.

    2012-01-01

    Specific psychiatric diagnoses and comorbidity patterns were examined to determine if they were related to the medical lethality of "suicide attempts" among adolescents presenting to an urban general hospital (N = 375). Bivariate analysis showed that attempters with substance abuse disorders had higher levels of lethality than attempters without…

  6. Evaluation of treatment effects in obese children with co-morbid medical or psychiatric conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The need for effective treatments for pediatric overweight is well known. We evaluated the applicability of an evidence-based treatment in an applied clinic setting that includes children with severe obesity and comorbid medical or psychiatric conditions. Forty-eight overweight children and their fa...

  7. Organization and development of pediatric medical-psychiatric units. Part II: Clinical management issues.

    PubMed

    Kahan, B B; Sexson, S B

    1991-11-01

    Scant literature exists regarding combined medical-psychiatric units for pediatric populations. The present article is the second in a two-part series describing issues relevant to the organization and development of such a unit within a tertiary-care children's hospital. Case examples of medical-psychiatry patients are presented, together with summary patient statistics for the first 3 years of operation. Additionally, issues regarding the physical layout, treatment program, and staffing are discussed. PMID:1765256

  8. 28 CFR 549.43 - Involuntary psychiatric treatment and medication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... treatment for the mental illness and less restrictive alternatives (e.g., seclusion or physical restraint... institution mental health division administrator shall appoint a staff representative. Witnesses should be called if they have information relevant to the inmate's mental condition and/or need for medication,...

  9. 28 CFR 549.43 - Involuntary psychiatric treatment and medication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... treatment for the mental illness and less restrictive alternatives (e.g., seclusion or physical restraint... institution mental health division administrator shall appoint a staff representative. Witnesses should be called if they have information relevant to the inmate's mental condition and/or need for medication,...

  10. Discussing the psychiatric manifestations of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: an exploration of clinical practice among medical geneticists

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Emily; Inglis, Angela; Friedman, Jan; Austin, Jehannine

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the frequency with which medical geneticists discuss the psychiatric manifestations of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) with families in relation to the frequency with which they discuss the other manifestations of the syndrome and to explore relationships between discussion of these features and stigma toward psychiatric disorders. Methods We surveyed medical geneticists in the United States and Canada regarding the frequency with which they discuss various features of 22q11DS with families in the context of four clinical scenarios in which only the age of the patient at diagnosis differed. Respondents also completed a 20-item validated psychometric measure of stigma towards psychiatric disorders. Results 308/546 medical geneticists completed the survey (56% response rate). Psychiatric disorders were discussed significantly less often than other features of 22q11DS (p<0.0001), but psychiatric disorders were discussed significantly more often when the patient was ≥ 13 years old (p<0.0001), than when the patient was younger. Geneticists who discussed psychiatric disorders the least had significantly higher levels of stigma towards psychiatric disorders (p=0.007). Conclusion Psychiatric risks are less often discussed with families during childhood. Education for physicians to help reduce stigma towards psychiatric disorders (which may impede discussion of psychiatric disorders) may warrant exploration in this population. PMID:23579435

  11. Talking about psychiatric medications: a parent-to-parent perspective (for children and youth) part I.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Susan; Rimm, Michael L; Arensdorf, Alfred M

    2007-10-01

    This article presents a format for parent-to-parent and parent-to-professional guidance on psychiatric medications for children and youth. It reviews progress in Hawai'i's system of care for child mental health. Between 1999 and 2006, Hawai'i had nationally and internationally renowned experts in psychiatric medication conduct CME for Hawai'i's primary care and specialist care physicians. These conferences have included consumers and non-physician mental health colleagues. The importance of involvement of consumers in the process of rational decision-making for the individual child or youth is an emphasis in the system of care in Hawai'i. The approach featured in Susan Cooper's "Meditation on Medication" presentation in the 2005 symposium breakout for parents demonstrates the genuine collaboration with consumers that may be a partial remedy for the data that shows an overall poor adherence to prescribed interventions.

  12. Videotaped recording as a method of participant observation in psychiatric nursing research.

    PubMed

    Latvala, E; Vuokila-Oikkonen, P; Janhonen, S

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes videotaped recording as a data collection method when conducting participant observation in a psychiatric nursing study. The videotaped episodes were part of the daily life of psychiatric nursing in a hospital environment. The advantages and limitations of using videotaped recording in nursing research will be discussed. This paper is based on two studies. The data consisted of 21 videotaped episodes of nursing report sessions or interdisciplinary team meetings in the psychiatric clinic of a university hospital. The participants consisted of patients, their significant others, nurses, doctors, social workers and physiotherapists. All videotaped material was transcribed verbatim. An essential advantage of videotaping is that most potentially useful interaction and behaviour can be captured. The advantage in terms of the credibility of videotaping was that the investigator was able to review the same videotaped situations again and again. Videotaped material is rich and provides several possibilities for analysing the data. In these studies data and source triangulation enabled the researchers to reduce personal influence on the results. The investigator must also be aware of the limitations concerning this method. The most essential limitations are mechanical problems and the influence of videotaping on behaviour. Careful ethical considerations are important concerning personal privacy, informed consent and respect for the self-determination of psychiatric patients.

  13. Availability of psychiatric medication in an urban area of The Gambia/West Africa.

    PubMed

    Thome, Johannes; Marenah, Essa; Moraru, Diana; Höppner, Jacqueline; Nyan, Ousman

    2011-09-01

    The use of a wide and differentiated arsenal of psychopharmacological substances is integral part of modern psychiatric treatment in addition to non-pharmacological interventions (e.g., psychotherapy). However, worldwide the access to such medication can vary considerably. In this study, access to a wide range of psychiatric medication including antidepressants, antipsychotics, tranquilisers, mood stabilisers and ADHD medication was analysed for the Western African country of The Gambia by surveying private pharmacies within the urban and sub-urban areas of Banjul, the country's capital. The results show that most of these pharmacies tend to keep a very limited range of psychiatric drugs in stock. In many instances only a tricyclic antidepressant (e.g., amitriptyline), the neuroleptic haloperidol and the benzodiazepine diazepam were readily available. None of the pharmacies kept ADHD medication in stock, and only very few had mood stabilisers. However, several pharmacies reported to be able to obtain at request most of the drugs from international sources, including atypical antipsychotics, SSRIs, and dual-acting antidepressants. Therefore, it can be concluded that in rapidly growing urban centres of developing countries exemplified by Banjul, the infrastructure for modern psychopharmacotherapy is well established, and that the lack of immediate access to modern psychopharmacological compounds represents not so much a genuine lack of availability, but rather a lack of demand which may be associated with the considerable cost-implications of such treatment and the absence of prescribers (i.e. psychiatrists and other doctors with an expertise in modern psychopharmacotherapy). To our knowledge this is the first such study for The Gambia and results might be representative for the wider Western African region. It also exemplifies the challenges psychiatry is facing in developing countries worldwide. It is essential that government-sponsored so-called "essential

  14. Medical Terminology of the Musculoskeletal System. Medical Records. Instructional Unit for the Medical Transcriber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosman, Minna L.

    Following an analysis of the task of transcribing as practiced in a health facility, this study guide was developed to teach the knowledge and skills required of a medical transcriber. The medical record department was identified as a major occupational area, and a task inventory for medical records was developed and used as a basis for a…

  15. Medical Terminology of the Circulatory System. Medical Records. Instructional Unit for the Medical Transcriber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosman, Minna L.

    Developed as a result of an analysis of the task of transcribing as practiced in a health facility, this study guide was designed to teach the knowledge and skills required of a medical transcriber. The medical record department was identified as a major occupational area, and a task inventory for medical records was developed and used as a basis…

  16. 37 CFR 102.26 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical... Special procedures: Medical records. (a) No response to any request for access to medical records by an... routine use, for all systems of records containing medical records, consultations with an...

  17. 21 CFR 870.2800 - Medical magnetic tape recorder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical magnetic tape recorder. 870.2800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2800 Medical magnetic tape recorder. (a) Identification. A medical magnetic tape recorder is a device used to record...

  18. 37 CFR 102.26 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical... Special procedures: Medical records. (a) No response to any request for access to medical records by an... routine use, for all systems of records containing medical records, consultations with an...

  19. 20 CFR 401.55 - Access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Access to medical records. 401.55 Section 401... INFORMATION The Privacy Act § 401.55 Access to medical records. (a) General. You have a right to access your medical records, including any psychological information that we maintain. (b) Medical records...

  20. Auditing medical records helps reduce liability.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, G; Winfrey, S

    1990-10-01

    An internal audit of a hospital's medical records department compares the department to standards developed by the hospital and to benchmarks set by accrediting organizations. An auditor can review the department's economy and effectiveness through employee surveys, direct observation, and interviews. By uncovering deficiencies and making recommendations for their correction, an internal audit can help limit a hospital's liability exposure.

  1. 12 CFR 310.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 310.6 Special procedures: Medical records. Medical records shall be disclosed on... information to a medical doctor named by the requesting individual for release of the patient....

  2. 12 CFR 310.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 310.6 Special procedures: Medical records. Medical records shall be disclosed on... information to a medical doctor named by the requesting individual for release of the patient....

  3. [Nurse's coworking to electronic medical record].

    PubMed

    Maresca, M; Gavaciuto, D; Cappelli, G

    2007-01-01

    Nephrologists need to register and look at a great number of clinical data. The use of electronic medical records may improve efficiency and reduce errors. Aim of our work is to report the experience of Villa Scassi Hospital in Genoa, where a "patient file" has been performed to improve nephrology practice management. The file contains all clinical records, laboratory and radiology data, therapy, dialysis clinics, in addition to reports of out-patients department. This system allowed a better efficiency in diagnosis and treatment of the patient. Moreover experience of nurses in employing electronic medical records is reported. A reduced number of errors was found in therapy administering, because of a only one data source for physicians and nurses. PMID:17922451

  4. Course of health care costs before and after psychiatric inpatient treatment: patient-reported vs. administrative records

    PubMed Central

    Zentner, Nadja; Baumgartner, Ildiko; Becker, Thomas; Puschner, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is limited evidence on the course of health service costs before and after psychiatric inpatient treatment, which might also be affected by source of cost data. Thus, this study examines: i) differences in health care costs before and after psychiatric inpatient treatment, ii) whether these differences vary by source of cost-data (self-report vs. administrative), and iii) predictors of cost differences over time. Methods: Sixty-one psychiatric inpatients gave informed consent to their statutory health insurance company to provide insurance records and completed assessments at admission and 6-month follow-up. These were compared to the self‐reported treatment costs derived from the "Client Socio-demographic and Service Use Inventory" (CSSRI‐EU) for two 6‐month observation periods before and after admission to inpatient treatment to a large psychiatric hospital in rural Bavaria. Costs were divided into subtypes including costs for inpatient and outpatient treatment as well as for medication. Results: Sixty-one participants completed both assessments. Over one year, the average patient‐reported total monthly treatment costs increased from € 276.91 to € 517.88 (paired Wilcoxon Z = ‐2.27; P = 0.023). Also all subtypes of treatment costs increased according to both data sources. Predictors of changes in costs were duration of the index admission and marital status. Conclusion: Self-reported costs of people with severe mental illness adequately reflect actual service use as recorded in administrative data. The increase in health service use after inpatient treatment can be seen as positive, while the pre-inpatient level of care is a potential problem, raising the question whether more or better outpatient care might have prevented hospital admission. Findings may serve as a basis for future studies aiming at furthering the understanding of what to expect regarding appropriate levels of post-hospital care, and what factors may help or

  5. Self-Medication of Somatic and Psychiatric Conditions Using Botanical Marijuana.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Lawrence A; Lauritsen, Kirstin J; Cross, Nicole; Davis, Alan K; Rosenberg, Harold; Bonadio, Francis; Lang, Brent

    2015-01-01

    As a complement to research evaluating botanical marijuana as a medical therapy for various somatic and psychiatric conditions, there is a growing body of research assessing marijuana users' self-reports of the symptoms and conditions for which they use marijuana without a physician's recommendation. As part of two larger web-based surveys and one in-situ survey at an outdoor marijuana festival, we asked regular marijuana users if they consumed the drug without a physician's recommendation and, if so, to describe (or select from a checklist) the conditions for which they used marijuana as a medication. Participants reported using marijuana to self-medicate a wide variety of both somatic conditions (such as pain, diabetes, and irritable bowel syndrome) and psychiatric conditions (such as depression, anxiety, and insomnia). Because fewer than half of the American states, and only a few countries, allow physicians to recommend medicinal marijuana, these findings may be of interest to clinicians as they treat patients, to lawmakers and policymakers as they consider legislation allowing physicians to recommend botanical marijuana for somatic and psychiatric conditions, and to researchers evaluating conditions that individuals elect to self-medicate using botanical marijuana.

  6. Psychiatric and medical management of marijuana intoxication in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Bui, Quan M; Simpson, Scott; Nordstrom, Kimberly

    2015-05-01

    We use a case report to describe the acute psychiatric and medical management of marijuana intoxication in the emergency setting. A 34-year-old woman presented with erratic, disruptive behavior and psychotic symptoms after recreational ingestion of edible cannabis. She was also found to have mild hypokalemia and QT interval prolongation. Psychiatric management of cannabis psychosis involves symptomatic treatment and maintenance of safety during detoxification. Acute medical complications of marijuana use are primarily cardiovascular and respiratory in nature; electrolyte and electrocardiogram monitoring is indicated. This patient's psychosis, hypokalemia and prolonged QTc interval resolved over two days with supportive treatment and minimal intervention in the emergency department. Patients with cannabis psychosis are at risk for further psychotic sequelae. Emergency providers may reduce this risk through appropriate diagnosis, acute treatment, and referral for outpatient care.

  7. Psychiatric and medical management of marijuana intoxication in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Bui, Quan M; Simpson, Scott; Nordstrom, Kimberly

    2015-05-01

    We use a case report to describe the acute psychiatric and medical management of marijuana intoxication in the emergency setting. A 34-year-old woman presented with erratic, disruptive behavior and psychotic symptoms after recreational ingestion of edible cannabis. She was also found to have mild hypokalemia and QT interval prolongation. Psychiatric management of cannabis psychosis involves symptomatic treatment and maintenance of safety during detoxification. Acute medical complications of marijuana use are primarily cardiovascular and respiratory in nature; electrolyte and electrocardiogram monitoring is indicated. This patient's psychosis, hypokalemia and prolonged QTc interval resolved over two days with supportive treatment and minimal intervention in the emergency department. Patients with cannabis psychosis are at risk for further psychotic sequelae. Emergency providers may reduce this risk through appropriate diagnosis, acute treatment, and referral for outpatient care. PMID:25987916

  8. Psychiatric and Medical Management of Marijuana Intoxication in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Quan M.; Simpson, Scott; Nordstrom, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    We use a case report to describe the acute psychiatric and medical management of marijuana intoxication in the emergency setting. A 34-year-old woman presented with erratic, disruptive behavior and psychotic symptoms after recreational ingestion of edible cannabis. She was also found to have mild hypokalemia and QT interval prolongation. Psychiatric management of cannabis psychosis involves symptomatic treatment and maintenance of safety during detoxification. Acute medical complications of marijuana use are primarily cardiovascular and respiratory in nature; electrolyte and electrocardiogram monitoring is indicated. This patient’s psychosis, hypokalemia and prolonged QTc interval resolved over two days with supportive treatment and minimal intervention in the emergency department. Patients with cannabis psychosis are at risk for further psychotic sequelae. Emergency providers may reduce this risk through appropriate diagnosis, acute treatment, and referral for outpatient care. PMID:25987916

  9. Recent perspectives of electronic medical record systems

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAO-YING; ZHANG, PEIYING

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of electronic medical record (EMR) systems within developing contexts as part of efforts to monitor and facilitate the attainment of health-related aims has been on the increase. However, these efforts have been concentrated on urban hospitals. Recent findings showed that development processes of EMR systems are associated with various discrepancies between protocols and work practices. These discrepancies were mainly caused by factors including high workload, lack of medical resources, misunderstanding of the protocols by health workers, and client/patient practices. The present review focused on the effects of EMRs on patient care work, and on appropriate EMR designs principles and strategies to ameliorate these systems. PMID:27284289

  10. 12 CFR 310.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 310.6... PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 310.6 Special procedures: Medical records. Medical records shall be disclosed on... transmission of the medical information directly to the requesting individual could have an adverse effect...

  11. 12 CFR 310.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 310.6... PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 310.6 Special procedures: Medical records. Medical records shall be disclosed on... transmission of the medical information directly to the requesting individual could have an adverse effect...

  12. Electronic medical records in clinical teaching.

    PubMed

    Warboys, Ina; Mok, Wai Yin; Frith, Karen H

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to provide students with experiences to develop their technology competency and examine student perceptions about an academic electronic medical record (EMR) as a learning tool. Nurse educators need to integrate EMRs into their curricula to give students practice in the use of electronic documentation and retrieval of clinical information. The findings of this study indicated that students' use of EMRs at least 5 times resulted in the development of positive perceptions about their EMR experience. PMID:25073041

  13. 7 CFR 1.115 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1.115 Section 1... Regulations § 1.115 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event an agency receives a request pursuant to § 1.112 for access to medical records (including psychological records) whose disclosure it...

  14. 18 CFR 1301.16 - Special procedures-medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-medical records. 1301.16 Section 1301.16 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY PROCEDURES Privacy Act § 1301.16 Special procedures—medical records. If, in the judgment of TVA, the transmission of medical records, including psychological records, directly to a...

  15. 5 CFR 297.205 - Access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Access to medical records. 297.205... PROCEDURES FOR PERSONNEL RECORDS Request for Access § 297.205 Access to medical records. When a request for access involves medical or psychological records that the system manager believes requires...

  16. 7 CFR 1.115 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1.115 Section 1... Regulations § 1.115 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event an agency receives a request pursuant to § 1.112 for access to medical records (including psychological records) whose disclosure it...

  17. 40 CFR 16.8 - Special procedures: Medical Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical Records. 16... PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 16.8 Special procedures: Medical Records. Should EPA receive a request for access to medical records (including psychological records) disclosure of which the system manager decides would...

  18. 18 CFR 1301.16 - Special procedures-medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-medical records. 1301.16 Section 1301.16 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY PROCEDURES Privacy Act § 1301.16 Special procedures—medical records. If, in the judgment of TVA, the transmission of medical records, including psychological records, directly to a...

  19. 29 CFR 1611.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1611.6 Section 1611.6... REGULATIONS § 1611.6 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event the Commission receives a request pursuant to § 1611.3 for access to medical records (including psychological records) whose disclosure...

  20. 5 CFR 297.205 - Access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Access to medical records. 297.205... PROCEDURES FOR PERSONNEL RECORDS Request for Access § 297.205 Access to medical records. When a request for access involves medical or psychological records that the system manager believes requires...

  1. 29 CFR 1611.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1611.6 Section 1611.6... REGULATIONS § 1611.6 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event the Commission receives a request pursuant to § 1611.3 for access to medical records (including psychological records) whose disclosure...

  2. 7 CFR 1.115 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1.115 Section 1... Regulations § 1.115 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event an agency receives a request pursuant to § 1.112 for access to medical records (including psychological records) whose disclosure it...

  3. 18 CFR 1301.16 - Special procedures-medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-medical records. 1301.16 Section 1301.16 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY PROCEDURES Privacy Act § 1301.16 Special procedures—medical records. If, in the judgment of TVA, the transmission of medical records, including psychological records, directly to a...

  4. 40 CFR 16.8 - Special procedures: Medical Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical Records. 16... PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 16.8 Special procedures: Medical Records. Should EPA receive a request for access to medical records (including psychological records) disclosure of which the system manager decides would...

  5. 40 CFR 16.8 - Special procedures: Medical Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical Records. 16... PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 16.8 Special procedures: Medical Records. Should EPA receive a request for access to medical records (including psychological records) disclosure of which the system manager decides would...

  6. 29 CFR 1611.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1611.6 Section 1611.6... REGULATIONS § 1611.6 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event the Commission receives a request pursuant to § 1611.3 for access to medical records (including psychological records) whose disclosure...

  7. Decision-making capacity for treatment in psychiatric and medical in-patients: cross-sectional, comparative study†

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Gareth S.; Szmukler, George; Richardson, Genevra; David, Anthony S.; Raymont, Vanessa; Freyenhagen, Fabian; Martin, Wayne; Hotopf, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Background Is the nature of decision-making capacity (DMC) for treatment significantly different in medical and psychiatric patients? Aims To compare the abilities relevant to DMC for treatment in medical and psychiatric patients who are able to communicate a treatment choice. Method A secondary analysis of two cross-sectional studies of consecutive admissions: 125 to a psychiatric hospital and 164 to a medical hospital. The MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool - Treatment and a clinical interview were used to assess decision-making abilities (understanding, appreciating and reasoning) and judgements of DMC. We limited analysis to patients able to express a choice about treatment and stratified the analysis by low and high understanding ability. Results Most people scoring low on understanding were judged to lack DMC and there was no difference by hospital (P = 0.14). In both hospitals there were patients who were able to understand yet lacked DMC (39% psychiatric v. 13% medical in-patients, P<0.001). Appreciation was a better ‘test’ of DMC in the psychiatric hospital (where psychotic and severe affective disorders predominated) (P<0.001), whereas reasoning was a better test of DMC in the medical hospital (where cognitive impairment was common) (P = 0.02). Conclusions Among those with good understanding, the appreciation ability had more salience to DMC for treatment in a psychiatric setting and the reasoning ability had more salience in a medical setting. PMID:23969482

  8. Patterns of psychotropic medication use in inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alosaimi, Fahad D; Alhabbad, Abdulhadi; Abalhassan, Mohammed F; Fallata, Ebtihaj O; Alzain, Nasser M; Alassiry, Mohammad Zayed; Haddad, Bander Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the pattern of psychotropic medication use and compare this pattern between inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings in Saudi Arabia. Method This cross-sectional observational study was conducted between July 2012 and June 2014 on patients seeking psychiatric advice at major hospitals in five main regions of Saudi Arabia. Male (n=651) and female (n=594) patients who signed the informed consent form and were currently or had been previously using psychotropic medications, irrespective of the patient’s type of psychiatric diagnosis and duration of the disease, were included. A total of 1,246 patients were found to be suitable in the inclusion criteria of whom 464 were inpatients while 782 were outpatients. Results Several studied demographic factors have shown that compared with outpatients, inpatients were more likely to be male (P=0.004), unmarried (P<0.001), have less number of children (1–3; P=0.002), unemployed (P=0.001), have a lower family income (<3,000 SR; P<0.001), live in rural communities (P<0.001), have a lower body mass index (P=0.001), and are smokers (P<0.001); however, there were no differences with regard to age or educational levels. The current frequency of use of psychotropic medications in overall patients was antipsychotics (76.6%), antidepressants (41.4%), mood stabilizers (27.9%), and antianxiety (6.2%). However, compared to outpatients, the current use of medications for inpatients was more frequent (93.8% vs 89.9%, P=0.019) with inpatients more likely to be treated with multiple medications (2.1 vs 1.8 medications). A similar trend was observed in the case of antipsychotics, high potency first-generation antipsychotics, second-generation antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and antianxiety medicines where inpatients were more frequently treated with these medications for all psychiatric diagnoses when compared with outpatients. On the contrary, in the case of antidepressant treatment, an opposite trend was observed

  9. Social Media Use in Psychiatric Graduate Medical Education: Where We Are and the Places We Could Go.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan, Thomas S; Roy, Durga; Anton, Blair; Chisolm, Margaret S

    2016-02-01

    This commentary discusses the use of social media in psychiatric graduate medical education (GME) based on a systematic search of the literature. The authors conclude that research on social media use in psychiatric GME is in its infancy. For the most part, the few articles that have been published on this topic caution against the use of social media in psychiatric training. However, reports from other specialties, in which social media use in medical education has been more extensively studied, suggest that there may be significant benefits to incorporating social media into medical education. Although additional challenges may exist in implementing these tools in psychiatric education, the authors suggest that this is an emerging field of scholarship that merits further investigation.

  10. 37 CFR 102.26 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... routine use, for all systems of records containing medical records, consultations with an individual's... record to USPTO's medical expert for review and a determination on whether consultation with or... be warranted, USPTO's medical expert shall so consult or transmit. Whether or not such a...

  11. 5 CFR 2412.7 - Special procedures; medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Special procedures; medical records. 2412.7 Section 2412.7 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE... Special procedures; medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which, in...

  12. 32 CFR 319.7 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 319.7... (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PRIVACY PROGRAM § 319.7 Special procedures: Medical records. Medical records, requested pursuant to § 319.5 of this part, will be disclosed to the...

  13. 18 CFR 701.306 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...: Medical records. 701.306 Section 701.306 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Protection of Privacy § 701.306 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) An individual requesting disclosure of a record which contains medical or psychological information may name a...

  14. 15 CFR 4.26 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 4... GOVERNMENT INFORMATION Privacy Act § 4.26 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) No response to any request for access to medical records from an individual will be issued by the Privacy Officer for a period...

  15. 15 CFR 4.26 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 4... GOVERNMENT INFORMATION Privacy Act § 4.26 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) No response to any request for access to medical records from an individual will be issued by the Privacy Officer for a period...

  16. 18 CFR 701.306 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...: Medical records. 701.306 Section 701.306 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Protection of Privacy § 701.306 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) An individual requesting disclosure of a record which contains medical or psychological information may name a...

  17. 29 CFR 1410.5 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1410.5 Section 1410.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE PRIVACY § 1410.5 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection...

  18. 5 CFR 2412.7 - Special procedures; medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Special procedures; medical records. 2412.7 Section 2412.7 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE... Special procedures; medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which, in...

  19. 32 CFR 319.7 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 319.7... (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PRIVACY PROGRAM § 319.7 Special procedures: Medical records. Medical records, requested pursuant to § 319.5 of this part, will be disclosed to the...

  20. 18 CFR 701.306 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...: Medical records. 701.306 Section 701.306 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Protection of Privacy § 701.306 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) An individual requesting disclosure of a record which contains medical or psychological information may name a...

  1. 15 CFR 4.26 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 4... GOVERNMENT INFORMATION Privacy Act § 4.26 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) No response to any request for access to medical records from an individual will be issued by the Privacy Officer for a period...

  2. 29 CFR 1410.5 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1410.5 Section 1410.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE PRIVACY § 1410.5 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection...

  3. 5 CFR 2412.7 - Special procedures; medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special procedures; medical records. 2412.7 Section 2412.7 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE... Special procedures; medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which, in...

  4. 10 CFR 35.2080 - Records of mobile medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of mobile medical services. 35.2080 Section 35.2080 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2080 Records of mobile medical services. (a) A licensee shall retain a copy of each letter that permits the use of byproduct material at a client's address,...

  5. 10 CFR 35.2080 - Records of mobile medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Records of mobile medical services. 35.2080 Section 35.2080 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2080 Records of mobile medical services. (a) A licensee shall retain a copy of each letter that permits the use of byproduct material at a client's address,...

  6. 37 CFR 102.26 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 102.26 Section 102.26 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK... Special procedures: Medical records. (a) No response to any request for access to medical records by...

  7. 12 CFR 310.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 310.6 Section 310.6 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION PROCEDURE AND RULES OF PRACTICE PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 310.6 Special procedures: Medical records. Medical records shall be disclosed on request to the individuals to whom...

  8. 5 CFR 2412.7 - Special procedures; medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special procedures; medical records. 2412.7 Section 2412.7 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE... Special procedures; medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which, in...

  9. 29 CFR 1410.5 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1410.5 Section 1410.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE PRIVACY § 1410.5 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection...

  10. Essentials of an Acceptable School for Medical Record Technicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Medical Association, Chicago, IL. Council on Medical Education.

    The Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association in collaboration with the American Association of Medical Record Librarians establishes standards for medical record technician education, surveys and approves educational programs, and publishes lists of approved programs. The standards presented are intended as a guide for…

  11. Effort-reward imbalance and burnout among German nurses in medical compared with psychiatric hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Schulz, M; Damkröger, A; Heins, C; Wehlitz, L; Löhr, M; Driessen, M; Behrens, J; Wingenfeld, K

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether nurses' efforts and rewards, as well as the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) and burnout, differ between subjects working in psychiatric vs. medical hospitals and between nurses under education and examined nurses respectively. Furthermore, the relationship between ERI and burnout was evaluated. Nursing is associated with high levels of emotional strain and heavy workloads. Burnout and a negative ERI can result in high absenteeism and turnover and have been identified as reasons why nurses leave their profession. In the last decade, working conditions of the nursing profession have changed in Germany, but somatic and psychiatric hospitals developed in different ways. This development may lead to different profiles. A sample of 389 nurses (78.8% female) in four German hospitals was investigated. A total of 147 nurses worked in psychiatric hospitals and 236 nurses worked in medical (somatic) hospitals. Fifty participants were still under education. The Effort-Reward Imbalance Inventory measures effort, reward and overcommitment at job and provides an imbalance score between effort and reward. The Maslach Burnout Inventory with the subscales, emotional exhaustion, lack of accomplishment and depersonalization, was also used. Nurses working in medical hospitals reported more burnout and had higher ERI scores. Subjects under education were comparable to examined nurses in terms of burnout but had lower ERI scores. Multiple regression analyses showed all ERI scales to be significant predictors for emotional exhaustion, while age, field of work and educational status further predict effort or ERI respectively. At present, the working situation of nurses in different settings appears to be characterized by a perceived imbalance of effort and reward and is associated with a high risk of developing burnout symptoms.

  12. Antipsychotic Medication Prescribing Practices Among Adult Patients Discharged From State Psychiatric Inpatient Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    HOLLEN, VERA; SCHACHT, LUCILLE

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The goal of this study was to explore antipsychotic medication prescribing practices in a sample of 86,034 patients discharged from state psychiatric inpatient hospitals and to find the prevalence of patients discharged with no antipsychotic medications, on antipsychotic monotherapy, and on antipsychotic polypharmacy. For patients discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy, the study explored the adjusted rates of antipsychotic polypharmacy, the reasons patients were discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy, the proportion of antipsychotic polypharmacy by mental health disorder, and the characteristics associated with being discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed all discharges for adult patients (18 to 64 y of age) from state psychiatric inpatient hospitals between January 1 and December 31, 2011. The relationship among variables was explored using χ2, t test, and analysis of variance. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy. Results: The prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy was 12%. Of the discharged patients receiving at least 1 antipsychotic medication (adjusted rate), 18% were on antipsychotic polypharmacy. The strongest predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy being prescribed were having a diagnosis of schizophrenia and a length of stay of 90 days or more. Patients were prescribed antipsychotic polypharmacy primarily to reduce their symptoms. Conclusions: Antipsychotic polypharmacy continues at a high enough rate to affect nearly 10,000 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia each year in state psychiatric inpatient hospitals. Further analysis of the clinical presentation of these patients may highlight particular aspects of the illness and its previous treatment that are contributing to practices outside the best-practice guideline. An increased understanding of trend data, patient characteristics, and national benchmarks provides an opportunity for

  13. 21 CFR 870.2800 - Medical magnetic tape recorder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical magnetic tape recorder. 870.2800 Section 870.2800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... magnetic tape recorder. (a) Identification. A medical magnetic tape recorder is a device used to record...

  14. Gaining Autonomy & [corrected] Medication Management (GAM): new perspectives on well-being, quality of life and psychiatric medication.

    PubMed

    del Barrio, Lourdes Rodriguez; Cyr, Céline; Benisty, Lisa; Richard, Pierrette

    2013-10-01

    Autonomous Medication Management (GAM) is an innovative approach developed in partnership with medication users. It takes their subjective experience into account and strives to place the individual at the center of pharmacological treatment in psychiatry with a view to improving well-being and quality of life. It creates spaces of open dialogue on the issue of medication amongst users, physicians and their family and friends. This article is derived from a research study and presents the principles, practices and main impacts of GAM on how people relate to their medications and the physicians who prescribe them. The major positive effects were the users' clearer understanding of their experience of taking psychiatric medication and their rights, the reduction or elimination of sudden and unsupervised treatment interruptions and the users' sense of having more control over their treatment. It includes inner experience and life, an improved relationship with professionals and space for negotiation with the physician and, lastly, changes to prescriptions that significantly improved well-being and recovery. The distinguishing features of GAM are described and compared with other approaches, giving a voice to people who take medication.

  15. Transaction recording in medical image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Christian H.; Ploeger, Andreas; Onnasch, Dietrich G. W.; Mehdorn, Hubertus M.

    1999-07-01

    In medical image processing original image data on archive servers may absolutely not be modified directly. On the other hand, images from read-only devices like CD-ROM cannot be changed and saved on the same storage medium. In both cases the modified data have to be stored as a second version and large amounts of storage volume are needed. We avoid these problems by using a program which records only each transaction prescribed to images. Each transaction is stored and used for further utilization and for renewed submission of the modified data. Conventionally, every time an image is viewed or printed, the modified version has to be saved in addition to the recorded data, either automatically or by the user. Compared to these approaches which not only squander storage space but area also time consuming our program has the following and advantages: First, the original image data which may not be modified are protected against manipulation. Second, small amounts of storage volume and network range are needed. Third, approved image operations can be automated by macros derived from transaction recordings. Finally, operations on the original data can always be controlled and traced back. As the handling of images gets easier with this concept, security for original image data is granted.

  16. Impact of an electronic medication administration record on medication administration efficiency and errors.

    PubMed

    McComas, Jeffery; Riingen, Michelle; Chae Kim, Son

    2014-12-01

    The study aims were to evaluate the impact of electronic medication administration record implementation on medication administration efficiency and occurrence of medication errors as well as to identify the predictors of medication administration efficiency in an acute care setting. A prospective, observational study utilizing time-and-motion technique was conducted before and after electronic medication administration record implementation in November 2011. A total of 156 cases of medication administration activities (78 pre- and 78 post-electronic medication administration record) involving 38 nurses were observed at the point of care. A separate retrospective review of the hospital Midas+ medication error database was also performed to collect the rates and origin of medication errors for 6 months before and after electronic medication administration record implementation. The mean medication administration time actually increased from 11.3 to 14.4 minutes post-electronic medication administration record (P = .039). In a multivariate analysis, electronic medication administration record was not a predictor of medication administration time, but the distractions/interruptions during medication administration process were significant predictors. The mean hospital-wide medication errors significantly decreased from 11.0 to 5.3 events per month post-electronic medication administration record (P = .034). Although no improvement in medication administration efficiency was observed, electronic medication administration record improved the quality of care with a significant decrease in medication errors.

  17. Video Recording Paper - Innovation In Medical Video Recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalit, Hanoch

    1985-09-01

    Traditionally, multiple format recording emulsions for medical video imaging have utilized a film (transparent) base. The major reason for this is probably because the film and camera manufacturers felt the diagnostician is accustomed to viewing x-ray images on a film base and would prefer to view video images that way also. Because of the need to keep radiation exposure to patients at a minimum and the fact that photographic emulsions are generally very inefficient in utilizing x-ray radiation, a film base was the logical requirement for direct x-ray imaging as it enabled the image to be recorded by two emulsions rather than one. The transparent base thus allows viewing a photograph which is the result of the additive effect of the two emulsions. The use of transparent base imposed specific requirements that necessitated the development of a whole complex of equipment designed for the particular use of film such as the processing machines, their chemical solutions, and the famous viewbox and alternators that characterize the radiology departments of today.

  18. A psychiatric medication decision support guide for social work practice with pregnant and postpartum women.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Kia J; Price, Sarah Kye; Cummings, Cory R

    2014-10-01

    In their work in human services organizations and community agencies across service sectors, social workers encounter pregnant and postpartum women experiencing mental health challenges. This article offers an evidence-informed Decision Support Guide designed for use by social workers working with pregnant and postpartum women who are struggling with complicated decisions about psychiatric medication use. The guide is built on contemporary notions of health literacy and shared decision making and is informed by three areas: (1) research into the lived experiences of pregnant and postpartum women and health care providers around psychiatric medication decision making, (2) a critical review of existing decision aids, and (3) feedback on the strategy from social work practitioners who work with pregnant and postpartum women. Emphasizing the relational nature of social work in supporting effective health-related decision making, the guide relies on maintaining a collaborative practice milieu and using a decision aid that engages clients in discussions about mental health during and around the time of pregnancy. The guide offers social workers a practice tool to support responsive and compassionate care by embracing their roles in problem solving and decision making, providing emotional and psychosocial support, and making appropriate referrals to prescribers.

  19. Assessment of clinical psychiatric skills in final-year medical students: the use of videotape.

    PubMed

    Fenton, G W; O'Gorman, E C

    1984-09-01

    Sixty final-year medical students had their clinical performance in psychiatry assessed by the following three methods: a multiple choice questionnaire based on a series of short videotaped interviews with psychiatric patients; the examination of a traditional long 'case' with presentation of the history, mental state findings and formulation about diagnosis and management to a panel of three examiners; and a conventional oral examination about the principles and practice of psychiatry with a different trio of examiners. The total mark on the videotape session correlated significantly with the combined clinical and oral marks. There was also a significant positive correlation between the total video marks and the individual clinical marks, but none between the marks obtained during the video and oral components of the examination. However, the significant positive correlations between the video marks and those of the clinical examination were modest and only accounted for not more than 14% of the variance. Inspection of the distribution of correct answers to the videotape questions shows that students do best in identifying mental state symptoms and signs and in choosing the correct diagnosis. They do less well in the areas of aetiology and treatment. Indeed, optimal performance in the latter distinguishes those who do well in the clinical/oral examination from those whose performance is mediocre. The significance of these findings to the teaching and assessment of psychiatric skills in medical students is discussed. PMID:6472143

  20. Perspectives on electronic medical records adoption: electronic medical records (EMR) in outcomes research.

    PubMed

    Belletti, Dan; Zacker, Christopher; Mullins, C Daniel

    2010-07-01

    Health information technology (HIT) is engineered to promote improved quality and efficiency of care, and reduce medical errors. Healthcare organizations have made significant investments in HIT tools and the electronic medical record (EMR) is a major technological advance. The Department of Veterans Affairs was one of the first large healthcare systems to fully implement EMR. The Veterans Health Information System and Technology Architecture (VistA) began by providing an interface to review and update a patient's medical record with its computerized patient record system. However, since the implementation of the VistA system there has not been an overall substantial adoption of EMR in the ambulatory or inpatient setting. In fact, only 23.9% of physicians were using EMRs in their office-based practices in 2005. A sample from the American Medical Association revealed that EMRs were available in an office setting to 17% of physicians in late 2007 and early 2008. Of these, 17% of physicians with EMR, only 4% were considered to be fully functional EMR systems. With the exception of some large aggregate EMR databases the slow adoption of EMR has limited its use in outcomes research. This paper reviews the literature and presents the current status of and forces influencing the adoption of EMR in the office-based practice, and identifies the benefits, limitations, and overall value of EMR in the conduct of outcomes research in the US.

  1. 19 CFR 201.27 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 201.27... APPLICATION Safeguarding Individual Privacy Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a § 201.27 Special procedures: Medical... maintained by the Commission which pertain to him or her, medical and psychological records merit...

  2. 19 CFR 201.27 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 201.27... APPLICATION Safeguarding Individual Privacy Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a § 201.27 Special procedures: Medical... maintained by the Commission which pertain to him or her, medical and psychological records merit...

  3. 28 CFR 513.42 - Inmate access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inmate access to medical records. 513.42... ADMINISTRATION ACCESS TO RECORDS Release of Information Inmate Requests to Institution for Information § 513.42 Inmate access to medical records. (a) Except for the limitations of paragraphs (c) and (d) of...

  4. 28 CFR 513.42 - Inmate access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inmate access to medical records. 513.42... ADMINISTRATION ACCESS TO RECORDS Release of Information Inmate Requests to Institution for Information § 513.42 Inmate access to medical records. (a) Except for the limitations of paragraphs (c) and (d) of...

  5. 28 CFR 513.42 - Inmate access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inmate access to medical records. 513.42... ADMINISTRATION ACCESS TO RECORDS Release of Information Inmate Requests to Institution for Information § 513.42 Inmate access to medical records. (a) Except for the limitations of paragraphs (c) and (d) of...

  6. 28 CFR 513.42 - Inmate access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inmate access to medical records. 513.42... ADMINISTRATION ACCESS TO RECORDS Release of Information Inmate Requests to Institution for Information § 513.42 Inmate access to medical records. (a) Except for the limitations of paragraphs (c) and (d) of...

  7. 28 CFR 513.42 - Inmate access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inmate access to medical records. 513.42... ADMINISTRATION ACCESS TO RECORDS Release of Information Inmate Requests to Institution for Information § 513.42 Inmate access to medical records. (a) Except for the limitations of paragraphs (c) and (d) of...

  8. 10 CFR 712.38 - Maintenance of medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... medical record. The psychological record must: (1) Contain any clinical reports, test protocols and data... accordance with the Privacy Act, 5 U.S.C. 552a, and DOE implementing regulations in 10 CFR part 1008; the Department of Labor's regulations on access to individual exposure and medical records, 29 CFR 1910.1020;...

  9. 10 CFR 712.38 - Maintenance of medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... medical record. The psychological record must: (1) Contain any clinical reports, test protocols and data... accordance with the Privacy Act, 5 U.S.C. 552a, and DOE implementing regulations in 10 CFR part 1008; the Department of Labor's regulations on access to individual exposure and medical records, 29 CFR 1910.1020;...

  10. 10 CFR 712.38 - Maintenance of medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... medical record. The psychological record must: (1) Contain any clinical reports, test protocols and data... accordance with the Privacy Act, 5 U.S.C. 552a, and DOE implementing regulations in 10 CFR part 1008; the Department of Labor's regulations on access to individual exposure and medical records, 29 CFR 1910.1020;...

  11. 10 CFR 712.38 - Maintenance of medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... medical record. The psychological record must: (1) Contain any clinical reports, test protocols and data... accordance with the Privacy Act, 5 U.S.C. 552a, and DOE implementing regulations in 10 CFR part 1008; the Department of Labor's regulations on access to individual exposure and medical records, 29 CFR 1910.1020;...

  12. 10 CFR 712.38 - Maintenance of medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... medical record. The psychological record must: (1) Contain any clinical reports, test protocols and data... accordance with the Privacy Act, 5 U.S.C. 552a, and DOE implementing regulations in 10 CFR part 1008; the Department of Labor's regulations on access to individual exposure and medical records, 29 CFR 1910.1020;...

  13. Report of the Task Force on Medical Record Education. American Medical Record Association.

    PubMed

    1986-12-01

    An eight-member task force on medical record education was created in 1985 as part of AMRA's strategic planning process and long history of commitment to education. This report on their activities was presented to the Board of Directors in September 1986. While not intended to be a definitive work plan, the recommendations in the report involve the entire AMRA membership. The task force expects and encourages extensive debate on the issues and recommendations contained herein.

  14. Nurses, medical records and the killing of sick persons before, during and after the Nazi regime in Germany.

    PubMed

    Foth, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    During the Nazi regime (1933-1945), more than 300,000 psychiatric patients were killed. The well-calculated killing of chronic mentally 'ill' patients was part of a huge biopolitical program of well-established scientific, eugenic standards of the time. Among the medical personnel implicated in these assassinations were nurses, who carried out this program through their everyday practice. However, newer research raises suspicions that psychiatric patients were being assassinated before and after the Nazi regime, which, I hypothesize, implies that the motives for these killings must be investigated within psychiatric practice itself. An investigation of the impact of the interplay between the notes left by nurses and those by psychiatrists illustrates the active role of the psychiatric medical record in the killing of these patients. Using theoretical insights from Michel Foucault and philosopher Giorgio Agamben and analyzing one part of a particularly rich patient file found in the Langenhorn Psychiatric Asylum in the city of Hamburg, I demonstrate the role of the record in both constructing and deconstructing patient subjectivities. De-subjectifying patients condemned them to specific zones in the asylum within which they were reduced to their 'bare life'--a precondition for their physical assassination.

  15. 44 CFR 6.31 - Special requirements for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 Individual Access to... Personnel Management and are described in Chapter 339, Federal Personnel Manual (medical records...

  16. Centralised versus decentralised management of patients' medical records.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Fassa, Maniane; Breton, Vincent; Jaquet-Chiffelle, David-Olivier; de Vlieger, Paul; Lypszyc, Norbert; Boire, Jean-Yves; Roux, Christian; Allaert, François-André

    2009-01-01

    For more than 20 years, many countries have been trying to set up a standardised medical record at the regional or at the national level. Most of them have not reached this goal, essentially due to two main difficulties related to patient identification and medical records standardisation. Moreover, the issues raised by the centralisation of all gathered medical data have to be tackled particularly in terms of security and privacy. We discuss here the interest of a non-centralised management of medical records which would require a specific procedure that gives to the patient access to his/her distributed medical data, wherever he/she is located.

  17. Medical records department and balanced scorecard approach

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima; Ebadsichani, Afsaneh; Tofighi, Shahram; Tavakoli, Nahid

    2013-01-01

    Context: The Medical Records Department (MRD) is an important source for evaluating and planning of healthcare services; therefore, hospital managers should improve their performance not only in the short-term but also in the long-term plans. The Balanced Scorecard (BSC) is a tool in the management system that enables organizations to correct operational functions and provides feedback around both the internal processes and the external outcomes, in order to improve strategic performance and outcomes continuously. Aims: The main goal of this study was to assess the MRD performance with BSC approach in a hospital. Materials and Methods: This research was an analytical cross-sectional study in which data was collected by questionnaires, forms and observation. The population was the staff of the MRD in a hospital in Najafabad, Isfahan, Iran. Statistical Analysis Used: To analyze data, first, objectives of the MRD, according to the mission and perspectives of the hospital, were redefined and, second, indicators were measured. Subsequently, findings from the performance were compared with the expected score. In order to achieve the final target, the programs, activities, and plans were reformed. Results: The MRD was successful in absorbing customer satisfaction. From a customer perspective, score in customer satisfaction of admission and statistics sections were 82% and 83%, respectively. Conclusions: The comprehensive nature of the strategy map makes the MRD especially useful as a consensus building and communication tool in the hospital. PMID:24083257

  18. Prescribing of psychiatric medication to bereaved parents following perinatal/neonatal death: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Lacasse, Jeffrey R; Cacciatore, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    To examine psychiatric prescribing in response to perinatal/neonatal death, we analyzed data from a cross-sectional survey of 235 bereaved parents participating in an online support community. Of the 88 respondents prescribed medication, antidepressants were most common (n = 70, 79.5%) followed by benzodiazepines/sleep aids (n = 18, 20.5%). Many prescriptions were written shortly after the death (32.2% within 48 hr, 43.7% within a week, and 74.7% within a month). Obstetrician/gynecologists wrote most prescriptions given shortly after loss. Most respondents prescribed antidepressants took them long-term. This sample is select, but these data raise disturbing questions about prescribing practices for grieving parents. PMID:24588074

  19. 42 CFR 494.170 - Condition: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Standard: Record retention and preservation. In accordance with 45 CFR § 164.530(j)(2), all patient records... Administration § 494.170 Condition: Medical records. The dialysis facility must maintain complete, accurate, and accessible records on all patients, including home patients who elect to receive dialysis supplies...

  20. Medical records: practicalities and principles of patient possession.

    PubMed

    Gilhooly, M L; McGhee, S M

    1991-09-01

    This review of issues and research is in two parts: 1) practical problems surrounding patient-held records and 2) ethical arguments for and against patient-held records. We argue that research on patient-held records indicates that there are no substantial practical drawbacks and considerable ethical benefits to be derived from giving patients custody of their medical records.

  1. Substance use disorders and comorbid Axis I and II psychiatric disorders among young psychiatric patients: findings from a large electronic health records database.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Gersing, Ken; Burchett, Bruce; Woody, George E; Blazer, Dan G

    2011-11-01

    This study examined the prevalence of substance use disorders (SUDs) among psychiatric patients aged 2-17 years in an electronic health records database (N=11,457) and determined patterns of comorbid diagnoses among patients with a SUD to inform emerging comparative effectiveness research (CER) efforts. DSM-IV diagnoses of all inpatients and outpatients at a large university-based hospital and its associated psychiatric clinics were systematically captured between 2000 and 2010: SUD, anxiety (AD), mood (MD), conduct (CD), attention deficit/hyperactivity (ADHD), personality (PD), adjustment, eating, impulse-control, psychotic, learning, mental retardation, and relational disorders. The prevalence of SUD in the 2-12-year age group (n=6210) was 1.6% and increased to 25% in the 13-17-year age group (n=5247). Cannabis diagnosis was the most prevalent SUD, accounting for more than 80% of all SUD cases. Among patients with a SUD (n=1423), children aged 2-12 years (95%) and females (75-100%) showed high rates of comorbidities; blacks were more likely than whites to be diagnosed with CD, impulse-control, and psychotic diagnoses, while whites had elevated odds of having AD, ADHD, MD, PD, relational, and eating diagnoses. Patients with a SUD used more inpatient treatment than patients without a SUD (43% vs. 21%); children, females, and blacks had elevated odds of inpatient psychiatric treatment. Collectively, results add clinical evidence on treatment needs and diagnostic patterns for understudied diagnoses.

  2. Are Sleep Onset/Maintenance Difficulties Associated with Medical or Psychiatric Comorbidities in Nondemented Community-Dwelling Older Adults?

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Molly E.; Bigal, Marcelo E.; Katz, Mindy J.; Derby, Carol A.; Lipton, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Older adults frequently report disruptions in their ability to initiate and maintain sleep. It remains unclear whether these sleep problems are consequent to associated medical comorbidities or if they represent primary sleep disturbances that exist independent of other disorders of senescence. Herein we describe sleep characteristics and associated medical and psychiatric comorbidities among ethnically diverse nondemented older adults. Methods: The cross-sectional sample consisted of 702 participants drawn from the Einstein Aging Study (EAS), a community-based study of aging. Sleep onset/maintenance difficulties (SO/MD) were ascertained using responses from the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (MOS-SS). Participants also completed assessments of medical history, psychological symptoms, and medication use. Results: Participants were an average of 80 ± 5.5 years of age and had 14 ± 3.4 years of education. Older adults reported sleeping an average of 6.5 ± 1.2 h/night. Mild SO/MD was reported in 43% of participants, while moderate/severe SO/MD was reported in 12% of participants. Sleep problems were associated with measures of obesity and symptoms of depression and anxiety. SO/MD was not associated with history of common medical conditions. Use rates of insomnia medication were low (0% to 3%). Conclusions: The prevalence of SO/MD is high in the elderly community-dwelling population and is associated with common psychiatric disorders. With the exception of obesity, SO/MD is not associated with common medical disorders. Further study is necessary to disentangle the nature of the relationship between sleep disturbance and psychiatric comorbidity among older adults. Citation: Zimmerman ME; Bigal ME; Katz MJ; Derby CA; Lipton RB. Are sleep onset/maintenance difficulties associated with medical or psychiatric comorbidities in nondemented community-dwelling older adults? J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(4):363-369. PMID:23585752

  3. HIV-infected individuals with co-occurring bipolar disorder evidence poor antiretroviral and psychiatric medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Moore, David J; Posada, Carolina; Parikh, Mili; Arce, Miguel; Vaida, Florin; Riggs, Patricia K; Gouaux, Ben; Ellis, Ronald J; Letendre, Scott L; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J Hampton

    2012-11-01

    The contribution of bipolar disorder (BD), a prevalent serious mental illness characterized by impulsivity and mood instability, to antiretroviral (ART) and psychiatric medication adherence among HIV-infected (HIV+) individuals is unknown. We examined medication adherence among 44 HIV+/BD+ persons as compared to 33 demographically- and medically-comparable HIV+/BD- persons. Classification of adherent (≥ 90%) or non-adherent (<90%) based on proportion of correctly taken doses over 30 days was determined using electronic medication monitoring devices. HIV+/BD+ persons were significantly less likely to be ART adherent (47.7%) as compared to HIV+/BD- (90.9%) persons. Within the HIV+/BD+ group, mean psychiatric medication adherence was significantly worse than ART medication adherence, although there was a significant correlation between ART and psychiatric adherence levels. Importantly, 30-day ART adherence was associated with plasma virologic response among HIV+/BD+ individuals. Given the high overlap of HIV and BD, and the observed medication adherence difficulties for these persons, specialized adherence improvement interventions are needed.

  4. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction in psychiatric disorders and the impact of psychotropic medications: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alvares, Gail A.; Quintana, Daniel S.; Hickie, Ian B.; Guastella, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction is a putative underlying mechanism for increased cardiovascular disease risk in individuals with psychiatric disorders. Previous studies suggest that this risk may be related to psychotropic medication use. In the present study we systematically reviewed and analyzed published studies of heart rate variability (HRV), measuring ANS output, to determine the effect of psychiatric illness and medication use. Methods We searched for studies comparing HRV in physically healthy adults with a diagnosed psychiatric disorder to controls and comparing HRV pre- and post-treatment with a psychotropic medication. Results In total, 140 case–control (mood, anxiety, psychosis, dependent disorders, k = 151) and 30 treatment (antidepressants, antipsychotics; k = 43) studies were included. We found that HRV was reduced in all patient groups compared to controls (Hedges g = −0.583) with a large effect for psychotic disorders (Hedges g = −0.948). Effect sizes remained highly significant for medication-free patients compared to controls across all disorders. Smaller and significant reductions in HRV were observed for specific antidepressants and antipsychotics. Limitations Study quality significantly moderated effect sizes in case–control analyses, underscoring the importance of assessing methodological quality when interpreting HRV findings. Conclusion Combined findings confirm substantial reductions in HRV across psychiatric disorders, and these effects remained significant even in medication-free individuals. Reductions in HRV may therefore represent a significant mechanism contributing to elevated cardiovascular risk in individuals with psychiatric disorders. The negative impact of specific medications on HRV suggest increased risk for cardiovascular disease in these groups, highlighting a need for treatment providers to consider modifiable cardiovascular risk factors to attenuate this risk. PMID:26447819

  5. 14 CFR 67.413 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to the FAA; or (2) Authorize any clinic, hospital, physician, or other person to release to the FAA... medical certificate or, in the case of an applicant, deny the application for a medical certificate....

  6. Behaviour Management Problems as Predictors of Psychotropic Medication and Use of Psychiatric Services in Adults with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsakanikos, Elias; Costello, Helen; Holt, Geraldine; Sturmey, Peter; Bouras, Nick

    2007-01-01

    We examined behaviour management problems as predictors of psychotropic medication, use of psychiatric consultation and in-patient admission in a group of 66 adults with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD) and intellectual disability (ID) and 99 controls matched in age, gender and level of ID. Overall, people with PDD had higher rates of most…

  7. 22 CFR 215.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 215.6... PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 215.6 Special procedures: Medical records. If the Assistant Director for Administration or the Privacy Liaison Officer, determines that the release directly to the individual of...

  8. 22 CFR 215.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 215.6... PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 215.6 Special procedures: Medical records. If the Assistant Director for Administration or the Privacy Liaison Officer, determines that the release directly to the individual of...

  9. 12 CFR 1403.6 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 1403.6 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 1403.6 Special procedures for medical records. Medical records in the custody of the Farm Credit System Insurance... the individual to whom they pertain or that person's authorized or legal representative or to...

  10. 18 CFR 701.306 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Special procedure: Medical records. 701.306 Section 701.306 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Protection of Privacy § 701.306 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) An...

  11. 18 CFR 701.306 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special procedure: Medical records. 701.306 Section 701.306 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Protection of Privacy § 701.306 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) An...

  12. 22 CFR 215.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 215.6... PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 215.6 Special procedures: Medical records. If the Assistant Director for Administration or the Privacy Liaison Officer, determines that the release directly to the individual of...

  13. Technology Acceptance of Electronic Medical Records by Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Technology Acceptance Model's (TAM) relevance of the intention of nurses to use electronic medical records in acute health care settings. The basic technology acceptance research of Davis (1989) was applied to the specific technology tool of electronic medical records (EMR) in a specific setting…

  14. Depressive Symptoms, Psychiatric Medication Use, and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: Results from the Health and Retirement Study

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Scott; Mezuk, Briana

    2015-01-01

    Objective This prospective study investigates the relationships between depressive symptoms, psychiatric medication use, and their interaction on risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Method Data come from the 1998 – 2010 waves of the Health and Retirement Study, a U.S. nationally-representative cohort of adults aged 51 and older. Analysis is restricted to participants <65 who did not have diabetes in 1998 (N=8,704). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the 8-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies–Depression scale. Risk of diabetes over the 12-year follow-up period was assessed using Cox proportional hazard models with time-varying covariates. Results After adjusting for covariates, both depressive symptoms (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.06, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.02 – 1.09) and psychiatric medication use (HR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.25 – 1.96) were associated with development of diabetes. The interaction between depressive symptoms and medication use was significant (beta = −0.240, p = .049), indicating that the association between elevated depressive symptoms and diabetes was higher among respondents not taking medications. The associations between depressive symptoms and medication use were also attenuated by increasing BMI. Conclusion Findings highlight the complex relationship between depressive symptoms and psychiatric medications on diabetes risk, and the need for a nuanced understanding of these factors. PMID:26094130

  15. Associations of Medically Documented Psychiatric Diagnoses and Risky Health Behaviors in Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy-Experienced Perinatally HIV-Infected Youth

    PubMed Central

    Wiegand, Ryan E.; Dominguez, Ken; Blumberg, Dean; Bohannon, Beverly; Wheeling, John; Rutstein, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The Longitudinal Epidemiologic Study to Gain Insight into HIV/AIDS in Children and Youth (LEGACY) study is a prospective, multisite, longitudinal cohort of U.S. HIV-infected youth. This analysis was limited to perinatally HIV-infected youth (n=197), 13 years and older, with selected variables completely abstracted from HIV diagnosis through 2006. We evaluated relationships between ever having one or more nonsubstance related medically documented psychiatric diagnoses and three risky health behaviors (substance abuse, preadult sexual activity, and treatment adherence problems) recorded between 2001 and 2006. Logistic regression was used for all binary outcomes and participant age was included as a covariate when possible. All 197 participants included in the analysis were prescribed antiretroviral therapy during the study period; 110 (56%) were female, 100 (51%) were black non-Hispanic, and 86 (44%) were Hispanic; mean age at the last visit was 16.8 years, ranging from 13 to 24 years. One hundred forty-six (74%) participants had a history of at least one risky health behavior. There were 108 (55%) participants with at least one medically documented psychiatric diagnosis, 17 (9%) with at least one record of substance abuse, 12 (6%) with documented preadult sexual activity, and 142 (72%) participants with reported adherence problems. In the final model, a history of at least one psychiatric diagnosis was associated with having at least one of the three risky behaviors (odds ratio [OR]=2.33, p=0.015). There is a need for a continued close partnership between HIV specialty care providers and mental health services treating perinatally HIV-infected youth with an added focus on improving treatment adherence. PMID:21745118

  16. Alcohol Misuse among College Athletes: Self-Medication for Psychiatric Symptoms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, B. E.; Miller, M. N.; Verhegge, R.; Linville, H. H.; Pumariega, A. J.

    2002-01-01

    Surveys a collegiate athlete population for alcohol abuse as well as self-reported depression, anxiety, and other psychiatric symptoms. Significant correlations were found between reported alcohol abuse and self-reported symptoms of depression and general psychiatric symptoms. Findings suggest a possible link between psychopathology and serious…

  17. Study of Screen Design Principles for Visualizing Medical Records.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kenichiro; Takemura, Tadamasa; Kuroda, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    To improve UX of EMR/EHR, the screen design principles for the visualization are required. Through the study of common attributes of medical records, we present four principles and show three screen designs by applying them.

  18. Medical record review for clinical pertinence.

    PubMed

    Lewis, K S

    1991-08-01

    This clinical pertinence review process described was in effect for seven months, after which the author terminated affiliation with the hospital. Despite resistance by many physicians, this monthly review process focused the medical staff's attention on good documentation practices. To the author's knowledge, the plan is still in use.

  19. SOAP to SNOCAMP: improving the medical record format.

    PubMed

    Larimore, W L; Jordan, E V

    1995-10-01

    Not since the development of the SOAP note in the problem-oriented medical record has there been a significant need to alter the format of medical record documentation. With the intrusion of third-party audits, malpractice attorney subpoenas, medical guidelines, and reimbursement code criteria into the practice of medicine, there is a need to expand the traditional SOAP note. This article proposes a new acronym, "SNOCAMP," for medical record documentation. SNOCAMP retains the SOAP format, which includes subjective, objective, assessment, and plan of treatment, with the addition of nature of the presenting complaint, counseling, and medical decision-making. It is hoped that this new, more explicit format will prove successful in meeting the divergent needs of practicing physicians, the patients they serve, and the inquiring minds that look over their shoulders.

  20. The New World of Interaction Recording for Medical Practices.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Today's medical practice staff communicates remotely with patients, pharmacies, and other medical providers in new ways that go far beyond telephone calls. Patient care and communication are now being provided via telecommunications technologies, including chat/IM, screen, Skype, and other video applications. This new paradigm in patient care, known as "telehealth" or "telemedicine," could put medical practices at risk for noncompliance with strict HIPAA and other regulations. Interaction recording encompasses these new means of communication and can help medical practice staff achieve compliance and reduce financial and liability risks while improving operations and patient care. This article explores what medical practices need to know about interaction recording, what to look for in an interaction recording solution, and how to best utilize that solution to meet compliance, manage liability, and improve patient care. PMID:27039643

  1. Psychometric properties and validation of the Satisfaction with Life Scale in psychiatric and medical outpatients in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Aishvarya, Sinniah; Maniam, Thambu; Karuthan, Chinna; Sidi, Hatta; Nik Jaafar, Nik Ruzyanei; Oei, Tian Po Sumantri

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the psychometric properties and factor structure of the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) in a sample of clinical outpatients in Malaysia. The SWLS is a measure designed to assess subjective life satisfaction. Four hundred eighty-three participants (283 with psychiatric illnesses and 200 with other medical illnesses) completed the SWLS and other self-report instruments. Results of the EFA and CFA supported the fit for the one-factor model as the best-fitting model. The internal consistency of the SWLS (α=0.86) was found to be high. Correlational analyses showed that SWLS had adequate concurrent validity. Scores on SWLS, which differentiated psychiatric patients and medical patients, supported criterion validity. The logistic regression analyses showed good discriminative validity of SWLS. The SWLS is a reliable and valid instrument to measure the satisfaction with life among psychiatry and clinical outpatients in Malaysia.

  2. Standing postural instability in patients with schizophrenia: Relationships with psychiatric symptoms, anxiety, and the use of neuroleptic medications.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yukako; Fujino, Haruo; Hashimoto, Ryota; Yasuda, Yuka; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Ohi, Kazutaka; Takeda, Masatoshi; Imura, Osamu

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess postural instability in patients with schizophrenia using a pressure-sensitive platform and to examine the effects of anxiety, psychiatric symptoms, and the use of neuroleptic medications on postural sway. Participants were 23 patients with schizophrenia and 23 healthy controls. We found that the patients showed greater overall postural instability than the controls. Furthermore, they demonstrated greater instability when the test was performed with the eyes closed than with the eyes open. However, removal of visual input had less impact on the indices of postural instability in the patients than in the controls, suggesting that schizophrenia is associated with difficulties in integrating visual information and proprioceptive signals. Furthermore, in contrast to the controls, anxiety exacerbated postural instability in the patients. There were significant associations between postural stability and psychiatric symptoms in the patients without extrapyramidal symptoms, whereas medication dose did not significantly correlate with postural stability.

  3. [Definition of the core area of medical services in the psychiatric-psychotherapeutic field--the prerequisite for any delegation].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Wolfgang; Bleich, Stefan; Cohrs, Stefan; von Einsiedel, Regina; Falkai, Peter; Grosskopf, Volker; Hauth, Iris; Steiner, Johann; Adler, Lothar

    2011-11-01

    Based on legal jurisdiction, knowledge of the psychiatric-psychotherapeutic field and insight into the necessity of a new allocation of responsibilities in the overall therapeutic service of a clinic, the core areas of medical activities are defined for the first time, innovative organisational approaches to the reorganisation of therapeutic service are presented and discussed against the background of qualified staff deficit, introduction of an OPS coding for inpatient psychiatry and economic constraints.

  4. 32 CFR 701.122 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS..., observing the following procedures: (1) In the United States, the laws of the State where the records are... statutes may apply. (2) For installations located outside the United States, the custodial parent or...

  5. 32 CFR 701.122 - Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS..., observing the following procedures: (1) In the United States, the laws of the State where the records are... statutes may apply. (2) For installations located outside the United States, the custodial parent or...

  6. 21 CFR 870.2800 - Medical magnetic tape recorder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical magnetic tape recorder. 870.2800 Section 870.2800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2800...

  7. 12 CFR 1102.104 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Subcommittee § 1102.104 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) Statement of physician or mental health... or a mental health professional indicating that, in his or her opinion, disclosure of the requested...) Designation of physician or mental health professional to receive records. If the ASC believes, in good...

  8. 12 CFR 1102.104 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Subcommittee § 1102.104 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) Statement of physician or mental health... or a mental health professional indicating that, in his or her opinion, disclosure of the requested...) Designation of physician or mental health professional to receive records. If the ASC believes, in good...

  9. 12 CFR 1102.104 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Subcommittee § 1102.104 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) Statement of physician or mental health... or a mental health professional indicating that, in his or her opinion, disclosure of the requested...) Designation of physician or mental health professional to receive records. If the ASC believes, in good...

  10. 12 CFR 1102.104 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Subcommittee § 1102.104 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) Statement of physician or mental health... or a mental health professional indicating that, in his or her opinion, disclosure of the requested...) Designation of physician or mental health professional to receive records. If the ASC believes, in good...

  11. 12 CFR 1102.104 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Subcommittee § 1102.104 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) Statement of physician or mental health... or a mental health professional indicating that, in his or her opinion, disclosure of the requested...) Designation of physician or mental health professional to receive records. If the ASC believes, in good...

  12. Electronic Medical Records and Their Impact on Resident and Medical Student Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Craig R.; Nguyen, Hien H.; Srinivasan, Malathi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Electronic medical records (EMRs) are becoming prevalent and integral tools for residents and medical students. EMRs can integrate point-of-service information delivery within the context of patient care. Though it may be an educational tool, little is known about how EMR technology is currently used for medical learners. Method: The…

  13. Privacy, confidentiality, privilege, and the medical record. Part I.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, E M

    1986-08-01

    For thousands of years physicians have recorded clinical observations as private notes to document the clinical course, findings, and treatment of their patients. The medical record was generated exclusively for the physician's use in treating the patient. Physicians and hospitals are now under extraordinary pressure to reveal patient information. During the past 20 years, the role of the medical record has changed and it now has become a multipurpose document. Health care records are the topic of reports, interviews and depositions. Controlled disclosure of the sensitive information contained in the record is essential in today's society yet, when such information is released, various considerations must be carefully evaluated and weighed. From his vantage point as a physician and attorney, the author shares his insight and his concerns about privacy, confidentiality and privilege as related to health records in this two part article.

  14. Community child psychiatric medication experiences measured by an internet-based, prospective parent survey of retail pharmacy customers.

    PubMed

    Hilt, Robert; Wolf, Christine; Koprowicz, Kent; Thomas, Elizabeth; Chandler, Mary; Hao, Xiao Lei; Russell, Matthew; Le, Tung; Hooks, Lee; King, Bryan

    2014-02-01

    One thousand five hundred parents filling a psychiatric prescription for their 6-18 year old child with a multi-state retail pharmacy chain received a single mailed invitation to complete a detailed online survey. 276 parents responded (18.4%). 60% of children on medications had a parent rated CBCL scale score in the clinically significant range at enrollment (T score ≥65), with a similar frequency of clinically significant CBCL scores through 15 months of survey followup. 47% of medication regimens were noted to be causing persistent side effects. This simple community based data collection method can offer a unique way to investigate naturalistic treatment outcomes.

  15. Community child psychiatric medication experiences measured by an internet-based, prospective parent survey of retail pharmacy customers.

    PubMed

    Hilt, Robert; Wolf, Christine; Koprowicz, Kent; Thomas, Elizabeth; Chandler, Mary; Hao, Xiao Lei; Russell, Matthew; Le, Tung; Hooks, Lee; King, Bryan

    2014-02-01

    One thousand five hundred parents filling a psychiatric prescription for their 6-18 year old child with a multi-state retail pharmacy chain received a single mailed invitation to complete a detailed online survey. 276 parents responded (18.4%). 60% of children on medications had a parent rated CBCL scale score in the clinically significant range at enrollment (T score ≥65), with a similar frequency of clinically significant CBCL scores through 15 months of survey followup. 47% of medication regimens were noted to be causing persistent side effects. This simple community based data collection method can offer a unique way to investigate naturalistic treatment outcomes. PMID:24323138

  16. [A mistake in forensic psychiatric evaluation or abuse of psychiatry for non-medical purposes - a case report].

    PubMed

    Florkowski, Antoni; Zboralski, Krzysztof; Macander, Marian; Flinik-Jankowska, Magdalena; Wierzbiński, Piotr

    2015-11-01

    In this study we attempted to visualize certain irregularities that took place in the evaluation of a patient with personality disorders performed by psychiatrist expert witness, which resulted in an incorrect diagnosis, leading to wrong ruling of the court and a referral of the patient to clinical therapy lasting six years. The psychiatric and psychological expert opinions submitted to the court and first-hand psychiatric and psychological examination of the patient were analyzed. Efforts were made to show that the failure to comply with the diagnostic criteria in the process of diagnosis and not taking into account the previously issued five forensic psychiatric opinions issued by independent and experienced teams of psychiatrist expert witnesses, as well as not taking into account the nature of the offense committed have led to a number of irregularities in the assessment of the mental state of the patient. Above mentioned shortcomings have caused unjustified legal classification of the offense and six years long detention of the patient in closed psychiatric institutions, in our regard unnecessary. The described case could be regarded as an abuse of psychiatry for the non-medical purposes and thus should have be punish. Based on the presented case it has been demonstrated that insufficient experience in forensic psychiatry and failure to comply with diagnostic criteria of psychiatrists and psychologists expert witnesses had led to a series of blatant offense of civil rights and liberties, and thus unnecessary detention of the patient for six years. PMID:26637100

  17. 32 CFR 324.13 - Access to medical and psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Program’ (see 32 CFR part 310). ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Access to medical and psychological records. 324... to medical and psychological records. Individual access to medical and psychological records...

  18. 32 CFR 324.13 - Access to medical and psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Program’ (see 32 CFR part 310). ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Access to medical and psychological records. 324... to medical and psychological records. Individual access to medical and psychological records...

  19. Should a patient have access to his medical records.

    PubMed

    de Klerk, A

    1989-01-01

    An investigation is undertaken into the right of a patient to have access to medical records concerning himself, and the ownership of medical records and X-ray photographs is discussed. It is argued that record accessibility by patients is to favoured. The current situation in England and the United States of America is considered and proposals de lege ferenda are made with respect to South Africa. The author is of the opinion that the South African legislature should consider legislation in this regard.

  20. Recent developments in electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Worth, E R

    1998-05-01

    Human factors engineering principles will guide the development of future EMR systems. Physicians will use wireless palmtop computers to record patient data so that the computer does not come between the physician and patient in routine encounters. With few exceptions, the pieces for this type of system are available today, but not in one package. I believe EMR developers have recognized the ubiquity and power of the Internet. Because of advances in computers, software, and telecommunications reliability, solutions using thin-client technology will lower the cost of EMRs to physicians. PMID:9604665

  1. Medical Record Clerk Training Program, Course of Study; Student Manual: For Medical Record Personnel in Small Rural Hospitals in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Health Service (DHEW/PHS), Arlington, VA. Div. of Health Resources.

    The manual provides major topics, objectives, activities and, procedures, references and materials, and assignments for the training program. The topics covered are hospital organization and community role, organization and management of a medical records department, international classification of diseases and operations, medical terminology,…

  2. Effectiveness of an electronic inpatient medication record in reducing medication errors in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Choo, Janet; Johnston, Linda; Manias, Elizabeth

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of an inpatient electronic medication record system in reducing medication errors in Singaporean hospitals. This pre- and post-intervention study involving a control group was undertaken in two Singaporean acute care hospitals. In one hospital the inpatient electronic medication record system was implemented while in another hospital the paper-based medication record system was used. The mean incidence difference in medication errors of 0.06 between pre-intervention (0.72 per 1000 patient days) and post-intervention (0.78 per 1000 patient days) for the two hospitals was not statistically significant (95%, CI: [0.26, 0.20]). The mean incidence differences in medication errors relating to prescription, dispensing, and administration were also not statistically different. Common system failures involved a lack of medication knowledge by health professionals and a lack of a systematic approach in identifying correct dosages. There was no difference in the incidence of medication errors following the introduction of the electronic medication record system. More work is needed on how this system can reduce medication error rates and improve medication safety.

  3. Computerized medical records: the need for a standard.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, A

    1990-03-01

    Major concepts introduced in this paper are as follows. 1) Organization, with its attendant qualities of accuracy, consistency, legibility, completeness, and simplicity, is the heart of the medical record. Technology should not be allowed to obscure this goal. 2) The main function of the computerized medical record is data storage with the qualities of organization noted above. This function must be clearly separated from condensation, analysis, or other secondary manipulation of data. 3) Many aspects of data manipulation call for the judgment of a physician. This judgement may be aided by computer software, but not replaced by it. 4) Present technological barriers, most notably speed, permanent large storage, and voice input should not influence the design of the effective computerized record. Future technology will be able to service the carefully designed medical record. 5) Textual parts of the computerized medical record can follow a simple and machine independent outline format. All parts of the record should use a textual introduction emphasizing patient and record identification. 6) A patient profile is central to each patient file. Updating this profile as needed must be recognized as a primary function of the physician at every patient encounter. 7) Acceptance of a standard for the computerized medical record now, before technology has matured and software diversified, will avoid a pitfall commonly experienced in other fields and save substantial healthcare funds. This standard should be geared to the needs of physicians and patients, not to the constraints of technology. The future of medical computing is bright. Obstacles to the practical use of the computerized medical record exist, but we may expect these to vanish within a few years. The great challenge to physicians now is to take this opportunity to control a new technology, rather than to be driven by it. The soul of good medicine is not in the equipment available, but in the rational and carefully

  4. Psychiatric Residents' Attitudes toward and Experiences with the Clinical-Skills Verification Process: A Pilot Study on U.S. and International Medical Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Nyapati R.; Kodali, Rahul; Mian, Ayesha; Ramtekkar, Ujjwal; Kamarajan, Chella; Jibson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors report on a pilot study of the experiences and perceptions of foreign international medical graduate (F-IMG), United States international medical graduate (US-IMG), and United States medical graduate (USMG) psychiatric residents with the newly mandated Clinical Skills Verification (CSV) process. The goal was to identify and…

  5. Building Structured Personal Health Records from Photographs of Printed Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Hu, Gang; Teng, Xiaofei; Xie, Guotong

    2015-01-01

    Personal health records (PHRs) provide patient-centric healthcare by making health records accessible to patients. In China, it is very difficult for individuals to access electronic health records. Instead, individuals can easily obtain the printed copies of their own medical records, such as prescriptions and lab test reports, from hospitals. In this paper, we propose a practical approach to extract structured data from printed medical records photographed by mobile phones. An optical character recognition (OCR) pipeline is performed to recognize text in a document photo, which addresses the problems of low image quality and content complexity by image pre-processing and multiple OCR engine synthesis. A series of annotation algorithms that support flexible layouts are then used to identify the document type, entities of interest, and entity correlations, from which a structured PHR document is built. The proposed approach was applied to real world medical records to demonstrate the effectiveness and applicability. PMID:26958219

  6. Medication Adherence, Work Performance and Self-Esteem among Psychiatric Patients Attending Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services at Bangalore, India

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Sailaxmi; Pavalur, Rajitha; Thanapal, Sivakumar; Parathasarathy, Nirmala B.; Desai, Geetha; Bhola, Poornima; Philip, Mariamma; Chaturvedi, Santosh K.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Work benefits mental health in innumerable ways. Vocational rehabilitation can enhance self-esteem. Medication adherence can improve work performance and thereby the individuals’ self-esteem. Aim: To test the hypothesis that there would be a significant correlation between medication adherence, work performance and self-esteem. Setting and Design: A quantitative, descriptive correlational research design was adopted to invite patients attending psychiatric rehabilitation services to participate in the research. Material and Methods: Data was collected from a convenience sample of 60 subjects using the ‘Medication Adherence Rating scale’, ‘Griffiths work behaviour scale’ and the ‘Rosenberg's Self-esteem scale’. Statistical analysis used: Analysis was done using spss18 with descriptive statistics, Pearsons correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis. Results: There were 36 males and 24 females who participated in this study. The subjects had good mean medication adherence of 8.4 ± 1.5 with median of 9.00, high mean self-esteem of 17.65 ± 2.97 with median of 18.0 and good mean work performance of 88.62 ± 22.56 with median of 93.0. Although weak and not significant, there was a positive correlation (r = 0.22, P = 0.103) between medication adherence and work performance; positive correlation between (r = 0.25, P = 0.067) medication adherence and self–esteem; positive correlation between (r = 0.136, P = 0.299) work performance and self-esteem. Multiple regression analysis showed no significant predictors for medication adherence, work performance and self-esteem among patients with psychiatric illness. Conclusions: Medication monitoring and strengthening of work habit can improve self-esteem thereby, strengthening hope of recovery from illness. PMID:25336771

  7. How to manage secure direct access of European patients to their computerized medical record and personal medical record.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Allaert, François André; Fassa, Maniane; Riandey, Benoît; Avillach, Paul; Cohen, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    The multiplication of the requests of the patients for a direct access to their Medical Record (MR), the development of Personal Medical Record (PMR) supervised by the patients themselves, the increasing development of the patients' electronic medical records (EMRs) and the world wide internet utilization will lead to envisage an access by using technical automatic and scientific way. It will require the addition of different conditions: a unique patient identifier which could base on a familial component in order to get access to the right record anywhere in Europe, very strict identity checks using cryptographic techniques such as those for the electronic signature, which will ensure the authentication of the requests sender and the integrity of the file but also the protection of the confidentiality and the access follow up. The electronic medical record must also be electronically signed by the practitioner in order to get evidence that he has given his agreement and taken the liability for that. This electronic signature also avoids any kind of post-transmission falsification. This will become extremely important, especially in France where patients will have the possibility to mask information that, they do not want to appear in their personal medical record. Currently, the idea of every citizen having electronic signatures available appears positively Utopian. But this is yet the case in eGovernment, eHealth and eShopping, world-wide. The same was thought about smart cards before they became generally available and useful when banks issued them.

  8. How to choose an electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Bob G

    2006-01-01

    I chose a Windows-based file system over a server-based system with a proprietary database, or a web-based system which has both a proprietary database and which also required a full time Internet connection. My reasoning was that I found it uncomplicated. I was familiar with the Windows interface and it required little effort to enter my existing data and was simple to operate the system. If one laptop crashes, my other computers still work. I don't fear failure of an Internet connection source, a modem or a server, power surges or other possible single points of failure that might prevent my patient care. I can incorporate all document types, I can update jump drives with any needed medical information. I can share information instantly with other systems. I can store my own data in a flexible and open format. I have no maintenance contract and I can make changes in my system or can even change vendors at any time. Last but certainly not least, I do not need a highly trained technical staff to operate or maintain our system.

  9. Duplicate Medical Records: A Survey of Twin Cities Healthcare Organizations

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, Molly A.

    2009-01-01

    Duplicate medical records occur when a single patient is associated with more than one medical record number. This causes a dangerous and expensive issue for hospitals and health information technology. A survey was constructed to gather qualitative information from Twin Cities healthcare organizations. The goal was to determine baseline information regarding the recognition of the problems surrounding duplicate medical record creation and organizational strategies for resolutions. The survey demonstrated that all organizations acknowledged the importance and patient safety issue regarding the creation of duplicates but the strategies and solutions are varied. As defined in the Minnesota Alliance for Patient Safety5, the ultimate goal of this survey was to favorably impact patient safety. The deidentified results were disseminated to all participating organizations along with recommendations for system improvements in order to raise awareness of the issue and promote patient safety. PMID:20351892

  10. The medical record entrepreneur: a future of opportunities.

    PubMed

    Dietz, M S; Nath, D D

    1989-06-01

    In summary, medical record practitioners can become successful entrepreneurs with the right motivation. It will be important to overcome the fear and inertia inherent in any bold new venture, to find our "niche," to assume the roles of explorer, artist, judge, and champion, as well as to encourage and promote our development within an organization or in a business of our own. Medical record entrepreneurs need to evaluate and understand current and potential consumers, their current needs, perceptions, and future needs. Entrepreneurs should capitalize on strengths, develop innovative marketing approaches, and apply them. In the current climate of the health care industry, there is a myriad of entrepreneurial opportunities available to the medical record profession. It all begins with the individual.

  11. Using electronic patient records in mental health care to capture housing and homelessness information of psychiatric consumers.

    PubMed

    Booth, Richard G

    2006-12-01

    Homelessness among people with psychiatric illness is at an all time high. Many explanations for this phenomenon exist, including the incidence of discharge from inpatient hospital directly into the streets or shelter system. With little known about this unseen social issue afflicting many mental health consumers, this manuscript provides recommendations for using electronic patient records (EPR) as a conduit to capture housing and homelessness related information. With the increased use of EPRs in the Canadian health care system, the research and clinical benefits of this technology have only recently begun to be realized in mental health care. PMID:17050339

  12. Real and imagined barriers to an electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Rind, D M; Safran, C

    1993-01-01

    We developed an electronic medical record for ambulatory patients as part of the integrated clinical information system at Beth Israel Hospital. During the four years since it was installed, clinicians have entered 76,060 patient problems, 137,713 medications, and 33,938 notes. Residents, who had to type notes in themselves, entered 49.5% of their notes into OMR. Several factors that we had predicted would be barriers to an electronic medical record, such as clinician reluctance to type or perform data entry, have not proved to be significant problems. Other anticipated barriers, such as difficulties with dual charting on paper during transition to an electronic medical record, have been realized. The major unexpected barrier that has been encountered is increased clinician concern about the privacy and security of full text notes relative to other data elements in the clinical information system. We have attempted to modify the electronic medical record so as to overcome some of these barriers. PMID:8130574

  13. Information integrity and privacy for computerized medical patient records

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, J.; Hamilton, V.; Gaylor, T.; McCurley, K.; Meeks, T.

    1996-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Oceania, Inc. entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) in November 1993 to provide ``Information Integrity and Privacy for Computerized Medical Patient Records`` (CRADA No. SC93/01183). The main objective of the project was to develop information protection methods that are appropriate for databases of patient records in health information systems. This document describes the findings and alternative solutions that resulted from this CRADA.

  14. Are In-Bed Electronic Weights Recorded in the Medical Record Accurate?

    PubMed

    Gerl, Heather; Miko, Alexandra; Nelson, Mandy; Godaire, Lori

    2016-01-01

    This study found large discrepancies between in-bed weights recorded in the medical record and carefully obtained standing weights with a calibrated, electronic bedside scale. This discrepancy appears to be related to inadequate bed calibration before patient admission and having excessive linen, clothing, and/or equipment on the bed during weighing by caregivers. PMID:27522846

  15. Carrying their own medical records: the perspective of pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Phipps, H

    2001-11-01

    Freedom of information, access to and ownership of medical records are current and controversial issues in Australia. Relating to pregnancy and birth the debate provokes emotional responses and raises important questions about access to information, decision-making, responsibility, power and control. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the impact on pregnant women of carrying their medical records throughout pregnancy Twenty-one women participated in face-to-face individual interviews, which were coded for thematic analysis. The study found the reaction of women toward carrying their own records to be overwhelmingly positive. Maternal record holding had the potential to improve the level of communication between the health care worker and the pregnant woman and provided a greater sense of sharing and communication within the family The study also established that maternal record holding was of benefit to the woman's partner who was better informed and more involved in the pregnancy All but one of the women who participated favoured carrying their records in subsequent pregnancies. A concern about the potential for losing or misplacing records was not seen in this study, as no women lost their records. A sense of ownership would argue against this possible drawback.

  16. War neuroses and Arthur Hurst: a pioneering medical film about the treatment of psychiatric battle casualties.

    PubMed

    Jones, Edgar

    2012-07-01

    From 1917 to 1918, Major Arthur Hurst filmed shell-shocked patients home from the war in France. Funded by the Medical Research Committee, and using Pathé cameramen, he recorded soldiers who suffered from intractable movement disorders as they underwent treatment at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Netley and undertook programs of occupational therapy at Seale Hayne in Devon. As one of the earliest UK medical films, Hurst's efforts may have drawn inspiration from the official documentary of the Battle of the Somme and films made in 1916 by French Army neurologists. Although initially motivated to make use of a novel medium to illustrate lectures, Hurst was alert to the wider appeal of the motion picture and saw an opportunity to position himself in the postwar medical hierarchy. Some "before treatment" shots were reenacted for the camera. Hurst, like some other shell shock doctors, openly used deception as a therapeutic measure. On the basis that the ends justified the means, they defended this procedure as ethical. Clinicians also took advantage of changes in military regulations to address functional symptoms. Claims made of "cures" in the film and associated publications by Hurst were challenged by other doctors treating shell shock. The absence of follow-up data and evidence from war pension files suggested that Hurst may have overstated the effectiveness of his methods. Nevertheless, the message conveyed in the film that chronic cases could be treated in a single session had a powerful resonance for ambitious or charismatic doctors and was revived in World War II.

  17. Validity of Childhood Autism in the Danish Psychiatric Central Register: Findings from a Cohort Sample Born 1990-1999

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauritsen, Marlene B.; Jorgensen, Meta; Madsen, Kreesten M.; Lemcke, Sanne; Toft, Susanne; Grove, Jakob; Schendel, Diana E.; Thorsen, Poul

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of the diagnosis of childhood autism in the Danish Psychiatric Central Register (DPCR) by reviewing medical records from 499 of 504 total children with childhood autism born 1990-1999. Based on review of abstracted behaviors recorded in case records from child psychiatric hospitals, case status…

  18. Psychiatric morbidities, sleep disturbances, suicidality, and quality-of-life in a community population with medically unexplained pain in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Subin; Cho, Maeng Je; Seong, Sujeong; Shin, Seo Yeon; Sohn, Jeehoon; Hahm, Bong-Jin; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2012-08-15

    We examined the psychiatric morbidities, sleep disturbances, suicidality, quality-of-life, and psychological distress of community-dwelling subjects in Korea who had medically unexplained pain. A total of 6510 subjects (age 18-65 years) participated in this study. A medically unexplained pain symptom (MUS-pain) was defined as pain lasting for 6 months or longer that was sufficiently severe to cause significant distress or to materially interfere with normal activities in the previous year, and that could not be explained by a medical condition or substance use/abuse. Diagnostic assessments were based on responses to the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, which was administered by lay colleagues. The presence of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) disorders, sleep disturbances, suicidal tendency, quality-of-life issues, and psychological distress was determined in subjects with and without MUS-pain. There were significant positive associations between MUS-pain and nicotine dependence and withdrawal, alcohol dependence, major depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder, and psychotic disorder. In addition, subjects with MUS-pain reported more sleep disturbances, suicidality, psychological distress, and a poorer quality-of-life than did subjects without MUS-pain. The results of this study suggest that clinicians should carefully evaluate and treat comorbid psychiatric problems in individuals with MUS-pain.

  19. Disclosure of psychiatric manifestations of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in medical genetics: A 12-year retrospective chart review.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Serena Talcott; Morris, Emily; Jensen, Kimberly; Austin, Jehannine

    2015-10-01

    Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS) have increased risk for psychiatric disorders. However, while medical geneticists self-report discussing psychiatric features of 22qDS with families (though often only when the child is older), most parents of children with 22qDS report receiving information about the psychiatric manifestations of 22qDS from non-medical sources. In an attempt to reconcile these previous findings, we sought to objectively determine the frequency with which medical geneticists discuss the potential psychiatric manifestations of 22qDS: (i) in letters to referring physicians and (ii) with families, and to explore plans for follow-up. We abstracted data from charts of patients with 22qDS who were referred to a single medical genetics center between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2012. Psychiatric disorders were discussed in consult letters to referring physicians for n = 57 (46%) of the 125 patients who met inclusion criteria-making them less frequently discussed than all other features of 22qDS. Despite exhaustive review of charts, the content of discussions with families was typically unclear. Follow-up in medical genetics was suggested for 50 people but only 18 (36%) of these patients returned. Disclosure of psychiatric features of 22qDS to families is necessary so that psychiatric disorders can be identified in time for early intervention to be implemented to achieve better prognosis for those affected. These empiric data offer some explanation as to why psychiatric services are underused by individuals with 22qDS.

  20. Clinicians’ Evaluation of Computer-Assisted Medication Summarization of Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xinxin; Cimin, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Each year thousands of patients die of avoidable medication errors. When a patient is admitted to, transferred within, or discharged from a clinical facility, clinicians should review previous medication orders, current orders and future plans for care, and reconcile differences if there are any. If medication reconciliation is not accurate and systematic, medication errors such as omissions, duplications, dosing errors, or drug interactions may occur and cause harm. Computer-assisted medication applications showed promise as an intervention to reduce medication summarization inaccuracies and thus avoidable medication errors. In this study, a computer-assisted medication summarization application, designed to abstract and represent multi-source time-oriented medication data, was introduced to assist clinicians with their medication reconciliation processes. An evaluation study was carried out to assess clinical usefulness and analyze potential impact of such application. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were applied to measure clinicians' performance efficiency and inaccuracy in medication summarization process with and without the intervention of computer-assisted medication application. Clinicians' feedback indicated the feasibility of integrating such a medication summarization tool into clinical practice workflow as a complementary addition to existing electronic health record systems. The result of the study showed potential to improve efficiency and reduce inaccuracy in clinician performance of medication summarization, which could in turn improve care efficiency, quality of care, and patient safety. PMID:24393492

  1. Psychiatric and Medical Disorders in the after Math of the Uttarakhand Disaster: Assessment, Approach, and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Channaveerachari, Naveen Kumar; Raj, Aneel; Joshi, Suvarna; Paramita, Prajna; Somanathan, Revathi; Chandran, Dhanya; Kasi, Sekar; Bangalore, N. Roopesh; Math, Suresh Bada

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To present the descriptive data on the frequency of medical and psychiatric morbidity and also to discuss various pertinent issues relevant to the disaster management, the future challenges and psychosocial needs of the 2013 floods in Uttarakhand, India. Materials and Methods: Observation was undertaken by the disaster management team of National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences in the worst affected four districts of Uttarakhand. Qualified psychiatrists diagnosed the patients using the International Classification of Diseases-10 criteria. Data were collected by direct observation, interview of the survivors, group sessions, individual key-informant interview, individual session, and group interventions. Results: Patients with physical health problems formed the majority of treatment seekers (39.6%) in this report. Only about 2% had disaster induced psychiatric diagnoses. As was expected, minor mental disorders in the form of depressive disorders and anxiety disorders formed majority of the psychiatric morbidity. Substance use disorders appear to be very highly prevalent in the community; however, we were not able to assess the morbidity systematically. Conclusions: The mental health infrastructure and manpower is abysmally inadequate. There is an urgent need to implement the National Mental Health Program to increase the mental health infrastructure and services in the four major disaster-affected districts. PMID:25969596

  2. [Relationship between psychiatric diagnosis and social or medical data in a child mental health center (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Casadebaig, F; Chevalier, A

    1978-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to point out the most significant sociodemographic and medical parameters related to psychiatric diagnoses, such as registered at the Alfred-Binet Child Mental Health Center (Paris). Statistical analysis shows the specific tendencies of each diagnosis and their similarities. Some diagnoses are particularly associated to negative aspects of the investigated parameters. This is true for psychotic disorders whereas normal variations are linked to positive aspects. Between these two extremes, neurotic disorders, the most numerous, are located in a middle position for all the investigated variables.

  3. Overcoming Stigma: Involving Families in Medical Student and Psychiatric Residency Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmetzer, Alan D.; Lafuze, Joan E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The primary purpose of this article is to present a possible mechanism for increasing communication about psychiatric matters such as diagnoses, treatment, and stigma between the physicians, including psychiatrists, and the families of persons with mental illness through a NAMI presentation. Methods: Included are a description of a…

  4. 28 CFR 549.46 - Procedures for involuntary administration of psychiatric medication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the mental illness or disorder, the inmate is dangerous to self or others, poses a serious threat of... the mental illness or disorder and its symptoms, and alternatives (e.g., seclusion or physical... subpart, a psychiatric emergency exists when a person suffering from a mental illness or disorder...

  5. 28 CFR 549.46 - Procedures for involuntary administration of psychiatric medication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the mental illness or disorder, the inmate is dangerous to self or others, poses a serious threat of... the mental illness or disorder and its symptoms, and alternatives (e.g., seclusion or physical... subpart, a psychiatric emergency exists when a person suffering from a mental illness or disorder...

  6. 28 CFR 549.46 - Procedures for involuntary administration of psychiatric medication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the mental illness or disorder, the inmate is dangerous to self or others, poses a serious threat of... the mental illness or disorder and its symptoms, and alternatives (e.g., seclusion or physical... subpart, a psychiatric emergency exists when a person suffering from a mental illness or disorder...

  7. [Errors in medical records as the cause of negative expert decisions regarding disability pensions].

    PubMed

    Zyss, Tomasz

    2007-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders frequently make the patient unable to perform their work. It is estimated that psychiatric disorders are the third most frequent reason for an expert's decision concerning long-term inability to work justifying the granting of a disability pension. Unfortunately, not all patients are certified positively, i.e. are granted disability pension or receive disability benefits in the expected amount; usually, they are lower than those they applied for. The paper discusses the premises applied by the Social Insurance Institution (ZUS) physicians and court appointed experts in their examination of patients applying for disability benefits. Some patients are positively certified already at the time of the initial contact. Their mode of behavior, functioning and patterns of speech leave no doubt as to the significant exacerbation of their mental disturbances. Another group of patients manifests situational "exacerbation" connected with the stressful nature of a meeting with an expert physician. In such cases, the patient's medical records are of great importance. Evaluation of medical records takes into account regular and systematic character of treatment, as well as the kind of pharmacotherapy applied in the treatment. The patient's discontinuation of treatment just after having been granted disability benefits and restarting it a short time before check-up examination is regarded rather critically. Rare appointments taking place once or twice a year are not recognized as corresponding with the existence of intense and debilitating mental disorders. Duration of treatment before applying for disability pension is also evaluated. The author discusses particular cases in the context of ethical and deontological principles.

  8. 32 CFR 319.7 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 319.7 Section 319.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PRIVACY PROGRAM § 319.7 Special procedures:...

  9. 32 CFR 319.7 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 319.7 Section 319.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PRIVACY PROGRAM § 319.7 Special procedures:...

  10. Evaluation of a Lecture Recording System in a Medical Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacro, Thierry R. H.; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Fitzharris, Timothy P.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the Medical University of South Carolina adopted a lecture recording system (LRS). A retrospective study of LRS was implemented to document the students' perceptions, pattern of usage, and impact on the students' grades in three basic sciences courses (Cell Biology/Histology, Physiology, and Neurosciences). The number of accesses and…

  11. Performance analysis of a medical record exchanges model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ean-Wen; Liou, Der-Ming

    2007-03-01

    Electronic medical record exchange among hospitals can provide more information for physician diagnosis and reduce costs from duplicate examinations. In this paper, we proposed and implemented a medical record exchange model. According to our study, exchange interface servers (EISs) are designed for hospitals to manage the information communication through the intra and interhospital networks linked with a medical records database. An index service center can be given responsibility for managing the EIS and publishing the addresses and public keys. The prototype system has been implemented to generate, parse, and transfer the health level seven query messages. Moreover, the system can encrypt and decrypt a message using the public-key encryption algorithm. The queuing theory is applied to evaluate the performance of our proposed model. We estimated the service time for each queue of the CPU, database, and network, and measured the response time and possible bottlenecks of the model. The capacity of the model is estimated to process the medical records of about 4000 patients/h in the 1-MB network backbone environments, which comprises about the 4% of the total outpatients in Taiwan.

  12. Who owns the information in the medical record? Copyright issues.

    PubMed

    Mair, Judith

    2011-01-01

    As part of every private healthcare practice and healthcare facility, documentation of patients' healthcare, diagnoses and treatment are an ongoing requirement with legal connotations. The question that may arise is whether copyright can subsist in patient medical records, and if so, what benefit may arise from ownership of such copyright.

  13. Sharing electronic medical records across multiple heterogeneous and competing institutions.

    PubMed Central

    Kohane, I. S.; van Wingerde, F. J.; Fackler, J. C.; Cimino, C.; Kilbridge, P.; Murphy, S.; Chueh, H.; Rind, D.; Safran, C.; Barnett, O.; Szolovits, P.

    1996-01-01

    Most early reports of implemented World-Wide Web (W3) medical record systems describe single institution architectures. We describe W3-EMRS, a multi-institutional architecture, and its implementation. Thorny problems in data sharing underlined by the W3-EMRS project are reviewed. PMID:8947738

  14. Biobanks and Electronic Medical Records: Enabling Cost-Effective Research

    PubMed Central

    Bowton, Erica; Field, Julie R.; Wang, Sunny; Schildcrout, Jonathan S.; Van Driest, Sara L.; Delaney, Jessica T.; Cowan, James; Weeke, Peter; Mosley, Jonathan D.; Wells, Quinn S.; Karnes, Jason H.; Shaffer, Christian; Peterson, Josh F.; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.; Pulley, Jill M.

    2014-01-01

    The use of electronic medical record data linked to biological specimens in health care settings is expected to enable cost-effective and rapid genomic analyses. Here, we present a model that highlights potential advantages for genomic discovery and describe the operational infrastructure that facilitated multiple simultaneous discovery efforts. PMID:24786321

  15. Physician Sensemaking and Readiness for Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riesenmy, Kelly Rouse

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore physician sensemaking and readiness to implement electronic medical records (EMR) as a first step to finding strategies that enhance EMR adoption behaviors. Design/methodology/approach: The case study approach provides a detailed analysis of individuals within an organizational unit. Using a…

  16. 32 CFR 319.7 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 319.7 Section 319.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PRIVACY PROGRAM § 319.7 Special procedures:...

  17. The relative contributions of psychiatric symptoms and psychotropic medications on the sleep-wake profile of young persons with anxiety, depression and bipolar disorders.

    PubMed

    Robillard, Rébecca; Oxley, Cristal; Hermens, Daniel F; White, Django; Wallis, Ryan; Naismith, Sharon L; Whitwell, Bradley; Southan, James; Scott, Elizabeth M; Hickie, Ian B

    2016-09-30

    This study investigated the relative contribution of psychiatric symptoms and psychotropic medications on the sleep-wake cycle. Actigraphy and clinical assessments (Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale) were conducted in 146 youths with anxiety, depression or bipolar disorders. Independently of medications, mania symptoms were predictive of lower circadian amplitude and rhythmicity. Independently of diagnosis and symptoms severity: i) antipsychotics were related to longer sleep period and duration, ii) serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors to longer sleep period, and iii) agomelatine to earlier sleep onset. Manic symptoms and different subclasses of medications may have independent influences on the sleep-wake cycle of young people with mental disorders. PMID:27449011

  18. Privacy preserving index for encrypted electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chi; Horng, Gwoboa; Lin, Yi-Jheng; Chen, Kuo-Chang

    2013-12-01

    With the development of electronic systems, privacy has become an important security issue in real-life. In medical systems, privacy of patients' electronic medical records (EMRs) must be fully protected. However, to combine the efficiency and privacy, privacy preserving index is introduced to preserve the privacy, where the EMR can be efficiently accessed by this patient or specific doctor. In the literature, Goh first proposed a secure index scheme with keyword search over encrypted data based on a well-known primitive, Bloom filter. In this paper, we propose a new privacy preserving index scheme, called position index (P-index), with keyword search over the encrypted data. The proposed index scheme is semantically secure against the adaptive chosen keyword attack, and it also provides flexible space, lower false positive rate, and search privacy. Moreover, it does not rely on pairing, a complicate computation, and thus can search over encrypted electronic medical records from the cloud server efficiently.

  19. A Codasyl-Type Schema for Natural Language Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Sager, N.; Tick, L.; Story, G.; Hirschman, L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a CODASYL (network) database schema for information derived from narrative clinical reports. The goal of this work is to create an automated process that accepts natural language documents as input and maps this information into a database of a type managed by existing database management systems. The schema described here represents the medical events and facts identified through the natural language processing. This processing decomposes each narrative into a set of elementary assertions, represented as MEDFACT records in the database. Each assertion in turn consists of a subject and a predicate classed according to a limited number of medical event types, e.g., signs/symptoms, laboratory tests, etc. The subject and predicate are represented by EVENT records which are owned by the MEDFACT record associated with the assertion. The CODASYL-type network structure was found to be suitable for expressing most of the relations needed to represent the natural language information. However, special mechanisms were developed for storing the time relations between EVENT records and for recording connections (such as causality) between certain MEDFACT records. This schema has been implemented using the UNIVAC DMS-1100 DBMS.

  20. Do Medical Students' Attitudes Toward Psychiatry and Their Intention to Pursue Psychiatry as a Career Change During Psychiatric Attachment?

    PubMed Central

    Khajeddin, Niloofar; Riahi, Foroughe; Salehi Veysi, Mhammad; Hoseyni, Hajar; Izadi Mazidi, Sakineh

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes of medical students toward psychiatry and their intention to pursue psychiatry as a career; and to determine if they change after psychiatric attachment. It also examined the relationship between the students' characteristics and their attitudes in details. Methods: Pre and post-surveys using Likert-type scales were conducted versus 106 medical students of Ahwaz Jondishapour University who entered psychiatric attachment between spring 2007 and spring 2010. They completed a demographic form and an "attitude toward psychiatry" questionnaire with two excess questions which measured their intention to pursue psychiatry as a career in future. Results: The majority of students appeared to have favorable attitudes before the attachment which improved during the course; but they didn't show significant change in their intention to pursue psychiatry as a prospective career. There was a significant correlation between age and change in attitudes. Also the career intention was significantly correlated with their attitudes. Conclusion: The study confirms previous reports that training can change students' attitudes toward psychiatry, but contrasting with them suggests that negative attitudes are not likely to be the main cause of the low career intention to psychiatry. Thus, teaching psychiatry can get the students rid of their negative attitudes but is not enough to encourage them to pursue psychiatry as a career. The authors suggest it is based on poor opportunities for postgraduates in the field and social stigma attached to psychiatry, which needs further studies. PMID:24644470

  1. Lifetime medical and psychiatric comorbidity of night eating behavior in the Swedish Twin Study of Adults: Genes and Environment (STAGE).

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Jennifer D; Allison, Kelly C; Stunkard, Albert J; Bulik, Cynthia M; Thornton, Laura M; Karin Lindroos, Anna; Rasmussen, Finn

    2012-09-30

    The medical and psychosocial comorbidity of two core features of night eating syndrome (NES), evening hyperphagia (EH) and nocturnal awakening and ingestion of food (NI), was evaluated in adults enrolled in the Swedish Twin Study of Adults: Genes and Environment (STAGE) study. As part of the STAGE study, more than 20,000 participants completed assessments of their physical and mental health, which included two night eating screening questions designed to assess EH and NI. STAGE participants who completed a night eating validation interview to confirm the presence or absence of night eating and who had comorbidity data available (n=463) were compared on the lifetime prevalence of several psychiatric and medical conditions. In contrast to previous studies, night eating (EH and/or NI) was not significantly associated with lifetime history of any mental or physical health variable.

  2. Lifetime medical and psychiatric comorbidity of night eating behavior in the Swedish Twin Study of Adults: Genes and Environment (STAGE).

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Jennifer D; Allison, Kelly C; Stunkard, Albert J; Bulik, Cynthia M; Thornton, Laura M; Karin Lindroos, Anna; Rasmussen, Finn

    2012-09-30

    The medical and psychosocial comorbidity of two core features of night eating syndrome (NES), evening hyperphagia (EH) and nocturnal awakening and ingestion of food (NI), was evaluated in adults enrolled in the Swedish Twin Study of Adults: Genes and Environment (STAGE) study. As part of the STAGE study, more than 20,000 participants completed assessments of their physical and mental health, which included two night eating screening questions designed to assess EH and NI. STAGE participants who completed a night eating validation interview to confirm the presence or absence of night eating and who had comorbidity data available (n=463) were compared on the lifetime prevalence of several psychiatric and medical conditions. In contrast to previous studies, night eating (EH and/or NI) was not significantly associated with lifetime history of any mental or physical health variable. PMID:22560060

  3. How Patients Can Improve the Accuracy of their Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Dullabh, Prashila M.; Sondheimer, Norman K.; Katsh, Ethan; Evans, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Assess (1) if patients can improve their medical records’ accuracy if effectively engaged using a networked Personal Health Record; (2) workflow efficiency and reliability for receiving and processing patient feedback; and (3) patient feedback’s impact on medical record accuracy. Background: Improving medical record’ accuracy and associated challenges have been documented extensively. Providing patients with useful access to their records through information technology gives them new opportunities to improve their records’ accuracy and completeness. A new approach supporting online contributions to their medication lists by patients of Geisinger Health Systems, an online patient-engagement advocate, revealed this can be done successfully. In late 2011, Geisinger launched an online process for patients to provide electronic feedback on their medication lists’ accuracy before a doctor visit. Patient feedback was routed to a Geisinger pharmacist, who reviewed it and followed up with the patient before changing the medication list shared by the patient and the clinicians. Methods: The evaluation employed mixed methods and consisted of patient focus groups (users, nonusers, and partial users of the feedback form), semi structured interviews with providers and pharmacists, user observations with patients, and quantitative analysis of patient feedback data and pharmacists’ medication reconciliation logs. Findings/Discussion: (1) Patients were eager to provide feedback on their medications and saw numerous advantages. Thirty percent of patient feedback forms (457 of 1,500) were completed and submitted to Geisinger. Patients requested changes to the shared medication lists in 89 percent of cases (369 of 414 forms). These included frequency—or dosage changes to existing prescriptions and requests for new medications (prescriptions and over-the counter). (2) Patients provided useful and accurate online feedback. In a subsample of 107 forms

  4. Medical record: systematic centralization versus secure on demand aggregation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As patients often see the data of their medical histories scattered among various medical records hosted in several health-care establishments, the purpose of our multidisciplinary study was to define a pragmatic and secure on-demand based system able to gather this information, with no risk of breaching confidentiality, and to relay it to a medical professional who asked for the information via a specific search engine. Methods Scattered data are often heterogeneous, which makes the task of gathering information very hard. Two methods can be compared: trying to solve the problem by standardizing and centralizing all the information about every patient in a single Medical Record system or trying to use the data "as is" and find a way to obtain the most complete and the most accurate information. Given the failure of the first approach, due to the lack of standardization or privacy and security problems, for example, we propose an alternative that relies on the current state of affairs: an on-demand system, using a specific search engine that is able to retrieve information from the different medical records of a single patient. Results We describe the function of Medical Record Search Engines (MRSE), which are able to retrieve all the available information regarding a patient who has been hospitalized in different hospitals and to provide this information to health professionals upon request. MRSEs use pseudonymized patient identities and thus never have access to the patient's identity. However, though the system would be easy to implement as it by-passes many of the difficulties associated with a centralized architecture, the health professional would have to validate the information, i.e. read all of the information and create his own synthesis and possibly reject extra data, which could be a drawback. We thus propose various feasible improvements, based on the implementation of several tools in our on-demand based system. Conclusions A system that

  5. Psychiatric disorders and sleep issues.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Eliza L

    2014-09-01

    Sleep issues are common in people with psychiatric disorders, and the interaction is complex. Sleep disorders, particularly insomnia, can precede and predispose to psychiatric disorders, can be comorbid with and exacerbate psychiatric disorders, and can occur as part of psychiatric disorders. Sleep disorders can mimic psychiatric disorders or result from medication given for psychiatric disorders. Impairment of sleep and of mental health may be different manifestations of the same underlying neurobiological processes. For the primary care physician, key tools include recognition of potential sleep effects of psychiatric medications and familiarity with treatment approaches for insomnia in depression and anxiety.

  6. Data-Driven Information Extraction from Chinese Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tianwan; Ge, Chen; Gao, Weiguo; Wei, Jia; Zhu, Kenny Q.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to propose a data-driven framework that takes unstructured free text narratives in Chinese Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) as input and converts them into structured time-event-description triples, where the description is either an elaboration or an outcome of the medical event. Materials and Methods Our framework uses a hybrid approach. It consists of constructing cross-domain core medical lexica, an unsupervised, iterative algorithm to accrue more accurate terms into the lexica, rules to address Chinese writing conventions and temporal descriptors, and a Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm that innovatively utilizes Normalized Google Distance (NGD) to estimate the correlation between medical events and their descriptions. Results The effectiveness of the framework was demonstrated with a dataset of 24,817 de-identified Chinese EMRs. The cross-domain medical lexica were capable of recognizing terms with an F1-score of 0.896. 98.5% of recorded medical events were linked to temporal descriptors. The NGD SVM description-event matching achieved an F1-score of 0.874. The end-to-end time-event-description extraction of our framework achieved an F1-score of 0.846. Discussion In terms of named entity recognition, the proposed framework outperforms state-of-the-art supervised learning algorithms (F1-score: 0.896 vs. 0.886). In event-description association, the NGD SVM is superior to SVM using only local context and semantic features (F1-score: 0.874 vs. 0.838). Conclusions The framework is data-driven, weakly supervised, and robust against the variations and noises that tend to occur in a large corpus. It addresses Chinese medical writing conventions and variations in writing styles through patterns used for discovering new terms and rules for updating the lexica. PMID:26295801

  7. National electronic medical records integration on cloud computing system.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Hebah; El-Masri, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Few Healthcare providers have an advanced level of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) adoption. Others have a low level and most have no EMR at all. Cloud computing technology is a new emerging technology that has been used in other industry and showed a great success. Despite the great features of Cloud computing, they haven't been utilized fairly yet in healthcare industry. This study presents an innovative Healthcare Cloud Computing system for Integrating Electronic Health Record (EHR). The proposed Cloud system applies the Cloud Computing technology on EHR system, to present a comprehensive EHR integrated environment.

  8. National electronic medical records integration on cloud computing system.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Hebah; El-Masri, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Few Healthcare providers have an advanced level of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) adoption. Others have a low level and most have no EMR at all. Cloud computing technology is a new emerging technology that has been used in other industry and showed a great success. Despite the great features of Cloud computing, they haven't been utilized fairly yet in healthcare industry. This study presents an innovative Healthcare Cloud Computing system for Integrating Electronic Health Record (EHR). The proposed Cloud system applies the Cloud Computing technology on EHR system, to present a comprehensive EHR integrated environment. PMID:23920993

  9. The search for the elusive electronic medical record system--medical liability, the missing factor.

    PubMed

    Grams, R R; Moyer, E H

    1997-02-01

    Over the past few years, the traditional paper-based medical record system has come under close scrutiny by every participant in the healthcare industry. Some groups, especially federal agencies such as Medicare and Medicaid, HMOs, and other third party payors, have begun to demand changes in medical record documentation, and have become very assertive as to what goals and objectives will be met. In contrast, the medical liability insurance industry has remained almost invisible during this period of transition. At a recent electronic medical records (EMR) conference participants attending a software development workshop were asked if they had their systems reviewed from a medicolegal standpoint by a malpractice insurance carrier. In response to this inquiry, not one software vendor raised their hand to indicate this had been accomplished, or was even contemplated. In the author's opinion, the key missing factor in the current quest for a paperless medical office system rests in the domain of those who represent the medical liability industry. All of these gate-keepers of medical loss and risk prevention will eventually be called upon, either by choice or necessity, to validate every working EMR system that is used in medical practices in the future. This article will explore the best information published from this currently silent sector of the industry, and proposes an active involvement by the medical liability industry in the current EMR design and development processes taking place. In addition, there are 10 minimum EMR design criteria contained in this article that are recommended for implementation based upon 16 years of medical malpractice experience and loss prevention input.

  10. Efficient medical information retrieval in encrypted Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Pruski, Cédric; Wisniewski, François

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of eHealth platforms across the world, whose main objective is to centralize patient's healthcare information to ensure the best continuity of care, requires the development of advanced tools and techniques for supporting health professionals in retrieving relevant information in this vast quantity of data. However, for preserving patient's privacy, some countries decided to de-identify and encrypt data contained in the shared Electronic Health Records, which reinforces the complexity of proposing efficient medical information retrieval approach. In this paper, we describe an original approach exploiting standards metadata as well as knowledge organizing systems to overcome the barriers of data encryption for improving the results of medical information retrieval in centralized and encrypted Electronic Health Records. This is done through the exploitation of semantic properties provided by knowledge organizing systems, which enable query expansion. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the approach together with illustrating examples and a discussion on the advantages and limitations of the provided framework.

  11. Task centered visualization of Electronic Medical Record flow sheet.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhong; Gregg, Peggy; Zhang, Jiajie

    2003-01-01

    Usability problem of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems is a major hurdle for their acceptance. In this study we used the methodology of Human-Centered Distributed Information Design (HCDID) to compare and evaluate Flow Sheet module of two commercial EMR systems. After which we tried to develop usable interface of a flow sheet using visualization, focusing on task-representation mapping during design and development.

  12. Meta-modelling the Medical Record: Design and Application

    PubMed Central

    Huet, Bernard; Lesueur, Bruno; Lebeux, Pierre; Blain, Gilles

    2000-01-01

    This project is based on a user-oriented design for medical record, thanks to a meta-model able to generate various models for an application domain. The meta-model is constituted of basic concepts: User Semantic Group, sentence-type, variable, graph. A beginning of implementation is in echocardiography report; The advantages are a very thorough personalization of the document for the user, and a greater independence of the design diagram from the technological platform.

  13. Education and the medical record professional: obligation or opportunity?

    PubMed

    Barr, C J

    1988-12-01

    The present health care environment demands an emphasis on continuing education and the constant upgrading of ones' professional skills and abilities. The pressure to update and maintain skills can be a burden on the members of our profession, or it can pose exciting challenges to our creativity. This article discusses the career opportunities available to medical record professionals in the area of providing educational programs to other health care professionals, and some ways to take advantage of these opportunities.

  14. Lay people's experiences with reading their medical record.

    PubMed

    Wibe, Torunn; Hellesø, Ragnhild; Slaughter, Laura; Ekstedt, Mirjam

    2011-05-01

    An increasing number of patients now make use of their legal right to read their medical record. We report findings from a study in which we conducted qualitative interviews with 17 Norwegian adult patients about their experiences of requesting a copy of their medical record following a hospital stay. Interviews took place between May, 2008 and April 2009. The analytical process, guided by qualitative content analysis, identified two main themes; "keeping a sense of control" and "not feeling respected as a person". The informants' experiences with reading their own medical record were often connected to their experiences in direct communication with health care professionals during the hospital stay, revealing a delicate interaction between trust and power. The informants were hoping for a more mutual exchange of information and knowledge from which they could benefit in the management of their own health. We conclude that to meet patients' expectations of mutuality, health care professionals in hospitals need to be more conscious about their attitudes and communication skills as well as how they exercise their power to define the patient's situation. At the same time, there should be more focus on how structural changes in the organization of hospitals may have impaired the capacity of health care professionals to meet these expectations. In the future, greater attention should also be paid to information exchange to avoid placing unreasonable responsibility on the patient to compensate for deficits in the health care system.

  15. Medical diagnosis of legal culpability: the impact of early psychiatric testimony in the 19th century English criminal trial.

    PubMed

    Toole, Ciara J

    2012-01-01

    Fast-paced developments in psychiatry, neuroscience and emerging neuroimaging technologies place continual pressure on the legal recognition of mental illness and disease across jurisdictional boundaries. Nevertheless, the Canadian legal definition of exculpatory mental disease in the context of criminal liability has remained largely static, sheltered from the immediate influence of medical theory and advancements. In order to effectively reflect on the intersection of mental health and criminal justice systems in this area, it is important to understand its historical development and the English common law origins of the current approach. Specifically turning to the early 19th century, documented history and accounts of early medical witness testimony on the mental state of the accused provide a unique opportunity to understand the initial collision between fundamental concepts of moral and legal culpability and new scientific understandings of mental function and disease. In this article, I suggest that early psychiatric testimony to the accused's mental state challenged the evolving criminal law of 19th century England to reconcile its restrictive definition of "insanity" with expanding scientific reasoning and accounts of mental disease. The trial of Edward Oxford, an attempted royal assassination case of 1840, is examined as a symbolic height in this conflict prior to the first common law pronouncement of the current approach in 1843. As debate continues on the role of medical advancement in the identification of exculpatory medical disorders in law, this historical perspective may serve as a touchstone in balancing the enforcement of legal culpability with our society's greater appreciation for mental illness.

  16. Recording and podcasting of lectures for students of medical school.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Pierre; Cuggia, Marc; Le Beux, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) becomes an important way for the knowledge transmission, especially in the field of medicine. Podcasting (mobile broadcast content) has recently emerged as an efficient tool for distributing information towards professionals, especially for e-learning contents.The goal of this work is to implement software and hardware tools for collecting medical lectures at its source by direct recording (halls and classrooms) and provide the automatic delivery of these resources for students on different type of devices (computer, smartphone or videogames console). We describe the overall architecture and the methods used by medical students to master this technology in their daily activities. We highlight the benefits and the limits of the Podcast technologies for medical education. PMID:21893751

  17. [Medical and pharmaceutical tales recorded in "Genroku- Sekenbanashi-Fubunshu"].

    PubMed

    Hamada, T

    1996-12-01

    "Genroku-Sekenbanashi-Fubunshu" consists of eleven volumes and was written from 1694 to 1703, in the Edo Period. The original book was kept at the Faculty of Literature, Tokyo University. In 1994, this book was first published as one of the Iwanami-Bunko Series. I studied the tales recorded in this book and found that twenty-seven of them were concerned with medical and pharmaceutial sciences. In these medical and pharmaceutical tales, there were several kinds, relating to such matters as spells to cure or prevent illness, curious sicknesses, episodes regarding the origin of remedies, medicinal plants and crude drugs, medical books, doctors and surgeons, persons who lived long, and so forth. It was difficult to explain about the spells which were thought effective to cure illness, but I could gain an understanding that Japanese people lived such lives in the old days. PMID:11619293

  18. Conflations of Marital Status and Sanity: Implicit Heterosexist Bias in Psychiatric Diagnosis in Physician-Dictated Charts at a Midwestern Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Metzl, Jonathan M.; McClelland, Sara I.; Bergner, Erin

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of gender role conformity in psychiatric determinants of well-being after of the depathologization of homosexuality from the DSM. In order to examine the heterosexualizing of sanity in U.S. psychiatric and popular cultures, we analyze archived psychiatrist-dictated patient charts from outpatient psychiatric clinics from a Midwestern medical center (n = 45). We highlight ways physicians deployed heteronormative gender expectations to describe and treat women’s and men’s depressive illness and implicitly construed troubled female-male relationships and sexual encounters as indices of psychopathology. We theorize how evolving connections between the heteronormal and the psychiatric normal performed some of the same regulatory functions, as did the DSM, coding particular gender performances and partner choices as mentally healthy while relegating others to the realm of disease. Only here, focusing on the mainstream instead of the marginalized kept the ideological work of these scripts hidden from view. PMID:27354850

  19. Conflations of Marital Status and Sanity: Implicit Heterosexist Bias in Psychiatric Diagnosis in Physician-Dictated Charts at a Midwestern Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Metzl, Jonathan M; McClelland, Sara I; Bergner, Erin

    2016-06-01

    This paper discusses the role of gender role conformity in psychiatric determinants of well-being after of the depathologization of homosexuality from the DSM. In order to examine the heterosexualizing of sanity in U.S. psychiatric and popular cultures, we analyze archived psychiatrist-dictated patient charts from outpatient psychiatric clinics from a Midwestern medical center (n = 45). We highlight ways physicians deployed heteronormative gender expectations to describe and treat women's and men's depressive illness and implicitly construed troubled female-male relationships and sexual encounters as indices of psychopathology. We theorize how evolving connections between the heteronormal and the psychiatric normal performed some of the same regulatory functions, as did the DSM, coding particular gender performances and partner choices as mentally healthy while relegating others to the realm of disease. Only here, focusing on the mainstream instead of the marginalized kept the ideological work of these scripts hidden from view. PMID:27354850

  20. The Regenstrief Medical Record System: a quarter century experience.

    PubMed

    McDonald, C J; Overhage, J M; Tierney, W M; Dexter, P R; Martin, D K; Suico, J G; Zafar, A; Schadow, G; Blevins, L; Glazener, T; Meeks-Johnson, J; Lemmon, L; Warvel, J; Porterfield, B; Warvel, J; Cassidy, P; Lindbergh, D; Belsito, A; Tucker, M; Williams, B; Wodniak, C

    1999-06-01

    Entrusted with the records for more than 1.5 million patients, the Regenstrief Medical Record System (RMRS) has evolved into a fast and comprehensive data repository used extensively at three hospitals on the Indiana University Medical Center campus and more than 30 Indianapolis clinics. The RMRS routinely captures laboratory results, narrative reports, orders, medications, radiology reports, registration information, nursing assessments, vital signs, EKGs and other clinical data. In this paper, we describe the RMRS data model, file structures and architecture, as well as recent necessary changes to these as we coordinate a collaborative effort among all major Indianapolis hospital systems, improving patient care by capturing city-wide laboratory and encounter data. We believe that our success represents persistent efforts to build interfaces directly to multiple independent instruments and other data collection systems, using medical standards such as HL7, LOINC, and DICOM. Inpatient and outpatient order entry systems, instruments for visit notes and on-line questionnaires that replace hardcopy forms, and intelligent use of coded data entry supplement the RMRS. Physicians happily enter orders, problems, allergies, visit notes, and discharge summaries into our locally developed Gopher order entry system, as we provide them with convenient output forms, choice lists, defaults, templates, reminders, drug interaction information, charge information, and on-line articles and textbooks. To prepare for the future, we have begun wrapping our system in Web browser technology, testing voice dictation and understanding, and employing wireless technology.

  1. Semantic models in medical record data-bases.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, S

    1980-01-01

    A great effort has been recently made in the area of data-base design in a number of application fields (banking, insurance, travel, etc.). Yet, it is the current experience of computer scientists in the medical field that medical record information-processing requires less rigid and more complete definition of data-base specifications for a much more heterogeneous set of data, for different users who have different aims. Hence, it is important to state that the data-base in the medical field ought to be a model of the environment for which it was created, rather than just a collection of data. New more powerful and more flexible data-base models are being now designed, particularly in the USA, where the current trend in medicine is to implement, in the same structure, the connection among more different and specific users and the data-base (for administrative aims, medical care control, treatments, statistical and epidemiological results, etc.). In such a way the single users are able to talk with the data-base without interfering with one another. The present paper outlines that this multi-purpose flexibility can be achieved by improving mainly the capabilities of the data-base model. This concept allows the creation of procedures of semantic integrity control which will certainly have in the future a dramatic impact on important management features, starting from data-quality checking and non-physiological state detections, as far as more medical-oriented procedures like drug interactions, record surveillance and medical care review. That is especially true when a large amount of data are to be processed and the classical hierarchical and network data models are no longer sufficient for developing satisfactory and reliable automatic procedures. In this regard, particular emphasis will be dedicated to the relational model and, at the highest level, to the same semantic data model.

  2. Five benefits of call recording for medical practices.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Despite documentation's essential positioning in medical practices of all sizes and specialties, one aspect of patient and insurance provider interaction remains overlooked in the majority of practices: telephone-based communication. In many cases, patient and payment information exchanged via telephone is logged with little more than a note typed or written in the patient file. This leads to "he said/she said" disagreements with regard to patient service, consultations, and coding; reduced payments from insurance providers; incomplete patient records; liability exposure; and a host of other problems. In this article, call recording professional Roland Murphy explains how a call recording solution can fill the gaps in documentation, increase practice revenues, and improve patient care without excessive investment costs and while protecting patient confidentiality. PMID:20480782

  3. Interface between shamanism and psychiatry in Miyako Islands, Okinawa, Japan: a viewpoint from medical and psychiatric anthropology.

    PubMed

    Shimoji, A

    1991-12-01

    This study is the first report regarding the borderland between psychiatry and shamanism in Miyako Islands, Okinawa, Japan. Folk healing practices are still flourishing on the islands. Most mentally ill persons we examined admitted to having consulted shamans. Although there is a need to assess the positive and negative effects of shamanistic practices on Miyako Islands' health care system as a whole, this report indicates the urgent need to come to terms with the interaction between shamanism and psychiatry on a multidimensional level. We describe here psychotic illness attributed to kandaari. These cases underline the importance of understanding "the explanatory model" (Kleinman 1979) of people as regards the causes and the effective healing of illness. From the viewpoint of medical and psychiatric anthropology, aspects of the treatment of such patients in the biocultural context are described. PMID:1813672

  4. Psychiatric Correlates of Medical Care Costs among Veterans Receiving Mental Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Tracy L.; Moore, Sally A.; Luterek, Jane; Varra, Alethea A.; Hyerle, Lynne; Bush, Kristen; Mariano, Mary Jean; Liu, Chaun-Fen; Kivlahan, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Research on increased medical care costs associated with posttraumatic sequelae has focused on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the provisional diagnosis of Disorders of Extreme Stress Not Otherwise Specified (DESNOS) encompasses broader trauma-related difficulties and may be uniquely related to medical costs. We investigated whether…

  5. Attitudes of Medical Students towards Psychiatry: Effects of Training, Courses in Psychiatry, Psychiatric Experience and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhnigk, Olaf; Strebel, Bernd; Schilauske, Joerg; Jueptner, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The attitudes of medical students towards psychiatry and psychotherapy were examined considering the extent of their education, previous psychiatry experience, the evaluation of the course, their career intentions and socio-demographic variables. Methods: Five hundred and eight medical students in their second, fifth, ninth and tenth…

  6. A Pharmacy Blueprint for Electronic Medical Record Implementation Success

    PubMed Central

    Bach, David S.; Risko, Kenneth R.; Farber, Margo S.; Polk, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Implementation of an integrated, electronic medical record (EMR) has been promoted as a means of improving patient safety and quality. While there are a few reports of such processes that incorporate computerized prescriber order entry, pharmacy verification, an electronic medication administration record (eMAR), point-of-care barcode scanning, and clinical decision support, there are no published reports on how a pharmacy department can best participate in implementing such a process across a multihospital health care system. Method: This article relates the experience of the design, build, deployment, and maintenance of an integrated EMR solution from the pharmacy perspective. It describes a 9-month planning and build phase and the subsequent rollout at 8 hospitals over the following 13 months. Results: Key components to success are identified, as well as a set of guiding principles that proved invaluable in decision making and dispute resolution. Labor/personnel requirements for the various stages of the process are discussed, as are issues involving medication workflow analysis, drug database considerations, the development of clinical order sets, and incorporation of bar-code scanning of medications. Recommended implementation and maintenance strategies are presented, and the impact of EMR implementation on the pharmacy practice model and revenue analysis are examined. Conclusion: Adherence to the principles and practices outlined in this article can assist pharmacy administrators and clinicians during all medication-related phases of the development, implementation, and maintenance of an EMR solution. Furthermore, review and incorporation of some or all of practices presented may help ease the process and ensure its success. PMID:26405340

  7. Disciplined doctors: the electronic medical record and physicians' changing relationship to medical knowledge.

    PubMed

    Reich, Adam

    2012-04-01

    This study explores the effects of the electronic medical record (EMR) on the power of the medical profession. It is based on twenty-five in-depth interviews with administrators and physicians across three departments of a large, U.S. integrated health system, as well as ethnographic observation, all of which took place between September of 2009 and December of 2010. While scholarship on professional power has tended toward the opposite poles of professional dominance and deprofessionalization or proletarianization, I find that doctors' interactions with the EMR reconcile these perspectives by making physicians' professional identities consistent with their subordination to bureaucratic authority. After examining the electronic medical record as a disciplinary technology, the paper analyzes variation in the extent to which practitioners' professional identities are reconciled with bureaucratic subordination across the different departments studies.

  8. [Electronic medical records: medical and legal aspects, privacy, safety, and legal validity].

    PubMed

    Ravizza, P; Pasini, E

    2001-03-01

    Medical records must collect all data concerning in-hospital management of patients: data have to be verified and easily retrievable. Clinicians are responsible for both format and content of medical records. Respect of patient's privacy must be made sure both during on-line management and long-term storage of records. Computerization can offer many advantages to clinicians, but needs some significant adjustments: training and motivation of operators, arrangement of clinical processes and of administrative rules to technological developments. Nevertheless, some important results can be afforded: standardization of procedures, distribution of univocal, verified and ubiquitous data to all concerned operators, protection against undesired retrieval, reliability of effective reports. Preliminary condition is a clinical local area network, widespread into the institution. Database implementation must follow well accepted methodology: flow chart design of data dictionary, standardization of data coding, input of verified data, effective reporting. Access to data must be controlled by sophisticated and sure password system. Back-up of data must be automatically available with adequate timing and methodology. Respect of rules on patient's privacy must be realized whenever possible. Complex clinical records should be made available, containing data, signals and images (both single frames and dynamic sequences), due to continuous technical progress of diagnostic tools. Medical records must be available for long periods of time: database engine and managing tools must be selected among well accepted and largely available producers; informatic assistance must be assured for management and evolution of systems over the years.

  9. Clinical research on the utility of hypnosis in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of medical and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Nash, Michael R; Perez, Nicole; Tasso, Anthony; Levy, Jacob J

    2009-10-01

    The authors summarize 4 articles of special interest to the hypnosis community in the general scientific and medical literatures. All are empirical studies testing the clinical utility of hypnosis, and together address the role of hypnosis in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of medical and psychiatric disorders/conditions. The first is a randomized controlled study of smoking cessation treatments comparing a hypnosis-based protocol to an established behavioral counseling protocol. Hypnosis quit rates are superior to those of the accepted behavioral counseling protocol. A second study with pediatric patients finds hypnosis critically helpful in differentiating nonepileptic seizure-like behaviors (pseudoseizures) from epilepsy. The remaining 2 papers are randomized controlled trials testing whether hypnosis is effective in helping patients manage the emotional distress of medical procedures associated with cancer treatment. Among female survivors of breast cancer, hypnosis reduces perceived hot flashes and associated emotional and sleep disruptions. Among pediatric cancer patients, a brief hypnotic intervention helps control venepuncture-related pain. PMID:20183001

  10. Use of electronic medical records in oncology outcomes research.

    PubMed

    Kanas, Gena; Morimoto, Libby; Mowat, Fionna; O'Malley, Cynthia; Fryzek, Jon; Nordyke, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Oncology outcomes research could benefit from the use of an oncology-specific electronic medical record (EMR) network. The benefits and challenges of using EMR in general health research have been investigated; however, the utility of EMR for oncology outcomes research has not been explored. Compared to current available oncology databases and registries, an oncology-specific EMR could provide comprehensive and accurate information on clinical diagnoses, personal and medical histories, planned and actual treatment regimens, and post-treatment outcomes, to address research questions from patients, policy makers, the pharmaceutical industry, and clinicians/researchers. Specific challenges related to structural (eg, interoperability, data format/entry), clinical (eg, maintenance and continuity of records, variety of coding schemes), and research-related (eg, missing data, generalizability, privacy) issues must be addressed when building an oncology-specific EMR system. Researchers should engage with medical professional groups to guide development of EMR systems that would ultimately help improve the quality of cancer care through oncology outcomes research.

  11. Integration of a Psychiatric Service in a Long-Term Charitable Facility for People with Intellectual Disabilities: A 5-Year Medication Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruggerini, Ciro; Guaraldi, Gian Paolo; Russo, Angela; Neviani, Vittoria; Castagnini, Augusto

    2004-01-01

    Since the implementation of a psychiatric service in a long-term facility for people with intellectual disability, the usage of psychotropic and anti-convulsant drugs has been surveyed over the 5-year period 1994-1999. At that time, although the overall prevalence rate of residents on medication was not declining significantly, a decrease in…

  12. Leveraging electronic health records to study pleiotropic effects on bipolar disorder and medical comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, M L; Ryu, E; Jenkins, G D; Batzler, A; Nassan, M M; Cuellar-Barboza, A B; Pathak, J; McElroy, S L; Frye, M A; Biernacka, J M

    2016-01-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder (BD) have a high prevalence of comorbid medical illness. However, the mechanisms underlying these comorbidities with BD are not well known. Certain genetic variants may have pleiotropic effects, increasing the risk of BD and other medical illnesses simultaneously. In this study, we evaluated the association of BD-susceptibility genetic variants with various medical conditions that tend to co-exist with BD, using electronic health records (EHR) data linked to genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. Data from 7316 Caucasian subjects were used to test the association of 19 EHR-derived phenotypes with 34 SNPs that were previously reported to be associated with BD. After Bonferroni multiple testing correction, P<7.7 × 10−5 was considered statistically significant. The top association findings suggested that the BD risk alleles at SNP rs4765913 in CACNA1C gene and rs7042161 in SVEP1 may be associated with increased risk of ‘cardiac dysrhythmias' (odds ratio (OR)=1.1, P=3.4 × 10−3) and ‘essential hypertension' (OR=1.1, P=3.5 × 10−3), respectively. Although these associations are not statistically significant after multiple testing correction, both genes have been previously implicated with cardiovascular phenotypes. Moreover, we present additional evidence supporting these associations, particularly the association of the SVEP1 SNP with hypertension. This study shows the potential for EHR-based analyses of large cohorts to discover pleiotropic effects contributing to complex psychiatric traits and commonly co-occurring medical conditions. PMID:27529678

  13. Leveraging electronic health records to study pleiotropic effects on bipolar disorder and medical comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Prieto, M L; Ryu, E; Jenkins, G D; Batzler, A; Nassan, M M; Cuellar-Barboza, A B; Pathak, J; McElroy, S L; Frye, M A; Biernacka, J M

    2016-01-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder (BD) have a high prevalence of comorbid medical illness. However, the mechanisms underlying these comorbidities with BD are not well known. Certain genetic variants may have pleiotropic effects, increasing the risk of BD and other medical illnesses simultaneously. In this study, we evaluated the association of BD-susceptibility genetic variants with various medical conditions that tend to co-exist with BD, using electronic health records (EHR) data linked to genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. Data from 7316 Caucasian subjects were used to test the association of 19 EHR-derived phenotypes with 34 SNPs that were previously reported to be associated with BD. After Bonferroni multiple testing correction, P<7.7 × 10(-5) was considered statistically significant. The top association findings suggested that the BD risk alleles at SNP rs4765913 in CACNA1C gene and rs7042161 in SVEP1 may be associated with increased risk of 'cardiac dysrhythmias' (odds ratio (OR)=1.1, P=3.4 × 10(-3)) and 'essential hypertension' (OR=1.1, P=3.5 × 10(-3)), respectively. Although these associations are not statistically significant after multiple testing correction, both genes have been previously implicated with cardiovascular phenotypes. Moreover, we present additional evidence supporting these associations, particularly the association of the SVEP1 SNP with hypertension. This study shows the potential for EHR-based analyses of large cohorts to discover pleiotropic effects contributing to complex psychiatric traits and commonly co-occurring medical conditions. PMID:27529678

  14. [Psychiatric medication as restraint: between autonomy and protection, is there place for a legal framework?].

    PubMed

    Bernheim, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    The use of chemical restraint has been regulated for the past ten years in Quebec. However, clinical, ethical and legal issues, sometimes contradictory, have not really been considered during the legislative process leading to consolidation in its current form. The author supports that, because of the absence of consent and the effects of medication, a specific legal framework to the use of medication is necessary in a context of unplanned intervention to protect both patients and medical staff. This framework would prescribe good practice, take into account the non-medical aspects of consent to care and formalize the practice as an exception to the rule. In addition, the symbolism of law, through which social solidarity can be expressed, must not be underestimated.

  15. Reflecting on the ethical administration of computerized medical records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collmann, Jeff R.

    1995-05-01

    This presentation examines the ethical issues raised by computerized image management and communication systems (IMAC), the ethical principals that should guide development of policies, procedures and practices for IMACS systems, and who should be involved in developing a hospital's approach to these issues. The ready access of computerized records creates special hazards of which hospitals must beware. Hospitals must maintain confidentiality of patient's records while making records available to authorized users as efficiently as possible. The general conditions of contemporary health care undermine protecting the confidentiality of patient record. Patients may not provide health care institutions with information about themselves under conditions of informed consent. The field of information science must design sophisticated systems of computer security that stratify access, create audit trails on data changes and system use, safeguard patient data from corruption, and protect the databases from outside invasion. Radiology professionals must both work with information science experts in their own hospitals to create institutional safeguards and include the adequacy of security measures as a criterion for evaluating PACS systems. New policies and procedures on maintaining computerized patient records must be developed that obligate all members of the health care staff, not just care givers. Patients must be informed about the existence of computerized medical records, the rules and practices that govern their dissemination and given the opportunity to give or withhold consent for their use. Departmental and hospital policies on confidentiality should be reviewed to determine if revisions are necessary to manage computer-based records. Well developed discussions of the ethical principles and administrative policies on confidentiality and informed consent and of the risks posed by computer-based patient records systems should be included in initial and continuing

  16. Cardiovascular disease documentation and counseling in electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jaeyong; Huerta, Timothy R; Ford, Eric W

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between clinical reminders generated by electronic medical record (EMR) systems and providers giving prevention counseling to patients at-risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Data were extracted from the 2012 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS). Results indicate that the providers routinely using clinical reminders are significantly more likely to document height and weight data to determine risk and provide the recommended counseling to patients that merit the intervention. The findings are important for policymakers and managers that have been promoting the adoption of more sophisticated EMR decision support functionalities across the care delivery spectrum. In particular, the ability to intervene prior to negative health events is an important feature of the movement to improve care quality and reduce costs. PMID:27002255

  17. The University of Washington electronic medical record experience.

    PubMed

    Welton, Nanette J

    2010-07-01

    The Health Sciences Library at the University of Washington initiated and continues to develop a role in the electronic medical record, starting with the development of the first integrated web-based interface, called MINDscape. An Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) grant in 1992 began the process, which also led to the development of a clinical medical librarian position. Over the years, the librarian's role in the clinical environment became more established, and with the advent of clinical online resources, it offered further opportunities for librarians to provide the expertise needed to incorporate the appropriate resources. The collaborative journey continues as librarians, now able to directly access the EMRs, provide information about what resources to use and where best to place them and design how best to provide notes or feedback to clinicians.

  18. [Implementation of the shared medication record is difficult].

    PubMed

    Christensen, Selina; Jensen, Line Due; Kaae, Susanne; Vinding, Kirsten Laila; Petersen, Janne

    2014-07-21

    The aim of the study was to examine the implementation of the shared medication record (SMR) and the barriers to lack of implementation. The research was done in three hospitals in Denmark. Data showed that SMR was not used systematically in the period 5-19 March 2012 at a hospital in the Capital Region of Denmark. We found that motivation, technical problems, time, and competencies were barriers to using SMR. Although all the doctors liked the idea of SMR, they did not find the present version of SMR to be fully developed for use in practice.

  19. Application of an Electronic Medical Record in Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinnis, Patrick J.

    2000-01-01

    Electronic Medical Records (EMR) have been emerging over the past decade. Today, they are replacing the paper chart in clinics throughout the nation. Approximately three years ago, the NASA-JSC Flight Medicine Clinic initiated an assessment of the EMRs available on the market. This assessment included comparing these products with the particular scope of practice at JSC. In 1998, the Logician EMR from Medicalogic was selected for the JSC Flight Medicine Clinic. This presentation reviews the process of selection and implementation of the EMR into the unique practice of aerospace medicine at JSC.

  20. Virtual medical record implementation for enhancing clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Gomoi, Valentin-Sergiu; Dragu, Daniel; Stoicu-Tivadar, Vasile

    2012-01-01

    Development of clinical decision support systems (CDS) is a process which highly depends on the local databases, this resulting in low interoperability. To increase the interoperability of CDS a standard representation of clinical information is needed. The paper suggests a CDS architecture which integrates several HL7 standards and the new vMR (virtual Medical Record). The clinical information for the CDS systems (the vMR) is represented with Topic Maps technology. Beside the implementation of the vMR, the architecture integrates: a Data Manager, an interface, a decision making system (based on Egadss), a retrieving data module. Conclusions are issued.

  1. Integration of radiographic images with an electronic medical record.

    PubMed Central

    Overhage, J. M.; Aisen, A.; Barnes, M.; Tucker, M.; McDonald, C. J.

    2001-01-01

    Radiographic images are important and expensive diagnostic tests. However, the provider caring for the patient often does not review the images directly due to time constraints. Institutions can use picture archiving and communications systems to make images more available to the provider, but this may not be the best solution. We integrated radiographic image review into the Regenstrief Medical Record System in order to address this problem. To achieve adequate performance, we store JPEG compressed images directly in the RMRS. Currently, physicians review about 5% of all radiographic studies using the RMRS image review function. PMID:11825241

  2. Patient clustering with uncoded text in electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Henao, Ricardo; Murray, Jared; Ginsburg, Geoffrey; Carin, Lawrence; Lucas, Joseph E

    2013-01-01

    We propose a mixture model for text data designed to capture underlying structure in the history of present illness section of electronic medical records data. Additionally, we propose a method to induce bias that leads to more homogeneous sets of diagnoses for patients in each cluster. We apply our model to a collection of electronic records from an emergency department and compare our results to three other relevant models in order to assess performance. Results using standard metrics demonstrate that patient clusters from our model are more homogeneous when compared to others, and qualitative analyses suggest that our approach leads to interpretable patient sub-populations when applied to real data. Finally, we demonstrate an example of our patient clustering model to identify adverse drug events.

  3. Applying XDS for sharing CDA-based medical records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joong Il; Jang, Bong Mun; Han, Dong Hoon; Yang, Keon Ho; Kang, Won-Suk; Jung, Haijo; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2006-03-01

    Many countries have set long-term objectives for establishing an Electronic Healthcare Records system(EHRs). Various IT Strategies note that integration of EHR systems has a high priority. Because the EHR systems are based on different information models and different technology platforms, one of the key integration problems in the realization of the EHRs for the continuity of patient care, is the inability to share patient records between various institutions. Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) committee has defined the detailed implementations of existing standards such as DICOM, HL7, in a publicly available document called the IHE technical framework (IHE-TF). Cross-enterprise document sharing (XDS), one of IHE technical frameworks, is describing how to apply the standards into the information systems for the sharing of medical documents among hospitals. This study aims to design Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) schema based on HL7, and to apply implementation strategies of XDS using this CDA schema.

  4. Patient Clustering with Uncoded Text in Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Henao, Ricardo; Murray, Jared; Ginsburg, Geoffrey; Carin, Lawrence; Lucas, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a mixture model for text data designed to capture underlying structure in the history of present illness section of electronic medical records data. Additionally, we propose a method to induce bias that leads to more homogeneous sets of diagnoses for patients in each cluster. We apply our model to a collection of electronic records from an emergency department and compare our results to three other relevant models in order to assess performance. Results using standard metrics demonstrate that patient clusters from our model are more homogeneous when compared to others, and qualitative analyses suggest that our approach leads to interpretable patient sub-populations when applied to real data. Finally, we demonstrate an example of our patient clustering model to identify adverse drug events. PMID:24551361

  5. 28 CFR 513.44 - Fees for copies of Inmate Central File and Medical Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Institution for Information § 513.44 Fees for copies of Inmate Central File and Medical Records. Within a... and Medical Records. 513.44 Section 513.44 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF... disclosable documents maintained in the Inmate Central File and Medical Record. Fees for the copies are to...

  6. 77 FR 42555 - Proposed Information Collection (Request for and Authorization To Release Medical Records or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-19

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Request for and Authorization To Release Medical Records or... solicits comments on information needed to obtain a patient written consent to disclose medical records or... Medical Records or Health Information, VA Form 10-5345. b. Individual's Request for a Copy of their...

  7. 41 CFR 51-9.303-2 - Special requirements for medical/psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... medical/psychological records. 51-9.303-2 Section 51-9.303-2 Public Contracts and Property Management... for medical/psychological records. (a) The Executive Director may require an individual who requests access to his medical or psychological record to designate a physician of his choice to whom he...

  8. 41 CFR 51-9.303-2 - Special requirements for medical/psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... medical/psychological records. 51-9.303-2 Section 51-9.303-2 Public Contracts and Property Management... for medical/psychological records. (a) The Executive Director may require an individual who requests access to his medical or psychological record to designate a physician of his choice to whom he...

  9. 32 CFR 1801.31 - Special procedures for medical and psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special procedures for medical and psychological... Special procedures for medical and psychological records. (a) In general. When a request for access or amendment involves medical or psychological records and when the originator determines that such records...

  10. School Administration Handbook for Approved Schools for Medical Record Technicians. Revised April 66.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Medical Record Librarians, Chicago, IL.

    These guidelines are for the development and operation of approved programs to prepare medical record technicians. "School Approval" discusses the cooperative roles of the American Medical Association (AMA) Council on Medical Education and the American Association of Medical Record Librarians (AAMRL) in connection with program approval, and other…

  11. A guide for medical information searches of bibliographic databases - psychiatric research as an example.

    PubMed

    Löhönen, Johanna; Isohanni, Matti; Nieminen, Pentti; Miettunen, Jouko

    2009-09-01

    Information overload, demanding work with strict time limits, and the extensive number of medical bibliographic databases and other research sources all underline the importance of being able to search for up-to-date information effectively. Medical journals play a key role in providing access to the latest information in medicine and health and bibliographic databases play an important role in accessing them. This paper sheds light on the role of the information search process and discusses how to approach key medical bibliographic databases and information sources, using the field of psychiatry as an example. Because of an increasing amount of information, the constant renewal within the discipline and a variety of services available, those seeking information must precisely define what kind of information they are looking for and from which sources the information needed may be found.

  12. Integrated medical-psychiatric treatment of the "crisis phase" in severe protein-energy malnutrition secondary to major eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Alfano, V; Bellini, O; De Filippo, E; Alfonsi, L; Pasanisi, F; Contaldo, F

    2004-06-01

    C.A., a 23-year old male was admitted in the clinical nutrition medical ward for severe, complicated protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) [body mass index (BMI) 11.08 kg/m2; body weight kg 35.81 due to major eating disorders. C.A.'s personality was narcissistic, with a rigid psychic structure. During hospitalitation (lasted 72 days) two acute episodes (a possibly self-inflicted damage and a persecution feeling) occurred that we consider as part of the "crisis phase", the period in which the patient's restrictive behaviour is no longer able to keep his personality equilibrium stable. The patient was treated by an integrated medical and psychiatric approach, including periods of never forced parenteral nutrition, nutritional and intensive psychoterapeutic interventions. For a short period the patient received also a pharmacological support (aloperidol orally). Treatment was successful and the patient was discharged completely autonomous and followed up on an outpatient basis. After about one year follow-up he is still in good clinical condition and in sufficient psychological equilibrium.

  13. Treatment of medical, psychiatric, and substance-use comorbidities in people infected with HIV who use drugs

    PubMed Central

    Altice, Frederick L; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Soriano, Vincent V; Schechter, Mauro; Friedland, Gerald H

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected drug users have increased age-matched morbidity and mortality compared with HIV-infected people who do not use drugs. Substance-use disorders negatively affect the health of HIV-infected drug users, who also have frequent medical and psychiatric comorbidities that complicate HIV treatment and prevention. Evidence-based treatments are available for the management of substance-use disorders, mental illness, HIV and other infectious complications such as viral hepatitis and tuberculosis, and many non-HIV-associated comorbidities. Tuberculosis co-infection in HIV-infected drug users, including disease caused by drug-resistant strains, is acquired and transmitted as a consequence of inadequate prescription of antiretroviral therapy, poor adherence, and repeated interfaces with congregate settings such as prisons. Medication-assisted therapies provide the strongest evidence for HIV treatment and prevention efforts, yet are often not available where they are needed most. Antiretroviral therapy, when prescribed and adherence is at an optimum, improves health-related outcomes for HIV infection and many of its comorbidities, including tuberculosis, viral hepatitis, and renal and cardiovascular disease. Simultaneous clinical management of multiple comorbidities in HIV-infected drug users might result in complex pharmacokinetic drug interactions that must be adequately addressed. Moreover, interventions to improve adherence to treatment, including integration of health services delivery, are needed. Multifaceted, interdisciplinary approaches are urgently needed to achieve parity in health outcomes in HIV-infected drug users. PMID:20650518

  14. Comparing the safety and efficacy of atypical antipsychotics in psychiatric patients with comorbid medical illnesses.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, John W

    2009-01-01

    Patients with severe mental illnesses have a higher risk of premature mortality than the general US population. Illnesses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are frequently complicated by physical comorbidities such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, including both coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease, which are associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death among individuals with severe mental illnesses. Modifiable risk factors such as dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, and obesity are common in this population and contribute to risk for both diabetes and coronary heart disease. While many psychotropic medications used in the treatment of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder have similar efficacy, some medications are associated with more metabolic side effects than others, and clinicians should consider these risks when choosing among these medications. Patients with severe mental illnesses tend to have reduced access to health care and treatment for medical comorbidities compared with the general population. Therefore, clinicians involved in the care of this patient population should screen and monitor carefully for cardiometabolic side effects and risk factors. PMID:19570499

  15. A Catalog of Psychiatric Medications Used in the Treatment of Child and Adolescent Mental Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Susan Hackbarth; Nims, Donald R.

    1996-01-01

    Although school counselors are increasingly involved in administering medications to students with emotional, conduct, and behavioral problems, few counselors have training in psychopharmacology. Gives a brief history of psychopharmacological interventions, and describes usage and side effects of drugs for psychosis, depression, anxiety, and…

  16. Training Groups and Foreign-Born Psychiatric Medical Residents in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Andrea; Juthani, Nalini

    1991-01-01

    About two-thirds of all psychiatry residents are foreign-born medical graduates. Discusses the operation, content, focus, challenges, and benefits of a training group experience for the psychiatry residents at Bronx Lebanon Hospital. The goals are to aid acculturation, improve group psychotherapeutic skills, encourage self-awareness, and promote…

  17. Psychiatric Services for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Medication Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Andrew T.; Hahn, Joan Earle; Hayward, Katharine

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the medication management and treatment provided in a specialty outpatient psychiatry clinic for 198 community-residing children and adults with intellectual disability and other developmental disabilities (IDD) referred to the clinic and discharged between 1999 and 2008. Using a descriptive design, data…

  18. Teaching Medication Compliance to Psychiatric Residents: Placing an Orphan Topic into a Training Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiden, Peter J.; Rao, Nyapati

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Medication compliance is an orphan topic. Training in the understanding and management of noncompliance does not neatly fall within the domain of psychopharmacology, nor does it clearly fit into other core curricula areas, such as clinical interviewing or psychotherapy training. The objective of this article is to increase awareness…

  19. Evaluation of a Videotape Technique for Measuring Clinical Psychiatric Skills of Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tardiff, Kenneth; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A technique developed at SUNY at Stony Brook measures changes in second-year medical students' ability to recognize psychopathology following an educational program in psychobiology. It compares ratings of videotaped interviews by the students to the ratings of the interviews made by the faculty preceptors participating in the teaching program.…

  20. Factors associated with antidepressant, anxiolytic, and other psychotropic medication use to treat psychiatric symptoms in the city of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Blay, Sergio L; Fillenbaum, Gerda G; Pitta, José C; Peluso, Erica T

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence and characteristics of adult psychotropic medication use in São Paulo, Brazil. Information on lifetime and 12-month psychotropic medication use, and psychiatric status was obtained from a representative sample of 2000 adults aged 18-65 years in São Paulo, Brazil. Lifetime and 12-month use of psychotropic medications was 16.8 and 7.1%, respectively. Of the 22.8% of patients with current psychiatric problems, 29.5% reported lifetime use and 15.8% (5.6% of the sample) reported 12-month use (anxiolytics: 2.7%, antidepressants: 1.8%, alternative medicines: 0.9%, antipsychotics: 0.4%, mood stabilizers: 0.4%, hypnotics: 0.3%; multiple class use occurred). The most frequent prescribers were psychiatrists and general practitioners. Determinants of use included identification as a psychiatric case (four-fold increased odds), being female (three-fold increase), age (4-5% per additional year), and lower odds if married. Education, employment status, and birth in São Paulo were not associated with use. Income did not affect anxiolytic use, but antidepressant and alternative medicine use was associated with higher income. These results show that psychotropic drug use was comparatively low. Only 15.8% of patients with psychiatric problems reported recent psychotropic use. Comparable with other studies, use was greater among women and increased with age.

  1. Relevance of the electronic computer to hospital medical records.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J H

    1969-10-18

    During the past 30 years an "information explosion" has completely changed patterns of illness. Unit files of individual patients have become so large that they are increasingly difficult both to store physically and to assimilate mentally. We have reached a communications barriers which poses a major threat to the efficient practice of clinical medicine.At the same time a new kind of machine, the electronic digital computer, which was invented only 26 years ago, has already come to dominate large areas of military, scientific, commercial, and industrial activity. Its supremacy rests on its ability to perform any data procedure automatically and incredibly quickly.Computers are being employed in clinical medicine in hospitals for various purposes. They can act as arithmetic calculators, they can process and analyse output from recording devices, and they can make possible the automation of various machine systems.However, in the field of case records their role is much less well defined, for here the organization of data as a preliminary to computer input is the real stumbling-block. Data banks of retrospective selected clinical information have been in operation in some centres for a number of years. Attempts are now being made to design computerized "total information systems" to replace conventional paper records, and the possibility of automated diagnosis is being seriously discussed.In my view, however, the medical profession is in danger of being dazzled by optimistic claims about the usefulness of computers in case record processing. The solution to the present problems of record storage and handling is very simple, and does not involve computerization.

  2. The role of psychiatric and medical traditions in the discovery and description of anorexia nervosa in France, Germany, and Italy, 1873-1918.

    PubMed

    Habermas, T

    1991-06-01

    Should the national idiosyncrasies in the medical history of anorexia nervosa be attributed to differences in its prevalence or to differences in medical thinking? French, German, and Italian literature prior to World War I demonstrates that three approaches within traditions of psychiatric or medical thinking suffice to explain the national differences in reports of anorexia nervosa: minute clinical description, attentiveness to psychological facts, and attentiveness to nutrition. Furthermore, additional contributing factors are considered: general interest in neuroses, the institutional context, and the political context. As a result, historical epidemiological inferences are not warranted on the basis of the number of publications alone.

  3. A clinical trial of a knowledge-based medical record.

    PubMed

    Safran, C; Rind, D M; Davis, R B; Sands, D Z; Caraballo, E; Rippel, K; Wang, Q; Rury, C; Makadon, H J; Cotton, D J

    1995-01-01

    To meet the needs of primary care physicians caring for patients with HIV infection, we developed a knowledge-based medical record to allow the on-line patient record to play an active role in the care process. These programs integrate the on-line patient record, rule-based decision support, and full-text information retrieval into a clinical workstation for the practicing clinician. To determine whether use of a knowledge-based medical record was associated with more rapid and complete adherence to practice guidelines and improved quality of care, we performed a controlled clinical trial among physicians and nurse practitioners caring for 349 patients infected with the human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV); 191 patients were treated by 65 physicians and nurse practitioners assigned to the intervention group, and 158 patients were treated by 61 physicians and nurse practitioners assigned to the control group. During the 18-month study period, the computer generated 303 alerts in the intervention group and 388 in the control group. The median response time of clinicians to these alerts was 11 days in the intervention group and 52 days in the control group (PJJ0.0001, log-rank test). During the study, the computer generated 432 primary care reminders for the intervention group and 360 reminders for the control group. The median response time of clinicians to these alerts was 114 days in the intervention group and more than 500 days in the control group (PJJ0.0001, log-rank test). Of the 191 patients in the intervention group, 67 (35%) had one or more hospitalizations, compared with 70 (44%) of the 158 patients in the control group (PJ=J0.04, Wilcoxon test stratified for initial CD4 count). There was no difference in survival between the intervention and control groups (P = 0.18, log-rank test). We conclude that our clinical workstation significantly changed physicians' behavior in terms of their response to alerts regarding primary care interventions and that these

  4. Change Management – Recommendations for Successful Electronic Medical Records Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Shoolin, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Change is difficult and managing change even more so. With the advent of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) and the difficulty of its acceptance, understanding physician’s attitudes and the psychology of change management is imperative. While many authors describe change management theories, one comes nearest to describing this particularly difficult transition. In 1969, Elizabeth Kübler-Ross wrote her seminal treatise, On Death and Dying, detailing the psychological changes terminally ill patients undergo. Her grieving model is a template to examine the impact of change. By following a physician through the EMR maze, understanding the difficulties he/she perceives and developing a plan other change agents are able to use, the paper gives practical recommendations to EMR change management. PMID:23616842

  5. Role prediction using Electronic Medical Record system audits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Gunter, Carl A; Liebovitz, David; Tian, Jian; Malin, Bradley

    2011-01-01

    Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) provide convenient access to patient data for parties who should have it, but, unless managed properly, may also provide it to those who should not. Distinguishing the two is a core security challenge for EMRs. Strategies proposed to address these problems include Role Based Access Control (RBAC), which assigns collections of privileges called roles to users, and Experience Based Access Management (EBAM), which analyzes audit logs to determine access rights. In this paper, we integrate RBAC and EBAM through an algorithm, called Roll-Up, to manage roles effectively. In doing so, we introduce the concept of "role prediction" to identify roles from audit data. We apply the algorithm to three months of logs from Northwestern Memorial Hospital's Cerner system with approximately 8000 users and 140 roles. We demonstrate that existing roles can be predicted with 50% accuracy and intelligent grouping of roles through Roll-Up can facilitate 65% accuracy.

  6. Forward secure digital signature for electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao-Chang; Huang, To-Yeh; Hou, Ting-Wei

    2012-04-01

    The Technology Safeguard in Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Title II has addressed a way to maintain the integrity and non-repudiation of Electronic Medical Record (EMR). One of the important cryptographic technologies is mentioned in the ACT is digital signature; however, the ordinary digital signature (e.g. DSA, RSA, GQ...) has an inherent weakness: if the key (certificate) is updated, than all signatures, even the ones generated before the update, are no longer trustworthy. Unfortunately, the current most frequently used digital signature schemes are categorized into the ordinary digital signature scheme; therefore, the objective of this paper is to analyze the shortcoming of using ordinary digital signatures in EMR and to propose a method to use forward secure digital signature to sign EMR to ensure that the past EMR signatures remain trustworthy while the key (certificate) is updated.

  7. Psychiatric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Wheat, Santina; Dschida, Dorothy; Talen, Mary R

    2016-06-01

    Psychiatric emergencies are acute disturbances in thought, behavior, mood, or social relationship that require immediate intervention as defined by the patient, family, or social unit to save the patient and/or others from imminent danger. Ensuring the safety of the patient, surrounding persons, and the medical team is the first step of evaluation. Treatment focuses on stabilization of the patient, then on specific symptoms and ultimately the cause of symptoms. There are important legal considerations, particularly regarding involuntary admissions. It is important to debrief with the patient, surrounding family, and the health care team to ensure a continued therapeutic alliance and the emotional health of all involved. PMID:27262012

  8. Factors Affecting Accuracy of Data Abstracted from Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Zozus, Meredith N.; Pieper, Carl; Johnson, Constance M.; Johnson, Todd R.; Franklin, Amy; Smith, Jack; Zhang, Jiajie

    2015-01-01

    Objective Medical record abstraction (MRA) is often cited as a significant source of error in research data, yet MRA methodology has rarely been the subject of investigation. Lack of a common framework has hindered application of the extant literature in practice, and, until now, there were no evidence-based guidelines for ensuring data quality in MRA. We aimed to identify the factors affecting the accuracy of data abstracted from medical records and to generate a framework for data quality assurance and control in MRA. Methods Candidate factors were identified from published reports of MRA. Content validity of the top candidate factors was assessed via a four-round two-group Delphi process with expert abstractors with experience in clinical research, registries, and quality improvement. The resulting coded factors were categorized into a control theory-based framework of MRA. Coverage of the framework was evaluated using the recent published literature. Results Analysis of the identified articles yielded 292 unique factors that affect the accuracy of abstracted data. Delphi processes overall refuted three of the top factors identified from the literature based on importance and five based on reliability (six total factors refuted). Four new factors were identified by the Delphi. The generated framework demonstrated comprehensive coverage. Significant underreporting of MRA methodology in recent studies was discovered. Conclusion The framework generated from this research provides a guide for planning data quality assurance and control for studies using MRA. The large number and variability of factors indicate that while prospective quality assurance likely increases the accuracy of abstracted data, monitoring the accuracy during the abstraction process is also required. Recent studies reporting research results based on MRA rarely reported data quality assurance or control measures, and even less frequently reported data quality metrics with research results. Given

  9. Intranet-based multi-purpose medical records in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Dugas, M; Bosch, R; Paulus, R; Lenz, T

    1999-01-01

    Quality assurance in orthopaedics--as in any medical speciality--relies on precise medical records. Data quality is crucial for statistical evaluation; missing values cannot be avoided but must be minimized. The quality assurance system must be accessible from many locations within the clinic; given the complex and heterogeneous computing infrastructure this is a technological challenge. Intranet technology--the application of internet-tools in local networks--can help to solve the technical problems. A generic Intranet-based quality assurance system in orthopaedics was designed, implemented and evaluated. The basic concept is an intranet data entry form which is generated semi-automatically from the data definition. This form is adapted according to the individual needs of the doctors (intelligent data entry). By flexible data transformation the same data set is used for clinical reports as well as scientific evaluations. The first use was for ultrasound examinations of neonatal hips. A report form consisting of 56 items was designed. Within the first 9-month period 1303 cases have been documented.

  10. Roles of Medical Record and Statistic Staff on Research at the Tawanchai Center.

    PubMed

    Pattaranit, Rumpan; Chantachum, Vasana; Lekboonyasin, Orathai; Pradubwong, Suteera

    2015-08-01

    The medical record and statistic staffs play a crucial role behind the achievements of treatment and research of physicians, nurses and other health care professionals. The medical record and statistic staff are in charge of keeping patient medical records; creating databases; presenting information; sorting patient's information; providing patient medical records and related information for various medical teams and researchers; Besides, the medical record and statistic staff have collaboration with the Center of Cleft Lip-Palate, Khon Kaen University in association with the Tawanchai Project. The Tawanchai Center is an organization, involving multidisciplinary team which aims to continuing provide care for patients with cleft lip and palate and craniofacial deformities who need a long term of treatment since newborns until the age of 19 years. With support and encouragement from the Tawanchai team, the medical record and statistic staff have involved in research under the Tawanchai Centre since then and produced a number of publications locally and internationally.

  11. Factors in medical student beliefs about electronic health record use.

    PubMed

    Harle, Christopher A; Gruber, Laura A; Dewar, Marvin A

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare providers' ongoing investment in electronic health records (EHRs) necessitates an understanding of physicians' expectations about using EHRs. Such understanding may aid educators and administrators when utilizing scarce resources during EHR training and implementation activities. This study aimed to link individual medical student characteristics to their perceptions of EHRs' ease of use and usefulness. This study employed a cross-sectional survey of 126 third-year medical students at a large southeastern university. Using a questionnaire designed for this study and containing previously validated items, the study team measured and related students' expectations about EHR ease of use and usefulness to their computer self-efficacy, openness to change, personality traits, and demographic characteristics. On a seven-point scale, men reported, on average, ease-of-use scores that were 0.71 higher than women's (p < .001). Also, increased computer self-efficacy related to higher expectations of EHR ease of use (p < .01) and usefulness (p < .05). Openness-to-change scores were also associated with higher expectations of EHR ease of use (p < .01) and usefulness (p < .001). Finally, a more conscientious personality was positively associated with EHR ease of use (p < .01). Our findings suggest that medical educators and administrators may consider targeting EHR management strategies on the basis of individual differences. Enhanced training and support interventions may be helpful to women or to clinicians with lower computer self-efficacy, lower openness to change, or less conscientious personalities. Also, current and future physicians who rate higher in terms of self-efficacy, openness to change, or conscientiousness may be useful as champions of EHR use among their peers.

  12. [An electronic medical record information system of DICOM-RT module-based in radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Xia, Deguo; Zhou, Linghong; Lei, Li

    2012-06-01

    Electronic medical records (EMR) is the clinical diagnosis, guiding intervention and digital medical service record of outpatient, hospital patients (or care object) in medical institution. And it is the complete, detailed clinical information resource which has produced and recorded in all previous medical treatments. Radiotherapy electronic medical records contain texts, images and graphics, therefore the information is more complicated. This paper proposes an EMR information system based on DICOM-RT standard, through the use of seven objects of DICOM-RT to achieve the information exchange and sharing between different systems, equipments, convenient radiotherapy treatment data management, improve the efficiency of radiation treatment.

  13. A Description of Walter Reed Army Medical Center's In-Patient Psychiatric Service Population 1973 to 1975

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James L.; Wells, John D.; Pearson, David

    1977-01-01

    A three-year evaluation of demographic and diagnostic patterns in a large Army psychiatric in-patient facility is described. Active duty personnel accounted for 83.6 percent of patient episodes. No simple catchment area could be defined for this facility. Active duty patient episodes tended to be with younger, junior enlisted men whose sicknesses were most frequently diagnosed as schizophrenia. The diseases of blacks were diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenia more frequently than in whites. Latent schizophrenia or undifferentiated schizophrenia were diagnosed more frequently in whites than in blacks. The illnesses of active duty female military personnel were more frequently diagnosed as neurotic than as schizophrenic. Of the patient episodes during the three-year period, 12.1 percent were about dependents. They were usually the wives of older, senior enlisted men or senior officers and they stayed an average of 12 days in the hospital. On the other hand, 4.3 percent of the patient episodes were about retired personnel. They came from Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) as did their dependents, and the most frequent diagnosis was alcoholism. Their median stay was 15 days. Subsequent studies will attempt to further clarify these initial findings. PMID:904006

  14. [15 years' activity of the Psychosomatic Disorders Section within the Psychiatric Association in the Czech Medical Society].

    PubMed

    Bastecký, J

    1992-08-01

    The author describes in detail the activities of the psychosomatic section of the Psychiatric Society of the Czech Medical Society since its foundation in 1975 from the theoretical, organizational, research and teaching aspects. The aim of this section is above all to enforce the psychosomatic approach and bio-psychosocial model of disease in the Czechoslovak health services. The society developed its activities according to interdisciplinary principles. The perspectives of development of psychosomatic care in Czechoslovakia in the next future are in particular: 1. further enforcement of the psychosomatic approach to patients and the bio-psychosocial model of disease in clinical practice and theory; 2. development of so-called consultation-liaison psychiatry according to the concept of Z. J. Lipowski on the basis of nonpsychiatric disciplines and creation of further psychosomatic in- and out-patient units and departments, in particularly at the primary health care level; 3. further development of postgraduate and initiation of undergraduate teaching of psychosomatic and behavioural medicine; 4. development of research, in particular by the method of controlled clinical trials and prospective studies; 5. extension of possibilities to publish work and of international collaboration. PMID:1525907

  15. 10 CFR 35.2063 - Records of dosages of unsealed byproduct material for medical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... medical use. 35.2063 Section 35.2063 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2063 Records of dosages of unsealed byproduct material for medical use. (a) A... must contain— (1) The radiopharmaceutical; (2) The patient's or human research subject's name,...

  16. 10 CFR 35.2063 - Records of dosages of unsealed byproduct material for medical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... medical use. 35.2063 Section 35.2063 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2063 Records of dosages of unsealed byproduct material for medical use. (a) A... must contain— (1) The radiopharmaceutical; (2) The patient's or human research subject's name,...

  17. Paperless medical records: moving from plan to reality.

    PubMed

    Tobey, Mary Ellen

    2004-01-01

    In 2002, North Shore Magnetic Imaging Center (NSMIC) decided that a major restructuring of the patient process was necessary to alleviate staff frustration and increase the level of patient care. An aggressive, 16-month timeline was established for the center to develop and implement a paperless environment. The project began by focusing on the center's existing radiology information system (RIS). Research showed that no "canned" system would perform the necessary tasks. The center's vendor, with whom senior management had developed a longstanding and trusting relationship, assured the center that, with the proper programming, the existing RIS could support the new paperless environment. Additional technology components were addressed. The first phase enabled staff to obtain physician orders and outside reports from the fax server. Once the patient medical record was fully electronic, these external documents were no longer printed. The transfer of billing information to the radiologist's billing office was achieved through a Health-Level 7 (HL7) interface between NSMIC's RIS and the information systems utilized by the billing office. Technologists were impacted when wireless personal computer (PC) tablets were implemented. Measuring 8.5" x 11" x 0.5", these tablets enable technologists to gather and record patient information while moving freely throughout the center. Forming the Reinvention Team--an internal team of NSMIC staff that would deal with the project's impact on staff, workflow, and patient care--was done in very deliberate fashion. During the recruitment phase of the project, each prospective team member was required to take 2 specific personality profile tests. The team was comprised of a combination of different personality profiles. A radiologist was later added to the team. Throughout the implementation of new processes at NSMIC, numerous breakdowns were encountered. The breakdowns could be classified into 2 categories: technical andpatient

  18. 29 CFR 1910.1020 - Access to employee exposure and medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... employment questionnaires or histories (including job description and occupational exposures), (B) The...'s medical program and its records, (B) First aid records (not including medical histories) of one... with 29 CFR 1910.1200(g). (C) Biological monitoring results designated as exposure records by...

  19. 29 CFR 1910.1020 - Access to employee exposure and medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... employment questionnaires or histories (including job description and occupational exposures), (B) The...'s medical program and its records, (B) First aid records (not including medical histories) of one... with 29 CFR 1910.1200(g). (C) Biological monitoring results designated as exposure records by...

  20. Patients Reading Their Medical Records: Differences in Experiences and Attitudes between Regular and Inexperienced Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huvila, Isto; Daniels, Mats; Cajander, Åsa; Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We report results of a study of how ordering and reading of printouts of medical records by regular and inexperienced readers relate to how the records are used, to the health information practices of patients, and to their expectations of the usefulness of new e-Health services and online access to medical records. Method: The study…

  1. Top 10 Lessons Learned from Electronic Medical Record Implementation in a Large Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Rizer, Milisa K; Kaufman, Beth; Sieck, Cynthia J; Hefner, Jennifer L; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) implementation efforts face many challenges, including individual and organizational barriers and concerns about loss of productivity during the process. These issues may be particularly complex in large and diverse settings with multiple specialties providing inpatient and outpatient care. This case report provides an example of a successful EMR implementation that emphasizes the importance of flexibility and adaptability on the part of the implementation team. It also presents the top 10 lessons learned from this EMR implementation in a large midwestern academic medical center. Included are five overarching lessons related to leadership, initial approach, training, support, and optimization as well as five lessons related to the EMR system itself that are particularly important elements of a successful implementation. PMID:26396558

  2. Top 10 Lessons Learned from Electronic Medical Record Implementation in a Large Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Rizer, Milisa K; Kaufman, Beth; Sieck, Cynthia J; Hefner, Jennifer L; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) implementation efforts face many challenges, including individual and organizational barriers and concerns about loss of productivity during the process. These issues may be particularly complex in large and diverse settings with multiple specialties providing inpatient and outpatient care. This case report provides an example of a successful EMR implementation that emphasizes the importance of flexibility and adaptability on the part of the implementation team. It also presents the top 10 lessons learned from this EMR implementation in a large midwestern academic medical center. Included are five overarching lessons related to leadership, initial approach, training, support, and optimization as well as five lessons related to the EMR system itself that are particularly important elements of a successful implementation.

  3. Top 10 Lessons Learned from Electronic Medical Record Implementation in a Large Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Rizer, Milisa K.; Kaufman, Beth; Sieck, Cynthia J.; Hefner, Jennifer L.; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) implementation efforts face many challenges, including individual and organizational barriers and concerns about loss of productivity during the process. These issues may be particularly complex in large and diverse settings with multiple specialties providing inpatient and outpatient care. This case report provides an example of a successful EMR implementation that emphasizes the importance of flexibility and adaptability on the part of the implementation team. It also presents the top 10 lessons learned from this EMR implementation in a large midwestern academic medical center. Included are five overarching lessons related to leadership, initial approach, training, support, and optimization as well as five lessons related to the EMR system itself that are particularly important elements of a successful implementation. PMID:26396558

  4. Association between neighbourhood air pollution concentrations and dispensed medication for psychiatric disorders in a large longitudinal cohort of Swedish children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bråbäck, Lennart; Åström, Daniel Oudin; Strömgren, Magnus; Forsberg, Bertil

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate associations between exposure to air pollution and child and adolescent mental health. Design Observational study. Setting Swedish National Register data on dispensed medications for a broad range of psychiatric disorders, including sedative medications, sleeping pills and antipsychotic medications, together with socioeconomic and demographic data and a national land use regression model for air pollution concentrations for NO2, PM10 and PM2.5. Participants The entire population under 18 years of age in 4 major counties. We excluded cohort members whose parents had dispensed a medication in the same medication group since the start date of the register. The cohort size was 552 221. Main outcome measures Cox proportional hazards models to estimate HRs and their 95% CIs for the outcomes, adjusted for individual-level and group-level characteristics. Results The average length of follow-up was 3.5 years, with an average number of events per 1000 cohort members of ∼21. The mean annual level of NO2 was 9.8 µg/m3. Children and adolescents living in areas with higher air pollution concentrations were more likely to have a dispensed medication for a psychiatric disorder during follow-up (HR=1.09, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.12, associated with a 10 µg/m3 increase in NO2). The association with NO2 was clearly present in 3 out of 4 counties in the study area; however, no statistically significant heterogeneity was detected. Conclusion There may be a link between exposure to air pollution and dispensed medications for certain psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents even at the relatively low levels of air pollution in the study regions. The findings should be corroborated by others. PMID:27259522

  5. Psychiatric, neurological and medical aspects of misidentification syndromes: a review of 260 cases.

    PubMed

    Förstl, H; Almeida, O P; Owen, A M; Burns, A; Howard, R

    1991-11-01

    Two hundred and sixty case reports of misidentification syndromes were evaluated. One hundred and seventy-four patients had a Capgras syndrome misidentifying other persons, 18 a Fregoli syndrome, 11 intermetamorphosis, 17 reduplicative paramnesia and the rest had other forms or combinations of mistaken identification. Schizophrenia (127 cases), mostly of paranoid type, affective disorder (29), and organic mental syndromes including dementia (46) were the most common diagnoses in patients who misidentified others or themselves. The patients with reduplicative paramnesia more frequently suffered from head trauma or cerebral infarction and showed more features of right hemisphere lesions on neuropsychological testing or CT scan than the patients with other misidentification syndromes. Forty-one case-reports implicated underlying medical conditions. Forty-six of the patients were reported to show violent behaviour. The misidentification of persons can be a manifestation of any organic or functional psychosis, but the misidentification of place is frequently associated with neurological diseases, predominantly of the right hemisphere. Misidentification syndromes show a great degree of overlap and do not represent distinctive syndromes nor can they be regarded as an expression of a particular disorder. These patients deserve special diagnostic and therapeutic attention because of the possible underlying disorders and their potentially dangerous behaviour.

  6. Lessons from psychiatry and psychiatric education for medical learners and teachers.

    PubMed

    Hilty, Donald M; Srinivasan, Malathi; Xiong, Glen L; Ferranti, Jessica; Li, Su-Ting T

    2013-06-01

    Medical learners, teachers, and institutions face significant challenges in health care delivery and in training the next generation of clinicians. We propose that psychiatry offers lessons which may help improve how we take care of patients and how we teach others to care for patients. Our objective is to discuss what learners and teachers can learn from psychiatry, organized around (1) how we make decisions, (2) how we learn, and (3) how we reflect on our practice. Information from clinical care, education, neuroscience and other aspects of life (e.g. business, creativity, and research) help us on these processes. We make 'good' decisions in concert with patients and learners, by listening to their experiences, asking questions and exploring subjective and objective information. Our learning has a neurobiological basis, and is effectively furthered by personalization, reinforcement, acquisition of critical thinking skills, and assessment of our limitations and errors. Our ability to reflect is determined by attitude, skill, tolerating ambiguity or dissonance, and planning for the unexpected. These processes - in addition to knowledge and other skills - will help physicians be successful in practice, learning and teaching, research and leadership.

  7. [A Research on the origin and development of standardization of Chinese medical case records].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei

    2014-11-01

    The origin of Chinese medical case history is rather early. Chunyu Yi's medical cases (zhen ji) of the Western Han Dynasty were the earliest actual extant medical case with the practical contents. In the Ming Dynasty, Han Mao put forward firstly the principles of "six aspects must be recorded" for writing the pulse record, as the beginning of the standardization of medical case record. Later, Wu Kun, Yu Yan, Li Yanzhen, He Lianchen et al. supplemented, adjusted and changed the format of medical case record. After 1949, the format of medical case record was revised several times to form the national standard. In fact, the clinical medical case record is different from the case history. The modern medical case record could not reflect fully the thinking process of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and the essence of the treatment based on syndrome differentiation. Exploring the origin and development of the standardization of medical case record will benefit for the improvement of modern format of medical case record. PMID:25620355

  8. [How should be a psychiatric hospital to take in and utilize the psycho-social approaches in Japan? -- From the view point of psychiatry, medical model, medical system and economical management system].

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Kohei; Horikawa, Yuriko

    2012-01-01

    The author developed argument that a cause of the present condition of our country, in which psycho-social approaches have not fully spread though its clinical efficacy has been well recognized, is in the medical institution side. Because, our psychiatric reforms over 17 years, that reduced the average duration of hospitalization from about 2156 days to 61 days, has attained by deployment of various psycho-social approaches based on "therapeutic community model" and "psychodynamic team treatment". Furthermore, it has done by the affinity, continuity and complementarities of "psychodynamic team treatment" and psychosocial approaches with following special features. That is, since psycho-social approaches is 1. techniques to acquire the social life skill and to prevent re-hospitalization, 2. the group psychotherapy by facilitating the patient's mutual help capability, 3. based on "acceptance of the disease" by "noticing the diagnosis". Even if the therapeutic orientation or assumption of the psychiatric hospital does not comprehend above all of 1-3, it is important whether it is in the same direction or not. In other words, it is the issue of the medical-economical-management system, medical model and also the kind of psychiatry that is the source of them. Our hospital is for short term hospitalization and in focus on the outpatient treatment with "psychodynamic team treatment" based on "therapeutic community model". That is why our hospital has a potential advantage to take in and utilize the psycho-social approaches. On the other hand, there is the same reason why it is difficult for the traditional psychiatric hospital for long term hospitalization with higher hierarchical "physical medicine model" based on the descriptive psychiatry. The further problem is that both psychiatric hospital staff and psycho-social therapists do not realize it. The most important issue for us is having the recognition and exploring the method not to adapt to a psychiatric hospital but

  9. [Approaches for suicide prevention in Osaka Psychiatric Medical Center: the importance of multi-disciplinary cooperation and partnerships with other organizations].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is a very common problem in psychiatric practice today. Therefore, almost all staff of psychiatric hospitals have encountered the suicide of one or more of their patients. Our hospital, Osaka Psychiatric Medical Center, is a public psychiatric hospital in Japan. We provide treatment and support for patients from the acute to chronic phases of psychiatric disorders, and patients range from children to the elderly. Because we accept many patients with severe mental illness from other hospitals, many of our staff are routinely confronted with patients' violence or suicidal attempts. If a patient commits suicide, the relevant staff immediately have a conference to implement measures for preventing a recurrence. At the same time, information about the incident is conveyed to the medical safety management office and made known to all staff in our hospital. This office was established in 2007. Currently, all information about incidents and accidents in our hospital (e.g., suicide, problems between patients, problems with hospital facilities) is aggregated in the office and distributed to all staff members through the hospital intranet. This system makes it possible for staff to consider countermeasures against similar incidents and accidents, even if not involved in the incident. Additionally, we make an effort to develop cooperative relationships with organizations including the police, public health centers, and the fire department. The social welfare council in Hirakata City, where our hospital is located, provides some services to prevent suicide (e.g., telephone counseling, meetings with bereaved family members). Our hospital cooperates with these services by providing lecturers. The partnerships with these organizations help regarding the mental crises of patients in our hospital and fulfill a role to prevent suicide. Multi-disciplinary cooperation and partnerships with community organizations are not special approaches to suicide prevention, but ordinary

  10. [Approaches for suicide prevention in Osaka Psychiatric Medical Center: the importance of multi-disciplinary cooperation and partnerships with other organizations].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is a very common problem in psychiatric practice today. Therefore, almost all staff of psychiatric hospitals have encountered the suicide of one or more of their patients. Our hospital, Osaka Psychiatric Medical Center, is a public psychiatric hospital in Japan. We provide treatment and support for patients from the acute to chronic phases of psychiatric disorders, and patients range from children to the elderly. Because we accept many patients with severe mental illness from other hospitals, many of our staff are routinely confronted with patients' violence or suicidal attempts. If a patient commits suicide, the relevant staff immediately have a conference to implement measures for preventing a recurrence. At the same time, information about the incident is conveyed to the medical safety management office and made known to all staff in our hospital. This office was established in 2007. Currently, all information about incidents and accidents in our hospital (e.g., suicide, problems between patients, problems with hospital facilities) is aggregated in the office and distributed to all staff members through the hospital intranet. This system makes it possible for staff to consider countermeasures against similar incidents and accidents, even if not involved in the incident. Additionally, we make an effort to develop cooperative relationships with organizations including the police, public health centers, and the fire department. The social welfare council in Hirakata City, where our hospital is located, provides some services to prevent suicide (e.g., telephone counseling, meetings with bereaved family members). Our hospital cooperates with these services by providing lecturers. The partnerships with these organizations help regarding the mental crises of patients in our hospital and fulfill a role to prevent suicide. Multi-disciplinary cooperation and partnerships with community organizations are not special approaches to suicide prevention, but ordinary

  11. Osteoporosis guideline implementation in family medicine using electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Janet; Karampatos, Sarah; Ioannidis, George; Adachi, Jonathan; Thabane, Lehana; Nash, Lynn; Mehan, Upe; Kozak, Joseph; Feldman, Sid; Hirsch, Steve; Jovaisas, Algis V.; Cheung, Angela; Lohfeld, Lynne; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify family physicians’ learning needs related to osteoporosis care; determine family physicians’ preferred modes of learning; and identify barriers to using electronic medical records (EMRs) to implement osteoporosis guidelines in practice. Design Web-based survey. Setting Ontario. Participants Family physicians. Main outcome measures Quantitative and qualitative data about learning needs related to osteoporosis diagnosis and management; preferred mode of learning about guidelines; and barriers to using EMRs to implement guidelines. Results Of the 12 332 family physicians invited to participate in the survey, 8.5% and 7.0% provided partial or fully completed surveys, respectively. More than 80% of respondents agreed that the priority areas for education were as follows: selecting laboratory tests for secondary osteoporosis and interpreting the test results; interpreting bone mineral density results; determining appropriate circumstances for ordering anterior-posterior lumbar spine x-ray scans; and understanding duration, types, and adverse effects of pharmacotherapy. Qualitative analysis revealed that managing moderate-risk patients was a learning need. Continuing medical education was the preferred mode of learning. Approximately 80% of respondents agreed that the scarcity of EMR tools to aid in guideline implementation was a barrier to using guidelines, and 50% of respondents agreed that if EMR-embedded tools were available, time would limit their ability to use them. Conclusion This survey identified key diagnostic- and treatment-related topics in osteoporosis care that should be the focus of future continuing professional development for family physicians. Developers of EMR tools, physicians, and researchers aiming to implement guidelines to improve osteoporosis care should consider the potential barriers indicated in this study.

  12. Key success factors behind electronic medical record adoption in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Narattharaksa, Kanida; Speece, Mark; Newton, Charles; Bulyalert, Damrongsak

    2016-09-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the elements that health care personnel in Thailand believe are necessary for successful adoption of electronic medical record (EMR) systems. Design/methodology/approach Initial qualitative in-depth interviews with physicians to adapt key elements from the literature to the Thai context. The 12 elements identified included things related to managing the implementation and to IT expertise. The nationwide survey was supported by the Ministry of Public Health and returned 1,069 usable questionnaires (response rate 42 percent) from a range of medical personnel. Findings The key elements clearly separated into a managerial dimension and an IT dimension. All were considered fairly important, but managerial expertise was more critical. In particular, there should be clear EMR project goals and scope, adequate budget allocation, clinical staff must be involved in implementation, and the IT should facilitate good electronic communication. Research limitations/implications Thailand is representative of middle-income developing countries, but there is no guarantee findings can be generalized. National policies differ, as do economic structures of health care industries. The focus is on management at the organizational level, but future research must also examine macro-level issues, as well as gain more depth into thinking of individual health care personnel. Practical implications Technical issues of EMR implementation are certainly important. However, it is clear actual adoption and use of the system also depends very heavily on managerial issues. Originality/value Most research on EMR implementation has been in developed countries, and has often focussed more on technical issues rather than examining managerial issues closely. Health IT is also critical in developing economies, and management of health IT implementation must be well understood. PMID:27681029

  13. Key success factors behind electronic medical record adoption in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Narattharaksa, Kanida; Speece, Mark; Newton, Charles; Bulyalert, Damrongsak

    2016-09-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the elements that health care personnel in Thailand believe are necessary for successful adoption of electronic medical record (EMR) systems. Design/methodology/approach Initial qualitative in-depth interviews with physicians to adapt key elements from the literature to the Thai context. The 12 elements identified included things related to managing the implementation and to IT expertise. The nationwide survey was supported by the Ministry of Public Health and returned 1,069 usable questionnaires (response rate 42 percent) from a range of medical personnel. Findings The key elements clearly separated into a managerial dimension and an IT dimension. All were considered fairly important, but managerial expertise was more critical. In particular, there should be clear EMR project goals and scope, adequate budget allocation, clinical staff must be involved in implementation, and the IT should facilitate good electronic communication. Research limitations/implications Thailand is representative of middle-income developing countries, but there is no guarantee findings can be generalized. National policies differ, as do economic structures of health care industries. The focus is on management at the organizational level, but future research must also examine macro-level issues, as well as gain more depth into thinking of individual health care personnel. Practical implications Technical issues of EMR implementation are certainly important. However, it is clear actual adoption and use of the system also depends very heavily on managerial issues. Originality/value Most research on EMR implementation has been in developed countries, and has often focussed more on technical issues rather than examining managerial issues closely. Health IT is also critical in developing economies, and management of health IT implementation must be well understood.

  14. Progress in electronic medical record adoption in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Feng; Gupta, Nishi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the rate of adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) by physicians across Canada, provincial incentives, and perceived benefits of and barriers to EMR adoption. Data sources Data on EMR adoption in Canada were collected from CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Health Council of Canada, Canada Health Infoway, government websites, regional EMR associations, and health professional association websites. Study selection After removal of duplicate articles, 236 documents were found matching the original search. After using the filter Canada, 12 documents remained. Additional documents were obtained from each province’s EMR website and from the Canada Health Infoway website. Synthesis Since 2006, Canadian EMR adoption rates have increased from about 20% of practitioners to an estimated 62% of practitioners in 2013, with substantial regional disparities ranging from roughly 40% of physicians in New Brunswick and Quebec to more than 75% of physicians in Alberta. Provincial incentives vary widely but appear to have only a weak relationship with the rate of adoption. Many adopters use only a fraction of their software’s available functions. User-cited benefits to adoption include time savings, improved record keeping, heightened patient safety, and confidence in retrieved data when EMRs are used efficiently. Barriers to adoption include financial and time constraints, lack of knowledgeable support personnel, and lack of interoperability with hospital and pharmacy systems. Conclusion Canadian physicians remain at the stage of EMR adoption. Progression in EMR use requires experienced, knowledgeable technical support during implementation, and financial support for the transcription of patient data from paper to electronic media. The interoperability of EMR offerings for hospitals, pharmacies, and clinics is the rate-limiting factor in achieving a unified EMR solution for Canada. PMID:27035020

  15. Development and Use of Mark Sense Record Cards for Recording Medical Data on Pilots Subjected to Acceleration Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smedal, Harald A.; Havill, C. Dewey

    1962-01-01

    A TIME-HONORED system of recording medical histories and the data obtained on physical and laboratory examination has been that of writing the information on record sheets that go into a folder for each patient. In order to have information which would be more readily retrieved, 'a program was initiated in 1952 by the U. S. Naval School of Aviation Medicine in connection with their "Care of the Flyer" study to place this information on machine record cards. In 1958, a machine record card method was developed for recording medical data in connection with the astronaut selection program. Machine record cards were also developed by the Aero Medical Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, and the Aviation Medical Acceleration Laboratory, Naval Air Development Center, Johnsville, Pennsylvania, for use in connection with a variety of tests including acceleration stress.1 Therefore, a variety of systems resulted in which data of a medical nature could easily be recalled. During the NASA, Ames Research Center centrifuge studies/'S the pilot subjects were interviewed after each centrifuge run, or series of runs, and subjective information was recorded in a log book by the usual history taking methods referred to above. After the methods Were reviewed, it' was recognized that a card system would be very useful in recording data from our pilots after they had been exposed to acceleration stress. Since the acceleration stress cards already developed did not meet our requirements, it was decided a different card was needed.

  16. Characterization of Statin Dose-response within Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei-Qi; Feng, Qiping; Jiang, Lan; Waitara, Magarya S.; Iwuchukwu, Otito F.; Roden, Dan M.; Jiang, Min; Xu, Hua; Krauss, Ronald M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Davis, Robert L.; Berg, Richard L.; Peissig, Peggy L.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Wilke, Russell A.; Denny, Joshua C.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to define the genetic architecture underlying variable statin response have met with limited success possibly because previous studies were limited to effect based on one-single-dose. We leveraged electronic medical records (EMRs) to extract potency (ED50) and efficacy (Emax) of statin dose-response curves and tested them for association with 144 pre-selected variants. Two large biobanks were used to construct dose-response curves for 2,026 (simvastatin) and 2,252 subjects (atorvastatin). Atorvastatin was more efficacious, more potent, and demonstrated less inter-individual variability than simvastatin. A pharmacodynamic variant emerging from randomized trials (PRDM16) was associated with Emax for both. For atorvastatin, Emax was 51.7 mg/dl in homozygous for the minor allele versus 75.0 mg/dl for those homozygous for the major allele. We also identified several loci associated with ED50. The extraction of rigorously defined traits from EMRs for pharmacogenetic studies represents a promising approach to further understand of genetic factors contributing to drug response. PMID:24096969

  17. Development of Mobile Platform Integrated with Existing Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Kim, YoungAh; Kang, Simon; Kim, Kyungduk; Kim, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This paper describes a mobile Electronic Medical Record (EMR) platform designed to manage and utilize the existing EMR and mobile application with optimized resources. Methods We structured the mEMR to reuse services of retrieval and storage in mobile app environments that have already proven to have no problem working with EMRs. A new mobile architecture-based mobile solution was developed in four steps: the construction of a server and its architecture; screen layout and storyboard making; screen user interface design and development; and a pilot test and step-by-step deployment. This mobile architecture consists of two parts, the server-side area and the client-side area. In the server-side area, it performs the roles of service management for EMR and documents and for information exchange. Furthermore, it performs menu allocation depending on user permission and automatic clinical document architecture document conversion. Results Currently, Severance Hospital operates an iOS-compatible mobile solution based on this mobile architecture and provides stable service without additional resources, dealing with dynamic changes of EMR templates. Conclusions The proposed mobile solution should go hand in hand with the existing EMR system, and it can be a cost-effective solution if a quality EMR system is operated steadily with this solution. Thus, we expect this example to be shared with hospitals that currently plan to deploy mobile solutions. PMID:25152837

  18. Improving the medical records department processes by lean management

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima; Ketabi, Saeedeh; Sadeghian, Akram; Saghaeinnejad-Isfahani, Sakine

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lean management is a process improvement technique to identify waste actions and processes to eliminate them. The benefits of Lean for healthcare organizations are that first, the quality of the outcomes in terms of mistakes and errors improves. The second is that the amount of time taken through the whole process significantly improves. Aims: The purpose of this paper is to improve the Medical Records Department (MRD) processes at Ayatolah-Kashani Hospital in Isfahan, Iran by utilizing Lean management. Materials and Methods: This research was applied and an interventional study. The data have been collected by brainstorming, observation, interview, and workflow review. The study population included MRD staff and other expert staff within the hospital who were stakeholders and users of the MRD. Statistical Analysis Used: The MRD were initially taught the concepts of Lean management and then formed into the MRD Lean team. The team then identified and reviewed the current processes subsequently; they identified wastes and values, and proposed solutions. Results: The findings showed that the MRD units (Archive, Coding, Statistics, and Admission) had 17 current processes, 28 wastes, and 11 values were identified. In addition, they offered 27 comments for eliminating the wastes. Conclusion: The MRD is the critical department for the hospital information system and, therefore, the continuous improvement of its services and processes, through scientific methods such as Lean management, are essential. Originality/Value: The study represents one of the few attempts trying to eliminate wastes in the MRD. PMID:26097862

  19. A critical pathway for electronic medical record selection.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, A; Keshavjee, K; Langton, K; Troyan, S; Millar, S; Olantunji, S; Pray, M; Tytus, R; Ford, P T

    2001-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly becoming a necessary tool in health care. Given their potential to influence every aspect of health care, there has been surprisingly little rigorous research applied to this important piece of emerging health technology. An initial phase of the COMPETE study, which is examining the impact of EMRs on efficiency, quality of care and privacy concerns, involved a rigorous "critical pathway" approach to EMR selection for the study. A multidisciplinary team with clinical, technical and research expertise led an 8-stage evaluation process with direct input from user physicians at each stage. An iterative sequence of review of EMR specifications and features, live product demonstrations, site visits, and negotiations with vendors led to a progressive narrowing of the field of eligible EMR systems. Final scoring was based on 3 main themes of clinical usability, data quality and support/vendor issues. We believe that a rigorous, multidisciplinary process such as this is required to maximize success of any EMR implementation project.

  20. Clinical characteristics of perinatal psychiatric patients: a chart review study.

    PubMed

    Battle, Cynthia L; Zlotnick, Caron; Miller, Ivan W; Pearlstein, Teri; Howard, Margaret

    2006-05-01

    Although postpartum depression and other perinatal disorders have been the subject of increased research attention, important questions remain regarding women who actively seek psychiatric treatment during pregnancy and the postpartum period. In this study, we examined clinical records of 500 perinatal psychiatric patients who received treatment in a psychiatric day hospital (N = 398) or outpatient behavioral health clinic (N = 102). Patients' presenting diagnoses, psychiatric history, treatment course, and depressive symptoms were recorded. The majority of women had major depression as their primary diagnosis, with an average Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale score of over 20. Many depressed patients were diagnosed with comorbid anxiety and substance abuse disorders. Although most women were willing to take psychotropic medications, a sizable minority were not, particularly those who were breast-feeding. For more than a third of the sample, the treatment sought while pregnant or postpartum represented their first contact with the mental health system. Treatment implications are discussed. PMID:16699387

  1. IMASIS computer-based medical record project: dealing with the human factor.

    PubMed

    Martín-Baranera, M; Planas, I; Palau, J; Sanz, F

    1995-01-01

    The Institut Municipal d'Assistència Sanitària (IMAS) is a health care organization in Barcelona, comprising two general hospitals, a psychiatric hospital, a surgical clinic, a geriatric center, some primary care clinics, and a research institute. Since 1984, IMAS has been engaged in creating a multicenter integrated hospital information system (IMASIS). Currently, IMASIS offers the possibility to manage administrative data, laboratory results, pathology and cytology reports, radiology reports, and pharmacy inpatient orders; it also shares this information on-line among IMAS centers. IMASIS users may also work with a word processor, a spreadsheet, a database, or a statistical package and have access to MEDLINE. A second phase of IMASIS development began in December 1993 focused on clinical information management. The goal was to move towards an integrated multimedia medical record [1]. As a first step, the implementation experiences of the most advanced hospital information systems around the world were studied. Some of these experiences detected behavioral, cultural, and organizational factors [2] as the main sources of delay, or even failure, in HIS projects. A preliminary analysis to define such factors, assess their potential impact, and introduce adequate measures to deal with them seemed unavoidable before structuring of the project. In our approach to physician attitudes analysis, two survey techniques were applied. First, every hospital service head was contacted to schedule an interview, with either a service representative or a group of staff physicians and residents. The aim was to provide detailed information about project objectives and collect personal opinions, problems encountered in the current HIS, and specific needs of every medical and surgical specialty (including imaging needs). Every service head was asked to distribute a questionnaire among all clinicians, which assessed frequency of use of IMASIS current applications, user's satisfaction

  2. IMASIS computer-based medical record project: dealing with the human factor.

    PubMed

    Martín-Baranera, M; Planas, I; Palau, J; Sanz, F

    1995-01-01

    The Institut Municipal d'Assistència Sanitària (IMAS) is a health care organization in Barcelona, comprising two general hospitals, a psychiatric hospital, a surgical clinic, a geriatric center, some primary care clinics, and a research institute. Since 1984, IMAS has been engaged in creating a multicenter integrated hospital information system (IMASIS). Currently, IMASIS offers the possibility to manage administrative data, laboratory results, pathology and cytology reports, radiology reports, and pharmacy inpatient orders; it also shares this information on-line among IMAS centers. IMASIS users may also work with a word processor, a spreadsheet, a database, or a statistical package and have access to MEDLINE. A second phase of IMASIS development began in December 1993 focused on clinical information management. The goal was to move towards an integrated multimedia medical record [1]. As a first step, the implementation experiences of the most advanced hospital information systems around the world were studied. Some of these experiences detected behavioral, cultural, and organizational factors [2] as the main sources of delay, or even failure, in HIS projects. A preliminary analysis to define such factors, assess their potential impact, and introduce adequate measures to deal with them seemed unavoidable before structuring of the project. In our approach to physician attitudes analysis, two survey techniques were applied. First, every hospital service head was contacted to schedule an interview, with either a service representative or a group of staff physicians and residents. The aim was to provide detailed information about project objectives and collect personal opinions, problems encountered in the current HIS, and specific needs of every medical and surgical specialty (including imaging needs). Every service head was asked to distribute a questionnaire among all clinicians, which assessed frequency of use of IMASIS current applications, user's satisfaction

  3. Consumers' Perceptions of Patient-Accessible Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Vaughon, Wendy L; Czaja, Sara J; Levy, Joslyn; Rockoff, Maxine L

    2013-01-01

    Background Electronic health information (eHealth) tools for patients, including patient-accessible electronic medical records (patient portals), are proliferating in health care delivery systems nationally. However, there has been very limited study of the perceived utility and functionality of portals, as well as limited assessment of these systems by vulnerable (low education level, racial/ethnic minority) consumers. Objective The objective of the study was to identify vulnerable consumers’ response to patient portals, their perceived utility and value, as well as their reactions to specific portal functions. Methods This qualitative study used 4 focus groups with 28 low education level, English-speaking consumers in June and July 2010, in New York City. Results Participants included 10 males and 18 females, ranging in age from 21-63 years; 19 non-Hispanic black, 7 Hispanic, 1 non-Hispanic White and 1 Other. None of the participants had higher than a high school level education, and 13 had less than a high school education. All participants had experience with computers and 26 used the Internet. Major themes were enhanced consumer engagement/patient empowerment, extending the doctor’s visit/enhancing communication with health care providers, literacy and health literacy factors, improved prevention and health maintenance, and privacy and security concerns. Consumers were also asked to comment on a number of key portal features. Consumers were most positive about features that increased convenience, such as making appointments and refilling prescriptions. Consumers raised concerns about a number of potential barriers to usage, such as complex language, complex visual layouts, and poor usability features. Conclusions Most consumers were enthusiastic about patient portals and perceived that they had great utility and value. Study findings suggest that for patient portals to be effective for all consumers, portals must be designed to be easy to read, visually

  4. Anonymization of DICOM electronic medical records for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Newhauser, Wayne; Jones, Timothy; Swerdloff, Stuart; Newhauser, Warren; Cilia, Mark; Carver, Robert; Halloran, Andy; Zhang, Rui

    2014-10-01

    Electronic medical records (EMR) and treatment plans are used in research on patient outcomes and radiation effects. In many situations researchers must remove protected health information (PHI) from EMRs. The literature contains several studies describing the anonymization of generic Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) files and DICOM image sets but no publications were found that discuss the anonymization of DICOM radiation therapy plans, a key component of an EMR in a cancer clinic. In addition to this we were unable to find a commercial software tool that met the minimum requirements for anonymization and preservation of data integrity for radiation therapy research. The purpose of this study was to develop a prototype software code to meet the requirements for the anonymization of radiation therapy treatment plans and to develop a way to validate that code and demonstrate that it properly anonymized treatment plans and preserved data integrity. We extended an open-source code to process all relevant PHI and to allow for the automatic anonymization of multiple EMRs. The prototype code successfully anonymized multiple treatment plans in less than 1min/patient. We also tested commercial optical character recognition (OCR) algorithms for the detection of burned-in text on the images, but they were unable to reliably recognize text. In addition, we developed and tested an image filtering algorithm that allowed us to isolate and redact alpha-numeric text from a test radiograph. Validation tests verified that PHI was anonymized and data integrity, such as the relationship between DICOM unique identifiers (UID) was preserved. PMID:25147130

  5. 77 FR 55221 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ..., at 77 FR 36285, allowing for a 60-day public comment period. USCIS received one submission from one... Medical Examination and Vaccination Record, Form I-693; Revision of a Currently Approved Collection ACTION...: Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the...

  6. Improving the Quality of Nursing Home Care and Medical-Record Accuracy with Direct Observational Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnelle, John F.; Osterweil, Dan; Simmons, Sandra F.

    2005-01-01

    Nursing home medical-record documentation of daily-care occurrence may be inaccurate, and information is not documented about important quality-of-life domains. The inadequacy of medical record data creates a barrier to improving care quality, because it supports an illusion of care consistent with regulations, which reduces the motivation and…

  7. Congruence of Self-Reported Medications with Pharmacy Prescription Records in Low-Income Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caskie, Grace I. L.; Willis, Sherry L.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the congruence of self-reported medications with computerized pharmacy records. Design and Methods: Pharmacy records and self-reported medications were obtained for 294 members of a state pharmaceutical assistance program who also participated in ACTIVE, a clinical trial on cognitive training in nondemented elderly…

  8. Urban Alabama Physicians and the Electronic Medical Record: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiggle, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The electronic medical record (EMR) is an information technology tool supporting the examination, treatment, and care of a patient. The EMR allows physicians to view a patient's record showing current medications, a history of visits from health care providers with notes from those visits, a problem list, a functional status assessment, a…

  9. 32 CFR 806b.48 - Disclosing the medical records of minors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of majority. (a) The Air Force must obey state laws protecting medical records of drug or alcohol abuse treatment, abortion, and birth control. If you manage medical records, learn the local laws and... sought or consented to treatment between the ages of 15 and 17 in a program where regulation or...

  10. 20 CFR 30.113 - What are the requirements for written medical documentation, contemporaneous records, and other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... documentation, contemporaneous records, and other records or documents? 30.113 Section 30.113 Employees... written medical documentation, contemporaneous records, and other records or documents? (a) All written medical documentation, contemporaneous records, and other records or documents submitted by an employee...

  11. 42 CFR 494.170 - Condition: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Standard: Record retention and preservation. In accordance with 45 CFR § 164.530(j)(2), all patient records... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS FOR COVERAGE FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE...

  12. 42 CFR 494.170 - Condition: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Standard: Record retention and preservation. In accordance with 45 CFR § 164.530(j)(2), all patient records... equipment from a supplier that is not a provider of ESRD services and all other home dialysis patients...

  13. 42 CFR 494.170 - Condition: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Standard: Record retention and preservation. In accordance with 45 CFR § 164.530(j)(2), all patient records... equipment from a supplier that is not a provider of ESRD services and all other home dialysis patients...

  14. 42 CFR 494.170 - Condition: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Standard: Record retention and preservation. In accordance with 45 CFR § 164.530(j)(2), all patient records... equipment from a supplier that is not a provider of ESRD services and all other home dialysis patients...

  15. Linking human anatomy to knowledge bases: a visual front end for electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Stewart; Pouchard, Line; Ward, Richard; Atkins, Gary; Cole, Martin; Lorensen, Bill; Ade, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    A new concept of a visual electronic medical record is presented based on developments ongoing in the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Virtual Soldier Project. This new concept is based on the holographic medical electronic representation (Holomer) and on data formats being developed to support this. The Holomer is being developed in two different visualization environments, one of which is suitable for prototyping the visual electronic medical record. The advantages of a visual approach as a front end for electronic medical records are discussed and specific implementations are presented. PMID:15718802

  16. Standards for medical identifiers, codes, and messages needed to create an efficient computer-stored medical record. American Medical Informatics Association.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    A major obstacle to establishing a computer-stored medical record is the lack of "standards" that would permit government, care providers, insurance companies, and medical computer system developers to share patient data easily. In this position paper, the Board of Directors of the American Medical Informatics Association recommends specific approaches to standardization in the areas of patient, provider, and site of care identifiers; computerized health care message exchange; medical record content and structure, and medical codes and terminologies. The key concept developed in this position paper is that developers and users of computer-stored medical records must embrace existing and tested approaches, despite their imperfections, to progress quickly. This approach to standardization is being coordinated with the American National Standards Institute's Health Informatics Standards Planning Panel. The development of standards is a long-term process involving continued refinement. The proposed standards are an important step toward the goal of better and more efficient health care. PMID:7719784

  17. Ethical issues in psychiatric research.

    PubMed

    Barry, Liliana Kalogjera

    2009-06-01

    The field of psychiatric research ethics has evolved in recent years. This evolution seems to stem from the efforts of various groups (eg, medical ethicists, regulatory bodies, and the profession's own association, the APA) and from increased understanding of the endeavor of psychiatric empirical research. Current data regarding mental illness highlight the need for the continued expansion of psychiatric research to help relieve the suffering of the many individuals whom mental illness affects. The ethics for psychiatric research should parallel this expansion of psychiatric research to ensure that studies sufficiently address ethical considerations and thus foster the proper, delicate balance between progress and protection (see Table 1).

  18. Deep brain stimulation for psychiatric disorders: where we are now.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Daniel R; Ozpinar, Alp; Raslan, Ahmed M; Ko, Andrew L

    2015-06-01

    Fossil records showing trephination in the Stone Age provide evidence that humans have sought to influence the mind through physical means since before the historical record. Attempts to treat psychiatric disease via neurosurgical means in the 20th century provided some intriguing initial results. However, the indiscriminate application of these treatments, lack of rigorous evaluation of the results, and the side effects of ablative, irreversible procedures resulted in a backlash against brain surgery for psychiatric disorders that continues to this day. With the advent of psychotropic medications, interest in invasive procedures for organic brain disease waned. Diagnosis and classification of psychiatric diseases has improved, due to a better understanding of psychiatric patho-physiology and the development of disease and treatment biomarkers. Meanwhile, a significant percentage of patients remain refractory to multiple modes of treatment, and psychiatric disease remains the number one cause of disability in the world. These data, along with the safe and efficacious application of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for movement disorders, in principle a reversible process, is rekindling interest in the surgical treatment of psychiatric disorders with stimulation of deep brain sites involved in emotional and behavioral circuitry. This review presents a brief history of psychosurgery and summarizes the development of DBS for psychiatric disease, reviewing the available evidence for the current application of DBS for disorders of the mind. PMID:26030702

  19. Impact of Randomization, Clinic Visits, and Medical and Psychiatric Cormorbidities on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Adherence in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Budhiraja, Rohit; Kushida, Clete A.; Nichols, Deborah A.; Walsh, James K.; Simon, Richard D.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Quan, Stuart F.

    2016-01-01

    visits approach. Citation: Budhiraja R, Kushida CA, Nichols DA, Walsh JK, Simon RD, Gottlieb DJ, Quan SF. Impact of randomization, clinic visits, and medical and psychiatric cormorbidities on continuous positive airway pressure adherence in obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(3):333–341. PMID:26518698

  20. 42 CFR 102.50 - Medical records necessary to establish that a covered injury was sustained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... date of the smallpox vaccination or exposure to vaccinia; and (2) All inpatient hospital medical... of the smallpox vaccination or exposure to vaccinia. (b) A requester may submit additional medical... sustained (e.g., medical records prior to the date of vaccination or accidental vaccinia exposure) or...

  1. 42 CFR 102.50 - Medical records necessary to establish that a covered injury was sustained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... date of the smallpox vaccination or exposure to vaccinia; and (2) All inpatient hospital medical... of the smallpox vaccination or exposure to vaccinia. (b) A requester may submit additional medical... sustained (e.g., medical records prior to the date of vaccination or accidental vaccinia exposure) or...

  2. 42 CFR 102.50 - Medical records necessary to establish that a covered injury was sustained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... date of the smallpox vaccination or exposure to vaccinia; and (2) All inpatient hospital medical... of the smallpox vaccination or exposure to vaccinia. (b) A requester may submit additional medical... sustained (e.g., medical records prior to the date of vaccination or accidental vaccinia exposure) or...

  3. 42 CFR 102.50 - Medical records necessary to establish that a covered injury was sustained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... date of the smallpox vaccination or exposure to vaccinia; and (2) All inpatient hospital medical... of the smallpox vaccination or exposure to vaccinia. (b) A requester may submit additional medical... sustained (e.g., medical records prior to the date of vaccination or accidental vaccinia exposure) or...

  4. 42 CFR 102.50 - Medical records necessary to establish that a covered injury was sustained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... date of the smallpox vaccination or exposure to vaccinia; and (2) All inpatient hospital medical... of the smallpox vaccination or exposure to vaccinia. (b) A requester may submit additional medical... sustained (e.g., medical records prior to the date of vaccination or accidental vaccinia exposure) or...

  5. DRUG-DRUG INTERACTION PROFILES OF MEDICATION REGIMENS EXTRACTED FROM A DE-IDENTIFIED ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Butkiewicz, Mariusz; Restrepo, Nicole A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Crawford, Dana C.

    2016-01-01

    With age, the number of prescribed medications increases and subsequently raises the risk for adverse drug-drug interactions. These adverse effects lower quality of life and increase health care costs. Quantifying the potential burden of adverse effects before prescribing medications can be a valuable contribution to health care. This study evaluated medication lists extracted from a subset of the Vanderbilt de-identified electronic medical record system. Reported drugs were cross-referenced with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes DRUG database to identify known drug-drug interactions. On average, a medication regimen contained 6.58 medications and 2.68 drug-drug interactions. Here, we quantify the burden of potential adverse events from drug-drug interactions through drug-drug interaction profiles and include a number of alternative medications as provided by the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. PMID:27570646

  6. DRUG-DRUG INTERACTION PROFILES OF MEDICATION REGIMENS EXTRACTED FROM A DE-IDENTIFIED ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS SYSTEM.

    PubMed

    Butkiewicz, Mariusz; Restrepo, Nicole A; Haines, Jonathan L; Crawford, Dana C

    2016-01-01

    With age, the number of prescribed medications increases and subsequently raises the risk for adverse drug-drug interactions. These adverse effects lower quality of life and increase health care costs. Quantifying the potential burden of adverse effects before prescribing medications can be a valuable contribution to health care. This study evaluated medication lists extracted from a subset of the Vanderbilt de-identified electronic medical record system. Reported drugs were cross-referenced with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes DRUG database to identify known drug-drug interactions. On average, a medication regimen contained 6.58 medications and 2.68 drug-drug interactions. Here, we quantify the burden of potential adverse events from drug-drug interactions through drug-drug interaction profiles and include a number of alternative medications as provided by the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. PMID:27570646

  7. The sensitivity of medical diagnostic decision-support knowledge bases in delineating appropriate terms to document in the medical record.

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, M. J.; Barnett, G. O.; Morgan, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    A pertinent, legible and complete medical record facilitates good patient care. The recording of the symptoms, signs and lab findings which are relevant to a patient's condition contributes importantly to the medical record. The consideration and documentation of other disease states known to be related to the patient's primary illness provide further enhancement. We propose that developing sets of disease-specific core elements which a physician may want to document in the medical record can have many benefits. We hypothesize that for a given disease, terms with high importance (TI) and frequency (TF) in the DX-plain, QMR and Iliad knowledge bases (KBs) are terms which are used commonly in the medical record, and may be, in fact, terms which physicians would find useful to document. A study was undertaken to validate ten such sets of disease-specific core elements. For each of ten prevalent diseases, high TI and TF terms from the three KBs mentioned were pooled to derive the set of core elements. For each disease, all patient records (range 385 to 16,972) from a computerized ambulatory medical record database were searched to document the actual use by physicians of each of these core elements. A significant percentage (range 50 to 86%) of each set of core elements was confirmed as being used by the physicians. In addition, all medical concepts from a selection of full text records were identified, and an average of 65% of the concepts were found to be core elements.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1807600

  8. A cross-sectional prospective study of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication in acute psychiatric wards: patient, staff and ward characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous research on mental health care has shown considerable differences in use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication among different wards and geographical areas. This study investigates to what extent use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication for involuntary admitted patients in Norwegian acute psychiatric wards is associated with patient, staff and ward characteristics. The study includes data from 32 acute psychiatric wards. Methods Multilevel logistic regression using Stata was applied with data from 1016 involuntary admitted patients that were linked to data about wards. The sample comprised two hierarchical levels (patients and wards) and the dependent variables had two values (0 = no use and 1 = use). Coercive measures were defined as use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary depot medication during hospitalization. Results The total number of involuntary admitted patients was 1214 (35% of total sample). The percentage of patients who were exposed to coercive measures ranged from 0-88% across wards. Of the involuntary admitted patients, 424 (35%) had been secluded, 117 (10%) had been restrained and 113 (9%) had received involuntary depot medication at discharge. Data from 1016 patients could be linked in the multilevel analysis. There was a substantial between-ward variance in the use of coercive measures; however, this was influenced to some extent by compositional differences across wards, especially for the use of restraint. Conclusions The substantial between-ward variance, even when adjusting for patients' individual psychopathology, indicates that ward factors influence the use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication and that some wards have the potential for quality improvement. Hence, interventions to reduce the use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication should take into account organizational and environmental factors. PMID:20370928

  9. Using the Electronic Medical Record to Assess Contraception Usage among Women Taking Category D or X Medications

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Sheila K; Farala, John Paul; Wu, Jennifer; Felix, Robert; Chambers, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to investigate contraceptive usage among women prescribed or currently taking a category D or X medication using the electronic medical record. Methods This is a retrospective study assessing contraceptive usage among women prescribed category D or X medications. We obtained access to the electronic medical records of women seen in an academic Family Medicine Department between April 2011 and April 2012 who were prescribed a category D or X medication. Information was abstracted regarding the specific category D or X medication, demographics, sexual activity, sexual partner gender, and contraceptive usage. Results There were a total of 610 women included in this study. Among the 610 women, 72 (11.8%) of women had documentation that they were not asked about their sexual activity. Sexual activity with men was documented in 407 of the 610 women (66.7%). Of these 407 women, 132 (32.4%) had no contraceptive method documented. Among the women using contraception, the most common method used was oral contraception. Conclusion According to data obtained from the electronic medical record, women who are taking a category D or X medication are not always asked about sexual activity. Contraception usage among women taking category D or X medications and who were sexually active with men was similar to the general population. Contraception usage should be better in this population given the risk of an unintended pregnancy includes fetal exposure to a potential teratogen. The electronic medical record creates an opportunity for an intervention to increase contraception utilization in this population. PMID:26306028

  10. Technology and Health Care: Efficiency, Frustration, and Disconnect in the Transition to Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Checton, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates one medical facility's transition to electronic medical records (becoming “paperless”). We utilized face-to-face interviews to investigate the transition process with one implementer (the vice president of the medical facility) and three stakeholders from one of the four offices (an assistant office manager, a nurse, and a medical technician). We discuss the dominant themes of efficiency, frustration, and disconnect as well as conclusions and implications. PMID:25729754

  11. Medical Education and the Pharmaceutical Industry: A Review of Ethical Guidelines and Their Implications for Psychiatric Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geppert, Cynthia M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This article reviews and summarizes eight ethical guidelines of major professional organizations regarding the pharmaceutical industry's role in the psychiatric education of trainees. Method: The author conducted a literature review of research and guidelines pertaining to the pharmaceutical industry's relationship to trainees, with…

  12. Medical records. Enhancing privacy, preserving the common good.

    PubMed

    Etzioni, A

    1999-01-01

    Personal medical information is now bought and sold on the open market. Companies use it to make hiring and firing decisions and to identify customers for new products. The justification for providing such access to medical information is that doing so benefits the public by securing public safety, controlling costs, and supporting medical research. And individuals have supposedly consented to it. But we can achieve the common goods while better protecting privacy by making institutional changes in the way information is maintained and protected. PMID:10321335

  13. Broader Indications for Psychiatric Consultation

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Paul

    1987-01-01

    A liaison approach to psychiatric consultation increases the patient population who can benefit from psychiatric assessment during hospitalization for medical or surgical conditions. It also broadens the scope of the psychiatric investigation of the individual patient. The meaning of the illness to the patient, and the patient's present methods of adapting to his or her illness are important considerations. Unconscious concerns, which interfere with the patient's compliance to medical treatment, may be sufficiently clarified and resolved so that medical progress is expedited. Psychiatric consultation can be used to prevent an untoward psychological reaction to illness, if this is foreseen. This preventive consultation, which is often possible only because of the family physician's awareness of the psychological vulnerability of some of her or his patients, can result in reduced medical and psychiatric morbidity. PMID:21263836

  14. Psychiatric illness in inpatients with neurological disorders: patients' views on discussion of emotional problems with neurologists.

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, K W; Goldberg, D P

    1984-01-01

    The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in inpatients with neurological disorders and the extent to which it is detected by neurologists were measured by using a two stage model of psychiatric assessment and from information recorded in the patients' medical notes. The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was estimated as 39%, of which 72% was unrecognised by the neurologists. Only a minority of patients with an uncertain physical diagnosis had a psychiatric illness, showing the error in assuming that a patient's physical symptoms arise from a psychological disturbance if an organic aetiology cannot be determined. When the patients were interviewed on their discharge from hospital they were divided on whether they had wished to discuss their mood with neurologists while they were in hospital. The reasons that they gave suggested that interactions between patients and doctors and the lack of ward facilities for private consultations with doctors are important determinants of hidden psychiatric morbidity in medical inpatients. PMID:6434026

  15. Physician Interaction with Electronic Medical Records: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noteboom, Cherie Bakker

    2010-01-01

    The integration of EHR (Electronic Health Records) in IT infrastructures supporting organizations enable improved access to and recording of patient data, enhanced ability to make better and more-timely decisions, and improved quality and reduced errors. Despite these benefits, there are mixed results as to the use of EHR. The literature suggests…

  16. 10 CFR 35.2080 - Records of mobile medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the last provision of service. (b) A licensee shall retain the record of each survey required by § 35.80(a)(4) for 3 years. The record must include the date of the survey, the results of the survey, the instrument used to make the survey, and the name of the individual who performed the survey....

  17. 10 CFR 35.2080 - Records of mobile medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the last provision of service. (b) A licensee shall retain the record of each survey required by § 35.80(a)(4) for 3 years. The record must include the date of the survey, the results of the survey, the instrument used to make the survey, and the name of the individual who performed the survey....

  18. 10 CFR 35.2080 - Records of mobile medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the last provision of service. (b) A licensee shall retain the record of each survey required by § 35.80(a)(4) for 3 years. The record must include the date of the survey, the results of the survey, the instrument used to make the survey, and the name of the individual who performed the survey....

  19. A computerised out-patient medical records programme based on the Summary Time-Oriented Record (STOR) System.

    PubMed

    Cheong, P Y; Goh, L G; Ong, R; Wong, P K

    1992-12-01

    Advances in microcomputer hardware and software technology have made computerised outpatient medical records practical. We have developed a programme based on the Summary Time-Oriented Record (STOR) system which complements existing paper-based record keeping. The elements of the Problem Oriented Medical Record (POMR) System are displayed in two windows within one screen, namely, the SOAP (Subjective information, Objective information, Assessments and Plans) elements in the Reason For Encounter (RFE) window and the problem list with outcomes in the Problem List (PL) window. Context sensitive child windows display details of plans of management in the RFE window and clinical notes in the PL window. The benefits of such innovations to clinical decision making and practice based research and its medico-legal implications are discussed.

  20. A Software System to Collect Expert Relevance Ratings of Medical Record Items for Specific Clinical Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaraj, Arun; Alkasab, Tarik K

    2014-01-01

    Development of task-specific electronic medical record (EMR) searches and user interfaces has the potential to improve the efficiency and safety of health care while curbing rising costs. The development of such tools must be data-driven and guided by a strong understanding of practitioner information requirements with respect to specific clinical tasks or scenarios. To acquire this important data, this paper describes a model by which expert practitioners are leveraged to identify which components of the medical record are most relevant to a specific clinical task. We also describe the computer system that was created to efficiently implement this model of data gathering. The system extracts medical record data from the EMR of patients matching a given clinical scenario, de-identifies the data, breaks the data up into separate medical record items (eg, radiology reports, operative notes, laboratory results, etc), presents each individual medical record item to experts under the hypothetical of the given clinical scenario, and records the experts’ ratings regarding the relevance of each medical record item to that specific clinical scenario or task. After an iterative process of data collection, these expert relevance ratings can then be pooled and used to design point-of-care EMR searches and user interfaces tailored to the task-specific needs of practitioners. PMID:25600925

  1. Does the HIPAA Privacy Rule Allow Parents the Right to See Their Children's Medical Records?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does the HIPAA Privacy Rule allow parents the right to see their children’s medical records? Answer: Yes, ... your contact information below. Email Office for Civil Rights Headquarters U.S. Department of Health & Human Services 200 ...

  2. The mixed management of patients' medical records: responsibility sharing between the patient and the physician.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Fassa, Maniane; Benzenine, Eric; Jaquet-Chiffelle, David-Olivier; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Allaert, François-André

    2010-01-01

    Through this article, we propose a mixed management of patients' medical records, so as to share responsibilities between the patient and the Medical Practitioner by making Patients responsible for the validation of their administrative information, and MPs responsible for the validation of their Patients' medical information. Our proposal can be considered a solution to the main problem faced by patients, health practitioners and the authorities, namely the gathering and updating of administrative and medical data belonging to the patient in order to accurately reconstitute a patient's medical history. This method is based on two processes. The aim of the first process is to provide a patient's administrative data, in order to know where and when the patient received care (name of the health structure or health practitioner, type of care: out patient or inpatient). The aim of the second process is to provide a patient's medical information and to validate it under the accountability of the Medical Practitioner with the help of the patient if needed. During these two processes, the patient's privacy will be ensured through cryptographic hash functions like the Secure Hash Algorithm, which allows pseudonymisation of a patient's identity. The proposed Medical Record Search Engines will be able to retrieve and to provide upon a request formulated by the Medical Practitioner all the available information concerning a patient who has received care in different health structures without divulging the patient's identity. Our method can lead to improved efficiency of personal medical record management under the mixed responsibilities of the patient and the MP.

  3. Electronic Medical Record and Quality Ratings of Long Term Care Facilities Long-Term Care Facility Characteristics and Reasons and Barriers for Adoption of Electronic Medical Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Cheryl Andrea

    2013-01-01

    With the growing elderly population, compounded by the retirement of the babyboomers, the need for long-term care (LTC) facilities is expected to grow. An area of great concern for those that are seeking a home for their family member is the quality of care provided by the nursing home to the residents. Electronic medical records (EMR) are often…

  4. Building a national electronic medical record exchange system - experiences in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Chuan Jack; Yen, Ju-Chuan; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Jian, Wen-Shan; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Hsu, Min-Huei

    2015-08-01

    There are currently 501 hospitals and about 20,000 clinics in Taiwan. The National Health Insurance (NHI) system, which is operated by the NHI Administration, uses a single-payer system and covers 99.9% of the nation's total population of 23,000,000. Taiwan's NHI provides people with a high degree of freedom in choosing their medical care options. However, there is the potential concern that the available medical resources will be overused. The number of doctor consultations per person per year is about 15. Duplication of laboratory tests and prescriptions are not rare either. Building an electronic medical record exchange system is a good method of solving these problems and of improving continuity in health care. In November 2009, Taiwan's Executive Yuan passed the 'Plan for accelerating the implementation of electronic medical record systems in medical institutions' (2010-2012; a 3-year plan). According to this plan, a patient can, at any hospital in Taiwan, by using his/her health insurance IC card and physician's medical professional IC card, upon signing a written agreement, retrieve all important medical records for the past 6 months from other participating hospitals. The focus of this plan is to establish the National Electronic Medical Record Exchange Centre (EEC). A hospital's information system will be connected to the EEC through an electronic medical record (EMR) gateway. The hospital will convert the medical records for the past 6 months in its EMR system into standardized files and save them on the EMR gateway. The most important functions of the EEC are to generate an index of all the XML files on the EMR gateways of all hospitals, and to provide search and retrieval services for hospitals and clinics. The EEC provides four standard inter-institution EMR retrieval services covering medical imaging reports, laboratory test reports, discharge summaries, and outpatient records. In this system, we adopted the Health Level 7 (HL7) Clinical Document

  5. Building a national electronic medical record exchange system - experiences in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Chuan Jack; Yen, Ju-Chuan; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Jian, Wen-Shan; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Hsu, Min-Huei

    2015-08-01

    There are currently 501 hospitals and about 20,000 clinics in Taiwan. The National Health Insurance (NHI) system, which is operated by the NHI Administration, uses a single-payer system and covers 99.9% of the nation's total population of 23,000,000. Taiwan's NHI provides people with a high degree of freedom in choosing their medical care options. However, there is the potential concern that the available medical resources will be overused. The number of doctor consultations per person per year is about 15. Duplication of laboratory tests and prescriptions are not rare either. Building an electronic medical record exchange system is a good method of solving these problems and of improving continuity in health care. In November 2009, Taiwan's Executive Yuan passed the 'Plan for accelerating the implementation of electronic medical record systems in medical institutions' (2010-2012; a 3-year plan). According to this plan, a patient can, at any hospital in Taiwan, by using his/her health insurance IC card and physician's medical professional IC card, upon signing a written agreement, retrieve all important medical records for the past 6 months from other participating hospitals. The focus of this plan is to establish the National Electronic Medical Record Exchange Centre (EEC). A hospital's information system will be connected to the EEC through an electronic medical record (EMR) gateway. The hospital will convert the medical records for the past 6 months in its EMR system into standardized files and save them on the EMR gateway. The most important functions of the EEC are to generate an index of all the XML files on the EMR gateways of all hospitals, and to provide search and retrieval services for hospitals and clinics. The EEC provides four standard inter-institution EMR retrieval services covering medical imaging reports, laboratory test reports, discharge summaries, and outpatient records. In this system, we adopted the Health Level 7 (HL7) Clinical Document

  6. Psychiatric diagnosis, psychiatric power and psychiatric abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Szasz, T

    1994-01-01

    Psychiatric abuse, such as we usually associate with practices in the former Soviet Union, is related not to the misuse of psychiatric diagnoses, but to the political power intrinsic to the social role of the psychiatrist in totalitarian and democratic societies alike. Some reflections are offered on the modern, therapeutic state's proclivity to treat adults as patients rather than citizens, disjoin rights from responsibilities, and thus corrupt the language of political-philosophical discourse. PMID:7996558

  7. Development of Markup Language for Medical Record Charting: A Charting Language.

    PubMed

    Jung, Won-Mo; Chae, Younbyoung; Jang, Bo-Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays a lot of trials for collecting electronic medical records (EMRs) exist. However, structuring data format for EMR is an especially labour-intensive task for practitioners. Here we propose a new mark-up language for medical record charting (called Charting Language), which borrows useful properties from programming languages. Thus, with Charting Language, the text data described in dynamic situation can be easily used to extract information.

  8. Documentation of Medical Records in Hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2014: a Quantitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Saravi, Benyamin Mohseni; Asgari, Zolaykha; Siamian, Hasan; Farahabadi, Ebrahim Bagherian; Gorji, Alimorad Heidari; Motamed, Nima; Fallahkharyeki, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Documentation of patient care in medical record formats is always emphasized. These documents are used as a means to go on treating the patients, staff in their own defense, assessment, care, any legal proceedings and medical science education. Therefore, in this study, each of the data elements available in patients’ records are important and filling them indicates the importance put by the documenting teams, so it has been dealt with the documentation the patient records in the hospitals of Mazandaran province. Method: This cross-sectional study aimed to review medical records in 16 hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences (MazUMS). In order to collection data, a check list was prepared based on the data elements including four forms of the admission, summary, patients’ medical history and progress note. The data recording was defined as “Yes” with the value of 1, lack of recording was defined as “No” with the value of 2, and “Not applied” with the value of 0 for the cases in which the mentioned variable medical records are not applied. Results: The overall evaluation of the documentation was considered as 95-100% equal to “good”, 75-94% equal to “average” and below -75% equal to “poor”. Using the stratified random sample volume formula, 381 cases were reviewed. The data were analyzed by the SPSS version 19 and descriptive statistics. Results: The results showed that %62 of registration and all the four forms were in the “poor” category. There was no big difference in average registration among the hospitals. Among the educational groups Gynecology and Infectious were equal and had the highest average of documentation of %68. In the data categories, the highest documentation average belonged to the verification, %91. Conclusion: According to the overall assessment in which the rate of documentation was in the category “week”, we should make much more efforts to reach better conditions. Even if a data

  9. Survey of electronic veterinary medical record adoption and use by independent small animal veterinary medical practices in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Krone, Lauren M.; Brown, Catherine M.; Lindenmayer, Joann M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the proportion of independent small animal veterinary medical practices in Massachusetts that use electronic veterinary medical records (EVMRs), determine the purposes for which EVMRs are used, and identify perceived barriers to their use. Design Survey. Sample 100 veterinarians. Procedures 213 of 517 independent small animal veterinary practices operating in Massachusetts were randomly chosen for study recruitment. One veterinarian at each practice was invited by telephone to answer a hardcopy survey regarding practice demographics, medical records type (electronic, paper, or both), purposes of EVMR use, and perceived barriers to adoption. Surveys were mailed to the first 100 veterinarians who agreed to participate. Practices were categorized by record type and size (large [≥ 5 veterinarians], medium [3 to 4 veterinarians], or small [1 to 2 veterinarians]). Results 84 surveys were returned; overall response was 84 of 213 (39.4%). The EVMRs were used alone or together with paper records in 66 of 82 (80.5%) practices. Large and medium-sized practices were significantly more likely to use EVMRs combined with paper records than were small practices. The EVMRs were most commonly used for ensuring billing, automating reminders, providing cost estimates, scheduling, recording medical and surgical information, and tracking patient health. Least common uses were identifying emerging infectious diseases, research, and insurance. Eleven veterinarians in paper record–only practices indicated reluctance to change, anticipated technological problems, time constraints, and cost were barriers to EVMR use. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results indicated EVMRs were underutilized as a tool for tracking and improving population health and identifying emerging infectious diseases. Efforts to facilitate adoption of EVMRs for these purposes should be strengthened by the veterinary medical, human health, and public health professions. PMID:25029312

  10. Achieving order entry by physicians in a computerized medical record.

    PubMed

    Larson, R L; Blake, J P

    1988-06-01

    When Community Memorial Hospital selected a computerized Medical Information System (MIS), it was recognized that physician use and acceptance was paramount to success. To achieve this, active participation from the medical-dental staff via an advisory committee, system education and emphasis on physician benefits was sought. Advance preparation included selection of light pen technology, field trips by selected physicians to other hospitals with the same system, and strategic placement and availability of terminals. During implementation, training was scheduled at the convenience of the physician. This training continues to be offered immediately to new physicians as they join the staff. System upgrades and added functions prompt scheduling of demonstrations for interested physicians. Many developmental ideas come from physicians using MIS indicating their interest in maintaining the system. New approaches that will make order entry easier for physicians so that everyone can benefit from their cooperation and participation are continually being looked for.

  11. 29 CFR 1904.9 - Recording criteria for cases involving medical removal under OSHA standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surveillance requirements of an OSHA standard, you must record the case on the OSHA 300 Log. (b) Implementation—(1) How do I classify medical removal cases on the OSHA 300 Log? You must enter each medical removal case on the OSHA 300 Log as either a case involving days away from work or a case involving...

  12. Organizational Learning and Large-Scale Change: Adoption of Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavis, Virginia D.

    2010-01-01

    Despite implementation of electronic medical record (EMR) systems in the United States and other countries, there is no organizational development model that addresses medical professionals' attitudes toward technology adoption in a learning organization. The purpose of this study was to assess whether a model would change those attitudes toward…

  13. The Psychiatric Disorders of Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Charles R.; Lucas, Alexander R.

    A general textbook on the psychiatric disorders of childhood, the book is intended to be an introductory text for students and practitioners working with children (such as psychiatric and pediatric residents and psychologists, teachers, medical students). The genesis of mental illness is discussed in terms of the contributions of heredity and the…

  14. Measurement of Psychiatric Treatment Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Sajatovic, Martha; Velligan, Dawn; Weiden, Peter J.; Valenstein, Marcia; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nonadherence to medications for mental disorders substantially limits treatment effectiveness and results in higher rates of relapse, hospitalization, and disability. Accurate measurement of medication adherence is important not only in adherence research, but also in clinical trials in which medications are being evaluated, and in clinical practice where failure to detect nonadherence results in premature medication changes, unnecessary polypharmacy, and greater likelihoods of functional deteriorations and hospitalizations. This is a review of psychiatric treatment adherence methods and measures arising from a meeting on “Methodological Challenges in Psychiatric Treatment Adherence Research” held on September 27-28, 2007 in Bethesda, MD and organized by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Methods This paper reviews the range of modalities currently available for assessing adherence behavior including pill counts, pharmacy records, technology-assisted monitoring, biological assays, and a range of self-report and interviewer-rated scales. Measures of adherence attitudes are also reviewed. Results Each of the adherence measures described are imperfect estimates of actual medication ingestion but each provides informative estimates of adherence or the attitudinal factors associated with adherence. Measure selection depends on a range of factors including the patient sample, the context in which the measure is being used, and the clinical outcomes expected from various levels of nonadherence. The use of multiple measures of adherence is encouraged to balance the limitations of individual measures. Conclusion While adherence assessment has become increasingly sophisticated in recent years there remains a need for refinement and expansion on currently available methods and measures. PMID:21109048

  15. Medical records for animals used in research, teaching, and testing: public statement from the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Field, Karl; Bailey, Michele; Foresman, Larry L; Harris, Robert L; Motzel, Sherri L; Rockar, Richard A; Ruble, Gaye; Suckow, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    Medical records are considered to be a key element of a program of adequate veterinary care for animals used in research, teaching, and testing. However, prior to the release of the public statement on medical records by the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine (ACLAM), the guidance that was available on the form and content of medical records used for the research setting was not consistent and, in some cases, was considered to be too rigid. To address this concern, ACLAM convened an ad hoc Medical Records Committee and charged the Committee with the task of developing a medical record guideline that was based on both professional judgment and performance standards. The Committee provided ACLAM with a guidance document titled Public Statements: Medical Records for Animals Used in Research, Teaching, and Testing, which was approved by ACLAM in late 2004. The ACLAM public statement on medical records provides guidance on the definition and content of medical records, and clearly identifies the Attending Veterinarian as the individual who is charged with authority and responsibility for oversight of the institution's medical records program. The document offers latitude to institutions in the precise form and process used for medical records but identifies typical information to be included in such records. As a result, the ACLAM public statement on medical records provides practical yet flexible guidelines to assure that documentation of animal health is performed in research, teaching, and testing situations.

  16. Recording wounds: Polaroid's new medically-designed cameras.

    PubMed

    Clarke, G

    2000-11-01

    Wound management is an important and increasingly complex area of nursing practice. Community nurses, in particular, spend a considerable amount of time assessing, evaluating and managing chronic, non-healing wounds. The rapid rise in the number of wound care products, combined with the emphasis on clinical governance and risk management, and increases in litigation have meant that accurate documentation and record keeping have become an essential part of care (UKCC, 1992, 1998). A standardized approach to assessment, classification, measurement and evaluation should be adopted to maximize optimal patient outcomes. There are a number of techniques for measuring wounds, ranging from manual measurement using tracing to computer-based imaging. Photography is a simple and quick form of documentation, which provides an accurate and objective record of the wound. This article highlights the benefits of using the new Polaroid Macro 5 SLR camera in wound documentation. PMID:12066058

  17. Surgeons' perspective of a newly initiated electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Frazee, Richard; Harmon, Laura; Papaconstantinou, Harry T

    2016-01-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act mandates "meaningful use" of an electronic health record (EHR) to receive current financial incentives and to avoid future financial penalties. Surgeons' ongoing adoption of an EHR nationally will be influenced by the early experiences of institutions that have made the transition from paper to electronic records. We conducted a survey to query surgeons at our institution regarding their perception of the EHR 3 months after institutional implementation. A total of 59 surveys were obtained from 24 senior staff and 35 residents. Results showed that surgeons believed the EHR was more effective as a billing tool than as a form of clinical documentation and believed the billing was more complete and accurate with the EHR. Surgeons also expressed concern that the EHR would negatively impact patient satisfaction, but in spite of this, they indicated that their personal quality of life was not negatively impacted.

  18. 42 CFR 482.24 - Condition of participation: Medical record services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... State laws, court orders, or subpoenas. (c) Standard: Content of record. The medical record must contain... such a practitioner is acting in accordance with State law, including scope-of-practice laws, hospital... with nationally recognized and evidence-based guidelines; (iii) Ensures that the periodic and...

  19. 45 CFR 5b.6 - Special procedures for notification of or access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... professional designated by the parent or guardian in all cases. If disclosure of the record would constitute an... component of the Department. Therefore, components may follow the paragraph (b) procedure for notification... purposes. The special procedure set forth in paragraph (c) of this section relating to medical records...

  20. 28 CFR 513.44 - Fees for copies of Inmate Central File and Medical Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fees for copies of Inmate Central File and Medical Records. 513.44 Section 513.44 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION ACCESS TO RECORDS Release of Information Inmate Requests...

  1. The urban underserved: Attitudes toward gaining full access to electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Walker, Jan; Reisch, Lisa; Oster, Natalia; Delbanco, Thomas; Elmore, Joann

    2012-01-01

    Background As the use of electronic medical records (EMRs) spreads, health care organizations are increasingly offering patients online access to their medical records. Studies evaluating patient attitudes toward viewing elements of their records through secure, electronic patient portals have generally not included medically underserved patients or those with HIV/AIDS. The goal of this study was to gain insight into such patients’ attitudes toward online access to their medical records, including their doctors’ visit notes. Methods Qualitative study of four focus groups with adult patients in general adult medicine and HIV clinics at a large county hospital. Transcripts were analyzed for themes using an immersion/crystallization approach. Results Patients’ baseline understanding of the health record was limited. Perceived benefits of online access were improved patient understanding of health and disease, convenience, empowerment, and a stronger relationship with their provider. Concerns included threats to privacy, worries about being unable to understand their record, fear that the computer would replace direct provider contact, and hesitancy about potential demands on a provider’s time. Patients also recommended providing online visit reminders, links to credible health information, and assistance for paying bills. Conclusion Despite their initial lack of knowledge of the health record, focus group participants were overwhelmingly positive about the prospect of online access to medical records. However, they worried about potential loss of privacy and interference with the patient-provider relationship. As EMRs increasingly offer patients open access to their medical records, vulnerable patient groups will likely join others in desiring and adopting such change, but may need targeted support during times of transition. PMID:22738155

  2. Marco (Medical Record Communications) - System Concept, Design and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Moffatt, P. H.; Heisler, B. D.; Mela, W. D.; Alpert, J. J.; Goldstein, H.M.

    1978-01-01

    MARCO, an interfacility communication system, has been designed to promote safe relevant health care delivery to the inner city pediatric patient receiving care in a network consisting of Boston City Hospital and its affiliated Neighborhood Health Centers. This application of computer technology to communication of medical information compiled on an individual patient in multiple locations has implications for private group practice as well as other urban networks similar to our own. This paper provides the MARCO system concept, the system design and evaluation of its success after two years of operation.

  3. Occupational Safety and Health Administration--Access to employee exposure and medical records. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1980-05-23

    This final occupational safety and health standard, promulgated today as a revised 29 CFR 1910.20, provides for employee, designated representative, and OSHA access to employer-maintained exposure and medical records relevant to employees exposed to toxic substances and harmful physical agents. Access is also assured to employer analyses using exposure and medical records. The final standard requires long term preservation of these records, contains provisions concerning informing employees of their rights under the standard, and includes provisions protective of trade secret information.

  4. Performance analysis of distributed and centralized models for electronic medical record exchanges.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ean-Wen; Lee, Chiung-San; Jiang, Wey-Wen; Chiou, Shwu-Fen; Liu, Fei-Ying; Liou, Der-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Electronic medical record exchanges can save time and reduce cost by eliminating redundant data and typing errors. The major steps of record exchange consist of querying information from database, encoding data into messages, and sending and decoding messages. Three medical-record-exchange models were proposed in the past, including the distributed, centralized, and indexed models. In this paper, the queuing theory is applied to evaluate the performance of the three models. We estimate the service time for each queue of the CPU, database and network, and predict the response time, probable bottlenecks and system capacities of each model.

  5. Patients, privacy and trust: patients' willingness to allow researchers to access their medical records.

    PubMed

    Damschroder, Laura J; Pritts, Joy L; Neblo, Michael A; Kalarickal, Rosemarie J; Creswell, John W; Hayward, Rodney A

    2007-01-01

    The federal Privacy Rule, implemented in the United States in 2003, as part of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), created new restrictions on the release of medical information for research. Many believe that its restrictions have fallen disproportionately on researchers prompting some to call for changes to the Rule. Here we ask what patients think about researchers' access to medical records, and what influences these opinions. A sample of 217 patients from 4 Veteran Affairs (VA) facilities deliberated in small groups at each location with the opportunity to question experts and inform themselves about privacy issues related to medical records research. After extensive deliberation, these patients were united in their inclination to share their medical records for research. Yet they were also united in their recommendations to institute procedures that would give them more control over whether and how their medical records are used for research. We integrated qualitative and quantitative results to derive a better understanding of this apparent paradox. Our findings can best be presented as answers to questions related to five dimensions of trust: Patients' trust in VA researchers was the most powerful determinant of the kind of control they want over their medical records. More specifically, those who had lower trust in VA researchers were more likely to recommend a more stringent process for obtaining individual consent. Insights on the critical role of trust suggest actions that researchers and others can take to more fully engage patients in research.

  6. Method and system for determining precursors of health abnormalities from processing medical records

    DOEpatents

    None, None

    2013-06-25

    Medical reports are converted to document vectors in computing apparatus and sampled by applying a maximum variation sampling function including a fitness function to the document vectors to reduce a number of medical records being processed and to increase the diversity of the medical records being processed. Linguistic phrases are extracted from the medical records and converted to s-grams. A Haar wavelet function is applied to the s-grams over the preselected time interval; and the coefficient results of the Haar wavelet function are examined for patterns representing the likelihood of health abnormalities. This confirms certain s-grams as precursors of the health abnormality and a parameter can be calculated in relation to the occurrence of such a health abnormality.

  7. Using an iconic language to improve access to electronic medical records in general medicine.

    PubMed

    Simon, Christian; Hassler, Sylvain; Beuscart-Zephir, Marie-Catherine; Favre, Madeleine; Venot, Alain; Duclos, Catherine; Lamy, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-01-01

    Physicians have difficulties to access and analyse information in a medical record. In a previous work on drug databanks, we have shown that with an iconic language as VCM, an icon-based presentation can help physicians to access medical information. Our objective, herein, is to study whether VCM can be used in an electronic medical record for facilitating physician access in general practice. We identify the data and the functionalities of an electronic medical record that could benefit from VCM icons representing clinical findings, patient history, etc. We also present a preliminary evaluation of this new icon-focused interface. We conclude by discussing the results like the assessment of the user's satisfaction and pointing out the importance of coding data.

  8. Psychiatric Morbidity Following Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, B.N.; Swain, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    A Case of cerebral neurocysticercosis reported with manic episode on first presentation which was confirmed after CT scan of Brain. Psychiatric manifestation showed a gradual decline following treatment with medication. Normal social and occupational functioning was ensured by prolonged treatment with Mood Stabilizer. PMID:21224909

  9. Giving Patients Access to Their Medical Records via the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Masys, Daniel; Baker, Dixie; Butros, Amy; Cowles, Kevin E.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The Patient-Centered Access to Secure Systems Online (pcasso) project is designed to apply state-of-the-art-security to the communication of clinical information over the Internet. Design: The authors report the legal and regulatory issues associated with deploying the system, and results of its use by providers and patients. Human subject protection concerns raised by the Institutional Review Board focused on three areas—unauthorized access to information by persons other than the patient; the effect of startling or poorly understood information; and the effect of patient access to records on the record-keeping behavior of providers. Measurements: Objective and subjective measures of security and usability were obtained. Results: During its initial deployment phase, the project enrolled 216 physicians and 41 patients; of these, 68 physicians and 26 patients used the system one or more times. The system performed as designed, with no unauthorized information access or intrusions detected. Providers rated the usability of the system low because of the complexity of the secure login and other security features and restrictions limiting their access to those patients with whom they had a professional relationship. In contrast, patients rated the usability and functionality of the system favorably. Conclusion: High-assurance systems that serve both patients and providers will need to address differing expectations regarding security and ease of use. PMID:11861633

  10. Automatic quality of life prediction using electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Pakhomov, Sergeui; Shah, Nilay; Hanson, Penny; Balasubramaniam, Saranya; Smith, Steven A; Smith, Steven Allan

    2008-11-06

    Health related quality of life (HRQOL) is an important variable used for prognosis and measuring outcomes in clinical studies and for quality improvement. We explore the use of a general pur-pose natural language processing system Metamap in combination with Support Vector Machines (SVM) for predicting patient responses on standardized HRQOL assessment instruments from text of physicians notes. We surveyed 669 patients in the Mayo Clinic diabetes registry using two instruments designed to assess functioning: EuroQoL5D and SF36/SD6. Clinical notes for these patients were represented as sets of medical concepts using Metamap. SVM classifiers were trained using various feature selection strategies. The best concordance between the HRQOL instruments and automatic classification was achieved along the pain dimension (positive agreement .76, negative agreement .78, kappa .54) using Metamap. We conclude that clinicians notes may be used to develop a surrogate measure of patients HRQOL status.

  11. Auditing medical records accesses via healthcare interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, You; Nyemba, Steve; Malin, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare organizations are deploying increasingly complex clinical information systems to support patient care. Traditional information security practices (e.g., role-based access control) are embedded in enterprise-level systems, but are insufficient to ensure patient privacy. This is due, in part, to the dynamic nature of healthcare, which makes it difficult to predict which care providers need access to what and when. In this paper, we show that modeling operations at a higher level of granularity (e.g., the departmental level) are stable in the context of a relational network, which may enable more effective auditing strategies. We study three months of access logs from a large academic medical center to illustrate that departmental interaction networks exhibit certain invariants, such as the number, strength, and reciprocity of relationships. We further show that the relations extracted from the network can be leveraged to assess the extent to which a patient's care satisfies expected organizational behavior.

  12. Auditing Medical Records Accesses via Healthcare Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, You; Nyemba, Steve; Malin, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare organizations are deploying increasingly complex clinical information systems to support patient care. Traditional information security practices (e.g., role-based access control) are embedded in enterprise-level systems, but are insufficient to ensure patient privacy. This is due, in part, to the dynamic nature of healthcare, which makes it difficult to predict which care providers need access to what and when. In this paper, we show that modeling operations at a higher level of granularity (e.g., the departmental level) are stable in the context of a relational network, which may enable more effective auditing strategies. We study three months of access logs from a large academic medical center to illustrate that departmental interaction networks exhibit certain invariants, such as the number, strength, and reciprocity of relationships. We further show that the relations extracted from the network can be leveraged to assess the extent to which a patient’s care satisfies expected organizational behavior. PMID:23304277

  13. Stimulation, Recording Potential and Antimicrobial Medical Catheter Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Richard B.; DeLaurent, Mark; Pourrezaei, Kambiz; Adrian, Sorin

    1994-01-01

    Biocompatibility of electrodes for stimulation are difficult to maintain homeostasis. Noble metal stimulating electrodes which are normally biocompatible on keratinized tissue become very non-biocompatible when they are interfaced with nonkeratinized tissue in an area such as the oral cavity. Composite electrodes have been made biocompatible in the oral cavity even at current densities larger than 1 μA/mm2. Electrodes used in potential readings require that the anodic and cathodic polarization remain minimal. Silver-silver chloride electrodes are minimal. Silver-silver chloride electrodes are not always reversible. The range of pH, voltages and current densities when silver-silver chloride are not reversible are presented. Recently at Drexel University reliable silver coatings inside and outside of medical catheters have been fabricated to act as antimicrobial to a variety of bacteria. Noble and nonnoble metals have been combined in coatings with silver to enhance the antimicrobial action. PMID:18476262

  14. Relationships Among Neurocognitive Status, Medication Adherence Measured by Pharmacy Refill Records, and Virologic Suppression in HIV-infected Persons

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Adriana S.A.; Deutsch, Reena; Celano, Shivaun; Duarte, Nichole A.; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Umlauf, Anya; Atkinson, J. Hampton; McCutchan, J. Allen; Franklin, Donald; Alexander, Terry J.; McArthur, Justin; Marra, Christina; Grant, Igor; Collier, Ann C

    2013-01-01

    Background Optimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) effectiveness depends upon medication adherence, which is a complex behavior with many contributing factors including neurocognitive function. Pharmacy refill records offer a promising and practical tool to assess adherence. Methods A substudy of the CHARTER (CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research) study was conducted at the Johns Hopkins University (JHU) and the University of Washington (UW). Pharmacy refill records were the primary method to measure ART adherence, indexed to a “sentinel” drug with the highest central nervous system penetration effectiveness score. Standardized neuromedical, neuropsychological, psychiatric and substance use assessments were performed at enrollment and at 6 months. Regression models were used to determine factors associated with adherence and the relationships between adherence and change in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid HIV RNA concentrations between visits. Results Among 80 (33 JHU, 47 UW) participants, the mean adherence score was 86.4% with no difference by site. In the final multivariable model, better neurocognitive function was associated with better adherence, especially among participants who were at JHU, male, and HIV-infected for a longer time-period. Worse performance on working memory tests was associated with worse adherence. Better adherence predicted greater decreases in cerebrospinal fluid HIV RNA between visits. Conclusion Poorer global neurocognitive functioning and deficits in working memory were associated with lower adherence defined by a pharmacy refill record measure, suggesting that assessments of cognitive function, and working memory in particular, may identify patients at risk for poor ART adherence who would benefit from adherence support. PMID:23202813

  15. [Pressure ulcer care quality indicator: analysis of medical records and incident report].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Cássia Teixeira; Oliveira, Magáli Costa; Pereira, Ana Gabriela da Silva; Suzuki, Lyliam Midori; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2013-03-01

    Cross-sectional study that aimed to compare the data reported in a system for the indication of pressure ulcer (PU) care quality, with the nursing evolution data available in the patients' medical records, and to describe the clinical profile and nursing diagnosis of those who developed PU grade 2 or higher Sample consisted of 188 patients at risk for PU in clinical and surgical units. Data were collected retrospectively from medical records and a computerized system of care indicators and statistically analyzed. Of the 188 patients, 6 (3%) were reported for pressure ulcers grade 2 or higher; however, only 19 (10%) were recorded in the nursing evolution records, thus revealing the underreporting of data. Most patients were women, older adults and patients with cerebrovascular diseases. The most frequent nursing diagnosis was risk of infection. The use of two or more research methodologies such as incident reporting data and retrospective review of patients' records makes the results trustworthy.

  16. Educational Impact of a Psychiatric Liaison in the Medical Intensive Care Unit: Effects on Attitudes and Beliefs of Trainees and Nurses Regarding Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Donna T.; Huffman, Jeff C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Despite high rates and increased risk of mortality, delirium remains underdiagnosed and a minimal focus of formal medical education. This is the first study to examine the educational impact of a psychiatric liaison on beliefs and knowledge about delirium among both nurses and residents. Method: One psychiatrist spent 9 months rounding weekly in the medical intensive care unit, interacting with critical care nurses and internal medicine residents. Preintervention and postintervention surveys were distributed in July 2009 and June 2010, respectively, to staff (critical care nurses: n = 23 and n = 25, respectively; internal medicine residents: n = 31 and n = 23, respectively) and a comparison group (psychiatry residents: n = 29 and n = 23, respectively). Participants responded to 12 statements regarding delirium on a 5-point Likert scale. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the presurveys and postsurveys for any item when examining all respondents together, as well as psychiatry and internal medicine residents as individual groups. Critical care nurses showed a significant change between surveys for the statements, “Patients with new-onset anxiety or depression in the intensive care unit most commonly have delirium” (17.4% agree presurvey vs 56.0% agree postsurvey, χ2 = 7.62, P = .006) and “Delirium is diagnosed less often than it actually occurs” (100% agree presurvey vs 80% agree postsurvey, χ2 = 5.13, P = .023). Conclusions: Though introduction of a psychiatric liaison was very well received by clinical staff, we did not meaningfully affect the attitudes and beliefs of trainees and nurses regarding delirium. Robust and lasting changes in attitudes regarding delirium may require more intensive efforts involving longer intervention periods, greater rounding frequency, or additional didactic teaching. PMID:24171148

  17. A scheme for assuring lifelong readability in computer based medical records.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Yasushi; Kurabayashi, Noriyuki; Iwasaki, Tetsuya; Sugaya, Shuichi; Ueda, Kanayo; Mineno, Takahiro; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Medical records must be kept over an extended period of time, meanwhile computer based medical records are renewed every 5-6 years. Readability of medical records must be assured even though the systems are renewed by different vendors. To achieve this, we proposed a method called DACS, in which a medical record is considered as an aggregation of documents. A Document generated by a system is transformed to a format read by free software such as PDF, which is transferred with the document meta-information and important data written on the XML to the Document Deliverer. It stores these data into the Document Archiver, the Document Sharing Server and the Data Warehouse (DWH). We developed the Matrix View which shows documents in chronological order, and the Tree View showing documents in class tree structure. By this method all the documents can be integrated and be viewed by a single viewer. This helps users figure out patient history and find a document being sought. In addition, documents' data can be shared among systems and analyzed by DWH. Most importantly DACS can assure the lifelong readability of medical records. PMID:20841656

  18. Semantic extraction and processing of medical records for patient-oriented visual index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weilin; Dong, Wenjie; Chen, Xiangjiao; Zhang, Jianguo

    2012-02-01

    To have comprehensive and completed understanding healthcare status of a patient, doctors need to search patient medical records from different healthcare information systems, such as PACS, RIS, HIS, USIS, as a reference of diagnosis and treatment decisions for the patient. However, it is time-consuming and tedious to do these procedures. In order to solve this kind of problems, we developed a patient-oriented visual index system (VIS) to use the visual technology to show health status and to retrieve the patients' examination information stored in each system with a 3D human model. In this presentation, we present a new approach about how to extract the semantic and characteristic information from the medical record systems such as RIS/USIS to create the 3D Visual Index. This approach includes following steps: (1) Building a medical characteristic semantic knowledge base; (2) Developing natural language processing (NLP) engine to perform semantic analysis and logical judgment on text-based medical records; (3) Applying the knowledge base and NLP engine on medical records to extract medical characteristics (e.g., the positive focus information), and then mapping extracted information to related organ/parts of 3D human model to create the visual index. We performed the testing procedures on 559 samples of radiological reports which include 853 focuses, and achieved 828 focuses' information. The successful rate of focus extraction is about 97.1%.

  19. Problem focused knowledge navigation: implementing the problem focused medical record and the O-HEAP note.

    PubMed

    Meyers, K C; Miller, H J; Naeymi-Rad, F

    1998-01-01

    The current organization of most Computerized Medical Records (CMR) is based on the Problem Oriented Medical Record (POMR) and the SOAP (Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan) note. The organizational structure of the POMR and especially the SOAP note, does not allow for optimal use of computer capabilities in the follow up note. Since follow up visits are the most common office visit by far, this is a major flaw in the CMR. The authors propose a Problem Focused Medical Record and the OHEAP (Orientation, History, Exam, Assessment and Plan) note to resolve this problem. OHEAP starts with a powerful orientation structure that brings forward the timeline, last Assessment and Plan, and Plan Results for each problem along with the patient's historical tables as the starting point of every follow up visit. The Assessment and Plan portion brings problem specific differential diagnoses and their workups along with other relevant tables such as expert systems, treatments, instructions, medical literature or pathways. This leads to Problem Focused Knowledge Navigation that brings powerful efficiencies to the CMR. By recognizing the true workflow in the longitudinal diagnosis and management of any medical problem, the efficiency of the CMR is maximized. OHEAP allows for optimal use of both personal and external data elements in the medical record. Its powerful orientation attributes minimize the time spent in analyzing the current status of the problem while its connections to problem specific databases help resolve the problem.

  20. Using the GAD-Q-IV to identify generalized anxiety disorder in psychiatric treatment seeking and primary care medical samples.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael T; Anderson, Nicholas L; Barnes, Jill M; Haigh, Emily A P; Fresco, David M

    2014-01-01

    The fourth edition of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD-Q-IV) is a self-report measure that is commonly used to screen for the presence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The current investigation attempted to identify an optimal cut score using samples obtained from an outpatient psychiatric (n=163) and primary care clinic (n=99). Results indicated that a cut score of 7.67 provided an optimal balance of sensitivity (.85) and specificity (.74) comparable to a previously identified cut score (5.7) across both samples (sensitivity=.90, specificity=.66). However, both cut scores were consistently outperformed by a score representing the criteria for GAD described in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (sensitivity=.89, specificity=.82).

  1. Using the GAD-Q-IV to identify generalized anxiety disorder in psychiatric treatment seeking and primary care medical samples.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael T; Anderson, Nicholas L; Barnes, Jill M; Haigh, Emily A P; Fresco, David M

    2014-01-01

    The fourth edition of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD-Q-IV) is a self-report measure that is commonly used to screen for the presence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The current investigation attempted to identify an optimal cut score using samples obtained from an outpatient psychiatric (n=163) and primary care clinic (n=99). Results indicated that a cut score of 7.67 provided an optimal balance of sensitivity (.85) and specificity (.74) comparable to a previously identified cut score (5.7) across both samples (sensitivity=.90, specificity=.66). However, both cut scores were consistently outperformed by a score representing the criteria for GAD described in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (sensitivity=.89, specificity=.82). PMID:24334213

  2. Profiling psychiatric inpatient suicide attempts in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ikeshita, Katsumi; Shimoda, Shigero; Norimoto, Kazunobu; Arita, Keisuke; Shimamoto, Takuya; Murata, Kiyoshi; Makinodan, Manabu; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2014-01-01

    Suicide is an adverse event that can occur even when patient are hospitalized in psychiatric facilities. This study delineates the demographic characteristics of suicide attempts in mental hospitals and psychiatric wards of general hospitals in Japan, a country where the suicide rate is remarkably high. Analyses of incident reports on serious suicide attempts in psychiatric inpatients were performed using prefectural incident records between April 1, 2001, and December 31, 2012. Suicide reports were included for 35 incidents that occurred over 11 years, and demonstrated that 83% of patients (n = 29) committed suicide and 17% (n = 6) survived their attempt with serious aftereffects, such as cognitive impairment or persistent vegetative state. The male/female ratio of inpatient suicide was 1.5:1. The mean age of the attempters was 50.5 years (SD = 18.2). The most common psychiatric diagnoses for those with suicide incident reports were schizophrenia spectrum disorders (51.4%) and affective disorders (40%). Hanging (60%) was the most common method of suicide attempt, followed by jumping in front of moving objects (14.3%) and jumping from height (11.4%). Fifty-four percent of suicides (n = 19) occurred within hospital sites and the remainder (46%; n = 16) occurred outside hospital sites (e.g., on medical leave or elopement) while they were still inpatients. PMID:25345233

  3. Congruence of Self-Reported Medications With Pharmacy Prescription Records In Low-Income Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Caskie, Grace I. L.; Willis, Sherry L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the congruence of self-reported medications with computerized pharmacy records. Design and Methods Pharmacy records and self-reported medications were obtained for 294 members of a state pharmaceutical assistance program who also participated in ACTIVE, a clinical trial on cognitive training in nondemented elderly persons. The average age of the sample participants was 74.5 years (range = 65–91); 87.8% were females. Results Congruence between self-report and pharmacy data was generally high. Self-reports omitted drug classes in the pharmacy records less often than the pharmacy records did not include self-reported drug classes. The percentage of individuals with perfect agreement between self-reports and pharmacy records varied from 49% for major drug classes to 81 % for specific cardiovascular and central nervous system drugs. Within a drug class, agreement tended to be higher for individuals without a prescription in that class. Poorer health was consistently related to poorer self-report of medications. Implications Self-reported medications are most likely to be congruent with pharmacy records for drugs prescribed for more serious conditions, for more specific classes of drugs, and for healthier individuals. PMID:15075414

  4. Intelligent technique for knowledge reuse of dental medical records based on case-based reasoning.

    PubMed

    Gu, Dong-Xiao; Liang, Chang-Yong; Li, Xing-Guo; Yang, Shan-Lin; Zhang, Pei

    2010-04-01

    With the rapid development of both information technology and the management of modern medical regulation, the generation of medical records tends to be increasingly intelligent. In this paper, Case-Based Reasoning is applied to the process of generating records of dental cases. Based on the analysis of the features of dental records, a case base is constructed. A mixed case retrieval method (FAIES) is proposed for the knowledge reuse of dental records by adopting Fuzzy Mathematics, which improves similarity algorithm based on Euclidian-Lagrangian Distance, and PULL & PUSH weight adjustment strategy. Finally, an intelligent system of dental cases generation (CBR-DENT) is constructed. The effectiveness of the system, the efficiency of the retrieval method, the extent of adaptation and the adaptation efficiency are tested using the constructed case base. It is demonstrated that FAIES is very effective in terms of reducing the time of writing medical records and improving the efficiency and quality. FAIES is also proven to be an effective aid for diagnoses and provides a new idea for the management of medical records and its applications.

  5. Overcoming Electronic Medical Record Challenges on the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship.

    PubMed

    Buery-Joyner, Samantha D; Dalrymple, John L; Abbott, Jodi F; Craig, LaTasha B; Forstein, David A; Graziano, Scott C; Hampton, Brittany S; Hopkins, Laura; Page-Ramsey, Sarah M; Pradhan, Archana; Wolf, Abigail; Mckenzie, Margaret L

    2015-09-01

    This article, for the "To the Point" series prepared by the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee, supplies educators with a review of best practices regarding incorporation of the electronic medical record (EMR) into undergraduate medical education. The unique circumstances of the obstetrics and gynecology clerkship require specific attention as it pertains to medical student use of the EMR. An outline of the regulatory requirements and authoritative body recommendations provides some guidance for implementation in the undergraduate medical education setting. A review of the basic framework for development of an EMR curriculum and examples of curricular innovations published in the literature offers solutions for obstacles that may be encountered by students and medical educators.

  6. Designing an Algorithm to Preserve Privacy for Medical Record Linkage With Error-Prone Data

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Doyel; Chen, Tingting; Khethavath, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Background Linking medical records across different medical service providers is important to the enhancement of health care quality and public health surveillance. In records linkage, protecting the patients’ privacy is a primary requirement. In real-world health care databases, records may well contain errors due to various reasons such as typos. Linking the error-prone data and preserving data privacy at the same time are very difficult. Existing privacy preserving solutions for this problem are only restricted to textual data. Objective To enable different medical service providers to link their error-prone data in a private way, our aim was to provide a holistic solution by designing and developing a medical record linkage system for medical service providers. Methods To initiate a record linkage, one provider selects one of its collaborators in the Connection Management Module, chooses some attributes of the database to be matched, and establishes the connection with the collaborator after the negotiation. In the Data Matching Module, for error-free data, our solution offered two different choices for cryptographic schemes. For error-prone numerical data, we proposed a newly designed privacy preserving linking algorithm named the Error-Tolerant Linking Algorithm, that allows the error-prone data to be correctly matched if the distance between the two records is below a threshold. Results We designed and developed a comprehensive and user-friendly software system that provides privacy preserving record linkage functions for medical service providers, which meets the regulation of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. It does not require a third party and it is secure in that neither entity can learn the records in the other’s database. Moreover, our novel Error-Tolerant Linking Algorithm implemented in this software can work well with error-prone numerical data. We theoretically proved the correctness and security of our Error

  7. The role of frontline RNs in the selection of an electronic medical record business partner.

    PubMed

    Wilhoit, Kathryn; Mustain, Jane; King, Marjorie

    2006-01-01

    Frontline RNs knowledgeable in the strategic objectives of their organization made a difference in the selection of an electronic medical record business partner for a large, complex healthcare system. Their impact was significant because of the chief nurse executive's personal articulation of the organization's strategic goals and of her investment in their education. These factors provided the frontline RNs with a foundational base of knowledge about a variety of electronic medical record systems. The preparation and exposure enabled the frontline RNs to make a valuable contribution to the selection of an electronic medical record business partner. The RNs were a major force in affecting philosophical change from the organization's original pursuit of "best-of-breed" interfaced systems to a fully integrated, "best-of-class" vendor business partner. The learning experiences of the frontline RNs are explored to answer the following question: Why must frontline RNs play a key role in this process? PMID:16849913

  8. The role of frontline RNs in the selection of an electronic medical record business partner.

    PubMed

    Wilhoit, Kathryn; Mustain, Jane; King, Marjorie

    2006-01-01

    Frontline RNs knowledgeable in the strategic objectives of their organization made a difference in the selection of an electronic medical record business partner for a large, complex healthcare system. Their impact was significant because of the chief nurse executive's personal articulation of the organization's strategic goals and of her investment in their education. These factors provided the frontline RNs with a foundational base of knowledge about a variety of electronic medical record systems. The preparation and exposure enabled the frontline RNs to make a valuable contribution to the selection of an electronic medical record business partner. The RNs were a major force in affecting philosophical change from the organization's original pursuit of "best-of-breed" interfaced systems to a fully integrated, "best-of-class" vendor business partner. The learning experiences of the frontline RNs are explored to answer the following question: Why must frontline RNs play a key role in this process?

  9. A patient-controlled journal for an electronic medical record: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Wald, Jonathan S; Middleton, Blackford; Bloom, Amy; Walmsley, Dan; Gleason, Mary; Nelson, Elizabeth; Li, Qi; Epstein, Marianna; Volk, Lynn; Bates, David W

    2004-01-01

    Partners Healthcare System, Boston, MA, has developed a patient Web portal that features a patient-controlled electronic "journal" to allow patients to interact with their physician's electronic medical record. Patients can view and respond to health reminders, critique electronic chart information maintained by their doctor's office, enter additional clinical information, and prepare information summaries before an office visit. Creating shared information resources to support a collaborative care model required analysis of the business, architectural, and workflow requirements of the patient-controlled clinical portal and the physician-controlled electronic medical record system. In this paper we describe the challenges in aligning the two systems and serving the different user groups. Coupling the Patient Gateway system, serving over 8700 patients of 90 physicians as of September, 2003, with the Longitudinal Medical Record system, serving over 4000 physicians, has required a clear definition of user goals and workflow, well-defined interfaces, and careful consideration of system assumptions to succeed.

  10. [Design and Implementation of a Mobile Operating Room Information Management System Based on Electronic Medical Record].

    PubMed

    Liu, Baozhen; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Xianwen

    2015-06-01

    A mobile operating room information management system with electronic medical record (EMR) is designed to improve work efficiency and to enhance the patient information sharing. In the operating room, this system acquires the information from various medical devices through the Client/Server (C/S) pattern, and automatically generates XML-based EMR. Outside the operating room, this system provides information access service by using the Browser/Server (B/S) pattern. Software test shows that this system can correctly collect medical information from equipment and clearly display the real-time waveform. By achieving surgery records with higher quality and sharing the information among mobile medical units, this system can effectively reduce doctors' workload and promote the information construction of the field hospital. PMID:26485982

  11. [Design and Implementation of a Mobile Operating Room Information Management System Based on Electronic Medical Record].

    PubMed

    Liu, Baozhen; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Xianwen

    2015-06-01

    A mobile operating room information management system with electronic medical record (EMR) is designed to improve work efficiency and to enhance the patient information sharing. In the operating room, this system acquires the information from various medical devices through the Client/Server (C/S) pattern, and automatically generates XML-based EMR. Outside the operating room, this system provides information access service by using the Browser/Server (B/S) pattern. Software test shows that this system can correctly collect medical information from equipment and clearly display the real-time waveform. By achieving surgery records with higher quality and sharing the information among mobile medical units, this system can effectively reduce doctors' workload and promote the information construction of the field hospital.

  12. Mining association rules between abnormal health examination results and outpatient medical records.

    PubMed

    Chao Huang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Currently, interpretation of health examination reports relies primarily on the physician's own experience. If health screening data could be integrated with outpatient medical records to uncover correlations between disease and abnormal test results, the physician could benefit from having additional reference resources for medical examination report interpretation and clinic diagnosis. This study used the medical database of a regional hospital in Taiwan to illustrate how association rules can be found between abnormal health examination results and outpatient illnesses. The rules can help to build up a disease-prevention knowledge database that assists healthcare providers in follow-up treatment and prevention. Furthermore, this study proposes a new algorithm, the data cutting and sorting method, or DCSM, in place of the traditional Apriori algorithm. DCSM significantly improves the mining performance of Apriori by reducing the time to scan health examination and outpatient medical records, both of which are databases of immense sizes.

  13. 76 FR 53921 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security ALL-034 Emergency Care Medical Records...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... employees, their records are considered part of the OPM/GOVT-10--Employee Medical File System Records, 71 FR... considered part of the OPM/GOVT- ] 10--Employee Medical File System Records, 71 FR 35360 (Jun. 19, 2006... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security ALL--034...

  14. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences electronic health record and medical informatics training for undergraduate health professionals.

    PubMed

    Hart, Jan K; Newton, Bruce W; Boone, Steven E

    2010-07-01

    The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) is planning interprofessional training in electronic health records (EHRs) and medical informatics. Training will be integrated throughout the curricula and will include seminars on broad concepts supplemented with online modules, didactic lectures, and hands-on experiences. Training will prepare future health professionals to use EHRs, evidence-based medicine, medical decision support, and point-of-care tools to reduce errors, improve standards of care, address Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act requirements and accreditation standards, and promote appropriate documentation to enable data retrieval for clinical research. UAMS will ensure that graduates are ready for the rapidly evolving practice environment created by the HITECH Act. PMID:20648253

  15. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences electronic health record and medical informatics training for undergraduate health professionals*

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Jan K; Newton, Bruce W; Boone, Steven E

    2010-01-01

    The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) is planning interprofessional training in electronic health records (EHRs) and medical informatics. Training will be integrated throughout the curricula and will include seminars on broad concepts supplemented with online modules, didactic lectures, and hands-on experiences. Training will prepare future health professionals to use EHRs, evidence-based medicine, medical decision support, and point-of-care tools to reduce errors, improve standards of care, address Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act requirements and accreditation standards, and promote appropriate documentation to enable data retrieval for clinical research. UAMS will ensure that graduates are ready for the rapidly evolving practice environment created by the HITECH Act. PMID:20648253

  16. The Effects of Sociodemographic Factors on Psychiatric Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal Rye; Eun, Hun-Jeong; Yoo, Tai P.; Yun, Youngmi; Wood, Christopher; Kase, Michael; Park, Jong-Il

    2012-01-01

    Objective Several studies have reported that ethnic differences influence psychiatric diagnoses. Some previous studies reported that African Americans and Hispanics are diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders more frequently than Caucasians, and that Caucasians are more likely to be diagnosed with affective disorders than other ethnic groups. We sought to identify associations between sociodemographic factors and psychiatric diagnosis. Methods We retrospectively examined the medical records of all psychiatric inpatients (ages over 18 years) treated at Kern county mental hospital (n=2,051) between July 2003 and March 2007 for demographic, clinical information, and discharge diagnoses. Results African American and Hispanic males were more frequently diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders than Caucasians, whereas Caucasian females were more frequently diagnosed with affective disorders than females in the other ethnic groups, suggesting that patient ethnicity and gender may influence clinical diagnoses. Demographic variables, that is, a lower education, failure of marriage, homelessness, and low quality insurance, were found to be significantly associated with a diagnosis of schizophrenia spectrum disorders after adjusting for clinical variables. And, the presence of a family psychiatric history, failure of marriage, not-homelessness, and quality insurance were found to be associated with a diagnosis of affective disorders. Conclusion Our results show that these demographic factors, including ethnicity, have effects on diagnoses in psychiatric inpatients. Furthermore, these variables may help prediction of psychiatric diagnoses. PMID:22993517

  17. A study on agent-based secure scheme for electronic medical record system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzer-Long; Chung, Yu-Fang; Lin, Frank Y S

    2012-06-01

    Patient records, including doctors' diagnoses of diseases, trace of treatments and patients' conditions, nursing actions, and examination results from allied health profession departments, are the most important medical records of patients in medical systems. With patient records, medical staff can instantly understand the entire medical information of a patient so that, according to the patient's conditions, more accurate diagnoses and more appropriate in-depth treatments can be provided. Nevertheless, in such a modern society with booming information technologies, traditional paper-based patient records have faced a lot of problems, such as lack of uniform formats, low data mobility, slow data transfer, illegible handwritings, enormous and insufficient storage space, difficulty of conservation, being easily damaged, and low transferability. To improve such drawbacks, reduce medical costs, and advance medical quality, paper-based patient records are modified into electronic medical records and reformed into electronic patient records. However, since electronic patient records used in various hospitals are diverse and different, in consideration of cost, it is rather difficult to establish a compatible and complete integrated electronic patient records system to unify patient records from heterogeneous systems in hospitals. Moreover, as the booming of the Internet, it is no longer necessary to build an integrated system. Instead, doctors can instantly look up patients' complete information through the Internet access to electronic patient records as well as avoid the above difficulties. Nonetheless, the major problem of accessing to electronic patient records cross-hospital systems exists in the security of transmitting and accessing to the records in case of unauthorized medical personnels intercepting or stealing the information. This study applies the Mobile Agent scheme to cope with the problem. Since a Mobile Agent is a program, which can move among hosts and

  18. The computerized medical record in gastroenterology: part 4. Health curriculum vitae.

    PubMed

    Jeanty, C

    1978-12-01

    The health curriculum vitae consists mainly of a chronological sequence of diagnoses, which are the mainstays of the medical record. Each diagnosis is connected vertically in the health curriculum vitae with its aetiological factors and its medical or surgical treatments in a casual concatenation; and horizontally throughout the other three parts of the record with its relevant functional, morphological (descriptive) and numerical laboratory data in a diagnostic association. The health curriculum vitae uses the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED), the International Nomenclature of the Diseases of the Gastrointestinal Tract (CIOMS) and the International Standard Classification of Occupations of the Internationl Labour Office.

  19. Focusing on Patient Safety: the Challenge of Securely Sharing Electronic Medical Records in Complex Care Continuums.

    PubMed

    Key, Diana; Ferneini, Elie M

    2015-09-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act's (PPACA) regulated approach to inclusive provision of care will increase the challenge health care administrators face ensuring secure communication and secure sharing of electronic medical records between divisions and care subcontractors. This analysis includes a summary overview of the PPACA; the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act (HCERA) of 2010; and required Essential Health Benefits (EHB). The analysis integrates an overview of how secure communication and secure sharing of electronic medical records will be essential to clinical outcomes across complex care continuums; as well as the actionable strategies health care leadership can employ to overcome associated IT security challenges.

  20. FRR: fair remote retrieval of outsourced private medical records in electronic health networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaqun; Wu, Qianhong; Qin, Bo; Domingo-Ferrer, Josep

    2014-08-01

    Cloud computing is emerging as the next-generation IT architecture. However, cloud computing also raises security and privacy concerns since the users have no physical control over the outsourced data. This paper focuses on fairly retrieving encrypted private medical records outsourced to remote untrusted cloud servers in the case of medical accidents and disputes. Our goal is to enable an independent committee to fairly recover the original private medical records so that medical investigation can be carried out in a convincing way. We achieve this goal with a fair remote retrieval (FRR) model in which either t investigation committee members cooperatively retrieve the original medical data or none of them can get any information on the medical records. We realize the first FRR scheme by exploiting fair multi-member key exchange and homomorphic privately verifiable tags. Based on the standard computational Diffie-Hellman (CDH) assumption, our scheme is provably secure in the random oracle model (ROM). A detailed performance analysis and experimental results show that our scheme is efficient in terms of communication and computation.