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Sample records for psychology military

  1. Military Psychology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    TRANSLATIONS, MILITARY TRAINING, OFFICER PERSONNEL, PERCEPTION( PSYCHOLOGY ), PERSONALITY , COMMUNISM, INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS, EMOTIONS....MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN), *MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY , *TEXTBOOKS, USSR, ORGANIZATIONS, COMBAT READINESS, PSYCHOMOTOR FUNCTION, REASONING, SURVEYS

  2. Military Psychology: An Overview,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    Department of Leadership and Law, provide academic and personal counseling to midshipmen, and conduct research. An example of psychological research...AD-Ai40 866 MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY : AN OYERYIEM(U) NAVY PERSONNEL i/i RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER SAN DIEGO CR C NEMETH ET AL. MAY 84 UNCLASSIFIED F...G 5/1@ NL L 8 -1.25 1 1.4 11.6 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATKiAk BURAMF OF STANDARDS- 1963-A %% a • v VjUU.U. 1 // 00 Military Psychology : An

  3. The Psychological Dynamics of Civil Military Collaboration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    negotiation. Page ii The psychological dynamics of civil-military collaboration Humansystems® Executive Summary The psychological dynamics of...i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...civilian) received $100 in remuneration for their participation. (See Annex A for the Voluntary Consent Form completed by all participants and Annex B

  4. Liberation psychological implications for pastoral care of Korean military wives.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bocheol

    2010-01-01

    Native Korean women frequently suffer poverty, sexual violence, and Confucian gender discrimination. Once in America Korean military wives also experience racial and sexual oppression, intercultural familial conflicts and violence, and identity crisis and lead to feelings of isolation and non-belonging, a sense of anomie. Korean American pastors tend to understate and oversimplify the complexity of psychological and spiritual suffering of Korean military wives and overemphasize individual faith development as a solution. Liberation psychology evolved from an awareness of similar dehumanizing realities. The context-based perspective of liberation psychology offers a model to interpret and assist in the psychological and spiritual healing of Korean military wives. The healing power of conscientization offered in Liberation psychology for oppressed individuals encourages self-awakening suggesting it as an ideal interventional model to help Korean military wives and would be a useful approach for Korean American pastors.

  5. Military psychology and police psychology: mutual contributions to crisis intervention and stress management.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurence

    2008-01-01

    Like siblings separated at birth, military psychology and police psychology have each independently addressed the cognitive, perceptual, emotional, and behavioral aspects of men and women performing extreme service in defense of their neighborhood or their country. This article reviews the major areas of commonality in the work of military and police psychologists in the areas of crisis intervention and stress management, and provides practical strategies for handling these operational and clinical challenges. The article makes specific recommendations for how police and military psychologists can cross-contribute to each other's fields for the overall enhanced provision of services to the men and women who wear uniforms of all kinds.

  6. Psychological Aspects of Military Performance in Hot Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    psychological mental conditions. Throughout military history, "breaking points" in performance. Unfortunately, more deaths and injuries in war have been...ception of our bodily sensations is important in judging the onset of heat injury . Concurrent Tasks Symptomatology The effects of heat on performance...member’s perception of heat illness symptoms is the ther the WBGT or a temperature-humidity index. sole basis for judging the onset of heat injury

  7. Military Psychology - Its Role in the Growth of Psychology in Australia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    guldance function of the psychology services wore taken over by the then Depatant of Labour ad National Service (now Employmet Kducation and Training... population rxms. Since Owmns’ extended series of projects, major projects have been undertae by Craig (1978) amd Godwin (1965). Army psichologists have...of the largest employers of labour in the nation and current research in the military focuses on managing this large personnel system. Future personel

  8. Psychological distress and coping in military cadre candidates

    PubMed Central

    Nakkas, Can; Annen, Hubert; Brand, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Background Soldiers must cope with stressors during both military operations and training if they are to accomplish their missions successfully and stay mentally stable. This holds true particularly for military superiors, as they bear greater responsibilities and must meet greater demands during both deployment and training. Accordingly, in the present study, we investigated whether recruits chosen for further promotion at the end of basic training differed with regard to psychological distress and coping strategies from those not chosen for promotion, and whether recruits’ coping styles and distress levels were associated. Methods A total of 675 Swiss recruits took part in the study. At the beginning of basic training, recruits filled out self-rating questionnaires covering demographic data, psychological distress (depression, somatization, anxiety, interpersonal sensitivity, and hostility), and coping styles. Results were compared between those recruits who received a recommendation for further promotion at the end of basic training and those who did not. Results Recruits selected for promotion had lower scores for depressive symptoms and hostility, engaged more in active coping, and considered their coping to be more effective. Dysfunctional and functional coping were associated with higher and lower distress levels, respectively. Conclusion Recruits recommended for promotion exhibited less psychological distress during basic training and exhibited a socially more conducive profile of distress. They also endorsed more efficient and more prosocial coping strategies than those recruits not recommended for promotion. These cognitive–emotional features not only contribute to resilience but are also consistent with leadership research, indicating the importance of emotional stability and prosocial behavior in successful leaders. PMID:27621634

  9. Impact of Positive Emotions Enhancement on Physiological Processes and Psychological Functioning in Military Pilots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    feels to them. The PSS is recommended for assessing non-specific appraisal because it is found to better predict stress - related psychological symptoms...the end of stressor facing, deleterious effects of stress reaction occur with negative consequences on psychological and/or cognitive abilities...and stress hormones [9,16]. Because physical and psychological stresses are inevitable components of military life, studies in the military context

  10. Do Military Peacekeepers Want to Talk about Their Experiences? Perceived Psychological Support of UK Military Peacekeepers on Return from Deployment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    stopped by the Surgeon General (the most senior UK military doctor) after emerging scientific evidence suggested that single session psychological...process” what has happened to them (15). Unlike formalized single session psychological debriefings, which have been found to be unhelpful, support...Kamphuis JH, Hulsbosch AM, Emmelkamp PM. Single session debriefing after psychological trauma: a meta-analysis. Lancet. 2002;360(9335):766-71. [9

  11. Spouse Psychological Well-Being: A Keystone to Military Family Health

    PubMed Central

    Green, Sara; Nurius, Paula S.; Lester, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Understanding predictors of military spouse psychosocial vulnerability informs efforts to assess, identify, and support at-risk spouses and families. In this analysis we test the effects of family stress and strain on military spouse psychological health, using a sample of female civilian spouses (n=161). Regression findings confirm expectations of the significant contribution of family stressors, strain, and resources in explaining variation in spouses' psychological health, controlling for deployment and socioeconomic factors. Identifying the effects of family stress on military spouse psychological health supports the need for family-centered interventions and prevention programs. PMID:24415897

  12. The Psychological Effects of Husband/Father Separation and Reunification in Military Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Keith Edward

    This document reviews the literature from 1949 to the present on psychological effects of husband/father separations and reunifications upon military families. Separations are limited to those that result directly from military duties; divorces, deaths and other permanent separations are not included. The review is organized into two parts, the…

  13. The Psychological Effects of Husband/Father Separation and Reunification in Military Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Keith Edward

    This document reviews the literature from 1949 to the present on psychological effects of husband/father separations and reunifications upon military families. Separations are limited to those that result directly from military duties; divorces, deaths and other permanent separations are not included. The review is organized into two parts, the…

  14. Evaluation of a psychological health and resilience intervention for military spouses: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kees, Michelle; Rosenblum, Katherine

    2015-08-01

    The decade long conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have placed considerable strain on military families. Given robust data showing high rates of deployment-related psychological health problems in spouses and children, and the near absence of evidence-based psychological health programs for military families in the community, interventions are urgently needed to support and strengthen spouses as they adjust to deployment transitions and military life experiences. This Phase 1 pilot study evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of a resiliency intervention for military spouses in civilian communities (HomeFront Strong; HFS), and generated preliminary efficacy data regarding impacts on psychological health and adjustment. Through two group cohorts, 14 women completed the intervention, with 10 women providing pre- and postgroup assessment data. Findings support feasibility of the intervention and high rates of program satisfaction. Participants reported learning new strategies and feeling more knowledgeable in their ability to use effective coping skills for managing deployment and military-related stressors. Participation in HFS was also associated with reduction in levels of anxiety and perceived stress, and improvements in life satisfaction and life engagement. HFS is a promising community-based intervention for military spouses designed to enhance resiliency, reduce negative psychological health symptoms, and improve coping. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Moral injury: a mechanism for war-related psychological trauma in military family members.

    PubMed

    Nash, William P; Litz, Brett T

    2013-12-01

    Recent research has provided compelling evidence of mental health problems in military spouses and children, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), related to the war-zone deployments, combat exposures, and post-deployment mental health symptoms experienced by military service members in the family. One obstacle to further research and federal programs targeting the psychological health of military family members has been the lack of a clear, compelling, and testable model to explain how war-zone events can result in psychological trauma in military spouses and children. In this article, we propose a possible mechanism for deployment-related psychological trauma in military spouses and children based on the concept of moral injury, a model that has been developed to better understand how service members and veterans may develop PTSD and other serious mental and behavioral problems in the wake of war-zone events that inflict damage to moral belief systems rather by threatening personal life and safety. After describing means of adapting the moral injury model to family systems, we discuss the clinical implications of moral injury, and describe a model for its psychological treatment.

  16. Summary of Proceedings, International Symposium on Applied Military Psychology (7th, Brussels, Belgium, 14-18 September 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Newell H.

    The symposium was attended by representatives of military psychology from seven nations and was hosted by the Centre De Recherches Des Facteurs, Humains, Forces Armees Belges. The primary purpose was to provide a forum to enhance the exchange of information about research in the field of military psychology. The agenda of the symposium included…

  17. A new psychological intervention: "512 Psychological Intervention Model" used for military rescuers in Wenchuan Earthquake in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shengjun; Zhu, Xia; Zhang, Yinling; Liang, Jie; Liu, Xufeng; Yang, Yebing; Yang, Hai; Miao, Danmin

    2012-07-01

    We sought to compare the efficacy of the "512 Psychological Intervention Model" (that is, "512 PIM", a new psychological intervention) with debriefing on symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety and depression of Chinese military rescuers in relation to a control group that had no intervention. We conducted a randomized controlled trial with 2,368 military rescuers 1 month after this event and then at follow-up 1, 2 and 4 months later to evaluate changes in symptoms of PTSD, anxiety and depression based on DSM-IV criteria, respectively. Baseline analysis suggested no significant differences between the study groups. Severity of PTSD, anxiety and depression decreased over time in all three groups, with significant differences between the groups in symptoms of PTSD (P < 0.01). Compared with the debriefing and control group, significant lower scores of PTSD and positive efficacy in improving symptoms of re-experiencing, avoidance and hyperarousal were found in the "512 PIM" group. "512 PIM" was an effective psychological intervention for military rescuers in reducing symptoms of PTSD, anxiety and depression after a crisis.

  18. [Psychiatric and psychological problems of the court expertise in military crimes].

    PubMed

    Florkowski, Antoni; Szubert, Sławomir; Bobińska, Kinga; Zboralski, Krzysztof; Gałecki, Piotr

    2008-01-01

    The responsibility for committing the military crime by an active service soldier is not always depending on the level of the accountability by the offender. The basis of the psychiatric and psychological court expertise in giving an opinion on military crimes have to be the motivation process. It is known that the motivation is creating by individualistic, biological and situational factors. Among soldiers the situational factors are connected with the decompensation of the personal accountability or with the adaptive disorders. Therefore, it is necessery and obligatory to appoint the psychologist for making court expertise.

  19. "Panic": the impact of Le Bon's crowd psychology on U.S. military thought.

    PubMed

    Bendersky, Joseph W

    2007-01-01

    The controversial crowd psychology of Gustave Le Bon has been both praised as an incisive contribution to social theory and also condemned as a doctrine of irrationality and mass manipulation associated with fascism. New archival documentation now demonstrates that Le Bon exercised significant influence on U.S. military thinking and practice through World War II. Army writings and officer training on morale, leadership, and battlefield psychology rested substantially on his theory of crowds, particularly regarding races and panic. Le Bon's racial psychology took on additional importance when the African-American 92 nd Infantry Division panicked during combat in Italy. This new evidence offers an excellent case study of the direct and enduring impact of a peculiar type of social psychology on the institutional culture of the army from the classrooms at the Army War College to the battlefield itself. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Screening for vulnerability to psychological disorders in the military: an historical survey.

    PubMed

    Jones, E; Hyams, K C; Wessely, S

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate attempts in the military to screen for vulnerability to psychological disorders from World War I to the present. An extensive literature review was conducted by hand-searching leading medical and psychological journals relating to World Wars I and II. Recent publications were surveyed electronically and UK archives investigated for British applications. Despite the optimism shown in World War I and the concerted efforts of World War II, follow-up studies showed that screening programmes did not succeed in reducing the incidence of psychological casualties. Furthermore, they had a counter-productive effect on manpower, often rejecting men who would have made good soldiers. Continued experimentation with screening methods for psychiatric vulnerability failed to yield convincing results during the post-war period. Although well-measured variables, such as intelligence, have been shown to predict success in training and aptitude, no instrument has yet been identified which can accurately assess psychological vulnerability. Previous attempts have failed because of false-positives, false-negatives and reluctance in the target population because of stigma. Early findings suggest that psychological surveillance, if not screening, may yield valuable results when applied to military populations exposed to stress.

  1. Family Relational Health, Psychological Resources, and Health Behaviors: A Dyadic Study of Military Couples.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Catherine Walker; Lucier-Greer, Mallory; Mancini, Jay A; Ferraro, Anthony J; Ross, D Bruce

    2016-02-01

    In addition to facing stressors that are typical of life course development (e.g., marital struggles, balancing work/family demands), military families face additional stress attributed to their military context (e.g., deployments, relocations). Using a systems framework and stress process perspective, this study examined military couples' relational health, as a gauge for how couples collectively cope and address challenges as a united front and how their relational health influences crucial health behaviors (sleeping and eating) through the promotion or erosion of psychological resources (N = 236 couples). This study evaluated a latent variable structural equation dyadic model whereby each partner's perspective of their family's relational health was hypothesized to influence their own eating and sleeping behaviors (actor effects), as well as the eating and sleeping behaviors of their spouse (partner effects). The role of psychological resources (high self-efficacy, few depressive symptoms, and minimal anxiety) as a mechanism linking family functioning to health behaviors was also examined. Overall, the findings supported the hypothesized model, particularly for actor (intraindividual) effects. Discussion is provided pertinent to service providers and researchers, including the importance of improving, or maintaining, family relational health, as a means for encouraging positive health behaviors among active duty military members and their spouses.

  2. Cohesion in Military and Aviation Psychology: An Annotated Bibliography and Suggestions for US Army Aviation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    performance (Carron, Colman, Wheeler, & Stevens , 2002). In general, cohesion can be defined as "a dynamic process that is reflected in the tendency for...for creating cohesion in teams (Bartone, Bjorn, Eid, Brun, & Laberg , 2002). Command, commonly described as leadership, bears much of the responsibility...Eid, J., Brun, W., & Laberg , J.C. (2002). Factors influencing small-unit cohesion in Norwegian navy officer cadets. Military Psychology, 14(1), 1

  3. Rank, job stress, psychological distress and physical activity among military personnel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical fitness is one of the most important qualities in armed forces personnel. However, little is known about the association between the military environment and the occupational and leisure-time dimensions of the physical activity practiced there. This study assessed the association of rank, job stress and psychological distress with physical activity levels (overall and by dimensions). Methods This a cross-sectional study among 506 military service personnel of the Brazilian Army examined the association of rank, job stress and psychological distress with physical activity through multiple linear regression using a generalized linear model. Results The adjusted models showed that the rank of lieutenant was associated with most occupational physical activity (β = 0.324; CI 95% 0.167; 0.481); “high effort and low reward” was associated with more occupational physical activity (β = 0.224; CI 95% 0.098; 0.351) and with less physical activity in sports/physical exercise in leisure (β = −0.198; CI 95% −0.384; −0.011); and psychological distress was associated with less physical activity in sports/exercise in leisure (β = −0.184; CI 95% −0.321; −0.046). Conclusions The results of this study show that job stress and rank were associated with higher levels of occupational physical activity. Moreover job stress and psychological distress were associated with lower levels of physical activity in sports/exercises. In the military context, given the importance of physical activity and the psychosocial environment, both of which are related to health, these findings may offer input to institutional policies directed to identifying psychological distress early and improving work relationships, and to creating an environment more favorable to increasing the practice of leisure-time physical activity. PMID:23914802

  4. Military Psychology. Volume 9, Number 4, 1997. Effects of Chemical Protective Clothing on Military Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    for implementa- tion. Several biomechanical restrictions imposed by CPC might be lessened some- what if protective-level design criteria could be made...checkers, electronic games, volleyball , and softball can be good ways to PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF CHEMICAL DEFENSE 409 introduce and periodically...sustain a program of mask alone (and later MOPP) training. Some personnel in Desert Storm played volleyball while wearing the gas mask to gain

  5. [Organisational peculiarities and principles of medical-psychological rehabilitation of military personnel of special units of the Ministry of Defence].

    PubMed

    Trishkin, D V; Titov, I G; Nechiporuk, S A

    2015-06-01

    The authors presented information about current state of organization of medical and psychological rehabilitation at sanatorium stage of military servicemen of special units of the Russian Defense Ministry, information about rehabilitation treatment techniques, and physical and psychological rehabilitation, natural and premature medicinal factors.

  6. Psychological Flexibility as a Framework for Understanding and Improving Family Reintegration Following Military Deployment.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Emily K; Moyer, Danielle N; Armelie, Aaron P

    2015-10-01

    Postdeployment reintegration may present an exceptional challenge to service members and their families; yet, overcoming this challenge seems to strengthen family relationships through a shared sense of purpose. Navigating family reintegration may be an important determinant of long-term psychological well-being. If the needs of military families are to be answered effectively, it is of critical importance to identify the skills that facilitate positive reintegration following deployment. This article proposes psychological flexibility as a group of interrelated skills that could be directly intervened on to facilitate not only resilience but also positive growth and development. This paper focuses on the conceptualization of family reintegration in terms of psychological flexibility, including common deficits observed in this population and potential goals of treatment. Video Abstract.

  7. Gender Differences Among Military Combatants: Does Social Support, Ostracism, and Pain Perception Influence Psychological Health?

    PubMed

    McGraw, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The literature on gender differences related to psychological health among in-theater service members who are deployed in a combatant role is limited. Much focuses on retrospective reports of service members who have returned from deployment. Potential key factors that contribute to gender differences in psychological health among combatants are found in literature across several topic areas, but integration of findings across disciplines is lacking. A growing body of literature on gender differences related to psychological health of postdeployment military populations suggests males and females respond differently to perceived levels of social support pre-and postdeployment. One study on service members who were deployed suggested no significant gender differences related to reported psychological health symptoms, but did appear to find significant gender differences related to reported perception of unit morale. In another related area, research explores how ostracism impacts physical and psychological health of individuals and organizations, and can result in perceptions of physical pain, although research on gender differences related to the impact of ostracism is scarce. Research has also begun to focus on sex differences in pain responses, and has identified multiple biopsychosocial, genetic, and hormonal factors that may contribute as potential underlying mechanisms. In this brief review, we focus on and begin to integrate relevant findings related to the psychological health of females in combat roles, gender differences in the impact of perception of social support on psychological health, the psychological and physical impact of ostracism on individuals and organizations, and the current literature on sex differences in pain perception. We conclude with a synthesis and discussion of research gaps identified through this review, implications for clinical practice, and potential future research directions. In conclusion, there appear to be gender

  8. [Analysis of effect of military outpatients' psychological feelings on doctor-patient relationship in orthodontic treatment].

    PubMed

    Wan, Rong; Han, Ying-xing; Guo, Li; Guo, Jia-ping; Gao, Qun; Huang, Shi-hua

    2015-10-01

    To explore the effect of military outpatients' psychological feelings on doctor-patient relationship in orthodontic treatment. A total of 95 clinic patients who were undergoing orthodontic treatment were asked to complete the questionnaire of dental visit satisfaction scale (DVSS) and orthodontist-patient relationship scale (OPRS). The results of different groups according to identity, gender, age and treatment time were compared. The data was analyzed with SPSS 20.0 software package for correlation analysis and stepwise regression. Except 6-18 months group, psychological feelings of patients had significant impact on doctor-patient relationship (P<0.01). The correlation coefficient was 0.610 between patients' satisfaction of outpatient treatment and doctor-patient relationship (P<0.001). Among 9 psychological feelings of orthodontic treatment, five kinds had significant effect on doctor-patient relationship, including three kinds of positive correlation and two kinds of negative correlation. The patients' psychological feelings are closely related to doctor-patient relationship. Doctors should try to improve medical quality, strengthen service level and pay much attention to the patients' psychological and social needs.

  9. Psychological morbidity, quality of life, and self-rated health in the military personnel.

    PubMed

    Chou, Han-Wei; Tzeng, Wen-Chii; Chou, Yu-Ching; Yeh, Hui-Wen; Chang, Hsin-An; Kao, Yu-Cheng; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The mental health of military personnel varies as a result of different cultural, political, and administrative factors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychological morbidity and quality of life of military personnel in Taiwan. This cross-sectional study utilized the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument, brief version, Taiwan version, the General Health Questionnaire-12, Chinese version, and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) in several military units. More than half of the subjects (55.3%) identified themselves as mentally unhealthy on the General Health Questionnaire-12, Chinese version; however, a higher percentage of officers perceived themselves as healthy (57.4%) than did noncommissioned officers (38.5%) or enlisted men (42.2%). Officers also had higher total quality of life (QOL) scores (83.98) than did enlisted men (79.67). Scores on the VAS also varied: officers: 72.5; noncommissioned officers: 67.7; and enlisted men: 66.3. The VAS and QOL were positively correlated with perceived mental health among these military personnel. Our subjects had higher rates of perceiving themselves as mentally unhealthy compared to the general population. Those of higher rank perceived themselves as having better mental health and QOL. Improving mental health could result in a better QOL in the military. The VAS may be a useful tool for the rapid screening of self-reported mental health, which may be suitable in cases of stressful missions, such as in disaster rescue; however, more studies are needed to determine the optimal cut-off point of this measurement tool.

  10. Psychological morbidity, quality of life, and self-rated health in the military personnel

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Han-Wei; Tzeng, Wen-Chii; Chou, Yu-Ching; Yeh, Hui-Wen; Chang, Hsin-An; Kao, Yu-Cheng; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective The mental health of military personnel varies as a result of different cultural, political, and administrative factors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychological morbidity and quality of life of military personnel in Taiwan. Materials and methods This cross-sectional study utilized the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument, brief version, Taiwan version, the General Health Questionnaire-12, Chinese version, and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) in several military units. Results More than half of the subjects (55.3%) identified themselves as mentally unhealthy on the General Health Questionnaire-12, Chinese version; however, a higher percentage of officers perceived themselves as healthy (57.4%) than did noncommissioned officers (38.5%) or enlisted men (42.2%). Officers also had higher total quality of life (QOL) scores (83.98) than did enlisted men (79.67). Scores on the VAS also varied: officers: 72.5; noncommissioned officers: 67.7; and enlisted men: 66.3. The VAS and QOL were positively correlated with perceived mental health among these military personnel. Conclusion Our subjects had higher rates of perceiving themselves as mentally unhealthy compared to the general population. Those of higher rank perceived themselves as having better mental health and QOL. Improving mental health could result in a better QOL in the military. The VAS may be a useful tool for the rapid screening of self-reported mental health, which may be suitable in cases of stressful missions, such as in disaster rescue; however, more studies are needed to determine the optimal cut-off point of this measurement tool. PMID:24570587

  11. Intimate Partner Violence in the Canadian Armed Forces: Psychological Distress and the Role of Individual Factors Among Military Spouses.

    PubMed

    Skomorovsky, Alla; LeBlanc, Manon Mireille

    2017-01-01

    Unique military demands can have a significant impact upon family life. Although most Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) families are able to cope effectively with the stressors of military life, some may experience marital conflicts, contributing to spousal violence. Moreover, there is evidence that certain personal resources can buffer the impact of spousal violence on psychological distress. The present study examined the roles of spousal violence and personal resources, including coping, mastery, and social support, in the psychological distress of CAF members' spouses (N = 1,892). Hierarchical regression analyses showed that violence significantly predicted psychological distress among spouses of CAF members; although physical violence was no longer significant, emotional violence remained a unique predictor. Coping, mastery, and perceived social support, entered together, significantly predicted psychological distress among spouses, over and above the role of violence. Specifically, emotion-focused coping, mastery, and social support remained unique predictors of distress. Furthermore, perceived social support buffered the negative impact of emotional violence on psychological distress. The study has important organizational implications, illuminating the risks related to the spousal violence in the military and the psychological consequences of such violence. These results can be used to improve treatment and prevention programs, enhancing the well-being of military families.

  12. Psychological resilience in U.S. military veterans: A 2-year, nationally representative prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Kayla; Mota, Natalie P; Tsai, Jack; Harpaz-Rotem, Ilan; Cook, Joan M; Kirwin, Paul D; Krystal, John H; Southwick, Steven M; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2017-01-01

    Although many cross-sectional studies have examined the correlates of psychological resilience in U.S. military veterans, few longitudinal studies have identified long-term predictors of resilience in this population. The current prospective cohort study utilized data from a nationally representative sample of 2157 U.S. military veterans who completed web-based surveys in two waves (2011 and 2013) as part of the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study (NHRVS). Cluster analysis of cumulative lifetime exposure to potentially traumatic events and Wave 2 measures of current symptoms of posttraumatic stress, major depressive, and generalized anxiety disorders was performed to characterize different profiles of current trauma-related psychological symptoms. Different profiles were compared with respect to sociodemographic, clinical, and psychosocial characteristics. A three-group cluster analysis revealed a Control group with low lifetime trauma exposure and low current psychological distress (59.5%), a Resilient group with high lifetime trauma and low current distress (27.4%), and a Distressed group with both high trauma exposure and current distress symptoms (13.1%). These results suggest that the majority of trauma-exposed veterans (67.7%) are psychologically resilient. Compared with the Distressed group, the Resilient group was younger, more likely to be Caucasian, and scored lower on measures of physical health difficulties, past psychiatric history, and substance abuse. Higher levels of emotional stability, extraversion, dispositional gratitude, purpose in life, and altruism, and lower levels of openness to experiences predicted resilient status. Prevention and treatment efforts designed to enhance modifiable factors such as gratitude, sense of purpose, and altruism may help promote resilience in highly trauma-exposed veterans.

  13. Effect of psychological skills training during military survival school: a randomized, controlled field study.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Marcus K; Stanfill, Katherine E; Padilla, Genieleah A; Markham, Amanda E; Ward, Michael D; Koehler, Matthew M; Anglero, Antonio; Adams, Barry D

    2011-12-01

    In this randomized, controlled field study, we examined the effects of a brief psychological skills training (PST) intervention on stress responses during military survival school. A second purpose was to build upon prior research in this unique environment by extending the follow-up window to 3 months. Baseline subjective distress (dissociative) symptoms were measured in 65 male military subjects, who were then randomized either to PST or a control group that received no training beyond the normal survival school curriculum. PST received training in arousal control, mental imagery, goal setting, and positive self-talk in two separate 40-minute sessions before stressful field exercises. Stress symptoms were then assessed during a mock-captivity phase of training, as well as 24 hours, 1 month, and 3 months after completion of training. Repeated-measures analyses of variance with follow-up paired t tests examined differences between groups and across time. Survival training precipitated remarkable increases in subjective distress, but few substantive group differences emerged. This study extends prior work quantifying the human stress response to intense military training.

  14. Parental Deployment, Adolescent Academic and Social-Behavioral Maladjustment, and Parental Psychological Well-being in Military Families.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, Nancy; Wong, Elizabeth; Shier, Victoria; Massachi, Samira; Datar, Ashlesha

    Increases in the frequency and length of military deployments have raised concerns about the well-being of military families. We examined the relationship between a military parent's deployment and (1) adolescent academic and social-behavioral maladjustment and (2) parental psychological well-being. We collected data from April 2013 through January 2014 from 1021 families of enlisted US Army personnel with children aged 12 or 13 during the Military Teenagers' Environments, Exercise, and Nutrition Study. Through online parent surveys, we collected data on deployment, adolescent academic and social-behavioral maladjustment, and parental psychological well-being. We estimated adjusted logistic and linear regression models for adolescents (all, boys, girls), military parents (all, fathers, mothers), and civilian parents. Compared with no or short deployments, long deployments (>180 days in the past 3 years) were associated with significantly higher odds of decreases in adolescent academic performance (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.54), independence (AOR = 2.04), and being responsible (AOR = 1.95). These associations were also significant for boys but not for girls. Among parents, long deployments were associated with significantly higher odds of being depressed (AOR = 2.58), even when controlling for adolescent maladjustment (AOR = 2.54). These associations did not differ significantly between military and civilian parents and were significant for military fathers but not military mothers. Recent deployment (in the past 12 months) was not associated with either adolescent or parent outcomes. Long deployments are associated with adolescents' academic and social-behavioral maladjustments and diminished parental well-being, especially among boys and military fathers.

  15. Evaluation Capacity Building in the Context of Military Psychological Health: Utilizing Preskill and Boyle's Multidisciplinary Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Lara; Libretto, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    The need for evaluation capacity building (ECB) in military psychological health is apparent in light of the proliferation of newly developed, yet untested programs coupled with the lack of internal evaluation expertise. This study addresses these deficiencies by utilizing Preskill and Boyle's multidisciplinary ECB model within a post-traumatic…

  16. PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT AND PREDICTION. PART I. BACKGROUND FOR PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PSYCHOLOGY , PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS, BEHAVIOR, INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY , INTELLIGENCE TESTS, MENTAL DISORDERS, MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY , PERSONALITY , PSYCHIATRY...PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY, SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY , VERBAL BEHAVIOR, STATISTICAL ANALYSIS, CRIMINOLOGY, DIAGNOSIS(MEDICINE).

  17. Psychological health of military children: longitudinal evaluation of a family-centered prevention program to enhance family resilience.

    PubMed

    Lester, Patricia; Stein, Judith A; Saltzman, William; Woodward, Kirsten; MacDermid, Shelley W; Milburn, Norweeta; Mogil, Catherine; Beardslee, William

    2013-08-01

    Family-centered preventive interventions have been proposed as relevant to mitigating psychological health risk and promoting resilience in military families facing wartime deployment and reintegration. This study evaluates the impact of a family-centered prevention program, Families OverComing Under Stress Family Resilience Training (FOCUS), on the psychological adjustment of military children. Two primary goals include (1) understanding the relationships of distress among family members using a longitudinal path model to assess relations at the child and family level and (2) determining pathways of program impact on child adjustment. Multilevel data analysis using structural equation modeling was conducted with deidentified service delivery data from 280 families (505 children aged 3-17) in two follow-up assessments. Standardized measures included service member and civilian parental distress (Brief Symptom Inventory, PTSD Checklist-Military), child adjustment (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire), and family functioning (McMaster Family Assessment Device). Distress was significantly related among the service member parent, civilian parent, and children. FOCUS improved family functioning, which in turn significantly reduced child distress at follow-up. Salient components of improved family functioning in reducing child distress mirrored resilience processes targeted by FOCUS. These findings underscore the public health potential of family-centered prevention for military families and suggest areas for future research. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  18. Psychological health of military children: Longitudinal evaluation of a family-centered prevention program to enhance family resilience

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Patricia; Stein, Judith A.; Saltzman, William; Woodward, Kirsten; MacDermid, Shelley W.; Milburn, Norweeta; Mogil, Catherine; Beardslee, William

    2014-01-01

    Family-centered preventive interventions have been proposed as relevant to mitigating psychological health risk and promoting resilience in military families facing wartime deployment and reintegration. This study evaluates the impact of a family-centered prevention program, Families OverComing Under Stress Family Resilience Training (FOCUS), on the psychological adjustment of military children. Two primary goals include: 1) Understanding the relationships of distress among family members using a longitudinal path model to assess relations at the child and family level, and 2) Determining pathways of program impact on child adjustment. Multilevel data analysis using structural equation modeling was conducted with de-identified service delivery data from 280 families (505 children ages 3-17) in two follow-up assessments. Standardized measures included Service Member and Civilian parental distress (Brief Symptom Inventory, PTSD Checklist – Military), child adjustment (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire), and family functioning (McMaster Family Assessment Device). Distress was significantly related among the service member parent, civilian parent and children. FOCUS improved family functioning, which in turn significantly reduced child distress at follow-up. Salient components of improved family functioning in reducing child distress mirrored resilience processes targeted by FOCUS. These findings underscore the public health potential of family-centered prevention for military families, and suggest areas for future research. PMID:23929043

  19. Stress and Psychological Support in Modern Military Operations (Stress et aide psychologique dans les operations militaires modernes)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    34 91 456 1976 email: jmpuenteo@oc.mde.es and jpuenteont@correo.cop.es SWEDEN Dr. Kristina POLLACK Director Military Psychology HQ GRO /UTB S...item depression module 7) Four-item PTSD module 8) Conflict and anger 9) Exposures to environmental hazards (solvents, pollution , lasers, smoke, etc...resolve, and the assurance that everything they had done and were feeling was entirely alright…. I don’t have any miracle cures to offer you

  20. The Belgian Concept of Social-Psychological Support of Families of Military Personnel Deployed in Crisis Response Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    e.g.: midlife crisis , retirement) • Social difficulties after the breakdown of a relationship or an illness, death, unexpected event (e.g...RTO-MP-HFM-134 37 - 1 The Belgian Concept of Social-Psychological Support of Families of Military Personnel Deployed in Crisis Response...Brussels BELGIUM Philippe.Manigart@rma.ac.be, Jean-Francois.Fils@rma.ac.be ABSTRACT With the multiplication of crisis response operations carried out

  1. International Applied Military Psychology Symposium (23rd) Held in Lisbon, Portugal on June 1-5, 1987

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-30

    questions of a social combination of accelerated resignations, psychological nature follow on the heels a drop in the birth rate, and reductions of the...of the limits of the military, such men have families, suffer stress, The first speaker to address the debate social questions, and participate...fluctuations the data may be used to assess the ef- usually on the order of 1-2 percent. fects of variations in social , political, Turnover thus was

  2. PSYCHOLOGICAL OPERATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY, SUPPLEMENT NO. 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    BIBLIOGRAPHIES, PSYCHOLOGY , MILITARY OPERATIONS, BRAINWASHING, COMMUNICATION AND RADIO SYSTEMS, PROPAGANDA, HISTORY, MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY ... PSYCHOLOGICAL WARFARE, COMMUNISTS, UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT, MILITARY STRATEGY, MILITARY INTELLIGENCE, DOCUMENTS, CULTURE, LOGISTICS, WARFARE, FOREIGN POLICY.

  3. Alcohol Misuse and Psychological Resilience among U.S. Iraq and Afghanistan Era Veteran Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Green, Kimberly T.; Beckham, Jean C.; Youssef, Nagy; Elbogen, Eric B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The present study sought to investigate the longitudinal effects of psychological resilience against alcohol misuse adjusting for socio-demographic factors, trauma-related variables, and self-reported history of alcohol abuse. Methodology Data were from National Post-Deployment Adjustment Study (NPDAS) participants who completed both a baseline and one-year follow-up survey (N=1090). Survey questionnaires measured combat exposure, probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), psychological resilience, and alcohol misuse, all of which were measured at two discrete time periods (baseline and one-year follow-up). Baseline resilience and change in resilience (increased or decreased) were utilized as independent variables in separate models evaluating alcohol misuse at the one-year follow-up. Results Multiple linear regression analyses controlled for age, gender, level of educational attainment, combat exposure, PTSD symptom severity, and self-reported alcohol abuse. Accounting for these covariates, findings revealed that lower baseline resilience, younger age, male gender, and self-reported alcohol abuse were related to alcohol misuse at the one-year follow-up. A separate regression analysis, adjusting for the same covariates, revealed a relationship between change in resilience (from baseline to the one-year follow-up) and alcohol misuse at the one-year follow-up. The regression model evaluating these variables in a subset of the sample in which all the participants had been deployed to Iraq and/or Afghanistan was consistent with findings involving the overall era sample. Finally, logistic regression analyses of the one-year follow-up data yielded similar results to the baseline and resilience change models. Conclusions These findings suggest that increased psychological resilience is inversely related to alcohol misuse and is protective against alcohol misuse over time. Additionally, it supports the conceptualization of resilience as a process which

  4. Programs Addressing Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Among U.S. Military Servicemembers and Their Families

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Complex Casualty Care Program x x Comprehensive Soldier Fitness x x x Coping with Deployments: Psychological First Aid for Military Families x CREDO ...x x x CREDO x x x x x x x x x x Defender’s Edge* x x x x x Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center Regional Care Coordination x x x x x x x x...Families x x x x x x x CREDO x x x x x Defender’s Edge* x x x x x Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center Regional Care Coordination x x x x

  5. The Art and Science of Psychological Operations: Case Studies of Military Application. Volume Two

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    Councils and a PSYOP Research Guide . M-61 ~ x -X 5 II OZAKI, Career Military officer ; assigned to Depart- John ment of Army (1969); served with ASA, head...for all crew members and officers in the form of cards and physical conditioning exercises. One sequence of pictures illus- trates the medical care ...casebook. Vt has been prepared in response to a request from the Office of the p uuty Chief of Staff for Military Operations, Department of the Army

  6. Contextualized Emotional Images in Children's Dreams: Psychological Adjustment in Conditions of Military Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helminen, Elisa; Punamaki, Raija-Leena

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the impact of military trauma on contextualized emotional images in children's dreams, and the function of the intensity and valence of the emotional images in protecting mental health from negative trauma impact. Participants were 345 Palestinian children and adolescents (aged 5-16 years) belonging to high trauma (Gaza) and…

  7. [Medical and psychological prediction of professional readiness of graduates of military school].

    PubMed

    Vorona, A A; Gerasimenko, V D; Kozlovskiĭ, É A; Kukushkin, Iu A; Bogomolov, A V

    2012-01-01

    The authors propose a method for assessing the professional readiness of graduates of military educational institution, taking into account academic performance, the results of sociometric surveys, data on the professional fitness and health. The high efficiency of the developed method for predicting successful adaptation of graduates to serve in the armed forces is showed.

  8. Technology complementing military psychology programs and services in the Pacific Regional Medical Command.

    PubMed

    Stetz, Melba C; Folen, Raymond A; Van Horn, Sandra; Ruseborn, Daniel; Samuel, Kevin M

    2013-08-01

    The Tripler Army Medical Center is the only federal tertiary care hospital serving the Pacific Regional Medical Command. Due to Tripler's large area of responsibility, many behavioral health professionals are starting to employ more technology during their sessions. As explained in this article, virtual reality and telepsychology efforts are proving to benefit military service members and their families in the Pacific Rim.

  9. Psychological Type and Undergraduate Student Achievement in Pharmacy Course in Military Medical University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Ru; Shan, Shou-qin; Tian, Jian-quan

    2007-01-01

    The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) was given to 264 students in an undergraduate Pharmacy course at a military medical university. Selected MBTI personality types were compared for achievement in the course using a t-test to compare total points earned. High grades were earned by students stronger in the traits of introversion (I) and judgment…

  10. Contextualized Emotional Images in Children's Dreams: Psychological Adjustment in Conditions of Military Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helminen, Elisa; Punamaki, Raija-Leena

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the impact of military trauma on contextualized emotional images in children's dreams, and the function of the intensity and valence of the emotional images in protecting mental health from negative trauma impact. Participants were 345 Palestinian children and adolescents (aged 5-16 years) belonging to high trauma (Gaza) and…

  11. Comparing elite soldiers' perceptions of psychological and physical demands during military training.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jeffrey L; Adler, Amy B; Wittels, Peter; Enne, Robert; Johannes, Bernd

    2004-07-01

    This research examined the impact of psychological and physical demands on a group of elite soldiers (N = 9) before, during and after training exercises involving routine and unrehearse tasks. Based on the psychological concept of toughening, we expected soldier responses to unrehearsed demands to be les resilient than to routine training demands. As hypothesized soldiers rated their perceptions of physical and psychologica demands higher during the unrehearsed training phase of the study. It was also hypothesized that soldiers would recover more from physical demands than from psychological de mands after the training exercise. Although a trend in the data marginally supported this hypothesis, a note of caution is warranted because of the small sample size. Limitations and implications of the study are discussed, with particular emphasis on the dual importance of psychological and physical training in preparing soldiers for mission demands.

  12. The International Applied Military Psychology Symposium (27th): A Focus on Decision Making Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-04

    Research Stanley C. Collyer (with Invited Papers) 4 August 1992 S 0 4 JAj 93-11389 / Approved for publik release; distdbution unlimitA’t. Office of Naval...identify 4 critical behaviors in various job-relevant situations, and interview questions are then developed that relate to those behaviors. For example...costs and decreasing budgets. and * an interest in being able to periodically use former military pilots now flying for the airline industry . Pilots who

  13. The psychological health and well-being experiences of female military veterans: a systematic review of the qualitative literature.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gemma L; Hanley, T

    2017-10-01

    Women in the military are a minority group who, in addition to facing exposure to traumatic events due to the nature of the work, face additional stressors while deployed. It is argued that these exposures and experiences place individuals at a significantly higher risk of finding it difficult adjusting post deployment. This paper focuses on the psychological health and well-being of female veterans post-deployment. A systematic review of the literature related to female veterans' experiences upon returning home from deployment was conducted. Eight in-depth qualitative studies met the inclusion criteria for the study and were analysed using thematic analysis. Five key themes were identified in the papers: (1) bringing the war home, (2) post-deployment adjustment, (3) loss, (4) failed belongingness and (5) post-traumatic growth. These studies provide a useful insight into the different psychological health and well-being experiences that female veterans encounter. Additionally, the associated effects upon the individual and their families and communities are considered. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Demographic and clinical characteristics of UK military veterans attending a psychological therapies service

    PubMed Central

    Giebel, Clarissa M.; Clarkson, Paul; Challis, David

    2014-01-01

    Aims and method To investigate the demographic and clinical characteristics of subgroups of UK veterans attending a dedicated psychological therapies service following the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) treatment model. Veterans accessing a newly established service in the north-west were categorised into three groups: early service leavers, those with a physical disability, and substance and/or alcohol misusers. Anxiety, depression and social functioning were measured pre- and post-treatment. Results Veterans vary in their demographic and clinical characteristics as well as in treatment efficacy, as measured by the post-treatment scores on probable depression and anxiety. Therapy appears to be most effective in early service leavers, whereas veterans with a physical disability or a substance or alcohol misuse problem tend not to do as well in terms of symptoms of depression or anxiety. Clinical implications This study highlights the importance of targeting different veteran subgroups for dedicated psychological therapy. PMID:25505626

  15. [Psychological aspects of voluntary induced abortion among fathers drafted into military service].

    PubMed

    Dubouis-bonnefond, J C; Galle-tessonneau, J R

    1982-06-01

    This work examines the symptomatology of 4 young men recently drafted into military service in France who had negative reactions to their partner's abortions. The men ranged in age from 19-21 years. In all cases there was frank depression, accompanied or not by activity illegal in the eyes of the military (unauthorized leave) or of the common law (theft, use of drugs). The abortion was either a pretext for a rapid decompensation of a pathological personality, or it occasioned a crisis in personalities previously relatively well adapted despite immaturity, psychopathology, or weakness. The organization of the couples tended to be recent, unstable, precarious, and without a promising future either affectively or socioeconomically. Either the woman decided to seek an abortion herself and presented the father with an accomplished fact, or the couple tacitly made a joint decision to seek an abortion, in which case the subsequent illegal activity of the father tended to be more serious. Each of the men had conflictive family relationships with their fathers especially perceived as hostile and rejecting. All of the men had attempted suicide or had considered it. Induction into the army has traditionally been seen as a rite of passage to adult life, but in some cases the emotional distances it causes and the socioeconomic difficulties it aggravates prevent the man from undertaking the responsibilities of fatherhood. In these cases it is as if social maturity can be acquired only at the expense of fatherhood; the 2 states cannot coexist. Frustration and sacrifice of fatherhood nevertheless may occasion loss of the social maturity stemming from military service. The abortion is followed by guilt, psychic suffering, and behavioral problems leading to expulsion from the military. On the symbolic level the man does not become either man or father. Another point is that depression, anxiety, and guilt are an affective expression of the idea of death; the embryo is thought of as

  16. The Art and Science of Psychological Operations: Case Studies of Military Application. Volume One

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    594 Content Analysis ------------------------------- 606 Factors Influencing North Vietnamese Morale, by 7th PSYOP Group...823 Influencing Political Change by Broadcasting to the Soviet Union, by Robert L. Tuck ---------------------- 8 Content Analysis...organizational influence and the role of psychological operadions have never received their proper due. There is ample histori- cal reason for this position

  17. The relation of cortisol and sex hormone levels to results of psychological, performance, IQ and memory tests in military men and women.

    PubMed

    Flegr, Jaroslav; Hampl, Richard; Černochová, Dana; Preiss, Marek; Bičíková, Marie; Sieger, Ladislav; Příplatová, Lenka; Kaňková, Šárka; Klose, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Cortisol, along with other hormones of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, belongs to one of the main factors influencing psychological and pathognomic factors, intelligence, and memory. The aim of our study was to review a large battery of psychological, performance, IQ and memory tests as to their relation with cortisol, testosterone and estrogen levels in groups of 100 men and 93 women who attended the Central Military Hospital in Prague for regular entrance psychological examinations for military personnel. In men, we detected positive correlations between cortisol and emotional lability, and negative correlations with impulsivity, while in women hypochondria and psychopathology were negatively correlated, and aggression measured with the Meili selective memory test had a positive relation to cortisol level. Testosterone correlated positively with emotional liability and negatively with impulsivity in men, and negatively with hypochondria and psychasteny, indirect aggression, irritability and paranoia in women. Estradiol correlated positively with psychopathology in men, and negatively with phobia. It was positively correlated with negativism in women. No clear correlation was observed between the concentration of steroid hormones and psychomotor performance or intelligence. Concentrations of steroid hormones correlate with results of several psychological tests, the sign and magnitude of these correlations, however, very often differ in military men and women.

  18. Overcoming the Fear of Lethal Injury: Evaluating Suicidal Behavior in the Military through the Lens of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Selby, Edward A.; Anestis, Michael D.; Bender, Theodore W.; Ribeiro, Jessica D.; Nock, Matthew K.; Rudd, M. David; Bryan, Craig J.; Lim, Ingrid C.; Baker, Monty T.; Gutierrez, Peter M.; Joiner, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Suicide rates have been increasing in military personnel since the start of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom, and it is vital that efforts be made to advance suicide risk assessment techniques and treatment for members of the military who may be experiencing suicidal symptoms. One potential way to advance the understanding of suicide in the military is through the use of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide. This theory proposes that three necessary factors are needed to complete suicide: feelings that one does not belong with other people, feelings that one is a burden on others or society, and an acquired capability to overcome the fear and pain associated with suicide. This review analyzes the various ways that military service may influence suicidal behavior and integrates these findings into an overall framework with relevant practical implications. Findings suggest that although there are many important factors in military suicide, the acquired capability may be the most impacted by military experience because combat exposure and training may cause habituation to fear of painful experiences, including suicide. Future research directions, ways to enhance risk assessment, and treatment implications are also discussed. PMID:20051309

  19. Overcoming the fear of lethal injury: evaluating suicidal behavior in the military through the lens of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide.

    PubMed

    Selby, Edward A; Anestis, Michael D; Bender, Theodore W; Ribeiro, Jessica D; Nock, Matthew K; Rudd, M David; Bryan, Craig J; Lim, Ingrid C; Baker, Monty T; Gutierrez, Peter M; Joiner, Thomas E

    2010-04-01

    Suicide rates have been increasing in military personnel since the start of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom, and it is vital that efforts be made to advance suicide risk assessment techniques and treatment for members of the military who may be experiencing suicidal symptoms. One potential way to advance the understanding of suicide in the military is through the use of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide. This theory proposes that three necessary factors are needed to complete suicide: feelings that one does not belong with other people, feelings that one is a burden on others or society, and an acquired capability to overcome the fear and pain associated with suicide. This review analyzes the various ways that military service may influence suicidal behavior and integrates these findings into an overall framework with relevant practical implications. Findings suggest that although there are many important factors in military suicide, the acquired capability may be the most impacted by military experience because combat exposure and training may cause habituation to fear of painful experiences, including suicide. Future research directions, ways to enhance risk assessment, and treatment implications are also discussed. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Moderators of Psychological and Physical Health in a Military Assessment Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    effects . Indeed, a multitude of different stressors may manifest during the course of the assessment center (e.g., role stressors). Stressors, of...course, are not without their consequences in terms of adverse health effects , psychological and physical (e.g., Beehr, 1995; Jex, 1998). As such...applied researchers are always searching for the often-elusive buffer effect (Cohen & Wills, 1985). In the present study, the Advanced Camp assessment

  1. Repetitive traumatic brain injury, psychological symptoms, and suicide risk in a clinical sample of deployed military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; Clemans, Tracy A

    2013-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is believed to be one factor contributing to rising suicide rates among military personnel and veterans. This study investigated the association of cumulative TBIs with suicide risk in a clinical sample of deployed military personnel referred for a TBI evaluation. To determine whether suicide risk is more frequent and heightened among military personnel with multiple lifetime TBIs than among those with no TBIs or a single TBI. Patients completed standardized self-report measures of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and suicidal thoughts and behaviors; clinical interview; and physical examination. Group comparisons of symptom scores according to number of lifetime TBIs were made, and generalized regression analyses were used to determine the association of cumulative TBIs with suicide risk. Patients included 161 military personnel referred for evaluation and treatment of suspected head injury at a military hospital's TBI clinic in Iraq. Behavioral Health Measure depression subscale, PTSD Checklist-Military Version, concussion symptoms, and Suicide Behaviors Questionnaire-Revised. Depression, PTSD, and TBI symptom severity significantly increased with the number of TBIs. An increased incidence of lifetime suicidal thoughts or behaviors was associated with the number of TBIs (no TBIs, 0%; single TBI, 6.9%; and multiple TBIs, 21.7%; P = .009), as was suicidal ideation within the past year (0%, 3.4%, and 12.0%, respectively; P = .04). The number of TBIs was associated with greater suicide risk (β [SE] = .214 [.098]; P = .03) when the effects of depression, PTSD, and TBI symptom severity were controlled for. A significant interaction between depression and cumulative TBIs was also found (β  = .580 [.283]; P = .04). Suicide risk is higher among military personnel with more lifetime TBIs, even after controlling for clinical symptom severity. Results suggest that multiple TBIs, which are common among

  2. Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmore, Susan; Fouad, Nadya; Kagan, Jerome; Kosslyn, Stephen; Posner, Michael; Sternburg, Robert; Driscoll, Marcy; Ge, Xun; Parrish, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of psychology were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Susan Blackmore, Nadya Fouad, Jerome Kagan, Stephen Kosslyn, Michael Posner, and Robert Sternberg.…

  3. Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmore, Susan; Fouad, Nadya; Kagan, Jerome; Kosslyn, Stephen; Posner, Michael; Sternburg, Robert; Driscoll, Marcy; Ge, Xun; Parrish, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of psychology were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Susan Blackmore, Nadya Fouad, Jerome Kagan, Stephen Kosslyn, Michael Posner, and Robert Sternberg.…

  4. Using Educational Psychology Courses at a Military Academy to Help Foster Mentoring Relationships between Officers and Cadets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katayama, Andrew D.; Jordan, Mark H.; Guerrero, Camilo

    2008-01-01

    In the "hands on" mentoring program describing in this paper, cadets enrolled in a traditional undergraduate Educational Psychology course at the U.S. Air Force Academy) were mentored by Air Officer Commanders (AOCs) enrolled in a graduate level Educational Psychology course. This mentoring program was ideal for both groups of students, as the…

  5. Psychological Screening for Weapons Use: A Clinical Validation of Measures,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS, *MILITARY PERSONNEL, *PERFORMANCE(HUMAN), *COMBAT READINESS, *WEAPONS CARRIERS, PERSONALITY TESTS, BEHAVIOR, ATTITUDES... PSYCHOLOGY ), SCORING, INSTRUMENTATION, STRESS( PSYCHOLOGY ), MODELS, VALIDATION, OPERATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS, SYMPOSIA

  6. A REVIEW OF CONTEMPORARY MILITARY TRAINING RESEARCH--THE STATE OF TRAINING TECHNOLOGY AND STUDIES OF MOTIVATION AND ATTITUDES IN LEARNING (IN PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH IN NATIONAL DEFENSE TODAY, EDITED BY J.E. UHLANER, PAGES 48-94).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CRAWFORD, MEREDITH P.; ECKSTRAND, GORDON

    PART OF A LARGER REVIEW OF RECENT PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH RELATING TO NATIONAL DEFENSE, THIS SECTION COVERS STUDIES ON TRAINING FOR LEADERSHIP, COMMAND, AND TEAM FUNCTIONS, AND ON THE EFFECTS OF PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGICAL FACTORS ON MILITARY PERFORMANCE. STUDIES IN THE FIRST CHAPTER OF THIS SECTION ARE DIVIDED BETWEEN INTERPERSONAL ASPECTS (LEADERSHIP)…

  7. The International Symposium on Applied Military Psychology (20th) Held on 25-29 June 1984 in Brussels, Belgium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-07

    women assigned to near-combat jobs and on public opinion about this assignment. Polls show definite agreement that women should serve in both peace and...served as dependent variables. 1. There is definite agreement it was found that conscripts meeting that women should serve in both peace test...military operational systems, a establishing definitions of PF and its topic all too often ignored in assessing relations and constituents. PF is taken

  8. Summary of the International Applied Military Psychology Symposium (24th) Held in Toronto, Canada on July 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-28

    rather than their literary label. In In the sample of Officers, there was no relationship be- fact, intellect in this study is a reflection of a...effects of age and gender of test administrator. Since the pects of military selection research. This is so because of test is grounded in Freudian ... theory , it is evident that test- the costs involved in training pilots, and of the potentially administrator factors could (indeed, should, theoreti

  9. Mechanisms of Action Contributing to Reductions in Suicide Attempts Following Brief Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Military Personnel: A Test of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; Wood, David S; May, Alexis; Peterson, Alan L; Wertenberger, Evelyn; Rudd, M David

    2017-04-19

    Brief cognitive behavioral therapy (BCBT) is associated with significant reductions in suicide attempts among military personnel. However, the underlying mechanisms of action contributing to reductions in suicide attempts in effective psychological treatments remain largely unknown. The present study conducted a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial of BCBT versus treatment as usual (TAU) to examine the mechanisms of action hypothesized by the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide (IPT): perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness, and fearlessness about death. In a sample of 152 active duty U.S. Army personnel with recent suicide ideation or attempts, there were significantly fewer suicide attempts in BCBT, but there were no differences between treatment groups from baseline to 6 months postbaseline on any of the 3 IPT constructs or their interactions. Tests of the moderated mediation failed to support an indirect effect for the IPT model, regardless of which IPT variables were specified as mediators or moderators. Results suggest that the IPT's hypothesized mechanisms of action do not account for reductions in suicide attempts in BCBT. Implications for clinical practice and research are discussed.

  10. MilitaryKidsConnect: Web-based prevention services for military children.

    PubMed

    Blasko, Kelly A

    2015-08-01

    Military children often present with psychological health concerns related to their experience of deployments, reintegration, and frequent moves common in military life. MilitaryKidsConnect is a Department of Defense (DoD) Web site designed to enhance the coping of military children in the context of their military life experience. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of the Web site as a resource that provides psychoeducation, coping strategies, and peer support to military children.

  11. Team spirit makes the difference: the interactive effects of team work engagement and organizational constraints during a military operation on psychological outcomes afterwards.

    PubMed

    Boermans, S M; Kamphuis, W; Delahaij, R; van den Berg, C; Euwema, M C

    2014-12-01

    This article prospectively explores the effects of collective team work engagement and organizational constraints during military deployment on individual-level psychological outcomes afterwards. Participants were 971 Dutch peacekeepers within 93 teams who were deployed between the end of 2008 and beginning of 2010, for an average of 4 months, in the International Security Assistance Force. Surveys were administered 2 months into deployment and 6 months afterwards. Multi-level regression analyses demonstrated that team work engagement during deployment moderated the relation between organizational constraints and post-deployment fatigue symptoms. Team members reported less fatigue symptoms after deployment if they were part of highly engaged teams during deployment, particularly when concerns about organizational constraints during deployment were high. In contrast, low team work engagement was related to more fatigue symptoms, particularly when concerns about organizational constraints were high. Contrary to expectations, no effects for team work engagement or organizational constraints were found for post-traumatic growth. The present study highlights that investing in team work engagement is important for those working in highly demanding jobs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Reduction in self- esteem may impact this relationship such that if self-esteem is not reduced as a result of bullying , psychological distress and sui...resources of the military, impact unit morale, and take a large emotional toll on the involved friends, family, and commanders. There is significant...practice that will have a direct impact on suicide-related and other mental health outcomes for military personnel. 3. Disseminate Consortium

  13. Psychological Screening for Weapons Use Suitability: A Formal Decision Model,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Psychological tests, *Military personnel, *Performance(Human), *Models, *Decision making, Scoring, Ratings, Data bases, Standardization, Personality ...tests, Psychology , Questionnaires, factor analysis, Diagnosis(General), Symposia

  14. USSR Report, Military Affairs, No. 1773

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Questionnaire "Psychological Steadfastness" Suitability for the Military Profession - N. Korf 41 The Food Program in Action Comprehensive Subsidiary Farm - V...60 DOSAAF AND MILITARY COMMISSARIATS DOSAAF Role in Food Program Discussed (V. Sysoyevj VOYENNYYE ZNANIYA, Nov 82) 6$ Military Patriotic...Party-Political Work on Guard Duty - N. Sirenko. 50 VOYENNYY VESTNIK QUESTIONNAIRE "PSYCHOLOGICAL STEADFASTNESS" To Win in Combat - S. Mirzoyan, S

  15. Overcoming the Fear of Lethal Injury: Evaluating Suicidal Behavior in the Military through the Lens of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Clinical Psychology Review 30 (2010) 298–307 ⁎ Corresponding author. Department of Psychology, Florida State University, 1107 W. Call Street...front matter © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.cpr.2009.12.004 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Clinical Psychology Review Author’s...linked to suicidal ideation (Van Orden et al., 2008), attempted suicide (Joiner et al., 2009, 2002; Van 299E.A. Selby et al. / Clinical Psychology Review 30

  16. Resilience among military youth.

    PubMed

    Easterbrooks, M Ann; Ginsburg, Kenneth; Lerner, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Much research on children in military families has taken a deficit approach--that is, it has portrayed these children as a population susceptible to psychological damage from the hardships of military life, such as frequent moves and separation from their parents during deployment. But M. Ann Easterbrooks, Kenneth Ginsburg, and Richard M. Lerner observe that most military children turn out just fine. They argue that, to better serve military children, we must understand the sources of strength that help them cope with adversity and thrive. In other words, we must understand their resilience. The authors stress that resilience is not a personal trait but a product of the relationships between children and the people and resources around them. In this sense, military life, along with its hardships, offers many sources for resilience--for example, a strong sense of belonging to a supportive community with a shared mission and values. Similarly, children whose parents are deployed may build their self-confidence by taking on new responsibilities in the family, and moving offers opportunities for adventure and personal growth. As the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan drew more and more service members into combat, the military and civilian groups alike rolled out dozens of programs aimed at boosting military children's resilience. Although the authors applaud this effort, they also note that few of these programs have been based on scientific evidence of what works, and few have been rigorously evaluated for their effectiveness. They call for a program of sustained research to boost our understanding of military children's resilience.

  17. Military Government

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1949-07-01

    CGSC MG MILITARY GOVERNMENT LIBHARY ARI\\’IY WAR COLLEGE CJ\\RLISLE BARRACKS, PAa This text is approved for resident and extension-course...and functions · of ’ military government . It conforms ·substantially to the subject matter , of Field Manual 27-5, Civil Affairs/ Military Government ...Teaching experience at the Command and General Staff College has ···--·demonstrated the need for a military government text which brings to- gether

  18. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    care resources of the military, impact unit morale, and take a large emotional toll on the involved friends, family, and commanders. There is...Psychology, 29(2), 177.,187. Gutierrez, P.M. (1999). Suicidality in parentally bereaved adolescents. Death Studies, 23(4), 359-370. Osman, A., Kopper, B. A...Gutierrez, P. M. VA continuum of care for suicidal Veterans. Panel presentation at the American Association of Suicidology conference, Pmilati.d, OR

  19. Assessing the Quality and Value of Psychological Health Care in Civilian Health Plans: Lessons and Implications for the Military Health System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) asked the RAND Corporation to conduct case studies to identify the ways in which civilian health plans...we conducted a small set of case studies of health plans to describe their approaches to assessing the quality of psychological health care. These... case studies had three primary aims: 1. to describe health plans’ efforts to assess the quality of psychological health care and the extent to which

  20. Obesity and the US Military Family

    PubMed Central

    Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Sbrocco, Tracy; Theim, Kelly R.; Cohen, L. Adelyn; Mackey, Eleanor R.; Stice, Eric; Henderson, Jennifer L.; McCreight, Sarah J.; Bryant, Edny J.; Stephens, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This review discusses the current knowledge and future directions regarding obesity within the US military family (i.e., active-duty servicemembers, as well as military spouses, children, retirees, and veterans). The increasing rates of overweight and obesity within the US military adversely impact military readiness, limit recruitment, and place a significant financial burden on the Department of Defense. Design and Methods The following topics are reviewed: 1) The prevalence of and the financial, physical, and psychological costs associated with overweight in military communities; 2) military weight regulations, and challenges faced by the military family related to overweight and disordered eating; 3) the continued need for rigorous program evaluations and new intervention development. Results Overweight and its associated sequelae impact the entire military family. Military families share many similarities with their civilian counterparts, but they face unique challenges (e.g., stress related to deployments and relocations). Although the military has weight management resources, there is an urgent need for rigorous program evaluation and the development of enhanced obesity prevention programs across the lifespan of the military family–several of which are proposed herein. Conclusions Interdisciplinary and collaborative research efforts and team-based interventions will continue to inform understanding of obesity treatment and prevention within military and civilian populations. PMID:23836452

  1. Obesity and the US military family.

    PubMed

    Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Sbrocco, Tracy; Theim, Kelly R; Cohen, L Adelyn; Mackey, Eleanor R; Stice, Eric; Henderson, Jennifer L; McCreight, Sarah J; Bryant, Edny J; Stephens, Mark B

    2013-11-01

    This review discusses the current knowledge and future directions regarding obesity within the US military family (i.e., active-duty servicemembers, as well as military spouses, children, retirees, and veterans). The increasing rates of overweight and obesity within the US military adversely impact military readiness, limit recruitment, and place a significant financial burden on the Department of Defense. The following topics are reviewed: 1) The prevalence of and the financial, physical, and psychological costs associated with overweight in military communities; 2) military weight regulations, and challenges faced by the military family related to overweight and disordered eating; 3) the continued need for rigorous program evaluations and new intervention development. Overweight and its associated sequelae impact the entire military family. Military families share many similarities with their civilian counterparts, but they face unique challenges (e.g., stress related to deployments and relocations). Although the military has weight management resources, there is an urgent need for rigorous program evaluation and the development of enhanced obesity prevention programs across the lifespan of the military family-several of which are proposed herein. Interdisciplinary and collaborative research efforts and team-based interventions will continue to inform understanding of obesity treatment and prevention within military and civilian populations. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  2. Impact of Service Member Death on Military Families: A National Study of Bereavement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Service Member Death on Military Families: A National Study of Bereavement Dr. Stephen Cozza Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of...Military Medicine Rockville, MD 20652 scozza@usuhs.mil The present study will examine various factors that influence the military family bereavement ...recruitment of study participants. military bereavement ; grief; coping; resilience; physical health; psychological health 7 INTRODUCTION: Since 9/11

  3. Study to Examine Psychological Processes in Suicidal Ideation and Behavior (STEPPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    diagnoses to better understand suicide; suicide is the result of a complex interplay of psychological , social and biological factors. A more...encounter frequent physiological/ psychological stressors, therefore identifying suicide risk and resilience factors in military personnel is vital; so...being conducted in a military sample, the fundamental psychological processes that underpin suicide risk are likely to be universal. New psychological

  4. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and 24 brigades were destroyed and taken prisoner. The Wehrmacht lost 1,600,000 soldiers and officers. According to German data , irreplaceable...health, taking psychological data into acount, and their physical and general-education preparation. In so doing, how sincere the youth are in...Hospital for Political Affairs Lt-Col Aleksey Tel’nov bade them farewell heartily. The soldiers answered: "Thanks for the help and the care. Thanks, dear military doctors!..." 11409 CSO: 1801/207 END 58

  5. Contrapower Sexual Harassment of Military Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    Contrapower Sexual Harassment of Military Officers A Thesis Presented by Sarah K. Clapp to the Department of Psychology in partial fulfillment of the...requirements for the degree of Master of Arts Connecticut College New London, Connecticut August, 2007 20080630 215 Contrapower Sexual Harassment ii...Abstract This study was designed to investigate the experiences of military officers with contrapower sexual harassment (i.e., harassment of superiors

  6. Military and civilian media coverage of suicide.

    PubMed

    Edwards-Stewart, Amanda; Kinn, Julie T; June, Jennifer D; Fullerton, Nicole R

    2011-01-01

    Military suicide has increased over the past decade and reports of Service Member and Veteran suicides receive media attention. Some methods of reporting suicide appear to cause a "media contagion" effect, potentially increasing suicide. This effect is explored in relation to media reports of both military and civilian suicides. To reduce possible contagion, recommendations for media reporting of suicides were adapted by the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC). We assessed 240 military and civilian newspaper reports of suicide from 15 different sources for compliance with the SPRC guidelines. Nearly all reviewed articles violated at least one guideline. Results highlighted military news articles regarding Service Members included more pejorative language and discussion of failed psychological treatment. Conversely, civilian articles romanticized the victim and provided more details regarding the suicide. Further exploration of military suicide reporting bias is discussed as a need in future research.

  7. Military Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton; Hayes, Bill

    2001-01-01

    This issue of "Bill of Rights in Action" explores questions of military authority. The first article looks at the French Army mutinies in World War I and how the French Army dealt with them. The second article examines President Truman's firing of popular and powerful General Douglas MacArthur during the Korean War. The final article…

  8. Student Reports in Soviet Military Doctrine and Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-30

    Mikhaylov) Fundamentals of the Theory of Troop Douglas E. Walker 114 Control (P.K. Altukhov, et al.) Civil Defense Steven A. White 120 (P.T. Yegorov...broadening "their outlook on military theory and solving problems related to the training and education of their subordinates" (p. xi). At times a very...the CPSU and the Soviet Armed Forces, Marxist-Leninist Military Theory -- to the not so expected -- The Fundamentals of Military Psychology and

  9. Psychological screening program overview.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kathleen M; Huffman, Ann H; Adler, Amy B; Castro, Carl A

    2002-10-01

    This article reviews the literature on health surveillance conducted during military deployments, focusing on models for assessing the impact of operational deployments on peacekeepers. A discussion of the stressors and potential mental health consequences of peacekeeping operations follows with relevant examples of findings from U.S. and international military forces. Psychological screening in different peacekeeping operations conducted in U.S. Army-Europe is reviewed. The review begins with the redeployment screening of military personnel deployed to Bosnia mandated under the Joint Medical Surveillance Program, and continues through the present screening of units deployed to Kosovo. The detailed description of the screening program includes a discussion of procedures and measures and demonstrates the evolution of the program. A summary of key findings from the screening program and a discussion of future research directions are provided.

  10. Evaluation of stress debriefing interventions with military populations.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Catherine M

    2003-12-01

    Military members are frequently exposed to traumatic events. In an attempt to mitigate the psychological impact of traumatic events, formal interventions, such as Critical Incident Stress Debriefing and Process Debriefing, have been developed and implemented. Through a literature review of psychological debriefing interventions in the military, several anecdotal and research-based observations are discussed. Suggestions for clinical application and programmatic research are made based on these empirical findings.

  11. The Children of Military Service Members: Challenges, Supports, and Future Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Pedro, Kris M. Tunac; Astor, Ron Avi; Benbenishty, Rami; Estrada, Jose; Smith, Gabrielle R. Dejoie; Esqueda, Monica Christina

    2011-01-01

    The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have led to concerning psychological, behavioral, and academic outcomes for children in military families. Of the 1.2 million school-aged children of military service members, only 86,000 actually attend schools administered by the Department of Defense on military installations throughout the world. The remaining…

  12. District, School, and Community Stakeholder Perspectives on the Experiences of Military-Connected Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Pedro, Kris Tunac; Esqueda, Monica Christina; Cederbaum, Julie A.; Astor, Ron Avi

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: The children of military service members experience numerous military-related stressors (e.g., deployment of a parent), resulting in negative psychological outcomes. About 90% of military-connected students are educated in civilian public schools. A few recent studies in disciplines outside education research suggest that…

  13. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Military Suicide Attitudes Questionnaire (MSAQ)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-12

    Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Military Suicide Attitudes Questionnaire (MSAQ) by Marcus VanSickle...MEDICAL AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAM Title of Dissertation: "Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Military Suicide Attitudes...hereby certifies that the use of any copyrighted material in the thesis manuscript entitled: "Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Military

  14. The Children of Military Service Members: Challenges, Supports, and Future Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Pedro, Kris M. Tunac; Astor, Ron Avi; Benbenishty, Rami; Estrada, Jose; Smith, Gabrielle R. Dejoie; Esqueda, Monica Christina

    2011-01-01

    The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have led to concerning psychological, behavioral, and academic outcomes for children in military families. Of the 1.2 million school-aged children of military service members, only 86,000 actually attend schools administered by the Department of Defense on military installations throughout the world. The remaining…

  15. District, School, and Community Stakeholder Perspectives on the Experiences of Military-Connected Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Pedro, Kris Tunac; Esqueda, Monica Christina; Cederbaum, Julie A.; Astor, Ron Avi

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: The children of military service members experience numerous military-related stressors (e.g., deployment of a parent), resulting in negative psychological outcomes. About 90% of military-connected students are educated in civilian public schools. A few recent studies in disciplines outside education research suggest that…

  16. AVIATION PSYCHOLOGY,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PSYCHOLOGY , AERONAUTICS, FLIGHT, PILOTS, PERCEPTION, ATTENTION, READING, MEMORY( PSYCHOLOGY ), PERSONALITY , EMOTIONS, FATIGUE(PHYSIOLOGY), AVIATION SAFETY, AVIATION ACCIDENTS, PSYCHOMOTOR TESTS, PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS, TRAINING.

  17. Military Versus Civilian Murder-Suicide.

    PubMed

    Patton, Christina L; McNally, Matthew R; Fremouw, William J

    2015-07-03

    Previous studies have implicated significant differences between military members and civilians with regard to violent behavior, including suicide, domestic violence, and harm to others, but none have examined military murder-suicide. This study sought to determine whether there were meaningful differences between military and civilian murder-suicide perpetrators. Using data from the Center for Disease Control's (CDC) National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS), military (n = 259) and civilian (n = 259) murder-suicide perpetrators were compared on a number of demographic, psychological, and contextual factors using chi-square analyses. Logistic regression was used to determine which variables predicted membership to the military or civilian perpetrator groups. Military murder-suicide perpetrators were more likely to be older, have physical health problems, be currently or formerly married, less likely to abuse substances, and to exhibit significantly different motives than civilian perpetrators. Logistic regression revealed that membership to the military, rather than the civilian, perpetrator group was predicted by age, physical health problems, and declining heath motive-reflecting the significance of a more than 15-year difference in mean age between the two groups. Findings point to the need to tailor suicide risk assessments to include questions specific to murder-suicide, to assess attitudes toward murder-suicide, and to the importance of assessing suicide and violence risk in older adult military populations.

  18. The military and the transition to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Kelty, Ryan; Kleykamp, Meredith; Segal, David R

    2010-01-01

    Ryan Kelty, Meredith Kleykamp, and David Segal examine the effect of military service on the transition to adulthood. They highlight changes since World War II in the role of the military in the lives of young adults, focusing especially on how the move from a conscription to an all-volunteer military has changed the way military service affects youths' approach to adult responsibilities. The authors note that today's all-volunteer military is both career-oriented and family-oriented, and they show how the material and social support the military provides to young servicemen and women promotes responsible membership in family relationships and the wider community. As a result, they argue, the transition to adulthood, including economic independence from parents, is more stable and orderly for military personnel than for their civilian peers. At the same time, they stress that serving in the military in a time of war holds dangers for young adults. The authors examine four broad areas of military service, focusing in each on how men and women in uniform today make the transition to adulthood. They begin by looking at the social characteristics of those who serve, especially at differences in access to the military and its benefits by socio-demographic characteristics, such as age, gender, race and ethnicity, social class, and sexual orientation. Military service also has important effects on family formation, including the timing of marriage and parenthood, family structure, and the influence of military culture on families. Family formation among servicemen and women, the authors observe, is earlier and more stable than among civilians of the same age. The authors then consider the educational and employment consequences of service. Finally, they scrutinize the dangers of military service during times of war and examine the physical and psychological effects of wartime military service. They also note the sexual trauma endured both by male and female military

  19. Military Strategy,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-01-01

    with a grass surface. This aircraft has the following cal- culated characteristics: maximum «peed 2500-2700 km/hour, service cell - ing up to...mobi- lisation of all the national resources to repel the enemy, and the systematic growth of the technical equipment of our Armed Forces. For...bombers. Cannon- machlnegun aircraft weapons have been replaced by rocket weapons. In recent years the speed and celling of military planes has

  20. National Military Family Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... have good news and bad news for military families. MORE Military Families Brace for What’s Next In Syria President Trump ordered an airstrike in Syria leaving military families wondering what's next. More April is the Month ...

  1. Predicting Leadership Potential through Psychological Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    impotent; and without craft they are dreamers . Successful senior leaders and commanders establish a clear personal vision or concept of what needs to...Military Personnel File composition be augmented through the inclusion of psychological test results designed to measure these psychological traits. 39

  2. Military sexual trauma.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Diane M; Haley, Jenna L; Bouder, Michelle

    2011-12-01

    Nurses' awareness of MST as a specific type of sexual assault within the military culture and sensitivity to the physical and psychological symptoms are important aspects of care. Nurses must treat the physical and emotional components of sexual assault in all settings; however, referral to the veterans administration programs and resources is key for the woman veteran to receive the specialized care developed by the healthcare system. Women veterans who have PTSD from MST and combat exposure are prone to depression, suicide and substance use/abuse. Nurses must not fear asking the woman if she is having suicidal thoughts or has a plan and intent to follow through with the plan. MST and PTSD may result in internalized anger, shame, self-blame, helplessness, hopelessness and powerlessness. Patient safety is of utmost importance. Assessing Patients for Sexual Violence, A Guide for Health Care Providers (2009) is a useful resource for nurses. The National Center for PTSD (2009) newsletter on the topic of MST includes a list of research studies. The work of Benedict (2007) and Corbett (2007) provide additional personal accounts of women soldiers who were in the Middle East conflicts. The nurse's referral to specialized services to treat MST and PTSD with evidence-based therapies is a crucial first step in the resiliency and well-being of these brave women who have served in all branches of the U.S. military.

  3. USSR Report, Military Affairs, No. 1807.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-25

    of collectivism and comradeship, and irreconcilability toward a lack of spirituality, egoism , and relapses of consumer psychology find broad...moral code of the builder of communism, to speak out more often on questions of moral indoctrination and the military ethic , and, by the force of the

  4. What is Military Psychology? Symposium Proceedings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    mentally retarded privates to overly strict generals having discipline problems with their own children . Psycholo- gists in the nonclinical areas have...93940 (30 ALEXANDRIA, VA 22314 (2) RONALD A. WEITZMAN (CODE 54WZ) DEAN OF REASEARCH , CODE 012 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOLMONTEREY, CA NAVAL POSTGRADUATE

  5. Intersex patients in military service.

    PubMed

    Marom, Tal; Itskoviz, David; Ostfeld, Ishay

    2008-11-01

    The term "intersex" describes a variety of medical conditions in which sex determination is atypical. One of its most severe forms is an inadequate response to androgens due to mutations in the androgen receptor gene, which may manifest as a complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS). In this form of intersex condition, genetically male individuals do not form masculine genitalia, but have a female phenotype. Officially, Israel Defense Forces policy does not prohibit intersex patients' draft. However, it is uncommon to encounter intersex patients in the military setting. In this report, we describe a case of a combat Israeli Defense Forces female soldier, whose CAIS diagnosis was not reported to the military health authorities before her recruitment, but was revealed only during active service. Medical and other professional issues were discreetly handled, permitting her to successfully fulfill her 2 years of duty service. Although CAIS is a rare entity, it should be appropriately addressed in medical, psychological, social, and command aspects in the unique military setting. Our recommendation is to allow intersex patients military service, but not in combat units.

  6. An introduction to the special section on U.S. military operations: effects on military members' partners and children.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Michelle L; Jouriles, Ernest N

    2011-08-01

    The deployment of U.S. military personnel to global hot spots, whether as combatants or as peacekeepers, has increased attention to the psychological well-being of military personnel and their family members. Despite the growing awareness that deployments have reverberating effects on all family members, theoretical explanations and empirical research on the impact of deployment on couple, family, and child adjustment, factors that serve to protect families from the demands of military employment, and effective methods of treating the mental health needs of military families are needed. The seven papers in this section increase our understanding of how the demands of U.S. military operations impact couples, family functioning, parenting, and child psychological adjustment and provide an additional resource for mental health professionals who work with these families.

  7. Suicides in the military: the post-modern combat veteran and the Hemingway effect.

    PubMed

    Castro, Carl Andrew; Kintzle, Sara

    2014-08-01

    Suicides in the military have increased over the last ten years. Much effort has been focused on suicide prevention and treatment, as well as understanding the reasons for the sharp increase in military suicides. Despite this effort, the definitive causes of military suicides remain elusive. Further, highly effective suicide prevention and treatment approaches have not yet been developed. The purpose of this article is to present a short review of the current state of suicide prevention interventions within the context of the military. The root causes of suicidal behavior and the role of combat in the military are each discussed. Interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide and the military transition theory are introduced as guiding frameworks for understanding suicides and suicidal behavior amongst active military personnel and military veterans. The article concludes with a set of recommendations for moving forward in understanding and addressing suicides in the military.

  8. Slowing Military Change

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Military Models to Ottoman Turkey and Meiji Japan,” in Theo Farrell and Terry Terriff, eds., The Sources of Military Change: Culture, Politics, Technology...2002; Farrell and Terriff, “The Sources of Military Change”; Goldman, “The Spread of Western Military Models to Ottoman Turkey and Meiji Japan.” 107

  9. Military specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Philip

    1987-01-01

    The current situation relative to the military specification is that there is not one specific model of turbulence which people are using. Particular disagreement exists on how turbulence levels will vary with qualitative analysis. It does not tie one down to specifics. When it comes to flying quality specifications, many feel that one should stay with the definitions of the Cooper-Harper rating scale but allow the levels to shift depending on the level of turbulence. There is a ride quality specification in the MIL-SPEC having to do with flight control systems design that is related to a turbulence model. This spec (MIL-F8785C) and others are discussed.

  10. ENGINEERING PSYCHOLOGY,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MAN MACHINE SYSTEMS, APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY ), INFORMATION THEORY, ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING, PERCEPTION( PSYCHOLOGY ...PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY, AUTOMATION, BRAIN, AUDITORY PERCEPTION, VISUAL PERCEPTION, MEMORY( PSYCHOLOGY ), MOTOR REACTIONS, NOISE, PERFORMANCE(HUMAN), USSR

  11. [Application and research of acupuncture in military].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu; Li, Xiao-Qian; Chen, Hong-Yun; Li, Wei-Hong; Zhou, Shuang; Zhou, Qing-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture has remarkable effects of pain relieving and functional restoration on injuries of soft tissue and joint due to military training. As more and more attention has been attached to the impact of psychological states and biorhythm disorder on the fighting ability of military staff, acupuncture has found its place in treating chronic fatigue, combat stress reaction, traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder as well as regulating circadian rhythms. The therapeutic effect of acupuncture in military training-related physical damage and psychological trauma has already been proved by numerous clinical practices and researches. It is held that using acupuncture as an alternative could not only save medical resources, but also enhance the fighting ability of the army. However, the current clinical studies is facing the problem of limited sample size. Therefore, randomized controlled trials in large scale and multiple centers should be further carried out toward military staff, so as to provide more speaking evidences to the prevention and treatment of physical and psychological diseases.

  12. ENGINEERING PSYCHOLOGY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MAN MACHINE SYSTEMS, *HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING, APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY , EDUCATION, TRAINING, SCIENTISTS, TECHNICIANS, PERFORMANCE(HUMAN...INSTRUMENTATION, GROUP DYNAMICS, SELECTION, PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS, PROGRAMMED INSTRUCTION, SIMULATION, TRAINING DEVICES, ABSTRACTS, USSR.

  13. Caring for Active Duty Military Personnel in the Civilian Sector

    PubMed Central

    Waitzkin, Howard; Noble, Marylou

    2011-01-01

    Due to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the unmet medical and psychological needs of military personnel are creating major challenges. Increasingly, active duty military personnel are seeking physical and mental health services from civilian professionals. The Civilian Medical Resources Network attempts to address these unmet needs. Participants in the Network include primary care and mental health practitioners in all regions of the country. Network professionals provide independent assessments, clinical interventions in acute situations, and documentation that assists GIs in obtaining reassignment or discharge. Most clients who use Network services come from low-income backgrounds and manifest psychological rather than physical disorders. Qualitative themes in professional-client encounters have focused on ethical conflicts, the impact of violence without meaning (especially violence against civilians), and perceived problems in military health and mental health policies. Unmet needs of active duty military personnel deserve more concerted attention from medical professionals and policy makers. PMID:21339846

  14. Military experience and levels of stress and coping in police officers.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Tara A; Violanti, John M; Mnatsakanova, Anna; Andrew, Michael E; Burchfiel, Cecil M

    2013-01-01

    Policing is a stressful occupation and working in this environment may make officers more vulnerable to adverse psychological and physiological outcomes. The impact of prior military experience on work stress and coping strategies has not been well-studied in police. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine differences in levels of police-related stress and coping in officers with and without military experience. Participants were 452 police officers from the Buffalo Cardio-metabolic Occupational Police Stress Study Officers were categorized into three groups: non-military (n = 334), non-combat military (n = 84), and military with combat (n = 34). Age, sex and education adjusted levels of psychological stress and coping measures were compared across the three groups using ANCOVA. P-values were derived from post-hoc comparisons. Non-military police officers had significantly higher stress levels for physically and psychological threatening events compared to non-combat officers (p = 0.019). Non-military officers also reported experiencing significantly more organizational stressors and physically and psychologically threatening events in the past year than combat and non-combat officers (p < 0.05). Combat officers had significantly lower levels of planning and active coping styles compared to non-combat officers (p = 0.026, p = 0.032, respectively) and non-military officers (p = 0.010, p = 0.005, respectively). In summary, police officers without military experience reported experiencing more organizational and life-threatening events than officers who served in the military. Yet combat officers were less likely to utilize positive coping than non-combat and non-military officers. These findings demonstrate the potential positive influence of military experience on police stress. Further research is needed as military veterans return to police work.

  15. Military Experience and Levels of Stress and Coping in Police Officers

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Tara A.; Violanti, John M.; Mnatsakanova, Anna; Andrew, Michael E.; Burchfiel, Cecil M.

    2016-01-01

    Policing is a stressful occupation and working in this environment may make officers more vulnerable to adverse psychological and physiological outcomes. The impact of prior military experience on work stress and coping strategies has not been well-studied in police. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine differences in levels of police-related stress and coping in officers with and without military experience. Participants were 452 police officers from the Buffalo Cardio-metabolic Occupational Police Stress Study. Officers were categorized into three groups: non-military (n=334), non-combat military (n=84), and military with combat (n=34). Age, sex and education adjusted levels of psychological stress and coping measures were compared across the three groups using ANCOVA. P-values were derived from post-hoc comparisons. Non-military police officers had significantly higher stress levels for physically and psychological threatening events compared to non-combat officers (p=0.019). Non-military officers also reported experiencing significantly more organizational stressors and physically and psychologically threatening events in the past year than combat and non-combat officers (p<0.05). Combat officers had significantly lower levels of planning and active coping styles compared to non-combat officers (p=0.026, p=0.032, respectively) and non-military officers (p=0.010, p=0.005, respectively). In summary, police officers without military experience reported experiencing more organizational and life-threatening events than officers who served in the military. Yet combat officers were less likely to utilize positive coping than non-combat and non-military officers. These findings demonstrate the potential positive influence of military experience on police stress. Further research is needed as military veterans return to police work. PMID:24707586

  16. Military nursing competencies.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mary Candice

    2010-06-01

    Competencies for military nurses are much broader in scope than their civilian counterparts. Not only must they be proficient at basic nursing skills, but they must also quickly master such military skills as protecting themselves and others during attack or threat of attack, caring for major trauma victims under austere conditions, and preparing such patients for transport through the military system of evacuation. This requires consistent and specialized training. This article describes the competencies necessary for practice by military nurses.

  17. Military Business Success

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT Military Business Success By: Lieutenant...TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Military Business Success 6. AUTHOR(S) Ahmad, Mohamad Krastev, Radostin Puciato, Arkadiusz 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING...unlimited. MILITARY BUSINESS SUCCESS Mohamad Ahmad, Lieutenant Colonel, Malaysian Air Force Radostin Krastev, Captain, Bulgarian Air

  18. Performance-enhancing technologies and moral responsibility in the military.

    PubMed

    Wolfendale, Jessica

    2008-02-01

    New scientific advances have created previously unheard of possibilities for enhancing combatants' performance. Future war fighters may be smarter, stronger, and braver than ever before. If these technologies are safe, is there any reason to reject their use? In this article, I argue that the use of enhancements is constrained by the importance of maintaining the moral responsibility of military personnel. This is crucial for two reasons: the military's ethical commitments require military personnel to be morally responsible agents, and moral responsibility is necessary for integrity and the moral emotions of guilt and remorse, both of which are important for moral growth and psychological well-being. Enhancements that undermined combatants' moral responsibility would therefore undermine the military's moral standing and would harm combatants' well-being. A genuine commitment to maintaining the military's ethical standards and the well-being of combatants therefore requires a careful analysis of performance-enhancing technologies before they are implemented.

  19. Impact of Social Networking Sites on Children in Military Families.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Austen B; Steele, Ric G

    2016-09-01

    Youth in military families experience a relatively unique set of stressors that can put them at risk for numerous psychological and behavior problems. Thus, there is a need to identify potential mechanisms by which children can gain resiliency against these stressors. One potential mechanism that has yet to be empirically studied with military youth is social networking sites (SNSs). SNSs have gained significant popularity among society, especially youth. Given the significance of these communication tools in youths' lives, it is important to analyze how SNS use may affect military youth and their ability to cope with common military life stressors. The current review examines the potential positive and negative consequences associated with SNS use in coping with three common stressors of youth in military families: parent deployment, frequent relocation, and having a family member with a psychological or physical disability. By drawing from SNS and military literature, we predict that SNS use can be a positive tool for helping children in military families to cope with stressors. However, certain SNS behaviors can potentially result in more negative outcomes. Recommendations for future research are also discussed.

  20. Military psychiatry in India

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, H. R. A.

    2010-01-01

    Military personnel, because of the unique nature of their duties and services, are likely to be under stress which at times has no parallel in civilian life. The stress of combat and service in extreme weather conditions often act as major stressors. The modern practices in military psychiatry had their beginning during the two World Wars, more particularly, the IInd World War. The GHPU concept had the beginning in India with military hospitals having such establishments in the care of their clientele. As the nation gained independence, many of the military psychiatrists shifted to the civil stream and contributed immensely in the development of modern psychiatry in India. In the recent years military psychiatry has been given the status of a subspecialty chapter and the military psychiatrists have been regularly organizing CMEs and training programs for their members to prepare them to function in the special role of military psychiatrists. PMID:21836702

  1. Psychological Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Jump to Topic Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Relaxation Techniques for IBS The cause of irritable ... used to treat IBS include psychotherapy (dynamic and cognitive-behavioral therapy ), ... hypnotherapy , and biofeedback therapy . Psychological treatments ...

  2. A Classification of Sentences Used in Natural Language Processing in the Military Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittrock, Merlin C.

    Concepts in cognitive psychology are applied to the language used in military situations, and a sentence classification system for use in analyzing military language is outlined. The system is designed to be used, in part, in conjunction with a natural language query system that allows a user to access a database. The discussion of military…

  3. Purple Alert: Helping Educators Understand the Unique Needs of Adolescents with Military and Veterans Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Natalie; Yates, Lucian, II

    2016-01-01

    When military service members dedicate their services to protect our great nation, they sometimes leave behind their children, move with their family, or return home physically or psychologically different which cause tension on the children. Reseachers' have shown the impacts of having military parents on children are numerous and evident. The…

  4. 75 FR 22751 - Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing; Charter...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... members, who are eminent authorities in the fields of educational and psychological testing. Committee... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing... notice that it is renewing the charter for the Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel...

  5. FACTORS RELATING TO SUCCESS OF COPING WITH CRISIS. IMPACT OF FATHER ABSENCE IN MILITARY FAMILIES, II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FAGEN, STANLEY A.; AND OTHERS

    THE PATTERN OF PREDISPOSITIONAL AND MEDIATIONAL FACTORS RELATING TO DIFFERENTIAL MATERNAL SUCCESS IN COPING WITH THE CRISIS CREATED BY FATHER ABSENCE IN MILITARY FAMILIES WAS EXAMINED. MOTHERS IN 23 FAMILIES WHOSE HUSBANDS WERE ABSENT ON EXTENDED MILITARY TOURS, WERE ADMINISTERED AN EXTENSIVE BATTERY OF SOCIOMETRIC AND PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS PRIOR TO…

  6. Worldwide Survey of Alcohol and Nonmedical Drug Use Among Military Personnel: 1985

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    Substance Abuse Prevention Programs ....... 147 1. A Prevention Perspective ....... ................ 147 2. Perceptions of the Acceptability and Risk of...and to beliefs about the harmful effects of drugs. vii The psychological belief variables (harmful effects of drugs, drug prevention efforts...military personnel. 1. The Context of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Programs Most military personnel feel that drinking and drug use are not

  7. Pharmaceutical Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolinsky, Donna

    1979-01-01

    Defines areas that could comprise pharmaceutical psychology. The discussion includes a review of literature, outline of areas in pharmacy in which psychologists could become involved, description of a project involving the application of psychology to pharmacy, and analysis of the concept of pharmaceutical psychology. A 99-item bibliography is…

  8. Psychological Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, David H.

    2004-01-01

    Psychology has recently identified itself as a health care profession and codified this change in the bylaws of the American Psychological Association. Although psychologists make a number of contributions to the nation's health-and mental health-the most identifiable activity focuses on treating physical or psychological pathology with…

  9. Positive Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive…

  10. Positive Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive…

  11. Psychiatry and the military: an update.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Elspeth Cameron; Benedek, David; Malone, Ricky; Carr-Malone, Rosemary

    2006-09-01

    The United States has historically been concerned about the successful adjustment of its military members returning from war. These concerns are based on the recognition that war-zone exposures may have considerable negative emotional or behavior consequences. As the global war on terror continues, the United States military medical system will be required to address issues at the interface of psychiatry and the law. Despite clinical advances within the theater of war and at tertiary facilities in the United States, some military members will develop chronic and disabling mental illness as a result of traumatic exposure and exacerbated by the demands of the austere and dangerous operational environment. The extent to which violent and aggressive behavior in the aftermath of deployment can be attributed to combat experience remains an area of debate and ongoing investigation. However, experience suggests that a very small subgroup of the hundreds of thousands of war veterans deployed in conjunction with the current conflict in Iraq has already been involved in violent crimes. For this group, military forensic psychiatrists will be called on to make determinations of competency and criminal responsibility and to inform the courts about the potential contributions of war-related distress or disorder to criminal behavior. Though the overwhelming majority of war veterans will not be involved in criminal proceedings, a minority will develop career-ending (and in rare instances, life-ending) disabilities as a result of mental illness. For those who are no longer fit for duty, the military Physical Disability Evaluation System must make determinations of the extent to which future military performance and future civilian social and occupational function have been compromised. For a small yet highly visible minority of returning veterans, questions about the cause, precipitants, and manner of death will necessitate psychological autopsies. This article highlighted recent

  12. Psychology in the Public Sector: Addressing the Psychological Effects of Combat in the U.S. Navy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sammons, Morgan T.

    2005-01-01

    The response of military psychology in times of war or other great public crises may presage the success of the profession in less perilous times. The ability of public-sector psychologists to provide assistance and improve the common welfare during conflict or turmoil is generally followed by an increased demand for psychological services. This…

  13. Immunization and military medicine.

    PubMed

    Benenson, A S

    1984-01-01

    This lecture, a memorial to Joseph E. Smadel, reviews the involvement of the military in the development and use of immunizing materials. Smallpox and smallpox immunization in the military and the development and present status of immunization against typhoid, cholera, yellow fever, typhus, tetanus, diphtheria, plague, influenza, adenovirus, meningitis, rubella, and malaria are reviewed. Dr. Smadel's personal contributions to the significant achievements of the military program to civilian practice are emphasized.

  14. Reflections on military psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Arthur, R J

    1978-07-01

    The need for psychiatrists in the military was recognized for the first time during World War I, which involved millions of men in unusually protracted warfare. The policy of treating psychiatric casualties close to the from and returning soldiers to their military units as quickly as possible proved of great significance in the U.S. war effort. During World War II, the Korean conflict, and the war in Viet Nam, military psychiatry made great contributions and learned many lessions, both at home and abroad. The lessions learned by military psychiatry have important applications for the rest of medicine, especially in the fields of stress, crisis therapy, and community psychiatry.

  15. About Military Sexual Trauma

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans Health Administration? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 15K ...

  16. Psychotherapy with military personnel: lessons learned, challenges ahead.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, civilian mental health clinicians will be enlisted to evaluate and treat active duty and post-deployment military service members of the OIF/OEF theaters, as well as veterans of previous wars. This article provides a summary of some of the effective psychological treatment modalities for military service members that can be adapted to outpatient psychotherapeutic practice, including structured psychological interventions and specialized techniques of individual psychotherapy, with special applications for dealing with combat stress, depression, suicidality, conflicts over killing, brain injury effects, family issues, post-deployment readjustment, and long-term problems. By adapting and integrating psychotherapeutic lessons learned from treating related populations of law enforcement and emergency services personnel, clinicians who treat military service members and vets can become more flexible, well-rounded, and effective clinicians for a wide variety of high-need service members.

  17. Committee on Military Nutrition Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    MILITARY RESEARCH, * NUTRITION , MILITARY PERSONNEL, PERFORMANCE(HUMAN), METABOLISM, NUTRIENTS, HIGH ENERGY, MEDICAL RESEARCH, FOOD, DIET, MENTAL ABILITY, WORKSHOPS, BIOMEDICINE, CAFFEINE, SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE.

  18. [Political psychology].

    PubMed

    Resch, Mária; Bella, Tamás

    2013-04-21

    In Hungary one can mostly find references to the psychological processes of politics in the writings of publicists, public opinion pollsters, philosophers, social psychologists, and political analysts. It would be still important if not only legal scientists focusing on political institutions or sociologist-politologists concentrating on social structures could analyse the psychological aspects of political processes; but one could also do so through the application of the methods of political psychology. The authors review the history of political psychology, its position vis-à-vis other fields of science and the essential interfaces through which this field of science, which is still to be discovered in Hungary, connects to other social sciences. As far as its methodology comprising psycho-biographical analyses, questionnaire-based queries, cognitive mapping of interviews and statements are concerned, it is identical with the psychiatric tools of medical sciences. In the next part of this paper, the focus is shifted to the essence and contents of political psychology. Group dynamics properties, voters' attitudes, leaders' personalities and the behavioural patterns demonstrated by them in different political situations, authoritativeness, games, and charisma are all essential components of political psychology, which mostly analyses psychological-psychiatric processes and also involves medical sciences by relying on cognitive and behavioural sciences. This paper describes political psychology, which is basically part of social sciences, still, being an interdisciplinary science, has several ties to medical sciences through psychological and psychiatric aspects.

  19. The impact of deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan on partners and wives of military personnel.

    PubMed

    de Burgh, H Thomas; White, Claire J; Fear, Nicola T; Iversen, Amy C

    2011-04-01

    Deployment has well documented psychological consequences for military personnel. To fully understand the human cost of war, the psychosocial impact of separation and homecoming of military personnel on their families must also be considered. Recent arduous conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan make understanding the impact of war on spouses topical and pertinent. Widespread psychological morbidity and social dysfunction have been reported in spouses of military personnel who have been deployed to combat zones such as Vietnam, with difficulties most acute for spouses of military personnel with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A review of the literature published between 2001 and 2010 assessing the impact of deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan on spouses of military personnel was conducted. A total of 14 US-based studies were identified which examined psychological morbidity, help seeking, marital dysfunction and stress in spouses. Longer deployments, deployment extensions and PTSD in military personnel were found to be associated with psychological problems for the spouse. Methodological differences in the studies limit direct comparisons. Recommendations for future research are outlined. The needs of spouses of military personnel remain an important issue with implications for service provision and occupational capability of both partners.

  20. Distress, support, and relationship satisfaction during military-induced separations: a longitudinal study among spouses of Dutch deployed military personnel.

    PubMed

    Andres, Manon

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine (a) how life stress, work-family conflict, social support, psychological distress, and relationship satisfaction develop over the course of military-induced separations; (b) what best predicts relationship satisfaction after being separated for several months; and (c) whether the effects were mediated by spousal interaction. Longitudinal data were collected among 153 spouses of Dutch military personnel before, during, and after military-induced separations. Analyses demonstrated a significant decrease in relationship satisfaction, psychological distress, and social support over time. Controlling for predeployment levels of relationship satisfaction, work-family conflict, social support, psychological distress, and spousal interaction made significant contributions to the explanation of relationship satisfaction after military-induced separations. However, the effects on relationships varied for each stage of the work-related spousal separation. Hence, clinical implications for psychological service delivery suggested by these findings are impacted by the stage of the work-related spousal separation. Specifically, before the separation, services might focus upon balancing work and family demands; during the separation, services that facilitate building networks are important; and finally, communication remains the key service focus upon reunion. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. Risk and resilience in military families experiencing deployment: the role of the family attachment network.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Shelley A; Riggs, David S

    2011-10-01

    Deployment separation constitutes a significant stressor for U.S. military men and women and their families. Many military personnel return home struggling with physical and/or psychological injuries that challenge their ability to reintegrate and contribute to marital problems, family dysfunction, and emotional or behavioral disturbance in spouses and children. Yet research examining the psychological health and functioning of military families is scarce and rarely driven by developmental theory. The primary purpose of this theoretical paper is to describe a family attachment network model of military families during deployment and reintegration that is grounded in attachment theory and family systems theory. This integrative perspective provides a solid empirical foundation and a comprehensive account of individual and family risk and resilience during military-related separations and reunions. The proposed family attachment network model will inform future research and intervention efforts with service members and their families.

  2. Body contouring surgery for military personnel following massive weight loss.

    PubMed

    Chong, S J; Kok, Y O; Foo, C L

    2011-12-01

    The burgeoning global obesity epidemic extends to the military service, where 6-53% of military personnel are overweight. Obese military personnel who adhere to a strict training and diet regime may potentially achieve and maintain significant weight loss. They may however face physical problems such as excess skin folds causing discomfort, difficulty in uniform fitting, personal hygiene, interference with full physical activities and psychological issues such as body image dissatisfaction, low self esteem and difficulty in social acceptance. We present a case report of a highly motivated military conscript who achieved and maintained significant weight loss but had physical defects following Massive Weight Loss. Body contouring surgery was successfully utilised to correct his physical defects and allowed him to return to full physical duties.

  3. Hebrew Military Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abarbanel, Joel I.

    Designed to give the military student a broad range of vocabulary on military subjects and a general understanding of the structure and operations of the Israel Defense Forces, this reader parallels advanced materials prepared for Foreign Service students of Hebrew and consists of short reading passages, each followed by a vocabulary list…

  4. Military Perspectives on Cyberpower

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    Zimet and Charles L. Barry Military cyberpower is the application of the domain of cyber- space to operational concepts to accomplish military objec...pable global backbone, unrestrained information sharing among com- mands, and truly interoperable networks wherein every authorized user can access...Special Operations Forces (SOF), and space forces performing missions around the world, and their supporting in- telligence networks. DOD divides

  5. Early Childhood Military Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Does the country's national security rely on top-quality early childhood education? Yes, say the military leaders of Mission: Readiness, an organization led by retired military commanders that promotes investment in education, child health, and parenting support. Actually, the generals are right, but for all the wrong reasons. The generals' aim is…

  6. Sustaining the Military Arts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    pidgin isn’t the antidote for strategic illiteracy. The military arts of strategy, operations, and tactics are merely the creative bridges that allow...Strategic pidgin isn’t the antidote for strategic illiteracy. about military arts and sciences is not merely a ’question of rhetorical clarity. Indeed

  7. Military Culture and Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    mines the success of transformation. The period between 1914 and 1945 shows the dynamic nature of military innova - tion and the difficulty military...maximized unity of effort. Leaders can foster a disciplined culture that encourages change and innova - tion by “creating a consistent system with clear

  8. Advising Transfer Military Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Today's students can come from a larger area than just high school. With the entire world's conflicts and today's society, more and more of our present day students may have come from the military ranks. Though we have not come to an actual draft system, more and more modern day students have served their time in the military, to keep America…

  9. Early Childhood Military Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Does the country's national security rely on top-quality early childhood education? Yes, say the military leaders of Mission: Readiness, an organization led by retired military commanders that promotes investment in education, child health, and parenting support. Actually, the generals are right, but for all the wrong reasons. The generals' aim is…

  10. Case report: Military subcultural competency.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Eric

    2013-07-01

    The military is comprised of numerous subcultures. These subcultures can dramatically impact perceptions of illness and care. Although efforts are currently underway to improve the military cultural competence of all health care providers, efforts to improve the subcultural competence of military providers require attention. Military providers, although part of the military culture, may not appreciate their patients' military subculture or be aware of the impact their own subculture plays on the encounter. To illustrate potential difficulties, a case is described where limited military subcultural competence disrupted care. As the military medical corps continues to integrate across service lines, this case underscores the importance of training military physicians to assess the influence of a service member's specific military subculture. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  11. PSYCHOLOGICAL ADVANTAGES IN GAMBLING.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    GROUP DYNAMICS, *DECISION MAKING, *SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY , PERFORMANCE(HUMAN), GAME THEORY, MOTIVATION, PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS, BEHAVIOR, ATTITUDES( PSYCHOLOGY ), PERCEPTION( PSYCHOLOGY ), RECALL, PROBABILITY, SOCIOMETRICS.

  12. Psychological behaviorism and behaviorizing psychology

    PubMed Central

    Staats, Arthur W.

    1994-01-01

    Paradigmatic or psychological behaviorism (PB), in a four-decade history of development, has been shaped by its goal, the establishment of a behaviorism that can also serve as the approach in psychology (Watson's original goal). In the process, PB has become a new generation of behaviorism with abundant heuristic avenues for development in theory, philosophy, methodology, and research. Psychology has resources, purview and problem areas, and nascent developments of many kinds, gathered in chaotic diversity, needing unification (and other things) that cognitivism cannot provide. Behaviorism can, within PB's multilevel framework for connecting and advancing both psychology and behaviorism. PMID:22478175

  13. Psychological behaviorism and behaviorizing psychology.

    PubMed

    Staats, A W

    1994-01-01

    Paradigmatic or psychological behaviorism (PB), in a four-decade history of development, has been shaped by its goal, the establishment of a behaviorism that can also serve as the approach in psychology (Watson's original goal). In the process, PB has become a new generation of behaviorism with abundant heuristic avenues for development in theory, philosophy, methodology, and research. Psychology has resources, purview and problem areas, and nascent developments of many kinds, gathered in chaotic diversity, needing unification (and other things) that cognitivism cannot provide. Behaviorism can, within PB's multilevel framework for connecting and advancing both psychology and behaviorism.

  14. [Quality of a life of military seamen of Northern fleet].

    PubMed

    Mosiagin, I G; Sakharov, O S; Gubernitskaia, S V

    2010-05-01

    Research of quality of a life of military seamen with use of the Russian-speaking version of the general questionnaire of health "Medical Outcomes Study-Short Forms" (SF-36) is conducted. 600 military men at the age from 18 till 55 years are surveyed. Military seamen have highly appreciated the quality of a life. Absolute values of indicators of quality of a life on all scales 70 points that is considered, how very high there are more. The physical component of health is estimated by military men above, than psychological. Values of indicators of quality of a life on all scales of questionnaire SF-36 at men were above, than at women, with preservation of the general tendency more an appreciation of a physical component of health. Military men on an appeal have estimated the quality of a life above, than military men under the contract. Essential distinctions in an estimation of quality of a life in group of military men under the contract it is not revealed.

  15. Weight Change Following US Military Service

    PubMed Central

    Littman, Alyson J.; Jacobson, Isabel G.; Boyko, Edward J.; Powell, Teresa; Smith, Tyler C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although overweight and obesity are less prevalent among active-duty military personnel compared with similar persons not serving in the military, no such differences have been observed between veterans and nonveterans. Objective To assess the magnitude of weight changes before, concurrent with, and following discharge from the military, relative to weight during service, and to determine the demographic, service-related, and psychological characteristics associated with clinically-important weight gain among those who were discharged from military service during follow-up. Methods Eligible Millennium Cohort Study participants (n=38,686) completed questionnaires approximately every three years (2001, 2004, and 2007) that were used to estimate annual weight changes, as well as the percentage experiencing clinically-important weight gain, defined as ≥10%. Analyses were stratified by sex. Results Weight gain was greatest around the time of discharge from service and in the 3 years prior to discharge (1.0–1.3 kg/year), while it was nearly half as much during service (0.6–0.7 kg/year) and three or more years after service ended (0.7 kg/year). Consequently, 6-year weight gain was over 2 kg greater in those who were discharged compared to those who remained in the military during follow-up (5.7 vs. 3.5 kg in men; 6.3 vs. 4.0 kg in women). In those who were discharged, younger age, less education, being overweight at baseline, being in the active duty component (vs. Reserve/National Guard), and having experienced deployment with combat exposures (vs. non-deployment) were associated with increased risks of clinically-important weight gain. Conclusions This study provides the first prospectively-collected evidence for an increased rate of weight gain around the time of military discharge that may explain previously reported higher rates of obesity in veterans, and identifies characteristics of higher risk groups. Discharge from military service presents a

  16. Weight change following US military service.

    PubMed

    Littman, A J; Jacobson, I G; Boyko, E J; Powell, T M; Smith, T C

    2013-02-01

    Although overweight and obesity are less prevalent among active-duty military personnel compared with similar persons not serving in the military, no such differences have been observed between veterans and non-veterans. To assess the magnitude of weight changes before, concurrent with and following discharge from the military, relative to weight during service, and to determine the demographic, service-related and psychological characteristics associated with clinically important weight gain among those who were discharged from military service during follow-up. Eligible Millennium Cohort Study participants (n=38 686) completed the questionnaires approximately every 3 years (2001, 2004 and 2007) that were used to estimate annual weight changes, as well as the percentage experiencing clinically important weight gain, defined as 10%. Analyses were stratified by sex. Weight gain was greatest around the time of discharge from service and in the 3 years before discharge (1.0-1.3 kg per year), while it was nearly half as much during service (0.6-0.7 kg per year) and 3 years after service ended (0.7 kg per year). Consequently, 6-year weight gain was over 2 kg greater in those who were discharged compared with those who remained in the military during follow-up (5.7 vs 3.5 kg in men; 6.3 vs 4.0 kg in women). In those who were discharged, younger age, less education, being overweight at baseline, being in the active-duty component (vs Reserve/National Guard) and having experienced deployment with combat exposures (vs non-deployment) were associated with increased risks of clinically important weight gain. This study provides the first prospectively collected evidence for an increased rate of weight gain around the time of military discharge that may explain previously reported higher rates of obesity in veterans, and identifies characteristics of higher-risk groups. Discharge from military service presents a window of risk and opportunity to prevent

  17. Homosexuality and the military.

    PubMed

    Jones, F D; Koshes, R J

    1995-01-01

    Homosexuality has remained a focus of military concern despite society's increasing acceptance of homosexual men and women and evidence that homosexuals have served and currently serve in the U.S. armed forces. President Clinton has stated a determination to end discrimination against homosexuals in the military and reverse the exclusionary policy on homosexuals serving in the armed forces. The authors review the history of the policy of the U.S. military to exclude homosexuals from serving in the armed forces. The data for this study were drawn from military archives and court cases that have shaped U.S. policy excluding homosexuals from serving in the armed forces. The three main arguments are addressed: 1) homosexuality is a mental disorder rendering a person unstable, 2) homosexual service members are a source of poor morale for military units, and 3) homosexual service members are poor security risks. Considerable evidence demonstrates that homosexuals in the military pose no documented threat to national security and show no evidence of poor work performance. Although issues of morale and fraternization in the military remain challenges, no evidence in this review supports the exclusion of homosexuals from service in the U.S. armed forces.

  18. Military Careers: A Guide to Military Occupations and Selected Military Career Paths, 1992-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense, Washington, DC.

    This book was developed to help educators and youth learn about career opportunities in the military. It is a compendium of military occupational, training, and career information and is designed for use by students interested in the military. The first section, military occupations, contains descriptions of 197 enlisted and officer occupations.…

  19. Professional Military Reading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    of the assurance that they will also serve as anchors during the rehabilitation period after release; psychological trauma has been experienced by...receiving a minor injury, his red badge of courage. Stephen Crane, never a soldier himself, writes perceptively of the psychological trauma of war and its...battlefield, but here is rentioned Its value ’n combatting the psychological hazards of the conflict. How do you develop mental and psychological toughness in

  20. Sport Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krotee, March L.

    1980-01-01

    Sport psychology is defined in terms of human behavior in athletic situations. The psychosocial cross-cultural setting provides a model for studying trait and state psychosocial attributes and suggests issues and concerns for further study. (JMF)

  1. [Psychological harassment].

    PubMed

    Puech, Paloma; Pitcho, Benjamin

    2013-04-01

    Two types of harassment are distinguished: sexual and psychological. In the private sector, according to French labour laws and the penal code, psychological harassment is actionable. It is up to the employer to prove the absence of harassment. The sanctions incurred can be up to 5 years imprisonment and a 150,000 euro fine and various measures of compensation for damages can be envisaged.

  2. Whither Psychology.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Diane F

    2017-07-01

    Contemporary psychology is experiencing tremendous growth in neuroscience, and there is every indication that it will continue to gain in popularity notwithstanding the scarcity of academic positions for newly minted Ph.Ds. Despite the general perception that brain correlates "explain" or "cause" the mind and behavior, these correlates have not yet proven useful in understanding psychological processes, although they offer the possibility of early identification of some disorders. Other recent developments in psychology include increased emphasis on applications and more global representation among researchers and participants. In thinking about the way we want psychology to evolve, psychologists need to pay more than lip service to the idea that complex questions in psychology require multiple levels of analysis with contributions from biological (brain, hormones, and genetics), individual differences and social and cultural perspectives. Early career psychologists who can attain a breadth of knowledge will be well-positioned for a team approach to psychological inquiry. Finally, I offer the belief that an emphasis on enhancing critical thinking skills at all levels of education offers the best hope for the future.

  3. Music in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Amanda

    1981-01-01

    Following a very brief history of military bands, the author describes the musical performance opportunities currently available in the United States Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard, for young musicians who may wish to enlist. (SJL)

  4. Music in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Amanda

    1981-01-01

    Following a very brief history of military bands, the author describes the musical performance opportunities currently available in the United States Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard, for young musicians who may wish to enlist. (SJL)

  5. Military usage of connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schade, R.

    1972-01-01

    Military specifications with general purpose parameters and termination data covering flat connectors and flat cables are proposed. The material, design, coating, and insulation are discussed, and drafts of specifications for flat cables including quality assurance provisions, and inspection are presented.

  6. Prior Military Service, Identity Stigma, and Mental Health Among Transgender Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Hoy-Ellis, Charles P; Shiu, Chengshi; Sullivan, Kathleen M; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Sturges, Allison M; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen I

    2017-02-01

    Converging evidence from large community-based samples, Internet studies, and Veterans Health Administration data suggest that transgender adults have high rates of U.S. military service. However, little is known about the role of prior military service in their mental health later in life, particularly in relation to identity stigma. In this article, we examine relationships between prior military service, identity stigma, and mental health among transgender older adults. We used a subsample of transgender older adults (n = 183) from the 2014 survey of Aging with Pride: National Health, Aging, and Sexuality/Gender Study (NHAS). We employed weighted multivariate linear models to evaluate the relationships between psychological health-related quality of life (HRQOL), depressive symptomatology (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale [CES-D] scores), identity stigma, and prior military service, controlling for background characteristics. Identity stigma was significantly related with higher depressive symptomatology and lower psychological HRQOL. Having a history of prior military service significantly predicted lower depressive symptomatology and higher psychological HRQOL. The relationships between psychological HRQOL, identity stigma, and prior military service were largely explained by depressive symptomatology. Prior military service significantly attenuated the relationship between identity stigma and depressive symptomatology. By identifying the role of military service in the mental health of transgender older adults, this study provides insights into how prior military service may contribute to resilience and positive mental health outcomes. Directions for future research are discussed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Change in the Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A survey was made of much of the current literature on the behavioral aspects of organizational change and how it pertains to the military. The survey is broad in nature and extends to processes for affecting change presently in use in the armed services. The study further describes some of the various opinions expressed in current articles on the affect of societal changes on the military.

  8. USSR Report, Military Affairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-04

    area. Convinced of its tec ity, the USA still hopesXto achieve the unachievable—to gain ty over the Soviet Union and to militarize outer space... militarism was a victory for progress over reaction. It demonstrated the invincible strength of the socialist system and its great advantages over...The scientific-technical progress in military affairs, progress that has been stimulated by the military-industrial complex, a union of militarism and

  9. Evaluating Military Compensation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    has also compared the out-of-pocket health costs of families who use its preferred-provider organization ( PPO ) or fee-for-service options with those...comparison controlled for demographic differ- ences between military and civilian families. EVALUATING MILITARY COMPENSATION 17using PPO plans. In 2005...governments would have to absorb the difference. A PP E N D IX A Total Compensation for the Median Enlisted MemberUsing a different approach from

  10. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    o Suicide Bereavement in Military and their Families, Dr. Julie Cerel, University of Kentucky, (Appendix 4) o Window to Hope: Evaluating a...Managing Suicide Risk in Primary Care . Presented at Community Based Outpatient Clinic, Appleton, WI, October 11, 2011. Gutierrez, P. M., Suicide...Appendix Pages: 32-34 A4. Suicide Bereavement in Military and their Families, Dr. Julie Cerel, University of Kentucky Appendix Pages: 35

  11. Military Energy Alternatives Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-08

    Power Generation and Alternative Energy Branch US Army RDECOM CERDEC CP&ID Power Division Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD...RDER-CCA-PG PG A E - C R – 1 2– 0 1 M ili ta ry E ne rg y A lte rn at iv es C on fe re nc e Military Energy ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Energy Alternatives Conference 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jonathan

  12. Movies and the Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-01-01

    motion picture history- movies (with two exceptions discussed below) were not made about the war. Anti-war films , and films with...of this aberration. Motion pictures are made to make money, and producers of films about the military make movies which reflect the anti-military...screen. Much of our culture is defined and transmitted by movies .2 The images implanted in the mind by motion pictures are vivid and lasting.

  13. Military Air Cargo Containerization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    MILITARY AIR CARGO CONTAINERIZATION GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER Joseph W. Mancy, Major, USAF AFIT/ GMO /LAL/96J-4 : ."•" ’* ■- ’ DEPARTMENT OF...Approved to public release; Distribution UnHmlted ? DTIC QUALITY INSPECTED 1 AFIT/ GMO /LAL/96J-4 MILITARY AIR CARGO CONTAINERIZATION GRADUATE RESEARCH...PAPER Joseph W. Mancy, Major, USAF AFIT/ GMO /LAL/96J-4 19960617 134 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited The views expressed in this

  14. Military Production Urgencies System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1955-08-17

    echelons. I4. To guide preparation of specific urgency lists for the time -phased demands of supporting industrial resources. 5. To indicate the...AD-A270 736 ELECTE aeprlnt Incorporating Transmittal 61-2 Au-uast 17, 1955 Department of Defense Directive SUBJECT Military Production Urgencies ...Departaent of Defense Military Production Urgencies System which will provide authoritative information for guidance as to the relative urgency of desired

  15. Military Personnel Law Deskbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    February 2006). B. Purpose of the Physical Disability Evaluation System (PDES). 1. Personnel Management. a. Effective and Fit Military b. Quality ...discipline, or morale of troops on the base under his command.”). 3. Limitations. There must be some nexus between the authority sought and the effect on...preparing group for and steeling it to violent action). A-7 (2) Military Standard: Speech which undermines the effectiveness of response to command

  16. Radiometry in military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Krzysztof

    2001-08-01

    Missiles guided using optoelectronic methods, optoelectronic imaging systems (thermal imaging systems, night vision devices, LLLTV cameras, TV cameras), and optoelectronic countermeasures (smoke screens, camouflage paints and nets, IR flares, decoys, jamming systems, warning systems) are one of the most important components of modern military armament. There are numerous military standards, some of them secret, that precise radiometric parameters to be measured and the testing methods to be used. There is also much literature on the subject of testing of the systems mentioned above, although mostly on subject of testing of the thermal imaging systems. In spite of this apparently numerous literature, there still significant confusion in this area due to secrecy of some parameters and testing methods, differences in recommendations of different military standards, fast progress in military optoelectronics, and also due to enormous number of different types of optoelectronics systems used in the military armament. A review of testing methods of the three basic groups of optoelectronics systems used in modern military armament: the missiles guided using optoelectronics methods, the optoelectronic imaging systems, and the optoelectronic countermeasures is presented in this paper. Trends in the measuring sets.

  17. Stability Operations and Government: An Inherently Military Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-25

    Maslow , “A Theory of Human Motivation,” Psychological Review 50 ( 1943 ): 370-96. 31 Bailey, 7-8. 32 Maslow , 370-96. 33 I. William Zartman, ed...Education in The Philippines, member of the AEF Staff in 1919 Siberia, and President of the University of California, told the 1943 School of Military...Endnotes 1 Richard Van Wagenen, “The Richard W. Van Wagenen Papers,” Course Materials from the 1943 class at the School of Military Government

  18. The well-being of children from military families.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, Teena M; McGuinness, John P

    2014-04-01

    Since 2001, the rapid pace of deployments of military personnel who are parents has created additional concern for the emotional and behavioral health of their children. Repeated deployments create prolonged periods of uncertainty and an increased sense of danger on the part of children and at-home spouses. Children of all ages have higher rates of anxiety and depressive symptoms. Academic problems for children of deployed parents also occur more frequently. The psychological stress of both at-home and deployed parents is associated with the child's level of emotional distress. Awareness of the possibility of greater challenges facing military families today is warranted to identify distress and referral to treatment.

  19. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE VOLUNTEER FOR PSYCHOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS, ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY ), (*ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY , PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS), PERSONALITY , MOTIVATION, ATTITUDES( PSYCHOLOGY ), NEUROSES, FEAR, ANXIETY, BEHAVIOR, SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY , GROUP DYNAMICS

  20. 'Post-deployment appraisal' and the relationship with stress and psychological health in Australian veterans.

    PubMed

    Wright, Breanna; Forbes, Andrew; Kelsall, Helen; Clarke, David; Ikin, Jill; Sim, Malcolm

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how veterans appraise their post-deployment experiences could provide insight into better assisting their deployment transitions. We aimed to assess the factor structure of positive and negative post-deployment appraisals in Australian veterans and to examine the resultant factors in their relationship with military stress and psychological health. Questions capturing post-deployment attitudes were developed by the researchers in collaboration with veterans. The questions were administered to 1938 veterans and the results factor analysed. The relationships between post-deployment appraisal, military stress and psychological health were examined using Structural Equation Modelling. A three-factor solution was found for the post-deployment appraisal questions; representing personal development, lack of recognition, and appreciation of life and country. Military stress was associated with the three factors and psychological health. The three factors were weakly to moderately associated with psychological health. Mediation between military stress and psychological health by any post-deployment appraisal factor was minimal. Post-deployment appraisal measures three important attitudes and concerns of veterans after deployment. Military stress is associated with the post-deployment appraisal factors. However, the factors did not mediate the relationship between military stress and psychological health. These factors provide insight into how veterans appraise their complex array of post-deployment experiences, and may provide useful in regard to transitions and integration into civilian life.

  1. Psychological maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Hibbard, Roberta; Barlow, Jane; Macmillan, Harriet

    2012-08-01

    Psychological or emotional maltreatment of children may be the most challenging and prevalent form of child abuse and neglect. Caregiver behaviors include acts of omission (ignoring need for social interactions) or commission (spurning, terrorizing); may be verbal or nonverbal, active or passive, and with or without intent to harm; and negatively affect the child's cognitive, social, emotional, and/or physical development. Psychological maltreatment has been linked with disorders of attachment, developmental and educational problems, socialization problems, disruptive behavior, and later psychopathology. Although no evidence-based interventions that can prevent psychological maltreatment have been identified to date, it is possible that interventions shown to be effective in reducing overall types of child maltreatment, such as the Nurse Family Partnership, may have a role to play. Furthermore, prevention before occurrence will require both the use of universal interventions aimed at promoting the type of parenting that is now recognized to be necessary for optimal child development, alongside the use of targeted interventions directed at improving parental sensitivity to a child's cues during infancy and later parent-child interactions. Intervention should, first and foremost, focus on a thorough assessment and ensuring the child's safety. Potentially effective treatments include cognitive behavioral parenting programs and other psychotherapeutic interventions. The high prevalence of psychological abuse in advanced Western societies, along with the serious consequences, point to the importance of effective management. Pediatricians should be alert to the occurrence of psychological maltreatment and identify ways to support families who have risk indicators for, or evidence of, this problem.

  2. Political psychology.

    PubMed

    Stone, Susanna; Johnson, Kate M; Beall, Erica; Meindl, Peter; Smith, Benjamin; Graham, Jesse

    2014-07-01

    Political psychology is a dynamic field of research that offers a unique blend of approaches and methods in the social and cognitive sciences. Political psychologists explore the interactions between macrolevel political structures and microlevel factors such as decision-making processes, motivations, and perceptions. In this article, we provide a broad overview of the field, beginning with a brief history of political psychology research and a summary of the primary methodological approaches in the field. We then give a more detailed account of research on ideology and social justice, two topics experiencing a resurgence of interest in current political psychology. Finally, we cover research on political persuasion and voting behavior. By summarizing these major areas of political psychology research, we hope to highlight the wide variety of theoretical and methodological approaches of cognitive scientists working at the intersection of psychology and political science. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:373-385. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1293 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Military Gay Ban Revisited: Is our Military Ready for Change?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-20

    Military gay ban revisited: Is our military ready for change? Captain LS...2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military gay ban revisited: Is our military ready for change? 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Transgender ] (LGBT) rights is exploited by those seeking to divide us. But at its core, this issue is about who we are as

  4. Psychological Resilience: Preparing our Soldiers for War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-23

    provides a historical example of how this affect was achieved. The process of becoming a Spartan began at birth where the newborns were screened and...Mental Health Screening The United States military began psychological screening in the early 20th century. During World War I, the Army Alpha and...institutional review board approved a study to assess the effectiveness of a systematic method of pre-deployment mental health screening to determine whether

  5. Psychological Operations: Fighting the War of Ideas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-18

    trust and respect of a populace, especially a hostile or at best neutral populace your facts must be timely, accurate, and consistent. Robert A. Cialdini ...Perspective on Information Operations, Military Review, 2005, p. 3. 18. Cialdini , Robert B., Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion, Quill William Morrow...21 May 05, Ft Bragg, NC. 29. Kurtz, Howard, "Newsweek Retracts Guantanamo Story", Washingpost, 17May 2005, p. A03. 30. Cialdini , Robert B

  6. LEARNING THEORY AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY , *ADJUSTMENT( PSYCHOLOGY ), LEARNING, LEARNING, BEHAVIOR, PERSONALITY , ANXIETY, ATTITUDES( PSYCHOLOGY ), NEUROSES, MENTAL DISORDERS...PERCEPTION( PSYCHOLOGY ), VERBAL BEHAVIOR, SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY , DIAGNOSIS(MEDICINE), THERAPY.

  7. Developing Effective Military Leaders: Facilitating the Acquisition of Experience-Based Tacit Knowledge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    is critical that an individual recognize the environmental conditions indicating particular actions to take in a given situation, the individual must...colleagues (see Sternberg et al., 2000 for a summary) indicate that results of assessments of tacit knowledge are related to the performance of military...through personnel development and vision-which occurs as military leaders are promoted (Donnithorne, 1993). They also may indicate the psychological

  8. Black Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Reginald L., Ed.

    The contents of the present volume, designed to bring together in a single place writings by the new black psychologists and other black social and behavioral scientists, are organized in seven parts, as follows: Part I, "Black Psychology: Perspectives," includes articles by Cedric Clark, Wade W. Nobles, Doris P. Mosby, Joseph White, and William…

  9. Adult Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bischof, Ledford J.

    This volume comprehensively reviews the research on the psychology of the middle aged (ages 40-65). Topics include the concept of maturity and maturation models, the measurement and influences of adult self image; marriage and sexual patterns; intergenerational relationships between and children; vocations and avocations (work, retirement, play,…

  10. Psychology Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGraw, Ken; Tew, Mark D.; Williams, John E.

    2001-01-01

    A goal of the PsychExperiments project was to reduce the financial burden on psychology departments for hardware/software used in their laboratories. In its third year, the PsychExperiments site now hosts 39 experiments. Over 200 classrooms worldwide have signed up as official site users and there have been nearly 10,000 data sessions conducted.…

  11. Space psychology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parin, V. V.; Gorbov, F. D.; Kosmolinskiy, F. P.

    1974-01-01

    Psychological selection of astronauts considers mental responses and adaptation to the following space flight stress factors: (1) confinement in a small space; (2) changes in three dimensional orientation; (3) effects of altered gravity and weightlessness; (4) decrease in afferent nerve pulses; (5) a sensation of novelty and danger; and (6) a sense of separation from earth.

  12. Psychology Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderssen, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    Describes the design of the University of Texas Austin's Seay Psychology and Child Development & Family Relationships building. With modern technique and materials, the Seay building adds to the established architectural language of the campus, offering a richly tactile structure and adjoining outdoor space embracing the tenets of successful…

  13. Adult Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bischof, Ledford J.

    This volume comprehensively reviews the research on the psychology of the middle aged (ages 40-65). Topics include the concept of maturity and maturation models, the measurement and influences of adult self image; marriage and sexual patterns; intergenerational relationships between and children; vocations and avocations (work, retirement, play,…

  14. Black Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Reginald L., Ed.

    The contents of the present volume, designed to bring together in a single place writings by the new black psychologists and other black social and behavioral scientists, are organized in seven parts, as follows: Part I, "Black Psychology: Perspectives," includes articles by Cedric Clark, Wade W. Nobles, Doris P. Mosby, Joseph White, and William…

  15. Instructional Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Robert; Resnick, Lauren B.

    1972-01-01

    The authors identify areas, issues and problems which are emerging as a result of the contact between scientific endeavors and technological developments in education. Through their review of the literature, a characterization and momentary definition of the field of instructional psychology are provided. Their reporting of the literature is often…

  16. Psychology Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGraw, Ken; Tew, Mark D.; Williams, John E.

    2001-01-01

    A goal of the PsychExperiments project was to reduce the financial burden on psychology departments for hardware/software used in their laboratories. In its third year, the PsychExperiments site now hosts 39 experiments. Over 200 classrooms worldwide have signed up as official site users and there have been nearly 10,000 data sessions conducted.…

  17. Space psychology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parin, V. V.; Gorbov, F. D.; Kosmolinskiy, F. P.

    1974-01-01

    Psychological selection of astronauts considers mental responses and adaptation to the following space flight stress factors: (1) confinement in a small space; (2) changes in three dimensional orientation; (3) effects of altered gravity and weightlessness; (4) decrease in afferent nerve pulses; (5) a sensation of novelty and danger; and (6) a sense of separation from earth.

  18. Psychological Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawes, Robyn M.

    1994-01-01

    L. L. Thurstone's revolutionary article resulted in the development of many representational measurement models, but the introduction of "true measurement" in social, attitudinal, and personality psychology did not yield the progress Thurstone envisioned. This specific model is seldom used in these areas today. (SLD)

  19. Psychology Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderssen, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    Describes the design of the University of Texas Austin's Seay Psychology and Child Development & Family Relationships building. With modern technique and materials, the Seay building adds to the established architectural language of the campus, offering a richly tactile structure and adjoining outdoor space embracing the tenets of successful…

  20. Military Affective Picture System (MAPS): A new emotion-based stimuli set for assessing emotional processing in military populations.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Adam M; Katz, Jeffrey S; Dretsch, Michael N

    2016-03-01

    Emotionally relevant pictorial stimuli utilized in studies to characterize both normal and pathological emotional responses do not include military scenarios. Failures to replicate consistent findings for military populations have led to speculation that these image sets do not capture personally relevant experiences. The Military Affective Picture System (MAPS) was developed consisting of 240 images depicting scenes common among military populations. A Self-Assessment Manikin was administered to a 1) U.S. Army soldiers and a 2) non-military population. Findings revealed gender differences in valence and dominance dimensions, but not arousal, for both samples. Valence scores were higher for the military. Arousal ratings decrease as a product of combat exposure. Civilian females demonstrated stronger correlations of valence and arousal when viewing positive or negative images. Given the limited power achieved in the current studies' gender comparisons; it would be difficult to draw major conclusions regarding the interaction of combat exposure or military status with gender for each of the categories. Without having included the IAPS ratings for comparison it is difficult to conclude whether effects only pertain to viewing MAPS images, or if there was unintentional selection bias. Additional ratings would provide better assessments for these effects in both males and females. The MAPS has potential as a screening instrument and clinical evaluation tool for assessing treatment outcomes for individuals with combat-related psychopathology. The MAPS is freely available for research to non-profit groups upon request at http://www.cla.auburn.edu/psychology/military-affective-picture-system/. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. LOYALTY AND THE MILITARY PROFESSION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-06

    service member possesses, the author asserts that loyalty is the cornerstone for successful service. Military loyalty extends beyond commitment and...analysis of the common trends displays the role military loyalty plays in the profession of arms as key to successful military operations in peace...not be successful . The oath of office inspires or demands service members’ loyalty while the military leaders must ensure it is given. Therefore, a

  2. Aerospace and military

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, J.A.; Esch, K

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews military and aerospace developments of 1989. The Voyager spacecraft returned astounding imagery from Neptune, sophisticated sensors were launched to explore Venus and Jupiter, and another craft went into earth orbit to explore cosmic rays, while a huge telescope is to be launched early in 1990. The U.S. space shuttle redesign was completed and access to space has become no longer purely a governmental enterprise. In the military realm, events within the Soviet bloc, such as the Berlin Wall's destruction, have popularized arms control. Several big treaties could be signed within the year. Massive troop, equipment, and budget reductions are being considered, along with a halt or delay of major new weapons systems. For new missions, the U.S. military is retreating to its role of a century ago - patrolling the nation's borders, this time against narcotics traffickers.

  3. Complementary and alternative medicine among veterans and military personnel: a synthesis of population surveys.

    PubMed

    Davis, Margot T; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Larson, Mary Jo; Hoover, Ronald; Mauch, Danna

    2014-12-01

    Recent reports reinforce the widespread interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), not only among military personnel with combat-related disorders, but also among providers who are pressed to respond to patient demand for these therapies. However, an understanding of utilization of CAM therapies in this population is lacking. The goals of this study are to synthesize the content of self-report population surveys with information on use of CAM in military and veteran populations, assess gaps in knowledge, and suggest ways to address current limitations. The research team conducted a literature review of population surveys to identify CAM definitions, whether military status was queried, the medical and psychological conditions queried, and each specific CAM question. Utilization estimates specific to military/veterans were summarized and limitations to knowledge was classified. Seven surveys of CAM utilization were conducted with military/veteran groups. In addition, 7 household surveys queried military status, although there was no military/veteran subgroup analysis. Definition of CAM varied widely limiting cross-survey analysis. Among active duty and Reserve military, CAM use ranged between 37% and 46%. Survey estimates do not specify CAM use that is associated with a medical or behavioral health condition. Comparisons between surveys are hampered due to variation in methodologies. Too little is known about reasons for using CAM and conditions for which it is used. Additional information could be drawn from current surveys with additional subgroup analysis, and future surveys of CAM should include military status variable.

  4. Technical Education in the Military

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Charles O.

    1974-01-01

    Cooperation between military and civilian technical training institutions has included evaluation and accreditation of five military training schools by a civilian evaluation team, which was impressed by the level, completeness and quality of the instruction. Additional cooperation and improved communications between military and civilian training…

  5. Academic and Military Instructional Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Robert K.

    This paper examines the practices and accomplishments of the military in the area of instructional technology. An examination of historical background is used to increase the precision of the definition of instructional technology. Specific contributions of the military are described and then uses of instructional technology in the military and…

  6. Committee on Military Nutrition Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-99-1-9478 TITLE: COMMITTEE ON MILITARY NUTRITION ...COVERED (From - To) 01 Jun 99 – 31 Dec 06 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE COMMITTEE ON MILITARY NUTRITION RESEARCH 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...report presents the activities of the National Academy of Sciences/Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Military Nutrition Research (CMNR) for the

  7. Measuring Underemployment Among Military Spouses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    widespread underemployment among military wives, this underemployment does not necessarily translate into dissatisfaction with the military...households (DMDC, 2004). Thus, a per- sistent lack of employment opportunity affects a spouse’s quality of life, and perennial dissatisfaction with...its own right, since wives’ dissatisfaction may translate into higher service member attrition from military service. The primary outcome of interest

  8. Fraternization - A Military Offense?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    34While Jiaf-ing of an appropriate regulation might be diffcult, %e recommend it to the responsible military services" (8:1.60). :iteen years later in...rank or positions for personal gain, and are prejudicial to good order and discipline, action must be taken against those involved. "The basic role and...vital, and responsive military oiqa[)_Jiza-1cn5: addition, the Air Force encourages open members*,:_ arc --_ _cpation in base *recreat ional1 ac t ivi t

  9. The invisible wounds of war: caring for women veterans who have experienced military sexual trauma.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, Alicia Gill; Smith, Sharlene

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this case study is to raise awareness about military sexual trauma (MST) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and the physical and psychological comorbidities associated with MST. Health Science Data Sources-PubMed and authors' experiences. Women veterans are the fastest growing segment of the veteran population. Approximately 200,000 of the 2.6 million veterans who have deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation New Dawn (OEF/OIF/OND) are women. Many are seeking care in both the Veteran Administration and the civilian sector. It is estimated that upwards of 26,000 women have experienced some form of sexual assault in the military. MST can lead to multiple deleterious physical and psychological comorbidities. It is imperative that nurse practitioners (NPs) ask women about military service and utilize the Military Health History Pocket Card for Clinicians to ascertain service-connected health risks, primarily MST and PTSD. Prompt identification and intervention is key to reducing physical and psychological comorbidities. This case study emphasizes the need for NPs to ask all women about military service and potential exposure to sexual trauma. It provides guidance on how to incorporate the Military Health History Pocket Card for Clinicians into practice. ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  10. Battlefield ethics training: integrating ethical scenarios in high-intensity military field exercises

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Megan M.; Jetly, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that modern missions have added stresses and ethical complexities not seen in previous military operations and that there are links between battlefield stressors and ethical lapses. Military ethicists have concluded that the ethical challenges of modern missions are not well addressed by current military ethics educational programs. Integrating the extant research in the area, we propose that scenario-based operational ethics training in high-intensity military field training settings may be an important adjunct to traditional military ethics education and training. We make the case as to why this approach will enhance ethical operational preparation for soldiers, supporting their psychological well-being as well as mission effectiveness. PMID:25206947

  11. [Reimbursement of opiate substitution drugs to militaries in 2007].

    PubMed

    d'Argouges, F; Desjeux, G; Marsan, P; Thevenin-Garron, V

    2012-09-01

    (maximum 22 years service). One hundred and fifty-nine militaries had been delivered buprenorphine, 15 had been delivered methadone and seven had been delivered both. The prevalence of opiate substitute drug consumption by the militaries (52 per 100,000) is lower than in general population. According to the criteria of the National Healthcare Insurance, this population is not affected by abuse or fraud behaviour. Doctors' shopping behaviour is unusual. Opiate substitutes are prescribed by general physicians in 88% of issues. Only one prescriber was a military physician. An analysis of reimbursement of some drugs associated with opiate substitute has been made. The sampled military consume more psychoactive drugs (anxiolytics, antidepressants, hypnotics) than the French population under opiate substitution. In our observation, the military physician is almost always excluded the process of substitution. His/her different responsibilities of care, but also in determining the working aptitude, lead to dissimulation behaviour by the militaries. The difficulty for military physicians is to identify such consumption. They have to evaluate the capacity to work through a physical and psychological examination. Copyright © 2011 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. [Prospects of IT usage in the field of military psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Kuvshinov, K E; Trishkin, D V; Goncharenko, A Yu; Shamrei, V K; Borisov, D N; Lobachev, A V

    2015-03-01

    Development of effective information support for monitoring of internal health, based on the principles of complex diagnostics, provides the necessary tools objektive evaluation and prediction of mental health in servicemen. Effectiveness of psychiatric prophylaxys technologies depends on compliance with a number of fundamental principles, the main of which should be considered as a multidimensional assessment of mental health in servicemen and real cooperation of different specialists (commanders, specialists of medical and psychological service) for its implementation. In this case, an introduction of information and communication technologies on the basis of the district (fleet) and the Central Military Hospital, as well as other bodies of military control will be almost justified only when creating a full-fledged "information field of military psychiatry" that implements the basic principles of the monitoring system of mental health and includes necessary infrastructure. The practical implementation of this system will allow to personjfyfy medical and psychological assistance to military personnel, to improve early diagnosis of mental disorders, addictive .and suicidal behaviour, and thus increase the effectiveness throughout psychiatric prophylaxis in the army.

  13. Unit cohesion, traumatic exposure and mental health of military personnel.

    PubMed

    Kanesarajah, J; Waller, M; Zheng, W Y; Dobson, A J

    2016-06-01

    The benefit of military unit cohesion to morale and psychological resilience is well established. But it remains unclear whether unit cohesion modifies the association between deployment-related traumatic exposure and mental health problems. To examine the association between unit cohesion, traumatic exposure and poor mental health [symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), psychological distress and alcohol dependency] and assess whether the relationship between traumatic exposure and poor mental health differs by level of unit cohesion. A self-reported cross-sectional survey of Australian military personnel deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan between 2001 and 2009. Among 11411 participants, those with low levels of unit cohesion had higher odds of PTSD symptoms [aOR (95% CI): 2.54 (1.88, 3.42)], very high psychological distress [aOR (95% CI): 4.28 (3.04, 6.02)] and a high level of alcohol problems [aOR (95% CI): 1.71 (1.32, 2.22)] compared with those reporting high unit cohesion on deployment. Higher exposure to traumatic events on deployment was associated with greater risk of PTSD symptoms, very high levels of psychological distress and high levels of alcohol problems in this cohort. However, there was no evidence of a statistically significant interaction between unit cohesion and traumatic exposures in influencing poor mental health. Our findings suggest that both unit cohesion and traumatic exposure are independently associated with poor mental health. Efforts to improve military unit cohesion may help to improve the mental health resilience of military personnel, regardless of their level of traumatic exposure. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Sub state Unconventional Warfare: Expanding United States Military Political Options

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-26

    consists of the interrelated fields of guerrilla warfare, evasion and escape, and subversion against hostile states (resistance). Unconventional warfare...describing what UW consists of, and how it is applied, in FM 31-21 (1969). “Unconventional warfare consists of military, political, psychological, or...philosopher, economist, and revolutionary sociologist Karl Marx.66 Marx proposed that economic evolution occurs in five sequential steps. Those steps are

  15. The Psychology of Teaching Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osaze, Jana D.

    1980-01-01

    Argues that psychology instructors should capitalize upon students' eagerness for self-disclosure and that course material should be channeled toward meeting this need. Examines the use of specific personality inventory tests measuring memory, motivation, creativity, and emotion as a link between course material and the students' personal…

  16. Psychological Strain and Emotional Labor among Police-Officers: A Diary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Gelderen, Benjamin; Heuven, Ellen; van Veldhoven, Marc; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Croon, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between psychological strain, emotional dissonance and emotional job demands during a working day of 65 Dutch (military) police officers, using a 5-day diary design. We hypothesized that emotional dissonance partly mediated the relationship between psychological strain at the start and at the end of a work…

  17. Impacts of Psychological Science on National Security Agencies Post-9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    Psychologists have been an integral part of national security agencies since World War I, when psychological science helped in personnel selection. A robust infrastructure supporting wider applications of psychology to military and intelligence problems developed further during World War II and the years following, primarily in the areas of…

  18. PSYOP and Persuasion: Applying Social Psychology and Becoming an Informed Citizen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Sara B.

    2004-01-01

    This project teaches students about persuasion techniques, especially as governments use them. Most project examples came from the work of the U.S. military's modern Psychological Operations division. Social psychology students (a) reviewed influence techniques; (b) examined posters, leaflets, and other persuasion tools used in World War II, the…

  19. Impacts of Psychological Science on National Security Agencies Post-9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    Psychologists have been an integral part of national security agencies since World War I, when psychological science helped in personnel selection. A robust infrastructure supporting wider applications of psychology to military and intelligence problems developed further during World War II and the years following, primarily in the areas of…

  20. Psychological Strain and Emotional Labor among Police-Officers: A Diary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Gelderen, Benjamin; Heuven, Ellen; van Veldhoven, Marc; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Croon, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between psychological strain, emotional dissonance and emotional job demands during a working day of 65 Dutch (military) police officers, using a 5-day diary design. We hypothesized that emotional dissonance partly mediated the relationship between psychological strain at the start and at the end of a work…

  1. PSYOP and Persuasion: Applying Social Psychology and Becoming an Informed Citizen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Sara B.

    2004-01-01

    This project teaches students about persuasion techniques, especially as governments use them. Most project examples came from the work of the U.S. military's modern Psychological Operations division. Social psychology students (a) reviewed influence techniques; (b) examined posters, leaflets, and other persuasion tools used in World War II, the…

  2. Understanding and preventing military suicide.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; Jennings, Keith W; Jobes, David A; Bradley, John C

    2012-01-01

    The continual rise in the U.S. military's suicide rate since 2004 is one of the most vexing issues currently facing military leaders, mental health professionals, and suicide experts. Despite considerable efforts to address this problem, however, suicide rates have not decreased. The authors consider possible reasons for this frustrating reality, and question common assumptions and approaches to military suicide prevention. They further argue that suicide prevention efforts that more explicitly embrace the military culture and implement evidence-based strategies across the full spectrum of prevention and treatment could improve success. Several recommendations for augmenting current efforts to prevent military suicide are proposed.

  3. Smile psychology.

    PubMed

    Cortés, M; Gaudino, D

    1994-01-01

    Facial expression, including smiling, is an important means of universal communication and an understudied area in dentistry. Currently there is limited availability of data on smile psychology in either general or cosmetic dental literature. However, the number of cosmetic dentistry patients is increasing and many require and desire physical changes that restore or enhance facial expressions, appearances, and smiles. Cosmetic dentistry patients, particularly those presenting with dental anxiety or phobia, require a more detailed physical and psychologic assessment due to their habitual avoidance of dental care and subsequent oral health deterioration. Increasing knowledge and data facilitate the development of new intervention and treatments for anxious and phobic dental patients. These new developments strengthen the dentist-patient partnership to foster optimal dental results.

  4. Cultural psychology.

    PubMed

    Heine, Steven J; Ruby, Matthew B

    2010-03-01

    Humans are a cultural species, constantly navigating a complex web of culturally bound practices, norms, and worldviews. This article provides a brief overview of the relatively young field of cultural psychology, which investigates the many ways psychology and culture interweave with one another. Highlighting the cultural nature of the human species, it draws upon research on cultural evolution, enculturation, and developmental processes. This review further summarizes a number of cultural differences in how people perceive the self, and the behavioral consequences that follow from these differences, in the domains of internal and external attribution styles, motivations for self-enhancement, approach/avoidance, primary and secondary control, as well as motivations for distinctiveness and conformity. Additionally, the review discusses research on the intersection of culture and emotion, as well as cultural differences in cognition, perception, and reasoning. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. A longitudinal pilot study of resilience in Canadian military personnel.

    PubMed

    Sudom, Kerry A; Lee, Jennifer E C; Zamorski, Mark A

    2014-12-01

    Research on psychological resilience is important for occupations involving routine exposure to trauma or critical events. Such research can allow for the identification of factors to target in training, education and intervention programs, as well as groups that may be at higher risk for mental health problems. Although efforts have been made to determine the individual characteristics that contribute to positive outcomes under stress, little is known about whether such characteristics are stable over time or how stressful events can impact psychological resilience in high-risk occupations such as military service. Following a review of the evidence on variations in resilience over time, results of a pilot study of Canadian Armed Forces personnel are presented in which differences in resilience characteristics were examined from military recruitment to several years after enrollment. While there was little change in resilience characteristics over time on average, there was considerable individual variation, with some individuals showing marked improvement and others showing marked deterioration in resilience characteristics. At both time points, individuals who had been deployed showed greater resilience characteristics than those who had never been deployed. Implications for the promotion of psychological resilience in military populations and personnel employed in other high-risk occupations are discussed.

  6. Military Forces in Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    families of military professionals withdrawn from East- em Europe are living in hostels , prefabricated barracks, or tents. In some cases, conscripts...Technological Capabilities: USSR/US Semiconductor Materials and Microelectronic C ircuils Software Producibility Parallel Computer Architectures ^ r...underground leadership bunker adjacent to Moscow State University . These fa- cilities are intended for the national command authority in wartime

  7. The Military Cooperation Group

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    stay in their respective countries and continue to face their host nation contacts daily. For host nation relations , it may be more expedient to...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited THE MILITARY...THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this

  8. Why Military History?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunting, Josiah, III

    2008-01-01

    Interest in military history is as strong as it has ever been--except on American college campuses. Lt. Gen. Josiah Bunting III examines why today's undergraduates need to study the facts of war, and why knowing its causes and consequences remain a vital part of our common knowledge.

  9. Soviet Union, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    agency of the Soviet Union. Permission for further reproduction must be obtained from copyright owner. SOVIET UNION MILITARY AFFAIRS CONTENTS...internationalists, it has always embodied the inviolable friendship of the peoples of the USSR. But are some of us not hypnotized by this principle

  10. Resilience among Military Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easterbrooks, M. Ann; Ginsburg, Kenneth; Lerner, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors present their approach to understanding resilience among military connected young people, and they discuss some of the gaps in their knowledge. They begin by defining resilience, and then present a theoretical model of how young people demonstrate resilient functioning. Next they consider some of the research on…

  11. Perceived deprivation in active duty military nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Julie A; Fallacaro, Michael D; Pellegrini, Joseph E

    2009-02-01

    There is a shortage of military Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs). Relative deprivation is a perception of unfairness due to discrepancies between what one has and what one could or should have that is dependent on feelings (subjective data) and facts (objective data). Feelings of relative deprivation could contribute to the military CRNA shortage. The purposes of this study were to measure relative deprivation in active-duty military CRNAs and explore variables that correlate with relative deprivation. The descriptive, correlational study was conducted using a self-administered survey sent to 435 active-duty Army, Navy, and Air Force CRNAs. Surveys were distributed to subjects by mail and could be answered by mail or by secured website. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Analysis of the data revealed a calculated response rate of 57.7%. There was no significant correlation (P < .05) between years as a CRNA, military pay, promotion opportunity, or scope of practice/autonomy and relative deprivation. Correlations of the psychological factors "wanting" and "deserving" with relative deprivation were significant (P < .001). Further research is indicated to identify definitive factors that can be modified to improve feelings of deprivation as they relate to retention and recruitment of military CRNAs.

  12. The United States Special Operations Command Civil Military Engagement Program - A Model for Military-Interagency Low Cost / Small Footprint Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-02

    Aptitude Test (DLAB, the Wonderlic Personnel Intelligence Test (WPIT), the Minnesota Multifacet Personality Inventory ( MMPI ), psychological... test and validate civil military engagement concept to bridge interagency gaps and assess partner nation capacity in the areas of governance, economic...events are continual graded events to pre-determined standards in order to tax mental acuteness. Administrative tests such as the Defense Language

  13. Sexual functioning in military personnel: preliminary estimates and predictors.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Sherrie L; Redmond, Sarah; Hassan, Anthony M

    2014-10-01

    Although the military is a young and vigorous force, service members and veterans may experience sexual functioning problems (SFPs) as a result of military service. Sexual functioning can be impaired by physical, psychological, and social factors and can impact quality of life (QOL) and happiness. This study aims to estimate rates and correlates of SFPs in male military personnel across demographic and psychosocial characteristics, to examine the QOL concomitants, and to evaluate barriers for treatment seeking. This exploratory cross-sectional study was conducted using data from a larger nationwide study conducted between October 2013 and November 2013. This sample consists of 367 male active duty service members and recent veterans (military personnel) age 40 or younger. Erectile dysfunction (ED) was determined using the five-item International Index of Erectile Function, sexual dysfunction (SD) was determined using the Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale, Male, and QOL was determined using the World Health Organization Quality of Life, Brief. SFPs were associated with various demographic, physical, and psychosocial risk factors. The rates of SD and ED were 8.45% and 33.24%, respectively, for male military personnel aged 21-40. Those who were 36-40, nonmarried, nonwhite, and of lower educational attainment reported the highest rates of SFPs. Male military personnel with poor physical and psychosocial health presented the greatest risk for ED and SD. SFPs were associated with reduced QOL and lower happiness, and barriers for treatment were generally related to social barriers. SFPs in young male military personnel are an important public health concern that can severely impact QOL and happiness. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  14. Psychology Faculty Perceptions of Abnormal Psychology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapport, Zachary

    2011-01-01

    The problem. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the perceptions and opinions of psychology professors regarding the accuracy and inclusiveness of abnormal psychology textbooks. It sought answers from psychology professors to the following questions: (1) What are the expectations of the psychology faculty at a private university of…

  15. Psychology Faculty Perceptions of Abnormal Psychology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapport, Zachary

    2011-01-01

    The problem. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the perceptions and opinions of psychology professors regarding the accuracy and inclusiveness of abnormal psychology textbooks. It sought answers from psychology professors to the following questions: (1) What are the expectations of the psychology faculty at a private university of…

  16. Politico-Military Relations, a Basis for Military Interaction between Argentina and the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-15

    POLITICO -MILITARY RELATIONS, A BASIS FOR MILITARY INTERACTION BETWEEN ARGENTINA AND THE UNITED STATES N IN w Fn STRATEGY AND CAMPAIGN DEPARTMENT...FUNDING NUMBERS PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO 11 TITLE (Include Security Classificationi Politico -Military Relations, A...America. Politico -Military relations. civil-military relations, military coups. military to military relations. South American democracy -con- 𔄃

  17. "I Serve 2": Meeting the needs of military children in civilian practice.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, Alicia Gill; Dumas, Mary Anne; Wilmoth, Margaret C; Patrician, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    The American Academy of Nursing launched the "Have You Ever Served in the Military?" campaign in 2013 in conjunction with the Joining Forces campaign spearheaded by First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden. The "Have You Ever Served in the Military?" campaign provides guidance and resources for nurses outside the Military Health System and Veterans Health Administration where upwards of 80% of veterans receive care. However, most military personnel do not serve alone. More than half of the 2.2 million active duty, National Guard, and Reserve service members currently serving in the armed forces have families and many military children experience stress and anxiety secondary to parental military service. Although strides have been made to improve identification and treatment of the visible and invisible wounds of war for service members, little to no information exists regarding the impact parental service has on the physical, psychological, and behavioral health of military children. In addition, there is no mechanism in place to identify military children in civilian practice nor resources providing evidence-based best practices when caring for these children.

  18. Hybrid Warfare: A Military Revolution or Revolution in Military Affairs?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-14

    4MacGregor Knox and Williamson Murray, eds., The Dynamics of Military Revolution 1300-2050 (Cambridge: Cambridge... Dynamics of Military Revolution 1300-2050.12 A case study helps compare the extrapolation of the analysis and synthesis of their writings on MR to...affairs as defined by Knox and Murray in their book The Dynamics of Military Revolution, 1300-2050. 37 Professors Knox and Murray, provide a conceptual

  19. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    Society of Implementation Research Collaboration. • Chris Patrick and Rick Wagner were named 2015 Fellows of the Association for Psychological Science as...Jobes, D., Pflanz, S., Jacoby, A., Ghahramanlou-Holloway, M., Campise, R., Joiner, T., Wagner , B., & Johnson, L. (2008). An investigation of...Gender specific gene-environment interactions on laboratory assessed aggression. Biological Psychology, 71, 33-41. 38. Wagner , K., Martinez, M

  20. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  1. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  2. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  3. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military pilot...

  4. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military pilot...

  5. PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT AND PREDICTION. PART II. MULTIDIMENSIONALITY AND PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PSYCHOLOGY , MEASUREMENT, PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS, FACTOR ANALYSIS, BEHAVIOR, REACTION( PSYCHOLOGY ), PERCEPTION( PSYCHOLOGY ), PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY, PERSONALITY , STATISTICAL ANALYSIS, MATRICES(MATHEMATICS), EQUATIONS, CORRELATION TECHNIQUES.

  6. Military Science and Academies,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-06

    the Higher Education Institutions" note that the higher school, which has a highly qualified-staff of scientific workers at its disposal, is not taking...deemed it necessary to significantly raise the role of higher education establish- ments in the solution of the most important scientific problems. This...requirement is totally applicable also to the higher military education institutions, it obliges the professorial teaching staffs to re-examine their

  7. Soviet Military Power 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    deployed in both a fixed and mobile ver- Kremlin should cease its massive military aid rrograms. sion. the mobile SS-25, and the new version of the...Libya. Angola, Vict- ability of mobile systems, coupled with greater yield and nam, Syria, and especially Cuba, which is only 90 miles accuracy of the...of severe repression in Poland, Moscow also deployed SS-20 intermediate-range mobile nuclear missiles that These apparent contradictions in Soviet

  8. Soviet Military Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    continuously deployed it frequently in their military journals. to South Yemen and periodically deployed to Mine warfare is a major mission of the So...plague, and cholera The results of that investment are reflected in for BW purposes, as well as botulinum toxin, a number of impressive new weapons such...since World War 11. Dur- In summary: ing the siege of Leningrad, single-cell protein "* A major outbreak of anthrax occurred at (SCP) derived from wood

  9. Military Reform -- What Next?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    at the military with small pockets of support within Congress. 13. 24 End Notes 1. Association of the United States Army, "Department of Defense...strategic reappraisal and of a much overdue organizational reordering." 2. 3’ End Notes 1. Lyman L. Lemnitzer, Gen USA, (ret), "Dont Alter the Joint Chiefs...centers for strategic thinking continue to develop joint strategic concepts that match resources with national strategy. 37 End Notes I. Fredrick H

  10. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-24

    Contents: TEKHNIKA I VOORUZHENIYE No 1, 1985 (TEKHNIKA I VOORUZHENIYE, No 1, Jan 85) 18 AIR / AIR DEFENSE FORCES Party Work, Improving Technical...One night an enemy aircraft flew over us and dropped its supply of bombs which, I think, our air defense troops and fighters did not allow it to...Eastern, Carpathian, Kiev and Turkestan military districts, the Baltic Fleet, the Moscow Air Defense District, and the organizations led by comrades

  11. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and leading seaman and honor student. The brothers Giya and Guliver Nikolaishvili of Sukhumi, Dato Metreveli of Kutaisi, who is at the Kiev higher...policy is closely related to its domestic and foreign policy and the strategy of accelerating social and economic development based on scientific...and special informational publications and become acquainted with patent materials. There is yet one more important concept in our military lexicon

  12. Military Review: Leadership

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    development this, the proponent defines the life-cycle model techn:ques, and advances in our ability todefine. to be tollowed. prect,,e, the SKAs...amnns, we nust population through the Civilian Integration continue to provide leaders the critical experi- into the Personnel Proponent System ( CIPPS ... model is not easy. Demonstrating 32 May 1991 e MILITARY REVIEW - BECKCETAMD NORTH uncompromising integrity, inculcating values But accomplishing the

  13. Prospects for Military Reform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    tradition has a literary side as well, one most often expressing itself through the medium of military journals. Each year, these journals publish a...beyond cranky literary mutterings and hero-worship for deceased generals of flawed reputation? Can the critique fashioned by the alternative...special timeliness. The archetypal Mac still hovered on the fringes of American politics after having been relieved the previous 40 Parameters year

  14. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Balkin, T., Wesensten, N., 2006. Impaired decision making fol- lowing 49 h of sleep deprivation . Journal of Sleep Research 15 (1), 7–13. Kim, M., Hong, S...Portland VAMC, $307,128 (Appendix 2) o A Behavioral Sleep Intervention for Suicidal Behaviors in Military Veterans: A Randomized Controlled Study, Dr...Moscowitz A, & Hom MH. (June 2015). Perceived Stigma Toward Mental Health in Association with Sleep Disturbances and as an Acute Predictor of Suicidal

  15. Sound Military Decision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1942-01-01

    included all available and’ pertinent military writings. Care has also been taken to in- S~~clude, from civil sources, the findings of those...The Advisory Function. Understanding between the civil representatives of the State and the leaders of the armed forces is manifestly essential to...conduct of war thus requires that under- standing exist (see pages 9 and 10) between the civil repre- sentatives of the State and the leaders of the armed

  16. Military Hybrid Vehicle Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-03

    Some examples include:  Allison Hybrid EP System™ - Transit buses two-mode parallel hybrid with continuously variable transmission (CVT)  Azure... Transit Buses , Proceeding of the Vehicular Technology Conference, Vol. 5, pp 3310-3315, October 2003. [3] E. Rosenthal, U.S. Military Orders Less...applications such as delivery trucks and transit busses. One of the biggest justifications for hybrids is their fuel efficiency. However, the U.S

  17. USSR Report, Military Affairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    to New Equipment ( Yu . Vikhrenko; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 28 Jun 86) 27 Maj Gen Avn Tabunshchikov on Results of Early Summer Training (A. Tabunshchikov...Interview; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 2 Jul 86). 31 Critique of Oversimplification in Pilot Training ( V . Vinokurov; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 7 Jul 86 34 Article...Discusses Career of Maj Gen Avn N. T. Antoshkin ( V . Filatov; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 7 Jun 86) 38 DOSAAF Military-Patriotic Education in Arkhangelsk

  18. Selection of Military Advisors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    this thesis will focus on the methods for selecting the best military personnel for advisor tasks. In doing so, specific qualities , capabilities...attract and keep the best personnel for subsequent advisory requirements. Finally, this document will analyze the quality and suitability of advisor...2006, p. 5-2. 5 study in its own right . Lastly, this thesis relies heavily on current published counterinsurgency doctrine since many aspects of

  19. Military display performance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Meyer, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of four of its segments: avionics, vetronics, dismounted soldier, and command and control. Requirements are summarized for a number of technology-driving parameters, to include luminance, night vision imaging system compatibility, gray levels, resolution, dimming range, viewing angle, video capability, altitude, temperature, shock and vibration, etc., for direct-view and virtual-view displays in cockpits and crew stations. Technical specifications are discussed for selected programs.

  20. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-20

    victorious offensive of the Soviet Army which had crushed the Nazi military machine and freed many peoples from the yoke of Naziism . 25 October is celebrated...dignation and hate for Naziism and the fascist regime grew and class contradic tions became exacerbated. In telling the people the bitter truth, the...country, Romania fought along with the Soviet Union until the complete defeat of Naziism and its troops participated in the liberation of hungary and

  1. Military Pay Comparability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    for promotions and for pay based on ability. Also included in this idea is one of equal pay for basically equal work. Thus, the sub-principle of...Report established for the first time the idea that pay within the services for basically equal jobs should be the same and that the pay should be...foundation for legislation creating the first idea of 4 P "regular military compensation" (basic pay , subsistence allowance and quarters allowance) as a

  2. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    praporshchiki] and officers bade farewell to the colors. I am sure that these instants when they pressed down to the crimson silk of the sacred military...clarify the results of the last firing in the battalion. According to the headquarters training data , those who were not at the exercise achieved...television camera, artificially developed target data is photographed and superimposed on a real air situation pre-recorded on videotape. In a matter of

  3. Rebalancing the Military Profession

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-17

    of individual officers than the traditional ethics .”3 The authors contend this primacy of careerism over selfless service began during World War II...states the military officer, by virtue of being a professional with an oath of office and a code of ethics , is granted the moral autonomy to openly...War College on 18 April 1970, to analyze “the state of discipline, integrity, morality, ethics , and professionalism in the Army.”32 This

  4. Police or Military Police?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    their MP to Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejuene as part of the Fleet Assistance Program (FAP).12 (FAP assigns FMF Marines to fill support functions on...1778. The responsibilities of this unit were essentially the same as the MP unit of today. "...[MP] were expected to patrol the camp ... During...Marine Corps. Camp Guards turned into Base Military Police Units and the MP ranks expanded with personnel who laterally moved from every MOS in the

  5. Is Military Science Scientific?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    approaches to strategy, doctrine, and planning. Early military theory in the United States was based largely on inherited European traditions pro...frequently capi- talized and placed alongside Physics, Philosophy, and other well-established academic disciplines. An irony of the term’s decline is...WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) National Defense University,Joint Force Quarterly,260 Fifth Avenue, S.W

  6. [The cradle of military medicine].

    PubMed

    Tsygan, V N

    2013-12-01

    The Kirov Military Medical Academy, included into the State Code of Particularly Valuable Objects of Cultural Heritage of the Peoples of the Russian Federation, plays an important role in national military-medical science and education during XVIII and XIX centuries. Today the Kirov Military Medical Academy consists of 7 faculties, 63 departments (52 military departments and 11 civil departments), 31 clinics (17 surgical clinics and 14 therapeutic clinics), center of extracorporeal detoxification, 3 departments, taking part in treatment and diagnostic process, 11 clinical subdivisions, research center consisting of 4 research subdivisions and 2 laboratories, and also 14 research laboratories, 32 supply subdivisions and publications department. Glorious staff and graduates of the Academy took part in all russian wars. All famous medical schools were founded in the Academy in XIX-XX centuries. At the present time the Kirov Military Medical Academy is the main military medical university, leading research center and treatment facility of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation.

  7. Sexual assault in the military.

    PubMed

    Castro, Carl Andrew; Kintzle, Sara; Schuyler, Ashley C; Lucas, Carrie L; Warner, Christopher H

    2015-07-01

    Military sexual assault is a pervasive problem throughout the military services, despite numerous initiatives to end it. No doubt the military's lack of progress stems from the complexity of sexual assaults, yet in order to develop effective strategies and programs to end sexual assault, deep understanding and appreciation of these complexities are needed. In this paper, we describe the root causes and numerous myths surrounding sexual assault, the military cultural factors that may unintentionally contribute to sexual assault, and the uncomfortable issues surrounding sexual assault that are often ignored (such as the prevalence of male sexual assault within the military). We conclude by offering a broad, yet comprehensive set of recommendations that considers all of these factors for developing effective strategies and programs for ending sexual assault within in the military.

  8. [Civilian-military coordination].

    PubMed

    de Montravel, G

    2002-01-01

    Current humanitarian emergencies create complex, mutidimensional situations that stimulate simultaneous responses from a wide variety of sources including governments, non-governmental organizations (NGO), United Nations agencies, and private individuals. As a result, it has become essential to establish a coherent framework in which each actor can contribute promptly and effectively to the overall effort. This is the role of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Regardless of the circumstances and level of coordination, cooperation and collaboration between humanitarian and military personnel, it is necessary to bear in mind their objectives. The purpose of humanitarian action is to reduce human suffering. The purpose of military intervention is to stop warfare. The author of this article will discuss the three major obstacles to civilian-military coordination (strategic, tactical, and operational). Operations cannot be conducted smoothly and differences cannot be ironed out without mutual respect between the two parties, an explicit definition of their respective duties and responsibilities, a clear understanding of their cultural differences, and the presence of an organization and facilities for coordination and arbitrage by a neutral referee.

  9. Military Healthcare Battlefield Immunity.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J C

    2012-12-01

    The combatant soldier on the battlefield remains protected from any claim in negligence by the doctrine of combat immunity for any negligent act or omission they may make when fighting. In other words, the combatant soldier does not owe a fellow soldier a duty of care on the battlefield, as the duty of care is non-justiciable. However, the non-combatant Military Healthcare Professional, although sometimes operating in the same hostile circumstances as the fighting soldier, is unlikely to benefit from combat immunity for any clinical negligence on the battlefield. This is because they continue to owe their patient a duty of care, although this has not been tested in the courts. This paper considers if any military healthcare professional could ever benefit from combat immunity, which is unlikely due to their non-combatant status. Instead, this paper suggests that a modified form of immunity; namely, Military Healthcare Battlefield Immunity could be a new, unique and viable doctrine, however, this could only be granted in rare circumstances and to a much lesser degree than combat immunity.

  10. Triage in military settings.

    PubMed

    Falzone, E; Pasquier, P; Hoffmann, C; Barbier, O; Boutonnet, M; Salvadori, A; Jarrassier, A; Renner, J; Malgras, B; Mérat, S

    2017-02-01

    Triage, a medical term derived from the French word "trier", is the practical process of sorting casualties to rationally allocate limited resources. In combat settings with limited medical resources and long transportation times, triage is challenging since the objectives are to avoid overcrowding medical treatment facilities while saving a maximum of soldiers and to get as many of them back into action as possible. The new face of modern warfare, asymmetric and non-conventional, has led to the integrative evolution of triage into the theatre of operations. This article defines different triage scores and algorithms currently implemented in military settings. The discrepancies associated with these military triage systems are highlighted. The assessment of combat casualty severity requires several scores and each nation adopts different systems for triage on the battlefield with the same aim of quickly identifying those combat casualties requiring lifesaving and damage control resuscitation procedures. Other areas of interest for triage in military settings are discussed, including predicting the need for massive transfusion, haemodynamic parameters and ultrasound exploration.

  11. A Coaching Psychology Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    In "Psychology in its place" (2008), John Radford considers "what is or should be the "place" of Psychology in education, more particularly Higher Education". In this article, the author looks at the possible inclusion of coaching psychology within undergraduate psychology programmes. Coaching psychology as an applied…

  12. Military applications of lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Richard A.

    1989-05-01

    Practically every weapon system requires a battery to provide electrical power for various functions. The lithium battery is becoming the 'power source of choice' for a large number of these military systems. Lithium technology offers unique solutions to the combination of requirements imposed by military systems - low weight, low volume, long storage life, low life cycle cost, and immediate readiness over the full military environmental condition spectrum.

  13. [Morbidity in draft military personnel].

    PubMed

    Mukhametzhanov, A M; Smagulov, N K

    2015-01-01

    Military service activity appeared to influence health state of military personnel. Body strain at initial stages of the service, connected with stress situation, affects general body resistance and manifests in higher general morbidity level with transitory disablement that decreases with adaptation. Based on normalized intensity parameters, the equation enables to ease a procedure of evaluation and forecast of transitory disablement morbidity in draft military personnel.

  14. Military Spending in Eastern Europe,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    on defense (the sums are less than the corresponding expenditures by the republics) or whether they involve military spending above and beyond that...certain military expenditures on personnel are included in budgetary categories other than defense spending . Transportation of soldiers to their first... expenditures and forces and military spending decisions in Eastern Europe. iii L SUMMARY Although the Soviet Union is the most threatening potential

  15. Military Influence Operations: Review of the Consumer Psychology Literature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    Repetition can also be an effective strategy when presenting persuasive messages, but varying both the content as well as the cosmetics of the message...more effective , and this approach can even offset the impact of including negative information in a message. The research reviewed also suggests...behaviours. Other research has explored the impact of the repetition of persuasive messages on attitudes toward products. In the literature

  16. Stressful Military Training: Endocrine Reactivity, Performance, and Psychological Impact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    performance, peritraumatic dissociation , and the subsequent impact of stressful events. Methods: Baseline salivary cortisol samples were self-collected by...to examine rela- tionships among endocrine responses, objectively mea- sured performance, peritraumatic dissociative symptoms, and subsequent impact...relationship between peritraumatic dissociation and subsequent development of PTSD ( 2,7 ). Current litera- ture across a variety of nonmilitary traumatic

  17. International Conference (11th) on Applied Military Psychology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    use the test in the selection of blacks, or women, or those for whom English is not the first language ? Carpenter suggested that the hard way of...English version of the test, as appropriate, with separate norms and validation data for the two language groups. This Is not a final answer, either...national sub-groups.) 8 C-15-75 Looking at language differences from an international rather than an intra- national perspective, Bremond (France

  18. Psychological Analyses of Courageous Performance in Military Personnel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    dangerous device despite the considerable risk that was involved. During the course of preparing the data for this report, it turned out that this same...realistic mock-up explosive devices , under considerable pressure. Subject #4 had a comparatively high basal heartrate during the laboratory stress test... danger , - Courage , Fear- * 05 0 _________ Bomb-disposal operators- Selection ,, K . ;. .. ( K,: Fearlessness. Training -4 f . 19, AL;.STRACT (Continue

  19. Institutional Violence: Organizational and Psychological Issues in the Military Context

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    reasons and often without restraint. If these men have any one dominant personality pattern, it is authoritarianism (see Adorno , 1950). They readily...from Johnson (1986). References: 1. Adorno , T. W., Frenkel-Brunswik, E., Levinson, D. J., & Sanford, N., THE AUTHORITARIAN PERSONALITY (New York: Harper

  20. Psychological Testing as a Prerequisite for Selecting Military Police

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-10

    indicators of performance can be placed in two general categories, either undesirable behavior or innate qualities such as emotional control and...3atterv (ACB), which are designed to measure aptitude and trainability, rather than innate qualities. The present lack of definitive characteristics...detection of homosexual or psychopathic trends. The latter persons being amoral and asocial, likely to engage in certain criminal activities. 10 ji" Scores on

  1. The Psychological Dynamics of Civil-Military Collaboration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    integrative negotiation and a more positive perception of one’s counterpart and the counterpart’s organization, as well as more satisfaction with the...including perceptions of one’s counterpart and their organization, satisfaction with the relationship and future relationships on the basis of the...collaboration experience, and satisfaction with the outcome. Respect and personal performance were positively correlated, but only in the RC scenario

  2. Promoting Psychological Resilience in the U.S. Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    challenge to figure out how to present the material in an effective way, e.g., self - care and self regulation can be presented as part of self ...by the fact that the goal of SELF (to guarantee access to behavioral health care ) has been met: 100 percent of soldiers who participated in the...trail of SELF compared with treatment as usual or a pre- SELF /post- SELF study looking at utilization of behavioral health care , stigma, and

  3. Nutrition research in the military.

    PubMed

    Hill, Neil E; Fallowfield, J L; Delves, S K; Wilson, D R

    2014-06-01

    Military research performed in an operational environment involves mission-specific considerations. The Institute of Naval Medicine was tasked in 2008 by the Surgeon General to investigate the nutritional status of deployed British military personnel, and how this might affect body composition, physical fitness and operational capability. This paper briefly describes the logistic and technical issues specific to military research that were encountered by the study team, how these issues were overcome and how this research has influenced military practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Military Youth and the Deployment Cycle: Emotional Health Consequences and Recommendations for Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Wolff, Jennifer; Lemmon, Keith M.; Bodzy, Mary; Swenson, Rebecca R.; Spirito, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The United States military force includes over 2.2 million volunteer service members. Three out of five service members who are deployed or are preparing for deployment have spouses and/or children. Stressors associated with the deployment cycle can lead to depression, anxiety, and behavior problems in children, as well as psychological distress in the military spouse. Further, the emotional and behavioral health of family members can affect the psychological functioning of the military service member during the deployment and re-integration periods. Despite widespread acknowledgement of the need for emotional and behavioral health services for youth from military families, many professionals in a position to serve them struggle with how to best respond and select appropriate interventions. The purpose of this paper is to provide an empirically-based and theoretically informed review to guide service provision and the development of evidence based treatments for military youth in particular. This review includes an overview of stressors associated with the deployment cycle, emotional and behavioral health consequences of deployment on youth and their caretaking parent, and existing preventative and treatment services for youth from military families. It concludes with treatment recommendations for older children and adolescents experiencing emotional and behavioral health symptoms associated with the deployment cycle. PMID:21707172

  5. Military youth and the deployment cycle: emotional health consequences and recommendations for intervention.

    PubMed

    Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Wolff, Jennifer; Lemmon, Keith M; Bodzy, Mary; Swenson, Rebecca R; Spirito, Anthony

    2011-08-01

    The United States military force includes over 2.2 million volunteer service members. Three out of five service members who are deployed or are preparing for deployment have spouses and/or children. Stressors associated with the deployment cycle can lead to depression, anxiety, and behavior problems in children, as well as psychological distress in the military spouse. Further, the emotional and behavioral health of family members can affect the psychological functioning of the military service member during the deployment and reintegration periods. Despite widespread acknowledgment of the need for emotional and behavioral health services for youth from military families, many professionals in a position to serve them struggle with how to best respond and select appropriate interventions. The purpose of this paper is to provide an empirically based and theoretically informed review to guide service provision and the development of evidence based treatments for military youth in particular. This review includes an overview of stressors associated with the deployment cycle, emotional and behavioral health consequences of deployment on youth and their caretaking parent, and existing preventative and treatment services for youth from military families. It concludes with treatment recommendations for older children and adolescents experiencing emotional and behavioral health symptoms associated with the deployment cycle.

  6. Military and Contractor Justice in Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    PI) governed under Article 32 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice.xliv For the most serious offenses, such as murder or manslaughter, the IG...mission in Iraq. While the military is governed under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, and the application of deadly force determined...mission of the military should be held accountable for their actions in the same manner as the US military, under the Uniform Code of Military

  7. Polycultural psychology.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael W; Chiu, Chi-yue; Liu, Zhi

    2015-01-03

    We review limitations of the traditional paradigm for cultural research and propose an alternative framework, polyculturalism. Polyculturalism assumes that individuals' relationships to cultures are not categorical but rather are partial and plural; it also assumes that cultural traditions are not independent, sui generis lineages but rather are interacting systems. Individuals take influences from multiple cultures and thereby become conduits through which cultures can affect each other. Past literatures on the influence of multiple cultural identities and cultural knowledge legacies can be better understood within a polyculturalist rubric. Likewise, the concept elucidates how cultures are changed by contact with other cultures, enabling richer psychological theories of intercultural influence. Different scientific paradigms about culture imply different ideologies and policies; polyculturalism's implied policy of interculturalism provides a valuable complement to the traditional policy frames of multiculturalism and colorblindness.

  8. Out of Uniform. A Career Transition Guide for Ex-Military Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drier, Harry N.

    This book is designed to help career military personnel make the transition to civilian life and careers. The first 14 chapters cover targeted issues and include many tips on how to cope with each important aspect of the transition. Topics include the following: psychology of transition, helping the family with the transition, financing the…

  9. Research on Role Sets and Emotional Relationships in Military Personnel Marriage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murtazina, Elmira I.; Minullina, Aida F.

    2016-01-01

    An urgent demand of society to conduct effective work with the family substantiates the relevance of the research. The article provides the investigation of role sets and emotional relationships in marriage through the study of military personnel and nonmilitary personnel families. Practical implementation of psychological ideas represents one of…

  10. Troubleshooting Complex Equipment in the Military Services: Research and Prospects. Technical Report No. 92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Nicholas A.; Towne, Douglas M.

    Psychological approaches to the troubleshooting of complex military equipments are designed to improve the selection, motivation, and training of technicians. Methods for enhancing the understanding of the physical relations in equipment, the hierarchical analysis and practice of sub-skills, and the general logic of searching behavior are aspects…

  11. Examining Treatment-Seeking College Students with and without Military Experience and Trauma Histories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Matthew C.; Graceffo, James M.; Hayes, Jeffrey A.; Locke, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of veterans are returning from war, many with mental health problems. Some of these returning veterans will enroll in college, and it is important that campus counseling centers can meet the needs of this population. This study examined psychological distress among students with and without military experience. Results…

  12. Examining Treatment-Seeking College Students with and without Military Experience and Trauma Histories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Matthew C.; Graceffo, James M.; Hayes, Jeffrey A.; Locke, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of veterans are returning from war, many with mental health problems. Some of these returning veterans will enroll in college, and it is important that campus counseling centers can meet the needs of this population. This study examined psychological distress among students with and without military experience. Results…

  13. Gender differences in response to deployment among military healthcare providers in Afghanistan and Iraq.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Susanne W; Hickling, Edward J; Barnett, Scott D; Herbig-Wall, Pamela L; Watts, Dorraine D

    2012-05-01

    Despite their growing numbers in the United States military, little has been published on healthcare providers (HCP) or female service members from conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. The purpose of this secondary analysis of data from the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Survey of Health Related Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel was to determine gender differences in reaction to the impact of operational stress in deployed military healthcare providers. The unweighted study sample selected for this data analysis included results from female and male active duty military personnel over the age of 18 years (n=16,146) deployed at least once to Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) or Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) within the past 3 years (n=1,425), for a final sample consisting of either officer (healthcare officer) or enlisted (healthcare specialist) personnel (n=455) (weighted n=23,440). Indices of psychologic distress and social relations were explored and compared. Enlisted female HCPs were more likely to be African American (42.3%) and single (63.0%) and represented the greater percentage with significant psychologic difficulties, as shown by serious psychologic distress endorsement (11.3%) and positive screen results for depression (32.2%). More harmful drinking patterns (Alcohol Use Disorders Identifications Test [AUDIT] score 8-15) were found in more female HCPs (enlisted 61.8%, officers 76.4%) compared with males (enlisted 41.1%, officers 67.1%). Female HCPs serving in the current military conflicts are reporting significant psychologic distress that may adversely impact their performance within the military, in theaters of operations, and in their lives at home. Implications for clinical care of female service members and veterans of current wars are addressed.

  14. Gender Differences in Response to Deployment Among Military Healthcare Providers in Afghanistan and Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Hickling, Edward J.; Barnett, Scott D.; Herbig-Wall, Pamela L.; Watts, Dorraine D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite their growing numbers in the United States military, little has been published on healthcare providers (HCP) or female service members from conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. The purpose of this secondary analysis of data from the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Survey of Health Related Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel was to determine gender differences in reaction to the impact of operational stress in deployed military healthcare providers. Methods The unweighted study sample selected for this data analysis included results from female and male active duty military personnel over the age of 18 years (n=16,146) deployed at least once to Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) or Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) within the past 3 years (n=1,425), for a final sample consisting of either officer (healthcare officer) or enlisted (healthcare specialist) personnel (n=455) (weighted n=23,440). Indices of psychologic distress and social relations were explored and compared. Results Enlisted female HCPs were more likely to be African American (42.3%) and single (63.0%) and represented the greater percentage with significant psychologic difficulties, as shown by serious psychologic distress endorsement (11.3%) and positive screen results for depression (32.2%). More harmful drinking patterns (Alcohol Use Disorders Identifications Test [AUDIT] score 8–15) were found in more female HCPs (enlisted 61.8%, officers 76.4%) compared with males (enlisted 41.1%, officers 67.1%). Conclusions Female HCPs serving in the current military conflicts are reporting significant psychologic distress that may adversely impact their performance within the military, in theaters of operations, and in their lives at home. Implications for clinical care of female service members and veterans of current wars are addressed. PMID:22224844

  15. Psychology Ethics in Introductory Psychology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucchero, Renee' A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research revealed that introductory psychology textbooks included limited information about psychology ethics. This study reviewed 48 current introductory psychology textbooks for research and other APA ethics content. These textbooks included slightly more total ethics content and were more thorough in their review of research ethics…

  16. Psychology Ethics in Introductory Psychology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucchero, Renee' A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research revealed that introductory psychology textbooks included limited information about psychology ethics. This study reviewed 48 current introductory psychology textbooks for research and other APA ethics content. These textbooks included slightly more total ethics content and were more thorough in their review of research ethics…

  17. Prevalence and Correlates of Drinking Behaviors of Previously Deployed Military Personnel and Matched Civilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Ramchand, Rajeev; Miles, Jeremy; Schell, Terry; Jaycox, Lisa; Marshall, Grant N.; Tanielian, Terri

    2011-01-01

    We examined drinking behaviors (frequency of use, quantity of use, and frequency of binge drinking) and correlates of frequency of use and binge drinking in a representative sample of previously deployed personnel from the US military (n = 1887). Drinking behaviors were compared with a matched sample of adults in U.S. households (n = 17,533). Comparable patterns of alcohol consumption were reported in both samples: 70% of previously deployed personnel and 69% of US adults reported drinking alcohol in the past 30 days though, civilians drank on average more drinks on the days that they drank than did previously deployed military personnel. Regression analyses indicated that among previously deployed military personnel, deployment-related experiences (e.g., combat-related traumas) and psychological distress (e.g., symptoms associated with posttraumatic stress disorder) were associated with frequency of drinking behaviors. We discuss the implication of our findings for developing interventions to modify drinking behaviors for military personnel. PMID:25324594

  18. Military Implications of Global Warming.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    U.S. environmental issues also have important global implications. This paper analyzes current U.S. Policy as it pertains to global warming and climate...for military involvement to reduce global warming . Global warming and other environmental issues are important to the U.S. military. As the United

  19. Advancing Military Professionalism in Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    costs for not having established strong professional militaries are high: persistent instability, chronic poverty, deterred investment, and stunted...Morsi. The constitution that subsequently passed through referendum in December 2012 made the military’s autonomy official. It required that the...Through a new constitution passed by referendum in 2014, the military affirmed autonomy over its budget, immunity for its members from prosecution

  20. Economic Conditions of Military Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosek, James; MacDermid Wadsworth, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors found that the economic circumstances of military families are good, certainly much improved compared with even a decade ago. The military context is nonetheless challenging, with long hours, dangerous work, frequent transfers, and stressful absences during deployment. Service members receive relatively high pay and…

  1. Life as a military spouse.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Military spouses live a capricious life. They often move away from everything familiar to support their active duty spouse. Honor, courage, and commitment are values military spouses need to assist them in being strong and resilient. Effective coping skills aid in the various roles these spouses assume, which may cause personal sacrifices to be made in support of the service member.

  2. Managing Military Child Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Based on research as well as on the down-to-earth experiences which come from running a large military child care center, this director's manual provides guidelines for running an effective program. The guidebook, one in a series on the subject of military child care centers, presents advice on the following seven topics: becoming a center…

  3. Soviet Military Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    military lpresence. To cite just one example, a Soviet Navy task force operated in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico from November 1982 to February 1985...year, Other Surface Combatants: Additionally, the Mi Prduction Naval Ship Cmo itlfon. . USSR and NATO USSR and NATO MI.l T6ype 1976’ 1979’ 1m, 101I...the Caribbean, Gulf of Soviet assistance to Grenada has taken the • Mexico and nearby portions of the Atlantic form of supplying weapons, construction

  4. Burns and military clothing.

    PubMed

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under

  5. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    Disorders (month 47).  Dr. Brenner and colleagues’ publication on the cross-cultural adaptation of the Window to Hope (WtoH) intervention will...exposure to suicide and suicide risk among military service members and veterans. Journal of Affective Disorders . doi:10.1016/j.jad.2016.09.043...members and veterans. Journal of Affective Disorders . doi:10.1016/j.jad.2016.09.043 Joiner, T. E., Hom, M. A., Rogers, M. L., Chu, C., Stanley, I. H

  6. Soviet Military Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    situations of crisis and instability in the Third World." Frnt the. Coilltuiliq fth NA TO Foreign Misbrs MeabuzIM AMay 1J9J Au,3 a F~i 1or tD I iC...helicopters. rates of production. Missile Production USSR Aircraft Production USSR Misile Type 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 ICBM. 300 300 200 200 200 Arcr...marines afloat during a crisis provides the ioned landing craft. The ROGOV can embark Soviet Union with a valuable political-military about 550 raval

  7. Psychological hardiness and coping style as risk/resilience factors for alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Bartone, Paul T; Hystad, Sigurd W; Eid, Jarle; Brevik, John I

    2012-05-01

    Alcohol abuse is a growing problem in the military, and a costly one. The present study evaluates the potential role of psychological hardiness, an individual resilience resource, to stress-related problem drinking in a military population. We assess the association of psychological hardiness and avoidance coping style with alcohol use patterns in a large national sample of Norwegian military defense personnel. Results show that low hardiness and high avoidance coping are significant predictors of alcohol abuse. Also, the challenge facet of hardiness predicts risk of alcohol abuse among respondents with recent deployment experience, and this effect is greater for those with harsh deployment experiences. Older defense workers are also at higher risk, suggesting cumulative occupational stress may take a toll. This research indicates that hardiness and avoidance coping measures may serve as useful adjunct screening tools for alcohol abuse in the military.

  8. The Importance of Military Cultural Competence.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Eric G; Writer, Brian W; Brim, William

    2016-03-01

    Military cultural competence has recently gained national attention. Experts have posited that limited outcomes in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder and depression in the military may be related to limited familiarity with the military. National surveys have indicated low military cultural competence among providers and limited educational efforts on military culture or pertinent military pathology in medical schools and residency training programs. Military families, with their own unique military cultural identity, have been identified as a population with increased risks associated with deployment. In response to these findings, several curricula regarding military culture have been established and widely distributed. Assessments of military cultural competence have also been developed. The clinical impact of enhanced cultural competence in general has thus far been limited. The military, however, with its highly prescribed cultural identity, may be a model culture for further study.

  9. 'You never come back the same': the challenge of spiritual care in a deployed military nursing context.

    PubMed

    Ormsby, Andrew; Harrington, Ann; Borbasi, Sally

    2017-05-01

    To explore the experience of spirituality and spiritual care by military nurses on deployed operations. Despite an increasing body of research addressing spirituality in nursing care in a variety of clinical settings, the deployed military nursing context remains poorly understood. A qualitative, philosophical hermeneutic design. Ten Australian military nurses were interviewed about their experiences of spirituality and spiritual care while on deployed operations. Analyses were performed using a phenomenological method informed by philosophical hermeneutics. The participants perceived that they had an important role in the provision of spiritual care in the absence of family on deployed operations. However, the nurse also needed to care for their own spiritual needs. The results suggested that spirituality and spiritual care may provide positive benefits in protecting against the long-term psychological, emotional and spiritual impacts of military service on deployed operations. Military nurses need to understand the factors that influence spiritual care delivery in their practice setting. Nurses need to be cognizant of the importance of spiritual care in the deployed military context, not only for their patients and colleagues, but also for themselves. Spirituality is argued as a protective factor against the challenges and consequences often associated with deployment. Well-developed spiritual resilience may assist in ensuring that military personnel return home emotionally, psychologically and spiritually 'fit'. To provide effective spiritual nursing care to deployed military populations, the nurse needs to understand the complex military practice environment, the personal and individual nature of spiritual expressions and their own spiritual care requirements. Meaningful spiritual care aids resilience against the psychological, emotional and spiritual dangers of deployment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Personality factors underlying suicidal behavior among military youth.

    PubMed

    Soltaninejad, Abdollah; Fathi-Ashtiani, Ali; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Mirsharafoddini, Hediye Sadat; Nikmorad, Alireza; Pilevarzadeh, Motahare

    2014-04-01

    Suicidal behavior is one the most significant mental health problems in the military. Militaries are closed systems that operate in particular situations. Military service is associated with certain stressful conditions. On this basis, there is likely of trauma in the military environment. Measures of suicidal behavior are pathologically complex. A range of biological, psychological, social, and institutional factors are involved in the incidence and prevalence of these behaviors. One of the underlying factors in suicidal behavior is individuals' personality. The study population comprised of the Iranian Armed Forces. To recruit the sample of the research, 1659 soldiers were selected by multistage sampling. Data were collected using the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSSI) and NEO-Five Factor Inventory. There was a significant positive correlation (r = 0.323) between neuroticism and suicide ideation; however, significant negative correlations existed between three other personality traits --extraversion [r = -0.306], agreeableness [r = -0.227], and conscientiousness [r = -0.271] and suicidal ideation. Unlike neuroticism, extraversion and conscientiousness personality factors could reduce significantly (as much 14% as are predicted) levels of suicidal ideation. Based on these results, neuroticism might increase suicide, but extraversion and conscientiousness personality traits are associated with a reduced risk of suicide.

  11. Personality Factors Underlying Suicidal Behavior Among Military Youth

    PubMed Central

    Soltaninejad, Abdollah; Fathi-Ashtiani, Ali; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Mirsharafoddini, Hediye Sadat; Nikmorad, Alireza; Pilevarzadeh, Motahare

    2014-01-01

    Background: Suicidal behavior is one the most significant mental health problems in the military. Militaries are closed systems that operate in particular situations. Military service is associated with certain stressful conditions. On this basis, there is likely of trauma in the military environment. Measures of suicidal behavior are pathologically complex. A range of biological, psychological, social, and institutional factors are involved in the incidence and prevalence of these behaviors. Objectives: One of the underlying factors in suicidal behavior is individuals' personality. Patients and Methods: The study population comprised of the Iranian Armed Forces. To recruit the sample of the research, 1659 soldiers were selected by multistage sampling. Data were collected using the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSSI) and NEO-Five Factor Inventory. Results: There was a significant positive correlation (r = 0.323) between neuroticism and suicide ideation; however, significant negative correlations existed between three other personality traits --extraversion [r = -0.306], agreeableness [r = -0.227], and conscientiousness [r = -0.271] and suicidal ideation. Unlike neuroticism, extraversion and conscientiousness personality factors could reduce significantly (as much 14% as are predicted) levels of suicidal ideation. Conclusions: Based on these results, neuroticism might increase suicide, but extraversion and conscientiousness personality traits are associated with a reduced risk of suicide. PMID:24910793

  12. Systematic review of mental health disorders and intimate partner violence victimisation among military populations.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Katherine; Kwan, Jamie; Howard, Louise; Fear, Nicola; MacManus, Deirdre

    2017-07-26

    There is growing awareness of the problem of intimate partner violence (IPV) among military populations. IPV victimisation has been shown to be associated with mental disorder. A better understanding of the link between IPV and mental disorder is needed to inform service development to meet the needs of military families. We aimed to systematically review the literature on the association between IPV victimisation and mental health disorders among military personnel. Searches of four electronic databases (Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, and Web of Science) were supplemented by reference list screening. Heterogeneity among studies precluded a meta-analysis. Thirteen studies were included. There was stronger evidence for an association between IPV and depression/alcohol problems than between IPV and PTSD. An association between IPV and mental health problems was more frequently found among veterans compared to active duty personnel. However, the link between IPV and alcohol misuse was more consistently found among active duty samples. Finally, among active duty personnel psychological IPV was more consistently associated with depression/alcohol problems than physical/sexual IPV. The review highlighted the lack of research on male IPV victimisation in the military. There is evidence that the burden of mental health need may be significant among military personnel who are victims of IPV. The influence of attitudes towards gender in the military on research in this area is discussed. Further research is needed to inform development of services and policy to reduce IPV victimisation and the mental health consequences among military personnel.

  13. Military children and families: strengths and challenges during peace and war.

    PubMed

    Park, Nansook

    2011-01-01

    Throughout history, military children and families have shown great capacity for adaptation and resilience. However, in recent years, unprecedented lengthy and multiple combat deployments of service members have posed multiple challenges for U.S. military children and families. Despite needs to better understand the impact of deployment on military children and families and to provide proper support for them, rigorous research is lacking. Programs exist that are intended to help, but their effectiveness is largely unknown. They need to be better coordinated and delivered at the level of individuals, families, and communities. Research and programs need to take a comprehensive approach that is strengths based and problem focused. Programs for military children and families often focus on the prevention or reduction of problems. It is just as important to recognize their assets and to promote them. This article reviews existing research on military children and families, with attention to their strengths as well as their challenges. Issues in need of further research are identified, especially research into programs that assist military children and families. Military children and families deserve greater attention from psychology.

  14. Stress and Psychological Support in Modern Military Operations: A Military Leader’s Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    this type of debriefing9. Scientific research into single session debriefing also raised questions on some types of debriefing10 11. The debriefers...Fighting for Peace (In Dutch). 10 .Emmerik, A.A.P. van, Kamphuis, J.H., Hulsbosch,A.M., Emmelkamp, P.M.G (2002): Single session debriefing after

  15. The Military Leaders Survey: NATO Military Leaders’ Perspectives on Psychological Support on Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    France. E-mail: phil.arvers@free.fr Capt Psy José Puente Inspección General de Sanidad-Unidad de Psicologia [Joint Medical Office-Unit of...health professionals ( social workers, psychiatric nurses, psychologists), chaplains, and medical professionals. Many nations also mentioned relying on...homecoming procedure.” Along the same lines, another respondent noted it would be good “…to have psychologists present at a social event 3 months after

  16. Sex differences in cardiovascular and subjective stress reactions: prospective evidence in a realistic military setting.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Marcus K; Larson, Gerald E; Hiller Lauby, Melissa D; Padilla, Genieleah A; Wilson, Ingrid E; Schmied, Emily A; Highfill-McRoy, Robyn M; Morgan, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    Evidence points to heightened physiological arousal in response to acute stress exposure as both a prospective indicator and a core characteristic of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Because females may be at higher risk for PTSD development, it is important to evaluate sex differences in acute stress reactions. This study characterized sex differences in cardiovascular and subjective stress reactions among military survival trainees. One hundred and eighty-five military members (78% males) were studied before, during, and 24 h after stressful mock captivity. Cardiovascular (heart rate [HR], systolic blood pressure [SBP], diastolic blood pressure [DBP]) and dissociative states were measured at all three time points. Psychological impact of mock captivity was assessed during recovery. General linear modeling with repeated measures evaluated sex differences for each cardiovascular endpoint, and causal steps modeling was used to explore interrelationships among sex, cardiovascular reactions and psychological impact of mock captivity. Although females had lower SBP than males at all three time points, the difference was most pronounced at baseline and during stress. Accordingly, females showed greater residual elevation in SBP during recovery. Females had lower DBP at all three time points. In addition, females reported greater psychological impact of mock captivity than males. Exploratory causal steps modeling suggested that stress-induced HR may partially mediate the effect of sex on psychological impact of mock captivity. In conclusion, this study demonstrated sex-specific cardiovascular stress reactions in military personnel, along with greater psychological impact of stress exposure in females. This research may elucidate sex differences in PTSD development.

  17. Mainstreaming Culture in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Fanny M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the "awakening" to the importance of culture in psychology in America, international psychology has remained on the sidelines of psychological science. The author recounts her personal and professional experience in tandem with the stages of development in international/cross-cultural psychology. Based on her research in cross-cultural…

  18. Mainstreaming Culture in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Fanny M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the "awakening" to the importance of culture in psychology in America, international psychology has remained on the sidelines of psychological science. The author recounts her personal and professional experience in tandem with the stages of development in international/cross-cultural psychology. Based on her research in cross-cultural…

  19. Introduction to Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Lesley

    Designed for community students interested in learning about psychology as a field of study, this module offers group and individual activities to involve the beginning student in research, experimentation and discussion. Unit 1, "What Is Psychology?," includes the use of animals in psychology, ethics, the history of psychology, an…

  20. Introduction to Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Lesley

    Designed for community students interested in learning about psychology as a field of study, this module offers group and individual activities to involve the beginning student in research, experimentation and discussion. Unit 1, "What Is Psychology?," includes the use of animals in psychology, ethics, the history of psychology, an…

  1. Psychology and Mathematics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischbein, Efraim

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes the relationship between cognitive psychology as a broad theoretical framework, and the psychology of mathematics education. Argues that mathematics education should not simply borrow from cognitive psychology; rather, it should provide its own psychological research problems, adapted investigation strategies, and adequate original…

  2. India and Pakistan Civil-Military Relations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-21

    culturally similar militaries and both countries faced tremendous stresses during their independence. However, in Pakistan the military became involved...and Pakistan. Both countries achieved their independence from Great Britain. They had culturally similar militaries and both countries faced tremendous...countries had culturally similar militaries, and both countries faced tremendous stresses during their early years after independence. However, in

  3. Military Intervention, Kemalism, and Politics in Turkey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    satisfaction the Sultans derived from military campaign and conquest. The dynasty was at its political and economic apex in periods of military expansion...military defeats at the hands of the Romanov and H~psburp Empires reiniorced the military’s central position. as they were granted special privileges in

  4. The Military and the Transition to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelty, Ryan; Kleykamp, Meredith; Segal, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Ryan Kelty, Meredith Kleykamp, and David Segal examine the effect of military service on the transition to adulthood. They highlight changes since World War II in the role of the military in the lives of young adults, focusing especially on how the move from a conscription to an all-volunteer military has changed the way military service affects…

  5. Satellite Power System (SPS) military implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, C. N.

    1978-01-01

    The military implications of the reference satellite power system (SPS) were examined is well as important military related study tasks. Primary areas of investigation were the potential of the SPS as a weapon, for supporting U.S. military preparedness, and for affecting international relations. In addition, the SPS's relative vulnerability to overt military action, terrorist attacks, and sabotage was considered.

  6. 32 CFR 575.1 - Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military Academy. 575.1 Section 575.1 National... MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.1 Military Academy. (a) Organization and administration. (1) The United States Military Academy is under the general direction and supervision of the Department of the Army....

  7. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... Satisfied by June 30, 1997 § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior to that date, credit for military...

  8. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... Satisfied by June 30, 1997 § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior to that date, credit for military service...

  9. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... Satisfied by June 30, 1997 § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior to that date, credit for military service...

  10. Changing Families in a Changing Military System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Edna J., Ed.

    Recently, the military system has begun to feel the impact of the military family. Whenever sudden dramatic changes or transitions occur, crises may result either for the individual or for the institution. At present both the military system and the military family are in a period of rapid transition. Perhaps one of the most important changes that…

  11. Suicide prevention in military organizations.

    PubMed

    Zamorski, Mark A

    2011-04-01

    Suicide is an important public health problem in the demographic group that forms the bulk of military populations, namely young and middle-aged men. Suicide in the military also has special significance: certain aspects of military service can lead to serious mental disorders that increase the risk of suicidal behaviour. Moreover, military organizations have control over a broad range of factors (notably the direct delivery of mental health care) that could mitigate suicide risk. This article will review the literature on suicide risk in military organizations to answer the important question: Are military personnel at increased risk for suicide? Next, Mann et al.'s (2005) model for specific suicide preventive interventions in civilian settings will be reviewed and then expanded, with an emphasis on identifying special opportunities for suicide prevention in military organizations, including: 1) organizational interventions to mitigate work stress; 2) selection, resilience training, and risk factor reduction; 3) interventions to overcome barriers to care; and 4) systematic quality improvement efforts in mental health care. Finally, the evidence behind comprehensive suicide prevention programmes will be reviewed, with a special focus on the US Air Force's benchmark programme.

  12. Continued growth for military PAs.

    PubMed

    Salyer, Steven W

    2002-10-01

    The US military physician assistant (PA) originated from the corpsmen and medics of the army, navy, air force, and Coast Guard. PAs have been present in every military campaign since 1980 and serve in a wide variety of medical roles. Their combat role has expanded so that in many instances the PA has replaced the physician as the front-line care provider. All have moved from warrant officer into the commissioned officer ranks, a change that has enabled them to rise into command and administrative positions. Narrowing of the pay differential between military and civilian PAs has contributed to their retention.

  13. Military Adaptation in War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    immediately facing their units in a moment of high tension, the one withdrawing and worrying about extricating casualties, the other bent on deploying...experiences that must be the product of peacetime training and education . There is a corollary to this point. Adding to the psychological pressures...however, has proven somewhat more difficult to manage. A recent book on the conduct of the Iraq War by marine units notes: “On this, the ‘ high ’ side of

  14. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Abramson, L. Y., Joiner, Jr., T. E., Alloy, L. B., & Metalsky, G. I. (1998). The hopelessness theory of depression: A review. Revista de...Blalock, J. (1996). Revista de una modelo de depresíon, ansiedad, y emocíon negativa. Revista de Psicopatologia y Psicologia Clinica, 1, 27-34. 46...Behavior, appointed 2003. Revista de Psicopatologia y Psicologia Clinica (Review of Psychopathology & Clinical Psychology), Spain, appointed 1995

  15. Military nuclear waste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robb, David W.

    1984-04-01

    A National Research Council (NRC) panel has endorsed a plan for a proposed underground military nuclear waste disposal facility located on a site near Carlsbad, N.M. The Department of Energy (DOE) asked NRC to evaluate the geologic suitability of the site.The NRC panel, chaired by Frank L. Parker of Vanderbilt University, concluded in its final report that “the important issues about the geology of the site have been resolved…” Those issues include the purity and volume of salt, the absence of brine pockets at the repository horizon in the areas excavated, the absence of breccia pipes and of toxic gases, and the nearly horizontal bedding of the salt. Thick underground salt beds have long been considered prime candidates for nuclear waste repositories. The existence of salt beds is believed to indicate long-term stability. In addition, the salt is flexible and will seal cracks and discontinuities over time.

  16. HIV in military.

    PubMed

    1996-05-31

    The House of Representatives approved a defense authorization bill that requires the Pentagon to discharge service members who test positive for HIV antibodies. This is the second measure of its kind. Last year, Rep. Robert K. Dornan (R-CA) pushed through Congress a similar measure that was repealed after encountering public opposition. President Clinton said he will veto the defense bill in its current form. The bill provides $13 billion in spending beyond the amount the Pentagon requested, resurrects plans for the Star Wars missile defense system, and rescinds Clinton's don't ask, don't tell policy toward gay men and lesbians in the military. Rep. Peter Torkildsen (R-MA) is confident that the HIV provision can be stricken when the bill goes to a House-Senate conference committee in a few weeks.

  17. PTSD among military personnel.

    PubMed

    Creamer, Mark; Wade, Darryl; Fletcher, Susan; Forbes, David

    2011-04-01

    Although symptoms characteristic of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been noted in military personnel for many centuries, it was not until 1980 that the disorder was formally recognized and became the focus of legitimate study. This paper reviews our current state of knowledge regarding the prevalence and course of this complex condition in past and present members of the defence forces. Although rates vary across conflicts and countries, there is no doubt that PTSD affects substantial numbers of personnel and results in considerable impairment in functioning and quality of life. The paper goes on to discuss recent attempts to build resilience and to promote adjustment following deployment, noting that there is little evidence at this stage upon which to draw firm conclusions. Finally, effective treatment for PTSD is reviewed, with particular reference to the challenges posed by this population in a treatment setting.

  18. Working Around the Military: Challenges of Military Spouse Employment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    spouses, such as age, education level, or number and age of children , as well as less observable factors , such as spouse’s interest in work, employer... children at home. Conventional wisdom also tends to envision these spouses in rural locales that limit their employment options and wages. In real...fared both better than the military spouses and better than the civilian average. In other words, the demograph - ics of military spouses suggest

  19. Shrinking the Civil-Military Divide: A Military Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-13

    Kohn, eds. Soldiers and Civilians: The Civil-Military Gap and American National Security (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2001) [Based on the digest of the...Evolution of the Civil-Military “ Gap ” Debate. A paper prepared for the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS), (Duke University, 1999). The term...Culture Gap ” is used by Cohn in much the same manner as in this thesis. 6 Philip Carter, “Final Draft,” Foreign Policy (28 January 2013

  20. Engaging military parents in a home-based reintegration program: a consideration of strategies.

    PubMed

    Ross, Abigail M; DeVoe, Ellen R

    2014-02-01

    For more than a decade, the long wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have placed tremendous and cumulative strain on U.S. military personnel and their families. The high operational tempo, length, and number of deployments-and greater in-theater exposure to threat-have resulted in well-documented psychological health concerns among service members and veterans. In addition, there is increasing and compelling evidence describing the significant deleterious impact of the deployment cycle on family members, including children, in military-connected families. However, rates of engagement and service utilization in prevention and intervention services continue to lag far below apparent need among service members and their families, because of both practical and psychological barriers. The authors describe the dynamic and ultimately successful process of engaging military families with young children in a home-based reintegration program designed to support parenting and strengthen parent-child relationships as service member parents move back into family life. In addition to the integration of existing evidence-based engagement strategies, the authors applied a strengths-based approach to working with military families and worked from a community-based participatory foundation to enhance family engagement and program completion. Implications for engagement of military personnel and their loved ones are discussed.

  1. Failing ethics 101: psychologists, the U.S. military establishment, and human rights.

    PubMed

    Boyd, J Wesley; LoCicero, Alice; Malowney, Monica; Aldis, Rajendra; Marlin, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) has long maintained a close, even symbiotic, relationship with the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Veterans Administration (VA). Herein we highlight these close ties and describe psychologists' participation in interrogations by U.S. military and intelligence entities. We then review the APA's statements about the permissibility of psychologist participation in the interrogation and torture of suspected terrorists. These issues are significant in and of themselves and because the VA and DOD have been described as "growth careers" for psychologists of the future (1). Additionally, the Health Care Personnel Delivery System allows the drafting of civilian clinical psychologists into military service even in the absence of a general draft. In light of psychologists' extensive involvement in the interrogation process of suspected terrorists, and the possibility that psychologists without prior military experience may be drafted, we wondered how much psychologists have been taught about their ethical duties should they find themselves in military settings. The results of our pilot study of U.S. psychology graduate students, which assessed their knowledge of military ethics, raise concerns that psychologists receive inadequate formal training in these matters. This may leave psychologists vulnerable to misinformation about proper ethical conduct in their future work.

  2. A systematic review of mental disorders and perpetration of domestic violence among military populations.

    PubMed

    Trevillion, Kylee; Williamson, Emma; Thandi, Gursimran; Borschmann, Rohan; Oram, Sian; Howard, Louise M

    2015-09-01

    Military populations may experience more severe forms of domestic violence than the general population. Although mental disorders are associated with domestic violence perpetration among the general population, it is not clear whether this is the case for military populations. This review aimed to establish the prevalence and odds of domestic violence perpetration among male and female military personnel with mental disorders. Systematic review: searches of eleven electronic databases were supplemented by hand searches, reference screening, citation tracking and expert recommendations. Ten studies were included; nine reporting on partner violence and one on violence against an adult family member. Median prevalence estimates were calculated for partner violence perpetration among male military personnel with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); estimates on other disorders were not possible due to lack of data. 27.5 % of men with PTSD reported past year physical violence perpetration against a partner and 91.0 % reported past year psychological violence perpetration against a partner. Due to limited data, no median estimates could be calculated for female military personnel. Data from individual papers indicate increased odds of past year partner violence perpetration among male and female military personnel with depression; inconsistent findings were reported for risk of partner violence perpetration among male and female military personnel with PTSD. There is some evidence that mental disorders among military personnel are associated with past year domestic violence perpetration, though current data cannot confirm direction of causality. Research is needed to inform the development of interventions targeted to reduce domestic violence perpetration among military personnel.

  3. [Professional psychological selection system in the Air Force - 50 years].

    PubMed

    Pokrovskiĭ, B L

    2014-08-01

    Given the data about the establishment of the professional psychological selection system in the Air Force in 1958-1964 in the NIIIAM Air Force by the team psychological department under the leadership of K.K.Platonova. Given the names of the developers of this system and given the results of their research. The result of all made work the order of Air Force Commander about the introduction of the psychological selection in Higher Military Aviation School of Pilots, starting from a set of 1964 became. Recommendations for professional psychological selection of a wide range of aviation professionals in various fields, and in the future - and other professionals of the Armed Forces, became the results of future work.

  4. Historizing epistemology in psychology.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Gordana

    2010-12-01

    The conflict between the psychometric methodological framework and the particularities of human experiences reported in psychotherapeutic context led Michael Schwarz to raise the question whether psychology is based on a methodological error. I take this conflict as a heuristic tool for the reconstruction of the early history of psychology, which bears witness to similar epistemological conflicts, though the dominant historiography of psychology has largely forgotten alternative conceptions and their valuable insights into complexities of psychic phenomena. In order to work against the historical amnesia in psychology I suggest to look at cultural-historical contexts which decisively shaped epistemological choices in psychology. Instead of keeping epistemology and history of psychology separate, which nurtures individualism and naturalism in psychology, I argue for historizing epistemology and for historical psychology. From such a historically reflected perspective psychology in contemporary world can be approached more critically.

  5. Chile Informed Question Paper - Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    superior military strength and regional economic integration. Internally, Chile also faces little threat; however, militants from the Mapuche ...considered a significant threat.11 The most significant internal security concern is the ongoing campaign by Mapuche indigenous community militants to

  6. Contact dermatitis in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Dever, Tara T; Walters, Michelle; Jacob, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Military personnel encounter the same allergens and irritants as their civilian counterparts and are just as likely to develop contact dermatitis from common exposures encountered in everyday life. In addition, they face some unique exposures that can be difficult to avoid owing to their occupational duties. Contact dermatitis can be detrimental to a military member's career if he or she is unable to perform core duties or avoid the inciting substances. An uncontrolled contact dermatitis can result in the member's being placed on limited-duty (ie, nondeployable) status, needing a job or rate change, or separation from military service. We present some common causes of contact dermatitis in military personnel worldwide and some novel sources of contact dermatitis in this population that may not be intuitive.

  7. Evaluation of a Family-Centered Preventive Intervention for Military Families: Parent and Child Longitudinal Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lester, Patricia; Liang, Li-Jung; Milburn, Norweeta; Mogil, Catherine; Woodward, Kirsten; Nash, William; Aralis, Hilary; Sinclair, Maegan; Semaan, Alan; Klosinski, Lee; Beardslee, William; Saltzman, William

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the longitudinal outcomes of Families OverComing Under Stress (FOCUS), a family-centered preventive intervention implemented to enhance resilience and to reduce psychological health risk in military families and children who have high levels of stress related to parental wartime military service. We performed a secondary analysis of evaluation data from a large-scale service implementation of the FOCUS intervention collected between July 2008 and December 2013 at 15 military installations in the United States and Japan. We present data for 2,615 unique families (3,499 parents and 3,810 children) with completed intake and at least 1 postintervention assessment. Longitudinal regression models with family-level random effects were used to assess the patterns of change in child and parent (civilian and military) psychological health outcomes over time. Improvement in psychological health outcomes occurred in both service member and civilian parents. Relative to intake, parental anxiety and depression symptoms were significantly reduced postintervention, and these reductions were maintained at 2 subsequent follow-up assessments. In addition, we identified an improvement over time in emotional and behavioral symptoms and in prosocial behaviors for both boys and girls. We observed reductions in the prevalence of unhealthy family functioning and child anxiety symptoms, as well as parental depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress symptoms from intake to follow-up. Longitudinal program evaluation data show sustained trajectories of reduced psychological health risk symptoms and improved indices of resilience in children, civilian, and active duty military parents participating in a strength-based, family-centered preventive intervention. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Death of Military Justice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Department of Defense’s report regarding the repeal of Section 654. Thus, the report will have no power to mitigate the effects , because to restore or...will have no effect on those powers. Five findings discuss in general terms military service. Finding 4 states the primary purpose of the armed...importance of cohesion to military effectiveness . The remaining six findings, 2, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 14, are key, because they define the principles

  9. Military Research with Contact Lenses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    numerous military laboratory-based and field tests of contact lenses are reviewed. Military contact lens research has a history of almost 50 years. In...research has a history of almost 50 years. In 1944, Jaeckle reported the results of his investigation of what were unspecified but are presumed to be... histories of more than 10 years. Bachman (1988, 1990) provided the results of a study of extended wear rigid and soft lenses fitted on 44 rotary-wing

  10. Military Review: Airland Battle Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    the forward support Certainl: we like our current organizations battalions and will also support uncommitted and our ways of doing business today...became. As a president envisages in describing the Desert result, decades of major Soviet military invest - Shield theater campaign at the strategic...doctrine must word political, military and economic elicit both the confidence of these forces and power, alies are even more important for that of the

  11. Military Robotics and Collateral Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    Applications and Operations Military Robotics and Collateral Damage Robert Douglass (Primary POC) SET Associates 3811 N. Fairfax...2004 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Robotics and Collateral Damage 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Abstract We explore a concept of a combined force of air and ground combat robots

  12. Military Theory, Strategy, and Praxis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    institutions. The conduct of network-centric warfare and precision strikes across the depth of the battlefield has introduced a new calculus (and...in the context of the Newtonian universe. Today’s military theorists confront a universe of quantum mechanics generating wicked problems. Good...position and out of the cities? How do you deal with non -state combatants? How does the civil population fit into the military calculations? The

  13. Cost as a Military Requirement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    advances in military weaponry, Lanchester’s basic observation—that quantity is essential to military success—remains true today. Yet weapons system...quantity changes, and schedule extensions . And, although these challenges have been studied and understood for decades, government initiatives have not...proportional to the square of the number of its units. In theory , then, a force of 15 pieces of artillery will have a nine-fold advantage (in terms

  14. Cohesion in the US Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    footsteps in the trench behind me rec,’ll me at a bound from the terrible loneliness and fear of death by which I had been almost destroyed. They are more to...2-12. 29. Morris Janowitz, ed. The new military: Changing patterns of organization. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1964. 30. Morris Janowitz...establishment. In The new military: Changing patterns of organization, edited by M. Janowitz, pp. 39-81. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1964. (Impact of new

  15. Military Pay Gaps and Caps.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    RATIOS AND ENLISTED RECRUIT QUALITY AND RETENTION 27 C. MILITARY-CrVIL SERVICE PAY ADJUSTMENT LINKAGE: LEGISLATIVE BACKGROUND, 1967-1993 30...DECI), which we constructed previously and have updated to include fiscal 1992. We compare pay gaps based on the ECI versus the DECI and present DECI...do. There is no claim that the levels of military and civilian pay are equal at base point. If pay levels are equal at the base point, the divergence

  16. [Psychological consequences of the 1994 massacres in Rwanda].

    PubMed

    Sydor, G; Philippot, P

    1996-01-01

    A research program on the prevalence of reactions of posttraumatic stress is described in this article. The program is specifically centered on the psychological consequences of the April 1994 events in Rwanda and the genocide that followed. It includes three psycho-epidemiologic studies: 1) a study of non-accompanied Rwandan children; 2) a study of a small group of belgian cooperants; and 3) a study of an important sample of belgian civilians and militaries having been through the rwandan events. The psychological impact of the rwandan events is described in terms of prevalence of symptoms of posttraumatic stress.

  17. Positive psychology and war: an oxymoron.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Sean

    2011-10-01

    The author was deeply disturbed by the January 2011 issue of the American Psychologist, which engendered a series of emotions in the author: first dismay, then anger, and finally a sense of shame about the current state of the profession. This was ostensibly an exposition of "positive psychology" principles and how they are to be applied in a colossal experiment designed to support our military in their fight against the ideology of jihadist Islam. The author found it hard to see what was positive in the presentation. Not one of the authors in this special issue discussed applying positive psychology principles to the reduction of conflict between nations, to the prevention of war, or to the promotion of peace. How about a positive psychology that questions the wisdom of leaders who tell us that the use of force is unavoidable, and seeks instead to help them find alternative, peaceful solutions? A true positive psychology should be primarily addressed to eradicating the disease of war, not to supporting those who fight it.

  18. Psychology in Action: Psychology in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, Sigmund

    1977-01-01

    "Psychologists in the People's Republic of China are engaged in research concerning theory, Chinese language, child development, vision, audition, and areas of physiological psychology including acupuncture, pain, memory, and central nervous system functioning. The Institute of Psychology within the Chinese Academy of Sciences represents the…

  19. Psychology in Action: Psychology in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, Sigmund

    1977-01-01

    "Psychologists in the People's Republic of China are engaged in research concerning theory, Chinese language, child development, vision, audition, and areas of physiological psychology including acupuncture, pain, memory, and central nervous system functioning. The Institute of Psychology within the Chinese Academy of Sciences represents the…

  20. Focus on Psychology: Precollege Psychology in Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahl, Robert J.; Casteel, J. Doyle

    1975-01-01

    In 1971 a survey was conducted of 409 Florida secondary schools to determine if they offer psychology courses and to obtain data about the courses offered. Data analysis showed that three decisions must be made: definition of psychology, identification of clientele, and teacher qualifications. (ND)

  1. Emotional ambivalence and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in soldiers during military operations

    PubMed Central

    Jerg-Bretzke, Lucia; Walter, Steffen; Limbrecht-Ecklundt, Kerstin; Traue, Harald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study examined the extent to which a specific mechanism of emotion regulation – namely, ambivalence concerning the expressiveness of German soldiers’ emotions – affects the severity of PTSD symptoms after a military operation. Methodology: A survey was conducted at three points in time among 66 soldiers deployed on military crisis operations. The Harvard Trauma Questionaire (HTQ), the Ambivalence over Emotional Expressiveness Questionnaire (AEQ-G18), and a questionnaire on the particular stress of German soldiers during military operations were used. Results: The study showed a significant correlation between emotional ambivalence and traumatization. Furthermore, it was shown that the subjective stress of soldiers leading up to deployment is more pronounced when emotional ambivalence is stronger in the context of military operations. This particular stress is greater before and during the military operation than after. Compared to a male control sample, the average AEQ-G18 scores of the soldier sample examined here are considerably lower. Conclusion: This pilot study clearly indicates that the AEQ-G18 could be a suitable predictor of the psychological burden on soldiers. The correlations between emotional ambivalence on the one hand and the particular and post-traumatic stressors on the other hand are not only statistically significant in the present pilot study, but may also be relevant as risk factors. It is, therefore, necessary to conduct more extensive studies on soldiers participating in military operations to verify the results of this pilot study. PMID:23798980

  2. Emotional ambivalence and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in soldiers during military operations.

    PubMed

    Jerg-Bretzke, Lucia; Walter, Steffen; Limbrecht-Ecklundt, Kerstin; Traue, Harald C

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study examined the extent to which a specific mechanism of emotion regulation - namely, ambivalence concerning the expressiveness of German soldiers' emotions - affects the severity of PTSD symptoms after a military operation. A survey was conducted at three points in time among 66 soldiers deployed on military crisis operations. The Harvard Trauma Questionaire (HTQ), the Ambivalence over Emotional Expressiveness Questionnaire (AEQ-G18), and a questionnaire on the particular stress of German soldiers during military operations were used. The study showed a significant correlation between emotional ambivalence and traumatization. Furthermore, it was shown that the subjective stress of soldiers leading up to deployment is more pronounced when emotional ambivalence is stronger in the context of military operations. This particular stress is greater before and during the military operation than after. Compared to a male control sample, the average AEQ-G18 scores of the soldier sample examined here are considerably lower. This pilot study clearly indicates that the AEQ-G18 could be a suitable predictor of the psychological burden on soldiers. The correlations between emotional ambivalence on the one hand and the particular and post-traumatic stressors on the other hand are not only statistically significant in the present pilot study, but may also be relevant as risk factors. It is, therefore, necessary to conduct more extensive studies on soldiers participating in military operations to verify the results of this pilot study.

  3. Adaption and adjustment of military spouses to overseas postings: an online forum study.

    PubMed

    Blakely, Gillian; Hennessy, Catherine; Chung, Man Cheung; Skirton, Heather

    2014-09-01

    Little research has examined the impact of being an accompanying spouse on British military foreign postings. The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate the experiences of 13 military spouses from 11 different overseas locations. Data were collected via an online forum and thematic content analysis was conducted. Key findings revealed that, regardless of the location, reactions to overseas posting varied considerably and were related to the military spouse's personality and personal circumstances, as well as their relationship with family, husband and their support networks. Spouses experienced a loss of control over their lives that was in some cases psychologically distressing. The findings corroborate and extend the findings from a previous study that was limited to one location, further highlighting the need for pre-established support resources from the military and healthcare professionals to be readily accessible for all military spouses. Importantly, such support provision may also facilitate the military spouse in regaining some control over their everyday life, enhancing their well-being and the experience for the family. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. The Temperament and Character of Korean Male Conscripts with Military Maladjustment-A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Bu

    2013-01-01

    Objective Recently, an increasing number of Korean male conscripts have been retiring because of military maladjustment despite the presence of qualifying medical and psychological screening tests in the Korean army. These problems suggest the presence of a common personality problem. To further examine this possibility, the present study used Cloninger's psychobiological model to investigate the temperament and character of soldiers suffering from military maladjustment. Methods Seventy-nine maladjusted male conscripts and eighty-seven controls enrolled at the 1596th unit from April 2011 to June 2012 participated in the present study. To measure participant personality, we used the Korean version of the Temperament and Character Inventory, Revised-Short. We used logistic regression analysis to examine the association between TCI-RS scores and risk of military maladjustment. Results The maladjustment group had a lower rank, socioeconomic status, education level, and a shorter duration of military service than the control group. The harm avoidance and self-transcendence scores were significantly higher in the maladjustment group, with lower scores for reward dependence, persistence, self-directedness, and cooperativeness scores. However, of these measures, only low cooperativeness was associated with an increased risk of military maladjustment. Conclusion These results suggest that a low level of cooperativeness can predict military inadequacy. Maladjusted male conscripts may have different personality characteristics from normals. To validate our results, further follow-up or cohort studies with a larger sample will be required. PMID:23798960

  5. Psychology in Japan.

    PubMed

    Imada, Hiroshi; Tanaka-Matsumi, Junko

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide information about Japan and its psychology in advance of the 31st International Congress of Psychology (ICP), to be held in Yokohama, Japan, in 2016. The article begins with the introduction of the Japanese Psychological Association (JPA), the hosting organization of the ICP 2016, and the Japanese Union of Psychological Associations consisting of 51 associations/societies, of which the JPA is a member. This is followed by a brief description of a history of psychology of Japan, with emphasis on the variation in our approach to psychology in three different periods, that is, the pre- and post-Pacific War periods, and the post-1960 period. Next, the international contributions of Japanese psychology/psychologists are discussed from the point of view of their visibility. Education and training in psychology in Japanese universities is discussed with a final positive remark about the long-awaited enactment of the Accredited Psychologist Law in September, 2015.

  6. Personality theory, abnormal psychology, and psychological measurement. A psychological behaviorism.

    PubMed

    Staats, A W

    1993-01-01

    Behaviorism, because it has not had a theory of personality, has been separated from the rest of psychology, unable in large part to draw from or contribute to it. Traditional psychology has not had a theory of personality that says what personality is, how it comes about, or how it functions. An antagonism has resulted that weakens rather than complements each tradition. Psychological behaviorism presents a new type of theory of personality. Derived from experimentation, it is constructed from basic theories of emotion, language, and sensory-motor behavior. It says personality is composed of learned basic behavioral repertoires (BBRs) that affect behavior. Personality measurement instruments are analyzed in terms of the BBRs, beginning the behaviorization of this field and calling for much additional research. These multilevel developments are then basic in psychological behaviorism's theory of abnormal behavior and of clinical treatment. The approach opens many new avenues of empirical and theoretical work.

  7. Professional Psychology in Germany, National Socialism, and the Second World War.

    PubMed

    Schönpflug, Wolfgang

    2017-07-17

    Hundreds of positions for psychologists were established after the National Socialists seized power in 1933. It has accordingly been asserted that professional psychology in Germany experienced significant growth during the National Socialist period. An analysis of archival materials and of a recent collection of biographies indicates otherwise, however. German psychology, in fact, declined because of systematic persecution and a surge of emigration, a deficit that subsequent cohorts were barely able to make up until 1945. The new positions for psychologists were mainly in the military testing service, and could only be filled after manpower was shifted from the civilian to the military sector. In 1941, the Ministry of Science and Education released regulations for an innovative practice-oriented national curriculum for psychology. The move was in line with Nazi policy, but it was initiated by a group of protagonists from psychology under the aegis of the German Psychological Association, not the National Socialist German Workers Party, the government, or the military. The present article elaborates how the conception of practice-oriented, state-approved studies was part of the traditional German dual system of academic and professional qualification, and thus actually predated 1933. The new curriculum was largely not implemented because of the exigencies of the war. However, as a regulatory framework it marked a turning point in the merging of academic and professional psychology in Germany. The relationship between academic and professional psychology is also discussed, along with the role of German psychology vis-à-vis National Socialism and the German military. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Sleep in the Military

    PubMed Central

    Troxel, Wendy M.; Shih, Regina A.; Pedersen, Eric R.; Geyer, Lily; Fisher, Michael P.; Griffin, Beth Ann; Haas, Ann C.; Kurz, Jeremy; Steinberg, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sleep disturbances are a common reaction to stress and are linked to a host of physical and mental health problems. Given the unprecedented demands placed on U.S. military forces since 2001, there has been growing concern about the prevalence and consequences of sleep problems for servicemembers. Sleep problems often follow a chronic course, persisting long after servicemembers return home from combat deployments, with consequences for their reintegration and the readiness and resiliency of the force. Therefore, it is critical to understand the role of sleep problems in servicemembers’ health and functioning and the policies and programs available to promote healthy sleep. This study provides the first comprehensive review of sleep-related policies and programs across the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), along with a set of actionable recommendations for DoD, commanders, researchers, and medical professionals who treat U.S. servicemembers. The two-year multimethod study also examined the rates and correlates of sleep problems among post-deployed servicemembers, finding negative effects on mental health, daytime impairment, and perceived operational readiness. The research reviewed evidence-based interventions to treat sleep disturbances among servicemembers and veterans and exposed several individual- and system-level barriers to achieving healthy sleep. Implementing evidence-based treatments is just one step toward improving sleep across the force; as the research recommendations highlight, it is equally important that policies and programs also focus on preventing sleep problems and their consequences. PMID:28083395

  9. Advances in military resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Sharon; Smith, Jason

    2016-10-06

    Trauma is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide, in civilian environments and on the battlefield. Trauma-induced haemorrhage is the principal cause of potentially preventable death, which is generally attributable to a combination of vascular injury and coagulopathy. Survival rates following severe traumatic injury have increased due to advanced trauma management initiatives and treatment protocols, influenced by lessons learned from recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. The use of tourniquets and intraosseous needles, early blood and blood product transfusion, administration of tranexamic acid in pre-hospital settings, and consultant-led damage control resuscitation incorporating damage control surgery have all played their part. All are quantified by trauma governance processes, including a robust trauma registry. Some of the lessons learned in combat are equally applicable to civilian environments, and this article describes several of the most important of these. It also gives an overview of advancements in UK military trauma management of severely injured combat casualties, honed over a decade of conflict.

  10. Psychology in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sushma, B.; Padmaja, G.

    2011-01-01

    Psychology forms the basis of every human activity. The scope of psychology is increasingly widening in various economic, political, social, cultural and technological aspects. Though the application of psychology is extending to various aspects of life, it needs to be indigenised to address the dynamic needs in the various socio-economic contexts…

  11. Nursing and Psychological Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwekkeboom, Kristine L.; Ameringer, Suzanne; Harrison, Tondi; Phillips, Christopher M.; Serlin, Ronald C.; Ward, Sandra E.

    2005-01-01

    This brief article presents a comment on "Psychological Treatments" by D. H. Barlow. In his article, Barlow pointed to the need "to solidify the identification of psychology as a health care profession" by changing the terminology of practice in the health care context from psychotherapy to psychological treatments and suggested that the only…

  12. Psychology: Student Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Rebecca

    This book published in 1986 introduces students to psychology and its related subject areas. Students learn that psychology has matured through the centuries from its taboo beginnings in supernatural beliefs and magic to its current status as a scientific discipline. Sections of the book include: (1) "What is Psychology?"; (2) "Human Development";…

  13. Psychology in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Eleonora Rubio

    2011-01-01

    The first formal psychology course taught in Mexico was in 1896 at Mexico's National University; today, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM in Spanish). The modern psychology from Europe and the US in the late 19th century were the primary influences of Mexican psychology, as well as psychoanalysis and both clinical and experimental…

  14. Arbitrary Metrics in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Hart; Jaccard, James

    2006-01-01

    Many psychological tests have arbitrary metrics but are appropriate for testing psychological theories. Metric arbitrariness is a concern, however, when researchers wish to draw inferences about the true, absolute standing of a group or individual on the latent psychological dimension being measured. The authors illustrate this in the context of 2…

  15. Psychology: Student Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Rebecca

    This book published in 1986 introduces students to psychology and its related subject areas. Students learn that psychology has matured through the centuries from its taboo beginnings in supernatural beliefs and magic to its current status as a scientific discipline. Sections of the book include: (1) "What is Psychology?"; (2) "Human Development";…

  16. Psychology and Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    1987-01-01

    Psychology and literature focus on human behavior. There are several points where the interests of psychologists and literary scholars converge. This convergence is evident in the use of literature to test psychological theories and to understand human behavior in historical times, in the psychological analyses of literature, and in psychological…

  17. Intro through Internet Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Sandra K.; Kelliher, Thomas P.

    Psychology and computer science were clustered into a course in "Internet Psychology" with the goal of enabling students to use electronic networks responsibly and creatively and to understand the principles of psychology as they operate in the electronic context. Fourteen students from a variety of majors registered for the class.…

  18. Arbitrary Metrics in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Hart; Jaccard, James

    2006-01-01

    Many psychological tests have arbitrary metrics but are appropriate for testing psychological theories. Metric arbitrariness is a concern, however, when researchers wish to draw inferences about the true, absolute standing of a group or individual on the latent psychological dimension being measured. The authors illustrate this in the context of 2…

  19. Family-supportive work environments and psychological strain: a longitudinal test of two theories.

    PubMed

    Odle-Dusseau, Heather N; Herleman, Hailey A; Britt, Thomas W; Moore, Dewayne D; Castro, Carl A; McGurk, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Based on the Job Demands-Resources (JDR) model (E. Demerouti, A. B. Bakker, F. Nachreiner, & W. B. Schaufeli, 2001, The job demands-resources model of burnout. Journal of Applied Psychology, 86, 499-512) and Conservation of Resources (COR) theory (S. E. Hobfoll, 2002, Social and psychological resources and adaptation. Review of General Psychology, 6, 307-324), we tested three competing models that predict different directions of causation for relationships over time between family-supportive work environments (FSWE) and psychological strain, with two waves of data from a military sample. Results revealed support for both the JDR and COR theories, first in the static model where FSWE at Time 1 predicted psychological strain at Time 2 and when testing the opposite direction, where psychological strain at Time 1 predicted FSWE at Time 2. For change models, FSWE predicted changes in psychological strain across time, although the reverse causation model was not supported (psychological strain at Time 1 did not predict changes in FSWE). Also, changes in FSWE across time predicted psychological strain at Time 2, whereas changes in psychological strain did not predict FSWE at Time 2. Theoretically, these results are important for the work-family interface in that they demonstrate the application of a systems approach to studying work and family interactions, as support was obtained for both the JDR model with perceptions of FSWE predicting psychological strain (in both the static and change models), and for COR theory where psychological strain predicts FSWE across time.

  20. Mindfulness-Based Mind Fitness Training: A Case Study of a High-Stress Predeployment Military Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Elizabeth A.; Schaldach, John M.; Kiyonaga, Anastasia; Jha, Amishi P.

    2011-01-01

    Current military deployments have resulted in many psychological and physical health issues and created interest in protective measures to mitigate effects of prolonged and repetitive stress. Mindfulness training has been successfully used for stress reduction in other contexts. The following case report presents a detachment of U.S. Marines who…

  1. Advice to Mental Health Intervention for Recruits Based on an Investigation for Mental Status of Servicemen during Basic Military Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong-zheng, Li; Dan-min, Miao; Mei-ying, Lei; Xiao-yan, Chen; Xiao-bing, Liu

    2007-01-01

    Basic military training consists of highly regimented training in the context of fairly extreme psychosocial stressors, and some recruits suffered from rigorous disturbance in mind. Even if practical measures which include instructive psychological intervention have been taken to ameliorate the disturbance, some questions still have not been…

  2. Multi Service Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Treatment of Chemical Warfare Agent Casualties and Conventional Military Chemical Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-02

    presence or threat of CW agent operations can create psychological and physiological problems , adversely affect morale, and reduce military or civilian...effects Generalized weakness, depression of respiratory and circulatory centers with dyspnea, cyanosis, and hypotension, convulsions, loss of...Death is usually due to respiratory arrest and anoxia. Prompt initiation of assisted ventilation may prevent death. Depression of the circulatory

  3. AN EVALUATION OF THE MILITARY FAMILY'S ADJUSTMENT. IMPACT OF FATHER ABSENCE ON PERSONALITY FACTORS OF BOYS, I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAKER, STEWARD L.; AND OTHERS

    A PRELIMINARY REPORT OF AN EFFORT TO STUDY THE EFFECTS OF FATHER'S ABSENCE (FA) AND/OR GEOGRAPHIC MOBILITY ON THE MILITARY FAMILY IS PRESENTED. CONTACT WAS ESTABLISHED WITH 65 FAMILIES WHO HAD FIVE TO EIGHT YEAR OLD SONS AND HAD ORDERS FOR AN UNACCOMPANIED FAMILY TOUR OF AT LEAST ONE YEAR'S DURATION IN A NONCOMBAT AREA. PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS WERE…

  4. Mindfulness-Based Mind Fitness Training: A Case Study of a High-Stress Predeployment Military Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Elizabeth A.; Schaldach, John M.; Kiyonaga, Anastasia; Jha, Amishi P.

    2011-01-01

    Current military deployments have resulted in many psychological and physical health issues and created interest in protective measures to mitigate effects of prolonged and repetitive stress. Mindfulness training has been successfully used for stress reduction in other contexts. The following case report presents a detachment of U.S. Marines who…

  5. 78 FR 5717 - Safety Zone; Military Ocean Terminal Concord Safety Zone, Suisun Bay, Military Ocean Terminal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Military Ocean Terminal Concord Safety Zone, Suisun Bay, Military Ocean Terminal Concord, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Interim rule and... Suisun Bay near Military Ocean Terminal Concord, CA in support of military onload and offload...

  6. Neoscholastic psychology revisited.

    PubMed

    Kugelmann, Robert

    2005-05-01

    Beginning around 1879, a Neoscholastic psychology developed, an experimental psychology with a soul. Opposed to materialism, it sought to renew Scholastic philosophy by incorporating the findings of the natural sciences. Neoscholastic psychology is an important chapter in the history of the relationships between science and religion in the 20th century. Neoscholastic psychology was both experimental and philosophical. This article presents the main accomplishments of North American Neoscholastic psychology in academic and applied areas. Neoscholastic psychologists championed scientific psychology while insisting on a better conception of human nature. Philosophical critiques led to a decline of Neoscholasticism; after the 1960s it was no longer official Catholic philosophy. Neoscholasticism gave psychologists concerned with philosophical questions impetus to turn to phenomenology, existentialism, and humanistic psychology.

  7. Examining the relationship between coping strategies and suicidal desire in a sample of United States military personnel.

    PubMed

    Khazem, Lauren R; Law, Keyne C; Green, Bradley A; Anestis, Michael D

    2015-02-01

    Suicidal desire in the military has been previously examined through the lens of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide (IPTS). However, no research has examined the impact of specific coping strategies on perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness, and suicidal ideation in a large population of individuals serving in the US military. Furthermore, the factor structure of previously utilized coping clusters did not apply to our sample of military personnel. Therefore, we found a three-factor solution to be tested in this sample. We hypothesized that specific types of coping behavior clusters (Adaptive and Maladaptive) would predict both IPTS constructs and suicidal ideation. Results indicated that Adaptive and Maladaptive coping clusters predicted the IPTS constructs in the hypothesized directions. However, only the Maladaptive cluster predicted suicidal ideation. These findings implicate the need for further research and suicide prevention efforts focusing on coping strategies, specifically those that are maladaptive in nature, in relation to suicidal ideation in military members.

  8. Families overcoming under stress: implementing family-centered prevention for military families facing wartime deployments and combat operational stress.

    PubMed

    Lester, Patricia; Mogil, Catherine; Saltzman, William; Woodward, Kirsten; Nash, William; Leskin, Gregory; Bursch, Brenda; Green, Sara; Pynoos, Robert; Beardslee, William

    2011-01-01

    The toll of multiple and prolonged deployments on families has become clearer in recent years as military families have seen an increase in childhood anxiety, parental psychological distress, and marital discord. Families overcoming under stress (FOCUS), a family-centered evidence-informed resiliency training program developed at University of California, Los Angeles and Harvard Medical School, is being implemented at military installations through an initiative from Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. The research foundation for FOCUS includes evidence-based preventive interventions that were adapted to meet the specific needs of military families facing combat operational stress associated with wartime deployments. Using a family narrative approach, FOCUS includes a customized approach utilizing core intervention components, including psychoeducation, emotional regulation skills, goal setting and problem solving skills, traumatic stress reminder management techniques, and family communication skills. The purpose of this study is to describe the development and implementation of FOCUS for military families. A case example is also presented.

  9. Why Thailand’s Military Stepped In

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    threats to interests. Additionally, the two cases demonstrate how Thailand’s military is compelled to act as a political army due to the birthright...threats to interests. Additionally, the two cases demonstrate how Thailand’s military is compelled to act as a political army due to the birthright...theory for the Thai military. Using the cases of Thai military coups of 1991 and 2006 as examples, this 2 thesis identifies which combination of

  10. Military Medical Care: Questions and Answers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-20

    Order Code RL33537 Military Medical Care : Questions and Answers Updated May 20, 2008 Richard A. Best Jr. Specialist in National Defense Foreign...control number. 1. REPORT DATE 20 MAY 2008 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Medical Care : Questions and...8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Military Medical Care : Questions and Answers Summary The primary mission of the military health system, which

  11. Military Retirement: Background and Recent Developments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-27

    Military Retirement: Background and Recent Developments David F. Burrelli Specialist in Military Manpower Policy Barbara Salazar Torreon...COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Retirement: Background and Recent Developments 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...Recent Developments Congressional Research Service Summary The military retirement system is a noncontributory, defined benefit system that has

  12. DOD Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-01

    DOD Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms As of March 2017 PREFACE i 1. Scope The DOD Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms...DOD Dictionary) sets forth standard US military and associated terminology to encompass the joint activity of the Armed Forces of the United States...These military and associated terms, together with their definitions, constitute approved Department of Defense (DOD) terminology for general use by

  13. Women in the Military: A Selected Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    Women in the Military: A Selected Bibliography was compiled to show the changing roles of women in the military and ongoing concerns relating to their integration in the military. Most of what is included was published after 1996, continuing the selection of materials included in the 1996 Library Notes version of Women in the Military. All the items are available in the U.S. Army War College Library collection or through the Internet.

  14. Military and Contractor Justice in Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-23

    governed under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, and the application of deadly force determined appropriate by the Rules of Engagement; PSC’ s...accountable for their actions in the same manner as the US military, under the Uniform Code of Military Justice. The Office of the Inspector General...in Baghdad. Conversely, the U.S. military defines the appropriate use of force under the Rules of Engagement(ROE), as defined by Combatant Commander

  15. US Military Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training Programs and Careers of Military Child Psychiatrists.

    PubMed

    Weston, Christina G; Dougherty, Joseph G; Nelson, Suzie C; Baker, Matthew J; Chow, Jennifer C

    2015-08-01

    Military child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) fellowship programs offer educational experiences universal to all civilian training programs in the USA. They also offer unique training opportunities not found in civilian CAP fellowships in order to prepare graduates to serve the needs of military families. Military-specific curricula and exposures prepare trainees to address various issues faced by military families, in contending with frequent military moves, parental deployments, and disrupted social ties. Curricula are also designed to provide the psychiatrist with a greater understanding of the rigors of military service. CAP training and subsequent assignments prepare military psychiatrists for diverse career paths in the military environment. CAP military careers often include duties in addition to treating patients. Administrative roles, academic teaching positions, as well as school consultation positions are all career options available to military CAP.

  16. Narrative transformation among military personnel on an adventurous training and sport course.

    PubMed

    Carless, David

    2014-10-01

    In the wake of recent wars, some military personnel face considerable physical and mental health problems. In this article I explore the effects of an adapted sport and inclusive adventurous training course for military personnel who have experienced physical injury and/or psychological trauma. Using a dialogical narrative approach, I analyzed stories shared by six soldiers during the course to explore the effects of involvement. Participation in the course seemed to facilitate a narrative transformation or opening corresponding to a broadening identity and sense of self. Story plots progressed from a failing monological narrative, through a chaos narrative, toward a dialogical quest narrative prioritizing immersion in an intense present, a developing self, and a relational orientation. On the basis of narrative theory, I suggest this transformation holds positive consequences for the health and well-being of military personnel who have experienced injury and/or trauma.

  17. [Regularity of psychophysiological adaptation to military-professional activity among staff of Northern Fleet].

    PubMed

    Sementsov, V K; Khankevich, Iu R; Mosiagin, I G; Maruniak, S V; Chesnokova, V N

    2010-03-01

    There were examined regularities of psycho-physiological adaptation of different categories of military-navy specialists, were detected periods of maximum decrease of compensation abilities among sailor-men and staff reserve of Naval Fleet from students. Were educed psycho-physiological strategies of adaptation of military-navy specialists in dependence of reference level of adaptation capabilities. Was detected the influence on the process of psycho-physiological adaptation to service activity of young specialists of a complex of psychological and social factors. Was educed the influence of ulterior motive on success of psycho-physiological adaptation to new conditions of environment. Was elaborated a complex of measures on optimization of accompaniment of adaptation of military-navy specialists and was given financial evaluation of it's implementation.

  18. Geographic mobility, family, and maternal variables as related to the psychosocial adjustment of military children.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Michelle L; Finkel, Lisa B; Ashby, Jayne

    2003-12-01

    The present study examined maternal and family factors and family mobility as related to mothers' and children's reports of the psychological adjustment of children in military families. Participants were 86 mother-child dyads in U.S. traditional military families. Children's reports of loneliness, peer relationships, fear of negative evaluations, and self-esteem were predicted by family cohesiveness, children's reports of their relationships with their mothers, and the length of time they had lived in their current residence, but not their rate of mobility (i.e., number of moves in the child's lifetime divided by the child's age). In contrast, maternal depressive symptoms predicted children's depressive and anxious behaviors, and both maternal depressive symptoms and children's perception of their relationship with their mothers predicted children's aggression and noncompliance. Results suggest that moving may not be as important as other aspects of maternal functioning and family relationships for the psychosocial adjustment of children in military families.

  19. Serial killers with military experience: applying learning theory to serial murder.

    PubMed

    Castle, Tammy; Hensley, Christopher

    2002-08-01

    Scholars have endeavored to study the motivation and causality behind serial murder by researching biological, psychological, and sociological variables. Some of these studies have provided support for the relationship between these variables and serial murder. However, the study of serial murder continues to be an exploratory rather than explanatory research topic. This article examines the possible link between serial killers and military service. Citing previous research using social learning theory for the study of murder, this article explores how potential serial killers learn to reinforce violence, aggression, and murder in military boot camps. As with other variables considered in serial killer research, military experience alone cannot account for all cases of serial murder. Future research should continue to examine this possible link.

  20. Family as a Total Package: Restoring and Enhancing Psychological Health for Citizen Soldiers and Families

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    reintegration services for military personnel and veterans in Missouri. Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program (YRRP): A mandated universal secondary...MO 63130 Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program, National Guard, Post-deployment Reintegration , Psychological Health Abstract on next page. 27 15 FEB...overall objectives of this study are to: (I) demonstrate the effectiveness of the Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program (YRRP); and (II) examine the role

  1. The 71F Advantage: Applying Army Research Psychology for Health and Performance Gains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Chapter 13 Psychological Effects of Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Weapons...better and more efficient selection and classification tools and strategies, more effective train- ing programs for military personnel, and improved...alcohol problems, and even suicide. This work being done by research psychologists not only helps with operational effectiveness , but it also helps the

  2. Suicide and the Military Justice System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lande, Raymond G.

    1992-01-01

    Notes that U.S. military policies emphasize humanitarian approach to issue of suicide, yet military law may view suicidal behavior as deviant and may prosecute suicide attempters. Cites convictions of soldiers for attempted and assisted suicides. Reviews recent court decisions and suggests revisions in military law. (Author/NB)

  3. 32 CFR 575.1 - Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.1 Military Academy. (a) Organization and administration. (1) The United States.... (b) Mission. The mission of the United States Military Academy is to educate, train, and motivate...

  4. Occupations: Military--Civilian Occupational Source Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armed Forces Vocational Testing Group, Universal City, TX.

    Information on enlisted military occupations is offered in the source book to arrive at a comprehensive statement of job tasks in the military service and their similarities to jobs in civilian life. Basic information about five areas of the U.S. military services (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard) focuses on their military…

  5. Support for Military Families and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoshmand, Lisa Tsoi; Hoshmand, Andrea L.

    2007-01-01

    This is a call for community psychologists to engage in research, consultation, and program development and evaluation in supporting military families and communities. Barriers to such involvement are identified and discussed. It is argued that the needs of military families and communities cannot be ignored when military and civilian communities…

  6. Limits of Military Power for National Security.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melman, Seymour

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the post World War II nuclear-military arms race and claims that it is possible to define significant limits of military power for national security. Topics discussed include public opinion regarding the arms race, constraints on military power, conventional forces, checkmating conventional strategy, and the seriousness of nuclear false…

  7. 14 CFR 13.21 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Military personnel. 13.21 Section 13.21... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.21 Military personnel. If a report made... civilian employee of the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10...

  8. 49 CFR 1503.407 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Military personnel. 1503.407 Section 1503.407... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.407 Military personnel. If a report made under this part... the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. chapter...

  9. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  10. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... CERTAIN DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA RETIREMENT PROGRAMS Split Benefits § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior...

  11. 5 CFR 842.306 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Military service. 842.306 Section 842.306... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-BASIC ANNUITY Credit for Service § 842.306 Military service. (a) Except as...' Retirement System Act of 1986, an employee's or Member's military service is creditable if it was...

  12. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Military personnel. 1400.213 Section 1400.213... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.213 Military personnel. If a person is called to active duty in the military before a determination is made that the person...

  13. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Military personnel. 1400.213 Section 1400.213... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.213 Military personnel. If a person is called to active duty in the military before a determination is made that the person...

  14. 49 CFR 1503.407 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Military personnel. 1503.407 Section 1503.407... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.407 Military personnel. If a report made under this part... the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. chapter...

  15. 5 CFR 842.306 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Military service. 842.306 Section 842.306... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-BASIC ANNUITY Credit for Service § 842.306 Military service. (a) Except as...' Retirement System Act of 1986, an employee's or Member's military service is creditable if it was...

  16. 5 CFR 842.306 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Military service. 842.306 Section 842.306... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-BASIC ANNUITY Credit for Service § 842.306 Military service. (a) Except as...' Retirement System Act of 1986, an employee's or Member's military service is creditable if it was...

  17. 49 CFR 1503.407 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Military personnel. 1503.407 Section 1503.407... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.407 Military personnel. If a report made under this part... the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. chapter...

  18. 14 CFR 13.21 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Military personnel. 13.21 Section 13.21... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.21 Military personnel. If a report made... civilian employee of the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10...

  19. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  20. 14 CFR 13.21 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Military personnel. 13.21 Section 13.21... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.21 Military personnel. If a report made... civilian employee of the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10...

  1. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  2. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Military personnel. 1400.213 Section 1400.213... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.213 Military personnel. If a person is called to active duty in the military before a determination is made that the person...

  3. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... CERTAIN DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA RETIREMENT PROGRAMS Split Benefits § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior...

  4. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Military personnel. 1400.213 Section 1400.213... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.213 Military personnel. If a person is called to active duty in the military before a determination is made that the person...

  5. The Barracks Subculture of Military School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliakov, R. Iu.

    2011-01-01

    The subcultures that develop among military students have a powerful influence on their values and behavior, and in some situations are more influential than the official, military culture. Any attempt to improve levels of discipline in the military cannot afford to ignore these subcultures. [This article was translated by Kim Braithwaite.

  6. Suicide and the Military Justice System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lande, Raymond G.

    1992-01-01

    Notes that U.S. military policies emphasize humanitarian approach to issue of suicide, yet military law may view suicidal behavior as deviant and may prosecute suicide attempters. Cites convictions of soldiers for attempted and assisted suicides. Reviews recent court decisions and suggests revisions in military law. (Author/NB)

  7. 32 CFR 575.1 - Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the administration and training of the Corps of Cadets and is also head of the Department of Tactics. (b) Mission. The mission of the United States Military Academy is to educate, train, and motivate the... military training. In accomplishing its mission, the Military Academy strives to develop in each cadet...

  8. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air Force...

  9. The Barracks Subculture of Military School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliakov, R. Iu.

    2011-01-01

    The subcultures that develop among military students have a powerful influence on their values and behavior, and in some situations are more influential than the official, military culture. Any attempt to improve levels of discipline in the military cannot afford to ignore these subcultures. [This article was translated by Kim Braithwaite.

  10. 5 CFR 842.306 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Military service. 842.306 Section 842.306... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-BASIC ANNUITY Credit for Service § 842.306 Military service. (a) Except as...' Retirement System Act of 1986, an employee's or Member's military service is creditable if it was performed...

  11. 5 CFR 842.306 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Military service. 842.306 Section 842.306... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-BASIC ANNUITY Credit for Service § 842.306 Military service. (a) Except as...' Retirement System Act of 1986, an employee's or Member's military service is creditable if it was performed...

  12. 5 CFR 831.301 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Military service. 831.301 Section 831.301...) RETIREMENT Credit for Service § 831.301 Military service. (a) Service of an individual who first became an... is not receiving military retired pay awarded for reasons other than (i) service-connected disability...

  13. 14 CFR 13.21 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Military personnel. 13.21 Section 13.21... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.21 Military personnel. If a report made... civilian employee of the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U...

  14. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Military personnel. 1400.213 Section 1400.213... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.213 Military personnel. If a person is called to active duty in the military before a determination is made that the person is...

  15. 49 CFR 1503.407 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Military personnel. 1503.407 Section 1503.407... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.407 Military personnel. If a report made under this part... the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. chapter 47...

  16. 78 FR 43796 - Indebtedness of Military Personnel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 513 Indebtedness of Military Personnel AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Final rule; removal. SUMMARY: This action removes regulations concerning indebtedness of military... CFR Part 112, ``Indebtedness of Military Personnel,'' and DoD Financial Management Review (FMR...

  17. 14 CFR 13.21 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Military personnel. 13.21 Section 13.21... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.21 Military personnel. If a report made... civilian employee of the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U...

  18. 32 CFR 724.215 - Military representation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military representation. 724.215 Section 724.215 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD Authority/Policy for Departmental Discharge Review § 724.215 Military representation. Military...

  19. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air Force...

  20. 32 CFR 724.215 - Military representation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military representation. 724.215 Section 724.215 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD Authority/Policy for Departmental Discharge Review § 724.215 Military representation. Military...

  1. Weight Change Following US Military Service

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-10

    available on how long individuals had served in the military and when they were discharged. Because of the adverse health outcomes associated with...overweight and obesity, studies using prospectively collected data, from individuals serving in the current conflicts, are needed to better understand...military discharge status. Discharge from the military Individuals were classified as discharged if they had an interservice separation code

  2. Military suicide: factors that need to be taken into consideration to understand the phenomena.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, José R; Quiñones-Maldonado, Randy; Alvarado-Pomales, Awilda

    2009-01-01

    Soldier suicide rates, unfortunately, continue to rise in our military services. It is well known that military personnel are highly vulnerable to multiple psychopathologies due to a lack of social support system, traumatizing life events and deprived sense of control. Serious psychopathologies such as post-traumatic stress disorders, other anxiety disorders (i.e., generalized anxiety disorder) and depression may increase the risk of suicide. In addition, malingering may be a serious problem that can affect valid treatment due to an intentional production of false or grossly exaggerated physical or psychological symptoms, motivated by external incentive such as avoiding military duty or obtaining financial compensation. Moreover, Hispanic soldiers may be at a higher risk for such psychopathologies due to extreme marginalization conditions by military peers, lack of bilingual language management and discrimination that can severely affect their quality of life. Thus, it is important to recognize those problems in order to prevent them. Literature demonstrate that Primary Preventive Interventions (PPI) can help to reduce the incidence of psychiatric disorders due to an early identification of the mental conditions associate to serious outcome, such as suicide. Taking the previous factors into consideration, the relevant literature pertaining suicidality in service members and the mental disorders associated with it is reviewed. Furthermore, emphasis is made in the importance to develop and validate a battery of screening instruments that address the previous conditions in the military personnel, especially in the Hispanic/Latino soldier and/or veteran as future plans of interventions. This implies the creation, adaptation and administration of a Psychological Battery that will be culturally sensitive for Hispanic/Latino soldiers in which the screening of the previously mentioned pathologies and conditions can be identified. This may help to prevent serious

  3. Increased protein intake in military special operations.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Arny A

    2013-11-01

    Special operations are so designated for the specialized military missions they address. As a result, special operations present some unique metabolic challenges. In particular, soldiers often operate in a negative energy balance in stressful and demanding conditions with little opportunity for rest or recovery. In this framework, findings inferred from the performance literature suggest that increased protein intake may be beneficial. In particular, increased protein intake during negative caloric balance maintains lean body mass and blood glucose production. The addition of protein to mixed macronutrient supplements is beneficial for muscle endurance and power endpoints, and the use of amino acids improves gross and fine motor skills. Increasing protein intake during periods of intense training and/or metabolic demand improves subsequent performance, improves muscular recovery, and reduces symptoms of psychological stress. Consumption of protein before sleep confers the anabolic responses required for the maintenance of lean mass and muscle recovery. A maximal response in muscle protein synthesis is achieved with the consumption of 20-25 g of protein alone. However, higher protein intakes in the context of mixed-nutrient ingestion also confer anabolic benefits by reducing protein breakdown. Restricted rations issued to special operators provide less than the RDA for protein ( ∼ 0.6 g/kg), and these soldiers often rely on commercial products to augment their rations. The provision of reasonable alternatives and/or certification of approved supplements by the U.S. Department of Defense would be prudent.

  4. Traumatic Brain Injury Incidence, Clinical Overview, and Policies in the US Military Health System Since 2000.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Thomas M; Isaacson, Brad M; Cyborski, Cherina M; French, Louis M; Tsao, Jack W; Pasquina, Paul F

    Exposure to explosive armaments during Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom contributed to approximately 14% of the 352 612 traumatic brain injury (TBI) diagnoses in the US military between 2000 and 2016. The US Department of Defense issued guidelines in 2009 to (1) standardize TBI diagnostic criteria; (2) classify TBI according to mechanism and severity; (3) categorize TBI symptoms as somatic, psychological, or cognitive; and (4) systematize types of care given during the acute and rehabilitation stages of TBI treatment. Polytrauma and associated psychological and neurologic conditions may create barriers to optimal rehabilitation from TBI. Given the completion of recent combat operations and the transition of TBI patients into long-term care within the US Department of Veterans Affairs system, a review of the literature concerning TBI is timely. Long-term follow-up care for patients who have sustained TBI will remain a critical issue for the US military.

  5. Clinical supervision in a UK military Department of Community Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Wesson, Matthew I; Whybrow, D; Greenberg, N; Gould, M

    2013-12-01

    Recent service developments in the NHS on the provision of talking therapies such as the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) initiative have made the compliance with clinical supervision (CS) inherent among its service guidelines. This paper presents the findings of an audit, measuring compliance with CS among clinicians providing psychological therapies within a military Department of Community Mental Health. Adherence to the recommended monthly supervision and the presence of an indate CS contract were audited on two separate occasions over 2 years by analysing the departmental electronic CS database. Compliance rates were found to be lower than the Defence guidelines, which are already modest in their expectations compared with IAPT CS standards. Potential reasons are hypothesised including high levels of staff rotation, other military commitments, clinicians not keeping up-to-date records and the pressures of meeting performance indicators on other clinical issues. Proposals for improving the uptake of CS are suggested along with areas for further research.

  6. The military upper extremity amputee.

    PubMed

    Petri, Richard P; Aguila, Eric

    2002-02-01

    Throughout the course of military history, soldiers have continued to sustain amputation injuries during war times and during peacetime and training missions. What has changed over time is the etiology of, indication for, and management of the amputations. Technology has advanced significantly, often with some military connection. More work still needs to be done, especially in the areas of greater prosthetic limb function and usage as well as phantom pain and sensation management. Collaborative efforts among physiatrists, surgeons, prosthetists, and therapists can only benefit the patient.

  7. China’s Military Potential

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    ing China’s military power.17 This strategy was confirmed in the second defense white paper by China, China’s National Defense, published on July 27...500,000 men to a current strength of 800,000. More recently, despite the announced troop reductions in the white paper Be]ing issued on national defense...Among Nations: The Struggle for Power and Peace, New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1949, p. 74. See also Philip Towle , ed., Estimating Foreign Military Power

  8. Military Observers 1815-1975

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-16

    Cavalry 7028 Evans, John Humphrey 1923, Infantry/Cavalry 7074 Ridings, Eugene Ware 1923, Infantry 7078 Reid, Alexander Davidson 1923, Infantry 7084...ColoreI , at Rome. :taly v.s issIs:an military attache in I-4S. 410 Trank Rzcc1ph Maerd~an 8 ~ nr Assigmel t o jartu.a-y to November. i952. S4:4 Ramon...1938,Signal Coros Ai a Lieutenant Colonel. in Finliarn as military a-taci- fr-m i945 to 1947. Member of j-i4t-cJ :4at- nrs nissiotn ’- .D -ii r L

  9. The effects of military deployment on early child development.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dana R; Ee, Juliana; Berry-Cabán, Cristobal S; Hoedebecke, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this observational, point prevalence study is to determine if parental deployment affects the cognitive, social and emotional development of preschool age children in the military family. Demographic information was collected and an age-appropriate Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ-3) and Ages and Stages Social-Emotional Inventory (ASQ:SE) were administered. The primary outcome measure was the failure rates on the developmental instruments. We identified 151 parents of eligible children; 95 children had a parent that deployed during their lifetime. We found a significant difference in ASQ-3 failure rates for children in the deployed group compared to those in the nondeployed group. Children of deployed parents were at least twice as often to fail the ASQ-3 or ASQ:SE developmental screen compared to children whose parents did not deploy. 30.5% of children in the deployed group failed the ASQ-3 screen while 12.5% of children who did not have a deployed parent failed (P=.009). On the ASQ:SE developmental screen, 16.8% of children who had a parent deploy failed versus 5.4% of children who did not have a parent deploy (P=.031). This study suggests that parental deployment is related to adverse risk for developmental delays in children in military families. The psychological burden on military children could be life-long or require significant resources to address. These adverse outcomes could be possibly mitigated by early detection of developmental delay and firm attention to aggressive screening techniques in military communities.

  10. Post-traumatic stress disorder in the military veteran.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M J; Schnurr, P P; McDonagh-Coyle, A

    1994-06-01

    1. Military personnel exposed to war-zone trauma are at risk for developing PTSD. Those at greatest risk are those exposed to the highest levels of war-zone stress, those wounded in action, those incarcerated as prisoners of war, and those who manifest acute war-zone reactions, such as CSR. 2. In addition to problems directly attributable to PTSD symptoms per se, individuals with this disorder frequently suffer from other comorbid psychiatric disorders, such as depression, other anxiety disorders, and alcohol or substance abuse/dependence. The resulting constellation of psychiatric symptoms frequently impairs marital, vocational, and social function. 3. The likelihood of developing chronic PTSD depends on premilitary and postmilitary factors in addition to features of the trauma itself. Premilitary factors include negative environmental factors in childhood, economic deprivation, family psychiatric history, age of entry into the military, premilitary educational attainment, and personality characteristics. Postmilitary factors include social support and the veteran's coping skills. 4. Among American military personnel, there are three populations at risk for unique problems that may amplify the psychological impact of war-zone stress. They are women whose war-zone experiences may be complicated by sexual assault and harassment; nonwhite ethnic minority individuals whose premilitary, postmilitary, and military experience is affected by the many manifestations of racism; and those with war-related physical disabilities, whose PTSD and medical problems often exacerbate each other. 5. The longitudinal course of PTSD is quite variable. Some trauma survivors may achieve complete recovery, whereas others may develop a persistent mental disorder in which they are severely and chronically incapacitated. Other patterns include delayed, chronic, and intermittent PTSD. 6. Theoretically primary preventive measures might include prevention of war or screening out vulnerable

  11. [Psychological approach to the prevention of war].

    PubMed

    Aisenson Kogan, A

    1976-09-01

    War is a complex social situation due to the interplay of multiple factors. Economical and political ones are of utmost importance, but human attitudes and motivations must be also taken into account. Being desirable to modify human transactions in such a way that they do not interfere with the basic right of everyone to a condition of physical and mental well-being, war must be abolished. The author contends that an understanding of behaviour through Psychology can be helpful in that aim. Aggression is considered the principal psychological cause of war. It is worth while to differentiate between aggression as an instrument for attaining a special end, and as pure hostility. Only in the first form, it is held here, does it play an important role in war. Psychogists must deal also with a wide range of states of mind that can be "served" by aggression: feelings of inferiority or insecurity, fear, greed, projections, compensations, rationalizations, etc. Scientific approach is not the only one Physiology brings to war prevention. It is equally important the wide dissemination of its conclusions among the general public. Information on the dynamics that prompt people to decide war would make it easier to control. This applies not only to political or military leaders, but also to civil populations. Concerning those two possible contributions of psychologists, scientific and educative, it is suggested the extensive use of psychodramatic techniques. Their richness lie in the lifelike experiences they convey to the participants, and particular aptitude to promote changes of attitudes. Investigation and information on the psychological processes related to war should be undertaken by international organizations of social scientists, acting simultaneously in several countries. Some of the initial steps they could further: 1) that prevention of war be a current subject matter in psychological courses; 2) that the World Health Organization take interest in this subject; 3

  12. [Military psychiatry in a theatre of operations: on mission in Mali].

    PubMed

    Colas, Marie-Dominique

    2015-01-01

    The recent missions of military psychiatrists in the theatres of operation underline the reactivity of the French healthcare system, focused on the expertise of the combat unit doctor. Operation Serval in Mali illustrates in particular the methods of medical-psychological support in exceptional situations, across a vast geographical area and in very difficult climatic conditions. The concept of "forward psychiatry" has a particularly important role to play in the early screening and treatment of psychological disorders in order to preserve the operational capacity of the deployed personnel.

  13. Military Career Guide: Employment and Training Opportunities in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Military Entrance Processing Command (DOD), North Chicago, IL.

    This copiously illustrated guide is a single reference source for the diverse employment and training opportunities in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. It is divided into two major sections. The first section contains descriptions of 134 enlisted military occupations and provides information regarding the aptitudes needed…

  14. Mainstreaming culture in psychology.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Fanny M

    2012-11-01

    Despite the "awakening" to the importance of culture in psychology in America, international psychology has remained on the sidelines of psychological science. The author recounts her personal and professional experience in tandem with the stages of development in international/cross-cultural psychology. Based on her research in cross-cultural personality assessment, the author discusses the inadequacies of sole reliance on either the etic or the emic approach and points out the advantages of a combined emic-etic approach in bridging global and local human experiences in psychological science and practice. With the blurring of the boundaries between North American-European psychologies and psychology in the rest of the world, there is a need to mainstream culture in psychology's epistemological paradigm. Borrowing from the concept of gender mainstreaming that embraces both similarities and differences in promoting equal opportunities, the author discusses the parallel needs of acknowledging universals and specifics when mainstreaming culture in psychology. She calls for building a culturally informed universal knowledge base that should be incorporated in the psychology curriculum and textbooks.

  15. Family Impact of Military Mental Health Stigma: A Narrative Ethical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Susanne W; Howe, Edmund Randy

    2016-01-01

    Our past lessons from war trauma have taught us that mental health-care stigma and other issues surrounding mental health-seeking behaviors can negatively impact the healing trajectory and long-term function for service members and their families. It can take years to decades before a service member seeks professional help for psychological distress, if he or she seeks it at all. Unfortunately, signs of personal and family problems can be subtle, and consequences, such as suicide, tragic. In this chapter, we consider the story one military health-care provider submitted in response to a study solicitation that read: Please provide your personal story telling me about any psychological distress you may have experienced after returning from deployment and your personal challenges accessing care and/or remaining in treatment. This story is analyzed to explore the moral implications of his experience for the military and for other service members. The main points to be highlighted are that altruism can leave altruists more vulnerable, military mental health stigma may exacerbate this risk, and military families may profoundly be affected.

  16. Men’s Appraisals of Their Military Experiences in World War II: A 40-Year Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Settersten, Richard A.; Day, Jack; Elder, Glen H.; Waldinger, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Using data on veterans from the longitudinal Harvard Study of Adult Development (N=241), we focused on subjective aspects of military service. We examined how veterans of World War II appraised specific dimensions of military service directly after the war and over 40 years later, as well as the role of military service in their life course. In addition to examining change in appraisals, we examined how postwar appraisals of service mediated the effects of objective aspects of service, and how postwar psychological adjustment and health mediated the effects of postwar appraisals, on later-life appraisals. Men’s appraisals at both time points were generally, but not highly, positive, and revealed remarkable consistency over four decades. Postwar appraisals strongly predicted later-life appraisals and mediated the effects of objective service variables. The effects of postwar appraisals were not carried forward through psychological adjustment or midlife health. Better adjustment, however, was negatively related to later-life appraisals. Results reinforce the idea that how men perceive their military experiences may be more important in predicting outcomes than the experiences themselves. Results are discussed in light of the sample characteristics, the historical context of World War II, and the complexities of appraisal and retrospection. PMID:23284272

  17. Men's Appraisals of Their Military Experiences in World War II: A 40-Year Perspective.

    PubMed

    Settersten, Richard A; Day, Jack; Elder, Glen H; Waldinger, Robert J

    2012-07-01

    Using data on veterans from the longitudinal Harvard Study of Adult Development (N=241), we focused on subjective aspects of military service. We examined how veterans of World War II appraised specific dimensions of military service directly after the war and over 40 years later, as well as the role of military service in their life course. In addition to examining change in appraisals, we examined how postwar appraisals of service mediated the effects of objective aspects of service, and how postwar psychological adjustment and health mediated the effects of postwar appraisals, on later-life appraisals. Men's appraisals at both time points were generally, but not highly, positive, and revealed remarkable consistency over four decades. Postwar appraisals strongly predicted later-life appraisals and mediated the effects of objective service variables. The effects of postwar appraisals were not carried forward through psychological adjustment or midlife health. Better adjustment, however, was negatively related to later-life appraisals. Results reinforce the idea that how men perceive their military experiences may be more important in predicting outcomes than the experiences themselves. Results are discussed in light of the sample characteristics, the historical context of World War II, and the complexities of appraisal and retrospection.

  18. Characteristics of Living and Deceased Suicidal Military Personnel Based on Single Versus Multiple Suicide Attempt Status

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-27

    8217 > - ;\\..,’ ·. Kristen Kochanski MEDICAL AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Uniformed Services University Date 05/10/2012 Running head: MILITARY SINGLE...greater risk for death by suicide than those with a single suicide attempt ( Christiansen & Jensen, 2007; Hawton & Fagg, 1988; Nordentoft et al., 1993...individuals identified in the suicide attempt registry died by suicide within four years ( Christiansen & Jensen, 2007). In England, individuals who

  19. Risk and Resolution: The Influence of Presidential Personality Predispositions on Military Disengagement Decisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT America repeatedly finds itself mired in military interventions long after public buy -in to the national...institutions. Behavioral science theorists who consider psychological factors such as the personalities of a country’s leaders to be instrumental in endgame...decision-making have in recent years experienced a resurgence. However, the dominant behavioral explanation of foreign policy decision-making, prospect

  20. Religious Accommodation for Military Members in the Twenty-First Century

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    Rehabilitation Psychology, 49, 91-99. 33 Heelas, P. The Spiritual Revolution: Why Religion is Giving Way to Spirituality. Blackwell Publishing (2005...The battle space regarding religious accommodation has changed. Evidence of extremism is found in the events of September 11th, Oklahoma City, and...alienating its sister services, but gains the potential of setting the standard for a comprehensive policy that will lead the services as the military

  1. Performance of UN Military Observer Teams: Does Victim Proximity Escalate Commitment to Saving Lives?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    role behavior : Disclosing social structure and history in the analysis of prosocial action. Social Psychology Quarterly, 50, 247–256. Carnevale, P. J...Canada–Toronto Barbara D. Adams and Michael H. Thomson Humansystems Inc. A field experiment examined the tactical peacekeeping behaviors of military...civilians’ lives. Proximity increased the frequency of behaviors that were specifically oriented toward saving the civilians’ lives and did not increase

  2. Military experience can influence Women's eating habits.

    PubMed

    Breland, Jessica Y; Donalson, Rosemary; Nevedal, Andrea; Dinh, Julie V; Maguen, Shira

    2017-11-01

    Disordered eating, ranging from occasional binge eating or restriction to behaviors associated with eating disorder diagnoses, is common among military personnel and veterans. However, there is little information on how military service affects eating habits. To describe possible pathways between military service and disordered eating among women veterans, a high risk group. Twenty women veterans who reported changing eating habits in response to stress participated in audio-recorded focus groups or dyadic interviews between April 2013 and October 2014. We used thematic analysis of transcripts to identify and understand women's self-reported eating habits before, during, and after military service. Participants reported entering the military with varied eating habits, but little disordered eating. Participants described several ways military environments affected eating habits, for example, by promoting fast, irregular, binge-like eating and disrupting the reward value of food. Participants believed military-related stressors, which were often related to gender, also affected eating habits. Such stressors included military sexual trauma and the need to meet military weight requirements in general and after giving birth. Participants also reported that poor eating habits continued after military service, often because they remained under stress. For some women, military service can result in socialization to poor eating habits, which when combined with exposure to stressors can lead to disordered eating. Additional research is needed, including work to understand possible benefits associated with providing support in relation to military weight requirements and the transition out of military service. Given the unique experiences of women in the military, future work could also focus on health services surrounding pregnancy-related weight change and the stress associated with being a woman in predominantly male military environments. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Prevalence of skin diseases in civilian and military population in a Turkish military hospital in the central Black Sea region.

    PubMed

    Şenel, Engin; Doğruer Şenel, S; Salmanoğlu, M

    2015-06-01

    There are no epidemiological studies comparing the prevalence of skin diseases between civilian and military populations. We sought to determine and compare the prevalence of skin conditions between civilian and military populations. A total of 3382 male patients (1148 military and 2234 civilian) were retrospectively and consecutively evaluated at Merzifon Military Hospital in the central Black Sea Region of Turkey. The most frequent dermatological condition was tinea pedis (15.8%) followed by acne vulgaris, allergic contact dermatitis and alopecia areata in the military population (15.7%, 7.7% and 5.4%, respectively). Acne vulgaris, xerosis cutis and allergic contact dermatitis were the most common diagnoses in the civilian group (19.4%, 14.1% and 9.1%, respectively). The prevalence of tinea pedis, alopecia areata, pityriasis versicolor, ingrown nail (unguis incarnatus) and callus were statistically significantly higher in the military group (15.8% vs 4.4%, p<0.001; 5.4% vs 1.7%, p<0.05; 3.5% vs 0.7%, p<0.001; 3.3% vs 0.3%, p<0.001 and 4.6% vs 0.9%, p<0.001; respectively). Xerosis cutis was found to be significantly higher in the civilian group (14.1% vs 5.8%, p<0.001). Superficial fungal disease was the most prevalent disorder as in the previous literature. Preventive measures should be taken to improve the health of troops and reduce the prevalence of the common disorders such as tinea pedis, alopecia areata and callus. Troops should wear boots only when necessary in base camps. Clothing which reduces ventilation is not recommended. Depression and anxiety should be recognised and treated in soldiers with alopecia areata, as a solely dermatological approach without psychological support may reduce treatment success. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. [Problematic medical and psychological issues concerning rehabilitation of crews during the after-sea-dutymen period].

    PubMed

    Liseenko, A N; Artemenko, E S; Demeev, Ya A; Shchur, M S

    2015-09-01

    The analysis of the causes of lack of effective functioning of the medical and psychological rehabilitation of crew of the Navy in the Pacific Fleet is performed. Possible ways of solving existing problematic issues are suggested. For determination of fatigue and overwork it was suggested to undertake mandatory initial medical and psychological screening examination of crews immediately before the return to the naval base, using a simple and affordable methods of testing. Medical and psychological rehabilitation of soldiers after the long sea voyages proposed to take immediate military sanatorium of the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation (on the territorial principle).

  5. Cultural Dimensions of Military Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-13

    advanced language skills, and culture and regional expertise with the goals to promote a rethinking of culture and intercultural competence , and how... Intercultural Competence ” (Center for Languages, Cultures, and Regional Studies, United States Military Academy, West Point, NY), 4. 34Headquarters...motivational components that enable individuals to adapt effectively in intercultural environments.”39 The Cross-cultural Competence model

  6. Military Deployments: Evaluating Teacher Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    This mixed method study examined the possible influence of a military deployment online tutorial on teacher knowledge. DoDEA and public school teachers were the two groups used for the study. From this exploratory study, the researcher also wanted to explore if teachers would find professional development provided in an online tutorial relevant…

  7. Military Civic Action in Colombia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    terror to destroy the Liberal forces.59 However, the government under G6mez also pursued other policies as a means to end the violence. Gomez attempted...military did initiate a number of civic action projects. One of these was the Servicio de Aeronavegaci6n a los Territorios Nacionales (SATENA

  8. Literacy Instruction in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Thomas M.

    Despite the fact that military careers require much higher levels of literacy than do comparable civilian careers, the range of literacy levels of enlistees is roughly representative of the abilities found amoung high school graduates. In response to the need to raise the literacy levels of their personnel, the Armed Forces have paid increasing…

  9. The Caltech Political Military Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munger, E. S.; And Others

    The Caltech political military exercise (PME) is a game in which players assume roles of leaders of various countries and attempt to act as they think these leaders would in a time of international crises. The main purposes of the exercise are (1) to provide students with an experience in crisis diplomacy and policy formation, and (2) to provide a…

  10. Supporting Students from Military Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossen, Eric; Carter, Courtney D.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, more than 800,000 parents of school-age children have been deployed by the U.S. military. Many have deployed more than once and for extended periods, often longer than a year. As a result, increasing numbers of students experience significant distress on a daily basis and are at increased risk for behavioral problems, decreased…

  11. Military Influence in Russian Politics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    sindrom 41-go." Novoe vremya, No. 8 (February volunteers over conscripts, and the Navy 1991); Maj. Gen. V.G. Strekozov, "Zakony ob oborone i statuse...for the military was 35 per of servicemen had such "backward" cent ( down from 44 per cent in political view•.iii One tends to agree December, 1989

  12. Military Education: Models from Antiquity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Unlike Westerners today, the Greeks and Romans put military training at the heart of their educational system. Examining the ancients' preoccupation with the inculcation of soldierly skills and disciplines, Professor Strauss asks whether we can find profit in their example. (Contains 7 footnotes.)

  13. THE TECHNOLOGY OF MILITARY TRAINING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WALLIS, D.

    THIS DOCUMENT IS PART OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF A CONFERENCE ON OPERATIONAL AND PERSONNEL RESEARCH IN THE MANAGEMENT OF MANPOWER SYSTEMS, HELD IN BRUSSELS IN 1965. A MODEL ILLUSTRATES THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED MILITARY INSTRUCTIONAL SYSTEM WHICH PROVIDES CONTINUOUS FEEDBACK AND CONTROL OF LEARNING. THE TRAINING COURSE INCLUDES--(1) A CLEAR…

  14. Military History, 1776-1782.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurr, G. Stephen

    An overview is given of the military action which took place in Georgia during the American Revolution, specifically the years 1776-1782. The pamphlet, one in a series about the American Revolution in Georgia, can be used for junior or senior high school students as supplementary reading or as a brief unit. A teacher's guide is included. Georgia…

  15. THE TECHNOLOGY OF MILITARY TRAINING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WALLIS, D.

    THIS DOCUMENT IS PART OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF A CONFERENCE ON OPERATIONAL AND PERSONNEL RESEARCH IN THE MANAGEMENT OF MANPOWER SYSTEMS, HELD IN BRUSSELS IN 1965. A MODEL ILLUSTRATES THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED MILITARY INSTRUCTIONAL SYSTEM WHICH PROVIDES CONTINUOUS FEEDBACK AND CONTROL OF LEARNING. THE TRAINING COURSE INCLUDES--(1) A CLEAR…

  16. Blogs and Military Information Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    universals, we hope to lay a general basis for military use of the blogosphere that can be adapted to specific tactical circumstances by information...port_display.asp. (6 Mar 2005). The Internet and Campaign 2004. Retrieved from: http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_2004_Cam- paign.pdf. Powerline . (9

  17. Cognitive Science and Military Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halff, Henry M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Four new military training systems offer the opportunity for the application of cognitive science. They are the following: (1) a family of memorization games; (2) a simulator with a graphic, schematic student interface; (3) a system for solving problems of relative motion; and (4) a method of building cognitive skills for air-intercept control.…

  18. Military Pay Gaps and Caps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    annual military pay legislation suspended 37 USC 1009; this provision called for equal percentage increases in all three cash components of RMC, with the...SERVICE PAY ADJUSTMENT LINKAGE: LEGISLATIVE BACKGROUND, 1967-1993 .................... 30 Bibliography...personnel. We do so via the Defense Employment Cost Index (DECI), which we constructed previously and have updated to include fiscal 1992. We compare pay

  19. Homosexuality, Morality, and Military Policy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    religious heritage of the United States, the First Amendment to the Constitution, and the history of military policies toward homosexuals; and an...heritage, and that the First Amendment to the Constitution was not written to exclude Christian moral influence from the public-decision making

  20. Soviet military strategy in space

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.L.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines the Soviet military space effort from its infancy in the 1950s to the spy craft and anti-satellite systems of today. It describes in detail the Soviet equivalents of the U.S. Star Wars program and explains technical and political issues in laymen's terms. A full text of major arms control agreements completes the volume.

  1. The Psychology of Confidence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-11

    affect predictions? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology , 1981, 41, 671-680. Summary One of the most fundamental and recurrent judgment tasks...pseudo-diagnosticity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology , in press. Summary Five experiments contrasted subjects’ intuitive evaluation of...COpY SEP 1 1 1984 Final Report PFTR-1092-83-1 Contract Number:, N00014-80-C-0140 Work Unit Number: -N197-064 DTIO0 ELECTEl odD THE PSYCHOLOGY OF

  2. Instructional Psychology 1976 - 1981,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    Alderman, D. L. Tree searching and student problem solving. Journal of Educational Psychology , 1978, 70, 209-217. Algozzine, B., & Sutherland, J. The...34learning disabilities" label: An experimental analysis. Comtemporary Educational Psychology , 1977, 2, 292-297. Allington, R. L. Sensitivity to...orthographic structure in educable mentally retarded children. Contemporary Educational Psychology , 1981, 6, 135-139. Ames, C., & Felker, D. W. Effects of self

  3. Public Image of Counseling Psychology: What Introductory Psychology Textbooks Say.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, David N.; Vrochopoulos, Sam; Burton, Jennifer

    1997-01-01

    Examines the adequacy of descriptions of counseling psychology and its professionals in introductory psychology textbooks compared to the descriptions of other applied areas of psychology. Results indicate that counseling psychology is less represented than industrial or organizational and clinical psychology and more represented than school…

  4. Positive Psychology: Considerations and Implications for Counseling Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mollen, Debra; Ethington, Lanaya L.; Ridley, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    Why has the specialty of counseling psychology been overlooked in the larger conversation about positive psychology? Is it reasonable that counseling psychology claims positive psychology as its own? What are some of the problems in defining "positive psychology," and how does the lack of consensus around operationalization thwart discourse on…

  5. Public Image of Counseling Psychology: What Introductory Psychology Textbooks Say.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, David N.; Vrochopoulos, Sam; Burton, Jennifer

    1997-01-01

    Examines the adequacy of descriptions of counseling psychology and its professionals in introductory psychology textbooks compared to the descriptions of other applied areas of psychology. Results indicate that counseling psychology is less represented than industrial or organizational and clinical psychology and more represented than school…

  6. Positive Psychology: Considerations and Implications for Counseling Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mollen, Debra; Ethington, Lanaya L.; Ridley, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    Why has the specialty of counseling psychology been overlooked in the larger conversation about positive psychology? Is it reasonable that counseling psychology claims positive psychology as its own? What are some of the problems in defining "positive psychology," and how does the lack of consensus around operationalization thwart discourse on…

  7. Psychological Component of Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  8. Military veterans and Social Security.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Anya

    There are 9.4 million military veterans receiving Social Security benefits, which means that almost one out of every four adult Social Security beneficiaries has served in the United States military. In addition, veterans and their families make up almost 40 percent of the adult Social Security beneficiary population. Policymakers are particularly interested in military veterans and their families and have provided them with benefits through several government programs, including Social Security credits, home loan guarantees, and compensation and pension payments through the Department of Veterans Affairs. It is therefore important to understand the economic and demographic characteristics of this population. Information in this article is based on data from the March 2004 Current Population Survey, a large, nationally representative survey of U.S. households. Veterans are overwhelmingly male compared with all adult Social Security beneficiaries who are more evenly split between males and females. Military veterans receiving Social Security are more likely to be married and to have finished high school compared with all adult Social Security beneficiaries, and they are less likely to be poor or near poor than the overall beneficiary population. Fourteen percent of veterans receiving Social Security benefits have income below 150 percent of poverty, while 25 percent of all adult Social Security beneficiaries are below this level. The higher economic status among veterans is also reflected in the relatively high Social Security benefits they receive. The number of military veterans receiving Social Security benefits will remain high over the next few decades, while their make-up and characteristics will change. In particular, the number of Vietnam War veterans who receive Social Security will increase in the coming decades, while the number of veterans from World War II and the Korean War will decline.

  9. Multiple traumatic brain injury and concussive symptoms among deployed military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J

    2013-01-01

    To identify if concussive symptoms occur with greater frequency among military personnel with multiple lifetime TBIs and if a history of TBI increases risk for subsequent TBI. One hundred and sixty-one military personnel referred to a TBI clinic for evaluation and treatment of suspected head injury at a military clinic in Iraq. Military patients completed standardized self-report measures of concussion, depression and post-traumatic stress symptoms; clinical interview; and physical examination. Group comparisons were made according to number of lifetime TBIs and logistic regression was utilized to determine the association of past TBIs on current TBI. Patients with one or more previous TBIs were more likely to report concussion symptoms immediately following a recent injury and during the evaluation. Although differences between single and multiple TBI groups were observed, these did not reach the level of statistical significance. A history of any TBI increased the likelihood of current TBI diagnosis, but this relationship was no longer significant when adjusting for injury mechanism, depression and post-traumatic stress symptoms. Among deployed military personnel, the relationship of previous TBI with recent TBI and concussive symptoms may be largely explained by the presence of psychological symptoms.

  10. Personal technology use by U.S. military service members and veterans: an update.

    PubMed

    Bush, Nigel E; Wheeler, William M

    2015-04-01

    Although personal electronic devices, such as mobile phones, computers, and tablets, increasingly are being leveraged as vehicles for health in the civilian world, almost nothing is known about personal technology use in the U.S. military. In 2012 we conducted a unique survey of personal technologies used by U.S. military service members. However, with the rapidly growing sophistication of personal technology and changes in consumer habits, that knowledge must be continuously updated to be useful. Accordingly, we recently surveyed new samples of active duty service members, National Guard and Reserve, and veterans. We collected data by online surveys in 2013 from 239 active, inactive, and former service members. Online surveys were completed in-person via laptop computers at a large military installation and remotely via Web-based surveys posted on the Army Knowledge Online Web site and on a Defense Center Facebook social media channel. We measured high rates of personal technology use by service members at home across popular electronic media. The most dramatic change since our earlier survey was the tremendous increase in mobile phone use at home for a wide variety of purposes. Participants also reported moderate non-work uses of computers and tablets while on recent deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan, but almost no mobile phone use, ostensibly because of military restrictions in the war zone. These latest results will enable researchers and technology developers target their efforts on the most promising and popular technologies for psychological health in the military.

  11. Demystifying the "Victimized State": A Civil-Military Crisis in Waiting?

    PubMed

    McGarry, Ross

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate prescient issues relating to current and ex-military communities in the United Kingdom who have featured heavily within the policy arena over the past decade in relation to several key areas of importance. It will be illustrated how this population becomes visible within the public imagination (via military losses), how discourses relating to the harms they experience are structured and articulated within political and policy domains (particularly in relation to mental health) via "state talk" (qua Sim), and what the potential social consequences are for politically rendering an unproblematized populist view of current and ex-military communities (i.e., pending crises). This argument is made with the express intention of reengaging critical recognition of the distancing of the military institution from the physical and psychological vulnerability of those who have participated in war and military environments. This is an argument returned to pertinence from the recent publication of the Chilcot Inquiry into British involvement in the Iraq war.

  12. Experiences of Military Spouses of Veterans With Combat-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Yambo, Teresa W; Johnson, Mary E; Delaney, Kathleen R; Hamilton, Rebekah; Miller, Arlene Michaels; York, Janet A

    2016-11-01

    To explore the experiences of military spouses living with veterans with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Husserlian phenomenology was chosen as the theoretical framework because it allowed a deeper understanding of the unfolding of the spouses' daily experience. A purposive sample of 14 spouses living with veterans with symptoms of PTSD participated in unstructured interviews. Data were analyzed using a modification of the Colaizzi phenomenological method. Spouses recognized that the veteran was no longer the same person, with life becoming one of living with the unpredictability of PTSD. The spouses bore the burden to maintain normalcy in the family and eventually created a new life. Military spouses endure psychological stress and strain, while living with a veteran with PTSD. There is a need for more programs to support the resilience of military spouses. Life for military spouses of veterans with PTSD is ever-changing and unpredictable. Practitioners need to be aware of the stress that spouses experience and develop programs and interventions that bolster the resilience of military families. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. Building Academic Partnerships in Psychology: The Psychology Partnerships Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathie, Virginia Andreoli

    2002-01-01

    Outlines how academic partnerships across educational levels can help psychology teachers address educational challenges, examining factors that facilitate the formation and maintenance of these partnerships and presenting the American Psychological Association's successful Psychology Partnerships Project: Academic Partnerships to Meet the…

  14. Comparative analysis of prevalence of intimate partner violence against women in military and civilian communities in Abuja, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Chimah, Carol Uzoamaka; Adogu, Prosper Obunikem Uche; Odeyemi, Kofoworola; Ilika, Amobi Linus

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intimate partner violence (IPV) occurs across the world, in various cultures, and affects people across societies irrespective of economic status or gender. Most data on IPV before World Health Organization multicountry study (WHOMCS) usually came from sources other than the military. Result of this study will contribute to the existing body of knowledge and may serve as a baseline for future studies in military populations. This study compares the prevalence of the different types of IPV against women in military and civilian communities in Abuja, Nigeria. Methods Using a multistage sampling technique, 260 women who had intimate male partners were selected from military and civilian communities of Abuja. Collected data on personal characteristics and different types of IPV experienced were analyzed to demonstrate comparison of the association between the different forms of IPV and the respondents’ sociodemographic and partner characteristics in the two study populations using percentages and χ-square statistics, and P-value was assumed to be significant at ≤0.05. Results The prevalence of the four major types of IPV was higher among the military respondents than among civilians: controlling behavior, 37.1% versus 29.1%; emotional/psychological abuse, 42.4% versus 13.4%; physical abuse, 19.7% versus 5.9%, and sexual abuse, 9.2% versus 8.8%. Significantly more respondents from the military population (59 [45.4%]) compared to civilians (21 [19.4%]) were prevented by their partners from seeing their friends (P=0.000). The situation is reversed with regard to permission to seek health care for self, with civilians reporting a significantly higher prevalence (35 [32.4%]) than did military respondents (20 [15.4%]) (P=0.002). The military respondents were clearly at a higher risk of experiencing all the variants of emotional violence than the civilians (P=0.00). The commonest form of physical violence against women was “being slapped or having

  15. Comparative analysis of prevalence of intimate partner violence against women in military and civilian communities in Abuja, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chimah, Carol Uzoamaka; Adogu, Prosper Obunikem Uche; Odeyemi, Kofoworola; Ilika, Amobi Linus

    2015-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) occurs across the world, in various cultures, and affects people across societies irrespective of economic status or gender. Most data on IPV before World Health Organization multicountry study (WHOMCS) usually came from sources other than the military. Result of this study will contribute to the existing body of knowledge and may serve as a baseline for future studies in military populations. This study compares the prevalence of the different types of IPV against women in military and civilian communities in Abuja, Nigeria. Using a multistage sampling technique, 260 women who had intimate male partners were selected from military and civilian communities of Abuja. Collected data on personal characteristics and different types of IPV experienced were analyzed to demonstrate comparison of the association between the different forms of IPV and the respondents' sociodemographic and partner characteristics in the two study populations using percentages and χ-square statistics, and P-value was assumed to be significant at ≤0.05. The prevalence of the four major types of IPV was higher among the military respondents than among civilians: controlling behavior, 37.1% versus 29.1%; emotional/psychological abuse, 42.4% versus 13.4%; physical abuse, 19.7% versus 5.9%, and sexual abuse, 9.2% versus 8.8%. Significantly more respondents from the military population (59 [45.4%]) compared to civilians (21 [19.4%]) were prevented by their partners from seeing their friends (P=0.000). The situation is reversed with regard to permission to seek health care for self, with civilians reporting a significantly higher prevalence (35 [32.4%]) than did military respondents (20 [15.4%]) (P=0.002). The military respondents were clearly at a higher risk of experiencing all the variants of emotional violence than the civilians (P=0.00). The commonest form of physical violence against women was "being slapped or having something thrown at them, that could hurt

  16. Construction of Military Intelligence Military Occupational Specialty Taxonomy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    or _preparation of changes to the military ocupational classification structure I(IOCSI1, (198).Alexandria, VA: Soldier Stipport Center - National...performance, health , and attrition. US Naval Health Research Center Report 83-7. Studied the effects of US Marine Corps basic training (BT) with 2,648...were secondary predictors. Health was not strongly related to any individual difference measure. BT attrition was related to suppression, displacement

  17. Military Expenditure, Force Potential, and Relative Military Power.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    of Abraham Becker. Without his contribution this project would not have been possible. I also wish to thank Abram Bergson and Mark Hopkins for their...estimated by Abram Bergson .’" His estimate must be adjusted to 1970 prices. Beginning with the 1955 estimates indicated above, the growth rates associated...levels of gross investment, a high estimate of military capital for 1967 is 241.1 billion rubles. The low estimate obtained by w’See Abram Bergson . The

  18. Virtual Reality in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    The benefits of using virtual environments (VEs) in psychology arise from the fact that movements in virtual space, and accompanying perceptual changes, are treated by the brain in much the same way as those in equivalent real space. The research benefits of using VEs, in areas of psychology such as spatial learning and cognition, include…

  19. Teaching Anomalistic Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Warren; Zusne, Leonard

    1981-01-01

    Discusses need for anomalistic psychology courses (the occult, astrology, ESP, or those phenomena inexplicable in terms of orthodox science) in the college psychology curriculum. A study of an anomalistics course indicates that student belief in the paranormal was associated with greater learning which was then followed by significant reductions…

  20. Psychology for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popovic, Nash

    2008-01-01

    In "Psychology in its place" (2008) John Radford explores and attempts to initiate a debate on what is or should be the place and role of psychology in Higher Education, primarily as a main subject for a first degree. In this paper, the author raises the stakes, and argues that Higher Education should provide a certain form of practical psychology…