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Sample records for ptb promotes formation

  1. Drosophila PTB promotes formation of high-order RNP particles and represses oskar translation

    PubMed Central

    Besse, Florence; López de Quinto, Sonia; Marchand, Virginie; Trucco, Alvar; Ephrussi, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Local translation of asymmetrically enriched mRNAs is a powerful mechanism for functional polarization of the cell. In Drosophila, exclusive accumulation of Oskar protein at the posterior pole of the oocyte is essential for development of the future embryo. This is achieved by the formation of a dynamic oskar ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex regulating the transport of oskar mRNA, its translational repression while unlocalized, and its translational activation upon arrival at the posterior pole. We identified the nucleo–cytoplasmic shuttling protein PTB (polypyrimidine tract-binding protein)/hnRNP I as a new factor associating with the oskar RNP in vivo. While PTB function is largely dispensable for oskar mRNA transport, it is necessary for translational repression of the localizing mRNA. Unexpectedly, a cytoplasmic form of PTB can associate with oskar mRNA and repress its translation, suggesting that nuclear recruitment of PTB to oskar complexes is not required for its regulatory function. Furthermore, PTB binds directly to multiple sites along the oskar 3′ untranslated region and mediates assembly of high-order complexes containing multiple oskar RNA molecules in vivo. Thus, PTB is a key structural component of oskar RNP complexes that dually controls formation of high-order RNP particles and translational silencing. PMID:19131435

  2. Hypoxia may increase rat insulin mRNA levels by promoting binding of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) to the pyrimidine-rich insulin mRNA 3'-untranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Tillmar, Linda; Welsh, Nils

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent reports identify the 3'-UTR of insulin mRNA as crucial for control of insulin messenger stability. This region contains a pyrimidine-rich sequence, which is similar to the hypoxia-responsive mRNA-stabilizing element of tyrosine hydroxylase. This study aimed to determine whether hypoxia affects insulin mRNA levels. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rat islets were incubated at normoxic or hypoxic conditions and with or without hydrogen peroxide and a nitric oxide donor. Insulin mRNA was determined by Northern hybridization. Islet homogenates were used for electrophoretic mobility shift assay with an RNA-oligonucleotide, corresponding to the pyrimidine-rich sequence of the 3'-UTR of rat insulin I mRNA. The expression of reporter gene mRNA, in islets transfected with reporter gene constructs containing the wild-type or mutated insulin mRNA pyrimidine-rich sequences, was measured by semiquantitive RT-PCR. RESULTS: Insulin mRNA was increased in response to hypoxia. This was paralleled by increased binding of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) to the pyrimidine-rich sequence of the 3'-UTR of insulin mRNA, which was counteracted by hydrogen peroxide. The reporter gene mRNA level containing the wild-type binding site was not increased in response to hypoxia, but mutation of the site resulted in a destabilization of the mRNA. CONCLUSIONS: The complete understanding of different diabetic conditions requires the elucidation of mechanisms that control insulin gene expression. Our data show that hypoxia may increase insulin mRNA levels by promoting the binding of PTB to the insulin mRNA 3'-UTR. Hydrogen peroxide abolishes the hypoxic effect indicating involvement of reactive oxygen species and/or the redox potential in the oxygen-signaling pathway. PMID:12359957

  3. Toward Efficient Thick Active PTB7 Photovoltaic Layers Using Diphenyl Ether as a Solvent Additive.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yifan; Goh, Tenghooi; Fan, Pu; Shi, Wei; Yu, Junsheng; Taylor, André D

    2016-06-22

    The development of thick organic photovoltaics (OPV) could increase absorption in the active layer and ease manufacturing constraints in large-scale solar panel production. However, the efficiencies of most low-bandgap OPVs decrease substantially when the active layers exceed ∼100 nm in thickness (because of low crystallinity and a short exciton diffusion length). Herein, we report the use of solvent additive diphenyl ether (DPE) that facilitates the fabrication of thick (180 nm) active layers and triples the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of conventional thienothiophene-co-benzodithiophene polymer (PTB7)-based OPVs from 1.75 to 6.19%. These results demonstrate a PCE 20% higher than those of conventional (PTB7)-based OPV devices using 1,8-diiodooctane. Morphology studies reveal that DPE promotes the formation of nanofibrillar networks and ordered packing of PTB7 in the active layer that facilitate charge transport over longer distances. We further demonstrate that DPE improves the fill factor and photocurrent collection by enhancing the overall optical absorption, reducing the series resistance, and suppressing bimolecular recombination.

  4. Toward Efficient Thick Active PTB7 Photovoltaic Layers Using Diphenyl Ether as a Solvent Additive.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yifan; Goh, Tenghooi; Fan, Pu; Shi, Wei; Yu, Junsheng; Taylor, André D

    2016-06-22

    The development of thick organic photovoltaics (OPV) could increase absorption in the active layer and ease manufacturing constraints in large-scale solar panel production. However, the efficiencies of most low-bandgap OPVs decrease substantially when the active layers exceed ∼100 nm in thickness (because of low crystallinity and a short exciton diffusion length). Herein, we report the use of solvent additive diphenyl ether (DPE) that facilitates the fabrication of thick (180 nm) active layers and triples the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of conventional thienothiophene-co-benzodithiophene polymer (PTB7)-based OPVs from 1.75 to 6.19%. These results demonstrate a PCE 20% higher than those of conventional (PTB7)-based OPV devices using 1,8-diiodooctane. Morphology studies reveal that DPE promotes the formation of nanofibrillar networks and ordered packing of PTB7 in the active layer that facilitate charge transport over longer distances. We further demonstrate that DPE improves the fill factor and photocurrent collection by enhancing the overall optical absorption, reducing the series resistance, and suppressing bimolecular recombination. PMID:27253271

  5. INCOME INCONGRUITY, RACE AND PRETERM BIRTH (PTB)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous research using birth records has found income incongruity associated with adverse birth outcomes. The effects of negative income incongruity (reporting lower household income than the census tract median household income) on PTB (<37 weeks completed gestation) are examin...

  6. Promoting proximal formative assessment with relational discourse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Close, Hunter G.; McKagan, Sarah B.

    2012-02-01

    The practice of proximal formative assessment - the continual, responsive attention to students' developing understanding as it is expressed in real time - depends on students' sharing their ideas with instructors and on teachers' attending to them. Rogerian psychology presents an account of the conditions under which proximal formative assessment may be promoted or inhibited: (1) Normal classroom conditions, characterized by evaluation and attention to learning targets, may present threats to students' sense of their own competence and value, causing them to conceal their ideas and reducing the potential for proximal formative assessment. (2) In contrast, discourse patterns characterized by positive anticipation and attention to learner ideas increase the potential for proximal formative assessment and promote self-directed learning. We present an analysis methodology based on these principles and demonstrate its utility for understanding episodes of university physics instruction.

  7. The origin of high PCE in PTB7 based photovoltaics: proper charge neutrality level and free energy of charge separation at PTB7/PC71BM interface

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soohyung; Jeong, Junkyeong; Hyun, Gyeongho; Kim, Minju; Lee, Hyunbok; Yi, Yeonjin

    2016-01-01

    The energy level alignments at donor/acceptor interfaces in organic photovoltaics (OPVs) play a decisive role in device performance. However, little is known about the interfacial energetics in polymer OPVs due to technical issues of the solution process. Here, the frontier ortbial line-ups at the donor/acceptor interface in high performance polymer OPVs, PTB7/PC71BM, were investigated using in situ UPS, XPS and IPES. The evolution of energy levels during PTB7/PC71BM interface formation was investigated using vacuum electrospray deposition, and was compared with that of P3HT/PC61BM. At the PTB7/PC71BM interface, the interface dipole and the band bending were absent due to their identical charge neutrality levels. In contrast, a large interfacial dipole was observed at the P3HT/PC61BM interface. The measured photovoltaic energy gap (EPVG) was 1.10 eV for PTB7/PC71BM and 0.90 eV for P3HT/PC61BM. This difference in the EPVG leads to a larger open-circuit voltage of PTB7/PC71BM than that of P3HT/PC61BM. PMID:27734957

  8. Cu(II) Promotes Amyloid Pore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hangyu; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Stanciu, Lia A

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of α-synuclein is associated with dopamine neuron death in Parkinson's disease. There is controversy in the field over the question of which species of the aggregates, fibrils or protofibrils, are toxic. Moreover, compelling evidence suggested the exposure to heavy metals to be a risk of PD. Nevertheless, the mechanism of metal ions in promoting PD remains unclear. In this research, we investigated the structural basis of Cu(II) induced aggregation of α-synuclein. Using transmission electron microscopy experiments, Cu(II) was found to promote in vitro aggregation of α-synuclein by facilitating annular protofibril formation rather than fibril formation. Furthermore, neuroprotective baicalein disaggregated annular protofibrils accompanied by considerable decrease of β-sheet content. These results strongly support the hypothesis that annular protofibrils are the toxic species, rather than fibrils, thereby inspiring us to search novel therapeutic strategies for the suppression of the toxic annular protofibril formation. PMID:26129772

  9. Cu(II) promotes amyloid pore formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hangyu; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Stanciu, Lia A

    2015-08-14

    The aggregation of α-synuclein is associated with dopamine neuron death in Parkinson's disease. There is controversy in the field over the question of which species of the aggregates, fibrils or protofibrils, are toxic. Moreover, compelling evidence suggested the exposure to heavy metals to be a risk of PD. Nevertheless, the mechanism of metal ions in promoting PD remains unclear. In this research, we investigated the structural basis of Cu(II) induced aggregation of α-synuclein. Using transmission electron microscopy experiments, Cu(II) was found to promote in vitro aggregation of α-synuclein by facilitating annular protofibril formation rather than fibril formation. Furthermore, neuroprotective baicalein disaggregated annular protofibrils accompanied by considerable decrease of β-sheet content. These results strongly support the hypothesis that annular protofibrils are the toxic species, rather than fibrils, thereby inspiring us to search novel therapeutic strategies for the suppression of the toxic annular protofibril formation.

  10. Cu(II) promotes amyloid pore formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hangyu; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Stanciu, Lia A.

    2015-08-14

    The aggregation of α-synuclein is associated with dopamine neuron death in Parkinson's disease. There is controversy in the field over the question of which species of the aggregates, fibrils or protofibrils, are toxic. Moreover, compelling evidence suggested the exposure to heavy metals to be a risk of PD. Nevertheless, the mechanism of metal ions in promoting PD remains unclear. In this research, we investigated the structural basis of Cu(II) induced aggregation of α-synuclein. Using transmission electron microscopy experiments, Cu(II) was found to promote in vitro aggregation of α-synuclein by facilitating annular protofibril formation rather than fibril formation. Furthermore, neuroprotective baicalein disaggregated annular protofibrils accompanied by considerable decrease of β-sheet content. These results strongly support the hypothesis that annular protofibrils are the toxic species, rather than fibrils, thereby inspiring us to search novel therapeutic strategies for the suppression of the toxic annular protofibril formation. - Highlights: • Cu(II) promoted the annular protofibril formation of α-synuclein in vitro. • Cu(II) postponed the in vitro fibrillization of α-synuclein. • Neuroprotective baicalein disaggregated annular protofibrils.

  11. Rationale for a novel nutraceutical complex 'K-water': potassium taurine bicarbonate (PTB).

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2006-01-01

    Potassium taurine bicarbonate (PTB), an equimolar blend of potassium bicarbonate and taurine, provides a convenient and feasible means of delivering physiologically significant doses of potassium, taurine, and organic base when dissolved in water ("K-water"). This brief essay reviews the versatile and complementary health benefits that likely would accrue in individuals making regular use of K-water; in particular, an adequate intake of PTB could be expected to aid blood pressure control, lessen risk for atherosclerosis and its thromboembolic complications (particularly stroke), promote maintenance of bone density, help to prevent calcium renal stones, and possibly reduce risk for weight gain and diabetes.

  12. PTB Binds to the 3’ Untranslated Region of the Human Astrovirus Type 8: A Possible Role in Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Hernández, Wendy; Velez-Uriza, Dora; Valdés, Jesús; Vélez-Del Valle, Cristina; Salas-Benito, Juan; Martínez-Contreras, Rebeca; García-Espítia, Matilde; Salas-Benito, Mariana; Vega-Almeida, Tania; De Nova-Ocampo, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    The 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of human astroviruses (HAstV) consists of two hairpin structures (helix I and II) joined by a linker harboring a conserved PTB/hnRNP1 binding site. The identification and characterization of cellular proteins that interact with the 3′UTR of HAstV-8 virus will help to uncover cellular requirements for viral functions. To this end, mobility shift assays and UV cross-linking were performed with uninfected and HAstV-8-infected cell extracts and HAstV-8 3′UTR probes. Two RNA-protein complexes (CI and CII) were recruited into the 3′UTR. Complex CII formation was compromised with cold homologous RNA, and seven proteins of 35, 40, 45, 50, 52, 57/60 and 75 kDa were cross-linked to the 3′UTR. Supermobility shift assays indicated that PTB/hnRNP1 is part of this complex, and 3′UTR-crosslinked PTB/hnRNP1 was immunoprecipitated from HAstV-8 infected cell-membrane extracts. Also, immunofluorescence analyses revealed that PTB/hnRNP1 is distributed in the nucleus and cytoplasm of uninfected cells, but it is mainly localized perinuclearly in the cytoplasm of HAstV-8 infected cells. Furthermore, the minimal 3′UTR sequences recognized by recombinant PTB are those conforming helix I, and an intact PTB/hnRNP1-binding site. Finally, small interfering RNA-mediated PTB/hnRNP1 silencing reduced synthesis viral genome and virus yield in CaCo2 cells, suggesting that PTB/hnRNP1 is required for HAstV replication. In conclusion, PTB/hnRNP1 binds to the 3′UTR HAstV-8 and is required or participates in viral replication. PMID:25406089

  13. PTB binds to the 3' untranslated region of the human astrovirus type 8: a possible role in viral replication.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Hernández, Wendy; Velez-Uriza, Dora; Valdés, Jesús; Vélez-Del Valle, Cristina; Salas-Benito, Juan; Martínez-Contreras, Rebeca; García-Espítia, Matilde; Salas-Benito, Mariana; Vega-Almeida, Tania; De Nova-Ocampo, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    The 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of human astroviruses (HAstV) consists of two hairpin structures (helix I and II) joined by a linker harboring a conserved PTB/hnRNP1 binding site. The identification and characterization of cellular proteins that interact with the 3'UTR of HAstV-8 virus will help to uncover cellular requirements for viral functions. To this end, mobility shift assays and UV cross-linking were performed with uninfected and HAstV-8-infected cell extracts and HAstV-8 3'UTR probes. Two RNA-protein complexes (CI and CII) were recruited into the 3'UTR. Complex CII formation was compromised with cold homologous RNA, and seven proteins of 35, 40, 45, 50, 52, 57/60 and 75 kDa were cross-linked to the 3'UTR. Supermobility shift assays indicated that PTB/hnRNP1 is part of this complex, and 3'UTR-crosslinked PTB/hnRNP1 was immunoprecipitated from HAstV-8 infected cell-membrane extracts. Also, immunofluorescence analyses revealed that PTB/hnRNP1 is distributed in the nucleus and cytoplasm of uninfected cells, but it is mainly localized perinuclearly in the cytoplasm of HAstV-8 infected cells. Furthermore, the minimal 3'UTR sequences recognized by recombinant PTB are those conforming helix I, and an intact PTB/hnRNP1-binding site. Finally, small interfering RNA-mediated PTB/hnRNP1 silencing reduced synthesis viral genome and virus yield in CaCo2 cells, suggesting that PTB/hnRNP1 is required for HAstV replication. In conclusion, PTB/hnRNP1 binds to the 3'UTR HAstV-8 and is required or participates in viral replication.

  14. The spectral irradiance traceability chain at PTB

    SciTech Connect

    Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Nevas, S.

    2013-05-10

    Spectral irradiance is a fundamental radiometric unit. Its application to measurement results requires qualified traceability to basic units of the international system of units (Systeme international d'unites, SI). The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is amongst other national metrological institutes (NMIs) responsible for the realization, maintenance and dissemination of various radiometric and photometric units based on and traceable to national standards. The unit of spectral irradiance is realized and represented by a blackbody-radiator as the national primary standard of the PTB. Based on Planck's radiation law, the irradiance is calculated and realized for any wavelength taking into account the exact knowledge of the radiation temperature and the geometrical parameters. Using a double-monochromator-based spectroradiometer system, secondary standard lamps can be calibrated by direct comparison to the blackbody-radiator (substitution method). These secondary standard lamps are then used at the PTB to calibrate standard lamps of customers. The customers themselves use these so-called transfer standards to calibrate their working standard lamps. These working standards are then used to calibrate own spectroradiometers or sources. This rather complex calibration chain is a common procedural method that for the customers generally leads to satisfying measurement results on site. Nevertheless, the standard lamps in use have to fulfill highest requirements concerning stability and reproducibility. Only this allows achieving comparably low transfer measurement uncertainties, which occur at each calibration step. Thus, the PTB is constantly investigating the improvement and further development of transfer standards and measurement methods for various spectral regions. The realization and dissemination of the spectral irradiance using the blackbody-radiator at the PTB is accomplished with worldwide approved minimized measurement uncertainties confirmed by

  15. The spectral irradiance traceability chain at PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Nevas, S.

    2013-05-01

    Spectral irradiance is a fundamental radiometric unit. Its application to measurement results requires qualified traceability to basic units of the international system of units (Système international d'unités, SI). The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is amongst other national metrological institutes (NMIs) responsible for the realization, maintenance and dissemination of various radiometric and photometric units based on and traceable to national standards. The unit of spectral irradiance is realized and represented by a blackbody-radiator as the national primary standard of the PTB. Based on Planck's radiation law, the irradiance is calculated and realized for any wavelength taking into account the exact knowledge of the radiation temperature and the geometrical parameters. Using a double-monochromator-based spectroradiometer system, secondary standard lamps can be calibrated by direct comparison to the blackbody-radiator (substitution method). These secondary standard lamps are then used at the PTB to calibrate standard lamps of customers. The customers themselves use these so-called transfer standards to calibrate their working standard lamps. These working standards are then used to calibrate own spectroradiometers or sources. This rather complex calibration chain is a common procedural method that for the customers generally leads to satisfying measurement results on site. Nevertheless, the standard lamps in use have to fulfill highest requirements concerning stability and reproducibility. Only this allows achieving comparably low transfer measurement uncertainties, which occur at each calibration step. Thus, the PTB is constantly investigating the improvement and further development of transfer standards and measurement methods for various spectral regions. The realization and dissemination of the spectral irradiance using the blackbody-radiator at the PTB is accomplished with worldwide approved minimized measurement uncertainties confirmed by

  16. Modelling PTB's spatial angle autocollimator calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, Oliver; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Just, Andreas; Krause, Michael

    2013-05-01

    The accurate and traceable form measurement of optical surfaces has been greatly advanced by a new generation of surface profilometers which are based on the reflection of light at the surface and the measurement of the reflection angle. For this application, high-resolution electronic autocollimators provide accurate and traceable angle metrology. In recent years, great progress has been made at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in autocollimator calibration. For an advanced autocollimator characterisation, a novel calibration device has been built up at PTB: the Spatial Angle Autocollimator Calibrator (SAAC). The system makes use of an innovative Cartesian arrangement of three autocollimators (two reference autocollimators and the autocollimator to be calibrated), which allows a precise measurement of the angular orientation of a reflector cube. Each reference autocollimator is sensitive primarily to changes in one of the two relevant tilt angles, whereas the autocollimator to be calibrated is sensitive to both. The distance between the reflector cube and the autocollimator to be calibrated can be varied flexibly. In this contribution, we present the SAAC and aspects of the mathematical modelling of the system for deriving analytical expressions for the autocollimators' angle responses. These efforts will allow advancing the form measurement substantially with autocollimator-based profilometers and approaching fundamental measurement limits. Additionally, they will help manufacturers of autocollimators to improve their instruments and will provide improved angle measurement methods for precision engineering.

  17. Analysis of Triplet Exciton Loss Pathways in PTB7:PC71BM Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Hannes; Heiber, Michael C.; Väth, Stefan; Kern, Julia; Deibel, Carsten; Sperlich, Andreas; Dyakonov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    A strategy for increasing the conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaics has been to increase the VOC by tuning the energy levels of donor and acceptor components. However, this opens up a new loss pathway from an interfacial charge transfer state to a triplet exciton (TE) state called electron back transfer (EBT), which is detrimental to device performance. To test this hypothesis, we study triplet formation in the high performing PTB7:PC71BM blend system and determine the impact of the morphology-optimizing additive 1,8-diiodoctane (DIO). Using photoluminescence and spin-sensitive optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) measurements at low temperature, we find that TEs form on PC71BM via intersystem crossing from singlet excitons and on PTB7 via EBT mechanism. For DIO blends with smaller fullerene domains, an increased density of PTB7 TEs is observed. The EBT process is found to be significant only at very low temperature. At 300 K, no triplets are detected via ODMR, and electrically detected magnetic resonance on optimized solar cells indicates that TEs are only present on the fullerenes. We conclude that in PTB7:PC71BM devices, TE formation via EBT is impacted by fullerene domain size at low temperature, but at room temperature, EBT does not represent a dominant loss pathway. PMID:27380928

  18. Analysis of Triplet Exciton Loss Pathways in PTB7:PC71BM Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Hannes; Heiber, Michael C.; Väth, Stefan; Kern, Julia; Deibel, Carsten; Sperlich, Andreas; Dyakonov, Vladimir

    2016-07-01

    A strategy for increasing the conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaics has been to increase the VOC by tuning the energy levels of donor and acceptor components. However, this opens up a new loss pathway from an interfacial charge transfer state to a triplet exciton (TE) state called electron back transfer (EBT), which is detrimental to device performance. To test this hypothesis, we study triplet formation in the high performing PTB7:PC71BM blend system and determine the impact of the morphology-optimizing additive 1,8-diiodoctane (DIO). Using photoluminescence and spin-sensitive optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) measurements at low temperature, we find that TEs form on PC71BM via intersystem crossing from singlet excitons and on PTB7 via EBT mechanism. For DIO blends with smaller fullerene domains, an increased density of PTB7 TEs is observed. The EBT process is found to be significant only at very low temperature. At 300 K, no triplets are detected via ODMR, and electrically detected magnetic resonance on optimized solar cells indicates that TEs are only present on the fullerenes. We conclude that in PTB7:PC71BM devices, TE formation via EBT is impacted by fullerene domain size at low temperature, but at room temperature, EBT does not represent a dominant loss pathway.

  19. Analysis of Triplet Exciton Loss Pathways in PTB7:PC71BM Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Hannes; Heiber, Michael C; Väth, Stefan; Kern, Julia; Deibel, Carsten; Sperlich, Andreas; Dyakonov, Vladimir

    2016-07-06

    A strategy for increasing the conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaics has been to increase the VOC by tuning the energy levels of donor and acceptor components. However, this opens up a new loss pathway from an interfacial charge transfer state to a triplet exciton (TE) state called electron back transfer (EBT), which is detrimental to device performance. To test this hypothesis, we study triplet formation in the high performing PTB7:PC71BM blend system and determine the impact of the morphology-optimizing additive 1,8-diiodoctane (DIO). Using photoluminescence and spin-sensitive optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) measurements at low temperature, we find that TEs form on PC71BM via intersystem crossing from singlet excitons and on PTB7 via EBT mechanism. For DIO blends with smaller fullerene domains, an increased density of PTB7 TEs is observed. The EBT process is found to be significant only at very low temperature. At 300 K, no triplets are detected via ODMR, and electrically detected magnetic resonance on optimized solar cells indicates that TEs are only present on the fullerenes. We conclude that in PTB7:PC71BM devices, TE formation via EBT is impacted by fullerene domain size at low temperature, but at room temperature, EBT does not represent a dominant loss pathway.

  20. Analysis of Triplet Exciton Loss Pathways in PTB7:PC71BM Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Hannes; Heiber, Michael C; Väth, Stefan; Kern, Julia; Deibel, Carsten; Sperlich, Andreas; Dyakonov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    A strategy for increasing the conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaics has been to increase the VOC by tuning the energy levels of donor and acceptor components. However, this opens up a new loss pathway from an interfacial charge transfer state to a triplet exciton (TE) state called electron back transfer (EBT), which is detrimental to device performance. To test this hypothesis, we study triplet formation in the high performing PTB7:PC71BM blend system and determine the impact of the morphology-optimizing additive 1,8-diiodoctane (DIO). Using photoluminescence and spin-sensitive optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) measurements at low temperature, we find that TEs form on PC71BM via intersystem crossing from singlet excitons and on PTB7 via EBT mechanism. For DIO blends with smaller fullerene domains, an increased density of PTB7 TEs is observed. The EBT process is found to be significant only at very low temperature. At 300 K, no triplets are detected via ODMR, and electrically detected magnetic resonance on optimized solar cells indicates that TEs are only present on the fullerenes. We conclude that in PTB7:PC71BM devices, TE formation via EBT is impacted by fullerene domain size at low temperature, but at room temperature, EBT does not represent a dominant loss pathway. PMID:27380928

  1. Update on EUV radiometry at PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubis, Christian; Barboutis, Annett; Buchholz, Christian; Fischer, Andreas; Haase, Anton; Knorr, Florian; Mentzel, Heiko; Puls, Jana; Schönstedt, Anja; Sintschuk, Michael; Soltwisch, Victor; Stadelhoff, Christian; Scholze, Frank

    2016-03-01

    The development of technology infrastructure for EUV Lithography (EUVL) still requires higher levels of technology readiness in many fields. A large number of new materials will need to be introduced. For example, development of EUV compatible pellicles to adopt an approved method from optical lithography for EUVL needs completely new thin membranes which have not been available before. To support these developments, PTB with its decades of experience [1] in EUV metrology [2] provides a wide range of actinic and non actinic measurements at in-band EUV wavelengths as well as out of band. Two dedicated, complimentary EUV beamlines [3] are available for radiometric [4,5] characterizations benefiting from small divergence or from adjustable spot size respectively. The wavelength range covered reaches from below 1 nm to 45 nm [6] for the EUV beamlines [7] to longer wavelengths if in addition the VUV beamline is employed. The standard spot size is 1 mm by 1 mm with an option to go as low as 0.1 mm to 0.1 mm. A separate beamline offers an exposure setup. Exposure power levels of 20 W/cm2 have been employed in the past, lower fluencies are available by attenuation or out of focus exposure. Owing to a differential pumping stage, the sample can be held under defined gas conditions during exposure. We present an updated overview on our instrumentation and analysis capabilities for EUV metrology and provide data for illustration.

  2. Spaceflight promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wooseong; Tengra, Farah K; Young, Zachary; Shong, Jasmine; Marchand, Nicholas; Chan, Hon Kit; Pangule, Ravindra C; Parra, Macarena; Dordick, Jonathan S; Plawsky, Joel L; Collins, Cynthia H

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the effects of spaceflight on microbial communities is crucial for the success of long-term, manned space missions. Surface-associated bacterial communities, known as biofilms, were abundant on the Mir space station and continue to be a challenge on the International Space Station. The health and safety hazards linked to the development of biofilms are of particular concern due to the suppression of immune function observed during spaceflight. While planktonic cultures of microbes have indicated that spaceflight can lead to increases in growth and virulence, the effects of spaceflight on biofilm development and physiology remain unclear. To address this issue, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured during two Space Shuttle Atlantis missions: STS-132 and STS-135, and the biofilms formed during spaceflight were characterized. Spaceflight was observed to increase the number of viable cells, biofilm biomass, and thickness relative to normal gravity controls. Moreover, the biofilms formed during spaceflight exhibited a column-and-canopy structure that has not been observed on Earth. The increase in the amount of biofilms and the formation of the novel architecture during spaceflight were observed to be independent of carbon source and phosphate concentrations in the media. However, flagella-driven motility was shown to be essential for the formation of this biofilm architecture during spaceflight. These findings represent the first evidence that spaceflight affects community-level behaviors of bacteria and highlight the importance of understanding how both harmful and beneficial human-microbe interactions may be altered during spaceflight. PMID:23658630

  3. hnRNP I/PTB can antagonize the splicing repressor activity of SRp30c

    PubMed Central

    Paradis, Caroline; Cloutier, Philippe; Shkreta, Lulzim; Toutant, Johanne; Klarskov, Klaus; Chabot, Benoit

    2007-01-01

    The control of alternative pre-mRNA splicing often requires the participation of factors displaying synergistic or antagonistic activities. In the hnRNP A1 pre-mRNA, three elements promote the exclusion of alternative exon 7B, while a fourth intron element (CE9) represses splicing of exon 7B to the downstream exon. We have shown previously that the 5′ portion of the 38-nucleotide-long CE9 element is bound by SRp30c, and that this interaction is important for repression in vitro. To determine whether SRp30c alone can impose repression, we tested a high-affinity SRp30c binding site that we identified using the SELEX protocol. We find that multiple high-affinity SRp30c sites are required to replicate the level of repression obtained with CE9, and that both the 5′ and the 3′ portions of CE9 contribute to SRp30c binding. Performing RNA affinity chromatography with the complete CE9 element recovered hnRNP I/PTB. Surprisingly however, His-tagged PTB reduced the binding of SRp30c to CE9 in a nuclear extract, stimulated splicing to a downstream 3′ splice site, and relieved the CE9-mediated splicing repression in vitro. Our in vivo results are consistent with the notion that increasing PTB levels alleviates the repression imposed by CE9 to a downstream 3′ splice site. Thus, PTB can function as an anti-repressor molecule to counteract the splicing inhibitory activity of SRp30c. PMID:17548433

  4. Signals to promote myelin formation and repair

    PubMed Central

    Taveggia, Carla; Feltri, Maria Laura; Wrabetz, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    The myelin sheath wraps large axons in both the CNS and the PNS, and is a key determinant of efficient axonal function and health. Myelin is targeted in a series of diseases, notably multiple sclerosis (MS). In MS, demyelination is associated with progressive axonal damage, which determines the level of patient disability. Few treatments are available for combating myelin damage in MS and related disorders. These treatments, which largely comprise anti-inflammatory drugs, only show limited efficacy in subsets of patients. More-effective treatment of myelin disorders will probably result from early intervention with combinatorial therapies that target inflammation and other processes—for example, signaling pathways that promote remyelination. Indeed, evidence suggests that such pathways might be impaired in pathology and, hence, contribute to the failure of remyelination in such diseases. In this article, we review the molecular basis of signaling pathways that regulate myelination in the CNS and PNS with a focus on differentiation of myelinating glia. We also discuss factors such as extracellular molecules that act as modulators of these pathways. Finally, we consider the few preclinical and clinical trials of agents that augment this signaling. PMID:20404842

  5. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation.

  6. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation. PMID:27392247

  7. P-selectin promotes neutrophil extracellular trap formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Etulain, Julia; Martinod, Kimberly; Wong, Siu Ling; Cifuni, Stephen M; Schattner, Mirta; Wagner, Denisa D

    2015-07-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) can be released in the vasculature. In addition to trapping microbes, they promote inflammatory and thrombotic diseases. Considering that P-selectin induces prothrombotic and proinflammatory signaling, we studied the role of this selectin in NET formation. NET formation (NETosis) was induced by thrombin-activated platelets rosetting with neutrophils and was inhibited by anti-P-selectin aptamer or anti-P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) inhibitory antibody but was not induced by platelets from P-selectin(-/-) mice. Moreover, NETosis was also promoted by P-selectin-immunoglobulin fusion protein but not by control immunoglobulin. We isolated neutrophils from mice engineered to overproduce soluble P-selectin (P-selectin(ΔCT/ΔCT) mice). Although the levels of circulating DNA and nucleosomes (indicative of spontaneous NETosis) were normal in these mice, basal neutrophil histone citrullination and presence of P-selectin on circulating neutrophils were elevated. NET formation after stimulation with platelet activating factor, ionomycin, or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was significantly enhanced, indicating that the P-selectin(ΔCT/ΔCT) neutrophils were primed for NETosis. In summary, P-selectin, cellular or soluble, through binding to PSGL-1, promotes NETosis, suggesting that this pathway is a potential therapeutic target for NET-related diseases.

  8. Prevalence of Invasive Aspergillosis Among (PTB) Patients in Kanchipuram, India

    PubMed Central

    S, Sivasankari; S, Senthamarai; C, Anitha; Sastry, Apurba Sankar; Bhatt, Sandhya; M.S, Kumudhavathi; S.K, Amshavathani

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major health problem worldwide. (PTB) is commonly associated with secondary aspergilloma. Repeated exposure of Aspergillus spores can aggravate the bronchial pathology and can manifest as asthmatic episodes. Aim and Objective: Pulmonary invasive aspergillosis is difficult to evaluate. Culture based diagnosis is time consuming. Hence (PCR) was done to evaluate the invasive fungal aspergillosis in (PTB) patients. Materials and Methods: Eighty sputum samples collected from TB patients were processed as per standard protocol. Species level identification was done using PCR. Results: Among 80 patients, 26 isolates were obtained, only 8 were Aspergillus species. All Aspergillus were taken up for PCR evaluation. Conclusion: Fungal infection should be suspected in all sputum positive patients. PCR is an effective tool to diagnose invasive aspergillosis. PMID:24783070

  9. The international Boltzmann project - the contribution of the PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellmuth, Bernd; Fischer, Joachim; Gaiser, Christof; Priruenrom, Tasanee; Sabuga, Wladimir; Ulbig, Peter

    2009-11-01

    To support new determinations of the Boltzmann constant, which have been requested by the International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) and which are necessary for preparative steps towards new definitions of the kilogram, the ampere, the kelvin and the mole, an iMERAPlus joint research project is coordinating the European activities in this field in Spain (CEM), Denmark (DFM), France (LNE-INM/CNAM, University Paris North), Italy (INRiM, Universities of Naples and Milan), United Kingdom (NPL), Germany (PTB) and in the European Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM). In this major European research project, the Boltzmann constant will be determined with various methods. The aims and the progress to date of the PTB contribution are reviewed in this article. To cite this article: B. Fellmuth et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  10. Allopurinol and oxypurinol promote osteoblast differentiation and increase bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Orriss, Isabel R.; Arnett, Timothy R.; George, Jacob; Witham, Miles D.

    2016-01-01

    Allopurinol and its active metabolite, oxypurinol are widely used in the treatment of gout and hyperuricemia. They inhibit xanthine oxidase (XO) an enzyme in the purine degradation pathway that converts xanthine to uric acid. This investigation examined the effect of allopurinol and oxypurinol on bone formation, cell number and viability, gene expression and enzyme activity in differentiating and mature, bone-forming osteoblasts. Although mRNA expression remained relatively constant, XO activity decreased over time with mature osteoblasts displaying reduced levels of uric acid (20% decrease). Treatment with allopurinol and oxypurinol (0.1–1 µM) reduced XO activity by up to 30%. At these concentrations, allopurinol and oxypurinol increased bone formation by osteoblasts ~4-fold and ~3-fold, respectively. Cell number and viability were unaffected. Both drugs increased tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) activity up to 65%. Osteocalcin and TNAP mRNA expression was increased, 5-fold and 2-fold, respectively. Expression of NPP1, the enzyme responsible for generating the mineralisation inhibitor, pyrophosphate, was decreased 5-fold. Col1α1 mRNA expression and soluble collagen levels were unchanged. Osteoclast formation and resorptive activity were not affected by treatment with allopurinol or oxypurinol. Our data suggest that inhibition of XO activity promotes osteoblast differentiation, leading to increased bone formation in vitro. PMID:26968635

  11. Vanadium promotes hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Fickl, Heidi; Theron, Annette J; Grimmer, Heidi; Oommen, Joyce; Ramafi, Grace J; Steel, Helen C; Visser, Susanna S; Anderson, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of vanadium in the +2, +3, +4, and +5 valence states on superoxide generation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils in vitro, using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (LECL), autoiodination, and electron spin resonance with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrroline N-oxide as the spin trap, respectively. At concentrations of up to 25 microM, vanadium, in the four different valence states used, did not affect the LECL responses of neutrophils activated with either the chemoattractant, N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine (1 microM), or the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 12-acetate (25 ng/ml). However, exposure to vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4, but not the +5, valence states was accompanied by significant augmentation of hydroxyl radical formation by activated neutrophils and attenuation of MPO-mediated iodination. With respect to hydroxyl radical formation, similar effects were observed using cell-free systems containing either hydrogen peroxide (100 microM) or xanthine/xanthine oxidase together with vanadium (+2, +3, +4), while the activity of purified MPO was inhibited by the metal in these valence states. These results demonstrate that vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4 valence states interacts prooxidatively with human neutrophils, competing effectively with MPO for hydrogen peroxide to promote formation of the highly toxic hydroxyl radical.

  12. Multi-protein delivery by nanodiamonds promotes bone formation.

    PubMed

    Moore, L; Gatica, M; Kim, H; Osawa, E; Ho, D

    2013-11-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-studied regulators of cartilage and bone development that have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the promotion of bone formation in certain procedures. BMPs are seeing more use in oral and maxillofacial surgeries because of recent FDA approval of InFUSE(®) for sinus augmentation and localized alveolar ridge augmentation. However, the utility of BMPs in medical and dental applications is limited by the delivery method. Currently, BMPs are delivered to the surgical site by the implantation of bulky collagen sponges. Here we evaluate the potential of detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) as a delivery vehicle for BMP-2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nanodiamonds are biocompatible, 4- to 5-nm carbon nanoparticles that have previously been used to deliver a wide variety of molecules, including proteins and peptides. We find that both BMP-2 and bFGF are readily loaded onto NDs by physisorption, forming a stable colloidal solution, and are triggered to release in slightly acidic conditions. Simultaneous delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF by ND induces differentiation and proliferation in osteoblast progenitor cells. Overall, we find that NDs provide an effective injectable alternative for the delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF to promote bone formation. PMID:24045646

  13. Multi-protein Delivery by Nanodiamonds Promotes Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, L.; Gatica, M.; Kim, H.; Osawa, E.; Ho, D.

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-studied regulators of cartilage and bone development that have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the promotion of bone formation in certain procedures. BMPs are seeing more use in oral and maxillofacial surgeries because of recent FDA approval of InFUSE® for sinus augmentation and localized alveolar ridge augmentation. However, the utility of BMPs in medical and dental applications is limited by the delivery method. Currently, BMPs are delivered to the surgical site by the implantation of bulky collagen sponges. Here we evaluate the potential of detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) as a delivery vehicle for BMP-2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nanodiamonds are biocompatible, 4- to 5-nm carbon nanoparticles that have previously been used to deliver a wide variety of molecules, including proteins and peptides. We find that both BMP-2 and bFGF are readily loaded onto NDs by physisorption, forming a stable colloidal solution, and are triggered to release in slightly acidic conditions. Simultaneous delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF by ND induces differentiation and proliferation in osteoblast progenitor cells. Overall, we find that NDs provide an effective injectable alternative for the delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF to promote bone formation. PMID:24045646

  14. Flotillin-1 promotes formation of glutamatergic synapses in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Swanwick, Catherine Croft; Shapiro, Marietta E; Vicini, Stefano; Wenthold, Robert J

    2010-11-01

    Synapse malformation underlies numerous neurodevelopmental illnesses, including autism spectrum disorders. Here we identify the lipid raft protein flotillin-1 as a promoter of glutamatergic synapse formation. We cultured neurons from the hippocampus, a brain region important for learning and memory, and examined them at two weeks in vitro, a time period rich with synapse formation. Double-label immunocytochemistry of native flot-1 with glutamatergic and GABAergic synapse markers showed that flot-1 was preferentially colocalized with the glutamatergic presynaptic marker vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), compared to the GABAergic presynaptic marker glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 (GAD-65). Triple-label immunocytochemistry of native flot-1, VGLUT1, and NR1, the obligatory subunit of NMDA receptors, indicates that Flot-1 was preferentially localized to synaptic rather than extrasynaptic NR1. Furthermore, electrophysiological results using whole-cell patch clamp showed that Flot-1 increased the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) but not miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), whereas amplitude and decay kinetics of either type of synaptic current was not affected. Corresponding immunocytochemical data confirmed that the number of glutamatergic synapses increased with flot-1 overexpression. Overall, our anatomical and physiological results show that flot-1 enhances the formation of glutamatergic synapses but not GABAergic synapses, suggesting that the role of flot-1 in neurodevelopmental disorders should be explored. PMID:20669324

  15. Hydrostatic Pressure Promotes Domain Formation in Model Lipid Raft Membranes.

    PubMed

    Worcester, David L; Weinrich, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements demonstrate that hydrostatic pressure promotes liquid-ordered (Lo) domain formation in lipid membranes prepared as both oriented multilayers and unilamellar vesicles made of a canonical ternary lipid mixture for which demixing transitions have been extensively studied. The results demonstrate an unusually large dependence of the mixing transition on hydrostatic pressure. Additionally, data at 28 °C show that the magnitude of increase in Lo caused by 10 MPa pressure is much the same as the decrease in Lo produced by twice minimum alveolar concentrations (MAC) of general anesthetics such as halothane, nitrous oxide, and xenon. Therefore, the results may provide a plausible explanation for the reversal of general anesthesia by hydrostatic pressure.

  16. Host-race formation: promoted by phenology, constrained by heritability.

    PubMed

    Whipple, A V; Abrahamson, W G; Khamiss, M A; Heinrich, P L; Urian, A G; Northridge, E M

    2009-04-01

    Host-race formation is promoted by genetic trade-offs in the ability of herbivores to use alternate hosts, including trade-offs due to differential timing of host-plant availability. We examined the role of phenology in limiting host-plant use in the goldenrod gall fly (Eurosta solidaginis) by determining: (1) whether phenology limits alternate host use, leading to a trade-off that could cause divergent selection on Eurosta emergence time and (2) whether Eurosta has the genetic capacity to respond to such selection in the face of existing environmental variation. Experiments demonstrated that oviposition and gall induction on the alternate host, Solidago canadensis, were the highest on young plants, whereas the highest levels of gall induction on the normal host, Solidago gigantea, occurred on intermediate-age plants. These findings indicate a phenological trade-off for host-plant use that sets up the possibility of divergent selection on emergence time. Heritability, estimated by parent-offspring regression, indicated that host-race formation is impeded by the amount of genetic variation, relative to environmental, for emergence time.

  17. Diatom assemblages promote ice formation in large lakes.

    PubMed

    D'souza, N A; Kawarasaki, Y; Gantz, J D; Lee, R E; Beall, B F N; Shtarkman, Y M; Koçer, Z A; Rogers, S O; Wildschutte, H; Bullerjahn, G S; McKay, R M L

    2013-08-01

    We present evidence for the directed formation of ice by planktonic communities dominated by filamentous diatoms sampled from the ice-covered Laurentian Great Lakes. We hypothesize that ice formation promotes attachment of these non-motile phytoplankton to overlying ice, thereby maintaining a favorable position for the diatoms in the photic zone. However, it is unclear whether the diatoms themselves are responsible for ice nucleation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed associations of bacterial epiphytes with the dominant diatoms of the phytoplankton assemblage, and bacteria isolated from the phytoplankton showed elevated temperatures of crystallization (T(c)) as high as -3 °C. Ice nucleation-active bacteria were identified as belonging to the genus Pseudomonas, but we could not demonstrate that they were sufficiently abundant to incite the observed freezing. Regardless of the source of ice nucleation activity, the resulting production of frazil ice may provide a means for the diatoms to be recruited to the overlying lake ice, thereby increasing their fitness. Bacterial epiphytes are likewise expected to benefit from their association with the diatoms as recipients of organic carbon excreted by their hosts. This novel mechanism illuminates a previously undescribed stage of the life cycle of the meroplanktonic diatoms that bloom in Lake Erie and other Great Lakes during winter and offers a model relevant to aquatic ecosystems having seasonal ice cover around the world.

  18. Diatom assemblages promote ice formation in large lakes

    PubMed Central

    D'souza, N A; Kawarasaki, Y; Gantz, J D; Lee, R E; Beall, B F N; Shtarkman, Y M; Koçer, Z A; Rogers, S O; Wildschutte, H; Bullerjahn, G S; McKay, R M L

    2013-01-01

    We present evidence for the directed formation of ice by planktonic communities dominated by filamentous diatoms sampled from the ice-covered Laurentian Great Lakes. We hypothesize that ice formation promotes attachment of these non-motile phytoplankton to overlying ice, thereby maintaining a favorable position for the diatoms in the photic zone. However, it is unclear whether the diatoms themselves are responsible for ice nucleation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed associations of bacterial epiphytes with the dominant diatoms of the phytoplankton assemblage, and bacteria isolated from the phytoplankton showed elevated temperatures of crystallization (Tc) as high as −3 °C. Ice nucleation-active bacteria were identified as belonging to the genus Pseudomonas, but we could not demonstrate that they were sufficiently abundant to incite the observed freezing. Regardless of the source of ice nucleation activity, the resulting production of frazil ice may provide a means for the diatoms to be recruited to the overlying lake ice, thereby increasing their fitness. Bacterial epiphytes are likewise expected to benefit from their association with the diatoms as recipients of organic carbon excreted by their hosts. This novel mechanism illuminates a previously undescribed stage of the life cycle of the meroplanktonic diatoms that bloom in Lake Erie and other Great Lakes during winter and offers a model relevant to aquatic ecosystems having seasonal ice cover around the world. PMID:23552624

  19. Diatom assemblages promote ice formation in large lakes.

    PubMed

    D'souza, N A; Kawarasaki, Y; Gantz, J D; Lee, R E; Beall, B F N; Shtarkman, Y M; Koçer, Z A; Rogers, S O; Wildschutte, H; Bullerjahn, G S; McKay, R M L

    2013-08-01

    We present evidence for the directed formation of ice by planktonic communities dominated by filamentous diatoms sampled from the ice-covered Laurentian Great Lakes. We hypothesize that ice formation promotes attachment of these non-motile phytoplankton to overlying ice, thereby maintaining a favorable position for the diatoms in the photic zone. However, it is unclear whether the diatoms themselves are responsible for ice nucleation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed associations of bacterial epiphytes with the dominant diatoms of the phytoplankton assemblage, and bacteria isolated from the phytoplankton showed elevated temperatures of crystallization (T(c)) as high as -3 °C. Ice nucleation-active bacteria were identified as belonging to the genus Pseudomonas, but we could not demonstrate that they were sufficiently abundant to incite the observed freezing. Regardless of the source of ice nucleation activity, the resulting production of frazil ice may provide a means for the diatoms to be recruited to the overlying lake ice, thereby increasing their fitness. Bacterial epiphytes are likewise expected to benefit from their association with the diatoms as recipients of organic carbon excreted by their hosts. This novel mechanism illuminates a previously undescribed stage of the life cycle of the meroplanktonic diatoms that bloom in Lake Erie and other Great Lakes during winter and offers a model relevant to aquatic ecosystems having seasonal ice cover around the world. PMID:23552624

  20. New PTB thermal neutron calibration facility: first results.

    PubMed

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Reginatto, M; Wershofen, H; Wiegel, B; Zimbal, A

    2014-10-01

    A new thermal neutron calibration facility based on a moderator assembly has been set up at PTB. It consists of 16 (241)Am-Be radionuclide sources mounted in a graphite block, 1.5 m wide, 1.5 m high and 1.8 m deep. The sources are distributed to eight different positions, at a mean distance of ∼1.25 m from the front face of the moderator. The neutron field at the reference position, 30 cm in front of the moderator device and 75 cm above the floor, has been characterised using calculations, Bonner sphere measurements and gold foil activation. First results are shown. The field is highly thermalised: 99 % in terms of fluence. It is quite homogenous within a 20 cm×20 cm area, but the absolute value of the thermal neutron fluence rate is small and yields an ambient dose equivalent rate of 3 µSv h(-1).

  1. PTB or not to be: promiscuous, tolerant and Bizarro domains come of age.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Amjad; Zhou, Ming-Ming

    2004-09-01

    PTB domains are protein modules that usually interact with the cytoplasmic tail of a wide variety of growth factor receptors. In so doing, they mediate the transduction of extracellular information to specific downstream targets within the cell that ultimately determine the fate of a number of important biological processes such as cell growth and differentiation, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. Recent structural and functional studies of PTB domains from a variety of cellular proteins have begun to shed light on the molecular mechanisms of action of these important protein modules. In the present review, we provide an account of such studies and suggest that PTB domains can be subdivided into three distinct categories on the basis of their topological differences. We also discuss the various mechanisms employed by the PTB domains in recognition of a diverse set of ligands without a consensus sequence. Finally, we discuss the role of molecular plasticity as a possible determinant of functional versatility of PTB domains. PMID:15590561

  2. High throughput sequencing analysis of Trypanosoma brucei DRBD3/PTB1-bound mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Das, Anish; Bellofatto, Vivian; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Carrington, Mark; Romero-Zaliz, Rocío; del Val, Coral; Estévez, Antonio M

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosomes are early-branched eukaryotes that show an unusual dependence on post-transcriptional mechanisms to regulate gene expression. RNA-binding proteins are crucial in controlling mRNA fate in these organisms, but their RNA substrates remain largely unknown. Here we have analyzed on a global scale the mRNAs associated with the Trypanosoma brucei RNA-binding protein DRBD3/PTB1, by capturing ribonucleoprotein complexes using UV cross-linking and subsequent immunoprecipitation. DRBD3/PTB1 associates with many transcripts encoding ribosomal proteins and translation factors. Consequently, silencing of DRBD3/PTB1 expression altered the protein synthesis rate. DRBD3/PTB1 also binds to mRNAs encoding the enzymes required to obtain energy through the oxidation of proline to succinate. We hypothesize that DRBD3/PTB1 is a key player in RNA regulon-based gene control influencing protein synthesis in trypanosomes. PMID:25725478

  3. Understanding the molecular basis of substrate binding specificity of PTB domains

    PubMed Central

    Sain, Neetu; Tiwari, Garima; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions mediated by phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains play a crucial role in various cellular processes. In order to understand the structural basis of substrate recognition by PTB domains, multiple explicit solvent atomistic simulations of 100ns duration have been carried out on 6 PTB-peptide complexes with known binding affinities. MM/PBSA binding energy values calculated from these MD trajectories and residue based statistical pair potential score show good correlation with the experimental dissociation constants. Our analysis also shows that the modeled structures of PTB domains can be used to develop less compute intensive residue level statistical pair potential based approaches for predicting interaction partners of PTB domains. PMID:27526776

  4. DEK over-expression promotes mitotic defects and micronucleus formation

    PubMed Central

    Matrka, Marie C; Hennigan, Robert F; Kappes, Ferdinand; DeLay, Monica L; Lambert, Paul F; Aronow, Bruce J; Wells, Susanne I

    2015-01-01

    The DEK gene encodes a nuclear protein that binds chromatin and is involved in various fundamental nuclear processes including transcription, RNA splicing, DNA replication and DNA repair. Several cancer types characteristically over-express DEK at the earliest stages of transformation. In order to explore relevant mechanisms whereby DEK supports oncogenicity, we utilized cancer databases to identify gene transcripts whose expression patterns are tightly correlated with that of DEK. We identified an enrichment of genes involved in mitosis and thus investigated the regulation and possible function of DEK in cell division. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that DEK dissociates from DNA in early prophase and re-associates with DNA during telophase in human keratinocytes. Mitotic cell populations displayed a sharp reduction in DEK protein levels compared to the corresponding interphase population, suggesting DEK may be degraded or otherwise removed from the cell prior to mitosis. Interestingly, DEK overexpression stimulated its own aberrant association with chromatin throughout mitosis. Furthermore, DEK co-localized with anaphase bridges, chromosome fragments, and micronuclei, suggesting a specific association with mitotically defective chromosomes. We found that DEK over-expression in both non-transformed and transformed cells is sufficient to stimulate micronucleus formation. These data support a model wherein normal chromosomal clearance of DEK is required for maintenance of high fidelity cell division and chromosomal integrity. Therefore, the overexpression of DEK and its incomplete removal from mitotic chromosomes promotes genomic instability through the generation of genetically abnormal daughter cells. Consequently, DEK over-expression may be involved in the initial steps of developing oncogenic mutations in cells leading to cancer initiation PMID:25945971

  5. DEK over-expression promotes mitotic defects and micronucleus formation.

    PubMed

    Matrka, Marie C; Hennigan, Robert F; Kappes, Ferdinand; DeLay, Monica L; Lambert, Paul F; Aronow, Bruce J; Wells, Susanne I

    2015-01-01

    The DEK gene encodes a nuclear protein that binds chromatin and is involved in various fundamental nuclear processes including transcription, RNA splicing, DNA replication and DNA repair. Several cancer types characteristically over-express DEK at the earliest stages of transformation. In order to explore relevant mechanisms whereby DEK supports oncogenicity, we utilized cancer databases to identify gene transcripts whose expression patterns are tightly correlated with that of DEK. We identified an enrichment of genes involved in mitosis and thus investigated the regulation and possible function of DEK in cell division. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that DEK dissociates from DNA in early prophase and re-associates with DNA during telophase in human keratinocytes. Mitotic cell populations displayed a sharp reduction in DEK protein levels compared to the corresponding interphase population, suggesting DEK may be degraded or otherwise removed from the cell prior to mitosis. Interestingly, DEK overexpression stimulated its own aberrant association with chromatin throughout mitosis. Furthermore, DEK co-localized with anaphase bridges, chromosome fragments, and micronuclei, suggesting a specific association with mitotically defective chromosomes. We found that DEK over-expression in both non-transformed and transformed cells is sufficient to stimulate micronucleus formation. These data support a model wherein normal chromosomal clearance of DEK is required for maintenance of high fidelity cell division and chromosomal integrity. Therefore, the overexpression of DEK and its incomplete removal from mitotic chromosomes promotes genomic instability through the generation of genetically abnormal daughter cells. Consequently, DEK over-expression may be involved in the initial steps of developing oncogenic mutations in cells leading to cancer initiation.

  6. Effects of ptb knockout on butyric acid fermentation by Clostridium tyrobutyricum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yali; Yu, Mingrui; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 is an anaerobic, rod-shaped, gram-positive bacterium that produces butyrate, acetate, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide from various saccharides, including glucose and xylose. Phosphotransbutyrylase (PTB) is a key enzyme in the butyric acid synthesis pathway. In this work, effects of ptb knockout by homologous recombination on metabolic flux and product distribution were investigated. When compared with the wild type, the activities of PTB and butyrate kinase in ptb knockout mutant decreased 76 and 42%, respectively; meanwhile, phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase increased 7 and 29%, respectively. However, ptb knockout did not significantly reduce butyric acid production from glucose or xylose in batch fermentations. Instead, it increased acetic acid and hydrogen production 33.3-53.8% and ≈ 11%, respectively. Thus, the ptb knockout did increase the carbon flux toward acetate synthesis, resulting in a significant decrease (28-35% reduction) in the butyrate/acetate ratio in ptb mutant fermentations. In addition, the mutant displayed a higher specific growth rate (0.20 h(-1) vs. 0.15 h(-1) on glucose and 0.14 h(-1) vs. 0.10 h(-1) on xylose) and tolerance to butyric acid. Consequently, batch fermentation with the mutant gave higher fermentation rate and productivities (26-48% increase for butyrate, 81-100% increase for acetate, and 38-46% increase for hydrogen). This mutant thus can be used more efficiently than the parental strain in fermentations to produce butyrate, acetate, and hydrogen from glucose and xylose.

  7. From plane to spatial angles: PTB's spatial angle autocollimator calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, Oliver; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Just, Andreas; Krause, Michael; Osten, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Electronic autocollimators are utilised versatilely for non-contact angle measurements in applications like straightness measurements and profilometry. Yet, no calibration of the angle measurement of an autocollimator has been available when both its measurement axes are engaged. Additionally, autocollimators have been calibrated at fixed distances to the reflector, although its distance may vary during the use of an autocollimator. To extend the calibration capabilities of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) regarding spatial angles and variable distances, a novel calibration device has been set up: the spatial angle autocollimator calibrator (SAAC). In this paper, its concept and its mechanical realisation will be presented. The focus will be on the system's mathematical modelling and its application in spatial angle calibrations. The model considers the misalignments of the SAAC's components, including the non-orthogonalities of the measurement axes of the autocollimators and of the rotational axes of the tilting unit. It allows us to derive specific measurement procedures to determine the misalignments in situ and, in turn, to correct the measurements of the autocollimators. Finally, the realisation and the results of a traceable spatial angle calibration of an autocollimator will be presented. This is the first calibration of this type worldwide.

  8. A physical and functional link between splicing factors promotes pre-mRNA 3′ end processing

    PubMed Central

    Millevoi, Stefania; Decorsière, Adrien; Loulergue, Clarisse; Iacovoni, Jason; Bernat, Sandra; Antoniou, Michael; Vagner, Stéphan

    2009-01-01

    Polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) is a splicing regulator that also plays a positive role in pre-mRNA 3′ end processing when bound upstream of the polyadenylation signal (pA signal). Here, we address the mechanism of PTB stimulatory function in mRNA 3′ end formation. We identify PTB as the protein factor whose binding to the human β-globin (HBB) 3′ UTR is abrogated by a 3′ end processing-inactivating mutation. We show that PTB promotes both in vitro 3′ end cleavage and polyadenylation and recruits directly the splicing factor hnRNP H to G-rich sequences associated with several pA signals. Increased binding of hnRNP H results in stimulation of polyadenylation through a direct interaction with poly(A) polymerase. Therefore, our results provide evidence of a concerted regulation of pA signal recognition by splicing factors bound to auxiliary polyadenylation sequence elements. PMID:19506027

  9. Long-term research in Inmetro on samples of quantum Hall resistance standards made by PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, H. R.; Briones, R. E. M.; Pierz, K.; Gotz, M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper shows up to date results of Inmetro's investigations on aging effects of quantum Hall samples fabricated by PTB in the frame of a mutual scientific agreement established between the Brazilian and German National Metrology Institutes.

  10. Functional validation of tensin2 SH2-PTB domain by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing

    PubMed Central

    MARUSUGI, Kiyoma; NAKANO, Kenta; SASAKI, Hayato; KIMURA, Junpei; YANOBU-TAKANASHI, Rieko; OKAMURA, Tadashi; SASAKI, Nobuya

    2016-01-01

    Podocytes are terminally differentiated and highly specialized cells in the glomerulus, and they form a crucial component of the glomerular filtration barrier. The ICGN mouse is a model of glomerular dysfunction that shows gross morphological changes in the podocyte foot process, accompanied by proteinuria. Previously, we demonstrated that proteinuria in ICR-derived glomerulonephritis mouse ICGN mice might be caused by a deletion mutation in the tensin2 (Tns2) gene (designated Tns2nph). To test whether this mutation causes the mutant phenotype, we created knockout (KO) mice carrying a Tns2 protein deletion in the C-terminal Src homology and phosphotyrosine binding (SH2-PTB) domains (designated Tns2ΔC) via CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing. Tns2nph/Tns2ΔC compound heterozygotes and Tns2ΔC/Tns2ΔC homozygous KO mice displayed podocyte abnormalities and massive proteinuria similar to ICGN mice, indicating that these two mutations are allelic. Further, this result suggests that the SH2-PTB domain of Tns2 is required for podocyte integrity. Tns2 knockdown in a mouse podocyte cell line significantly enhanced actin stress fiber formation and cell migration. Thus, this study provides evidence that alteration of actin remodeling resulting from Tns2 deficiency causes morphological changes in podocytes and subsequent proteinuria. PMID:27246398

  11. Type IV pili promote early biofilm formation by Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Maldarelli, Grace A; Piepenbrink, Kurt H; Scott, Alison J; Freiberg, Jeffrey A; Song, Yang; Achermann, Yvonne; Ernst, Robert K; Shirtliff, Mark E; Sundberg, Eric J; Donnenberg, Michael S; von Rosenvinge, Erik C

    2016-08-01

    Increasing morbidity and mortality from Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) present an enormous challenge to healthcare systems. Clostridium difficile express type IV pili (T4P), but their function remains unclear. Many chronic and recurrent bacterial infections result from biofilms, surface-associated bacterial communities embedded in an extracellular matrix. CDI may be biofilm mediated; T4P are important for biofilm formation in a number of organisms. We evaluate the role of T4P in C. difficile biofilm formation using RNA sequencing, mutagenesis and complementation of the gene encoding the major pilin pilA1, and microscopy. RNA sequencing demonstrates that, in comparison to other growth phenotypes, C. difficile growing in a biofilm has a distinct RNA expression profile, with significant differences in T4P gene expression. Microscopy of T4P-expressing and T4P-deficient strains suggests that T4P play an important role in early biofilm formation. A non-piliated pilA1 mutant forms an initial biofilm of significantly reduced mass and thickness in comparison to the wild type. Complementation of the pilA1 mutant strain leads to formation of a biofilm which resembles the wild-type biofilm. These findings suggest that T4P play an important role in early biofilm formation. Novel strategies for confronting biofilm infections are emerging; our data suggest that similar strategies should be investigated in CDI. PMID:27369898

  12. Polluted dust promotes new particle formation and growth

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Wei; Ding, Aijun; Wang, Tao; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; George, Christian; Xue, Likun; Wang, Wenxing; Zhang, Qingzhu; Petäjä, Tuukka; Qi, Ximeng; Gao, Xiaomei; Wang, Xinfeng; Yang, Xiuqun; Fu, Congbin; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-01-01

    Understanding new particle formation and their subsequent growth in the troposphere has a critical impact on our ability to predict atmospheric composition and global climate change. High pre-existing particle loadings have been thought to suppress the formation of new atmospheric aerosol particles due to high condensation and coagulation sinks. Here, based on field measurements at a mountain site in South China, we report, for the first time, in situ observational evidence on new particle formation and growth in remote ambient atmosphere during heavy dust episodes mixed with anthropogenic pollution. Both the formation and growth rates of particles in the diameter range 15–50 nm were enhanced during the dust episodes, indicating the influence of photo-induced, dust surface-mediated reactions and resulting condensable vapor production. This study provides unique in situ observations of heterogeneous photochemical processes inducing new particle formation and growth in the real atmosphere, and suggests an unexpected impact of mineral dust on climate and atmospheric chemistry. PMID:25319109

  13. DEXAMETHASONE PROMOTES CPPD CRYSTAL FORMATION BY ARTICULAR CHONDROCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, Mark; Mitton, Elizabeth; Muth, Emily; Rosenthal, Ann K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals (CPPD) are commonly found in osteoarthritic joints and correlate with a poor prognosis. Intra-articular corticosteroids, such as dexamethasone (Dxm), are commonly used therapies for osteoarthritis with or without CPPD deposition. Dxm has variable effects in mineralization models. We investigated the effects of Dxm on CPPD crystal formation in a well established tissue culture model. Methods Porcine articular chondrocytes were incubated with ATP to generate CPPD crystals. Chondrocytes incubated with or without ATP were exposed to 1–100 nM Dxm in the presence of 45Ca. Mineralization was measured by 45Ca uptake in the cell layer. We also investigated the effect of Dxm on mineralization-regulating enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase, NTPPPH and transglutaminase. Results Dxm significantly increased ATP-induced mineralization by articular chondrocytes. While alkaline phosphatase and NTPPPH activities were unchanged by Dxm, transglutaminase activity increased in a clear dose responsive manner. Levels of factor XIIIA mRNA and protein were increased by Dxm, while type II Tgase protein was unchanged. Transglutaminase inhibitors suppressed Dxm-induced increases in CPPD crystal formation. Conclusion These findings suggest a potential for Dxm to contribute to pathologic mineralization in cartilage and reinforce a central role for the transglutaminase enzymes in CPPD crystal formation. PMID:19132782

  14. Coordinate repression of a trio of neuron-specific splicing events by the splicing regulator PTB.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Liu, W; Grabowski, P J

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the ability of the polypyrimidine tract binding protein PTB to function as a coordinator of splicing regulation for a trio of neuron-specific exons that are subject to developmental splicing changes in the rat cerebellum. Three neuron-specific exons that show positive regulation are derived from the GABA(A) receptor gamma2 subunit 24 nucleotide exon, clathrin light chain B exon EN, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NR1 subunit exon 5 pre-mRNAs. The functional activity of splicing repressor signals located in the 3' splice site regions adjacent to the neural exons is shown using an alternative splicing switch assay, in which these short RNA sequences function in trans to switch splicing to the neural pathway in HeLa splicing reactions. Parallel UV crosslinking/competition assays demonstrate selective binding of PTB in comparison to substantially lower binding at adjacent, nonneural 3' splice sites. Substantially lower PTB binding and splicing switch activity is also observed for the 3' splice site of NMDA exon 21, which is subject to negative regulation in cerebellum tissue in the same time frame. In splicing active neural extracts, the balance of control shifts to positive regulation, and this shift correlates with a PTB status that is predominantly the neural form. In this context, the addition of recombinant PTB is sufficient to switch splicing to the nonneural pathway. The neural extracts also reveal specific binding of the CUG triplet repeat binding protein to a subset of regulatory 3' splice site regions. These interactions may interfere with PTB function or modulate splicing levels in a substrate-specific manner within neural tissue. Together these results strengthen the evidence that PTB is a splicing regulator with multiple targets and demonstrate its ability to discriminate among neural and nonneural substrates. Thus, a variety of mechanisms that counterbalance the splicing repressor function of PTB in neural tissue are

  15. Tracing behavior of endothelial cells promotes vascular network formation.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Noriko; Sekine, Hidekazu; Bise, Ryoma; Okano, Teruo; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2016-05-01

    The in vitro formation of network structures derived from endothelial cells in grafts before transplantation contributes to earlier engraftment. In a previous study, endothelial cells migrated to form a net-shaped structure in co-culture. However, the specific network formation behavior of endothelial cells during migration remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated the tracing behavior and cell cycle of endothelial cells using Fucci-labeled (Fluorescent Ubiquitination-based Cell Cycle Indicator) endothelial cells. Here, we observed the co-culture of Fucci-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) together with normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) using time-lapse imaging and analyzed by multicellular concurrent tracking. In the G0/G1 period, HUVECs migrate faster than in the S/G2/M period, because G0/G1 is the mobile phase and S/G2/M is the proliferation phase in the cell cycle. When HUVECs are co-cultured, they tend to move randomly until they find existing tracks that they then follow to form clusters. Extracellular matrix (ECM) staining showed that collagen IV, laminin and thrombospondin deposited in accordance with endothelial cell networks. Therefore the HUVECs may migrate on the secreted ECM and exhibit tracing behavior, where the HUVECs migrate toward each other. These results suggested that ECM and a cell phase contributed to form a network by accelerating cell migration.

  16. NADPH Oxidase Promotes Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation in Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Röhm, Marc; Grimm, Melissa J.; D'Auria, Anthony C.; Almyroudis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-01-01

    NADPH oxidase is a crucial enzyme in antimicrobial host defense and in regulating inflammation. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder of NADPH oxidase in which phagocytes are defective in generation of reactive oxidant intermediates. Aspergillus species are ubiquitous, filamentous fungi, which can cause invasive aspergillosis, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CGD, reflecting the critical role for NADPH oxidase in antifungal host defense. Activation of NADPH oxidase in neutrophils can be coupled to the release of proteins and chromatin that comingle in neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which can augment extracellular antimicrobial host defense. NETosis can be driven by NADPH oxidase-dependent and -independent pathways. We therefore undertook an analysis of whether NADPH oxidase was required for NETosis in Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. Oropharyngeal instillation of live Aspergillus hyphae induced neutrophilic pneumonitis in both wild-type and NADPH oxidase-deficient (p47phox−/−) mice which had resolved in wild-type mice by day 5 but progressed in p47phox−/− mice. NETs, identified by immunostaining, were observed in lungs of wild-type mice but were absent in p47phox−/− mice. Using bona fide NETs and nuclear chromatin decondensation as an early NETosis marker, we found that NETosis required a functional NADPH oxidase in vivo and ex vivo. In addition, NADPH oxidase increased the proportion of apoptotic neutrophils. Together, our results show that NADPH oxidase is required for pulmonary clearance of Aspergillus hyphae and generation of NETs in vivo. We speculate that dual modulation of NETosis and apoptosis by NADPH oxidase enhances antifungal host defense and promotes resolution of inflammation upon infection clearance. PMID:24549323

  17. Native low density lipoprotein promotes lipid raft formation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Ping, Ling-Yan; Duong, Duc M; Gao, Xiao-Yan; He, Chun-Yan; Wei, Lei; Wu, Jun-Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Oxidized low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) has an important role in atherogenesis; however, the mechanisms underlying cell‑mediated LDL oxidation remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated whether native‑LDL induced lipid raft formation, in order to gain further insight into LDL oxidation. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that lipid rafts were aggregated or clustered in the membrane, which were colocalized with myeloperoxidase (MPO) upon native LDL stimulation; however, in the presence of methyl‑β‑cyclodextrin (MβCD), LDL‑stimulated aggregation, translocation, and colocalization of lipid rafts components was abolished.. In addition, lipid raft disruptors MβCD and filipin decreased malondialdehyde expression levels. Density gradient centrifugation coupled to label‑free quantitative proteomic analysis identified 1,449 individual proteins, of which 203 were significantly upregulated following native‑LDL stimulation. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the lipid rafts revealed that the expression levels of translocation proteins were upregulated. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that native‑LDL induced lipid raft clustering in macrophages, and the expression levels of several proteins were altered in the stimulated macrophages, which provided novel insights into the mechanism underlying LDL oxidation.

  18. Chlorogenic acid increased acrylamide formation through promotion of HMF formation and 3-aminopropionamide deamination.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yun; Zhang, Zhenhua; Jiang, Shanshan; Yu, Miao; Huang, Caihuan; Qiu, Ruixia; Zou, Yueyu; Zhang, Qirui; Ou, Shiyi; Zhou, Hua; Wang, Yong; Bai, Weibing; Li, Yiqun

    2014-03-15

    This research was aimed to investigate why chlorogenic acid, presents at high concentrations in some food raw material, influences acrylamide formation. In the asparagine/glucose Maillard reaction system (pH=6.8), addition of chlorogenic acid significantly increased acrylamide formation and inhibited its elimination. In contrast, the quinone derivative of chlorogenic acid decreased acrylamide formation. Three mechanisms may be involved for increasing acrylamide formation by chlorogenic acid. Firstly, it increased the formation of HMF, which acts as a more efficient precursor than glucose to form acrylamide. Secondly, it decreased activation energy for conversion of 3-aminopropionamide (3-APA) to acrylamide (from 173.2 to 136.6kJ/mol), and enhances deamination from 3-APA. And thirdly, it prevented attack of the produced acrylamide from free radicals by keeping high redox potential during the Maillard reaction.

  19. Optical properties of low bandgap copolymer PTB7 for organic photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Uyen; Basel, Tek; Xu, Tao; Lu, Luyao; Zheng, Tianyue; Yu, Luping; Vardeny, Valy

    2014-09-01

    We used both cw and transient spectroscopies for studying the optical properties and photoexcitations in the low bandgap copolymer PTB7 that has been used in organic photovoltaic applications (OPV). Surprisingly we observed two primary photoexcitations that are generated within ~150 fs (our time resolution); we identify them as singlet exciton (S1) and triplet-pair (1TT). The singlet exciton has been considered to be the only primary photoexcitation in regular π-conjugated polymers and is related with a transient absorption band that peaks at an energy value close to the exciton binding energy (~0.4 eV in PTB7). The TT pair is a novel photoexcitation species in low band-gap π-conjugated copolymers. It has an absorption band close to that of isolated triplet exciton, and may readily dissociate at the donoracceptor interfaces in the PTB7/fullerene blend. This finding may explain the underlying mechanism for the high obtained power conversion efficiency in OPV devices based on the PTB7 copolymer.

  20. In Vivo Expression of the PTB-deleted Odin Mutant Results in Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunjung; Lee, Haeryung; Park, Soochul

    2015-05-01

    Odin has been implicated in the downstream signaling pathway of receptor tyrosine kinases, such as the epidermal growth factor and Eph receptors. However, the physiologically relevant function of Odin needs to be further determined. In this study, we used Odin heterozygous mice to analyze the Odin expression pattern; the targeted allele contained a β-geo gene trap vector inserted into the 14th intron of the Odin gene. Interestingly, we found that Odin was exclusively expressed in ependymal cells along the brain ventricles. In particular, Odin was highly expressed in the subcommissural organ, a small ependymal glandular tissue. However, we did not observe any morphological abnormalities in the brain ventricles or ependymal cells of Odin null-mutant mice. We also generated BAC transgenic mice that expressed the PTB-deleted Odin (dPTB) after a floxed GFP-STOP cassette was excised by tissue-specific Cre expression. Strikingly, Odin-dPTB expression played a causative role in the development of the hydrocephalic phenotype, primarily in the midbrain. In addition, Odin-dPTB expression disrupted proper development of the subcommissural organ and interfered with ependymal cell maturation in the cerebral aqueduct. Taken together, our findings strongly suggest that Odin plays a role in the differentiation of ependymal cells during early postnatal brain development. PMID:26018557

  1. Evidence that PTB does not stimulate HCV IRES-driven translation.

    PubMed

    Brocard, Michèle; Paulous, Sylvie; Komarova, Anastassia V; Deveaux, Vanessa; Kean, Katherine M

    2007-08-01

    It is now well established that Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) translation is driven by an Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) resulting in cap-independent translation. Such a mechanism usually occurs with the help of IRES Associated Factors (ITAFs). Moreover, an important translational feature is likely conserved from the model of classical mRNA circularisation (5'-3' cross-talk), involving the HCV RNA highly structured 3' extremity called the 3'X region. This could bind several cellular factors and modulate the translation efficacy, at least in Rabbit Reticulocyte Lysate (RRL). In particular, polypyrimidine-binding proteins have been proposed to be potential HCV ITAFs, such as Polypyrimidine Tract Binding protein (PTB). However, contradictions still exist as to the role of PTB: its ability to bind both the HCV IRES and the 3'X region leads to the hypothesis that it could positively modulate IRES-driven translation in the presence of the X structure. Results of translational and PTB-binding studies of X mutant sequences led us to discredit PTB as protagonist of 3'X region stimulation on HCV IRES-driven translation. Moreover, competition assays of X RNA in trans on IRES-driven translation demonstrate the involvement of at least two stimulating factors and led to the conclusion that this mechanism is more complex than initially thought. Although we did not identify these factors, it is no longer doubtful that there is effectively a stimulating functional interaction between the HCV IRES and the 3'X region in RRL.

  2. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 promotes primordial follicle formation in the ovary

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Prabuddha; Roy, Shyamal K.

    2015-01-01

    Primordial follicles (PF) are formed when somatic cells differentiate into flattened pregranulosa cells, invaginate into the oocyte nests and encircle individual oocytes. We hypothesize that BMP2 regulates PF formation by promoting the transition of germ cells into oocytes and somatic cells into pregranulosa cells. E15 hamster ovaries were cultured for 8 days corresponding to postnatal day 8 (P8) in vivo, with or without BMP2, and the formation of PF was examined. BMP2 was expressed in the oocytes as well as ovarian somatic cells during development. BMP2 exposure for the first two days or the last two days or the entire 8 days of culture led to increase in PF formation suggesting that BMP2 affected both germ cell transition and somatic cell differentiation. Whereas an ALK2/3 inhibitor completely blocked BMP2-induced PF formation, an ALK2-specific inhibitor was partially effective, suggesting that BMP2 affected PF formation via both ALK2 and ALK3. BMP2 also reduced apoptosis in vitro. Further, more meiotic oocytes were present in BMP2 exposed ovaries. In summary, the results provide the first evidence that BMP2 regulates primordial follicle formation by promoting germ cell to oocyte transition and somatic cell to pre-granulosa cells formation and it acts via both ALK2 and ALK3. PMID:26219655

  3. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 promotes primordial follicle formation in the ovary.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Prabuddha; Roy, Shyamal K

    2015-01-01

    Primordial follicles (PF) are formed when somatic cells differentiate into flattened pregranulosa cells, invaginate into the oocyte nests and encircle individual oocytes. We hypothesize that BMP2 regulates PF formation by promoting the transition of germ cells into oocytes and somatic cells into pregranulosa cells. E15 hamster ovaries were cultured for 8 days corresponding to postnatal day 8 (P8) in vivo, with or without BMP2, and the formation of PF was examined. BMP2 was expressed in the oocytes as well as ovarian somatic cells during development. BMP2 exposure for the first two days or the last two days or the entire 8 days of culture led to increase in PF formation suggesting that BMP2 affected both germ cell transition and somatic cell differentiation. Whereas an ALK2/3 inhibitor completely blocked BMP2-induced PF formation, an ALK2-specific inhibitor was partially effective, suggesting that BMP2 affected PF formation via both ALK2 and ALK3. BMP2 also reduced apoptosis in vitro. Further, more meiotic oocytes were present in BMP2 exposed ovaries. In summary, the results provide the first evidence that BMP2 regulates primordial follicle formation by promoting germ cell to oocyte transition and somatic cell to pre-granulosa cells formation and it acts via both ALK2 and ALK3. PMID:26219655

  4. The polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) requirement for internal initiation of translation of cardiovirus RNAs is conditional rather than absolute.

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, A; Jackson, R J

    1998-01-01

    Picornavirus RNAs are translated by an unusual mechanism of internal ribosome entry that requires a substantial segment of the viral 5'-untranslated region, generally known as the internal ribosome entry segment (IRES), and in some circumstances may require cellular trans-acting proteins, particularly polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB). It is shown here that for encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), the PTB dependence of IRES function in vitro is determined partly by the nature of the reporter cistron, and more especially by the size of an A-rich bulge in the IRES. With a wild-type EMCV IRES (which has a bulge of 6 As), translation is effectively independent of PTB provided the IRES is driving the synthesis of EMCV viral polyprotein. With an enlarged (7A) bulge and heterologous reporters, translation is highly dependent on PTB. Intermediate levels of PTB dependence are seen with a 7A bulge IRES driving viral polyprotein synthesis or a wild-type (6A) bulge IRES linked to a heterologous reporter. None of these parameters influenced the binding of PTB to the high-affinity site in the IRES. These results argue that PTB is not an essential and universal internal initiation factor, but, rather, that when it is required, its binding to the IRES helps to maintain the appropriate higher-order structure and to reverse distortions caused, for example, by an enlarged A-rich bulge. PMID:9622122

  5. A critical role of downstream RNA polymerase-promoter interactions in the formation of initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Severinov, Konstantin

    2011-06-24

    Nucleation of promoter melting in bacteria is coupled with RNA polymerase (RNAP) binding to a conserved -10 promoter element located at the upstream edge of the transcription bubble. The mechanism of downstream propagation of the transcription bubble to include the transcription start site is unclear. Here we introduce new model downstream fork junction promoter fragments that specifically bind RNAP and mimic the downstream segment of promoter complexes. We demonstrate that RNAP binding to downstream fork junctions is coupled with DNA melting around the transcription start point. Consequently, certain downstream fork junction probes can serve as transcription templates. Using a protein beacon fluorescent method, we identify structural determinants of affinity and transcription activity of RNAP-downstream fork junction complexes. Measurements of RNAP interaction with double-stranded promoter fragments reveal that the strength of RNAP interactions with downstream DNA plays a critical role in promoter opening and that the length of the downstream duplex must exceed a critical length for efficient formation of transcription competent open promoter complex.

  6. Thyroid dysfunction, either hyper or hypothyroidism, promotes gallstone formation by different mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Yu, Xing; Zhao, Qun-zi; Zheng, Shu; Qing, Wen-jie; Miao, Chun-di; Sanjay, Jaiswal

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated comprehensively the effects of thyroid function on gallstone formation in a mouse model. Gonadectomized gallstone-susceptible male C57BL/6 mice were randomly distributed into three groups each of which received an intervention to induce hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, or euthyroidism. After 5 weeks of feeding a lithogenic diet of 15% (w/w) butter fat, 1% (w/w) cholesterol, and 0.5% (w/w) cholic acid, mice were killed for further experiments. The incidence of cholesterol monohydrate crystal formation was 100% in mice with hyperthyroidism, 83% in hypothyroidism, and 33% in euthyroidism, the differences being statistically significant. Among the hepatic lithogenic genes, Trβ was found to be up-regulated and Rxr down-regulated in the mice with hypothyroidism. In contrast, Lxrα, Rxr, and Cyp7α1 were up-regulated and Fxr down-regulated in the mice with hyperthyroidism. In conclusion, thyroid dysfunction, either hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, promotes the formation of cholesterol gallstones in C57BL/6 mice. Gene expression differences suggest that thyroid hormone disturbance leads to gallstone formation in different ways. Hyperthyroidism induces cholesterol gallstone formation by regulating expression of the hepatic nuclear receptor genes such as Lxrα and Rxr, which are significant in cholesterol metabolism pathways. However, hypothyroidism induces cholesterol gallstone formation by promoting cholesterol biosynthesis. PMID:27381728

  7. Thyroid dysfunction, either hyper or hypothyroidism, promotes gallstone formation by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yu, Xing; Zhao, Qun-Zi; Zheng, Shu; Qing, Wen-Jie; Miao, Chun-di; Sanjay, Jaiswal

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated comprehensively the effects of thyroid function on gallstone formation in a mouse model. Gonadectomized gallstone-susceptible male C57BL/6 mice were randomly distributed into three groups each of which received an intervention to induce hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, or euthyroidism. After 5 weeks of feeding a lithogenic diet of 15% (w/w) butter fat, 1% (w/w) cholesterol, and 0.5% (w/w) cholic acid, mice were killed for further experiments. The incidence of cholesterol monohydrate crystal formation was 100% in mice with hyperthyroidism, 83% in hypothyroidism, and 33% in euthyroidism, the differences being statistically significant. Among the hepatic lithogenic genes, Trβ was found to be up-regulated and Rxr down-regulated in the mice with hypothyroidism. In contrast, Lxrα, Rxr, and Cyp7α1 were up-regulated and Fxr down-regulated in the mice with hyperthyroidism. In conclusion, thyroid dysfunction, either hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, promotes the formation of cholesterol gallstones in C57BL/6 mice. Gene expression differences suggest that thyroid hormone disturbance leads to gallstone formation in different ways. Hyperthyroidism induces cholesterol gallstone formation by regulating expression of the hepatic nuclear receptor genes such as Lxrα and Rxr, which are significant in cholesterol metabolism pathways. However, hypothyroidism induces cholesterol gallstone formation by promoting cholesterol biosynthesis. PMID:27381728

  8. Retinoid signaling is necessary for, and promotes long-term memory formation following operant conditioning.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, Cailin M; Spencer, Gaynor E

    2014-10-01

    Retinoic acid, a metabolite of vitamin A, is proposed to play an important role in vertebrate learning and memory, as well as hippocampal-dependent synaptic plasticity. However, it has not yet been determined whether retinoic acid plays a similar role in learning and memory in invertebrates. In this study, we report that retinoid signaling in the mollusc Lymnaea stagnalis, is required for long-term memory formation following operant conditioning of its aerial respiratory behaviour. Animals were exposed to inhibitors of the RALDH enzyme (which synthesizes retinoic acid), or various retinoid receptor antagonists. Following exposure to these inhibitors, neither learning nor intermediate-term memory (lasting 2 h) was affected, but long-term memory formation (tested at either 24 or 72 h) was inhibited. We next demonstrated that various retinoid receptor agonists promoted long-term memory formation. Using a training paradigm shown only to produce intermediate-term memory (lasting 2 h, but not 24 h) we found that exposure of animals to synthetic retinoids promoted memory formation that lasted up to 30 h. These findings suggest that the role of retinoids in memory formation is ancient in origin, and that retinoid signaling is also important for the formation of implicit memories, in addition to its previously demonstrated role in hippocampal-dependent memories.

  9. Trilateral Intercomparison of Photometric Units Maintained at NIST (USA), NPL (UK), and PTB (Germany)

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoshi; Goodman, Teresa; Sauter, Georg

    1999-01-01

    A trilateral intercomparison of photometric units between NIST (USA), NPL (UK), and PTB (Germany) has been conducted to update the knowledge of the relationship between the photometric units disseminated in the three countries. The luminous intensity unit (cd), the luminous responsivity scale (A/lx), and the luminous flux unit (lm) maintained at each laboratory were compared by circulating transfer standard lamps and photometers. The results showed that the relative luminous intensity values, with respect to the average, measured by NIST, NPL, and PTB were 1.0014, 1.0021, and 0.9966; the relative inverse values of the luminous responsivity (corresponding to illuminance) were 1.0023, 1.0011, and 0.9965; the relative luminous flux values were 0.9994, 1.0034, and 0.9972, respectively. The results agreed within the stated uncertainties of the units maintained at the three laboratories.

  10. SCCmec-associated psm-mec mRNA promotes Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongchang; Zhang, Xuemei; Huang, Wenfang; Yin, Yibing

    2016-10-01

    Biofilm formation is considered the major pathogenic mechanism of Staphylococcus epidermidis-associated nosocomial infections. Reports have shown that SCCmec-associated psm-mec regulated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus virulence and biofilm formation. However, the role of psm-mec in S. epidermidis remains unclear. To this purpose, we analysed 165 clinical isolates of S. epidermidis to study the distribution, mutation and expression of psm-mec and the relationship between this gene and biofilm formation. Next, we constructed three psm-mec deletion mutants, one psm-mec transgene expression strain (p221) and two psm-mec point mutant strains (pM, pAG) to explore its effects on S. epidermidis biofilm formation. Then, the amount of biofilm formation, extracellular DNA (eDNA) and Triton X-100-induced autolysis of the constructed strains was measured. Results of psm-mec deletion and transgene expression showed that the gene regulated S. epidermidis biofilm formation. Compared with the control strains, the ability to form biofilm, Triton X-100-induced autolysis and the amount of eDNA increased in the p221 strain and the two psm-mec mutants pM and pAG expressed psm-mec mRNA without its protein, whereas no differences were observed among the three constructed strains, illustrating that psm-mec mRNA promoted S. epidermidis biofilm formation through up-regulation of bacterial autolysis and the release of eDNA. Our results reveal that acquisition of psm-mec promotes S. epidermidis biofilm formation. PMID:27502022

  11. SCCmec-associated psm-mec mRNA promotes Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongchang; Zhang, Xuemei; Huang, Wenfang; Yin, Yibing

    2016-10-01

    Biofilm formation is considered the major pathogenic mechanism of Staphylococcus epidermidis-associated nosocomial infections. Reports have shown that SCCmec-associated psm-mec regulated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus virulence and biofilm formation. However, the role of psm-mec in S. epidermidis remains unclear. To this purpose, we analysed 165 clinical isolates of S. epidermidis to study the distribution, mutation and expression of psm-mec and the relationship between this gene and biofilm formation. Next, we constructed three psm-mec deletion mutants, one psm-mec transgene expression strain (p221) and two psm-mec point mutant strains (pM, pAG) to explore its effects on S. epidermidis biofilm formation. Then, the amount of biofilm formation, extracellular DNA (eDNA) and Triton X-100-induced autolysis of the constructed strains was measured. Results of psm-mec deletion and transgene expression showed that the gene regulated S. epidermidis biofilm formation. Compared with the control strains, the ability to form biofilm, Triton X-100-induced autolysis and the amount of eDNA increased in the p221 strain and the two psm-mec mutants pM and pAG expressed psm-mec mRNA without its protein, whereas no differences were observed among the three constructed strains, illustrating that psm-mec mRNA promoted S. epidermidis biofilm formation through up-regulation of bacterial autolysis and the release of eDNA. Our results reveal that acquisition of psm-mec promotes S. epidermidis biofilm formation.

  12. Providing radiometric traceability for the calibration home base of DLR by PTB

    SciTech Connect

    Taubert, D. R.; Hollandt, J.; Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Hoepe, A.; Hauer, K.-O.; Gege, P.; Schwarzmaier, T.; Lenhard, K.; Baumgartner, A.

    2013-05-10

    A dedicated calibration technique was applied for the calibration of the spectral radiance transfer standard (RASTA) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), consisting of two independent but complementing calibration procedures to provide redundancy and smallest possible calibration uncertainties. Procedure I included two calibration steps: In a first step the optical radiation source of RASTA, an FEL lamp, was calibrated in terms of its spectral irradiance E{sub {lambda}}({lambda}) in the wavelength range from 350 nm to 2400 nm using the PTB Spectral Irradiance Calibration Equipment (SPICE), while in a second step the spectral radiance factor {beta}{sub 0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign }({lambda}) of the RASTA reflection standard was calibrated in a 0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign -viewing geometry in the wavelength range from 350 nm to 1700 nm at the robot-based gonioreflectometer facility of PTB. The achieved relative standard uncertainties (k= 1) range from 0.6 % to 3.2 % and 0.1 % to 0.6 % respectively. Procedure II was completely independent from procedure I and allowed to cover the entire spectral range of RASTA from 350 nm to 2500 nm. In the second procedure, the 0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign -viewing geometry spectral radiance L{sub {lambda},0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign }({lambda}) of RASTA was directly calibrated at the Spectral Radiance Comparator Facility (SRCF) of PTB. The relative uncertainties for this calibration procedure range from 0.8 % in the visible up to 7.5 % at 2500 nm (k= 1). In the overlapping spectral range of both calibration procedures the calculated spectral radiance L{sub {lambda},0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign ,calc}({lambda}) from procedure I is in good agreement with the direct measurement of procedure II, i.e. well within the combined expanded uncertainties (k= 2) of both procedures.

  13. Cofilin-mediated actin dynamics promotes actin bundle formation during Drosophila bristle development

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Heng; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    The actin bundle is an array of linear actin filaments cross-linked by actin-bundling proteins, but its assembly and dynamics are not as well understood as those of the branched actin network. Here we used the Drosophila bristle as a model system to study actin bundle formation. We found that cofilin, a major actin disassembly factor of the branched actin network, promotes the formation and positioning of actin bundles in the developing bristles. Loss of function of cofilin or AIP1, a cofactor of cofilin, each resulted in increased F-actin levels and severe defects in actin bundle organization, with the defects from cofilin deficiency being more severe. Further analyses revealed that cofilin likely regulates actin bundle formation and positioning by the following means. First, cofilin promotes a large G-actin pool both locally and globally, likely ensuring rapid actin polymerization for bundle initiation and growth. Second, cofilin limits the size of a nonbundled actin-myosin network to regulate the positioning of actin bundles. Third, cofilin prevents incorrect assembly of branched and myosin-associated actin filament into bundles. Together these results demonstrate that the interaction between the dynamic dendritic actin network and the assembling actin bundles is critical for actin bundle formation and needs to be closely regulated. PMID:27385345

  14. Cofilin-mediated actin dynamics promotes actin bundle formation during Drosophila bristle development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Heng; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Jiong

    2016-08-15

    The actin bundle is an array of linear actin filaments cross-linked by actin-bundling proteins, but its assembly and dynamics are not as well understood as those of the branched actin network. Here we used the Drosophila bristle as a model system to study actin bundle formation. We found that cofilin, a major actin disassembly factor of the branched actin network, promotes the formation and positioning of actin bundles in the developing bristles. Loss of function of cofilin or AIP1, a cofactor of cofilin, each resulted in increased F-actin levels and severe defects in actin bundle organization, with the defects from cofilin deficiency being more severe. Further analyses revealed that cofilin likely regulates actin bundle formation and positioning by the following means. First, cofilin promotes a large G-actin pool both locally and globally, likely ensuring rapid actin polymerization for bundle initiation and growth. Second, cofilin limits the size of a nonbundled actin-myosin network to regulate the positioning of actin bundles. Third, cofilin prevents incorrect assembly of branched and myosin-associated actin filament into bundles. Together these results demonstrate that the interaction between the dynamic dendritic actin network and the assembling actin bundles is critical for actin bundle formation and needs to be closely regulated.

  15. Coupling of downstream RNA polymerase-promoter interactions with formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex

    PubMed Central

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Borukhov, Sergei; Mustaev, Arkady; Severinov, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) makes extensive contacts with duplex DNA downstream of the transcription bubble in initiation and elongation complexes. We investigated the role of downstream interactions in formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex by measuring initiation activity of stable RNAP complexes with model promoter DNA fragments whose downstream ends extend from +3 to +21 relative to the transcription start site at +1. We found that DNA downstream of position +6 does not play a significant role in transcription initiation when RNAP-promoter interactions upstream of the transcription start site are strong and promoter melting region is AT-rich. Further shortening of downstream DNA dramatically reduces efficiency of transcription initiation. The boundary of minimal downstream DNA duplex needed for efficient transcription initiation shifted further away from the catalytic center upon increasing the GC content of promoter melting region or in the presence of bacterial stringent response regulators DksA and ppGpp. These results indicate that the strength of RNAP-downstream DNA interactions has to reach a certain threshold to retain the catalytically competent conformation of the initiation complex and that establishment of contacts between RNAP and downstream DNA can be coupled with promoter melting. The data further suggest that RNAP interactions with DNA immediately downstream of the transcription bubble are particularly important for initiation of transcription. We hypothesize that these active center-proximal contacts stabilize the DNA template strand in the active center cleft and/or position the RNAP clamp domain to allow RNA synthesis. PMID:25311862

  16. Nitrite promotes protein carbonylation and Strecker aldehyde formation in experimental fermented sausages: are both events connected?

    PubMed

    Villaverde, A; Ventanas, J; Estévez, M

    2014-12-01

    The role played by curing agents (nitrite, ascorbate) on protein oxidation and Strecker aldehyde formation is studied. To fulfill this objective, increasing concentrations of nitrite (0, 75 and 150ppm) and ascorbate (0, 250 and 500ppm) were added to sausages subjected to a 54day drying process. The concurrence of intense proteolysis, protein carbonylation and formation of Strecker aldehydes during processing of sausages suggests that α-aminoadipic semialdehyde (AAS) and γ-glutamic semialdehyde (GGS) may be implicated in the formation of Strecker aldehydes. The fact that nitrite (150ppm, ingoing amount) significantly promoted the formation of protein carbonyls at early stages of processing and the subsequent formation of Strecker aldehydes provides strength to this hypothesis. Ascorbate (125 and 250ppm) controlled the overall extent of protein carbonylation in sausages without declining the formation of Strecker aldehydes. These results may contribute to understanding the chemistry fundamentals of the positive influence of nitrite on the flavor and overall acceptability of cured muscle foods.

  17. Proneural and abdominal Hox inputs synergize to promote sensory organ formation in the Drosophila abdomen.

    PubMed

    Gutzwiller, Lisa M; Witt, Lorraine M; Gresser, Amy L; Burns, Kevin A; Cook, Tiffany A; Gebelein, Brian

    2010-12-15

    The atonal (ato) proneural gene specifies a stereotypic number of sensory organ precursors (SOP) within each body segment of the Drosophila ectoderm. Surprisingly, the broad expression of Ato within the ectoderm results in only a modest increase in SOP formation, suggesting many cells are incompetent to become SOPs. Here, we show that the SOP promoting activity of Ato can be greatly enhanced by three factors: the Senseless (Sens) zinc finger protein, the Abdominal-A (Abd-A) Hox factor, and the epidermal growth factor (EGF) pathway. First, we show that expression of either Ato alone or with Sens induces twice as many SOPs in the abdomen as in the thorax, and do so at the expense of an abdomen-specific cell fate: the larval oenocytes. Second, we demonstrate that Ato stimulates abdominal SOP formation by synergizing with Abd-A to promote EGF ligand (Spitz) secretion and secondary SOP recruitment. However, we also found that Ato and Sens selectively enhance abdominal SOP development in a Spitz-independent manner, suggesting additional genetic interactions between this proneural pathway and Abd-A. Altogether, these experiments reveal that genetic interactions between EGF-signaling, Abd-A, and Sens enhance the SOP-promoting activity of Ato to stimulate region-specific neurogenesis in the Drosophila abdomen.

  18. Mesenchymal Deletion of Histone Demethylase NO66 in Mice Promotes Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qin; Sinha, Krishna; Deng, Jian Min; Yasuda, Hideyo; Krahe, Ralf; Behringer, Richard R.; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies indicated that the Jumonji C (JmjC)-domain-containing NO66 is a histone demethylase with specificity for methylated histone H3K4 and H3K36. NO66 binds to the transcription factor Osterix (Osx) and inhibits its transcriptional activity in promoter assays. However, the physiological role of NO66 in formation of mammalian bones is unknown. Here, using a genetically engineered mouse model, we show that during early skeletal development, Prx1-Cre dependent mesenchymal deletion of NO66 promotes osteogenesis and formation of both endochondral as well as intramembranous skeletal elements, leading to a larger skeleton and a high bone mass phenotype in adult mice. The excess bone formation in mice where NO66 was deleted in cells of mesenchymal origin is associated with an increase in the number of preosteoblasts and osteoblasts. Further analysis revealed that in the embryonic limbs and adult calvaria of mice with deletion of NO66 in cells of mesenchymal origin, expression of several genes including bone morphogenetic protein 2, insulin-like growth factor 1 and osteoclast inhibitor osteoprotegerin was increased, concurrent with an increase in expression of bone formation markers such as Osx, type I collagen and bone sialoprotein. Taken together, our results provide the first in vivo evidence that NO66 histone demethylase plays an important role in mammalian osteogenesis during early development as well as in adult bone homeostasis. We postulate that NO66 regulates bone formation, at least in part, via regulating the number of bone-forming cells and expression of multiple genes that are critical for these processes. PMID:25736226

  19. Two cassava promoters related to vascular expression and storage root formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Bohl-Zenger, Susanne; Puonti-Kaerlas, Johanna; Potrykus, Ingo; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2003-12-01

    Cassava ( Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage roots, organs accumulating large amounts of starch, develop from primary roots via secondary growth. The availability of promoters related to storage-root formation is a prerequisite for engineering root traits in cassava. Two cDNAs, c15 and c54, were identified from a storage-root cDNA library of cassava MCol1505 via differential screening. The transcripts of c15 and c54 were detected in storage roots but not in leaves by Northern analysis. Homology analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences showed that C15 is likely to be related to cytochrome P450 proteins, which are involved in the oxidative degradation of various compounds, while C54 may be related to Pt2L4, a cassava glutamic acid-rich protein. The promoter regions of c15 and c54 were isolated from the corresponding clones in a cassava genomic library. A 1,465-bp promoter fragment ( p15/1.5) of c15 and a 1,081-bp promoter region ( p54/1.0) of c54 were translationally fused to the uidA reporter gene, and introduced into cassava and Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. The expression patterns of p15/1.5::uidA and p54/1.0::uidA in transgenic plants showed that both promoters are predominantly active in phloem, cambium and xylem vessels of vascular tissues from leaves, stems, and root systems. More importantly, strong beta-glucuronidase activity was also detected in the starch-rich parenchyma cells of transgenic storage roots. Our results demonstrate that the two promoters are related to vascular expression and secondary growth of storage roots in cassava.

  20. Neuroprotection of lipoic acid treatment promotes angiogenesis and reduces the glial scar formation after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Rocamonde, B; Paradells, S; Barcia, J M; Barcia, C; García Verdugo, J M; Miranda, M; Romero Gómez, F J; Soria, J M

    2012-11-01

    After trauma brain injury, a large number of cells die, releasing neurotoxic chemicals into the extracellular medium, decreasing cellular glutathione levels and increasing reactive oxygen species that affect cell survival and provoke an enlargement of the initial lesion. Alpha-lipoic acid is a potent antioxidant commonly used as a treatment of many degenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis or diabetic neuropathy. Herein, the antioxidant effects of lipoic acid treatment after brain cryo-injury in rat have been studied, as well as cell survival, proliferation in the injured area, gliogenesis and angiogenesis. Thus, it is shown that newborn cells, mostly corresponded with blood vessels and glial cells, colonized the damaged area 15 days after the lesion. However, lipoic acid was able to stimulate the synthesis of glutathione, decrease cell death, promote angiogenesis and decrease the glial scar formation. All those facts allow the formation of new neural tissue. In view of the results herein, lipoic acid might be a plausible pharmacological treatment after brain injury, acting as a neuroprotective agent of the neural tissue, promoting angiogenesis and reducing the glial scar formation. These findings open new possibilities for restorative strategies after brain injury, stroke or related disorders.

  1. Collagen-derived matricryptins promote inhibitory nerve terminal formation in the developing neocortex.

    PubMed

    Su, Jianmin; Chen, Jiang; Lippold, Kumiko; Monavarfeshani, Aboozar; Carrillo, Gabriela Lizana; Jenkins, Rachel; Fox, Michael A

    2016-03-14

    Inhibitory synapses comprise only ∼20% of the total synapses in the mammalian brain but play essential roles in controlling neuronal activity. In fact, perturbing inhibitory synapses is associated with complex brain disorders, such as schizophrenia and epilepsy. Although many types of inhibitory synapses exist, these disorders have been strongly linked to defects in inhibitory synapses formed by Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons. Here, we discovered a novel role for an unconventional collagen-collagen XIX-in the formation of Parvalbumin(+) inhibitory synapses. Loss of this collagen results not only in decreased inhibitory synapse number, but also in the acquisition of schizophrenia-related behaviors. Mechanistically, these studies reveal that a proteolytically released fragment of this collagen, termed a matricryptin, promotes the assembly of inhibitory nerve terminals through integrin receptors. Collectively, these studies not only identify roles for collagen-derived matricryptins in cortical circuit formation, but they also reveal a novel paracrine mechanism that regulates the assembly of these synapses.

  2. Collagen-derived matricryptins promote inhibitory nerve terminal formation in the developing neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jianmin; Chen, Jiang; Lippold, Kumiko; Monavarfeshani, Aboozar; Carrillo, Gabriela Lizana; Jenkins, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory synapses comprise only ∼20% of the total synapses in the mammalian brain but play essential roles in controlling neuronal activity. In fact, perturbing inhibitory synapses is associated with complex brain disorders, such as schizophrenia and epilepsy. Although many types of inhibitory synapses exist, these disorders have been strongly linked to defects in inhibitory synapses formed by Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons. Here, we discovered a novel role for an unconventional collagen—collagen XIX—in the formation of Parvalbumin+ inhibitory synapses. Loss of this collagen results not only in decreased inhibitory synapse number, but also in the acquisition of schizophrenia-related behaviors. Mechanistically, these studies reveal that a proteolytically released fragment of this collagen, termed a matricryptin, promotes the assembly of inhibitory nerve terminals through integrin receptors. Collectively, these studies not only identify roles for collagen-derived matricryptins in cortical circuit formation, but they also reveal a novel paracrine mechanism that regulates the assembly of these synapses. PMID:26975851

  3. Thrombospondin 1 promotes synaptic formation in bone marrow-derived neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun; Lu, Mingnan; Guo, Weitao; Zeng, Rong; Wang, Bin; Wang, Huaibo

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a combination of growth factors was used to induce bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiation into neuron-like cells, in a broader attempt to observe the role of thrombospondin 1 in synapse formation. Results showed that there was no significant difference in the differentiation rate of neuron-like cells between bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with thrombospondin induction and those without. However, the cell shape was more complex and the neurites were dendritic, with unipolar, bipolar or multipolar morphologies, after induction with thrombospondin 1. The induced cells were similar in morphology to normal neurites. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the number of positive cells for postsynaptic density protein 95 and synaptophysin 1 protein was significantly increased after induction with thrombospondin 1. These findings indicate that thrombospondin 1 promotes synapse formation in neuron-like cells that are differentiated from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

  4. Interferon-β promotes macrophage foam cell formation by altering both cholesterol influx and efflux mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Boshuizen, Marieke C S; Hoeksema, Marten A; Neele, Annette E; van der Velden, Saskia; Hamers, Anouk A J; Van den Bossche, Jan; Lutgens, Esther; de Winther, Menno P J

    2016-01-01

    Foam cell formation is a crucial event in atherogenesis. While interferon-β (IFNβ) is known to promote atherosclerosis in mice, studies on the role of IFNβ on foam cell formation are minimal and conflicting. We therefore extended these studies using both in vitro and in vivo approaches and examined IFNβ's function in macrophage foam cell formation. To do so, murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) and human monocyte-derived macrophages were loaded with acLDL overnight, followed by 6h IFNβ co-treatment. This increased lipid content as measured by Oil red O staining. We next analyzed the lipid uptake pathways of IFNβ-stimulated BMDMs and observed increased endocytosis of DiI-acLDL as compared to controls. These effects were mediated via SR-A, as its gene expression was increased and inhibition of SR-A with Poly(I) blocked the IFNβ-induced increase in Oil red O staining and DiI-acLDL endocytosis. The IFNβ-induced increase in lipid content was also associated with decreased ApoA1-mediated cholesterol efflux, in response to decreased ABCA1 protein and gene expression. To validate our findings in vivo, LDLR(-/-) mice were put on chow or a high cholesterol diet for 10weeks. 24 and 8h before sacrifice mice were injected with IFNβ or PBS, after which thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages were collected and analyzed. In accordance with the in vitro data, IFNβ increased lipid accumulation. In conclusion, our experimental data support the pro-atherogenic role of IFNβ, as we show that IFNβ promotes macrophage foam cell formation by increasing SR-A-mediated cholesterol influx and decreasing ABCA1-mediated efflux mechanisms.

  5. Biosurfactant as a Promoter of Methane Hydrate Formation: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Studies.

    PubMed

    Arora, Amit; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh; Kumar, Rajnish; Balomajumder, Chandrajit; Singh, Anil Kumar; Santhakumari, B; Kumar, Pushpendra; Laik, Sukumar

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates (NGHs) are solid non-stoichiometric compounds often regarded as a next generation energy source. Successful commercialization of NGH is curtailed by lack of efficient and safe technology for generation, dissociation, storage and transportation. The present work studied the influence of environment compatible biosurfactant on gas hydrate formation. Biosurfactant was produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain A11 and was characterized as rhamnolipids. Purified rhamnolipids reduced the surface tension of water from 72 mN/m to 36 mN/m with Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC) of 70 mg/l. Use of 1000 ppm rhamnolipids solution in C type silica gel bed system increased methane hydrate formation rate by 42.97% and reduced the induction time of hydrate formation by 22.63% as compared to water saturated C type silica gel. Presence of rhamnolipids also shifted methane hydrate formation temperature to higher values relative to the system without biosurfactant. Results from thermodynamic and kinetic studies suggest that rhamnolipids can be applied as environment friendly methane hydrate promoter. PMID:26869357

  6. Biosurfactant as a Promoter of Methane Hydrate Formation: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Amit; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh; Kumar, Rajnish; Balomajumder, Chandrajit; Singh, Anil Kumar; Santhakumari, B.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Laik, Sukumar

    2016-02-01

    Natural gas hydrates (NGHs) are solid non-stoichiometric compounds often regarded as a next generation energy source. Successful commercialization of NGH is curtailed by lack of efficient and safe technology for generation, dissociation, storage and transportation. The present work studied the influence of environment compatible biosurfactant on gas hydrate formation. Biosurfactant was produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain A11 and was characterized as rhamnolipids. Purified rhamnolipids reduced the surface tension of water from 72 mN/m to 36 mN/m with Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC) of 70 mg/l. Use of 1000 ppm rhamnolipids solution in C type silica gel bed system increased methane hydrate formation rate by 42.97% and reduced the induction time of hydrate formation by 22.63% as compared to water saturated C type silica gel. Presence of rhamnolipids also shifted methane hydrate formation temperature to higher values relative to the system without biosurfactant. Results from thermodynamic and kinetic studies suggest that rhamnolipids can be applied as environment friendly methane hydrate promoter.

  7. Biosurfactant as a Promoter of Methane Hydrate Formation: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Amit; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh; Kumar, Rajnish; Balomajumder, Chandrajit; Singh, Anil Kumar; Santhakumari, B.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Laik, Sukumar

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates (NGHs) are solid non-stoichiometric compounds often regarded as a next generation energy source. Successful commercialization of NGH is curtailed by lack of efficient and safe technology for generation, dissociation, storage and transportation. The present work studied the influence of environment compatible biosurfactant on gas hydrate formation. Biosurfactant was produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain A11 and was characterized as rhamnolipids. Purified rhamnolipids reduced the surface tension of water from 72 mN/m to 36 mN/m with Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC) of 70 mg/l. Use of 1000 ppm rhamnolipids solution in C type silica gel bed system increased methane hydrate formation rate by 42.97% and reduced the induction time of hydrate formation by 22.63% as compared to water saturated C type silica gel. Presence of rhamnolipids also shifted methane hydrate formation temperature to higher values relative to the system without biosurfactant. Results from thermodynamic and kinetic studies suggest that rhamnolipids can be applied as environment friendly methane hydrate promoter. PMID:26869357

  8. Proneural proteins Achaete and Scute associate with nuclear actin to promote formation of external sensory organs.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yun-Ling; Chen, Yu-Ju; Chang, Yi-Jie; Yeh, Hsiao-Fong; Huang, Yi-Chun; Pi, Haiwei

    2014-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proneural proteins promote neurogenesis through transcriptional regulation. Although much is known about the tissue-specific regulation of proneural gene expression, how proneural proteins interact with transcriptional machinery to activate downstream target genes is less clear. Drosophila proneural proteins Achaete (Ac) and Scute (Sc) induce external sensory organ formation by activating neural precursor gene expression. Through co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric analyses, we found that nuclear but not cytoplasmic actin associated with the Ac and Sc proteins in Drosophila S2 cells. Daughterless (Da), the common heterodimeric partner of Drosophila bHLH proteins, was observed to associate with nuclear actin through proneural proteins. A yeast two-hybrid assay revealed that the binding specificity between actin and Ac or Sc was conserved in yeast nuclei without the presence of additional Drosophila factors. We further show that actin is required in external sensory organ formation. Reduction in actin gene activity impaired proneural-protein-dependent expression of the neural precursor genes, as well as formation of neural precursors. Furthermore, increased nuclear actin levels, obtained by expression of nucleus-localized actin, elevated Ac-Da-dependent gene transcription as well as Ac-mediated external sensory organ formation. Taken together, our in vivo and in vitro observations suggest a novel link for actin in proneural-protein-mediated transcriptional activation and neural precursor differentiation.

  9. Cisplatin upregulates mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase and peroxynitrite formation to promote renal injury

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Michaela; Sola, Anna

    2009-01-15

    The mitochondria are a critical target for cisplatin-associated nephrotoxicity. Though nitric oxide formation has been implicated in the toxicity of cisplatin, this formation has not so far been related to a possible activation of mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mNOS). We show here that the upregulation of oxide mNOS and peroxynitrite formation in cisplatin treatment are key events that influence the development of the harmful parameters described in cisplatin-associated kidney failure. We confirm this by isolating the mitochondrial fraction of the kidney and across different access routes such as the use of a specific inhibitor of neuronal NOS, L-NPA, a peroxynitrite scavenger, FeTMPyP, and a peroxynitrite donor, SIN-1. The in vitro studies corroborated the information obtained in the in vivo experiments. The administration of cisplatin reveals a clear upregulation in the transcription of neuronal NOS and an increase in the levels of nitrites in the mitochondrial fractions of the kidneys. The upregulated transcription directly affects the cytoskeleton structure and the apoptosis. The inhibition of neuronal NOS reduces the levels of nitrites, cell death, and cytoskeleton derangement. Peroxynitrite is involved in the mechanism promoting the NOS transcription. In addition, in controls SIN-1 imitates the effects of cisplatin. In summary, we demonstrate that upregulation of mNOS in cisplatin treatment is a key component in both the initiation and the spread of cisplatin-associated damage in the kidney. Furthermore, peroxynitrite formation is directly involved in this process.

  10. Incorporation of RANKL promotes osteoclast formation and osteoclast activity on β-TCP ceramics.

    PubMed

    Choy, John; Albers, Christoph E; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Dolder, Silvia; Hofstetter, Wilhelm; Klenke, Frank M

    2014-12-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ceramics are approved for the repair of osseous defects. In large defects, however, the substitution of the material by authentic bone is inadequate to provide sufficient long-term mechanical stability. We aimed to develop composites of β-TCP ceramics and receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL) to enhance the formation of osteoclasts and promote cell mediated calcium phosphate resorption. RANKL was adsorbed superficially onto β-TCP ceramics or incorporated into a crystalline layer of calcium phosphate by the use of a co-precipitation technique. Murine osteoclast precursors were seeded onto the ceramics. After 15 days, the formation of osteoclasts was quantified cytologically and colorimetrically with tartrate-resistant acidic phosphatase (TRAP) staining and TRAP activity measurements, respectively. Additionally, the expression of transcripts encoding the osteoclast gene products cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, and of the sodium/hydrogen exchanger NHA2 were quantified by real-time PCR. The activity of newly formed osteoclasts was evaluated by means of a calcium phosphate resorption assay. Superficially adsorbed RANKL did not induce the formation of osteoclasts on β-TCP ceramics. When co-precipitated onto β-TCP ceramics RANKL supported the formation of mature osteoclasts. The development of osteoclast lineage cells was further confirmed by the increased expression of cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, and NHA2. Incorporated RANKL stimulated the cells to resorb crystalline calcium phosphate. Our in vitro study shows that RANKL incorporated into β-TCP ceramics induces the formation of active, resorbing osteoclasts on the material surface. Once formed, osteoclasts mediate the release of RANKL thereby perpetuating their differentiation and activation. In vivo, the stimulation of osteoclast-mediated resorption may contribute to a coordinated sequence of material resorption and bone formation. Further in vivo studies

  11. Bound transcription factor suppresses photoproduct formation in the NF-kappa B promoter.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, R; Paniker, L; Mitchell, D L

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between purified transcription factor p50 binding and ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage formation in the NF-kappa B promoter element was investigated. The effect of bound transcription factor on cyclobutane dimer formation was quantified using Maxam-Gilbert analysis of irradiated substrate digested with T4 phage endonuclease V. Two methods were employed for cleaving (6-4) photoproducts. Sites of (6-4) photoproducts cleaved by piperidine showed a general suppression in the presence of bound p50 protein similar to that observed for cyclobutane dimers. In contrast to piperidine, digestion with ultraviolet damage endonuclease (UVDE) from Saccharomyces pombe subsequent to cyclobutane dimer reversal by photolyase displayed a broader spectrum of damaged sites. Whereas some of these sites were suppressed by bound p50 protein, some remained unaffected and one site showed increased (6-4) photoproduct induction. These data illustrate the advantage of UVDE over piperidine for studying (6-4) photoproducts at the sequence level and suggest that this approach may be useful for footprinting transcription factor binding in other promoters.

  12. Nucleoporin translocated promoter region (Tpr) associates with dynein complex, preventing chromosome lagging formation during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Hiroshi; Funasaka, Tatsuyoshi; Hashizume, Chieko; Wong, Richard W

    2010-04-01

    Gain or loss of whole chromosomes is often observed in cancer cells and is thought to be due to aberrant chromosome segregation during mitosis. Proper chromosome segregation depends on a faithful interaction between spindle microtubules and kinetochores. Several components of the nuclear pore complex/nucleoporins play critical roles in orchestrating the rapid remodeling events that occur during mitosis. Our recent studies revealed that the nucleoporin, Rae1, plays critical roles in maintaining spindle bipolarity. Here, we show association of another nucleoporin, termed Tpr (translocated promoter region), with the molecular motors dynein and dynactin, which both orchestrate with the spindle checkpoints Mad1 and Mad2 during cell division. Overexpression of Tpr enhanced multinucleated cell formation. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Tpr caused a severe lagging chromosome phenotype and disrupted spindle checkpoint proteins expression and localization. Next, we performed a series of rescue and dominant negative experiments to confirm that Tpr orchestrates proper chromosome segregation through interaction with dynein light chain. Our data indicate that Tpr functions as a spatial and temporal regulator of spindle checkpoints, ensuring the efficient recruitment of checkpoint proteins to the molecular motor dynein to promote proper anaphase formation.

  13. Subinhibitory concentrations of triclosan promote Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation and adherence to oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bedran, Telma Blanca Lombardo; Grignon, Louis; Spolidorio, Denise Palomari; Grenier, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Triclosan is a general membrane-active agent with a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity that is commonly used in oral care products. In this study, we investigated the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of triclosan on the capacity of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans to form biofilm and adhere to oral epithelial cells. As quantified by crystal violet staining, biofilm formation by two reference strains of S. mutans was dose-dependently promoted, in the range of 2.2- to 6.2-fold, by 1/2 and 1/4 MIC of triclosan. Observations by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of a dense biofilm attached to the polystyrene surface. Growth of S. mutans in the presence of triclosan at sub-MICs also increased its capacity to adhere to a monolayer of gingival epithelial cells. The expression of several genes involved in adherence and biofilm formation in S. mutans was investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. It was found that sub-MICs of triclosan significantly increased the expression of comD, gtfC, and luxS, and to a lesser extent of gtfB and atlA genes. These findings stress the importance of maintaining effective bactericidal concentrations of therapeutic triclosan since sub-MICs may promote colonization of the oral cavity by S. mutans.

  14. Soil-litter Mixing Accelerates Decomposition and May Promote Soil Aggregate Formation in the Chihuahuan Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewins, D. B.; Throop, H. L.; Archer, S. R.; Okin, G. S.

    2010-12-01

    Vegetation cover in drylands can strongly affect soil movement by wind and water. Many dryland systems are currently experiencing declines in grass cover due to livestock grazing and woody plant encroachment and increased soil movement is one consequence of these disturbances. Here, we test the hypothesis that declines in dryland grass cover could indirectly promote litter decomposition, an important ecosystem process that regulates carbon (C) and nutrient cycling, by enhancing soil-litter mixing. To test this hypothesis we quantified litter decomposition in the northern Chihuahuan Desert in plots where reductions in grass cover (0, 50, 75, and 100%) have been quantified and related to increases in aeolian soil movement. After 12 months of litterbag exposure we found a positive, linear relationship (R2= 0.32) between soil-litter mixing and litter mass loss. However, patterns of soil accumulation in litterbags and litter mass loss did not show a clear relationship with respect to vegetation removal treatments (R2 = 0.03 and 0.006 respectively). This lack of pattern may be due to high spatial variability that is associated with soil movement in dryland systems. Additionally, in all vegetation removal treatments we observed soil aggregate formation within litterbags. Soil aggregates were not initially evident within litterbags (1 and 3 month exposure), but were apparent after 6 and 12 months of field exposure. Although the abiotic and/or biotic mechanism of aggregation remains to be elucidated, observed aggregate formation may rely on exposure to seasonal dust storms and monsoon rains characteristic of the Chihuahuan Desert. These climatic events may increase soil-litter mixing and promote moisture conditions favorable to microbial activity. We hypothesize that the formation of aggregates, which may locally stabilize soil surfaces and affect soil C sequestration, may be promoted by the release of microbially derived extracellular compounds and inorganic C during leaf

  15. Systematic analysis of diguanylate cyclases that promote biofilm formation by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1.

    PubMed

    Newell, Peter D; Yoshioka, Shiro; Hvorecny, Kelli L; Monds, Russell D; O'Toole, George A

    2011-09-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a broadly conserved, intracellular second-messenger molecule that regulates biofilm formation by many bacteria. The synthesis of c-di-GMP is catalyzed by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) containing the GGDEF domain, while its degradation is achieved through the phosphodiesterase activities of EAL and HD-GYP domains. c-di-GMP controls biofilm formation by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 by promoting the cell surface localization of a large adhesive protein, LapA. LapA localization is regulated posttranslationally by a c-di-GMP effector system consisting of LapD and LapG, which senses cytoplasmic c-di-GMP and modifies the LapA protein in the outer membrane. Despite the apparent requirement for c-di-GMP for biofilm formation by P. fluorescens Pf0-1, no DGCs from this strain have been characterized to date. In this study, we undertook a systematic mutagenesis of 30 predicted DGCs and found that mutations in just 4 cause reductions in biofilm formation by P. fluorescens Pf0-1 under the conditions tested. These DGCs were characterized genetically and biochemically to corroborate the hypothesis that they function to produce c-di-GMP in vivo. The effects of DGC gene mutations on phenotypes associated with biofilm formation were analyzed. One DGC preferentially affects LapA localization, another DGC mainly controls swimming motility, while a third DGC affects both LapA and motility. Our data support the conclusion that different c-di-GMP-regulated outputs can be specifically controlled by distinct DGCs.

  16. Degradation mechanism of a low band gap polymer PTB7 by oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soohyung; Jeong, Junkyeong; Lee, Hyunbok; Yi, Yeonjin

    Recently, the PCE of OPVs is at the 10% mark by using donor materials having a low band gap, such as poly(4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl-alt-3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophene-4,6-diyl) (PTB7) and its analogues. In spite of the significant PCE improvement, the lifetime issue still remains open problem. To solve these technical limitations fundamentally, the degradation mechanism should be understood. It can be revealed by investigating the electronic structures of polymers with controlled exposure of oxygen, moisture and light. In this study, ultraviolet, X-ray and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy measurements were performed with step-by-step exposure of controlled oxygen, moisture and light to investigate the degradation mechanism of each polymer film. Theoretical calculations using density functional theory (DFT) were also performed to understand detailed degradation process. From the experimental results, we demonstrate that push-pull polymers are more sensitive to environmental conditions, compared with non-push-pull (conventional) polymers such as poly (3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT). In addition, we show high photo-oxidation of PTB7 is originated from the structural reason.

  17. Sinusoidal electromagnetic fields promote bone formation and inhibit bone resorption in rat femoral tissues in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Ma, Xiao-Ni; Gao, Yu-Hai; Yan, Juan-Li; Shi, Wen-Gui; Xian, Cory J; Chen, Ke-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Effects of sinusoidal electromagnetic fields (SEMFs) on bone metabolism have not yet been well defined. The present study investigated SEMF effects on bone formation and resorption in rat femur bone tissues in vitro. Cultured femur diaphyseal (cortical bone) and metaphyseal (trabecular bone) tissues were treated with 50 Hz 1.8 mT SEMFs 1.5 h per day for up to 12 days and treatment effects on bone formation and resorption markers and associated gene expression were examined. Treatment with SEMFs caused a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and inhibited the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) activity in the femoral diaphyseal or metaphyseal tissues. SEMFs also significantly increased levels of mRNA expression of osterix (OSX), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and ALP in the bone tissues. SEMF treatment decreased glucose content and increased lactic acid contents in the culture conditioned medium. In addition, treatment with SEMFs decreased mRNA expression levels of bone resorption-related genes TRACP, macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and cathepsin K (CTSK) in the cultured bone tissues. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that treatment with 1.8 mT SEMFs at 1.5 h per day promoted bone formation, increased metabolism and inhibited resorption in both metaphyseal and diaphyseal bone tissues in vitro.

  18. Promoter-Specific Effects of DREADD Modulation on Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity and Memory Formation

    PubMed Central

    López, Alberto J.; Kramár, Enikö; Matheos, Dina P.; White, André O.; Kwapis, Janine; Vogel-Ciernia, Annie; Sakata, Keith; Espinoza, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drug (DREADDs) are a novel tool with the potential to bidirectionally drive cellular, circuit, and ultimately, behavioral changes. We used DREADDs to evaluate memory formation in a hippocampus-dependent task in mice and effects on synaptic physiology in the dorsal hippocampus. We expressed neuron-specific (hSyn promoter) DREADDs that were either excitatory (HM3D) or inhibitory (HM4D) in the dorsal hippocampus. As predicted, hSyn–HM3D was able to transform a subthreshold learning event into long-term memory (LTM), and hSyn–HM4D completely impaired LTM formation. Surprisingly, the opposite was observed during experiments examining the effects on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). hSyn–HM3D impaired LTP and hSyn–HM4D facilitated LTP. Follow-up experiments indicated that the hSyn–HM3D-mediated depression of fEPSP appears to be driven by presynaptic activation of inhibitory currents, whereas the hSyn–HM4D-mediated increase of fEPSP is induced by a reduction in GABAA receptor function. To determine whether these observations were promoter specific, we next examined the effects of using the CaMKIIα promoter that limits expression to forebrain excitatory neurons. CaMKIIα–HM3D in the dorsal hippocampus led to the transformation of a subthreshold learning event into LTM, whereas CaMKIIα–HM4D blocked LTM formation. Consistent with these findings, baseline synaptic transmission and LTP was increased in CaMKIIα–HM3D hippocampal slices, whereas slices from CaMKIIα–HM4D mice produced expected decreases in baseline synaptic transmission and LTP. Together, these experiments further demonstrate DREADDs as being a robust and reliable means of modulating neuronal function to manipulate long-term changes in behavior, while providing evidence for specific dissociations between LTM and LTP. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study evaluates the efficacy of designer receptors exclusively activated by designer

  19. A pro-chelator triggered by hydrogen peroxide inhibits iron-promoted hydroxyl radical formation.

    PubMed

    Charkoudian, Louise K; Pham, David M; Franz, Katherine J

    2006-09-27

    The synthesis and structural characterization of a new pro-chelating agent, isonicotinic acid [2-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-benzylidene]-hydrazide (BSIH), are presented. BSIH only weakly interacts with iron unless hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is present to remove the boronic ester protecting group to reveal a phenol that is a key metal-binding group of tridentate salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (SIH). BSIH prevents deoxyribose degradation caused by hydroxyl radicals that are generated from H2O2 and redox-active iron by sequestering Fe3+ and preventing iron-promoted hydroxyl radical formation. The rate-determining step for iron sequestration is conversion of BSIH to SIH, followed by rapid Fe3+ complexation. The pro-chelate approach of BSIH represents a promising strategy for chelating a specific pool of detrimental metal ions without disturbing healthy metal ion distribution.

  20. A pro-chelator triggered by hydrogen peroxide inhibits iron-promoted hydroxyl radical formation.

    PubMed

    Charkoudian, Louise K; Pham, David M; Franz, Katherine J

    2006-09-27

    The synthesis and structural characterization of a new pro-chelating agent, isonicotinic acid [2-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-benzylidene]-hydrazide (BSIH), are presented. BSIH only weakly interacts with iron unless hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is present to remove the boronic ester protecting group to reveal a phenol that is a key metal-binding group of tridentate salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (SIH). BSIH prevents deoxyribose degradation caused by hydroxyl radicals that are generated from H2O2 and redox-active iron by sequestering Fe3+ and preventing iron-promoted hydroxyl radical formation. The rate-determining step for iron sequestration is conversion of BSIH to SIH, followed by rapid Fe3+ complexation. The pro-chelate approach of BSIH represents a promising strategy for chelating a specific pool of detrimental metal ions without disturbing healthy metal ion distribution. PMID:16984186

  1. Monoallelic Loss of the Imprinted Gene Grb10 Promotes Tumor Formation in Irradiated Nf1+/- Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Rana; Huang, Brian; Braunstein, Steve; Firestone, Ari J.; Nakamura, Jean L.

    2015-01-01

    Imprinted genes are expressed from only one parental allele and heterozygous loss involving the expressed allele is sufficient to produce complete loss of protein expression. Genetic alterations are common in tumorigenesis but the role of imprinted genes in this process is not well understood. In earlier work we mutagenized mice heterozygous for the Neurofibromatosis I tumor suppressor gene (NF1) to model radiotherapy-associated second malignant neoplasms that arise in irradiated NF1 patients. Expression analysis of tumor cell lines established from our mouse models identified Grb10 expression as widely absent. Grb10 is an imprinted gene and polymorphism analysis of cell lines and primary tumors demonstrates that the expressed allele is commonly lost in diverse Nf1 mutant tumors arising in our mouse models. We performed functional studies to test whether Grb10 restoration or loss alter fundamental features of the tumor growth. Restoring Grb10 in Nf1 mutant tumors decreases proliferation, decreases soft agar colony formation and downregulates Ras signaling. Conversely, Grb10 silencing in untransformed mouse embryo fibroblasts significantly increased cell proliferation and increased Ras-GTP levels. Expression of a constitutively activated MEK rescued tumor cells from Grb10-mediated reduction in colony formation. These studies reveal that Grb10 loss can occur during in vivo tumorigenesis, with a functional consequence in untransformed primary cells. In tumors, Grb10 loss independently promotes Ras pathway hyperactivation, which promotes hyperproliferation, an early feature of tumor development. In the context of a robust Nf1 mutant mouse model of cancer this work identifies a novel role for an imprinted gene in tumorigenesis. PMID:26000738

  2. Cell-mediated BMP-2 liberation promotes bone formation in a mechanically unstable implant environment.

    PubMed

    Hägi, Tobias T; Wu, Gang; Liu, Yuelian; Hunziker, Ernst B

    2010-05-01

    The flexible alloplastic materials that are used in bone-reconstruction surgery lack the mechanical stability that is necessary for sustained bone formation, even if this process is promoted by the application of an osteogenic agent, such as BMP-2. We hypothesize that if BMP-2 is delivered gradually, in a cell-mediated manner, to the surgical site, then the scaffolding material's lack of mechanical stability becomes a matter of indifference. Flexible discs of Ethisorb were functionalized with BMP-2, which was either adsorbed directly onto the material (rapid release kinetics) or incorporated into a calcium-phosphate coating (slow release kinetics). Unstabilized and titanium-plate-stabilized samples were implanted subcutaneously in rats and retrieved up to 14 days later for a histomorphometric analysis of bone and cartilage volumes. On day 14, the bone volume associated with titanium-plate-stabilized discs bearing an adsorbed depot of BMP-2 was 10-fold higher than that associated with their mechanically unstabilized counterparts. The bone volume associated with discs bearing a coating-incorporated depot of BMP-2 was similar in the mechanically unstabilized and titanium-plate-stabilized groups, and comparable to that associated with the titanium-plate-stabilized discs bearing an adsorbed depot of BMP-2. Hence, if an osteogenic agent is delivered in a cell-mediated manner (via coating degradation), ossification can be promoted even within a mechanically unstable environment.

  3. Sympathetic stimulation facilitates thrombopoiesis by promoting megakaryocyte adhesion, migration, and proplatelet formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shilei; Du, Changhong; Shen, Mingqiang; Zhao, Gaomei; Xu, Yang; Yang, Ke; Wang, Xinmiao; Li, Fengju; Zeng, Dongfeng; Chen, Fang; Wang, Song; Chen, Mo; Wang, Cheng; He, Ting; Wang, Fengchao; Wang, Aiping; Cheng, Tianmin; Su, Yongping; Zhao, Jinghong; Wang, Junping

    2016-02-25

    The effect of sympathetic stimulation on thrombopoiesis is not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that both continual noise and exhaustive exercise elevate peripheral platelet levels in normal and splenectomized mice, but not in dopamine β-hydroxylase-deficient (Dbh(-/-)) mice that lack norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI). Further investigation demonstrates that sympathetic stimulation via NE or EPI injection markedly promotes platelet recovery in mice with thrombocytopenia induced by 6.0 Gy of total-body irradiation and in mice that received bone marrow transplants after 10.0 Gy of lethal irradiation. Unfavorably, sympathetic stress-stimulated thrombopoiesis may also contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by increasing both the amount and activity of platelets in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice. In vitro studies reveal that both NE and EPI promote megakaryocyte adhesion, migration, and proplatelet formation (PPF) in addition to the expansion of CD34(+) cells, thereby facilitating platelet production. It is found that α2-adrenoceptor-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation is involved in NE- and EPI-induced megakaryocyte adhesion and migration, and PPF is regulated by ERK1/2 activation-mediated RhoA GTPase signaling. Our data deeply characterize the role of sympathetic stimulation in the regulation of thrombopoiesis and reevaluate its physiopathological implications. PMID:26644453

  4. Src and cortactin promote lamellipodia protrusion and filopodia formation and stability in growth cones

    PubMed Central

    He, Yingpei; Ren, Yuan; Wu, Bingbing; Decourt, Boris; Lee, Aih Cheun; Taylor, Aaron; Suter, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Src tyrosine kinases have been implicated in axonal growth and guidance; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are not well understood. Specifically, it is unclear which aspects of actin organization and dynamics are regulated by Src in neuronal growth cones. Here, we investigated the function of Src2 and one of its substrates, cortactin, in lamellipodia and filopodia of Aplysia growth cones. We found that up-regulation of Src2 activation state or cortactin increased lamellipodial length, protrusion time, and actin network density, whereas down-regulation had opposite effects. Furthermore, Src2 or cortactin up-regulation increased filopodial density, length, and protrusion time, whereas down-regulation promoted lateral movements of filopodia. Fluorescent speckle microscopy revealed that rates of actin assembly and retrograde flow were not affected in either case. In summary, our results support a model in which Src and cortactin regulate growth cone motility by increasing actin network density and protrusion persistence of lamellipodia by controlling the state of actin-driven protrusion versus retraction. In addition, both proteins promote the formation and stability of actin bundles in filopodia. PMID:26224308

  5. Integrin Alpha 9 Blockade Suppresses Lymphatic Valve Formation and Promotes Transplant Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Gyeong Jin; Truong, Tan; Huang, Eric; Su, Valerie; Ge, Shaokui; Chen, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The lymphatic pathway mediates transplant rejection. We recently reported that lymphatic vessels develop luminal valves in the cornea during lymphangiogenesis, and these valves express integrin alpha 9 (Itga-9) and play a critical role in directing lymph flow. In this study, we used an allogeneic corneal transplantation model to investigate whether Itga-9 blockade could suppress valvulogenesis after transplantation, and how this effect would influence the outcomes of the transplants. Methods Orthotopic corneal transplantation was performed between fully mismatched C57BL/6 (donor) and BALB/c (recipient) mice. The recipients were randomized to receive subconjunctival injections of either Itga-9 blocking antibody or isotype control twice a week for 8 weeks. Corneal grafts were assessed in vivo by ophthalmic slit-lamp biomicroscopy and analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Additionally, whole-mount full-thickness corneas were evaluated ex vivo by immunofluorescent microscopy on both lymphatic vessels and valves. Results Anti–Itga-9 treatment suppressed lymphatic valvulogenesis after transplantation. Our treatment did not affect lymphatic vessel formation or their nasal polarized distribution in the cornea. More importantly, Itga-9 blockade led to a significant promotion of graft survival. Conclusions Lymphatic valvulogenesis is critically involved in transplant rejection. Itga-9 targeting may offer a new and effective strategy to interfere with the immune responses and promote graft survival. PMID:27806381

  6. Human Umbilical Tissue-Derived Cells Promote Synapse Formation and Neurite Outgrowth via Thrombospondin Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Sehwon; Kim, Namsoo; Yin, Henry H.; Harris, Ian R.; Dejneka, Nadine S.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy demonstrates great potential for the treatment of neurological disorders. Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTCs) were previously shown to have protective and regenerative effects in animal models of stroke and retinal degeneration, but the underlying therapeutic mechanisms are unknown. Because synaptic dysfunction, synapse loss, degeneration of neuronal processes, and neuronal death are hallmarks of neurological diseases and retinal degenerations, we tested whether hUTCs contribute to tissue repair and regeneration by stimulating synapse formation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal survival. To do so, we used a purified rat retinal ganglion cell culture system and found that hUTCs secrete factors that strongly promote excitatory synaptic connectivity and enhance neuronal survival. Additionally, we demonstrated that hUTCs support neurite outgrowth under normal culture conditions and in the presence of the growth-inhibitory proteins chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, myelin basic protein, or Nogo-A (reticulon 4). Furthermore, through biochemical fractionation and pharmacology, we identified the major hUTC-secreted synaptogenic factors as the thrombospondin family proteins (TSPs), TSP1, TSP2, and TSP4. Silencing TSP expression in hUTCs, using small RNA interference, eliminated both the synaptogenic function of these cells and their ability to promote neurite outgrowth. However, the majority of the prosurvival functions of hUTC-conditioned media was spared after TSP knockdown, indicating that hUTCs secrete additional neurotrophic factors. Together, our findings demonstrate that hUTCs affect multiple aspects of neuronal health and connectivity through secreted factors, and each of these paracrine effects may individually contribute to the therapeutic function of these cells. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC) are currently under clinical investigation for the treatment of geographic atrophy secondary to age-related macular

  7. BipA Is Associated with Preventing Autoagglutination and Promoting Biofilm Formation in Bordetella holmesii

    PubMed Central

    Hiramatsu, Yukihiro; Saito, Momoko; Otsuka, Nao; Suzuki, Eri; Watanabe, Mineo; Shibayama, Keigo; Kamachi, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Bordetella holmesii causes both invasive and respiratory diseases in humans. Although the number of cases of pertussis-like respiratory illnesses due to B. holmesii infection has increased in the last decade worldwide, little is known about the virulence factors of the organism. Here, we analyzed a B. holmesii isolate that forms large aggregates and precipitates in suspension, and subsequently demonstrated that the autoagglutinating isolate is deficient in Bordetella intermediate protein A (BipA) and that this deletion is caused by a frame-shift mutation in the bipA gene. A BipA-deficient mutant generated by homologous recombination also exhibited the autoagglutination phenotype. Moreover, the BipA mutant adhered poorly to an abiotic surface and failed to form biofilms, as did two other B. holmesii autoagglutinating strains, ATCC 51541 and ATCC 700053, which exhibit transcriptional down-regulation of bipA gene expression, indicating that autoagglutination indirectly inhibits biofilm formation. In a mouse intranasal infection model, the BipA mutant showed significantly lower levels of initial lung colonization than did the parental strain (P < 0.01), suggesting that BipA might be a critical virulence factor in B. holmesii respiratory infection. Together, our findings suggest that BipA production plays an essential role in preventing autoagglutination and indirectly promoting biofilm formation by B. holmesii. PMID:27448237

  8. Drosophila Ge-1 Promotes P Body Formation and oskar mRNA Localization

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shih-Jung; Marchand, Virginie; Ephrussi, Anne

    2011-01-01

    mRNA localization coupled with translational control is a widespread and conserved strategy that allows the localized production of proteins within eukaryotic cells. In Drosophila, oskar (osk) mRNA localization and translation at the posterior pole of the oocyte are essential for proper patterning of the embryo. Several P body components are involved in osk mRNA localization and translational repression, suggesting a link between P bodies and osk RNPs. In cultured mammalian cells, Ge-1 protein is required for P body formation. Combining genetic, biochemical and immunohistochemical approaches, we show that, in vivo, Drosophila Ge-1 (dGe-1) is an essential gene encoding a P body component that promotes formation of these structures in the germline. dGe-1 partially colocalizes with osk mRNA and is required for osk RNP integrity. Our analysis reveals that although under normal conditions dGe-1 function is not essential for osk mRNA localization, it becomes critical when other components of the localization machinery, such as staufen, Drosophila decapping protein 1 and barentsz are limiting. Our findings suggest an important role of dGe-1 in optimization of the osk mRNA localization process required for patterning the Drosophila embryo. PMID:21655181

  9. Akt3 Deficiency in Macrophages Promotes Foam Cell Formation and Atherosclerosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Liang; Biswas, Sudipta; Morton, Richard E.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Hay, Nissim; Byzova, Tatiana; Febbraio, Maria; Podrez, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Summary Akt, a serine-threonine protein kinase, exists as three isoforms. The Akt signaling pathway controls multiple cellular functions in the cardiovascular system, and the atheroprotective endothelial cell dependent role of Akt1 has been recently demonstrated. The role of Akt3 isoform in cardiovascular pathophysiology is not known. We explored the role of Akt3 in atherosclerosis using mice with a genetic ablation of the Akt3 gene. Using hyperlipidemic ApoE−/− mice, we demonstrated a macrophage dependent, atheroprotective role for Akt3. In vitro experiments demonstrated differential subcellular localization of Akt1 and Akt3 in macrophages, and showed that Akt3 specifically inhibits macrophage cholesteryl ester accumulation and foam cell formation, a critical early event in atherogenesis. Mechanistically, Akt3 suppresses foam cell formation by reducing lipoprotein uptake and promoting ACAT-1 degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. These studies demonstrate the non-redundant atheroprotective role for Akt3 exerted via the previously unknown link between the Akt signaling pathway and cholesterol metabolism. PMID:22632897

  10. Detergent-Mediated Formation of β-Hematin: Heme Crystallization Promoted by Detergents Implicates Nanostructure Formation for Use as a Biological Mimic

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hemozoin is a unique biomineral that results from the sequestration of toxic free heme liberated as a consequence of hemoglobin degradation in the malaria parasite. Synthetic neutral lipid droplets (SNLDs) and phospholipids were previously shown to support the rapid formation of β-hematin, abiological hemozoin, under physiologically relevant pH and temperature, though the mechanism by which heme crystallization occurs remains unclear. Detergents are particularly interesting as a template because they are amphiphilic molecules that spontaneously organize into nanostructures and have been previously shown to mediate β-hematin formation. Here, 11 detergents were investigated to elucidate the physicochemical properties that best recapitulate crystal formation in the parasite. A strong correlation between the detergent’s molecular structure and the corresponding kinetics of β-hematin formation was observed, where higher molecular weight polar chains promoted faster reactions. The larger hydrophilic chains correlated to the detergent’s ability to rapidly sequester heme into the lipophilic core, allowing for crystal nucleation to occur. The data presented here suggest that detergent nanostructures promote β-hematin formation in a similar manner to SNLDs and phospholipids. Through understanding mediator properties that promote optimal crystal formation, we are able to establish an in vitro assay to probe this drug target pathway. PMID:27175104

  11. Optical measurement of absolute flatness with the deflectometric measurement systems at PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, Gerd; Schulz, Michael; Baier, Maik; Fitzenreiter, Arne

    2013-03-01

    Highly accurate flatness measurements are needed for synchrotron optics, optical flats, or optical mirrors. Recently, two new scanning deflectometric flatness measurement systems have been installed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). The two systems (one system for horizontal and the other for vertical specimens) can measure specimens with sizes up to one metre with an expected uncertainty in the sub-nanometre range. In addition to the classical deflectometric procedure, also the 'extended shear angle difference (ESAD)' and the 'exact autocollimation deflectometric scanning (EADS)' procedures are implemented. The lateral resolution of scanning deflectometric techniques is limited by the aperture of the angle measurement system, usually an autocollimator with typical apertures of a few millimetres. With the EADS procedure, the specimen is scanned with an angular null instrument which has the potential to improve the lateral resolution down to the sub-millimetre region. A new concept and design of an appropriate angular null instrument are presented and discussed.

  12. Spray deposited PTB7:PC71BM organic polymer solar cells for efficient power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Shizuyasu; Kumar, Palanisamy; Santhakumar, Kannappan; Saitoh, Leona; Kojima, Kenzo; Shin, Paik-Kyun

    2012-09-01

    Organic solar cell (OSC) materials have recently gained rich attention due to capable of efficient power conversion, cost-effective, mechanically flexible and light weight solar cells. At the same time further materials developments for high performance will be necessary for commercial production of organic photovoltaics. The increase of efficiency has resulted from the low band gab materials, combination of polymer: fullerene and presence of blend micro structure. In this regard, the authors have achieved an efficient polymer solar cells based on Poly[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl) carbonyl] thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl(PTB7) and [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) as donor and acceptor respectively. The photocurrent active layers were fabricated by spray coating technique which enables large area, low cost solar cells. A systematic analysis of PTB7:PC71BM devices carried out with TiOx electron transport layer, Chlorobenzene (CB) and 1,8 Diiodooctane (DIO) solvents. Optical and surface characterization analysis carried out by UV-visible and AFM techniques respectively. From the J-V characteristics, the device prepared with CB+DIO mixture solvents and TiOx layer exhibits the best power conversion efficiency of 4.90%. It shows the device efficiency is one order of magnitude higher compared to that achieved with a TiOx electron transport layer and without DIO solvent. The obtained results shows that DIO cosolvent induced changes in active layer morphology down to nano scale range and the TiOx layer decrease the resistance between the active layer and electrode material.

  13. Characterization of optical material parameters for EUV Lithography applications at PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubis, Christian; Haase, Anton; Soltwisch, Victor; Scholze, Frank

    2015-09-01

    EUV Lithography now reaches the fab floor. The technology ramp up and integration with existing processes will require evolutionary steps in many aspects of the technology. For instance will it be necessary to reduce 3D mask effects like shadowing e.g. by introducing a thinner absorber structure. Continuous progress will be based on using new materials, adapted multilayers, and new reticle designs. Many of these developments are based on simulations and computer models for the design of the required structures and thus require data on the optical properties of the materials involved. In particular when addressing the reticle where the optical function is the target value. Using its more than 25 years of expertise in EUV metrology1, PTB operates instrumentation for reflectometry and scatterometry2 in the EUV and adjacent wavelength ranges and can provide the data for the determination of optical material parameters for individual thin layers. The need for sound optical parameter characterization for the development of alternative EUV materials was thoroughly motivated during the 2015 SPIE Advanced Lithography conference3. The data required is not readily available from databases, as thin film properties - depending on their deposition method and interfaces - may deviate significantly from standard bulk data4. Therefore, better optical constants and a continuous availability of the associated measurement tools are vital for further progress in EUV reticle and optical system design. The ability to vary relevant parameters like wavelength, angle of incidence (AOI), the plane of incidence and polarization is a prerequisite to gather sufficient data to model optical constants. We give details on PTB's measurement capabilities and accessible parameter space for optical material parameter characterization and show some representative data and results.

  14. Final results of bilateral comparison between NIST and PTB for flows of high pressure natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickan, B.; Toebben, H.; Johnson, A.; Kegel, T.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009 NIST developed a US national flow standard to provide traceability for flow meters used for custody transfer of pipeline quality natural gas. NIST disseminates the SI unit of flow by calibrating a customer flow meter against a parallel array of turbine meter working standards, which in turn are traceable to a pressure-volume-temperature-time (PVTt) primary standard. The calibration flow range extends from 0.125 actual m3/s to 9 actual m3/s with an expanded uncertainty as low as 0.22% at high flows, and increasing to almost 0.40% at the lowest flows. Details regarding the traceability chain and uncertainty analysis are documented in prior publications. The current manuscript verifies NIST's calibration uncertainty via a bilateral comparison with the German National Metrology Institute PTB. The results of the bilateral are linked to the 2006 key comparison results between three EURAMET national metrology institutes (i.e., PTB, VSL and LNE). Linkage is accomplished in spite of using a different transfer standard in the bilateral versus the key comparison. A mathematical proof is included that demonstrates that the relative difference between a laboratory's measured flow and the key comparison reference value is independent of the transfer package for most flow measurement applications. The bilateral results demonstrate that NIST's natural gas flow measurements are within their specified uncertainties and are equivalent to those of the EURAMET National Metrology Institutes. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  15. Optical metrology of micro- and nanostructures at PTB: status and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodermann, Bernd; Buhr, Egbert; Ehret, Gerd; Scholze, Frank; Wurm, Matthias

    2008-09-01

    Today, various types of high resolution dimensional metrology instrumentation are in use for a quantitative characterisation of micro- and nanostructures. Although sophisticated ultra high resolution microscopic techniques like SEM and AFM are available, optical methods like microscopy and scatterometry are still of interest and are important because they are non-destructive, fast and have a good in-line capability. At PTB different optical tools are used for high-resolution metrology. Our standard instrument for CD metrology is a special UV transmission microscope. A new 193nm microscope is currently under development which will meet future requirements at least for the 32nm node as specified in the ITRS roadmap. A special alternating grazing incidence dark field microscope is used to measure the width of single features down to 100nm. For grating structures, we developed an optical diffractometer for pitch calibrations with an uncertainty down to 10 pm. Recently we realised a DUV scatterometer and ellipsometer capable to measure accurately CD, edge profile, layer thickness, and optical parameters. A versatile EUV scatterometer can be used to characterise absorber structures e. g. on EUV photomasks. For accurate measurements a thorough modelling on the basis of rigorous diffraction calculation is essential, which accounts for both polarisation effects and the 3D geometry of the structures. We use the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) method and the finite elements (FEM) method. We present an overview of PTB's current and future activities in optical high-resolution metrology and how these systems compare to ultra-high resolution microscopy like SEM or AFM.

  16. Precise time and frequency intercomparison between NPL, India and PTB, Federal Republic of Germany via satellite symphonie-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, B. S.; Banerjee, P.; Sood, P. C.; Saxena, M.; Kumar, N.; Suri, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    A time and frequency intercomparison experiment conducted using Earth stations in New Delhi, India and Raisting, FRG is described. The NPL clock was placed at New Delhi Earth Station and the Raisting Clock was calibrated with PTB/Primary standard via LORAN-C and travelling clocks. The random uncertainity of time comparisons, represented by two sample Allan Variance sigma (30 seconds), was less than 10 nanoseconds. The relative frequency difference between the NPL and Raisting Clocks, SNPL, RAIS, as measured over the 44 days period was found to be -15.7 x 10 to the -13th power. The relative frequency difference between PTB Primary Standard and Raisting Clock, SPTB, RAIS, during this period, was measured to be -22.8 x 10 to the -13th power. The relative frequency difference between NPL clock and PTB Primary Standard, SNPL, PTB, thus, is +7.1 x 10 to the -13th power. The clock rate (UTC, India) of +7.1 + or - 0.5 x 10 to the -13th power, agrees well with that obtained via VLF phase measurements over one year period and with USNO travelling clock time comparisons made in September, 1980.

  17. Interleukin-8 reduces post-surgical lymphedema formation by promoting lymphatic vessel regeneration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Inho; Lee, Yong Suk; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Choi, Dongwon; Ecoiffier, Tatiana; Lee, Ha Neul; Kim, Kyu Eui; Lee, Sunju; Park, Eun Kyung; Maeng, Yong Sun; Kim, Nam Yun; Ladner, Robert D; Petasis, Nicos A; Koh, Chester J; Chen, Lu; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Lymphedema is mainly caused by lymphatic obstruction and manifested as tissue swelling, often in the arms and legs. Lymphedema is one of the most common post-surgical complications in breast cancer patients and presents a painful and disfiguring chronic illness that has few treatment options. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of interleukin (IL)-8 in lymphatic regeneration independent of its pro-inflammatory activity. We found that IL-8 promoted proliferation, tube formation, and migration of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) without activating the VEGF signaling. Additionally, IL-8 suppressed the major cell cycle inhibitor CDKN1C/p57(KIP2) by downregulating its positive regulator PROX1, which is known as the master regulator of LEC-differentiation. Animal-based studies such as matrigel plug and cornea micropocket assays demonstrated potent efficacy of IL-8 in activating lymphangiogenesis in vivo. Moreover, we have generated a novel transgenic mouse model (K14-hIL8) that expresses human IL-8 in the skin and then crossed with lymphatic-specific fluorescent (Prox1-GFP) mouse. The resulting double transgenic mice showed that a stable expression of IL-8 could promote embryonic lymphangiogenesis. Moreover, an immunodeficient IL-8-expressing mouse line that was established by crossing K14-hIL8 mice with athymic nude mice displayed an enhanced tumor-associated lymphangiogenesis. Finally, when experimental lymphedema was introduced, K14-hIL8 mice showed an improved amelioration of lymphedema with an increased lymphatic regeneration. Together, we report that IL-8 can activate lymphangiogenesis in vitro and in vivo with a therapeutic efficacy in post-surgical lymphedema.

  18. Using formative research to develop CHANGE!: a curriculum-based physical activity promoting intervention

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Low childhood physical activity levels are currently one of the most pressing public health concerns. Numerous school-based physical activity interventions have been conducted with varied success. Identifying effective child-based physical activity interventions are warranted. The purpose of this formative study was to elicit subjective views of children, their parents, and teachers about physical activity to inform the design of the CHANGE! (Children's Health, Activity, and Nutrition: Get Educated!) intervention programme. Methods Semi-structured mixed-gender interviews (group and individual) were conducted in 11 primary schools, stratified by socioeconomic status, with 60 children aged 9-10 years (24 boys, 36 girls), 33 parents (4 male, 29 female) and 10 teachers (4 male, 6 female). Questions for interviews were structured around the PRECEDE stage of the PRECEDE-PROCEDE model and addressed knowledge, attitudes and beliefs towards physical activity, as well as views on barriers to participation. All data were transcribed verbatim. Pen profiles were constructed from the transcripts in a deductive manner using the Youth Physical Activity Promotion Model framework. The profiles represented analysis outcomes via a diagram of key emergent themes. Results Analyses revealed an understanding of the relationship between physical activity and health, although some children had limited understanding of what constitutes physical activity. Views elicited by children and parents were generally consistent. Fun, enjoyment and social support were important predictors of physical activity participation, though several barriers such as lack of parental support were identified across all group interviews. The perception of family invested time was positively linked to physical activity engagement. Conclusions Families have a powerful and important role in promoting health-enhancing behaviours. Involvement of parents and the whole family is a strategy that could be

  19. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-{alpha}-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 {mu}M) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-{alpha} and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction.

  20. Promotion of experimental thrombus formation by the procoagulant activity of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Berny-Lang, MA; Aslan, JE; Tormoen, GW; Patel, IA; Bock, PE; Gruber, A

    2011-01-01

    The routine observation of tumor emboli in the peripheral blood of patients with carcinomas raises questions about the clinical relevance of these circulating tumor cells. Thrombosis is a common clinical manifestation of cancer and circulating tumor cells may play a pathogenetic role in this process. The presence of coagulation-associated molecules on cancer cells has been described, but the mechanisms by which circulating tumor cells augment or alter coagulation remains unclear. In this study we utilized suspensions of a metastatic adenocarcinoma cell line, MDA-MB-231, and a non-metastatic breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A, as models of circulating tumor cells to determine the thromobogenic activity of these blood-foreign cells. In human plasma, both metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells and non-metastatic MCF-10A cells significantly enhanced clotting kinetics. The effect of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells on clotting times was cell number-dependent and inhibited by a neutralizing antibody to tissue factor (TF) as well as inhibitors of activated factor X and thrombin. Using fluorescence microscopy, we found that both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells supported the binding of fluorescently-labeled thrombin. Furthermore, in a model of thrombus formation under pressure-driven flow, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells significantly decreased the time to occlusion. Our findings indicate that the presence of breast epithelial cells in blood can stimulate coagulation in a TF-dependent manner, suggesting that tumor cells that enter the circulation may promote the formation of occlusive thrombi under shear flow conditions. PMID:21301066

  1. Promotion of experimental thrombus formation by the procoagulant activity of breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berny-Lang, M. A.; Aslan, J. E.; Tormoen, G. W.; Patel, I. A.; Bock, P. E.; Gruber, A.; McCarty, O. J. T.

    2011-02-01

    The routine observation of tumor emboli in the peripheral blood of patients with carcinomas raises questions about the clinical relevance of these circulating tumor cells. Thrombosis is a common clinical manifestation of cancer, and circulating tumor cells may play a pathogenetic role in this process. The presence of coagulation-associated molecules on cancer cells has been described, but the mechanisms by which circulating tumor cells augment or alter coagulation remains unclear. In this study we utilized suspensions of a metastatic adenocarcinoma cell line, MDA-MB-231, and a non-metastatic breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A, as models of circulating tumor cells to determine the thromobogenic activity of these blood-foreign cells. In human plasma, both metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells and non-metastatic MCF-10A cells significantly enhanced clotting kinetics. The effect of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells on clotting times was cell number-dependent and inhibited by a neutralizing antibody to tissue factor (TF) as well as inhibitors of activated factor X and thrombin. Using fluorescence microscopy, we found that both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells supported the binding of fluorescently labeled thrombin. Furthermore, in a model of thrombus formation under pressure-driven flow, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells significantly decreased the time to occlusion. Our findings indicate that the presence of breast epithelial cells in blood can stimulate coagulation in a TF-dependent manner, suggesting that tumor cells that enter the circulation may promote the formation of occlusive thrombi under shear flow conditions.

  2. SAMHD1 Inhibits LINE-1 Retrotransposition by Promoting Stress Granule Formation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Siqi; Li, Jian; Xu, Fengwen; Mei, Shan; Le Duff, Yann; Yin, Lijuan; Pang, Xiaojing; Cen, Shan; Jin, Qi; Liang, Chen; Guo, Fei

    2015-07-01

    The SAM domain and HD domain containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) inhibits retroviruses, DNA viruses and long interspersed element 1 (LINE-1). Given that in dividing cells, SAMHD1 loses its antiviral function yet still potently restricts LINE-1, we propose that, instead of blocking viral DNA synthesis by virtue of its dNTP triphosphohydrolase activity, SAMHD1 may exploit a different mechanism to control LINE-1. Here, we report a new activity of SAMHD1 in promoting cellular stress granule assembly, which correlates with increased phosphorylation of eIF2α and diminished eIF4A/eIF4G interaction. This function of SAMHD1 enhances sequestration of LINE-1 RNP in stress granules and consequent blockade to LINE-1 retrotransposition. In support of this new mechanism of action, depletion of stress granule marker proteins G3BP1 or TIA1 abrogates stress granule formation and overcomes SAMHD1 inhibition of LINE-1. Together, these data reveal a new mechanism for SAMHD1 to control LINE-1 by activating cellular stress granule pathway.

  3. SAMHD1 Inhibits LINE-1 Retrotransposition by Promoting Stress Granule Formation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fengwen; Mei, Shan; Le Duff, Yann; Yin, Lijuan; Pang, Xiaojing; Cen, Shan; Jin, Qi; Liang, Chen; Guo, Fei

    2015-01-01

    The SAM domain and HD domain containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) inhibits retroviruses, DNA viruses and long interspersed element 1 (LINE-1). Given that in dividing cells, SAMHD1 loses its antiviral function yet still potently restricts LINE-1, we propose that, instead of blocking viral DNA synthesis by virtue of its dNTP triphosphohydrolase activity, SAMHD1 may exploit a different mechanism to control LINE-1. Here, we report a new activity of SAMHD1 in promoting cellular stress granule assembly, which correlates with increased phosphorylation of eIF2α and diminished eIF4A/eIF4G interaction. This function of SAMHD1 enhances sequestration of LINE-1 RNP in stress granules and consequent blockade to LINE-1 retrotransposition. In support of this new mechanism of action, depletion of stress granule marker proteins G3BP1 or TIA1 abrogates stress granule formation and overcomes SAMHD1 inhibition of LINE-1. Together, these data reveal a new mechanism for SAMHD1 to control LINE-1 by activating cellular stress granule pathway. PMID:26134849

  4. ADAM17 in tumor associated leukocytes regulates inflammatory mediators and promotes mammary tumor formation

    PubMed Central

    Chuntova, Pavlina; Brady, Nicholas J.; Witschen, Patrice M.; Kemp, Sarah E.; Nelson, Andrew C.; Walcheck, Bruce; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of inflammatory cells within the tumor microenvironment has been tightly linked to mammary tumor formation and progression. Specifically, interactions between tumor cells and infiltrating macrophages can contribute to the generation of a pro-tumorigenic microenvironment. Understanding the complex mechanisms that drive tumor cell-macrophage cross-talk will ultimately lead to the development of approaches to prevent or treat early stage breast cancers. As described here, we demonstrate that the cell surface protease a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) is expressed by macrophages in mammary tumors and contributes to regulating the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, including inflammatory cytokines and the inflammatory mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2). Furthermore, we demonstrate that ADAM17 is expressed on leukocytes, including macrophages, within polyoma middle T (PyMT)-derived mammary tumors. Genetic deletion of ADAM17 in leukocytes resulted in decreased onset of mammary tumor growth, which was associated with reduced expression of the Cox-2 within the tumor. These findings demonstrate that ADAM17 regulates key inflammatory mediators in macrophages and that leukocyte-specific ADAM17 is an important promoter of mammary tumor initiation. Understanding the mechanisms associated with early stage tumorigenesis has implications for the development of preventive and/or treatment strategies for early stage breast cancers.

  5. Unfractionated Heparin Promotes Osteoclast Formation in Vitro by Inhibiting Osteoprotegerin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Binghan; Lu, Dan; Chen, Yuqing; Zhao, Minghui; Zuo, Li

    2016-01-01

    Heparin has been proven to enhance bone resorption and induce bone loss. Since osteoclasts play a pivotal role in bone resorption, the effect of heparin on osteoclastogenesis needs to be clarified. Since osteocytes are the key modulator during osteoclastogenesis, we evaluated heparin’s effect on osteoclastogenesis in vitro by co-culturing an osteocyte cell line (MLO-Y4) and pre-osteoclasts (RAW264.7). In this co-culture system, heparin enhanced osteoclastogenesis and osteoclastic bone resorption while having no influence on the production of RANKL (receptor activator of NFκB ligand), M-CSF (macrophage colony-stimulating factor), and OPG (osteoprotegerin), which are three main regulatory factors derived from osteocytes. According to previous studies, heparin could bind specifically to OPG and inhibit its activity, so we hypothesized that this might be a possible mechanism of heparin activity. To test this hypothesis, osteoclastogenesis was induced using recombinant RANKL or MLO-Y4 supernatant. We found that heparin has no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis (contains no OPG). However, after incubation with OPG, the capacity of MLO-Y4 supernatant for supporting osteoclast formation was increased. This effect disappeared after OPG was neutralized and reappeared after OPG was replenished. These results strongly suggest that heparin promotes osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis in vitro, at least partially, through inhibiting OPG activity. PMID:27110777

  6. MEKK2 mediates an alternative β-catenin pathway that promotes bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Greenblatt, Matthew Blake; Shin, Dong Yeon; Oh, Hwanhee; Lee, Ki-Young; Zhai, Bo; Gygi, Steven P.; Lotinun, Sutada; Baron, Roland; Liu, Dou; Su, Bing; Glimcher, Laurie H.; Shim, Jae-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    Proper tuning of β-catenin activity in osteoblasts is required for bone homeostasis, because both increased and decreased β-catenin activity have pathologic consequences. In the classical pathway for β-catenin activation, stimulation with WNT ligands suppresses constitutive phosphorylation of β-catenin by glycogen synthase kinase 3β, preventing β-catenin ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Here, we have found that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 2 (MAP3K2 or MEKK2) mediates an alternative pathway for β-catenin activation in osteoblasts that is distinct from the canonical WNT pathway. FGF2 activates MEKK2 to phosphorylate β-catenin at serine 675, promoting recruitment of the deubiquitinating enzyme, ubiquitin-specific peptidase 15 (USP15). USP15 in turn prevents the basal turnover of β-catenin by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation, thereby enhancing WNT signaling. Analysis of MEKK2-deficient mice and genetic interaction studies between Mekk2- and β-catenin–null alleles confirm that this pathway is an important physiologic regulator of bone mass in vivo. Thus, an FGF2/MEKK2 pathway mediates an alternative nonclassical pathway for β-catenin activation, and this pathway is a key regulator of bone formation by osteoblasts. PMID:26884171

  7. Soybean NAC transcription factors promote abiotic stress tolerance and lateral root formation in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yu-Jun; Wei, Wei; Song, Qing-Xin; Chen, Hao-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Wang, Fang; Zou, Hong-Feng; Lei, Gang; Tian, Ai-Guo; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Jin-Song; Chen, Shou-Yi

    2011-10-01

    NAC transcription factors play important roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. Previously, we identified multiple NAC genes in soybean (Glycine max). Here, we identify the roles of two genes, GmNAC11 and GmNAC20, in stress responses and other processes. The two genes were differentially induced by multiple abiotic stresses and plant hormones, and their transcripts were abundant in roots and cotyledons. Both genes encoded proteins that localized to the nucleus and bound to the core DNA sequence CGT[G/A]. In the protoplast assay system, GmNAC11 acts as a transcriptional activator, whereas GmNAC20 functions as a mild repressor; however, the C-terminal end of GmANC20 has transcriptional activation activity. Over-expression of GmNAC20 enhances salt and freezing tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants; however, GmNAC11 over-expression only improves salt tolerance. Over-expression of GmNAC20 also promotes lateral root formation. GmNAC20 may regulate stress tolerance through activation of the DREB/CBF-COR pathway, and may control lateral root development by altering auxin signaling-related genes. GmNAC11 probably regulates DREB1A and other stress-related genes. The roles of the two GmNAC genes in stress tolerance were further analyzed in soybean transgenic hairy roots. These results provide a basis for genetic manipulation to improve the agronomic traits of important crops.

  8. TORC2 mediates the heat stress response in Drosophila by promoting the formation of stress granules

    PubMed Central

    Jevtov, Irena; Zacharogianni, Margarita; van Oorschot, Marinke M.; van Zadelhoff, Guus; Aguilera-Gomez, Angelica; Vuillez, Igor; Braakman, Ineke; Hafen, Ernst; Stocker, Hugo; Rabouille, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The kinase TOR is found in two complexes, TORC1, which is involved in growth control, and TORC2, whose roles are less well defined. Here, we asked whether TORC2 has a role in sustaining cellular stress. We show that TORC2 inhibition in Drosophila melanogaster leads to a reduced tolerance to heat stress, whereas sensitivity to other stresses is not affected. Accordingly, we show that upon heat stress, both in the animal and Drosophila cultured S2 cells, TORC2 is activated and is required for maintaining the level of its known target, Akt1 (also known as PKB). We show that the phosphorylation of the stress-activated protein kinases is not modulated by TORC2 nor is the heat-induced upregulation of heat-shock proteins. Instead, we show, both in vivo and in cultured cells, that TORC2 is required for the assembly of heat-induced cytoprotective ribonucleoprotein particles, the pro-survival stress granules. These granules are formed in response to protein translation inhibition imposed by heat stress that appears to be less efficient in the absence of TORC2 function. We propose that TORC2 mediates heat resistance in Drosophila by promoting the cell autonomous formation of stress granules. PMID:26054799

  9. Unfractionated Heparin Promotes Osteoclast Formation in Vitro by Inhibiting Osteoprotegerin Activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Binghan; Lu, Dan; Chen, Yuqing; Zhao, Minghui; Zuo, Li

    2016-01-01

    Heparin has been proven to enhance bone resorption and induce bone loss. Since osteoclasts play a pivotal role in bone resorption, the effect of heparin on osteoclastogenesis needs to be clarified. Since osteocytes are the key modulator during osteoclastogenesis, we evaluated heparin's effect on osteoclastogenesis in vitro by co-culturing an osteocyte cell line (MLO-Y4) and pre-osteoclasts (RAW264.7). In this co-culture system, heparin enhanced osteoclastogenesis and osteoclastic bone resorption while having no influence on the production of RANKL (receptor activator of NFκB ligand), M-CSF (macrophage colony-stimulating factor), and OPG (osteoprotegerin), which are three main regulatory factors derived from osteocytes. According to previous studies, heparin could bind specifically to OPG and inhibit its activity, so we hypothesized that this might be a possible mechanism of heparin activity. To test this hypothesis, osteoclastogenesis was induced using recombinant RANKL or MLO-Y4 supernatant. We found that heparin has no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis (contains no OPG). However, after incubation with OPG, the capacity of MLO-Y4 supernatant for supporting osteoclast formation was increased. This effect disappeared after OPG was neutralized and reappeared after OPG was replenished. These results strongly suggest that heparin promotes osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis in vitro, at least partially, through inhibiting OPG activity. PMID:27110777

  10. A Formative Experiment to Promote Disciplinary Literacy in Middle-School and Pre-Service Teacher Education through Blogging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colwell, Jamie R.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation describes a formative experiment that investigated how strategy instruction paired with collaborative blogging could promote disciplinary literacy among eighth-grade students in a social studies classroom and among pre-service teachers in a social studies methods course. Qualitative methods were utilized to collect and analyze…

  11. Heat and Radiofrequency Plasma Glow Discharge Pretreatment of a Titanium Alloy Promote Bone Formation and Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Daniel E.; Rapuano, Bruce E.; Vyas, Parth; Lane, Joseph M.; Meyers, Kathleen; Wright, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Orthopedic and dental implants manifest increased failure rates when inserted into low density bone. We determined whether chemical pretreatments of a titanium alloy implant material stimulated new bone formation to increase osseointegration in vivo in trabecular bone using a rat model. Titanium alloy rods were untreated or pretreated with heat (600°C) or radiofrequency plasma glow discharge (RFGD). The rods were then coated with the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin (1 nM) or left uncoated and surgically implanted into the rat femoral medullary cavity. Animals were euthanized 3 or 6 weeks later, and femurs were removed for analysis. The number of trabeculae in contact with the implant surface, surface contact between trabeculae and the implant, and the length and area of bone attached to the implant were measured by histomorphometry. Implant shear strength was measured by a pull-out test. Both pretreatments and fibronectin enhanced the number of trabeculae bonding with the implant and trabeculae-to-implant surface contact, with greater effects of fibronectin observed with pretreated compared to untreated implants. RFGD pretreatment modestly increased implant shear strength, which was highly correlated (r2 = 0.87 – 0.99) with measures of trabecular bonding for untreated and RFGD-pretreated implants. In contrast, heat pretreatment increased shear strength 3 to 5-fold for both uncoated and fibronectin-coated implants at 3 and 6 weeks, suggesting a more rapid increase in implant-femur bonding compared to the other groups. In summary, our findings suggest that the heat and RFGD pretreatments can promote the osseointegration of a titanium alloy implant material. PMID:23649564

  12. Nanoscale Morphology of PTB7 Based Organic Photovoltaics as a Function of Fullerene Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehling, John D.; Baran, Derya; Sit, Joseph; Kassar, Thaer; Ameri, Tayebeh; Unruh, Tobias; Brabec, Christoph J.; Moulé, Adam J.

    2016-08-01

    High efficiency polymer:fullerene photovoltaic device layers self-assemble with hierarchical features from ångströms to 100’s of nanometers. The feature size, shape, composition, orientation, and order all contribute to device efficiency and are simultaneously difficult to study due to poor contrast between carbon based materials. This study seeks to increase device efficiency and simplify morphology measurements by replacing the typical fullerene acceptor with endohedral fullerene Lu3N@PC80BEH. The metal atoms give excellent scattering contrast for electron beam and x-ray experiments. Additionally, Lu3N@PC80BEH has a lower electron affinity than standard fullerenes, which can raise the open circuit voltage of photovoltaic devices. Electron microscopy techniques are used to produce a detailed account of morphology evolution in mixtures of Lu3N@PC80BEH with the record breaking donor polymer, PTB7 and coated using solvent mixtures. We demonstrate that common solvent additives like 1,8-diiodooctane or chloronapthalene do not improve the morphology of endohedral fullerene devices as expected. The poor device performance is attributed to the lack of mutual miscibility between this particular polymer:fullerene combination and to co-crystallization of Lu3N@PC80BEH with 1,8-diiodooctane. This negative result explains why solvent additives mixtures are not necessarily a morphology cure-all.

  13. Nanoscale Morphology of PTB7 Based Organic Photovoltaics as a Function of Fullerene Size.

    PubMed

    Roehling, John D; Baran, Derya; Sit, Joseph; Kassar, Thaer; Ameri, Tayebeh; Unruh, Tobias; Brabec, Christoph J; Moulé, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    High efficiency polymer:fullerene photovoltaic device layers self-assemble with hierarchical features from ångströms to 100's of nanometers. The feature size, shape, composition, orientation, and order all contribute to device efficiency and are simultaneously difficult to study due to poor contrast between carbon based materials. This study seeks to increase device efficiency and simplify morphology measurements by replacing the typical fullerene acceptor with endohedral fullerene Lu3N@PC80BEH. The metal atoms give excellent scattering contrast for electron beam and x-ray experiments. Additionally, Lu3N@PC80BEH has a lower electron affinity than standard fullerenes, which can raise the open circuit voltage of photovoltaic devices. Electron microscopy techniques are used to produce a detailed account of morphology evolution in mixtures of Lu3N@PC80BEH with the record breaking donor polymer, PTB7 and coated using solvent mixtures. We demonstrate that common solvent additives like 1,8-diiodooctane or chloronapthalene do not improve the morphology of endohedral fullerene devices as expected. The poor device performance is attributed to the lack of mutual miscibility between this particular polymer:fullerene combination and to co-crystallization of Lu3N@PC80BEH with 1,8-diiodooctane. This negative result explains why solvent additives mixtures are not necessarily a morphology cure-all. PMID:27498880

  14. Nanoscale Morphology of PTB7 Based Organic Photovoltaics as a Function of Fullerene Size

    PubMed Central

    Roehling, John D.; Baran, Derya; Sit, Joseph; Kassar, Thaer; Ameri, Tayebeh; Unruh, Tobias; Brabec, Christoph J.; Moulé, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    High efficiency polymer:fullerene photovoltaic device layers self-assemble with hierarchical features from ångströms to 100’s of nanometers. The feature size, shape, composition, orientation, and order all contribute to device efficiency and are simultaneously difficult to study due to poor contrast between carbon based materials. This study seeks to increase device efficiency and simplify morphology measurements by replacing the typical fullerene acceptor with endohedral fullerene Lu3N@PC80BEH. The metal atoms give excellent scattering contrast for electron beam and x-ray experiments. Additionally, Lu3N@PC80BEH has a lower electron affinity than standard fullerenes, which can raise the open circuit voltage of photovoltaic devices. Electron microscopy techniques are used to produce a detailed account of morphology evolution in mixtures of Lu3N@PC80BEH with the record breaking donor polymer, PTB7 and coated using solvent mixtures. We demonstrate that common solvent additives like 1,8-diiodooctane or chloronapthalene do not improve the morphology of endohedral fullerene devices as expected. The poor device performance is attributed to the lack of mutual miscibility between this particular polymer:fullerene combination and to co-crystallization of Lu3N@PC80BEH with 1,8-diiodooctane. This negative result explains why solvent additives mixtures are not necessarily a morphology cure-all. PMID:27498880

  15. Nanoscale Morphology of PTB7 Based Organic Photovoltaics as a Function of Fullerene Size.

    PubMed

    Roehling, John D; Baran, Derya; Sit, Joseph; Kassar, Thaer; Ameri, Tayebeh; Unruh, Tobias; Brabec, Christoph J; Moulé, Adam J

    2016-08-08

    High efficiency polymer:fullerene photovoltaic device layers self-assemble with hierarchical features from ångströms to 100's of nanometers. The feature size, shape, composition, orientation, and order all contribute to device efficiency and are simultaneously difficult to study due to poor contrast between carbon based materials. This study seeks to increase device efficiency and simplify morphology measurements by replacing the typical fullerene acceptor with endohedral fullerene Lu3N@PC80BEH. The metal atoms give excellent scattering contrast for electron beam and x-ray experiments. Additionally, Lu3N@PC80BEH has a lower electron affinity than standard fullerenes, which can raise the open circuit voltage of photovoltaic devices. Electron microscopy techniques are used to produce a detailed account of morphology evolution in mixtures of Lu3N@PC80BEH with the record breaking donor polymer, PTB7 and coated using solvent mixtures. We demonstrate that common solvent additives like 1,8-diiodooctane or chloronapthalene do not improve the morphology of endohedral fullerene devices as expected. The poor device performance is attributed to the lack of mutual miscibility between this particular polymer:fullerene combination and to co-crystallization of Lu3N@PC80BEH with 1,8-diiodooctane. This negative result explains why solvent additives mixtures are not necessarily a morphology cure-all.

  16. Metrology capabilities and performance of the new DUV scatterometer of the PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurm, Matthias; Bodermann, Bernd; Pilarski, Frank

    2007-02-01

    At PTB a new type of DUV scatterometer has been developed and set up. The concept of the system is very variable, so that many different types of measurements like e. g. goniometric scatterometry, ellipsometric scatterometry, polarisation dependent reflectometry and ellipsometry can be performed. The main applications are CD, pitch and edge profile characterisation of nano-structured surfaces mainly, but not only, on photomasks. Different operation wavelength down to 193nm can be used. The system is not only a versatile tool for a variety of different at-wavelength metrology connected with state-of-the-art photolithography. It allows also to adapt and to vary the measurand and measurement geometry to optimise the sensitivity and the unambiguity for the measurement problem. In this paper the system is presented and described in detail for the first time. Additionally first measurements of grating test structures on a 193nm CoG photomasks are presented. The measurements have to be evaluated by solving the inverse diffraction problem. We finally give a short overview of the evaluation method developed and used by us.

  17. Interfacial energy level alignments between low-band-gap polymer PTB7 and indium zinc oxide anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dongguen; Lee, Jeihyun; Park, Soohyung; Jeong, Junkyeong; Seo, Ki-Won; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Kim, Han-Ki; Choi, Min-Jun; Chung, Kwun-Bum; Yi, Yeonjin

    2015-09-01

    The interfacial energy level alignments between poly(thieno[3,4-b]-thiophene)-co-benzodithiophene (PTB7) and indium zinc oxide (IZO) were investigated. In situ ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy measurements were conducted with the step-by-step deposition of PTB7 on IZO substrate. All spectral changes were analyzed between each deposition step, and interfacial energy level alignments were estimated. The hole barrier of standard ultraviolet-ozone treated IZO is 0.58 eV, which is lower than the value of 1.09 eV obtained for bare IZO. The effect of barrier reduction on the hole transport was also confirmed with electrical measurements of hole-dominated devices.

  18. Dramatic Enhancement of Power Conversion Efficiency in Polymer Solar Cells by Conjugating Very Low Ratio of Triplet Iridium Complexes to PTB7.

    PubMed

    Qian, Min; Zhang, Ran; Hao, Jingyu; Zhang, Wenjun; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Jianpu; Tao, Youtian; Chen, Shufen; Fang, Junfeng; Huang, Wei

    2015-06-17

    Various low ratios of triplet iridium complexes (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2.5, and 5 mol%) are conjugated to the backbone of the famous champion donor polymer PTB7. At the same conditions, the power conversion efficiency for polymer containing 1% of Ir increases by 45%, 39%, and 31% in three batches of devices compared with control Ir-free PTB7.

  19. Visible-light-promoted iminyl radical formation from vinyl azides: synthesis of 6-(fluoro)alkylated phenanthridines.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyang; Yu, Shouyun

    2016-09-18

    An efficient strategy assisted by visible-light-promoted iminyl radical formation has been developed for the synthesis of 6-(fluoro)alkylated phenanthridine derivatives. In the reactions, addition of alkyl and trifluoromethyl radicals onto vinyl azides gives iminyl radicals, which then undergo intramolecular homolytic aromatic substitution leading to phenanthridines. These reactions can be carried out under mild conditions with high chemical yields and broad substrate scope. PMID:27530901

  20. Biomarker evidence for shallow water marine euxinia through the PTB in the Panthalassic Ocean (Peace River Basin Embayment, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, L. E.; Beatty, T.; Henderson, C. M.; Summons, R. E.; Love, G. D.

    2007-12-01

    Protracted euxinic conditions in the late Paleozoic and early Mesozoic oceans may have been an important paleoenvironmental factor in the Permian-Triassic Boundary (PTB) extinction. Release of hydrogen sulfide during upwelling or transgressive events from such an ocean (Kump et al. 2005; Riccardi et al. 2006) may have been a driver of the extinction in both marine and terrestrial environments. Worldwide marine PTB sections show evidence for a stratified water column and the presence of sulfidic deep water, at least episodically (Isozaki 1997; Grice et al. 2005). Taxa that are particularly characteristic of such an environment are the green sulfur bacteria, or Chlorobiaceae. These anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria utilize sulfide as an electron donor for photosynthesis and live in modern stratified water columns where euxinia extends into the photic zone. Indeed, biomarkers derived from these organisms have been identified at a number of the PTB sections. The Peace River embayment in western Canada has been identified as a section that spans the PTB based on conodont biostratigraphy (Henderson 1997). Samples from five drill cores in this section provide new insight into the state of the Panthalassic Ocean during this time of unprecedented turnover in Earth's biota. Using standard biomarker protocols, we identified aromatic hydrocarbons that are diagentic products of the carotenoids isorenieratene and chlorobactene, which are diagnostic for the brown and green strains, respectively, of the Chlorobiaceae. The occurrence of chlorobactane is especially notable since the green-pigmented varieties of the Chlorobiaceae require higher light intensities than the brown-pigmented forms and, in modern environments where they have been found, occur between 13 and 30 m of the surface. This is the first time that chlorobactane has been reported from a PTB section and it suggests a particularly shallow chemocline periodically at this location. The δ13C values for the aryl

  1. Frequency Comparison of [Formula: see text] Ion Optical Clocks at PTB and NPL via GPS PPP.

    PubMed

    Leute, J; Huntemann, N; Lipphardt, B; Tamm, Christian; Nisbet-Jones, P B R; King, S A; Godun, R M; Jones, J M; Margolis, H S; Whibberley, P B; Wallin, A; Merimaa, M; Gill, P; Peik, E

    2016-07-01

    We used precise point positioning, a well-established GPS carrier-phase frequency transfer method to perform a direct remote comparison of two optical frequency standards based on single laser-cooled [Formula: see text] ions operated at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), U.K. and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Germany. At both institutes, an active hydrogen maser serves as a flywheel oscillator which is connected to a GPS receiver as an external frequency reference and compared simultaneously to a realization of the unperturbed frequency of the (2)S1/2(F=0)-(2)D3/2(F=2) electric quadrupole transition in [Formula: see text] via an optical femtosecond frequency comb. To profit from long coherent GPS-link measurements, we extrapolate the fractional frequency difference over the various data gaps in the optical clock to maser comparisons which introduces maser noise to the frequency comparison but improves the uncertainty from the GPS-link instability. We determined the total statistical uncertainty consisting of the GPS-link uncertainty and the extrapolation uncertainties for several extrapolation schemes. Using the extrapolation scheme with the smallest combined uncertainty, we find a fractional frequency difference [Formula: see text] of -1.3×10(-15) with a combined uncertainty of 1.2×10(-15) for a total measurement time of 67 h. This result is consistent with an agreement of the frequencies realized by both optical clocks and with recent absolute frequency measurements against caesium fountain clocks within the corresponding uncertainties.

  2. Frequency Comparison of [Formula: see text] Ion Optical Clocks at PTB and NPL via GPS PPP.

    PubMed

    Leute, J; Huntemann, N; Lipphardt, B; Tamm, Christian; Nisbet-Jones, P B R; King, S A; Godun, R M; Jones, J M; Margolis, H S; Whibberley, P B; Wallin, A; Merimaa, M; Gill, P; Peik, E

    2016-07-01

    We used precise point positioning, a well-established GPS carrier-phase frequency transfer method to perform a direct remote comparison of two optical frequency standards based on single laser-cooled [Formula: see text] ions operated at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), U.K. and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Germany. At both institutes, an active hydrogen maser serves as a flywheel oscillator which is connected to a GPS receiver as an external frequency reference and compared simultaneously to a realization of the unperturbed frequency of the (2)S1/2(F=0)-(2)D3/2(F=2) electric quadrupole transition in [Formula: see text] via an optical femtosecond frequency comb. To profit from long coherent GPS-link measurements, we extrapolate the fractional frequency difference over the various data gaps in the optical clock to maser comparisons which introduces maser noise to the frequency comparison but improves the uncertainty from the GPS-link instability. We determined the total statistical uncertainty consisting of the GPS-link uncertainty and the extrapolation uncertainties for several extrapolation schemes. Using the extrapolation scheme with the smallest combined uncertainty, we find a fractional frequency difference [Formula: see text] of -1.3×10(-15) with a combined uncertainty of 1.2×10(-15) for a total measurement time of 67 h. This result is consistent with an agreement of the frequencies realized by both optical clocks and with recent absolute frequency measurements against caesium fountain clocks within the corresponding uncertainties. PMID:26863657

  3. Dyrk1A-mediated phosphorylation of RCAN1 promotes the formation of insoluble RCAN1 aggregates.

    PubMed

    Song, Woo-Joo; Song, Eun-Ah Christine; Choi, Sun-Hee; Baik, Hyung-Hwan; Jin, Byung Kwan; Kim, Jeong Hee; Chung, Sul-Hee

    2013-10-25

    The mechanisms underlying aggregate formation in age-related neurodegenerative diseases remain not well understood. Here we investigated whether dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A) is involved in the formation of regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1) aggregates. We show that RCAN1 self-associates and forms multimers, and that this process is promoted by the Dyrk1A-mediated phosphorylation of RCAN1 at the Thr(192) residue. Transgenic mice that overexpress the Dyrk1A exhibited lower levels of phospho-Thr(192)-RCAN1 in 10-month-old-group compared to littermate controls, when analyzed with soluble hippocampus lysates. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of RCAN1 by Dyrk1A stimulates the formation of insoluble aggregates upon aging. PMID:24021800

  4. Response Gene to Complement 32 Promotes Vascular Lesion Formation through Stimulation of Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-Ning; Shi, Ning; Xie, Wei-bing; Guo, Xia; Chen, Shi-You

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study are to determine the role of response gene to complement 32 (RGC-32) in vascular lesion formation after experimental angioplasty and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods and Results Using a rat carotid artery balloon-injury model, we documented for the first time that neointima formation was closely associated with a significantly increased expression of RGC-32 protein. shRNA Knockdown of RGC-32 via adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene delivery dramatically inhibited the lesion formation by 62% as compared to control groups 14 days after injury. Conversely, RGC-32 overexpression significantly promoted the neointima formation by 33%. Gain and loss of function studies in primary culture of rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs) indicated that RGC-32 is essential for both the proliferation and migration of RASMCs. RGC-32 induced RASMC proliferation by enhancing p34CDC2 activity. RGC-32 stimulated the migration of RASMC via inducing focal adhesion contact and stress fiber formation. These effects were caused by the enhanced ROKα activity due to RGC-32-induced downregulation of Rad GTPase. Conclusions RGC-32 plays an important role in vascular lesion formation following vascular injury. Increased RGC-32 expression in vascular injury appears to be a novel mechanism underlying the migration and proliferation of vascular SMCs. Therefore, targeting RGC-32 is a potential therapeutic strategy for the prevention of vascular remodeling in proliferative vascular diseases. PMID:21636805

  5. Surfactant process for promoting gas hydrate formation and application of the same

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Rudy E.; Zhong, Yu

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of storing gas using gas hydrates comprising forming gas hydrates in the presence of a water-surfactant solution that comprises water and surfactant. The addition of minor amounts of surfactant increases the gas hydrate formation rate, increases packing density of the solid hydrate mass and simplifies the formation-storage-decomposition process of gas hydrates. The minor amounts of surfactant also enhance the potential of gas hydrates for industrial storage applications.

  6. The "Balance Intervention" for Promoting Caloric Compensatory Behaviours in Response to Overeating: A Formative Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wammes, Birgitte; Breedveld, Boudewijn; Kremers, Stef; Brug, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    To help people prevent weight gain, the Netherlands Nutrition Centre initiated the "balance intervention", which promotes moderation of food intake and/or increased physical activity in response to occasions of overeating. The aim of this study was to determine whether intervention materials were appreciated, encouraged information seeking and…

  7. A Vygotskian Approach to Promote and Formatively Assess Academic Concept Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edens, Kellah; Shields, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Promoting students' conceptual understanding and academic language development is a primary goal of instructors in all subject areas. These goals, however, are sometimes hindered by the way students' learning is assessed. In many college-level courses, knowledge-level tests that assess concrete thinking associated with superficial approaches to…

  8. Ubiquilin/Dsk2 promotes inclusion body formation and vacuole (lysosome)-mediated disposal of mutated huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Kun-Han; Liang, Fengshan; Higgins, Ryan; Wang, Yanchang

    2016-07-01

    Ubiquilin proteins contain a ubiquitin-like domain (UBL) and ubiquitin-associated domain(s) that interact with the proteasome and ubiquitinated substrates, respectively. Previous work established the link between ubiquilin mutations and neurodegenerative diseases, but the function of ubiquilin proteins remains elusive. Here we used a misfolded huntingtin exon I containing a 103-polyglutamine expansion (Htt103QP) as a model substrate for the functional study of ubiquilin proteins. We found that yeast ubiquilin mutant (dsk2Δ) is sensitive to Htt103QP overexpression and has a defect in the formation of Htt103QP inclusion bodies. Our evidence further suggests that the UBL domain of Dsk2 is critical for inclusion body formation. Of interest, Dsk2 is dispensable for Htt103QP degradation when Htt103QP is induced for a short time before noticeable inclusion body formation. However, when the inclusion body forms after a long Htt103QP induction, Dsk2 is required for efficient Htt103QP clearance, as well as for autophagy-dependent delivery of Htt103QP into vacuoles (lysosomes). Therefore our data indicate that Dsk2 facilitates vacuole-mediated clearance of misfolded proteins by promoting inclusion body formation. Of importance, the defect of inclusion body formation in dsk2 mutants can be rescued by human ubiquilin 1 or 2, suggesting functional conservation of ubiquilin proteins.

  9. Layered double hydroxide formation in Bayer liquor and its promotional effect on oxalate precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Perrotta, A.J.; Williams, F.

    1996-10-01

    Enhancing the precipitation of sodium oxalate from Bayer process liquor to improve the quality of alumina product remains an important objective for Bayer refining. The formation of layered double hydroxides by the reaction of alkaline earth oxides, such as lime and magnesia, with Bayer liquor gives a crystal structure which is capable of intercalating anions, both inorganic and organic, within its structure. Both lime and magnesia, with long contact times in Bayer liquor, show layered double hydroxide formation. This layered double hydroxide formation is accompanied with a decrease in the sodium oxalate content in the liquor from about 3 g/L to below 1 g/L. Short contact times lead to a destabilization of the liquor which facilitates sodium oxalate precipitation. Additional work on magnesium hydroxide shows, in comparison to lime and magnesia, much less layered double hydroxide formation with equivalent residence time in the liquor. Destabilization of the liquor also occurs, giving enhanced oxalate precipitation with less alumina being consumed in agreement with lower layered double hydroxide formation. Thermal regeneration of these structures, followed by in-situ recrystallization in Bayer liquor, also gives enhanced oxalate precipitation, suggesting that there is an opportunity for a regenerable oxalate reduction system. The implementation of these experiments and other related technology into the plant has resulted in the Purox Process for enhancing the precipitation of sodium oxalate from Bayer liquor.

  10. First calibration of the Canadian high-energy neutron spectrometry system with HAWK TEPC and Liulin at PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, L. G. I.; Boudreau, M.; Lewis, B. J.; Smith, M. B.; Zhang, M.; Ing, H.

    The Canadian high-energy neutron spectrometry system CHENSS was constructed for the Canadian Space Agency CSA to measure accurately the neutron spectrum in low-Earth orbit A large specially formulated viscoelastic scintillator uses proton recoil and good pulse-shape discrimination to measure from a few MeV to about 100 MeV With delays in the NASA flight schedule for the shuttle opportunities exist to calibrate the CHENSS at up to three reference calibration fields Measurements were taken at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt PTB in late 2005 and similar calibrations are planned at Institut de Physique Nucl e aire of the Universit e catholique de Louvain UCL and the iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences In separate exposures two spectrometers a HAWK tissue equivalent proportional counter TEPC and a Liulin and an Eberline FH41B-10 gamma-ray and neutron-sensitive meter used for airborne cosmic radiation measurements were calibrated for comparison The CHENSS HAWK and Liulin were subjected to 2 5 5 0 14 8 and 19 0 MeV neutrons with fluence measurements taken by PTB staff In addition since the HAWK and Liulin are capable of measuring the total dose equivalent they were also calibrated with PTB s Cs-137 and Cf-252 sources The results of these calibrations and comparison with all of the equipment will be reported in the paper The knowledge gained from this first calibration effort will be beneficial for the CHENSS when flown in a GAS can on a future shuttle flight as well as for the HAWK Liulin and FH41B-10 used

  11. First performance results of PTB's atomic caesium fountain and a study of contributions to its frequency instability.

    PubMed

    Weyers, S; Bauch, A; Hubner, U; Schroder, R; Tamm, C

    2000-01-01

    At the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), an atomic caesium fountain was constructed. Ramsey fringes with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.86 Hz were obtained by launching the atoms to a height of 83 cm above the cooling region (40 cm above the microwave cavity center). A first measurement of the homogeneity of the magnetic flux density yields 0.33 nT (rms), only 0.16% of the mean value of 0.205 muT used in normal operation. The inherent elementary noise contributions of the fountain and of a thermal beam atomic clock are compared in some detail.

  12. Loss of expression and promoter methylation of SLIT2 are associated with sessile serrated adenoma formation.

    PubMed

    Beggs, Andrew D; Jones, Angela; Shepherd, Neil; Arnaout, Abed; Finlayson, Caroline; Abulafi, A Muti; Morton, Dion G; Matthews, Glenn M; Hodgson, Shirley V; Tomlinson, Ian P M

    2013-05-01

    Serrated adenomas form a distinct subtype of colorectal pre-malignant lesions that may progress to malignancy along a different molecular pathway than the conventional adenoma-carcinoma pathway. Previous studies have hypothesised that BRAF mutation and promoter hypermethylation plays a role, but the evidence for this is not robust. We aimed to carry out a whole-genome loss of heterozygosity analysis, followed by targeted promoter methylation and expression analysis to identify potential pathways in serrated adenomas. An initial panel of 9 sessile serrated adenomas (SSA) and one TSA were analysed using Illumina Goldengate HumanLinkage panel arrays to ascertain regions of loss of heterozygosity. This was verified via molecular inversion probe analysis and microsatellite analysis of a further 32 samples. Methylation analysis of genes of interest was carried out using methylation specific PCR (verified by pyrosequencing) and immunohistochemistry used to correlate loss of expression of genes of interest. All experiments used adenoma samples and normal tissue samples as control. SSA samples were found on whole-genome analysis to have consistent loss of heterozygosity at 4p15.1-4p15.31, which was not found in the sole TSA, adenomas, or normal tissues. Genes of interest in this region were PDCH7 and SLIT2, and combined MSP/IHC analysis of these genes revealed significant loss of SLIT2 expression associated with promoter methylation of SLIT2. Loss of expression of SLIT2 by promoter hypermethylation and loss of heterozygosity events is significantly associated with serrated adenoma development, and SLIT2 may represent a epimutated tumour suppressor gene according to the Knudson "two hit" hypothesis.

  13. Internalized Tau sensitizes cells to stress by promoting formation and stability of stress granules

    PubMed Central

    Brunello, Cecilia A.; Yan, Xu; Huttunen, Henri J.

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules are membrane-less RNA- and RNA-binding protein-containing complexes that are transiently assembled in stressful conditions to promote cell survival. Several stress granule-associated RNA-binding proteins have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, a close link was recently identified between the stress granule core-nucleating protein TIA-1 and Tau. Tau is a central pathological protein in Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies, and misfolded, aggregated Tau is capable of propagating pathology via cell-to-cell transmission. Here we show that following internalization hyperphosphorylated extracellular Tau associates with stress granules in a TIA-1 dependent manner. Cytosolic Tau normally only weakly interacts with TIA-1 but mutations mimicking abnormal phosphorylation promote this interaction. We show that internalized Tau significantly delays normal clearance of stress granules in the recipient cells sensitizing them to secondary stress. These results suggest that secreted Tau species may have properties, likely related to its hyperphosphorylation and oligomerization, which promote pathological association of internalized Tau with stress granules altering their dynamics and reducing cell viability. We suggest that stress granules and TIA-1 play a central role in the cell-to-cell transmission of Tau pathology. PMID:27460788

  14. Control of mammalian cell mutagenesis and differentiation by chemicals which initiate or promote tumor formation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C. A.; Huberman, E.

    1980-01-01

    A cell-mediated mutagenesis assay was developed to predict the potential carcinogenic hazard of some environmental chemicals. In this assay, Chinese hamster V79 cells, which are susceptible to mutagenesis, are co-cultivated with cells capable of metabolizing chemical carcinogens. Use of this assay made it possible to demonstrate a relationship between the degree of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of a series of polycyclic hydrocarbons and nitrosamines and to study the organ specificity exhibited by some chemical carcinogens. However, most short-term in vitro assays are designed to detect mutagenic activity and therefore do not detect tumor promoting agents which are devoid of this activity. By analyzing various markers of terminal differentiation in cultured human melanoma and myeloid leukemia cells, we have established a relationship between the activity of a series of tumor promoting phorbol diesters in the mouse skin and their ability to induce terminal differentiation. We suggest that measuring alterations in the differentiation characteristics of some cultured cells may represent an approach by which environmental tumor promoting agents can be studied and detected.

  15. Induction of mutation and differentiation in mammalian cells by chemicals which initiate or promote tumor formation

    SciTech Connect

    Huberman, E.

    1980-01-01

    A cell-mediated mutagenesis assay was developed to predict the potential carcinogenic hazard of some environmental chemicals. In this assay, cells with appropriate markers for mutagenesis, such as the Chinese hamster V79 cells, are co-cultivated with cells capable of metabolizing chemical carcinogens. Use of this assay made it possible to demonstrate a relationship between the degree of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of a series of polycyclic hydrocarbons, nitrosamines and aflatoxins, and to establish means to study organ specificity of some chemical carcinogens. However, most short term in vitro assays are designed to detect mutagenic activity and therefore do not detect tumor promoting agents which are devoid of this activity. By analyzing various markers of terminal differentiation in cultured human melanoma and myeloid leukemia cells, we have established a relationship between the activity of a series of tumor promoting phorbol diesters in the mouse skin and their ability to induce terminal differentiation. We suggest that measuring alterations in the differentiation characteristics of some cultured cells may represent an approach by which environmental tumor promoting agents can be studied and detected.

  16. HIV-1 Tat protein promotes formation of more-processive elongation complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Marciniak, R A; Sharp, P A

    1991-01-01

    The Tat protein of HIV-1 trans-activates transcription in vitro in a cell-free extract of HeLa nuclei. Quantitative analysis of the efficiency of elongation revealed that a majority of the elongation complexes generated by the HIV-1 promoter were not highly processive and terminated within the first 500 nucleotides. Tat trans-activation of transcription from the HIV-1 promoter resulted from an increase in processive character of the elongation complexes. More specifically, the analysis suggests that there exist two classes of elongation complexes initiating from the HIV promoter: a less-processive form and a more-processive form. Addition of purified Tat protein was found to increase the abundance of the more-processive class of elongation complex. The purine nucleoside analog, 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) inhibits transcription in this reaction by decreasing the efficiency of elongation. Surprisingly, stimulation of transcription elongation by Tat was preferentially inhibited by the addition of DRB. Images PMID:1756726

  17. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) Promoter polymorphisms are well linked with lower stomach tumor formation in eastern Indian population.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sanjib; Ghosh, Nillu; Saha, Debjit; Kesh, Kousik; Gupta, Arnab; Swarnakar, Snehasikta

    2014-01-01

    Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), an interstitial collagenase, plays a major role in cellular invasion during development of gastric cancer, a leading cause of death worldwide. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) -1607 1G/2G site of the MMP-1 gene promoter has been reported to alter transcription level. While the importance's of other SNPs in the MMP-1 promoter have not yet been studied in gastric cancer, our aim was to investigate MMP-1 gene promoter polymorphisms and gastric cancer susceptibility in eastern Indian population. A total of 145 gastric cancer patients and 145 healthy controls were genotyped for MMP-1 -1607 1G/2G (rs1799750) by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), while MMP-1 -519 A/G (rs1144393), MMP-1 -422 T/A (rs475007), MMP-1 -340 T/C (rs514921) and MMP-1 -320 T/C (rs494379) were genotyped by DNA sequencing. A positive association was found with MMP-1 -422 T/A SNP that showed significant risk for regional lymph node metastasis (P = 0.021, Odd's ratio (OR) = 3.044, Confidence intervals (CI) = 1.187-7.807). In addition, we found a significant association with lower stomach tumor formation among gastric cancer patients for three adjacent polymorphisms near the transcriptional start sites of [MMP-1 -422 T/A (P = 0.043, OR = 2.182, CI = 1.03-4.643), MMP-1 -340 T/C (P = 0.075, OR = 1.97, CI = 0.94-4.158) and MMP-1 -320 T/C (P = 0.034, OR = 2.224, CI = 1.064-40731)]. MMP-1 level in patients' serum was correlated with MMP-1 promoter haplotypes conferring these three SNPs to evaluate the functional importance of these polymorphisms in lower stomach tumor formation and significant correlation was observed. Furthermore, MMP-1 -519 A/G polymorphism displayed poor cellular differentiation (P = 0.024, OR = 3.8, CI = 1.69-8.56) attributing a higher risk of cancer progression. In conclusion, MMP-1 proximal promoter SNPs are associated with the risk of lower stomach

  18. Erythorbic acid promoted formation of CdS QDs in a tube-in-tube micro-channel reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yan; Tan, Jiawei; Wang, Jiexin; Chen, Jianfeng; Sun, Baochang; Shao, Lei

    2014-12-15

    Erythorbic acid assistant synthesis of CdS quantum dots (QDs) was conducted by homogeneous mixing of two continuous liquids in a high-throughput microporous tube-in-tube micro-channel reactor (MTMCR) at room temperature. The effects of the micropore size of the MTMCR, liquid flow rate, mixing time and reactant concentration on the size and size distribution of CdS QDs were investigated. It was found that the size and size distribution of CdS QDs could be tuned in the MTMCR. A combination of erythorbic acid promoted formation technique with the MTMCR may be a promising pathway for controllable mass production of QDs.

  19. Endothelial progenitor cells promote tumor growth and progression by enhancing new vessel formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Liu, Huan-Qiu; Li, Ji; Liu, Xiao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Tumor growth and progression require new blood vessel formation to deliver nutrients and oxygen for further cell proliferation and to create a neovascular network exit for tumor cell metastasis. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are a bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cell population that circulates in the peripheral circulation and homes to the tumor bed to participate in new blood vessel formation. In addition to structural support to nascent vessels, these cells can also regulate the angiogenic process by paracrine secretion of a number of proangiogenic growth factors and cytokines, thus playing a crucial role in tumor neovascularization and development. Inhibition of EPC-mediated new vessel formation may be a promising therapeutic strategy in tumor treatment. EPC-mediated neovascularization is a complex process that includes multiple steps and requires a series of cytokines and modulators, thus understanding the underlying mechanisms may provide anti-neovasculogenesis targets that may be blocked for the prevention of tumor development. The present review stresses the process and contribution of EPCs to the formation of new blood vessels in solid tumors, in an attempt to gain an improved understanding of the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms involved, and to provide a potential effective therapeutic target for cancer treatment. PMID:27446353

  20. An Undergraduate Study of Two Transcription Factors that Promote Lateral Root Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bargmann, Bastiaan O. R.; Birnbaum, Kenneth D.; Brenner, Eric D.

    2014-01-01

    We present a lab that enables students to test the role of genes involved in the regulation of lateral roots growth in the model plant "Arabidopsis thaliana." Here, students design an experiment that follows the effects of the hormone auxin on the stimulation of genes involved in the formation of lateral root initials. These genes, known…

  1. Identification of Genes That Promote or Inhibit Olfactory Memory Formation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Walkinshaw, Erica; Gai, Yunchao; Farkas, Caitlin; Richter, Daniel; Nicholas, Eric; Keleman, Krystyna; Davis, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster and other organisms have been pursued to filter the genome for genetic functions important for memory formation. Such screens have employed primarily chemical or transposon-mediated mutagenesis and have identified numerous mutants including classical memory mutants, dunce and rutabaga. Here, we report the results of a large screen using panneuronal RNAi expression to identify additional genes critical for memory formation. We identified >500 genes that compromise memory when inhibited (low hits), either by disrupting the development and normal function of the adult animal or by participating in the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying memory formation. We also identified >40 genes that enhance memory when inhibited (high hits). The dunce gene was identified as one of the low hits and further experiments were performed to map the effects of the dunce RNAi to the α/β and γ mushroom body neurons. Additional behavioral experiments suggest that dunce knockdown in the mushroom body neurons impairs memory without significantly affecting acquisition. We also characterized one high hit, sickie, to show that RNAi knockdown of this gene enhances memory through effects in dopaminergic neurons without apparent effects on acquisition. These studies further our understanding of two genes involved in memory formation, provide a valuable list of genes that impair memory that may be important for understanding the neurophysiology of memory or neurodevelopmental disorders, and offer a new resource of memory suppressor genes that will aid in understanding restraint mechanisms employed by the brain to optimize resources. PMID:25644700

  2. A Needs Assessment, Development, and Formative Evaluation of a Health Promotion Smartphone Application for College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Tiffany; Chandler, Laura; Mouttapa, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Background: Approximately half of college students who completed the National College Health Assessment 2013 indicated a greater need for health-related information. University-based smartphone applications may help students better access this information. Purpose: This study describes the needs assessment, development, and formative evaluation of…

  3. Using Common Formative Assessments to Promote Student Achievement: A Case Study of Practice, Leadership, and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Patricia T. C.

    2012-01-01

    It is the moral responsibility of educators to work diligently to provide every student with rich, challenging coursework in efforts to prepare them for post high school careers and education. The use of common formative assessments provides teachers with the valuable, timely information they need to make instructional decisions that will better…

  4. Embedded Formative Assessment and Classroom Process Quality: How Do They Interact in Promoting Science Understanding?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decristan, Jasmin; Klieme, Eckhard; Kunter, Mareike; Hochweber, Jan; Büttner, Gerhard; Fauth, Benjamin; Hondrich, A. Lena; Rieser, Svenja; Hertel, Silke; Hardy, Ilonca

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine the interplay between curriculum-embedded formative assessment--a well-known teaching practice--and general features of classroom process quality (i.e., cognitive activation, supportive climate, classroom management) and their combined effect on elementary school students' understanding of the scientific concepts of…

  5. Using Science Notebooks to Promote Preservice Teachers' Understanding of Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Judith A.

    2005-01-01

    Science notebooks can be a formative assessment tool for both teachers and students to determine: (1) prior knowledge and existing science ideas; (2) how conceptual understanding is being built; (3) procedural understanding; (4) mastery of curriculum goals; and (5) the ability to apply/transfer ideas to new context (Volkmann & Abell, 2003). Using…

  6. NRP1 Regulates CDC42 Activation to Promote Filopodia Formation in Endothelial Tip Cells.

    PubMed

    Fantin, Alessandro; Lampropoulou, Anastasia; Gestri, Gaia; Raimondi, Claudio; Senatore, Valentina; Zachary, Ian; Ruhrberg, Christiana

    2015-06-16

    Sprouting blood vessels are led by filopodia-studded endothelial tip cells that respond to angiogenic signals. Mosaic lineage tracing previously revealed that NRP1 is essential for tip cell function, although its mechanistic role in tip cells remains poorly defined. Here, we show that NRP1 is dispensable for genetic tip cell identity. Instead, we find that NRP1 is essential to form the filopodial bursts that distinguish tip cells morphologically from neighboring stalk cells, because it enables the extracellular matrix (ECM)-induced activation of CDC42, a key regulator of filopodia formation. Accordingly, NRP1 knockdown and pharmacological CDC42 inhibition similarly impaired filopodia formation in vitro and in developing zebrafish in vivo. During mouse retinal angiogenesis, CDC42 inhibition impaired tip cell and vascular network formation, causing defects that resembled those due to loss of ECM-induced, but not VEGF-induced, NRP1 signaling. We conclude that NRP1 enables ECM-induced filopodia formation for tip cell function during sprouting angiogenesis. PMID:26051942

  7. Biofuel-Promoted Polychlorinated Dibenzodioxin/furan Formation in an Iron-Catalyzed Diesel Particle Filter.

    PubMed

    Heeb, Norbert V; Rey, Maria Dolores; Zennegg, Markus; Haag, Regula; Wichser, Adrian; Schmid, Peter; Seiler, Cornelia; Honegger, Peter; Zeyer, Kerstin; Mohn, Joachim; Bürki, Samuel; Zimmerli, Yan; Czerwinski, Jan; Mayer, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Iron-catalyzed diesel particle filters (DPFs) are widely used for particle abatement. Active catalyst particles, so-called fuel-borne catalysts (FBCs), are formed in situ, in the engine, when combusting precursors, which were premixed with the fuel. The obtained iron oxide particles catalyze soot oxidation in filters. Iron-catalyzed DPFs are considered as safe with respect to their potential to form polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs). We reported that a bimetallic potassium/iron FBC supported an intense PCDD/F formation in a DPF. Here, we discuss the impact of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) biofuel on PCDD/F emissions. The iron-catalyzed DPF indeed supported a PCDD/F formation with biofuel but remained inactive with petroleum-derived diesel fuel. PCDD/F emissions (I-TEQ) increased 23-fold when comparing biofuel and diesel data. Emissions of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, the most toxic congener [toxicity equivalence factor (TEF) = 1.0], increased 90-fold, and those of 2,3,7,8-TCDF (TEF = 0.1) increased 170-fold. Congener patterns also changed, indicating a preferential formation of tetra- and penta-chlorodibenzofurans. Thus, an inactive iron-catalyzed DPF becomes active, supporting a PCDD/F formation, when operated with biofuel containing impurities of potassium. Alkali metals are inherent constituents of biofuels. According to the current European Union (EU) legislation, levels of 5 μg/g are accepted. We conclude that risks for a secondary PCDD/F formation in iron-catalyzed DPFs increase when combusting potassium-containing biofuels.

  8. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouza, Maksim; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Kolinski, Andrzej; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-01

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  9. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    SciTech Connect

    Kouza, Maksim Kolinski, Andrzej; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  10. Biofuel-Promoted Polychlorinated Dibenzodioxin/furan Formation in an Iron-Catalyzed Diesel Particle Filter.

    PubMed

    Heeb, Norbert V; Rey, Maria Dolores; Zennegg, Markus; Haag, Regula; Wichser, Adrian; Schmid, Peter; Seiler, Cornelia; Honegger, Peter; Zeyer, Kerstin; Mohn, Joachim; Bürki, Samuel; Zimmerli, Yan; Czerwinski, Jan; Mayer, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Iron-catalyzed diesel particle filters (DPFs) are widely used for particle abatement. Active catalyst particles, so-called fuel-borne catalysts (FBCs), are formed in situ, in the engine, when combusting precursors, which were premixed with the fuel. The obtained iron oxide particles catalyze soot oxidation in filters. Iron-catalyzed DPFs are considered as safe with respect to their potential to form polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs). We reported that a bimetallic potassium/iron FBC supported an intense PCDD/F formation in a DPF. Here, we discuss the impact of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) biofuel on PCDD/F emissions. The iron-catalyzed DPF indeed supported a PCDD/F formation with biofuel but remained inactive with petroleum-derived diesel fuel. PCDD/F emissions (I-TEQ) increased 23-fold when comparing biofuel and diesel data. Emissions of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, the most toxic congener [toxicity equivalence factor (TEF) = 1.0], increased 90-fold, and those of 2,3,7,8-TCDF (TEF = 0.1) increased 170-fold. Congener patterns also changed, indicating a preferential formation of tetra- and penta-chlorodibenzofurans. Thus, an inactive iron-catalyzed DPF becomes active, supporting a PCDD/F formation, when operated with biofuel containing impurities of potassium. Alkali metals are inherent constituents of biofuels. According to the current European Union (EU) legislation, levels of 5 μg/g are accepted. We conclude that risks for a secondary PCDD/F formation in iron-catalyzed DPFs increase when combusting potassium-containing biofuels. PMID:26176879

  11. Insights into the Regulation of mRNA Processing of Polycistronic Transcripts Mediated by DRBD4/PTB2, a Trypanosome Homolog of the Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    De Gaudenzi, Javier G; Jäger, Adriana V; Izcovich, Ronan; Campo, Vanina A

    2016-07-01

    Trypanosomes regulate gene expression mostly by posttranscriptional mechanisms, including control of mRNA turnover and translation efficiency. This regulation is carried out via certain elements located at the 3'-untranslated regions of mRNAs, which are recognized by RNA-binding proteins. In trypanosomes, trans-splicing is of central importance to control mRNA maturation. We have previously shown that TcDRBD4/PTB2, a trypanosome homolog of the human polypyrimidine tract-binding protein splicing regulator, interacts with the intergenic region of one specific dicistronic transcript, referred to as TcUBP (and encoding for TcUBP1 and TcUBP2, two closely kinetoplastid-specific proteins). In this work, a survey of TcUBP RNA processing revealed certain TcDRBD4/PTB2-regulatory elements within its intercistronic region, which are likely to influence the trans-splicing rate of monocistronic-derived transcripts. Furthermore, TcDRBD4/PTB2 overexpression in epimastigote cells notably decreased both UBP1 and UBP2 protein expression. This type of posttranscriptional gene regulatory mechanism could be extended to other transcripts as well, as we identified several other RNA precursor molecules that specifically bind to TcDRBD4/PTB2. Altogether, these findings support a model in which TcDRBD4/PTB2-containing ribonucleoprotein complexes can prevent trans-splicing. This could represent another stage of gene expression regulation mediated by the masking of trans-splicing/polyadenylation signals.

  12. Convergence of bone morphogenetic protein and laminin-1 signaling pathways promotes proliferation and colony formation by fetal mouse pancreatic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Fangxu . E-mail: jiang@wehi.edu.au; Harrison, Leonard C.

    2005-08-01

    We previously reported that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), members of the transforming growth factor superfamily, together with the basement membrane glycoprotein laminin-1 (Ln-1), promote proliferation of fetal pancreatic cells and formation of colonies containing peripheral insulin-positive cells. Here, we further investigate the cross-talk between BMP and Ln-1 signals. By RT-PCR, receptors for BMP (BMPR) (excepting BMPR-1B) and Ln-1 were expressed in the fetal pancreas between E13.5 and E17.5. Specific blocking antibodies to BMP-4 and -6 and selective BMP antagonists partially inhibited colony formation by fetal pancreas cells. Colony formation induced by BMP-6 and Ln-1 was completely abolished in a dose-dependent manner by blocking Ln-1 binding to its {alpha}{sub 6} integrin and {alpha}-dystroglycan receptors or by blocking the Ln-1 signaling molecules, phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (P13K) and MAP kinase kinase-1. These results demonstrate a convergence of BMP and Ln-1 signaling through P13K and MAP kinase pathways to induce proliferation and colony formation in E15.5 fetal mouse pancreatic cells.

  13. Ethylene Biosynthesis Is Promoted by Very-Long-Chain Fatty Acids during Lysigenous Aerenchyma Formation in Rice Roots.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Takaki; Shiono, Katsuhiro; Nagano, Minoru; Fukazawa, Aya; Ando, Miho; Takamure, Itsuro; Mori, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Naoko K; Kawai-Yamada, Maki; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Kato, Kiyoaki; Nakazono, Mikio

    2015-09-01

    In rice (Oryza sativa) roots, lysigenous aerenchyma, which is created by programmed cell death and lysis of cortical cells, is constitutively formed under aerobic conditions, and its formation is further induced under oxygen-deficient conditions. Ethylene is involved in the induction of aerenchyma formation. reduced culm number1 (rcn1) is a rice mutant in which the gene encoding the ATP-binding cassette transporter RCN1/OsABCG5 is defective. Here, we report that the induction of aerenchyma formation was reduced in roots of rcn1 grown in stagnant deoxygenated nutrient solution (i.e. under stagnant conditions, which mimic oxygen-deficient conditions in waterlogged soils). 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) is a key enzyme in ethylene biosynthesis. Stagnant conditions hardly induced the expression of ACS1 in rcn1 roots, resulting in low ethylene production in the roots. Accumulation of saturated very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) of 24, 26, and 28 carbons was reduced in rcn1 roots. Exogenously supplied VLCFA (26 carbons) increased the expression level of ACS1 and induced aerenchyma formation in rcn1 roots. Moreover, in rice lines in which the gene encoding a fatty acid elongase, CUT1-LIKE (CUT1L; a homolog of the gene encoding Arabidopsis CUT1, which is required for cuticular wax production), was silenced, both ACS1 expression and aerenchyma formation were reduced. Interestingly, the expression of ACS1, CUT1L, and RCN1/OsABCG5 was induced predominantly in the outer part of roots under stagnant conditions. These results suggest that, in rice under oxygen-deficient conditions, VLCFAs increase ethylene production by promoting 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid biosynthesis in the outer part of roots, which, in turn, induces aerenchyma formation in the root cortex.

  14. Ethylene Biosynthesis Is Promoted by Very-Long-Chain Fatty Acids during Lysigenous Aerenchyma Formation in Rice Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Takaki; Shiono, Katsuhiro; Nagano, Minoru; Fukazawa, Aya; Ando, Miho; Takamure, Itsuro; Mori, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Naoko K.; Kawai-Yamada, Maki; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Kato, Kiyoaki; Nakazono, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    In rice (Oryza sativa) roots, lysigenous aerenchyma, which is created by programmed cell death and lysis of cortical cells, is constitutively formed under aerobic conditions, and its formation is further induced under oxygen-deficient conditions. Ethylene is involved in the induction of aerenchyma formation. reduced culm number1 (rcn1) is a rice mutant in which the gene encoding the ATP-binding cassette transporter RCN1/OsABCG5 is defective. Here, we report that the induction of aerenchyma formation was reduced in roots of rcn1 grown in stagnant deoxygenated nutrient solution (i.e. under stagnant conditions, which mimic oxygen-deficient conditions in waterlogged soils). 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) is a key enzyme in ethylene biosynthesis. Stagnant conditions hardly induced the expression of ACS1 in rcn1 roots, resulting in low ethylene production in the roots. Accumulation of saturated very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) of 24, 26, and 28 carbons was reduced in rcn1 roots. Exogenously supplied VLCFA (26 carbons) increased the expression level of ACS1 and induced aerenchyma formation in rcn1 roots. Moreover, in rice lines in which the gene encoding a fatty acid elongase, CUT1-LIKE (CUT1L; a homolog of the gene encoding Arabidopsis CUT1, which is required for cuticular wax production), was silenced, both ACS1 expression and aerenchyma formation were reduced. Interestingly, the expression of ACS1, CUT1L, and RCN1/OsABCG5 was induced predominantly in the outer part of roots under stagnant conditions. These results suggest that, in rice under oxygen-deficient conditions, VLCFAs increase ethylene production by promoting 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid biosynthesis in the outer part of roots, which, in turn, induces aerenchyma formation in the root cortex. PMID:26036614

  15. Tamm-Horsfall mucoproteins promote calcium oxalate crystal formation in urine: quantitative studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, G.A.; Sulaiman, S.

    1982-01-01

    The technique of rapid evaporation of whole urine to standard osmolality has been studied further and quantitative measurements made of the calcium oxalate crystals resulting, firstly by a microscope method and secondly by isotope method using 14C-oxalate. It is confirmed that ultrafiltration of urine prior to evaporation leads to a large reduction in calcium oxalate crystal formation and that this is largely restored by addition of human urinary Tamm-Horsfall protein (uromucoid). Albumin does not have this effect.

  16. Intermolecular disulfide bond formation promotes immunoglobulin aggregation: investigation by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nag, Moupriya; Bera, Kallol; Basak, Soumen

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation generally results from association between hydrophobic regions of individual monomers. However, additional mechanisms arising from specific interactions, such as intermolecular disulfide bond formation, may also contribute to the process. The latter is proposed to be the initiating pathway for aggregation of immunoglobulin (IgG), which is essential for triggering its immune response. To test the veracity of this hypothesis, we have employed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to measure the kinetics of aggregation of IgG in separate experiments either allowing or inhibiting disulfide formation. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements yielded a diffusion time (τ(D)) of ∼200 µsec for Rhodamine-labeled IgG, corresponding to a hydrodynamic radius (R(H)) of 56 Å for the IgG monomer. The aggregation kinetics of the protein was followed by monitoring the time evolution of τ(D) under conditions in which its cysteine residues were either free or blocked. In both cases, the progress curves confirmed that aggregation proceeded via the nucleation-dependent polymerization pathway. However, for aggregation in the presence of free cysteines, the lag times were shorter, and the aggregate sizes bigger, than their respective counterparts for aggregation in the presence of blocked cysteines. This result clearly demonstrates that formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds represents a preferred pathway in the aggregation process of IgG. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that aggregates formed in experiments where disulfide formation was prevented denatured at lower concentration of guanidine hydrochloride than those obtained in experiments where the disulfides were free to form, indicating that intermolecular disulfide bridging is a valid pathway for IgG aggregation. PMID:25371040

  17. The use of bovine screws to promote bone formation using a tibia model in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Bianchini, Marco Aurélio; Pontual, Marco Antônio B; Bez, Leonardo; Benfatti, César Augusto M; Boabaid, Fernanda; Somerman, Martha J; Magini, Ricardo S

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of a unique resorbable bovine bone screw, to stimulate bone formation. Bovine bone screws were inserted in the tibia beagle dogs. Each animal received 8 screws, divided into Groups A (screws + no membranes), B (screws + titanium reinforced membranes) and C (bone defects treated with autogenous bone grafts). Animals were sacrificed at 2, 4 and 6 months. New bone was measured with a periodontal probe and reported an average of 7.4 mm in vertical bone gain for Group B, 3.6 mm for Group A and 1.7 mm for Group C. Submission to Kruskal-Wallis test showed statistical differences between groups (p<0,05). Histological examination revealed an intimate contact between the newly formed bone and the resorbing bone screws. Conclusion: Bovine bone screws provide environment for new bone formation and thus may provide an alternative therapy for enhancing bone formation vertically, including for regenerative procedures as well as prior to implant therapy. PMID:23058228

  18. Wave energy focusing to subsurface poroelastic formations to promote oil mobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karve, Pranav M.; Kallivokas, Loukas F.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss an inverse source formulation aimed at focusing wave energy produced by ground surface sources to target subsurface poroelastic formations. The intent of the focusing is to facilitate or enhance the mobility of oil entrapped within the target formation. The underlying forward wave propagation problem is cast in two spatial dimensions for a heterogeneous poroelastic target embedded within a heterogeneous elastic semi-infinite host. The semi-infiniteness of the elastic host is simulated by augmenting the (finite) computational domain with a buffer of perfectly matched layers. The inverse source algorithm is based on a systematic framework of partial-differential-equation-constrained optimization. It is demonstrated, via numerical experiments, that the algorithm is capable of converging to the spatial and temporal characteristics of surface loads that maximize energy delivery to the target formation. Consequently, the methodology is well-suited for designing field implementations that could meet a desired oil mobility threshold. Even though the methodology, and the results presented herein are in two dimensions, extensions to three dimensions are straightforward.

  19. Bovine binder-of-sperm protein BSP1 promotes protrusion and nanotube formation from liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, Michel; Courtemanche, Lesley; Karlsson, Goeran; Edwards, Katarina; Schwartz, Jean-Louis; Manjunath, Puttaswamy

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Binder-of-sperm protein 1 (BSP1) modifies the morphology of lipidic vesicles inducing bead necklace-like and thread-like structures. {yields} In the presence of multilamellar liposomes, BSP1 leads to the formation of long nanotubes. {yields} The insertion of BSP1 in the external lipid leaflet of membranes induces local changes in bilayer curvature. -- Abstract: Binder-of-sperm (BSP) proteins interact with sperm membranes and are proposed to extract selectively phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol from these. This change in lipid composition is a key step in sperm capacitation. The present work demonstrates that the interactions between the protein BSP1 and model membranes composed with phosphatidylcholine lead to drastic changes in the morphology of the lipidic self-assemblies. Using cryo-electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy, we show that, in the presence of the protein, the lipid vesicles elongate, and form bead necklace-like structures that evolve toward small vesicles or thread-like structures. In the presence of multilamellar vesicles, where a large reservoir of lipid is available, the presence of BSP proteins lead to the formation of long nanotubes. Long spiral-like threads, associated with lipid/protein complexes, are also observed. The local curvature of lipid membranes induced by the BSP proteins may be involved in lipid domain formation and the extraction of some lipids during the sperm maturation process.

  20. Hydroxyapatite bioactivated bacterial cellulose promotes osteoblast growth and the formation of bone nodules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of bacterial cellulose (BC) scaffold to support osteoblast growth and bone formation. BC was produced by culturing Acetobacter xylinum supplemented with hydroxyapatite (HA) to form BC membranes (without HA) and BC/HA membranes. Membranes were subjected to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis to determine surface element composition. The membranes were further used to evaluate osteoblast growth, alkaline phosphatase activity and bone nodule formation. BC was free of calcium and phosphate. However, XPS analysis revealed the presence of both calcium (10%) and phosphate (10%) at the surface of the BC/HA membrane. Osteoblast culture showed that BC alone was non-toxic and could sustain osteoblast adhesion. Furthermore, osteoblast adhesion and growth were significantly (p ≤0.05) increased on BC/HA membranes as compared to BC alone. Both BC and BC/HA membranes improved osteoconductivity, as confirmed by the level of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity that increased from 2.5 mM with BC alone to 5.3 mM with BC/HA. BC/HA membranes also showed greater nodule formation and mineralization than the BC membrane alone. This was confirmed by Alizarin red staining (ARS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). This work demonstrates that both BC and BC/HA may be useful in bone tissue engineering. PMID:23174338

  1. Translocations of chromosome end-segments and facultative heterochromatin promote meiotic ring formation in evening primroses.

    PubMed

    Golczyk, Hieronim; Massouh, Amid; Greiner, Stephan

    2014-03-01

    Due to reciprocal chromosomal translocations, many species of Oenothera (evening primrose) form permanent multichromosomal meiotic rings. However, regular bivalent pairing is also observed. Chiasmata are restricted to chromosomal ends, which makes homologous recombination virtually undetectable. Genetic diversity is achieved by changing linkage relations of chromosomes in rings and bivalents via hybridization and reciprocal translocations. Although the structural prerequisite for this system is enigmatic, whole-arm translocations are widely assumed to be the mechanistic driving force. We demonstrate that this prerequisite is genome compartmentation into two epigenetically defined chromatin fractions. The first one facultatively condenses in cycling cells into chromocenters negative both for histone H3 dimethylated at lysine 4 and for C-banding, and forms huge condensed middle chromosome regions on prophase chromosomes. Remarkably, it decondenses in differentiating cells. The second fraction is euchromatin confined to distal chromosome segments, positive for histone H3 lysine 4 dimethylation and for histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation. The end-segments are deprived of canonical telomeres but capped with constitutive heterochromatin. This genomic organization promotes translocation breakpoints between the two chromatin fractions, thus facilitating exchanges of end-segments. We challenge the whole-arm translocation hypothesis by demonstrating why reciprocal translocations of chromosomal end-segments should strongly promote meiotic rings and evolution toward permanent translocation heterozygosity. Reshuffled end-segments, each possessing a major crossover hot spot, can furthermore explain meiotic compatibility between genomes with different translocation histories. PMID:24681616

  2. Institute of social justice and medicine: developing a think tank to promote policy formation.

    PubMed

    Boozary, Andrew; Dugani, Sagar B

    2011-10-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) defines health as a "resource for everyday living, not the objective of living"; however, worldwide, there remains an unmistakable inequity in level of health and access to healthcare. The WHO has published documents on financing health systems towards universal health coverage [1], promoting healthy life [2], improving performance of health systems [3], and enriching humanity [4], highlighting our shared responsibility towards improving both national and global health and access to healthcare. These documents also recognize that, despite our local and regional priorities, there is a global desire to develop international strategies to improve healthcare. [1] WHO Report. Health systems financing and the path to universal coverage. 2010. http://www.who.int/bulletin/health_financing/en/index.html [2] WHO Report. Reducing risks, promoting healthy life. 2002. http://www.who.int/whr/2002/en/index.html [3] WHO Bulletin. Health systems: improving performance. 2000. http://www.who.int/whr/2000/en/index.html [4] WHO Bulletin. Conquering suffering, enriching humanity 1997. http://www.who.int/whr/1997/en/index.html.

  3. Protonation switching to the least-basic heteroatom of carbamate through cationic hydrogen bonding promotes the formation of isocyanate cations.

    PubMed

    Kurouchi, Hiroaki; Sumita, Akinari; Otani, Yuko; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2014-07-01

    We found that phenethylcarbamates that bear ortho-salicylate as an ether group (carbamoyl salicylates) dramatically accelerate OC bond dissociation in strong acid to facilitate generation of isocyanate cation (N-protonated isocyanates), which undergo subsequent intramolecular aromatic electrophilic cyclization to give dihydroisoquinolones. To generate isocyanate cations from carbamates in acidic media as electrophiles for aromatic substitution, protonation at the ether oxygen, the least basic heteroatom, is essential to promote CO bond cleavage. However, the carbonyl oxygen of carbamates, the most basic site, is protonated exclusively in strong acids. We found that the protonation site can be shifted to an alternative basic atom by linking methyl salicylate to the ether oxygen of carbamate. The methyl ester oxygen ortho to the phenolic (ether) oxygen of salicylate is as basic as the carbamate carbonyl oxygen, and we found that monoprotonation at the methyl ester oxygen in strong acid resulted in the formation of an intramolecular cationic hydrogen bond (>CO(+) H⋅⋅⋅O<) with the phenolic ether oxygen. This facilitates OC bond dissociation of phenethylcarbamates, thereby promoting isocyanate cation formation. In contrast, superacid-mediated diprotonation at the methyl ester oxygen of the salicylate and the carbonyl oxygen of the carbamate afforded a rather stable dication, which did not readily undergo CO bond dissociation. This is an unprecedented and unknown case in which the monocation has greater reactivity than the dication.

  4. Adhesion- and Degranulation-Promoting Adapter Protein Promotes CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Resident Memory Formation and Function during an Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Fiege, Jessica K; Beura, Lalit K; Burbach, Brandon J; Shimizu, Yoji

    2016-09-15

    During acute infections, naive Ag-specific CD8 T cells are activated and differentiate into effector T cells, most of which undergo contraction after pathogen clearance. A small population of CD8 T cells persists as memory to protect against future infections. We investigated the role of adhesion- and degranulation-promoting adapter protein (ADAP) in promoting CD8 T cell responses to a systemic infection. Naive Ag-specific CD8 T cells lacking ADAP exhibited a modest expansion defect early after Listeria monocytogenes or vesicular stomatitis virus infection but comparable cytolytic function at the peak of response. However, reduced numbers of ADAP-deficient CD8 T cells were present in the spleen after the peak of the response. ADAP deficiency resulted in a greater frequency of CD127(+) CD8 memory precursors in secondary lymphoid organs during the contraction phase. Reduced numbers of ADAP-deficient killer cell lectin-like receptor G1(-) CD8 resident memory T (TRM) cell precursors were present in a variety of nonlymphoid tissues at the peak of the immune response, and consequently the total numbers of ADAP-deficient TRM cells were reduced at memory time points. TRM cells that did form in the absence of ADAP were defective in effector molecule expression. ADAP-deficient TRM cells exhibited impaired effector function after Ag rechallenge, correlating with defects in their ability to form T cell-APC conjugates. However, ADAP-deficient TRM cells responded to TGF-β signals and recruited circulating memory CD8 T cells. Thus, ADAP regulates CD8 T cell differentiation events following acute pathogen challenge that are critical for the formation and selected functions of TRM cells in nonlymphoid tissues. PMID:27521337

  5. Flexible PTB7:PC71BM bulk heterojunction solar cells with a LiF buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagidate, Tatsuki; Fujii, Shunjiro; Ohzeki, Masaya; Yanagi, Yuichiro; Arai, Yuki; Okukawa, Takanori; Yoshida, Akira; Kataura, Hiromichi; Nishioka, Yasushiro

    2014-02-01

    Bulk heterojunction solar cells were fabricated using poly[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo [1,2-b:4,5-b‧]dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]-thiophenediyl] (PTB7) and [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) after a layer of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) was deposited on a flexible indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated polyethylene terephthalate substrate. The fabricated structures were Al/LiF/PTB7:PC71BM/PEDOT:PSS/ITO with or without a lithium fluoride (LiF) buffer layer, and the effect of the LiF buffer layer on the performance of the solar cells was investigated. The LiF layer significantly increased the open-circuit voltages and fill factors of the solar cells, presumably because of the work function shift of the aluminum cathode. As a result, the conversion efficiency increased from 2.31 to 4.02% owing to the presence of the LiF layer. From the results of a stability test, it was concluded that the inserted LiF layer acted as a shielding and scavenging protector, which prevented the intrusion of some chemical species into the active layer, thereby improving the lifetime of the unpakcaged devices.

  6. Structure of the intracellular domain of the amyloid precursor protein in complex with Fe65-PTB2

    PubMed Central

    Radzimanowski, Jens; Simon, Bernd; Sattler, Michael; Beyreuther, Konrad; Sinning, Irmgard; Wild, Klemens

    2008-01-01

    Cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a crucial event in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis that creates the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) and liberates the carboxy-terminal APP intracellular domain (AICD) into the cytosol. The interaction of the APP C terminus with the adaptor protein Fe65 mediates APP trafficking and signalling, and is thought to regulate APP processing and Aβ generation. We determined the crystal structure of the AICD in complex with the C-terminal phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain of Fe65. The unique interface involves the NPxY PTB-binding motif and two α helices. The amino-terminal helix of the AICD is capped by threonine T668, an Alzheimer disease-relevant phosphorylation site involved in Fe65-binding regulation. The structure together with mutational studies, isothermal titration calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments sets the stage for understanding T668 phosphorylation-dependent complex regulation at a molecular level. A molecular switch model is proposed. PMID:18833287

  7. Appalachian Mountaintop Mining Particulate Matter Induces Neoplastic Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells and Promotes Tumor Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that living near mountaintop coal mining (MTM) activities is one of the contributing factors for high lung cancer incidence. The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term carcinogenic potential of MTM particulate matter (PMMTM) exposure on human bronchial epithelial cells. Our results show that chronic exposure (3 months) to noncytotoxic, physiological relevant concentration (1 μg/mL) of PMMTM, but not control particle PMCON, induced neoplastic transformation, accelerated cell proliferation, and enhanced cell migration of the exposed lung cells. Xenograft transplantation of the PMMTM-exposed cells in mice caused no apparent tumor formation, but promoted tumor growth of human lung carcinoma H460 cells, suggesting the tumor-promoting effect of PMMTM. Chronic exposure to the main inorganic chemical constituent of PMMTM, molybdenum but not silica, similarly induced cell transformation and tumor promotion, suggesting the contribution of molybdenum, at least in part, in the PMMTM effects. These results provide new evidence for the carcinogenic potential of PMMTM and support further risk assessment and implementation of exposure control for PMMTM. PMID:25347054

  8. FRK inhibits migration and invasion of human glioma cells by promoting N-cadherin/β-catenin complex formation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiong; Song, Xu; Wang, Jun; Gu, Jia; Zhang, Weijian; Hu, Jinxia; Zhou, Xiuping; Yu, Rutong

    2015-01-01

    Fyn-related kinase (FRK), a member of Src-related tyrosine kinases, is recently reported to function as a potent tumor suppressor in several cancer types. Our previous study has also shown that FRK over-expression inhibited the migration and invasion of glioma cells. However, the mechanism of FRK effect on glioma cell migration and invasion, a feature of human malignant gliomas, is still not clear. In this study, we found that FRK over-expression increased the protein level of N-cadherin, but not E-cadherin. Meanwhile, FRK over-expression promoted β-catenin translocation to the plasma membrane, where it formed complex with N-cadherin, while decreased β-catenin level in the nuclear fraction. In addition, down-regulation of N-cadherin by siRNA promoted the migration and invasion of glioma U251 and U87 cells and abolished the inhibitory effect of FRK on glioma cell migration and invasion. In summary, these results indicate that FRK inhibits migration and invasion of human glioma cells by promoting N-cadherin/β-catenin complex formation.

  9. Calcium Promotes the Formation of Syntaxin 1 Mesoscale Domains through Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate*

    PubMed Central

    Platen, Mitja; Junius, Meike; Diederichsen, Ulf; Schaap, Iwan A. T.; Honigmann, Alf; Jahn, Reinhard; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) is a minor component of total plasma membrane lipids, but it has a substantial role in the regulation of many cellular functions, including exo- and endocytosis. Recently, it was shown that PI(4,5)P2 and syntaxin 1, a SNARE protein that catalyzes regulated exocytosis, form domains in the plasma membrane that constitute recognition sites for vesicle docking. Also, calcium was shown to promote syntaxin 1 clustering in the plasma membrane, but the molecular mechanism was unknown. Here, using a combination of superresolution stimulated emission depletion microscopy, FRET, and atomic force microscopy, we show that Ca2+ acts as a charge bridge that specifically and reversibly connects multiple syntaxin 1/PI(4,5)P2 complexes into larger mesoscale domains. This transient reorganization of the plasma membrane by physiological Ca2+ concentrations is likely to be important for Ca2+-regulated secretion. PMID:26884341

  10. Curcumin promotes fibril formation in F isomer of human serum albumin via amorphous aggregation.

    PubMed

    Mothi, Nivin; Muthu, Shivani A; Kale, Avinash; Ahmad, Basir

    2015-12-01

    We here describe the amyloid fibrils promoting behavior of curcumin, which ability to inhibit amyloid fibrillization of several globular proteins is well documented. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), 90° light scattering (RLS), thioflavine T (ThT) and Congo red (CR) binding studies demonstrated that both F (pH3.4) and E (pH1.8) isomers of human serum albumin (HSA) in the absence and presence of curcumin initially converted into amorphous aggregates. Interestingly, only the sample containing F isomer preincubated with curcumin formed fibrils on incubation for longer period. We also found that curcumin strongly bind to the F isomer, alter its secondary, tertiary structures and thermal stability. We conclude that the conversion of intermediate states into amorphous aggregate to fibrils is dictated by its conformation. This study provides unique insights into ligand-controlled HSA aggregation pathway and should provide a useful model system to study both amorphous and the fibrillar aggregation of multidomain proteins.

  11. Comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K8 of high dose-rate Ir-192 brachytherapy standards for reference air kerma rate of the PTB and the BIPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Allisy-Roberts, P. J.; Selbach, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for reference air kerma rate (RAKR) for 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Germany, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out at the PTB in September 2011. The comparison result, based on the calibration coefficients for a transfer standard and expressed as a ratio of the PTB and the BIPM standards for reference air kerma rate, is 1.0003 with a combined standard uncertainty of 0.0099. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  12. Rho1 regulates adherens junction remodeling by promoting recycling endosome formation through activation of myosin II

    PubMed Central

    Yashiro, Hanako; Loza, Andrew J.; Skeath, James B.; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Once adherens junctions (AJs) are formed between polarized epithelial cells they must be maintained because AJs are constantly remodeled in dynamic epithelia. AJ maintenance involves endocytosis and subsequent recycling of E-cadherin to a precise location along the basolateral membrane. In the Drosophila pupal eye epithelium, Rho1 GTPase regulates AJ remodeling through Drosophila E-cadherin (DE-cadherin) endocytosis by limiting Cdc42/Par6/aPKC complex activity. We demonstrate that Rho1 also influences AJ remodeling by regulating the formation of DE-cadherin–containing, Rab11-positive recycling endosomes in Drosophila postmitotic pupal eye epithelia. This effect of Rho1 is mediated through Rok-dependent, but not MLCK-dependent, stimulation of myosin II activity yet independent of its effects upon actin remodeling. Both Rho1 and pMLC localize on endosomal vesicles, suggesting that Rho1 might regulate the formation of recycling endosomes through localized myosin II activation. This work identifies spatially distinct functions for Rho1 in the regulation of DE-cadherin–containing vesicular trafficking during AJ remodeling in live epithelia. PMID:25079692

  13. Syndapin promotes pseudocleavage furrow formation by actin organization in the syncytial Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Sherlekar, Aparna; Rikhy, Richa

    2016-01-01

    Coordinated membrane and cytoskeletal remodeling activities are required for membrane extension in processes such as cytokinesis and syncytial nuclear division cycles in Drosophila. Pseudocleavage furrow membranes in the syncytial Drosophila blastoderm embryo show rapid extension and retraction regulated by actin-remodeling proteins. The F-BAR domain protein Syndapin (Synd) is involved in membrane tubulation, endocytosis, and, uniquely, in F-actin stability. Here we report a role for Synd in actin-regulated pseudocleavage furrow formation. Synd localized to these furrows, and its loss resulted in short, disorganized furrows. Synd presence was important for the recruitment of the septin Peanut and distribution of Diaphanous and F-actin at furrows. Synd and Peanut were both absent in furrow-initiation mutants of RhoGEF2 and Diaphanous and in furrow-progression mutants of Anillin. Synd overexpression in rhogef2 mutants reversed its furrow-extension phenotypes, Peanut and Diaphanous recruitment, and F-actin organization. We conclude that Synd plays an important role in pseudocleavage furrow extension, and this role is also likely to be crucial in cleavage furrow formation during cell division. PMID:27146115

  14. Prophage spontaneous activation promotes DNA release enhancing biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Carrolo, Margarida; Frias, Maria João; Pinto, Francisco Rodrigues; Melo-Cristino, José; Ramirez, Mário

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is able to form biofilms in vivo and previous studies propose that pneumococcal biofilms play a relevant role both in colonization and infection. Additionally, pneumococci recovered from human infections are characterized by a high prevalence of lysogenic bacteriophages (phages) residing quiescently in their host chromosome. We investigated a possible link between lysogeny and biofilm formation. Considering that extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a key factor in the biofilm matrix, we reasoned that prophage spontaneous activation with the consequent bacterial host lysis could provide a source of eDNA, enhancing pneumococcal biofilm development. Monitoring biofilm growth of lysogenic and non-lysogenic pneumococcal strains indicated that phage-infected bacteria are more proficient at forming biofilms, that is their biofilms are characterized by a higher biomass and cell viability. The presence of phage particles throughout the lysogenic strains biofilm development implicated prophage spontaneous induction in this effect. Analysis of lysogens deficient for phage lysin and the bacterial major autolysin revealed that the absence of either lytic activity impaired biofilm development and the addition of DNA restored the ability of mutant strains to form robust biofilms. These findings establish that limited phage-mediated host lysis of a fraction of the bacterial population, due to spontaneous phage induction, constitutes an important source of eDNA for the S. pneumoniae biofilm matrix and that this localized release of eDNA favors biofilm formation by the remaining bacterial population. PMID:21187931

  15. Chilling out: a cool aqueous environment promotes the formation of gas-surface complexes.

    PubMed

    Ota, Stephanie T; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2011-05-18

    SO(2), an important atmospheric pollutant, has been implicated in environmental phenomena such as acid rain, climate change, and cloud formation. In addition, SO(2) is fundamentally interesting because it forms spectroscopically identifiable complexes with water at aqueous surfaces. Vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) is used here to further investigate the mechanism by which SO(2) adsorbs to water at tropospherically relevant temperatures (0-23 °C). The spectral results lead to two important conclusions. SO(2) surface affinity is enhanced at colder temperatures, with nearly all of the topmost water molecules showing evidence of binding to SO(2) at 0 °C as compared to a much lower fraction at room temperature. This surface adsorption results in significant changes in water orientation at the surface, but is reversible at the temperatures examined here. Second, the SO(2) complex formation at aqueous surfaces is independent of aqueous solution acidity. One challenge in previous uptake studies was the ability to distinguish between the effects of surface adsorption as compared to bulk accommodation. The surface and vibrational specificity of these studies make this distinction possible, allowing a selective study of how the aqueous properties temperature and pH influence SO(2) surface affinity.

  16. Lrp4 in osteoblasts suppresses bone formation and promotes osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Lei; Jung, Ji-Ung; Wu, Haitao; Xia, Wen-Fang; Pan, Jin-Xiu; Shen, Chengyong; Mei, Lin; Xiong, Wen-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Bone mass is maintained by balanced activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Lrp4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein 4) is a member of the LDL receptor family, whose mutations have been identified in patients with high–bone-mass disorders, such as sclerosteosis and van Buchem diseases. However, it remains unknown whether and how Lrp4 regulates bone-mass homeostasis in vivo. Here we provide evidence that Lrp4-null mutation or specific mutation in osteoblast-lineage cells increased cortical and trabecular bone mass, which was associated with elevated bone formation and impaired bone resorption. This phenotype was not observed in osteoclast-selective Lrp4 knockout mice. Mechanistic studies indicate that loss of Lrp4 function in osteoblast-lineage cells increased serum levels of sclerostin, a key factor for bone-mass homeostasis that interacts with Lrp4, but abolished the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and osteoblastic differentiation by sclerostin. Concomitantly, sclerostin induction of RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear kappa B ligand) was impaired, leading to a lower ratio of RANKL over OPG (osteoprotegerin) (a key factor for osteoclastogenesis). Taken together, these results support the view for Lrp4 as a receptor of sclerostin to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin signaling and bone formation and identify Lrp4 as a critical player in bone-mass homeostasis. PMID:25733894

  17. Telomeres and centromeres have interchangeable roles in promoting meiotic spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, Alex; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Tomita, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres and centromeres have traditionally been considered to perform distinct roles. During meiotic prophase, in a conserved chromosomal configuration called the bouquet, telomeres gather to the nuclear membrane (NM), often near centrosomes. We found previously that upon disruption of the fission yeast bouquet, centrosomes failed to insert into the NM at meiosis I and nucleate bipolar spindles. Hence, the trans-NM association of telomeres with centrosomes during prophase is crucial for efficient spindle formation. Nonetheless, in approximately half of bouquet-deficient meiocytes, spindles form properly. Here, we show that bouquet-deficient cells can successfully undergo meiosis using centromere–centrosome contact instead of telomere–centrosome contact to generate spindle formation. Accordingly, forced association between centromeres and centrosomes fully rescued the spindle defects incurred by bouquet disruption. Telomeres and centromeres both stimulate focal accumulation of the SUN domain protein Sad1 beneath the centrosome, suggesting a molecular underpinning for their shared spindle-generating ability. Our observations demonstrate an unanticipated level of interchangeability between the two most prominent chromosomal landmarks. PMID:25688135

  18. Cobalt (II) chloride promoted formation of honeycomb patterned cellulose acetate films.

    PubMed

    Naboka, Olga; Sanz-Velasco, Anke; Lundgren, Per; Enoksson, Peter; Gatenholm, Paul

    2012-02-01

    CoCl(2) containing honeycomb patterned films were prepared from cellulose acetate (CA)/CoCl(2)/acetone solutions by the breath figure method in a wide range of humidities. Size and pore regularity depend on the CA/CoCl(2) molar ratio and humidity. When replacing CoCl(2) with Co(NO(3))(2) or CoBr(2), no formation of ordered porosity in the cellulose acetate films is observed. According to data from scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Microanalysis (EDX), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, the key role in the formation of honeycomb structures can be attributed to the physical and chemical properties of CoCl(2) - hygroscopicity, low interaction with CA, and extraction from CA/CoCl(2)/acetone solution by water droplets condensed on the surface of the CA/CoCl(2) solution. Obtained films are prospective for using in catalysis, hydrogen fuel cells, and optical sensing materials.

  19. Syndapin promotes pseudocleavage furrow formation by actin organization in the syncytial Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Sherlekar, Aparna; Rikhy, Richa

    2016-07-01

    Coordinated membrane and cytoskeletal remodeling activities are required for membrane extension in processes such as cytokinesis and syncytial nuclear division cycles in Drosophila Pseudocleavage furrow membranes in the syncytial Drosophila blastoderm embryo show rapid extension and retraction regulated by actin-remodeling proteins. The F-BAR domain protein Syndapin (Synd) is involved in membrane tubulation, endocytosis, and, uniquely, in F-actin stability. Here we report a role for Synd in actin-regulated pseudocleavage furrow formation. Synd localized to these furrows, and its loss resulted in short, disorganized furrows. Synd presence was important for the recruitment of the septin Peanut and distribution of Diaphanous and F-actin at furrows. Synd and Peanut were both absent in furrow-initiation mutants of RhoGEF2 and Diaphanous and in furrow-progression mutants of Anillin. Synd overexpression in rhogef2 mutants reversed its furrow-extension phenotypes, Peanut and Diaphanous recruitment, and F-actin organization. We conclude that Synd plays an important role in pseudocleavage furrow extension, and this role is also likely to be crucial in cleavage furrow formation during cell division.

  20. microRNAs That Promote or Inhibit Memory Formation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Busto, Germain U.; Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Fulga, Tudor A.; Van Vactor, David; Davis, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. Prior studies have shown that they regulate numerous physiological processes critical for normal development, cellular growth control, and organismal behavior. Here, we systematically surveyed 134 different miRNAs for roles in olfactory learning and memory formation using “sponge” technology to titrate their activity broadly in the Drosophila melanogaster central nervous system. We identified at least five different miRNAs involved in memory formation or retention from this large screen, including miR-9c, miR-31a, miR-305, miR-974, and miR-980. Surprisingly, the titration of some miRNAs increased memory, while the titration of others decreased memory. We performed more detailed experiments on two miRNAs, miR-974 and miR-31a, by mapping their roles to subpopulations of brain neurons and testing the functional involvement in memory of potential mRNA targets through bioinformatics and a RNA interference knockdown approach. This screen offers an important first step toward the comprehensive identification of all miRNAs and their potential targets that serve in gene regulatory networks important for normal learning and memory. PMID:26088433

  1. Does radiative feedback by the first stars promote or prevent second generation star formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyungjin; Shapiro, Paul R.

    2007-03-01

    We study the effect of starlight from the first stars on the ability of other minihaloes in their neighbourhood to form additional stars. The first stars in the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) universe are believed to have formed in minihaloes of total mass ~105-6 Msolar at redshifts z >~ 20, when molecular hydrogen (H2) formed and cooled the dense gas at their centres, leading to gravitational collapse. Simulations suggest that the Population III (Pop III) stars thus formed were massive (~100 Msolar) and luminous enough in ionizing radiation to cause an ionization front (I-front) to sweep outward, through their host minihalo and beyond, into the intergalactic medium. Our previous work suggested that this I-front was trapped when it encountered other, nearby minihaloes, and that it failed to penetrate the dense gas at their centres within the lifetime of the Pop III stars (<~3 Myr). The question of what the dynamical consequences were for these target minihaloes, of their exposure to the ionizing and dissociating starlight from the Pop III star requires further study, however. Towards this end, we have performed a series of detailed, one-dimensional (1D), radiation-hydrodynamical simulations to answer the question of whether star formation in these surrounding minihaloes was triggered or suppressed by radiation from the first stars. We have varied the distance to the source (and, hence, the flux) and the mass and evolutionary stage of the target haloes to quantify this effect. We find (1) trapping of the I-front and its transformation from R-type to D-type, preceded by a shock front; (2) photoevaporation of the ionized gas (i.e. all gas originally located outside the trapping radius); (3) formation of an H2 precursor shell which leads the I-front, stimulated by partial photoionization; and (4) the shock-induced formation of H2 in the minihalo neutral core when the shock speeds up and partially ionizes the gas. The fate of the neutral core is mostly determined by the

  2. An Exploration of Teachers' Narratives: What Are the Facilitators and Constraints Which Promote or Inhibit "Good" Formative Assessment Practices in Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sach, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This paper set out to explore teachers' narratives in order to understand some of the facilitators and constraints which promote or inhibit good formative assessment practices in schools. A "responsive interview" approach was used to probe a small sample of lower and middle school teachers' perceptions of formative assessment.…

  3. Wnt3a Promotes the Vasculogenic Mimicry Formation of Colon Cancer via Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lisha; Song, Wangzhao; Liu, Zhiyong; Zhao, Xiulan; Cao, Wenfeng; Sun, Baocun

    2015-08-10

    Our previous study provided evidence that non-canonical Wnt signaling is involved in regulating vasculogenic mimicry (VM) formation. However, the functions of canonical Wnt signaling in VM formation have not yet been explored. In this study, we found the presence of VM was related to colon cancer histological differentiation (p < 0.001), the clinical stage (p < 0.001), and presence of metastasis and recurrence (p < 0.001). VM-positive colon cancer samples showed increased Wnt3a expression (p < 0.001) and β-catenin nuclear expression (p < 0.001) compared with the VM-negative samples. In vitro, over-regulated Wnt3a expression in HT29 colon cancer cells promoted the capacity to form tube-like structures in the three-dimensional (3-D) culture together with increased expression of endothelial phenotype-associated proteins such as VEGFR2 and VE-cadherin. The mouse xenograft model showed that Wnt3a-overexpressing cells grew into larger tumor masses and formed more VM than the control cells. In addition, the Wnt/β-catenin signaling antagonist Dickkopf-1(Dkk1) can reverse the capacity to form tube-like structures and can decrease the expressions of VEGFR2 and VE-cadherin in Wnt3a-overexpressing cells. Taken together, our results suggest that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is involved in VM formation in colon cancer and might contribute to the development of more accurate treatment modalities aimed at VM.

  4. The matrix protein CCN1 (CYR61) promotes proliferation, migration and tube formation of endothelial progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yang; Gao Yu; Wang, Hong; Huang Lan Qin Jun; Guo Ruiwei; Song Mingbao; Yu Shiyong; Chen Jianfei; Cui Bin; Gao Pan

    2008-10-15

    Neovascularization and re-endothelialization relies on circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), but their recruitment and angiogenic roles are subjected to regulation by the vascular microenvironment, which remains largely unknown. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of mature ECs and matrix protein CCN1 on the properties of EPCs. In a coculture system, effects of ECs on proliferation, migration and participation in tube-like formation of EPCs were evaluated, and functional assays were employed to identify the exact role of CCN1 in EPCs vitality and function. We demonstrated that ECs, as an indispensable part of the cellular milieu, significantly promoted the proliferation, migration and tube formation activities of EPCs, and more importantly, CCN1 was potentially involved in such effects of ECs. Expression of CCN1 in EPCs was significantly increased by serum, VEGF, ECs-cocultivation and ECs conditioned medium. Moreover, Ad-CCN1-mediated overexpression of CCN1 directly enhanced migration and tube formation of EPCs, whereas silencing of endogenous CCN1 in EPCs inhibits cell functions. Furthermore, CCN1 induced the expressions of chemokines and growth factors, such as MCP-1 and VEGF, suggesting a complex interaction between those proangiogenic factors. Our data suggest that matrix protein CCN1 may play an important role in microenvironment-mediated biological properties of EPCs.

  5. Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) promotes the adhesion of marine bacteria and algae and enhances following biofilm formation in artificial seawater.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jinpeng; Abdoli, Leila; Li, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Adhesion of microorganisms in the marine environment is essential for initiation and following development of biofouling. A variety of factors play roles in regulating the adhesion. Here we report the influence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in artificial seawater on attachment and colonization of Bacillus sp., Chlorella and Phaeodactylum tricornutum on silicon wafer. Extra addition of the typical divalent cations in culturing solution gives rise to significantly enhanced adhesion of the microorganisms. Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) affect the adhesion of Bacillus sp. presumably by regulating aggregation and formation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The ions alter quantity and types of the proteins in EPS, in turn affecting subsequent adhesion. However, it is noted that Mg(2+) promotes adhesion of Chlorella likely by regulating EPS formation and polysaccharide synthesis. Ca(2+) plays an important role in protein expression to enhance the adhesion of Chlorella. For Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Ca(2+) expedites protein synthesis for enhanced adhesion. The results shed some light on effective ways of utilizing divalent cations to mediate formation of biofilms on the marine structures for desired performances. PMID:27362920

  6. Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) promotes the adhesion of marine bacteria and algae and enhances following biofilm formation in artificial seawater.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jinpeng; Abdoli, Leila; Li, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Adhesion of microorganisms in the marine environment is essential for initiation and following development of biofouling. A variety of factors play roles in regulating the adhesion. Here we report the influence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in artificial seawater on attachment and colonization of Bacillus sp., Chlorella and Phaeodactylum tricornutum on silicon wafer. Extra addition of the typical divalent cations in culturing solution gives rise to significantly enhanced adhesion of the microorganisms. Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) affect the adhesion of Bacillus sp. presumably by regulating aggregation and formation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The ions alter quantity and types of the proteins in EPS, in turn affecting subsequent adhesion. However, it is noted that Mg(2+) promotes adhesion of Chlorella likely by regulating EPS formation and polysaccharide synthesis. Ca(2+) plays an important role in protein expression to enhance the adhesion of Chlorella. For Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Ca(2+) expedites protein synthesis for enhanced adhesion. The results shed some light on effective ways of utilizing divalent cations to mediate formation of biofilms on the marine structures for desired performances.

  7. Lysine 63-linked ubiquitination promotes the formation and autophagic clearance of protein inclusions associated with neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jeanne M M; Wong, Esther S P; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Pletnikova, Olga; Ko, Han Seok; Tay, Shiam-Peng; Ho, Michelle W L; Troncoso, Juan; Gygi, Steven P; Lee, Michael K; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Lim, Kah-Leong

    2008-02-01

    Although ubiquitin-enriched protein inclusions represent an almost invariant feature of neurodegenerative diseases, the mechanism underlying their biogenesis remains unclear. In particular, whether the topology of ubiquitin linkages influences the dynamics of inclusions is not well explored. Here, we report that lysine 48 (K48)- and lysine 63 (K63)-linked polyubiquitination, as well as monoubiquitin modification contribute to the biogenesis of inclusions. K63-linked polyubiquitin is the most consistent enhancer of inclusions formation. Under basal conditions, ectopic expression of K63 mutant ubiquitin in cultured cells promotes the accumulation of proteins and the formation of intracellular inclusions in the apparent absence of proteasome impairment. When co-expressed with disease-associated tau and SOD1 mutants, K63 ubiquitin mutant facilitates the formation of tau- and SOD-1-positive inclusions. Moreover, K63-linked ubiquitination was found to selectively facilitate the clearance of inclusions via autophagy. These data indicate that K63-linked ubiquitin chains may represent a common denominator underlying inclusions biogenesis, as well as a general cellular strategy for defining cargo destined for the autophagic system. Collectively, our results provide a novel mechanistic route that underlies the life cycle of an inclusion body. Harnessing this pathway may offer innovative approaches in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:17981811

  8. Silk matrices promote formation of insulin-secreting islet-like clusters.

    PubMed

    Shalaly, Nancy Dekki; Ria, Massimiliano; Johansson, Ulrika; Åvall, Karin; Berggren, Per-Olof; Hedhammar, My

    2016-06-01

    Ex vivo expansion of endocrine cells constitutes an interesting alternative to be able to match the unmet need of transplantable pancreatic islets. However, endocrine cells become fragile once removed from their extracellular matrix (ECM) and typically become senescent and loose insulin expression during conventional 2D culture. Herein we develop a protocol where 3D silk matrices functionalized with ECM-derived motifs are used for generation of insulin-secreting islet-like clusters from mouse and human primary cells. The obtained clusters were shown to attain an islet-like spheroid shape and to maintain functional insulin release upon glucose stimulation in vitro. Furthermore, in vivo imaging of transplanted murine clusters showed engraftment with increasing vessel formation during time. There was no sign of cell death and the clusters maintained or increased in size throughout the period, thus suggesting a suitable cluster size for transplantation. PMID:26986856

  9. Septins promote F-actin ring formation by crosslinking actin filaments into curved bundles.

    PubMed

    Mavrakis, Manos; Azou-Gros, Yannick; Tsai, Feng-Ching; Alvarado, José; Bertin, Aurélie; Iv, Francois; Kress, Alla; Brasselet, Sophie; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Lecuit, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Animal cell cytokinesis requires a contractile ring of crosslinked actin filaments and myosin motors. How contractile rings form and are stabilized in dividing cells remains unclear. We address this problem by focusing on septins, highly conserved proteins in eukaryotes whose precise contribution to cytokinesis remains elusive. We use the cleavage of the Drosophila melanogaster embryo as a model system, where contractile actin rings drive constriction of invaginating membranes to produce an epithelium in a manner akin to cell division. In vivo functional studies show that septins are required for generating curved and tightly packed actin filament networks. In vitro reconstitution assays show that septins alone bundle actin filaments into rings, accounting for the defects in actin ring formation in septin mutants. The bundling and bending activities are conserved for human septins, and highlight unique functions of septins in the organization of contractile actomyosin rings.

  10. Hypoxia regulates SOX2 expression to promote prostate cancer cell invasion and sphere formation

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kyung-Mi; Dai, Yao; Vieweg, Johannes; Siemann, Dietmar W

    2016-01-01

    SOX2 is an embryonic stem cell marker that in prostate cancer has been associated not only with tumorigenesis but also metastasis. Furthermore hypoxia in primary tumors has been linked to poor prognosis and outcomes in this disease. The goal of the present study was to investigate the impact of hypoxia on SOX2 expression and metastasis-associated functions in prostate cancer cells. A tissue microarray of 80 samples from prostate cancer patients or healthy controls was employed to examine the expression of HIF-1α and its correlation with SOX2. The role of SOX2 and HIF-1/2α in the regulation of cell invasion and sphere formation capacity under hypoxic conditions was investigated in vitro using short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown in three human prostate cancer cell lines. HIF-1α expression was significantly elevated in malignant prostate tissue compared to benign or normal tissue, and in tumor samples its expression was highly correlated with SOX2. In prostate cancer cells, acute and chronic exposures to hypoxia that resulted in elevated expression levels of HIF-1α and HIF-2α, respectively, also induced SOX2. Genetic depletion of SOX2 attenuated hypoxia-induced cell functions. Knockdown of HIF-1α, but not HIF-2α, decreased acute hypoxia-mediated cell invasion and SOX2 up-regulation, whereas only HIF-2α gene silencing reduced sphere formation capacity and chronic hypoxia-mediated SOX2 up-regulation. Enhanced SOX2 expression and HIF-1α or HIF-2α associated phenotypes are dependent on the time duration of exposure to hypoxia. The present results indicate that SOX2 may be a key mediator of hypoxia-induced metastasis-associated functions and hence may serve as a potential target for therapeutic interventions for metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:27294000

  11. Monocytes Induce STAT3 Activation in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Promote Osteoblast Formation

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaidou, Vicky; Wong, Mei Mei; Redpath, Andia N.; Ersek, Adel; Baban, Dilair F.; Williams, Lynn M.; Cope, Andrew P.; Horwood, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    A major therapeutic challenge is how to replace bone once it is lost. Bone loss is a characteristic of chronic inflammatory and degenerative diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. Cells and cytokines of the immune system are known to regulate bone turnover by controlling the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts, the bone resorbing cells. However, less is known about the regulation of osteoblasts (OB), the bone forming cells. This study aimed to investigate whether immune cells also regulate OB differentiation. Using in vitro cell cultures of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), it was shown that monocytes/macrophages potently induced MSC differentiation into OBs. This was evident by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) after 7 days and the formation of mineralised bone nodules at 21 days. This monocyte-induced osteogenic effect was mediated by cell contact with MSCs leading to the production of soluble factor(s) by the monocytes. As a consequence of these interactions we observed a rapid activation of STAT3 in the MSCs. Gene profiling of STAT3 constitutively active (STAT3C) infected MSCs using Illumina whole human genome arrays showed that Runx2 and ALP were up-regulated whilst DKK1 was down-regulated in response to STAT3 signalling. STAT3C also led to the up-regulation of the oncostatin M (OSM) and LIF receptors. In the co-cultures, OSM that was produced by monocytes activated STAT3 in MSCs, and neutralising antibodies to OSM reduced ALP by 50%. These data indicate that OSM, in conjunction with other mediators, can drive MSC differentiation into OB. This study establishes a role for monocyte/macrophages as critical regulators of osteogenic differentiation via OSM production and the induction of STAT3 signalling in MSCs. Inducing the local activation of STAT3 in bone cells may be a valuable tool to increase bone formation in osteoporosis and arthritis, and in localised bone remodelling during fracture repair. PMID:22802946

  12. Inhibition of transforming growth factor β signaling promotes epiblast formation in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Sabitri; Heindryckx, Björn; Van der Jeught, Margot; Neupane, Jitesh; O'Leary, Thomas; Lierman, Sylvie; De Vos, Winnok H; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana; Deroo, Tom; De Sutter, Petra

    2015-02-15

    Early lineage segregation in preimplantation embryos and maintenance of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are both regulated by specific signaling pathways. Small molecules have been shown to modulate these signaling pathways. We examined the influence of several small molecules and growth factors on second-lineage segregation of the inner cell mass toward hypoblast and epiblast lineage during mouse embryonic preimplantation development. We found that the second-lineage segregation is influenced by activation or inhibition of the transforming growth factor (TGF)β pathway. Inhibition of the TGFβ pathway from the two-cell, four-cell, and morula stages onward up to the blastocyst stage significantly increased the epiblast cell proliferation. The epiblast formed in the embryos in which TGFβ signaling was inhibited was fully functional as demonstrated by the potential of these epiblast cells to give rise to pluripotent ESCs. Conversely, activating the TGFβ pathway reduced epiblast formation. Inhibition of the glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3 pathway and activation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 signaling reduced the formation of both epiblast and hypoblast cells. Activation of the protein kinase A pathway and of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway did not influence the second-lineage segregation in mouse embryos. The simultaneous inhibition of three pathways--TGFβ, GSK3β, and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk)--significantly enhanced the proliferation of epiblast cells than that caused by inhibition of either TGFβ pathway alone or by combined inhibition of the GSK3β and FGF/Erk pathways only.

  13. Inhibition of Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling Promotes Epiblast Formation in Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Sabitri; Heindryckx, Björn; Van der Jeught, Margot; Neupane, Jitesh; O'Leary, Thomas; Lierman, Sylvie; De Vos, Winnok H.; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana; Deroo, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Early lineage segregation in preimplantation embryos and maintenance of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are both regulated by specific signaling pathways. Small molecules have been shown to modulate these signaling pathways. We examined the influence of several small molecules and growth factors on second-lineage segregation of the inner cell mass toward hypoblast and epiblast lineage during mouse embryonic preimplantation development. We found that the second-lineage segregation is influenced by activation or inhibition of the transforming growth factor (TGF)β pathway. Inhibition of the TGFβ pathway from the two-cell, four-cell, and morula stages onward up to the blastocyst stage significantly increased the epiblast cell proliferation. The epiblast formed in the embryos in which TGFβ signaling was inhibited was fully functional as demonstrated by the potential of these epiblast cells to give rise to pluripotent ESCs. Conversely, activating the TGFβ pathway reduced epiblast formation. Inhibition of the glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3 pathway and activation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 signaling reduced the formation of both epiblast and hypoblast cells. Activation of the protein kinase A pathway and of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway did not influence the second-lineage segregation in mouse embryos. The simultaneous inhibition of three pathways—TGFβ, GSK3β, and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk)—significantly enhanced the proliferation of epiblast cells than that caused by inhibition of either TGFβ pathway alone or by combined inhibition of the GSK3β and FGF/Erk pathways only. PMID:25245024

  14. Surfactant tuning of hydrophilicity of porous degradable copolymer scaffolds promotes cellular proliferation and enhances bone formation.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Mohammed A; Leknes, Knut N; Sun, Yang; Lie, Stein A; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-08-01

    Poly(l-lactide-co-ɛ-caprolactone) (poly(LLA-co-CL)) has been blended with Tween 80 to tune the material properties and optimize cell-material interactions. Accordingly, the aims of this study were fourfold: to evaluate the effect of low concentrations of Tween 80 on the surface microstructure of 3D poly(LLA-co-CL) porous scaffolds: to determine the effect of different concentrations of Tween 80 on proliferation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in vitro under dynamic cell culture at 7 and 21 days; to assess the influence of Tween 80 on the degradation rate of poly(LLA-co-CL) at 7 and 21 days; and in a subcutaneous rat model, to evaluate the effect on bone formation of porous scaffolds modified with 3% Tween 80 at 2 and 8 weeks. Blending 3% (w/w) Tween 80 with poly(LLA-co-CL) improves the surface wettability (p < 0.001). Poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 shows significantly increased cellular proliferation at days 7 and 21 (p < 0.001). Moreover, the presence of Tween 80 facilitates the degradation of poly(LLA-co-CL). Two weeks post-implantation, the poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 scaffolds exhibit significant mRNA expression of Runx2 (p = 0.004). After 8 weeks, poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 scaffolds show significantly increased de novo bone formation, demonstrated by μ-CT (p = 0.0133) and confirmed histologically. It can be concluded that blending 3% (w/w) Tween 80 with poly (LLA-co-CL) improves the hydrophilicity and osteogenic potential of the scaffolds. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2049-2059, 2016.

  15. Calcium carbonate hybrid coating promotes the formation of biomimetic hydroxyapatite on titanium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Marcos Antônio E.; Ruiz, Gilia C. M.; Faria, Amanda N.; Zancanela, Daniela C.; Pereira, Lourivaldo S.; Ciancaglini, Pietro; Ramos, Ana P.

    2016-05-01

    CaCO3 particles dispersed in liquid media have proven to be good inductors of hydroxyapatite (HAp) growth. However, the use of CaCO3 deposited as thin films for this propose is unknown. Here, we report the growth of CaCO3 continuous films on Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) modified titanium surfaces and its use as HAp growth inductor. The Ti surfaces were modified with two, four, and six layers of dihexadecylphosphate (DHP)-LB films containing Ca2+, exposed to CO2 (g) for 12 h. The modified surfaces were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C for 36 h and submitted to bioactivity studies. This procedure originates bioactive coatings composed by non-stoichiometric HAp as evidenced by Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The presence of the CaCO3 film as pre-coating diminished the time necessary to growth continuous and homogeneous HAp films using a biomimetic approach. The surface properties of the films regarding their roughness, composition, charge, wettability, and surface free energy (γs) were accessed. The presence of HAp increased the wettability and γs of the surfaces. The coatings are not toxic for osteoblasts as observed for cell viability assays obtained after 7 and 14 days of culture. Moreover, the CaCO3 thin films promote the recovery of the osteoblasts viability more than the Ti surfaces themselves.

  16. Silicon-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes Promoted Bone Formation on Titanium Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xijiang; Wang, Tao; Qian, Shi; Liu, Xuanyong; Sun, Junying; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    While titanium (Ti) implants have been extensively used in orthopaedic and dental applications, the intrinsic bioinertness of untreated Ti surface usually results in insufficient osseointegration irrespective of the excellent biocompatibility and mechanical properties of it. In this study, we prepared surface modified Ti substrates in which silicon (Si) was doped into the titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes on Ti surface using plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technology. Compared to TiO2 nanotubes and Ti alone, Si-doped TiO2 nanotubes significantly enhanced the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation, including Col-I, ALP, Runx2, OCN, and OPN, in mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and deposition of mineral matrix. In vivo, the pull-out mechanical tests after two weeks of implantation in rat femur showed that Si-doped TiO2 nanotubes improved implant fixation strength by 18% and 54% compared to TiO2-NT and Ti implants, respectively. Together, findings from this study indicate that Si-doped TiO2 nanotubes promoted the osteogenic differentiation of osteoblastic cells and improved bone-Ti integration. Therefore, they may have considerable potential for the bioactive surface modification of Ti implants. PMID:26927080

  17. NR4A1 promotes PDGF-BB-induced cell colony formation in soft agar.

    PubMed

    Eger, Glenda; Papadopoulos, Natalia; Lennartsson, Johan; Heldin, Carl-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The fibroblast mitogen platelet-derived growth factor -BB (PDGF-BB) induces a transient expression of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 (also named Nur77, TR3 or NGFIB). The aim of the present study was to investigate the pathways through which NR4A1 is induced by PDGF-BB and its functional role. We demonstrate that in PDGF-BB stimulated NIH3T3 cells, the MEK1/2 inhibitor CI-1040 strongly represses NR4A1 expression, whereas Erk5 downregulation delays the expression, but does not block it. Moreover, we report that treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 suppresses NR4A1 mRNA and protein expression. The majority of NR4A1 in NIH3T3 was found to be localized in the cytoplasm and only a fraction was translocated to the nucleus after continued PDGF-BB treatment. Silencing NR4A1 slightly increased the proliferation rate of NIH3T3 cells; however, it did not affect the chemotactic or survival abilities conferred by PDGF-BB. Moreover, overexpression of NR4A1 promoted anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells and the glioblastoma cell lines U-105MG and U-251MG. Thus, whereas NR4A1, induced by PDGF-BB, suppresses cell growth on a solid surface, it increases anchorage-independent growth. PMID:25269081

  18. The 'balance intervention' for promoting caloric compensatory behaviours in response to overeating: a formative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wammes, Birgitte; Breedveld, Boudewijn; Kremers, Stef; Brug, Johannes

    2006-08-01

    To help people prevent weight gain, the Netherlands Nutrition Centre initiated the 'balance intervention', which promotes moderation of food intake and/or increased physical activity in response to occasions of overeating. The aim of this study was to determine whether intervention materials were appreciated, encouraged information seeking and increased motivation and caloric compensatory behaviours. A three-group randomized trial with pre-intervention measures (n = 963, response 86%) and post-intervention measures (n = 857) using electronic questionnaires was conducted among participants aged 25-40 years, recruited from an Internet research panel. The first group received a printed brochure and electronic newsletters (print group), the second group was exposed to radio advertisements (radio group) and the third group was the control group. Multiple regression analyses were used to investigate the impact of the materials on self-reported prevalence of overeating, attitudes, perceived behavioural control, intentions and compensatory behaviours. At follow-up, we found significantly more positive attitudes, intentions and dietary action in the print and radio groups. However, participants who received the radio advertisement had a significantly lower perceived behavioural control. No effects were found on the prevalence of overeating. The results indicate that the intervention materials have potential for increasing people's attitudes, motivation and self-reported behaviour actions, with a possible negative side-effect on perceived behavioural control. PMID:16606638

  19. Silicon-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes Promoted Bone Formation on Titanium Implants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xijiang; Wang, Tao; Qian, Shi; Liu, Xuanyong; Sun, Junying; Li, Bin

    2016-02-26

    While titanium (Ti) implants have been extensively used in orthopaedic and dental applications, the intrinsic bioinertness of untreated Ti surface usually results in insufficient osseointegration irrespective of the excellent biocompatibility and mechanical properties of it. In this study, we prepared surface modified Ti substrates in which silicon (Si) was doped into the titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanotubes on Ti surface using plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technology. Compared to TiO₂ nanotubes and Ti alone, Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes significantly enhanced the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation, including Col-I, ALP, Runx2, OCN, and OPN, in mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and deposition of mineral matrix. In vivo, the pull-out mechanical tests after two weeks of implantation in rat femur showed that Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes improved implant fixation strength by 18% and 54% compared to TiO₂-NT and Ti implants, respectively. Together, findings from this study indicate that Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes promoted the osteogenic differentiation of osteoblastic cells and improved bone-Ti integration. Therefore, they may have considerable potential for the bioactive surface modification of Ti implants.

  20. NR4A1 Promotes PDGF-BB-Induced Cell Colony Formation in Soft Agar

    PubMed Central

    Eger, Glenda; Papadopoulos, Natalia; Lennartsson, Johan; Heldin, Carl-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The fibroblast mitogen platelet-derived growth factor -BB (PDGF-BB) induces a transient expression of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 (also named Nur77, TR3 or NGFIB). The aim of the present study was to investigate the pathways through which NR4A1 is induced by PDGF-BB and its functional role. We demonstrate that in PDGF-BB stimulated NIH3T3 cells, the MEK1/2 inhibitor CI-1040 strongly represses NR4A1 expression, whereas Erk5 downregulation delays the expression, but does not block it. Moreover, we report that treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 suppresses NR4A1 mRNA and protein expression. The majority of NR4A1 in NIH3T3 was found to be localized in the cytoplasm and only a fraction was translocated to the nucleus after continued PDGF-BB treatment. Silencing NR4A1 slightly increased the proliferation rate of NIH3T3 cells; however, it did not affect the chemotactic or survival abilities conferred by PDGF-BB. Moreover, overexpression of NR4A1 promoted anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells and the glioblastoma cell lines U-105MG and U-251MG. Thus, whereas NR4A1, induced by PDGF-BB, suppresses cell growth on a solid surface, it increases anchorage-independent growth. PMID:25269081

  1. NR4A1 promotes PDGF-BB-induced cell colony formation in soft agar.

    PubMed

    Eger, Glenda; Papadopoulos, Natalia; Lennartsson, Johan; Heldin, Carl-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The fibroblast mitogen platelet-derived growth factor -BB (PDGF-BB) induces a transient expression of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 (also named Nur77, TR3 or NGFIB). The aim of the present study was to investigate the pathways through which NR4A1 is induced by PDGF-BB and its functional role. We demonstrate that in PDGF-BB stimulated NIH3T3 cells, the MEK1/2 inhibitor CI-1040 strongly represses NR4A1 expression, whereas Erk5 downregulation delays the expression, but does not block it. Moreover, we report that treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 suppresses NR4A1 mRNA and protein expression. The majority of NR4A1 in NIH3T3 was found to be localized in the cytoplasm and only a fraction was translocated to the nucleus after continued PDGF-BB treatment. Silencing NR4A1 slightly increased the proliferation rate of NIH3T3 cells; however, it did not affect the chemotactic or survival abilities conferred by PDGF-BB. Moreover, overexpression of NR4A1 promoted anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells and the glioblastoma cell lines U-105MG and U-251MG. Thus, whereas NR4A1, induced by PDGF-BB, suppresses cell growth on a solid surface, it increases anchorage-independent growth.

  2. The WOX13 homeobox gene promotes replum formation in the Arabidopsis thaliana fruit.

    PubMed

    Romera-Branchat, Maida; Ripoll, Juan José; Yanofsky, Martin F; Pelaz, Soraya

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis fruit forms a seedpod that develops from the fertilized gynoecium. It is mainly comprised of an ovary in which three distinct tissues can be differentiated: the valves, the valve margins and the replum. Separation of cells at the valve margin allows for the valves to detach from the replum and thus dispersal of the seeds. Valves and valve margins are located in lateral positions whereas the replum is positioned medially and retains meristematic properties resembling the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Members of the WUSCHEL-related homeobox family have been involved in stem cell maintenance in the SAM, and within this family, we found that WOX13 is expressed mainly in meristematic tissues including the replum. We also show that wox13 loss-of-function mutations reduce replum size and enhance the phenotypes of mutants affected in the replum identity gene RPL. Conversely, misexpression of WOX13 produces, independently from BP and RPL, an oversized replum and valve defects that closely resemble those of mutants in JAG/FIL activity genes. Our results suggest that WOX13 promotes replum development by likely preventing the activity of the JAG/FIL genes in medial tissues. This regulation seems to play a role in establishing the gradient of JAG/FIL activity along the medio-lateral axis of the fruit critical for proper patterning. Our data have allowed us to incorporate the role of WOX13 into the regulatory network that orchestrates fruit patterning. PMID:22946675

  3. Attenuation of AMPK signaling by ROQUIN promotes T follicular helper cell formation

    PubMed Central

    Ramiscal, Roybel R; Parish, Ian A; Lee-Young, Robert S; Babon, Jeffrey J; Blagih, Julianna; Pratama, Alvin; Martin, Jaime; Hawley, Naomi; Cappello, Jean Y; Nieto, Pablo F; Ellyard, Julia I; Kershaw, Nadia J; Sweet, Rebecca A; Goodnow, Christopher C; Jones, Russell G; Febbraio, Mark A; Vinuesa, Carola G; Athanasopoulos, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    T follicular helper cells (Tfh) are critical for the longevity and quality of antibody-mediated protection against infection. Yet few signaling pathways have been identified to be unique solely to Tfh development. ROQUIN is a post-transcriptional repressor of T cells, acting through its ROQ domain to destabilize mRNA targets important for Th1, Th17, and Tfh biology. Here, we report that ROQUIN has a paradoxical function on Tfh differentiation mediated by its RING domain: mice with a T cell-specific deletion of the ROQUIN RING domain have unchanged Th1, Th2, Th17, and Tregs during a T-dependent response but show a profoundly defective antigen-specific Tfh compartment. ROQUIN RING signaling directly antagonized the catalytic α1 subunit of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a central stress-responsive regulator of cellular metabolism and mTOR signaling, which is known to facilitate T-dependent humoral immunity. We therefore unexpectedly uncover a ROQUIN–AMPK metabolic signaling nexus essential for selectively promoting Tfh responses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08698.001 PMID:26496200

  4. Pyruvate kinase M2 activators promote tetramer formation and suppress tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Yu, Yimin; Israelsen, William J.; Jiang, Jian-Kang; Boxer, Matthew B.; Hong, Bum Soo; Tempel, Wolfram; Dimov, Svetoslav; Shen, Min; Jha, Abhishek; Yang, Hua; Mattaini, Katherine R.; Metallo, Christian M.; Fiske, Brian P.; Courtney, Kevin D.; Malstrom, Scott; Khan, Tahsin M.; Kung, Charles; Skoumbourdis, Amanda P.; Veith, Henrike; Southall, Noel; Walsh, Martin J.; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Leister, William; Lunt, Sophia Y.; Johnson, Zachary R.; Yen, Katharine E.; Kunii, Kaiko; Davidson, Shawn M.; Christofk, Heather R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Inglese, James; Harris, Marian H.; Asara, John M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Salituro, Francesco G.; Jin, Shengfang; Dang, Lenny; Auld, Douglas S.; Park, Hee-Won; Cantley, Lewis C.; Thomas, Craig J.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2012-08-26

    Cancer cells engage in a metabolic program to enhance biosynthesis and support cell proliferation. The regulatory properties of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) influence altered glucose metabolism in cancer. The interaction of PKM2 with phosphotyrosine-containing proteins inhibits enzyme activity and increases the availability of glycolytic metabolites to support cell proliferation. This suggests that high pyruvate kinase activity may suppress tumor growth. We show that expression of PKM1, the pyruvate kinase isoform with high constitutive activity, or exposure to published small-molecule PKM2 activators inhibits the growth of xenograft tumors. Structural studies reveal that small-molecule activators bind PKM2 at the subunit interaction interface, a site that is distinct from that of the endogenous activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). However, unlike FBP, binding of activators to PKM2 promotes a constitutively active enzyme state that is resistant to inhibition by tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. This data supports the notion that small-molecule activation of PKM2 can interfere with anabolic metabolism.

  5. TPPP/p25 promotes tubulin assemblies and blocks mitotic spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Tirián, L.; Hlavanda, E.; Oláh, J.; Horváth, I.; Orosz, F.; Szabó, B.; Kovács, J.; Szabad, J.; Ovádi, J.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, we isolated from bovine brain a protein, TPPP/p25 and identified as p25, a brain-specific protein that induced aberrant tubulin assemblies. The primary sequence of this protein differs from that of other proteins identified so far; however, it shows high homology with p25-like hypothetical proteins sought via blast. Here, we characterized the binding of TPPP/p25 to tubulin by means of surface plasmon resonance; the kinetic parameters are as follows: kon, 2.4 × 104 M–1·s–1; koff, 5.4 × 10–3 s–1; and Kd, 2.3 × 10–7 M. This protein at substoichometric concentration promotes the polymerization of tubulin into double-walled tubules and polymorphic aggregates or bundles paclitaxel-stabilized microtubules as judged by quantitative data of electron and atomic force microscopies. Injection of bovine TPPP/p25 into cleavage Drosophila embryos expressing tubulin–GFP fusion protein reveals that TPPP/p25 inhibits mitotic spindle assembly and nuclear envelope breakdown without affecting other cellular events like centrosome replication and separation, microtubule nucleation by the centrosomes, and nuclear growth. GTP counteracts TPPP/p25 both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:14623963

  6. Vascular niche promotes hematopoietic multipotent progenitor formation from pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Jennifer L.; Butler, Jason M.; Chan, Yan-Yi; Chandrasekaran, Devikha; Poulos, Michael G.; Ginsberg, Michael; Nolan, Daniel J.; Elemento, Olivier; Wood, Brent L.; Adair, Jennifer E.; Rafii, Shahin; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represent an alternative hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) source for treating hematopoietic disease. The limited engraftment of human PSC–derived (hPSC-derived) multipotent progenitor cells (MPP) has hampered the clinical application of these cells and suggests that MPP require additional cues for definitive hematopoiesis. We hypothesized that the presence of a vascular niche that produces Notch ligands jagged-1 (JAG1) and delta-like ligand-4 (DLL4) drives definitive hematopoiesis. We differentiated hes2 human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and Macaca nemestrina–induced PSC (iPSC) line-7 with cytokines in the presence or absence of endothelial cells (ECs) that express JAG1 and DLL4. Cells cocultured with ECs generated substantially more CD34+CD45+ hematopoietic progenitors compared with cells cocultured without ECs or with ECs lacking JAG1 or DLL4. EC-induced cells exhibited Notch activation and expressed HSC-specific Notch targets RUNX1 and GATA2. EC-induced PSC-MPP engrafted at a markedly higher level in NOD/SCID/IL-2 receptor γ chain–null (NSG) mice compared with cytokine-induced cells, and low-dose chemotherapy-based selection further increased engraftment. Long-term engraftment and the myeloid-to-lymphoid ratio achieved with vascular niche induction were similar to levels achieved for cord blood–derived MPP and up to 20-fold higher than those achieved with hPSC-derived MPP engraftment. Our findings indicate that endothelial Notch ligands promote PSC-definitive hematopoiesis and production of long-term engrafting CD34+ cells, suggesting these ligands are critical for HSC emergence. PMID:25664855

  7. Self-assembly of colloidal nanocrystals: Surface ligands promote the formation of unexpected superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boles, Michael Adam

    The advent and refinement of chemical techniques to produce uniform collections of colloidal nanocrystals in recent years has made accessible a wide range of nanocrystal materials, shapes, and sizes, offering a fertile testbed for developing an understanding of nanoscale crystallization. Elucidating the role of nanocrystal surfaces in promoting self-assembly of superlattice phases unanticipated by hard-shape packing models has been the focus of my graduate work. Chapter One provides a practical overview of the experimental approaches to prepare and characterize colloidal nanocrystals and self-assembled nanocrystal superlattices. Chapter Two discusses colloidal nanocrystal surfaces including atomic composition, chemical reactivity, and influence over electronic structure. Chapter Three provides an overview of nanocrystal self-assembly including interparticle potentials and predicted phase behavior for hard and soft shapes. Chapter Four describes the preparation of tetrahedrally-shaped CdSe nanocrystals and their self-assembly into an unexpected superlattice structure. Chapter Five presents a selection of electron microscopy images of superlattices comprised of nearly spherical nanocrystals. Chapter Six describes the application of image analysis techniques to elucidate ligand shell deformability of spherical nanocrystals and resulting implications for entropy-driven crystallization of soft objects. Chapter Seven analyzes the role of PbS surface ligand desorption in determining binary phase behavior with Au nanocrystals. Chapter Eight describes the implications of the ideas presented in this thesis, places them in the context of recent work by others in the field, and offers an outlook towards promising directions for future research. Together, the ideas contained herein aim to provide the conceptual foundation necessary to exploit nanocrystal self-assembly for the rational design of next-generation functional solids.

  8. Rac1 promotes diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced formation of liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Anita; Wartlick, Friedrich; Henninger, Christian; Schwarz, Michael; Kaina, Bernd; Fritz, Gerhard

    2015-03-01

    To elucidate the function of the Ras-homologous GTPase Rac1 in hepatocarcinogenesis induced by diethylnitrosamine (DEN), mice lacking hepatic Rac1 expression were treated with DEN and compared to the wild-type (WT). Rac1 knock-out (KO) mice were found to have a lower tumor yield as compared to Rac1 proficient mice. The small-sized tumors formed in the absence of Rac1 lack an activated Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, as indicated by the absence of p-ERK expression. Apparently, Rac1 is required for Ras-driven oncogenic pathways. Moreover, tumors in Rac1 deficient mice were glutamine synthase (GS) negative. They displayed a high number of p-H3-positive and cyclinB1 expressing cells, pointing to a defect in mitotic progression. To elucidate the influence of Rac1 on mechanisms of tumor initiation, acute DEN-induced hepatic stress responses were monitored. Rac1 deficiency caused fairly complex, partially time-dependent, alterations in both basal and/or DEN-induced messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of susceptibility-related genes. Basal protein expression of DNA repair factors Brca1 and DNA repair protein RAD51 homolog (Rad51) and the cell cycle regulatory factor p27 was enhanced in the absence of Rac1. Following DEN treatment, p21 mRNA and protein expression was stimulated independent of the Rac1 status. Lack of Rac1 increased mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR), as shown by elevated protein levels of p-ATR, p-p53 and γH2AX 24h after DEN treatment. The data show that Rac1 is essential for DEN-stimulated hepatocarcinogenesis. We hypothesize that it promotes tumor initiation by counteracting the elimination of initiated cells and, moreover, alleviates the outgrowth of transformed cells. Hence, pharmacological targeting of Rac1 could be suitable for chemoprevention.

  9. Designing health promotion approaches to high-risk adolescents through formative research with youth and parents.

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Young people who engage in multiple health risk behaviors such as alcohol and other drug use, unprotected sexual activity, smoking, and violence, are a serious public health concern. To help identify potential strategies for influencing these behaviors, focus groups were conducted with 160 youth ages 10-18 years. For additional insights, focus groups also were held subsequently with 70 parents and grandparents of youth of similar ages. The youth participants were well-informed about most of the risky behaviors and their health consequences. Safe sex practices and the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection were the exceptions. Despite this understanding, participants spoke of engaging in these behaviors as part of a lifestyle common to the high-risk environments where they live. The youth said that knowing why these practices were harmful was not enough to help them change the behavior. The need for skills building and support systems to reinforce their generally high level of awareness was evident. Love, home, family, and safety were cited as very important. Many participants said they wanted to talk to someone they could trust, who knew what they were going through. The groups of parents and grandparents were concerned about the physical dangers facing their adolescents and about peer influence. They also acknowledged their own mixed messages to their youth. The focus group findings suggest that health promotion strategies for high-risk youth should be comprehensive rather than categorical, with nonjudgmental, interpersonal communication integrated into community-based programs. To be relevant, program strategies must reach outside the usual channels and incorporate the high-risk environment where these youth live. PMID:8210276

  10. Three-dimensional hyaluronic acid grafts promote healing and reduce scar formation in skin incision wounds.

    PubMed

    Hu, Min; Sabelman, Eric E; Cao, Yang; Chang, James; Hentz, Vincent R

    2003-10-15

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) has been found to play important roles in tissue regeneration and wound-healing processes. Fetal tissue with a high concentration of HA heals rapidly without scarring. The present study employed HA formed into three-dimensional strands with or without keratinocytes to treat full-thickness skin incision wounds in rats. Wound closure rates of HA strand grafts both with and without keratinocytes were substantially enhanced. The closure times of both HA grafts were less than 1 day (average 16 h), about 1/7 that of the contralateral control incisions (114 h, p <.01). Average wound areas after 10 days were HA-only graft: 0.151 mm2 +/- 0.035; HA + cell grafts: 0.143 mm2 +/- 0.036 and controls: 14.434 mm2 +/- 1.175, experimental areas were 1% of the controls (p < 0.01). Transforming growth factor (TGF) beta1 measured by immunostaining was remarkably reduced in HA-treated wounds compared to the controls. In conclusion, HA grafts appeared to produce a fetal-like environment with reduced TGF-beta1, which is known to be elevated in incipient scars. The HA strands with or without cultured cells may potentially improve clinical wound healing as well as reduce scar formation.

  11. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Valerie T.; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2016-01-01

    Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7), an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) clustering in neurites and activates Gαo signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gαo subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation. PMID:26881110

  12. Does Radiative Feedback by the First Stars Promote or Prevent Second Generation Star Formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyungjin; Shapiro, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    We present a self-consistent study of formation of Pop III stars in the early stage of cosmic reionization. We study the effect of starlight from the first stars on the ability of other minihalos in their neighborhood to form additional stars. We show that the ionization front (I-front) is trapped by the neighboring minihalos, after it is transformed from R-type to D-type and preceded by a shock front. The fate of the core of nearby minihalos is mostly determined by the response of the core to this shock front, which leads to molecular cooling and collapse that, when compared to the same halo without external radiation, is (a) expedited, (b) delayed, (c) unaltered, or (d) reversed and prevented, depending upon the flux and halo mass and evolutionary stage. Roughly speaking, most halos that were destined to cool, collapse and form stars in the absence of external radiation are found to do so even when exposed to the first Pop III star in their neighborhood, while those that would not have done so are still not able to.

  13. Thromboxane A2 exacerbates acute lung injury via promoting edema formation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Koji; Horikami, Daiki; Omori, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Yamazaki, Arisa; Maeda, Shingo; Murata, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is produced in the lungs of patients suffering from acute lung injury (ALI). We assessed its contribution in disease progression using three different ALI mouse models. The administration of hydrochloric acid (HCl) or oleic acid (OA)+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused tissue edema and neutrophil infiltration with TXA2 production in the lungs of the experimental mice. The administration of LPS induced only neutrophil accumulation without TXA2 production. Pretreatment with T prostanoid receptor (TP) antagonist attenuated the tissue edema but not neutrophil infiltration in these models. Intravital imaging and immunostaining demonstrated that administration of TP agonist caused vascular hyper-permeability by disrupting the endothelial barrier formation in the mouse ear. In vitro experiments showed that TP-stimulation disrupted the endothelial adherens junction, and it was inhibited by Ca(2+) channel blockade or Rho kinase inhibition. Thus endogenous TXA2 exacerbates ALI, and its blockade attenuates it by modulating the extent of lung edema. This can be explained by the endothelial hyper-permeability caused by the activation of TXA2-TP axis, via Ca(2+)- and Rho kinase-dependent signaling. PMID:27562142

  14. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Valerie T; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7), an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) clustering in neurites and activates Gα(o) signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gα(o) subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation. PMID:26881110

  15. Tau and spectraplakins promote synapse formation and maintenance through Jun kinase and neuronal trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Voelzmann, Andre; Okenve-Ramos, Pilar; Qu, Yue; Chojnowska-Monga, Monika; del Caño-Espinel, Manuela; Prokop, Andreas; Sanchez-Soriano, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms regulating synapse numbers during development and ageing are essential for normal brain function and closely linked to brain disorders including dementias. Using Drosophila, we demonstrate roles of the microtubule-associated protein Tau in regulating synapse numbers, thus unravelling an important cellular requirement of normal Tau. In this context, we find that Tau displays a strong functional overlap with microtubule-binding spectraplakins, establishing new links between two different neurodegenerative factors. Tau and the spectraplakin Short Stop act upstream of a three-step regulatory cascade ensuring adequate delivery of synaptic proteins. This cascade involves microtubule stability as the initial trigger, JNK signalling as the central mediator, and kinesin-3 mediated axonal transport as the key effector. This cascade acts during development (synapse formation) and ageing (synapse maintenance) alike. Therefore, our findings suggest novel explanations for intellectual disability in Tau deficient individuals, as well as early synapse loss in dementias including Alzheimer’s disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14694.001 PMID:27501441

  16. TSC1 Promotes B Cell Maturation but Is Dispensable for Germinal Center Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxia; Carico, Zachary; Hopper, Kristen; Shin, Jinwook; Deng, Xuming; Qiu, Yirong; Unniraman, Shyam; Kelsoe, Garnett; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1), a tumor suppressor that acts by inhibiting mTOR signaling, plays an important role in the immune system. We report here that TSC1 differentially regulates mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2/Akt signaling in B cells. TSC1 deficiency results in the accumulation of transitional-1 (T1) B cells and progressive losses of B cells as they mature beyond the T1 stage. Moreover, TSC1KO mice exhibit a mild defect in the serum antibody responses or rate of Ig class-switch recombination after immunization with a T-cell-dependent antigen. In contrast to a previous report, we demonstrate that both constitutive Peyer’s patch germinal centers (GCs) and immunization-induced splenic GCs are unimpaired in TSC1-deficient (TSC1KO) mice and that the ratio of GC B cells to total B cells is comparable in WT and TSC1KO mice. Together, our data demonstrate that TSC1 plays important roles for B cell development, but it is dispensable for GC formation and serum antibody responses. PMID:26000908

  17. Thickness-controllable electrospun fibers promote tubular structure formation by endothelial progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jong Kyu; Bang, Ju Yup; Xu, Guan; Lee, Jun-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Ho-Jun; Kim, Han Seong; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the thickness of an electrospun nanofibrous scaffold by altering its pore size has been shown to regulate cell behaviors such as cell infiltration into a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold. This is of great importance when manufacturing tissue-engineering scaffolds using an electrospinning process. In this study, we report the development of a novel process whereby additional aluminum foil layers were applied to the accumulated electrospun fibers of an existing aluminum foil collector, effectively reducing the incidence of charge buildup. Using this process, we fabricated an electrospun scaffold with a large pore (pore size >40 μm) while simultaneously controlling the thickness. We demonstrate that the large pore size triggered rapid infiltration (160 μm in 4 hours of cell culture) of individual endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and rapid cell colonization after seeding EPC spheroids. We confirmed that the 3D, but not two-dimensional, scaffold structures regulated tubular structure formation by the EPCs. Thus, incorporation of stem cells into a highly porous 3D scaffold with tunable thickness has implications for the regeneration of vascularized thick tissues and cardiac patch development. PMID:25709441

  18. CD147 promotes the formation of functional osteoclasts through NFATc1 signalling.

    PubMed

    Nishioku, Tsuyoshi; Terasawa, Mariko; Baba, Misaki; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2016-04-29

    CD147, a membrane glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is highly upregulated during dynamic cellular events including tissue remodelling. Elevated CD147 expression is present in the joint of rheumatoid arthritis patients. However, the role of CD147 in bone destruction remains unclear. To determine whether CD147 is involved in osteoclastogenesis, we studied its expression in mouse osteoclasts and its role in osteoclast differentiation and function. CD147 expression was markedly upregulated during osteoclast differentiation. To investigate the role of CD147 in receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption activity, osteoclast precursor cells were transfected with CD147 siRNA. Decreased CD147 expression inhibited osteoclast formation and bone resorption, inhibited RANKL-induced nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c1 and decreased the expression of the d2 isoform of vacuolar ATPase Vo domain and cathepsin K. Therefore, CD147 plays a critical role in the differentiation and function of osteoclasts by upregulating NFATc1 through the autoamplification of its expression in osteoclastogenesis.

  19. Thromboxane A2 exacerbates acute lung injury via promoting edema formation

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Koji; Horikami, Daiki; Omori, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Yamazaki, Arisa; Maeda, Shingo; Murata, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is produced in the lungs of patients suffering from acute lung injury (ALI). We assessed its contribution in disease progression using three different ALI mouse models. The administration of hydrochloric acid (HCl) or oleic acid (OA)+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused tissue edema and neutrophil infiltration with TXA2 production in the lungs of the experimental mice. The administration of LPS induced only neutrophil accumulation without TXA2 production. Pretreatment with T prostanoid receptor (TP) antagonist attenuated the tissue edema but not neutrophil infiltration in these models. Intravital imaging and immunostaining demonstrated that administration of TP agonist caused vascular hyper-permeability by disrupting the endothelial barrier formation in the mouse ear. In vitro experiments showed that TP-stimulation disrupted the endothelial adherens junction, and it was inhibited by Ca2+ channel blockade or Rho kinase inhibition. Thus endogenous TXA2 exacerbates ALI, and its blockade attenuates it by modulating the extent of lung edema. This can be explained by the endothelial hyper-permeability caused by the activation of TXA2-TP axis, via Ca2+- and Rho kinase-dependent signaling. PMID:27562142

  20. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Valerie T; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7), an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) clustering in neurites and activates Gα(o) signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gα(o) subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation.

  1. Studies of the structure and function of Mms6, a bacterial protein that promotes the formation of magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lijun

    2011-01-01

    Here we report structural and functional studies of Mms6, a biomineralization protein that can promote the formation in vitro of magnetic nanoparticles with sizes and morphologies similar to the magnetites synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria. We found the binding pattern of Mms6 to ferric ion to be two-phase and multivalent. We quantatively determined that Mms6 binds one Fe3+ with a very high affinity (Kd = 1016 M). The second phase of iron binding is multivalent and cooperative with respect to iron with a Kd in the μM range and a stoichiometry of about 20 ferric ion per protein molecule. We found that Mms6 exists in large particles of two sizes, one consisting of 20-40 monomeric units and the other of 200 units. From proteolytic digestion, ultracentrifugation and liposome fusion studies, we found that Mms6 forms a large micellar quaternary structure with the N-terminal domain self-assembling into a uniformly sized micelle and the C-terminal domain on the surface. The two-phase iron-binding pattern may be relevant to iron crystal formation. We propose that the first high affinity phase may stabilize a new conformation of the C-terminal domain that allows interaction with other C-terminal domains leading to a structural change in the multimeric protein complex that enables the second low affinity iron binding phase to organize iron and initiate crystal formation. We also observed a dimeric apparent molecular mass of the Mms6 C-terminal peptide (C21Mms6). We speculate that the C-terminal domain may form higher order quaternary arrangements on the surface of the micelle or when anchored to a membrane by the N-terminal domain. The change in fluorescence quenching in the N-terminal domain with iron binding suggests a structural integrity between the C- and N-terminal domains. The slow change in trp fluorescence as a function of time after adding iron suggests a very slow conformational change in the protein that involves

  2. [A role of the motor-and-active forms of training in lifestyle formation and health promotion in schoolchildren].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanov, R S; Nesterenko, A V

    2005-01-01

    The motor-and-active forms of training were studied for their impact on the health status, moral, business, and social qualities of children and adolescents. The school-children's health was found to be worse, which was attended by a rise in the total morbidity, which was 9.3 times higher in pupils from general educational classes. The lifestyle of today's young people has some negative aspects: the early onset of smoking, alcoholic use, and sexual life. The goal-oriented educational work promotes the formation of healthy lifestyle in children and adolescents--their striving for harmonic physical development, achievement of sports results, leads to a significant reduction in the number of smokers and alcohol users in a more problematic section of pupils. The diet in adolescents is unbalanced, has inadequate caloric value and does not meet the rational nutrition principles (predominance of calorie consumption over energy expenditure), and it needs to be corrected.

  3. Reactive γ-ketoaldehydes promote protein misfolding and preamyloid oligomer formation in rapidly-activated atrial cells.

    PubMed

    Sidorova, Tatiana N; Yermalitskaya, Liudmila V; Mace, Lisa C; Wells, K Sam; Boutaud, Olivier; Prinsen, Joseph K; Davies, Sean S; Roberts, L Jackson; Dikalov, Sergey I; Glabe, Charles G; Amarnath, Venkataraman; Barnett, Joey V; Murray, Katherine T

    2015-02-01

    Rapid activation causes remodeling of atrial myocytes resembling that which occurs in experimental and human atrial fibrillation (AF). Using this cellular model, we previously observed transcriptional upregulation of proteins implicated in protein misfolding and amyloidosis. For organ-specific amyloidoses such as Alzheimer's disease, preamyloid oligomers (PAOs) are now recognized to be the primary cytotoxic species. In the setting of oxidative stress, highly-reactive lipid-derived mediators known as γ-ketoaldehydes (γ-KAs) have been identified that rapidly adduct proteins and cause PAO formation for amyloid β1-42 implicated in Alzheimer's. We hypothesized that rapid activation of atrial cells triggers oxidative stress with lipid peroxidation and formation of γ-KAs, which then rapidly crosslink proteins to generate PAOs. To investigate this hypothesis, rapidly-paced and control, spontaneously-beating atrial HL-1 cells were probed with a conformation-specific antibody recognizing PAOs. Rapid stimulation of atrial cells caused the generation of cytosolic PAOs along with a myocyte stress response (e.g., transcriptional upregulation of Nppa and Hspa1a), both of which were absent in control, unpaced cells. Rapid activation also caused the formation of superoxide and γ-KA adducts in atriomyocytes, while direct exposure of cells to γ-KAs resulted in PAO production. Increased cytosolic atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and the generation of ANP oligomers with exposure to γ-KAs and rapid atrial HL-1 cell stimulation, strongly suggest a role for ANP in PAO formation. Salicylamine (SA) is a small molecule scavenger of γ-KAs that can protect proteins from modification by these reactive compounds. PAO formation and transcriptional remodeling were inhibited when cells were stimulated in the presence of SA, but not with the antioxidant curcumin, which is incapable of scavenging γ-KAs. These results demonstrate that γ-KAs promote protein misfolding and PAO formation as a

  4. Urinary bladder matrix promotes site appropriate tissue formation following right ventricle outflow tract repair

    PubMed Central

    Remlinger, Nathaniel T; Gilbert, Thomas W; Yoshida, Masahiro; Guest, Brogan N; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Weaver, Michelle L; Wagner, William R; Brown, Bryan N; Tobita, Kimimasa; Wearden, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    The current prevalence and severity of heart defects requiring functional replacement of cardiac tissue pose a serious clinical challenge. Biologic scaffolds are an attractive tissue engineering approach to cardiac repair because they avoid sensitization associated with homograft materials and theoretically possess the potential for growth in similar patterns as surrounding native tissue. Both urinary bladder matrix (UBM) and cardiac ECM (C-ECM) have been previously investigated as scaffolds for cardiac repair with modest success, but have not been compared directly. In other tissue locations, bone marrow derived cells have been shown to play a role in the remodeling process, but this has not been investigated for UBM in the cardiac location, and has never been studied for C-ECM. The objectives of the present study were to compare the effectiveness of an organ-specific C-ECM patch with a commonly used ECM scaffold for myocardial tissue repair of the right ventricle outflow tract (RVOT), and to examine the role of bone marrow derived cells in the remodeling response. A chimeric rat model in which all bone marrow cells express green fluorescent protein (GFP) was generated and used to show the ability of ECM scaffolds derived from the heart and bladder to support cardiac function and cellular growth in the RVOT. The results from this study suggest that urinary bladder matrix may provide a more appropriate substrate for myocardial repair than cardiac derived matrices, as shown by differences in the remodeling responses following implantation, as well as the presence of site appropriate cells and the formation of immature, myocardial tissue. PMID:23974174

  5. The transcription factor Mlc promotes Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation through repression of phosphotransferase system components.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Bradley S; Lopilato, Jane E; Smith, Daniel R; Watnick, Paula I

    2014-07-01

    The phosphoenol phosphotransferase system (PTS) is a multicomponent signal transduction cascade that regulates diverse aspects of bacterial cellular physiology in response to the availability of high-energy sugars in the environment. Many PTS components are repressed at the transcriptional level when the substrates they transport are not available. In Escherichia coli, the transcription factor Mlc (for makes large colonies) represses transcription of the genes encoding enzyme I (EI), histidine protein (HPr), and the glucose-specific enzyme IIBC (EIIBC(Glc)) in defined media that lack PTS substrates. When glucose is present, the unphosphorylated form of EIIBC(Glc) sequesters Mlc to the cell membrane, preventing its interaction with DNA. Very little is known about Vibrio cholerae Mlc. We found that V. cholerae Mlc activates biofilm formation in LB broth but not in defined medium supplemented with either pyruvate or glucose. Therefore, we questioned whether V. cholerae Mlc functions differently than E. coli Mlc. Here we have shown that, like E. coli Mlc, V. cholerae Mlc represses transcription of PTS components in both defined medium and LB broth and that E. coli Mlc is able to rescue the biofilm defect of a V. cholerae Δmlc mutant. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Mlc indirectly activates transcription of the vps genes by repressing expression of EI. Because activation of the vps genes by Mlc occurs under only a subset of the conditions in which repression of PTS components is observed, we conclude that additional inputs present in LB broth are required for activation of vps gene transcription by Mlc.

  6. Soluble THSD7A Is an N-Glycoprotein That Promotes Endothelial Cell Migration and Tube Formation in Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Meng-Wei; Wang, Chian-Huei; Wu, Hsiao-Chun; Chang, Shing-Jyh; Chuang, Yung-Jen

    2011-01-01

    Background Thrombospondin type I domain containing 7A (THSD7A) is a novel neural protein that is known to affect endothelial migration and vascular patterning during development. To further understand the role of THSD7A in angiogenesis, we investigated the post-translational modification scheme of THS7DA and to reveal the underlying mechanisms by which this protein regulates blood vessel growth. Methodology/Principal Findings Full-length THSD7A was overexpressed in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells and was found to be membrane associated and N-glycosylated. The soluble form of THSD7A, which is released into the cultured medium, was harvested for further angiogenic assays. We found that soluble THSD7A promotes human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) migration and tube formation. HUVEC sprouts and zebrafish subintestinal vessel (SIV) angiogenic assays further revealed that soluble THSD7A increases the number of branching points of new vessels. Interestingly, we found that soluble THSD7A increased the formation of filopodia in HUVEC. The distribution patterns of vinculin and phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were also affected, which implies a role for THSD7A in focal adhesion assembly. Moreover, soluble THSD7A increased FAK phosphorylation in HUVEC, suggesting that THSD7A is involved in regulating cytoskeleton reorganization. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our results indicate that THSD7A is a membrane-associated N-glycoprotein with a soluble form. Soluble THSD7A promotes endothelial cell migration during angiogenesis via a FAK-dependent mechanism and thus may be a novel neuroangiogenic factor. PMID:22194972

  7. Pyrrolidine and Piperidine Formation Via Copper(II) Carboxylate Promoted Intramolecular Carboamination of Unactivated Olefins: Diastereoselectivity and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Eric S.; Fuller, Peter H.; Kasi, Dhanalakshmi; Chemler, Sherry R.

    2008-01-01

    An expanded substrate scope and in depth analysis of the reaction mechanism of the copper(II) carboxylate promoted intramolecular carboamination of unactivated alkenes is described. This method provides access to N-functionalized pyrrolidines and piperidines. Both aromatic and aliphatic γ- and δ-alkenyl N-arylsulfonamides undergo the oxidative cyclization reaction efficiently. N-Benzoyl-2-allylaniline also underwent the oxidative cyclization. The terminal olefin substrates examined were more reactive than those with internal olefins, and the latter terminated in elimination rather than carbon-carbon bond formation. The efficiency of the reaction was enhanced by the use of more organic soluble copper(II) carboxylate salts, copper(II) neodecanoate in particular. The reaction times were reduced by the use of microwave heating. High levels of diastereoselectivity were observed in the synthesis of 2,5-disubstituted pyrrolidines, wherein the cis substitution pattern predominates. The mechanism of the reaction is discussed in the context of the observed reactivity and in comparison to analogous reactions promoted by other reagents and conditions. Our evidence supports a mechanism wherein the N-C bond is formed via intramolecular syn aminocupration and the C-C bond is formed via intramolecular addition of a primary carbon radical to an aromatic ring. PMID:17428100

  8. Polygonatum sibiricum polysaccharide inhibits osteoporosis by promoting osteoblast formation and blocking osteoclastogenesis through Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Du, Li; Nong, Meng-Ni; Zhao, Jin-Min; Peng, Xiao-Ming; Zong, Shao-Hui; Zeng, Gao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by a balance between bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts. Osteoporosis occurs when osteoclast activity surpasses osteoblast activity. Our previous studies showed the plant-derived natural polysaccharide (Polygonatum sibiricum polysaccharide or PSP) had significant anti-ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporosis effects in vivo, but the mechanisms of PSP’s anti-osteoporosis effect remains unclear. In this study, we assessed PSP’s effect on the generation of osteoblast and osteoclast in vitro. This study showed that PSP promoted the osteogenic differentiation of mouse bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) without affecting BMPs signaling pathway. This effect was due to the increased nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, resulting in a higher expression of osteoblast-related genes. Furthermore, the study showed PSP could inhibit the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis and exert prophylatic protection against LPS-induced osteolysis in vivo. This effect was also related to the increased nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, resulting in the decreased expression of osteoclast-related genes. In conclusion, our results showed that PSP effectively promoted the osteogenic differentiation of mouse BMSCs and suppressed osteoclastogenesis; therefore, it could be used to treat osteoporosis. PMID:27554324

  9. Silicon Promotes Exodermal Casparian Band Formation in Si-Accumulating and Si-Excluding Species by Forming Phenol Complexes.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Alexander T; Schulze, Sascha; Hinrichs, Martin; Specht, André; Waßmann, Friedrich; Schreiber, Lukas; Schenk, Manfred K

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effect of Silicon (Si) on Casparian band (CB) development, chemical composition of the exodermal CB and Si deposition across the root in the Si accumulators rice and maize and the Si non-accumulator onion. Plants were cultivated in nutrient solution with and without Si supply. The CB development was determined in stained root cross-sections. The outer part of the roots containing the exodermis was isolated after enzymatic treatment. The exodermal suberin was transesterified with MeOH/BF3 and the chemical composition was measured using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) and flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS) was used to determine the Si deposition across root cross sections. Si promoted CB formation in the roots of Si-accumulator and Si non-accumulator species. The exodermal suberin was decreased in rice and maize due to decreased amounts of aromatic suberin fractions. Si did not affect the concentration of lignin and lignin-like polymers in the outer part of rice, maize and onion roots. The highest Si depositions were found in the tissues containing CB. These data along with literature were used to suggest a mechanism how Si promotes the CB development by forming complexes with phenols.

  10. Gastric LTi cells promote lymphoid follicle formation but are limited by IRAK-M and do not alter microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Shiu, J; Piazuelo, M B; Ding, H; Czinn, S J; Drakes, M L; Banerjee, A; Basappa, N; Kobayashi, K S; Fricke, W F; Blanchard, T G

    2015-09-01

    Lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells are activated by accessory cell IL-23, and promote lymphoid tissue genesis and antibacterial peptide production by the mucosal epithelium. We investigated the role of LTi cells in the gastric mucosa in the context of microbial infection. Mice deficient in IRAK-M, a negative regulator of TLR signaling, were investigated for increased LTi cell activity, and antibody mediated LTi cell depletion was used to analyze LTi cell dependent antimicrobial activity. H. pylori infected IRAK-M deficient mice developed increased gastric IL-17 and lymphoid follicles compared to wild type mice. LTi cells were present in naive and infected mice, with increased numbers in IRAK-M deficient mice by two weeks. Helicobacter and Candida infection of LTi cell depleted rag1(-/-) mice demonstrated LTi-dependent increases in calprotectin but not RegIII proteins. However, pathogen and commensal microbiota populations remained unchanged in the presence or absence of LTi cell function. These data demonstrate LTi cells are present in the stomach and promote lymphoid follicle formation in response to infection, but are limited by IRAK-M expression. Additionally, LTi cell mediated antimicrobial peptide production at the gastric epithelium is less efficacious at protecting against microbial pathogens than has been reported for other tissues.

  11. Pyrrolidine and piperidine formation via copper(II) carboxylate-promoted intramolecular carboamination of unactivated olefins: diastereoselectivity and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Eric S; Fuller, Peter H; Kasi, Dhanalakshmi; Chemler, Sherry R

    2007-05-11

    An expanded substrate scope and in-depth analysis of the reaction mechanism of the copper(II) carboxylate-promoted intramolecular carboamination of unactivated alkenes is described. This method provides access to N-functionalized pyrrolidines and piperidines. Both aromatic and aliphatic gamma- and delta-alkenyl N-arylsulfonamides undergo the oxidative cyclization reaction efficiently. N-Benzoyl-2-allylaniline also underwent the oxidative cyclization. The terminal olefin substrates examined were more reactive than those with internal olefins, and the latter terminated in elimination rather than carbon-carbon bond formation. The efficiency of the reaction was enhanced by the use of more organic soluble copper(II) carboxylate salts, copper(II) neodecanoate in particular. The reaction times were reduced by the use of microwave heating. High levels of diastereoselectivity were observed in the synthesis of 2,5-disubstituted pyrrolidines, wherein the cis substitution pattern predominates. The mechanism of the reaction is discussed in the context of the observed reactivity and in comparison to analogous reactions promoted by other reagents and conditions. Our evidence supports a mechanism wherein the N-C bond is formed via intramolecular syn aminocupration and the C-C bond is formed via intramolecular addition of a primary carbon radical to an aromatic ring.

  12. Lewis acid promoted titanium alkylidene formation: off-cycle intermediates relevant to olefin trimerization catalysis.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Aaron; VanderVelde, David G; Labinger, Jay A; Bercaw, John E

    2014-07-30

    Two new precatalysts for ethylene and α-olefin trimerization, (FI)Ti(CH2SiMe3)2Me and (FI)Ti(CH2CMe3)2Me (FI = phenoxy-imine), have been synthesized and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. (FI)Ti(CH2SiMe3)2Me can be activated with 1 equiv of B(C6F5)3 at room temperature to give the solvent-separated ion pair [(FI)Ti(CH2SiMe3)2][MeB(C6F5)3], which catalytically trimerizes ethylene or 1-pentene to produce 1-hexene or C15 olefins, respectively. The neopentyl analogue (FI)Ti(CH2CMe3)2Me is unstable toward activation with B(C6F5)3 at room temperature, giving no discernible diamagnetic titanium complexes, but at -30 °C the following can be observed by NMR spectroscopy: (i) formation of the bis-neopentyl cation [(FI)Ti(CH2CMe3)2](+), (ii) α-elimination of neopentane to give the neopentylidene complex [(FI)Ti(═CHCMe3)](+), and (iii) subsequent conversion to the imido-olefin complex [(MeOAr2N═)Ti(OArHC═CHCMe3)](+) via an intramolecular metathesis reaction with the imine fragment of the (FI) ligand. If the reaction is carried out at low temperature in the presence of ethylene, catalytic production of 1-hexene is observed, in addition to the titanacyclobutane complex [(FI)Ti(CH(CMe3)CH2CH2)](+), resulting from addition of ethylene to the neopentylidene [(FI)Ti(═CHCMe3)](+). None of the complexes observed spectroscopically subsequent to [(FI)Ti(CH2CMe3)2](+) is an intermediate or precursor for ethylene trimerization, but notwithstanding these off-cycle pathways, [(FI)Ti(CH2CMe3)2](+) is a precatalyst that undergoes rapid initiation to generate a catalyst for trimerizing ethylene or 1-pentene.

  13. Pulsed electromagnetic fields partially preserve bone mass, microarchitecture, and strength by promoting bone formation in hindlimb-suspended rats.

    PubMed

    Jing, Da; Cai, Jing; Wu, Yan; Shen, Guanghao; Li, Feijiang; Xu, Qiaoling; Xie, Kangning; Tang, Chi; Liu, Juan; Guo, Wei; Wu, Xiaoming; Jiang, Maogang; Luo, Erping

    2014-10-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF), as a safe and noninvasive method, could promote in vivo and in vitro osteogenesis. Thus far, the effects and underlying mechanisms of PEMF on disuse osteopenia and/or osteoporosis remain poorly understood. Herein, the efficiency of PEMF on osteoporotic bone microarchitecture, bone strength, and bone metabolism, together with its associated signaling pathway mechanism, was systematically investigated in hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rats. Thirty young mature (3-month-old), male Sprague-Dawley rats were equally assigned to control, HU, and HU + PEMF groups. The HU + PEMF group was subjected to daily 2-hour PEMF exposure at 15 Hz, 2.4 mT. After 4 weeks, micro-computed tomography (µCT) results showed that PEMF ameliorated the deterioration of trabecular and cortical bone microarchitecture. Three-point bending test showed that PEMF mitigated HU-induced reduction in femoral mechanical properties, including maximum load, stiffness, and elastic modulus. Moreover, PEMF increased serum bone formation markers, including osteocalcin (OC) and N-terminal propeptide of type 1 procollagen (P1NP); nevertheless, PEMF exerted minor inhibitory effects on bone resorption markers, including C-terminal crosslinked telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX-I) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAcP5b). Bone histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that PEMF increased mineral apposition rate, bone formation rate, and osteoblast numbers in cancellous bone, but PEMF caused no obvious changes on osteoclast numbers. Real-time PCR showed that PEMF promoted tibial gene expressions of Wnt1, LRP5, β-catenin, OPG, and OC, but did not alter RANKL, RANK, or Sost mRNA levels. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of PEMF on disuse-induced osteopenia were further confirmed in 8-month-old mature adult HU rats. Together, these results demonstrate that PEMF alleviated disuse-induced bone loss by promoting skeletal anabolic activities

  14. Deactivation of steam-reforming model catalysts by coke formation. II. Promotion with potassium and effect of water

    SciTech Connect

    Demicheli, M.C.; Duprez, D.; Barbier, J. ); Ferretti, O.A.; Ponzi, E.N. )

    1994-02-01

    The influence of potassium on the hydrogenolysis of cyclopentane and on the simultaneous carbon formation over a series of alumina-supported Ni catalysts was studied. With increasing potassium loadings at temperatures where either a deactivating two-dimensional carbon or a filamentary carbon was formed, the catalytic activity passed through a maximum and then decreased. With relatively high K-doses there was less coking in the presence of steam; the growth of filamentary carbon was then largely reduced. Characterization of the coked catalysts by temperature-programmed oxidation and SEM disclosed quite different roles of alkali: at lower contents, associated with alumina, potassium facilitates the formation of filamentary carbon and minimizes the generation of coke precursors, whereas at higher contents it acts as a poison for both hydrogenolysis and coking reactions. In all cases, the alkali promoted the catalytic oxidation of the carbon deposits. Because of its localization, the alkali could also modify the nickel-carbon interface in carbon filaments. 32 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A at Ser285 to promote cell contact maturation and tight junction formation

    PubMed Central

    Iden, Sandra; Misselwitz, Steve; Peddibhotla, Swetha S.D.; Tuncay, Hüseyin; Rehder, Daniela; Gerke, Volker; Robenek, Horst; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    The PAR-3–atypical protein kinase C (aPKC)–PAR-6 complex has been implicated in the development of apicobasal polarity and the formation of tight junctions (TJs) in vertebrate epithelial cells. It is recruited by junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) to primordial junctions where aPKC is activated by Rho family small guanosine triphosphatases. In this paper, we show that aPKC can interact directly with JAM-A in a PAR-3–independent manner. Upon recruitment to primordial junctions, aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A at S285 to promote the maturation of immature cell–cell contacts. In fully polarized cells, S285-phosphorylated JAM-A is localized exclusively at the TJs, and S285 phosphorylation of JAM-A is required for the development of a functional epithelial barrier. Protein phosphatase 2A dephosphorylates JAM-A at S285, suggesting that it antagonizes the activity of aPKC. Expression of nonphosphorylatable JAM-A/S285A interferes with single lumen specification during cyst development in three-dimensional culture. Our data suggest that aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A at S285 to regulate cell–cell contact maturation, TJ formation, and single lumen specification. PMID:22371556

  16. The Listeria monocytogenes Hibernation-Promoting Factor Is Required for the Formation of 100S Ribosomes, Optimal Fitness, and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Benjamin C.; McKay, Susannah L.; Tang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    During exposure to certain stresses, bacteria dimerize pairs of 70S ribosomes into translationally silent 100S particles in a process called ribosome hibernation. Although the biological roles of ribosome hibernation are not completely understood, this process appears to represent a conserved and adaptive response that contributes to optimal survival during stress and post-exponential-phase growth. Hibernating ribosomes are formed by the activity of one or more highly conserved proteins; gammaproteobacteria produce two relevant proteins, ribosome modulation factor (RMF) and hibernation promoting factor (HPF), while most Gram-positive bacteria produce a single, longer HPF protein. Here, we report the formation of 100S ribosomes by an HPF homolog in Listeria monocytogenes. L. monocytogenes 100S ribosomes were observed by sucrose density gradient centrifugation of bacterial extracts during mid-logarithmic phase, peaked at the transition to stationary phase, and persisted at lower levels during post-exponential-phase growth. 100S ribosomes were undetectable in bacteria carrying an hpf::Himar1 transposon insertion, indicating that HPF is required for ribosome hibernation in L. monocytogenes. Additionally, epitope-tagged HPF cosedimented with 100S ribosomes, supporting its previously described direct role in 100S formation. We examined hpf mRNA by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and identified several conditions that upregulated its expression, including carbon starvation, heat shock, and exposure to high concentrations of salt or ethanol. Survival of HPF-deficient bacteria was impaired under certain conditions both in vitro and during animal infection, providing evidence for the biological relevance of 100S ribosome formation. PMID:25422304

  17. Narrow-band UVB radiation promotes dendrite formation by activating Rac1 in B16 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wu-Qing; Wu, Jin-Feng; Xiao, Xiao-Qing; Xiao, Qin; Wang, Jing; Zuo, Fu-Guo

    2013-09-01

    Melanocytes are found scattered throughout the basal layer of the epidermis. Following hormone or ultraviolet (UV) light stimulation, the melanin pigments contained in melanocytes are transferred through the dendrites to the surrounding keratinocytes to protect against UV light damage or carcinogenesis. This has been considered as a morphological indicator of melanocytes and melanoma cells. Small GTPases of the Rho family have been implicated in the regulation of actin reorganization underlying dendrite formation in melanocytes and melanoma cells. It has been proven that ultraviolet light plays a pivotal role in melanocyte dendrite formation; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this process has not been fully elucidated. The effect of small GTPases, such as Rac1 and RhoA, on the morphology of B16 melanoma cells treated with narrow-band UVB radiation was investigated. The morphological changes were observed under a phase contrast microscope and the F-actin microfilament of the cytoskeleton was observed under a laser scanning confocal microscope. The pull-down assay was performed to detect the activity of the small GTPases Rac1 and RhoA. The morphological changes were evident, with globular cell bodies and increased numbers of tree branch-like dendrites. The cytoskeletal F-actin appeared disassembled following narrow-band UVB irradiation of B16 melanoma cells. Treatment of B16 melanoma cells with narrow-band UVB radiation resulted in the activation of Rac1 in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, the present study may provide a novel method through which narrow-band UVB radiation may be used to promote dendrite formation by activating the Rac1 signaling pathway, resulting in F-actin rearrangement in B16 melanoma cells. PMID:24649261

  18. The Transmembrane Domain Peptide of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Promotes Both Intermediate and Pore Formation during PEG-Mediated Vesicle Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Tanusree; Chakraborty, Hirak; Lentz, Barry R.

    2014-01-01

    We propose mechanisms by which the transmembrane domain of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-TMD) promotes both initiation of fusion and formation of a fusion pore. Time courses of polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-mediated fusion of 25 nm small unilamellar vesicles composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), bovine brain sphingomyelin, and cholesterol (35:30:15:20 molar ratio) were recorded at pH 7.4 at five different temperatures (from 17°C to 37°C) and compared with time courses obtained with the same vesicles containing the fusion-active TMD of the G protein of VSV. Multiple time courses were fitted globally to a one-intermediate ensemble kinetic model to estimate the rate constants for conversion of the aggregated state to an intermediate hemifused state (k1, stalk, or I1) that rapidly transits to an unstable intermediate (I2 state) that converts to a final fusion pore state with a combined rate k3. The probabilities of lipid mixing, contents mixing, and contents leakage in the three states were also obtained from this analysis. The activation thermodynamics for each step were consistent with previously published models of lipid rearrangements during intermediate and pore formation. The influences of VSV-TMD, hexadecane, and VSV-TMD + hexadecane on the kinetics, activation thermodynamics, and membrane structure support the hypothesis that these two agents do not catalyze fusion by a common mechanism, except possibly at the lowest temperatures examined. VSV-TMD primarily catalyzed initial intermediate formation, although it substantially increased the probability of contents mixing in the intermediate state. Our results support the hypothesis that the catalytic influence of VSV-TMD on the initial-intermediate- and pore-forming steps of PEG-mediated fusion derives from its ability to impose a positive intrinsic curvature and thereby stress small unilamellar vesicle outer leaflets as well as the periphery of intermediate

  19. The Listeria monocytogenes hibernation-promoting factor is required for the formation of 100S ribosomes, optimal fitness, and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kline, Benjamin C; McKay, Susannah L; Tang, William W; Portnoy, Daniel A

    2015-02-01

    During exposure to certain stresses, bacteria dimerize pairs of 70S ribosomes into translationally silent 100S particles in a process called ribosome hibernation. Although the biological roles of ribosome hibernation are not completely understood, this process appears to represent a conserved and adaptive response that contributes to optimal survival during stress and post-exponential-phase growth. Hibernating ribosomes are formed by the activity of one or more highly conserved proteins; gammaproteobacteria produce two relevant proteins, ribosome modulation factor (RMF) and hibernation promoting factor (HPF), while most Gram-positive bacteria produce a single, longer HPF protein. Here, we report the formation of 100S ribosomes by an HPF homolog in Listeria monocytogenes. L. monocytogenes 100S ribosomes were observed by sucrose density gradient centrifugation of bacterial extracts during mid-logarithmic phase, peaked at the transition to stationary phase, and persisted at lower levels during post-exponential-phase growth. 100S ribosomes were undetectable in bacteria carrying an hpf::Himar1 transposon insertion, indicating that HPF is required for ribosome hibernation in L. monocytogenes. Additionally, epitope-tagged HPF cosedimented with 100S ribosomes, supporting its previously described direct role in 100S formation. We examined hpf mRNA by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and identified several conditions that upregulated its expression, including carbon starvation, heat shock, and exposure to high concentrations of salt or ethanol. Survival of HPF-deficient bacteria was impaired under certain conditions both in vitro and during animal infection, providing evidence for the biological relevance of 100S ribosome formation.

  20. Overproduction, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of human Fe65-PTB2 in complex with the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain

    SciTech Connect

    Radzimanowski, Jens; Beyreuther, Konrad; Sinning, Irmgard; Wild, Klemens

    2008-05-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which releases the aggregation-prone amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and liberates the intracellular domain (AICD) that interacts with various adaptor proteins. The crystallized AICD–Fe65-PTB2 complex is of central importance for APP translocation, nuclear signalling, processing and Aβ generation. Alzheimer’s disease is associated with typical brain deposits (senile plaques) that mainly contain the neurotoxic amyloid β peptide. This peptide results from proteolytic processing of the type I transmembrane protein amyloid precursor protein (APP). During this proteolytic pathway the APP intracellular domain (AICD) is released into the cytosol, where it associates with various adaptor proteins. The interaction of the AICD with the C-terminal phosphotyrosine-binding domain of Fe65 (Fe65-PTB2) regulates APP translocation, signalling and processing. Human AICD and Fe65-PTB2 have been cloned, overproduced and purified in large amounts in Escherichia coli. A complex of Fe65-PTB2 with the C-terminal 32 amino acids of the AICD gave well diffracting hexagonal crystals and data have been collected to 2.1 Å resolution. Initial phases obtained by the molecular-replacement method are of good quality and revealed well defined electron density for the substrate peptide.

  1. High Fat Diet Enhances β-Site Cleavage of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) via Promoting β-Site APP Cleaving Enzyme 1/Adaptor Protein 2/Clathrin Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Maesako, Masato; Uemura, Maiko; Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Sasaki, Kazuki; Watanabe, Kiwamu; Noda, Yasuha; Ueda, Karin; Asada-Utsugi, Megumi; Kubota, Masakazu; Okawa, Katsuya; Ihara, Masafumi; Shimohama, Shun; Uemura, Kengo; Kinoshita, Ayae

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are risk factors of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We reported that a high fat diet (HFD) promotes amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleavage by β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) without increasing BACE1 levels in APP transgenic mice. However, the detailed mechanism had remained unclear. Here we demonstrate that HFD promotes BACE1/Adaptor protein-2 (AP-2)/clathrin complex formation by increasing AP-2 levels in APP transgenic mice. In Swedish APP overexpressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells as well as in SH-SY5Y cells, overexpression of AP-2 promoted the formation of BACE1/AP-2/clathrin complex, increasing the level of the soluble form of APP β (sAPPβ). On the other hand, mutant D495R BACE1, which inhibits formation of this trimeric complex, was shown to decrease the level of sAPPβ. Overexpression of AP-2 promoted the internalization of BACE1 from the cell surface, thus reducing the cell surface BACE1 level. As such, we concluded that HFD may induce the formation of the BACE1/AP-2/clathrin complex, which is followed by its transport of BACE1 from the cell surface to the intracellular compartments. These events might be associated with the enhancement of β-site cleavage of APP in APP transgenic mice. Here we present evidence that HFD, by regulation of subcellular trafficking of BACE1, promotes APP cleavage. PMID:26414661

  2. Human Choline Kinase-α Promotes Hepatitis C Virus RNA Replication through Modulation of Membranous Viral Replication Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Mun-Teng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection reorganizes cellular membranes to create an active viral replication site named the membranous web (MW). The role that human choline kinase-α (hCKα) plays in HCV replication remains elusive. Here, we first showed that hCKα activity, not the CDP-choline pathway, promoted viral RNA replication. Confocal microscopy and subcellular fractionation of HCV-infected cells revealed that a small fraction of hCKα colocalized with the viral replication complex (RC) on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and that HCV infection increased hCKα localization to the ER. In the pTM-NS3-NS5B model, NS3-NS5B expression increased the localization of the wild-type, not the inactive D288A mutant, hCKα on the ER, and hCKα activity was required for effective trafficking of hCKα and NS5A to the ER. Coimmunoprecipitation showed that hCKα was recruited onto the viral RC presumably through its binding to NS5A domain 1 (D1). hCKα silencing or treatment with CK37, an hCKα activity inhibitor, abolished HCV-induced MW formation. In addition, hCKα depletion hindered NS5A localization on the ER, interfered with NS5A and NS5B colocalization, and mitigated NS5A-NS5B interactions but had no apparent effect on NS5A-NS4B and NS4B-NS5B interactions. Nevertheless, hCKα activity was not essential for the binding of NS5A to hCKα or NS5B. These findings demonstrate that hCKα forms a complex with NS5A and that hCKα activity enhances the targeting of the complex to the ER, where hCKα protein, not activity, mediates NS5A binding to NS5B, thereby promoting functional membranous viral RC assembly and viral RNA replication. IMPORTANCE HCV infection reorganizes the cellular membrane to create an active viral replication site named the membranous web (MW). Here, we report that human choline kinase-α (hCKα) acts as an essential host factor for HCV RNA replication. A fraction of hCKα colocalizes with the viral replication complex (RC) on the endoplasmic reticulum

  3. Human recombinant cementum attachment protein (hrPTPLa/CAP) promotes hydroxyapatite crystal formation in vitro and bone healing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Gonzalo; Arenas, Jesús; Romo, Enrique; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Alvarez, Marco; Narayanan, A Sampath; Velázquez, Ulises; Mercado, Gabriela; Arzate, Higinio

    2014-12-01

    Cementum extracellular matrix is similar to other mineralized tissues; however, this unique tissue contains molecules only present in cementum. A cDNA of these molecules, cementum attachment protein (hrPTPLa/CAP) was cloned and expressed in a prokaryotic system. This molecule is an alternative splicing of protein tyrosine phosphatase-like A (PTPLa). In this study, we wanted to determine the structural and functional characteristics of this protein. Our results indicate that hrPTPLa/CAP contains a 43.2% α-helix, 8.9% β-sheet, 2% β-turn and 45.9% random coil secondary structure. Dynamic light scattering shows that this molecule has a size distribution of 4.8 nm and aggregates as an estimated mass of 137 kDa species. AFM characterization and FE-SEM studies indicate that this protein self-assembles into nanospheres with sizes ranging from 7.0 to 27 nm in diameter. Functional studies demonstrate that hrPTPLa/CAP promotes hydroxyapatite crystal nucleation: EDS analysis revealed that hrPTPLa/CAP-induced crystals had a 1.59 ± 0.06 Ca/P ratio. Further confirmation with MicroRaman spectrometry and TEM confirm the presence of hydroxyapatite. In vivo studies using critical-size defects in rat cranium showed that hrPTPLa/CAP promoted 73% ± 2.19% and 87% ± 1.97% new bone formation at 4 and 8 weeks respectively. Although originally identified in cementum, PTPLa/CAP is very effective at inducing bone repair and healing and therefore this novel molecule has a great potential to be used for mineralized tissue bioengineering and tissue regeneration. PMID:25263524

  4. Human recombinant cementum attachment protein (hrPTPLa/CAP) promotes hydroxyapatite crystal formation in vitro and bone healing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Gonzalo; Arenas, Jesús; Romo, Enrique; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Alvarez, Marco; Narayanan, A Sampath; Velázquez, Ulises; Mercado, Gabriela; Arzate, Higinio

    2014-12-01

    Cementum extracellular matrix is similar to other mineralized tissues; however, this unique tissue contains molecules only present in cementum. A cDNA of these molecules, cementum attachment protein (hrPTPLa/CAP) was cloned and expressed in a prokaryotic system. This molecule is an alternative splicing of protein tyrosine phosphatase-like A (PTPLa). In this study, we wanted to determine the structural and functional characteristics of this protein. Our results indicate that hrPTPLa/CAP contains a 43.2% α-helix, 8.9% β-sheet, 2% β-turn and 45.9% random coil secondary structure. Dynamic light scattering shows that this molecule has a size distribution of 4.8 nm and aggregates as an estimated mass of 137 kDa species. AFM characterization and FE-SEM studies indicate that this protein self-assembles into nanospheres with sizes ranging from 7.0 to 27 nm in diameter. Functional studies demonstrate that hrPTPLa/CAP promotes hydroxyapatite crystal nucleation: EDS analysis revealed that hrPTPLa/CAP-induced crystals had a 1.59 ± 0.06 Ca/P ratio. Further confirmation with MicroRaman spectrometry and TEM confirm the presence of hydroxyapatite. In vivo studies using critical-size defects in rat cranium showed that hrPTPLa/CAP promoted 73% ± 2.19% and 87% ± 1.97% new bone formation at 4 and 8 weeks respectively. Although originally identified in cementum, PTPLa/CAP is very effective at inducing bone repair and healing and therefore this novel molecule has a great potential to be used for mineralized tissue bioengineering and tissue regeneration.

  5. GhAGL15s, preferentially expressed during somatic embryogenesis, promote embryogenic callus formation in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Yang, Zuoren; Li, Changfeng; Wang, Ye; Zhang, Chaojun; Wu, Zhixia; Zhang, Xueyan; Liu, Chuanliang; Li, Fuguang

    2014-10-01

    Somatic embryogenesis is a useful tool for gene transfer and propagation of plants. AGAMOUS-LIKE15 (AGL15) promotes somatic embryogenesis in many plant species. In this study, three homologous AGL15 genes were isolated from Gossypium hirsutum L., namely GhAGL15-1, GhAGL15-3, and GhAGL15-4. Their putative proteins contained a highly conserved MADS-box DNA-binding domain and a less conserved K domain. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the three GhAGL15s clustered most closely with AGL15 proteins in other plants. Subcellular location analyses revealed that three GhAGL15s were localized in the nucleus. Furthermore, their expression levels increased following embryogenic callus induction, but sharply decreased during the embryoid stage. GhAGL15-1 and GhAGL15-3 were significantly induced by 2,4-D and kinetin, whereas GhAGL15-4 was only responsive to 2,4-D treatment. Over-expression of the three GhAGL15s in cotton callus improved callus quality and significantly increased the embryogenic callus formation rate, while GhAGL15-4 had the highest positive effect on the embryogenic callus formation rate (an increase from 38.1 to 65.2%). These results suggest that over-expression of GhAGL15s enhances embryogenic potential of transgenic calli. Therefore, spatiotemporal manipulation of GhAGL15s expression may prove valuable in improving cotton transformation efficiency.

  6. Shoot bending promotes flower bud formation by miRNA-mediated regulation in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.).

    PubMed

    Xing, Libo; Zhang, Dong; Zhao, Caiping; Li, Youmei; Ma, Juanjuan; An, Na; Han, Mingyu

    2016-02-01

    Flower induction in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) trees plays an important life cycle role, but young trees produce fewer and inferior quality flower buds. Therefore, shoot bending has become an important cultural practice, significantly promoting the capacity to develop more flower buds during the growing seasons. Additionally, microRNAs (miRNAs) play essential roles in plant growth, flower induction and stress responses. In this study, we identified miRNAs potentially involved in the regulation of bud growth, and flower induction and development, as well as in the response to shoot bending. Of the 195 miRNAs identified, 137 were novel miRNAs. The miRNA expression profiles revealed that the expression levels of 68 and 27 known miRNAs were down-regulated and up-regulated, respectively, in response to shoot bending, and that the 31 differentially expressed novel miRNAs between them formed five major clusters. Additionally, a complex regulatory network associated with auxin, cytokinin, abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA) plays important roles in cell division, bud growth and flower induction, in which related miRNAs and targets mediated regulation. Among them, miR396, 160, 393, and their targets associated with AUX, miR159, 319, 164, and their targets associated with ABA and GA, and flowering-related miRNAs and genes, regulate bud growth and flower bud formation in response to shoot bending. Meanwhile, the flowering genes had significantly higher expression levels during shoot bending, suggesting that they are involved in this regulatory process. This study provides a framework for the future analysis of miRNAs associated with multiple hormones and their roles in the regulation of bud growth, and flower induction and formation in response to shoot bending in apple trees.

  7. A common role of CRP in transcription activation: CRP acts transiently to stimulate events leading to open complex formation at a diverse set of promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Tagami, H; Aiba, H

    1998-01-01

    We have shown previously that the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) is not required after the formation of the open complex at the lac promoter (Tagami and Aiba, 1995, Nucleic Acids Res., 19, 6705-6712). In this paper, we investigate the role of CRP in transcription activation at the malT and gal promoters. At the malT promoter, RNA polymerase (RNAP) forms a nonproductive RNAP-promoter binary complex in the absence of CRP and a productive CRP-RNAP-promoter ternary complex in the presence of CRP. CRP can be removed from the malT ternary complex by a moderate concentration of heparin. The resulting binary complex is functionally identical to the ternary complex. At the gal promoter, RNAP predominantly forms a binary complex at the P2 promoter in the absence of CRP and a ternary complex at the P1 promoter in the presence of CRP. A very high concentration of heparin is able to dissociate CRP from the galP1 ternary complex without changing the properties of the complex. These data indicate that CRP is not required for the maintenance of the ternary complex and plays no role in the subsequent steps, irrespective of the promoter. We conclude that the common role of CRP in the activation of transcription is to stimulate events leading to the formation of a productive open complex at a diverse set of CRP-dependent promoters. We suggest that the interaction between CRP and RNAP is needed only transiently for the activation of transcription. PMID:9501097

  8. Phenylethanol promotes adhesion and biofilm formation of the antagonistic yeast Kloeckera apiculata for the control of blue mold on citrus.

    PubMed

    Pu, Liu; Jingfan, Fang; Kai, Chen; Chao-an, Long; Yunjiang, Cheng

    2014-06-01

    The yeast Kloeckera apiculata strain 34-9 is an antagonist with biological control activity against postharvest diseases of citrus fruit. In a previous study it was demonstrated that K. apiculata produced the aromatic alcohol phenylethanol. In the present study, we found that K. apiculata was able to form biofilm on citrus fruit and embed in an extracellular matrix, which created a mechanical barrier interposed between the wound surface and pathogen. As a quorum-sensing molecule, phenylethanol can promote the formation of filaments by K. apiculata in potato dextrose agar medium, whereas on the citrus fruit, the antagonist remains as yeast after being treated with the same concentration of phenylethanol. It only induced K. apiculata to adhere and form biofilm. Following genome-wide computational and experimental identification of the possible genes associated with K. apiculata adhesion, we identified nine genes possibly involved in triggering yeast adhesion. Six of these genes were significantly induced after phenylethanol stress treatment. This study provides a new model system of the biology of the antagonist-pathogen interactions that occur in the antagonistic yeast K. apiculata for the control of blue mold on citrus caused by Penicillium italicum.

  9. Promotional Effects of Bismuth on the Formation of Platinum-Bismuth Nanowires Network and the Electrocatalytic Activity toward Ethanol Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Du, W.; Su, D.; Wang, Q.; Frenkel, A.I.; Teng, X.

    2011-01-11

    Electrocatalytic activities of Pt and their alloys toward small organic molecules oxidation are highly dependent on their morphology, chemical composition, and electronic structure. Here, we report the synthesis of dendrite-like Pt{sub 95}Bi{sub 5}, Pt{sub 83}Bi{sub 17}, and Pt{sub 76}Bi{sub 24} nanowires network with a high aspect ratio (up to 68). The electronic structure and heterogeneous crystalline structure have been studied using combined techniques, including aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Bismuth-oriented attachment growth mechanism has been proposed for the anisotropic growth of Pt/Bi. The electrochemical activities of Pt/Bi nanowires network toward ethanol oxidations have been tested. In particular, the as-made Pt{sub 95}Bi{sub 5} appears to have superior activity toward ethanol oxidation in comparison with the commercial Pt/C catalyst. The reported promotional effect of Bi on the formation of Pt/Bi and electrochemical activities will be important to design effective catalysts for ethanol fuel cell application.

  10. Promotional Effects of Bismuth on the Formation of Platinum-Bismuth Nanowires Network and the Electrocatalytic Activity toward Ethanol Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    X Teng; W Du; D Su; Q Wang; A Frenkel

    2011-12-31

    Electrocatalytic activities of Pt and their alloys toward small organic molecules oxidation are highly dependent on their morphology, chemical composition, and electronic structure. Here, we report the synthesis of dendrite-like Pt{sub 95}Bi{sub 5}, Pt{sub 83}Bi{sub 17}, and Pt{sub 76}Bi{sub 24} nanowires network with a high aspect ratio (up to 68). The electronic structure and heterogeneous crystalline structure have been studied using combined techniques, including aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Bismuth-oriented attachment growth mechanism has been proposed for the anisotropic growth of Pt/Bi. The electrochemical activities of Pt/Bi nanowires network toward ethanol oxidations have been tested. In particular, the as-made Pt{sub 95}Bi{sub 5} appears to have superior activity toward ethanol oxidation in comparison with the commercial Pt/C catalyst. The reported promotional effect of Bi on the formation of Pt/Bi and electrochemical activities will be important to design effective catalysts for ethanol fuel cell application.

  11. An auxin-mediated shift toward growth isotropy promotes organ formation at the shoot meristem in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Massimiliano; Ali, Olivier; Boudon, Frédéric; Cloarec, Gladys; Abad, Ursula; Cellier, Coralie; Chen, Xu; Gilles, Benjamin; Milani, Pascale; Friml, Jiří; Vernoux, Teva; Godin, Christophe; Hamant, Olivier; Traas, Jan

    2014-10-01

    To control morphogenesis, molecular regulatory networks have to interfere with the mechanical properties of the individual cells of developing organs and tissues, but how this is achieved is not well known. We study this issue here in the shoot meristem of higher plants, a group of undifferentiated cells where complex changes in growth rates and directions lead to the continuous formation of new organs. Here, we show that the plant hormone auxin plays an important role in this process via a dual, local effect on the extracellular matrix, the cell wall, which determines cell shape. Our study reveals that auxin not only causes a limited reduction in wall stiffness but also directly interferes with wall anisotropy via the regulation of cortical microtubule dynamics. We further show that to induce growth isotropy and organ outgrowth, auxin somehow interferes with the cortical microtubule-ordering activity of a network of proteins, including AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN 1 and KATANIN 1. Numerical simulations further indicate that the induced isotropy is sufficient to amplify the effects of the relatively minor changes in wall stiffness to promote organogenesis and the establishment of new growth axes in a robust manner.

  12. Elastin-Derived Peptides Promote Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation by Modulating M1/M2 Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Dale, Matthew A; Xiong, Wanfen; Carson, Jeffrey S; Suh, Melissa K; Karpisek, Andrew D; Meisinger, Trevor M; Casale, George P; Baxter, B Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a dynamic vascular disease characterized by inflammatory cell invasion and extracellular matrix degradation. Damage to elastin in the extracellular matrix results in release of elastin-derived peptides (EDPs), which are chemotactic for inflammatory cells such as monocytes. Their effect on macrophage polarization is less well known. Proinflammatory M1 macrophages initially are recruited to sites of injury, but, if their effects are prolonged, they can lead to chronic inflammation that prevents normal tissue repair. Conversely, anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages reduce inflammation and aid in wound healing. Thus, a proper M1/M2 ratio is vital for tissue homeostasis. Abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue reveals a high M1/M2 ratio in which proinflammatory cells and their associated markers dominate. In the current study, in vitro treatment of bone marrow-derived macrophages with EDPs induced M1 macrophage polarization. By using C57BL/6 mice, Ab-mediated neutralization of EDPs reduced aortic dilation, matrix metalloproteinase activity, and proinflammatory cytokine expression at early and late time points after aneurysm induction. Furthermore, direct manipulation of the M1/M2 balance altered aortic dilation. Injection of M2-polarized macrophages reduced aortic dilation after aneurysm induction. EDPs promoted a proinflammatory environment in aortic tissue by inducing M1 polarization, and neutralization of EDPs attenuated aortic dilation. The M1/M2 imbalance is vital to aneurysm formation. PMID:27183603

  13. Brg1 promotes both tumor-suppressive and oncogenic activities at distinct stages of pancreatic cancer formation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Nilotpal; Malik, Shivani; Villanueva, Karina E.; Urano, Atsushi; Lu, Xinyuan; Von Figura, Guido; Seeley, E. Scott; Dawson, David W.; Collisson, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) develops predominantly through pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) precursor lesions. Pancreatic acinar cells are reprogrammed to a “ductal-like” state during PanIN-PDA formation. Here, we demonstrate a parallel mechanism operative in mature duct cells during which functional cells undergo “ductal retrogression” to form IPMN-PDA. We further identify critical antagonistic roles for Brahma-related gene 1 (Brg1), a catalytic subunit of the SWI/SNF complexes, during IPMN-PDA development. In mature duct cells, Brg1 inhibits the dedifferentiation that precedes neoplastic transformation, thus attenuating tumor initiation. In contrast, Brg1 promotes tumorigenesis in full-blown PDA by supporting a mesenchymal-like transcriptional landscape. We further show that JQ1, a drug that is currently being tested in clinical trials for hematological malignancies, impairs PDA tumorigenesis by both mimicking some and inhibiting other Brg1-mediated functions. In summary, our study demonstrates the context-dependent roles of Brg1 and points to potential therapeutic treatment options based on epigenetic regulation in PDA. PMID:25792600

  14. Top3β is an RNA topoisomerase that works with Fragile X syndrome protein to promote synapse formation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dongyi; Shen, Weiping; Guo, Rong; Xue, Yutong; Peng, Wei; Sima, Jian; Yang, Jay; Sharov, Alexei; Srikantan, Subramanya; Yang, Jiandong; Fox, David; Qian, Yong; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Piao, Yulan; Machamer, James; Joshi, Samit R.; Mohanty, Subhasis; Shaw, Albert C.; Lloyd, Thomas E.; Brown, Grant W.; Ko, Minoru S.H.; Gorospe, Myriam; Zou, Sige; Wang, Weidong

    2013-01-01

    Topoisomerases are crucial to solve DNA topological problems, but they have not been linked to RNA metabolism. Here we show that human topoisomerase 3β (Top3β) is an RNA topoisomerase that biochemically and genetically interacts with FMRP, a protein deficient in Fragile X syndrome and known to regulate translation of mRNAs important for neuronal function and autism. Notably, the FMRP-Top3β interaction is abolished by a disease-associated FMRP mutation, suggesting that Top3β may contribute to pathogenesis of mental disorders. Top3β binds multiple mRNAs encoded by genes with neuronal functions related to schizophrenia and autism. Expression of one such gene, ptk2/FAK, is reduced in neuromuscular junctions of Top3β mutant flies. Synapse formation is defective in Top3β mutant flies and mice, as observed in FMRP mutant animals. Our findings suggest that Top3β acts as an RNA topoisomerase and works with FMRP to promote expression of mRNAs critical for neurodevelopment and mental health. PMID:23912945

  15. A Novel Collagen Matricryptin Reduces Left Ventricular Dilation Post-myocardial Infarction by Promoting Scar Formation and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Merry L.; Iyer, Rugmani Padmanabhan; Zamilpa, Rogelio; Yabluchanskiy, Andriy; DeLeon-Pennell, Kristine Y.; Hall, Michael E.; Kaplan, Abdullah; Zouein, Fouad A.; Bratton, Dustin; Flynn, Elizabeth R.; Cannon, Presley L.; Tian, Yuan; Jin, Yu-Fang; Lange, Richard A.; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Fields, Gregg B.; de Castro Brás, Lisandra E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Proteolytically-released extracellular matrix (ECM) fragments, matricryptins, are biologically active and play important roles in wound healing. Following myocardial infarction (MI), collagen I, a major component of cardiac ECM, is cleaved by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Objectives We identified novel collagen-derived matricryptins generated post-MI that mediate remodeling of the left ventricle (LV). Results In situ, MMP-2 and -9 generate a collagen Iα1 C-1158/59 fragment, and MMP-9 can further degrade it. The C-1158/59 fragment was identified post-MI both in human plasma and mouse LV at levels that inversely correlated to MMP-9 levels. We synthesized a peptide beginning at the cleavage site (p1158/59, amino acids 1159 to 1173) to investigate its biological functions. In vitro, p1158/59 stimulated fibroblast wound healing and robustly promoted angiogenesis. In vivo, early post-MI treatment with p1158/59 reduced LV dilation at day 7 post-MI by preserving LV structure (p < 0.05 versus control). The p1158/59 stimulated both in vitro and in vivo wound healing by enhancing basement membrane proteins, granulation tissue components, and angiogenic factors. Conclusions Collagen Iα1 matricryptin p1158/59 facilitates LV remodeling post-MI by regulating scar formation through targeted ECM generation and stimulation of angiogenesis. PMID:26383724

  16. G4-DNA Formation in the HRAS Promoter and Rational Design of Decoy Oligonucleotides for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Membrino, Alexandro; Cogoi, Susanna; Pedersen, Erik B.; Xodo, Luigi E.

    2011-01-01

    HRAS is a proto-oncogene involved in the tumorigenesis of urinary bladder cancer. In the HRAS promoter we identified two G-rich elements, hras-1 and hras-2, that fold, respectively, into an antiparallel and a parallel quadruplex (qhras-1, qhras-2). When we introduced in sequence hras-1 or hras-2 two point mutations that block quadruplex formation, transcription increased 5-fold, but when we stabilized the G-quadruplexes by guanidinium phthalocyanines, transcription decreased to 20% of control. By ChIP we found that sequence hras-1 is bound only by MAZ, while hras-2 is bound by MAZ and Sp1: two transcription factors recognizing guanine boxes. We also discovered by EMSA that recombinant MAZ-GST binds to both HRAS quadruplexes, while Sp1-GST only binds to qhras-1. The over-expression of MAZ and Sp1 synergistically activates HRAS transcription, while silencing each gene by RNAi results in a strong down-regulation of transcription. All these data indicate that the HRAS G-quadruplexes behave as transcription repressors. Finally, we designed decoy oligonucleotides mimicking the HRAS quadruplexes, bearing (R)-1-O-[4-(1-Pyrenylethynyl) phenylmethyl] glycerol and LNA modifications to increase their stability and nuclease resistance (G4-decoys). The G4-decoys repressed HRAS transcription and caused a strong antiproliferative effect, mediated by apoptosis, in T24 bladder cancer cells where HRAS is mutated. PMID:21931711

  17. Smooth muscle cell-specific Tgfbr1 deficiency promotes aortic aneurysm formation by stimulating multiple signaling events

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pu; Schmit, Bradley M.; Fu, Chunhua; DeSart, Kenneth; Oh, S. Paul; Berceli, Scott A.; Jiang, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling disorder has emerged as a common molecular signature for aortic aneurysm development. The timing of postnatal maturation plays a key role in dictating the biological outcome of TGF-β signaling disorders in the aortic wall. In this study, we investigated the impact of deficiency of TGFβ receptors on the structural homeostasis of mature aortas. We used an inducible Cre-loxP system driven by a Myh11 promoter to delete Tgfbr1, Tgfbr2, or both in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of adult mice. TGFBR1 deficiency resulted in rapid and severe aneurysmal degeneration, with 100% penetrance of ascending thoracic aortas, whereas TGFBR2 deletion only caused mild aortic pathology with low (26%) lesion prevalence. Removal of TGFBR2 attenuated the aortic pathology caused by TGFBR1 deletion and correlated with a reduction of early ERK phosphorylation. In addition, the production of angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme was upregulated in TGFBR1 deficient aortas at the early stage of aneurysmal degeneration. Inhibition of ERK phosphorylation or blockade of AngII type I receptor AT1R prevented aneurysmal degeneration of TGFBR1 deficient aortas. In conclusion, loss of SMC-Tgfbr1 triggers multiple deleterious pathways, including abnormal TGFBR2, ERK, and AngII/AT1R signals that disrupt aortic wall homeostasis to cause aortic aneurysm formation. PMID:27739498

  18. An auxin-mediated shift toward growth isotropy promotes organ formation at the shoot meristem in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Massimiliano; Ali, Olivier; Boudon, Frédéric; Cloarec, Gladys; Abad, Ursula; Cellier, Coralie; Chen, Xu; Gilles, Benjamin; Milani, Pascale; Friml, Jiří; Vernoux, Teva; Godin, Christophe; Hamant, Olivier; Traas, Jan

    2014-10-01

    To control morphogenesis, molecular regulatory networks have to interfere with the mechanical properties of the individual cells of developing organs and tissues, but how this is achieved is not well known. We study this issue here in the shoot meristem of higher plants, a group of undifferentiated cells where complex changes in growth rates and directions lead to the continuous formation of new organs. Here, we show that the plant hormone auxin plays an important role in this process via a dual, local effect on the extracellular matrix, the cell wall, which determines cell shape. Our study reveals that auxin not only causes a limited reduction in wall stiffness but also directly interferes with wall anisotropy via the regulation of cortical microtubule dynamics. We further show that to induce growth isotropy and organ outgrowth, auxin somehow interferes with the cortical microtubule-ordering activity of a network of proteins, including AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN 1 and KATANIN 1. Numerical simulations further indicate that the induced isotropy is sufficient to amplify the effects of the relatively minor changes in wall stiffness to promote organogenesis and the establishment of new growth axes in a robust manner. PMID:25264254

  19. Integrated “plume winter” scenario for the double-phased extinction during the Paleozoic-Mesozoic transition: The G-LB and P-TB events from a Panthalassan perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isozaki, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    changes have appeared twice in the second half of the Permian in a global extent. It is emphasized here that everything geologically unusual started in the Late Guadalupian; i.e., (1) the first mass extinction, (2) onset of the superanoxia, (3) sea-level drop down to the Phanerozoic minimum, (4) onset of volatile fluctuation in carbon isotope ratio, 5) 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio of the Paleozoic minimum, (6) extensive felsic alkaline volcanism, and (7) Illawarra Reversal. The felsic alkaline volcanism and the concurrent formation of several large igneous provinces (LIPs) in the eastern Pangea suggest that the Permian biosphere was involved in severe volcanic hazards twice at the G-LB and the P-TB. This episodic magmatism was likely related to the activity of a mantle superplume that initially rifted Pangea. The supercontinent-dividing superplume branched into several secondary plumes in the mantle transition zone (410-660 km deep) beneath Pangea. These secondary plumes induced the decompressional melting of mantle peridotite and pre-existing Pangean crust to form several LIPs that likely caused a "plume winter" with global cooling by dust/aerosol screens in the stratosphere, gas poisoning, acid rain damage to surface vegetation etc. After the main eruption of plume-derived flood basalt, global warming (plume summer) took over cooling, delayed the recovery of biodiversity, and intensified the ocean stratification. It was repeated twice at the G-LB and P-TB. A unique geomagnetic episode called the Illawarra Reversal around the Wordian-Capitanian boundary (ca. 265 Ma) recorded the appearance of a large instability in the geomagnetic dipole in the Earth's outer core. This rapid change was triggered likely by the episodic fall-down of a cold megalith (subducted oceanic slabs) from the upper mantle to the D″ layer above the 2900 km-deep core-mantle boundary, in tight association with the launching of a mantle superplume. The initial changes in the surface environment in the Capitanian

  20. Correlating high power conversion efficiency of PTB7:PC71BM inverted organic solar cells with nanoscale structures.

    PubMed

    Das, Sanjib; Keum, Jong K; Browning, James F; Gu, Gong; Yang, Bin; Dyck, Ondrej; Do, Changwoo; Chen, Wei; Chen, Jihua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Hong, Kunlun; Rondinone, Adam J; Joshi, Pooran C; Geohegan, David B; Duscher, Gerd; Xiao, Kai

    2015-10-14

    Advances in material design and device engineering led to inverted organic solar cells (i-OSCs) with superior power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) compared to their "conventional" counterparts, in addition to the well-known better ambient stability. Here, we report an in-depth morphology study of the i-OSC active and cathode modifying layers, employing a model system with a well-established bulk-heterojunction, PTB7:PC71BM as the active layer and poly-[(9,9-bis(3'-(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-alt-2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)] (PFN) as the cathode surface modifying layer. We have also identified the role of a processing additive, 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO), used in the spin-casting of the active layer to increase PCE. Using various characterization techniques, we demonstrate that the high PCEs of i-OSCs are due to the diffusion of electron-accepting PC71BM into the PFN layer, resulting in improved electron transport. The diffusion occurs when residual solvent molecules in the spun-cast film act as a plasticizer. Addition of DIO to the casting solution results in more PC71BM diffusion and therefore more efficient electron transport. This work provides important insight and guidance to further enhancement of i-OSC performance by materials and interface engineering.

  1. Irradiation-induced degradation of PTB7 investigated by valence band and S 2p photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darlatt, Erik; Muhsin, Burhan; Roesch, Roland; Lupulescu, Cosmin; Roth, Friedrich; Kolbe, Michael; Gottwald, Alexander; Hoppe, Harald; Richter, Mathias

    2016-08-01

    Monochromatic radiation with known absolute radiant power from an undulator at the electron storage ring Metrology Light Source (MLS) was used to irradiate PTB7 (a thieno[3, 4-b]thiophene-alt-benzodithiophene polymer) thin films at wavelengths (photon energies) of 185 nm (6.70 eV), 220 nm (5.64 eV), 300 nm (4.13 eV), 320 nm (3.88 eV), 356 nm (3.48 eV) and 675 nm (1.84 eV) under ultra-high vacuum conditions for the investigation of radiation-induced degradation effects. The characterization of the thin films is focused at ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) of valence bands and is complemented by S 2p x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (S 2p XPS) before and after the irradiation procedure. The radiant exposure was determined for each irradiation by means of photodiodes traceably calibrated to the international system of units SI. The valence band spectra show the strongest changes for the shortest wavelengths and no degradation effect at 356 nm and 675 nm even with the highest radiant exposure applied. In the spectral range where the Sun appears bright on the Earth’s surface, no degradation effects are observed.

  2. The PTB primary standard for the absorbed-dose to water for I-125 interstitial brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, T.

    2012-10-01

    The German national metrology institute (PTB) developed a primary standard in terms of absorbed-dose to water Dw for low-energy interstitial brachytherapy sources, which is based on an extrapolation chamber in a phantom of water-equivalent material. The method to determine Dw from extrapolation chamber measurements has been newly developed and is already described in the literature. With the chamber the absorbed-dose at 30 cm distance from the source is measured and the quantity is converted into the desired quantity, the absorbed-dose to water measured at 1 cm distance perpendicular to the source axis. In this paper, a synthesis of the work done within the EMRP Project: ‘TP2.JRP6: Increasing Cancer Treatment Efficacy Using 3D Brachytherapy’ is given and the final results and the final uncertainty budget are presented. Furthermore, an experimentally determined dose-rate constant for this seed type (BEBIG Symmetra I25.S16) is given based on the measurement of four different instances.

  3. IL-10 Promotes Neurite Outgrowth and Synapse Formation in Cultured Cortical Neurons after the Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation via JAK1/STAT3 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongbin; Lin, Wei; Zhang, Yixian; Lin, Longzai; Chen, Jianhao; Zeng, Yongping; Zheng, Mouwei; Zhuang, Zezhong; Du, Houwei; Chen, Ronghua; Liu, Nan

    2016-01-01

    As a classic immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10) provides neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia in vivo or oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced injury in vitro. However, it remains blurred whether IL-10 promotes neurite outgrowth and synapse formation in cultured primary cortical neurons after OGD injury. In order to evaluate its effect on neuronal apoptosis, neurite outgrowth and synapse formation, we administered IL-10 or IL-10 neutralizing antibody (IL-10NA) to cultured rat primary cortical neurons after OGD injury. We found that IL-10 treatment activated the Janus kinase 1 (JAK1)/signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. Moreover, IL-10 attenuated OGD-induced neuronal apoptosis by down-regulating the Bax expression and up-regulating the Bcl-2 expression, facilitated neurite outgrowth by increasing the expression of Netrin-1, and promoted synapse formation in cultured primary cortical neurons after OGD injury. These effects were partly abolished by JAK1 inhibitor GLPG0634. Contrarily, IL-10NA produced opposite effects on the cultured cortical neurons after OGD injury. Taken together, our findings suggest that IL-10 not only attenuates neuronal apoptosis, but also promotes neurite outgrowth and synapse formation via the JAK1/STAT3 signaling pathway in cultured primary cortical neurons after OGD injury. PMID:27456198

  4. Substoichiometric Levels of Cu2+ Ions Accelerate the Kinetics of Fiber Formation and Promote Cell Toxicity of Amyloid-β from Alzheimer Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Sarell, Claire J.; Wilkinson, Shane R.; Viles, John H.

    2010-01-01

    A role for Cu2+ ions in Alzheimer disease is often disputed, as it is believed that Cu2+ ions only promote nontoxic amorphous aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ). In contrast with currently held opinion, we show that the presence of substoichiometric levels of Cu2+ ions in fact doubles the rate of production of amyloid fibers, accelerating both the nucleation and elongation of fiber formation. We suggest that binding of Cu2+ ions at a physiological pH causes Aβ to approach its isoelectric point, thus inducing self-association and fiber formation. We further show that Cu2+ ions bound to Aβ are consistently more toxic to neuronal cells than Aβ in the absence of Cu2+ ions, whereas Cu2+ ions in the absence of Aβ are not cytotoxic. The degree of Cu-Aβ cytotoxicity correlates with the levels of Cu2+ ions that accelerate fiber formation. We note the effect appears to be specific for Cu2+ ions as Zn2+ ions inhibit the formation of fibers. An active role for Cu2+ ions in accelerating fiber formation and promoting cell death suggests impaired copper homeostasis may be a risk factor in Alzheimer disease. PMID:20974842

  5. Correlating high power conversion efficiency of PTB7:PC71BM inverted organic solar cells with nanoscale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sanjib; Keum, Jong K.; Browning, James F.; Gu, Gong; Yang, Bin; Dyck, Ondrej; Do, Changwoo; Chen, Wei; Chen, Jihua; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Hong, Kunlun; Rondinone, Adam J.; Joshi, Pooran C.; Geohegan, David B.; Duscher, Gerd; Xiao, Kai

    2015-09-01

    Advances in material design and device engineering led to inverted organic solar cells (i-OSCs) with superior power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) compared to their ``conventional'' counterparts, in addition to the well-known better ambient stability. Here, we report an in-depth morphology study of the i-OSC active and cathode modifying layers, employing a model system with a well-established bulk-heterojunction, PTB7:PC71BM as the active layer and poly-[(9,9-bis(3'-(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-alt-2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)] (PFN) as the cathode surface modifying layer. We have also identified the role of a processing additive, 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO), used in the spin-casting of the active layer to increase PCE. Using various characterization techniques, we demonstrate that the high PCEs of i-OSCs are due to the diffusion of electron-accepting PC71BM into the PFN layer, resulting in improved electron transport. The diffusion occurs when residual solvent molecules in the spun-cast film act as a plasticizer. Addition of DIO to the casting solution results in more PC71BM diffusion and therefore more efficient electron transport. This work provides important insight and guidance to further enhancement of i-OSC performance by materials and interface engineering.Advances in material design and device engineering led to inverted organic solar cells (i-OSCs) with superior power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) compared to their ``conventional'' counterparts, in addition to the well-known better ambient stability. Here, we report an in-depth morphology study of the i-OSC active and cathode modifying layers, employing a model system with a well-established bulk-heterojunction, PTB7:PC71BM as the active layer and poly-[(9,9-bis(3'-(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-alt-2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)] (PFN) as the cathode surface modifying layer. We have also identified the role of a processing additive, 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO), used in the spin-casting of the active

  6. Correlating High Power Conversion Efficiency of PTB7:PC71BM Inverted Organic Solar Cells with Nanoscale Structures

    DOE PAGES

    Das, Sanjib; Keum, Jong Kahk; Browning, Jim; Gu, Gong; Yang, Bin; Do, Changwoo; Chen, Wei; Chen, Jihua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Hong, Kunlun; et al

    2015-01-01

    Advances in materials design and device engineering led to inverted organic solar cells (i-OSCs) with superior power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) to their conventional counterparts, in addition to the well-known better ambient stability. Despite the significant progress, however, it has so far been unclear how the morphologies of the photoactive layer and its interface with the cathode modifying layer impact device performance. Here, we report an in-depth morphology study of the i-OSC active and cathode modifying layers, employing a model system with the well-established bulk-heterojunction, PTB7:PC71BM as the active layer and poly-[(9,9-bis(3 -(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-alt-2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)] (PFN) as the cathode surface modifying layer. Wemore » have also identified the role of a processing additive, 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO), used in the spin-casting of the active layer to increase PCE. Using a variety of characterization techniques, we demonstrate that the high PCEs of i-OSCs are due to the smearing (diffusion) of electron-accepting PC71BM into the PFN layer, resulting in improved electron transport. The PC71BM diffusion occurs after spin-casting the active layer onto the PFN layer, when residual solvent molecules act as a plasticizer. The DIO additive, with a higher boiling point than the host solvent, has a longer residence time in the spin-cast active layer, resulting in more PC71BM smearing and therefore more efficient electron transport. This work provides important insight and guidance to further enhancement of i-OSC performance by materials and interface engineering.« less

  7. New developments at PTB in 3D-AFM with tapping and torsion AFM mode and vector approach probing strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, G.; Hässler-Grohne, W.; Hüser, D.; Wolff, H.; Fluegge, J.; Bosse, H.

    2011-06-01

    A new 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nano structures has been developed at Physikalisch Technische-Bundesanstalt, the national metrology institute of Germany. In its configuration, two piezo actuators are applied to drive the AFM cantilever near its vertical and torsional resonant frequencies. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and/or a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. For enhancing measurement flexibility as well as reducing tip wear, a so called "vector approach probing" (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point by point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface in its normal direction until the desired tip-sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. The measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip is performed, showing a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p-v). A single crystal critical dimension reference material (SCCDRM) having features with almost vertical sidewall is measured using a flared AFM tip. Results show that the feature has averaged left and right sidewall angles of 88.64° and 88.67deg;, respectively. However, the feature width non-uniformity may reach 10 nm within the measurement range of 1 μm. The standard deviation of the averaged middle CD values of 7 repeated measurements reaches 0.35 nm. In addition, an investigation of long term measurement stability is performed on a PTB photomask. The results shows that the 3D-AFM has a drift rate of about 0.00033 nm per line, which confirms the high measurement stability and the very low tip wear.

  8. Support vector regression-guided unravelling: antioxidant capacity and quantitative structure-activity relationship predict reduction and promotion effects of flavonoids on acrylamide formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mengmeng; Wei, Yan; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Yu

    2016-09-01

    We used the support vector regression (SVR) approach to predict and unravel reduction/promotion effect of characteristic flavonoids on the acrylamide formation under a low-moisture Maillard reaction system. Results demonstrated the reduction/promotion effects by flavonoids at addition levels of 1–10000 μmol/L. The maximal inhibition rates (51.7%, 68.8% and 26.1%) and promote rates (57.7%, 178.8% and 27.5%) caused by flavones, flavonols and isoflavones were observed at addition levels of 100 μmol/L and 10000 μmol/L, respectively. The reduction/promotion effects were closely related to the change of trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (ΔTEAC) and well predicted by triple ΔTEAC measurements via SVR models (R: 0.633–0.900). Flavonols exhibit stronger effects on the acrylamide formation than flavones and isoflavones as well as their O-glycosides derivatives, which may be attributed to the number and position of phenolic and 3-enolic hydroxyls. The reduction/promotion effects were well predicted by using optimized quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) descriptors and SVR models (R: 0.926–0.994). Compared to artificial neural network and multi-linear regression models, SVR models exhibited better fitting performance for both TEAC-dependent and QSAR descriptor-dependent predicting work. These observations demonstrated that the SVR models are competent for predicting our understanding on the future use of natural antioxidants for decreasing the acrylamide formation.

  9. Support vector regression-guided unravelling: antioxidant capacity and quantitative structure-activity relationship predict reduction and promotion effects of flavonoids on acrylamide formation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mengmeng; Wei, Yan; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    We used the support vector regression (SVR) approach to predict and unravel reduction/promotion effect of characteristic flavonoids on the acrylamide formation under a low-moisture Maillard reaction system. Results demonstrated the reduction/promotion effects by flavonoids at addition levels of 1–10000 μmol/L. The maximal inhibition rates (51.7%, 68.8% and 26.1%) and promote rates (57.7%, 178.8% and 27.5%) caused by flavones, flavonols and isoflavones were observed at addition levels of 100 μmol/L and 10000 μmol/L, respectively. The reduction/promotion effects were closely related to the change of trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (ΔTEAC) and well predicted by triple ΔTEAC measurements via SVR models (R: 0.633–0.900). Flavonols exhibit stronger effects on the acrylamide formation than flavones and isoflavones as well as their O-glycosides derivatives, which may be attributed to the number and position of phenolic and 3-enolic hydroxyls. The reduction/promotion effects were well predicted by using optimized quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) descriptors and SVR models (R: 0.926–0.994). Compared to artificial neural network and multi-linear regression models, SVR models exhibited better fitting performance for both TEAC-dependent and QSAR descriptor-dependent predicting work. These observations demonstrated that the SVR models are competent for predicting our understanding on the future use of natural antioxidants for decreasing the acrylamide formation. PMID:27586851

  10. Support vector regression-guided unravelling: antioxidant capacity and quantitative structure-activity relationship predict reduction and promotion effects of flavonoids on acrylamide formation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mengmeng; Wei, Yan; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    We used the support vector regression (SVR) approach to predict and unravel reduction/promotion effect of characteristic flavonoids on the acrylamide formation under a low-moisture Maillard reaction system. Results demonstrated the reduction/promotion effects by flavonoids at addition levels of 1-10000 μmol/L. The maximal inhibition rates (51.7%, 68.8% and 26.1%) and promote rates (57.7%, 178.8% and 27.5%) caused by flavones, flavonols and isoflavones were observed at addition levels of 100 μmol/L and 10000 μmol/L, respectively. The reduction/promotion effects were closely related to the change of trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (ΔTEAC) and well predicted by triple ΔTEAC measurements via SVR models (R: 0.633-0.900). Flavonols exhibit stronger effects on the acrylamide formation than flavones and isoflavones as well as their O-glycosides derivatives, which may be attributed to the number and position of phenolic and 3-enolic hydroxyls. The reduction/promotion effects were well predicted by using optimized quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) descriptors and SVR models (R: 0.926-0.994). Compared to artificial neural network and multi-linear regression models, SVR models exhibited better fitting performance for both TEAC-dependent and QSAR descriptor-dependent predicting work. These observations demonstrated that the SVR models are competent for predicting our understanding on the future use of natural antioxidants for decreasing the acrylamide formation. PMID:27586851

  11. Support vector regression-guided unravelling: antioxidant capacity and quantitative structure-activity relationship predict reduction and promotion effects of flavonoids on acrylamide formation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mengmeng; Wei, Yan; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Yu

    2016-09-02

    We used the support vector regression (SVR) approach to predict and unravel reduction/promotion effect of characteristic flavonoids on the acrylamide formation under a low-moisture Maillard reaction system. Results demonstrated the reduction/promotion effects by flavonoids at addition levels of 1-10000 μmol/L. The maximal inhibition rates (51.7%, 68.8% and 26.1%) and promote rates (57.7%, 178.8% and 27.5%) caused by flavones, flavonols and isoflavones were observed at addition levels of 100 μmol/L and 10000 μmol/L, respectively. The reduction/promotion effects were closely related to the change of trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (ΔTEAC) and well predicted by triple ΔTEAC measurements via SVR models (R: 0.633-0.900). Flavonols exhibit stronger effects on the acrylamide formation than flavones and isoflavones as well as their O-glycosides derivatives, which may be attributed to the number and position of phenolic and 3-enolic hydroxyls. The reduction/promotion effects were well predicted by using optimized quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) descriptors and SVR models (R: 0.926-0.994). Compared to artificial neural network and multi-linear regression models, SVR models exhibited better fitting performance for both TEAC-dependent and QSAR descriptor-dependent predicting work. These observations demonstrated that the SVR models are competent for predicting our understanding on the future use of natural antioxidants for decreasing the acrylamide formation.

  12. Epitope-tagged yeast strains reveal promoter driven changes to 3'-end formation and convergent antisense-transcription from common 3' UTRs.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Angavai; Beilharz, Traude H

    2016-01-01

    Epitope-tagging by homologous recombination is ubiquitously used to study gene expression, protein localization and function in yeast. This is generally thought to insulate the regulation of gene expression to that mediated by the promoter and coding regions because native 3' UTR are replaced. Here we show that the 3' UTRs, CYC1 and ADH1, contain cryptic promoters that generate abundant convergent antisense-transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover we show that aberrant, truncating 3' -end formation is often associated with regulated transcription in TAP-tagged strains. Importantly, the steady-state level of both 3' -truncated and antisense transcription products is locus dependent. Using TAP and GFP-tagged strains we show that the transcriptional state of the gene-of-interest induces changes to 3' -end formation by alternative polyadenylation and antisense transcription from a universal 3' UTR. This means that these 3' UTRs contains plastic features that can be molded to reflect the regulatory architecture of the locus rather than bringing their own regulatory paradigm to the gene-fusions as would be expected. Our work holds a cautionary note for studies utilizing tagged strains for quantitative biology, but also provides a new model for the study of promoter driven rewiring of 3' -end formation and regulatory non-coding transcription. PMID:26481348

  13. 3-Methylcholanthrene elicits DNA adduct formation in the CYP1A1 promoter region and attenuates reporter gene expression in rat H4IIE cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moorthy, Bhagavatula . E-mail: bmoorthy@bcm.tmc.edu; Muthiah, Kathirvel; Fazili, Inayat S.; Kondraganti, Sudha R.; Wang Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Jiang Weiwu

    2007-03-23

    Cytochrome CYP1A (CYP1A) enzymes catalyze bioactivation of 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) to genotoxic metabolites. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CYP1A2 catalyzes formation of MC-DNA adducts that are preferentially formed in the promoter region of CYP1A1, resulting in modulation of CYP1A1 gene expression. MC bound covalently to plasmid DNA (50 {mu}g) containing human CYP1A1 promoter (pGL3-1A1), when incubated with wild-type (WT) liver microsomes (2 mg) and NAPPH 37 {sup o}C for 2 h, giving rise to 9 adducts, as determined by {sup 32}P-postlabeling. Eighty percent of adducts was located in the promoter region. Transient transfection of the adducted plasmids into rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells for 16 h, followed by MC (1 {mu}M) treatment for 24 h inhibited reporter (luciferase) gene expression by 75%, compared to unadducted controls. Our results suggest that CYP1A2 plays a key role in sequence-specific MC-DNA adduct formation in the CYP1A1 promoter region, leading to attenuation of CYP1A1 gene expression.

  14. A Model Formative Assessment Strategy to Promote Student-Centered Self-Regulated Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bose, Jayakumar; Rengel, Zed

    2009-01-01

    Adult learners are already involved in the process of self-regulation; hence, higher education institutions should focus on strengthening students' self-regulatory skills. Self-regulation can be facilitated through formative assessment. This paper proposes a model formative assessment strategy that would complement existing university teaching,…

  15. The distal elements, OCT and SPH, stimulate the formation of preinitiation complexes on a human U6 snRNA gene promoter in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, G R; Hixson, J D

    1998-03-15

    The distal control region of a human U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) gene promoter contains two separable elements, octamer (OCT) and SPH, found in many vertebrate snRNA genes. Complete distal regions generally account for a 4- to 100-fold stimulation of snRNA gene promoters. We examined the mechanism of transcriptional stimulation by each element when linked to the proximal U6 promoter. Multimers of either OCT or SPH did not increase transcriptional levels above that with a single copy, either in transfected human cells or after in vitro transcription in a HeLa S100 extract. The orientation of a single SPH element differentially stimulated transcription in transfected cells, whereas the orientation of an octamer element was not important. Using Sarkosyl to limit transcription to a single-round, we concluded that promoters containing either OCT or SPH elements supported an increased number of preinitiation complexes in vitro. Furthermore, the rate of formation of U6 promoter preinitiation complexes resistant to low (0.015%) concentrations of Sarkosyl was accelerated on templates containing either OCT or SPH. However, neither element had a significant effect on the number of rounds of reinitiation in the S100 extract.

  16. Pt-B System Revisited: Pt2B, a New Structure Type of Binary Borides. Ternary WAl12-Type Derivative Borides.

    PubMed

    Sologub, Oksana; Salamakha, Leonid; Rogl, Peter; Stöger, Berthold; Bauer, Ernst; Bernardi, Johannes; Giester, Gerald; Waas, Monika; Svagera, Robert

    2015-11-16

    On the basis of a detailed study applying X-ray single-crystal and powder diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and scanning electron microscopy analysis, it was possible to resolve existing uncertainties in the Pt-rich section (≥65 atom % Pt) of the binary Pt-B phase diagram above 600 °C. The formation of a unique structure has been observed for Pt2B [X-ray single-crystal data: space group C2/m, a = 1.62717(11) nm, b = 0.32788(2) nm, c = 0.44200(3) nm, β = 104.401(4)°, RF2 = 0.030]. Within the homogeneity range of "Pt3B", X-ray powder diffraction phase analysis prompted two structural modifications as a function of temperature. The crystal structure of "hT-Pt3B" complies with the hitherto reported structure of anti-MoS2 [space group P63/mmc, a = 0.279377(2) nm, c = 1.04895(1) nm, RF = 0.075, RI = 0.090]. The structure of the new "[Formula: see text]T-Pt3B" is still unknown. The formation of previously reported Pt∼4B has not been confirmed from binary samples. Exploration of the Pt-rich section of the Pt-Cu-B system at 600 °C revealed a new ternary compound, Pt12CuB6-y [X-ray single-crystal data: space group Im3̅, a = 0.75790(2) nm, y = 3, RF2 = 0.0129], which exhibits the filled WAl12-type structure accommodating boron in the interstitial trigonal-prismatic site 12e. The isotypic platinum-aluminum-boride was synthesized and studied. The solubility of copper in binary platinum borides has been found to attain ∼7 atom % Cu for Pt2B but to be insignificant for "[Formula: see text]T-Pt3B". The architecture of the new Pt2B structure combines puckered layers of boron-filled and empty [Pt6] octahedra (anti-CaCl2-type fragment) alternating along the x axis with a double layer of boron-semifilled [Pt6] trigonal prisms interbedded with a layer of empty tetrahedra and tetragonal pyramids (B-deficient α-T[Formula: see text]I fragment). Assuming boron vacancies ordering (space group R3), the Pt12CuB6-y structure exhibits serpentine-like columns of edge

  17. Pt-B System Revisited: Pt2B, a New Structure Type of Binary Borides. Ternary WAl12-Type Derivative Borides.

    PubMed

    Sologub, Oksana; Salamakha, Leonid; Rogl, Peter; Stöger, Berthold; Bauer, Ernst; Bernardi, Johannes; Giester, Gerald; Waas, Monika; Svagera, Robert

    2015-11-16

    On the basis of a detailed study applying X-ray single-crystal and powder diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and scanning electron microscopy analysis, it was possible to resolve existing uncertainties in the Pt-rich section (≥65 atom % Pt) of the binary Pt-B phase diagram above 600 °C. The formation of a unique structure has been observed for Pt2B [X-ray single-crystal data: space group C2/m, a = 1.62717(11) nm, b = 0.32788(2) nm, c = 0.44200(3) nm, β = 104.401(4)°, RF2 = 0.030]. Within the homogeneity range of "Pt3B", X-ray powder diffraction phase analysis prompted two structural modifications as a function of temperature. The crystal structure of "hT-Pt3B" complies with the hitherto reported structure of anti-MoS2 [space group P63/mmc, a = 0.279377(2) nm, c = 1.04895(1) nm, RF = 0.075, RI = 0.090]. The structure of the new "[Formula: see text]T-Pt3B" is still unknown. The formation of previously reported Pt∼4B has not been confirmed from binary samples. Exploration of the Pt-rich section of the Pt-Cu-B system at 600 °C revealed a new ternary compound, Pt12CuB6-y [X-ray single-crystal data: space group Im3̅, a = 0.75790(2) nm, y = 3, RF2 = 0.0129], which exhibits the filled WAl12-type structure accommodating boron in the interstitial trigonal-prismatic site 12e. The isotypic platinum-aluminum-boride was synthesized and studied. The solubility of copper in binary platinum borides has been found to attain ∼7 atom % Cu for Pt2B but to be insignificant for "[Formula: see text]T-Pt3B". The architecture of the new Pt2B structure combines puckered layers of boron-filled and empty [Pt6] octahedra (anti-CaCl2-type fragment) alternating along the x axis with a double layer of boron-semifilled [Pt6] trigonal prisms interbedded with a layer of empty tetrahedra and tetragonal pyramids (B-deficient α-T[Formula: see text]I fragment). Assuming boron vacancies ordering (space group R3), the Pt12CuB6-y structure exhibits serpentine-like columns of edge

  18. Ash2L enables P53–dependent apoptosis by favoring stable transcription pre–initiation complex formation on its pro-apoptotic target promoters

    PubMed Central

    Mungamuri, Sathish Kumar; Wang, Shaomeng; Manfredi, James J.; Gu, Wei; Aaronson, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin conformation plays a major role in all cellular decisions. We showed previously that P53 pro-apoptotic target promoters are enriched with H3K9me3 mark and induction of P53 abrogates this repressive chromatin conformation by down-regulating SUV39H1, the writer of this mark present on these promoters. In the present study, we demonstrate that in response to P53 stabilization, its pro-apoptotic target promoters become enriched with the H3K4me3 epigenetic mark as well as its readers, Wdr5, RbBP5 and Ash2L, which were not observed in response to SUV39H1 down-regulation alone. Overexpression of Ash2L enhanced P53–dependent apoptosis in response to chemotherapy, associated with increased P53 pro–apoptotic gene promoter occupancy and target gene expression. In contrast, pre–silencing of Ash2L abrogated P53's ability to induce the expression of these transcriptional targets, without affecting P53 or RNAP II recruitment. However, Ash2L pre–silencing, under the same conditions, resulted in reduced RNAP II ser5–CTD phosphorylation on these same pro-apoptotic target promoters, which correlated with reduced promoter occupancy of TFIIB as well as TFIIF (RAP74). Based on these findings, we propose that Ash2L acts in concert with P53 promoter occupancy to activate RNAP II by aiding formation of a stable transcription pre–initiation complex required for its activation. PMID:25023704

  19. TolC Promotes ExPEC Biofilm Formation and Curli Production in Response to Medium Osmolarity

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Bo; Meng, Xian-Rong; Zhang, Li-Yuan; Tan, Chen; Jin, Hui; Zhou, Rui; Gao, Jian-Feng; Wu, Bin; Li, Zi-Li; Chen, Huan-Chun; Bi, Ding-Ren; Li, Shao-Wen

    2014-01-01

    While a high osmolarity medium activates Cpx signaling and causes CpxR to repress csgD expression, and efflux protein TolC protein plays an important role in biofilm formation in Escherichia coli, whether TolC also responds to an osmolarity change to regulate biofilm formation in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) remains unknown. In this study, we constructed ΔtolC mutant and complement ExPEC strains to investigate the role of TolC in the retention of biofilm formation and curli production capability under different osmotic conditions. The ΔtolC mutant showed significantly decreased biofilm formation and lost the ability to produce curli fimbriae compared to its parent ExPEC strain PPECC42 when cultured in M9 medium or 1/2 M9 medium of increased osmolarity with NaCl or sucrose at 28°C. However, biofilm formation and curli production levels were restored to wild-type levels in the ΔtolC mutant in 1/2 M9 medium. We propose for the first time that TolC protein is able to form biofilm even under high osmotic stress. Our findings reveal an interplay between the role of TolC in ExPEC biofilm formation and the osmolarity of the surrounding environment, thus providing guidance for the development of a treatment for ExPEC biofilm formation. PMID:25243151

  20. Oncostatin M promotes bone formation independently of resorption when signaling through leukemia inhibitory factor receptor in mice.

    PubMed

    Walker, Emma C; McGregor, Narelle E; Poulton, Ingrid J; Solano, Melissa; Pompolo, Sueli; Fernandes, Tania J; Constable, Matthew J; Nicholson, Geoff C; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Nicola, Nicos A; Gillespie, Matthew T; Martin, T John; Sims, Natalie A

    2010-02-01

    Effective osteoporosis therapy requires agents that increase the amount and/or quality of bone. Any modification of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption by disease or drug treatment, however, elicits a parallel change in osteoblast-mediated bone formation because the processes are tightly coupled. Anabolic approaches now focus on uncoupling osteoblast action from osteoclast formation, for example, by inhibiting sclerostin, an inhibitor of bone formation that does not influence osteoclast differentiation. Here, we report that oncostatin M (OSM) is produced by osteoblasts and osteocytes in mouse bone and that it has distinct effects when acting through 2 different receptors, OSM receptor (OSMR) and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR). Specifically, mouse OSM (mOSM) inhibited sclerostin production in a stromal cell line and in primary murine osteoblast cultures by acting through LIFR. In contrast, when acting through OSMR, mOSM stimulated RANKL production and osteoclast formation. A key role for OSMR in bone turnover was confirmed by the osteopetrotic phenotype of mice lacking OSMR. Furthermore, in contrast to the accepted model, in which mOSM acts only through OSMR, mOSM inhibited sclerostin expression in Osmr-/- osteoblasts and enhanced bone formation in vivo. These data reveal what we believe to be a novel pathway by which bone formation can be stimulated independently of bone resorption and provide new insights into OSMR and LIFR signaling that are relevant to other medical conditions, including cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases and cancer.

  1. Promotion of peripheral nerve regeneration and prevention of neuroma formation by PRGD/PDLLA/β-TCP conduit: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yixia; Li, Binbin; Yan, Qiongjiao; Dai, Honglian; Wang, Xinyu; Huang, Jifeng; Li, Shipu

    2015-06-01

    In the field of nerve repair, one major challenge is the formation of neuroma. However, reports on both the promotion of nerve regeneration and prevention of traumatic neuroma in the clinical settings are rare in the field of nerve repair. One of the reasons could be the insufficiency in the follow-up system. We have conducted 33 cases of nerve repair using PRGD/PDLLA/β-TCP conduit without any sign of adverse reaction, especially no neuroma formation. Among them, we have selected two cases as representatives to report in this article. The first case was a patient with an upper limb nerve wound was bridged by PRGD/PDLLA/β-TCP conduit and a plate fixation was given. After nearly 3-years' follow-up, the examination results demonstrated that nerve regeneration effect was very good. When the reoperation was performed to remove the steel plate we observed a uniform structure of the regenerated nerve without the formation of neuroma, and to our delight, the implanted conduit was completely degraded 23 months after the implantation. The second case had an obsolete nerve injury with neuroma formation. After removal of the neuroma, the nerve was bridged by PRGD/PDLLA/β-TCP conduit. Follow-up examinations showed that the structure and functional recovery were improved gradually in the 10-month follow-up; no end-enlargement and any other abnormal reaction associated with the characteristic of neuroma were found. Based on our 33-case studies, we have concluded that PRGD/PDLLA/β-TCP nerve conduit could both promote nerve regeneration and prevent neuroma formation; therefore, it is a good alternative for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:26816636

  2. The BR domain of PsrP interacts with extracellular DNA to promote bacterial aggregation; structural insights into pneumococcal biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Tim; Mikaelsson, Cecilia; Beaussart, Audrey; Kikhney, Alexey; Deshmukh, Maya; Wolniak, Sebastian; Pathak, Anuj; Ebel, Christine; Löfling, Jonas; Fogolari, Federico; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Dufrêne, Yves F.; Svergun, Dmitri; Nygren, Per-Åke; Achour, Adnane

    2016-01-01

    The major human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of disease and death worldwide. Pneumococcal biofilm formation within the nasopharynx leads to long-term colonization and persistence within the host. We have previously demonstrated that the capsular surface-associated pneumococcal serine rich repeat protein (PsrP), key factor for biofilm formation, binds to keratin-10 (KRT10) through its microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM)-related globular binding region domain (BR187–385). Here, we show that BR187–385 also binds to DNA, as demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and size exclusion chromatography. Further, heterologous expression of BR187–378 or the longer BR120–378 construct on the surface of a Gram-positive model host bacterium resulted in the formation of cellular aggregates that was significantly enhanced in the presence of DNA. Crystal structure analyses revealed the formation of BR187–385 homo-dimers via an intermolecular β-sheet, resulting in a positively charged concave surface, shaped to accommodate the acidic helical DNA structure. Furthermore, small angle X-ray scattering and circular dichroism studies indicate that the aggregate-enhancing N-terminal region of BR120–166 adopts an extended, non-globular structure. Altogether, our results suggest that PsrP adheres to extracellular DNA in the biofilm matrix and thus promotes pneumococcal biofilm formation. PMID:27582320

  3. The BR domain of PsrP interacts with extracellular DNA to promote bacterial aggregation; structural insights into pneumococcal biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Tim; Mikaelsson, Cecilia; Beaussart, Audrey; Kikhney, Alexey; Deshmukh, Maya; Wolniak, Sebastian; Pathak, Anuj; Ebel, Christine; Löfling, Jonas; Fogolari, Federico; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Dufrêne, Yves F; Svergun, Dmitri; Nygren, Per-Åke; Achour, Adnane

    2016-01-01

    The major human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of disease and death worldwide. Pneumococcal biofilm formation within the nasopharynx leads to long-term colonization and persistence within the host. We have previously demonstrated that the capsular surface-associated pneumococcal serine rich repeat protein (PsrP), key factor for biofilm formation, binds to keratin-10 (KRT10) through its microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM)-related globular binding region domain (BR187-385). Here, we show that BR187-385 also binds to DNA, as demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and size exclusion chromatography. Further, heterologous expression of BR187-378 or the longer BR120-378 construct on the surface of a Gram-positive model host bacterium resulted in the formation of cellular aggregates that was significantly enhanced in the presence of DNA. Crystal structure analyses revealed the formation of BR187-385 homo-dimers via an intermolecular β-sheet, resulting in a positively charged concave surface, shaped to accommodate the acidic helical DNA structure. Furthermore, small angle X-ray scattering and circular dichroism studies indicate that the aggregate-enhancing N-terminal region of BR120-166 adopts an extended, non-globular structure. Altogether, our results suggest that PsrP adheres to extracellular DNA in the biofilm matrix and thus promotes pneumococcal biofilm formation. PMID:27582320

  4. discordia1 and alternative discordia1 Function Redundantly at the Cortical Division Site to Promote Preprophase Band Formation and Orient Division Planes in Maize[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Amanda J.; Gallagher, Kimberly; Smith, Laurie G.

    2009-01-01

    In plants, cell wall placement during cytokinesis is determined by the position of the preprophase band (PPB) and the subsequent expansion of the phragmoplast, which deposits the new cell wall, to the cortical division site delineated by the PPB. New cell walls are often incorrectly oriented during asymmetric cell divisions in the leaf epidermis of maize (Zea mays) discordia1 (dcd1) mutants, and this defect is associated with aberrant PPB formation in asymmetrically dividing cells. dcd1 was cloned and encodes a putative B'' regulatory subunit of the PP2A phosphatase complex highly similar to Arabidopsis thaliana FASS/TONNEAU2, which is required for PPB formation. We also identified alternative discordia1 (add1), a second gene in maize nearly identical to dcd1. While loss of add1 function does not produce a noticeable phenotype, knock down of both genes in add1(RNAi) dcd1(RNAi) plants prevents PPB formation and causes misorientation of symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions. Immunolocalization studies with an antibody that recognizes both DCD1 and ADD1 showed that these proteins colocalize with PPBs and remain at the cortical division site through metaphase. Our results indicate that DCD1 and ADD1 function in PPB formation, that this function is more critical in asymmetrically dividing cells than in symmetrically dividing cells, and that DCD1/ADD1 may have other roles in addition to promoting PPB formation at the cortical division site. PMID:19168717

  5. Cooperativity between Al Sites Promotes Hydrogen Transfer and Carbon–Carbon Bond Formation upon Dimethyl Ether Activation on Alumina

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The methanol-to-olefin (MTO) process allows the conversion of methanol/dimethyl ether into olefins on acidic zeolites via the so-called hydrocarbon pool mechanism. However, the site and mechanism of formation of the first carbon–carbon bond are still a matter of debate. Here, we show that the Lewis acidic Al sites on the 110 facet of γ-Al2O3 can readily activate dimethyl ether to yield CH4, alkenes, and surface formate species according to spectroscopic studies combined with a computational approach. The carbon–carbon forming step as well as the formation of methane and surface formate involves a transient oxonium ion intermediate, generated by a hydrogen transfer between surface methoxy species and coordinated methanol on adjacent Al sites. These results indicate that extra framework Al centers in acidic zeolites, which are associated with alumina, can play a key role in the formation of the first carbon–carbon bond, the initiation step of the industrial MTO process. PMID:27162986

  6. Fibrinogen triggers astrocyte scar formation by promoting the availability of active TGF-β after vascular damage

    PubMed Central

    Schachtrup, Christian; Ryu, Jae K.; Helmrick, Matthew; Vagena, Eirini; Galanakis, Dennis K.; Degen, Jay L.; Margolis, Richard U.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2010-01-01

    Scar formation in the nervous system begins within hours after traumatic injury and is characterized primarily by reactive astrocytes depositing proteoglycans that inhibit regeneration. A fundamental question in CNS repair has been the identity of the initial molecular mediator that triggers glial scar formation. Here we show that the blood protein fibrinogen, which leaks into the CNS immediately after blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption or vascular damage, serves as an early signal for the induction of glial scar formation via the TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway. Our studies revealed that fibrinogen is a carrier of latent TGF-β and induces phosphorylation of Smad2 in astrocytes that leads to inhibition of neurite outgrowth. Consistent with these findings, genetic or pharmacologic depletion of fibrinogen in mice reduces active TGF-β, Smad2 phosphorylation, glial cell activation and neurocan deposition following cortical injury. Furthermore, stereotactic injection of fibrinogen into the mouse cortex is sufficient to induce astrogliosis. Inhibition of the TGF-β receptor pathway abolishes the fibrinogen-induced effects on glial scar formation in vivo and in vitro. These results identify fibrinogen as a primary astrocyte activation signal, provide evidence that deposition of inhibitory proteoglycans is induced by a blood protein that leaks in the CNS after vasculature rupture, and point to TGF-β as a molecular link between vascular permeability and scar formation. PMID:20427645

  7. Dynamic and structural characterisation of multiple steps during complex formation between E. coli RNA polymerase and the tetR promoter from pSC101.

    PubMed Central

    Duval-Valentin, G; Ehrlich, R

    1987-01-01

    Kinetic, functional and structural studies of the recognition of the tetR promoter from pSC101 by E. coli RNA polymerase allowed the characterization of several steps in the specific complex formation and transcription initiation process. First, enzyme and DNA enter in a short life-time complex. An isomerization will convert this unstable complex into a closed stable one where RNA polymerase is tightly attached without establishing stable chemical contacts with the bases. In the next step, stable close contacts appear between both macromolecules involving mainly the downstream part of the promoter. A further isomerization will lead to an open complex where DNA is locally melted and the system is able to initiate transcription. This latter process is accompanied by changes in the upstream part of the promoter. Finally, in vitro transcription assays showed that the position of the major transcription start sites depends on temperature. From the reported results, it appears that the recognition event is a sequential process where different structural elements of the promoter, that can be located apart in the sequence, are involved in a concerted manner in each stage. Images PMID:3547327

  8. Protein kinase D promotes plasticity-induced F-actin stabilization in dendritic spines and regulates memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Bencsik, Norbert; Szíber, Zsófia; Liliom, Hanna; Tárnok, Krisztián; Borbély, Sándor; Gulyás, Márton; Rátkai, Anikó; Szűcs, Attila; Hazai-Novák, Diána; Ellwanger, Kornelia; Rácz, Bence; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Hausser, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Actin turnover in dendritic spines influences spine development, morphology, and plasticity, with functional consequences on learning and memory formation. In nonneuronal cells, protein kinase D (PKD) has an important role in stabilizing F-actin via multiple molecular pathways. Using in vitro models of neuronal plasticity, such as glycine-induced chemical long-term potentiation (LTP), known to evoke synaptic plasticity, or long-term depolarization block by KCl, leading to homeostatic morphological changes, we show that actin stabilization needed for the enlargement of dendritic spines is dependent on PKD activity. Consequently, impaired PKD functions attenuate activity-dependent changes in hippocampal dendritic spines, including LTP formation, cause morphological alterations in vivo, and have deleterious consequences on spatial memory formation. We thus provide compelling evidence that PKD controls synaptic plasticity and learning by regulating actin stability in dendritic spines. PMID:26304723

  9. Evidence that a threshold of serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins recruits CFIm to promote rous sarcoma virus mRNA 3' end formation.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Stephen W; McNally, Lisa M; McNally, Mark T

    2016-11-01

    The weak polyadenylation site (PAS) of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) is activated by the juxtaposition of SR protein binding sites within the spatially separate negative regulator of splicing (NRS) element and the env RNA splicing enhancer (Env enhancer), which are far upstream of the PAS. Juxtaposition occurs by formation of the NRS - 3' ss splicing regulatory complex and is thought to provide a threshold of SR proteins that facilitate long-range stimulation of the PAS. We provide evidence for the threshold model by showing that greater than three synthetic SR protein binding sites are needed to substitute for the Env enhancer, that either the NRS or Env enhancer alone promotes polyadenylation when the distance to the PAS is decreased, and that SR protein binding sites promote binding of the polyadenylation factor cleavage factor I (CFIm) to the weak PAS. These observations may be relevant for cellular PASs. PMID:27596537

  10. Acetylcholine Protects against Candida albicans Infection by Inhibiting Biofilm Formation and Promoting Hemocyte Function in a Galleria mellonella Infection Model.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Ranjith; Borghi, Elisa; Falleni, Monica; Perdoni, Federica; Tosi, Delfina; Lappin, David F; O'Donnell, Lindsay; Greetham, Darren; Ramage, Gordon; Nile, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Both neuronal acetylcholine and nonneuronal acetylcholine have been demonstrated to modulate inflammatory responses. Studies investigating the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections have revealed contradictory findings with regard to disease outcome. At present, the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of fungal infections is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether acetylcholine plays a role in fungal biofilm formation and the pathogenesis of Candida albicans infection. The effect of acetylcholine on C. albicans biofilm formation and metabolism in vitro was assessed using a crystal violet assay and phenotypic microarray analysis. Its effect on the outcome of a C. albicans infection, fungal burden, and biofilm formation were investigated in vivo using a Galleria mellonella infection model. In addition, its effect on modulation of host immunity to C. albicans infection was also determined in vivo using hemocyte counts, cytospin analysis, larval histology, lysozyme assays, hemolytic assays, and real-time PCR. Acetylcholine was shown to have the ability to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, acetylcholine protected G. mellonella larvae from C. albicans infection mortality. The in vivo protection occurred through acetylcholine enhancing the function of hemocytes while at the same time inhibiting C. albicans biofilm formation. Furthermore, acetylcholine also inhibited inflammation-induced damage to internal organs. This is the first demonstration of a role for acetylcholine in protection against fungal infections, in addition to being the first report that this molecule can inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation. Therefore, acetylcholine has the capacity to modulate complex host-fungal interactions and plays a role in dictating the pathogenesis of fungal infections.

  11. Acetylcholine Protects against Candida albicans Infection by Inhibiting Biofilm Formation and Promoting Hemocyte Function in a Galleria mellonella Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Ranjith; Borghi, Elisa; Falleni, Monica; Perdoni, Federica; Tosi, Delfina; Lappin, David F.; O'Donnell, Lindsay; Greetham, Darren; Ramage, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Both neuronal acetylcholine and nonneuronal acetylcholine have been demonstrated to modulate inflammatory responses. Studies investigating the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections have revealed contradictory findings with regard to disease outcome. At present, the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of fungal infections is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether acetylcholine plays a role in fungal biofilm formation and the pathogenesis of Candida albicans infection. The effect of acetylcholine on C. albicans biofilm formation and metabolism in vitro was assessed using a crystal violet assay and phenotypic microarray analysis. Its effect on the outcome of a C. albicans infection, fungal burden, and biofilm formation were investigated in vivo using a Galleria mellonella infection model. In addition, its effect on modulation of host immunity to C. albicans infection was also determined in vivo using hemocyte counts, cytospin analysis, larval histology, lysozyme assays, hemolytic assays, and real-time PCR. Acetylcholine was shown to have the ability to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, acetylcholine protected G. mellonella larvae from C. albicans infection mortality. The in vivo protection occurred through acetylcholine enhancing the function of hemocytes while at the same time inhibiting C. albicans biofilm formation. Furthermore, acetylcholine also inhibited inflammation-induced damage to internal organs. This is the first demonstration of a role for acetylcholine in protection against fungal infections, in addition to being the first report that this molecule can inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation. Therefore, acetylcholine has the capacity to modulate complex host-fungal interactions and plays a role in dictating the pathogenesis of fungal infections. PMID:26092919

  12. Visible-light-promoted iminyl-radical formation from acyl oximes: a unified approach to pyridines, quinolines, and phenanthridines.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Heng; An, Xiaode; Tong, Kun; Zheng, Tianyi; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Shouyun

    2015-03-23

    A unified strategy involving visible-light-induced iminyl-radical formation has been established for the construction of pyridines, quinolines, and phenanthridines from acyl oximes. With fac-[Ir(ppy)3 ] as a photoredox catalyst, the acyl oximes were converted by 1 e(-) reduction into iminyl radical intermediates, which then underwent intramolecular homolytic aromatic substitution (HAS) to give the N-containing arenes. These reactions proceeded with a broad range of substrates at room temperature in high yield. This strategy of visible-light-induced iminyl-radical formation was successfully applied to a five-step concise synthesis of benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloids.

  13. Progesterone receptor-NFκB complex formation is required for progesterone-induced NFκB nuclear translocation and binding onto the p53 promoter.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sung-Po; Yang, Ho-Ching; Kuo, Chun-Ting; Wen, Heng-Ching; Chen, Li-Ching; Huo, Yen-Nien; Lee, Wen-Sen

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that progesterone (P4) up-regulates p53 expression in human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs) through P4 receptor (PR) activation of extranuclear signaling pathways. However, the involvement of nuclear PR in P4-increased p53 expression is still unclear. Here, the molecular mechanism underlying PR-regulated p53 expression in HUVECs was investigated. Treatment with P4 increased nuclear factor of κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, α phosphorylation (IκBα and nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) nuclear translocation. Interestingly, P4 also increased PR-A, but not PR-B, nuclear translocation in HUVECs. Immunoprecipitation assay illustrated that P4 increased the formation of PR-A-NFκB complex in both the cytosol and the nucleus of HUVEC. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed an interaction between PR and the NFκB binding motif on the p53 promoter. Ablation of the NFκB binding motif in the p53 promoter completely abolished P4-increased p53 promoter activity. In the absence of P4, overexpression of NFκB did not increase NFκB nuclear translocation. In contrast, treatment of NFκB-overexpressing HUVECs with P4 for only 4 hours, which is much shorter than the time (21.5 h) required for P4-induced IκBα phosphorylation, increased NFκB nuclear translocation. Blockade of PR activity abolished this effect. Taken together, these results uncover a novel role of PR for P4-induced NFκB nuclear translocation and suggest that PR-A-NFκB complex formation is required for NFκB nuclear translocation and binding onto the p53 promoter in HUVECs. Our data indicate that both nuclear and extranuclear signaling pathways of PR are involved in P4-regulated p53 expression in HUVECs. PMID:25353185

  14. Progesterone receptor-NFκB complex formation is required for progesterone-induced NFκB nuclear translocation and binding onto the p53 promoter.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sung-Po; Yang, Ho-Ching; Kuo, Chun-Ting; Wen, Heng-Ching; Chen, Li-Ching; Huo, Yen-Nien; Lee, Wen-Sen

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that progesterone (P4) up-regulates p53 expression in human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs) through P4 receptor (PR) activation of extranuclear signaling pathways. However, the involvement of nuclear PR in P4-increased p53 expression is still unclear. Here, the molecular mechanism underlying PR-regulated p53 expression in HUVECs was investigated. Treatment with P4 increased nuclear factor of κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, α phosphorylation (IκBα and nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) nuclear translocation. Interestingly, P4 also increased PR-A, but not PR-B, nuclear translocation in HUVECs. Immunoprecipitation assay illustrated that P4 increased the formation of PR-A-NFκB complex in both the cytosol and the nucleus of HUVEC. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed an interaction between PR and the NFκB binding motif on the p53 promoter. Ablation of the NFκB binding motif in the p53 promoter completely abolished P4-increased p53 promoter activity. In the absence of P4, overexpression of NFκB did not increase NFκB nuclear translocation. In contrast, treatment of NFκB-overexpressing HUVECs with P4 for only 4 hours, which is much shorter than the time (21.5 h) required for P4-induced IκBα phosphorylation, increased NFκB nuclear translocation. Blockade of PR activity abolished this effect. Taken together, these results uncover a novel role of PR for P4-induced NFκB nuclear translocation and suggest that PR-A-NFκB complex formation is required for NFκB nuclear translocation and binding onto the p53 promoter in HUVECs. Our data indicate that both nuclear and extranuclear signaling pathways of PR are involved in P4-regulated p53 expression in HUVECs.

  15. Task-Appropriate Visualizations: Can the Very Same Visualization Format Either Promote or Hinder Learning Depending on the Task Requirements?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soemer, Alexander; Schwan, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    In a series of experiments, we tested a recently proposed hypothesis stating that the degree of alignment between the form of a mental representation resulting from learning with a particular visualization format and the specific requirements of a learning task determines learning performance (task-appropriateness). Groups of participants were…

  16. A Formative Evaluation of Customized Pamphlets to Promote Physical Activity and Symptom Self-Management in Women with Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plow, Matthew; Bethoux, Francois; Mai, Kimloan; Marcus, Bess

    2014-01-01

    Inactivity is a prevalent problem in the population affected with multiple sclerosis (MS). Thus, there is a need to develop and test physical activity (PA) interventions that can be widely disseminated. We conducted a formative evaluation as part of a randomized controlled trial of a pamphlet-based PA intervention among 30 women with MS. Pamphlets…

  17. Formative Evaluation of MyFit: A Curriculum to Promote Self-Regulation of Physical Activity among Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grim, Melissa; Petosa, Rick; Hortz, Brian; Hunt, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous interventions to increase physical activity among middle school students have not produced long-term results. Often, students lack the self-regulation skills needed to support long-term adherence to physical activity. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a formative evaluation of a self-regulation based physical…

  18. K2CO3-promoted formation of aryl esters from primary aryl amides by the acyl-acyl exchange process.

    PubMed

    Bian, Yongjun; Qu, Xingyu

    2016-04-28

    A new acyl-acyl exchange reaction has been developed for the formation of aryl esters from primary aryl amides. The reaction could occur under mild reaction conditions with catalytic quantities of K2CO3, and could afford moderate to good yields of the desired products. PMID:27035611

  19. An Exploratory Study of a Novel Online Formative Assessment and Instructional Tool to Promote Students' Circuit Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Gregory K. W. K.; Shel, Tammy; Kaiser, William J.

    2006-01-01

    We examined a novel formative assessment and instructional approach with 89 students in three electrical engineering classes in special computer-based discussion sections. The technique involved students individually solving circuit problems online, with their real-time responses observed by the instructor. While exploratory, survey and…

  20. Amyloidogenic Mutation Promotes Fibril Formation of the N-terminal Apolipoprotein A-I on Lipid Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Ogata, Fuka; Mikawa, Shiho; Tsuji, Kohei; Baba, Teruhiko; Shigenaga, Akira; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Okuhira, Keiichiro; Otaka, Akira; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal amino acid 1–83 fragment of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) has a strong propensity to form amyloid fibrils at physiological neutral pH. Because apoA-I has an ability to bind to lipid membranes, we examined the effects of the lipid environment on fibril-forming properties of the N-terminal fragment of apoA-I variants. Thioflavin T fluorescence assay as well as fluorescence and transmission microscopies revealed that upon lipid binding, fibril formation by apoA-I 1–83 is strongly inhibited, whereas the G26R mutant still retains the ability to form fibrils. Such distinct effects of lipid binding on fibril formation were also observed for the amyloidogenic prone region-containing peptides, apoA-I 8–33 and 8–33/G26R. This amyloidogenic region shifts from random coil to α-helical structure upon lipid binding. The G26R mutation appears to prevent this helix transition because lower helical propensity and more solvent-exposed conformation of the G26R variant upon lipid binding were observed in the apoA-I 1–83 fragment and 8–33 peptide. With a partially α-helical conformation induced by the presence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, fibril formation by apoA-I 1–83 was strongly inhibited, whereas the G26R variant can form amyloid fibrils. These findings suggest a new possible pathway for amyloid fibril formation by the N-terminal fragment of apoA-I variants: the amyloidogenic mutations partially destabilize the α-helical structure formed upon association with lipid membranes, resulting in physiologically relevant conformations that allow fibril formation. PMID:26175149

  1. Amyloidogenic Mutation Promotes Fibril Formation of the N-terminal Apolipoprotein A-I on Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Ogata, Fuka; Mikawa, Shiho; Tsuji, Kohei; Baba, Teruhiko; Shigenaga, Akira; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Okuhira, Keiichiro; Otaka, Akira; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-21

    The N-terminal amino acid 1-83 fragment of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) has a strong propensity to form amyloid fibrils at physiological neutral pH. Because apoA-I has an ability to bind to lipid membranes, we examined the effects of the lipid environment on fibril-forming properties of the N-terminal fragment of apoA-I variants. Thioflavin T fluorescence assay as well as fluorescence and transmission microscopies revealed that upon lipid binding, fibril formation by apoA-I 1-83 is strongly inhibited, whereas the G26R mutant still retains the ability to form fibrils. Such distinct effects of lipid binding on fibril formation were also observed for the amyloidogenic prone region-containing peptides, apoA-I 8-33 and 8-33/G26R. This amyloidogenic region shifts from random coil to α-helical structure upon lipid binding. The G26R mutation appears to prevent this helix transition because lower helical propensity and more solvent-exposed conformation of the G26R variant upon lipid binding were observed in the apoA-I 1-83 fragment and 8-33 peptide. With a partially α-helical conformation induced by the presence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, fibril formation by apoA-I 1-83 was strongly inhibited, whereas the G26R variant can form amyloid fibrils. These findings suggest a new possible pathway for amyloid fibril formation by the N-terminal fragment of apoA-I variants: the amyloidogenic mutations partially destabilize the α-helical structure formed upon association with lipid membranes, resulting in physiologically relevant conformations that allow fibril formation.

  2. A Sensitized Screen for Genes Promoting Invadopodia Function In Vivo: CDC-42 and Rab GDI-1 Direct Distinct Aspects of Invadopodia Formation.

    PubMed

    Lohmer, Lauren L; Clay, Matthew R; Naegeli, Kaleb M; Chi, Qiuyi; Ziel, Joshua W; Hagedorn, Elliott J; Park, Jieun E; Jayadev, Ranjay; Sherwood, David R

    2016-01-01

    Invadopodia are specialized membrane protrusions composed of F-actin, actin regulators, signaling proteins, and a dynamically trafficked invadopodial membrane that drive cell invasion through basement membrane (BM) barriers in development and cancer. Due to the challenges of studying invasion in vivo, mechanisms controlling invadopodia formation in their native environments remain poorly understood. We performed a sensitized genome-wide RNAi screen and identified 13 potential regulators of invadopodia during anchor cell (AC) invasion into the vulval epithelium in C. elegans. Confirming the specificity of this screen, we identified the Rho GTPase cdc-42, which mediates invadopodia formation in many cancer cell lines. Using live-cell imaging, we show that CDC-42 localizes to the AC-BM interface and is activated by an unidentified vulval signal(s) that induces invasion. CDC-42 is required for the invasive membrane localization of WSP-1 (N-WASP), a CDC-42 effector that promotes polymerization of F-actin. Loss of CDC-42 or WSP-1 resulted in fewer invadopodia and delayed BM breaching. We also characterized a novel invadopodia regulator, gdi-1 (Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor), which mediates membrane trafficking. We show that GDI-1 functions in the AC to promote invadopodia formation. In the absence of GDI-1, the specialized invadopodial membrane was no longer trafficked normally to the invasive membrane, and instead was distributed to plasma membrane throughout the cell. Surprisingly, the pro-invasive signal(s) from the vulval cells also controls GDI-1 activity and invadopodial membrane trafficking. These studies represent the first in vivo screen for genes regulating invadopodia and demonstrate that invadopodia formation requires the integration of distinct cellular processes that are coordinated by an extracellular cue.

  3. Suppression of fibrotic scar formation promotes axonal regeneration without disturbing blood-brain barrier repair and withdrawal of leukocytes after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Nozomu; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi; Kawano, Hitoshi

    2010-09-15

    The fibrotic scar containing type IV collagen (Col IV) formed in a lesion site is considered as an obstacle to axonal regeneration, because intracerebral injection of 2,2'-dipyridyl (DPY), an inhibitor of Col IV triple-helix formation, suppresses fibrotic scar formation in the lesion site and promotes axonal regeneration. To determine the role of the fibrotic scar on the healing process of injured central nervous system (CNS), the restoration of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and withdrawal of inflammatory leukocytes were examined in mice subjected to unilateral transection of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway and intracerebral DPY injection. At 5 days after injury, destruction of BBB represented by leakage of Evans blue (EB) and widespread infiltration of CD45-immunoreactive leukocytes was observed around the lesion site, whereas reactive astrocytes increased surrounding the BBB-destroyed area. By 2 weeks after injury, the region of EB leakage and the diffusion of leukocytes were restricted to the inside of the fibrotic scar, and reactive astrocytes gathered around the fibrotic scar. In the DPY-treated lesion site, formation of the fibrotic scar was suppressed (84% decrease in Col IV-deposited area), reactive astrocytes occupied the lesion center, and areas of both EB leakage and leukocyte infiltration decreased by 86%. DPY treatment increased the number of regenerated dopaminergic axons by 2.53-fold. These results indicate that suppression of fibrotic scar formation does not disturb the healing process in damaged CNS, and suggest that this strategy is a reliable tool to promote axonal regeneration after traumatic injury in the CNS.

  4. A Sensitized Screen for Genes Promoting Invadopodia Function In Vivo: CDC-42 and Rab GDI-1 Direct Distinct Aspects of Invadopodia Formation

    PubMed Central

    Naegeli, Kaleb M.; Chi, Qiuyi; Ziel, Joshua W.; Hagedorn, Elliott J.; Park, Jieun E.; Jayadev, Ranjay; Sherwood, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Invadopodia are specialized membrane protrusions composed of F-actin, actin regulators, signaling proteins, and a dynamically trafficked invadopodial membrane that drive cell invasion through basement membrane (BM) barriers in development and cancer. Due to the challenges of studying invasion in vivo, mechanisms controlling invadopodia formation in their native environments remain poorly understood. We performed a sensitized genome-wide RNAi screen and identified 13 potential regulators of invadopodia during anchor cell (AC) invasion into the vulval epithelium in C. elegans. Confirming the specificity of this screen, we identified the Rho GTPase cdc-42, which mediates invadopodia formation in many cancer cell lines. Using live-cell imaging, we show that CDC-42 localizes to the AC-BM interface and is activated by an unidentified vulval signal(s) that induces invasion. CDC-42 is required for the invasive membrane localization of WSP-1 (N-WASP), a CDC-42 effector that promotes polymerization of F-actin. Loss of CDC-42 or WSP-1 resulted in fewer invadopodia and delayed BM breaching. We also characterized a novel invadopodia regulator, gdi-1 (Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor), which mediates membrane trafficking. We show that GDI-1 functions in the AC to promote invadopodia formation. In the absence of GDI-1, the specialized invadopodial membrane was no longer trafficked normally to the invasive membrane, and instead was distributed to plasma membrane throughout the cell. Surprisingly, the pro-invasive signal(s) from the vulval cells also controls GDI-1 activity and invadopodial membrane trafficking. These studies represent the first in vivo screen for genes regulating invadopodia and demonstrate that invadopodia formation requires the integration of distinct cellular processes that are coordinated by an extracellular cue. PMID:26765257

  5. Performance improvement of flexible bulk heterojunction solar cells using PTB7:PC71BM by optimizing spin coating and drying processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzeki, Masaya; Fujii, Shunjiro; Arai, Yuki; Yanagidate, Tatsuki; Yanagi, Yuichiro; Okukawa, Takanori; Yoshida, Akira; Kataura, Hiromichi; Nishioka, Yasushiro

    2014-02-01

    Bulk-heterojunction solar cells were fabricated using a dichlorobenzene solution of poly[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b‧]dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]-thiophenediyl] (PTB7):[6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) on a flexible indium-tin-oxide-coated polyethylene terephthalate substrate. It was found that the performance of the solar cells could be markedly improved by minimizing the spin coating time of a blend of PTB7 and PC71BM to 10 s and maximizing the successive drying and solidification time up to 30 min in a confined Petri dish. As a result, a short-circuit current density of 14.5 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage of 0.62 V, and a power conversion efficiency of 3.67% were obtained. These improvements are attributed to the growth of favorable nanostructures during the slow drying process that increased the photocarrier collection efficiency while simultaneously increasing the performance fluctuations of each device.

  6. Comparison of air kerma measurements between the PTB and the IAEA for x-radiation qualities used in general diagnostic radiology and mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csete, István; Büermann, Ludwig; Gomola, Igor; Girzikowsky, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    A comparison of the air kerma standards for x-radiation qualities used in general diagnostic radiology and mammography, identified as EURAMET.RI(I)-S10 (EURAMET project #1221), was performed between the PTB and the IAEA. Two spherical and two parallel-plate reference-class ionization chambers of the IAEA and 12 beam qualities standardized in the IEC standard 61267:2005 plus 7 additional standard beam qualities established at both laboratories were selected for the comparison. The calibration coefficients were determined for the transfer chambers at the PTB in September 2012 and before and after this at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory. The results show the calibration coefficients of both laboratories to be in good agreement within the standard uncertainty of the comparison of about 0.47%. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by EURAMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  7. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K4 of the absorbed dose to water standards of the PTB, Germany and the BIPM in 60Co gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Burns, D. T.; Kapsch, R.-P.; Krauss, A.

    2016-01-01

    An indirect comparison has been made of the standards for absorbed dose to water in 60Co radiation of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, (PTB), Germany and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). The measurements at the BIPM were carried out in October 2015. The comparison result, based on the calibration coefficients for two transfer standards and evaluated as a ratio of the PTB and the BIPM standards for absorbed dose to water, is 0.9977 with a combined standard uncertainty of 3.8 × 10-3. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  8. All-trans retinoic acid impairs the vasculogenic mimicry formation ability of U87 stem-like cells through promoting differentiation

    PubMed Central

    LING, GENG-QIANG; LIU, YI-JING; KE, YI-QUAN; CHEN, LEI; JIANG, XIAO-DAN; JIANG, CHUAN-LU; YE, WEI

    2015-01-01

    The poor therapeutic effect of traditional antiangiogenic therapy on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) may be attributed to vasculogenic mimicry (VM), which was previously reported to be promoted by cancer stem-like cells (SLCs). All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), a potent reagent which drives differentiation, was reported to be able to eradicate cancer SLCs in certain malignancies. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of ATRA on the VM formation ability of U87 glioblastoma SLCs. The expression of cancer SLC markers CD133 and nestin was detected using immunocytochemistry in order to identify U87 SLCs. In addition, the differentiation of these SLCs was observed through detecting the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), β-tubulin III and galactosylceramidase (Galc) using immunofluorescent staining. The results showed that the expression levels of GFAP, β-tubulin III and Galc were upregulated following treatment with ATRA in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, ATRA significantly reduced the proliferation, invasiveness, tube formation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion of U87 SLCs. In conclusion, the VM formation ability of SLCs was found to be negatively correlated with differentiation. These results therefore suggested that ATRA may serve as a promising novel agent for the treatment of GBM due to its role in reducing VM formation. PMID:25760394

  9. BM-MSCs and Bio-Oss complexes enhanced new bone formation during maxillary sinus floor augmentation by promoting differentiation of BM-MSCs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qian; Yu, Bo-Han; Liu, Wei-Cai; Wang, Zuo-Lin

    2016-08-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have been recognized as a new strategy for maxillary sinus floor elevation. However, little is known concerning the effect of the biomechanical pressure (i.e., sinus pressure, masticatory pressure, and respiration) on the differentiation of BM-MSCs and the formation of new bone during maxillary sinus floor elevation. The differentiation of BM-MSCs into osteoblasts was examined in vitro under cyclic compressive pressure using the Flexcell® pressure system, and by immunohistochemical analysis, qRT-PCR, and Western blot. Micro-CT was used to detect bone formation and allow image reconstruction of the entire maxillary sinus floor elevation area. Differentiation of BM-MSCs into osteoblasts was significantly increased under cyclic compressive pressure. The formation of new bone was enhanced after implantation of the pressured complex of BM-MSCs and Bio-Oss during maxillary sinus floor elevation. The pressured complex of BM-MSCs and Bio-Oss promoted new bone formation and maturation in the rabbit maxillary sinus. Stem cell therapy combined with this tissue engineering technique could be effectively used in maxillary sinus elevation and bone regeneration. PMID:27251156

  10. The Planar Cell Polarity Transmembrane Protein Vangl2 Promotes Dendrite, Spine and Glutamatergic Synapse Formation in the Mammalian Forebrain.

    PubMed

    Okerlund, Nathan D; Stanley, Robert E; Cheyette, Benjamin N R

    2016-07-01

    The transmembrane protein Vangl2, a key regulator of the Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, is involved in dendrite arbor elaboration, dendritic spine formation and glutamatergic synapse formation in mammalian central nervous system neurons. Cultured forebrain neurons from Vangl2 knockout mice have simpler dendrite arbors, fewer total spines, less mature spines and fewer glutamatergic synapse inputs on their dendrites than control neurons. Neurons from mice heterozygous for a semidominant Vangl2 mutation have similar but not identical phenotypes, and these phenotypes are also observed in Golgi-stained brain tissue from adult mutant mice. Given increasing evidence linking psychiatric pathophysiology to these subneuronal sites and structures, our findings underscore the relevance of core PCP proteins including Vangl2 to the underlying biology of major mental illnesses and their treatment. PMID:27606324

  11. A ribozyme selected from variants of U6 snRNA promotes 2',5'-branch formation.

    PubMed Central

    Tuschl, T; Sharp, P A; Bartel, D P

    2001-01-01

    In vitro selection was used to sample SnRNA-related sequences for ribozyme activities, and several 2',5'-branch-forming ribozymes were isolated. One such ribozyme is highly dependent upon an 11-nt motif that contains a conserved U6 snRNA sequence (ACAGAGA-box) known to be important for pre-mRNA splicing. The ribozyme reaction is similar to the first step of splicing in that an internal 2'-hydroxyl of an unpaired adenosine attacks at the 5'-phosphate of a guanosine. It differs in that the leaving group is diphosphate rather than a 5' exon. The finding that lariat formation can be accomplished by a small RNA with sequences related to U6 snRNA indicates that the RNA available in the spliceosome may be involved in RNA-catalyzed branch formation. PMID:11214178

  12. New Organocatalyst Scaffolds with High Activity in Promoting Hydrazone and Oxime Formation at Neutral pH

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of two new classes of catalysts for hydrazone and oxime formation in water at neutral pH, namely 2-aminophenols and 2-(aminomethyl)benzimidazoles, is reported. Kinetics studies in aqueous solutions at pH 7.4 revealed rate enhancements up to 7-fold greater than with classic aniline catalysis. 2-(Aminomethyl)benzimidazoles were found to be effective catalysts with otherwise challenging aryl ketone substrates. PMID:25545888

  13. Nudel is crucial for the WAVE complex assembly in vivo by selectively promoting subcomplex stability and formation through direct interactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuang; Ma, Li; Wu, Yibo; Zeng, Rong; Zhu, Xueliang

    2012-08-01

    The WAVE regulatory complex (WRC), consisting of WAVE, Sra, Nap, Abi, and HSPC300, activates the Arp2/3 complex to control branched actin polymerization in response to Rac activation. How the WRC is assembled in vivo is not clear. Here we show that Nudel, a protein critical for lamellipodia formation, dramatically stabilized the Sra1-Nap1-Abi1 complex against degradation in cells through a dynamic binding to Sra1, whereas its physical interaction with HSPC300 protected free HSPC300 from the proteasome-mediated degradation and stimulated the HSPC300-WAVE2 complex formation. By contrast, Nudel showed little or no interactions with the Sra1-Nap1-Abi1-WAVE2 and the Sra1-Nap1-Abi1-HSPC300 complexes as well as the mature WRC. Depletion of Nudel by RNAi led to general subunit degradation and markedly attenuated the levels of mature WRC. It also abolished the WRC-dependent actin polymerization in vitro and the Rac1-induced lamellipodial actin network formation during cell spreading. Therefore, Nudel is important for the early steps of the WRC assembly in vivo by antagonizing the instability of certain WRC subunits and subcomplexes. PMID:22453242

  14. Lipid Peroxides Promote Large Rafts: Effects of Excitation of Probes in Fluorescence Microscopy and Electrochemical Reactions during Vesicle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ayuyan, Artem G.; Cohen, Fredric S.

    2006-01-01

    Raft formation and enlargement was investigated in liposomes and supported bilayers prepared from sphingomyelin (SM), cholesterol, and unsaturated phospholipids; NBD-DPPE and rhodamine-(DOPE) were employed as fluorescent probes. Rafts were created by lowering temperature. Maintaining 20 mol % SM, fluorescence microscopy showed that, in the absence of photooxidation, large rafts did not form in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) containing 20 or more mol % cholesterol. But if photooxidation was allowed to proceed, large rafts were readily observed. In population, cuvette experiments, small rafts formed without photooxidation at high cholesterol concentrations. Thus, photooxidation was the cause of raft enlargement during microscopy experiments. Because photooxidation results in peroxidation at lipid double bonds, photosensitization experiments were performed to explicitly produce peroxides of SM and an unsaturated phospholipid. GUVs of high cholesterol content containing the breakdown products of SM-peroxide, but not phospholipid-peroxide, resulted in large rafts after lowering temperature. In addition, GUV production by electroswelling can result in peroxides that cause large raft formation. The use of titanium electrodes eliminates this problem. In conclusion, lipid peroxides and their breakdown products are the cause of large raft formation in GUVs containing biological levels of cholesterol. It is critical that experiments investigating rafts in bilayer membranes avoid the production of peroxides. PMID:16815906

  15. Capsicum annuum S (CaS) promotes reproductive transition and is required for flower formation in pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Cohen, Oded; Borovsky, Yelena; David-Schwartz, Rakefet; Paran, Ilan

    2014-05-01

    The genetic control of the transition to flowering has mainly been studied in model species, while few data are available in crop species such as pepper (Capsicum spp.). To elucidate the genetic control of the transition to flowering in pepper, mutants that lack flowers were isolated and characterized. Genetic mapping and sequencing allowed the identification of the gene disrupted in the mutants. Double mutants and expression analyses were used to characterize the relationships between the mutated gene and other genes controlling the transition to flowering and flower differentiation. The mutants were characterized by a delay in the initiation of sympodial growth, a delay in the termination of sympodial meristems and complete inhibition of flower formation. Capsicum annuum S (CaS), the pepper (Capsicum annuum) ortholog of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) COMPOUND INFLORESCENCE and petunia (Petunia hybrida) EVERGREEN, was found to govern the mutant phenotype. CaS is required for the activity of the flower meristem identity gene Ca-ANANTHA and does not affect the expression of CaLEAFY. CaS is epistatic over other genes controlling the transition to flowering with respect to flower formation. Comparative homologous mutants in the Solanaceae indicate that CaS has uniquely evolved to have a critical role in flower formation, while its role in meristem maturation is conserved in pepper, tomato and petunia.

  16. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase p110δ promotes lumen formation through enhancement of apico-basal polarity and basal membrane organization

    PubMed Central

    Sar, Sokhavuth; Komaiha, Ola Hamze; Moyano, Romina; Rayal, Amel; Samuel, Didier; Shewan, Annette; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart; Mostov, Keith; Gassama-Diagne, Ama

    2016-01-01

    Signaling triggered by adhesion to the extracellular matrix plays a key role in the spatial orientation of epithelial polarity and formation of lumens in glandular tissues. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling in particular is known to influence the polarization process during epithelial cell morphogenesis. Here, using Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells grown in 3D culture, we show that the p110δ isoform of phosphoinositide 3-kinase colocalizes with focal adhesion proteins at the basal surface of polarized cells. Pharmacological, siRNA- or kinase-dead mediated inhibition of p110δ impair the early stages of lumen formation, resulting in inverted polarized cysts, with no laminin or type IV collagen assembly at cell/extracellular matrix contacts. p110δ also regulates the organization of focal adhesions and membrane localization of dystroglycan. Thus, we uncover a previously unrecognized role for p110δ in epithelial cells in the orientation of the apico-basal axis and lumen formation. PMID:25583025

  17. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor MYB112 Promotes Anthocyanin Formation during Salinity and under High Light Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lotkowska, Magda E.; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Xue, Gang-Ping; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    MYB transcription factors (TFs) are important regulators of flavonoid biosynthesis in plants. Here, we report MYB112 as a formerly unknown regulator of anthocyanin accumulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Expression profiling after chemically induced overexpression of MYB112 identified 28 up- and 28 down-regulated genes 5 h after inducer treatment, including MYB7 and MYB32, which are both induced. In addition, upon extended induction, MYB112 also positively affects the expression of PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT1, a key TF of anthocyanin biosynthesis, but acts negatively toward MYB12 and MYB111, which both control flavonol biosynthesis. MYB112 binds to an 8-bp DNA fragment containing the core sequence (A/T/G)(A/C)CC(A/T)(A/G/T)(A/C)(T/C). By electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we show that MYB112 binds in vitro and in vivo to MYB7 and MYB32 promoters, revealing them as direct downstream target genes. We further show that MYB112 expression is up-regulated by salinity and high light stress, environmental parameters that both require the MYB112 TF for anthocyanin accumulation under these stresses. In contrast to several other MYB TFs affecting anthocyanin biosynthesis, MYB112 expression is not controlled by nitrogen limitation or an excess of carbon. Thus, MYB112 constitutes a regulator that promotes anthocyanin accumulation under abiotic stress conditions. PMID:26378103

  18. Activated expression of AtEDT1/HDG11 promotes lateral root formation in Arabidopsis mutant edt1 by upregulating jasmonate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiao-Teng; Xu, Ping; Wang, Yao; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2015-12-01

    Root architecture is crucial for plants to absorb water and nutrients. We previously reported edt1 (edt1D) mutant with altered root architecture that contributes significantly to drought resistance. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here we report one of the mechanisms underlying EDT1/HDG11-conferred altered root architecture. Root transcriptome comparison between the wild type and edt1D revealed that the upregulated genes involved in jasmonate biosynthesis and signaling pathway were enriched in edt1D root, which were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Further analysis showed that EDT1/HDG11, as a transcription factor, bound directly to the HD binding sites in the promoters of AOS, AOC3, OPR3, and OPCL1, which encode four key enzymes in JA biosynthesis. We found that the jasmonic acid level was significantly elevated in edt1D root compared with that in the wild type subsequently. In addition, more auxin accumulation was observed in the lateral root primordium of edt1D compared with that of wild type. Genetic analysis of edt1D opcl1 double mutant also showed that HDG11 was partially dependent on JA in regulating LR formation. Taken together, overexpression of EDT1/HDG11 increases JA level in the root of edt1D by directly upregulating the expressions of several genes encoding JA biosynthesis enzymes to activate auxin signaling and promote lateral root formation. PMID:25752924

  19. Cellular nucleic-acid-binding protein, a transcriptional enhancer of c-Myc, promotes the formation of parallel G-quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Borgognone, Mariana; Armas, Pablo; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2010-06-15

    G-rich sequences that contain stretches of tandem guanines can form four-stranded, intramolecular stable DNA structures called G-quadruplexes (termed G4s). Regulation of the equilibrium between single-stranded and G4 DNA in promoter regions is essential for control of gene expression in the cell. G4s are highly stable structures; however, their folding kinetics are slow under physiological conditions. CNBP (cellular nucleic-acid-binding protein) is a nucleic acid chaperone that binds the G4-forming G-rich sequence located within the NHE (nuclease hypersensitivity element) III of the c-Myc proto-oncogene promoter. Several reports have demonstrated that CNBP enhances the transcription of c-Myc in vitro and in vivo; however, none of these reports have assessed the molecular mechanisms responsible for this control. In the present study, by means of Taq polymerase stop assays, electrophoretic mobility-shift assays and CD spectroscopy, we show that CNBP promotes the formation of parallel G4s to the detriment of anti-parallel G4s, and its nucleic acid chaperone activity is required for this effect. These findings are the first to implicate CNBP as a G4-folding modulator and, furthermore, assign CNBP a novel mode-of-action during c-Myc transcriptional regulation.

  20. AINTEGUMENTA and AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE6/PLETHORA3 Induce LEAFY Expression in Response to Auxin to Promote the Onset of Flower Formation in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Nobutoshi; Nole-Wilson, Staci; Wagner, Doris

    2016-01-01

    Proper timing of the onset to flower formation is critical for reproductive success. Monocarpic plants like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) switch from production of branches in the axils of leaves to that of flowers once in their lifecycle, during the meristem identity transition. The plant-specific transcription factor LEAFY (LFY) is necessary and sufficient for this transition. Previously, we reported that the plant hormone auxin induces LFY expression through AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR5/MONOPTEROS (ARF5/MP). It is not known whether MP is solely responsible for auxin-directed transcriptional activation of LFY. Here, we show that two transcription factors belonging to the AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE/PLETHORA family, AINTEGUMENTA (ANT) and AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE6/PLETHORA3 (AIL6/PLT3), act in parallel with MP to upregulate LFY in response to auxin. ant ail6 mutants display a delay in the meristem identity transition and in LFY induction. ANT and AIL6/PLT3 are expressed prior to LFY and bind to the LFY promoter to control LFY mRNA accumulation. Genetic and promoter/reporter studies suggest that ANT/AIL6 act in parallel with MP to promote LFY induction in response to auxin sensing. Our study highlights the importance of two separate auxin-controlled pathways in the meristem identity transition. PMID:26537561

  1. AINTEGUMENTA and AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE6/PLETHORA3 Induce LEAFY Expression in Response to Auxin to Promote the Onset of Flower Formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Nobutoshi; Jeong, Cheol Woong; Nole-Wilson, Staci; Krizek, Beth A; Wagner, Doris

    2016-01-01

    Proper timing of the onset to flower formation is critical for reproductive success. Monocarpic plants like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) switch from production of branches in the axils of leaves to that of flowers once in their lifecycle, during the meristem identity transition. The plant-specific transcription factor LEAFY (LFY) is necessary and sufficient for this transition. Previously, we reported that the plant hormone auxin induces LFY expression through AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR5/MONOPTEROS (ARF5/MP). It is not known whether MP is solely responsible for auxin-directed transcriptional activation of LFY. Here, we show that two transcription factors belonging to the AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE/PLETHORA family, AINTEGUMENTA (ANT) and AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE6/PLETHORA3 (AIL6/PLT3), act in parallel with MP to upregulate LFY in response to auxin. ant ail6 mutants display a delay in the meristem identity transition and in LFY induction. ANT and AIL6/PLT3 are expressed prior to LFY and bind to the LFY promoter to control LFY mRNA accumulation. Genetic and promoter/reporter studies suggest that ANT/AIL6 act in parallel with MP to promote LFY induction in response to auxin sensing. Our study highlights the importance of two separate auxin-controlled pathways in the meristem identity transition.

  2. Protease cleavage of iron-transferrin augments pyocyanin-mediated endothelial cell injury via promotion of hydroxyl radical formation.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R A; Rasmussen, G T; Cox, C D; Britigan, B E

    1996-01-01

    Although a number of bacterium- and host-derived factors have been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-associated tissue injury, the mechanism remains unclear. We have previously shown that protease modification of iron (Fe)-transferrin generates new iron chelates capable of catalyzing hydroxyl radical (.OH) formation from superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. The latter two oxidants are generated during redox cycling of another P. aeruginosa secretory product, pyocyanin. The lung is a major site of P. aeruginosa infection, with damage to local endothelial cells contributing to the pathogenesis of such infections. Endothelial cells are highly susceptible to oxidant-mediated injury. Therefore, we examined whether pseudomonas elastase-cleaved Fe-transferrin and pyocyanin synergistically enhance pulmonary artery endothelial cell injury via .OH formation. By measuring 51Cr release from cultured endothelial cell monolayers, pseudomonas elastase-cleaved Fe-transferrin significantly augmented cell injury resulting from cellular exposure to sublethal concentrations of pyocyanin. This enhancement in injury was not protease specific, as similar results were obtained with pyocyanin in combination with trypsin- or porcine pancreatic elastase-cleaved Fe-transferrin. The association of iron with the transferrin appeared to be necessary in this process. Supporting the involvement of .OH generation via the Haber-Weiss reaction in augmenting cell injury, catalase, dimethyl thiourea, superoxide dismutase, deferoxamine, and dimethyl sulfoxide significantly inhibited cell injury resulting from exposure to pyocyanin and protease-cleaved Fe-transferrin. Furthermore, spin trapping demonstrated the production of .OH in this cellular system. We conclude that .OH formation resulting from the interaction of protease-cleaved Fe-transferrin and endothelial cell redox cycling of pyocyanin may contribute to P. aeruginosa-associated tissue injury via endothelial cell

  3. Insights on co-catalyst-promoted enamine formation between dimethylamine and propanal through ab initio and density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Patil, Mahendra P; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2007-10-26

    The mechanistic details on enamine formation between dimethylamine and propanal are unraveled using the ab initio and density functional theory methods. The addition of secondary amine to the electrophile and simultaneous proton transfer results in a carbinolamine intermediate, which subsequently undergoes dehydration to form enamine. The direct addition of amine as well as the dehydration of the resulting carbinolamine intermediate is predicted to possess fairly high activation barrier implying that a unimolecular process is unlikely to be responsible for enamine formation. Different models are therefore proposed which could explain the relative ease of enamine formation under neat condition as well as under the influence of methanol as the co-catalyst. The explicit inclusion of either the reagent or the co-catalyst is considered in the transition states as stabilizing agents. The participation of the reagent or the co-catalyst as a monofunctional ancillary species is found to stabilize the transition states relative to the unassisted or the direct addition/dehydration pathways. The reduction in enthalpy of activation is found to be much more dramatic when two co-catalysts participate in an active bifunctional mode in the rate-determining dehydration step. The transition structures exhibited characteristic features of a relay proton transfer mechanism. The free energy of activation associated with the two methanol-assisted pathway is found to be 16.7 kcal/mol lower than that of the unassisted pathway. The results are found to be in concurrence with the available reports on the rate acceleration by co-catalysts in the Michael reaction between enamine and methyl vinyl ketone under neat conditions.

  4. Loss of nuclear receptor RXRα in epidermal keratinocytes promotes the formation of Cdk4-activated invasive melanomas.

    PubMed

    Hyter, Stephen; Bajaj, Gaurav; Liang, Xiaobo; Barbacid, Mariano; Ganguli-Indra, Gitali; Indra, Arup Kumar

    2010-10-01

    Keratinocytes contribute to melanocyte transformation by affecting their microenvironment, in part through the secretion of paracrine factors. Here we report a loss of expression of nuclear receptor RXRα in epidermal keratinocytes during human melanoma progression. In the absence of keratinocytic RXRα, in combination with mutant Cdk4, cutaneous melanoma was generated that metastasized to lymph nodes in a bigenic mouse model. Expression of several keratinocyte-derived mitogenic growth factors (Et-1, Hgf, Scf, α-MSH and Fgf 2 ) was elevated in skin of bigenic mice, whereas Fas, E-cadherin and Pten, implicated in apoptosis, cellular invasion and melanomagenesis, respectively, were downregulated within the microdissected melanocytic tumors. We demonstrated that RXRα is recruited on the proximal promoter of both Et-1 and Hgf, possibly directly regulating their transcription in keratinocytes. These studies demonstrate the contribution of keratinocytic paracrine signaling during the cellular transformation and malignant conversion of melanocytes.

  5. Precise Formation of a Hollow Carbon Nitride Structure with a Janus Surface To Promote Water Splitting by Photoredox Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dandan; Cao, Xu-Ning; Wang, Xinchen

    2016-09-12

    The precise modification of redox species on the inner and outer surfaces of hollow nanostructures is relevant in catalysis, surface science, and nanotechnology, but has proven difficult to achieve. Herein, we develop a facile approach to specifically fabricate Pt and Co3 O4 nanoparticles (NPs) onto the interior and exterior surface of hollow carbon nitride spheres (HCNS), respectively, to promote the surface redox functions of the polymer semiconductors. The photocatalytic water splitting activities of HCNS with spatially separated oxidation and reduction centers at their nanodomains were enhanced. The origin of the enhanced activity was attributed to the spatially separated reactive sites for the evolution of H2 and O2 and also to the unidirectional migration of the electron and hole on the Janus surfaces, thereby preventing the unwanted reverse reaction of water splitting and decreasing charge recombination. PMID:27533739

  6. Loss of nuclear receptor RXRα in epidermal keratinocytes promotes the formation of Cdk4-activated invasive melanomas.

    PubMed

    Hyter, Stephen; Bajaj, Gaurav; Liang, Xiaobo; Barbacid, Mariano; Ganguli-Indra, Gitali; Indra, Arup Kumar

    2010-10-01

    Keratinocytes contribute to melanocyte transformation by affecting their microenvironment, in part through the secretion of paracrine factors. Here we report a loss of expression of nuclear receptor RXRα in epidermal keratinocytes during human melanoma progression. In the absence of keratinocytic RXRα, in combination with mutant Cdk4, cutaneous melanoma was generated that metastasized to lymph nodes in a bigenic mouse model. Expression of several keratinocyte-derived mitogenic growth factors (Et-1, Hgf, Scf, α-MSH and Fgf 2 ) was elevated in skin of bigenic mice, whereas Fas, E-cadherin and Pten, implicated in apoptosis, cellular invasion and melanomagenesis, respectively, were downregulated within the microdissected melanocytic tumors. We demonstrated that RXRα is recruited on the proximal promoter of both Et-1 and Hgf, possibly directly regulating their transcription in keratinocytes. These studies demonstrate the contribution of keratinocytic paracrine signaling during the cellular transformation and malignant conversion of melanocytes. PMID:20629968

  7. Precise Formation of a Hollow Carbon Nitride Structure with a Janus Surface To Promote Water Splitting by Photoredox Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dandan; Cao, Xu-Ning; Wang, Xinchen

    2016-09-12

    The precise modification of redox species on the inner and outer surfaces of hollow nanostructures is relevant in catalysis, surface science, and nanotechnology, but has proven difficult to achieve. Herein, we develop a facile approach to specifically fabricate Pt and Co3 O4 nanoparticles (NPs) onto the interior and exterior surface of hollow carbon nitride spheres (HCNS), respectively, to promote the surface redox functions of the polymer semiconductors. The photocatalytic water splitting activities of HCNS with spatially separated oxidation and reduction centers at their nanodomains were enhanced. The origin of the enhanced activity was attributed to the spatially separated reactive sites for the evolution of H2 and O2 and also to the unidirectional migration of the electron and hole on the Janus surfaces, thereby preventing the unwanted reverse reaction of water splitting and decreasing charge recombination.

  8. FGFR3 promotes angiogenesis-dependent metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma via facilitating MCP-1-mediated vascular formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyu; Jing, Xiaoqian; Cheng, Xi; Ma, Ding; Jin, Zhijian; Yang, Weiping; Qiu, Weihua

    2016-05-01

    The biological role of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) in tumor angiogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has not been discussed before. Our previous work had indicated FGFR3 was overexpressed in HCC, and silencing FGFR3 in Hu7 cells could regulate tumorigenesis via down-regulating the phosphorylation level of key members of classic signaling pathways including ERK and AKT. In the present work, we explored the role of FGFR3 in angiogenesis-dependent metastasis by using SMMC-7721 and QGY-7703 stable cell lines. Our results indicated FGFR3 could regulate in vitro cell migration ability and in vivo lung metastasis ability of HCC, which was in accordance with increased angiogenesis ability in vitro and in vivo. Using the supernatant from SMMC-7721/FGFR3 cells, we conducted a human angiogenesis protein microarray including 43 angiogenesis factors and found that FGFR3 modulated angiogenesis and metastasis of HCC mainly by promoting the protein level of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1). Silencing FGFR3 by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) could reduce MCP-1 level in lysates and supernatant of QGY-7703 cells and SMMC-7721 cells. Silencing MCP-1 in QGY-7703 or SMMC-7721 cells could induce similar phenotypes compared with silencing FGFR3. Our results suggested FGFR3 promoted metastasis potential of HCC, at least partially if not all, via facilitating MCP-1-mediated angiogenesis, in addition to previously found cell growth and metastasis. MCP-1, a key medium between HCC cells and HUVECs, might be a novel anti-vascular target in HCC. PMID:27044356

  9. Human resistin promotes neutrophil proinflammatory activation and neutrophil extracellular trap formation and increases severity of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shaoning; Park, Dae Won; Tadie, Jean-Marc; Gregoire, Murielle; Deshane, Jessy; Pittet, Jean Francois; Abraham, Edward; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W

    2014-05-15

    Although resistin was recently found to modulate insulin resistance in preclinical models of type II diabetes and obesity, recent studies also suggested that resistin has proinflammatory properties. We examined whether the human-specific variant of resistin affects neutrophil activation and the severity of LPS-induced acute lung injury. Because human and mouse resistin have distinct patterns of tissue distribution, experiments were performed using humanized resistin mice that exclusively express human resistin (hRTN(+/-)(/-)) but are deficient in mouse resistin. Enhanced production of TNF-α or MIP-2 was found in LPS-treated hRtn(+/-/-) neutrophils compared with control Rtn(-/-/-) neutrophils. Expression of human resistin inhibited the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, a major sensor and regulator of cellular bioenergetics that also is implicated in inhibiting inflammatory activity of neutrophils and macrophages. In addition to the ability of resistin to sensitize neutrophils to LPS stimulation, human resistin enhanced neutrophil extracellular trap formation. In LPS-induced acute lung injury, humanized resistin mice demonstrated enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines, more severe pulmonary edema, increased neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and elevated concentration of the alarmins HMGB1 and histone 3 in the lungs. Our results suggest that human resistin may play an important contributory role in enhancing TLR4-induced inflammatory responses, and it may be a target for future therapies aimed at reducing the severity of acute lung injury and other inflammatory situations in which neutrophils play a major role.

  10. Carrageenan-induced inflammation promotes ROS generation and neutrophil extracellular trap formation in a mouse model of peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Barth, Cristiane R; Funchal, Giselle A; Luft, Carolina; de Oliveira, Jarbas R; Porto, Bárbara N; Donadio, Márcio V F

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are a combination of DNA fibers and granular proteins, such as neutrophil elastase (NE). NETs are released in the extracellular space in response to different stimuli. Carrageenan is a sulfated polysaccharide extracted from Chondrus crispus, a marine algae, used for decades in research for its potential to induce inflammation in different animal models. In this study, we show for the first time that carrageenan injection can induce NET release in a mouse model of acute peritonitis. Carrageenan induced NET release by viable neutrophils with NE and myeloperoxidase (MPO) expressed on DNA fibers. Furthermore, although this polysaccharide was able to stimulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by peritoneal neutrophils, NADPH oxidase derived ROS were dispensable for NET formation by carrageenan. In conclusion, our results show that carrageenan-induced inflammation in the peritoneum of mice can induce NET formation in an ROS-independent manner. These results may add important information to the field of inflammation and potentially lead to novel anti-inflammatory agents targeting the production of NETs.

  11. Promotion of triplex formation by 3'-amino-2'-O,4'-C-methylene bridged nucleic acid modification.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kiyomi; Rahman, S M Abdur; Sato, Norihiro; Obika, Satoshi; Imanishi, Takeshi; Torigoe, Hidetaka

    2009-01-01

    We examined the effect of 3'-amino-2'-O,4'-C-methylene bridged nucleic acid (3'-amino-2',4'-BNA) backbone modification of triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) on the pyrimidine motif triplex formation at neutral pH, a condition where pyrimidine motif triplexes are unstable. The melting temperature of the pyrimidine motif triplex at pH 6.8 with 3'-amino-2',4'-BNA modified TFO was significantly higher than that observed with unmodified TFO. The 3'-amino-2',4'-BNA modification of TFO increased the thermal stability of the pyrimidine motif triplex at neutral pH. The present results certainly support the idea that the 3'-amino-2',4'-BNA modification of TFO could be a key chemical modification and may eventually lead to progress in therapeutic applications of the antigene strategy in vivo. PMID:19749309

  12. MUT-16 promotes formation of perinuclear mutator foci required for RNA silencing in the C. elegans germline.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Carolyn M; Montgomery, Taiowa A; Breen, Peter C; Ruvkun, Gary

    2012-07-01

    RNA silencing can be initiated by endogenous or exogenously delivered siRNAs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, RNA silencing guided by primary siRNAs is inefficient and therefore requires an siRNA amplification step involving RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs). Many factors involved in RNA silencing localize to protein- and RNA-rich nuclear pore-associated P granules in the germline, where they are thought to surveil mRNAs as they exit the nucleus. Mutator class genes are required for siRNA-mediated RNA silencing in both germline and somatic cells, but their specific roles and relationship to other siRNA factors are unclear. Here we show that each of the six mutator proteins localizes to punctate foci at the periphery of germline nuclei. The Mutator foci are adjacent to P granules but are not dependent on core P-granule components or other RNAi pathway factors for their formation or stability. The glutamine/asparagine (Q/N)-rich protein MUT-16 is specifically required for the formation of a protein complex containing the mutator proteins, and in its absence, Mutator foci fail to form at the nuclear periphery. The RdRP RRF-1 colocalizes with MUT-16 at Mutator foci, suggesting a role for Mutator foci in siRNA amplification. Furthermore, we demonstrate that genes that yield high levels of siRNAs, indicative of multiple rounds of siRNA amplification, are disproportionally affected in mut-16 mutants compared with genes that yield low levels of siRNAs. We propose that the mutator proteins and RRF-1 constitute an RNA processing compartment required for siRNA amplification and RNA silencing.

  13. Progesterone promotes focal adhesion formation and migration in breast cancer cells through induction of protease-activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Jorge; Aranda, Evelyn; Henriquez, Soledad; Quezada, Marisol; Espinoza, Estefanía; Bravo, Maria Loreto; Oliva, Bárbara; Lange, Soledad; Villalon, Manuel; Jones, Marius; Brosens, Jan J; Kato, Sumie; Cuello, Mauricio A; Knutson, Todd P; Lange, Carol A; Leyton, Lisette; Owen, Gareth I

    2012-08-01

    Progesterone and progestins have been demonstrated to enhance breast cancer cell migration, although the mechanisms are still not fully understood. The protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a family of membrane receptors that are activated by serine proteases in the blood coagulation cascade. PAR1 (F2R) has been reported to be involved in cancer cell migration and overexpressed in breast cancer. We herein demonstrate that PAR1 mRNA and protein are upregulated by progesterone treatment of the breast cancer cell lines ZR-75 and T47D. This regulation is dependent on the progesterone receptor (PR) but does not require PR phosphorylation at serine 294 or the PR proline-rich region mPRO. The increase in PAR1 mRNA was transient, being present at 3  h and returning to basal levels at 18  h. The addition of a PAR1-activating peptide (aPAR1) to cells treated with progesterone resulted in an increase in focal adhesion (FA) formation as measured by the cellular levels of phosphorylated FA kinase. The combined but not individual treatment of progesterone and aPAR1 also markedly increased stress fiber formation and the migratory capacity of breast cancer cells. In agreement with in vitro findings, data mining from the Oncomine platform revealed that PAR1 expression was significantly upregulated in PR-positive breast tumors. Our observation that PAR1 expression and signal transduction are modulated by progesterone provides new insight into how the progestin component in hormone therapies increases the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

  14. Is active management the key to the conservation of saproxylic biodiversity? Pollarding promotes the formation of tree hollows.

    PubMed

    Sebek, Pavel; Altman, Jan; Platek, Michal; Cizek, Lukas

    2013-01-01

    Trees with hollows are key features sustaining biodiversity in wooded landscapes. They host rich assemblages of often highly specialised organisms. Hollow trees, however, have become rare and localised in Europe. Many of the associated biota is thus declining or endangered. The challenge of its conservation, therefore, is to safeguard the presence of hollow trees in sufficient numbers. Populations of numerous species associated with tree hollows and dead wood are often found in habitats that were formed by formerly common traditional silvicultural practices such as coppicing, pollarding or pasture. Although it has been occasionally mentioned that such practices increase the formation of hollows and the availability of often sun-exposed dead wood, their effect has never been quantified. Our study examined the hollow incidence in pollard and non-pollard (unmanaged) willows and the effect of pollarding on incremental growth rate by tree ring analysis. The probability of hollow occurrence was substantially higher in pollard than in non-pollard trees. Young pollards, especially, form hollows much more often than non-pollards; for instance, in trees of 50 cm DBH, the probability of hollow ocurrence was ∼0.75 in pollards, but only ∼0.3 in non-pollards. No difference in growth rate was found. Pollarding thus leads to the rapid formation of tree hollows, a habitat usually associated with old trees. It is therefore potentially a very important tool in the restoration of saproxylic habitats and conservation of hollow-dependent fauna. If applied along e.g. roads and watercourses, pollarding could also be used to increase landscape connectivity for saproxylic organisms. In reserves where pollarding was formerly practiced, its restoration would be necessary to prevent loss of saproxylic biodiversity. Our results point to the importance of active management measures for maintaining availability, and spatial and temporal continuity of deadwood microhabitats. PMID:23544142

  15. TGF-β induces p53/Smads complex formation in the PAI-1 promoter to activate transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kawarada, Yuki; Inoue, Yasumichi; Kawasaki, Fumihiro; Fukuura, Keishi; Sato, Koichi; Tanaka, Takahito; Itoh, Yuka; Hayashi, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling facilitates tumor development during the advanced stages of tumorigenesis, but induces cell-cycle arrest for tumor suppression during the early stages. However, the mechanism of functional switching of TGF-β is still unknown, and it is unclear whether inhibition of TGF-β signaling results amelioration or exacerbation of cancers. Here we show that the tumor suppressor p53 cooperates with Smad proteins, which are TGF-β signal transducers, to selectively activate plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) transcription. p53 forms a complex with Smad2/3 in the PAI-1 promoter to recruit histone acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein (CBP) and enhance histone H3 acetylation, resulting in transcriptional activation of the PAI-1 gene. Importantly, p53 is required for TGF-β-induced cytostasis and PAI-1 is involved in the cytostatic activity of TGF-β in several cell lines. Our results suggest that p53 enhances TGF-β-induced cytostatic effects by activating PAI-1 transcription, and the functional switching of TGF-β is partially caused by p53 mutation or p53 inactivation during cancer progression. It is expected that these findings will contribute to optimization of TGF-β-targeting therapies for cancer. PMID:27759037

  16. Single-Molecule Kinetics Reveal Cation-Promoted DNA Duplex Formation Through Ordering of Single-Stranded Helices

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Nicholas F.; Holmstrom, Erik D.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the kinetics of short, fully complementary oligonucleotides are investigated at the single-molecule level. Constructs 6–9 bp in length exhibit single exponential kinetics over 2 orders of magnitude time for both forward (kon, association) and reverse (koff, dissociation) processes. Bimolecular rate constants for association are weakly sensitive to the number of basepairs in the duplex, with a 2.5-fold increase between 9 bp (k′on = 2.1(1) × 106 M−1 s−1) and 6 bp (k′on = 5.0(1) × 106 M−1 s−1) sequences. In sharp contrast, however, dissociation rate constants prove to be exponentially sensitive to sequence length, varying by nearly 600-fold over the same 9 bp (koff = 0.024 s−1) to 6 bp (koff = 14 s−1) range. The 8 bp sequence is explored in more detail, and the NaCl dependence of kon and koff is measured. Interestingly, konincreases by >40-fold (kon = 0.10(1) s−1 to 4.0(4) s−1 between [NaCl] = 25 mM and 1 M), whereas in contrast, koffdecreases by fourfold (0.72(3) s−1 to 0.17(7) s−1) over the same range of conditions. Thus, the equilibrium constant (Keq) increases by ≈160, largely due to changes in the association rate, kon. Finally, temperature-dependent measurements reveal that increased [NaCl] reduces the overall exothermicity (ΔΔH° > 0) of duplex formation, albeit by an amount smaller than the reduction in entropic penalty (−TΔΔS° < 0). This reduced entropic cost is attributed to a cation-facilitated preordering of the two single-stranded species, which lowers the association free-energy barrier and in turn accelerates the rate of duplex formation. PMID:23931323

  17. Formation of single domain magnetite by green rust oxidation promoted by microbial anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Li, Jinhua; Benzerara, Karim; Sougrati, Moulay Tahar; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Bernard, Sylvain; Jumas, Jean-Claude; Guyot, François

    2014-08-01

    Biomineralization of magnetite is a central geomicrobiological process that might have played a primordial role over Earth’s history, possibly leaving traces of life in the geological record or controlling trace metal(loid)s and organic pollutants mobility in modern environments. Magnetite biomineralization has been attributed to two main microbial pathways to date (namely magnetotactic bacteria and dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria). Here, we uncover a new route of magnetite biomineralization involving the anaerobic nitrate-reducing iron(II) oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1. Using transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy and rock magnetic analyses, this strain is shown to promote the transformation of hydroxychloride green rust in equilibrium with dissolved Fe(II) to (1) periplasmic lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and (2) extracellular magnetite, thus leading to strong redox heterogeneities at the nanometer scale. On the one hand, lepidocrocite was associated with protein moieties and exhibited an anisotropic texture, with the elongated axis parallel to the cell wall. On the other hand, magnetite crystals exhibited grain sizes and magnetic properties consistent with stable single domain particles. By comparison, abiotic controls led to a very slow (4 months vs. 2 days in BoFeN1 cultures) and incomplete oxidation of hydroxychloride green rust towards magnetite. As this abiotic magnetite exhibited the same size and magnetic properties (stable single domain particles) as magnetite produced in BoFeN1 cultures, only the co-occurrence of textured Fe(III)-oxides and magnetite, associated with the persistence of organic carbon molecules, might constitute valuable biosignatures to be looked for in the geological record. Our results furthermore contribute to a more complex picture of Fe redox cycling in the environment, providing an additional process of Fe(II)-bearing phase

  18. Glycines from the APP GXXXG/GXXXA Transmembrane Motifs Promote Formation of Pathogenic Aβ Oligomers in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Decock, Marie; Stanga, Serena; Octave, Jean-Noël; Dewachter, Ilse; Smith, Steven O.; Constantinescu, Stefan N.; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive decline leading to dementia. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a ubiquitous type I transmembrane (TM) protein sequentially processed to generate the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), the major constituent of senile plaques that are typical AD lesions. There is a growing body of evidence that soluble Aβ oligomers correlate with clinical symptoms associated with the disease. The Aβ sequence begins in the extracellular juxtamembrane region of APP and includes roughly half of the TM domain. This region contains GXXXG and GXXXA motifs, which are critical for both TM protein interactions and fibrillogenic properties of peptides derived from TM α-helices. Glycine-to-leucine mutations of these motifs were previously shown to affect APP processing and Aβ production in cells. However, the detailed contribution of these motifs to APP dimerization, their relation to processing, and the conformational changes they can induce within Aβ species remains undefined. Here, we describe highly resistant Aβ42 oligomers that are produced in cellular membrane compartments. They are formed in cells by processing of the APP amyloidogenic C-terminal fragment (C99), or by direct expression of a peptide corresponding to Aβ42, but not to Aβ40. By a point-mutation approach, we demonstrate that glycine-to-leucine mutations in the G29XXXG33 and G38XXXA42 motifs dramatically affect the Aβ oligomerization process. G33 and G38 in these motifs are specifically involved in Aβ oligomerization; the G33L mutation strongly promotes oligomerization, while G38L blocks it with a dominant effect on G33 residue modification. Finally, we report that the secreted Aβ42 oligomers display pathological properties consistent with their suggested role in AD, but do not induce toxicity in survival assays with neuronal cells. Exposure of neurons to these Aβ42 oligomers dramatically affects neuronal

  19. Renal tubular injury induced by ischemia promotes the formation of calcium oxalate crystals in rats with hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanwei; Liu, Wanpeng; Hui, Limei; Zhao, Jianjun; Yang, Xuecheng; Wang, Yonghua; Niu, Haitao

    2016-10-01

    Hyperoxaluria and cell injury are key factors in urolithiasis. Oxalate metabolism may be altered by renal dysfunction and therefore, impact the deposition of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals. We investigated the relationship of renal function, oxalate metabolism and CaOx crystal deposition in renal ischemia. One hundred male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups. Hyperoxaluria model (Group A and B) was established by feeding rats with 0.75 % ethylene glycol (EG). The left renal pedicle was clamped for 30 min to establish renal ischemia Groups (B and C), while Groups A and D underwent sham operation. Then, serum and urine oxalate (Ox), creatinine (Cr) and urea nitrogen (UN) levels were evaluated by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS) and ion mass spectrum (IMS) at days 0, 2, 4, 7, and 14. CaOx crystallization was assessed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). A temporal and significant increase of serum Cr and UN levels was observed in Groups B and C compared to values obtained for Groups A and D (P < 0.05). Ox levels in serum and urine were significantly higher in Groups A and B than in the other two groups from day 7 (P < 0.05). In addition, CaOx crystallization was observed in both Groups A and B, but Group B showed earlier and more pronounced crystal deposition in the renal tissue. Our results indicated that renal tubular injury induced by renal ischemia might not affect Ox levels but could promote CaOx crystal retention under hyperoxaluria.

  20. Overexpression of H1 Calponin in Osteoblast Lineage Cells Leads to a Decrease in Bone Mass by Disrupting Osteoblast Function and Promoting Osteoclast Formation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Nan; Chen, Maomao; Chen, Siyu; Li, Can; Xie, Yangli; Zhu, Ying; Zhang, Yaozong; Zhao, Ling; He, Qifen; Du, Xiaolan; Chen, Di; Chen, Lin

    2013-01-01

    H1 calponin (CNN1) is known as a smooth muscle-specific, actin-binding protein which regulates smooth muscle contractive activity. Although previous studies have shown that CNN1 has effect on bone, the mechanism is not well defined. To investigate the role of CNN1 in maintaining bone homeostasis, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Cnn1 under the control of the osteoblast-specific 3.6-kb Col1a1 promoter. Col1a1-Cnn1 transgenic mice showed delayed bone formation at embryonic stage and decreased bone mass at adult stage. Morphology analyses showed reduced trabecular number, thickness and defects in bone formation. The proliferation and migration of osteoblasts were decreased in Col1a1-Cnn1 mice due to alterations in cytoskeleton. The early osteoblast differentiation of Col1a1-Cnn1 mice was increased, but the late stage differentiation and mineralization of osteoblasts derived from Col1a1-Cnn1 mice were significantly decreased. In addition to impaired bone formation, the decreased bone mass was also associated with enhanced osteoclastogenesis. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining revealed increased osteoclast numbers in tibias of 2-month-old Col1a1-Cnn1 mice, and increased numbers of osteoclasts co-cultured with Col1a1-Cnn1 osteoblasts. The ratio of RANKL to OPG was significantly increased in Col1a1-Cnn1 osteoblasts. These findings reveal a novel function of CNN1 in maintaining bone homeostasis by coupling bone formation to bone resorption. PMID:23044709

  1. The Kringle-like Domain Facilitates Post-endoplasmic Reticulum Changes to Premelanosome Protein (PMEL) Oligomerization and Disulfide Bond Configuration and Promotes Amyloid Formation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tina; Watt, Brenda; Spruce, Lynn A; Seeholzer, Steven H; Marks, Michael S

    2016-02-12

    The formation of functional amyloid must be carefully regulated to prevent the accumulation of potentially toxic products. Premelanosome protein (PMEL) forms non-toxic functional amyloid fibrils that assemble into sheets upon which melanins ultimately are deposited within the melanosomes of pigment cells. PMEL is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum but forms amyloid only within post-Golgi melanosome precursors; thus, PMEL must traverse the secretory pathway in a non-amyloid form. Here, we identified two pre-amyloid PMEL intermediates that likely regulate the timing of fibril formation. Analyses by non-reducing SDS-PAGE, size exclusion chromatography, and sedimentation velocity revealed two native high Mr disulfide-bonded species that contain Golgi-modified forms of PMEL. These species correspond to disulfide bond-containing dimeric and monomeric PMEL isoforms that contain no other proteins as judged by two-dimensional PAGE of metabolically labeled/immunoprecipitated PMEL and by mass spectrometry of affinity-purified complexes. Metabolic pulse-chase analyses, small molecule inhibitor treatments, and evaluation of site-directed mutants suggest that the PMEL dimer forms around the time of endoplasmic reticulum exit and is resolved by disulfide bond rearrangement into a monomeric form within the late Golgi or a post-Golgi compartment. Mutagenesis of individual cysteine residues within the non-amyloid cysteine-rich Kringle-like domain stabilizes the disulfide-bonded dimer and impairs fibril formation as determined by electron microscopy. Our data show that the Kringle-like domain facilitates the resolution of disulfide-bonded PMEL dimers and promotes PMEL functional amyloid formation, thereby suggesting that PMEL dimers must be resolved to monomers to generate functional amyloid fibrils. PMID:26694611

  2. Multinucleation and Polykaryon Formation is Promoted by the EhPC4 Transcription Factor in Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Olga Hernández de la; Marchat, Laurence A.; Guillén, Nancy; Weber, Christian; Rosas, Itzel López; Díaz-Chávez, José; Herrera, Luis; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; Orozco, Esther; López-Camarillo, César

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the intestinal parasite responsible for human amoebiasis that is a leading cause of death in developing countries. In this protozoan, heterogeneity in DNA content, polyploidy and genome plasticity have been associated to alterations in mechanisms controlling DNA replication and cell division. Studying the function of the transcription factor EhPC4, we unexpectedly found that it is functionally related to DNA replication, and multinucleation. Site-directed mutagenesis on the FRFPKG motif revealed that the K127 residue is required for efficient EhPC4 DNA-binding activity. Remarkably, overexpression of EhPC4 significantly increased cell proliferation, DNA replication and DNA content of trophozoites. A dramatically increase in cell size resulting in the formation of giant multinucleated trophozoites (polykaryon) was also found. Multinucleation event was associated to cytokinesis failure leading to abortion of ongoing cell division. Consistently, genome-wide profiling of EhPC4 overexpressing trophozoites revealed the up-regulation of genes involved in carbohydrates and nucleic acids metabolism, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Forced overexpression of one of these genes, EhNUDC (nuclear movement protein), led to alterations in cytokinesis and partially recapitulated the multinucleation phenotype. These data indicate for the first time that EhPC4 is associated with events related to polyploidy and genome stability in E. histolytica. PMID:26792358

  3. Multinucleation and Polykaryon Formation is Promoted by the EhPC4 Transcription Factor in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Hernández de la Cruz, Olga; Marchat, Laurence A; Guillén, Nancy; Weber, Christian; López Rosas, Itzel; Díaz-Chávez, José; Herrera, Luis; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; Orozco, Esther; López-Camarillo, César

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the intestinal parasite responsible for human amoebiasis that is a leading cause of death in developing countries. In this protozoan, heterogeneity in DNA content, polyploidy and genome plasticity have been associated to alterations in mechanisms controlling DNA replication and cell division. Studying the function of the transcription factor EhPC4, we unexpectedly found that it is functionally related to DNA replication, and multinucleation. Site-directed mutagenesis on the FRFPKG motif revealed that the K127 residue is required for efficient EhPC4 DNA-binding activity. Remarkably, overexpression of EhPC4 significantly increased cell proliferation, DNA replication and DNA content of trophozoites. A dramatically increase in cell size resulting in the formation of giant multinucleated trophozoites (polykaryon) was also found. Multinucleation event was associated to cytokinesis failure leading to abortion of ongoing cell division. Consistently, genome-wide profiling of EhPC4 overexpressing trophozoites revealed the up-regulation of genes involved in carbohydrates and nucleic acids metabolism, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Forced overexpression of one of these genes, EhNUDC (nuclear movement protein), led to alterations in cytokinesis and partially recapitulated the multinucleation phenotype. These data indicate for the first time that EhPC4 is associated with events related to polyploidy and genome stability in E. histolytica. PMID:26792358

  4. A formative evaluation of customized pamphlets to promote physical activity and symptom self-management in women with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Plow, Matthew; Bethoux, Francois; Mai, Kimloan; Marcus, Bess

    2014-10-01

    Inactivity is a prevalent problem in the population affected with multiple sclerosis (MS). Thus, there is a need to develop and test physical activity (PA) interventions that can be widely disseminated. We conducted a formative evaluation as part of a randomized controlled trial of a pamphlet-based PA intervention among 30 women with MS. Pamphlets were customized to sub-sets of participants who shared similar symptoms and barriers to PA. Mixed methods were used to examine the intervention's influence on self-efficacy, social support, processes of change and stages of change placement, as well as explore participants' perceived barriers, motivators and strategies for engaging in a PA program. Results indicated that the intervention group significantly improved stages of change placement (F = 16.64, P < 0.01) and social support (F = 4.08, P = 0.05) in comparison to the control group. Fatigue, pain and lack of time were the commonly cited barriers to engage in the PA program; whereas the pamphlets, phone calls and action planning were cited as motivators. Participants used fatigue management strategies, enlisted social support and modified their environment to routinely engage in the PA program. Strategies were identified to improve the PA intervention in future research. PMID:24989822

  5. A formative evaluation of customized pamphlets to promote physical activity and symptom self-management in women with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Plow, Matthew; Bethoux, Francois; Mai, Kimloan; Marcus, Bess

    2014-10-01

    Inactivity is a prevalent problem in the population affected with multiple sclerosis (MS). Thus, there is a need to develop and test physical activity (PA) interventions that can be widely disseminated. We conducted a formative evaluation as part of a randomized controlled trial of a pamphlet-based PA intervention among 30 women with MS. Pamphlets were customized to sub-sets of participants who shared similar symptoms and barriers to PA. Mixed methods were used to examine the intervention's influence on self-efficacy, social support, processes of change and stages of change placement, as well as explore participants' perceived barriers, motivators and strategies for engaging in a PA program. Results indicated that the intervention group significantly improved stages of change placement (F = 16.64, P < 0.01) and social support (F = 4.08, P = 0.05) in comparison to the control group. Fatigue, pain and lack of time were the commonly cited barriers to engage in the PA program; whereas the pamphlets, phone calls and action planning were cited as motivators. Participants used fatigue management strategies, enlisted social support and modified their environment to routinely engage in the PA program. Strategies were identified to improve the PA intervention in future research.

  6. A formative evaluation of customized pamphlets to promote physical activity and symptom self-management in women with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Plow, Matthew; Bethoux, Francois; Mai, Kimloan; Marcus, Bess

    2014-01-01

    Inactivity is a prevalent problem in the population affected with multiple sclerosis (MS). Thus, there is a need to develop and test physical activity (PA) interventions that can be widely disseminated. We conducted a formative evaluation as part of a randomized controlled trial of a pamphlet-based PA intervention among 30 women with MS. Pamphlets were customized to sub-sets of participants who shared similar symptoms and barriers to PA. Mixed methods were used to examine the intervention’s influence on self-efficacy, social support, processes of change and stages of change placement, as well as explore participants’ perceived barriers, motivators and strategies for engaging in a PA program. Results indicated that the intervention group significantly improved stages of change placement (F = 16.64, P < 0.01) and social support (F = 4.08, P = 0.05) in comparison to the control group. Fatigue, pain and lack of time were the commonly cited barriers to engage in the PA program; whereas the pamphlets, phone calls and action planning were cited as motivators. Participants used fatigue management strategies, enlisted social support and modified their environment to routinely engage in the PA program. Strategies were identified to improve the PA intervention in future research. PMID:24989822

  7. Fluxes of Water through Aquaporin 9 Weaken Membrane-Cytoskeleton Anchorage and Promote Formation of Membrane Protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Thommie; Bolshakova, Anastasia; Magalhães, Marco A. O.; Loitto, Vesa M.; Magnusson, Karl-Eric

    2013-01-01

    All modes of cell migration require rapid rearrangements of cell shape, allowing the cell to navigate within narrow spaces in an extracellular matrix. Thus, a highly flexible membrane and a dynamic cytoskeleton are crucial for rapid cell migration. Cytoskeleton dynamics and tension also play instrumental roles in the formation of different specialized cell membrane protrusions, viz. lamellipodia, filopodia, and membrane blebs. The flux of water through membrane-anchored water channels, known as aquaporins (AQPs) has recently been implicated in the regulation of cell motility, and here we provide novel evidence for the role of AQP9 in the development of various forms of membrane protrusion. Using multiple imaging techniques and cellular models we show that: (i) AQP9 induced and accumulated in filopodia, (ii) AQP9-associated filopodial extensions preceded actin polymerization, which was in turn crucial for their stability and dynamics, and (iii) minute, local reductions in osmolarity immediately initiated small dynamic bleb-like protrusions, the size of which correlated with the reduction in osmotic pressure. Based on this, we present a model for AQP9-induced membrane protrusion, where the interplay of water fluxes through AQP9 and actin dynamics regulate the cellular protrusive and motile activity of cells. PMID:23573219

  8. APIP, an ERBB3-binding partner, stimulates erbB2-3 heterodimer formation to promote tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Doo; Kim, Hyunjoo; Jeon, Young-Jun; Lim, Bitna; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Heo, Won Do; Yang, Doo-Hyun; Kim, Chan-Young; Yang, Han-Kwang; Yang, Jin Kuk; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family member ERBB3 (HER3) is deregulated in many cancers, the list of ERBB3-interacting partners remains limited. Here, we report that the Apaf-1-interacting protein (APIP) stimulates heregulin-β1 (HRG-β1)/ERBB3-driven cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. APIP levels are frequently increased in human gastric cancers and gastric cancer-derived cells. Cell proliferation and tumor formation are repressed by APIP downregulation and stimulated by its overexpression. APIP's role in the ERBB3 pathway is not associated with its functions within the methionine salvage pathway. In response to HRG-β1, APIP binds to the ERBB3 receptor, leading to an enhanced binding of ERBB3 and ERBB2 that results in sustained activations of ERK1/2 and AKT protein kinases. Furthermore, HRG-β1/ERBB3-dependent signaling is gained in APIP transgenic mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), but not lost in Apip−/− MEFs. Our findings offer compelling evidence that APIP plays an essential role in ERBB3 signaling as a positive regulator for tumorigenesis, warranting future development of therapeutic strategies for ERBB3-driven gastric cancer. PMID:26942872

  9. Novel apo E-derived ABCA1 agonist peptide (CS-6253) promotes reverse cholesterol transport and induces formation of preβ-1 HDL in vitro

    DOE PAGES

    Hafiane, Anouar; Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan O.; Genest, Jacques; Zhu, Xuewei

    2015-07-24

    Apolipoprotein (apo) mimetic peptides replicate some aspects of HDL function. We have previously reported the effects of compound ATI-5261 on its ability to replicate many functions of native apo A-I in the process of HDL biogenesis. ATI-5261 induced muscle toxicity in wild type C57Bl/6 mice, increased CPK, ALT and AST and increase in triglyceride (Tg) levels. Aromatic phenylalanine residues on the non-polar face of ATI-5261, together with positively charged arginine residues at the lipid-water interface were responsible for these effects. This information was used to create a novel analog (CS-6253) that was non-toxic. We evaluated this peptide designed from themore » carboxyl terminus of apo E, in its ability to mimic apo A-I functionality. Our data shows that the lipidated particles generated by incubating cells overexpressing ABCA1 with lipid free CS-6253 enhances the rate of ABCA1 lipid efflux with high affinity interactions with native ABCA1 oligomeric forms and plasma membrane micro-domains. Interaction between ABCA1 and lipid free CS-6253 resulted in formation of nascent HDL-CS-6253 particles that are actively remodeled in plasma. Mature HDL-CS-6253 particles deliver cholesterol to liver cells via SR-BI in-vitro. CS-6253 significantly increases cholesterol efflux in murine macrophages and in human THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells expressing ABCA1. Addition of CS-6253 to plasma dose-dependently displaced apo A-I from α-HDL particles and led to de novo formation of preβ-1 HDL that stimulates ABCA1 dependent cholesterol efflux efficiently. When incubated with human plasma CS-6253 was also found to bind with HDL and LDL and promoted the transfer of cholesterol from HDL to LDL predominantly. Our data shows that CS-6253 mimics apo A-I in its ability to promote ABCA1-mediated formation of nascent HDL particles, and enhances formation of preβ-1 HDL with increase in the cycling of apo A-I between the preβ and α-HDL particles in-vitro. These mechanisms are

  10. Influence of Blend Ratio and Processing Additive on Free Carrier Yield and Mobility in PTB7:PC71BM Photovoltaic Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Charge separation and extraction dynamics were investigated in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells made from the polymer PTB7 and the soluble fullerene PC71BM on a broad time scale from subpicosecond to microseconds using ultrafast optical probing of carrier drift and the integral-mode photocurrent measurements. We show that the short circuit current is determined by the separation of charge pairs into free carriers, which is strongly influenced by blend composition. This separation is found to be efficient in fullerene-rich blends where a high electron mobility of >0.1 cm2 V–1 s–1 is observed in the first 10 ps after excitation. Morphology optimization using the solvent additive 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) doubles the charge pair separation efficiency and the short-circuit current. Carrier extraction at low internal electric field is slightly faster from the cells prepared with DIO, which can reduce recombination losses and enhance a fill factor. PMID:27293495

  11. SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON: Bilateral direct comparison of Josephson array voltage standards of the PTB (Germany) and PEL (Croatia): Draft B report for EUROMET.EM-S28

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Ralf; Ilić, Damir; Šala, Alan

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of the 10 V Josephson array voltage standard of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Germany, was made with that of the Primarni Elektromagnetski Laboratorij (PEL), Croatia, in April 2007. The results are in very good agreement and the measured overall relative combined standard uncertainty is better than 1 part in 1010. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by EURAMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  12. A molecular beacon strategy for the thermodynamic characterization of triplex DNA: triplex formation at the promoter region of cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Antony, T; Thomas, T; Sigal, L H; Shirahata, A; Thomas, T J

    2001-08-01

    We studied the formation of triplex DNA in the purine-pyrimidine-rich promoter site sequence of cyclin D1, located at -116 to -99 from the transcription initiation site, with a molecular beacon comprised of a G-rich 18-mer triplex forming oligodeoxyribonucleotide. Formation of triplex DNA was monitored by enhanced fluorescence of the beacon, due to the weakening of fluorescence energy transfer, upon its binding to the target duplex. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed triplex DNA formation by these oligonucleotides. In low salt buffer (10 mM Na(+)), triplex DNA formation was not observed in the absence of a ligand such as spermine. At room temperature (22 degrees C), the equilibrium association constant (K(a)) calculated in the presence of 1 microM spermine and 10 mM Na(+) was 3.2 x 10(8) M(-1). The K(a) value was 1.0 x 10(9) M(-1) in the presence of 150 mM Na(+), and it increased by 10-fold by the addition of 1 mM spermine. Delta H, Delta S, and Delta G of triplex DNA formation, calculated from the temperature dependence of K(a) in the range of 20--45 degrees C, were -35.9 kcal/mol, -77 cal/(mol.K), and -13 kcal/mol, respectively, in the presence of 150 mM NaCl. The corresponding values were -52.9 kcal/mol, -132.5 cal/(mol.K), and -13.4 kcal/mol in the presence of 150 mM NaCl and 1 mM spermine. Structurally related polyamines exerted different degrees of triplex DNA stabilization, as determined by binding constant measurements. Comparison of spermine versus hexamine showed a 17-fold increase in the equilibrium association constant, whereas bis(ethyl) derivatization lead to a 4-fold decrease of this value. In the absence of added duplex and polyamines, the molecular beacon dissociated with a melting temperature of 67 degrees C. Thermodynamic parameters of beacon melting were calculated from the melting curve, and the Delta H, Delta S, and Delta G values were 37.8 kcal/mol, 112 cal/(mol.K), and 4.4 kcal/mol, respectively. These results demonstrate that

  13. Phosphoric acid-etching promotes bond strength and formation of acid-base resistant zone on enamel.

    PubMed

    Li, N; Nikaido, T; Alireza, S; Takagaki, T; Chen, J-H; Tagami, J

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of phosphoric acid (PA) etching on the bond strength and acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ) formation of a two-step self-etching adhesive (SEA) system to enamel. An etch-and-rinse adhesive (EAR) system Single Bond (SB) and a two-step SEA system Clearfil SE Bond (SE) were used. Human teeth were randomly divided into four groups according to different adhesive treatments: 1) SB; 2) SE; 3) 35% PA etching→SE primer→SE adhesive (PA/SEp+a); (4) 35% PA etching→SE adhesive (PA/SEa). Microshear bond strength to enamel was measured and then statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and the Tukey honestly significant difference test. The failure mode was recorded and analyzed by χ( 2 ) test. The etching pattern of the enamel surface was observed with scanning electron microscope (SEM). The bonded interface was exposed to a demineralizing solution (pH=4.5) for 4.5 hours and then 5% sodium hypochlorite with ultrasonication for 30 minutes. After argon-ion etching, the interfacial ultrastructure was observed using SEM. The microshear bond strength to enamel of the SE group was significantly lower (p<0.05) than that of the three PA-etched groups, although the latter three were not significantly different from one another. The ABRZ was detected in all the groups. In morphological observation, the ABRZ in the three PA-etched groups were obviously thicker compared with the SE group with an irregular wave-shaped edge.

  14. Formation of a physiological complex between TRPV2 and RGA protein promotes cell surface expression of TRPV2.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Alexander J; Wakano, Clay; Del Carmen, Kimberly A; Koblan-Huberson, Murielle; Turner, Helen

    2005-03-01

    The transient receptor potential, sub-family Vanilloid (TRPV)(2) cation channel is activated in response to extreme temperature elevations in sensory neurons. However, TRPV2 is widely expressed in tissues with no sensory function, including cells of the immune system. Regulation of GRC, the murine homolog of TRPV2 has been studied in insulinoma cells and myocytes. GRC is activated in response to certain growth factors and neuropeptides, via a mechanism that involves regulated access of the channel to the plasma membrane. This is likely to be an important primary control mechanism for TRPV2 outside the CNS. Here, we report that a regulated trafficking step controls the access of TRPV2 to the cell surface in mast cells. In mast cells, elevations in cytosolic cAMP are sufficient to drive plasma membrane localization of TRPV2. We have previously proposed that the recombinase gene activator protein (RGA), a four-transmembrane domain, intracellular protein, associates with TRPV2 during the biosynthesis and early trafficking of the channel. We use a polyclonal antibody to RGA to confirm the formation of a physiological complex between RGA and TRPV2. Finally, we show that over-expression of the RGA protein potentiates the basal surface localization of TRPV2. We propose that trafficking and activation mechanisms intersect for TRPV2, and that cAMP mobilizing stimuli may regulate TRPV2 localization in non-sensory cells. RGA participates in the control of TRPV2 surface levels, and co-expression of RGA may be a key component of experimental systems that seek to study TRPV2 physiology.

  15. Acidic retinoids in small amounts promote retinyl ester formation in neonatal lung, with transient increases in retinoid homeostatic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mixing a small proportion, 10%, of retinoic acid (RA) into an oral dose of vitamin A (VA) has been shown to markedly increase retinol uptake and retinyl ester (RE) formation in the neonatal lung, as compared to VA given alone. Concomitantly, several retinoid homeostatic genes, lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT), RA-4-hydroxylase (CYP26B1), and stimulated by retinoic acid gene-6 (STRA6) were upregulated. However, whether multiple doses may act accumulatively and whether less than 10% RA can be used has not been determined. Methods Neonatal rats were treated once on postnatal day (PD) 4 or PD14 with VA alone or VA combined with 10% RA (VARA10%) or a stable analog, Am580 (VAAm10%), or they were treated with multiple doses on PD4, 7, 11, and 14. Results RE increased cumulatively with multiple dosing. However, LRAT, CYP26B1 and STRA6 mRNA levels were similar for single and multiple treatments, indicating a transient noncumulative impact on gene expression. Lung RE was elevated with as little as 0.5% RA (P < 0.05) in a single dosing study. Whereas all concentrations of VARA elevated lung RE in single dosing studies, only 10% RA increased lung RE after multiple dosing, suggesting an attenuation of RA action with repeated dosing. In contrast, VAAm10%, 2%, and 1% all significantly increased lung RE after multiple doses (P < 0.05), while also increasing the expression of LRAT and CYP26B1. Conclusions These results indicate that the neonatal lung is very sensitive to acidic retinoid exposure and suggest that a VA combined with a very small fraction of acidic retinoid could be effective in increasing the lung’s storage pool of VA. PMID:24351038

  16. SclR, a Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor, Regulates Hyphal Morphology and Promotes Sclerotial Formation in Aspergillus oryzae ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Feng Jie; Takahashi, Tadashi; Matsushima, Ken-ichiro; Hara, Seiichi; Shinohara, Yasutomo; Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Koyama, Yasuji

    2011-01-01

    Most known basic-region helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins belong to a superfamily of transcription factors often involved in the control of growth and differentiation. Therefore, inappropriate expression of genes encoding bHLH proteins is frequently associated with developmental dysfunction. In our previously reported study, a novel bHLH protein-encoding gene (AO090011000215) of Aspergillus oryzae was identified. The gene-disrupted strain was found to produce dense conidia, but sparse sclerotia, relative to the parent strain. Here, to further analyze its function, we generated an overexpressing strain using the A. oryzae amyB gene promoter. Genetic overexpression led to a large number of initial hyphal aggregations and then the formation of mature sclerotia; it was therefore designated sclR (sclerotium regulator). At the same time, the sclR-overexpressing strain also displayed both delayed and decreased conidiation. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the aerial hyphae of the sclR-overexpressing strain were extremely branched and intertwined with each other. In the generation of the SclR-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression strain, the SclR-EGFP protein fusion was conditionally detected in the nuclei. In addition, the loss of sclR function led to rapid protein degradation and cell lysis in dextrin-polypeptone-yeast extract liquid medium. Taken together, these observations indicate that SclR plays an important role in hyphal morphology, asexual conidiospore formation, and the promotion of sclerotial production, even retaining normal cell function, at least in submerged liquid culture. PMID:21551246

  17. UV-B Induced Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Promotes Formation of BFA-Induced Compartments in Cells of Arabidopsis Root Apices

    PubMed Central

    Yokawa, Ken; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    UV-B radiation is an important part of the electromagnetic spectrum emitted by the sun. For much of the period of biological evolution organisms have been exposed to UV radiation, and have developed diverse mechanisms to cope with this potential stress factor. Roots are usually shielded from exposure to UV by the surrounding soil, but may nevertheless be exposed to high energy radiation on the soil surface. Due to their high sensitivity to UV-B radiation, plant roots need to respond rapidly in order to minimize exposure on the surface. In addition to root gravitropism, effective light perception by roots has recently been discovered to be essential for triggering negative root phototropism in Arabidopsis. However, it is not fully understood how UV-B affects root growth and phototropism. Here, we report that UV-B induces rapid generation of reactive oxygen species which in turn promotes the formation of BFA-induced compartments in the Arabidopsis root apex. During unilateral UV-B irradiation of roots changes in auxin concentration on the illuminated side have been recorded. In conclusion, UV-B-induced and ROS-mediated stimulation of vesicle recycling promotes root growth and induces negative phototropism. PMID:26793199

  18. UV-B Induced Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Promotes Formation of BFA-Induced Compartments in Cells of Arabidopsis Root Apices.

    PubMed

    Yokawa, Ken; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Baluška, František

    2015-01-01

    UV-B radiation is an important part of the electromagnetic spectrum emitted by the sun. For much of the period of biological evolution organisms have been exposed to UV radiation, and have developed diverse mechanisms to cope with this potential stress factor. Roots are usually shielded from exposure to UV by the surrounding soil, but may nevertheless be exposed to high energy radiation on the soil surface. Due to their high sensitivity to UV-B radiation, plant roots need to respond rapidly in order to minimize exposure on the surface. In addition to root gravitropism, effective light perception by roots has recently been discovered to be essential for triggering negative root phototropism in Arabidopsis. However, it is not fully understood how UV-B affects root growth and phototropism. Here, we report that UV-B induces rapid generation of reactive oxygen species which in turn promotes the formation of BFA-induced compartments in the Arabidopsis root apex. During unilateral UV-B irradiation of roots changes in auxin concentration on the illuminated side have been recorded. In conclusion, UV-B-induced and ROS-mediated stimulation of vesicle recycling promotes root growth and induces negative phototropism.

  19. Jasmonate-Activated MYC2 Represses ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 Activity to Antagonize Ethylene-Promoted Apical Hook Formation in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing; Zhu, Ziqiang; An, Fengying; Hao, Dongdong; Li, Pengpeng; Song, Jinghui; Yi, Chengqi; Guo, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    The apical hook is an essential structure that enables epigeal plants to protrude through the soil. Arabidopsis thaliana HOOKLESS1 (HLS1) is reported to be a key regulator of hook development and a direct target gene of the ethylene (ET)-activated transcription factors ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3) and its close homolog EIN3-Like1. Previous research has shown that the phytohormones jasmonate (JA) and ET antagonistically regulate apical hook development, although the underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here, we report that JA represses hook formation by reducing HLS1 expression. Our results further reveal that the JA-activated transcription factor MYC2 represses EIN3 function to reduce HLS1 expression through at least the following two layers of regulation: (1) MYC2 binds to the promoter of an F-box gene, EIN3 BINDING F-BOX PROTEIN1, to induce its expression and thus promote EIN3 degradation; and (2) MYC2 physically interacts with EIN3 and inhibits its DNA binding activity. Collectively, our findings shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the antagonism between JA and ET during apical hook development and provide insight into the coaction of multiple phytohormones in the regulation of plant growth and development. PMID:24668749

  20. Efficiently engineered cell sheet using a complex of polyethylenimine–alginate nanocomposites plus bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene to promote new bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Han; Zhang, Kai; Qiao, Chunyan; Yuan, Anliang; Li, Daowei; Zhao, Liang; Shi, Ce; Xu, Xiaowei; Ni, Shilei; Zheng, Changyu; Liu, Xiaohua; Yang, Bai; Sun, Hongchen

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of large bone defects is a common clinical problem. Recently, stem cell sheet has been an emerging strategy in bone tissue engineering. To enhance the osteogenic potential of stem cell sheet, we fabricated bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) gene-engineered cell sheet using a complex of polyethylenimine–alginate (PEI–al) nanocomposites plus human BMP-2 complementary(c)DNA plasmid, and studied its osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. PEI–al nanocomposites carrying BMP-2 gene could efficiently transfect bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The cell sheet was made by culturing the cells in medium containing vitamin C for 10 days. Assays on the cell culture showed that the genetically engineered cells released the BMP-2 for at least 14 days. The expression of osteogenesis-related gene was increased, which demonstrated that released BMP-2 could effectively induce the cell sheet osteogenic differentiation in vitro. To further test the osteogenic potential of the cell sheet in vivo, enhanced green fluorescent protein or BMP-2-producing cell sheets were treated on the cranial bone defects. The results indicated that the BMP-2-producing cell sheet group was more efficient than other groups in promoting bone formation in the defect area. Our results suggested that PEI–al nanocomposites efficiently deliver the BMP-2 gene to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and that BMP-2 gene-engineered cell sheet is an effective way for promoting bone regeneration. PMID:24855355

  1. UV-B Induced Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Promotes Formation of BFA-Induced Compartments in Cells of Arabidopsis Root Apices.

    PubMed

    Yokawa, Ken; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Baluška, František

    2015-01-01

    UV-B radiation is an important part of the electromagnetic spectrum emitted by the sun. For much of the period of biological evolution organisms have been exposed to UV radiation, and have developed diverse mechanisms to cope with this potential stress factor. Roots are usually shielded from exposure to UV by the surrounding soil, but may nevertheless be exposed to high energy radiation on the soil surface. Due to their high sensitivity to UV-B radiation, plant roots need to respond rapidly in order to minimize exposure on the surface. In addition to root gravitropism, effective light perception by roots has recently been discovered to be essential for triggering negative root phototropism in Arabidopsis. However, it is not fully understood how UV-B affects root growth and phototropism. Here, we report that UV-B induces rapid generation of reactive oxygen species which in turn promotes the formation of BFA-induced compartments in the Arabidopsis root apex. During unilateral UV-B irradiation of roots changes in auxin concentration on the illuminated side have been recorded. In conclusion, UV-B-induced and ROS-mediated stimulation of vesicle recycling promotes root growth and induces negative phototropism. PMID:26793199

  2. Increase in Bacterial Colony Formation from a Permafrost Ice Wedge Dosed with a Tomitella biformata Recombinant Resuscitation-Promoting Factor Protein.

    PubMed

    Puspita, Indun Dewi; Kitagawa, Wataru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H

    2015-01-01

    Resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) is a protein that has been found in a number of different Actinobacteria species and has been shown to promote the growth of active cells and resuscitate dormant (non-dividing) cells. We previously reported the biological activity of an Rpf protein in Tomitella biformata AHU 1821(T), an Actinobacteria isolated from a permafrost ice wedge. This protein is excreted outside the cell; however, few studies have investigated its contribution in environmental samples to the growth or resuscitation of bacteria other than the original host. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether Rpf from T. biformata impacted the cultivation of other bacteria from the permafrost ice wedge from which it was originally isolated. All experiments used recombinant Rpf proteins produced using a Rhodococcus erythropolis expression system. Dilutions of melted surface sterilized ice wedge samples mixed with different doses of the purified recombinant Rpf (rRpf) protein indicated that the highest concentration tested, 1250 pM, had a significantly (p <0.05) higher number of CFUs on agar plates after 8 d, approximately 14-fold higher than that on control plates without rRpf. 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that all the colonies on plates were mainly related to Brevibacterium antiquum strain VKM Ac-2118 (AY243344), with 98-99% sequence identity. This species is also a member of the phylum Actinobacteria and was originally isolated from Siberian permafrost sediments. The results of the present study demonstrated that rRpf not only promoted the growth of T. biformata from which it was isolated, but also enhanced colony formation by another Actinobacteria in an environmental sample.

  3. Human amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channel gamma subunit promoter: functional analysis and identification of a polypurine-polypyrimidine tract with the potential for triplex DNA formation.

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, S D; Loftus, R W; Itani, O A; Thomas, C P

    2000-01-01

    The mRNA for the epithelial Na(+) channel gamma subunit (gammaENaC) is regulated developmentally in the lung, colon and distal nephron and in response to Na(+) deprivation and systemic corticosteroids in the distal colon. Because such regulation is likely to be at the level of gene transcription, we examined the function of the promoter and other 5' flanking elements of the human gammaENaC gene. The proximal 5' flanking region contains two GC boxes but does not contain a TATA box. A 450 bp human gammaENaC fragment (-459 to +40) directed the expression of luciferase in H441 cells and primer extension analysis in transfected cells confirmed the correct initiation of human gammaENaC-luciferase chimaeric transcripts. By deletional analysis, GC boxes at -21 and -52 were found to be critical for this promoter activity. To begin to identify transcription factors that bind to the core promoter, a double-stranded oligonucleotide that corresponded to this region was synthesized and tested in a gel mobility-shift assay. Incubation of this radiolabelled oligonucleotide with nuclear extracts from H441 and FRTL5 cells resulted in the formation of four specific and distinct DNA-protein complexes. On the basis of antibody 'supershift' assays, one of these factors corresponds to Sp1, whereas the other three correspond to Sp3. Further upstream, an approx. 300 nt (-1143 to -839) polypurine-polypyrimidine tract (PPy tract) containing internal mirror repeats was identified. When contained in a supercoiled plasmid, the approx. 1200 nt 5' flanking region was sensitive to S1 endonuclease, which was consistent with the formation of an intramolecular triplex DNA ('H-DNA') structure with an unpaired single strand. High-resolution mapping with S1 endonuclease and sequencing of S1-generated clones confirmed that all S1-sensitive sites were within the PPy tract. Finally, a negative regulatory element was identified between -1525 and -1296 that functioned in lung, colon and collecting duct cell

  4. Transglutaminase 2 Promotes PDGF-Mediated Activation of PDGFR/Akt1 and β-catenin Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and Supports Neointima Formation

    PubMed Central

    Nurminskaya, Maria; Beazley, Kelly E.; Smith, Elizabeth P.; Belkin, Alexey M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Phenotypic switch of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) accompanies neointima formation and associates with vascular diseases. Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced activation of PDGFR/Akt1 and β-catenin signaling pathways in VSMCs has been implicated in vessel occlusion. Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) regulates these pathways and its levels are increased in the neointima. Objective To evaluate the role of TG2 in PDGF/β-catenin signaling cross-talk and assess its contribution to neointima. Methods Aortic VSMCs from wild-type and TG2 knockout mice were tested in vitro for levels of VSMC markers, proliferation, migration, and PDGF-induced activation of PDGFR/Akt1 and β-catenin pathways. Neointima in these mice was studied ex vivo in coronary vessels using heart slice model and in vivo using carotid artery ligation (CAL) model. Results Genetic deletion of TG2 attenuated the PDGF-induced phenotypic switch of aortic VSMCs, reduced their proliferation and migration rates, and inhibited PDGF-induced activation of PDGFR/Akt1 and β-catenin pathways in both ex vivo and in vivo neointima models. Importantly, genetic deletion of TG2 also markedly attenuated vessel occlusion. Conclusions TG2 promotes neointima formation by mediating the PDGF-induced activation of the PDGFR/Akt1 and β-catenin pathways in VSMCs. This study identifies TG2 as a potential therapeutic target for blocking neointima in blood vessels. PMID:25612735

  5. Polysaccharides and Proteins Added to Flowing Drinking Water at Microgram-per-Liter Levels Promote the Formation of Biofilms Predominated by Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Eveline L. W.; van der Kooij, Dick

    2014-01-01

    Biopolymers are important substrates for heterotrophic bacteria in (ultra)oligotrophic freshwater environments, but information about their utilization at microgram-per-liter levels by attached freshwater bacteria is lacking. This study aimed at characterizing biopolymer utilization in drinking-water-related biofilms by exposing such biofilms to added carbohydrates or proteins at 10 μg C liter−1 in flowing tap water for up to 3 months. Individually added amylopectin was not utilized by the biofilms, whereas laminarin, gelatin, and caseinate were. Amylopectin was utilized during steady-state biofilm growth with simultaneously added maltose but not with simultaneously added acetate. Biofilm formation rates (BFR) at 10 μg C liter−1 per substrate were ranked as follows, from lowest to highest: blank or amylopectin (≤6 pg ATP cm−2 day−1), gelatin or caseinate, laminarin, maltose, acetate alone or acetate plus amylopectin, and maltose plus amylopectin (980 pg ATP cm−2 day−1). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses revealed that the predominant maltose-utilizing bacteria also dominated subsequent amylopectin utilization, indicating catabolic repression and (extracellular) enzyme induction. The accelerated BFR with amylopectin in the presence of maltose probably resulted from efficient amylopectin binding to and hydrolysis by inductive enzymes attached to the bacterial cells. Cytophagia, Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Sphingobacteriia grew during polysaccharide addition, and Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria, Cytophagia, Flavobacteriia, and Sphingobacteriia grew during protein addition. The succession of bacterial populations in the biofilms coincided with the decrease in the specific growth rate during biofilm formation. Biopolymers can clearly promote biofilm formation at microgram-per-liter levels in drinking water distribution systems and, depending on their concentrations, might

  6. Polysaccharides and proteins added to flowing drinking water at microgram-per-liter levels promote the formation of biofilms predominated by bacteroidetes and proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Sack, Eveline L W; van der Wielen, Paul W J J; van der Kooij, Dick

    2014-04-01

    Biopolymers are important substrates for heterotrophic bacteria in (ultra)oligotrophic freshwater environments, but information about their utilization at microgram-per-liter levels by attached freshwater bacteria is lacking. This study aimed at characterizing biopolymer utilization in drinking-water-related biofilms by exposing such biofilms to added carbohydrates or proteins at 10 μg C liter(-1) in flowing tap water for up to 3 months. Individually added amylopectin was not utilized by the biofilms, whereas laminarin, gelatin, and caseinate were. Amylopectin was utilized during steady-state biofilm growth with simultaneously added maltose but not with simultaneously added acetate. Biofilm formation rates (BFR) at 10 μg C liter(-1) per substrate were ranked as follows, from lowest to highest: blank or amylopectin (≤6 pg ATP cm(-2) day(-1)), gelatin or caseinate, laminarin, maltose, acetate alone or acetate plus amylopectin, and maltose plus amylopectin (980 pg ATP cm(-2) day(-1)). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses revealed that the predominant maltose-utilizing bacteria also dominated subsequent amylopectin utilization, indicating catabolic repression and (extracellular) enzyme induction. The accelerated BFR with amylopectin in the presence of maltose probably resulted from efficient amylopectin binding to and hydrolysis by inductive enzymes attached to the bacterial cells. Cytophagia, Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Sphingobacteriia grew during polysaccharide addition, and Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria, Cytophagia, Flavobacteriia, and Sphingobacteriia grew during protein addition. The succession of bacterial populations in the biofilms coincided with the decrease in the specific growth rate during biofilm formation. Biopolymers can clearly promote biofilm formation at microgram-per-liter levels in drinking water distribution systems and, depending on their concentrations, might

  7. GmEXPB2, a Cell Wall β-Expansin, Affects Soybean Nodulation through Modifying Root Architecture and Promoting Nodule Formation and Development.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxin; Zhao, Jing; Tan, Zhiyuan; Zeng, Rensen; Liao, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Nodulation is an essential process for biological nitrogen (N2) fixation in legumes, but its regulation remains poorly understood. Here, a β-expansin gene, GmEXPB2, was found to be critical for soybean (Glycine max) nodulation. GmEXPB2 was preferentially expressed at the early stage of nodule development. β-Glucuronidase staining further showed that GmEXPB2 was mainly localized to the nodule vascular trace and nodule vascular bundles, as well as nodule cortical and parenchyma cells, suggesting that GmEXPB2 might be involved in cell wall modification and extension during nodule formation and development. Overexpression of GmEXPB2 dramatically modified soybean root architecture, increasing the size and number of cortical cells in the root meristematic and elongation zones and expanding root hair density and size of the root hair zone. Confocal microscopy with green fluorescent protein-labeled rhizobium USDA110 cells showed that the infection events were significantly enhanced in the GmEXPB2-overexpressing lines. Moreover, nodule primordium development was earlier in overexpressing lines compared with wild-type plants. Thereby, overexpression of GmEXPB2 in either transgenic soybean hairy roots or whole plants resulted in increased nodule number, nodule mass, and nitrogenase activity and thus elevated plant N and phosphorus content as well as biomass. In contrast, suppression of GmEXPB2 in soybean transgenic composite plants led to smaller infected cells and thus reduced number of big nodules, nodule mass, and nitrogenase activity, thereby inhibiting soybean growth. Taken together, we conclude that GmEXPB2 critically affects soybean nodulation through modifying root architecture and promoting nodule formation and development and subsequently impacts biological N2 fixation and growth of soybean.

  8. GmEXPB2, a Cell Wall β-Expansin, Affects Soybean Nodulation through Modifying Root Architecture and Promoting Nodule Formation and Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinxin; Zhao, Jing; Tan, Zhiyuan; Liao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Nodulation is an essential process for biological nitrogen (N2) fixation in legumes, but its regulation remains poorly understood. Here, a β-expansin gene, GmEXPB2, was found to be critical for soybean (Glycine max) nodulation. GmEXPB2 was preferentially expressed at the early stage of nodule development. β-Glucuronidase staining further showed that GmEXPB2 was mainly localized to the nodule vascular trace and nodule vascular bundles, as well as nodule cortical and parenchyma cells, suggesting that GmEXPB2 might be involved in cell wall modification and extension during nodule formation and development. Overexpression of GmEXPB2 dramatically modified soybean root architecture, increasing the size and number of cortical cells in the root meristematic and elongation zones and expanding root hair density and size of the root hair zone. Confocal microscopy with green fluorescent protein-labeled rhizobium USDA110 cells showed that the infection events were significantly enhanced in the GmEXPB2-overexpressing lines. Moreover, nodule primordium development was earlier in overexpressing lines compared with wild-type plants. Thereby, overexpression of GmEXPB2 in either transgenic soybean hairy roots or whole plants resulted in increased nodule number, nodule mass, and nitrogenase activity and thus elevated plant N and phosphorus content as well as biomass. In contrast, suppression of GmEXPB2 in soybean transgenic composite plants led to smaller infected cells and thus reduced number of big nodules, nodule mass, and nitrogenase activity, thereby inhibiting soybean growth. Taken together, we conclude that GmEXPB2 critically affects soybean nodulation through modifying root architecture and promoting nodule formation and development and subsequently impacts biological N2 fixation and growth of soybean. PMID:26432877

  9. A Heterodimeric Cytokine, Consisting of IL-17A and IL-17F, Promotes Migration and Capillary-Like Tube Formation of Human Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Numasaki, Muneo; Tsukamoto, Hiroki; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Ohrui, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The interleukin (IL)-17 family, consisting of six homodimeric cytokines IL-17A, IL-17B, IL-17C, IL-17D, IL-17E/IL-25, and IL-17F, mediates a variety of biological activities including regulation of chemokine secretion and angiogenesis. Among the IL-17 family members, IL-17A and IL-17E/IL-25 are angiogenesis stimulators, while IL-17B and IL-17F are angiogenesis inhibitors. Recently, IL-17A/F heterodimer, comprised of the IL-17A and IL-17F subunits, was found as another member of the IL-17 cytokine family. However, to date, it has been unknown whether IL-17A/F has biological actions to affect the angiogenesis-related vascular endothelial functions. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the biological effects of IL-17A/F on the growth, migration and capillary-like tube formation of vascular endothelial cells. Recombinant IL-17A/F protein had no direct effects on the growth of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs), whereas, after 4-hour incubation in a modified Boyden Chemotaxicell chamber, IL-17A/F significantly induced migration of HMVECs over a wide range of doses via the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. We further investigated the biological effect of IL-17A/F on capillary-like tube formation using a co-culture system of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs), which mimicked the in vivo microenvironment. In this co-culture system, IL-17A/F significantly promoted capillary-like endothelial tube formation in a dose-dependent fashion via the PI3K and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Additionally, IL-17A/F up-regulated secretion of angiogenic growth factors such as IL-8 and growth-related oncogene (GRO)-α by HDFs. These findings identify a novel biological function for IL-17A/F as an indirect angiogenic agent. PMID:27594509

  10. Notch signaling in the pigmented epithelium of the anterior eye segment promotes ciliary body development at the expense of iris formation.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Bhushan; Nowell, Craig S; Ihm, JongEun; Kostic, Corinne; Arsenijevic, Yvan; Moulin, Alexandre P; Schorderet, Daniel F; Beermann, Friedrich; Radtke, Freddy

    2014-07-01

    The ciliary body and iris are pigmented epithelial structures in the anterior eye segment that function to maintain correct intra-ocular pressure and regulate exposure of the internal eye structures to light, respectively. The cellular and molecular factors that mediate the development of the ciliary body and iris from the ocular pigmented epithelium remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we have investigated the role of Notch signaling during the development of the anterior pigmented epithelium by using genetic loss- and gain-of-function approaches. Loss of canonical Notch signaling results in normal iris development but absence of the ciliary body. This causes progressive hypotony and over time leads to phthisis bulbi, a condition characterized by shrinkage of the eye and loss of structure/function. Conversely, Notch gain-of-function results in aniridia and profound ciliary body hyperplasia, which causes ocular hypertension and glaucoma-like disease. Collectively, these data indicate that Notch signaling promotes ciliary body development at the expense of iris formation and reveals novel animal models of human ocular pathologies.

  11. An enantioselective strategy for the total synthesis of (S)-tylophorine via catalytic asymmetric allylation and a one-pot DMAP-promoted isocyanate formation/Lewis acid catalyzed cyclization sequence.

    PubMed

    Su, Bo; Zhang, Hui; Deng, Meng; Wang, Qingmin

    2014-06-14

    A new asymmetric total synthesis of a phenanthroindolizidine alkaloid (S)-tylophorine is reported, which features a catalytic asymmetric allylation of aldehydes and an unexpected one-pot DMAP promoted isocyanate formation and Lewis acid catalyzed intramolecular cyclization reaction. In addition, White's direct C-H oxidation catalyst system converting monosubstituted olefins to linear allylic acetates was also employed for late-stage transformation.

  12. Autocatalytic formation of an iron(IV)-oxo complex via scandium ion-promoted radical chain autoxidation of an iron(II) complex with dioxygen and tetraphenylborate.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Yusuke; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2014-06-01

    A non-heme iron(IV)-oxo complex, [(TMC)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) (TMC = 1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane), was formed by oxidation of an iron(II) complex ([(TMC)Fe(II)](2+)) with dioxygen (O2) and tetraphenylborate (BPh4(-)) in the presence of scandium triflate (Sc(OTf)3) in acetonitrile at 298 K via autocatalytic radical chain reactions rather than by a direct O2 activation pathway. The autocatalytic radical chain reaction is initiated by scandium ion-promoted electron transfer from BPh4(-) to [(TMC)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) to produce phenyl radical (Ph(•)). The chain propagation step is composed of the addition of O2 to Ph(•) and the reduction of the resulting phenylperoxyl radical (PhOO(•)) by scandium ion-promoted electron transfer from BPh4(-) to PhOO(•) to produce phenyl hydroperoxide (PhOOH), accompanied by regeneration of phenyl radical. PhOOH reacts with [(TMC)Fe(II)](2+) to yield phenol (PhOH) and [(TMC)Fe(IV)(O)](2+). Biphenyl (Ph-Ph) was formed via the radical chain autoxidation of BPh3 by O2. The induction period of the autocatalytic radical chain reactions was shortened by addition of a catalytic amount of [(TMC)Fe(IV)(O)](2+), whereas addition of a catalytic amount of ferrocene that can reduce [(TMC)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) resulted in elongation of the induction period. Radical chain autoxidation of BPh4(-) by O2 also occurred in the presence of Sc(OTf)3 without [(TMC)Fe(IV)(O)](2+), initiating the autocatalytic oxidation of [(TMC)Fe(II)](2+) with O2 and BPh4(-) to yield [(TMC)Fe(IV)(O)](2+). Thus, the general view for formation of non-heme iron(IV)-oxo complexes via O2-binding iron species (e.g., Fe(III)(O2(•-))) without contribution of autocatalytic radical chain reactions should be viewed with caution.

  13. Hybrid use of combined and sequential delivery of growth factors and ultrasound stimulation in porous multilayer composite scaffolds to promote both vascularization and bone formation in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haoran; Liu, Xia; Zhu, Minghua; Luo, Guilin; Sun, Tao; Peng, Qiang; Zeng, Yi; Chen, Taijun; Wang, Yingying; Liu, Keliang; Feng, Bo; Weng, Jie; Wang, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a multilayer coating technology would be adopted to prepare a porous composite scaffold and the growth factor release and ultrasound techniques were introduced into bone tissue engineering to finally solve the problems of vascularization and bone formation in the scaffold whilst the designed multilayer composite with gradient degradation characteristics in the space was used to match the new bone growth process better. The results of animal experiments showed that the use of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) combined with growth factors demonstrated excellent capabilities and advantages in both vascularization and new bone formation in bone tissue engineering. The degradation of the used scaffold materials could match new bone formation very well. The results also showed that only RGD-promoted cell adhesion was insufficient to satisfy the needs of new bone formation while growth factors and LIPUS stimulation were the key factors in new bone formation.

  14. Overexpression of angiopoietin 2 promotes the formation of oral squamous cell carcinoma by increasing epithelial–mesenchymal transition-induced angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Li, Q; Cai, Y; He, Y; Lan, X; Wang, W; Liu, J; Wang, S; Zhu, G; Fan, J; Zhou, Y; Sun, R

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common cancer of the head and neck and is associated with a high rate of lymph node metastasis. The initial step in the metastasis and transition of tumors is epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-induced angiogenesis, which can be mediated by angiopoietin 2 (ANG2), a key regulatory factor in angiogenesis. In the present study, immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase (qRT-PCR) were used to measure the expression of ANG2 in OSCC tissues. Plasmids encoding ANG2 mRNA were used for increased ANG2 expression in the OSCC cell line TCA8113. The short interfering RNA (siRNA)-targeting ANG2 mRNA sequences were used to inhibit ANG2 expression in TCA8113 cells. Subsequently, transwell assays were performed to examine the effects of ANG2 on TCA8113 cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, in vivo assays were performed to assess the effect of ANG2 on tumor growth. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assays and immunohistochemistry were used to examine cell apoptosis and angiogenesis in tumor tissues, respectively. Finally, western blot analysis was performed to evaluate tumor formation-related proteins in OSCC tissues. We found that protein expression of ANG2 was remarkably upregulated in OSCC tissues. Overexpression of ANG2 increased the migration and invasion of TCA8113 cells by regulating EMT. Further investigations showed that overexpression of ANG2 increased tumor growth in nude mice, and angiogenesis of OSCC tissues increased in the presence of ANG2 overexpression. Overexpression of ANG2 also reduced cell apoptosis in tumor tissue cells. Finally, we found that overexpression of ANG2 resulted in changes in the expression of tumor formation-related proteins including vimentin, E-cadherin, Bim, PUMA, Bcl-2, Bax, Cyclin D1, PCNA and CD31. Our findings show that ANG2 has an important role in the migration and invasion of OSCC. More importantly, further

  15. Overexpression of angiopoietin 2 promotes the formation of oral squamous cell carcinoma by increasing epithelial-mesenchymal transition-induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Li, Q; Cai, Y; He, Y; Lan, X; Wang, W; Liu, J; Wang, S; Zhu, G; Fan, J; Zhou, Y; Sun, R

    2016-09-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common cancer of the head and neck and is associated with a high rate of lymph node metastasis. The initial step in the metastasis and transition of tumors is epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-induced angiogenesis, which can be mediated by angiopoietin 2 (ANG2), a key regulatory factor in angiogenesis. In the present study, immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase (qRT-PCR) were used to measure the expression of ANG2 in OSCC tissues. Plasmids encoding ANG2 mRNA were used for increased ANG2 expression in the OSCC cell line TCA8113. The short interfering RNA (siRNA)-targeting ANG2 mRNA sequences were used to inhibit ANG2 expression in TCA8113 cells. Subsequently, transwell assays were performed to examine the effects of ANG2 on TCA8113 cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, in vivo assays were performed to assess the effect of ANG2 on tumor growth. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assays and immunohistochemistry were used to examine cell apoptosis and angiogenesis in tumor tissues, respectively. Finally, western blot analysis was performed to evaluate tumor formation-related proteins in OSCC tissues. We found that protein expression of ANG2 was remarkably upregulated in OSCC tissues. Overexpression of ANG2 increased the migration and invasion of TCA8113 cells by regulating EMT. Further investigations showed that overexpression of ANG2 increased tumor growth in nude mice, and angiogenesis of OSCC tissues increased in the presence of ANG2 overexpression. Overexpression of ANG2 also reduced cell apoptosis in tumor tissue cells. Finally, we found that overexpression of ANG2 resulted in changes in the expression of tumor formation-related proteins including vimentin, E-cadherin, Bim, PUMA, Bcl-2, Bax, Cyclin D1, PCNA and CD31. Our findings show that ANG2 has an important role in the migration and invasion of OSCC. More importantly, further

  16. The formation and characteristics of the i-motif structure within the promoter of the c-myb proto-oncogene.

    PubMed

    Li, Huihui; Hai, Jinhui; Zhou, Jiang; Yuan, Gu

    2016-09-01

    C-myb proto-oncogene is a potential therapeutic target for some human solid tumors and leukemias. A long cytosine-rich sequence, which locates the downstream of the transcription initiation site, is demonstrated to fold into an intramolecular i-motif DNA using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Effects of factors, including the pH value, the number of C:C(+) dimers, the concentration of buffer, the molecular crowding condition, and the coexistence of the complementary DNA, on the formation and the structural stability of the i-motif DNA are systematically studied. We have demonstrated that the i-motif folding in the c-myb promoter could be accelerated upon synergistic physiological stimuli including intracellular molecular crowding and low pH values, as well as the large number of the i-motif C:C(+) dimers. Meanwhile, various inputs, such as acids/bases and metal ions, have exhibited their abilities in controlling the conformational switch of the c-myb GC-rich DNA. Acidic pH values and the presence of K(+) ions can induce the dissociation of the double helix. Our present strategy can greatly extend the potential usages of i-motif DNA molecules with specific sequences as conformational switch-controlled devices. Moreover, this work demonstrates the superiority of CD spectroscopy associated with ESI-MS as a rapid, more cost-effective and sensitive structural change responsive method in the research of DNA conformational switching. PMID:27487467

  17. The neuronal differentiation factor NeuroD1 downregulates the neuronal repellent factor Slit2 expression and promotes cell motility and tumor formation of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peng; Kishida, Satoshi; Cao, Dongliang; Murakami-Tonami, Yuko; Mu, Ping; Nakaguro, Masato; Koide, Naoshi; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Onishi, Akira; Kadomatsu, Kenji

    2011-04-15

    The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD1 has been implicated in the neurogenesis and early differentiation of pancreatic endocrine cells. However, its function in relation to cancer has been poorly examined. In this study, we found that NeuroD1 is involved in the tumorigenesis of neuroblastoma. NeuroD1 was strongly expressed in a hyperplastic region comprising neuroblasts in the celiac sympathetic ganglion of 2-week-old MYCN transgenic (Tg) mice and was consistently expressed in the subsequently generated neuroblastoma tissue. NeuroD1 knockdown by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) resulted in motility inhibition of the human neuroblastoma cell lines, and this effect was reversed by shRNA-resistant NeuroD1. The motility inhibition by NeuroD1 knockdown was associated with induction of Slit2 expression, and knockdown of Slit2 could restore cell motility. Consistent with this finding, shRNA-resistant NeuroD1 suppressed Slit2 expression. NeuroD1 directly bound to the first and second E-box of the Slit2 promoter region. Moreover, we found that the growth of tumor spheres, established from neuroblastoma cell lines in MYCN Tg mice, was suppressed by NeuroD1 suppression. The functions identified for NeuroD1 in cell motility and tumor sphere growth may suggest a link between NeuroD1 and the tumorigenesis of neuroblastoma. Indeed, tumor formation of tumor sphere-derived cells was significantly suppressed by NeuroD1 knockdown. These data are relevant to the clinical features of human neuroblastoma: high NeuroD1 expression was closely associated with poor prognosis. Our findings establish the critical role of the neuronal differentiation factor NeuroD1 in neuroblastoma as well as its functional relationship with the neuronal repellent factor Slit2.

  18. Design of Low Pt Concentration Electrocatalyst Surfaces with High Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity Promoted by Formation of a Heterogeneous Interface between Pt and CeO(x) Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Shipra; Mori, Toshiyuki; Masuda, Takuya; Ueda, Shigenori; Richards, Gary J; Hill, Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Isaka, Noriko; Auchterlonie, Graeme; Drennan, John

    2016-04-13

    Pt-CeO(x) nanowire (NW)/C electrocatalysts for the improvement of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity on Pt were prepared by a combined process involving precipitation and coimpregnation. A low, 5 wt % Pt-loaded CeO(x) NW/C electrocatalyst, pretreated by an optimized electrochemical conditioning process, exhibited high ORR activity over a commercially available 20 wt % Pt/C electrocatalyst although the ORR activity observed for a 5 wt % Pt-loaded CeO(x) nanoparticle (NP)/C was similar to that of 20 wt % Pt/C. To investigate the role of a CeO(x) NW promotor on the enhancement of ORR activity on Pt, the Pt-CeO(x) NW interface was characterized by using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HXPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Microanalytical data obtained by these methods were discussed in relation to atomistic simulation performed on the interface structures. The combined techniques of HXPS, TEM-EELS, and atomistic simulation indicate that the Pt-CeO(x) NW interface in the electrocatalyst contains two different defect clusters: Frenkel defect clusters (i.e., 2Pt(i)(••) - 4O(i)″ - 4V(o)(••) - V(Ce)″″) formed in the surface around the Pt-CeO(x) NW interface and Schottky defect clusters (i.e., (Pt(Ce)″ - 2V(O)(••) - 2Ce(Ce)') and (Pt(Ce)″ - V(O)(••))) which appear in the bulk of the Pt-CeO(x) NW interface similarly to Pt-CeO(x) NP/C. It is concluded that the formation of both Frenkel defect clusters and Schottky defect clusters at the Pt-CeO(x) NW heterointerface contributes to the promotion of ORR activity and permits the use of lower Pt-loadings in these electrocatalysts.

  19. Correlating High Power Conversion Efficiency of PTB7:PC71BM Inverted Organic Solar Cells with Nanoscale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sanjib; Keum, Jong Kahk; Browning, Jim; Gu, Gong; Yang, Bin; Do, Changwoo; Chen, Wei; Chen, Jihua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Hong, Kunlun; Rondinone, Adam J.; Joshi, Pooran C.; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Advances in materials design and device engineering led to inverted organic solar cells (i-OSCs) with superior power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) to their conventional counterparts, in addition to the well-known better ambient stability. Despite the significant progress, however, it has so far been unclear how the morphologies of the photoactive layer and its interface with the cathode modifying layer impact device performance. Here, we report an in-depth morphology study of the i-OSC active and cathode modifying layers, employing a model system with the well-established bulk-heterojunction, PTB7:PC71BM as the active layer and poly-[(9,9-bis(3 -(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-alt-2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)] (PFN) as the cathode surface modifying layer. We have also identified the role of a processing additive, 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO), used in the spin-casting of the active layer to increase PCE. Using a variety of characterization techniques, we demonstrate that the high PCEs of i-OSCs are due to the smearing (diffusion) of electron-accepting PC71BM into the PFN layer, resulting in improved electron transport. The PC71BM diffusion occurs after spin-casting the active layer onto the PFN layer, when residual solvent molecules act as a plasticizer. The DIO additive, with a higher boiling point than the host solvent, has a longer residence time in the spin-cast active layer, resulting in more PC71BM smearing and therefore more efficient electron transport. This work provides important insight and guidance to further enhancement of i-OSC performance by materials and interface engineering.

  20. Adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper (APPL1) regulates the protein level of EGFR by modulating its trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Rin; Hahn, Hwa-Sun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Nguyen, Hong-Hoa; Yang, Jun-Mo; Kang, Jong-Sun; Hahn, Myong-Joon

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer APPL1 regulates the protein level of EGFR in response to EGF stimulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of APPL1 accelerates the movement of EGF/EGFR from the cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of APPL1 enhances the activity of Rab5. -- Abstract: The EGFR-mediated signaling pathway regulates multiple biological processes such as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Previously APPL1 (adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper 1) has been reported to function as a downstream effector of EGF-initiated signaling. Here we demonstrate that APPL1 regulates EGFR protein levels in response to EGF stimulation. Overexpression of APPL1 enhances EGFR stabilization while APPL1 depletion by siRNA reduces EGFR protein levels. APPL1 depletion accelerates EGFR internalization and movement of EGF/EGFR from cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF treatment. Conversely, overexpression of APPL1 decelerates EGFR internalization and translocation of EGF/EGFR to the perinuclear region. Furthermore, APPL1 depletion enhances the activity of Rab5 which is involved in internalization and trafficking of EGFR and inhibition of Rab5 in APPL1-depleted cells restored EGFR levels. Consistently, APPL1 depletion reduced activation of Akt, the downstream signaling effector of EGFR and this is restored by inhibition of Rab5. These findings suggest that APPL1 is required for EGFR signaling by regulation of EGFR stabilities through inhibition of Rab5.

  1. Mammary gland specific expression of Brk/PTK6 promotes delayed involution and tumor formation associated with activation of p38 MAPK

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    ; ductal and lobular carcinomas expressing Brk were significantly more likely to express elevated phospho-p38 MAPK. Conclusions These studies illustrate that forced expression of Brk/PTK6 in non-transformed mammary epithelial cells mediates p38 MAPK phosphorylation and promotes increased cellular survival, delayed involution, and latent tumor formation. Brk expression in human breast tumors may contribute to progression by inducing p38-driven pro-survival signaling pathways. PMID:21923922

  2. Hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) mediates the effects of hypoxia on the promotion of HeLa cell viability, colony formation, and invasion capacity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiong, J; Zhu, F F; Nie, M F

    2015-04-13

    Hypoxia reduces the oxygen supply to tumor cells and may limit tumor cell growth. However, hypoxia promotes tumor cell metabolic adaptation, apoptosis resistance, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) may be responsible for these hypoxia-induced changes. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypoxia and HIF-2α knockdown in HeLa cells. HIF-2α shRNA lentivirus was used to knock down HIF-2α expression; cell viability, colony formation, invasion capacity, and gene expression were assessed. Hypoxia promoted HeLa cell growth, whereas knockdown of HIF-2α expression reduced HeLa cell viability under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, with a greater effect observed under hypoxic conditions. Knockdown of HIF-2α expression also reduced HeLa cell colony formation and invasion capacity under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Expression of cyclooxygenase 2 and vascular endothelial growth factor was reduced after knockdown of HIF-2α expression, with a greater effect observed under hypoxic conditions. HIF-2α mediated the hypoxia-induced effect on the promotion of HeLa cell viability, colony formation, and invasion capacity in vitro. Further studies are needed to confirm the in vivo relevance of hypoxia and HIF-2α.

  3. Formation of pseudotachylitic breccias in the central uplifts of very large impact structures: Scaling the melt formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr-Westheide, Tanja; Reimold, Wolf Uwe

    2011-04-01

    The processes leading to formation of sometimes massive occurrences of pseudotachylitic breccia (PTB) in impact structures have been strongly debated for decades. Variably an origin of these pseudotachylite (friction melt)-like breccias by (1) shearing (friction melting); (2) so-called shock compression melting (with or without a shear component) immediately after shock propagation through the target; (3) decompression melting related to rapid uplift of crustal material due to central uplift formation; (4) combinations of these processes; or (5) intrusion of allochthonous impact melt from a coherent melt body has been advocated. Our investigations of these enigmatic breccias involve detailed multidisciplinary analysis of millimeter- to meter-sized occurrences from the type location, the Vredefort Dome. This complex Archean to early Proterozoic terrane constitutes the central uplift of the originally >250 km diameter Vredefort impact structure in South Africa. Previously, results of microstructural and microchemical investigations have indicated that formation of very small veinlets involved local melting, likely during the early shock compression phase. However, for larger veins and networks it was so far not possible to isolate a specific melt-forming mechanism. Macroscopic to microscopic evidence for friction melting is very limited, and so far chemical results have not directly supported PTB generation by intrusion of impact melt. On the other hand, evidence for filling of dilational sites with melt is abundant. Herein, we present a new approach to the mysterium of PTB formation based on volumetric melt breccia calculations. The foundation for this is the detailed analysis of a 1.5 × 3 × 0.04 m polished granite slab from a dimension-stone quarry in the core of the Vredefort Dome. This slab contains a 37.5 dm3 breccia zone. The pure melt volume in 0.1 m3 PTB-bearing granitic target rock outside of the several-decimeter-wide breccia zone in the granite slab was

  4. Polypyrimidine tract-binding proteins of potato mediate tuberization through an interaction with StBEL5 RNA.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Ki; Sharma, Pooja; Butler, Nathaniel M; Kang, Il-Ho; Shah, Shweta; Rao, A Gururaj; Hannapel, David J

    2015-11-01

    Polypyrimidine tract-binding (PTB) proteins are a family of RNA-binding proteins that function in a wide range of RNA metabolic processes by binding to motifs rich in uracils and cytosines. A PTB protein of pumpkin was identified as the core protein of an RNA-protein complex that trafficks RNA. The biological function of the PTB-RNA complex, however, has not been demonstrated. In potato, six PTB proteins have been identified, and two, designated StPTB1 and StPTB6, are similar to the phloem-mobile pumpkin type. RNA binding assays confirmed the interaction of StPTB1 and StPTB6 with discrete pyrimidine-rich sequences of the 3'-untranslated regions of the phloem-mobile mRNA, StBEL5. The promoter of StPTB1 was active in companion cells of phloem in both stem and petioles. Expression of both types was evident in phloem cells of roots and in stolons during tuber formation. RNA accumulation of both PTB proteins was induced by short days in leaves in correlation with enhanced accumulation of StBEL5 RNA. StPTB suppression lines exhibited reduced tuber yields and decreased StBEL5 RNA accumulation, whereas StPTB overexpression lines displayed an increase in tuber production correlated with the enhanced production in stolons of steady-state levels of StBEL5 transcripts and RNA of key tuber identity genes. In StPTB overexpression lines, both the stability and long-distance transport of StBEL5 transcripts were enhanced, whereas in suppression lines stability and transport decreased. Using a transgenic approach, it is shown that the StPTB family of RNA-binding proteins regulate specific stages of development through an interaction with phloem-mobile transcripts of StBEL5. PMID:26283046

  5. Polypyrimidine tract-binding proteins of potato mediate tuberization through an interaction with StBEL5 RNA.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Ki; Sharma, Pooja; Butler, Nathaniel M; Kang, Il-Ho; Shah, Shweta; Rao, A Gururaj; Hannapel, David J

    2015-11-01

    Polypyrimidine tract-binding (PTB) proteins are a family of RNA-binding proteins that function in a wide range of RNA metabolic processes by binding to motifs rich in uracils and cytosines. A PTB protein of pumpkin was identified as the core protein of an RNA-protein complex that trafficks RNA. The biological function of the PTB-RNA complex, however, has not been demonstrated. In potato, six PTB proteins have been identified, and two, designated StPTB1 and StPTB6, are similar to the phloem-mobile pumpkin type. RNA binding assays confirmed the interaction of StPTB1 and StPTB6 with discrete pyrimidine-rich sequences of the 3'-untranslated regions of the phloem-mobile mRNA, StBEL5. The promoter of StPTB1 was active in companion cells of phloem in both stem and petioles. Expression of both types was evident in phloem cells of roots and in stolons during tuber formation. RNA accumulation of both PTB proteins was induced by short days in leaves in correlation with enhanced accumulation of StBEL5 RNA. StPTB suppression lines exhibited reduced tuber yields and decreased StBEL5 RNA accumulation, whereas StPTB overexpression lines displayed an increase in tuber production correlated with the enhanced production in stolons of steady-state levels of StBEL5 transcripts and RNA of key tuber identity genes. In StPTB overexpression lines, both the stability and long-distance transport of StBEL5 transcripts were enhanced, whereas in suppression lines stability and transport decreased. Using a transgenic approach, it is shown that the StPTB family of RNA-binding proteins regulate specific stages of development through an interaction with phloem-mobile transcripts of StBEL5.

  6. A synthetic mechano-growth factor E peptide promotes rat tenocyte migration by lessening cell stiffness and increasing F-actin formation via the FAK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingyu; Luo, Qing; Mao, Xinjian; Xu, Baiyao; Yang, Li; Ju, Yang; Song, Guanbin

    2014-03-10

    Tendon injuries are common in sports and are frequent reasons for orthopedic consultations. The management of damaged tendons is one of the most challenging problems in orthopedics. Mechano-growth factor (MGF), a recently discovered growth repair factor, plays positive roles in tissue repair through the improvement of cell proliferation and migration and the protection of cells against injury-induced apoptosis. However, it remains unclear whether MGF has the potential to accelerate tendon repair. We used a scratch wound assay in this study to demonstrate that MGF-C25E (a synthetic mechano-growth factor E peptide) promotes the migration of rat tenocytes and that this promotion is accompanied by an elevation in the expression of the following signaling molecules: focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2). Inhibitors of the FAK and ERK1/2 pathways inhibited the MGF-C25E-induced tenocyte migration, indicating that MGF-C25E promotes tenocyte migration through the FAK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway. The analysis of the mechanical properties showed that the Young's modulus of tenocytes was decreased through treatment of MGF-C25E, and an obvious formation of pseudopodia and F-actin was observed in MGF-C25E-treated tenocytes. The inhibition of the FAK or ERK1/2 signals restored the decrease in Young's modulus and inhibited the formation of pseudopodia and F-actin. Overall, our study demonstrated that MGF-C25E promotes rat tenocyte migration by lessening cell stiffness and increasing pseudopodia formation via the FAK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway. - Highlights: • Mechano-growth factor E peptide (MGF-C25E) promotes migration of rat tenocytes. • MGF-C25E activates the FAK-ERK1/2 pathway in rat tenocytes. • MGF-C25E induces the actin remodeling and the formation of pseudopodia, and decreases the stiffness in rat tenocytes. • MGF-C25E promotes tenocyte migration via altering stiffness and forming pseudopodia by the activation of the FAK-ERK1

  7. The roles of epithelial cell contact, respiratory bacterial interactions and phosphorylcholine in promoting biofilm formation by Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Ajay; Kyd, Jennelle

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) often share a common niche within the nasopharynx, both associated with infections such as bronchitis and otitis media. This study investigated how the association between NTHi and S. pneumoniae and the host affects their propensity to form biofilms. We investigated a selection of bacterial strain and serotype combinations on biofilm formation, and the effect of contact with respiratory epithelial cells. Measurement of biofilm showed that co-infection with NTHi and S. pneumoniae increased biofilm formation following contact with epithelial cells compared to no contact demonstrating the role of epithelial cells in biofilm formation. Additionally, the influence of phosphorylcholine (ChoP) on biofilm production was investigated using the licD mutant strain of NTHi 2019 and found that ChoP had a role in mixed biofilm formation but was not the only requirement. The study highlights the complex interactions between microbes and the host epithelium during biofilm production, suggesting the importance of understanding why certain strains and serotypes differentially influence biofilm formation. A key contributor to increased biofilm formation was the upregulation of biofilm formation by epithelial cell factors.

  8. Hydrogen-bond-driven electrophilic activation for selectivity control: scope and limitations of fluorous alcohol-promoted selective formation of 1,2-disubstituted benzimidazoles and mechanistic insight for rationale of selectivity.

    PubMed

    Chebolu, Rajesh; Kommi, Damodara N; Kumar, Dinesh; Bollineni, Narendra; Chakraborti, Asit K

    2012-11-16

    Hydrogen-bond-driven electrophilic activation for selectivity control during competitive formation of 1,2-disubstituted and 2-substituted benzimidazoles from o-phenylenediamine and aldehydes is reported. The fluorous alcohols trifluoroethanol and hexafluoro-2-propanol efficiently promote the cyclocondensation of o-phenylenediamine with aldehydes to afford selectively the 1,2-disubstituted benzimidazoles at rt in short times. A mechanistic insight is invoked by NMR, mass spectrometry, and chemical studies to rationalize the selectivity. The ability of the fluorous alcohols in promoting the reaction and controlling the selectivity can be envisaged from their better hydrogen bond donor (HBD) abilities compared to that of the other organic solvents as well as of water. Due to the better HBD values, the fluorous alcohols efficiently promote the initial bisimine formation by electrophilic activation of the aldehyde carbonyl. Subsequently the hydrogen-bond-mediated activation of the in situ-formed bisimine triggers the rearrangement via 1,3-hydride shift to form the 1,2-disubstituted benzimidazoles.

  9. Visible-Light-Promoted Dual C-C Bond Formations of Alkynoates via a Domino Radical Addition/Cyclization Reaction: A Synthesis of Coumarins.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangbiao; Xie, Xingang; Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Lin; Zhong, Zhuliang; Xu, Dengyu; She, Xuegong

    2016-08-01

    A visible-light-promoted, mild, and direct difunctionalization of alkynoates has been accomplished. This procedure provides a new strategy toward synthesis of the coumarin core structure by photoredox-mediated oxidation to generate the α-oxo radical, which supervenes a domino radical addition/cyclization reaction in moderate to good yields with high regioselectivity at ambient temperature.

  10. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-polysaccharide-like polysaccharide promotes osteoclast-like cell formation by interleukin-1 alpha production in mouse marrow cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, T; Ueda, N; Amano, K; Ishihara, Y; Hayakawa, H; Kuroyanagi, T; Ohsaki, Y; Nagata, K; Noguchi, T

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of osteoclast-like cell formation induced by periodontopathic bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 (serotype b) capsular-polysaccharide-like polysaccharide (capsular-like polysaccharide) was examined in a mouse bone marrow culture system. When mouse bone marrow cells were cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide for 9 days, many multinucleated cells were formed. The multinucleated cells showed several characteristics of osteoclasts, including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) and the ability to resorb the calcified dentine. In this study, we examined the effects of antisera to interleukins on the formation of osteoclast-like cells induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide. Monospecific anti-mouse recombinant interleukin-1 alpha (rIL-1 alpha) serum completely inhibited the formation of osteoclast-like cells in the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide. However, anti-mouse rIL-1 beta and anti-mouse rIL-6 sera showed no effect on osteoclast-like cell formation. IL-1 receptor antagonist significantly inhibited the osteoclast-like cell formation mediated by A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide in mouse marrow cultures. The bioactive IL-1 was detected in the culture media of mouse bone marrow cells stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide. These results indicate that IL-1 alpha is involved in the mechanism of the formation of osteoclast-like cells induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide. We sought to determine whether osteoclast-like cell formation induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide could be modulated by the protein kinase inhibitors H8 and HA1004. The formation of osteoclast-like cells was suppressed by H8 and HA1004. These findings suggest that the signals by protein kinases may regulate osteoclast-like cell formation induced by A

  11. Interleukin-1 Receptor-associated Kinase-4 (IRAK4) Promotes Inflammatory Osteolysis by Activating Osteoclasts and Inhibiting Formation of Foreign Body Giant Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Katsuyama, Eri; Miyamoto, Hiroya; Kobayashi, Tami; Sato, Yuiko; Hao, Wu; Kanagawa, Hiroya; Fujie, Atsuhiro; Tando, Toshimi; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Miyamoto, Kana; Niki, Yasuo; Morioka, Hideo; Matsumoto, Morio; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Formation of foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) occurs following implantation of medical devices such as artificial joints and is implicated in implant failure associated with inflammation or microbial infection. Two major macrophage subpopulations, M1 and M2, play different roles in inflammation and wound healing, respectively. Therefore, M1/M2 polarization is crucial for the development of various inflammation-related diseases. Here, we show that FBGCs do not resorb bone but rather express M2 macrophage-like wound healing and inflammation-terminating molecules in vitro. We also found that FBGC formation was significantly inhibited by inflammatory cytokines or infection mimetics in vitro. Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 (IRAK4) deficiency did not alter osteoclast formation in vitro, and IRAK4-deficient mice showed normal bone mineral density in vivo. However, IRAK4-deficient mice were protected from excessive osteoclastogenesis induced by IL-1β in vitro or by LPS, an infection mimetic of Gram-negative bacteria, in vivo. Furthermore, IRAK4 deficiency restored FBGC formation and expression of M2 macrophage markers inhibited by inflammatory cytokines in vitro or by LPS in vivo. Our results demonstrate that osteoclasts and FBGCs are reciprocally regulated and identify IRAK4 as a potential therapeutic target to inhibit stimulated osteoclastogenesis and rescue inhibited FBGC formation under inflammatory and infectious conditions without altering physiological bone resorption. PMID:25404736

  12. CD133+ cancer stem-like cells promote migration and invasion of salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma by inducing vasculogenic mimicry formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sha-sha; Gao, Xiao-lei; Liu, Xin; Gao, Shi-yu; Fan, Yun-long; Jiang, Ya-ping; Ma, Xiang-rui; Jiang, Jian; Feng, Hao; Chen, Qian-ming; Tang, Ya-jie; Tang, Ya-ling; Liang, Xin-hua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have gained much attention due to their roles in the invasion and metastasis of numerous kinds of human cancers. Here, we showed that the positive expression of CD133, the stemness marker, was positively associated with vasculogenic mimicry (VM) formation, local regional recurrence, distant metastasis and poorer prognosis in salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) specimens. Compared with CD133− ACC cells, CD133+ cancer stem-like cells had more migration and invasion capabilities, as well as more VM formation. The levels of endothelial cell marker VE-cadherin, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in CD133+ cancer stem-like cells and xenograft tumors of nude mice injected with CD133+ cells were significantly higher than those with CD133− cells. The data indicated that CD133+ cancer stem-like cells might contribute to the migration and invasion of ACC through inducing VM formation. PMID:27074560

  13. The salmochelin receptor IroN itself, but not salmochelin-mediated iron uptake promotes biofilm formation in extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC).

    PubMed

    Magistro, Giuseppe; Hoffmann, Christiane; Schubert, Sören

    2015-01-01

    The key to success of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) to colonize niches outside the intestinal tract and to establish infection is the coordinated action of numerous virulence and fitness factors. Intense research revealed not only an arsenal of unique virulence determinants with specific action, but also the multi-functionality of single elements. Especially iron uptake systems of ExPEC proved to be of prime importance. Apart from iron acquisition they optimize certain virulence properties. Here we analyzed the contribution of the salmochelin siderophore system to the ability of ExPEC to form biofilms. In the same iron limited environment, ExPEC displayed a distinct transcriptional profile of siderophore systems. During biofilm formation the iroN gene coding for the specific receptors of the siderophore salmochelin was highly upregulated. Almost no induction was observed during planctonic growth. Disruption of iroN resulted in a reduction of almost 50% in biofilm production. Efficient biofilm formation was not affected in a salmochelin synthesis mutant. Thus, the contribution of IroN is independent from the ability to produce salmochelin. Enhanced expression of IroN did not increase significantly the capacity to form biofilms in ExPEC. Interestingly, the additional expression of IroN or even the acquisition of the entire salmochelin system was not able to improve biofilm formation in a poor biofilm producer like a laboratory E. coli K12 strain. However, complementation with only IroN in an ExPEC iroA deletion mutant was able to restore biofilm formation. The contribution of IroN to biofilm formation appears to require a certain background found in ExPEC, but not in E. coli K12. This study identified the contribution of IroN to biofilm formation and highlights the multi-functional role of iron uptake systems in ExPEC.

  14. Improvement of total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of low Z elements on silicon wafer surfaces at the PTB monochromator beamline for undulator radiation at the electron storage ring BESSY II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckhoff, B.; Fliegauf, R.; Ulm, G.; Pepponi, G.; Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.; Fabry, L.; Pahlke, S.

    2001-11-01

    Several different total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) experiments were conducted at the plane grating monochromator beamline for undulator radiation of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the electron storage ring BESSY II, which provides photon energies between 0.1 and 1.9 keV for specimen excitation. The lower limits of detection of TXRF analysis were investigated for some low Z elements such as C, N, O, Al, Mg and Na in two different detection geometries for various excitation modes. Compared to ordinary XRF geometries involving large incident angles, the background contributions in TXRF are drastically reduced by the total reflection of the incident beam at the polished surface of a flat specimen carrier such as a silicon wafer. For the sake of an application-oriented TXRF approach, droplet samples on Si wafer surfaces were prepared by Wacker Siltronic and investigated in the TXRF irradiation chamber of the Atominstitut and the ultra-high vacuum TXRF irradiation chamber of the PTB. In the latter, thin C layer depositions on Si wafers were also studied.

  15. Health promotion in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Buss, Paulo Marchiori; de Carvalho, Antonio Ivo

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of health promotion within the Brazilian health system is examined, including an assessment of the intersectoral and development policies that have influenced the process. Particular attention is paid to the legal characteristics of the Unified Health System. Human resources formation and research initiatives in health promotion are outlined, with a summary of the obstacles that need to be overcome in order to ensure the effective implementation of health promotion in the future. Up to the end of the 20th Century health promotion was not used as a term in the Brazilian public heath context. Health promoting activities were concentrated in the area of health education, although targeting the social determinants of health and the principle of intersectoral action were part of the rhetoric. The situation has changed during the last decade, with the publication of a national policy of health promotion, issued by the Ministry of Health and jointly implemented with the States and Municipals Health Secretaries. More recently there has been a re-emergence of the discourse on the social determinants of health and the formation of intersectoral public policies as the basis of a comprehensive health promotion. Health promotion infrastructure, particularly around human resources and financing, requires strengthening in order to ensure capacity and sustainability in health promotion practice. PMID:18372870

  16. Health promotion in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Buss, Paulo Marchiori; de Carvalho, Antonio Ivo

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of health promotion within the Brazilian health system is examined, including an assessment of the intersectoral and development policies that have influenced the process. Particular attention is paid to the legal characteristics of the Unified Health System. Human resources formation and research initiatives in health promotion are outlined, with a summary of the obstacles that need to be overcome in order to ensure the effective implementation of health promotion in the future. Up to the end of the 20th Century health promotion was not used as a term in the Brazilian public heath context. Health promoting activities were concentrated in the area of health education, although targeting the social determinants of health and the principle of intersectoral action were part of the rhetoric. The situation has changed during the last decade, with the publication of a national policy of health promotion, issued by the Ministry of Health and jointly implemented with the States and Municipals Health Secretaries. More recently there has been a re-emergence of the discourse on the social determinants of health and the formation of intersectoral public policies as the basis of a comprehensive health promotion. Health promotion infrastructure, particularly around human resources and financing, requires strengthening in order to ensure capacity and sustainability in health promotion practice.

  17. Brønsted Acid-Promoted Formation of Stabilized Silylium Ions for Catalytic Friedel-Crafts C-H Silylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing-An; Klare, Hendrik F T; Oestreich, Martin

    2016-06-29

    A counterintuitive approach to electrophilic aromatic substitution with silicon electrophiles is disclosed. A strong Brønsted acid that would usually promote the reverse reaction, i.e., protodesilylation, was found to initiate the C-H silylation of electron-rich (hetero)arenes with hydrosilanes. Protonation of the hydrosilane followed by liberation of dihydrogen is key to success, fulfilling two purposes: to generate the stabilized silylium ion and to remove the proton released from the Wheland intermediate. PMID:27303857

  18. Using Formal Embedded Formative Assessments Aligned with a Short-Term Learning Progression to Promote Conceptual Change and Achievement in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Yue; Tomita, Miki K.; Shavelson, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of learning progression-aligned formal embedded formative assessment on conceptual change and achievement in middle-school science. Fifty-two sixth graders were randomly assigned to either an experimental group or a control group. Both groups were taught about sinking and floating by the same teacher with identical…

  19. Crystallographic analysis of an RNA polymerase σ-subunit fragment complexed with -10 promoter element ssDNA: quadruplex formation as a possible tool for engineering crystal contacts in protein-ssDNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Feklistov, Andrey; Darst, Seth A

    2013-09-01

    Structural studies of -10 promoter element recognition by domain 2 of the RNA polymerase σ subunit [Feklistov & Darst (2011), Cell, 147, 1257-1269] reveal an unusual crystal-packing arrangement dominated by G-quartets. The 3'-terminal GGG motif of the oligonucleotide used in crystallization participates in G-quadruplex formation with GGG motifs from symmetry-related complexes. Stacking between neighboring G-quadruplexes results in the formation of pseudo-continuous four-stranded columns running throughout the length of the crystal (G-columns). Here, a new crystal form is presented with a different arrangement of G-columns and it is proposed that the fortuitous finding of G-quartet packing could be useful in engineering crystal contacts in protein-ssDNA complexes. PMID:23989139

  20. Demonstration of osmotically dependent promotion of aerenchyma formation at different levels in the primary roots of rice using a ‘sandwich’ method and X-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Karahara, Ichirou; Umemura, Konomi; Soga, Yuumi; Akai, Yuki; Bando, Tadafumi; Ito, Yuko; Tamaoki, Daisuke; Uesugi, Kentaro; Abe, Jun; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The effect of environmental factors on the regulation of aerenchyma formation in rice roots has been discussed for a long time, because aerenchyma is constitutively formed under aerated conditions. To elucidate this problem, a unique method has been developed that enables sensitive detection of differences in the development of aerenchyma under two different environmental conditions. The method is tested to determine whether aerenchyma development in rice roots is affected by osmotic stress. Methods To examine aerenchyma formation both with and without mannitol treatment in the same root, germinating rice (Oryza sativa) caryopses were sandwiched between two agar slabs, one of which contained 270 mm of mannitol. The roots were grown touching both slabs and were thereby exposed unilaterally to osmotic stress. As a non-invasive approach, refraction contrast X-ray computed tomography (CT) using a third-generation synchrotron facility, SPring-8 (Super photon ring 8 GeV, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute), was used to visualize the three-dimensional (3-D) intact structure of aerenchyma and its formation in situ in rice roots. The effects of unilateral mannitol treatment on the development of aerenchyma were quantitatively examined using conventional light microscopy. Key Results Structural continuity of aerenchyma was clearly visualized in 3-D in the primary root of rice and in situ using X-ray CT. Light microscopy and X-ray CT showed that the development of aerenchyma was promoted on the mannitol-treated side of the root. Detailed light microscopic analysis of cross-sections cut along the root axis from the tip to the basal region demonstrated that aerenchyma developed significantly closer to the root tip on the mannitol-treated side of the root. Conclusions Continuity of the aerenchyma along the rice root axis was morphologically demonstrated using X-ray CT. By using this ‘sandwich’ method it was shown that mannitol promoted

  1. Sustained release poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres of bone morphogenetic protein 2 plasmid/calcium phosphate to promote in vitro bone formation and in vivo ectopic osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Chunyan; Zhang, Kai; Sun, Bin; Liu, Jinzhong; Song, Jiyu; Hu, Yue; Yang, Shihui; Sun, Hongchen; Yang, Bai

    2015-01-01

    Bone regeneration often requires continuous stimulation to promote local bone formation. In the present study, calcium phosphate (CaPi) was used to promote transfection of human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) cDNA plasmid, and poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) was used to prepare microspheres of pBMP-2/CaPi (i.e., PLGA@pBMP-2/CaPi) using W/O/W double emulsion solvent evaporation method. We showed that PLGA@pBMP-2/CaPi microspheres were spherical with smooth surface, and the particle size ranged from 0.5 to 35 μm. Encapsulation efficiency was up to 30~50%. The release of BMP-2 cDNA from microspheres continued more than 30 days and constituted, less than 7.5% of total plasmid amount within the first 24 h. Real-time PCR results showed that co-culturing of PLGA@pBMP-2/CaPi with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) increased calcium deposition and gene expressions of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), SP7, and collagen type I (COLL I) in a time-dependent manner. Finally, X-ray analysis demonstrated that in vivo delivery of PLGA@pBMP-2/CaPi microspheres into the tibialis anterior muscles of rats promoted the generation of osteoblasts, bone tissue, and bone structure. The findings suggested that PLGA@pBMP-2/CaPi microspheres can promote ectopic osteogenesis in non-bone tissues, with strong prospects in promoting bone regeneration. PMID:26885257

  2. Polypyrimidine tract-binding proteins of potato mediate tuberization through an interaction with StBEL5 RNA

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Ki; Sharma, Pooja; Butler, Nathaniel M.; Kang, Il-Ho; Shah, Shweta; Rao, A. Gururaj; Hannapel, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Polypyrimidine tract-binding (PTB) proteins are a family of RNA-binding proteins that function in a wide range of RNA metabolic processes by binding to motifs rich in uracils and cytosines. A PTB protein of pumpkin was identified as the core protein of an RNA–protein complex that trafficks RNA. The biological function of the PTB–RNA complex, however, has not been demonstrated. In potato, six PTB proteins have been identified, and two, designated StPTB1 and StPTB6, are similar to the phloem-mobile pumpkin type. RNA binding assays confirmed the interaction of StPTB1 and StPTB6 with discrete pyrimidine-rich sequences of the 3′-untranslated regions of the phloem-mobile mRNA, StBEL5. The promoter of StPTB1 was active in companion cells of phloem in both stem and petioles. Expression of both types was evident in phloem cells of roots and in stolons during tuber formation. RNA accumulation of both PTB proteins was induced by short days in leaves in correlation with enhanced accumulation of StBEL5 RNA. StPTB suppression lines exhibited reduced tuber yields and decreased StBEL5 RNA accumulation, whereas StPTB overexpression lines displayed an increase in tuber production correlated with the enhanced production in stolons of steady-state levels of StBEL5 transcripts and RNA of key tuber identity genes. In StPTB overexpression lines, both the stability and long-distance transport of StBEL5 transcripts were enhanced, whereas in suppression lines stability and transport decreased. Using a transgenic approach, it is shown that the StPTB family of RNA-binding proteins regulate specific stages of development through an interaction with phloem-mobile transcripts of StBEL5. PMID:26283046

  3. Hydrocarbon-NO{sub x} interactions at low temperatures. 1: Conversion of NO to NO{sub 2} promoted by propane and the formation of HNCO

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P.F.; Haynes, B.S.

    1994-12-31

    Reactant conversions and product distributions for reactions between NO (0--350 ppm), propane (425--1,000 ppm), and O{sub 2} (2.3--16%) in a laminar flow reactor at temperatures in the range 500 C--800 C have been determined by long-path-length Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Addition of NO significantly decreases the temperature at which oxidation of propane commences, but the formation of intermediate products (the olefins, ethylene and propylene, and formaldehyde) occurs over a wider temperature range than does the formation of these products in the absence of added NO. Oxidation of the propane coincides with NO to NO{sub 2} conversion, although significant NO to NO{sub 2} conversion occurs before substantial oxidation of the hydrocarbon. The NO to NO{sub 2} conversion occurs in stages and increases when the intermediate carbon-containing products begin themselves to oxidize. For experiments in the presence of added NO, CH{sub 4} is not observed as a product, implying that steady-state concentrations of CH{sub 3} radicals are low; rapid conversion of CH{sub 3} to CH{sub 3}O{sub 2} followed by reaction of CH{sub 3}O{sub 2} with NO is a probable reason for this observation. At high NO and propane concentrations (350 and 1000 ppm, respectively), HNCO was detected as a product of these reactions. Formation of HNCO coincides with NO to NO{sub 2} conversion. These observations provide evidence for hydrocarbon-NO interactions that result in the formation of species containing C{single_bond}N bonds occurring at lower temperatures than previously reported.

  4. Histone H3.3 promotes IgV gene diversification by enhancing formation of AID-accessible single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Romanello, Marina; Schiavone, Davide; Frey, Alexander; Sale, Julian E

    2016-07-01

    Immunoglobulin diversification is driven by activation-induced deaminase (AID), which converts cytidine to uracil within the Ig variable (IgV) regions. Central to the recruitment of AID to the IgV genes are factors that regulate the generation of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), the enzymatic substrate of AID Here, we report that chicken DT40 cells lacking variant histone H3.3 exhibit reduced IgV sequence diversification. We show that this results from impairment of the ability of AID to access the IgV genes due to reduced formation of ssDNA during IgV transcription. Loss of H3.3 also diminishes IgV R-loop formation. However, reducing IgV R-loops by RNase HI overexpression in wild-type cells does not affect IgV diversification, showing that these structures are not necessary intermediates for AID access. Importantly, the reduction in the formation of AID-accessible ssDNA in cells lacking H3.3 is independent of any effect on the level of transcription or the kinetics of RNAPII elongation, suggesting the presence of H3.3 in the nucleosomes of the IgV genes increases the chances of the IgV DNA becoming single-stranded, thereby creating an effective AID substrate.

  5. Enhanced biofilm formation and melanin synthesis by the oyster settlement-promoting Shewanella colwelliana is related to hydrophobic surface and simulated intertidal environment.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sayani; Gachhui, Ratan; Mukherjee, Joydeep

    2015-01-01

    A direct relationship between biofilm formation and melanogenesis in Shewanella colwelliana with increased oyster recruitment is already established. Previously, S. colwelliana was grown in a newly patented biofilm-cultivation device, the conico-cylindrical flask (CCF), offering interchangeable hydrophobic/hydrophilic surfaces. Melanization was enhanced when S. colwelliana was cultivated in a hydrophobic vessel compared with a hydrophilic vessel. In the present study, melanogenesis in the CCF was positively correlated with increased architectural parameters of the biofilm (mean thickness and biovolume obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy) and melanin gene (melA) expression observed by densitometry. Niche intertidal conditions were mimicked in a process operated in an ultra-low-speed rotating disk bioreactor, which demonstrated enhanced biofilm formation, melanogenesis, exopolysaccharide synthesis and melA gene expression compared with a process where 12-h periodic immersion and emersion was prevented. The wettability properties of the settling plane as well as intermittent wetting and drying, which influenced biofilm formation and melA expression, may affect oyster settlement in nature.

  6. Formation of Land Use Order in Hamamatsu City under the Original Criteria of the Farm Land Exclusion from the Agricultural Promotion Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Shingo

    While zoning has been practiced to prevent sprawling development and to preserve collective farmland under the Agriculture Promotion Act, The Agricultural Promotion Area (APA) has been reduced in area by the action of the Farm Land Exclusion from the APA (EAPA) aiming at urban-uses. Since the EAPA has a great impact on the regional land use, appropriate criteria application techniques ought to be formulated at the transaction level. However, most local governments seem to have no strategic measure so far. Hamamatsu city, meanwhile, has introduced a unique standard upon which approval of the EAPA aptitude is based in 2003. Since the number of EAPA registration was relatively large in Hamamatsu city owing to the zone bordering on the line of land which a building has erected the officials' willingness to establish an objective standard was high. In this research, we verified the effect of the criteria application over the land use ordering, and made proposals for improvement of the present state through the examination of the EAPA criterion application of Hamamatsu city.

  7. The UBC Domain Is Required for BRUCE to Promote BRIT1/MCPH1 Function in DSB Signaling and Repair Post Formation of BRUCE-USP8-BRIT1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Chunmin; Che, Lixiao; Du, Chunying

    2015-01-01

    BRUCE is implicated in the regulation of DNA double-strand break response to preserve genome stability. It acts as a scaffold to tether USP8 and BRIT1, together they form a nuclear BRUCE-USP8-BRIT1 complex, where BRUCE holds K63-ubiquitinated BRIT1 from access to DSB in unstressed cells. Following DSB induction, BRUCE promotes USP8 mediated deubiquitination of BRIT1, a prerequisite for BRIT1 to be released from the complex and recruited to DSB by binding to γ-H2AX. BRUCE contains UBC and BIR domains, but neither is required for the scaffolding function of BRUCE mentioned above. Therefore, it remains to be determined whether they are required for BRUCE in DSB response. Here we show that the UBC domain, not the BIR domain, is required for BRUCE to promote DNA repair at a step post the formation of BRUCE-USP8-BRIT1 complex. Mutation or deletion of the BRUCE UBC domain did not disrupt the BRUCE-USP8-BRIT1 complex, but impaired deubiquitination and consequent recruitment of BRIT1 to DSB. This leads to impaired chromatin relaxation, decreased accumulation of MDC1, NBS1, pATM and RAD51 at DSB, and compromised homologous recombination repair of DNA DSB. These results demonstrate that in addition to the scaffolding function in complex formation, BRUCE has an E3 ligase function to promote BRIT1 deubiquitination by USP8 leading to accumulation of BRIT1 at DNA double-strand break. These data support a crucial role for BRUCE UBC activity in the early stage of DSB response. PMID:26683461

  8. The class II phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate kinase PIK3C2A promotes Shigella flexneri dissemination through formation of vacuole-like protrusions.

    PubMed

    Dragoi, Ana-Maria; Agaisse, Hervé

    2015-04-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as Shigella flexneri and Listeria monocytogenes achieve dissemination in the intestinal epithelium by displaying actin-based motility in the cytosol of infected cells. As they reach the cell periphery, motile bacteria form plasma membrane protrusions that resolve into vacuoles in adjacent cells, through a poorly understood mechanism. Here, we report on the role of the class II phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate kinase PIK3C2A in S. flexneri dissemination. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that PIK3C2A was required for the resolution of protrusions into vacuoles through the formation of an intermediate membrane-bound compartment that we refer to as a vacuole-like protrusion (VLP). Genetic rescue of PIK3C2A depletion with RNA interference (RNAi)-resistant cDNA constructs demonstrated that VLP formation required the activity of PIK3C2A in primary infected cells. PIK3C2A expression was required for production of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PtdIns(3)P] at the plasma membrane surrounding protrusions. PtdIns(3)P production was not observed in the protrusions formed by L. monocytogenes, whose dissemination did not rely on PIK3C2A. PIK3C2A-mediated PtdIns(3)P production in S. flexneri protrusions was regulated by host cell tyrosine kinase signaling and relied on the integrity of the S. flexneri type 3 secretion system (T3SS). We suggest a model of S. flexneri dissemination in which the formation of VLPs is mediated by the PIK3C2A-dependent production of the signaling lipid PtdIns(3)P in the protrusion membrane, which relies on the T3SS-dependent activation of tyrosine kinase signaling in protrusions.

  9. A Pseudomonas strain isolated from date-palm rhizospheres improves root growth and promotes root formation in maize exposed to salt and aluminum stress.

    PubMed

    Zerrouk, Izzeddine Zakarya; Benchabane, Messaoud; Khelifi, Lakhdar; Yokawa, Ken; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Baluska, Frantisek

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Pseudomonas fluorescens 002 (P.f.002.), isolated from the rhizosphere of date palms from the Ghardaia region in the Algerian Sahara, to promote root growth of two varieties of maize under conditions of salt and aluminum stress. Primary roots of 5-day-old seedlings were inoculated with P.f.002., and seedlings were then grown under both control and stressed conditions. Primary, lateral, and seminal root lengths and numbers, as well as root dry mass, were evaluated. P.f.002 increased all parameters measured under both salt and aluminum stress. Hence, the use of P.f.002 may represent an important biotechnological approach to decrease the impact of salinity and acidity in crops. PMID:26759938

  10. Wild-Type N-Ras, Overexpressed in Basal-like Breast Cancer, Promotes Tumor Formation by Inducing IL-8 Secretion via JAK2 Activation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ze-Yi; Tian, Lin; Bu, Wen; Fan, Cheng; Gao, Xia; Wang, Hai; Liao, Yi-Hua; Li, Yi; Lewis, Michael T; Edwards, Dean; Zwaka, Thomas P; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Medina, Daniel; Perou, Charles M; Creighton, Chad J; Zhang, Xiang H-F; Chang, Eric C

    2015-07-21

    Basal-like breast cancers (BLBCs) are aggressive, and their drivers are unclear. We have found that wild-type N-RAS is overexpressed in BLBCs but not in other breast cancer subtypes. Repressing N-RAS inhibits transformation and tumor growth, whereas overexpression enhances these processes even in preinvasive BLBC cells. We identified N-Ras-responsive genes, most of which encode chemokines; e.g., IL8. Expression levels of these chemokines and N-RAS in tumors correlate with outcome. N-Ras, but not K-Ras, induces IL-8 by binding and activating the cytoplasmic pool of JAK2; IL-8 then acts on both the cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts. Thus, BLBC progression is promoted by increasing activities of wild-type N-Ras, which mediates autocrine/paracrine signaling that can influence both cancer and stroma cells.

  11. Long Term Culture of the A549 Cancer Cell Line Promotes Multilamellar Body Formation and Differentiation towards an Alveolar Type II Pneumocyte Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, James Ross; Abdullatif, Muhammad Bilal; Burnett, Edward C.; Kempsell, Karen E.; Conforti, Franco; Tolley, Howard; Collins, Jane E.; Davies, Donna E.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary research requires models that represent the physiology of alveolar epithelium but concerns with reproducibility, consistency and the technical and ethical challenges of using primary or stem cells has resulted in widespread use of continuous cancer or other immortalized cell lines. The A549 ‘alveolar’ cell line has been available for over four decades but there is an inconsistent view as to its suitability as an appropriate model for primary alveolar type II (ATII) cells. Since most work with A549 cells involves short term culture of proliferating cells, we postulated that culture conditions that reduced proliferation of the cancer cells would promote a more differentiated ATII cell phenotype. We examined A549 cell growth in different media over long term culture and then used microarray analysis to investigate temporal regulation of pathways involved in cell cycle and ATII differentiation; we also made comparisons with gene expression in freshly isolated human ATII cells. Analyses indicated that long term culture in Ham’s F12 resulted in substantial modulation of cell cycle genes to result in a quiescent population of cells with significant up-regulation of autophagic, differentiation and lipidogenic pathways. There were also increased numbers of up- and down-regulated genes shared with primary cells suggesting adoption of ATII characteristics and multilamellar body (MLB) development. Subsequent Oil Red-O staining and Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed MLB expression in the differentiated A549 cells. This work defines a set of conditions for promoting ATII differentiation characteristics in A549 cells that may be advantageous for studies with this cell line. PMID:27792742

  12. Interleukin-6 from Ovarian Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promotes Proliferation, Sphere and Colony Formation and Tumorigenesis of an Ovarian Cancer Cell Line SKOV3

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dah-Ching; Liu, Hwan-Wun; Chu, Tang-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The origin of the majority of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC) is regarded as extraovarian, with the ovary being the secondary site. The aim of this study was to explore the possible role of ovarian mesenchymal stem cells (OvMSCs) and secreted IL-6 in the development of EOC. OvMSCs were derived from normal ovarian stroma. Cell surface markers and differentiation capability were determined. The effects of IL-6 and conditioned medium of OvMSCs on the malignant phenotype of SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells were tested, and the status of STAT3 and ERK phosphorylation was investigated. OvMSCs had similar surface marker profiles as bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, i.e., CD44 (+), CD90 (+) and CD45 (-), and was readily inducible to osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. OvMSCs secreted an extremely high level (>2500 pg/ml) of IL-6. Treatment of SKOV3 cells with conditioned media from OvMSCs increased cell proliferation, tumor sphere formation and anchorage independent growth, and resulted in activation of STAT3 but not ERK. Coinjection of OvMSCs with SKOV3 cell enhanced tumorigenesis in NOD-SCID mice. All of these behaviors were blocked by IL-6 receptor blocking antibody administered in vitro or in vivo. The OvMSCs alone injected into mice had no tumor growth after 3 months. By secreting high levels of IL-6, OvMSCs enhance the proliferation, sphere and colony formation and tumorigenesis of SKOV3 cells. PMID:27698921

  13. Interleukin-6 from Ovarian Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promotes Proliferation, Sphere and Colony Formation and Tumorigenesis of an Ovarian Cancer Cell Line SKOV3

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dah-Ching; Liu, Hwan-Wun; Chu, Tang-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The origin of the majority of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC) is regarded as extraovarian, with the ovary being the secondary site. The aim of this study was to explore the possible role of ovarian mesenchymal stem cells (OvMSCs) and secreted IL-6 in the development of EOC. OvMSCs were derived from normal ovarian stroma. Cell surface markers and differentiation capability were determined. The effects of IL-6 and conditioned medium of OvMSCs on the malignant phenotype of SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells were tested, and the status of STAT3 and ERK phosphorylation was investigated. OvMSCs had similar surface marker profiles as bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, i.e., CD44 (+), CD90 (+) and CD45 (-), and was readily inducible to osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. OvMSCs secreted an extremely high level (>2500 pg/ml) of IL-6. Treatment of SKOV3 cells with conditioned media from OvMSCs increased cell proliferation, tumor sphere formation and anchorage independent growth, and resulted in activation of STAT3 but not ERK. Coinjection of OvMSCs with SKOV3 cell enhanced tumorigenesis in NOD-SCID mice. All of these behaviors were blocked by IL-6 receptor blocking antibody administered in vitro or in vivo. The OvMSCs alone injected into mice had no tumor growth after 3 months. By secreting high levels of IL-6, OvMSCs enhance the proliferation, sphere and colony formation and tumorigenesis of SKOV3 cells.

  14. VEGF-A/NRP1 stimulates GIPC1 and Syx complex formation to promote RhoA activation and proliferation in skin cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Ayumi; Shimizu, Akio; Asano, Hirotsugu; Kadonosono, Tetsuya; Kondoh, Shinae Kizaka; Geretti, Elena; Mammoto, Akiko; Klagsbrun, Michael; Seo, Misuzu Kurokawa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) has been identified as a VEGF-A receptor. DJM-1, a human skin cancer cell line, expresses endogenous VEGF-A and NRP1. In the present study, the RNA interference of VEGF-A or NRP1 suppressed DJM-1 cell proliferation. Furthermore, the overexpression of the NRP1 wild type restored shNRP1-treated DJM-1 cell proliferation, whereas NRP1 cytoplasmic deletion mutants did not. A co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that VEGF-A induced interactions between NRP1 and GIPC1, a scaffold protein, and complex formation between GIPC1 and Syx, a RhoGEF. The knockdown of GIPC1 or Syx reduced active RhoA and DJM-1 cell proliferation without affecting the MAPK or Akt pathway. C3 exoenzyme or Y27632 inhibited the VEGF-A-induced proliferation of DJM-1 cells. Conversely, the overexpression of the constitutively active form of RhoA restored the proliferation of siVEGF-A-treated DJM-1 cells. Furthermore, the inhibition of VEGF-A/NRP1 signaling upregulated p27, a CDK inhibitor. A cell-penetrating oligopeptide that targeted GIPC1/Syx complex formation inhibited the VEGF-A-induced activation of RhoA and suppressed DJM-1 cell proliferation. In conclusion, this new signaling pathway of VEGF-A/NRP1 induced cancer cell proliferation by forming a GIPC1/Syx complex that activated RhoA to degrade the p27 protein. PMID:26209534

  15. The SAGA Deubiquitination Module Promotes DNA Repair and Class Switch Recombination through ATM and DNAPK-Mediated γH2AX Formation.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Shaliny; Haddad, Dania; Li, Conglei; Le, Michael X; Ling, Alexanda K; So, Clare C; Nepal, Rajeev M; Gommerman, Jennifer L; Yu, Kefei; Ketela, Troy; Moffat, Jason; Martin, Alberto

    2016-05-17

    Class switch recombination (CSR) requires activation-induced deaminase (AID) to instigate double-stranded DNA breaks at the immunoglobulin locus. DNA breaks activate the DNA damage response (DDR) by inducing phosphorylation of histone H2AX followed by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair. We carried out a genome-wide screen to identify CSR factors. We found that Usp22, Eny2, and Atxn7, members of the Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltransferase (SAGA) deubiquitination module, are required for deubiquitination of H2BK120ub following DNA damage, are critical for CSR, and function downstream of AID. The SAGA deubiquitinase activity was required for optimal irradiation-induced γH2AX formation, and failure to remove H2BK120ub inhibits ATM- and DNAPK-induced γH2AX formation. Consistent with this effect, these proteins were found to function upstream of various double-stranded DNA repair pathways. This report demonstrates that deubiquitination of histone H2B impacts the early stages of the DDR and is required for the DNA repair phase of CSR. PMID:27160905

  16. Formation of a cobalt(III)-phenoxyl radical complex by acetic acid promoted aerobic oxidation of a Co(II)salen complex.

    PubMed

    Vinck, Evi; Murphy, Damien M; Fallis, Ian A; Strevens, Robert R; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2010-03-01

    The activation of N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexane-diamino Co(II), [Co(II)(1)], by the addition of acetic acid under aerobic conditions has been investigated by a range of spectroscopic techniques including continuous-wave EPR, HYSCORE, pulsed ENDOR, and resonance Raman. These measurements have revealed for the first time the formation of a coordinated cobalt(III)-bound phenoxyl radical labeled [Co(III)(1(*))(OAc)(n)](OAc)(m) (n = m = 1 or n = 2, m = 0). This cobalt(III)-bound phenoxyl radical is characterized by the following spin Hamiltonian parameters: g(x) = 2.0060, g(y) = 2.0031, g(z) = 1.9943, A(x) = 17 MHz, A(y) = 55 MHz, and A(z) = 14 MHz. Although the radical contains coordinated acetate(s), the experiments unambiguously proved that the phenoxyl radical is situated on ligand (1) as opposed to a phenoxyl radical ligated to cobalt in the axial position. Density functional theory computations on different models corroborate the stability of such a phenoxyl radical species and suggest the ligation of one or two acetate molecules to the complex. A mechanism is proposed, which accounts for the formation of this unusual and extremely robust phenoxyl radical, never previously observed for [Co(1)].

  17. VEGF-A/NRP1 stimulates GIPC1 and Syx complex formation to promote RhoA activation and proliferation in skin cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ayumi; Shimizu, Akio; Asano, Hirotsugu; Kadonosono, Tetsuya; Kondoh, Shinae Kizaka; Geretti, Elena; Mammoto, Akiko; Klagsbrun, Michael; Seo, Misuzu Kurokawa

    2015-01-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) has been identified as a VEGF-A receptor. DJM-1, a human skin cancer cell line, expresses endogenous VEGF-A and NRP1. In the present study, the RNA interference of VEGF-A or NRP1 suppressed DJM-1 cell proliferation. Furthermore, the overexpression of the NRP1 wild type restored shNRP1-treated DJM-1 cell proliferation, whereas NRP1 cytoplasmic deletion mutants did not. A co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that VEGF-A induced interactions between NRP1 and GIPC1, a scaffold protein, and complex formation between GIPC1 and Syx, a RhoGEF. The knockdown of GIPC1 or Syx reduced active RhoA and DJM-1 cell proliferation without affecting the MAPK or Akt pathway. C3 exoenzyme or Y27632 inhibited the VEGF-A-induced proliferation of DJM-1 cells. Conversely, the overexpression of the constitutively active form of RhoA restored the proliferation of siVEGF-A-treated DJM-1 cells. Furthermore, the inhibition of VEGF-A/NRP1 signaling upregulated p27, a CDK inhibitor. A cell-penetrating oligopeptide that targeted GIPC1/Syx complex formation inhibited the VEGF-A-induced activation of RhoA and suppressed DJM-1 cell proliferation. In conclusion, this new signaling pathway of VEGF-A/NRP1 induced cancer cell proliferation by forming a GIPC1/Syx complex that activated RhoA to degrade the p27 protein. PMID:26209534

  18. Promoting formation of noncrystalline Li2O2 in the Li-O2 battery with RuO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Eda; Yogi, Chihiro; Yamanaka, Keisuke; Ohta, Toshiaki; Byon, Hye Ryung

    2013-10-01

    Low electrical efficiency for the lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) electrochemical reaction is one of the most significant challenges in current nonaqueous Li-O2 batteries. Here we present ruthenium oxide nanoparticles (RuO2 NPs) dispersed on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a cathode, which dramatically increase the electrical efficiency up to 73%. We demonstrate that the RuO2 NPs contribute to the formation of poorly crystalline lithium peroxide (Li2O2) that is coated over the CNT with large contact area during oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). This unique Li2O2 structure can be smoothly decomposed at low potential upon oxygen evolution reaction (OER) by avoiding the energy loss associated with the decomposition of the more typical Li2O2 structure with a large size, small CNT contact area, and insulating crystals.

  19. Arabidopsis PIAL1 and 2 Promote SUMO Chain Formation as E4-Type SUMO Ligases and Are Involved in Stress Responses and Sulfur Metabolism[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tomanov, Konstantin; Zeschmann, Anja; Hermkes, Rebecca; Eifler, Karolin; Ziba, Ionida; Grieco, Michele; Novatchkova, Maria; Hofmann, Kay; Hesse, Holger; Bachmair, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genes PROTEIN INHIBITOR OF ACTIVATED STAT LIKE1 (PIAL1) and PIAL2 encode proteins with SP-RING domains, which occur in many ligases of the small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) conjugation pathway. We show that PIAL1 and PIAL2 function as SUMO ligases capable of SUMO chain formation and require the SUMO-modified SUMO-conjugating enzyme SCE1 for optimal activity. Mutant analysis indicates a role for PIAL1 and 2 in salt stress and osmotic stress responses, whereas under standard conditions, the mutants show close to normal growth. Mutations in PIAL1 and 2 also lead to altered sulfur metabolism. We propose that, together with SUMO chain binding ubiquitin ligases, these enzymes establish a pathway for proteolytic removal of sumoylation substrates. PMID:25415977

  20. Amplification and over-expression of MAP3K3 gene in human breast cancer promotes formation and survival of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yihui; Ge, Ningling; Wang, Xiaosong; Sun, Wenjing; Mao, Renfang; Bu, Wen; Creighton, Chad J; Zheng, Pingju; Vasudevan, Sanjeev; An, Lei; Yang, Jinshu; Zhao, Yi-Jue; Zhang, Huiyuan; Li, Xiao-Nan; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Leung, Eastwood; Lu, Yong-Jie; Gray, Joe W; Schiff, Rachel; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Osborne, C Kent; Yang, Jianhua; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Gene amplifications in the 17q chromosomal region are observed frequently in breast cancers. An integrative bioinformatics analysis of this region nominated the MAP3K 3 gene as a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer. This gene encodes mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 3 (MAP3K3/MEKK3), which has not yet been reported to be associated with cancer-causing genetic aberrations. We found that MAP3K3 was amplified in approximately 8–20% of breast cancers. Knockdown of MAP3K3 expression significantly inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation in MAP3K3-amplified breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-361 but not in MAP3K3 non-amplified breast cancer cells. Knockdown of MAP3K3 expression in MAP3K3-amplified breast cancer cells sensitized breast cancer cells to apoptotic induction by TNFα and TRAIL, as well as doxorubicin, VP-16 and fluorouracil, three commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs for treating breast cancer. In addition, ectopic expression of MAP3K3, in collaboration with Ras, induced colony formation in both primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts and immortalized human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A). Combined, these results suggest that MAP3K3 contributes to breast carcinogenesis and may endow resistance of breast cancer cells to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Therefore, MAP3K3 may be a valuable therapeutic target in patients with MAP3K3-amplified breast cancers, and blocking MAP3K3 kinase activity with a small molecule inhibitor may sensitize MAP3K3-amplified breast cancer cells to chemotherapy. PMID:24122835

  1. Smooth Muscle Cell Foam Cell Formation, Apolipoproteins, and ABCA1 in Intracranial Aneurysms: Implications for Lipid Accumulation as a Promoter of Aneurysm Wall Rupture.

    PubMed

    Ollikainen, Eliisa; Tulamo, Riikka; Lehti, Satu; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam; Hernesniemi, Juha; Niemelä, Mika; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Kovanen, Petri T; Frösen, Juhana

    2016-07-01

    Saccular intracranial aneurysm (sIA) aneurysm causes intracranial hemorrhages that are associated with high mortality. Lipid accumulation and chronic inflammation occur in the sIA wall. A major mechanism for lipid clearance from arteries is adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1)-mediated lipid efflux from foam cells to apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I). We investigated the association of wall degeneration, inflammation, and lipid-related parameters in tissue samples of 16 unruptured and 20 ruptured sIAs using histology and immunohistochemistry. Intracellular lipid accumulation was associated with wall remodeling (p = 0.005) and rupture (p = 0.020). Foam cell formation was observed in smooth muscle cells, in addition to CD68- and CD163-positive macrophages. Macrophage infiltration correlated with intracellular lipid accumulation and apolipoproteins, including apoA-I. ApoA-I correlated with markers of lipid accumulation and wall degeneration (p = 0.01). ApoA-I-positive staining colocalized with ABCA1-positive cells particularly in sIAs with high number of smooth muscle cells (p = 0.003); absence of such colocalization was associated with wall degeneration (p = 0.017). Known clinical risk factors for sIA rupture correlated inversely with apoA-I. We conclude that lipid accumulation associates with sIA wall degeneration and risk of rupture, possibly via formation of foam cells and subsequent loss of mural cells. Reduced removal of lipids from the sIA wall via ABCA1-apoA-I pathway may contribute to this process.

  2. Short-term spheroid formation enhances the regenerative capacity of adipose-derived stem cells by promoting stemness, angiogenesis, and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Nai-Chen; Chen, Szu-Yu; Li, Jia-Rong; Young, Tai-Horng

    2013-08-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) represent an important source of mesenchymal stem cells for clinical application. During in vitro culture, ASCs quickly lose the expression of transcription factors associated with pluripotency and self-renewal (Sox-2, Oct-4, and Nanog) and CXCR4, the key receptor responsible for stem cell homing. To enhance their therapeutic potential despite in vitro passages, we examined whether ASCs exhibit superior regenerative capacity by expanding them in monolayers following short-term spheroid formation. Spheroid-derived ASCs retained the expression pattern of cell surface markers and adipogenic/osteogenic differentiation capabilities of ASCs constantly cultured in monolayers. However, spheroid-derived ASCs exhibited higher expansion efficiency with less senescence. Moreover, spheroid-derived ASCs expressed significantly higher levels of pluripotency markers, CXCR4, and angiogenic growth factors. Enhanced in vitro migration, associated with the increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-9 and MMP-13), was also observed in spheroid-derived ASCs. The enhanced migration and MMP expression could be inhibited by a CXCR4-specific peptide antagonist, AMD3100. Using a murine model with healing-impaired cutaneous wounds, we observed faster healing and enhanced angiogenesis in the wounds treated with spheroid-derived ASCs. Significantly more cellular engraftment of spheroid-derived ASCs in the cutaneous wound tissue was also noted, with evidence of ASC differentiation toward endothelial and epidermal lineages. These findings suggest that short-term spheroid formation of ASCs before monolayer culture enhances their properties of stemness, angiogenesis, and chemotaxis and thereby increases their regenerative potential for therapeutic use.

  3. Smooth Muscle Cell Foam Cell Formation, Apolipoproteins, and ABCA1 in Intracranial Aneurysms: Implications for Lipid Accumulation as a Promoter of Aneurysm Wall Rupture.

    PubMed

    Ollikainen, Eliisa; Tulamo, Riikka; Lehti, Satu; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam; Hernesniemi, Juha; Niemelä, Mika; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Kovanen, Petri T; Frösen, Juhana

    2016-07-01

    Saccular intracranial aneurysm (sIA) aneurysm causes intracranial hemorrhages that are associated with high mortality. Lipid accumulation and chronic inflammation occur in the sIA wall. A major mechanism for lipid clearance from arteries is adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1)-mediated lipid efflux from foam cells to apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I). We investigated the association of wall degeneration, inflammation, and lipid-related parameters in tissue samples of 16 unruptured and 20 ruptured sIAs using histology and immunohistochemistry. Intracellular lipid accumulation was associated with wall remodeling (p = 0.005) and rupture (p = 0.020). Foam cell formation was observed in smooth muscle cells, in addition to CD68- and CD163-positive macrophages. Macrophage infiltration correlated with intracellular lipid accumulation and apolipoproteins, including apoA-I. ApoA-I correlated with markers of lipid accumulation and wall degeneration (p = 0.01). ApoA-I-positive staining colocalized with ABCA1-positive cells particularly in sIAs with high number of smooth muscle cells (p = 0.003); absence of such colocalization was associated with wall degeneration (p = 0.017). Known clinical risk factors for sIA rupture correlated inversely with apoA-I. We conclude that lipid accumulation associates with sIA wall degeneration and risk of rupture, possibly via formation of foam cells and subsequent loss of mural cells. Reduced removal of lipids from the sIA wall via ABCA1-apoA-I pathway may contribute to this process. PMID:27283327

  4. Docosahexaenoic acid promotes dopaminergic differentiation in induced pluripotent stem cells and inhibits teratoma formation in rats with Parkinson-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuh-Lih; Chen, Shih-Jen; Kao, Chung-Lan; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Ding, Dah-Ching; Yu, Cheng-Chia; Chen, Yi-Jen; Ku, Hung-Hai; Lin, Chin-Po; Lee, Kun-Hsiung; Chen, Yu-Chih; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Chen, Liang-Kung; Li, Hsin-Yang; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the midbrain. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have shown potential for differentiation and may become a resource of functional neurons for the treatment of PD. However, teratoma formation is a major concern for transplantation-based therapies. This study examined whether functional neurons could be efficiently generated from iPS cells using a five-step induction procedure combined with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) treatment. We demonstrated that DHA, a ligand for the RXR/Nurr1 heterodimer, significantly activated expression of the Nurr1 gene and the Nurr1-related pathway in iPS cells. DHA treatment facilitated iPS differentiation into tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in vitro and in vivo and functionally increased dopamine release in transplanted grafts in PD-like animals. Furthermore, DHA dramatically upregulated the endogenous expression levels of neuroprotective genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-xl, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor) and protected against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced apoptosis in iPS-derived neuronal precursor cells. DHA-treated iPS cells significantly improved the behavior of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-treated PD-like rats compared to control or eicosapentaenoic acid-treated group. Importantly, the in vivo experiment suggests that DHA induces the differentiation of functional dopaminergic precursors and improves the abnormal behavior of 6-OHDA-treated PD-like rats by 4 months after transplantation. Furthermore, we found that DHA treatment in iPS cell-grafted rats significantly downregulated the mRNA expression of embryonic stem cell-specific genes (Oct-4 and c-Myc) in the graft and effectively blocked teratoma formation. Importantly, 3 Tesla-magnetic resonance imaging and ex vivo green fluorescence protein imaging revealed that no teratomas were present

  5. Retinoid X receptor:vitamin D3 receptor heterodimers promote stable preinitiation complex formation and direct 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-dependent cell-free transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, B D; Fondell, J D; Freedman, L P

    1997-01-01

    The numerous members of the steroid/nuclear hormone receptor superfamily act as direct transducers of circulating signals, such as steroids, thyroid hormone, and vitamin or lipid metabolites, and modulate the transcription of specific target genes, primarily as dimeric complexes. The receptors for 9-cis retinoic acid and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3], RXR and VDR, respectively, as members of this superfamily, form a heterodimeric complex and bind cooperatively to vitamin D responsive elements (VDREs) to activate or repress the transcription of a multitude of genes which regulate a variety of physiological functions. To directly investigate RXR- and VDR-mediated transactivation, we developed a cell-free transcription system for 1,25(OH)2D3 signaling by utilizing crude nuclear extracts and a G-free cassette-based assay. Transcriptional enhancement in vitro was dependent on purified, exogenous RXR and VDR and was responsive to physiological concentrations of 1,25(OH)2D3. We found that RXR and VDR transactivated selectively from VDRE-linked templates exclusively as a heterodimeric complex, since neither receptor alone enhanced transcription in vitro. By the addition of low concentrations of the anionic detergent Sarkosyl to limit cell-free transcription to a single round and the use of agarose gel mobility shift experiments to assay factor complex assembly, we observed that 1,25(OH)2D3 enhanced RXR:VDR-mediated stabilization or assembly of preinitiation complexes to effect transcriptional enhancement from VDRE-linked promoter-containing DNA. PMID:9121440

  6. The DEAH-box Helicase Dhr1 Dissociates U3 from the Pre-rRNA to Promote Formation of the Central Pseudoknot

    PubMed Central

    Granneman, Sander; Zhu, Jieyi; Gill, Michael; Papoulas, Ophelia; Marcotte, Edward M.; Tollervey, David; Correll, Carl C.; Johnson, Arlen W.

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the highly conserved U3 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) base-pairs to multiple sites in the pre-ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) to promote early cleavage and folding events. Binding of the U3 box A region to the pre-rRNA is mutually exclusive with folding of the central pseudoknot (CPK), a universally conserved rRNA structure of the small ribosomal subunit essential for protein synthesis. Here, we report that the DEAH-box helicase Dhr1 (Ecm16) is responsible for displacing U3. An active site mutant of Dhr1 blocked release of U3 from the pre-ribosome, thereby trapping a pre-40S particle. This particle had not yet achieved its mature structure because it contained U3, pre-rRNA, and a number of early-acting ribosome synthesis factors but noticeably lacked ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) that surround the CPK. Dhr1 was cross-linked in vivo to the pre-rRNA and to U3 sequences flanking regions that base-pair to the pre-rRNA including those that form the CPK. Point mutations in the box A region of U3 suppressed a cold-sensitive mutation of Dhr1, strongly indicating that U3 is an in vivo substrate of Dhr1. To support the conclusions derived from in vivo analysis we showed that Dhr1 unwinds U3-18S duplexes in vitro by using a mechanism reminiscent of DEAD box proteins. PMID:25710520

  7. The DEAH-box helicase Dhr1 dissociates U3 from the pre-rRNA to promote formation of the central pseudoknot.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Richa; Liu, Xin; Granneman, Sander; Zhu, Jieyi; Gill, Michael; Papoulas, Ophelia; Marcotte, Edward M; Tollervey, David; Correll, Carl C; Johnson, Arlen W

    2015-02-01

    In eukaryotes, the highly conserved U3 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) base-pairs to multiple sites in the pre-ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) to promote early cleavage and folding events. Binding of the U3 box A region to the pre-rRNA is mutually exclusive with folding of the central pseudoknot (CPK), a universally conserved rRNA structure of the small ribosomal subunit essential for protein synthesis. Here, we report that the DEAH-box helicase Dhr1 (Ecm16) is responsible for displacing U3. An active site mutant of Dhr1 blocked release of U3 from the pre-ribosome, thereby trapping a pre-40S particle. This particle had not yet achieved its mature structure because it contained U3, pre-rRNA, and a number of early-acting ribosome synthesis factors but noticeably lacked ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) that surround the CPK. Dhr1 was cross-linked in vivo to the pre-rRNA and to U3 sequences flanking regions that base-pair to the pre-rRNA including those that form the CPK. Point mutations in the box A region of U3 suppressed a cold-sensitive mutation of Dhr1, strongly indicating that U3 is an in vivo substrate of Dhr1. To support the conclusions derived from in vivo analysis we showed that Dhr1 unwinds U3-18S duplexes in vitro by using a mechanism reminiscent of DEAD box proteins.

  8. The Drosophila FHOD1-like formin Knittrig acts through Rok to promote stress fiber formation and directed macrophage migration during the cellular immune response.

    PubMed

    Lammel, Uwe; Bechtold, Meike; Risse, Benjamin; Berh, Dimitri; Fleige, Astrid; Bunse, Ingrid; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Klämbt, Christian; Bogdan, Sven

    2014-03-01

    A tight spatiotemporal control of actin polymerization is important for many cellular processes that shape cells into a multicellular organism. The formation of unbranched F-actin is induced by several members of the formin family. Drosophila encodes six formin genes, representing six of the seven known mammalian subclasses. Knittrig, the Drosophila homolog of mammalian FHOD1, is specifically expressed in the developing central nervous system midline glia, the trachea, the wing and in macrophages. knittrig mutants exhibit mild tracheal defects but survive until late pupal stages and mainly die as pharate adult flies. knittrig mutant macrophages are smaller and show reduced cell spreading and cell migration in in vivo wounding experiments. Rescue experiments further demonstrate a cell-autonomous function of Knittrig in regulating actin dynamics and cell migration. Knittrig localizes at the rear of migrating macrophages in vivo, suggesting a cellular requirement of Knittrig in the retraction of the trailing edge. Supporting this notion, we found that Knittrig is a target of the Rho-dependent kinase Rok. Co-expression with Rok or expression of an activated form of Knittrig induces actin stress fibers in macrophages and in epithelial tissues. Thus, we propose a model in which Rok-induced phosphorylation of residues within the basic region mediates the activation of Knittrig in controlling macrophage migration. PMID:24553290

  9. Promoting the bio-cathode formation of a constructed wetland-microbial fuel cell by using powder activated carbon modified alum sludge in anode chamber.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Zhao, Yaqian; Doherty, Liam; Hu, Yuansheng; Hao, Xiaodi

    2016-01-01

    MFC centered hybrid technologies have attracted attention during the last few years due to their compatibility and dual advantages of energy recovery and wastewater treatment. In this study, a MFC was integrated into a dewatered alum sludge (DAS)- based vertical upflow constructed wetland (CW). Powder activate carbon (PAC) was used in the anode area in varied percentage with DAS to explore its influences on the performance of the CW-MFC system. The trial has demonstrated that the inclusion of PAC improved the removal efficiencies of COD, TN and RP. More significantly, increasing the proportion of PAC from 2% to 10% can significantly enhance the maximum power densities from 36.58 mW/m(2) to 87.79 mW/m(2). The induced favorable environment for bio-cathode formation might be the main reason for this improvement since the content of total extracellular polymeric substances (TEPS) of the substrate in the cathode area almost doubled (from 44.59 μg/g wet sludge to 87.70 μg/g wet sludge) as the percentage of PAC increased to 10%. This work provides another potential usage of PAC in CW-MFCs with a higher wastewater treatment efficiency and energy recovery. PMID:27197845

  10. Promoting the bio-cathode formation of a constructed wetland-microbial fuel cell by using powder activated carbon modified alum sludge in anode chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Zhao, Yaqian; Doherty, Liam; Hu, Yuansheng; Hao, Xiaodi

    2016-05-01

    MFC centered hybrid technologies have attracted attention during the last few years due to their compatibility and dual advantages of energy recovery and wastewater treatment. In this study, a MFC was integrated into a dewatered alum sludge (DAS)- based vertical upflow constructed wetland (CW). Powder activate carbon (PAC) was used in the anode area in varied percentage with DAS to explore its influences on the performance of the CW-MFC system. The trial has demonstrated that the inclusion of PAC improved the removal efficiencies of COD, TN and RP. More significantly, increasing the proportion of PAC from 2% to 10% can significantly enhance the maximum power densities from 36.58 mW/m2 to 87.79 mW/m2. The induced favorable environment for bio-cathode formation might be the main reason for this improvement since the content of total extracellular polymeric substances (TEPS) of the substrate in the cathode area almost doubled (from 44.59 μg/g wet sludge to 87.70 μg/g wet sludge) as the percentage of PAC increased to 10%. This work provides another potential usage of PAC in CW-MFCs with a higher wastewater treatment efficiency and energy recovery.

  11. Promoting the bio-cathode formation of a constructed wetland-microbial fuel cell by using powder activated carbon modified alum sludge in anode chamber

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lei; Zhao, Yaqian; Doherty, Liam; Hu, Yuansheng; Hao, Xiaodi

    2016-01-01

    MFC centered hybrid technologies have attracted attention during the last few years due to their compatibility and dual advantages of energy recovery and wastewater treatment. In this study, a MFC was integrated into a dewatered alum sludge (DAS)- based vertical upflow constructed wetland (CW). Powder activate carbon (PAC) was used in the anode area in varied percentage with DAS to explore its influences on the performance of the CW-MFC system. The trial has demonstrated that the inclusion of PAC improved the removal efficiencies of COD, TN and RP. More significantly, increasing the proportion of PAC from 2% to 10% can significantly enhance the maximum power densities from 36.58 mW/m2 to 87.79 mW/m2. The induced favorable environment for bio-cathode formation might be the main reason for this improvement since the content of total extracellular polymeric substances (TEPS) of the substrate in the cathode area almost doubled (from 44.59 μg/g wet sludge to 87.70 μg/g wet sludge) as the percentage of PAC increased to 10%. This work provides another potential usage of PAC in CW-MFCs with a higher wastewater treatment efficiency and energy recovery. PMID:27197845

  12. Cby1 promotes Ahi1 recruitment to a ring-shaped domain at the centriole-cilium interface and facilitates proper cilium formation and function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yin Loon; Santé, Joshua; Comerci, Colin J; Cyge, Benjamin; Menezes, Luis F; Li, Feng-Qian; Germino, Gregory G; Moerner, W E; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi; Stearns, Tim

    2014-10-01

    Defects in centrosome and cilium function are associated with phenotypically related syndromes called ciliopathies. Cby1, the mammalian orthologue of the Drosophila Chibby protein, localizes to mature centrioles, is important for ciliogenesis in multiciliated airway epithelia in mice, and antagonizes canonical Wnt signaling via direct regulation of β-catenin. We report that deletion of the mouse Cby1 gene results in cystic kidneys, a phenotype common to ciliopathies, and that Cby1 facilitates the formation of primary cilia and ciliary recruitment of the Joubert syndrome protein Arl13b. Localization of Cby1 to the distal end of mature centrioles depends on the centriole protein Ofd1. Superresolution microscopy using both three-dimensional SIM and STED reveals that Cby1 localizes to an ∼250-nm ring at the distal end of the mature centriole, in close proximity to Ofd1 and Ahi1, a component of the transition zone between centriole and cilium. The amount of centriole-localized Ahi1, but not Ofd1, is reduced in Cby1(-/-) cells. This suggests that Cby1 is required for efficient recruitment of Ahi1, providing a possible molecular mechanism for the ciliogenesis defect in Cby1(-/-) cells.

  13. SadA, a Trimeric Autotransporter from Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium, Can Promote Biofilm Formation and Provides Limited Protection against Infection ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Raghunathan, Dhaarini; Wells, Timothy J.; Morris, Faye C.; Shaw, Robert K.; Bobat, Saeeda; Peters, Sarah E.; Paterson, Gavin K.; Jensen, Karina Tveen; Leyton, Denisse L.; Blair, Jessica M. A.; Browning, Douglas F.; Pravin, John; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Hitchcock, Jessica R.; Moraes, Claudia T. P.; Piazza, Roxane M. F.; Maskell, Duncan J.; Webber, Mark A.; May, Robin C.; MacLennan, Calman A.; Piddock, Laura J.; Cunningham, Adam F.; Henderson, Ian R.

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a major cause of morbidity worldwide and mortality in children and immunocompromised individuals in sub-Saharan Africa. Outer membrane proteins of Salmonella are of significance because they are at the interface between the pathogen and the host, they can contribute to adherence, colonization, and virulence, and they are frequently targets of antibody-mediated immunity. In this study, the properties of SadA, a purported trimeric autotransporter adhesin of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, were examined. We demonstrated that SadA is exposed on the Salmonella cell surface in vitro and in vivo during infection of mice. Expression of SadA resulted in cell aggregation, biofilm formation, and increased adhesion to human intestinal Caco-2 epithelial cells. Immunization of mice with folded, full-length, purified SadA elicited an IgG response which provided limited protection against bacterial challenge. When anti-SadA IgG titers were enhanced by administering alum-precipitated protein, a modest additional protection was afforded. Therefore, despite SadA having pleiotropic functions, it is not a dominant, protective antigen for antibody-mediated protection against Salmonella. PMID:21859856

  14. Novel apo E-derived ABCA1 agonist peptide (CS-6253) promotes reverse cholesterol transport and induces formation of preβ-1 HDL in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Hafiane, Anouar; Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan O.; Genest, Jacques; Zhu, Xuewei

    2015-07-24

    Apolipoprotein (apo) mimetic peptides replicate some aspects of HDL function. We have previously reported the effects of compound ATI-5261 on its ability to replicate many functions of native apo A-I in the process of HDL biogenesis. ATI-5261 induced muscle toxicity in wild type C57Bl/6 mice, increased CPK, ALT and AST and increase in triglyceride (Tg) levels. Aromatic phenylalanine residues on the non-polar face of ATI-5261, together with positively charged arginine residues at the lipid-water interface were responsible for these effects. This information was used to create a novel analog (CS-6253) that was non-toxic. We evaluated this peptide designed from the carboxyl terminus of apo E, in its ability to mimic apo A-I functionality. Our data shows that the lipidated particles generated by incubating cells overexpressing ABCA1 with lipid free CS-6253 enhances the rate of ABCA1 lipid efflux with high affinity interactions with native ABCA1 oligomeric forms and plasma membrane micro-domains. Interaction between ABCA1 and lipid free CS-6253 resulted in formation of nascent HDL-CS-6253 particles that are actively remodeled in plasma. Mature HDL-CS-6253 particles deliver cholesterol to liver cells via SR-BI in-vitro. CS-6253 significantly increases cholesterol efflux in murine macrophages and in human THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells expressing ABCA1. Addition of CS-6253 to plasma dose-dependently displaced apo A-I from α-HDL particles and led to de novo formation of preβ-1 HDL that stimulates ABCA1 dependent cholesterol efflux efficiently. When incubated with human plasma CS-6253 was also found to bind with HDL and LDL and promoted the transfer of cholesterol from HDL to LDL predominantly. Our data shows that CS-6253 mimics apo A-I in its ability to promote ABCA1-mediated formation of nascent HDL particles, and enhances formation of preβ-1 HDL with increase in the cycling of apo A-I between the preβ and α-HDL particles in-vitro. These

  15. The Drosophila histone variant H2A.V works in concert with HP1 to promote kinetochore-driven microtubule formation

    PubMed Central

    Vernì, Fiammetta; Cenci, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Unlike other organisms that have evolved distinct H2A variants for different functions, Drosophila melanogaster has just one variant which is capable of filling many roles. This protein, H2A.V, combines the features of the conserved variants H2A.Z and H2A.X in transcriptional control/heterochromatin assembly and DNA damage response, respectively. Here we show that mutations in the gene encoding H2A.V affect chromatin compaction and perturb chromosome segregation in Drosophila mitotic cells. A microtubule (MT) regrowth assay after cold exposure revealed that loss of H2A.V impairs the formation of kinetochore-driven (k) fibers, which can account for defects in chromosome segregation. All defects are rescued by a transgene encoding H2A.V that lacks the H2A.X function in the DNA damage response, suggesting that the H2A.Z (but not H2A.X) functionality of H2A.V is required for chromosome segregation. We also found that loss of H2A.V weakens HP1 localization, specifically at the pericentric heterochromatin of metaphase chromosomes. Interestingly, loss of HP1 yielded not only telomeric fusions but also mitotic defects similar to those seen in H2A.V null mutants, suggesting a role for HP1 in chromosome segregation. We also show that H2A.V precipitates HP1 from larval brain extracts indicating that both proteins are part of the same complex. Moreover, we found that the overexpression of HP1 rescues chromosome missegregation and defects in the kinetochore-driven k-fiber regrowth of H2A.V mutants indicating that both phenotypes are influenced by unbalanced levels of HP1. Collectively, our results suggest that H2A.V and HP1 work in concert to ensure kinetochore-driven MT growth. PMID:25591068

  16. Short-term beef consumption promotes systemic oxidative stress, TMAO formation and inflammation in rats, and dietary fat content modulates these effects.

    PubMed

    Van Hecke, Thomas; Jakobsen, Louise M A; Vossen, Els; Guéraud, Françoise; De Vos, Filip; Pierre, Fabrice; Bertram, Hanne C S; De Smet, Stefaan

    2016-09-14

    A high consumption of red and/or processed meat is associated with a higher risk to develop several chronic diseases in which oxidative stress, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and/or inflammation are involved. We aimed to elucidate the effect of white (chicken) vs. red (beef) meat consumption in a low vs. high dietary fat context (2 × 2 factorial design) on oxidative stress, TMAO and inflammation in Sprague-Dawley rats. Higher malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations were found in gastrointestinal contents (up to 96% higher) and colonic tissues (+8.8%) of rats fed the beef diets (all P < 0.05). The lean beef diet resulted in lower blood glutathione, higher urinary excretion of the major 4-hydroxy-nonenal metabolite, and higher plasma C-reactive protein, compared to the other dietary treatments (all P < 0.05). Rats on the fat beef diet had higher renal MDA (+24.4% compared to all other diets) and heart MDA (+12.9% compared to lean chicken) and lower liver vitamin E (-26.2% compared to lean chicken) (all P < 0.05). Rats on the fat diets had lower plasma vitamin E (-23.8%), lower brain MDA (-6.8%) and higher plasma superoxide dismutase activity (+38.6%), higher blood glutathione (+16.9%) (all P < 0.05) and tendency to higher ventral prostate MDA (+14.5%, P = 0.078) and prostate weight (+18.9%, P = 0.073), compared to rats on the lean diets. Consumption of the beef diets resulted in higher urinary trimethylamine (4.5-fold) and TMAO (3.7-fold) concentrations (P < 0.001), compared to the chicken diets. In conclusion, consumption of a high beef diet may stimulate gastrointestinal and/or systemic oxidative stress, TMAO formation and inflammation, depending on the dietary fat content and composition. PMID:27531020

  17. Downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity and cyclin A promoter activity in vascular smooth muscle cells by p27(KIP1), an inhibitor of neointima formation in the rat carotid artery.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D; Krasinski, K; Sylvester, A; Chen, J; Nisen, P D; Andrés, V

    1997-01-01

    Abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contributes to intimal hyperplasia during atherosclerosis and restenosis, but the endogenous cell cycle regulatory factors underlying VSMC growth in response to arterial injury are not well understood. In the present study, we report that downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) activity in serum-deprived VSMCs was associated with the formation of complexes between cdk2 and its inhibitory protein p27(KIP1) (p27). Ectopic overexpression of p27 in serum-stimulated VSMCs resulted in the inhibition of cdk2 activity and repression of cyclin A promoter activity. Collectively, these findings indicate that p27 may contribute to VSMC growth arrest in vitro. Using the rat carotid model of balloon angioplasty, a marked upregulation of p27 was observed in injured arteries. High levels of p27 expression in the media and neointima correlated with downregulation of cdk2 activity at 2 wk after angioplasty, and adenovirus-mediated overexpression of p27 in balloon-injured arteries attenuated neointimal lesion formation. Thus, the inhibition of cdk2 function and repression of cyclin A gene transcription through the induction of the endogenous p27 protein provides a mechanism for the inhibition of VSMC growth at late time points after angioplasty. PMID:9153274

  18. miR-216a rescues dexamethasone suppression of osteogenesis, promotes osteoblast differentiation and enhances bone formation, by regulating c-Cbl-mediated PI3K/AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Li, T; Fan, J; Li, T; Fan, L; Wang, S; Weng, X; Han, Q; Zhao, R C

    2015-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a disease marked by reduced bone mass, leading to an increased risk of fractures or broken bones. Bone formation is mediated by recruiting mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that regulate MSC differentiation into osteoblasts is of great importance for the development of anabolic therapies for osteoporosis and other bone metabolism-related diseases. microRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to have crucial roles in bone development, osteogenic differentiation and osteoporosis pathophysiology. However, to date, only a few miRNAs have been reported to enhance osteogenesis and regulate the suppressive effect of glucocorticoids on osteogenic differentiation. In this study, we discovered that miR-216a, a pancreatic-specific miRNA, was significantly upregulated during osteogenic differentiation in human adipose-derived MSCs (hAMSCs). The expression of miR-216a was positively correlated with the expression of bone formation marker genes in clinical osteoporosis samples. Functional analysis demonstrated that miR-216a can markedly promote osteogenic differentiation of hAMSCs, rescue the suppressive effect of dexamethasone (DEX) on osteogenic differentiation in vitro and enhance bone formation in vivo. c-Cbl, a gene that encodes a RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase, was identified as a direct target of miR-216a. Downregulation of c-Cbl by short hairpin RNAs can mimic the promotion effects of miR-216a and significantly rescue the suppressive effects of DEX on osteogenesis. Pathway analysis indicated that miR-216a regulation of osteogenic differentiation occurs via the c-Cbl-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. The recovery effects of miR-216a on the inhibition of osteogenesis by DEX were attenuated after blocking the PI3K pathway. Thus, our findings suggest that miR-216a may serve as a novel therapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis and other bone metabolism-related diseases. PMID

  19. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Diguanylate Cyclase GcbA, a Homolog of P. fluorescens GcbA, Promotes Initial Attachment to Surfaces, but Not Biofilm Formation, via Regulation of Motility

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Olga E.; Cherny, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP is a conserved signaling molecule regulating the transitions between motile and sessile modes of growth in a variety of bacterial species. Recent evidence suggests that Pseudomonas species harbor separate intracellular pools of c-di-GMP to control different phenotypic outputs associated with motility, attachment, and biofilm formation, with multiple diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) playing distinct roles in these processes, yet little is known about the potential conservation of functional DGCs across Pseudomonas species. In the present study, we demonstrate that the P. aeruginosa homolog of the P. fluorescens DGC GcbA involved in promoting biofilm formation via regulation of swimming motility likewise synthesizes c-di-GMP to regulate surface attachment via modulation of motility, however, without affecting subsequent biofilm formation. P. aeruginosa GcbA was found to regulate flagellum-driven motility by suppressing flagellar reversal rates in a manner independent of viscosity, surface hardness, and polysaccharide production. P. fluorescens GcbA was found to be functional in P. aeruginosa and was capable of restoring phenotypes associated with inactivation of gcbA in P. aeruginosa to wild-type levels. Motility and attachment of a gcbA mutant strain could be restored to wild-type levels via overexpression of the small regulatory RNA RsmZ. Furthermore, epistasis analysis revealed that while both contribute to the regulation of initial surface attachment and flagellum-driven motility, GcbA and the phosphodiesterase DipA act within different signaling networks to regulate these processes. Our findings expand the complexity of c-di-GMP signaling in the regulation of the motile-sessile switch by providing yet another potential link to the Gac/Rsm network and suggesting that distinct c-di-GMP-modulating signaling pathways can regulate a single phenotypic output. PMID:24891445

  20. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the formation of triple helices between purine-rich deoxyribo-oligonucleotides and the promoter region of the human c-src proto-oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Aich, P; Ritchie, S; Bonham, K; Lee, J S

    1998-01-01

    The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of triplex formation between four purine-rich oligonucleotides and a 22 bp pyrimidine. purine tract in the promoter region of the c-src gene were determined by fluorescence polarization studies. Three of these four oligonucleotides were 11 nt in length, corresponding to the left, central or right portion of the tract, while the fourth was a 22mer covering the whole tract. Binding constants ( Ka) were measured as a function of Mg2+ concentration (0-10 mM) and temperature (0-41 degrees C). In 10 mM Mg2+, K a for the left, central and right 11mers were 0.26, 0.75 and 1.4 x 10(8)/M, respectively, while for the 22mer the value was 1.8 x 10(8)/M at 22 degrees C. Under the same conditions, Ka was estimated by an electrophoretic band shift technique. The agreement between the two methods was acceptable for the 22mer but not for the 11mers. Kinetic measurements demonstrated that the rate of dissociation of the 22mer from the triplex was significantly slower than that of the 11mers, providing an explanation for the observed discrepancy. The entropy and enthalpy of triplex formation were calculated from van't Hoff plots. In all cases the entropy was favourable, especially for the 22mer and for the 11mer with the lowest guanine content. The enthalpy was unfavourable for the 22mer and most favourable for the 11mer with the highest guanine content. These results provide a thermodynamic explanation for length and sequence effects on the formation of purine.pyrimidine.purine triplexes. PMID:9722637

  1. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa diguanylate cyclase GcbA, a homolog of P. fluorescens GcbA, promotes initial attachment to surfaces, but not biofilm formation, via regulation of motility.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Olga E; Cherny, Kathryn E; Sauer, Karin

    2014-08-01

    Cyclic di-GMP is a conserved signaling molecule regulating the transitions between motile and sessile modes of growth in a variety of bacterial species. Recent evidence suggests that Pseudomonas species harbor separate intracellular pools of c-di-GMP to control different phenotypic outputs associated with motility, attachment, and biofilm formation, with multiple diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) playing distinct roles in these processes, yet little is known about the potential conservation of functional DGCs across Pseudomonas species. In the present study, we demonstrate that the P. aeruginosa homolog of the P. fluorescens DGC GcbA involved in promoting biofilm formation via regulation of swimming motility likewise synthesizes c-di-GMP to regulate surface attachment via modulation of motility, however, without affecting subsequent biofilm formation. P. aeruginosa GcbA was found to regulate flagellum-driven motility by suppressing flagellar reversal rates in a manner independent of viscosity, surface hardness, and polysaccharide production. P. fluorescens GcbA was found to be functional in P. aeruginosa and was capable of restoring phenotypes associated with inactivation of gcbA in P. aeruginosa to wild-type levels. Motility and attachment of a gcbA mutant strain could be restored to wild-type levels via overexpression of the small regulatory RNA RsmZ. Furthermore, epistasis analysis revealed that while both contribute to the regulation of initial surface attachment and flagellum-driven motility, GcbA and the phosphodiesterase DipA act within different signaling networks to regulate these processes. Our findings expand the complexity of c-di-GMP signaling in the regulation of the motile-sessile switch by providing yet another potential link to the Gac/Rsm network and suggesting that distinct c-di-GMP-modulating signaling pathways can regulate a single phenotypic output.

  2. Hacking RNA: Hakai promotes tumorigenesis by enhancing the RNA-binding function of PSF.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Angélica; Fujita, Yasuyuki; Gorospe, Myriam

    2009-11-15

    Hakai, an E3 ubiquitin ligase for the E-cadherin complex, plays a crucial role in lowering cell-cell contacts in epithelial cells, a hallmark feature of tumor progression. Recently, Hakai was also found to interact with PSF (PTB-associated splicing factor). While PSF can function as a DNA-binding protein with a tumor suppressive function, its association with Hakai promotes PSF's RNA-binding ability and post-transcriptional influence on target mRNAs. Hakai overexpression enhanced the binding of PSF to mRNAs encoding cancer-related proteins, while knockdown of Hakai reduced the RNA-binding ability of PSF. Furthermore, the knockdown of PSF suppressed Hakai-induced cell proliferation. Thus, Hakai can affect the oncogenic phenotype both by altering E-cadherin-based intercellular adhesions and by increasing PSF's ability to bind RNAs that promote cancer-related gene expression. PMID:19855157

  3. Hacking RNA: Hakai promotes tumorigenesis by enhancing the RNA-binding function of PSF.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Angélica; Fujita, Yasuyuki; Gorospe, Myriam

    2009-11-15

    Hakai, an E3 ubiquitin ligase for the E-cadherin complex, plays a crucial role in lowering cell-cell contacts in epithelial cells, a hallmark feature of tumor progression. Recently, Hakai was also found to interact with PSF (PTB-associated splicing factor). While PSF can function as a DNA-binding protein with a tumor suppressive function, its association with Hakai promotes PSF's RNA-binding ability and post-transcriptional influence on target mRNAs. Hakai overexpression enhanced the binding of PSF to mRNAs encoding cancer-related proteins, while knockdown of Hakai reduced the RNA-binding ability of PSF. Furthermore, the knockdown of PSF suppressed Hakai-induced cell proliferation. Thus, Hakai can affect the oncogenic phenotype both by altering E-cadherin-based intercellular adhesions and by increasing PSF's ability to bind RNAs that promote cancer-related gene expression.

  4. Hacking RNA: Hakai promotes tumorigenesis by switching on the RNA-binding function of PSF

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Angélica; Fujita, Yasuyuki; Gorospe, Myriam

    2009-01-01

    Hakai, an E3 ubiquitin ligase for the E-cadherin complex, plays a crucial role in lowering cell-cell contacts in epithelial cells, a hallmark feature of tumor progression. Recently, Hakai was also found to interact with PSF (PTB-associated splicing factor). While PSF can function as a DNA-binding protein with a tumor suppressive function, its association with Hakai promotes PSF’s RNA-binding ability and post-transcriptional influence on target mRNAs. Hakai overexpression enhanced the binding of PSF to mRNAs encoding cancer-related proteins, while knockdown of Hakai reduced the RNA-binding ability of PSF. Furthermore, the knockdown of PSF suppressed Hakai-induced cell proliferation. Thus, Hakai can affect the oncogenic phenotype both by altering E-cadherin-based intercellular adhesions and by increasing PSF’s ability to bind RNAs that promote cancer-related gene expression. PMID:19855157

  5. 17β-Estradiol regulates cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, invasion and promotes apoptosis by upregulating miR-9 and thus degrades MALAT-1 in osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an estrogen receptor-independent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Dengfeng; Yang, Hui; Lin, Jing; Teng, Yi; Jiang, Yingying; Chen, Jiao; Li, Yu

    2015-02-20

    In bone, different concentration of estrogen leads to various of physiological processes in osteoblast, such as the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis in an estrogen receptor-dependent manner. But little was known about the estrogen effects on osteosarcoma (OS). In this study, OS cell MG-63 was treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of 17β-Estradiol (E2) with the presence or absence of estrogen receptor α (ERα), for evaluating the E2 effects on proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis. Consistent with a previous study, high dose of E2 treatment dramatically downregulated expressing level of long non-coding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1). The observation of upregulation of miR-9 after a high dose of E2 treatment indicated the cause of MALAT-1 reduction. Downregulation of MALAT-1 promoted the combination of SFPQ/PTBP2 complex. It was also observed that the proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis of OS cells were remarkably affected by high dose of E2 treatment, but not by low dose, in an ERα independent manner. Furthermore, the abolishment of the effects on these physiological processes caused by ectopic expression of miR-9 ASOs suggested the necessity of miR-9 in MALAT-1 regulation. Here we found that the high dose of E2 treatment upregulated miR-9 thus posttranscriptionally regulated MALAT-1 RNA level in OS cells, and then the downregulation of MALAT-1 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes in the E2-dose dependent and ER-independent ways. - Highlights: • E2 affects osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an Estrogen receptor-independent way. • High dose of E2 treatment upregulates miR-9 which target to MALAT-1 RNA. • Upregulated miR-9 degrades MALAT-1 and thus affects combination of SFPQ/PTBP2. • E2 treatment block cell proliferation, colony formation, mobility, and enhance apoptosis.

  6. Preservation and promotion of bone formation in the mandible as a response to a novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial in mineral deficiency induced low bone mass male versus female rats.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Kritika; Naula, Diana P; Mijares, Dindo Q; Janal, Malvin N; LeGeros, Racquel Z; Zhang, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Calcium and other trace mineral supplements have previously demonstrated to safely improve bone quality. We hypothesize that our novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial (SBM) preserves and promotes mandibular bone formation in male and female rats on mineral deficient diet (MD). Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive one of three diets (n = 10): basic diet (BD), MD or mineral deficient diet with 2% SBM. Rats were sacrificed after 6 months. Micro-computed tomography (µCT) was used to evaluate bone volume and 3D-microarchitecture while microradiography (Faxitron) was used to measure bone mineral density from different sections of the mandible. Results showed that bone quality varied with region, gender and diet. MD reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and volume and increased porosity. SBM preserved BMD and bone mineral content (BMC) in the alveolar bone and condyle in both genders. In the alveolar crest and mandibular body, while preserving more bone in males, SBM also significantly supplemented female bone. Results indicate that mineral deficiency leads to low bone mass in skeletally immature rats, comparatively more in males. Furthermore, SBM administered as a dietary supplement was effective in preventing mandibular bone loss in all subjects. This study suggests that the SBM preparation has potential use in minimizing low peak bone mass induced by mineral deficiency and related bone loss irrespective of gender. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1622-1632, 2016. PMID:26914814

  7. Preservation and promotion of bone formation in the mandible as a response to a novel calcium-p